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Sample records for respiratory control neuromodulatory

  1. Contributions of 5-HT Neurons to Respiratory Control: Neuromodulatory and Trophic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Matthew R.; Richerson, George B.

    2008-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) is a neurotransmitter produced by a small number of neurons in the midbrain, pons and medulla. These neurons project widely throughout the neuraxis, where they release 5-HT and co-localized neuropeptides such as substance P (SP) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). Each of these chemicals produce effects largely through G protein-coupled receptors, second messenger systems and subsequent neuromodulatory effects on target neurons. Emerging evidence suggests that 5-HT has additional modes of action during development and in adult mammals, including trophic effects (neurogenesis, cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and maturation) and influences on synaptic plasticity. Here, we discuss some of the neuromodulatory and trophic roles of 5-HT in general and in the context of respiratory control, as well as the regulation of release of modulatory neurotransmitters from 5-HT neurons. Future directions of study are also discussed. PMID:18595785

  2. Neuromodulatory Control of a Goal-Directed Decision

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Keiko; Moroz, Leonid L.; Hatcher, Nathan G.; Gillette, Rhanor

    2014-01-01

    Many cost-benefit decisions reduce to simple choices between approach or avoidance (or active disregard) to salient stimuli. Physiologically, critical factors in such decisions are modulators of the homeostatic neural networks that bias decision processes from moment to moment. For the predatory sea-slug Pleurobranchaea, serotonin (5-HT) is an intrinsic modulatory promoter of general arousal and feeding. We correlated 5-HT actions on appetitive state with its effects on the approach-avoidance decision in Pleurobranchaea. 5-HT and its precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) augmented general arousal state and reduced feeding thresholds in intact animals. Moreover, 5-HT switched the turn response to chemosensory stimulation from avoidance to orienting in many animals. In isolated CNSs, bath application of 5-HT both stimulated activity in the feeding motor network and switched the fictive turn response to unilateral sensory nerve stimulation from avoidance to orienting. Previously, it was shown that increasing excitation state of the feeding network reversibly switched the turn motor network response from avoidance to orienting, and that 5-HT levels vary inversely with nutritional state. A simple model posits a critical role for 5-HT in control of the turn network response by corollary output of the feeding network. In it, 5-HT acts as an intrinsic neuromodulatory factor coupled to nutritional status and regulates approach-avoidance via the excitation state of the feeding network. Thus, the neuromodulator is a key organizing element in behavioral choice of approach or avoidance through its actions in promoting appetitive state, in large part via the homeostatic feeding network. PMID:25048964

  3. Neuromodulatory control of a goal-directed decision.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Keiko; Moroz, Leonid L; Hatcher, Nathan G; Gillette, Rhanor

    2014-01-01

    Many cost-benefit decisions reduce to simple choices between approach or avoidance (or active disregard) to salient stimuli. Physiologically, critical factors in such decisions are modulators of the homeostatic neural networks that bias decision processes from moment to moment. For the predatory sea-slug Pleurobranchaea, serotonin (5-HT) is an intrinsic modulatory promoter of general arousal and feeding. We correlated 5-HT actions on appetitive state with its effects on the approach-avoidance decision in Pleurobranchaea. 5-HT and its precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) augmented general arousal state and reduced feeding thresholds in intact animals. Moreover, 5-HT switched the turn response to chemosensory stimulation from avoidance to orienting in many animals. In isolated CNSs, bath application of 5-HT both stimulated activity in the feeding motor network and switched the fictive turn response to unilateral sensory nerve stimulation from avoidance to orienting. Previously, it was shown that increasing excitation state of the feeding network reversibly switched the turn motor network response from avoidance to orienting, and that 5-HT levels vary inversely with nutritional state. A simple model posits a critical role for 5-HT in control of the turn network response by corollary output of the feeding network. In it, 5-HT acts as an intrinsic neuromodulatory factor coupled to nutritional status and regulates approach-avoidance via the excitation state of the feeding network. Thus, the neuromodulator is a key organizing element in behavioral choice of approach or avoidance through its actions in promoting appetitive state, in large part via the homeostatic feeding network. PMID:25048964

  4. Dynamics of neuromodulatory feedback determines frequency modulation in a reduced respiratory network: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Toporikova, Natalia; Butera, Robert J

    2013-02-01

    Neuromodulators, such as amines and neuropeptides, alter the activity of neurons and neuronal networks. In this work, we investigate how neuromodulators, which activate G(q)-protein second messenger systems, can modulate the bursting frequency of neurons in a critical portion of the respiratory neural network, the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC). These neurons are a vital part of the ponto-medullary neuronal network, which generates a stable respiratory rhythm whose frequency is regulated by neuromodulator release from the nearby Raphe nucleus. Using a simulated 50-cell network of excitatory preBötC neurons with a heterogeneous distribution of persistent sodium conductance and Ca(2+), we determined conditions for frequency modulation in such a network by simulating interaction between Raphe and preBötC nuclei. We found that the positive feedback between the Raphe excitability and preBötC activity induces frequency modulation in the preBötC neurons. In addition, the frequency of the respiratory rhythm can be regulated via phasic release of excitatory neuromodulators from the Raphe nucleus. We predict that the application of a G(q) antagonist will eliminate this frequency modulation by the Raphe and keep the network frequency constant and low. In contrast, application of a G(q) agonist will result in a high frequency for all levels of Raphe stimulation. Our modeling results also suggest that high [K(+)] requirement in respiratory brain slice experiments may serve as a compensatory mechanism for low neuromodulatory tone. PMID:23202052

  5. Optogenetic Dissection of the Basal Forebrain Neuromodulatory Control of Cortical Activation, Plasticity, and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ritchie E.; Hussain Shuler, Marshall G.; Petersen, Carl C.H.; Kepecs, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) houses major ascending projections to the entire neocortex that have long been implicated in arousal, learning, and attention. The disruption of the BF has been linked with major neurological disorders, such as coma and Alzheimer's disease, as well as in normal cognitive aging. Although it is best known for its cholinergic neurons, the BF is in fact an anatomically and neurochemically complex structure. Recent studies using transgenic mouse lines to target specific BF cell types have led to a renaissance in the study of the BF and are beginning to yield new insights about cell-type-specific circuit mechanisms during behavior. These approaches enable us to determine the behavioral conditions under which cholinergic and noncholinergic BF neurons are activated and how they control cortical processing to influence behavior. Here we discuss recent advances that have expanded our knowledge about this poorly understood brain region and laid the foundation for future cell-type-specific manipulations to modulate arousal, attention, and cortical plasticity in neurological disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although the basal forebrain is best known for, and often equated with, acetylcholine-containing neurons that provide most of the cholinergic innervation of the neocortex, it is in fact an anatomically and neurochemically complex structure. Recent studies using transgenic mouse lines to target specific cell types in the basal forebrain have led to a renaissance in this field and are beginning to dissect circuit mechanisms in the basal forebrain during behavior. This review discusses recent advances in the roles of basal forebrain cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons in cognition via their dynamic modulation of cortical activity. PMID:26468190

  6. Pontine Mechanisms of Respiratory Control

    PubMed Central

    Dutschmann, Mathias; Dick, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Pontine respiratory nuclei provide synaptic input to medullary rhythmogenic circuits to shape and adapt the breathing pattern. An understanding of this statement depends on appreciating breathing as a behavior, rather than a stereotypic rhythm. In this review, we focus on the pontine-mediated inspiratory off-switch (IOS) associated with postinspiratory glottal constriction. Further, IOS is examined in the context of pontine regulation of glottal resistance in response to multimodal sensory inputs and higher commands, which in turn rules timing, duration, and patterning of respiratory airflow. In addition, network plasticity in respiratory control emerges during the development of the pons. Synaptic plasticity is required for dynamic and efficient modulation of the expiratory breathing pattern to cope with rapid changes from eupneic to adaptive breathing linked to exploratory (foraging and sniffing) and expulsive (vocalizing, coughing, sneezing, and retching) behaviors, as well as conveyance of basic emotions. The speed and complexity of changes in the breathing pattern of behaving animals implies that “learning to breathe” is necessary to adjust to changing internal and external states to maintain homeostasis and survival. PMID:23720253

  7. Investigations of respiratory control systems simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    The Grodins' respiratory control model was investigated and it was determined that the following modifications were necessary before the model would be adaptable for current research efforts: (1) the controller equation must be modified to allow for integration of the respiratory system model with other physiological systems; (2) the system must be more closely correlated to the salient physiological functionings; (3) the respiratory frequency and the heart rate should be expanded to illustrate other physiological relationships and dependencies; and (4) the model should be adapted to particular individuals through a better defined set of initial parameter values in addition to relating these parameter values to the desired environmental conditions. Several of Milhorn's respiratory control models were also investigated in hopes of using some of their features as modifications for Grodins' model.

  8. Baseline Brain Activity Predicts Response to Neuromodulatory Pain Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Sherlin, Leslie H.; Fregni, Felipe; Gianas, Ann; Howe, Jon D.; Hakimian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine the associations between baseline electroencephalogram (EEG)-assessed brain oscillations and subsequent response to four neuromodulatory treatments. Based on available research, we hypothesized that baseline theta oscillations would prospectively predict response to hypnotic analgesia. Analyses involving other oscillations and the other treatments (meditation, neurofeedback, and both active and sham transcranial direct current stimulation) were viewed as exploratory, given the lack of previous research examining brain oscillations as predictors of response to these other treatments. Design Randomized controlled study of single sessions of four neuromodulatory pain treatments and a control procedure. Methods Thirty individuals with spinal cord injury and chronic pain had their EEG recorded before each session of four active treatments (hypnosis, meditation, EEG biofeedback, transcranial direct current stimulation) and a control procedure (sham transcranial direct stimulation). Results As hypothesized, more presession theta power was associated with greater response to hypnotic analgesia. In exploratory analyses, we found that less baseline alpha power predicted pain reduction with meditation. Conclusions The findings support the idea that different patients respond to different pain treatments and that between-person treatment response differences are related to brain states as measured by EEG. The results have implications for the possibility of enhancing pain treatment response by either 1) better patient/treatment matching or 2) influencing brain activity before treatment is initiated in order to prepare patients to respond. Research is needed to replicate and confirm the findings in additional samples of individuals with chronic pain. PMID:25287554

  9. Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Synthesize Neuromodulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sakry, Dominik; Yigit, Hatice; Dimou, Leda; Trotter, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    NG2 protein-expressing oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) are a persisting and major glial cell population in the adult mammalian brain. Direct synaptic innervation of OPC by neurons throughout the brain together with their ability to sense neuronal network activity raises the question of additional physiological roles of OPC, supplementary to generating myelinating oligodendrocytes. In this study we investigated whether OPC express neuromodulatory factors, typically synthesized by other CNS cell types. Our results show that OPC express two well-characterized neuromodulatory proteins: Prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS) and neuronal Pentraxin 2 (Nptx2/Narp). Expression levels of the enzyme PTGDS are influenced in cultured OPC by the NG2 intracellular region which can be released by cleavage and localizes to glial nuclei upon transfection. Furthermore PTGDS mRNA levels are reduced in OPC from NG2-KO mouse brain compared to WT cells after isolation by cell sorting and direct analysis. These results show that OPC can contribute to the expression of these proteins within the CNS and suggest PTGDS expression as a downstream target of NG2 signaling. PMID:25966014

  10. Spinal metaplasticity in respiratory motor control

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Daryl P.; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of the neural system controlling breathing is its ability to exhibit plasticity. Less appreciated is the ability to exhibit metaplasticity, a change in the capacity to express plasticity (i.e., “plastic plasticity”). Recent advances in our understanding of cellular mechanisms giving rise to respiratory motor plasticity lay the groundwork for (ongoing) investigations of metaplasticity. This detailed understanding of respiratory metaplasticity will be essential as we harness metaplasticity to restore breathing capacity in clinical disorders that compromise breathing, such as cervical spinal injury, motor neuron disease and other neuromuscular diseases. In this brief review, we discuss key examples of metaplasticity in respiratory motor control, and our current understanding of mechanisms giving rise to spinal plasticity and metaplasticity in phrenic motor output; particularly after pre-conditioning with intermittent hypoxia. Progress in this area has led to the realization that similar mechanisms are operative in other spinal motor networks, including those governing limb movement. Further, these mechanisms can be harnessed to restore respiratory and non-respiratory motor function after spinal injury. PMID:25717292

  11. Control Measures for Human Respiratory Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Lesley; Waterer, Grant

    2016-08-01

    New viral respiratory pathogens are emerging with increasing frequency and have potentially devastating impacts on the population worldwide. Recent examples of newly emerged threats include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Experiences with these pathogens have shown up major deficiencies in how we deal globally with emerging pathogens and taught us salient lessons in what needs to be addressed for future pandemics. This article reviews the lessons learnt from past experience and current knowledge on the range of measures required to limit the impact of emerging respiratory infections from public health responses down to individual patient management. Key areas of interest are surveillance programs, political limitations on our ability to respond quickly enough to emerging threats, media management, public information dissemination, infection control, prophylaxis, and individual patient management. Respiratory physicians have a crucial role to play in many of these areas and need to be aware of how to respond as new viral pathogens emerge. PMID:27486741

  12. Modelling respiratory infection control measure effects

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, C. M.; CHEN, S. C.; CHANG, C. F.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY One of the most pressing issues in facing emerging and re-emerging respiratory infections is how to bring them under control with current public health measures. Approaches such as the Wells–Riley equation, competing-risks model, and Von Foerster equation are used to prioritize control-measure efforts. Here we formulate how to integrate those three different types of functional relationship to construct easy-to-use and easy-to-interpret critical-control lines that help determine optimally the intervention strategies for containing airborne infections. We show that a combination of assigned effective public health interventions and enhanced engineering control measures would have a high probability for containing airborne infection. We suggest that integrated analysis to enhance modelling the impact of potential control measures against airborne infections presents an opportunity to assess risks and benefits. We demonstrate the approach with examples of optimal control measures to prioritize respiratory infections of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), influenza, measles, and chickenpox. PMID:17475088

  13. Respiratory Control in Stuttering Speakers: Evidence from Respiratory High-Frequency Oscillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Margaret; Smith, Anne

    2000-01-01

    This study examined whether stuttering speakers (N=10) differed from fluent speakers in relations between the neural control systems for speech and life support. It concluded that in some stuttering speakers the relations between respiratory controllers are atypical, but that high participation by the high frequency oscillation-producing circuitry…

  14. Hebbian and neuromodulatory mechanisms interact to trigger associative memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Joshua P.; Diaz-Mataix, Lorenzo; Hamanaka, Hiroki; Ozawa, Takaaki; Ycu, Edgar; Koivumaa, Jenny; Kumar, Ashwani; Hou, Mian; Deisseroth, Karl; Boyden, Edward S.; LeDoux, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing hypothesis termed “Hebbian plasticity” suggests that memories are formed through strengthening of synaptic connections between neurons with correlated activity. In contrast, other theories propose that coactivation of Hebbian and neuromodulatory processes produce the synaptic strengthening that underlies memory formation. Using optogenetics we directly tested whether Hebbian plasticity alone is both necessary and sufficient to produce physiological changes mediating actual memory formation in behaving animals. Our previous work with this method suggested that Hebbian mechanisms are sufficient to produce aversive associative learning under artificial conditions involving strong, iterative training. Here we systematically tested whether Hebbian mechanisms are necessary and sufficient to produce associative learning under more moderate training conditions that are similar to those that occur in daily life. We measured neural plasticity in the lateral amygdala, a brain region important for associative memory storage about danger. Our findings provide evidence that Hebbian mechanisms are necessary to produce neural plasticity in the lateral amygdala and behavioral memory formation. However, under these conditions Hebbian mechanisms alone were not sufficient to produce these physiological and behavioral effects unless neuromodulatory systems were coactivated. These results provide insight into how aversive experiences trigger memories and suggest that combined Hebbian and neuromodulatory processes interact to engage associative aversive learning. PMID:25489081

  15. Neuromodulatory signaling in hippocampus-dependent memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    Considerable advances have been made toward understanding the molecular signaling events that underlie memory acquisition and consolidation. In contrast, less is known about memory retrieval, despite its necessity for utilizing learned information. This review focuses on neuromodulatory and intracellular signaling events that underlie memory retrieval mediated by the hippocampus, for which the most information is currently available. Among neuromodulators, adrenergic signaling is required for the retrieval of various types of hippocampus-dependent memory. Although they contribute to acquisition and/or consolidation, cholinergic and dopaminergic signaling are generally not required for retrieval. Interestingly, while not required for retrieval, serotonergic and opioid signaling may actually constrain memory retrieval. Roles for histamine and non-opioid neuropeptides are currently unclear but possible. A critical effector of adrenergic signaling in retrieval is reduction of the slow afterhyperpolarization mediated by β1 receptors, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A, Epac, and possibly ERK. In contrast, stress and glucocorticoids impair retrieval by decreasing cyclic AMP, mediated in part by the activation of β2 -adrenergic receptors. Clinically, alterations in neuromodulatory signaling and in memory retrieval occur in Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder, and recent evidence has begun to link changes in neuromodulatory signaling with effects on memory retrieval. PMID:25475876

  16. Effects of Smoking on Respiratory Capacity and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Alphonso, Vania A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide information concerning the possible early effects of smoking on measures of respiratory capacity and control in young adult female smokers vs. nonsmokers. In particular, maximum performance test results (vital capacity and maximum phonation time) and measures of air pressures and airflows during voiceless,…

  17. Respiratory Motor Control Disrupted by Spinal Cord Injury: Mechanisms, Evaluation, and Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Terson de Paleville, Daniela G. L.; McKay, William B.; Folz, Rodney J.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary complications associated with persistent respiratory muscle weakness, paralysis, and spasticity are among the most important problems faced by patients with spinal cord injury when lack of muscle strength and disorganization of reciprocal respiratory muscle control lead to breathing insufficiency. This review describes the mechanisms of the respiratory motor control and its change in individuals with spinal cord injury, methods by which respiratory function is measured, and rehabilitative treatment used to restore respiratory function in those who have experienced such injury. PMID:22408690

  18. Egr2-neurons control the adult respiratory response to hypercapnia

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Russell S.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Brust, Rachael D.; Soriano, Laura P.; Nattie, Eugene E.; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    ‘The early growth response 2 transcription factor, Egr2, establishes a population of brainstem neurons essential for normal breathing at birth. Egr2-null mice die perinatally of respiratory insufficiency characterized by subnormal respiratory rate and severe apneas. Here we bypass this lethality using a noninvasive pharmacogenetic approach to inducibly perturb neuron activity postnatally, and ask if Egr2-neurons control respiration in adult mice. We found that the normal ventilatory increase in response to elevated tissue CO2 was impaired, blunted by 63.1±8.7% after neuron perturbation due to deficits in both respiratory amplitude and frequency. By contrast, room-air breathing was unaffected, suggesting that the drive for baseline breathing may not require those Egr2-neurons manipulated here. Of the multiple brainstem sites proposed to affect ventilation in response to hypercapnia, only the retrotrapezoid nucleus, a portion of the serotonergic raphé, and a portion of the A5 nucleus have a history of Egr2 expression. We recently showed that acute inhibition of serotonergic neurons en masse blunts the CO2 chemoreflex in adults, causing a difference in hypercapnic response of ~50% after neuron perturbation through effects on respiratory amplitude only. The suppressed respiratory frequency upon perturbation of Egr2-neurons thus may stem from non-serotonergic neurons within the Egr2 domain. Perturbation of Egr2-neurons did not affect body temperature, even on exposure to ambient 4 °C. These findings support a model in which Egr2-neurons are a critical component of the respiratory chemoreflex into adulthood. Methodologically, these results highlight how pharmacogenetic approaches allow neuron function to be queried in unanesthetized adult animals, reaching beyond the roadblocks of developmental lethality and compensation as well as the anatomical disturbances associated with invasive methods. PMID:23261662

  19. Control of respiratory and cardiovascular functions by leptin

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, M.; Werner, I.F.; Zoccal, D.B.; Menani, J.V.; Colombari, E.; Hall, J.E.; da Silva, A.A.; do Carmo, J.M.; Colombari, D.S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone produced by adipose tissue, acts in brain centers that control critical physiological functions such as metabolism, breathing and cardiovascular regulation. The importance of leptin for respiratory control is evident by the fact that leptin deficient mice exhibit impaired ventilatory responses to carbon dioxide (CO2), which can be corrected by intracerebroventricular leptin replacement therapy. Leptin is also recognized as an important link between obesity and hypertension. Humans and animal models lacking either leptin or functional leptin receptors exhibit many characteristics of the metabolic syndrome, including hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and visceral adiposity, but do not exhibit increased sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and have normal to lower blood pressure (BP) compared to lean controls. Even though previous studies have extensively focused on the brain sites and intracellular signaling pathways involved in leptin effects on food intake and energy balance, the mechanisms that mediate the actions of leptin on breathing and cardiovascular function are only beginning to be elucidated. This mini-review summarizes recent advances on the effects of leptin on cardiovascular and respiratory control with emphasis on the neural control of respiratory function and autonomic activity. PMID:25645056

  20. Dynamic subcellular localization of a respiratory complex controls bacterial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Alberge, François; Espinosa, Leon; Seduk, Farida; Sylvi, Léa; Toci, René; Walburger, Anne; Magalon, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Respiration, an essential process for most organisms, has to optimally respond to changes in the metabolic demand or the environmental conditions. The branched character of their respiratory chains allows bacteria to do so by providing a great metabolic and regulatory flexibility. Here, we show that the native localization of the nitrate reductase, a major respiratory complex under anaerobiosis in Escherichia coli, is submitted to tight spatiotemporal regulation in response to metabolic conditions via a mechanism using the transmembrane proton gradient as a cue for polar localization. These dynamics are critical for controlling the activity of nitrate reductase, as the formation of polar assemblies potentiates the electron flux through the complex. Thus, dynamic subcellular localization emerges as a critical factor in the control of respiration in bacteria. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05357.001 PMID:26077726

  1. Turkey industry strategies for control of respiratory and enteric diseases.

    PubMed

    Poss, P E

    1998-08-01

    Current strategies to control respiratory and enteric diseases of turkeys involve sanitation and biosecurity practices to prevent the introduction of infectious agents. In addition, proper husbandry and management practice reduce stress and help maintain a competent immune system. Industry-wide monitoring programs are used in conjunction with isolation, depopulation, and orderly marketing to eliminate pathogens that cause serious economic loss. Vaccines are available and utilized against some pathogens. Effective drug treatment is available and used for some diseases but is most commonly used to control secondary disease losses when treatment is not available for the primary disease. PMID:9706086

  2. Respiratory protective device design using control system techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, W. A.; Yankovich, D.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of a control system analysis approach to provide a design base for respiratory protective devices is considered. A system design approach requires that all functions and components of the system be mathematically identified in a model of the RPD. The mathematical notations describe the operation of the components as closely as possible. The individual component mathematical descriptions are then combined to describe the complete RPD. Finally, analysis of the mathematical notation by control system theory is used to derive compensating component values that force the system to operate in a stable and predictable manner.

  3. Transmission Dynamics and Control of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipsitch, Marc; Cohen, Ted; Cooper, Ben; Robins, James M.; Ma, Stefan; James, Lyn; Gopalakrishna, Gowri; Chew, Suok Kai; Tan, Chorh Chuan; Samore, Matthew H.; Fisman, David; Murray, Megan

    2003-06-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently described illness of humans that has spread widely over the past 6 months. With the use of detailed epidemiologic data from Singapore and epidemic curves from other settings, we estimated the reproductive number for SARS in the absence of interventions and in the presence of control efforts. We estimate that a single infectious case of SARS will infect about three secondary cases in a population that has not yet instituted control measures. Public-health efforts to reduce transmission are expected to have a substantial impact on reducing the size of the epidemic.

  4. Yoga respiratory training improves respiratory function and cardiac sympathovagal balance in elderly subjects: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Santaella, Danilo F; Devesa, Cesar R S; Rojo, Marcos R; Amato, Marcelo B P; Drager, Luciano F; Casali, Karina R; Montano, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Since ageing is associated with a decline in pulmonary function, heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex, and recent studies suggest that yoga respiratory exercises may improve respiratory and cardiovascular function, we hypothesised that yoga respiratory training may improve respiratory function and cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy elderly subjects. Design 76 healthy elderly subjects were enrolled in a randomised control trial in Brazil and 29 completed the study (age 68±6 years, 34% males, body mass index 25±3 kg/m2). Subjects were randomised into a 4-month training program (2 classes/week plus home exercises) of either stretching (control, n=14) or respiratory exercises (yoga, n=15). Yoga respiratory exercises (Bhastrika) consisted of rapid forced expirations followed by inspiration through the right nostril, inspiratory apnoea with generation of intrathoracic negative pressure, and expiration through the left nostril. Pulmonary function, maximum expiratory and inspiratory pressures (PEmax and PImax, respectively), heart rate variability and blood pressure variability for spontaneous baroreflex determination were determined at baseline and after 4 months. Results Subjects in both groups had similar demographic parameters. Physiological variables did not change after 4 months in the control group. However, in the yoga group, there were significant increases in PEmax (34%, p<0.0001) and PImax (26%, p<0.0001) and a significant decrease in the low frequency component (a marker of cardiac sympathetic modulation) and low frequency/high frequency ratio (marker of sympathovagal balance) of heart rate variability (40%, p<0.001). Spontaneous baroreflex did not change, and quality of life only marginally increased in the yoga group. Conclusion Respiratory yoga training may be beneficial for the elderly healthy population by improving respiratory function and sympathovagal balance. Trial Registration CinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT

  5. Respiratory control and substrate effects in the working rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, F M; Malloy, C R

    1992-01-01

    31P n.m.r. spectroscopy was used to measure the concentration of phosphates commonly proposed to control oxidative phosphorylation. The effect of loading conditions, beta-adrenergic stimulation and different substrates (acetate, pyruvate or glucose) was examined under steady-state conditions in the isolated working rat heart. Oxygen consumption and haemodynamic variables were monitored continuously. In response to a 2-fold increase in afterload, there were no significant changes in [ADP], [ATP]/[ADP], or [ATP]/[ADP][Pi]. In the presence of isoprenaline, these variables also tended not to change from afterload. However, isoprenaline, at identical perfusion pressures, consistently decreased the phosphorylation potential and [ATP]/[ADP], but had little effect on [ADP]. Substrates altered the phosphate metabolites in a manner independent of oxygen consumption, and had only minor effects on the relationship between phosphates and work, in contrast with other studies. Thus, metabolites of ATP synthesis are not normally involved in respiratory control. The 31P n.m.r. spectrum can vary greatly, but does not predict oxygen consumption in this preparation. Substrates have no effect on the mechanism of respiratory control. Thus the normal control of respiration in the heart at steady state cannot occur at the level of its substrates. Rather, there must be concerted regulation of the numerous pathways, involving allostery and covalent modification. The attention of future research should be shifted away from the metabolites of ATP and towards identifying the effectors of such regulation. PMID:1417763

  6. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus: epidemiology and disease control measures

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Memish, Ziad A

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in 2012 resulted in an increased concern of the spread of the infection globally. MERS-CoV infection had previously caused multiple health-care-associated outbreaks and resulted in transmission of the virus within families. Community onset MERS-CoV cases continue to occur. Dromedary camels are currently the most likely animal to be linked to human MERS-CoV cases. Serologic tests showed significant infection in adult camels compared to juvenile camels. The control of MERS-CoV infection relies on prompt identification of cases within health care facilities, with institutions applying appropriate infection control measures. In addition, determining the exact route of transmission from camels to humans would further add to the control measures of MERS-CoV infection. PMID:25395865

  7. RNASeq-derived transcriptome comparisons reveal neuromodulatory deficiency in the CO2 insensitive brown Norway rat

    PubMed Central

    Puissant, Madeleine M; Echert, Ashley E; Yang, Chun; Mouradian, Gary C; Novotny, Tyler; Liu, Pengyuan; Liang, Mingyu; Hodges, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    Raphé-derived serotonin (5-HT) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) play important roles in fundamental, homeostatic control systems such as breathing and specifically the ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex. Brown Norway (BN) rats exhibit an inherent and severe ventilatory insensitivity to hypercapnia but also exhibit relatively normal ventilation at rest and during other conditions, similar to multiple genetic models of 5-HT system dysfunction in mice. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that the ventilatory insensitivity to hypercapnia in BN rats is due to altered raphé gene expression and the consequent deficiencies in raphé-derived neuromodulators such as TRH. Medullary raphé transcriptome comparisons revealed lower expression of multiple 5-HT neuron-specific genes in BN compared to control Dahl salt-sensitive rats, predictive of reduced central nervous system monoamines by bioinformatics analyses and confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography measurements. In particular, raphé Trh mRNA and peptide levels were significantly reduced in BN rats, and injections of the stable TRH analogue Taltirelin (TAL) stimulated breathing dose-dependently, with greater effects in BN versus control Sprague–Dawley rats. Importantly, TAL also effectively normalized the ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex in BN rats, but TAL did not affect CO2 sensitivity in control Sprague–Dawley rats. These data establish a molecular basis of the neuromodulatory deficiency in BN rats, and further suggest an important functional role for TRH signalling in the mammalian CO2 chemoreflex. PMID:25630262

  8. Nuclear Control of Respiratory Chain Expression by Nuclear Respiratory Factors and PGC-1-Related Coactivator

    PubMed Central

    Scarpulla, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of the respiratory apparatus depends on both nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Although these genes are sequestered in distinct cellular organelles, their transcription relies on nucleus-encoded factors. Certain of these factors are directed to the mitochondria, where they sponsor the bi-directional transcription of mitochondrial DNA. Others act on nuclear genes that encode the majority of the respiratory subunits and many other gene products required for the assembly and function of the respiratory chain. The nuclear respiratory factors, NRF-1 and NRF-2, contribute to the expression of respiratory subunits and mitochondrial transcription factors and thus have been implicated in nucleo-mitochondrial interactions. In addition, coactivators of the PGC-1 family serve as mediators between the environment and the transcriptional machinery governing mitochondrial biogenesis. One family member, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), is an immediate early gene product that is rapidly induced by mitogenic signals in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. Like other PGC-1 family members, PRC binds NRF-1 and activates NRF-1 target genes. In addition, PRC complexes with NRF-2 and HCF-1 (host cell factor-1) in the activation of NRF-2-dependent promoters. HCF-1 functions in cell-cycle progression and has been identified as an NRF-2 coactivator. The association of these factors with PRC is suggestive of a role for the complex in cell growth. Finally, shRNA-mediated knock down of PRC expression results in a complex phenotype that includes the inhibition of respiratory growth on galactose and the loss of respiratory complexes. Thus, PRC may help integrate the expression of the respiratory apparatus with the cell proliferative program. PMID:19076454

  9. Respiratory Source Control Using Surgical Masks With Nanofiber Media

    PubMed Central

    Skaria, Shaji D.; Smaldone, Gerald C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Potentially infected individuals (‘source’) are sometimes encouraged to use face masks to reduce exposure of their infectious aerosols to others (‘receiver’). To improve compliance with Respiratory Source Control via face mask and therefore reduce receiver exposure, a mask should be comfortable and effective. We tested a novel face mask designed to improve breathability and filtration using nanofiber filtration. Methods: Using radiolabeled test aerosols and a calibrated exposure chamber simulating source to receiver interaction, facepiece function was measured with a life-like ventilated manikin model. Measurements included mask airflow resistance (pressure difference during breathing), filtration, (mask capture of exhaled radiolabeled test aerosols), and exposure (the transfer of ‘infectious’ aerosols from the ‘source’ to a ‘receiver’). Polydisperse aerosols were measured at the source with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 0.95 µm. Approximately 90% of the particles were <2.0 µm. Tested facepieces included nanofiber prototype surgical masks, conventional surgical masks, and for comparison, an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an ‘N95 respirator’). Airflow through and around conventional surgical face mask and nanofiber prototype face mask was visualized using Schlieren optical imaging. Results: Airflow resistance [ΔP, cmH2O] across sealed surgical masks (means: 0.1865 and 0.1791 cmH2O) approached that of the N95 (mean: 0.2664 cmH2O). The airflow resistance across the nanofiber face mask whether sealed or not sealed (0.0504 and 0.0311 cmH2O) was significantly reduced in comparison. In addition, ‘infected’ source airflow filtration and receiver exposure levels for nanofiber face masks placed on the source were comparable to that achieved with N95 placed on the source; 98.98% versus 82.68% and 0.0194 versus 0.0557, respectively. Compared to deflection within and around the conventional face

  10. The respiratory-vocal system of songbirds: anatomy, physiology, and neural control.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marc F; Martin Wild, J

    2014-01-01

    This wide-ranging review presents an overview of the respiratory-vocal system in songbirds, which are the only other vertebrate group known to display a degree of respiratory control during song rivalling that of humans during speech; this despite the fact that the peripheral components of both the respiratory and vocal systems differ substantially in the two groups. We first provide a brief description of these peripheral components in songbirds (lungs, air sacs and respiratory muscles, vocal organ (syrinx), upper vocal tract) and then proceed to a review of the organization of central respiratory-related neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem, the latter having an organization fundamentally similar to that of the ventral respiratory group of mammals. The second half of the review describes the nature of the motor commands generated in a specialized "cortical" song control circuit and how these might engage brainstem respiratory networks to shape the temporal structure of song. We also discuss a bilaterally projecting "respiratory-thalamic" pathway that links the respiratory system to "cortical" song control nuclei. This necessary pathway for song originates in the brainstem's primary inspiratory center and is hypothesized to play a vital role in synchronizing song motor commands both within and across hemispheres. PMID:25194204

  11. The respiratory-vocal system of songbirds: Anatomy, physiology, and neural control

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Marc F.; Wild, J. Martin

    2015-01-01

    This wide-ranging review presents an overview of the respiratory-vocal system in songbirds, which are the only other vertebrate group known to display a degree of respiratory control during song rivalling that of humans during speech; this despite the fact that the peripheral components of both the respiratory and vocal systems differ substantially in the two groups. We first provide a brief description of these peripheral components in songbirds (lungs, air sacs and respiratory muscles, vocal organ (syrinx), upper vocal tract) and then proceed to a review of the organization of central respiratory-related neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem, the latter having an organization fundamentally similar to that of the ventral respiratory group of mammals. The second half of the review describes the nature of the motor commands generated in a specialized “cortical” song control circuit and how these might engage brainstem respiratory networks to shape the temporal structure of song. We also discuss a bilaterally projecting “respiratory-thalamic” pathway that links the respiratory system to “cortical” song control nuclei. This necessary pathway for song originates in the brainstem’s primary inspiratory center and is hypothesized to play a vital role in synchronizing song motor commands both within and across hemispheres. PMID:25194204

  12. Respiratory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  13. Starvation promotes concerted modulation of appetitive olfactory behavior via parallel neuromodulatory circuits

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Kang I; Root, Cory M; Lindsay, Scott A; Zaninovich, Orel A; Shepherd, Andrew K; Wasserman, Steven A; Kim, Susy M; Wang, Jing W

    2015-01-01

    The internal state of an organism influences its perception of attractive or aversive stimuli and thus promotes adaptive behaviors that increase its likelihood of survival. The mechanisms underlying these perceptual shifts are critical to our understanding of how neural circuits support animal cognition and behavior. Starved flies exhibit enhanced sensitivity to attractive odors and reduced sensitivity to aversive odors. Here, we show that a functional remodeling of the olfactory map is mediated by two parallel neuromodulatory systems that act in opposing directions on olfactory attraction and aversion at the level of the first synapse. Short neuropeptide F sensitizes an antennal lobe glomerulus wired for attraction, while tachykinin (DTK) suppresses activity of a glomerulus wired for aversion. Thus we show parallel neuromodulatory systems functionally reconfigure early olfactory processing to optimize detection of nutrients at the risk of ignoring potentially toxic food resources. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08298.001 PMID:26208339

  14. Starvation promotes concerted modulation of appetitive olfactory behavior via parallel neuromodulatory circuits.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kang I; Root, Cory M; Lindsay, Scott A; Zaninovich, Orel A; Shepherd, Andrew K; Wasserman, Steven A; Kim, Susy M; Wang, Jing W

    2015-01-01

    The internal state of an organism influences its perception of attractive or aversive stimuli and thus promotes adaptive behaviors that increase its likelihood of survival. The mechanisms underlying these perceptual shifts are critical to our understanding of how neural circuits support animal cognition and behavior. Starved flies exhibit enhanced sensitivity to attractive odors and reduced sensitivity to aversive odors. Here, we show that a functional remodeling of the olfactory map is mediated by two parallel neuromodulatory systems that act in opposing directions on olfactory attraction and aversion at the level of the first synapse. Short neuropeptide F sensitizes an antennal lobe glomerulus wired for attraction, while tachykinin (DTK) suppresses activity of a glomerulus wired for aversion. Thus we show parallel neuromodulatory systems functionally reconfigure early olfactory processing to optimize detection of nutrients at the risk of ignoring potentially toxic food resources. PMID:26208339

  15. Control of abdominal muscles by brain stem respiratory neurons in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Ezure, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the control of abdominal muscles by the brain stem respiratory neurons was investigated in decerebrate unanesthetized cats. First, it was determined which of the brain stem respiratory neurons project to the lumbar cord (from which the abdominal muscles receive part of their innervation), by stimulating the neurons monopolarly. In a second part of the study, it was determined if lumbar-projecting respiratory neurons make monosynaptic connections with abdominal motoneurons; in these experiments, discriminate spontaneous spikes of antidromically acivated expiratory (E) neurons were used to trigger activity from both L1 and L2 nerves. A large projection was observed from E neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group to the contralateral upper lumber cord. However, cross-correlation experiments found only two (out of 47 neuron pairs tested) strong monosynaptic connections between brain stem neurons and abdominal motoneurons.

