Science.gov

Sample records for response curve shape

  1. Comparing Angular and Curved Shapes in Terms of Implicit Associations and Approach/Avoidance Responses.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Letizia; Ruta, Nicole; Bertamini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Most people prefer smoothly curved shapes over more angular shapes. We investigated the origin of this effect using abstract shapes and implicit measures of semantic association and preference. In Experiment 1 we used a multidimensional Implicit Association Test (IAT) to verify the strength of the association of curved and angular polygons with danger (safe vs. danger words), valence (positive vs. negative words) and gender (female vs. male names). Results showed that curved polygons were associated with safe and positive concepts and with female names, whereas angular polygons were associated with danger and negative concepts and with male names. Experiment 2 used a different implicit measure, which avoided any need to categorise the stimuli. Using a revised version of the Stimulus Response Compatibility (SRC) task we tested with a stick figure (i.e., the manikin) approach and avoidance reactions to curved and angular polygons. We found that RTs for approaching vs. avoiding angular polygons did not differ, even in the condition where the angles were more pronounced. By contrast participants were faster and more accurate when moving the manikin towards curved shapes. Experiment 2 suggests that preference for curvature cannot derive entirely from an association of angles with threat. We conclude that smoothly curved contours make these abstract shapes more pleasant. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature of such a preference. PMID:26460610

  2. Comparing Angular and Curved Shapes in Terms of Implicit Associations and Approach/Avoidance Responses

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Letizia; Ruta, Nicole; Bertamini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Most people prefer smoothly curved shapes over more angular shapes. We investigated the origin of this effect using abstract shapes and implicit measures of semantic association and preference. In Experiment 1 we used a multidimensional Implicit Association Test (IAT) to verify the strength of the association of curved and angular polygons with danger (safe vs. danger words), valence (positive vs. negative words) and gender (female vs. male names). Results showed that curved polygons were associated with safe and positive concepts and with female names, whereas angular polygons were associated with danger and negative concepts and with male names. Experiment 2 used a different implicit measure, which avoided any need to categorise the stimuli. Using a revised version of the Stimulus Response Compatibility (SRC) task we tested with a stick figure (i.e., the manikin) approach and avoidance reactions to curved and angular polygons. We found that RTs for approaching vs. avoiding angular polygons did not differ, even in the condition where the angles were more pronounced. By contrast participants were faster and more accurate when moving the manikin towards curved shapes. Experiment 2 suggests that preference for curvature cannot derive entirely from an association of angles with threat. We conclude that smoothly curved contours make these abstract shapes more pleasant. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature of such a preference. PMID:26460610

  3. Measurement error in environmental epidemiology and the shape of exposure-response curves.

    PubMed

    Rhomberg, Lorenz R; Chandalia, Juhi K; Long, Christopher M; Goodman, Julie E

    2011-09-01

    Both classical and Berkson exposure measurement errors as encountered in environmental epidemiology data can result in biases in fitted exposure-response relationships that are large enough to affect the interpretation and use of the apparent exposure-response shapes in risk assessment applications. A variety of sources of potential measurement error exist in the process of estimating individual exposures to environmental contaminants, and the authors review the evaluation in the literature of the magnitudes and patterns of exposure measurement errors that prevail in actual practice. It is well known among statisticians that random errors in the values of independent variables (such as exposure in exposure-response curves) may tend to bias regression results. For increasing curves, this effect tends to flatten and apparently linearize what is in truth a steeper and perhaps more curvilinear or even threshold-bearing relationship. The degree of bias is tied to the magnitude of the measurement error in the independent variables. It has been shown that the degree of bias known to apply to actual studies is sufficient to produce a false linear result, and that although nonparametric smoothing and other error-mitigating techniques may assist in identifying a threshold, they do not guarantee detection of a threshold. The consequences of this could be great, as it could lead to a misallocation of resources towards regulations that do not offer any benefit to public health. PMID:21823979

  4. A study of the shape of dose-response curves for acute lethality at low response: a megadaphnia study'

    SciTech Connect

    Sebaugh, J.L.; Wilson, J.D.; Tucker, M.W.; Adams, W.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Dose-response curves were developed for the immobilization response in Daphnia magna to four toxicants. The purpose of this work was to study the effect of the form of the model and the number of concentration levels used on the estimates of typical low-dose effective concentrations (1%, 5%, 10%). The generalized four-parameter logistic model was used as the reference. When using 12 concentration levels, one of the logistic family two- or three-parameter models was shown reliably to represent each of these various sets of dose-response data, and to provide adequate estimates of EC01 and EC05, as well as EC10 and EC50. For two of the toxicants, an asymmetric model was required. When reducing the number of concentrations to five, the EC10 and EC50 were well estimated by the probit model, with acceptable results at the EC05 level.

  5. Divergent selection for shape of growth curve in Japanese quail. 1. Responses in growth parameters and food conversion.

    PubMed

    Hyánková, L; Knízetová, H; Dĕdková, L; Hort, J

    2001-12-01

    1. HG and LG quail lines selected for high and low relative weight gain between 11 and 28 d of age (RG11-28), respectively, and an unselected C line were compared. Mature body weight of both selected lines was held at that of the C line. Progeny of generation 6 were used for analysis. 2. Divergent selection for RG11-28 brought about opposite changes in the growth rates shortly after hatching. 3. Parameters of the Richards function were used to describe the growth curve. The largest differences between HG and LG lines occurred in age (t+) and body weight (y+) at the inflection point of the growth curve (on average for both sexes 28% and 20%, respectively). For HG quail, the parameter t+ was 5 d later than that for LG quail (18.6 vs 14.1 d for males and 20.6 vs 15.6 d for females, respectively), and consequently the parameter y+ was greater (90.3 vs 84.0 g for males and 104.5 vs 96.1 g for females, respectively). The shape of the growth curve expressed by the y+/A ratio was substantialy different for HG and LG quail (44.8% vs 39.6% for males and 43.5% vs 36.8% for females, respectively). 4. The food/gain ratios for the fattening period (3 to 35 d of age) were 3.21, 3.47 and 3.34 for the HG, LG and C lines, respectively. The HG quail started to utilise food more efficiently than the LG quail as early as 10 to 14 d, that is, at the age when their relative growth rate first became greater. 5. The relative deviations of the HG and LG lines from the C line are discussed. PMID:11811909

  6. Mysteries of LiF TLD response following high ionisation density irradiation: nanodosimetry and track structure theory, dose response and glow curve shapes

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Y.; Fuks, E.; Datz, H.; Oster, L.; Livingstone, J.; Rosenfeld, A.

    2011-01-01

    Three outstanding effects of ionisation density on the thermoluminescence (TL) mechanisms giving rise to the glow peaks of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) are currently under investigation: (1) the dependence of the heavy charged particle (HCP) relative efficiency with increasing ionisation density and the effectiveness of its modelling by track structure theory (TST), (2) the behaviour of the TL efficiency, f(D), as a function of photon energy and dose. These studies are intended to promote the development of a firm theoretical basis for the evaluation of relative TL efficiencies to assist in their application in mixed radiation fields. And (3) the shape of composite peak 5 in the glow curve for various HCP types and energies and following high-dose electron irradiation, i.e. the ratio of the intensity of peak 5a to peak 5. Peak 5a is a low-temperature satellite of peak 5 arising from electron-hole capture in a spatially correlated trapping centre/luminescent centre (TC/LC) complex that has been suggested to possess a potential as a solid-state nanodosemeter due to the preferential electron/hole population of the TC/LC at high ionisation density. It is concluded that (1) the predictions of TST are very strongly dependent on the choice of photon energy used in the determination of f(D); (2) modified TST employing calculated values of f(D) at 2 keV is in agreement with 5-MeV alpha particle experimental results for composite peak 5 but underestimates the 1.5-MeV proton relative efficiencies. Both the proton and alpha particle relative TL efficiencies of the high-temperature TL (HTTL) peaks 7 and 8 are underestimated by an order of magnitude suggesting that the HTTL efficiencies are affected by other factors in addition to radial electron dose; (3) the dose–response supralinearity of peaks 7 and 8 change rapidly with photon energy: this behaviour is explained in the framework of the unified interaction model as due to a very strong dependence on photon energy of the relative

  7. Mysteries of LiF TLD response following high ionisation density irradiation: nanodosimetry and track structure theory, dose response and glow curve shapes.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y; Fuks, E; Datz, H; Oster, L; Livingstone, J; Rosenfeld, A

    2011-06-01

    Three outstanding effects of ionisation density on the thermoluminescence (TL) mechanisms giving rise to the glow peaks of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) are currently under investigation: (1) the dependence of the heavy charged particle (HCP) relative efficiency with increasing ionisation density and the effectiveness of its modelling by track structure theory (TST), (2) the behaviour of the TL efficiency, f(D), as a function of photon energy and dose. These studies are intended to promote the development of a firm theoretical basis for the evaluation of relative TL efficiencies to assist in their application in mixed radiation fields. And (3) the shape of composite peak 5 in the glow curve for various HCP types and energies and following high-dose electron irradiation, i.e. the ratio of the intensity of peak 5a to peak 5. Peak 5a is a low-temperature satellite of peak 5 arising from electron-hole capture in a spatially correlated trapping centre/luminescent centre (TC/LC) complex that has been suggested to possess a potential as a solid-state nanodosemeter due to the preferential electron/hole population of the TC/LC at high ionisation density. It is concluded that (1) the predictions of TST are very strongly dependent on the choice of photon energy used in the determination of f(D); (2) modified TST employing calculated values of f(D) at 2 keV is in agreement with 5-MeV alpha particle experimental results for composite peak 5 but underestimates the 1.5-MeV proton relative efficiencies. Both the proton and alpha particle relative TL efficiencies of the high-temperature TL (HTTL) peaks 7 and 8 are underestimated by an order of magnitude suggesting that the HTTL efficiencies are affected by other factors in addition to radial electron dose; (3) the dose-response supralinearity of peaks 7 and 8 change rapidly with photon energy: this behaviour is explained in the framework of the unified interaction model as due to a very strong dependence on photon energy of the relative

  8. Shape optimization of self-avoiding curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Shawn W.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a softened notion of proximity (or self-avoidance) for curves. We then derive a sensitivity result, based on shape differential calculus, for the proximity. This is combined with a gradient-based optimization approach to compute three-dimensional, parameterized curves that minimize the sum of an elastic (bending) energy and a proximity energy that maintains self-avoidance by a penalization technique. Minimizers are computed by a sequential-quadratic-programming (SQP) method where the bending energy and proximity energy are approximated by a finite element method. We then apply this method to two problems. First, we simulate adsorbed polymer strands that are constrained to be bound to a surface and be (locally) inextensible. This is a basic model of semi-flexible polymers adsorbed onto a surface (a current topic in material science). Several examples of minimizing curve shapes on a variety of surfaces are shown. An advantage of the method is that it can be much faster than using molecular dynamics for simulating polymer strands on surfaces. Second, we apply our proximity penalization to the computation of ideal knots. We present a heuristic scheme, utilizing the SQP method above, for minimizing rope-length and apply it in the case of the trefoil knot. Applications of this method could be for generating good initial guesses to a more accurate (but expensive) knot-tightening algorithm.