  16. Synaptic activation of efferent neuromodulatory neurones in the locust Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Baudoux, S; Burrows, M

    1998-12-01

    The segmental ganglia of the locust contain efferent neuromodulatory neurones with cell bodies at the dorsal midline and axons that supply muscles and other tissue on both sides of the body. These are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurones. Intracellular recordings were made from pairs of known metathoracic efferent DUM neurones in locusts in which all nerves were intact and in isolated metathoracic ganglia. The 19 metathoracic, efferent DUM neurones were identified according to the nerve roots through which their axons emerge from the ganglion. The synaptic potentials in these DUM neurones have been analysed to investigate how these neurones are activated and how their spikes are controlled. The degree of correlation between the synaptic potentials in particular pairs of neurones was quantified using a correlation analysis. This allowed the population of DUM neurones to be divided into three subsets that also map onto an anatomical grouping based on the distribution of their axons in the lateral nerves: (i) DUM1 neurones (DUMDL and DUM1b); (ii) DUM3 and DUM3,4 neurones; and (iii) DUM3,4,5, DUM5b neurones and DUMETi. Individual neurones within each subset showed strong correlations between their synaptic potentials, in both intact locusts and isolated ganglia, and tended to spike at the same time. Neurones in different subsets had few synaptic potentials in common and tended to spike independently. The persistence of common synaptic potentials in neurones of the three subsets in isolated ganglia indicates that they are derived from neurones within the metathoracic ganglion. The DUM neurones that had many common synaptic potentials in a quiescent locust responded in similar ways to mechanosensory stimulation of different parts of the body. DUM3,4, 5 and DUM5 neurones gave the clearest and most consistent responses to stimulation of mechanoreceptors on either hind leg. DUM3 and DUM3, 4 neurones responded variably, but usually with a hyperpolarisation. DUM1

  17. Early Respiratory Management of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Very Preterm Infants and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    te Pas, Arjan B.; Lopriore, Enrico; Engbers, Marissa J.; Walther, Frans J.

    2007-01-01

    Background In the period immediately after birth, preterm infants are highly susceptible to lung injury. Early nasal continuous positive airway pressure (ENCPAP) is an attempt to avoid intubation and may minimize lung injury. In contrast, ENCPAP can fail, and at that time surfactant rescue can be less effective. Objective To compare the pulmonary clinical course and outcome of very preterm infants (gestational age 25–32 weeks) with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) who started with ENCPAP and failed (ECF group), with a control group of infants matched for gestational age, who were directly intubated in the delivery room (DRI group). Primary outcome consisted of death during admission or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Results 25 infants were included in the ECF group and 50 control infants matched for gestational age were included in the DRI group. Mean gestational age and birth weight in the ECF group were 29.7 weeks and 1,393 g and in the DRI group 29.1 weeks and 1,261 g (p = NS). The incidence of BPD was significantly lower in the ECF group than in the DRI group (4% vs. 35%; P<0.004; OR 12.6 (95% CI 1.6–101)). Neonatal mortality was similar in both groups (4%). The incidence of neonatal morbidities such as severe cerebral injury, patent ductus arteriosus, necrotizing enterocolitis and retinopathy of prematurity, was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion A trial of ENCPAP at birth may reduce the incidence of BPD and does not seem to be detrimental in very preterm infants. Randomized controlled trials are needed to test whether early respiratory management of preterm infants with RDS plays an important role in the development of BPD. PMID:17285145

  18. Monodisperse, Uniformly-Shaped Particles for Controlled Respiratory Vaccine Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromen, Catherine Ann

    The majority of the world's most infectious diseases occur at the air-tissue interface called the mucosa, including HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, measles, and bacterial or viral gut and respiratory infections. Despite this, vaccines have generally been developed for the systemic immune system and fail to provide protection at the mucosal site. Vaccine delivery directly to the lung mucosa could provide superior lung protection for many infectious diseases, such as TB or influenza, as well as systemic and therapeutic vaccines for diseases such as Dengue fever, asthma, or cancer. Specifically, precision engineered biomaterials are believed to offer tremendous opportunities for a new generation of vaccines. The goal of this approach is to leverage naturally occurring processes of the immune system to produce memory responses capable of rapidly destroy virulent pathogens without harmful exposure. Considerable knowledge of biomaterial properties and their interaction with the immune system of the lung is required for successful translation. The overall goal of this work was to fabricate and characterize nano- and microparticles using the Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates (PRINT) fabrication technique and optimize them as pulmonary vaccine carriers. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  19. [Respiratory behavior].

    PubMed

    Gallego, J; Gaultier, C

    2000-02-01

    The notion of respiratory behaviour is grounded, among other approaches, on studies of neuronal mechanisms of voluntary breathing, clinical data, conditioning experiments and respiratory sensations. The interactions between cortical centres of voluntary breathing and respiratory neurones in the brain stem are poorly understood: voluntary control operates through the direct action of corticomotor centres on respiratory motoneurones; however these cortical structures may directly act on bulbopontine centres, and therefore indirectly on respiratory motoneurones. Recordings in animals of brain stem neuronal activity, brain imaging in humans, and transcortical stimulation of the diaphragm in humans and in animal models support either one or the other hypothesis. The mutual independence of the automatic and the voluntary controls of breathing appears in patients with impaired bulbopontine automatism and operational voluntary control (Central Congenital Hypoventilation Syndrome), and in patients with the reverse impairment (locked-in syndrome). Finally, recent studies in humans and animals show that classical conditioning affects respiratory control and sensations. PMID:10756555

  20. A computer-controlled pump and realistic anthropomorphic respiratory phantom for validating image-guided systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ralph; Wilson, Emmanuel; Tang, Jonathan; Stoianovici, Dan; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    The development of image-guided interventions requires validation studies to evaluate new protocols. So far, these validation studies have been limited to animal models and to software and physical phantoms that simulate respiratory motion but cannot accommodate needle punctures in a realistic manner. We have built a computer-controlled pump that drives an anthropomorphic respiratory phantom for simulating natural breathing patterns. This pump consists of a power supply, a motion controller with servo amplifier, linear actuator, and custom fabricated pump assembly. By generating several sample waveforms, we were able to simulate typical breathing patterns. Using this pump, we were able to produce chest wall movements similar to typical chest wall movements observed in humans. This system has potential applications for evaluating new respiratory compensation algorithms and may facilitate improved testing of image-guided protocols under realistic interventional conditions.

  1. Modification of Traffic-related Respiratory Response by Asthma Control in a Population of Car Commuters

    PubMed Central

    Mirabelli, Maria C.; Golan, Rachel; Greenwald, Roby; Raysoni, Amit U.; Holguin, Fernando; Kewada, Priya; Winquist, Andrea; Flanders, W. Dana; Sarnat, Jeremy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Effects of traffic-related exposures on respiratory health are well documented, but little information is available about whether asthma control influences individual susceptibility. We analyzed data from the Atlanta Commuter Exposure study to evaluate modification of associations between rush-hour commuting, in-vehicle air pollution, and selected respiratory health outcomes by asthma control status. Methods Between 2009 and 2011, 39 adults participated in Atlanta Commuter Exposure, and each conducted two scripted rush-hour highway commutes. In-vehicle particulate components were measured during all commutes. Among adults with asthma, we evaluated asthma control by questionnaire and spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and other metrics of respiratory health were measured precommute and 0, 1, 2, and 3 hours postcommute. We used mixed effects linear regression to evaluate associations between commute-related exposures and postcommute changes in metrics of respiratory health by level of asthma control. Results We observed increased exhaled nitric oxide across all levels of asthma control compared with precommute measurements, with largest postcommute increases observed among participants with below-median asthma control (2 hours postcommute: 14.6% [95% confidence interval {CI} = 5.7, 24.2]; 3 hours postcommute: 19.5% [95% CI = 7.8, 32.5]). No associations between in-vehicle pollutants and percent of predicted FEV1 were observed, although higher PM2.5 was associated with lower FEV1 % predicted among participants with below-median asthma control (3 hours postcommute: −7.2 [95% CI = −11.8, −2.7]). Conclusions Level of asthma control may influence respiratory response to in-vehicle exposures experienced during rush-hour commuting. PMID:25901844

  2. Chronic intermittent hypoxia creates the perfect storm with calamitous consequences for respiratory control.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Ken D

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a common respiratory disorder with devastating consequences for integrative body systems. A picture is emerging to illustrate wide-ranging deleterious consequences of disordered breathing during sleep for major homeostatic control systems, with considerable interest in cardiorespiratory and autonomic morbidity underpinning the development of hypertension. The vista is bleak when one also considers the link between OSAS and a host of other maladies. Exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), resulting from repeated obstructions of the pharyngeal airway, is a hallmark feature of OSAS that appears, in animal models, to drive the development and maintenance of several key morbidities. A growing body of evidence now points to aberrant respiratory plasticity at multiple levels following exposure to CIH. Herein, we review the experimental data revealing that CIH causes: respiratory muscle weakness and fatigue; impaired motor control of the upper airway; and, discordant respiratory rhythm and pattern generation. This multifaceted conspiracy creates the perfect storm with the potential to exacerbate OSAS-serving to establish an inescapable cycle of respiratory morbidity. Several pharmacological interventions in animal models appear wholly effective in preventing the calamitous consequences of CIH and may have application as adjunctive therapies in the treatment of OSAS. PMID:26528897

  3. Polymorphisms in genes of respiratory control and sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Läer, Katharina; Dörk, Thilo; Vennemann, Marielle; Rothämel, Thomas; Klintschar, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is a multifactorial syndrome and assumingly, among other mechanisms, a deficit in respiratory control leads to a failure of arousal and autoresuscitation when the child is challenged by a stressful homeostatic event, e.g., hypoxia. We hypothesize that genetic polymorphisms involved in respiratory control mediated in the medulla oblongata contribute to SIDS. Therefore, a total of 366 SIDS cases and 421 controls were genotyped for 48 SNPs in 41 candidate genes. Genotyping was performed using Fluidigm nanofluidic technology. Results were obtained for 356 SIDS and 406 controls and 38 SNPs. After correction for multiple testing, one SNP retained a nominally significant association with seasonal SIDS: rs1801030 in the phenol sulfotransferase 1A1 gene (subgroup: death occurring during summer). A borderline association could be also observed for rs563649 in the opioid receptor μ1 gene in a recessive model (subgroup: death occurring during autumn). As a conclusion, although these data suggest two SNPs to be associated with different subgroups of SIDS cases, none of them can fully explain the SIDS condition, consistent with its multifactorial etiology. Given the great complexity of respiratory control and our initial findings reported here, we believe it is worthwhile to further investigate genes involved in the respiratory system. PMID:26198620

  4. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Infection Control and Prevention Guideline for Healthcare Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Yong; Song, Joon Young; Yoon, Young Kyung; Choi, Seong-Ho; Song, Young Goo; Kim, Sung-Ran; Son, Hee-Jung; Jeong, Sun-Young; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Kyung Mi; Yoon, Hee Jung; Choi, Jun Yong; Kim, Tae Hyong; Choi, Young Hwa; Kim, Hong Bin; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jacob; Eom, Joong Sik; Lee, Sang-Oh; Oh, Won Sup; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong; Kim, Woo Joo

    2015-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is an acute viral respiratory illness with high mortality caused by a new strain of betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Since the report of the first patient in Saudi Arabia in 2012, large-scale outbreaks through hospital-acquired infection and inter-hospital transmission have been reported. Most of the patients reported in South Korea were also infected in hospital settings. Therefore, to eliminate the spread of MERS-CoV, infection prevention and control measures should be implemented with rigor. The present guideline has been drafted on the basis of the experiences of infection control in the South Korean hospitals involved in the recent MERS outbreak and on domestic and international infection prevention and control guidelines. To ensure efficient MERS-CoV infection prevention and control, care should be taken to provide comprehensive infection control measures including contact control, hand hygiene, personal protective equipment, disinfection, and environmental cleaning. PMID:26788414

  5. [Comparison of respiratory control responses in bronchial and external airway stenosis].

    PubMed

    Marek, W; Rasche, K; Mailänder, A; Hoffarth, H P; Ulmer, W T

    1989-11-01

    Respiratory responses during allergen-induced airway obstruction and external airway stenosis were investigated in anaesthetised sheep. The results were compared to those obtained from healthy subjects during external airway stenosis. Allergen-induced increase in airway resistance results in an increased respiratory frequency, mainly due to a shortening of expiration (TE) and only partially due to a shortening of inspiration (TI). Tidal volume is diminished while respiratory changes in oesophageal pressure (delta Poes) are increased. Both results in an increase of dynamic elastance (Edyn) representing airway resistance. Based on the increase in the slope and amplitude of inspiratory pressure (delta Poes/TI), the mean inspiratory airflow (VT/TI) remains almost unchanged. In spite of an increased ventilation PaO2 decreases, whereas PaCO2 increases only slightly. External airway stenosis, however, results in a decrease of respiratory frequency, mainly depending on a prolongation of inspiration. Changes in Poes and VT are similar to those of allergen-induced airway obstruction. delta Poes/TI, however, increases less than during allergen application and results in a decrease of mean inspiratory airflow, tidal volume and ventilation. Respiratory responses of healthy subjects during external airway stenosis were similar to those described in experimental animals. The results of our investigation show a different pattern in the control of breathing during bronchial and external stenosis-induced airway obstruction and thus indicate different vagal reflex mechanisms. PMID:2608647

  6. Cognition Enhancing and Neuromodulatory Propensity of Bacopa monniera Extract Against Scopolamine Induced Cognitive Impairments in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T; Khanum, Farhath

    2016-05-01

    Cognition-enhancing activity of Bacopa monniera extract (BME) was evaluated against scopolamine-induced amnesic rats by novel object recognition test (NOR), elevated plus maze (EPM) and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Scopolamine (2 mg/kg body wt, i.p.) was used to induce amnesia in rats. Piracetam (200 mg/kg body wt, i.p.) was used as positive control. BME at three different dosages (i.e., 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body wt.) improved the impairment induced by scopolamine by increasing the discrimination index of NOR and by decreasing the transfer latency of EPM and escape latency of MWM tests. Our results further elucidate that BME administration has normalized the neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, glutamate, 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, norepinephrine) levels that were altered by scopolamine administration in hippocampus of rat brain. BME administration also ameliorated scopolamine effect by down-regulating AChE and up-regulating BDNF, muscarinic M1 receptor and CREB expression in brain hippocampus confirms the potent neuroprotective role and these results are in corroboration with the earlier in vitro studies. BME administration showed significant protection against scopolamine-induced toxicity by restoring the levels of antioxidant and lipid peroxidation. These results indicate that, cognition-enhancing and neuromodulatory propensity of BME is through modulating the expression of AChE, BDNF, MUS-1, CREB and also by altering the levels of neurotransmitters in hippocampus of rat brain. PMID:26677075

  7. Inhibitory control of ascending glutamatergic projections to the lamprey respiratory rhythm generator.

    PubMed

    Cinelli, Elenia; Mutolo, Donatella; Contini, Massimo; Pantaleo, Tito; Bongianni, Fulvia

    2016-06-21

    Neurons within the vagal motoneuron region of the lamprey have been shown to modulate respiratory activity via ascending excitatory projections to the paratrigeminal respiratory group (pTRG), the proposed respiratory rhythm generator. The present study was performed on in vitro brainstem preparations of the lamprey to provide a characterization of ascending projections within the whole respiratory motoneuron column with regard to the distribution of neurons projecting to the pTRG and related neurochemical markers. Injections of Neurobiotin were performed into the pTRG and the presence of glutamate, GABA and glycine immunoreactivity was investigated by double-labeling experiments. Interestingly, retrogradely labeled neurons were found not only in the vagal region, but also in the facial and glossopharyngeal motoneuron regions. They were also present within the sensory octavolateral area (OLA). The results show for the first time that neurons projecting to the pTRG are immunoreactive for glutamate, surrounded by GABA-immunoreactive structures and associated with the presence of glycinergic cells. Consistently, GABAA or glycine receptor blockade within the investigated regions increased the respiratory frequency. Furthermore, microinjections of agonists and antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors and of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol showed that OLA neurons do not contribute to respiratory rhythm generation. The results provide evidence that glutamatergic ascending pathways to the pTRG are subject to a potent inhibitory control and suggest that disinhibition is one important mechanism subserving their function. The general characteristics of inhibitory control involved in rhythmic activities, such as respiration, appear to be highly conserved throughout vertebrate evolution. PMID:27058146

  8. Pseudopterosin A: Protection of Synaptic Function and Potential as a Neuromodulatory Agent.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Stacee Lee; Zheng, Bo; Dawson-Scully, Ken; White, Catherine A; West, Lyndon M

    2016-03-01

    Natural products have provided an invaluable source of inspiration in the drug discovery pipeline. The oceans are a vast source of biological and chemical diversity. Recently, this untapped resource has been gaining attention in the search for novel structures and development of new classes of therapeutic agents. Pseudopterosins are group of marine diterpene glycosides that possess an array of potent biological activities in several therapeutic areas. Few studies have examined pseudopterosin effects during cellular stress and, to our knowledge, no studies have explored their ability to protect synaptic function. The present study probes pseudopterosin A (PsA) for its neuromodulatory properties during oxidative stress using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. We demonstrate that oxidative stress rapidly reduces neuronal activity, resulting in the loss of neurotransmission at a well-characterized invertebrate synapse. PsA mitigates this effect and promotes functional tolerance during oxidative stress by prolonging synaptic transmission in a mechanism that differs from scavenging activity. Furthermore, the distribution of PsA within mammalian biological tissues following single intravenous injection was investigated using a validated bioanalytical method. Comparable exposure of PsA in the mouse brain and plasma indicated good distribution of PsA in the brain, suggesting its potential as a novel neuromodulatory agent. PMID:26978375

  9. Pseudopterosin A: Protection of Synaptic Function and Potential as a Neuromodulatory Agent

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Stacee Lee; Zheng, Bo; Dawson-Scully, Ken; White, Catherine A.; West, Lyndon M.

    2016-01-01

    Natural products have provided an invaluable source of inspiration in the drug discovery pipeline. The oceans are a vast source of biological and chemical diversity. Recently, this untapped resource has been gaining attention in the search for novel structures and development of new classes of therapeutic agents. Pseudopterosins are group of marine diterpene glycosides that possess an array of potent biological activities in several therapeutic areas. Few studies have examined pseudopterosin effects during cellular stress and, to our knowledge, no studies have explored their ability to protect synaptic function. The present study probes pseudopterosin A (PsA) for its neuromodulatory properties during oxidative stress using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. We demonstrate that oxidative stress rapidly reduces neuronal activity, resulting in the loss of neurotransmission at a well-characterized invertebrate synapse. PsA mitigates this effect and promotes functional tolerance during oxidative stress by prolonging synaptic transmission in a mechanism that differs from scavenging activity. Furthermore, the distribution of PsA within mammalian biological tissues following single intravenous injection was investigated using a validated bioanalytical method. Comparable exposure of PsA in the mouse brain and plasma indicated good distribution of PsA in the brain, suggesting its potential as a novel neuromodulatory agent. PMID:26978375

  10. Control of abdominal muscles by brain stem respiratory neurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    Miller, A D; Ezure, K; Suzuki, I

    1985-07-01

    Control of abdominal musculature by brain stem respiratory neurons was studied in decerebrate unanesthetized cats by determining 1) which brain stem respiratory neurons could be antidromically activated from the lumbar cord, from which the abdominal muscles receive part of their innervation, and 2) if lumbar-projecting respiratory neurons make monosynaptic connections with abdominal motoneurons. A total of 462 respiratory neurons, located between caudal C2 and the retrofacial nucleus (Bötzinger complex), were tested for antidromic activation from the upper lumbar cord. Fifty-eight percent of expiratory (E) neurons (70/121) in the caudal ventral respiratory group (VRG) between the obex and rostral C1 were antidromically activated from contralateral L1. Eight of these neurons were activated at low thresholds from lamina VIII and IX in the L1-2 gray matter. One-third (14/41) of the E neurons that projected to L1 could also be activated from L4-5. Almost all antidromic E neurons had an augmenting firing pattern. Ten scattered inspiratory (I) neurons projected to L1 but could not be activated from L4-5. No neurons that fired during both E and I phases (phase-spanning neurons) were antidromically activated from the lumbar cord. In order to test for possible monosynaptic connections between descending E neurons and abdominal motoneurons, cross-correlations were obtained between 27 VRG E neurons, which were antidromically activated from caudal L2 and contralateral L1 and L2 abdominal nerve activity (47 neuron-nerve combinations). Only two neurons showed a correlation with one of the two nerves tested. Although there is a large projection to the lumbar cord from expiratory neurons in the ventral respiratory group caudal to the obex, cross-correlation analyses suggest that strong monosynaptic connections between these neurons and abdominal motoneurons are scarce. PMID:3162005

  11. Differential effects of GABAA receptor antagonists in the control of respiratory neuronal discharge patterns.

    PubMed

    Dogas, Z; Krolo, M; Stuth, E A; Tonkovic-Capin, M; Hopp, F A; McCrimmon, D R; Zuperku, E J

    1998-11-01

    To ascertain the role of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in shaping and controlling the phasic discharge patterns of medullary respiratory premotor neurons, localized pressure applications of the competitive GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (BIC) and the noncompetitive GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin (PIC) were studied. Multibarrel micropipettes were used in halothane anesthetized, paralyzed, ventilated, vagotomized dogs to record single unit activity from inspiratory and expiratory neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group and to picoeject GABAA receptor antagonists. The moving time average of phrenic nerve activity was used to determine respiratory phase durations and to synchronize cycle-triggered histograms of discharge patterns. Picoejection of BIC and PIC had qualitatively different effects on the discharge patterns of respiratory neurons. BIC caused an increase in the discharge rate during the neuron's active phase without inducing activity during the neuron's normally silent phase. The resulting discharge patterns were amplified replicas (x2-3) of the underlying preejection phasic patterns. In contrast, picoejection of PIC did not increase the peak discharge rate during the neuron's active phase but induced a tonic level of activity during the neuron's normally silent phase. The maximum effective BIC dose (15 +/- 1.8 pmol/min) was considerably smaller than that for PIC (280 +/- 53 pmol/min). These findings suggest that GABAA receptors with differential pharmacology mediate distinct functions within the same neuron, 1) gain modulation that is BIC sensitive but PIC insensitive and 2) silent-phase inhibition blocked by PIC. These studies also suggest that the choice of an antagonist is an important consideration in the determination of GABA receptor function within the respiratory motor control system. PMID:9819249

  12. Respiratory source control using a surgical mask: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajeev B; Skaria, Shaji D; Mansour, Mohamed M; Smaldone, Gerald C

    2016-07-01

    Cough etiquette and respiratory hygiene are forms of source control encouraged to prevent the spread of respiratory infection. The use of surgical masks as a means of source control has not been quantified in terms of reducing exposure to others. We designed an in vitro model using various facepieces to assess their contribution to exposure reduction when worn at the infectious source (Source) relative to facepieces worn for primary (Receiver) protection, and the factors that contribute to each. In a chamber with various airflows, radiolabeled aerosols were exhaled via a ventilated soft-face manikin head using tidal breathing and cough (Source). Another manikin, containing a filter, quantified recipient exposure (Receiver). The natural fit surgical mask, fitted (SecureFit) surgical mask and an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an "N95 respirator") with and without a Vaseline-seal were tested. With cough, source control (mask or respirator on Source) was statistically superior to mask or unsealed respirator protection on the Receiver (Receiver protection) in all environments. To equal source control during coughing, the N95 respirator must be Vaseline-sealed. During tidal breathing, source control was comparable or superior to mask or respirator protection on the Receiver. Source control via surgical masks may be an important adjunct defense against the spread of respiratory infections. The fit of the mask or respirator, in combination with the airflow patterns in a given setting, are significant contributors to source control efficacy. Future clinical trials should include a surgical mask source control arm to assess the contribution of source control in overall protection against airborne infection. PMID:26225807

  13. Respiratory source control using a surgical mask: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajeev B.; Skaria, Shaji D.; Mansour, Mohamed M.; Smaldone, Gerald C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cough etiquette and respiratory hygiene are forms of source control encouraged to prevent the spread of respiratory infection. The use of surgical masks as a means of source control has not been quantified in terms of reducing exposure to others. We designed an in vitro model using various facepieces to assess their contribution to exposure reduction when worn at the infectious source (Source) relative to facepieces worn for primary (Receiver) protection, and the factors that contribute to each. In a chamber with various airflows, radiolabeled aerosols were exhaled via a ventilated soft-face manikin head using tidal breathing and cough (Source). Another manikin, containing a filter, quantified recipient exposure (Receiver). The natural fit surgical mask, fitted (SecureFit) surgical mask and an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an “N95 respirator”) with and without a Vaseline-seal were tested. With cough, source control (mask or respirator on Source) was statistically superior to mask or unsealed respirator protection on the Receiver (Receiver protection) in all environments. To equal source control during coughing, the N95 respirator must be Vaseline-sealed. During tidal breathing, source control was comparable or superior to mask or respirator protection on the Receiver. Source control via surgical masks may be an important adjunct defense against the spread of respiratory infections. The fit of the mask or respirator, in combination with the airflow patterns in a given setting, are significant contributors to source control efficacy. Future clinical trials should include a surgical mask source control arm to assess the contribution of source control in overall protection against airborne infection. PMID:26225807

  14. Respiratory training as strategy to prevent cognitive decline in aging: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Leandro; Tanaka, Kátia; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth Ferreira; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate oxygenation may cause lesions and brain atrophy during aging. Studies show a positive association between pulmonary function and the cognitive performance of individuals from middle age on. Objective To investigate the effect of aerobic physical exercises and respiratory training on the blood oxygenation, pulmonary functions, and cognition of the elderly. Design This was a randomized and controlled trial with three parallel groups. A total of 195 community-dwelling elderly were assessed for eligibility; only n=102 were included and allocated into the three groups, but after 6 months, n=68 were analyzed in the final sample. Participants were randomized into a social interaction group (the control group), an aerobic exercise group (the “walking” group), or a respiratory training group (the “breathing” group). The main outcome measures were the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Wechsler Memory Scale, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, respiratory muscular strength, cirtometry (thoracic–abdominal circumference); oxygen saturation in arterial blood (SpO2), and hemogram. Results No differences were observed for any of the blood parameters. Aerobic exercise and respiratory training were effective in improving the pulmonary parameters. Better cognitive performance was observed for the breathing group as regards abstraction and mental flexibility. The walking group remained stable in the cognitive performance of most of the tests, except attention. The control group presented worst performance in mental manipulation of information, abstraction, mental flexibility, and attention. Conclusion Our results showed that both the walking and breathing groups presented improvement of pulmonary function. However, only the breathing group showed improved cognitive function (abstraction, mental flexibility). The improvement in cognitive functions cannot be explained by blood parameters, such as SpO2, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. PMID:25848235

  15. [Acute respiratory distress subordinate to a morphine overdose during a frail elderly patient controlled analgesia].

    PubMed

    Ades, A; Compère, V; Abriou, C; Baert, O; Fourdrinier, V; Dureuil, B

    2009-04-01

    We describe a case-report of an 85-year-male patient with a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) after a total hip arthroplasty. Four hours after surgery, acute respiratory distress secondary to a morphine overdose occurred, requiring an antagonisation with naloxone. Morphine overdose during a PCA was always caused by a wrong use of the pump. In this case-report, no mistake of programming or administration's use was found. Too important morphine's doses managed in comparison with the patient's age and his renal failure could explain this morphine's accumulation and the respiratory distress. This observation reminds us the obligation to determine the optimal posology in accordance with the rate of glomerular filtration estimated by Cockcroft and Gault formula for patients using a PCA. PMID:19361945

  16. Challenges and opportunities for the control and elimination of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Rowland, R R R; Morrison, R B

    2012-03-01

    The control and elimination of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) represent two of the most challenging tasks facing the pig industry worldwide. Several factors related to the biology of the virus make disease detection and elimination difficult. Efforts are further hampered by the lack of vaccines that can protect naïve herds from infection. With this in mind, elimination efforts are being initiated which incorporate existing tools and knowledge. A new approach extends herd control strategies to the level of a region. One example of success in PRRSV regional elimination is the Stevens County project in Minnesota. PMID:25471243

  17. User's instructions for the Grodins' respiratory control model using the UNIVAC 1110 remote batch and demand processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The transient and steady state response of the respiratory control system for variations in volumetric fractions of inspired gases and special system parameters are modeled. The program contains the capability to change workload. The program is based on Grodins' respiratory control model and can be envisioned as a feedback control system comprised of a plant (the controlled system) and the regulating component (controlling system). The controlled system is partitioned into 3 compartments corresponding to lungs, brain, and tissue with a fluid interconnecting patch representing the blood.

  18. Effects of Pranayam Breathing on Respiratory Pressures and Sympathovagal Balance of Patients with Chronic Airflow Limitation and in Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jaju, Deepali S; Dikshit, Mohan B; Balaji, Jothi; George, Jyoji; Rizvi, Syed; Al-Rawas, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare the effects of Pranayam breathing on respiratory muscle strength measured as maximum expiratory and inspiratory pressures (MEP and MIP) and relevant spirometry parameters in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and in control subjects, and on the sympatho-vagal balance in both the groups. Methods: The research was performed in the Clinical Physiology Department, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman. Eleven patients (mean age 43.91 ± 20.56 yr; mean BMI 21.9 ± 5.5 kg/m2) and 6 controls (43.5 ± 14.6yr; 25.4 ± 3.2 kg/m2) learnt and practised Pranayam. Their respiratory and cardiovascular parameters were recorded. Their respiratory “well being” was noted as a visual analogue score (VAS). The respiratory parameters were expressed as a percentage change of predicted values. Results: Patients’ respiratory parameters were significantly lower than those of controls. Patients’ maximum respiratory pressures did not improve after Pranayam; however, they showed significant improvement in VAS 5.4 ± 2.4 to 7.2 ± 1.2 (P < 0.03). Controls showed significant increase in MIP after Pranayam exercises. There were no changes in other spirometry indices. Controls showed significant increase in their systolic blood pressure and stroke index after exercise. The vago-sympathetic balance shifted towards sympathetic in both patients and controls after exercise. Conclusion: The improvement in MIP in controls indicated the positive effect of Pranayam exercise; however, it may not be an adequately stressful exercise to produce changes in the respiratory parameters of COPD patients. The increase in VAS in patients suggested improvement in respiratory distress and quality of life. PMID:21969894

  19. A Metagenomics and Case-Control Study To Identify Viruses Associated with Bovine Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kondov, Nikola O.; Deng, Xutao; Van Eenennaam, Alison; Neibergs, Holly L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a common health problem for both dairy and beef cattle, resulting in significant economic loses. In order to identify viruses associated with BRD, we used a metagenomics approach to enrich and sequence viral nucleic acids in the nasal swabs of 50 young dairy cattle with symptoms of BRD. Following deep sequencing, de novo assembly, and translated protein sequence similarity searches, numerous known and previously uncharacterized viruses were identified. Bovine adenovirus 3, bovine adeno-associated virus, bovine influenza D virus, bovine parvovirus 2, bovine herpesvirus 6, bovine rhinitis A virus, and multiple genotypes of bovine rhinitis B virus were identified. The genomes of a previously uncharacterized astrovirus and picobirnaviruses were also partially or fully sequenced. Using real-time PCR, the rates of detection of the eight viruses that generated the most reads were compared for the nasal secretions of 50 animals with BRD versus 50 location-matched healthy control animals. Viruses were detected in 68% of BRD-affected animals versus 16% of healthy control animals. Thirty-eight percent of sick animals versus 8% of controls were infected with multiple respiratory viruses. Significantly associated with BRD were bovine adenovirus 3 (P < 0.0001), bovine rhinitis A virus (P = 0.005), and the recently described bovine influenza D virus (P = 0.006), which were detected either alone or in combination in 62% of animals with BRD. A metagenomics and real-time PCR detection approach in carefully matched cases and controls can provide a rapid means to identify viruses associated with a complex disease, paving the way for further confirmatory tests and ultimately to effective intervention strategies. IMPORTANCE Bovine respiratory disease is the most economically important disease affecting the cattle industry, whose complex root causes include environmental, genetics, and infectious factors. Using an unbiased metagenomics

  20. Respiratory mechanics and ventilatory control in overlap syndrome and obesity hypoventilation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The overlap syndrome of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in addition to obesity hypoventilation syndrome, represents growing health concerns, owing to the worldwide COPD and obesity epidemics and related co-morbidities. These disorders constitute the end points of a spectrum with distinct yet interrelated mechanisms that lead to a considerable health burden. The coexistence OSA and COPD seems to occur by chance, but the combination can contribute to worsened symptoms and oxygen desaturation at night, leading to disrupted sleep architecture and decreased sleep quality. Alveolar hypoventilation, ventilation-perfusion mismatch and intermittent hypercapnic events resulting from apneas and hypopneas contribute to the final clinical picture, which is quite different from the “usual” COPD. Obesity hypoventilation has emerged as a relatively common cause of chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure. Its pathophysiology results from complex interactions, among which are respiratory mechanics, ventilatory control, sleep-disordered breathing and neurohormonal disturbances, such as leptin resistance, each of which contributes to varying degrees in individual patients to the development of obesity hypoventilation. This respiratory embarrassment takes place when compensatory mechanisms like increased drive cannot be maintained or become overwhelmed. Although a unifying concept for the pathogenesis of both disorders is lacking, it seems that these patients are in a vicious cycle. This review outlines the major pathophysiological mechanisms believed to contribute to the development of these specific clinical entities. Knowledge of shared mechanisms in the overlap syndrome and obesity hypoventilation may help to identify these patients and guide therapy. PMID:24256627

  1. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus: transmission, virology and therapeutic targeting to aid in outbreak control

    PubMed Central

    Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Batool, Maria; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes high fever, cough, acute respiratory tract infection and multiorgan dysfunction that may eventually lead to the death of the infected individuals. MERS-CoV is thought to be transmitted to humans through dromedary camels. The occurrence of the virus was first reported in the Middle East and it subsequently spread to several parts of the world. Since 2012, about 1368 infections, including ~487 deaths, have been reported worldwide. Notably, the recent human-to-human ‘superspreading' of MERS-CoV in hospitals in South Korea has raised a major global health concern. The fatality rate in MERS-CoV infection is four times higher compared with that of the closely related severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection. Currently, no drug has been clinically approved to control MERS-CoV infection. In this study, we highlight the potential drug targets that can be used to develop anti-MERS-CoV therapeutics. PMID:26315600

  2. Nebulised amiloride in respiratory exacerbations of cystic fibrosis: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, I M; Kelman, B; Worthington, D; Littlewood, J M; Watson, A; Conway, S P; Smye, S W; James, S L; Sheldon, T A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the benefit of nebulised amiloride added to the standard inpatient treatment of a respiratory exacerbation in cystic fibrosis. DESIGN--Prospective, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial. SUBJECTS--27 cystic fibrosis patients (mean age 12.8 years). SETTING--Two hospitals in Leeds, UK. RESULTS--Both forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) showed improvements over the course of treatment, although there was no difference in respiratory function between the two groups at any of three time periods during the study. The time to reach peak FVC was significantly reduced in the amiloride group (4.2 v 7.6 days; 95% CI 0.4 to 6.4 days), but not in the time to reach peak FEV1 (5.7 v 7.9 days; 95% CI -1.2 to 5.6 days). CONCLUSIONS--Amiloride did not result in a greater overall improvement in respiratory function. There was a suggestion that it may have an effect on the rate of improvement, and thus may possibly influence the duration of treatment. This hypothesis deserves further evaluation. Images p428-a PMID:8554360

  3. Social Mixing Patterns Within a South African Township Community: Implications for Respiratory Disease Transmission and Control

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone-Robertson, Simon P.; Mark, Daniella; Morrow, Carl; Middelkoop, Keren; Chiswell, Melika; Aquino, Lisa D. H.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Wood, Robin

    2011-01-01

    A prospective survey of social mixing patterns relevant to respiratory disease transmission by large droplets (e.g., influenza) or small droplet nuclei (e.g., tuberculosis) was performed in a South African township in 2010. A total of 571 randomly selected participants recorded the numbers, times, and locations of close contacts (physical/nonphysical) and indoor casual contacts met daily. The median number of physical contacts was 12 (interquartile range (IQR), 7–18), the median number of close contacts was 20 (IQR, 13–29), and the total number of indoor contacts was 30 (IQR, 12–54). Physical and close contacts were most frequent and age-associative in youths aged 5–19 years. Numbers of close contacts were 40% higher than in corresponding populations in industrialized countries (P < 0.001). This may put township communities at higher risk for epidemics of acute respiratory illnesses. Simulations of an acute influenza epidemic predominantly involved adolescents and young adults, indicating that control strategies should be directed toward these age groups. Of all contacts, 86.2% occurred indoors with potential exposure to respiratory droplet nuclei, of which 27.2%, 20.1%, 20.0%, and 8.0% were in transport, own household, crèche/school, and work locations, respectively. Indoor contact time was long in households and short during transport. High numbers of indoor contacts and intergenerational mixing in households and transport may contribute to exceptionally high rates of tuberculosis transmission reported in the community. PMID:22071585

  4. Taiwan's traffic control bundle and the elimination of nosocomial severe acute respiratory syndrome among healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Yen, M-Y; Lin, Y-E; Lee, C-H; Ho, M-S; Huang, F-Y; Chang, S-C; Liu, Y-C

    2011-04-01

    The traffic control bundle consists of procedures designed to help prevent epidemic nosocomial infection. We retrospectively studied the serial infection control measures to determine factors most effective in preventing nosocomial infections of healthcare workers (HCWs) during the 2003 Taiwanese severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic. Fever screening stations, triage of fever patients, separating SARS patients from other patients, separation of entrances and passageways between patients and HCWs, and increasing hand-washing facilities all demonstrated a protective effect for HCWs (univariate analysis; P<0.05). By multiple logistic regression: (i) checkpoint alcohol dispensers for glove-on hand rubbing between zones of risk, and (ii) fever screening at the fever screen station outside the emergency department, were the significant methods effectively minimising nosocomial SARS infection of HCWs (P<0.05). The traffic control bundle should be implemented in future epidemics as a tool to achieve strict infection control measures. PMID:21316802

  5. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F.; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Huang, Cher X.; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Bell, George W.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26438848

  6. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Huang, Cher X; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D; Stokes, Matthew P; Silva, Jeffrey C; Bell, George W; MacArthur, Daniel G; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26438848

  7. A Chronic Respiratory Pasteurella multocida Infection Is Well-Controlled by Long-Term Macrolide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masafumi; Sakata, Tomomi; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Nishi, Isao; Tomono, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with severe bronchiectasis frequently received antibiotics, including penicillin, for acute exacerbations due to Pasteurella multocida. Although the bacteria showed a decrease in antibiotic susceptibility, her symptoms and X-ray findings became stable, and severe exacerbations were not observed for the last few years after a low-dose erythromycin treatment was started. The development of a respiratory infection with Pasteurella multocida is relatively uncommon, but it can be controlled by immunomodulation which is associated with long-term macrolide therapy. PMID:26831030

  8. Optimal control problem in correlation between smoking and epidemic of respiratory diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldila, D.; Apri, M.

    2014-02-01

    Smoking appears to be a risk factor that may increase the number of different pulmonary infections. This link is likely to be mediated by smoking adverse effects on the respiratory defenses. A mathematical model to describe correlation between the number of smokers and its effect on the number of infected people suffer from respiratory disease like influenza is constructed in this paper. Promotion of healthy life is accounted in the model as an optimal control problem to reduce the number of smokers. In this work, the transition rates from smokers to non-smokers and from non-smokers to smokers are regarded as the control variables. Assuming the control variables are constant, equilibrium points of the model can be obtained analytically. The basic reproductive ratio as the endemic threshold is taken from the spectral radius of the next-generation matrix. Using numerical simulation, we show that the healthy life promotion can reduce the number of infected person significantly by reducing the number of smokers. Furthermore, different initial conditions to show different situations in the field are also simulated. It is shown that a large effort to increase the transition rate from smokers to non-smokers and to reduce the transition from non-smokers to smokers should be applied in the endemic reduction scenario.

  9. Respiratory rehabilitation: a physiotherapy approach to the control of asthma symptoms and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, Renata André; Barnabé, Viviane; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz M.; Stelmach, Rafael; Cukier, Alberto; do Patrocínio T. Nunes, Maria

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to verify the degree of anxiety, respiratory distress, and health-related quality of life in a group of asthmatic patients who have experienced previous panic attacks. Additionally, we evaluated if a respiratory physiotherapy program (breathing retraining) improved both asthma and panic disorder symptoms, resulting in an improvement in the health-related quality of life of asthmatics. METHODS: Asthmatic individuals were assigned to a chest physiotherapy group that included a breathing retraining program held once a week for three months or a paired control group that included a Subtle Touch program. All patients were assessed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV, the Sheehan Anxiety Scale, the Quality of Life Questionnaire, and spirometry parameter measurements. RESULTS: Both groups had high marks for panic disorder and agoraphobia, which limited their quality of life. The Breathing Retraining Group program improved the clinical control of asthma, reduced panic symptoms and agoraphobia, decreased patient scores on the Sheehan Anxiety Scale, and improved their quality of life. Spirometry parameters were unchanged. CONCLUSION: Breathing retraining improves the clinical control of asthma and anxiety symptoms and the health-related quality of life in asthmatic patients. PMID:23184206

  10. Neuromodulatory unpaired median neurons in the New Zealand tree weta, Hemideina femorata.

    PubMed

    Pflüger, Hans-Joachim; Field, Laurence H; Nishino, Hiroshi; Currie, Margaret J

    2011-10-01

    Wetas are ancient Gondwanan orthopterans (Anostostomatidae) with many species endemic to New Zealand. Like all Orthoptera they possess efferent neuromodulatory dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, with bilaterally symmetrical axons, that are important components of motor networks. These neurons produce overshooting action potentials and are easily stimulated by a variety of external mechanosensory stimuli delivered to the body and appendages. In particular, stimulation of the antennae, mouth parts, tarsi and femora of the legs, abdomen, cerci and ovipositor is very effective in activating DUM neurons in the metathoracic ganglion of wetas. In addition, looming visual stimuli or light on-, light off-stimuli excite many metathoracic DUM neurons. These DUM sensory reflex pathways remain viable after the prothoracic to subesophageal connective is cut, whereas in locusts such reflex pathways are interrupted by the ablation. This suggests that, in wetas, sensory reflex pathways for DUM activation are organized in a less centralized fashion than in locusts, and may therefore reflect a plesiomorphic evolutionary state in the weta. In addition, many weta DUM neurons exhibit slow rhythmic bursting which also persists following the connective ablation. PMID:21810425

  11. Peripheral-central chemoreceptor interaction and the significance of a critical period in the development of respiratory control

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Riley, Margaret T.T.; Liu, Qiuli; Gao, Xiu-ping

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory control entails coordinated activities of peripheral chemoreceptors (mainly the carotid bodies) and central chemosensors within the brain stem respiratory network. Candidates for central chemoreceptors include Phox2b-containing neurons of the retrotrapezoid nucleus, serotonergic neurons of the medullary raphé, and/or multiple sites within the brain stem. Extensive interconnections among respiratory-related nuclei enable central chemosensitive relay. Both peripheral and central respiratory centers are not mature at birth, but undergo considerable development during the first two postnatal weeks in rats. A critical period of respiratory development (~P12–13 in the rat) exists when abrupt neurochemical, metabolic, ventilatory, and electrophysiological changes occur. Environmental perturbations, including hypoxia, intermittent hypoxia, hypercapnia, and hyperoxia alter the development of the respiratory system. Carotid body denervation during the first two postnatal weeks in the rat profoundly affects the development and functions of central respiratory-related nuclei. Such denervation delays and prolongs the critical period, but does not eliminate it, suggesting that the critical period may be intrinsically and genetically determined. PMID:22684042

  12. The role of P2Y1 receptor signaling in central respiratory control.

    PubMed

    Rajani, V; Zhang, Y; Revill, A L; Funk, G D

    2016-06-01

    The profile of P2 receptor signaling in respiratory control has increased substantially since the first suggestions more than 15 years ago of roles in central chemoreception and modulating inspiratory motor outflow. Part of this reflects the paradigm shift that glia participate in information processing and that ATP is a major gliotransmitter. P2 receptors are a diverse family. Here, we review ATP signaling in respiratory control, highlighting G-protein coupled P2Y1 receptors that have been a focus of recent work. Despite strong evidence of a role for glia and P2 receptor signaling in the central chemosensitivity mediated by the retotrapezoid nucleus, P2Y1 receptors do not appear to be directly involved. Evidence that central P2 receptors and glia contribute to the hypoxic ventilatory response is compelling and P2Y1 receptors are the strongest candidate. However, functional significance in vivo, details of the signaling pathways and involvement of other receptor subtypes remain important questions. PMID:26476057

  13. China upgrades surveillance and control measures of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).

    PubMed

    Gao, Jianjun; Song, Peipei

    2015-06-01

    Three years after the identification of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in Saudi Arabia, the first case of MERS in China was reported on May 29, 2015. Although the Chinese government issued the MERS Prevention and Control Plan in 2013, a novel edition was released on June 5, 2015 to better cope with the current epidemic situation. The revised Plan refines the descriptions in case-finding and establishment of case-monitoring systems. In addition, tougher regulations on close contacts of confirmed patients and suspected cases are introduced in this new Plan. It is expected these countermeasures will play a greater role in surveilling and controlling MERS in China. PMID:26063202

  14. Neuromodulation to the Rescue: Compensation of Temperature-Induced Breakdown of Rhythmic Motor Patterns via Extrinsic Neuromodulatory Input

    PubMed Central

    Städele, Carola; Heigele, Stefanie; Stein, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Stable rhythmic neural activity depends on the well-coordinated interplay of synaptic and cell-intrinsic conductances. Since all biophysical processes are temperature dependent, this interplay is challenged during temperature fluctuations. How the nervous system remains functional during temperature perturbations remains mostly unknown. We present a hitherto unknown mechanism of how temperature-induced changes in neural networks are compensated by changing their neuromodulatory state: activation of neuromodulatory pathways establishes a dynamic coregulation of synaptic and intrinsic conductances with opposing effects on neuronal activity when temperature changes, hence rescuing neuronal activity. Using the well-studied gastric mill pattern generator of the crab, we show that modest temperature increase can abolish rhythmic activity in isolated neural circuits due to increased leak currents in rhythm-generating neurons. Dynamic clamp-mediated addition of leak currents was sufficient to stop neuronal oscillations at low temperatures, and subtraction of additional leak currents at elevated temperatures was sufficient to rescue the rhythm. Despite the apparent sensitivity of the isolated nervous system to temperature fluctuations, the rhythm could be stabilized by activating extrinsic neuromodulatory inputs from descending projection neurons, a strategy that we indeed found to be implemented in intact animals. In the isolated nervous system, temperature compensation was achieved by stronger extrinsic neuromodulatory input from projection neurons or by augmenting projection neuron influence via bath application of the peptide cotransmitter Cancer borealis tachykinin-related peptide Ia (CabTRP Ia). CabTRP Ia activates the modulator-induced current IMI (a nonlinear voltage-gated inward current) that effectively acted as a negative leak current and counterbalanced the temperature-induced leak to rescue neuronal oscillations. Computational modelling revealed the ability of

  15. Control of pathogenic effector T-cell activities in situ by PD-L1 expression on respiratory inflammatory dendritic cells during respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, S; Jiang, L; Moser, EK; Jewett, LB; Wright, J; Du, J; Zhou, B; Davis, SD; Krupp, NL; Braciale, TJ; Sun, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract illness in young infants, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. We demonstrate here that the co-inhibitory molecule programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is selectively upregulated on T cells within the respiratory tract during both murine and human RSV infection. Importantly, the interaction of PD-1 with its ligand PD-L1 is vital to restrict the pro-inflammatory activities of lung effector T cells in situ, thereby inhibiting the development of excessive pulmonary inflammation and injury during RSV infection. We further identify that PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells is critical to suppress inflammatory T-cell activities, and an interferon–STAT1–IRF1 axis is responsible for increased PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells. Our findings suggest a potentially critical role of PD-L1 and PD-1 interactions in the lung for controlling host inflammatory responses and disease progression in clinical RSV infection. PMID:25465101

  16. Nuclear respiratory factor 1 controls myocyte enhancer factor 2A transcription to provide a mechanism for coordinate expression of respiratory chain subunits.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Bindu; Yu, Gengsheng; Gulick, Tod

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear respiratory factors NRF1 and NRF2 regulate the expression of nuclear genes encoding heme biosynthetic enzymes, proteins required for mitochondrial genome transcription and protein import, and numerous respiratory chain subunits. NRFs thereby coordinate the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes relevant to mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Only two of the nuclear-encoded respiratory chain subunits have evolutionarily conserved tissue-specific forms: the cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunits VIa and VIIa heart/muscle (H) and ubiquitous (L) isoforms. We used genome comparisons to conclude that the promoter regions of COX6A(H) and COX7A(H) lack NRF sites but have conserved myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) elements. We show that MEF2A mRNA is induced with forced expression of NRF1 and that the MEF2A 5'-regulatory region contains an evolutionarily conserved canonical element that binds endogenous NRF1 in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. NRF1 regulates MEF2A promoter-reporters according to overexpression, RNA interference underexpression, and promoter element mutation studies. As there are four mammalian MEF2 isotypes, we used an isoform-specific antibody in ChIP to confirm MEF2A binding to the COX6A(H) promoter. These findings support a role for MEF2A as an intermediary in coordinating respiratory chain subunit expression in heart and muscle through a NRF1 --> MEF2A --> COX(H) transcriptional cascade. MEF2A also bound the MEF2A and PPARGC1A promoters in ChIP, placing it within a feedback loop with PGC1alpha in controlling NRF1 activity. Interruption of this cascade and loop may account for striated muscle mitochondrial defects in mef2a null mice. Our findings also account for the previously described indirect regulation by NRF1 of other MEF2 targets in muscle such as GLUT4. PMID:18222924

  17. Nuclear Respiratory Factor 1 Controls Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2A Transcription to Provide a Mechanism for Coordinate Expression of Respiratory Chain Subunits*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Bindu; Yu, Gengsheng; Gulick, Tod

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear respiratory factors NRF1 and NRF2 regulate the expression of nuclear genes encoding heme biosynthetic enzymes, proteins required for mitochondrial genome transcription and protein import, and numerous respiratory chain subunits. NRFs thereby coordinate the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes relevant to mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Only two of the nuclear-encoded respiratory chain subunits have evolutionarily conserved tissue-specific forms: the cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunits VIa and VIIa heart/muscle (H) and ubiquitous (L) isoforms. We used genome comparisons to conclude that the promoter regions of COX6AH and COX7AH lack NRF sites but have conserved myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) elements. We show that MEF2A mRNA is induced with forced expression of NRF1 and that the MEF2A 5′-regulatory region contains an evolutionarily conserved canonical element that binds endogenous NRF1 in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. NRF1 regulates MEF2A promoter-reporters according to overexpression, RNA interference underexpression, and promoter element mutation studies. As there are four mammalian MEF2 isotypes, we used an isoform-specific antibody in ChIP to confirm MEF2A binding to the COX6AH promoter. These findings support a role for MEF2A as an intermediary in coordinating respiratory chain subunit expression in heart and muscle through a NRF1 → MEF2A → COXH transcriptional cascade. MEF2A also bound the MEF2A and PPARGC1A promoters in ChIP, placing it within a feedback loop with PGC1α in controlling NRF1 activity. Interruption of this cascade and loop may account for striated muscle mitochondrial defects in mef2a null mice. Our findings also account for the previously described indirect regulation by NRF1 of other MEF2 targets in muscle such as GLUT4. PMID:18222924

  18. The preprotein translocase YidC controls respiratory metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Preeti; Gantasala, Nagavara Prasad; Choudhary, Eira; Singh, Nirpendra; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Agarwal, Nisheeth

    2016-01-01

    The YidC-Oxa1-Alb3 preprotein translocases play a vital role in membrane insertion of proteins in eukaryotes and bacteria. In a recent study we observed that Rv3921c, which encodes putative YidC translocase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is essential for in vitro growth of bacteria. However, the exact function of this particular protein remains to identify in mycobacterial pathogens. By performing a systematic study here we show that YidC of Mtb is an envelope protein, which is required for production of ATP and maintenance of cellular redox balance. Drastic effects of depletion of Rv3921c on the expression of hypoxic genes, ATP synthases, and many proteins of central metabolic and respiratory pathways shed a significant light on the function of YidC towards controlling respiratory metabolism in Mtb. Association of YidC with proteins such as succinate dehydrogenases and ubiquinol-cytochrome C reductase further confirms its role in respiration. Finally we demonstrate that YidC is required for the intracellular survival of Mtb in human macrophages. PMID:27166092

  19. [Basic types of respiratory system structure in insect egg envelopes, and genes controlling their formation].

    PubMed

    Omelina, E S; Baricheva, É M; Fedorova, E V

    2012-01-01

    Insects is a taxon surprisingly rich with species and varieties, and its representatives are considered as the most fitted and "evolutionary successful" living things. Insects are distinguished by diversity and abundance of adaptations to environmental conditions, representatives of this class inhabit different ecological niches, they can be found practically in every corner of the Earth and, in particular, in close adjacency to man. Among them are those who man benefits from and those who man struggles against. This determines man's interest in studying peculiarities of their development as well as adaptations formed by them in the course of evolution to become more viable. In the paper, data are presented on morphological structure of respiratory systems in insect egg envelopes that ensure respiration process of developing embryo. Variability of these systems and their dependence on environmental conditions are demonstrated for different insect species. The information about genes controlling development of respiratory systems in fruit fly eggs is brought together, and occurrence of evolutionary conservative genes participating in development of such systems in other insect species is ascertained. PMID:22834166

  20. The preprotein translocase YidC controls respiratory metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Preeti; Gantasala, Nagavara Prasad; Choudhary, Eira; Singh, Nirpendra; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Agarwal, Nisheeth

    2016-01-01

    The YidC–Oxa1–Alb3 preprotein translocases play a vital role in membrane insertion of proteins in eukaryotes and bacteria. In a recent study we observed that Rv3921c, which encodes putative YidC translocase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is essential for in vitro growth of bacteria. However, the exact function of this particular protein remains to identify in mycobacterial pathogens. By performing a systematic study here we show that YidC of Mtb is an envelope protein, which is required for production of ATP and maintenance of cellular redox balance. Drastic effects of depletion of Rv3921c on the expression of hypoxic genes, ATP synthases, and many proteins of central metabolic and respiratory pathways shed a significant light on the function of YidC towards controlling respiratory metabolism in Mtb. Association of YidC with proteins such as succinate dehydrogenases and ubiquinol-cytochrome C reductase further confirms its role in respiration. Finally we demonstrate that YidC is required for the intracellular survival of Mtb in human macrophages. PMID:27166092

  1. Differential neuromodulatory role of NO in anxiety and seizures: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Kavita; Ray, Arunabha

    2014-12-01

    Nitric oxide is a simple, ubiquitous, diatomic molecule with complex neuromodulatory functions. Anxiety and seizures are closely similar neurobehavioral disorders and are regulated by limbic system. The present study evaluated the regulatory roles of NO in these pathophysiological states in experimental models. In test for anxiety, aminophylline induced anxiogenic responses were assessed by the elevated plus maze (EPM) test, and a low dose of the drug (50 mg/kg) reduced both open arm entries and open arm time in rats. Pretreatment with the NO mimetic, L-arginine (500 and 1000 mg/kg) and melatonin (50 mg/kg) attenuated aminophylline induced anxiogenesis whereas the NO synthase inhibitors, L-NAME and 7-NI (30 mg/kg) aggravated the anxiogeneic response. Such aminophylline induced neurobehavioral suppression in the EPM activity was accompanied by increases in MDA levels and reductions in GSH and NOx activity in brain homogenates - changes which were reversed by L-arginine and melatonin pretreatments. In tests for seizures, aminophylline induced seizures and mortality at higher dose levels of the drug (300 mg/kg). Interestingly, such seizures and mortality in rats were antagonized by L-NAME and 7-NI pretreatments. On the other hand, L-arginine tended to potentiate seizures after sub-convulsive dose (100 mg/kg) of this methylxanthine. Aminophylline induced seizures were accompanied by greater elevations in brain MDA levels, whereas, GSH levels were consistently lowered. Unlike that seen during anxiety, NOx levels were increased in brain homogenates of these rats. The changes in oxidative stress markers were neutralized by NO synthase inhibitors. Synergistic anticonvulsant effect on aminophylline seizures was seen when L-NAME was combined with melatonin. These pharmacological and biochemical data indicate that aminophylline induced anxiety and seizures are differentially modulated by NO. PMID:25152447

  2. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia, effortful control, and parenting as predictors of children's sympathy across early childhood.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Zoe E; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine physiological and environmental predictors of children's sympathy (an emotional response consisting of feelings of concern or sorrow for others who are distressed or in need) and whether temperamental effortful control mediated these relations. Specifically, in a study of 192 children (23% Hispanic; 54% male), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a measure thought to reflect physiological regulation, and observed authoritative parenting (both at 42 months) were examined as predictors of children's effortful control (at 54 months) and, in turn, children's sympathy (at 72 and 84 months). Measures of both baseline RSA and RSA suppression were examined. In a structural equation model, observed parenting was positively related to children's subsequent sympathy through its positive relation to effortful control. Furthermore, the indirect path from baseline RSA to higher sympathy through effortful control was marginally significant. Authoritative parenting and baseline RSA uniquely predicted individual differences in children's effortful control. Findings highlight the potential role of both authoritative parenting and physiological regulation in the development of children's sympathy. PMID:25329555

  3. Respiratory control in aquatic insects dictates their vulnerability to global warming

    PubMed Central

    Verberk, Wilco C. E. P.; Bilton, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Forecasting species responses to climatic warming requires knowledge of how temperature impacts may be exacerbated by other environmental stressors, hypoxia being a principal example in aquatic systems. Both stressors could interact directly as temperature affects both oxygen bioavailability and ectotherm oxygen demand. Insufficient oxygen has been shown to limit thermal tolerance in several aquatic ectotherms, although, the generality of this mechanism has been challenged for tracheated arthropods. Comparing species pairs spanning four different insect orders, we demonstrate that oxygen can indeed limit thermal tolerance in tracheates. Species that were poor at regulating oxygen uptake were consistently more vulnerable to the synergistic effects of warming and hypoxia, demonstrating the importance of respiratory control in setting thermal tolerance limits. PMID:23925834

  4. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia, Shyness, and Effortful Control in Preschool-Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Sulik, Michael J.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Silva, Kassondra M.; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Kupfer, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and shyness were examined as predictors of effortful control (EC) in a sample of 101 preschool-age children. Resting RSA was calculated from respiration and heart rate data collected during a neutral film; shyness was measured using parents’, preschool teachers’, and classroom observers’ reports; and EC was measured using four laboratory tasks in addition to questionnaire measures. Principal components analysis was used to create composite measures of EC and shyness. The relation between RSA and EC was moderated by shyness, such that RSA was positively related to EC only for children high in shyness. This interaction suggests that emotional reactivity affects the degree to which RSA can be considered a correlate of EC. This study also draws attention to the need to consider the measurement context when assessing resting psychophysiology measures; shy individuals may not exhibit true baseline RSA responding in an unfamiliar laboratory setting. PMID:23127725

  5. Meditation or Exercise for Preventing Acute Respiratory Infection: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Bruce; Hayney, Mary S.; Muller, Daniel; Rakel, David; Ward, Ann; Obasi, Chidi N.; Brown, Roger; Zhang, Zhengjun; Zgierska, Aleksandra; Gern, James; West, Rebecca; Ewers, Tola; Barlow, Shari; Gassman, Michele; Coe, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was designed to evaluate potential preventive effects of meditation or exercise on incidence, duration, and severity of acute respiratory infection (ARI) illness. METHODS Community-recruited adults aged 50 years and older were randomized to 1 of 3 study groups: 8-week training in mindfulness meditation, matched 8-week training in moderate-intensity sustained exercise, or observational control. The primary outcome was area-under-the-curve global illness severity during a single cold and influenza season, using the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-24) to assess severity. Health care visits and days of missed work were counted. Nasal wash collected during ARI illness was assayed for neutrophils, interleukin-8, and viral nucleic acid. RESULTS Of 154 adults randomized into the study, 149 completed the trial (82% female, 94% white, mean age 59.3 ± 6.6 years). There were 27 ARI episodes and 257 days of ARI illness in the meditation group (n = 51), 26 episodes and 241 illness days in the exercise group (n = 47), and 40 episodes and 453 days in the control group (n = 51). Mean global severity was 144 for meditation, 248 for exercise, and 358 for control. Compared with control, global severity was significantly lower for meditation (P = .004). Both global severity and total days of illness (duration) trended toward being lower for the exercise group (P=.16 and P=.032, respectively), as did illness duration for the meditation group (P=.034). Adjusting for covariates using zero-inflated multivariate regression models gave similar results. There were 67 ARI-related days of-work missed in the control group, 32 in the exercise group (P = .041), and 16 in the meditation group (P <.001). Health care visits did not differ significantly. Viruses were identified in 54% of samples from meditation, 42% from exercise, and 54% from control groups. Neutrophil count and interleukin-8 levels were similar among intervention groups. CONCLUSIONS Training in

  6. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease ) Diseases of the chest ( ...

  7. Genetic control of host resistance to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection.

    PubMed

    Lunney, Joan K; Chen, Hongbo

    2010-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on the advances made using genomic approaches to identify biomarkers that define genes and pathways that are correlated with swine resistance to infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), the most economically important swine viral pathogen worldwide. International efforts are underway to assess resistance and susceptibility to infectious pathogens using tools such as gene arrays, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) chips, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), proteomics, and advanced bioinformatics. These studies should identify new candidate genes and biological pathways associated with host PRRS resistance and alternate viral disease processes and mechanisms; they may unveil biomarkers that account for genetic control of PRRS or, alternately, that reveal new targets for therapeutics or vaccines. Previous genomic approaches have expanded our understanding of quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling traits of economic importance in pig production, e.g., feed efficiency, meat production, leanness; only recently have these included health traits and disease resistance. Genomic studies should have substantial impact for the pig industry since it is now possible to include the use of biomarkers for basic health traits alongside broader set of markers utilized for selection of pigs for improved performance and reproductive traits, as well as pork quality. Additionally these studies may reveal alternate PRRS control mechanisms that can be exploited for novel drugs, biotherapeutics and vaccine designs. PMID:20709118

  8. Effects of specific carotid body and brain hypoxia on respiratory muscle control in the awake goat.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C A; Engwall, M J; Dempsey, J A; Bisgard, G E

    1993-01-01

    1. We assessed the effects of specific brain hypoxia on the control of inspiratory and expiratory muscle electromyographic (EMG) activities in response to specific carotid body hypoxia in seven awake goats. We used an isolated carotid body perfusion technique that permitted specific, physiological, steady-state stimulation of the carotid bodies or maintenance of normoxia and normocapnia at the carotid bodies while varying the level of systemic, and therefore, brain oxygenation. 2. Isolated brain normocapnic hypoxia of up to 1.5 h duration increased inspired minute ventilation (VI) by means of increases in both tidal volume (VT) and respiratory frequency (fR). Electromyographic activities of both inspiratory and expiratory muscles were augmented as well. These responses were similar to those produced by low levels of whole-body normoxic hypercapnia. We conclude that moderate levels of brain hypoxia (Pa,O2 approximately 40 mmHg) in awake goats caused a net stimulation of ventilatory motor output. 3. Hypoxic stimulation of the carotid bodies alone caused comparable increases in VT and fR, and EMG augmentation of both inspiratory and expiratory muscles whether the brain was hypoxic or normoxic. These responses were quite similar to those obtained over a wide range of whole-body normoxic hypercapnia. We conclude that the integration of carotid body afferent information is not affected by moderate brain hypoxia in awake goats. 4. We found no evidence for an asymmetrical recruitment pattern of inspiratory vs. expiratory muscles in response to carotid body hypoxia or in response to brain hypoxia alone. 5. Our data support the concept that moderate brain hypoxia results in a net stimulation of respiratory motor output. These findings question the significance of 'central hypoxic depression' to the regulation of breathing under physiological levels of hypoxaemia in the awake animal. PMID:8487210

  9. A Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Ibuprofen for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in a Bovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Paul; Behrens, Nicole; Carvallo Chaigneau, Francisco R.; McEligot, Heather; Agrawal, Karan; Newman, John W.; Anderson, Mark; Gershwin, Laurel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to the virus. RSV is accompanied by elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) which is followed by neutrophil led inflammation in the lung. Ibuprofen is a prototypical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that decreases PGE2 levels by inhibiting cyclooxygenase. Hypotheses We hypothesized that treatment of RSV with ibuprofen would decrease PGE2 levels, modulate the immune response, decrease clinical illness, and decrease the histopathological lung changes in a bovine model of RSV. We further hypothesized that viral replication would be unaffected. Methods We performed a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen in 16 outbred Holstein calves that we infected with RSV. We measured clinical scores, cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and endocannabinoid products in plasma and mediastinal lymph nodes and interleukin (Il)-4, Il-13, Il-17 and interferon-γ in mediastinal lymph nodes. RSV shedding was measured daily and nasal Il-6, Il-8 and Il-17 every other day. The calves were necropsied on Day 10 post inoculation and histology performed. Results One calf in the ibuprofen group required euthanasia on Day 8 of infection for respiratory distress. Clinical scores (p<0.01) and weight gain (p = 0.08) seemed better in the ibuprofen group. Ibuprofen decreased cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 products, and increased monoacylglycerols in lung lymph nodes. Ibuprofen modulated the immune response as measured by narrowed range of observed Il-13, Il-17 and IFN-γ gene expression in mediastinal lymph nodes. Lung histology was not different between groups, and viral shedding was increased in calves randomized to ibuprofen. Conclusions Ibuprofen decreased PGE2, modulated the immune

  10. Central CO2 chemoreception and integrated neural mechanisms of cardiovascular and respiratory control

    PubMed Central

    Stornetta, Ruth L.; Abbott, Stephen B. G.; Depuy, Seth D.; Fortuna, Michal G.; Kanbar, Roy

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we examine why blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) increase during a rise in central nervous system (CNS) Pco2 (central chemoreceptor stimulation). CNS acidification modifies SNA by two classes of mechanisms. The first one depends on the activation of the central respiratory controller (CRG) and causes the much-emphasized respiratory modulation of the SNA. The CRG probably modulates SNA at several brain stem or spinal locations, but the most important site of interaction seems to be the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM), where unidentified components of the CRG periodically gate the baroreflex. CNS Pco2 also influences sympathetic tone in a CRG-independent manner, and we propose that this process operates differently according to the level of CNS Pco2. In normocapnia and indeed even below the ventilatory recruitment threshold, CNS Pco2 exerts a tonic concentration-dependent excitatory effect on SNA that is plausibly mediated by specialized brain stem chemoreceptors such as the retrotrapezoid nucleus. Abnormally high levels of Pco2 cause an aversive interoceptive awareness in awake individuals and trigger arousal from sleep. These alerting responses presumably activate wake-promoting and/or stress-related pathways such as the orexinergic, noradrenergic, and serotonergic neurons. These neuronal groups, which may also be directly activated by brain acidification, have brainwide projections that contribute to the CO2-induced rise in breathing and SNA by facilitating neuronal activity at innumerable CNS locations. In the case of SNA, these sites include the nucleus of the solitary tract, the ventrolateral medulla, and the preganglionic neurons. PMID:20075262

  11. Progress in understanding and controlling respiratory syncytial virus: still crazy after all these years

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Peter L.; Melero, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects everyone worldwide early in life and is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract disease in the pediatric population as well as in the elderly and in profoundly immunosuppressed individuals. RSV is an enveloped, nonsegmented negative-sense RNA virus that is classified in Family Paramyxoviridae and is one of its more complex members. Although the replicative cycle of RSV follows the general pattern of the Paramyxoviridae, it encodes additional proteins. Two of these (NS1 and NS2) inhibit the host type I and type III interferon (IFN) responses, among other functions, and another gene encodes two novel RNA synthesis factors (M2-1 and M2-2). The attachment (G) glycoprotein also exhibits unusual features, such as high sequence variability, extensive glycosylation, cytokine mimicry, and a shed form that helps the virus evade neutralizing antibodies. RSV is notable for being able to efficiently infect early in life, with the peak of hospitalization at 2–3 months of age. It also is notable for the ability to reinfect symptomatically throughout life without need for significant antigenic change, although immunity from prior infection reduces disease. It is widely thought that re-infection is due to an ability of RSV to inhibit or subvert the host immune response. Mechanisms of viral pathogenesis remain controversial. RSV is notable for a historic, tragic pediatric vaccine failure involving a formalin-inactivated virus preparation that was evaluated in the 1960’s and that was poorly protective and paradoxically primed for enhanced RSV disease. RSV also is notable for the development of a successful strategy for passive immunoprophylaxis of high-risk infants using RSV-neutralizing antibodies. Vaccines and new antiviral drugs are in pre-clinical and clinical development, but controlling RSV remains a formidable challenge. PMID:21963675

  12. BARC 2007 EXPERIMENT STATION REPORT FOR NC-229 NATIONAL PROJECT ON PORCINE REPRODUCTIVE AND RESPIRATORY SYNDROME (PRRS) CONTROL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NC-229 national project “Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS): Methods for the integrated control, prevention, and elimination of PRRS in United States swine herds.” This station report summarizes the BARC lab’s recent research progress. Four major projects have been addressed. 1...

  13. Viral respiratory diseases (ILT, aMPV infections, IB): are they ever under control?

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard C

    2010-02-01

    1. The use of vaccines is the main approach to control of the economically important poultry viral respiratory diseases infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infections and infectious bronchitis (IB). This paper appraises the current methods of vaccine control in the light of the nature of each virus and epidemiological factors associated with each disease. 2. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) exists as a single type with a wide range of disease severity. It is a serious disease in certain regions of the world. Recent work has distinguished molecular differences between vaccine and field strains and vaccine virus can be a cause of disease. Vaccines have remained unaltered for many years but new ones are being developed to counter vaccine side effects and reversion and reactivation of latent virus. 3. Avian metapneumoviruses, the cause of turkey rhinotracheitis and respiratory disease in chickens exists as 4 subtypes, A, B, C and D. A and B are widespread and vaccines work well provided that accurate doses are given. Newer vaccine developments are designed to eliminate reversion and possibly counter the appearance of newer field strains which may break through established vaccine coverage. 4. IB presents the biggest problem of the three. Being an unstable RNA virus, part of the viral genome that codes for the S1 spike gene can undergo mutation and recombination so that important antigenic variants can appear irregularly which may evade existing vaccine protection. While conventional vaccines work well against homologous types, new strategies are needed to counter this instability. Molecular approaches involving tailoring viruses to suit field challenges are in progress. However, the simple use of two genetically different vaccines to protect against a wide range of heterologous types is now a widespread practice that is very effective. 5. None of the three diseases described can claim to be satisfactorily controlled and it remains

  14. Prenatal Vitamin D Supplementation and Child Respiratory Health: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, Stephen T.; Griffiths, Chris J.; Martineau, Adrian R.; Robinson, Stephen; Yu, Christina; Poulton, Sheree; Kirkby, Jane C.; Stocks, Janet; Hooper, Richard; Shaheen, Seif O.; Warner, John O.; Boyle, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Observational studies suggest high prenatal vitamin D intake may be associated with reduced childhood wheezing. We examined the effect of prenatal vitamin D on childhood wheezing in an interventional study. Methods We randomised 180 pregnant women at 27 weeks gestation to either no vitamin D, 800 IU ergocalciferol daily until delivery or single oral bolus of 200,000 IU cholecalciferol, in an ethnically stratified, randomised controlled trial. Supplementation improved but did not optimise vitamin D status. Researchers blind to allocation assessed offspring at 3 years. Primary outcome was any history of wheeze assessed by validated questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included atopy, respiratory infection, impulse oscillometry and exhaled nitric oxide. Primary analyses used logistic and linear regression. Results We evaluated 158 of 180 (88%) offspring at age 3 years for the primary outcome. Atopy was assessed by skin test for 95 children (53%), serum IgE for 86 (48%), exhaled nitric oxide for 62 (34%) and impulse oscillometry of acceptable quality for 51 (28%). We found no difference between supplemented and control groups in risk of wheeze [no vitamin D: 14/50 (28%); any vitamin D: 26/108 (24%) (risk ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval 0.49, 1.50; P = 0.69)]. There was no significant difference in atopy, eczema risk, lung function or exhaled nitric oxide between supplemented groups and controls. Conclusion Prenatal vitamin D supplementation in late pregnancy that had a modest effect on cord blood vitamin D level, was not associated with decreased wheezing in offspring at age three years. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN68645785 PMID:23826104

  15. KIF7 Controls the Proliferation of Cells of the Respiratory Airway through Distinct Microtubule Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Garry L.; Baglia, Laurel A.; Ackerman, Kate G.