  9. THE SHAPE OF THE TUMOR DOSE RESPONSE CURVES AT LOW PAH EXPOSURES: TESTING THE DEFAULT ASSUMPTION OF LINEARITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously characterized the administered dose tumor-response, stable DNA adduct-lung tumor response, and K-ras mutation profiles in tumors from strain A/J mice exposed i.p. to 6 PAHs including B[a]P . In summary, we demonstrated that: 1. The relationships between admini...

  10. Stochastic basis for curve shape, RBE and temporal dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1982-08-10

    This paper uses biophysical-microdosimetric quantities, measured in a physical surrogate or phantom cell, to explain the shape of absorbed dose-quantal cell response curves, the role of radiation quality and the influence of dose rate. Responses expected are explored first in simple autonomous cell systems, followed by increasingly-complex systems. Complications seen with increasingly-complex systems appear to be confined largely to the higher dose and dose rate ranges.

  11. Serelaxin-mediated signal transduction in human vascular cells: bell-shaped concentration–response curves reflect differential coupling to G proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, M; Samuel, C S; Bathgate, R A; Stewart, D R; Summers, R J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In a recently conducted phase III clinical trial, RELAX-AHF, serelaxin infusion over 48 h improved short- and long-term clinical outcomes in patients with acute heart failure. In this study we used human primary cells from the umbilical vasculature to better understand the signalling mechanisms activated by serelaxin. Experimental Approach We examined the acute effects of serelaxin on signal transduction mechanisms in primary human umbilical vascular cells and its chronic actions on markers of cardiovascular function and disease. Key Results The RXFP1 receptor, the cognate serelaxin receptor, was expressed at the cell surface in HUVECs and human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HUVSMCs), human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) and human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs), but not human umbilical artery endothelial cells. In HUVECs and HUVSMCs, serelaxin increased cAMP, cGMP accumulation and pERK1/2, and the concentration–response curves (CRCs) were bell-shaped. Similar bell-shaped CRCs for cGMP and pERK1/2 were observed in HCFs, whereas in HUASMCs, serelaxin increased cAMP, cGMP and pERK1/2 with sigmoidal CRCs. Gαi/o and lipid raft disruption, but not Gαs inhibition, altered the serelaxin CRC for cAMP and cGMP accumulation in HUVSMC but not HUASMC. Longer term serelaxin exposure increased the expression of neuronal NOS, VEGF, ETβ receptors and MMPs (gelatinases) in RXFP1 receptor-expressing cells. Conclusions and Implications Serelaxin caused acute and chronic changes in human umbilical vascular cells that were cell background dependent. Bell-shaped CRCs that were observed only in venous cells and fibroblasts involved Gαi/o located within membrane lipid rafts. PMID:25297987

  12. Bell-shaped calcium-response curves of lns(l,4,5)P3- and calcium-gated channels from endoplasmic reticulum of cerebellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezprozvanny, Llya; Watras, James; Ehrlich, Barbara E.

    1991-06-01

    RELEASE of calcium from intracellular stores occurs by two pathways, an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-gated channel1-3 and a calcium-gated channel (ryanodine receptor)4-6. Using specific antibodies, both receptors were found in Purkinje cells of cerebellum7,8. We have now compared the functional properties of the channels corresponding to the two receptors by incorporating endoplasmic reticulum vesicles from canine cerebellum into planar bilayers. InsP3-gated channels were observed most frequently. Another channel type was activated by adenine nucleotides or caffeine, inhibited by ruthenium red, and modified by ryanodine, characteristics of the ryanodine receptor/channel6. The open probability of both channel types displayed a bell-shaped curve for dependence on calcium. For the InsP3-gated channel, the maximum probability of opening occurred at 0.2 µM free calcium, with sharp decreases on either side of the maximum. Maximum activity for the ryanodine receptor/channel was maintained between 1 and 100 µM calcium. Thus, within the physiological range of cytoplasmic calcium, the InsP3-gated channel itself allows positive feed-back and then negative feedback for calcium release, whereas the ryanodine receptor/channel behaves solely as a calcium-activated channel. The existence in the same cell of two channels with different responses to calcium and different ligand sensitivities provides a basis for complex patterns of intracellular calcium regulation.

  13. U-Shaped Curves in Development: A PDP Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Timothy T.; Rakison, David H.; McClelland, James L.

    2004-01-01

    As the articles in this issue attest, U-shaped curves in development have stimulated a wide spectrum of research across disparate task domains and age groups and have provoked a variety of ideas about their origins and theoretical significance. In the authors' view, the ubiquity of the general pattern suggests that U-shaped curves can arise from…

  14. Light shaping along 3D curves and particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2015-03-01

    We present a non-iterative holographic technique for efficient and versatile laser beam shaping along arbitrary 3D curves. Light beams with intensity shaped for several 3D curves: Tilted ring, Viviani's curve, Archimedean spiral, and trefoil-knotted curve have been experimentally generated and applied for optical trapping of micrometer-sized dielectric particles. The high intensity gradients and independent phase control prescribed along the curve make this kind of laser trap attractive for multiple particle manipulation and allow for forward and backward motion to the light source. Indeed, different configurations of tractor beam traps are experimentally demonstrated. This technique can also be applied for laser micro-machining.

  15. Implicit dose-response curves.

    PubMed

    Pérez Millán, Mercedes; Dickenstein, Alicia

    2015-06-01

    We develop tools from computational algebraic geometry for the study of steady state features of autonomous polynomial dynamical systems via elimination of variables. In particular, we obtain nontrivial bounds for the steady state concentration of a given species in biochemical reaction networks with mass-action kinetics. This species is understood as the output of the network and we thus bound the maximal response of the system. The improved bounds give smaller starting boxes to launch numerical methods. We apply our results to the sequential enzymatic network studied in Markevich et al. (J Cell Biol 164(3):353-359, 2004) to find nontrivial upper bounds for the different substrate concentrations at steady state. Our approach does not require any simulation, analytical expression to describe the output in terms of the input, or the absence of multistationarity. Instead, we show how to extract information from effectively computable implicit dose-response curves, with the use of resultants and discriminants. We moreover illustrate in the application to an enzymatic network, the relation between the exact implicit dose-response curve we obtain symbolically and the standard hysteresis diagram provided by a numerical ode solver. The setting and tools we propose could yield many other results adapted to any autonomous polynomial dynamical system, beyond those where it is possible to get explicit expressions. PMID:25008963

  16. Asteroid Shape and Spin Axis Modeling Via Light Curve Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friz, Paul; Gokhale, V.

    2013-01-01

    We present light curves and shape and spin axis models for the five asteroids: 291 Alice, 281 Lucretia, 321 Florentina, 714 Ulula, and 3169 Ostro. These models were obtained using data taken from the Truman Observatory, the Asteroid Photometric Catalogue, and the Minor Planet Center. Knowledge of individual asteroids shapes and spin axes is vital to understanding the solar system. However, currently only 213 out of the 500,000 asteroids with known orbits have been modeled. By taking many light curves of asteroids over several apparitions it is possible to determine their shapes and spin axes by a process known as light curve inversion.

  17. Folding DNA into Twisted and Curved Nanoscale Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Hendrik; Douglas, Shawn M.; Shih, William M.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to engineer complex shapes that twist and curve at the nanoscale from DNA. Through programmable self-assembly, strands of DNA are directed to form a custom-shaped bundle of tightly crosslinked double helices, arrayed in parallel to their helical axes. Targeted insertions and deletions of base pairs cause the DNA bundles to develop twist of either handedness or to curve. The degree of curvature could be quantitatively controlled, and a radius of curvature as tight as 6 nanometers was achieved. We also combined multiple curved elements to build several different types of intricate nanostructures, such as a wireframe beach ball or square-toothed gears. PMID:19661424

  18. Trends in scale and shape of survival curves

    PubMed Central

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2012-01-01

    The ageing of the population is an issue in wealthy countries worldwide because of increasing costs for health care and welfare. Survival curves taken from demographic life tables may help shed light on the hypotheses that humans are living longer and that human populations are growing older. We describe a methodology that enables us to obtain separate measurements of scale and shape variances in survival curves. Specifically, ‘living longer’ is associated with the scale variance of survival curves, whereas ‘growing older’ is associated with the shape variance. We show how the scale and shape of survival curves have changed over time during recent decades, based on period and cohort female life tables for selected wealthy countries. Our methodology will be useful for performing better tracking of ageing statistics and it is possible that this methodology can help identify the causes of current trends in human ageing. PMID:22792436

  19. Trends in scale and shape of survival curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2012-07-01

    The ageing of the population is an issue in wealthy countries worldwide because of increasing costs for health care and welfare. Survival curves taken from demographic life tables may help shed light on the hypotheses that humans are living longer and that human populations are growing older. We describe a methodology that enables us to obtain separate measurements of scale and shape variances in survival curves. Specifically, `living longer' is associated with the scale variance of survival curves, whereas `growing older' is associated with the shape variance. We show how the scale and shape of survival curves have changed over time during recent decades, based on period and cohort female life tables for selected wealthy countries. Our methodology will be useful for performing better tracking of ageing statistics and it is possible that this methodology can help identify the causes of current trends in human ageing.

  20. Wavefront shaping through emulated curved space in waveguide settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Chong; Bekenstein, Rivka; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-02-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in wavefront shaping, including shaping of beams in free space, of plasmonic wavepackets and of electronic wavefunctions. In all of these, the wavefront shaping was achieved by external means such as masks, gratings and reflection from metasurfaces. Here, we propose wavefront shaping by exploiting general relativity (GR) effects in waveguide settings. We demonstrate beam shaping within dielectric slab samples with predesigned refractive index varying so as to create curved space environment for light. We use this technique to construct very narrow non-diffracting beams and shape-invariant beams accelerating on arbitrary trajectories. Importantly, the beam transformations occur within a mere distance of 40 wavelengths, suggesting that GR can inspire any wavefront shaping in highly tight waveguide settings. In such settings, we demonstrate Einstein's Rings: a phenomenon dating back to 1936.