    2015-01-01

    The cell cycle must be tightly coordinated for proper control of embryonic development and for the long-term maintenance of organs such as the lung. There is emerging evidence that Kinesin family member 7 (Kif7) promotes Hedgehog (Hh) signaling during embryonic development, and its misregulation contributes to diseases such as ciliopathies and cancer. Kif7 encodes a microtubule interacting protein that controls Hh signaling through regulation of microtubule dynamics within the primary cilium. However, whether Kif7 has a function in nonciliated cells remains largely unknown. The role Kif7 plays in basic cell biological processes like cell proliferation or cell cycle progression also remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that Kif7 is required for coordination of the cell cycle, and inactivation of this gene leads to increased cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Immunostaining and transmission electron microscopy experiments show that Kif7 dda/dda mutant lungs are hyperproliferative and exhibit reduced alveolar epithelial cell differentiation. KIF7 depleted C3H10T1/2 fibroblasts and Kif7 dda/dda mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts have increased growth rates at high cellular densities, suggesting that Kif7 may function as a general regulator of cellular proliferation. We ascertained that in G1, Kif7 and microtubule dynamics regulate the expression and activity of several components of the cell cycle machinery known to control entry into S phase. Our data suggest that Kif7 may function to regulate the maintenance of the respiratory airway architecture by controlling cellular density, cell proliferation, and cycle exit through its role as a microtubule associated protein. PMID:26439735

  16. Respiratory and Cardiovascular Response during Electronic Control Device Exposure in Law Enforcement Trainees

    PubMed Central

    VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Lavietes, Marc H.; Cherniack, Neil S.; Bergen, Michael T.; Teichman, Ronald; Servatius, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Law enforcement represents a large population of workers who may be exposed to electronic control devices (ECDs). Little is known about the potential effect of exposure to these devices on respiration or cardiovascular response during current discharge. Methods: Participants (N = 23) were trainees exposed to 5 s of an ECD (Taser X26®) as a component of training. Trainees were asked to volitionally inhale during exposure. Respiratory recordings involved a continuous waveform recorded throughout the session including during the exposure period. Heart rate was calculated from a continuous pulse oximetry recording. Results: The exposure period resulted in the cessation of normal breathing patterns in all participants and in particular a decrease in inspiratory activity. No significant changes in heart rate during ECD exposure were found. Conclusion: This is the first study to examine breathing patterns during ECD exposure with the resolution to detect changes over this discrete period of time. In contrast to reports suggesting respiration is unaffected by ECDs, present evidence suggests that voluntary inspiration is severely compromised. There is no evidence of cardiac disruption during ECD exposure. PMID:23616772

  17. The control properties of phosphofructokinase in relation to the respiratory climacteric in banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Salminen, S O; Young, R E

    1975-01-01

    Glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, fructose 1, 6-diphosphate, and triose phosphates, and the enzymes phosphofructokinase, aldolase, and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were extracted from banana fruit (Musa cavendishii, Lambert var. Valery) at the (a) preclimacteric, (b) climacteric rise, (c) climacteric peak, and (d) postclimacteric stages of ripening. The level of fructose 1, 6-diphosphate increased 20-fold whereas the concentration of other intermediates changed no more than 2.5-fold between stages a and c. For these same extracts, phosphofructokinase activity increased 2.5-fold whereas the activity of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and aldolase changed only fractionally. Substrate saturation studies (fructose 6-phosphate) of phosphofructokinase activity showed a decrease in the [S](0.5) from 5.6 to 1.7 mM betwen stages a and c. The enzyme from both sources seems to be regulated by a negative cooperative effect with the control being more stringent in the enzyme from stage a. The difference in enzyme activity is consistent with the increase in respiratory activity between the two stages. PMID:16659026

  18. Noninvasive Ventilation for Preterm Twin Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Wang, Li; Li, Jie; Wang, Nan; Shi, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation has been proven to be effective strategies for reducing the need for endotracheal ventilation in preterm infant with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), however the best option needs to be further determined. A single center, paired design, randomized, controlled trial was conducted between Jan 2011 and July 2014. Preterm twins with RDS were included. One of a pair was randomized to NIPPV, while another to NCPAP. Surfactant was administrated as rescue treatment. The primary outcome was the need for endotracheal ventilation. The secondary outcomes were the complications. 143 pairs were randomized and 129 pairs finished the trial. The rates of endotracheal ventilation did not differ significantly between NIPPV and NCPAP groups (11.9% vs 19.6%, P = 0.080). This difference was not observed in the subgroup of infants who received surfactant therapy (11.1% vs 19.7%, P = 0.087). No secondary outcomes also differed significantly between the two groups. NIPPV did not result in a significantly lower incidence of intubation as compared with NCPAP in preterm twins with RDS. PMID:26399752

  19. Noninvasive Ventilation for Preterm Twin Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Wang, Li; Li, Jie; Wang, Nan; Shi, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation has been proven to be effective strategies for reducing the need for endotracheal ventilation in preterm infant with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), however the best option needs to be further determined. A single center, paired design, randomized, controlled trial was conducted between Jan 2011 and July 2014. Preterm twins with RDS were included. One of a pair was randomized to NIPPV, while another to NCPAP. Surfactant was administrated as rescue treatment. The primary outcome was the need for endotracheal ventilation. The secondary outcomes were the complications. 143 pairs were randomized and 129 pairs finished the trial. The rates of endotracheal ventilation did not differ significantly between NIPPV and NCPAP groups (11.9% vs 19.6%, P = 0.080). This difference was not observed in the subgroup of infants who received surfactant therapy (11.1% vs 19.7%, P = 0.087). No secondary outcomes also differed significantly between the two groups. NIPPV did not result in a significantly lower incidence of intubation as compared with NCPAP in preterm twins with RDS. PMID:26399752

  20. Respiratory Infections in the U.S. Military: Recent Experience and Control.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jose L; Cooper, Michael J; Myers, Christopher A; Cummings, James F; Vest, Kelly G; Russell, Kevin L; Sanchez, Joyce L; Hiser, Michelle J; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2015-07-01

    This comprehensive review outlines the impact of military-relevant respiratory infections, with special attention to recruit training environments, influenza pandemics in 1918 to 1919 and 2009 to 2010, and peacetime operations and conflicts in the past 25 years. Outbreaks and epidemiologic investigations of viral and bacterial infections among high-risk groups are presented, including (i) experience by recruits at training centers, (ii) impact on advanced trainees in special settings, (iii) morbidity sustained by shipboard personnel at sea, and (iv) experience of deployed personnel. Utilizing a pathogen-by-pathogen approach, we examine (i) epidemiology, (ii) impact in terms of morbidity and operational readiness, (iii) clinical presentation and outbreak potential, (iv) diagnostic modalities, (v) treatment approaches, and (vi) vaccine and other control measures. We also outline military-specific initiatives in (i) surveillance, (ii) vaccine development and policy, (iii) novel influenza and coronavirus diagnostic test development and surveillance methods, (iv) influenza virus transmission and severity prediction modeling efforts, and (v) evaluation and implementation of nonvaccine, nonpharmacologic interventions. PMID:26085551

  1. Respiratory Infections in the U.S. Military: Recent Experience and Control

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Michael J.; Myers, Christopher A.; Cummings, James F.; Vest, Kelly G.; Russell, Kevin L.; Sanchez, Joyce L.; Hiser, Michelle J.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY This comprehensive review outlines the impact of military-relevant respiratory infections, with special attention to recruit training environments, influenza pandemics in 1918 to 1919 and 2009 to 2010, and peacetime operations and conflicts in the past 25 years. Outbreaks and epidemiologic investigations of viral and bacterial infections among high-risk groups are presented, including (i) experience by recruits at training centers, (ii) impact on advanced trainees in special settings, (iii) morbidity sustained by shipboard personnel at sea, and (iv) experience of deployed personnel. Utilizing a pathogen-by-pathogen approach, we examine (i) epidemiology, (ii) impact in terms of morbidity and operational readiness, (iii) clinical presentation and outbreak potential, (iv) diagnostic modalities, (v) treatment approaches, and (vi) vaccine and other control measures. We also outline military-specific initiatives in (i) surveillance, (ii) vaccine development and policy, (iii) novel influenza and coronavirus diagnostic test development and surveillance methods, (iv) influenza virus transmission and severity prediction modeling efforts, and (v) evaluation and implementation of nonvaccine, nonpharmacologic interventions. PMID:26085551

  2. Transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus from persistently infected sows to contact controls.

    PubMed Central

    Bierk, M D; Dee, S A; Rossow, K D; Otake, S; Collins, J E; Molitor, T W

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) could persist in non-pregnant sows and if persistently infected sows could transmit virus to naive contact controls. Twelve PRRSV-naive, non-pregnant sows (index sows) were infected with a field isolate of PRRSV and housed in individual isolation rooms for 42 to 56 days postinfection. Following this period, 1 naive contact sow was placed in each room divided by a gate allowing nose-to-nose contact with a single index sow. Index sows were not viremic at the time of contact sow entry. Virus nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction, and infectious virus was detected by virus isolation in sera from 3 of the 12 contact sows at 49, 56, and 86 days postinfection. All 3 infected contacts developed PRRSV antibodies. Virus nucleic acid was detected in tissues of all of the 12 index sows at 72 or 86 days postinfection. Nucleic acid sequencing indicated that representative samples from index and infected contacts were homologous (> 99%) to the PRRSV used to infect index sows at the onset of the study. This study demonstrates that PRRSV can persist in sows and that persistently infected sows can transmit virus to naive contact animals. PMID:11768134

  3. Assessment of autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia using point process models of human heart beat dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2009-07-01

    Tracking the autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) from electrocardiogram and respiratory measurements is an important problem in cardiovascular control. We propose a point process adaptive filter algorithm based on an inverse Gaussian model to track heart beat intervals that incorporates respiratory measurements as a covariate and provides an analytic form for computing a dynamic estimate of RSA gain. We use Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests and autocorrelation function analyses to assess model goodness-of-fit. We illustrate the properties of the new dynamic estimate of RSA in the analysis of simulated heart beat data and actual heart beat data recorded from subjects in a four-state postural study of heart beat dynamics: control, sympathetic blockade, parasympathetic blockade, and combined sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade. In addition to giving an accurate description of the heart beat data, our adaptive filter algorithm confirms established findings pointing at a vagally mediated RSA and provides a new dynamic RSA estimate that can be used to track cardiovascular control between and within a broad range of postural, pharmacological, and age conditions. Our paradigm suggests a possible framework for designing a device for ambulatory monitoring and assessment of autonomic control in both laboratory research and clinical practice. PMID:19272971

  4. A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of a fiberglass manufacturing facility.

    PubMed Central

    Chiazze, L; Watkins, D K; Fryar, C

    1992-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to determine the influence of non-workplace factors on risk of respiratory disease among workers at the Owens-Corning Fiberglas plant in Newark, Ohio. Cases and controls were drawn from a historical cohort mortality study conducted on behalf of the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers Association (TIMA) of workers employed at Newark for at least one year between 1 January 1940 and 31 December 1963 and followed up to the end of 1982. The TIMA study reported a statistically significant increase in respiratory cancer (compared with national death rates). Interviews were completed for 144 lung cancer cases and 299 matching controls and 102 non-malignant respiratory disease cases and 201 matching controls. Unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) were used to assess the association between lung cancer or non-malignant respiratory disease and birthplace, education, income, marital state, smoking with a duration of six months or more, age at which smoking first started, and duration of smoking. Only the smoking variables were statistically significant. For lung cancer, of the variables entered into a conditional logistic regression model, only the smoking OR of 23.4 (95% CI 3.2-172.9) was statistically significant. For non-malignant respiratory disease no variables entered into the final model were statistically significant. Results of the interview portion of our case-control study clearly indicate that smoking is the most important non-workplace factor for risk of lung cancer in this group of workers. Smoking does not seem to play as important a part, however, for non-malignant respiratory disease. Prevalence of cigarette smoking at the Newark plant was estimated for birth cohorts by calendar year. Corresponding data for the United States were compiled from national smoking surveys. Prevalence of cigarette smoking for Newark in 1955 appears to be sufficiently greater than the corresponding United States data in 1955 to suggest that some of the

  5. Respiratory hospitalizations of children living near a hazardous industrial site adjusted for prevalent dust: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nirel, Ronit; Maimon, Nimrod; Fireman, Elizabeth; Agami, Sarit; Eyal, Arnona; Peretz, Alon

    2015-03-01

    The Neot Hovav Industrial Park (IP), located in southern Israel, hosts 23 chemical industry facilities and the national site for treatment of hazardous waste. Yet, information about its impact on the health of local population has been mostly ecological, focused on Bedouins and did not control for possible confounding effect of prevalent dust storms. This case-control study examined whether living near the IP could lead to increased risk of pediatric hospitalization for respiratory diseases. Cases (n=3608) were residents of the Be'er Sheva sub-district aged 0-14 years who were admitted for respiratory illnesses between 2004 and 2009. These were compared to children admitted for non-respiratory conditions (n=3058). Home addresses were geocoded and the distances from the IP to the child's residence were calculated. The association between hospitalization and residential distance from the IP was examined for three age groups (0-1, 2-6, 7-14) by logistic regressions adjusting for gender, socioeconomic status, urbanity and temperature. We found that infants in the first year of life who lived within 10 km of the IP had increased risk of respiratory hospitalization when compared with those living >20 km from the IP (adjusted odds ratio, OR=2.07, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.19-3.59). In models with both distance from the IP and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <10 μm (PM(10)) the estimated risk was modestly attenuated (OR=1.96, 95% CI: 1.09-3.51). Elevated risk was also observed for children 2-5 years of age but with no statistical significance (OR=1.16, 95% CI: 0.76-1.76). Our findings suggest that residential proximity to a hazardous industrial site may contribute to early life respiratory admissions, beyond that of prevailing PM(10). PMID:25547415

  6. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  7. Impact on mortality of a community-based programme to control acute lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed Central

    Fauveau, V.; Stewart, M. K.; Chakraborty, J.; Khan, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    Acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRIs) are a major cause of death among young children in developing countries. A targeted programme designed to treat children with ALRI was implemented in 1988 in a primary health care project in rural Bangladesh. In the 2 years preceding the introduction of the programme (1986-87), non-ALRI-specific health services were provided, including promotion of oral rehydration therapy, family planning, immunization of children and mothers, distribution of vitamin A, referral of severely sick children to field clinics, and nutritional rehabilitation of malnourished children. The targeted ALRI programme, which was in place in 1988-89, was based on systematic ALRI case detection and management by community health workers, who were linked to a referral system for medical support. These two levels of intervention have been evaluated by comparing the ALRI-specific mortality in the programme area and a neighbouring control area during the two periods. During the first phase (1986-87), the ALRI mortality among under-5-year-olds was 28% lower in the intervention than in the comparison area (P less than 0.01). During the second phase (1988-89), the ALRI mortality was 32% lower in the intervention area than during the preceding phase, while there was no significant difference for the comparison area. These findings suggest that in the study region the combination of specific and nonspecific interventions can reduce ALRI mortality by as much as 50% and the overall mortality among under-5-year-olds by as much as 30%. PMID:1568275

  8. Indomethacin-induced impairment of regional cerebrovascular reactivity: implications for respiratory control

    PubMed Central

    Hoiland, Ryan L; Ainslie, Philip N; Wildfong, Kevin W; Smith, Kurt J; Bain, Anthony R; Willie, Chris K; Foster, Glen; Monteleone, Brad; Day, Trevor A

    2015-01-01

    implications for the chemoreflex control of breathing are unclear. Indomethacin-induced blunting of cerebrovascular flow responsiveness did not affect central or peripheral respiratory chemoreflex magnitude using steady-state end-tidal forcing techniques. Posterior reactivity was related to hypoxic ventilatory decline, suggesting that CO2 washout from central chemoreceptors modulates hypoxic ventilatory dynamics. Our data indicate that steady-state end-tidal forcing techniques reduce the arterial–venous gradients, attenuating the effect of brain blood flow on ventilatory responses. Our study confirms the importance of measuring posterior cerebrovasculature when investigating the link between cerebral blood flow and the chemical control of breathing. PMID:25641262

  9. Breath-taking jobs: a case–control study of respiratory work disability by occupation in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Fell, AKM; Abrahamsen, R; Henneberger, PK; Svendsen, MV; Andersson, E; Torén, K; Kongerud, J

    2016-01-01

    Background The current knowledge on respiratory work disability is based on studies that used crude categories of exposure. This may lead to a loss of power, and does not provide sufficient information to allow targeted workplace interventions and follow-up of patients with respiratory symptoms. Objectives The aim of this study was to identify occupations and specific exposures associated with respiratory work disability. Methods In 2013, a self-administered questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of the general population, aged 16–50, in Telemark County, Norway. We defined respiratory work disability as a positive response to the survey question: ‘Have you ever had to change or leave your job because it affected your breathing?’ Occupational exposures were assessed using an asthma-specific job-exposure matrix, and comparison of risks was made for cases and a median of 50 controls per case. Results 247 workers had changed their work because of respiratory symptoms, accounting for 1.7% of the respondents ever employed. The ‘breath-taking jobs’ were cooks/chefs: adjusted OR 3.6 (95% CI 1.6 to 8.0); welders: 5.2 (2.0 to 14); gardeners: 4.5 (1.3 to 15); sheet metal workers: 5.4 (2.0 to 14); cleaners: 5.0 (2.2 to 11); hairdressers: 6.4 (2.5 to 17); and agricultural labourers: 7.4 (2.5 to 22). Job changes were also associated with a variety of occupational exposures, with some differences between men and women. Conclusions Self-report and job-exposure matrix data showed similar findings. For the occupations and exposures associated with job change, preventive measures should be implemented. PMID:27365181

  10. Peripheral nervous control of cold-induced reduction in the respiratory quotient of the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refinetti, Roberto

    1990-03-01

    Cold-exposed rats show a reduction in the respiratory quotient which is indicative of a relative shift from carbohydrates to lipids as substrates for oxidative metabolism. In the present study, the effects of food deprivation and cold exposure on the respiratory quotient were observed. In addition, the involvement of the three main branches of the peripheral nervous system (sympathetic, parasympathetic, and somatic) was investigated by means of synaptic blockade with propranolol, atropine, and quinine, respectively. Both propranolol and quinine blocked the cold-induced decrease in respiratory quotient and increase in heat production, whereas atropine had only minor and very brief effects. It is concluded that both the sympathetic and somatic branches are involved in the metabolic changes associated with cold-induced thermogenesis and that the increase in metabolic heat production involves a shift from carbohydrate to lipid utilization irrespective of which of the two branches is activated.

  11. Respiratory alkalosis

    MedlinePlus

    Alkalosis - respiratory ... leads to shortness of breath can also cause respiratory alkalosis (such as pulmonary embolism and asthma). ... Treatment is aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing into a paper bag -- or using ...

  12. G protein-independent neuromodulatory action of adenosine on metabotropic glutamate signalling in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Toshihide; Kawakami, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Hashimotodani, Yuki; Fredholm, Bertil B; Sekino, Yuko; Aiba, Atsu; Kano, Masanobu

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediating the neuromodulatory actions of adenosine that influence emotional, cognitive, motor, and other functions in the central nervous system (CNS). Previous studies show complex formation between ARs and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in heterologous systems and close colocalization of ARs and mGluRs in several central neurons. Here we explored the possibility of intimate functional interplay between Gi/o protein-coupled A1-subtype AR (A1R) and type-1 mGluR (mGluR1) naturally occurring in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Using a perforated-patch voltage-clamp technique, we found that both synthetic and endogenous agonists for A1R induced continuous depression of a mGluR1-coupled inward current. A1R agonists also depressed mGluR1-coupled intracellular Ca2+ mobilization monitored by fluorometry. A1R indeed mediated this depression because genetic depletion of A1R abolished it. Surprisingly, A1R agonist-induced depression persisted after blockade of Gi/o protein. The depression appeared to involve neither the cAMP-protein kinase A cascade downstream of the alpha subunits of Gi/o and Gs proteins, nor cytoplasmic Ca2+ that is suggested to be regulated by the beta-gamma subunit complex of Gi/o protein. Moreover, A1R did not appear to affect Gq protein which mediates the mGluR1-coupled responses. These findings suggest that A1R modulates mGluR1 signalling without the aid of the major G proteins. In this respect, the A1R-mediated depression of mGluR1 signalling shown here is clearly distinguished from the A1R-mediated neuronal responses described so far. These findings demonstrate a novel neuromodulatory action of adenosine in central neurons. PMID:17379632

  13. Control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) through genetic improvements in disease resistance and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Raymond R R; Lunney, Joan; Dekkers, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have a severe economic impact on pig production in North America, Europe, and Asia. The emergence and eventual predominance of PRRS in the 1990s are the likely result of changes in the pork industry initiated in the late 1970s, which allowed the virus to occupy a unique niche within a modern commercial production system. PRRSV infection is responsible for severe clinical disease, but can maintain a life-long subclinical infection, as well as participate in several polymicrobial syndromes. Current vaccines lessen clinical signs, but are of limited use for disease control and elimination. The relatively poor protective immunity following vaccination is a function of the virus's capacity to generate a large degree of genetic diversity, combined with several strategies to evade innate and adaptive immune responses. In 2007, the PRRS Host Genetics consortium (PHGC) was established to explore the role of host genetics as an avenue for PRRS control. The PHGC model for PRRS incorporates the experimental infection of large numbers of growing pigs and has created the opportunity to study experimental PRRSV infection at the population level. The results show that pigs can be placed into distinct phenotypic groups, including pigs that show resistance (i.e., low virus load) or pigs that exhibit "tolerance" to infection. Tolerance was illustrated by pigs that gain weight normally in the face of a relatively high virus load. Genome-wide association analysis has identified a region on chromosome 4 (SSC4) correlated with resistance; i.e., lower cumulative virus load within the first 42 days of infection. The genomic region is near a family of genes involved in innate immunity. The region is also associated with higher weight gain in challenged pigs, suggesting that pigs with the resistance alleles don't seem to simultaneously experience reduction in growth, i.e., that resistance and tolerance are not

  14. Control of respiration in non-phosphorylating mitochondria is shared between the proton leak and the respiratory chain.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, M D; Hafner, R P; Brown, G C

    1988-01-01

    We measured the relationship between rate of respiration and membrane potential in isolated mitochondria titrated with malonate (to inhibit the electron transport chain) or with uncoupler (to increase the proton conductance of the inner membrane). We used the flux control summation and connectivity theorems of metabolic control theory to calculate the control over non-phosphorylating respiration exerted by the respiratory chain (and associated reactions) and by the leak of protons across the inner membrane. At 37 degrees C the flux control coefficient of the leak over respiration was 0.66; the flux control coefficient of the chain over respiration was 0.34. At 25 degrees C the values were 0.75 and 0.25 respectively. We argue that the basis for previous conclusions that all the control is exerted by the proton leak under similar conditions is invalid. PMID:2849419

  15. Prediction of Muscle Energy States at Low Metabolic Rates Requires Feedback Control of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activity by Inorganic Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Joep P. J.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.; van Oorschot, Joep W. M.; Prompers, Jeanine J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; van Riel, Natal A. W.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of the 100-fold dynamic range of mitochondrial ATP synthesis flux in skeletal muscle was investigated. Hypotheses of key control mechanisms were included in a biophysical model of oxidative phosphorylation and tested against metabolite dynamics recorded by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS). Simulations of the initial model featuring only ADP and Pi feedback control of flux failed in reproducing the experimentally sampled relation between myoplasmic free energy of ATP hydrolysis (ΔGp = ΔGpo′+RT ln ([ADP][Pi]/[ATP]) and the rate of mitochondrial ATP synthesis at low fluxes (<0.2 mM/s). Model analyses including Monte Carlo simulation approaches and metabolic control analysis (MCA) showed that this problem could not be amended by model re-parameterization, but instead required reformulation of ADP and Pi feedback control or introduction of additional control mechanisms (feed forward activation), specifically at respiratory Complex III. Both hypotheses were implemented and tested against time course data of phosphocreatine (PCr), Pi and ATP dynamics during post-exercise recovery and validation data obtained by 31P MRS of sedentary subjects and track athletes. The results rejected the hypothesis of regulation by feed forward activation. Instead, it was concluded that feedback control of respiratory chain complexes by inorganic phosphate is essential to explain the regulation of mitochondrial ATP synthesis flux in skeletal muscle throughout its full dynamic range. PMID:22470528

  16. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  17. A randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen for respiratory syncytial infection in a bovine model study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to ...

  18. GENETIC CONTROL OF SWINE RESPONSES TO PORCINE REPRODUCTIVE AND RESPIRATORY SYNDROME VIRUS INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal is use the Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray (www.pigoligoarray.org) to identify immune regulatory and protective pathways to uncover genetic components involved in early immune responses during porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. Animals ...

  19. Reliable Detection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Children for Adequate Hospital Infection Control Management

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Susanne; Nadal, David; Stroehle, Angelika; Bossart, Walter

    2001-01-01

    By using a rapid test for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) detection (Abbott TestPack RSV), a number of patients were observed, showing repeatedly positive results over a period of up to 10 weeks. A prospective study was initiated to compare the rapid test with an antigen capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and a nested reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) protocol for detection of RSV serotypes A and B. Only respiratory samples from children exhibiting the prolonged presence of RSV (≥5 days) as determined by the rapid test were considered. A total of 134 specimens from 24 children was investigated by antigen capture EIA and nested RT-PCR. Using RT-PCR as the reference method, we determined the RSV rapid test to have a specificity of 63% and a sensitivity of 66% and the antigen capture EIA to have a specificity of 96% and a sensitivity of 69% for acute-phase samples and the homologous virus serotype A. In 7 (29%) of 24 patients, the positive results of the RSV rapid test could not be confirmed by either nested RT-PCR or antigen capture EIA. In these seven patients a variety of other respiratory viruses were detected. For general screening the RSV rapid test was found to be a reasonable tool to get quick results. However, its lack of specificity in some patients requires confirmation by additional tests to rule out false-positive results and/or detection of other respiratory viruses. PMID:11526141

  20. GENETIC CONTROL OF SWINE RESPONSES TO PORCINE REPRODUCTIVE AND RESPIRATORY SYNDROME VIRUS INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal is to uncover genetic components involved in early immune responses during porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. PRRS costs U.S. swine producers >$700 million annually. We want to determine what are the most significant pathways and genes involved in early i...

  1. Prenatal diazepam exposure alters respiratory control system and GABAA and adenosine receptor gene expression in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Picard, Nathalie; Guénin, Stéphanie; Perrin, Yolande; Hilaire, Gérard; Larnicol, Nicole

    2008-07-01

    In experimental animals, prenatal diazepam exposure has clearly been associated with behavioral disturbances. Its impact on newborn breathing has not been documented despite potential deleterious consequences for later brain development. We addressed this issue in neonatal rats (0-2 d) born from dams, which consumed 2 mg/kg/d diazepam via drinking fluid throughout gestation. In vivo, prenatal diazepam exposure significantly altered the normoxic-breathing pattern, lowering breathing frequency (105 vs. 125 breaths/min) and increasing tidal volume (16.2 vs. 12.7 mL/kg), and the ventilatory response to hypoxia, inducing an immediate and marked decrease in tidal volume (-30%) absent in controls. In vitro, prenatal diazepam exposure significantly increased the respiratory-like frequency produced by pontomedullary and medullary preparations (+38% and +19%, respectively) and altered the respiratory-like response to application of nonoxygenated superfusate. Both in vivo and in vitro, the recovery from oxygen deprivation challenges was delayed by prenatal diazepam exposure. Finally, real-time PCR showed that prenatal diazepam exposure affected mRNA levels of alpha1 and alpha2 GABAA receptor subunits and of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors in the brainstem. These mRNA changes, which are region-specific, suggest that prenatal diazepam exposure interferes with developmental events whose impact on the respiratory system maturation deserves further studies. PMID:18360306

  2. Effects of pressure-controlled and volume-controlled ventilation on respiratory mechanics and systemic stress response during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Oznur; Umutoglu, Tarik; Aydın, Nurdan; Toptas, Mehmet; Tutuncu, Ayse Cigdem; Bakan, Mefkur

    2016-01-01

    Pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) is less frequently employed in general anesthesia. With its high and decelerating inspiratory flow, PCV has faster tidal volume delivery and different gas distribution. The same tidal volume setting, delivered by PCV versus volume-controlled ventilation (VCV), will result in a lower peak airway pressure and reduced risk of barotrauma. We hypothesized that PCV instead of VCV during laparoscopic surgery could achieve lower airway pressures and reduce the systemic stress response. Forty ASA I-II patients were randomly selected to receive either the PCV (Group PC, n = 20) or VCV (Group VC, n = 20) during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Blood sampling was made for baseline arterial blood gases (ABG), cortisol, insulin, and glucose levels. General anesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl was employed to all patients. After anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation, patients in Group PC were given pressure support to form 8 mL/kg tidal volume and patients in Group VC was maintained at 8 mL/kg tidal volume calculated using predicted body weight. All patients were maintained with 5 cmH2O positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP). Respiratory parameters were recorded before and 30 min after pneumoperitonium. Assessment of ABG and sampling for cortisol, insulin and glucose levels were repeated 30 min after pneumoperitonium and 60 min after extubation. The P-peak levels observed before (18.9 ± 3.8 versus 15 ± 2.2 cmH2O) and during (23.3 ± 3.8 versus 20.1 ± 2.9 cmH2O) pneumoperitoneum in Group VC were significantly higher. Postoperative partial arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2) values are higher (98 ± 12 versus 86 ± 11 mmHg) in Group PC. Arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) values (41.8 ± 5.4 versus 36.7 ± 3.5 mmHg) during pneumoperitonium and post-operative mean cortisol and insulin levels were higher in Group VC. When compared to VCV mode, PCV mode may improve compliance during pneumoperitoneum

  3. No direct association among respiratory function, disease control and family functioning in a sample of Mexican children with intermittent asthma.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain Raimundo; Núñez-Tapia, Rosa María; Ramírez-Silva, Armando; Gómez-Alonso, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    Asthma has been linked to family disfunctioning and poor control of the disease.This study was conducted to analyze the interactions between the level of intermittent asthma control, family functioning and respiratory function and between quality of life of asthmatic patients and their caregivers.7 to 15 years old children with intermittent asthma were included. Asthma Control Test Questionnaire, Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ) test, and flowmetry were applied to children and Pediatric Asthma Caregiver´s Quatily of Life Questionnaire (PAQCLQ) and the Family Functioning Perception Test (FF-SIL) were applied to their parents.The most affected areas of family functioning in dysfunctional families were adaptability and permeability. A medium to high strength of association was founded between the emotional function of parents and the emotional function of children, R2=0.552. The most remarkable associations were among parents' limitation of activities and parents' emotional function (r=0.837), parents' limitation of activities and child's emotional function (r=0.722), parents' emotional role and limitation of activities (r=0.837), parents' emotional role and emotional functioning of children with asthma (r=0.743) and the limitation of activities of children with asthma and the emotional function of children with asthma (r=0.870).No direct associations were founded among respiratory function, disease control and family functioning in Mexican children with intermittent asthma and emotional function of parents and children were associated in both groups. PMID:23754351

  4. A review of the expected effects of antimicrobials in bovine respiratory disease treatment and control using outcomes from published randomized clinical trials with negative controls.

    PubMed

    DeDonder, Keith D; Apley, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) remains a major disease from an economic and an animal welfare standpoint in beef production systems. Antimicrobial administration is a mainstay in the control of and therapeutic treatment of acute BRD. Judicious use of antimicrobials remains paramount to ensure efficacy of treatment remains acceptable. A systemic review was conducted in the scientific literature, the objective of which was to present a cumulative review of the data from published randomized clinical trials using a negative control in the treatment and control of BRD and using the number needed to treat as a means to effectively convey this information to bovine practitioners. PMID:25578389

  5. Buoyancy under Control: Underwater Locomotor Performance in a Deep Diving Seabird Suggests Respiratory Strategies for Reducing Foraging Effort

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Timothée R.; Kato, Akiko; Tanaka, Hideji; Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Bost, Charles-André

    2010-01-01

    Background Because they have air stored in many body compartments, diving seabirds are expected to exhibit efficient behavioural strategies for reducing costs related to buoyancy control. We study the underwater locomotor activity of a deep-diving species from the Cormorant family (Kerguelen shag) and report locomotor adjustments to the change of buoyancy with depth. Methodology/Principal Findings Using accelerometers, we show that during both the descent and ascent phases of dives, shags modelled their acceleration and stroking activity on the natural variation of buoyancy with depth. For example, during the descent phase, birds increased swim speed with depth. But in parallel, and with a decay constant similar to the one in the equation explaining the decrease of buoyancy with depth, they decreased foot-stroke frequency exponentially, a behaviour that enables birds to reduce oxygen consumption. During ascent, birds also reduced locomotor cost by ascending passively. We considered the depth at which they started gliding as a proxy to their depth of neutral buoyancy. This depth increased with maximum dive depth. As an explanation for this, we propose that shags adjust their buoyancy to depth by varying the amount of respiratory air they dive with. Conclusions/Significance Calculations based on known values of stored body oxygen volumes and on deep-diving metabolic rates in avian divers suggest that the variations of volume of respiratory oxygen associated with a respiration mediated buoyancy control only influence aerobic dive duration moderately. Therefore, we propose that an advantage in cormorants - as in other families of diving seabirds - of respiratory air volume adjustment upon diving could be related less to increasing time of submergence, through an increased volume of body oxygen stores, than to reducing the locomotor costs of buoyancy control. PMID:20352122

  6. Stability of the human respiratory control system. I. Analysis of a two-dimensional delay state-space model.

    PubMed

    Batzel, J J; Tran, H T

    2000-07-01

    A number of mathematical models of the human respiratory control system have been developed since 1940 to study a wide range of features of this complex system. Among them, periodic breathing (including Cheyne-Stokes respiration and apneustic breathing) is a collection of regular but involuntary breathing patterns that have important medical implications. The hypothesis that periodic breathing is the result of delay in the feedback signals to the respiratory control system has been studied since the work of Grodins et al. in the early 1950's [12]. The purpose of this paper is to study the stability characteristics of a feedback control system of five differential equations with delays in both the state and control variables presented by Khoo et al. [17] in 1991 for modeling human respiration. The paper is divided in two parts. Part I studies a simplified mathematical model of two nonlinear state equations modeling arterial partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and a peripheral controller. Analysis was done on this model to illuminate the effect of delay on the stability. It shows that delay dependent stability is affected by the controller gain, compartmental volumes and the manner in which changes in the ventilation rate is produced (i.e., by deeper breathing or faster breathing). In addition, numerical simulations were performed to validate analytical results. Part II extends the model in Part I to include both peripheral and central controllers. This, however, necessitates the introduction of a third state equation modeling CO2 levels in the brain. In addition to analytical studies on delay dependent stability, it shows that the decreased cardiac output (and hence increased delay) resulting from the congestive heart condition can induce instability at certain control gain levels. These analytical results were also confirmed by numerical simulations. PMID:10958415

  7. Stability of the human respiratory control system. II. Analysis of a three-dimensional delay state-space model.

    PubMed

    Batzel, J J; Tran, H T

    2000-07-01

    A number of mathematical models of the human respiratory control system have been developed since 1940 to study a wide range of features of this complex system. Among them, periodic breathing (including Cheyne-Stokes respiration and apneustic breathing) is a collection of regular but involuntary breathing patterns that have important medical implications. The hypothesis that periodic breathing is the result of delay in the feedback signals to the respiratory control system has been studied since the work of Grodins et al. in the early 1950's [1]. The purpose of this paper is to study the stability characteristics of a feedback control system of five differential equations with delays in both the state and control variables presented by Khoo et al. [4] in 1991 for modeling human respiration. The paper is divided in two parts. Part I studies a simplified mathematical model of two nonlinear state equations modeling arterial partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and a peripheral controller. Analysis was done on this model to illuminate the effect of delay on the stability. It shows that delay dependent stability is affected by the controller gain, compartmental volumes and the manner in which changes in the ventilation rate is produced (i.e., by deeper breathing or faster breathing). In addition, numerical simulations were performed to validate analytical results. Part II extends the model in Part I to include both peripheral and central controllers. This, however, necessitates the introduction of a third state equation modeling CO2 levels in the brain. In addition to analytical studies on delay dependent stability, it shows that the decreased cardiac output (and hence increased delay) resulting from the congestive heart condition can induce instability at certain control gain levels. These analytical results were also confirmed by numerical simulations. PMID:10958416

  8. Effects of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on respiratory function and trunk control ability in patients with scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jwa Jun; Song, Gui Bin; Park, Eun Cho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on the respiratory function and trunk control ability of patients with scoliosis. [Subjects] Forty scoliosis patients were randomly divided into the Swiss ball exercise group (n= 20) and resistance exercise group (n = 20). [Methods] The Swiss ball and resistance exercise groups performed chest expansion and breathing exercises with a Swiss ball and a therapist’s resistance, respectively. Both groups received training 30 min per day, 5 times per week for 8 weeks. [Results] Both groups exhibited significant changes in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and trunk impairment scale after the intervention. However, there was no significant change in the forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity ratio after the intervention in either group. Meanwhile, forced expiratory volume in one second and trunk impairment scale were significantly greater in the resistance exercise group after the intervention. [Conclusion] Both Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise are effective for improving the respiratory function and trunk control ability of patients with scoliosis. However, resistance exercise is more effective for increasing the forced expiratory volume in one second and trunk control ability. PMID:26180318

  9. Effects of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on respiratory function and trunk control ability in patients with scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jwa Jun; Song, Gui Bin; Park, Eun Cho

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on the respiratory function and trunk control ability of patients with scoliosis. [Subjects] Forty scoliosis patients were randomly divided into the Swiss ball exercise group (n= 20) and resistance exercise group (n = 20). [Methods] The Swiss ball and resistance exercise groups performed chest expansion and breathing exercises with a Swiss ball and a therapist's resistance, respectively. Both groups received training 30 min per day, 5 times per week for 8 weeks. [Results] Both groups exhibited significant changes in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and trunk impairment scale after the intervention. However, there was no significant change in the forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity ratio after the intervention in either group. Meanwhile, forced expiratory volume in one second and trunk impairment scale were significantly greater in the resistance exercise group after the intervention. [Conclusion] Both Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise are effective for improving the respiratory function and trunk control ability of patients with scoliosis. However, resistance exercise is more effective for increasing the forced expiratory volume in one second and trunk control ability. PMID:26180318

  10. Zinc or Multiple Micronutrient Supplementation to Reduce Diarrhea and Respiratory Disease in South African Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Luabeya, Kany-Kany Angelique; Mpontshane, Nontobeko; Mackay, Malanie; Ward, Honorine; Elson, Inga; Chhagan, Meera; Tomkins, Andrew; den Broeck, Jan Van; Bennish, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Background Prophylactic zinc supplementation has been shown to reduce diarrhea and respiratory illness in children in many developing countries, but its efficacy in children in Africa is uncertain. Objective To determine if zinc, or zinc plus multiple micronutrients, reduces diarrhea and respiratory disease prevalence. Design Randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. Setting Rural community in South Africa. Participants Three cohorts: 32 HIV-infected children; 154 HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers; and 187 HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers. Interventions Children received either 1250 IU of vitamin A; vitamin A and 10 mg of zinc; or vitamin A, zinc, vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12, C, D, E, and K and copper, iodine, iron, and niacin starting at 6 months and continuing to 24 months of age. Homes were visited weekly. Outcome Measures Primary outcome was percentage of days of diarrhea per child by study arm within each of the three cohorts. Secondary outcomes were prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms and percentage of children who ever had pneumonia by maternal report, or confirmed by the field worker. Results Among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers, median percentage of days with diarrhea was 2.3% for 49 children allocated to vitamin A; 2.5% in 47 children allocated to receive vitamin A and zinc; and 2.2% for 46 children allocated to multiple micronutrients (P = 0.852). Among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers, median percentage of days of diarrhea was 2.4% in 56 children in the vitamin A group; 1.8% in 57 children in the vitamin A and zinc group; and 2.7% in 52 children in the multiple micronutrient group (P = 0.857). Only 32 HIV-infected children were enrolled, and there were no differences between treatment arms in the prevalence of diarrhea. The prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms or incidence of pneumonia did not differ by treatment arms in any of the cohorts. Conclusion

  11. 5-HT2A Receptors are Concentrated in Regions of the Human Infant Medulla Involved in Respiratory and Autonomic Control

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, David S.; Darnall, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) system in the human medulla oblongata is well-recognized to play an important role in the regulation of respiratory and autonomic function. In this study, using both immunocytochemistry (n=5) and tissue section autoradiography with the radioligand 125I-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-phenyl)2-aminopropane (n=7), we examine the normative development and distribution of the 5-HT2A receptor in the human medulla during the last part of gestation and first postnatal year when dramatic changes are known to occur in respiratory and autonomic control, in part mediated by the 5-HT2A receptor. High 5-HT2A receptor binding was observed in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (preganglionic parasympathetic output) and hypoglossal nucleus (airway patency); intermediate binding was present in the nucleus of the solitary tract (visceral sensory input), gigantocellularis, intermediate reticular zone, and paragigantocellularis lateralis. Negligible binding was present in the raphé obscurus and arcuate nucleus. The pattern of 5-HT2A immunoreactivity paralleled that of binding density. By 15 gestational weeks, the relative distribution of the 5-HT2A receptor was similar to that in infancy. In all nuclei sampled, 5-HT2A receptor binding increased with age, with significant increases in the hypoglossal nucleus (p=0.027), principal inferior olive (p=0.044), and medial accessory olive (0.038). Thus, 5-HT2A receptors are concentrated in regions involved in autonomic and respiratory control in the human infant medulla, and their developmental profile changes over the first year of life in the hypoglossal nucleus critical to airway patency and the inferior olivary complex essential to cerebellar function. PMID:19213611

  12. Aerobic fitness in patients with fibrositis. A controlled study of respiratory gas exchange and 133-xenon clearance from exercising muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.M.; Clark, S.R.; Goldberg, L.; Nelson, D.; Bonafede, R.P.; Porter, J.; Specht, D.