  1. Wavefront shaping through emulated curved space in waveguide settings

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Chong; Bekenstein, Rivka; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in wavefront shaping, including shaping of beams in free space, of plasmonic wavepackets and of electronic wavefunctions. In all of these, the wavefront shaping was achieved by external means such as masks, gratings and reflection from metasurfaces. Here, we propose wavefront shaping by exploiting general relativity (GR) effects in waveguide settings. We demonstrate beam shaping within dielectric slab samples with predesigned refractive index varying so as to create curved space environment for light. We use this technique to construct very narrow non-diffracting beams and shape-invariant beams accelerating on arbitrary trajectories. Importantly, the beam transformations occur within a mere distance of 40 wavelengths, suggesting that GR can inspire any wavefront shaping in highly tight waveguide settings. In such settings, we demonstrate Einstein's Rings: a phenomenon dating back to 1936. PMID:26899285

  2. Wavefront shaping through emulated curved space in waveguide settings.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chong; Bekenstein, Rivka; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in wavefront shaping, including shaping of beams in free space, of plasmonic wavepackets and of electronic wavefunctions. In all of these, the wavefront shaping was achieved by external means such as masks, gratings and reflection from metasurfaces. Here, we propose wavefront shaping by exploiting general relativity (GR) effects in waveguide settings. We demonstrate beam shaping within dielectric slab samples with predesigned refractive index varying so as to create curved space environment for light. We use this technique to construct very narrow non-diffracting beams and shape-invariant beams accelerating on arbitrary trajectories. Importantly, the beam transformations occur within a mere distance of 40 wavelengths, suggesting that GR can inspire any wavefront shaping in highly tight waveguide settings. In such settings, we demonstrate Einstein's Rings: a phenomenon dating back to 1936. PMID:26899285

  3. Shape and Individual Variability of the Blur Adaptation Curve

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Diaz, Fuensanta A.; Woods, Russell L.; Peli, Eli

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in clinical implications of adaptation to blurred and sharpened images. Therefore, we investigated repeatability, individual variability and characteristics of the adaptation curves in normally-sighted individuals (n=39). The point of subjective neutrality (PSN – the slope of the spatial spectrum of the image that appears normal) following adaptation was measured for each adaptation level and was used to derive individual adaptation curves for each subject. Adaptation curves were fitted with a modified Tukey biweight function as the curves were found to be tumbled-S shaped and asymmetrical for blur and sharp in some subjects. The adaptation curve was found to be an individual characteristic as inter-subject variability exceeds test-retest variability. The existence of individual variability may have implications for the prescription and clinical success of optical devices as well as image enhancement rehabilitation options. PMID:20417657

  4. Factors Affecting the Shape of Current-Potential Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloy, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    Voltammetry, the fundamental electrochemical experiment, is the measurement of the current which flows at an electrode as a function of the potential applied to the electrode. Such an experiment is discussed, focusing on factors which influence the shape of the current potential curve. (JN)

  5. Shaping the learning curve: epigenetic dynamics in neural plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bronfman, Zohar Z.; Ginsburg, Simona; Jablonka, Eva

    2014-01-01

    A key characteristic of learning and neural plasticity is state-dependent acquisition dynamics reflected by the non-linear learning curve that links increase in learning with practice. Here we propose that the manner by which epigenetic states of individual cells change during learning contributes to the shape of the neural and behavioral learning curve. We base our suggestion on recent studies showing that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and RNA-mediated gene regulation are intimately involved in the establishment and maintenance of long-term neural plasticity, reflecting specific learning-histories and influencing future learning. Our model, which is the first to suggest a dynamic molecular account of the shape of the learning curve, leads to several testable predictions regarding the link between epigenetic dynamics at the promoter, gene-network, and neural-network levels. This perspective opens up new avenues for therapeutic interventions in neurological pathologies. PMID:25071483

  6. Drop shape visualization and contact angle measurement on curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guilizzoni, Manfredo

    2011-12-01

    The shape and contact angles of drops on curved surfaces is experimentally investigated. Image processing, spline fitting and numerical integration are used to extract the drop contour in a number of cross-sections. The three-dimensional surfaces which describe the surface-air and drop-air interfaces can be visualized and a simple procedure to determine the equilibrium contact angle starting from measurements on curved surfaces is proposed. Contact angles on flat surfaces serve as a reference term and a procedure to measure them is proposed. Such procedure is not as accurate as the axisymmetric drop shape analysis algorithms, but it has the advantage of requiring only a side view of the drop-surface couple and no further information. It can therefore be used also for fluids with unknown surface tension and there is no need to measure the drop volume. Examples of application of the proposed techniques for distilled water drops on gemstones confirm that they can be useful for drop shape analysis and contact angle measurement on three-dimensional sculptured surfaces. PMID:21889152

  7. Pump function curve shape for a model lymphatic vessel.

    PubMed

    Bertram, C D; Macaskill, C; Moore, J E

    2016-07-01

    The transport capacity of a contractile segment of lymphatic vessel is defined by its pump function curve relating mean flow-rate and adverse pressure difference. Numerous system characteristics affect curve shape and the magnitude of the generated flow-rates and pressures. Some cannot be varied experimentally, but their separate and interacting effects can be systematically revealed numerically. This paper explores variations in the rate of change of active tension and the form of the relation between active tension and muscle length, factors not known from experiment to functional precision. Whether the pump function curve bends toward or away from the origin depends partly on the curvature of the passive pressure-diameter relation near zero transmural pressure, but rather more on the form of the relation between active tension and muscle length. A pump function curve bending away from the origin defines a well-performing pump by maximum steady output power. This behaviour is favoured by a length/active-tension relationship which sustains tension at smaller lengths. Such a relationship also favours high peak mechanical efficiency, defined as output power divided by the input power obtained from the lymphangion diameter changes and active-tension time-course. The results highlight the need to pin down experimentally the form of the length/active-tension relationship. PMID:27185045

  8. Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal?**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal? The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the 1940s, originally focusing on linear no threshold (LNT) versus threshold responses for cancer and noncanc...

  9. Inferring mechanisms from dose-response curves

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Carson C.; Ong, Karen M.; Dougherty, Edward J.; Simons, S. Stoney

    2011-01-01

    The steady state dose-response curve of ligand-mediated gene induction usually appears to precisely follow a first-order Hill equation (Hill coefficient equal to 1). Additionally, various cofactors/reagents can affect both the potency and the maximum activity of gene induction in a gene-specific manner. Recently, we have developed a general theory for which an unspecified sequence of steps or reactions yields a first-order Hill dose-response curve (FHDC) for plots of the final product vs. initial agonist concentration. The theory requires only that individual reactions “dissociate” from the downstream reactions leading to the final product, which implies that intermediate complexes are weakly bound or exist only transiently. We show how the theory can be utilized to make predictions of previously unidentified mechanisms and the site of action of cofactors/reagents. The theory is general and can be applied to any biochemical reaction that has a FHDC. PMID:21187235

  10. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations. PMID:26952004

  11. Automatic Sulcal Curve Extraction with MRF Based Shape Prior

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Prince, Jerry. L.

    2016-01-01

    Extracting and labeling sulcal curves on the human cerebral cortex is important for many neuroscience studies, however manually annotating the sulcal curves is a time-consuming task. In this paper, we present an automatic sulcal curve extraction method by registering a set of dense landmark points representing the sulcal curves to the subject cortical surface. A Markov random field is used to model the prior distribution of these landmark points, with short edges in the graph preserving the curve structure and long edges modeling the global context of the curves. Our approach is validated using a leave-one-out strategy of training and evaluation on fifteen cortical surfaces, and a quantitative error analysis on the extracted major sulcal curves. PMID:27303593

  12. An analytical solution for curved piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers with spherically shaped diaphragms.

    PubMed

    Sammoura, Firas; Akhbari, Sina; Lin, Liwei

    2014-09-01

    An analytical solution for piezoelectrically actuated spherically shaped diaphragms has been developed to study their dynamic behavior with targeted applications in piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers (pMUT). The analytical model starts with a curved pMUT composed of a piezoelectric diaphragm with a nominal radius in size, a radius of curvature in shape, and under both possible actuation sources of radial pressure and electric potential. The diaphragm has the piezoelectric material polarized in the direction perpendicular to its surface and sandwiched between two metal electrodes. When an electric field is applied between the two electrodes, the in-plane piezoelectric strain can cause larger out-of-plane deflections than a flat unimorph piezoelectric diaphragm because of the diaphragm's spherical curvature with a clamped periphery for high electromechanical coupling factor. Key performance parameters, including mechanical mode shapes, resonant frequencies, dynamic responses, and displacements, with respect to the curvature and size of the diaphragm have been investigated. Both analytical derivations and numerical simulations using finite element analysis have been performed for the optimal design of the electromechanical coupling factor, with varying factors such as mechanical resonant frequency, radius of curvature, nominal radius, and thickness. As such, this work provides theoretical foundations for the design of curved pMUTs with high electromechanical coupling factor compared with planar-shape pMUTs. PMID:25167153

  13. Colloidal Drug Formulations Can Explain “Bell-Shaped” Concentration–Response Curves

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Drug efficacy does not always increase sigmoidally with concentration, which has puzzled the community for decades. Unlike standard sigmoidal curves, bell-shaped concentration–response curves suggest more complex biological effects, such as multiple-binding sites or multiple targets. Here, we investigate a physical property-based mechanism for bell-shaped curves. Beginning with the observation that some drugs form colloidal aggregates at relevant concentrations, we determined concentration–response curves for three aggregating anticancer drugs, formulated both as colloids and as free monomer. Colloidal formulations exhibited bell-shaped curves, losing activity at higher concentrations, while monomeric formulations gave typical sigmoidal curves, sustaining a plateau of maximum activity. Inverting the question, we next asked if molecules with bell-shaped curves, reported in the literature, form colloidal aggregates at relevant concentrations. We selected 12 molecules reported to have bell-shaped concentration–response curves and found that five of these formed colloids. To understand the mechanism behind the loss of activity at concentrations where colloids are present, we investigated the diffusion of colloid-forming dye Evans blue into cells. We found that colloidal species are excluded from cells, which may explain the mechanism behind toxicological screens that use Evans blue, Trypan blue, and related dyes. PMID:24397822

  14. Extension of Ko Straight-Beam Displacement Theory to Deformed Shape Predictions of Slender Curved Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2011-01-01

    The Ko displacement theory originally developed for shape predictions of straight beams is extended to shape predictions of curved beams. The surface strains needed for shape predictions were analytically generated from finite-element nodal stress outputs. With the aid of finite-element displacement outputs, mathematical functional forms for curvature-effect correction terms are established and incorporated into straight-beam deflection equations for shape predictions of both cantilever and two-point supported curved beams. The newly established deflection equations for cantilever curved beams could provide quite accurate shape predictions for different cantilever curved beams, including the quarter-circle cantilever beam. Furthermore, the newly formulated deflection equations for two-point supported curved beams could provide accurate shape predictions for a range of two-point supported curved beams, including the full-circular ring. Accuracy of the newly developed curved-beam deflection equations is validated through shape prediction analysis of curved beams embedded in the windward shallow spherical shell of a generic crew exploration vehicle. A single-point collocation method for optimization of shape predictions is discussed in detail

  15. On the shape of the hospital industry long run average cost curve.

    PubMed

    Finkler, S A

    1979-01-01

    Empirical studies of the hospital industry have produced conflicting results with respect to the shape of the industry's long run average cost (LRAC) curve. Some of the studies have found a classical U-shaped curve. Others have produced results indicating that the LRAC curve is much closer to being L-shaped. Some theoretical support exists for both sets of findings. While classical theory predicts that the LRAC curve will be U-shaped, Alchian has presented theoretical arguments explaining why such curves would be L-shaped. This paper reconciles the results of these studies. The basis for the reconciliation is recognition of the failure of individual hospitals to produce all their individual product lines at efficient volumes. Such inefficient production is feasible and perhaps common, given the incentive structure which exists under current cost reimbursement systems. The implication of this paper is that large hospitals may have a greater potential for scale economies than has previously been recognized. PMID:528221