    1989-04-01

    Aerobic fitness was evaluated in 25 women with fibrositis, by having them exercise to volitional exhaustion on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Compared with published standards, greater than 80% of the fibrositis patients were not physically fit, as assessed by maximal oxygen uptake. Compared with matched sedentary controls, fibrositis patients accurately perceived their level of exertion in relation to oxygen consumption and attained a similar level of lactic acidosis, as assessed by their respiratory quotient and ventilatory threshold. Exercising muscle blood flow was estimated by 133-xenon clearance in a subgroup of 16 fibrositis patients and compared with that in 16 matched sedentary controls; the fibrositis patients exhibited reduced 133-xenon clearance. These results indicate a need to include aerobic fitness as a matched variable in future controlled studies of fibrositis and suggest that the detraining phenomenon may be of relevance to the etiopathogenesis of the disease.

  13. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas. PMID:27625447

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial of Mindfulness Meditation and Exercise for the Prevention of Acute Respiratory Infection: Possible Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Obasi, Chidi N.; Brown, Roger; Muller, Daniel; Gassman, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Background. A randomized trial suggests that meditation and exercise may prevent acute respiratory infection (ARI). This paper explores potential mediating mechanisms. Methods. Community-recruited adults were randomly assigned to three nonblinded arms: 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (N = 51), moderate-intensity exercise (N = 51), or wait-list control (N = 52). Primary outcomes were ARI illness burden (validated Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey). Potential mediators included self-reported psychophysical health and exercise intensity (baseline, 9 weeks, and 3 months). A Baron and Kenny approach-based mediational analysis model, adjusted for group status, age, and gender, evaluated the relationship between the primary outcome and a potential mediator using zero-inflated modeling and Sobel testing. Results. Of 154 randomized, 149 completed the trial (51, 47, and 51 in meditation, exercise, and control groups) and were analyzed (82% female, 94% Caucasian, 59.3 ± SD 6.6 years old). Mediational analyses suggested that improved mindfulness (Mindful Attention Awareness Scale) at 3 months may mediate intervention effects on ARI severity and duration (P < 0.05); 1 point increase in the mindfulness score corresponded to a shortened ARI duration by 7.2–9.6 hours. Conclusions. Meditation and exercise may decrease the ARI illness burden through increased mindfulness. These preliminary findings need confirmation, if confirmed, they would have important policy and clinical implications. This trial registration was Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01057771. PMID:24191174

  15. Effect of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability with chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Dae-Hyouk; Son, Young-Lan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received intensive aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. The comparison of the two groups after the intervention revealed that the experimental group showed more significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. There was no significant difference in saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that intensive aerobic exercise has a positive effect on respiratory capacity and walking endurance in patients with chronic stroke.

  16. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection: Mechanisms of Redox Control and Novel Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Roberto P.; Kolli, Deepthi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most important causes of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children, for which no effective treatment is currently available. Although the mechanisms of RSV-induced airway disease remain incompletely defined, the lung inflammatory response is thought to play a central pathogenetic role. In the past few years, we and others have provided increasing evidence of a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as important regulators of RSV-induced cellular signaling leading to the expression of key proinflammatory mediators, such as cytokines and chemokines. In addition, RSV-induced oxidative stress, which results from an imbalance between ROS production and airway antioxidant defenses, due to a widespread inhibition of antioxidant enzyme expression, is likely to play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of RSV-associated lung inflammatory disease, as demonstrated by a significant increase in markers of oxidative injury, which correlate with the severity of clinical illness, in children with RSV infection. Modulation of ROS production and oxidative stress therefore represents a potential novel pharmacological approach to ameliorate RSV-induced lung inflammation and its long-term consequences. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 186–217. PMID:22799599

  17. Comparison of visual biofeedback system with a guiding waveform and abdomen-chest motion self-control system for respiratory motion management

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yujiro; Kadoya, Noriyuki; Kanai, Takayuki; Ito, Kengo; Sato, Kiyokazu; Dobashi, Suguru; Yamamoto, Takaya; Ishikawa, Yojiro; Matsushita, Haruo; Takeda, Ken; Jingu, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Irregular breathing can influence the outcome of 4D computed tomography imaging and cause artifacts. Visual biofeedback systems associated with a patient-specific guiding waveform are known to reduce respiratory irregularities. In Japan, abdomen and chest motion self-control devices (Abches) (representing simpler visual coaching techniques without a guiding waveform) are used instead; however, no studies have compared these two systems to date. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of respiratory coaching in reducing respiratory irregularities by comparing two respiratory management systems. We collected data from 11 healthy volunteers. Bar and wave models were used as visual biofeedback systems. Abches consisted of a respiratory indicator indicating the end of each expiration and inspiration motion. Respiratory variations were quantified as root mean squared error (RMSE) of displacement and period of breathing cycles. All coaching techniques improved respiratory variation, compared with free-breathing. Displacement RMSEs were 1.43 ± 0.84, 1.22 ± 1.13, 1.21 ± 0.86 and 0.98 ± 0.47 mm for free-breathing, Abches, bar model and wave model, respectively. Period RMSEs were 0.48 ± 0.42, 0.33 ± 0.31, 0.23 ± 0.18 and 0.17 ± 0.05 s for free-breathing, Abches, bar model and wave model, respectively. The average reduction in displacement and period RMSE compared with the wave model were 27% and 47%, respectively. For variation in both displacement and period, wave model was superior to the other techniques. Our results showed that visual biofeedback combined with a wave model could potentially provide clinical benefits in respiratory management, although all techniques were able to reduce respiratory irregularities. PMID:26922090

  18. Nasal swab samples and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays in community-based, longitudinal studies of respiratory viruses: the importance of sample integrity and quality control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carefully conducted, community-based, longitudinal studies are required to gain further understanding of the nature and timing of respiratory viruses causing infections in the population. However, such studies pose unique challenges for field specimen collection, including as we have observed the appearance of mould in some nasal swab specimens. We therefore investigated the impact of sample collection quality and the presence of visible mould in samples upon respiratory virus detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Methods Anterior nasal swab samples were collected from infants participating in an ongoing community-based, longitudinal, dynamic birth cohort study. The samples were first collected from each infant shortly after birth and weekly thereafter. They were then mailed to the laboratory where they were catalogued, stored at -80°C and later screened by PCR for 17 respiratory viruses. The quality of specimen collection was assessed by screening for human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using endogenous retrovirus 3 (ERV3). The impact of ERV3 load upon respiratory virus detection and the impact of visible mould observed in a subset of swabs reaching the laboratory upon both ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection was determined. Results In total, 4933 nasal swabs were received in the laboratory. ERV3 load in nasal swabs was associated with respiratory virus detection. Reduced respiratory virus detection (odds ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.27-0.44) was observed in samples where the ERV3 could not be identified. Mould was associated with increased time of samples reaching the laboratory and reduced ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection. Conclusion Suboptimal sample collection and high levels of visible mould can impact negatively upon sample quality. Quality control measures, including monitoring human DNA loads using ERV3 as a marker for epithelial cell components in samples should be undertaken to optimize the

  19. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  20. Probiotics and vitamin C for the prevention of respiratory tract infections in children attending preschool: a randomised controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Garaiova, I; Muchová, J; Nagyová, Z; Wang, D; Li, J V; Országhová, Z; Michael, D R; Plummer, S F; Ďuračková, Z

    2015-01-01

    Background: This pilot study investigates the efficacy of a probiotic consortium (Lab4) in combination with vitamin C on the prevention of respiratory tract infections in children attending preschool facilities. Subjects/methods: In a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled pilot study with children aged 3–6 years, 57 received 1.25 × 1010 colony-forming units of Lactobacillus acidophilus CUL21 (NCIMB 30156), Lactobacillus acidophilus CUL60 (NCIMB 30157), Bifidobacterium bifidum CUL20 (NCIMB 30153) and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis CUL34 (NCIMB 30172) plus 50 mg vitamin C or a placebo daily for 6 months. Results: Significant reductions in the incidence rate of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI; 33%, P=0.002), the number of days with URTI symptoms (mean difference: −21.0, 95% confidence interval (CI):−35.9, −6.0, P=0.006) and the incidence rate of absence from preschool (30%, P=0.007) were observed in the active group compared with the placebo. The number of days of use of antibiotics, painkillers, cough medicine or nasal sprays was lower in the active group and reached significance for use of cough medicine (mean difference: −6.6, 95% CI: −12.9, −0.3, P=0.040). No significant differences were observed in the incidence rate ratio or duration of lower respiratory tract infection or in the levels of plasma cytokines, salivary immunoglobulin A or urinary metabolites. Conclusions: Supplementation with a probiotic/vitamin C combination may be beneficial in the prevention and management of URTIs. PMID:25205320

  1. The human respiratory gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this 'respiratory gating' is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R-R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R-R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms.

  2. The human respiratory gate

    PubMed Central

    Eckberg, Dwain L

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this ‘respiratory gating’ is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R–R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R–R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms. PMID:12626671

  3. Impaired Respiratory and Body Temperature Control Upon Acute Serotonergic Neuron Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Russell; Corcoran, Andrea; Brust, Rachael; Kim, Jun Chul; Richerson, George B.; Nattie, Eugene; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological homeostasis is essential for organism survival. Highly responsive neuronal networks are involved but constituent neurons are just beginning to be resolved. To query brain serotonergic neurons in homeostasis, we used a synthetic GPCR (Di)-based neuronal silencing tool, mouse RC∷FPDi, designed for cell type-specific, ligand (clozapine-N-oxide, CNO)-inducible and reversible suppression of action potential firing. In mice harboring Di-expressing serotonergic neurons, CNO administration by systemic injection attenuated the chemoreflex that normally increases respiration in response to tissue CO2 elevation and acidosis. At the cellular level, CNO suppressed firing rate increases evoked by CO2/acidosis. Body thermoregulation at room temperature was also disrupted following CNO triggering of Di; core temperatures plummeted, then recovered. This work establishes that serotonergic neurons regulate life-sustaining respiratory and thermoregulatory networks, and demonstrates a noninvasive tool for mapping neuron function. PMID:21798952

  4. Closed-loop control of respiratory drive using pressure-support ventilation: target drive ventilation.

    PubMed

    Spahija, Jadranka; Beck, Jennifer; de Marchie, Michel; Comtois, Alain; Sinderby, Christer

    2005-05-01

    By using diaphragm electrical activity (multiple-array esophageal electrode) as an index of respiratory drive, and allowing such activity above or below a preset target range to indicate an increased or reduced demand for ventilatory assistance (target drive ventilation), we evaluated whether the level of pressure-support ventilation can be automatically adjusted in response to exercise-induced changes in ventilatory demand. Eleven healthy individuals breathed through a circuit (18 cm H2O/L/second inspiratory resistance at 1 L/second flow; 0.5-1.0 L/second expiratory flow limitation) connected to a modified ventilator. Subjects breathed for 6-minute periods at rest and during 20 and 40 W of bicycle exercise, with and without target drive ventilation (the target was set to 60% of the increase in diaphragm electrical activity observed between rest and 20 W of unassisted exercise). With target drive ventilation during exercise, the level of pressure-support ventilation was automatically increased, reaching 13.3 +/- 4.0 and 20.3 +/- 2.8 cm H2O during 20- and 40-W exercise, respectively, whereas diaphragm electrical activity was reduced to a level within the target range. Both diaphragmatic pressure-time product and end-tidal CO2 were significantly reduced with target drive ventilation at the end of the 20- (p < 0.01) and 40-W (p < 0.001) exercise periods. Minute ventilation was not altered. These results demonstrate that target drive ventilation can automatically adjust pressure-support ventilation, maintaining a constant neural drive and compensating for changes in respiratory demand. PMID:15665323

  5. Optical monitoring of cardiac and respiratory rhythms in the skin perfusion near the brain under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukunda Rao, M.; Blazek, Vladimir; Schmitt, Hans J.

    1998-04-01

    In this investigation an attempt is made to find the effects of controlled breathing on brain with the help of optical sensor mounted on the left and right temples of a subject. It has already been established that the brain activity can be monitored in terms of arterial blood volumetric changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain recorded with the help of optical sensors. To investigate the influence of controlled breathing, an expert in controlled breathing is chosen as the subject. Pranayama is believed to be the controlled intake and outflow of breath in a firmly established posture. Some types of pranayama are believed to relieve mental stress. While the subject is practicing one such type of breath control, arterial blood volume changes in the brain are recorded using optical sensor mounted on the left and right temples of the subject. From these measurements at the beginning and end of the pranayama exercise, it could be noticed that the subject could induce changes in the cardiac and respiratory rhythms by controlled breathing. Rhythmic phenomena in the skin perfusion in the vicinity of the brian are also studied when the subject is holding his breath. The arterial blood volume changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brian, as monitored by the optical sensors during this period, exhibit asymmetric reaction when the subject is holding his breath. An attempt is made to understand whether these changes induced by stoppage of breathing are 'chaotic' or 'adaptive' in nature.

  6. Optical monitoring of cardiac and respiratory rhythms in the skin perfusion near the brain under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukunda Rao, M.; Blazek, Vladimir; Schmitt, Hans J.

    1998-06-01

    In this investigation an attempt is made to find the effects of controlled breathing on brain with the help of optical sensors mounted on the left and right temples of a subject. It has already been established that the brain activity can be monitored in terms of arterial blood volumetric changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain recorded with the help of optical sensors. To investigate the influence of controlled breathing, an expert in controlled breathing (pranayama) is chosen as the subject. Pranayama is believed to be the controlled intake and outflow of breath in a firmly established posture. Some types of pranayama are believed to relive mental stress. While the subject is practicing one such type of breath control, arterial blood volume changes in the brain are recorded using optical sensors mounted on the left and right temples of the subject. From these measurements at the beginning and end of the pranayama exercise, it could be noticed that the subject could induce changes in the cardiac and respiratory rhythms by controlled breathing. Rhythmic phenomena in the skin perfusion in the vicinity of the brian are also studied when the subject is holding his breath. The arterial blood volume changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain, as monitored by the optical sensors during this period, exhibit asymmetric reaction when the subject is holding his breath. An attempt is made to understand whether these changes induced by stoppage of breathing are 'chaotic' or 'adaptive' in nature.

  7. Electrophysiological biomarkers of neuromodulatory strategies to recover motor function after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Parag; Roy, Roland R.; Choe, Jaehoon; Creagmile, Jack; Zhong, Hui; Gerasimenko, Yury

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord contains the circuitry to control posture and locomotion after complete paralysis, and this circuitry can be enabled with epidural stimulation [electrical enabling motor control (eEmc)] and/or administration of pharmacological agents [pharmacological enabling motor control (fEmc)] when combined with motor training. We hypothesized that the characteristics of the spinally evoked potentials after chronic administration of both strychnine and quipazine under the influence of eEmc during standing and stepping can be used as biomarkers to predict successful motor performance. To test this hypothesis we trained rats to step bipedally for 7 wk after paralysis and characterized the motor potentials evoked in the soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles with the rats in a non-weight-bearing position, standing and stepping. The middle responses (MRs) to spinally evoked stimuli were suppressed with either or both drugs when the rat was suspended, whereas the addition of either or both drugs resulted in an overall activation of the extensor muscles during stepping and/or standing and reduced the drag duration and cocontraction between the TA and soleus muscles during stepping. The administration of quipazine and strychnine in concert with eEmc and step training after injury resulted in larger-amplitude evoked potentials [MRs and late responses (LRs)] in flexors and extensors, with the LRs consisting of a more normal bursting pattern, i.e., randomly generated action potentials within the bursts. This pattern was linked to more successful standing and stepping. Thus it appears that selected features of the patterns of potentials evoked in specific muscles with stimulation can serve as effective biomarkers and predictors of motor performance. PMID:25695648

  8. Probiotic attributes, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuromodulatory effects of Enterococcus faecium CFR 3003: in vitro and in vivo evidence.

    PubMed

    Divyashri, G; Krishna, G; Muralidhara; Prapulla, S G

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that probiotic bacteria play a vital role in modulating various aspects integral to the health and well-being of humans. In the present study, probiotic attributes and the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuromodulatory potential of Enterococcus faecium CFR 3003 were investigated by employing suitable model systems. E. faecium exhibited robust resistance to gastrointestinal stress conditions as it could withstand acid stress at pH 1.5, 2 and 3. The bacterium also survived at a bile salt concentration of 0.45 %, and better tolerance was observed towards pepsin and trypsin. E. faecium produced lactic acid as a major metabolic product, followed by butyric acid. Lyophilized cell-free supernatant (LCS) of E. faecium exhibited significant antioxidant capacity evaluated against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl, ascorbate auto-oxidation, oxygen radical absorbance and reducing power. Interestingly, E. faecium, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG MTCC 1408 and LCS showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect by negatively modulating TNF-α production and upregulating IL-10 levels in LPS-stimulated macrophage cell lines. In an in vivo mice model, the propensity of probiotic supplements to modulate endogenous oxidative markers and redox status in brain regions was assessed. Young mice provided with oral supplements (daily for 28 days) of E. faecium and L. rhamnosus exhibited diminished oxidative markers in the brain and enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes with a concomitant increase in γ-aminobutyric acid and dopamine levels. Collectively, our findings clearly suggest the propensity of these bacteria to protect against tissue damage mediated through free radicals and inflammatory cytokines. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms need further studies, it is tempting to speculate that probiotics confer a neuroprotective advantage in vivo against oxidative damage-mediated neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:26450608

  9. NEUROMODULATORY EFFECTS OF THYMOQUINONE IN EXTENUATING OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CHLORPROMAZINE TREATED RATS.

    PubMed

    Safhi, Mohammed Mohsin

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the possible protective effect of thymoquinone on chlorpromazine induced catalepsy, locomotor activity and cerebral oxidative stress in rats. The rats were divided into four groups, each group containing eight animals. The animals were evaluated after repeated administration of chlorpromazine (CPZ) 30 min before the administration of thymoquinone (TQ) for 21 days. Catalepsy was assessed using block method whereas the locomotor activity was assessed using acceleratory rotarod and actophotometer. Markers of oxidative stress parameters (LPO, GSH, GPx, GR, GST and CAT) were evaluated in the brain of rats. The cataleptic scores were significantly increased in CPZ treated rats when compared with normal control rats. Oral administration of TQ (5 and 10 mg/kg) significantly decreased cataleptic scores when compared with chlorpromazine (CPZ) treated rats. The muscle coordination and spontaneous locomotor activity was significantly decreased in CPZ treated rats when compared with normal control rats. Treatment with TQ significantly improved the muscle coordination and spontaneous locomotor activity when compared with CPZ treated rats. TQ treated rats significantly reduced the elevated levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO), increased levels of antioxidant enzymes i.e., reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) when compared with CPZ treated rats. The results clearly suggest that supplementation with TQ can be used to preclude CPZ induced extrapyramidal side effects and may find a role in reducing the oxidative stress. PMID:27180446

  10. Control of abdominal and expiratory intercostal muscle activity during vomiting - Role of ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Tan, L. K.; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    The role of ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons in the control of abdominal and internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting was investigated in cats. Two series of experiments were performed: in one, the activity of VRG E neurons was recorded during fictive vomiting in cats that were decerebrated, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated; in the second, the abdominal muscle activity during vomiting was compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons in decerebrate spontaneously breathing cats. The results show that about two-thirds of VRG E neurons that project at least as far caudally as the lower thoracic cord contribute to internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting. The remaining VRG E neurons contribute to abdominal muscle activation. As shown by severing the axons of the VRG E neurons, other, as yet unidenified, inputs (either descending from the brain stem or arising from spinal reflexes) can also produce abdominal muscle activation.

  11. Mucosal Adjuvants For Vaccines To Control Upper Respiratory Infections In The Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fujihashi, Kohtaro; Sato, Shintaro; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae are two major pathogens that lead to significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Since both pathogens enter the host via the mucosa, especially the upper respiratory tract (URT), it is essential to elicit pathogen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody (Ab) responses at mucosal surfaces for defense of the elderly. However, as aging occurs, alterations in the mucosal immune system of older individuals result in a failure to induce SIgA Abs for protection from these infections. To overcome mucosal immunosenescence, we have developed a mucosal dendritic cell targeting, novel double adjuvant system which we show to be an attractive and effective immunological modulator. This system induces a more balanced Th1- and Th2- type cytokine response which supports both mucosal SIgA and systemic IgG1 and IgG2a Ab responses. Thus, adaptation of this adjuvant system to nasal vaccines for influenza virus and S. pneumoniae could successfully provide protection by supporting pathogen-specific SIgA Ab responses in the URT in the mouse model of aging. In summary, a double adjuvant system is considered to be an attractive and potentially important strategy for the future development of mucosal vaccines for the elderly. PMID:24440991

  12. Mucosal adjuvants for vaccines to control upper respiratory infections in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Fujihashi, Kohtaro; Sato, Shintaro; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Influenza virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae are two major pathogens that lead to significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Since both pathogens enter the host via the mucosa, especially the upper respiratory tract (URT), it is essential to elicit pathogen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody (Ab) responses at mucosal surfaces for defense of the elderly. However, as aging occurs, alterations in the mucosal immune system of older individuals result in a failure to induce SIgA Abs for protection from these infections. To overcome mucosal immunosenescence, we have developed a mucosal dendritic cell targeting, novel double adjuvant system which we show to be an attractive and effective immunological modulator. This system induces a more balanced Th1- and Th2-type cytokine response which supports both mucosal SIgA and systemic IgG1 and IgG2a Ab responses. Thus, adaptation of this adjuvant system to nasal vaccines for influenza virus and S. pneumoniae could successfully provide protection by supporting pathogen-specific SIgA Ab responses in the URT in the mouse model of aging. In summary, a double adjuvant system is considered to be an attractive and potentially important strategy for the future development of mucosal vaccines for the elderly. PMID:24440991

  13. Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Hospital Infection Control Response to an Epidemic Respiratory Virus Threat

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Yock Young; Sim, Joe; Lim, Jeremy; Hsu, Li Yang; Chow, Wai Leng; Fisher, Dale A.; Wong, Yue Sie; Ho, Khek Yu

    2009-01-01

    The outbreak of influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 prompted many countries in Asia, previously strongly affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), to respond with stringent measures, particularly in preventing outbreaks in hospitals. We studied actual direct costs and cost-effectiveness of different response measures from a hospital perspective in tertiary hospitals in Singapore by simulating outbreaks of SARS, pandemic (H1N1) 2009, and 1918 Spanish influenza. Protection measures targeting only infected patients yielded lowest incremental cost/death averted of $23,000 (US$) for pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Enforced protection in high-risk areas (Yellow Alert) and full protection throughout the hospital (Orange Alert) averted deaths but came at an incremental cost of up to $2.5 million/death averted. SARS and Spanish influenza favored more stringent measures. High case-fatality rates, virulence, and high proportion of atypical manifestations impacted cost-effectiveness the most. A calibrated approach in accordance with viral characteristics and community risks may help refine responses to future epidemics. PMID:19961669

  14. Effect of diaphragmatic fatigue on control of the respiratory muscles during CO sub 2 rebreathing

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S.; Lichros, I.; Macklem, P.T. Montreal Chest Hospital, Quebec )

    1991-03-11

    The authors measured respiratory muscle recruitment and ventilation ({dot V}{sub E}) during CO{sub 2} rebreathing before and after diaphragmatic fatigue in normal subjects. Muscle activity was assessed by measuring pleural, abdominal, and transdiaphragmatic pressures (Ppl, Pab, and Pdi, resp). The results showed that (1) there was a progressive increase in Pdi with increasing end-tidal PCO{sub 2} (P{sub ET}CO{sub 2}); the rate of increase was usually greater before than after fatigue, however, in some it was less because of longer operating length and/or passive stretching of the diaphragm due to strong rib cage muscle (RCM) activity induced by fatigue; (2) Pdi increased mainly due to greater fall in Ppl; {Delta}Pab increased little during CO{sub 2} rebreathing or even decreased with P{sub ET}CO{sub 2} over 50-55 mmHg; this pattern was exaggerated by fatigue; (3) at the end of each trial, the ratio {minus}{Delta}Ppl/{Delta}Pab increased by {approximately}140% before and {approximately}850% after fatigue; (4) CO{sub 2} induced expiratory abdominal muscle activity; and (5) as a group, {dot V}{sub E} and its pattern did not change appreciably with fatigue. The authors conclude that RCM are recruited proportionately more than the diaphragm by CO{sub 2} and that diaphragmatic fatigue shifts the central drive from the fatigued diaphragm to TCM to preserve ventilation.

  15. Combined neuromodulatory interventions in acute experimental pain: assessment of melatonin and non-invasive brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Nádia Regina Jardim; Laste, Gabriela; Deitos, Alícia; Stefani, Luciana Cadore; Cambraia-Canto, Gustavo; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Brunoni, Andre R.; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and melatonin can effectively treat pain. Given their potentially complementary mechanisms of action, their combination could have a synergistic effect. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that compared to the control condition and melatonin alone, tDCS combined with melatonin would have a greater effect on pain modulatory effect, as assessed by quantitative sensory testing (QST) and by the pain level during the Conditioned Pain Modulation (CPM)-task. Furthermore, the combined treatment would have a greater cortical excitability effect as indicated by the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and on the serum BDNF level. Healthy males (n = 20), (aged 18–40 years), in a blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover, clinical trial, were randomized into three groups: sublingual melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) + a-tDCS, melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) + sham-(s)-tDCS, or sublingual placebo+sham-(s)-tDCS. Anodal stimulation (2 mA, 20 min) was applied over the primary motor cortex. There was a significant difference in the heat pain threshold (°C) for melatonin+a-tDCS vs. placebo+s-tDCS (mean difference: 4.86, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9 to 8.63) and melatonin+s-tDCS vs. placebo+s-tDCS (mean: 5.16, 95% CI: 0.84 to 8.36). There was no difference between melatonin+s-tDCS and melatonin+a-tDCS (mean difference: 0.29, 95% CI: −3.72 to 4.23). The mean change from the baseline on amplitude of motor evocate potential (MEP) was significantly higher in the melatonin+a-tDCS (−19.96% ± 5.2) compared with melatonin+s-tDCS group (−1.36% ± 5.35) and with placebo+s-tDCS group (3.61% ± 10.48), respectively (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). While melatonin alone or combined with a-tDCS did not significantly affect CPM task result, and serum BDNF level. The melatonin effectively reduced pain; however, its association with a-tDCS did not present an additional modulatory effect on acute induced pain. PMID:25873871

  16. Activity of neuromodulatory neurones during stepping of a single insect leg.

    PubMed

    Mentel, Tim; Weiler, Violetta; Büschges, Ansgar; Pflüger, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Octopamine plays a major role in insect motor control and is released from dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurones, a group of cells located on the dorsal midline of each ganglion. We were interested whether and how these neurones are activated during walking and chose the semi-intact walking preparation of stick insects that offers to investigate single leg-stepping movements. DUM neurones were characterized in the thoracic nerve cord by backfilling lateral nerves. These backfills revealed a population of 6-8 efferent DUM cells per thoracic segment. Mesothoracic DUM cells were subsequently recorded during middle leg stepping and characterized by intracellular staining. Seven out of eight identified individual different types of DUM neurones were efferent. Seven types except the DUMna nl2 were tonically depolarized during middle leg stepping and additional phasic depolarizations in membrane potential linked to the stance phase of the middle leg were observed. These DUM neurones were all multimodal and received depolarizing synaptic drive when the abdomen, antennae or different parts of the leg were mechanically stimulated. We never observed hyperpolarising synaptic inputs to DUM neurones. Only one type of DUM neurone, DUMna, exhibited spontaneous rhythmic activity and was unaffected by different stimuli or walking movements. PMID:17931650

  17. Neuromodulatory Effects of Hesperidin in Mitigating Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Laxmi; Khan, Mohammad Haaris Ajmal; Salman, Mohd.; Naseem, Mehar; Wajid, Saima

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in pathogenesis of streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetes mellitus and its complication in central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies have provided insights on antioxidants and their emergence as potential therapeutic and nutraceutical. The present study examined the hypothesis that hesperidin (HP) ameliorates oxidative stress and may be a limiting factor in the extent of CNS complication following diabetes. To test this hypothesis rats were divided into four groups: control, diabetic, diabetic-HP treated, and vehicle for HP treatment group. Diabetes mellitus was induced by a single injection of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Three days after STZ injection, HP was given (50 mg/kg b.wt. orally) once daily for four weeks. The results of the present investigation suggest that the significant elevated levels of oxidative stress markers were observed in STZ-treated animals, whereas significant depletion in the activity of nonenzymatic antioxidants and enzymatic antioxidants was witnessed in diabetic rat brain. Neurotoxicity biomarker activity was also altered significantly. HP treatment significantly attenuated the altered levels of oxidative stress and neurotoxicity biomarkers. Our results demonstrate that HP exhibits potent antioxidant and neuroprotective effects on the brain tissue against the diabetic oxidative damage in STZ-induced rodent model. PMID:25050332

  18. Provider Decisions to Treat Respiratory Illnesses with Antibiotics: Insights from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Branche, Angela R.; Walsh, Edward E.; Jadhav, Nagesh; Karmally, Rachel; Baran, Andrea; Peterson, Derick R.; Falsey, Ann R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI) frequently causes adult hospitalization and antibiotic overuse. Procalcitonin (PCT) treatment algorithms have been used successfully in Europe to safely reduce antibiotic use for LRTI but have not been adopted in the United States. We recently performed a feasibility study for a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of PCT and viral testing to guide therapy for non-pneumonic LRTI. Objective The primary objective of the current study was to understand factors influencing PCT algorithm adherence during the RCT and evaluate factors influencing provider antibiotic prescribing practices for LRTI. Study Design From October 2013-April 2014, 300 patients hospitalized at a community teaching hospital with non-pneumonic LRTI were randomized to standard or PCT-guided care with viral PCR testing. Algorithm adherence data was collected and multivariate stepwise logistic regression of clinical variables used to model algorithm compliance. 134 providers were surveyed anonymously before and after the trial to assess knowledge of biomarkers and viral testing and antibiotic prescribing practices. Results Diagnosis of pneumonia on admission was the only variable significantly associated with non-adherence [7% (adherence) vs. 26% (nonadherence), p = 0.01]. Surveys confirmed possible infiltrate on chest radiograph as important for provider decisions, as were severity of illness, positive sputum culture, abnormal CBC and fever. However, age, patient expectations and medical-legal concerns were also at least somewhat important to prescribing practices. Physician agreement with the importance of viral and PCT testing increased from 42% to 64% (p = 0.007) and 49% to 74% (p = 0.001), respectively, after the study. Conclusions Optimal algorithm adherence will be important for definitive PCT intervention trials in the US to determine if PCT guided algorithms result in better outcomes than reliance on traditional clinical variables. Factors

  19. Evaluation of respiratory variables in smelter and control workers before and during a shutdown period

    SciTech Connect

    Holness, D.L.; Batten, B.; Broder, I.; Corey, P.; Mintz, S.

    1985-05-01

    Thirty-six smelter workers examined in this pilot study were found to have a higher prevalence of cough and dyspnea and lower baseline lung function than did 31 controls. They also experienced decreases in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1) over the workweek while the controls did not. Baseline airflow rates and change in FVC and FEV1 over the workweek varied with levels of sulfur dioxide and particulates. Twenty-three smelter workers and 21 controls were seen on a second occasion, six months into an extended shutdown. The smelter workers continued to have a higher prevalence of cough and dyspnea and lower baseline lung function than the controls. There was, however, a slight increase in lung function in both the exposed workers and the controls during the shutdown. The results suggest that smelter workers may develop both acute and chronic work-related pulmonary effects and that the chronic effects may be nonreversible.