  16. Cue Reliability Represented in the Shape of Tuning Curves in the Owl's Sound Localization System

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Brian J.; Peña, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal use of sensory information requires that the brain estimates the reliability of sensory cues, but the neural correlate of cue reliability relevant for behavior is not well defined. Here, we addressed this issue by examining how the reliability of spatial cue influences neuronal responses and behavior in the owl's auditory system. We show that the firing rate and spatial selectivity changed with cue reliability due to the mechanisms generating the tuning to the sound localization cue. We found that the correlated variability among neurons strongly depended on the shape of the tuning curves. Finally, we demonstrated that the change in the neurons' selectivity was necessary and sufficient for a network of stochastic neurons to predict behavior when sensory cues were corrupted with noise. This study demonstrates that the shape of tuning curves can stand alone as a coding dimension of environmental statistics. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In natural environments, sensory cues are often corrupted by noise and are therefore unreliable. To make the best decisions, the brain must estimate the degree to which a cue can be trusted. The behaviorally relevant neural correlates of cue reliability are debated. In this study, we used the barn owl's sound localization system to address this question. We demonstrated that the mechanisms that account for spatial selectivity also explained how neural responses changed with degraded signals. This allowed for the neurons' selectivity to capture cue reliability, influencing the population readout commanding the owl's sound-orienting behavior. PMID:26888922

  17. Changes in power curve shapes as an indicator of fatigue during dynamic contractions.

    PubMed

    Mallor, Fermin; Leon, Teresa; Gaston, Martin; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2010-05-28

    The purpose of this study was to analyze exercise-induced leg fatigue during a dynamic fatiguing task by examining the shapes of power vs. time curves through the combined use of several statistical methods: B-spline smoothing, functional principal components and (supervised and unsupervised) classification. In addition, granulometric size distributions were also computed to allow for comparison of curves coming from different subjects. Twelve physically active men participated in one acute heavy-resistance exercise protocol which consisted of five sets of 10 repetition maximum leg press with 120 s of rest between sets. To obtain a smooth and accurate representation of the data, a basis of 180 B-splines was used. Functional principal component (FPC) analysis was used to find the dominant modes of variation in the curves. A multivariate cluster over the FPC scores and a k-nearest neighbor classification led to three interpretable groups corresponding to different levels of fatigue. Fatigue-induced changes in the shapes of the power curves were evident, in which curves progressively flatten and develop a second power peak. In a practical setting FPC analysis greatly reduces dimensionality and the use of granulometries allows for comparison of the curve shapes without distorting the time scale. In contrast to the present methodology, which considers each curve as a datum, classical statistical approaches using summary parameters of time series may lead to limited information about the impact of dynamic fatiguing protocols on kinematic and kinetic time-course changes in curve shapes. PMID:20170919

  18. Assessment of Shape Changes of Mistletoe Berries: A New Software Approach to Automatize the Parameterization of Path Curve Shaped Contours

    PubMed Central

    Derbidge, Renatus; Feiten, Linus; Conradt, Oliver; Heusser, Peter; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Photographs of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) berries taken by a permanently fixed camera during their development in autumn were subjected to an outline shape analysis by fitting path curves using a mathematical algorithm from projective geometry. During growth and maturation processes the shape of mistletoe berries can be described by a set of such path curves, making it possible to extract changes of shape using one parameter called Lambda. Lambda describes the outline shape of a path curve. Here we present methods and software to capture and measure these changes of form over time. The present paper describes the software used to automatize a number of tasks including contour recognition, optimization of fitting the contour via hill-climbing, derivation of the path curves, computation of Lambda and blinding the pictures for the operator. The validity of the program is demonstrated by results from three independent measurements showing circadian rhythm in mistletoe berries. The program is available as open source and will be applied in a project to analyze the chronobiology of shape in mistletoe berries and the buds of their host trees. PMID:23565255

  19. Optimal phase response curves for stochastic synchronization of limit-cycle oscillators by common Poisson noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Shigefumi; Arai, Kensuke; Galán, Roberto F.; Nakao, Hiroya

    2011-07-01

    We consider optimization of phase response curves for stochastic synchronization of noninteracting limit-cycle oscillators by common Poisson impulsive signals. The optimal functional shape for sufficiently weak signals is sinusoidal, but can differ for stronger signals. By solving the Euler-Lagrange equation associated with the minimization of the Lyapunov exponent characterizing synchronization efficiency, the optimal phase response curve is obtained. We show that the optimal shape mutates from a sinusoid to a sawtooth as the constraint on its squared amplitude is varied.

  20. Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal?##

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal? Leon Earl Gray Jr, USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, TAD, RTB. RTP, NC, USA The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since th...

  1. Simulated Equating Using Several Item Response Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boldt, R. F.

    The comparison of item response theory models for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) was extended to an equating context as simulation trials were used to "equate the test to itself." Equating sample data were generated from administration of identical item sets. Equatings that used procedures based on each model (simple item…

  2. From Curves to Trees: A Tree-like Shapes Distance Using the Elastic Shape Analysis Framework.

    PubMed

    Mottini, A; Descombes, X; Besse, F

    2015-04-01

    Trees are a special type of graph that can be found in various disciplines. In the field of biomedical imaging, trees have been widely studied as they can be used to describe structures such as neurons, blood vessels and lung airways. It has been shown that the morphological characteristics of these structures can provide information on their function aiding the characterization of pathological states. Therefore, it is important to develop methods that analyze their shape and quantify differences between their structures. In this paper, we present a method for the comparison of tree-like shapes that takes into account both topological and geometrical information. This method, which is based on the Elastic Shape Analysis Framework, also computes the mean shape of a population of trees. As a first application, we have considered the comparison of axon morphology. The performance of our method has been evaluated on two sets of images. For the first set of images, we considered four different populations of neurons from different animals and brain sections from the NeuroMorpho.org open database. The second set was composed of a database of 3D confocal microscopy images of three populations of axonal trees (normal and two types of mutations) of the same type of neurons. We have calculated the inter and intra class distances between the populations and embedded the distance in a classification scheme. We have compared the performance of our method against three other state of the art algorithms, and results showed that the proposed method better distinguishes between the populations. Furthermore, we present the mean shape of each population. These shapes present a more complete picture of the morphological characteristics of each population, compared to the average value of certain predefined features. PMID:25391359

  3. Phase response curves elucidating the dynamics of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Granada, A; Hennig, R M; Ronacher, B; Kramer, A; Herzel, H

    2009-01-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs) are widely used in circadian clocks, neuroscience, and heart physiology. They quantify the response of an oscillator to pulse-like perturbations. Phase response curves provide valuable information on the properties of oscillators and their synchronization. This chapter discusses biological self-sustained oscillators (circadian clock, physiological rhythms, etc.) in the context of nonlinear dynamics theory. Coupled oscillators can synchronize with different frequency ratios, can generate toroidal dynamics (superposition of independent frequencies), and may lead to deterministic chaos. These nonlinear phenomena can be analyzed with the aid of a phase transition curve, which is intimately related to the phase response curve. For illustration purposes, this chapter discusses a model of circadian oscillations based on a delayed negative feedback. In a second part, the chapter provides a step-by-step recipe to measure phase response curves. It discusses specifications of this recipe for circadian rhythms, heart rhythms, neuronal spikes, central pattern generators, and insect communication. Finally, it stresses the predictive power of measured phase response curves. PRCs can be used to quantify the coupling strength of oscillations, to classify oscillator types, and to predict the complex dynamics of periodically driven oscillations. PMID:19216921

  4. Neighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage and the Shape of the Age–Crime Curve

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Li-Chuan; Loeber, Rolf; Cohen, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to better determine the way in which neighborhood disadvantage affects the shape of the age–crime curve. Methods. We used data from the Pittsburgh Youth Study (PYS), a 14-year longitudinal study, to compare the age–crime curves of individuals in neighborhoods of different disadvantage. We visually compared observed age–crime curves, and then used generalized linear mixed models to test for differences in curve parameters. Results. Adjusted for individual risk factors, the mixed models found that the parameters for interactions of neighborhood disadvantage with both linear age and quadratic age were significant (P < .05) and consistent with higher and longer age–crime curves in more disadvantaged neighborhoods. This implied that compared with boys in advantaged neighborhoods, rates of violence among boys in disadvantaged neighborhoods rose to higher levels that were sustained significantly longer. Conclusions. These results suggested that residing in a disadvantaged neighborhood during early adolescence may have an enduring effect on the shape of the age–crime curve throughout an individual's life. PMID:21778512

  5. Robust Entrainment of Circadian Oscillators Requires Specific Phase Response Curves

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuty, Benjamin; Thommen, Quentin; Lefranc, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clocks keeping time in many living organisms rely on self-sustained biochemical oscillations entrained by external cues, such as light, to the 24-h cycle induced by Earth's rotation. However, environmental cues are unreliable due to the variability of habitats, weather conditions, or cue-sensing mechanisms among individuals. A tempting hypothesis is that circadian clocks have evolved so as to be robust to fluctuations in the signal that entrains them. To support this hypothesis, we analyze the synchronization behavior of weakly and periodically forced oscillators in terms of their phase response curve (PRC), which measures phase changes induced by a perturbation applied at different times of the cycle. We establish a general relationship between the robustness of key entrainment properties, such as stability and oscillator phase, on the one hand, and the shape of the PRC as characterized by a specific curvature or the existence of a dead zone, on the other hand. The criteria obtained are applied to computational models of circadian clocks and account for the disparate robustness properties of various forcing schemes. Finally, the analysis of PRCs measured experimentally in several organisms strongly suggests a case of convergent evolution toward an optimal strategy for maintaining a clock that is accurate and robust to environmental fluctuations. PMID:21641300

  6. Projectile shape influence on ballistic limit curves as determined by computational simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1995-09-01

    A requirement for an effective debris shield is that it must protect a spacecraft from impacts by irregularly shaped particles. A series of numerical simulations has been performed using the multi-dimensional shock physics code CTH to numerically determine the ballistic limit curve for a Whipple bumper shield. Two different projectile shapes are considered for the numerical simulations, flat plates of varying diameters with a constant thickness and spheres of varying diameters. The critical diameter of ballistic limit was determined over a velocity range from 4 km/s to 15 km/s. We have found both experimentally and numerically that the particle shape has a significant effect on the debris cloud distribution, ballistic limit curve, and penetration capability.

  7. Origin of the Shape of Current-Voltage Curve through Nanopores: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Sumikama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Ion transports through ion channels, biological nanopores, are essential for life: Living cells generate electrical signals by utilizing ion permeation through channels. The measured current-voltage (i-V) relations through most ion channels are sublinear, however, its physical meaning is still elusive. Here we calculated the i-V curves through anion-doped carbon nanotubes, a model of an ion channel, using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found the i-V curve reflects the physical origin of the rate-determining step: the i-V curve is sublinear when the permeation is entropy bottlenecked, while it is superlinear in the case of the energy bottlenecked permeation. Based on this finding, we discuss the relation between the molecular mechanism of ion permeation through the biological K+ channels and the shape of the i-V curves through them. This work also provides a clue for a novel design of nanopores that show current rectification. PMID:27167118

  8. Origin of the Shape of Current-Voltage Curve through Nanopores: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Sumikama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Ion transports through ion channels, biological nanopores, are essential for life: Living cells generate electrical signals by utilizing ion permeation through channels. The measured current-voltage (i-V) relations through most ion channels are sublinear, however, its physical meaning is still elusive. Here we calculated the i-V curves through anion-doped carbon nanotubes, a model of an ion channel, using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found the i-V curve reflects the physical origin of the rate-determining step: the i-V curve is sublinear when the permeation is entropy bottlenecked, while it is superlinear in the case of the energy bottlenecked permeation. Based on this finding, we discuss the relation between the molecular mechanism of ion permeation through the biological K(+) channels and the shape of the i-V curves through them. This work also provides a clue for a novel design of nanopores that show current rectification. PMID:27167118

  9. Non-ideal assembly of the driving unit affecting shape of load-displacement curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hu; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-03-01

    The results of nanoindentation testing strongly rely on load-displacement curves, but an abnormal load-displacement curve with obvious inflection in the unloading portion was commonly observed in previously published papers and the reason is not clear. In this paper, possible reasons involved in a custom-made indentation instrument, such as sensors, control and assembly issues, are analyzed and discussed step by step. Experimental results indicate that non-ideal assembly of the precision driving unit strongly affects the shape of the load-displacement curve and its affecting mechanism is studied by theoretical analysis and finite element simulations. This paper reveals the reason leading to the abnormal load-displacement curve, which is helpful for debugging of indentation instruments and can enhance comparability of indentation results.