  20. Respiratory assistance with a non-invasive ventilator (Bipap) in MND/ALS patients: survival rates in a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pinto, A C; Evangelista, T; Carvalho, M; Alves, M A; Sales Luís, M L

    1995-05-01

    Noninvasive ventilatory assistance, in ALS patients, with the bilevel intermittent positive air pressure (Bipap) was studied, in a prospective and controlled trial, by the authors. Twenty ALS bulbar patients, fulfilling El Escorial criteria for probable or definite disease, were selected. For the follow-up all patients were submitted to evaluation with the Norris scale, modified Barthel score and an analog scale of life satisfaction, every 3 months. All patients were also submitted to respiratory functional testing (RFT). Ten of these patients were treated with palliative management (group I), the remaining ten patients received Bipap support (group II). Clinical evolution curves and clinical parameters were not statistically different in both groups, except for the percentage of actual predicted value of vital capacity (p < 0.03), showing a more advanced disease in group II patients. Analog scale of life satisfaction showed improvement in the group II, even after the beginning of respiratory insufficiency, though without significance probably due to the small sample size (p < 0.1). Since 6 patients in group II are still alive survival rates were compared with log rank test considering cumulative survivals with Kaplan-Meier estimates. Total survival and survival from diurnal abnormalities in gas exchange (survival 1) were significantly longer for group II (p < 0.006 and p < 0.0004, respectively). In spite of the small number of patients, preliminary results strongly support the importance of BIPAP in ALS patients, though further studies must go on in order to optimize the best time for introducing Bipap. PMID:7595610

  1. Respiratory virus is a real pathogen in immunocompetent community-acquired pneumonia: comparing to influenza like illness and volunteer controls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral pathogens were more commonly reported than previously estimated in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. However, the real role of virus was still controversial. Methods Consecutive adult patients with CAP between April and December, 2009 were prospectively enrolled. A four-fold or greater increase of IgG-titres against respiratory viruses in pair sera was tested by means of hemagglutination inhibition assay or indirect immunofluorescence. Swab samples were tested by cell culture and/or nucleic amplification tests. Viral etiology was considered definitive if at least one of the above tests was positive. Results Viral etiology was established in fifty-two (34.9%) of 149 CAP patients, twenty-two (81.5%) of 27 influenza like illness patients, and none of 75 volunteer controls. Forty-seven CAP patients were infected by a single virus (24 influenza A virus, 5 influenza B, 10 parainfluenza virus type 3 [PIV-3], 2 PIV-1, 2 adenovirus, 2 human rhinovirus and 2 coronavirus OC43), five cases by two or three viruses co-infection. Fever ≥ 39°C (66.7%), fatigue (64.6%), and purulent sputum (52.1%) was the most common symptoms in viral pneumonia patients. On multivariate analysis, myalgia was included in the model for pneumonia associated with influenza infection. In the CURB-65 model only influenza infection was found independently associated with severe disease (CURB-65 score ≥ 3) out of variables, including age(years), sex, current smoking status, sick contact with febrile patients, numbers of comorbidity, presence of influenza infection, presence of PIV infection, with P = 0.021, OR 7.86 (95% CI 1.37-45.04). Conclusion Respiratory virus was not a bystander, but pathogenic in pneumonia and was a common cause of CAP. PMID:25178477

  2. Microtopographic and Hydrological Controls over Respiratory Efflux and Late-Season Arctic Methane Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkman, E.; Zona, D.; Oechel, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, Arctic peatlands have released approximately 35 Tg (3.5 x 1012g) of CH4 annually, corresponding to around 1/3 of the aggregate wetland CH4 fluxes and 16% of all natural emissions. As climate models increasingly suggest that current warming trends in the Arctic (4-8 °C higher annual surface air temperatures) will continue by century's end, carbon (C) cycling in these northern climes may be further amplified. Although much has been learned in recent decades, uncertainty remains in regard to the spatial and temporal extent of CO2 and CH4 emissions from these systems. Chamber based carbon flux measurements were gathered for three growing seasons from June 2007 to September 2013 in Barrow, Alaska to investigate the diurnal, weekly, and monthly patterns of CO2 and CH4 flux in the North American Arctic. For the 2007 and 2008 growing seasons, high temporal frequency auto-chambers (LI-8100A Automated Soil Flux System, LI-COR Biosciences) were used to gather over 18,000 individual flux measurements. From July to September 2013 an Ultraportable Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (Los Gatos Research Inc.) was deployed in concert with this soil flux system to gather high temporal frequency soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes. Nearby eddy covariance towers provided auxiliary meteorological and environmental data, while weekly transects amassed further surficial hydrological measures (pH, thaw depth, water table). For earlier periods of data, respiratory fluxes were partitioned into five microtopographic classes (polygon rims and troughs, low centered basins, high ridges, and flat mesic terrain). Conversely, for the later periods of data covered chamber fluxes were partitioned into three 'habitat' types (High, Medium, Wet) based on corresponding aboveground average water table extent. Marked dissimilarities were noted across habitat types and microtopographic classes. In general more mesic, waterlogged regions released greater quantities of CO2 across the growing season, while

  3. Cardiac vagal control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia during hypercapnia in humans.

    PubMed

    Brown, S J; Mundel, T; Brown, J A

    2007-12-01

    Normoxic hypercapnia may increase high-frequency (HF) power in heart rate variability (HRV) and also increase respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Low-frequency (LF) power may remain unchanged. In this study, 5-min ECG recordings (N = 10) were analyzed in time and frequency domains while human subjects breathed normoxic 5% CO2 (5%CO2) or room air (RA). Tidal volume (VT), inhalatory (TI), and exhalatory (TE) times of breaths in the final minute were measured. ECG time domain measures were unaffected by CO2 inhalation (P > 0.05). Following natural logarithmic transformation (LN), LFLN was unaltered (RA: 7.14 +/- 0.95 vs. 5%CO2: 7.35 +/- 1.12, P > 0.05), and HFLN increased (RA: 7.65 +/- 1.37 vs. 5%CO2: 8.58 +/- 1.11, P < 0.05) with CO2 inhalation. When changes in total power (NU) were corrected, LF(NU) decreased (RA: 34.4 +/- 22.9 vs. 5%CO2: 23.8 +/- 23.1, P < 0.01), and HFNU increased (RA: 56.5 +/- 22.3 vs. 5%CO2: 66.8 +/- 22.9, P < 0.01) with CO2 inhalation. TI (RA: 2.0 +/- 1.0 vs. 5%CO2: 1.9 +/- 0.8 s) and TE (RA: 2.5 +/- 1.1 vs. 5%CO2: 2.4 +/- 0.9 s) remained unchanged, but VT increased with CO2 inhalation (RA: 1.1 +/- 0.3 vs. 5%CO2: 2.0 +/- 0.8 L, P < 0.001). Heart rates during inhalation (RA: 35.2 +/- 4.4, 5%CO2: 34.5 +/- 4.8 beats min(-1)) were different from heart rates during exhalation (RA: 28.8 +/- 4.4, 5%CO2: 29.1 +/- 3.1 beats min(-1)). Hypercapnia did not increase the clustering of heart beats during inhalation, and we suggest that the HF component may not adequately reflect RSA. PMID:17996126

  4. Effects of a difference in respiratory cycle between treatment planning and irradiation for phase-controlled rescanning and carbon pencil beam scanning

    PubMed Central

    Inaniwa, T; Furukawa, T; Zenklusen, S; Shirai, T; Noda, K

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of variation in respiratory cycle between treatment planning and irradiation for pencil beam scanning and phase-controlled rescanning (PCR) on the resulting dose distribution, we conducted a simulation study based on four-dimensional CT (4DCT) data for lung cancer patients. Methods: 4DCT data were acquired for seven patients with lung tumours. Treatment planning was designed to ensure the delivery of 95% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume in respective phases of the 4DCT by taking account of intrafractional beam range variations. Carbon ion pencil beam scanning dose distributions were calculated for various respiratory cycles that differed from the reference respiration (=4.4 s) but which stayed regular during irradiation. The number of rescannings was changed to 1, 4 or 8 times. PCR was correlated with the gating window in treatment planning to calculate the beam weighting map. Results: 8×PCR improved dose conformation to the target for all irradiation respiratory cycles. Minimum dose (Dmin) and lowest dose encompassing 95% of the target (D95) values with 4×PCR were decreased from 94.1% and 98.1% to 88.4% and 93.5% with an altered irradiation respiratory cycle of 2.4 s. However, these values were improved with 8×PCR to over 94.9% for Dmin and 98.6% for D95 for respective irradiation respiratory cycles. Conclusion: Pencil beam scanning treatment with eight or more PCRs consistently improved dose conformation for moving lung targets even when different respiratory cycles were used for treatment planning and irradiation. Advances in knowledge: Scanning treatment with eight or more rescannings consistently improved dose homogeneity to a moving target even though respiratory cycles varied during treatment. PMID:23833034

  5. Is acute idiopathic pericarditis associated with recent upper respiratory tract infection or gastroenteritis? A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Florian; Delhumeau-Cartier, Cecile; Meyer, Philippe; Genne, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the association of a clinical diagnosis of acute idiopathic pericarditis (AIP), and a reported upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) or gastroenteritis (GE) in the preceding month. Design Patients who were hospitalised with a first diagnosis of AIP were retrospectively compared with a control group of patients admitted with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), matched by gender and age. Setting Primary and secondary care level; one hospital serving a population of about 170 000. Participants A total of 51 patients with AIP were included, of whom 46 could be matched with 46 patients with control DVT. Only patients with a complete review of systems on the admission note were included in the study. Main outcome measure Conditional logistic regression was used to assess the association of a clinical diagnosis of AIP and an infectious episode (URTI or GE) in the month preceding AIP diagnosis. Results Patients with AIP had more often experienced a recent episode of URTI or GE than patients with DVT (39.1% vs 10.9%, p=0.002). The multivariate conditional regression showed that AIP was independently associated with URTI or GE in the last month preceding diagnosis (OR=37.18, 95% CI=1.91 to 724.98, p=0.017). Conclusions This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study demonstrating an association between a recent episode of URTI or GE and a clinical diagnosis of AIP. PMID:26603247

  6. Upper respiratory cancer among refinery and chemical plant workers: a case-control study in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Soskolne, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Upper respiratory cancer (URC) specific to workers employed on an ethanol unit at a large southern United States refinery and chemical plant was associated with exposure to strong concentrations of sulfuric acid used as a reactant in this process. The carcinogen implicated by indirect evidence was diethyl sulfate. However, additional URC cases were subsequently found that could not be associated with employment on the former ethanol unit. This fact, together with the continued use of sulfuric acid in strong, intermediate, and weak concentrations in the same industrial complex, motivated the present investigation. In particular, hypotheses concerning an association between laryngeal cancer and industrial exposure to the three concentrations of sulfuric acid present in the complex have been tested. The study is a multiple-matched case-control design with a minimum of three controls individually matched to each case on race, sex, date of birth, date of initial employment and duration of employment. Results indicate significant associations between sulfuric acid exposure and URC with odds ratio exceeding four. Strong collinearity among the three acid concentrations has rendered any separation of independent acid strength effects impossible. None of the other exposures examined in this study, including asbestos, nickel or wood dust, revealed significant associations. There is a strong possibility that the association is specific for laryngeal cancer.

  7. [Respiratory and hemodynamic monitoring during laparoscopy and two computer-controlled TCI anesthesiologic technique].

    PubMed

    Georgiev, S; Smilov, I

    2004-01-01

    Forty women under general anaesthesia (computer-controlled TCI-infusion) in two groups were subjected to non-invasive haemodynamic monitoring together with arterial gasometry and capnography. Simultaneous continuous monitoring of aortic blood flow and PetCO2 allows an undelayed recognition of major circulatory disturbances, before significant changes in heart rate and arterial pressure occur. PMID:15185526

  8. Sleeping and resting respiratory rates in dogs and cats with medically-controlled left-sided congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Porciello, F; Rishniw, M; Ljungvall, I; Ferasin, L; Haggstrom, J; Ohad, D G

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping and resting respiratory rates (SRR and RRR, respectively) are commonly used to monitor dogs and cats with left-sided cardiac disease and to identify animals with left-sided congestive heart failure (L-CHF). Dogs and cats with subclinical heart disease have SRRmean values <30 breaths/min. However, little is known about SRR and RRR in dogs and cats with CHF that is well controlled with medical therapy. In this study, SRR and RRR were measured by the owners of 51 dogs and 22 cats with stable, well-controlled CHF. Median canine SRRmean was 20 breaths/min (7-39 breaths/min); eight dogs were ≥25 breaths/min and one dog only was ≥30 breaths/min. Canine SRRmean was unrelated to pulmonary hypertension or diuretic dose. Median feline SRRmean was 20 breaths/min (13-31 breaths/min); four cats were ≥25 breaths/min and only one cat was ≥30 breaths/min. Feline SRRmean was unrelated to diuretic dose. SRR remained stable during collection in both species with little day-to-day variability. The median canine RRRmean was 24 breaths/min (12-44 breaths/min), 17 were ≥25 breaths/min, seven were ≥30 breaths/min, two were >40 breaths/min. Median feline RRRmean was 24 breaths/min (15-45 breaths/min); five cats had RRRmean ≥25 breaths/min; one had ≥30 breaths/min, and two had ≥40 breaths/min. These data suggest that most dogs and cats with CHF that is medically well-controlled and stable have SRRmean and RRRmean <30 breaths/min at home. Clinicians can use these data to help determine how best to control CHF in dogs and cats. PMID:26639825

  9. Ventilatory dynamics during transient arousal from NREM sleep: implications for respiratory control stability.

    PubMed

    Khoo, M C; Koh, S S; Shin, J J; Westbrook, P R; Berry, R B

    1996-05-01

    The polysomnographic and ventilatory patterns of nine normal adults were measured during non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) stage 2 sleep before and after repeated administrations of a tone (40-72 dB) lasting 5 s. The ventilatory response to arousal (VRA) was determined in data sections showing electrocortical arousal following the start of the tone. Mean inspiratory flow and tidal volume increased significantly above control levels in the first seven breaths after the start of arousal, with peak increases (64.2% > control) occurring on the second breath. Breath-to-breath occlusion pressure 100 ms after the start of inspiration showed significant increases only on the second and third postarousal breaths, whereas upper airway resistance declined immediately and remained below control for > or = 7 consecutive breaths. These results suggest that the first breath and latter portion of the VRA are determined more by upper airway dynamics than by changes in the neural drive to breathe. Computer model simulations comparing different VRA time courses show that sustained periodic apnea is more likely to occur when the fall in the postarousal increase in ventilation is more abrupt. PMID:8727529

  10. [Respiratory controlled intermittent inspiratory pleural drainage--a method for handling life threatening bronchopleural fistulas].

    PubMed

    Gramm, H J; Frucht, U; Simgen, W L; Dennhardt, R

    1984-10-01

    A report is presented on a technical device for artificial ventilation of patients with severe bronchopleural fistulae. The respirator-controlled apparatus interrupts drainage suction at the beginning of inspiration and releases it again at expiration. In contrast to similar constructions, this system does not allow drainage secretions to influence its functional efficiency. Modifications for connection of this apparatus are conceivable for all modern respirators. A case is described in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the procedure. The hitherto published literature is critically reviewed. PMID:6391271

  11. [Respiratory failure in disseminated sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Popova, L M; Avdiunina, I A; Alferova, V P

    2000-01-01

    The development and patterns of respiratory failure (RF) are analyzed in 9 patients with disseminated sclerosis (DS). Forced ventilation of the lungs was carried out with consideration for main location of the process. Relationship between patterns of respiratory disorders and neuroanatomy of respiratory regulation is discussed. Involvement of the corticospinal routes is paralleled by dissociation during functional pulmonary tests: spontaneous volumes are less than controlled inspirations. The most severe symptom complexes were observed in RF of predominantly bulbar localization: respiratory anarchy, blocking of airways caused by impaired swallowing, impaired mechanism of coughing reflex, loss of spontaneous respiration, sometimes apnea during sleeping. Involvement of the respiratory nuclei of medullary respiratory center and airways and of the corticonuclear routes of caudal cranial nerves causes the development of a triad of symptoms: glossopharyngolaryngeal paralysis, dysfunction of respiratory nuclei of medulla oblongata, and decreased sensitivity of respiratory center to CO2. Aspiration complications caused by dysphagia are characteristic of bulbar DS. Respiratory function in 5 patients without clinical picture of RF are specially discussed. The authors emphasize unfavorable prognostic significance of signs of extracorporeal obstruction indicating the probability of RF long before its manifestation. Special attention is paid to early diagnosis of symptoms of coming RF when evaluating the status of patients with DS during treatment. Timely use of respiratory resuscitation methods reduces the mortality and ensures a good chance for remissions with recovery of respiratory function, which are characteristic of RF. PMID:11014001

  12. The Hemagglutinin Stem-Binding Monoclonal Antibody VIS410 Controls Influenza Virus-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baranovich, Tatiana; Jones, Jeremy C; Russier, Marion; Vogel, Peter; Szretter, Kristy J; Sloan, Susan E; Seiler, Patrick; Trevejo, Jose M; Webby, Richard J; Govorkova, Elena A

    2016-04-01

    Most cases of severe influenza are associated with pulmonary complications, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and no antiviral drugs of proven value for treating such complications are currently available. The use of monoclonal antibodies targeting the stem of the influenza virus surface hemagglutinin (HA) is a rapidly developing strategy for the control of viruses of multiple HA subtypes. However, the mechanisms of action of these antibodies are not fully understood, and their ability to mitigate severe complications of influenza has been poorly studied. We evaluated the effect of treatment with VIS410, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the HA stem region, on the development of ARDS in BALB/c mice after infection with influenza A(H7N9) viruses. Prophylactic administration of VIS410 resulted in the complete protection of mice against lethal A(H7N9) virus challenge. A single therapeutic dose of VIS410 given 24 h after virus inoculation resulted in dose-dependent protection of up to 100% of mice inoculated with neuraminidase inhibitor-susceptible or -resistant A(H7N9) viruses. Compared to the outcomes in mock-treated controls, a single administration of VIS410 improved viral clearance from the lungs, reduced virus spread in lungs in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in a lower lung injury score, reduced the extent of the alteration in lung vascular permeability and protein accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and improved lung physiologic function. Thus, antibodies targeting the HA stem can reduce the severity of ARDS and show promise as agents for controlling pulmonary complications in influenza. PMID:26787699

  13. Using an integrated infection control strategy during outbreak control to minimize nosocomial infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome among healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Yen, M-Y; Lin, Y E; Su, I-J; Huang, F-Y; Huang, F-Y; Ho, M-S; Chang, S-C; Tan, K-H; Chen, K-T; Chang, H; Liu, Y-C; Loh, C-H; Wang, L-S; Lee, C-H

    2006-02-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at risk of acquiring severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) while caring for SARS patients. Personal protective equipment and negative pressure isolation rooms (NPIRs) have not been completely successful in protecting HCWs. We introduced an innovative, integrated infection control strategy involving triaging patients using barriers, zones of risk, and extensive installation of alcohol dispensers for glove-on hand rubbing. This integrated infection control approach was implemented at a SARS designated hospital ('study hospital') where NPIRs were not available. The number of HCWs who contracted SARS in the study hospital was compared with the number of HCWs who contracted SARS in 86 Taiwan hospitals that did not use the integrated infection control strategy. Two HCWs contracted SARS in the study hospital (0.03 cases/bed) compared with 93 HCWs in the other hospitals (0.13 cases/bed) during the same three-week period. Our strategy appeared to be effective in reducing the incidence of HCWs contracting SARS. The advantages included rapid implementation without NPIRs, flexibility to transfer patients, and re-inforcement for HCWs to comply with infection control procedures, especially handwashing. The efficacy and low cost are major advantages, especially in countries with large populations at risk and fewer economic resources. PMID:16153744

  14. A Numerically Subdominant CD8 T Cell Response to Matrix Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Controls Infection with Limited Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Haddad, Elias K.; Marceau, Joshua; Morabito, Kaitlyn M.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    CD8 T cells are involved in pathogen clearance and infection-induced pathology in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Studying bulk responses masks the contribution of individual CD8 T cell subsets to protective immunity and immunopathology. In particular, the roles of subdominant responses that are potentially beneficial to the host are rarely appreciated when the focus is on magnitude instead of quality of response. Here, by evaluating CD8 T cell responses in CB6F1 hybrid mice, in which multiple epitopes are recognized, we found that a numerically subdominant CD8 T cell response against DbM187 epitope of the virus matrix protein expressed high avidity TCR and enhanced signaling pathways associated with CD8 T cell effector functions. Each DbM187 T effector cell lysed more infected targets on a per cell basis than the numerically dominant KdM282 T cells, and controlled virus replication more efficiently with less pulmonary inflammation and illness than the previously well-characterized KdM282 T cell response. Our data suggest that the clinical outcome of viral infections is determined by the integrated functional properties of a variety of responding CD8 T cells, and that the highest magnitude response may not necessarily be the best in terms of benefit to the host. Understanding how to induce highly efficient and functional T cells would inform strategies for designing vaccines intended to provide T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:26943673

  15. Mitochondrial respiratory control and early defects of oxidative phosphorylation in the failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Hélène; Semsroth, Severin; Antretter, Herwig; Höfer, Daniel; Gnaiger, Erich

    2011-12-01

    Heart failure is a consequence of progressive deterioration of cardiac performance. Little is known about the role of impaired oxidative phosphorylation in the progression of the disease, since previous studies of mitochondrial injuries are restricted to end-stage chronic heart failure. The present study aimed at evaluating the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of human heart failure. We measured the control of oxidative phosphorylation with high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized myocardial fibres from donor hearts (controls), and patients with no or mild heart failure but presenting with heart disease, or chronic heart failure due to dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy. The capacity of the phosphorylation system exerted a strong limitation on oxidative phosphorylation in the human heart, estimated at 121 pmol O(2)s(-1)mg(-1) in the healthy left ventricle. In heart disease, a specific defect of the phosphorylation system, Complex I-linked respiration, and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation were identified. These early defects were also significant in chronic heart failure, where the capacities of the oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer systems per cardiac tissue mass were decreased with all tested substrate combinations, suggesting a decline of mitochondrial density. Oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer system capacities were higher in ventricles compared to atria, but the impaired mitochondrial quality was identical in the four cardiac chambers of chronic heart failure patients. Coupling was preserved in heart disease and chronic heart failure, in contrast to the mitochondrial dysfunction observed after prolonged cold storage of cardiac tissue. Mitochondrial defects in the phosphorylation system, Complex I respiration and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation occurred early in the development of heart failure. Targeting these mitochondrial injuries with metabolic therapy may offer a promising approach to delay

  16. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the lungs cannot remove all of the carbon dioxide the body produces. This causes body fluids, especially ... Acute respiratory acidosis is a condition in which carbon dioxide builds up very quickly, before the kidneys can ...

  17. Oxygen-Dependent Control of Respiratory Nitrate Reduction in Mycelium of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marco; Falke, Dörte; Pawlik, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Several members of the obligately aerobic genus Streptomyces are able to reduce nitrate, catalyzed by Nar-type respiratory nitrate reductases. A unique feature of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) compared with other streptomycetes is that it synthesizes three nonredundant Nar enzymes. In this study, we show that Nar2 is the main Nar enzyme active in mycelium and could characterize the conditions governing its synthesis. Nar2 was present at low levels in aerobically cultivated mycelium, but synthesis was induced when cultures were grown under oxygen limitation. Growth in the presence of high oxygen concentrations prevented the induction of Nar2 synthesis. Equally, an abrupt shift from aerobiosis to anaerobiosis did not result in the immediate induction of Nar2 synthesis. This suggests that the synthesis of Nar2 is induced during a hypoxic downshift, probably to allow maintenance of a proton gradient during the transition to anaerobiosis. Although no Nar2 could be detected in freshly harvested mature spores, synthesis of the enzyme could be induced after long-term (several days) incubation of these resting spores under anaerobic conditions. Induction of Nar2 synthesis in spores was linked to transcriptional control. Nar2 activity in whole mycelium was strictly dependent on the presence of a putative nitrate transporter, NarK2. The oxygen-dependent inhibition of nitrate reduction by Nar2 was mediated by NarK2-dependent nitrate:nitrite antiport. This antiport mechanism likely prevents the accumulation of toxic nitrite in the cytoplasm. A deletion of the narK2 gene had no effect on Nar1-dependent nitrate reduction in resting spores. Together, our results indicate redox-dependent transcriptional and posttranslational control of nitrate reduction by Nar2. PMID:25225271

  18. Risk of nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus infection and effectiveness of control measures to prevent transmission events: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    French, Clare E; McKenzie, Bruce C; Coope, Caroline; Rajanaidu, Subhadra; Paranthaman, Karthik; Pebody, Richard; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; Higgins, Julian P T; Beck, Charles R

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes a significant public health burden, and outbreaks among vulnerable patients in hospital settings are of particular concern. We reviewed published and unpublished literature from hospital settings to assess: (i) nosocomial RSV transmission risk (attack rate) during outbreaks, (ii) effectiveness of infection control measures. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, together with key websites, journals and grey literature, to end of 2012. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool or Newcastle-Ottawa scale. A narrative synthesis was conducted. Forty studies were included (19 addressing research question one, 21 addressing question two). RSV transmission risk varied by hospital setting; 6-56% (median: 28·5%) in neonatal/paediatric settings (n = 14), 6-12% (median: 7%) in adult haematology and transplant units (n = 3), and 30-32% in other adult settings (n = 2). For question two, most studies (n = 13) employed multi-component interventions (e.g. cohort nursing, personal protective equipment (PPE), isolation), and these were largely reported to be effective in reducing nosocomial transmission. Four studies examined staff PPE; eye protection appeared more effective than gowns and masks. One study reported on RSV prophylaxis for patients (RSV-Ig/palivizumab); there was no statistical evidence of effectiveness although the sample size was small. Overall, risk of bias for included studies tended to be high. We conclude that RSV transmission risk varies widely during hospital outbreaks. Although multi-component control strategies appear broadly successful, further research is required to disaggregate the effectiveness of individual components including the potential role of palivizumab prophylaxis. PMID:26901358

  19. Primary care randomised controlled trial of a tailored interactive website for the self-management of respiratory infections (Internet Doctor)

    PubMed Central

    Little, Paul; Stuart, Beth; Andreou, Panayiota; McDermott, Lisa; Joseph, Judith; Mullee, Mark; Moore, Mike; Broomfield, Sue; Thomas, Tammy; Yardley, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess an internet-delivered intervention providing advice to manage respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Design Open pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial. Setting Primary care in UK. Participants Adults (aged ≥18) registered with general practitioners, recruited by postal invitation. Intervention Patients were randomised with computer-generated random numbers to access the intervention website (intervention) or not (control). The intervention tailored advice about the diagnosis, natural history, symptom management (particularly paracetamol/ibuprofen use) and when to seek further help. Outcomes Primary: National Health Service (NHS) contacts for those reporting RTIs from monthly online questionnaires for 20 weeks. Secondary: hospitalisations; symptom duration/severity. Results 3044 participants were recruited. 852 in the intervention group and 920 in the control group reported 1 or more RTIs, among whom there was a modest increase in NHS direct contacts in the intervention group (intervention 37/1574 (2.4%) versus control 20/1661 (1.2%); multivariate risk ratio (RR) 2.25 (95% CI 1.00 to 5.07, p=0.048)). Conversely, reduced contact with doctors occurred (239/1574 (15.2%) vs 304/1664 (18.3%); RR 0.71, 0.52 to 0.98, p=0.037). Reduction in contacts occurred despite slightly longer illness duration (11.3 days vs 10.7 days, respectively; multivariate estimate 0.60 days longer (−0.15 to 1.36, p=0.118) and more days of illness rated moderately bad or worse illness (0.52 days; 0.06 to 0.97, p=0.026). The estimate of slower symptom resolution in the intervention group was attenuated when controlling for whether individuals had used web pages which advocated ibuprofen use (length of illness 0.22 days, −0.51 to 0.95, p=0.551; moderately bad or worse symptoms 0.36 days, −0.08 to 0.80, p=0.105). There was no evidence of increased hospitalisations (risk ratio 0.25; 0.05 to 1.12; p=0.069). Conclusions An internet

  20. Indomethacin-induced impairment of regional cerebrovascular reactivity: implications for respiratory control.

    PubMed

    Hoiland, Ryan L; Ainslie, Philip N; Wildfong, Kevin W; Smith, Kurt J; Bain, Anthony R; Willie, Chris K; Foster, Glen; Monteleone, Brad; Day, Trevor A

    2015-03-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity impacts CO₂-[H(+)] washout at the central chemoreceptors and hence has marked influence on the control of ventilation. To date, the integration of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and ventilation has been investigated exclusively with measures of anterior CBF, which has a differential reactivity from the vertebrobasilar system and perfuses the brainstem. We hypothesized that: (1) posterior versus anterior CBF would have a stronger relationship to central chemoreflex magnitude during hypercapnia, and (2) that higher posterior reactivity would lead to a greater hypoxic ventilatory decline (HVD). End-tidal forcing was used to induce steady-state hyperoxic (300 mmHg P ET ,O₂) hypercapnia (+3, +6 and +9 mmHg P ET ,CO₂) and isocapnic hypoxia (45 mmHg P ET ,O₂) before and following pharmacological blunting (indomethacin; INDO; 1.45 ± 0.17 mg kg(-1)) of resting CBF and reactivity. In 22 young healthy volunteers, ventilation, intra-cranial arterial blood velocities and extra-cranial blood flows were measured during these challenges. INDO-induced blunting of cerebrovascular flow responsiveness (CVR) to CO₂ was unrelated to variability in ventilatory sensitivity during hyperoxic hypercapnia. Further results in a sub-group of volunteers (n = 9) revealed that elevations of P ET,CO₂ via end-tidal forcing reduce arterial-jugular venous gradients, attenuating the effect of CBF on chemoreflex responses. During isocapnic hypoxia, vertebral artery CVR was related to the magnitude of HVD (R(2) = 0.27; P < 0.04; n = 16), suggesting that CO₂-[H(+)] washout from central chemoreceptors modulates hypoxic ventilatory dynamics. No relationships were apparent with anterior CVR. As higher posterior, but not anterior, CVR was linked to HVD, our study highlights the importance of measuring flow in posterior vessels to investigate CBF and ventilatory integration. PMID:25641262

  1. Comparative binding of biotinylated neurotrophins to alpha(2)-macroglobulin family of proteins: relationship between cytokine-binding and neuro-modulatory activities of the macroglobulins.

    PubMed

    Skornicka, Erin L; Shi, Xiaoqing; Koo, Peter H

    2002-02-01

    Human alpha(2)-macroglobulin (alpha(2)M), pregnancy zone protein (PZP), rat alpha(1)M and acute-phase rat alpha(2)M belong to the alpha(2)M gene family of proteins, which can react covalently with nucleophilic monoamines to yield monoamine-activated (MA) macroglobulins. The MA forms of human alpha(2)M, PZP and rat alpha(2)M have been demonstrated previously to inhibit various neurotrophin-promoted neuronal activities, whereas MA-alpha(1)M is neurostimulatory and all native macroglobulins are generally inactive. The mechanism of neuromodulation is unknown, but it has been postulated that MA macroglobulins might inhibit neurons via their binding and sequestration of neurotrophins. This study employed a novel biotinylation-Western blot technique to compare the neurotrophin-binding properties of the four macroglobulins, and to correlate their binding activities with their known neuro-modulatory activities. In comparison with their respective native counterparts, human and rat MA-alpha(2)M bound slightly more NGF, but significantly less BDNF or NT-3. Native human alpha(2)M and PZP in general have no neuro-modulatory activity, but native PZP bound significantly more NGF, BDNF or NT-3 than either native alpha(2)M or MA-alpha(2)M, which is neuro-inhibitory. It is known that MA-PZP is neuro-inhibitory, but it fails to bind more NGF, BDNF, or NT-3 than native PZP. MA-alpha(1)M is the only macroglobulin known to stimulate NGF-promoted neurite outgrowth, but it bound NGF with similar affinities as native alpha(1)M and rat alpha(2)M; in addition, it bound significantly less BDNF or NT-3 than native alpha(1)M. All the bindings were non-covalent and appeared specific. In conclusion, PZP and rat macroglobulins are versatile carriers of neurotrophins with diverse binding capacities, and the neurotrophin-binding property does not appear to mediate the neuro-modulatory activity of these human and rat macroglobulins. PMID:11813239

  2. The static pressure-volume relationship of the respiratory system determined with a computer-controlled ventilator.

    PubMed

    Svantesson, C; Drefeldt, B; Jonson, B

    1997-07-01

    The pressure-volume relationship of the respiratory system offers a guideline for setting of ventilators. The occlusion method for determination of the static elastic pressure-volume (Pel(st)/V) relationship is used as a reference and the aim of the study was to improve it with respect to time consumption and precision of recording and analysis. The inspiratory Pel(st)/V curve was determined with a computer-controlled ventilator using its pressure and flow sensors. During an automated procedure, an operator-defined volume history preceded each of a number of study breaths. These were interrupted at different volumes evenly distributed over a predefined volume interval. Total positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was measured and could be separated into its components, external PEEP and auto-PEEP. The volume relationship between the curve and the current tidal volume was defined. An analytical method for definition of a linear segment of the Pel(st)/V curve and determination of its compliance is presented. In eight healthy human anaesthetized subjects duplicate Pel(st)/V curves were studied with respect to compliance and the position along the volume axis of the linear segment. The difference in compliance between measurements was 1.6 +/- 1.3 ml cmH2O(-1) or 1.2 +/- 0.9%. The position of the curve differed between measurements by 15 +/- 10 ml or by 1.1 +/- 0.9%. In a patient with acute lung injury the feasibility of applying a numerical method for a more detailed description of the Pel(st)/V curve was illustrated. PMID:19361153

  3. Helmet CPAP versus Oxygen Therapy in Hypoxemic Acute Respiratory Failure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuwen; Luo, Yan; Li, Yun; Zhou, Luqian; Zhu, Zhe; Chen, Yitai; Huang, Yuxia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of helmet continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in hypoxemic acute respiratory failure (hARF) remains unclear. The aim of this meta-analysis was to critically review studies that investigated the effect of helmet CPAP on gas exchange, mortality, and intubation rate in comparison with standard oxygen therapy. Materials and Methods We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) by searching the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, OVID, and CBM databases, and the bibliographies of the retrieved articles. Studies that enrolled adults with hARF who were treated with helmet CPAP and measured at least one of the following parameters were included: gas exchange, intubation rate, in-hospital mortality rate. Results Four studies with 377 subjects met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Compared to the standard oxygen therapy, helmet CPAP significantly increased the PaO2/FiO2 [weighted mean difference (WMD)=73.40, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 43.92 to 102.87, p<0.00001], and decreased the arterial carbon dioxide levels (WMD=-1.92, 95% CI: -3.21 to -0.63, p=0.003), intubation rate [relative risk (RR)=0.21, 95% CI: 0.11 to 0.40, p<0.00001], and in-hospital mortality rate (RR=0.22, 95% CI: 0.09 to 0.50, p=0.0004). Conclusion The results of this meta-analysis suggest that helmet CPAP improves oxygenation and reduces mortality and intubation rates in hARF. However, the significant clinical and statistical heterogeneity of the literature implies that large RCTs are needed to determine the role of helmet CPAP in different hypoxemic ARF populations. PMID:27189288

  4. Efficacy of a respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package in hospitalized elderly patients with acute exacerbation of COPD: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lin-Yu; Chen, Kuei-Min; Chung, Wei-Sheng; Chien, Jung-Yien

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials identifier NCT02329873 Background Acute exacerbation (AE) of COPD is characterized by a sudden worsening of COPD symptoms. Previous studies have explored the effectiveness of respiratory rehabilitation for patients with COPD; however, no training program specific to acute exacerbation in elderly patients or unstable periods during hospitalization has been developed. Objective To evaluate the effects of a respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package on dyspnea, cough, exercise tolerance, and sputum expectoration among hospitalized elderly patients with AECOPD. Methods A randomized control trial was conducted. Pretest and posttest evaluations of 61 elderly inpatients with AECOPD (experimental group n=30; control group n=31) were performed. The experimental group received respiratory rehabilitation exercise training twice a day, 10–30 minutes per session for 4 days. The clinical parameters (dyspnea, cough, exercise tolerance, and sputum expectoration) were assessed at the baseline and at the end of the fourth day. Results All participants (median age =70 years, male =60.70%, and peak expiratory flow 140 L) completed the study. In the patients of the experimental group, dyspnea and cough decreased and exercise tolerance and sputum expectoration increased significantly compared with those of the patients in the control group (all P<0.05). Within-group comparisons revealed that the dyspnea, cough, and exercise tolerance significantly improved in the experimental group by the end of the fourth day (all P<0.05). Conclusion Results of this study suggest that the respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package reduced symptoms and enhanced the effectiveness of the care of elderly inpatients with AECOPD. PMID:26345529

  5. Bronchiectasis exacerbation study on azithromycin and amoxycillin-clavulanate for respiratory exacerbations in children (BEST-2): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis (CF) is being increasingly recognized in children and adults globally, both in resource-poor and in affluent countries. However, high-quality evidence to inform management is scarce. Oral amoxycillin-clavulanate is often the first antibiotic chosen for non-severe respiratory exacerbations, because of the antibiotic-susceptibility patterns detected in the respiratory pathogens commonly associated with bronchiectasis. Azithromycin has a prolonged half-life, and with its unique anti-bacterial, immunomodulatory, and anti-inflammatory properties, presents an attractive alternative. Our proposed study will test the hypothesis that oral azithromycin is non-inferior (within a 20% margin) to amoxycillin-clavulanate at achieving resolution of non-severe respiratory exacerbations by day 21 of treatment in children with non-CF bronchiectasis. Methods This will be a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, parallel group trial involving six Australian and New Zealand centers. In total, 170 eligible children will be stratified by site and bronchiectasis etiology, and randomized (allocation concealed) to receive: 1) azithromycin (5 mg/kg daily) with placebo amoxycillin-clavulanate or 2) amoxycillin-clavulanate (22.5 mg/kg twice daily) with placebo azithromycin for 21 days as treatment for non-severe respiratory exacerbations. Clinical data and a parent-proxy cough-specific quality of life (PC-QOL) score will be obtained at baseline, at the start and resolution of exacerbations, and on day 21. In most children, blood and deep-nasal swabs will also be collected at the same time points. The primary outcome is the proportion of children whose exacerbations have resolved at day 21. The main secondary outcome is the PC-QOL score. Other outcomes are: time to next exacerbation; requirement for hospitalization; duration of exacerbation, and spirometry data. Descriptive viral and bacteriological data

  6. A Switch in the Neuromodulatory Effects of Dopamine in the Oval Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis Associated with Cocaine Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Michal; Sharma, Robyn; Mason, Xenos; DeBacker, Julian; Jones, Andrea A.; Dumont, Éric C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to drugs of abuse alters brain reward circuits and produces functional changes in the dopamine (DA) system. However, it is not known whether these changes are directly related to drug-driven behaviors or whether they simply are adaptive responses to long-term drug exposure. Here, we combined the rat model of cocaine self-administration with brain slice electrophysiology to identify drug-use related alterations in the neuromodulatory effects of DA in the oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (ovBST), a robust DA terminal field. Long–Evans rats self-administered cocaine intravenously (0.75 mg/kg/injection) for an average of 15 d, on reward-lean or -rich schedules of reinforcement. Brain slice recordings conducted 20 h after the last self-administration session revealed a reversal of the neuromodulatory effect of DA on GABAA-IPSCs. Specifically, the effect of DA switched from a D2-mediated decrease in drug-naive rats to a D1-receptor-mediated increase in GABAA-IPSC in cocaine self-administering rats. Furthermore, the switch in DA modulation of GABAA-IPSC remained after a 30 d withdrawal period. In contrast, this switch was not observed after the acquisition phase of cocaine self-administration, when rats received cocaine passively, or in rats maintaining sucrose self-administration. Therefore, our study reveals a reversal in the effects of DA on inhibitory transmission, from reduction to enhancement, in the ovBST of cocaine self-administering rats. This change was unique to voluntary intake of cocaine and maintained after a withdrawal period, suggesting a mechanism underlying the maintenance of cocaine self-administration and perhaps craving during drug-free periods. PMID:21677176

  7. A switch in the neuromodulatory effects of dopamine in the oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis associated with cocaine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Michal; Sharma, Robyn; Mason, Xenos; Debacker, Julian; Jones, Andrea A; Dumont, Eric C

    2011-06-15

    Chronic exposure to drugs of abuse alters brain reward circuits and produces functional changes in the dopamine (DA) system. However, it is not known whether these changes are directly related to drug-driven behaviors or whether they simply are adaptive responses to long-term drug exposure. Here, we combined the rat model of cocaine self-administration with brain slice electrophysiology to identify drug-use related alterations in the neuromodulatory effects of DA in the oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (ovBST), a robust DA terminal field. Long-Evans rats self-administered cocaine intravenously (0.75 mg/kg/injection) for an average of 15 d, on reward-lean or -rich schedules of reinforcement. Brain slice recordings conducted 20 h after the last self-administration session revealed a reversal of the neuromodulatory effect of DA on GABA(A)-IPSCs. Specifically, the effect of DA switched from a D2-mediated decrease in drug-naive rats to a D1-receptor-mediated increase in GABA(A)-IPSC in cocaine self-administering rats. Furthermore, the switch in DA modulation of GABA(A)-IPSC remained after a 30 d withdrawal period. In contrast, this switch was not observed after the acquisition phase of cocaine self-administration, when rats received cocaine passively, or in rats maintaining sucrose self-administration. Therefore, our study reveals a reversal in the effects of DA on inhibitory transmission, from reduction to enhancement, in the ovBST of cocaine self-administering rats. This change was unique to voluntary intake of cocaine and maintained after a withdrawal period, suggesting a mechanism underlying the maintenance of cocaine self-administration and perhaps craving during drug-free periods. PMID:21677176

  8. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... from inhaling smoke or harmful fumes Treatment for respiratory failure depends on whether the condition is acute (short-term) or chronic (ongoing) and how severe it is. It also depends on the underlying cause. You may receive oxygen therapy and other treatment to help you breathe. NIH: ...