  10. Changing Amplitudes: Detecting RR Lyrae Light Curve Shape Variations in the Galactic Disk and Inner Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lee, Nathan M.; Kinemuchi, K.; Pepper, J.; Rodriguez, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    In this poster we will discuss our ongoing program to use extant light curves from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) survey to find and characterize RR Lyrae (RRL) stars in the disk and inner halo of the Milky Way. RRL stars are of particular interest because they are standard candles and can be used to map out structure in the galaxy. The periods and shape of RRL light curves also contain information about their Oosterhoff type, which can probe galactic formation history, and metallicity respectively. Although there have been several large photometric surveys for RR Lyrae in the nearby galaxy (OGLE, NSVS, ASAS, and MACHO to name a few), they have each been limited in either sky coverage or number of epochs. The KELT survey represents a new generation of surveys that has many epochs over a large portion of the sky. KELT samples 60% of the sky in both northern and southern hemispheres, and has a long-time-baseline of 4-8 years with a very high cadence rate of less than 20 minutes. This translates into 4,000 to 9,000 epochs per light curve with completeness out to 3 kpc from the Sun. Recent results from both Kepler and ground based surveys results suggest that as many as 50% of RR Lyrae stars show long-term modulation of their light curve shapes (Blazhko effect). These stars combined with RRL stars that pulsate in more than one mode give a sample of objects that the KELT survey is uniquely suited to explore. This poster concentrates on a pilot project to examine RRL stars in a limited number of KELT fields. In particular, we focus on, detecting RR Lyrae, developing a light curve shape-metallicity relationship in the KELT band-pass, and some initial characterization of RRL with either amplitude-modulated or period-modulated light curves.

  11. 3D shape shearography with integrated structured light projection for strain inspection of curved objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, Andrei G.; Groves, Roger M.

    2015-05-01

    Shearography (speckle pattern shearing interferometry) is a non-destructive testing technique that provides full-field surface strain characterization. Although real-life objects especially in aerospace, transport or cultural heritage are not flat (e.g. aircraft leading edges or sculptures), their inspection with shearography is of interest for both hidden defect detection and material characterization. Accurate strain measuring of a highly curved or free form surface needs to be performed by combining inline object shape measuring and processing of shearography data in 3D. Previous research has not provided a general solution. This research is devoted to the practical questions of 3D shape shearography system development for surface strain characterization of curved objects. The complete procedure of calibration and data processing of a 3D shape shearography system with integrated structured light projector is presented. This includes an estimation of the actual shear distance and a sensitivity matrix correction within the system field of view. For the experimental part a 3D shape shearography system prototype was developed. It employs three spatially-distributed shearing cameras, with Michelson interferometers acting as the shearing devices, one illumination laser source and a structured light projector. The developed system performance was evaluated with a previously reported cylinder specimen (length 400 mm, external diameter 190 mmm) loaded by internal pressure. Further steps for the 3D shape shearography prototype and the technique development are also proposed.

  12. The curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus enhances surface colonization in flow

    PubMed Central

    Persat, Alexandre; Stone, Howard A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-01-01

    Each bacterial species has a characteristic shape, but the benefits of specific morphologies remain largely unknown. To understand potential functions for cell shape, we focused on the curved bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Paradoxically, C. crescentus curvature is robustly maintained in the wild but straight mutants have no known disadvantage in standard laboratory conditions. Here we demonstrate that cell curvature enhances C. crescentus surface colonization in flow. Imaging the formation of microcolonies at high spatial and temporal resolution indicates that flow causes curved cells to orient such that they arc over the surface, thereby decreasing the distance between the surface and polar adhesive pili and orienting pili to face the surface. C. crescentus thus repurposes pilus retraction, typically used for surface motility, for surface attachment. The benefit provided by curvature is eliminated at high flow intensity, raising the possibility that diversity in curvature adapts related species for life in different flow environments. PMID:24806788

  13. The curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus enhances surface colonization in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persat, Alexandre; Stone, Howard A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-05-01

    Each bacterial species has a characteristic shape, but the benefits of specific morphologies remain largely unknown. To understand potential functions for cell shape, we focused on the curved bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Paradoxically, C. crescentus curvature is robustly maintained in the wild but straight mutants have no known disadvantage in standard laboratory conditions. Here we demonstrate that cell curvature enhances C. crescentus surface colonization in flow. Imaging the formation of microcolonies at high spatial and temporal resolution indicates that flow causes curved cells to orient such that they arc over the surface, thereby decreasing the distance between the surface and polar adhesive pili, and orienting pili to face the surface. C. crescentus thus repurposes pilus retraction, typically used for surface motility, for surface attachment. The benefit provided by curvature is eliminated at high flow intensity, raising the possibility that diversity in curvature adapts related species for life in different flow environments.

  14. The curved shape of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus enhances colonization of surfaces in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persat, Alexandre; Gitai, Zemer; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria thrive in all types of fluid environments; flow is thus a ubiquitous aspect of their lives. Bacteria have evolved a variety of cellular components contributing to their growth in specific environments. However, cellular features that help them survive and develop in flow have been rarely characterized. Here, we show that Caulobacter crescentus may have evolved its curved shape to enhance the colonization of surfaces in flow. C. crescentus curvature is preserved in the wild but straight mutants have no known growth disadvantage in standard laboratory conditions. Leveraging microfluidics and single-cell imaging, we demonstrate that curvature enhances surface colonization in flow, promoting the formation of larger microcolonies. Cells attach to a surface from a single pole, so that flow affects their orientation. In flow, viscous forces generate a torque on the curved cell body, which reorients the cell in the direction of the flow. The curved cell appears to arc above the surface, optimally orienting its unattached pole towards the surface. This reduces the distance between the surface and the pole, thereby enhancing attachment of its progeny. Additionally, we show that curved shape enhances colony spreading across the direction of the flow, generating more robust biofilm compared to straight mutants.

  15. Nonparametric Item Response Curve Estimation with Correction for Measurement Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Hongwen; Sinharay, Sandip

    2011-01-01

    Nonparametric or kernel regression estimation of item response curves (IRCs) is often used in item analysis in testing programs. These estimates are biased when the observed scores are used as the regressor because the observed scores are contaminated by measurement error. Accuracy of this estimation is a concern theoretically and operationally.…

  16. Object signature curve and invariant shape patches for geometric indexing into pictorial databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhibin; Tasdizen, Tolga; Cooper, David B.

    1997-10-01

    Implicit polynomials (IPs) are among the most effective representations for modeling and recognition of complex geometric shape structures because of their stability, robustness and invariant characteristics. In this paper, we describe an approach for geometric indexing into pictorial databases using IP representations. We discuss in detail a breakthrough in invariant decomposition of a complex object shape into manageable pieces or patches. The self and mutual invariants of those invariant patches can be then used as geometric indexing features vectors. The new concept of invariant signature curve for complex shapes ins developed that captures the semi-global algebraic structure of the object and has the advantage of being able to deal with multi-scale and object occlusion.

  17. A universal dose–response curve for radiochromic films

    SciTech Connect

    Martín-Viera Cueto, J. A. Parra Osorio, V.; Moreno Sáiz, C.; Navarro Guirado, F.; Casado Villalón, F. J.; Galán Montenegro, P.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: This paper presents a model for dose–response curves of radiochromic films. It is based on a modified version of single-hit model to take into account the growth experienced by lithium salt of pentacosa-10,12-diynoic acid polymers after irradiation. Methods: Polymer growth in radiochromic films is a critical phenomenon that can be properly described by means of percolation theory to provide an appropriate distribution function for polymer sizes. Resulting functional form is a power function featuring a critical exponent and two adjustable parameters. Moreover, these parameters act as scaling factors setting a natural scale for sensitometric curves where the dependence on channel sensitivity is removed. A unique reduced response curve is then obtained from all the color channels describing film behavior independently of film dosimetry system. Results: Resulting functional form has been successfully tested in several sensitometric curves from different Gafchromic EBT models, providing excellent agreement with experimental data in a wide dose range up to about 40 Gy and low dose uncertainty. Conclusions: The model presented in this paper describes accurately the sensitometric curves of radiochromic films in wide dose ranges covering all typical ranges used in external radiotherapy. Resulting dose uncertainty is low enough to render a reasonably good performance in clinical applications. Due to cross-correlation, only one of the adjustable parameters is totally independent and characterizes film batches.

  18. Carbon Management Response curves: estimates of temporal soil carbon dynamics.

    PubMed

    West, Tristram O; Marland, Gregg; King, Anthony W; Post, Wilfred M; Jain, Atul K; Andrasko, Kenneth

    2004-04-01

    Measurement of the change in soil carbon that accompanies a change in land use (e.g., forest to agriculture) or management (e.g., conventional tillage to no-till) can be complex and expensive, may require reference plots, and is subject to the variability of statistical sampling and short-term variability in weather. In this paper, we develop Carbon Management Response (CMR) curves that could be used as an alternative to in situ measurements. The CMR curves developed here are based on quantitative reviews of existing global analyses and field observations of changes in soil carbon. The curves show mean annual rates of soil carbon change, estimated time to maximum rates of change, and estimated time to a new soil carbon steady state following the initial change in management. We illustrate how CMR curves could be used in a carbon accounting framework while effectively addressing a number of potential policy issues commonly associated with carbon accounting. We find that CMR curves provide a transparent means to account for changes in soil carbon accumulation and loss rates over time, and also provide empirical relationships that might be used in the development or validation of ecological or Earth systems models. PMID:15453404

  19. Using Light Curves to Characterize Size and Shape of Pseudo-Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Heather M.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Barker, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    Photometric measurements were collected for a new study aimed at estimating orbital debris sizes based on object brightness. To obtain a size from optical measurements the current practice is to assume an albedo and use a normalized magnitude to calculate optical size. However, assuming a single albedo value may not be valid for all objects or orbit types; material type and orientation can mask an object s true optical cross section. This experiment used a CCD camera to record data, a 300 W Xenon, Ozone Free collimated light source to simulate solar illumination, and a robotic arm with five degrees of freedom to move the piece of simulated debris through various orientations. The pseudo-debris pieces used in this experiment originate from the European Space Operations Centre s ESOC2 ground test explosion of a mock satellite. A uniformly illuminated white ping-pong ball was used as a zero-magnitude reference. Each debris piece was then moved through specific orientations and rotations to generate a light curve. This paper discusses the results of five different object-based light curves as measured through an x-rotation. Intensity measurements, from which each light curve was generated, were recorded in five degree increments from zero to 180 degrees. Comparing light curves of different shaped and sized pieces against their characteristic length establishes the start of a database from which an optical size estimation model will be derived in the future.

  20. Using Light Curves to Characterize Size and Shape of Pseudo-Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, H.; Abercromby, K.; Jarvis, K.; Barker, E.

    Photometric measurements were collected for a new study aimed at estimating orbital debris sizes based on object brightness. To obtain a size from optical measurements the current practice is to assume an albedo and use a normalized magnitude to calculate optical size. However, assuming a single albedo value may not be valid for all objects or orbit types and material type and orientation can mask an object's true optical cross section. This experiment used a CCD camera to record data, a 300 W Xenon Ozone Free collimated light source to simulate solar illumination, and a robotic arm with five degrees of freedom to move the piece of simulated debris through various orientations. The pseudo-debris pieces used in this experiment originate from the European Space Operations Centre's ESOC2 ground test explosion of a mock satellite. A uniformly illuminated white ping-pong ball was used as a zero-magnitude reference. Each debris piece was then moved through specific orientations and rotations to generate a light curve. This paper discusses the results of five different object-based light curves as measured through an x-rotation. Intensity measurements, from which each light curve was generated, were recorded in five degree increments from zero to 360 degrees. Comparing light curves of different shaped and sized pieces against their characteristic length establishes the start of a database from which an optical size estimation model will be derived in the future.

  1. Cyclic Fatigue Resistance and Force Generated by OneShape Instruments during Curved Canal Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cyclic fatigue resistance and the force generated by OneShape files during preparation of simulated curved canals. Methods Six OneShape files (the test) and six ProTaper F2 files (the control) were subject to the bending ability test. Another thirty files of each type were used to prepare artificial canals (n = 60), which were divided into 3 groups according to respective curvatures of the canals (30°, 60°, and 90°). The numbers of cycles to fatigue (NCF) as well as the positive and negative forces that were generated by files during canal preparation were recorded. The scanning electron microscopy was applied to detect the fracture surfaces. Results Compared with ProTaper F2 files, the bending loads of OneShape files were significantly lower at deflections of 45°(P < .05), 60° (P < .05) and 75° (P < .01). No significant difference was found at 30°. OneShape files presented a higher NCF in both 60° and 90° canals than the control (P < .01). No significant difference of NCF was found between OneShape and ProTaper files in 30° canals. During the preparation of 30° canals by both files, the negative forces were dominant. With the increase of the curvature, more positive forces were observed. When the OneShape Files were compared with the control, significant different forces were found at D3 and D2 (P < .05) in 30° canals, at D2 (P < .05), D1 (P < .01) and D0 (P < .01) in 60° canals, and at D4 and D3 (P < .01) in 90° canals. Conclusions OneShape files possessed a reliable flexibility and cyclic fatigue resistance. According to the assessments of the forces generated by files, OneShape instruments performed in a more fatigue-resistant way during curved canal preparation, compared with the ProTaper F2 files. PMID:27513666

  2. Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal? ###SETAC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the late 1940s. The debate originally focused on linear no threshold (LNT) vs threshold responses in the low dose range for cancer and noncancer related effects. Recently, claims have arisen tha...

  3. NONMONOTONIC DOSE RESPONSE CURVES (NMDRCS) ARE COMMON AFTER ESTROGEN OR ANDROGEN SIGNALING PATHWAY DISRUPTION. FACT OR FALDERAL?

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the 1940s, originally focusing on linear no threshold (LNT) versus threshold responses for cancer and noncancer effects. Recently, it has been claimed that endocrine disrupters (EDCs...

  4. On Mechanistic Explanation of the Shape of the Universal Curve of Earthquake Recurrence Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Białecki, Mariusz

    2015-10-01

    This paper outlines an idea for an explanation of a mechanism underlying the shape of the universal curve of the Earthquake Recurrence Time Distributions. The proposed simple stochastic cellular automaton model is reproducing the gamma distribution fit with the proper value of parameter γ characterizing the Earth's seismicity and also imitates a deviation from the fit at short interevent times, as observed in real data. Thus the model suggests an explanation of the universal pattern of rescaled Earthquake Recurrence Time Distributions in terms of combinatorial rules for accumulation and abrupt release of seismic energy.

  5. Viscous flow in simple curved gaps. I - An asymptotic theory. II - Viscous stress and shape function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, D.-N.; Tong, W.

    1989-01-01

    The present asymptotic theory for generalized incompressible two-dimensional steady flow in curved channels has been constructed in the limit when gas thickness approaches zero with its lateral dimensions fixed; successive asymptotic solution terms are analytically generated by quadratures. In the second part of this work, the curvature of the gap treated is arbitrary. It is established that each term in the series solution of velocity and pressure is the product of a scale factor and a universal shape functions. Various interaction modes between the volume rate-of-flow, curvature, and its variations, are identified and quantitatively characterized.

  6. A comparison of the shaping ability of reciprocating NiTi instruments in simulated curved canals

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Young-Sil

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The study was to compare the shaping ability of Reciproc (VDW) and WaveOne (Dentsply Maillefer) instruments compared with ProTaper, Profile and hand instrument during the preparation of simulated root canals. Materials and Methods Five groups (n = 5) were established. Reciproc, WaveOne, ProTaper, Profile and K file (K-flexo file) were used to prepare the resin simulated canals. A series of preoperative and postoperative images were taken by a microscope and superimposed in 2 different layers. The amount of resin removed from both the inner and the outer sides of the canal was measured to the level of 10 mm from the apical tip, with a 1 mm increment. Results The mean of resin removal from the inner canal wall was not different from the outer canal wall for Reciproc and WaveOne groups at apical third (1 - 3 mm level). There was no difference in the change of working length and maintenance of canal curvature. NiTi instruments are superior to stainless-steel K file in their shaping ability. Conclusions Within the limitation of this present study, Reciproc and WaveOne instruments maintained the original canal curvature in curved canals better than ProTaper and Profile, which tend to transport towards the outer canal wall of the curve in the apical part of the canal. PMID:23430033

  7. Quantitative dose-response curves from subcellular lipid multilayer microarrays.

    PubMed

    Kusi-Appiah, A E; Lowry, T W; Darrow, E M; Wilson, K A; Chadwick, B P; Davidson, M W; Lenhert, S

    2015-08-21

    The dose-dependent bioactivity of small molecules on cells is a crucial factor in drug discovery and personalized medicine. Although small-molecule microarrays are a promising platform for miniaturized screening, it has been a challenge to use them to obtain quantitative dose-response curves in vitro, especially for lipophilic compounds. Here we establish a small-molecule microarray assay capable of controlling the dosage of small lipophilic molecules delivered to cells by varying the sub-cellular volumes of surface supported lipid micro- and nanostructure arrays fabricated with nanointaglio. Features with sub-cellular lateral dimensions were found necessary to obtain normal cell adhesion with HeLa cells. The volumes of the lipophilic drug-containing nanostructures were determined using a fluorescence microscope calibrated by atomic-force microscopy. We used the surface supported lipid volume information to obtain EC-50 values for the response of HeLa cells to three FDA-approved lipophilic anticancer drugs, docetaxel, imiquimod and triethylenemelamine, which were found to be significantly different from neat lipid controls. No significant toxicity was observed on the control cells surrounding the drug/lipid patterns, indicating lack of interference or leakage from the arrays. Comparison of the microarray data to dose-response curves for the same drugs delivered liposomally from solution revealed quantitative differences in the efficacy values, which we explain in terms of cell-adhesion playing a more important role in the surface-based assay. The assay should be scalable to a density of at least 10,000 dose response curves on the area of a standard microtiter plate. PMID:26167949

  8. Quantitative Dose-Response Curves from Subcellular Lipid Multilayer Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kusi-Appiah, A. E.; Lowry, T. W.; Darrow, E. M.; Wilson, K.; Chadwick, B. P.; Davidson, M. W.; Lenhert, S.

    2015-01-01

    The dose-dependent bioactivity of small molecules on cells is a crucial factor in drug discovery and personalized medicine. Although small-molecule microarrays are a promising platform for miniaturized screening, it has been a challenge to use them to obtain quantitative dose-response curves in vitro, especially for lipophilic compounds. Here we establish a small-molecule microarray assay capable of controlling the dosage of small lipophilic molecules delivered to cells by varying the sub-cellular volumes of surface supported lipid micro- and nanostructure arrays fabricated with nanointaglio. Features with sub-cellular lateral dimensions were found necessary to obtain normal cell adhesion with HeLa cells. The volumes of the lipophilic drug-containing nanostructures were determined using a fluorescence microscope calibrated by atomic-force microscopy. We used the surface supported lipid volume information to obtain EC-50 values for the response of HeLa cells to three FDA-approved lipophilic anticancer drugs, docetaxel, imiquimod and triethylenemelamine, which were found to be significantly different from neat lipid controls. No significant toxicity was observed on the control cells surrounding the drug/lipid patterns, indicating lack of interference or leakage from the arrays. Comparison of the microarray data to dose-response curves for the same drugs delivered liposomally from solution revealed quantitative differences in the efficacy values, which we explain in terms of cell-adhesion playing a more important role in the surface-based assay. The assay should be scalable to a density of at least 10,000 dose response curves on the area of a standard microtiter plate. PMID:26167949

  9. An Investigation of How a Meteor Light Curve is Modified by Meteor Shape and Atmospheric Density Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    This is a preliminary investigation of how perturbations to meteoroid shape or atmospheric density affect a meteor light curve. A simple equation of motion and ablation are simultaneously solved numerically to give emitted light intensity as a function of height. It is found that changing the meteoroid shape, by changing the relationship between the cross-section area and the mass, changes the curvature and symmetry of the light curve, while making a periodic oscillation in atmospheric density gives a small periodic oscillation in the light curve.

  10. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.

  11. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period. PMID:27368770

  12. Phase response curves in the characterization of epileptiform activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Velazquez, J. L.; Galán, R. F.; Dominguez, L. Garcia; Leshchenko, Y.; Lo, S.; Belkas, J.; Erra, R. Guevara

    2007-12-01

    Coordinated cellular activity is a major characteristic of nervous system function. Coupled oscillator theory offers unique avenues to address cellular coordination phenomena. In this study, we focus on the characterization of the dynamics of epileptiform activity, based on some seizures that manifest themselves with very periodic rhythmic activity, termed absence seizures. Our approach consists in obtaining experimentally the phase response curves (PRCs) in the neocortex and thalamus, and incorporating these PRCs into a model of coupled oscillators. Phase preferences of the stationary states and their stability are determined, and these results from the model are compared with the experimental recordings, and interpreted in physiological terms.