  9. Does trans-spinal direct current stimulation alter phrenic motoneurons and respiratory neuromechanical outputs in humans? A double-blind, sham-controlled, randomized, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Niérat, Marie-Cécile; Similowski, Thomas; Lamy, Jean-Charles

    2014-10-22

    Although compelling evidence has demonstrated considerable neuroplasticity in the respiratory control system, few studies have explored the possibility of altering descending projections to phrenic motoneurons (PMNs) using noninvasive stimulation protocols. The present study was designed to investigate the immediate and long-lasting effects of a single session of transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS), a promising technique for modulating spinal cord functions, on descending ventilatory commands in healthy humans. Using a double-blind, controlled, randomized, crossover approach, we examined the effects of anodal, cathodal, and sham tsDCS delivered to the C3-C5 level on (1) diaphragm motor-evoked potentials (DiMEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation and (2) spontaneous ventilation, as measured by respiratory inductance plethysmography. Both anodal and cathodal tsDCS induced a progressive increase in DiMEP amplitude during stimulation that persisted for at least 15 min after current offset. Interestingly, cathodal, but not anodal, tsDCS induced a persistent increase in tidal volume. In addition, (1) short-interval intracortical inhibition, (2) nonlinear complexity of the tidal volume signal (related to medullary ventilatory command), (3) autonomic function, and (4) compound muscle action potentials evoked by cervical magnetic stimulation were unaffected by tsDCS. This suggests that tsDCS-induced aftereffects did not occur at brainstem or cortical levels and were likely not attributable to direct polarization of cranial nerves or ventral roots. Instead, we argue that tsDCS could induce sustained changes in PMN output. Increased tidal volume after cathodal tsDCS opens up the perspective of harnessing respiratory neuroplasticity as a therapeutic tool for the management of several respiratory disorders. PMID:25339753

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alexander K. C.; Kellner, James D.; Davies, H. Dele

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus, the most common cause of bronchiolitis, is the leading cause of infant hospitalization in developed countries and accounts for substantial mortality and morbidity in developing countries. Children at increased risk of developing severe bronchiolitis are those <6 weeks of age, those born prematurely and those with an underlying cardiopulmonary disorder or immunodeficiency. Approximately 80% of cases occur in the first year of life. By two years of age, virtually all children have been infected by at least one strain of the virus. Classically, respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis manifests as cough, wheezing and respiratory distress. The mainstay of treatment is supportive care, consisting of adequate fluid intake, antipyretics to control fever and use of supplemental oxygen if necessary. Frequent and meticulous hand-washing is the best measure to prevent secondary spread. Treatment of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis beyond supportive care should be individualized. Palivizumab has been shown to be effective in preventing severe respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in high-risk children when given prophylactically. In the majority of cases, the disease is usually self-limited. The mortality rate is <1% and occurs predominantly in children at high risk for severe disease. PMID:16396064

  11. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  12. A pilot study of respiratory muscle training to improve cough effectiveness and reduce the incidence of pneumonia in acute stroke: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background After stroke, pneumonia is a relevant medical complication that can be precipitated by aspiration of saliva, liquids, or solid food. Swallowing difficulty and aspiration occur in a significant proportion of stroke survivors. Cough, an important mechanism protecting the lungs from inhaled materials, can be impaired in stroke survivors, and the likely cause for this impairment is central weakness of the respiratory musculature. Thus, respiratory muscle training in acute stroke may be useful in the recovery of respiratory muscle and cough function, and may thereby reduce the risk of pneumonia. The present study is a pilot study, aimed at investigating the validity and feasibility of this approach by exploring effect size, safety, and patient acceptability of the intervention. Methods/design Adults with moderate to severe stroke impairment (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score 5 to 25 at the time of admission) are recruited within 2 weeks of stroke onset. Participants must be able to perform voluntary respiratory maneuvers. Excluded are patients with increased intracranial pressure, uncontrolled hypertension, neuromuscular conditions other than stroke, medical history of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and recent cardiac events. Participants are randomized to receive inspiratory, expiratory, or sham respiratory training over a 4-week period, by using commercially available threshold resistance devices. Participants and caregivers, but not study investigators, are blind to treatment allocation. All participants receive medical care and stroke rehabilitation according to the usual standard of care. The following assessments are conducted at baseline, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks: Voluntary and reflex cough flow measurements, forced spirometry, respiratory muscle strength tests, incidence of pneumonia, assessments of safety parameters, and self-reported activity of daily living. The primary outcome is peak expiratory cough flow

  13. Measuring Progress on the Control of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) at a Regional Level: The Minnesota N212 Regional Control Project (Rcp) as a Working Example.

    PubMed

    Valdes-Donoso, Pablo; Jarvis, Lovell S; Wright, Dave; Alvarez, Julio; Perez, Andres M

    2016-01-01

    Due to the highly transmissible nature of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), implementation of regional programs to control the disease may be critical. Because PRRS is not reported in the US, numerous voluntary regional control projects (RCPs) have been established. However, the effect of RCPs on PRRS control has not been assessed yet. This study aims to quantify the extent to which RCPs contribute to PRRS control by proposing a methodological framework to evaluate the progress of RCPs. Information collected between July 2012 and June 2015 from the Minnesota Voluntary Regional PRRS Elimination Project (RCP-N212) was used. Demography of premises (e.g. composition of farms with sows = SS and without sows = NSS) was assessed by a repeated analysis of variance. By using general linear mixed-effects models, active participation of farms enrolled in the RCP-N212, defined as the decision to share (or not to share) PRRS status, was evaluated and used as a predictor, along with other variables, to assess the PRRS trend over time. Additionally, spatial and temporal patterns of farmers' participation and the disease dynamics were investigated. The number of farms enrolled in RCP-N212 and its geographical coverage increased, but the proportion of SS and NSS did not vary significantly over time. A significant increasing (p<0.001) trend in farmers' decision to share PRRS status was observed, but with NSS producers less willing to report and a large variability between counties. The incidence of PRRS significantly (p<0.001) decreased, showing a negative correlation between degree of participation and occurrence of PRRS (p<0.001) and a positive correlation with farm density at the county level (p = 0.02). Despite a noted decrease in PRRS, significant spatio-temporal patterns of incidence of the disease over 3-weeks and 3-kms during the entire study period were identified. This study established a systematic approach to quantify the effect of RCPs on PRRS

  14. Measuring Progress on the Control of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) at a Regional Level: The Minnesota N212 Regional Control Project (Rcp) as a Working Example

    PubMed Central

    Valdes-Donoso, Pablo; Jarvis, Lovell S.; Wright, Dave; Alvarez, Julio; Perez, Andres M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the highly transmissible nature of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), implementation of regional programs to control the disease may be critical. Because PRRS is not reported in the US, numerous voluntary regional control projects (RCPs) have been established. However, the effect of RCPs on PRRS control has not been assessed yet. This study aims to quantify the extent to which RCPs contribute to PRRS control by proposing a methodological framework to evaluate the progress of RCPs. Information collected between July 2012 and June 2015 from the Minnesota Voluntary Regional PRRS Elimination Project (RCP-N212) was used. Demography of premises (e.g. composition of farms with sows = SS and without sows = NSS) was assessed by a repeated analysis of variance. By using general linear mixed-effects models, active participation of farms enrolled in the RCP-N212, defined as the decision to share (or not to share) PRRS status, was evaluated and used as a predictor, along with other variables, to assess the PRRS trend over time. Additionally, spatial and temporal patterns of farmers’ participation and the disease dynamics were investigated. The number of farms enrolled in RCP-N212 and its geographical coverage increased, but the proportion of SS and NSS did not vary significantly over time. A significant increasing (p<0.001) trend in farmers’ decision to share PRRS status was observed, but with NSS producers less willing to report and a large variability between counties. The incidence of PRRS significantly (p<0.001) decreased, showing a negative correlation between degree of participation and occurrence of PRRS (p<0.001) and a positive correlation with farm density at the county level (p = 0.02). Despite a noted decrease in PRRS, significant spatio-temporal patterns of incidence of the disease over 3-weeks and 3-kms during the entire study period were identified. This study established a systematic approach to quantify the effect of RCPs on PRRS

  15. A comparison of synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in elderly patients with acute exacerbations of COPD and respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Suchi; Shi, Jindong; Fu, Cuiping; Wu, Xu; Li, Shanqun

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Acute exacerbations of COPD may cause respiratory failure, requiring intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation. Intensive care unit patients with acute exacerbations of COPD requiring mechanical ventilation have higher mortality rates than other hospitalized patients. Although mechanical ventilation is the most effective intervention for these conditions, invasive ventilation techniques have yielded variable effects. Objective We evaluated pressure-regulated volume control (PRVC) ventilation treatment efficacy and preventive effects on pulmonary barotrauma in elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure. Patients and methods Thirty-nine intubated patients were divided into experimental and control groups and treated with the PRVC and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation – volume control methods, respectively. Vital signs, respiratory mechanics, and arterial blood gas analyses were monitored for 2–4 hours and 48 hours. Results Both groups showed rapidly improved pH, partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and PaO2 per fraction of inspired O2 levels and lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. The pH and PaCO2 levels at 2–4 hours were lower and higher, respectively, in the test group than those in the control group (P<0.05 for both); after 48 hours, blood gas analyses showed no statistical difference in any marker (P>0.05). Vital signs during 2–4 hours and 48 hours of treatment showed no statistical difference in either group (P>0.05). The level of peak inspiratory pressure in the experimental group after mechanical ventilation for 2–4 hours and 48 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05), while other variables were not significantly different between groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Among elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure, application of PRVC resulted in rapid improvement in arterial blood gas analyses while maintaining

  16. Sustained lung inflation in the delivery room in preterm infants at high risk of respiratory distress syndrome (SLI STUDY): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Some studies have suggested that the early sustained lung inflation (SLI) procedure is effective in decreasing the need for mechanical ventilation (MV) and improving respiratory outcome in preterm infants. We planned the present randomized controlled trial to confirm or refute these findings. Methods/Design In this study, 276 infants born at 25+0 to 28+6 weeks’ gestation at high risk of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) will be randomized to receive the SLI maneuver (25 cmH2O for 15 seconds) followed by nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) or NCPAP alone in the delivery room. SLI and NCPAP will be delivered using a neonatal mask and a T-piece ventilator. The primary endpoint is the need for MV in the first 72 hours of life. The secondary endpoints include the need and duration of respiratory support (NCPAP, MV and surfactant), and the occurrence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Trial registration Trial registration number: NCT01440868 PMID:23497495

  17. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

    MedlinePlus

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; Novel coronavirus; nCoV ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Middle East ... 2, 2015. www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/mers/faq.html . Accessed April ...

  18. CADMIUM AS A RESPIRATORY TOXICANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium is a major respiratory toxicant as evidenced by numerous human and animal studies. Controlled animal inhalation studies provide supporting evidence to the associations observed in epidemiological studies that Cd has the potential to cause lung fibrosis, emphysema, cancer,...

  19. High fatty acid oxidation capacity and phosphorylation control despite elevated leak and reduced respiratory capacity in northern elephant seal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chicco, Adam J; Le, Catherine H; Schlater, Amber; Nguyen, Alex; Kaye, Spencer; Beals, Joseph W; Scalzo, Rebecca L; Bell, Christopher; Gnaiger, Erich; Costa, Daniel P; Crocker, Daniel E; Kanatous, Shane B

    2014-08-15

    Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) are extreme, hypoxia-adapted endotherms that rely largely on aerobic metabolism during extended breath-hold dives in near-freezing water temperatures. While many aspects of their physiology have been characterized to account for these remarkable feats, the contribution of adaptations in the aerobic powerhouses of muscle cells, the mitochondria, are unknown. In the present study, the ontogeny and comparative physiology of elephant seal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function was investigated under a variety of substrate conditions and respiratory states. Intact mitochondrial networks were studied by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized fiber bundles obtained from primary swimming muscles of pup, juvenile and adult seals, and compared with fibers from adult human vastus lateralis. Results indicate that seal muscle maintains a high capacity for fatty acid oxidation despite a progressive decrease in total respiratory capacity as animals mature from pups to adults. This is explained by a progressive increase in phosphorylation control and fatty acid utilization over pyruvate in adult seals compared with humans and seal pups. Interestingly, despite higher indices of oxidative phosphorylation efficiency, juvenile and adult seals also exhibit a ~50% greater capacity for respiratory 'leak' compared with humans and seal pups. The ontogeny of this phenotype suggests it is an adaptation of muscle to the prolonged breath-hold exercise and highly variable ambient temperatures experienced by mature elephant seals. These studies highlight the remarkable plasticity of mammalian mitochondria to meet the demands for both efficient ATP production and endothermy in a cold, oxygen-limited environment. PMID:24902742

  20. Respiratory Distress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The University of Miami School of Medicine asked the Research Triangle Institute for assistance in improvising the negative pressure technique to relieve respiratory distress in infants. Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center engineers adapted this idea to the lower-body negative-pressure system seals used during the Skylab missions. Some 20,000 babies succumb to respiratory distress in the U.S. each year, a condition in which lungs progressively lose their ability to oxygenate blood. Both positive and negative pressure techniques have been used - the first to force air into lungs, the second to keep infant's lungs expanded. Negative pressure around chest helps the baby expand his lungs and maintain proper volume of air. If doctors can keep the infant alive for four days, the missing substance in the lungs will usually form in sufficient quantity to permit normal breathing. The Skylab chamber and its leakproof seals were adapted for medical use.

  1. The Use of Benzodiazepine Receptor Agonists and Risk of Respiratory Failure in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su-Jung; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chao, Tze-Fan; Liu, Chia-Jen; Wang, Kang-Ling; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chou, Pesus; Wang, Fu-Der

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Insomnia is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BZRAs) are the most commonly used drugs despite their adverse effects on respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of BZRAs was associated with an increased risk of respiratory failure (RF) in COPD patients. Design: Matched case-control study. Setting: National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. Participants: The case group consisted of 2,434 COPD patients with RF, and the control group consisted of 2,434 COPD patients without RF, matched for age, sex, and date of enrollment. Measurements and Results: Exposure to BZRAs during the 180-day period preceding the index date was analyzed and compared in the case and control groups. Conditional logistic regression was performed, and the use of BZRAs was associated with an increased risk of RF (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14–2.13). In subgroup analysis, we found that the benzodiazepine (BZD) users had a higher risk of RF (aOR 1.58, 95% CI 1.14–2.20), whereas the risk in non-benzodiazepine (non-BZD) users was insignificant (aOR 0.85, 95% CI 0.51–1.44). A greater than 2-fold increase in risk was found in those who received two or more kinds of BZRAs and those using a combination of BZD and non-BZD medications. Conclusions: The use of benzodiazepine receptor agonists was a significant risk factor for respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Compared to benzodiazepine, the prescription of non-benzodiazepine may be safer for the management of insomnia in COPD patients. Citation: Chen SJ, Yeh CM, Chao TF, Liu CJ, Wang KL, Chen TJ, Chou P, Wang FD. The use of benzodiazepine receptor agonists and risk of respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a nationwide population-based case-control study. SLEEP 2015;38(7):1045–1050

  2. Randomized, non-inferiority trial comparing a nitric oxide releasing solution with a macrolide antibiotic for control of bovine respiratory disease in beef feedlot calves at high-risk of developing respiratory tract disease.

    PubMed

    Crepieux, T; Miller, C; Regev-Shoshani, G; Schaefer, A; Dorin, C; Alexander, T; Timsit, E

    2016-04-01

    Nitric oxide, a molecule produced in most mammalian cells, has bactericidal and virucidal properties. Nasal instillation of a nitric oxide releasing solution (NORS) on arrival at the feedlot was recently reported as non-inferior to a parenteral injection of a macrolide antibiotic, tilmicosin, for control of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in cattle at low-to-moderate risk of developing BRD. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether NORS was non-inferior to tilmicosin for control of BRD in cattle at high-risk of developing BRD (the target population for many BRD control programs). High-risk Angus-cross heifers (n=840) were randomly allocated to 2 treatment groups on arrival at a feedlot and received either NORS or tilmicosin for BRD control. Non-inferiority was assessed by calculating the difference in prevalence of heifers diagnosed with BRD during the first 40d after arrival between NORS and tilmicosin treatment groups. The non-inferiority margin (δ) was set at 8.5%. Thirty-six and 19% of heifers were diagnosed with BRD in the NORS and tilmicosin groups, respectively. Because the lower bound of the 2-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) of the difference in BRD prevalence between the 2 treatment groups (17%; 95% CI=11-23%) was higher than δ, an inferiority of NORS was concluded. Although on-arrival nasal administration of NORS can be viewed as a more rational control strategy than parental injection of antibiotics, further research is needed to improve NORS efficacy before it can be recommended to prevent BRD in high-risk cattle. PMID:27033936

  3. Initial Treatment of Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Nasal Intermittent Mandatory Ventilation versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Armanian, Amir-Mohammad; Badiee, Zohreh; Heidari, Ghobad; Feizi, Awat; Salehimehr, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in premature infants who survived and its complications are a common problem. Due to high morbidity and mechanical ventilation (MV) nowadays researchers in interested minimizing MV. To determine, in very low birth weight (BW) preterm neonates with RDS, if initial treatment with nasal intermittent mandatory ventilation (early NIMV) compared with early nasal continuous positive airway pressure (early NCPAP) obtains more favorable outcomes in terms of the duration of treatment, and the need for endotracheal tube ventilation. Methods: In this single-center randomized control trial study, infants (BW ≤ 1500 g and/or gestational age ≤ 34 weeks) with respiratory distress were considered eligible. Forty-four infants were randomly assigned to receive early-NIMV and 54 comparable infants to early-NCPAP. Surfactants were given, when FIO2 requirement was of >30%. Primary outcomes were failure of noninvasive respiratory support, that is, the need for MV in the first 48 h of life and for the duration of noninvasive respiratory support in each group. Results: 98 infants were enrolled (44 in the NIMV and 54 in the NCPAP group). The Preventive power of MV of NIMV usage (95.5%) was not lower than the NCPAP (98.1%) strength (hazard ratio: 0.21 (95% confidence interval: 0.02-2.66); P: 0.23). The duration of noninvasive respiratory support in the NIMV group was significantly shorter than NCPAP (the median (range) was 24 (18.00-48.00) h versus 48.00 (22.00-120.00) h in NIMV versus NCPAP groups; P < 0.001). Similarly, the duration of dependency on oxygen was less, for NIMV (the median (range) was 96.00 (41.00-504.00) h versus144.00 (70.00-1130.00) h in NIMV versus NCPAP groups; P: 0.009). Interestingly, time to full enteral feeds and length of hospital stay were more favorable in the NIMV versus the NCPAP group. Conclusions: Initial treatment of RDS with NIMV was safe, and well tolerated. Furthermore, NIMV had excellent

  4. A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of a fiberglass manufacturing facility. II. Exposure assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Chiazze, L; Watkins, D K; Fryar, C; Kozono, J

    1993-01-01

    A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of the Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation's Newark, Ohio plant was undertaken. The aim was to determine the extent to which exposures to substances in the Newark plant environment, to non-workplace factors, or to a combination may play a part in the risk of mortality from respiratory disease among workers in this plant. A historical environmental reconstruction of the plant was undertaken to characterise the exposure profile for workers in this plant from its beginnings in 1934 to the end of 1987. The exposure profile provided estimates of cumulative exposure to respirable fibres, fine fibres, asbestos, talc, formaldehyde, silica, and asphalt fumes. Employment histories from Owens-Corning Fiberglas provided information on employment characteristics (duration of employment, year of hire, age at first hire) and an interview survey obtained information on demographic characteristics (birthdate, race, education, marital state, parent's ethnic background, and place of birth), lifetime residence, occupational and smoking histories, hobbies, and personal and family medical history. Matched, unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) were used to assess the association between lung cancer or non-malignant respiratory disease and the cumulative exposure history, demographic characteristics, and employment variables. Only the smoking variables and employment characteristics (year of hire and age at first hire) were statistically significant for lung cancer. For non-malignant respiratory disease, only the smoking variables were statistically significant in the univariate analysis. Of the variables entered into a conditional logistic regression model for lung cancer, only smoking (smoked for six months or more v never smoked: OR = 26.17, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 3.316-206.5) and age at first hire (35 and over v less than 35: OR = 0.244, 95% CI 0.083-0.717) were statistically significant. There

  5. Middle East respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Hui, David S; Perlman, Stanley

    2015-09-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a highly lethal respiratory disease caused by a novel single-stranded, positive-sense RNA betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Dromedary camels, hosts for MERS-CoV, are implicated in direct or indirect transmission to human beings, although the exact mode of transmission is unknown. The virus was first isolated from a patient who died from a severe respiratory illness in June, 2012, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. As of May 31, 2015, 1180 laboratory-confirmed cases (483 deaths; 40% mortality) have been reported to WHO. Both community-acquired and hospital-acquired cases have been reported with little human-to-human transmission reported in the community. Although most cases of MERS have occurred in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, cases have been reported in Europe, the USA, and Asia in people who travelled from the Middle East or their contacts. Clinical features of MERS range from asymptomatic or mild disease to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure resulting in death, especially in individuals with underlying comorbidities. No specific drug treatment exists for MERS and infection prevention and control measures are crucial to prevent spread in health-care facilities. MERS-CoV continues to be an endemic, low-level public health threat. However, the virus could mutate to have increased interhuman transmissibility, increasing its pandemic potential. PMID:26049252

  6. Dysrhythmias of the respiratory oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paydarfar, David; Buerkel, Daniel M.

    1995-03-01

    refractory periods. The same system can be perturbed to a state in which amplitude of oscillation is attenuated or abolished. We have characterized critical perturbations which induce transitions between these two states, giving rise to patterns of dysrhythmic activity that are similar to those seen in the experiments. We illustrate the importance of noise in initiation and termination of rhythm, comparable to normal respiratory rhythm intermixed with spontaneous dysrhythmias. In the BvP system the incidence and duration of dysrhythmia is shown to be strongly influenced by the level of noise. These studies should lead to greater understanding of rhythmicity and integrative responses of the respiratory control system, and provide insight into disturbances in control mechanisms that cause apnea and aspiration in clinical disease states.

  7. On the possible high +Gz tolerance increase by multimodal brain imaging controlled respiratory AFTE biofeedback training exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smietanowski, Maciej; Achimowicz, Jerzy; Lorenc, Kamil; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Zalewska, Ewa; Truszczynski, Olaf

    The experimental data related to Valsalva manouvers and short term voluntary apnea, available in the literature, suggest that the cerebral blood flow increase and reduction of the peripheral one may be expected if the specific AFTE based respiratory training is performed. The authors had verified this hypothesis by studying the relations between EEG measured subject relaxation combined with voluntary apnea by multimodal brain imaging technique (EEG mapping, Neuroscan and fMRI) in a group of healthy volunteers. The SPM analysis of respiratory related changes in cortical and subcortical BOLD signal has partially confirmed the hypothesis. The mechanism of this effect is probably based on the simultaneous blood pressure increase and total peripheral resistance increase. However the question is still open for further experimental verification if AFTE can be treated as the tool which can increase pilot/astronaut situation awareness in the extreme environment typical for aerospace operations where highly variable accelerations due to liftoff, rapid maneuvers, and vibrations can be expected in the critical phases of the mission.

  8. Initial synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation versus assist/control ventilation in treatment of moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome: a prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Wang, Mao-Yun; Liang, Bin-Miao; Yu, He; Jiang, Fa-Ming; Wang, Ting; Shi, Chao-Li; Li, Pei-Jun; Liu, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Background Assist/control (A/C) ventilation may induce delirium in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We conducted a trial to determine whether initial synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation with pressure support (SIMV + PS) could improve clinical outcomes in these patients. Methods Intubated patients with moderate ARDS were enrolled and we compared SIMV + PS with A/C. Identical sedation, analgesia and ventilation strategies were performed. The co-primary outcomes were early (≤72 h) partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) and incidence of delirium. The secondary outcomes were all-cause in-hospital mortality, dosages of analgesics and sedatives, incidence of patient-ventilator asynchrony, and duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay. Results We screened 2,684 patients and 40 patients were enrolled in our study. In SIMV + PS, early (≤72 h) PaO2/FiO2 was greater improved than that at baseline and that in A/C (P<0.05) with lower positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (8.7±3.0 vs. 10.3±3.2, P<0.001) and FiO2 (58%±18% vs. 67%±19%, P<0.001). We found more SIMV + PS success (defined as SIMV + PS successfully applied without switching to A/C) (100.0% vs. 16.7%, P<0.001), less male (46.3% vs. 85.7%, P=0.015) and pulmonary etiology of ARDS (53.8% vs. 92.9%, P=0.015), and lower PEEP (9.1±3.1 vs. 10.3±3.3, P=0.004) and FiO2 (58%±19% vs. 71%±19%, P<0.001) in survival patients. However, there were no significant differences in incidence of delirium and mortality, dosages of analgesics and sedatives, incidence of patient-ventilator asynchrony, duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay (P>0.05). Conclusions In patients with moderate ARDS, SIMV + PS can safely and effectively improve oxygenation, but does not decrease mortality, incidence of delirium and patient-ventilator asynchrony, dosages of analgesics and sedatives, and duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay

  9. Brain stimulation for the treatment of pain: A review of costs, clinical effects, and mechanisms of treatment for three different central neuromodulatory approaches

    PubMed Central

    Zaghi, Soroush; Heine, Nikolas; Fregni, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    Methods of cortical stimulation including epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS), repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are emerging as alternatives in the management of pain in patients with chronic medically-refractory pain disorders. Here we consider the three methods of brain stimulation that have been investigated for the treatment of central pain: MCS, rTMS, and tDCS. While all three treatment modalities appear to induce significant clinical gains in patients with chronic pain, tDCS is revealed as the most cost-effective approach (compared to rTMS and MCS) when considering a single year of treatment. However, if a 5-year treatment is considered, MCS is revealed as the most cost-effective modality (as compared to rTMS and tDCS) for the neuromodulatory treatment of chronic pain. We discuss the theory behind the application of each modality as well as efficacy, cost, safety, and practical considerations. PMID:20585474

  10. Progesterone Exerts a Neuromodulatory Effect on Turning Behavior of Hemiparkinsonian Male Rats: Expression of 3α-Hydroxysteroid Oxidoreductase and Allopregnanolone as Suggestive of GABAA Receptors Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Yunes, Roberto; Casas, Sebastián; Gaglio, Eliana; Cabrera, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence for a neuroprotective role of progesterone and its neuroactive metabolite, allopregnanolone, in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. By using a model of hemiparkinsonism in male rats, injection of the neurotoxic 6-OHDA in left striatum, we studied progesterone's effects on rotational behavior induced by amphetamine or apomorphine. Also, in order to find potential explanatory mechanisms, we studied expression and activity of nigrostriatal 3α-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase, the enzyme that catalyzes progesterone to its active metabolite allopregnanolone. Coherently, we tested allopregnanolone for a possible neuromodulatory effect on rotational behavior. Also, since allopregnanolone is known as a GABAA modulator, we finally examined the action of GABAA antagonist bicuculline. We found that progesterone, in addition to an apparent neuroprotective effect, also increased ipsilateral expression and activity of 3α-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase. It was interesting to note that ipsilateral administration of allopregnanolone reversed a clear sign of motor neurodegeneration, that is, contralateral rotational behavior. A possible GABAA involvement modulated by allopregnanolone was shown by the blocking effect of bicuculline. Our results suggest that early administration of progesterone possibly activates genomic mechanisms that promote neuroprotection subchronically. This, in turn, could be partially mediated by fast, nongenomic, actions of allopregnanolone acting as an acute modulator of GABAergic transmission. PMID:25918669

  11. Protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial for reducing irrational antibiotic prescribing among children with upper respiratory infections in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Guanyang; Wei, Xiaolin; Hicks, Joseph P; Hu, Yanhong; Walley, John; Zeng, Jun; Elsey, Helen; King, Rebecca; Zhang, Zhitong; Deng, Simin; Huang, Yuanyuan; Blacklock, Claire; Yin, Jia; Sun, Qiang; Lin, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Irrational use of antibiotics is a serious issue within China and internationally. In 2012, the Chinese Ministry of Health issued a regulation for antibiotic prescriptions limiting them to <20% of all prescriptions for outpatients, but no operational details have been issued regarding policy implementation. This study aims to test the effectiveness of a multidimensional intervention designed to reduce the use of antibiotics among children (aged 2–14 years old) with acute upper respiratory infections in rural primary care settings in China, through changing doctors' prescribing behaviours and educating parents/caregivers. Methods and analysis This is a pragmatic, parallel-group, controlled, cluster-randomised superiority trial, with blinded evaluation of outcomes and data analysis, and un-blinded treatment. From two counties in Guangxi Province, 12 township hospitals will be randomised to the intervention arm and 13 to the control arm. In the control arm, the management of antibiotics prescriptions will continue through usual care via clinical consultations. In the intervention arm, a provider and patient/caregiver focused intervention will be embedded within routine primary care practice. The provider intervention includes operational guidelines, systematic training, peer review of antibiotic prescribing and provision of health education to patient caregivers. We will also provide printed educational materials and educational videos to patients' caregivers. The primary outcome is the proportion of all prescriptions issued by providers for upper respiratory infections in children aged 2–14 years old, which include at least one antibiotic. Ethics and dissemination The trial has received ethical approval from the Ethics Committee of Guangxi Provincial Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, China. The results will be disseminated through workshops, policy briefs, peer-reviewed publications, local and international conferences. Trial

  12. Temperature control of a microspectrophotometer system for monitoring the redox reactions of respiratory pigments in small volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, Karen Y.; Walsh, James E.; Murphy, J.; Harmey, M.; Farrell, M. A.; Hardimann, O.; Perryman, R.

    1998-05-01

    We report the development of a microspectrophotometer system for use on micro samples of mitochondrial respiratory pigments. A novel optical fiber set-up uses visible spectrophotometry to monitor the reduction of mitochondrial electron carriers. Data is presented for the reduction of cytochrome-c and for the effect of temperature on the levels of complex II/III activity from the mitochondria of rat liver. This in-vivo simulation of the reduction of cytochrome-c can be observed using a fiber optic probe which requires less than twenty (mu) l of sample for analysis. The key features of the system are: front end adaptability, high sensitivity and fast multispectral acquisition which are essential for the biological reactions which are observed.

  13. Respiratory control and sternohyoid muscle structure and function in aged male rats: decreased susceptibility to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Skelly, J Richard; Edge, Deirdre; Shortt, Christine M; Jones, James F X; Bradford, Aidan; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2012-03-15

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a common respiratory disorder characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). We have shown that CIH causes upper airway muscle dysfunction in the rat due to oxidative stress. Ageing is an independent risk factor for the development of OSAS perhaps due to respiratory muscle remodelling and increased susceptibility to hypoxia. We sought to examine the effects of CIH on breathing and pharyngeal dilator muscle structure and function in aged rats. Aged (18-20 months), male Wistar rats were exposed to alternating cycles of normoxia and hypoxia (90 s each; F(I)O(2)=5% O(2) at nadir) or sham treatment for 8h/day for 9 days. Following CIH exposure, breathing was assessed by whole-body plethysmography. In addition, sternohyoid muscle contractile and endurance properties were examined in vitro. Muscle fibre type and cross-sectional area, and the activity of key oxidative and glycolytic enzymes were determined. CIH had no effect on basal breathing or ventilatory responses to hypoxia or hypercapnia. CIH did not alter succinate dehydrogenase or glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme activities, myosin heavy chain fibre areal density or cross-sectional area. Sternohyoid muscle force and endurance were unaffected by CIH exposure. Since we have established that this CIH paradigm causes sternohyoid muscle weakness in adult male rats, we conclude that aged rats have decreased susceptibility to CIH-induced stress. We suggest that structural remodelling with improved hypoxic tolerance in upper airway muscles may partly compensate for impaired neural regulation of the upper airway and increased propensity for airway collapse in aged mammals. PMID:22122888

  14. Vaccine Induced Herd Immunity for Control of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease in a Low-Income Country Setting

    PubMed Central

    Kinyanjui, Timothy M.; House, Thomas A.; Kiti, Moses C.; Cane, Patricia A.; Nokes, David J.; Medley, Graham F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is globally ubiquitous, and infection during the first six months of life is a major risk for severe disease and hospital admission; consequently RSV is the most important viral cause of respiratory morbidity and mortality in young children. Development of vaccines for young infants is complicated by the presence of maternal antibodies and immunological immaturity, but vaccines targeted at older children avoid these problems. Vaccine development for young infants has been unsuccessful, but this is not the case for older children (> 6m). Would vaccinating older children have a significant public health impact? We developed a mathematical model to explore the benefits of a vaccine against RSV. Methods and Findings We have used a deterministic age structured model capturing the key epidemiological characteristics of RSV and performed a statistical maximum-likelihood fit to age-specific hospitalization data from a developing country setting. To explore the effects of vaccination under different mixing assumptions, we included two versions of contact matrices: one from a social contact diary study, and the second a synthesised construction based on demographic data. Vaccination is assumed to elicit an immune response equivalent to primary infection. Our results show that immunisation of young children (5–10m) is likely to be a highly effective method of protection of infants (<6m) against hospitalisation. The majority benefit is derived from indirect protection (herd immunity). A full sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using Latin Hypercube Sampling of the parameter space shows that our results are robust to model structure and model parameters. Conclusions This result suggests that vaccinating older infants and children against RSV can have a major public health benefit. PMID:26390032

  15. Visual aided pacing in respiratory maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaudi, L. R.; Rossi, E.; Mántaras, M. C.; Perrone, M. S.; Siri, L. Nicola

    2007-11-01

    A visual aid to pace self-controlled respiratory cycles in humans is presented. Respiratory manoeuvres need to be accomplished in several clinic and research procedures, among others, the studies on Heart Rate Variability. Free running respiration turns to be difficult to correlate with other physiologic variables. Because of this fact, voluntary self-control is asked from the individuals under study. Currently, an acoustic metronome is used to pace respiratory frequency, its main limitation being the impossibility to induce predetermined timing in the stages within the respiratory cycle. In the present work, visual driven self-control was provided, with separate timing for the four stages of a normal respiratory cycle. This visual metronome (ViMet) was based on a microcontroller which power-ON and -OFF an eight-LED bar, in a four-stage respiratory cycle time series handset by the operator. The precise timing is also exhibited on an alphanumeric display.

  16. The Impact of a School-Based Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Program on Absenteeism, Diarrhea, and Respiratory Infection: A Matched-Control Trial in Mali.