  13. Divergent selection for shape of growth curve in Japanese quail. 4. Carcase composition and thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Hyánková, L; Novotná, B; Darras, V M

    2008-03-01

    1. Changes in the relative weights of carcase, abdominal fat, breast and leg muscles, and plasma thyroid hormone concentrations occurring during the first 6 weeks of postnatal growth were analysed in males of HG and LG lines divergently selected for high and low relative body weight (BW) gain between 11 and 28 d of age, respectively, and constant adult BW. 2. The second week of postnatal life was a critical age at which the HG males exhibited a relatively faster growth in comparison to their LG counterparts and permanently exceeded LG males in the percentage by weight of carcase, breast and leg muscle. A higher production of muscle tissues was associated with lower accumulation of abdominal fat before sexual maturity. 3. In general, the plasma T(3) level of HG quail exceeded that of LG quail. Nevertheless, significant differences were found only at 14, 21 and 28 d of age, that is, in the period during which the highest inter-line differences in relative growth rate were noted. Also the T(3)/T(4) ratio followed a similar trend while plasma T(4) level showed no clear and consistent inter-line differences. 4. The results suggest that the selection for the shape of the growth curve, like the selection for body fat, modifies the carcase quality owing to shortening/prolongation of the acceleration growth phase. Individuals with a short acceleration phase of the growth curve are characterised by low carcase quality during the fattening period. PMID:18409082

  14. Interactive 3D medical data cutting using closed curve with arbitrary shape.

    PubMed

    Ning, Hai; Yang, Rongqian; Ma, Amin; Wu, Xiaoming

    2015-03-01

    Interactive 3D cutting is widely used as a flexible manual segmentation tool to extract medical data on regions of interest. A novel method for clipping 3D medical data is proposed to reveal the interior of volumetric data. The 3D cutting method retains or clips away selected voxels projected inside an arbitrary-shaped closed curve which is clipping geometry constructed by interactive tool to make cutting operation more flexible. Transformation between the world and screen coordinate frames is studied to project voxels of medical data onto the screen frame and avoid computing intersection of clipping geometry and volumetric data in 3D space. For facilitating the decision on whether the voxels should be retained, voxels through coordinate transformation are all projected onto a binary mask image on screen frame which the closed curve is also projected onto to conveniently obtain the voxels of intersection. The paper pays special attention to optimization algorithm of cutting process. The optimization algorithm that mixes octree with quad-tree decomposition is introduced to reduce computation complexity, save computation time, and match real time. The paper presents results obtained from raw and segmented medical volume datasets and the process time of cutting operation. PMID:25456145

  15. Estimation of a Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory Model by the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott; Cai, Li

    2014-01-01

    In Ramsay curve item response theory (RC-IRT) modeling, the shape of the latent trait distribution is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters. In its original implementation, RC-IRT is estimated via Bock and Aitkin's EM algorithm, which yields maximum marginal likelihood estimates. This method, however, does not produce the…

  16. Interpretation of psychophysics response curves using statistical physics.

    PubMed

    Knani, S; Khalfaoui, M; Hachicha, M A; Mathlouthi, M; Ben Lamine, A

    2014-05-15

    Experimental gustatory curves have been fitted for four sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose and maltitol), using a double layer adsorption model. Three parameters of the model are fitted, namely the number of molecules per site n, the maximum response RM and the concentration at half saturation C1/2. The behaviours of these parameters are discussed in relationship to each molecule's characteristics. Starting from the double layer adsorption model, we determined (in addition) the adsorption energy of each molecule on taste receptor sites. The use of the threshold expression allowed us to gain information about the adsorption occupation rate of a receptor site which fires a minimal response at a gustatory nerve. Finally, by means of this model we could calculate the configurational entropy of the adsorption system, which can describe the order and disorder of the adsorbent surface. PMID:24423561

  17. Measurement of infinitesimal phase response curves from noisy real neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Keisuke; Omori, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Shigeo; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Okada, Masato; Aonishi, Toru

    2011-10-01

    We sought to measure infinitesimal phase response curves (iPRCs) from rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. It is difficult to measure iPRCs from noisy neurons because of the dilemma that either the linearity or the signal-to-noise ratio of responses to external perturbations must be sacrificed. To overcome this difficulty, we used an iPRC measurement model formulated as the Langevin phase equation (LPE) to extract iPRCs in the Bayesian scheme. We then simultaneously verified the effectiveness of the measurement model and the reliability of the estimated iPRCs by demonstrating that LPEs with the estimated iPRCs could predict the stochastic behaviors of the same neurons, whose iPRCs had been measured, when they were perturbed by periodic stimulus currents. Our results suggest that the LPE is an effective model for real oscillating neurons and that many theoretical frameworks based on it may be applicable to real nerve systems.

  18. Velocity response curves demonstrate the complexity of modeling entrainable clocks.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephanie R; Cheever, Allyson; Harmon, Sarah M

    2014-12-21

    Circadian clocks are biological oscillators that regulate daily behaviors in organisms across the kingdoms of life. Their rhythms are generated by complex systems, generally involving interlocked regulatory feedback loops. These rhythms are entrained by the daily light/dark cycle, ensuring that the internal clock time is coordinated with the environment. Mathematical models play an important role in understanding how the components work together to function as a clock which can be entrained by light. For a clock to entrain, it must be possible for it to be sped up or slowed down at appropriate times. To understand how biophysical processes affect the speed of the clock, one can compute velocity response curves (VRCs). Here, in a case study involving the fruit fly clock, we demonstrate that VRC analysis provides insight into a clock׳s response to light. We also show that biochemical mechanisms and parameters together determine a model׳s ability to respond realistically to light. The implication is that, if one is developing a model and its current form has an unrealistic response to light, then one must reexamine one׳s model structure, because searching for better parameter values is unlikely to lead to a realistic response to light. PMID:25193284

  19. Collective phase response curves for heterogeneous coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, Kevin M.; Booth, Victoria; Forger, Daniel B.

    2015-08-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs) have become an indispensable tool in understanding the entrainment and synchronization of biological oscillators. However, biological oscillators are often found in large coupled heterogeneous systems and the variable of physiological importance is the collective rhythm resulting from an aggregation of the individual oscillations. To study this phenomena we consider phase resetting of the collective rhythm for large ensembles of globally coupled Sakaguchi-Kuramoto oscillators. Making use of Ott-Antonsen theory we derive an asymptotically valid analytic formula for the collective PRC. A result of this analysis is a characteristic scaling for the change in the amplitude and entrainment points for the collective PRC compared to the individual oscillator PRC. We support the analytical findings with numerical evidence and demonstrate the applicability of the theory to large ensembles of coupled neuronal oscillators.

  20. Optimal Colored Noise for Estimating Phase Response Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morinaga, Kazuhiko; Miyata, Ryota; Aonishi, Toru

    2015-09-01

    The phase response curve (PRC) is an important measure representing the interaction between oscillatory elements. To understand synchrony in biological systems, many research groups have sought to measure PRCs directly from biological cells including neurons. Ermentrout et al. and Ota et al. showed that PRCs can be identified through measurement of white-noise spike-triggered averages. The disadvantage of this method is that one has to collect more than ten-thousand spikes to ensure the accuracy of the estimate. In this paper, to achieve a more accurate estimation of PRCs with a limited sample size, we use colored noise, which has recently drawn attention because of its unique effect on dynamical systems. We numerically show that there is an optimal colored noise to estimate PRCs in the most rigorous fashion.

  1. Light curve and fan-shaped coma of comet P/Tempel 2 in 1988-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akisawa, Hiroki; Tsumura, Mitsunori; Nakamura, Akimasa; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi

    1992-01-01

    Visual and Photographic Monitoring observations of comet P/Tempel 2 were carried out by a Japanese amateur group 'Hoshi-no-Hiroba' in 1988-1989. We analyzed the light curve and the time variation of the fan-shaped coma. The light curve was asymmetric to the perihelion passage. The fan angle in September-October was wider than that in December. The direction of the fan generally coincided with Sekanina's prediction (1988).

  2. Improved Distances to Type Ia Supernovae withMulticolor Light Curve Shapes: MLCS2k2

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Saurabh; Riess, Adam G.; Kirshner, Robert P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-01-05

    We present an updated version of the Multicolor Light Curve Shape method to measure distances to type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), incorporating new procedures for K-correction and extinction corrections. We also develop a simple model to disentangle intrinsic color variations and reddening by dust, and expand the method to incorporate U-band light curves and to more easily accommodate prior constraints on any of the model parameters. We apply this method to 133 nearby SN Ia, including 95 objects in the Hubble flow (cz {ge} 2500 km s{sup -1}), which give an intrinsic dispersion of less than 7% in distance. The Hubble flow sample, which is of critical importance to all cosmological uses of SN Ia, is the largest ever presented with homogeneous distances. We find the Hubble flow supernovae with H{sub 0}d{sub SN} {ge} 7400 km s{sup -1} yield an expansion rate that is 6.5 {+-} 1.8% lower than the rate determined from supernovae within that distance, and this can have a large effect on measurements of the dark energy equation of state with SN Ia. Peculiar velocities of SN Ia host galaxies in the rest frame of the Local Group are consistent with the dipole measured in the Cosmic Microwave Background. Direct fits of SN Ia that are significantly reddened by dust in their host galaxies suggest their mean extinction law may be described by R{sub V} {approx_equal} 2.7, but optical colors alone provide weak constraints on R{sub V}.

  3. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L.; DuFrain, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes are exposed to low-LET radiation, and the resulting dicentric chromosome aberrations follow the Poisson distribution. The expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been presented by Kellerer and Rossi (1972, Current Topics on Radiation Research Quarterly 8, 85-158; 1978, Radiation Research 75, 471-488) using the theory of dual radiation action. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting dose-time-response models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general-purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described, and estimation for the nonlinear models is illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  4. Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory for the Three-Parameter Logistic Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2008-01-01

    In Ramsay-curve item response theory (RC-IRT), the latent variable distribution is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters of a unidimensional item response model using marginal maximum likelihood estimation. This study evaluates RC-IRT for the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model with comparisons to the normal model and to the empirical…

  5. Finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for threshold detection of stimulus-response curves.

    PubMed

    Duc, Luu Hoang; Chávez, Joseph Páez; Son, Doan Thai; Siegmund, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In biochemical networks transient dynamics plays a fundamental role, since the activation of signalling pathways is determined by thresholds encountered during the transition from an initial state (e.g. an initial concentration of a certain protein) to a steady-state. These thresholds can be defined in terms of the inflection points of the stimulus-response curves associated to the activation processes in the biochemical network. In the present work, we present a rigorous discussion as to the suitability of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for the detection of inflection points of stimulus-response curves with sigmoidal shape. PMID:27416142

  6. Constraining the Physical Properties of Meteor Stream Particles by Light Curve Shapes Using the Virtual Meteor Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschny, D.; Gritsevich, M.; Barentsen, G.

    2011-01-01

    Different authors have produced models for the physical properties of meteoroids based on the shape of a meteor's light curve, typically from short observing campaigns. We here analyze the height profiles and light curves of approx.200 double-station meteors from the Leonids and Perseids using data from the Virtual Meteor Observatory, to demonstrate that with this web-based meteor database it is possible to analyze very large datasets from different authors in a consistent way. We compute the average heights for begin point, maximum luminosity, and end heights for Perseids and Leonids. We also compute the skew of the light curve, usually called the F-parameter. The results compare well with other author's data. We display the average light curve in a novel way to assess the light curve shape in addition to using the F-parameter. While the Perseids show a peaked light curve, the average Leonid light curve has a more flat peak. This indicates that the particle distribution of Leonid meteors can be described by a Gaussian distribution; the Perseids can be described with a power law. The skew for Leonids is smaller than for Perseids, indicating that the Leonids are more fragile than the Perseids.