    PubMed

    Trinies, Victoria; Garn, Joshua V; Chang, Howard H; Freeman, Matthew C

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a matched-control trial in Mali to assess the effectiveness of a comprehensive school-based water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) intervention on pupil absence, diarrhea, and respiratory infections. After completion of the intervention, data were collected from 100 beneficiary schools and 100 matched comparison schools in 5-6 sessions over a 14-month period. Data collection included roll calls to assess absenteeism and interviews with a subset of pupils to assess recent absence and disease symptoms. The odds of pupils being absent at roll call were 23% higher in beneficiary schools than in comparison schools (odds ratio [OR]: 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06, 1.42). The odds of pupils reporting being absent due to diarrhea (OR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.94) or having had diarrhea (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.60, 0.85) or respiratory infection symptoms (OR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.65, 0.86) in the past week were lower in beneficiary schools compared with comparison schools. We found that a school-based WASH intervention can have a positive effect on reducing rates of illness, as well as absence due to diarrhea. However, we did not find evidence that these health impacts led to a reduction in overall absence. Higher absence rates are less likely attributable to the intervention than the result of an imbalance in unobserved confounders between study groups. PMID:27114292

  17. YME1L controls the accumulation of respiratory chain subunits and is required for apoptotic resistance, cristae morphogenesis, and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Stiburek, Lukas; Cesnekova, Jana; Kostkova, Olga; Fornuskova, Daniela; Vinsova, Kamila; Wenchich, Laszlo; Houstek, Josef; Zeman, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA) proteases are involved in the quality control and processing of inner-membrane proteins. Here we investigate the cellular activities of YME1L, the human orthologue of the Yme1 subunit of the yeast i‑AAA complex, using stable short hairpin RNA knockdown and expression experiments. Human YME1L is shown to be an integral membrane protein that exposes its carboxy-terminus to the intermembrane space and exists in several complexes of 600–1100 kDa. The stable knockdown of YME1L in human embryonic kidney 293 cells led to impaired cell proliferation and apoptotic resistance, altered cristae morphology, diminished rotenone-sensitive respiration, and increased susceptibility to mitochondrial membrane protein carbonylation. Depletion of YME1L led to excessive accumulation of nonassembled respiratory chain subunits (Ndufb6, ND1, and Cox4) in the inner membrane. This was due to a lack of YME1L proteolytic activity, since the excessive accumulation of subunits was reversed by overexpression of wild-type YME1L but not a proteolytically inactive YME1L variant. Similarly, the expression of wild-type YME1L restored the lamellar cristae morphology of YME1L-deficient mitochondria. Our results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial inner-membrane proteostasis to both mitochondrial and cellular function and integrity and reveal a novel role for YME1L in the proteolytic regulation of respiratory chain biogenesis. PMID:22262461

  18. YME1L controls the accumulation of respiratory chain subunits and is required for apoptotic resistance, cristae morphogenesis, and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Stiburek, Lukas; Cesnekova, Jana; Kostkova, Olga; Fornuskova, Daniela; Vinsova, Kamila; Wenchich, Laszlo; Houstek, Josef; Zeman, Jiri

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondrial ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA) proteases are involved in the quality control and processing of inner-membrane proteins. Here we investigate the cellular activities of YME1L, the human orthologue of the Yme1 subunit of the yeast i-AAA complex, using stable short hairpin RNA knockdown and expression experiments. Human YME1L is shown to be an integral membrane protein that exposes its carboxy-terminus to the intermembrane space and exists in several complexes of 600-1100 kDa. The stable knockdown of YME1L in human embryonic kidney 293 cells led to impaired cell proliferation and apoptotic resistance, altered cristae morphology, diminished rotenone-sensitive respiration, and increased susceptibility to mitochondrial membrane protein carbonylation. Depletion of YME1L led to excessive accumulation of nonassembled respiratory chain subunits (Ndufb6, ND1, and Cox4) in the inner membrane. This was due to a lack of YME1L proteolytic activity, since the excessive accumulation of subunits was reversed by overexpression of wild-type YME1L but not a proteolytically inactive YME1L variant. Similarly, the expression of wild-type YME1L restored the lamellar cristae morphology of YME1L-deficient mitochondria. Our results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial inner-membrane proteostasis to both mitochondrial and cellular function and integrity and reveal a novel role for YME1L in the proteolytic regulation of respiratory chain biogenesis. PMID:22262461

  19. Preparation of His-Tagged Armored RNA Phage Particles as a Control for Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Detection of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yangjian; Niu, Jianjun; Zhang, Yongyou; Huang, Jianwei; Li, Qingge

    2006-01-01

    Armored RNA has been increasingly used as both an external and internal positive control in nucleic acid-based assays for RNA virus. In order to facilitate armored RNA purification, a His6 tag was introduced into the loop region of the MS2 coat protein, which allows the exposure of multiple His tags on the surface during armored RNA assembly. The His-tagged armored RNA particles were purified to homogeneity and verified to be free of DNA contamination in a single run of affinity chromatography. A fragment of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) genome targeted for SARS-CoV detection was chosen for an external positive control preparation. A plant-specific gene sequence was chosen for a universal noncompetitive internal positive control preparation. Both controls were purified by Co2+ affinity chromatography and were included in a real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay for SARS-CoV. The noncompetitive internal positive control can be added to clinical samples before RNA extraction and enables the identification of potential inhibitive effects without interfering with target amplification. The external control could be used for the quantification of viral loads in clinical samples. PMID:17021082

  20. Differential Effects of Endotracheal Suctioning on Gas Exchanges in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure under Pressure-Controlled and Volume-Controlled Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Wei; Jin, Yan; Ma, Tao; Qu, Bo; Liu, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of open endotracheal suctioning on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics in ARF patients under the modes of PCV or VCV. Ninety-six ARF patients were treated with open endotracheal suctioning and their variations in respiratory mechanics and gas exchange after the suctions were compared. Under PCV mode, compared with the initial level of tidal volume (V T ), ARF patients showed 30.0% and 27.8% decrease at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Furthermore, the initial respiratory system compliance (C rs) decreased by 29.6% and 28.5% at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under VCV mode, compared with the initial level, 38.6% and 37.5% increase in peak airway pressure (PAP) were found at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under PCV mode, the initial PaO2 increased by 6.4% and 10.2% at 3 min and 10 min, respectively, while 18.9% and 30.6% increase of the initial PaO2 were observed under VCV mode. Summarily, endotracheal suctioning may impair gas exchange and decrease lung compliance in ARF patients receiving mechanical ventilation under both PCV and VCV modes, but endotracheal suctioning effects on gas exchange were more severe and longer-lasting under PCV mode than VCV. PMID:25954759

  1. Differential Effects of Endotracheal Suctioning on Gas Exchanges in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure under Pressure-Controlled and Volume-Controlled Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Wei; Jin, Yan; Ma, Tao; Qu, Bo; Liu, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of open endotracheal suctioning on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics in ARF patients under the modes of PCV or VCV. Ninety-six ARF patients were treated with open endotracheal suctioning and their variations in respiratory mechanics and gas exchange after the suctions were compared. Under PCV mode, compared with the initial level of tidal volume (VT), ARF patients showed 30.0% and 27.8% decrease at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Furthermore, the initial respiratory system compliance (Crs) decreased by 29.6% and 28.5% at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under VCV mode, compared with the initial level, 38.6% and 37.5% increase in peak airway pressure (PAP) were found at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under PCV mode, the initial PaO2 increased by 6.4% and 10.2 % at 3 min and 10 min, respectively, while 18.9% and 30.6% increase of the initial PaO2 were observed under VCV mode. Summarily, endotracheal suctioning may impair gas exchange and decrease lung compliance in ARF patients receiving mechanical ventilation under both PCV and VCV modes, but endotracheal suctioning effects on gas exchange were more severe and longer-lasting under PCV mode than VCV. PMID:25954759

  2. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia as a predictor of eating disorder symptoms in college students: Moderation by responses to stress and parent psychological control.

    PubMed

    Abaied, Jamie L; Wagner, Caitlin; Breslend, Nicole Lafko; Flynn, Megan

    2016-04-01

    This longitudinal study examined the prospective contribution of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a key physiological indicator of self-regulation, to eating disorder symptoms in college students, and whether this link was moderated by maladaptive responses to stress and parent psychological control. At Wave 1, college students' RSA was measured at rest. At Waves 1 and 2 (six-month follow-up), students reported on their eating disorder symptoms, coping and involuntary responses to stress, and perceptions of their parents' use of psychological control. Significant three-way interactions indicated that the link between RSA and subsequent eating disorder symptoms was contingent on responses to stress and parent psychological control. In the context of maladaptive responses to stress and high psychological control, RSA predicted increased eating disorder symptoms over time. In the absence of parent psychological control, high RSA was beneficial in most cases, even when individuals reported maladaptive responses to stress. This study presents novel evidence that high RSA contributes to risk for or resilience to eating disorder symptoms over time. RSA can be protective against eating disorder symptoms, but in some contexts, the self-regulation resources that high RSA provides may be inappropriately applied to eating cognitions and behaviors. This research highlights the importance of examining physiological functioning conjointly with other risk factors as precursors to eating disorder symptoms over time. PMID:26826976

  3. Access to a polymerase chain reaction assay method targeting 13 respiratory viruses can reduce antibiotics: a randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral respiratory infections are common worldwide and range from completely benign disease to life-threatening illness. Symptoms can be unspecific, and an etiologic diagnosis is rarely established because of a lack of suitable diagnostic tools. Improper use of antibiotics is common in this setting, which is detrimental in light of the development of bacterial resistance. It has been suggested that the use of diagnostic tests could reduce antibiotic prescription rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether access to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay panel for etiologic diagnosis of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) would have an impact on antibiotic prescription rate in primary care clinical settings. Methods Adult patients with symptoms of ARTI were prospectively included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed by using a multiplex real-time PCR method targeting thirteen viruses and two bacteria. Patients were recruited at 12 outpatient units from October 2006 through April 2009, and samples were collected on the day of inclusion (initial visit) and after 10 days (follow-up visit). Patients were randomised in an open-label treatment protocol to receive a rapid or delayed result (on the following day or after eight to twelve days). The primary outcome measure was the antibiotic prescription rate at the initial visit, and the secondary outcome was the total antibiotic prescription rate during the study period. Results A total sample of 447 patients was randomised. Forty-one were excluded, leaving 406 patients for analysis. In the group of patients randomised for a rapid result, 4.5% (9 of 202) of patients received antibiotics at the initial visit, compared to 12.3% (25 of 204) (P = 0.005) of patients in the delayed result group. At follow-up, there was no significant difference between the groups: 13.9% (28 of 202) in the rapid result group and 17.2% (35 of 204) in the delayed result group (P = 0

  4. Staff perception and institutional reporting: two views of infection control compliance in British Columbia and Ontario three years after an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bryce, E; Copes, R; Gamage, B; Lockhart, K; Yassi, A

    2008-06-01

    Few studies have audited the resources available to infection control (IC) and occupational health (OH) to promote safe work behaviour, whilst comparing audited findings with perceptions by healthcare workers (HCWs). We aimed to determine the IC and OH resources available and compare this with HCWs' perception of resources, following an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). A survey of IC and OH resources and a questionnaire completed by HCWs were compared with on-site observational audits. HCWs believed that plans were available to protect against future SARS-like events but audits revealed that these did not exist in many facilities. Both OH and IC were under-resourced post-SARS, with OH professionals particularly lacking in British Columbia. There is a discrepancy between HCWs' perception of what is available and what is actually accessible in facilities. Experts in IC and OH need to focus on communication. PMID:18485532

  5. Peer academic detailing on use of antibiotics in acute respiratory tract infections. A controlled study in an urban Norwegian out-of-hours service

    PubMed Central

    Dyrkorn, Roar; Gjelstad, Svein; Espnes, Ketil Arne; Lindbæk, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse if peer academic detailing by experienced general practitioners (GPs) could be a useful way to change Medical Doctors, (MDs) prescription of antibiotics for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in out-of-hours service. Method An educational Intervention study based on prescription data among MDs working in an out-of-hours service from June 2006 through October 2008. Specially trained GPs lectured a peer educational program (3 × 45 minutes) about use of antibiotics for ARTIs according to national recommendations. Outcome measures The type and frequency of antibiotics prescribed for different ARTIs before and after intervention comparing the intervention group with the control group. Subjects 22 MDs in the intervention group and 31 MDs in the control group. Results The intervention group showed an overall statistically significantly absolute increase in the use of penicillin V (Penicillin V) of 9.8% (95% CI: 2.3%–17.4% p < 0.05), and similarly an statistically significantly absolute decrease in the use of macrolides and lincosamides of 8.8% (95% CI: 2.6%–14.9.2% p < 0.05) for all diagnoses. For subgroups of ARTIs we found a significant increase in the use of Penicillin V for acute otitis media, sinusitis, pneumonia and upper ARTIs. There was no significant changes in total prescription rates in the two groups. 41% of all consultations with respiratory tract infections resulted in antibiotic prescription. Conclusions Using trained GPs to give peer academic detailing to colleagues in combination with open discussion on prescription, showed a significant change in prescription of antibiotics towards national guidelines. Key pointsPhenoxymethylpenicillin is the first choice for the most of respiratory tract infections when indicated.Despite the guidelines for the choice of antibiotics in Norway, general practitioners’ choice often differs from these.We showed that a session of three times 45 min of peer academic detailing

  6. Aldosterone, corticosterone, and thyroid hormone and their influence on respiratory control development in Lithobates catesbeianus: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Jean-Philippe; Bairam, Aida; Kinkead, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of air breathing during Lithobates catesbeianus development requires significant changes to the brainstem circuits that generate and regulate breathing; however, the mechanisms responsible for initiating this transformation remain largely unknown. Because amphibian metamorphosis is regulated by hormones such as aldosterone, corticosterone, and thyroid hormone (T3), we tested the hypothesis that exposing the brainstem to these hormones augments the fictive air breathing frequency in pre-metamorphic tadpoles. Brainstems were isolated and were placed either in the recording chamber (acute; 1h+1h recovery) or in a bottle (chronic exposure; 24h) for treatment. Brainstems were exposed to artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF; sham treatment) or one of the following hormones: aldosterone (100nM), corticosterone (100nM), or T3 (100nM). While acute exposure had limited effects on respiratory motor output, chronic incubation with any hormone significantly increased fictive air breathing; the burst frequencies observed following treatment were similar to those observed in adult bullfrogs. We conclude that through their long term effects, hormones regulating metamorphosis can initiate the maturation of the neural circuits that generate and regulate breathing in this species. PMID:25476838

  7. Health Instruction Packages: Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavich, Margot; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to teach respiratory therapy students a variety of job-related skills. The first module, "Anatomy and Physiology of the Central Controls of Respiration" by Margot Lavich, describes the functions of the five centers of the brain that control respiration and identifies…

  8. LABORATORY TEST METHODS OF EXPOSURE TO MICROBIAL PEST CONTROL AGENTS BY THE RESPIRATORY ROUTE TO NON-TARGET AVIAN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial pest control agents (MPCAs) are microorganisms applied to agricultural and silvacultural environments to control proliferation and spread of insect or plant pests. uring application, it is likely that nontarget plants and animals are exposed to MPCAs. ollowing extensive...

  9. A randomized controlled trial on the benefits and respiratory adverse effects of morphine for refractory dyspnea in patients with COPD: Protocol of the MORDYC study.

    PubMed

    Verberkt, C A; van den Beuken-van Everdingen, M H J; Franssen, F M E; Dirksen, C D; Schols, J M G A; Wouters, E F M; Janssen, D J A

    2016-03-01

    Dyspnea is one of the most reported symptoms of patients with advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and is often undertreated. Morphine has proven to be an effective treatment for dyspnea and is recommended in clinical practice guidelines, but questions concerning benefits and respiratory adverse effects remain. This study primarily evaluates the impact of oral sustained release morphine (morphine SR) on health-related quality of life and respiratory adverse effects in patients with COPD. Secondary objectives include the impact on exercise capacity, the relationship between description and severity of dyspnea and the presence of a clinically relevant response to morphine, and cost-effectiveness. A single-center, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled intervention study will be performed in 124 patients with COPD who recently completed a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation program. Participants will receive 20-30 mg/24h morphine SR or placebo for four weeks. After the intervention, participants will be followed for twelve weeks. Outcomes include: the COPD Assessment Test, six minute walking test, Multidimensional Dyspnea Scale and a cost diary. Furthermore, lung function and arterial blood gasses will be measured. These measures will be assessed during a baseline and outcome assessment, two home visits, two phone calls, and three follow-up assessments. The intervention and control group will be compared using uni- and multivariate regression analysis and logistic regression analysis. Finally, an economic evaluation will be performed from a societal and healthcare perspective. The current manuscript describes the rationale and methods of this study and provides an outline of the possible strengths, weaknesses and clinical consequences. PMID:26825021

  10. Respiratory sensory gating measured by respiratory-related evoked potentials in generalized anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pei-Ying S.; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Liu, Chia-Yih; Davenport, Paul W.; von Leupoldt, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The perception of respiratory sensations plays an important role both in respiratory diseases and in anxiety disorders. However, little is known about the neural processes underlying respiratory sensory perception, especially in patient groups. Therefore, the present study examined whether patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) would demonstrate altered respiratory sensory gating compared to a healthy control group. Respiratory-related evoked potentials (RREP) were measured in a paired inspiratory occlusion paradigm presenting two brief occlusion stimuli (S1 and S2) within one inspiration. The results showed a significantly greater S2/S1 ratio for the N1 component of the RREP in the GAD group compared to the control group. Our findings suggest altered respiratory sensory processing in patients with GAD, which might contribute to altered perception of respiratory sensations in these patients. PMID:26217278

  11. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Hui, David S; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a newly recognized highly lethal respiratory disease caused by a novel single stranded, positive sense RNA betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Dromedary camels, host species for MERS-CoV are implicated in the direct or indirect transmission to humans, although the exact mode of transmission remains unknown. First isolated from a patient who died from a severe respiratory illness in June 2012 in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, as of 16 February 2015, 983 laboratory-confirmed cases of MERS-CoV (360 deaths; 36.6% mortality) were reported to the WHO. Cases have been acquired in both the community and hospitals with limited human-to-human transmission reported in the community. Whilst the majority of MERS cases have occurred in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, cases have been reported from Europe, USA and Asia in people who traveled from the Middle East or their contacts. Clinical features of MERS range from asymptomatic or mild disease to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ failure resulting in death, especially in individuals with underlying co-morbidities. There is no specific drug treatment for MERS and infection prevention and control measures are crucial to prevent spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities. MERS-CoV continues to be an endemic,low level public health threat. However, the concern remains that the virus could mutate to exhibit increased interhuman transmissibility, increasing pandemic potential. Our seminar presents an overview of current knowledge and perspectives on the epidemiology, virology, mode of transmission, pathogen-host responses, clinical features, diagnosis and development of new drugs and vaccines. PMID:26049252

  12. Use of respiratory quotient as a control parameter for optimum oxygen supply and scale-up of 2,3-butanediol production under microaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, A.P.; Byun, T.G.; Posten, C.; Deckwer, W.D. . Biochemical Engineering Division)

    1994-11-05

    The respiratory quotient (RQ) was found to be a suitable control parameter for optimum oxygen supply for the production of 2,3-butanediol + acetoin under microaerobic conditions. In laboratory scale continuous cultures optimum production of 2,3-butanediol + acetoin was obtained at an RQ value between 4.0 to 4.5. This agreed well with the optimum RQ value (4.0) stoichiometrically derived from the bioreactions involved. In fed-batch cultures product concentration as high as 102.9 g/L can be achieved within 32 h cultivation with an RQ control algorithm for oxygen supply. Under similar conditions only 85.7 g/L product was obtained with control of constant oxygen supply rate throughout the cultivation. In pilot scale batch cultures under identical oxygen supply rate the achievable RQ value was found to be strongly influenced by the reactor type and scale. The initial oxygen supply rate influenced the achievable RQ as well. However, in all the reactors studied the specific product formation rate of cells in the exponential growth phase was only a function of RQ. The same optimum RQ value as found in continuous cultures was obtained. It was thus concluded that RQ can be used as a control parameter for optimum production of 2,3-butanediol + acetoin in both laboratory and pilot plant scale reactors.

  13. Effects of L-carnitine supplementation on respiratory distress syndrome development and prognosis in premature infants: A single blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    OZTURK, MEHMET ADNAN; KARDAS, ZEHRA; KARDAS, FATİH; GUNES, TAMER; KURTOGLU, SELİM

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of L-carnitine therapy on the occurrence and prognosis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). A single blind, randomized controlled trial study was conducted on 130 infants with gestational ages of 28–36 weeks. Infants were assigned to experimental groups (groups 1 and 2) and control groups (groups 3 and 4). Groups 1 and 3 consisted of infants with RDS, and groups 2 and 4 groups were composed of infants without RDS. The experimental groups were treated with carnitine. No statistically significant differences in serum carnitine levels were detected between the study and the control groups on day 1 of treatment (P=0.06). However, on day 7 of treatment, serum carnitine levels in the experimental groups were significantly increased (P=0.02), as compared with the control groups. The surfactant requirement value, which is how many rounds of surfactant therapy were required, was 1.56±0.97 in group 1, and 2.12±0.99 in group 3 (P<0.001). The mean duration of mechanical ventilation required was 3.04±3.60 days in group 1, and 4.73±5.63 days in group 3 (P<0.001). The present results indicate that carnitine supplementation in premature infants with RDS may help to increase carnitine levels, thus decreasing the duration of mechanical ventilation and surfactant requirement. PMID:26998047

  14. Multiple cis Regulatory Elements Control RANTES Promoter Activity in Alveolar Epithelial Cells Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Casola, Antonella; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Haeberle, Helene; Elliott, Todd F.; Lin, Rongtuan; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Brasier, Allan R.

    2001-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) produces intense pulmonary inflammation, in part through its ability to induce chemokine synthesis in infected airway epithelial cells. RANTES (regulated upon activation, normally T-cell expressed and presumably secreted) is a CC chemokine which recruits and activates monocytes, lymphocytes, and eosinophils, all cell types present in the lung inflammatory infiltrate induced by RSV infection. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism of RSV-induced RANTES promoter activation in human type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549 cells). Promoter deletion and mutagenesis experiments indicate that RSV requires the presence of five different cis regulatory elements, located in the promoter fragment spanning from −220 to +55 nucleotides, corresponding to NF-κB, C/EBP, Jun/CREB/ATF, and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) binding sites. Although site mutations of the NF-κB, C/EBP, and CREB/AP-1 like sites reduce RSV-induced RANTES gene transcription to 50% or less, only mutations affecting IRF binding completely abolish RANTES inducibility. Supershift and microaffinity isolation assays were used to identify the different transcription factor family members whose DNA binding activity was RSV inducible. Expression of dominant negative mutants of these transcription factors further established their central role in virus-induced RANTES promoter activation. Our finding that the presence of multiple cis regulatory elements is required for full activation of the RANTES promoter in RSV-infected alveolar epithelial cells supports the enhanceosome model for RANTES gene transcription, which is absolutely dependent on binding of IRF transcription factors. The identification of regulatory mechanisms of RANTES gene expression is fundamental for rational design of inhibitors of RSV-induced lung inflammation. PMID:11413310

  15. Pneumococcal Colonization Rates in Patients Admitted to a United Kingdom Hospital with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection: a Prospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Catherine M. K.; Gritzfeld, Jenna F.; Banyard, Antonia; Hancock, Carole A.; Wright, Angela D.; Macfarlane, Laura; Ferreira, Daniela M.

    2016-01-01

    Current diagnostic tests are ineffective for identifying the etiological pathogen in hospitalized adults with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). The association of pneumococcal colonization with disease has been suggested as a means to increase the diagnostic precision. We compared the pneumococcal colonization rates and the densities of nasal pneumococcal colonization by (i) classical culture and (ii) quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting lytA in patients with LRTIs admitted to a hospital in the United Kingdom and control patients. A total of 826 patients were screened for inclusion in this prospective case-control study. Of these, 38 patients were recruited, 19 with confirmed LRTIs and 19 controls with other diagnoses. Nasal wash (NW) samples were collected at the time of recruitment. Pneumococcal colonization was detected in 1 patient with LRTI and 3 controls (P = 0.6) by classical culture. By qPCR, pneumococcal colonization was detected in 10 LRTI patients and 8 controls (P = 0.5). Antibiotic usage prior to sampling was significantly higher in the LRTI group than in the control group (19 versus 3; P < 0.001). With a clinically relevant cutoff of >8,000 copies/ml on qPCR, pneumococcal colonization was found in 3 LRTI patients and 4 controls (P > 0.05). We conclude that neither the prevalence nor the density of nasal pneumococcal colonization (by culture and qPCR) can be used as a method of microbiological diagnosis in hospitalized adults with LRTI in the United Kingdom. A community-based study recruiting patients prior to antibiotic therapy may be a useful future step. PMID:26791364

  16. Presentation of respiratory symptoms prior to diagnosis in general practice: a case–control study examining free text and morbidity codes

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Richard A; Chen, Ying; Croft, Peter; Jordan, Kelvin P

    2015-01-01

    Objective General practitioners can record patients’ presenting symptoms by using a code or free text. We compared breathlessness and wheeze symptom codes and free text recorded prior to diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Design A case–control study. Setting 11 general practices in North Staffordshire, UK, contributing to the Consultations in Primary Care Archive consultation database. Participants Cases with an incident diagnosis of IHD, COPD or asthma in 2010 were matched to controls (four per case) with no such diagnosis. All prior consultations with codes for breathlessness or wheeze symptoms between 2004 and 2010 were identified. Free text of cases and controls were also searched for mention of these symptoms. Results 592 cases were identified, 194 (33%) with IHD, 182 (31%) with COPD and 216 (37%) with asthma. 148 (25%) cases and 125 (5%) controls had a prior coded consultation for breathlessness. Prevalence of a prior coded symptom of breathlessness or wheeze was 30% in cases, 6% in controls. Median time from first coded symptom to diagnosis among cases was 57 weeks. After adding symptoms recorded in text, prevalence rose to 62% in cases and 25% in controls. Median time from first recorded symptom increased to 144 weeks. The associations between diagnosis of cases and prior symptom codes was strong IHD relative risk ratio (RRR) 3.21 (2.15 to 4.79); COPD RRR 9.56 (6.74 to 13.60); asthma RRR 10.30 (7.17 to 14.90). Conclusions There is an association between IHD, COPD and asthma diagnosis and earlier consultation for respiratory symptoms. Symptoms are often noted in free text by GPs long before they are coded. Free text searching may aid investigation of early presentation of long-term conditions using GP databases, and may be an important direction for future research. PMID:26070795

  17. Investigation of occupational and environmental causes of respiratory cancers (ICARE): a multicenter, population-based case-control study in France

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Occupational causes of respiratory cancers need to be further investigated: the role of occupational exposures in the aetiology of head and neck cancers remains largely unknown, and there are still substantial uncertainties for a number of suspected lung carcinogens. The main objective of the study is to examine occupational risk factors for lung and head and neck cancers. Methods/design ICARE is a multi-center, population-based case-control study, which included a group of 2926 lung cancer cases, a group of 2415 head and neck cancer cases, and a common control group of 3555 subjects. Incident cases were identified in collaboration with cancer registries, in 10 geographical areas. The control group was a random sample of the population of these areas, with a distribution by sex and age comparable to that of the cases, and a distribution by socioeconomic status comparable to that of the population. Subjects were interviewed face to face, using a standardized questionnaire collecting particularly information on tobacco and alcohol consumption, residential history and a detailed description of occupational history. Biological samples were also collected from study subjects. The main occupational exposures of interest are asbestos, man-made mineral fibers, formaldehyde, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, chromium and nickel compounds, arsenic, wood dust, textile dust, solvents, strong acids, cutting fluids, silica, diesel fumes, welding fumes. The complete list of exposures of interest includes more than 60 substances. Occupational exposure assessment will use several complementary methods: case-by-case evaluation of exposure by experts; development and use of algorithms to assess exposure from the questionnaires; application of job-exposure matrices. Discussion The large number of subjects should allow to uncover exposures associated with moderate increase in risks, and to evaluate risks associated with infrequent or widely dispersed exposures. It will be

  18. Reducing antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory tract infections in family practice: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial evaluating a multifaceted peer-group-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Vervloet, Marcia; Meulepas, Marianne A; Cals, Jochen W L; Eimers, Mariëtta; van der Hoek, Lucas S; van Dijk, Liset

    2016-01-01

    Irrational antibiotic use for respiratory tract infections (RTI) is a major driver of bacterial resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a multifaceted peer-group based intervention aiming to reduce RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions in family practice. This was a cluster randomized controlled trial with pre- and follow-up measurement. The intervention was implemented through PharmacoTherapy Audit Meetings (PTAM) in which family physicians (FPs) and pharmacists collaborate. Four PTAM groups received the intervention consisting of: (1) FP communication skills training, including communication about delayed prescribing; (2) implementation of antibiotic prescribing agreements in FPs' Electronic Prescribing Systems; (3) quarterly feedback figures for FPs. Four other PTAM groups were matched controls. Primary outcome measure was the number of RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions after the intervention, assessed with multilevel linear regression analyses. Total number and number of prescriptions stratified by age (under/over 12 years) were analysed. At baseline, the average total number of RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions per 1,000 patients was 207.9 and 176.7 in the intervention and control PTAM groups, respectively. At follow-up, FPs in both the intervention and control groups prescribed significantly less antibiotics. For adolescents and adults, the drop in number of antibiotic prescription was significantly larger in the intervention groups (-27.8 per 1,000 patients) than the control groups (-7.2 per 1,000 patients; P<0.05). This multifaceted peer-group-based intervention was effective in reducing the number of RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions for adolescents and adults. To affect antibiotic prescribing in children other methods are needed. PMID:26845640

  19. Consumption of a fermented dairy product containing the probiotic Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 reduces the duration of respiratory infections in the elderly in a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Guillemard, E; Tondu, F; Lacoin, F; Schrezenmeir, J

    2010-01-01

    Common infectious diseases (CID) of the airways and the gastrointestinal tract are still a considerable cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. The present study examined the beneficial effect of a dairy product containing the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 (fermented product) on the resistance of free-living elderly to CID. The study was multicentric, double blind and controlled, involving 1072 volunteers (median age = 76.0 years) randomised for consumption of either 200 g/d of fermented (n 537) or control (non-fermented) dairy product (n 535) for 3 months, followed by an additional 1 month's follow-up. The results showed that, when considering all CID, the fermented product significantly reduced the average duration per episode of CID (6.5 v. 8 d in control group; P = 0.008) and the cumulative duration of CID (7 v. 8 d in control group; P = 0.009). Reduction in both episode and cumulative durations was also significant for all upper respiratory tract infections (URTI; P < 0.001) and for rhinopharyngitis (P < 0.001). This was accompanied with an increase of L. casei species in stools throughout the fermented product consumption (2-3.8 x 107 equivalents of colony-forming unit/g of stools, P < 0.001). The cumulative number of CID (primary outcome) was not different between groups nor was the CID severity, fever, pathogens' occurrence, medication, immune blood parameters and quality of life. The fermented product was safe and well tolerated. In conclusion, consumption of a fermented dairy product containing the probiotic strain L. casei DN-114 001 in elderly was associated with a decreased duration of CID in comparison with the control group, especially for URTI such as rhinopharyngitis. PMID:19747410

  20. Reducing antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory tract infections in family practice: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial evaluating a multifaceted peer-group-based intervention

    PubMed Central

    Vervloet, Marcia; Meulepas, Marianne A; Cals, Jochen W L; Eimers, Mariëtta; van der Hoek, Lucas S; van Dijk, Liset

    2016-01-01

    Irrational antibiotic use for respiratory tract infections (RTI) is a major driver of bacterial resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a multifaceted peer-group based intervention aiming to reduce RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions in family practice. This was a cluster randomized controlled trial with pre- and follow-up measurement. The intervention was implemented through PharmacoTherapy Audit Meetings (PTAM) in which family physicians (FPs) and pharmacists collaborate. Four PTAM groups received the intervention consisting of: (1) FP communication skills training, including communication about delayed prescribing; (2) implementation of antibiotic prescribing agreements in FPs’ Electronic Prescribing Systems; (3) quarterly feedback figures for FPs. Four other PTAM groups were matched controls. Primary outcome measure was the number of RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions after the intervention, assessed with multilevel linear regression analyses. Total number and number of prescriptions stratified by age (under/over 12 years) were analysed. At baseline, the average total number of RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions per 1,000 patients was 207.9 and 176.7 in the intervention and control PTAM groups, respectively. At follow-up, FPs in both the intervention and control groups prescribed significantly less antibiotics. For adolescents and adults, the drop in number of antibiotic prescription was significantly larger in the intervention groups (−27.8 per 1,000 patients) than the control groups (−7.2 per 1,000 patients; P<0.05). This multifaceted peer-group-based intervention was effective in reducing the number of RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions for adolescents and adults. To affect antibiotic prescribing in children other methods are needed. PMID:26845640

  1. Descriptive analysis and spatial epidemiology of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) for swine sites participating in area regional control and elimination programs from 3 regions of Ontario.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Andreia G; Poljak, Zvonimir; Friendship, Robert; Carpenter, Jane; Hand, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe demographics, basic biosecurity practices, ownership structure, and prevalence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in swine sites located in 3 regions in Ontario, and investigate the presence of spatial clustering and clusters of PRRS positive sites in the 3 regions. A total of 370 swine sites were enrolled in Area Regional Control and Elimination projects in Niagara, Watford, and Perth from 2010 to 2013. Demographics, biosecurity, and site ownership data were collected using a standardized questionnaire and site locations were obtained from an industry organization. Status was assigned on the basis of available diagnostic tests and/or assessment by site veterinarians. Spatial dependence was investigated using the D-function, the spatial scan statistic test and the spatial relative risk method. Results showed that the use of strict all-in all-out (AIAO) pig flow and shower before entry are uncommon biosecurity practices in swine sites, but a larger proportion of sites reported having a Danish entry. The prevalence of PRRS in the 3 regions ranged from 17% to 48% and localized high and low risk clusters were detected. Sites enrolled in the PRRS control projects were characterized by membership in multiple and overlapping ownership structures and networks, which complicates the way the results of monitoring and disease management measures are communicated to the target population. PMID:26424906

  2. Controlling Legionella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa re-growth in therapeutic spas: implementation of physical disinfection treatments, including UV/ultrafiltration, in a respiratory hydrotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Leoni, E; Sanna, T; Zanetti, F; Dallolio, L

    2015-12-01

    The study aimed to assess the efficacy of an integrated water safety plan (WSP) in controlling Legionella re-growth in a respiratory hydrotherapy system located in a spa centre, supplied with sulphurous water, which was initially colonized by Legionella pneumophila. Heterotrophic plate counts, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella spp. were detected in water samples taken 6-monthly from the hydrotherapy equipment (main circuit, entry to benches, final outlets). On the basis of the results obtained by the continuous monitoring and the changes in conditions, the original WSP, including physical treatments of water and waterlines, environmental surveillance and microbiological monitoring, was integrated introducing a UV/ultrafiltration system. The integrated treatment applied to the sulphurous water (microfiltration/UV irradiation/ultrafiltration), waterlines (superheated stream) and distal outlets (descaling/disinfection of nebulizers and nasal irrigators), ensured the removal of Legionella spp. and P. aeruginosa and a satisfactory microbiological quality over time. The environmental surveillance was successful in evaluating the hazard and identifying the most suitable preventive strategies to avoid Legionella re-growth. Ultrafiltration is a technology to take into account in the control of microbial contamination of therapeutic spas, since it does not modify the chemical composition of the water, thus allowing it to retain its therapeutic properties. PMID:26608761

  3. Descriptive analysis and spatial epidemiology of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) for swine sites participating in area regional control and elimination programs from 3 regions of Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Andreia G.; Poljak, Zvonimir; Friendship, Robert; Carpenter, Jane; Hand, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe demographics, basic biosecurity practices, ownership structure, and prevalence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in swine sites located in 3 regions in Ontario, and investigate the presence of spatial clustering and clusters of PRRS positive sites in the 3 regions. A total of 370 swine sites were enrolled in Area Regional Control and Elimination projects in Niagara, Watford, and Perth from 2010 to 2013. Demographics, biosecurity, and site ownership data were collected using a standardized questionnaire and site locations were obtained from an industry organization. Status was assigned on the basis of available diagnostic tests and/or assessment by site veterinarians. Spatial dependence was investigated using the D-function, the spatial scan statistic test and the spatial relative risk method. Results showed that the use of strict all-in all-out (AIAO) pig flow and shower before entry are uncommon biosecurity practices in swine sites, but a larger proportion of sites reported having a Danish entry. The prevalence of PRRS in the 3 regions ranged from 17% to 48% and localized high and low risk clusters were detected. Sites enrolled in the PRRS control projects were characterized by membership in multiple and overlapping ownership structures and networks, which complicates the way the results of monitoring and disease management measures are communicated to the target population. PMID:26424906

  4. Effects of dynamic controlled atmosphere by respiratory quotient on some quality parameters and volatile profile of 'Royal Gala' apple after long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Both, Vanderlei; Thewes, Fabio Rodrigo; Brackmann, Auri; de Oliveira Anese, Rogerio; de Freitas Ferreira, Daniele; Wagner, Roger

    2017-01-15

    The effects of dynamic controlled atmosphere (DCA) storage based on chlorophyll fluorescence (DCA-CF) and respiratory quotient (DCA-RQ) on the quality and volatile profile of 'Royal Gala' apple were evaluated. DCA storage reduces ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) oxidase activity, ethylene production and respiration rate of apples stored for 9months at 1.0°C plus 7days at 20°C, resulting in higher flesh firmness, titratable acidity and lesser physiological disorders, and provided a higher proportion of healthy fruit. Storage in a regular controlled atmosphere gave higher levels of key volatiles (butyl acetate, 2-methylbutyl acetate and hexyl acetate), as compared to fruit stored under DCA-CF, but fruit stored under DCA-RQ 1.5 and RQ 2.0 also showed higher amounts of key volatile compounds, with increment in ethanol and ethyl acetate, but far below the odour threshold. Storage in DCA-CF reduces fruit ester production, especially 2-methylbutyl acetate, which is the most important component of 'Royal Gala' apple flavour. PMID:27542502

  5. Evaluation of exercise-respiratory system modifications and preliminary respiratory-circulatory system integration scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The respiratory control system, functioning as an independent system, is presented with modifications of the exercise subroutine. These modifications illustrate an improved control of ventilation rates and arterial and compartmental gas tensions. A very elementary approach to describing the interactions of the respiratory and circulatory system is presented.

  6. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia, Effortful Control, and Parenting as Predictors of Children's Sympathy across Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Zoe E.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine physiological and environmental predictors of children's sympathy (an emotional response consisting of feelings of concern or sorrow for others who are distressed or in need) and whether temperamental effortful control mediated these relations. Specifically, in a study of 192 children (23% Hispanic; 54%…

  7. Outcomes of a Telehealth Intervention for Homebound Older Adults with Heart or Chronic Respiratory Failure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellis, Zvi D.; Kenaley, Bonnie; McGinty, Jean; Bardelli, Ellen; Davitt, Joan; Ten Have, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Telehealth care is emerging as a viable intervention model to treat complex chronic conditions, such as heart failure (HF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and to engage older adults in self-care disease management. Design and Methods: We report on a randomized controlled trial examining the impact of a multifaceted…

  8. Probiotics in respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Lehtoranta, L; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R

    2014-08-01

    Viral respiratory infections are the most common diseases in humans. A large range of etiologic agents challenge the development of efficient therapies. Research suggests that probiotics are able to decrease the risk or duration of respiratory infection symptoms. However, the antiviral mechanisms of probiotics are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the effects of probiotics on respiratory virus infections and to provide insights on the possible antiviral mechanisms of probiotics. A PubMed and Scopus database search was performed up to January 2014 using appropriate search terms on probiotic and respiratory virus infections in cell models, in animal models, and in humans, and reviewed for their relevance. Altogether, thirty-three clinical trials were reviewed. The studies varied highly in study design, outcome measures, probiotics, dose, and matrices used. Twenty-eight trials reported that probiotics had beneficial effects in the outcome of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and five showed no clear benefit. Only eight studies reported investigating viral etiology from the respiratory tract, and one of these reported a significant decrease in viral load. Based on experimental studies, probiotics may exert antiviral effects directly in probiotic-virus interaction or via stimulation of the immune system. Although probiotics seem to be beneficial in respiratory illnesses, the role of probiotics on specific viruses has not been investigated sufficiently. Due to the lack of confirmatory studies and varied data available, more randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials in different age populations investigating probiotic dose response, comparing probiotic strains/genera, and elucidating the antiviral effect mechanisms are necessary. PMID:24638909

  9. MSFC Respiratory Protection Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    CoVan, James P.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the Marshall Space Flight Center Respiratory Protection program is provided in this poster display. Respiratory protection personnel, building, facilities, equipment, customers, maintenance and operational activities, and Dynatech fit testing details are described and illustrated.

  10. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...