  7. Encoding Curved Tetrahedra in Face Holonomies: Phase Space of Shapes from Group-Valued Moment Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggard, Hal M.; Han, Muxin; Riello, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    We present a generalization of Minkowski's classic theorem on the reconstruction of tetrahedra from algebraic data to homogeneously curved spaces. Euclidean notions such as the normal vector to a face are replaced by Levi-Civita holonomies around each of the tetrahedron's faces. This allows the reconstruction of both spherical and hyperbolic tetrahedra within a unified framework. A new type of hyperbolic simplex is introduced in order for all the sectors encoded in the algebraic data to be covered. Generalizing the phase space of shapes associated to flat tetrahedra leads to group valued moment maps and quasi-Poisson spaces. These discrete geometries provide a natural arena for considering the quantization of gravity including a cosmological constant. A concrete realization of this is provided by the relation with the spin-network states of loop quantum gravity. This work therefore provides a bottom-up justification for the emergence of deformed gauge symmetries and quantum groups in 3+1 dimensional covariant loop quantum gravity in the presence of a cosmological constant.

  8. The Importance of 56Ni in Shaping the Light Curves of Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakar, Ehud; Poznanski, Dovi; Katz, Boaz

    2016-06-01

    What intrinsic properties shape the light curves of SNe II? To address this question we derive observational measures that are robust (i.e., insensitive to detailed radiative transfer) and constrain the contribution from 56Ni as well as a combination of the envelope mass, progenitor radius, and explosion energy. By applying our methods to a sample of SNe II from the literature, we find that a 56Ni contribution is often significant. In our sample, its contribution to the time-weighted integrated luminosity during the photospheric phase ranges between 8% and 72% with a typical value of 30%. We find that the 56Ni relative contribution is anti-correlated with the luminosity decline rate. When added to other clues, this in turn suggests that the flat plateaus often observed in SNe II are not a generic feature of the cooling envelope emission, and that without 56Ni many of the SNe that are classified as II-P would have shown a decline rate that is steeper by up to 1 mag/100 days. Nevertheless, we find that the cooling envelope emission, and not 56Ni contribution, is the main driver behind the observed range of decline rates. Furthermore, contrary to previous suggestions, our findings indicate that fast decline rates are not driven by lower envelope masses. We therefore suggest that the difference in observed decline rates is mainly a result of different density profiles of the progenitors.

  9. Dome Shape Optimization of Composite Pressure Vessels Based on Rational B-Spline Curve and Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaeesefat, Abbas

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for shape optimization of composite pressure vessels head. The shape factor which is defined as the ratio of internal volume to weight of the vessel is used as an objective function. Design constrains consist of the geometrical limitations, winding conditions, and Tsai-Wu failure criterion. The geometry of dome shape is defined by a B-spline rational curve. By altering the weights of control points, depth of dome, and winding angle, the dome shape is changed. The proposed algorithm uses genetic algorithm and finite element analysis to optimize the design parameters. The algorithm is applied on a CNG pressure vessel and the results show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently define the optimal dome shape. This algorithm is general and can be used for general shape optimization.

  10. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L; DuFrain, R.J.

    1983-10-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between the yield of dicentric chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The dicentric yields follow the Poisson distribution, and the expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose for low LET radiation. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been obtained by Kellerer and Rossi using the theory of dual radiation action. The yield of elementary lesions is kappa(..gamma..d + g(t, tau)d/sup 2/), where t is the time and d is dose. The coefficient of the d/sup 2/ term is determined by the recovery function and the temporal mode of irradiation. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described and illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  11. An item response curves analysis of the Force Concept Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Gary A.; Harshman, Nathan; Branum-Martin, Lee; Mazur, Eric; Mzoughi, Taha; Baker, Stephen D.

    2012-09-01

    Several years ago, we introduced the idea of item response curves (IRC), a simplistic form of item response theory (IRT), to the physics education research community as a way to examine item performance on diagnostic instruments such as the Force Concept Inventory (FCI). We noted that a full-blown analysis using IRT would be a next logical step, which several authors have since taken. In this paper, we show that our simple approach not only yields similar conclusions in the analysis of the performance of items on the FCI to the more sophisticated and complex IRT analyses but also permits additional insights by characterizing both the correct and incorrect answer choices. Our IRC approach can be applied to a variety of multiple-choice assessments but, as applied to a carefully designed instrument such as the FCI, allows us to probe student understanding as a function of ability level through an examination of each answer choice. We imagine that physics teachers could use IRC analysis to identify prominent misconceptions and tailor their instruction to combat those misconceptions, fulfilling the FCI authors' original intentions for its use. Furthermore, the IRC analysis can assist test designers to improve their assessments by identifying nonfunctioning distractors that can be replaced with distractors attractive to students at various ability levels.

  12. BUMP: a FORTRAN program for identifying dose-response curves subject to downturns.

    PubMed

    Simpson, D G; Dallal, G E

    1989-02-01

    BUMP is a FORTRAN implementation of a modified Jonckheere-Terpstra test, proposed by Simpson and Margolin, to test nonparametrically for a dose-response curve when a downturn is possible at high doses. The Jonckheere-Terpstra statistic is commonly used to test for increasing or decreasing trends in dose-response relationships. In many experimental settings, however, a test agent has more than one effect, and a "bump"-shaped dose-response can occur. For instance, increasing the concentration of a certain nutrient on a petri dish may increase the growth rate at low doses yet decrease the growth rate at high doses because of toxicity. The modified test allows one to assess the significance of the initial increase in the dose-response curve and yet to minimize the effect on the conclusions of any downturn at higher doses. A complete system which operates directly on SYSTAT/MYSTAT files is available for the IBM-PC and compatibles; it includes a utility which converts ASCII data files to the SYSTAT/MYSTAT format. The FORTRAN 77 source code is available for those who would like to run BUMP on other machines. PMID:2914424

  13. The effects of cholinergic neuromodulation on neuronal phase-response curves of modeled cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Stiefel, Klaus M.; Gutkin, Boris S.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The response of an oscillator to perturbations is described by its phase-response curve (PRC), which is related to the type of bifurcation leading from rest to tonic spiking. In a recent experimental study, we have shown that the type of PRC in cortical pyramidal neurons can be switched by cholinergic neuromodulation from type II (biphasic) to type I (monophasic). We explored how intrinsic mechanisms affected by acetylcholine influence the PRC using three different types of neuronal models: a theta neuron, single-compartment neurons and a multi-compartment neuron. In all of these models a decrease in the amount of a spike-frequency adaptation current was a necessary and sufficient condition for the shape of the PRC to change from biphasic (type II) to purely positive (type I). PMID:18784991

  14. Shape of the Hanle curve in spin-transport structures in the presence of an ac drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, R. C.; Prestgard, M. C.; Tiwari, A.; Raikh, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    Resistance between two ferromagnetic electrodes coupled to a normal channel depends on their relative magnetizations. The spin-dependent component, R , of the resistance changes with magnetic field, B , normal to the directions of magnetizations. In the field of spin transport, this change, R (B ) , originating from the Larmour spin precession, is called the Hanle curve. We demonstrate that the shape of the Hanle curve evolves upon application of an ac drive and study this evolution theoretically as a function of the amplitude, B1, and frequency, ω , of the drive. If the distance between the electrodes, L , is smaller than the spin-diffusion length, λs, the prime effect of a weak circular-polarized drive is the shift of the center of the curve to the value of B for which the Larmour frequency, ωL, is ˜B12/ω . Magnetic resonance at ωL˜ω manifests itself in the derivative, d/R d B . For large L ≫λs the ac drive affects the Hanle curve if the drive amplitude exceeds the spin-relaxation rate, τs-1, i.e., at B1τs≳1 . The prime effect of the drive is the elimination of a minimum in R (B ) . A linearly polarized drive has a fundamentally different effect on the Hanle curve, affecting not its shape but rather its width.

  15. A Simple Experiment Demonstrating the Relationship between Response Curves and Absorption Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Chia-yu

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment for recording two individual spectrophotometer response curves. The two curves are directly related to the power of transmitted beams that pass through a solvent and solution. An absorption spectrum of the solution can be constructed from the calculated rations of the curves as a function of wavelength. (JN)

  16. Effects of mistuning and matrix structure on the topology of frequency response curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afolabi, Dare

    1989-01-01

    The stability of a frequency response curve under mild perturbations of the system's matrix is investigated. Using recent developments in the theory of singularities of differentiable maps, it is shown that the stability of a response curve depends on the structure of the system's matrix. In particular, the frequency response curves of a cylic system are shown to be unstable. Consequently, slight parameter variations engendered by mistuning will induce a significant difference in the topology of the forced response curves, if the mistuning transformation crosses the bifurcation set.

  17. Re-shaping graphene hydrogels for effectively enhancing actuation responses.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jiangli; Hu, Chuangang; Lv, Lingxiao; Dai, Liming; Qu, Liangti

    2015-08-01

    The development of actuation-enabled materials is important for smart devices and systems. Among them, graphene with outstanding electric, thermal, and mechanical properties holds great promise as a new type of stimuli-responsive material. In this study, we developed a re-shaping strategy to construct structure-controlled graphene hydrogels for highly enhanced actuation responses. Actuators based on the re-shaped graphene hydrogel showed a much higher actuation response than that of the common graphene counterparts. On the other hand, once composited with a conducting polymer (e.g., polypyrrole), the re-shaped hybrid actuator exhibits excellent actuation behavior in response to electrochemical potential variation. Even under stimulation at a voltage as low as 0.8 V, actuators based on the re-shaped graphene-polypyrrole composite hydrogel exhibit a maximum strain response of up to 13.5%, which is the highest value reported to date for graphene-based materials. PMID:26130158

  18. The light curve shapes as a key to resolving the origin of long secondary periods in red giant stars

    SciTech Connect

    Soszyński, I.; Udalski, A. E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl

    2014-06-10

    We present a study of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment light curves of red giant stars exhibiting long secondary periods (LSPs)—an enigmatic phenomenon commonly observed in stars on the upper red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch. We show that the light curves of LSP stars are essentially identical to those of the spotted variables with one dark spot on their photospheres. Such behavior can be explained by the presence of a dusty cloud orbiting the red giant together with a low-mass companion in a close, circular orbit. We argue that the binary scenario is in agreement with most of the observational properties of LSP variables, including non-sinusoidal shapes of their radial velocity curves.

  19. Modeling and regression analysis of semiochemical dose-response curves of insect antennal reception and behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dose-response curves with semiochemicals are reported in many articles in insect chemical ecology regarding neurophysiology and behavioral bioassays. Most such curves are shown in figures where the x-axis has order of magnitude increases in dosages versus responses on the y-axis represented by point...

  20. Mass estimation of shaped charge jets from x-ray shadow graph with new calibration curve method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kishimura, Hiroaki; Kumakura, Akira; Sakai, Shun

    2015-06-01

    In order to assess the penetration capability of the Al and Cu metal jets against a bumper structure (such as Al plate and/or Al block), we measured the initial formation process of the metal jets generated from conical shaped charge device. The shaped charge device configurations employed in the experimental and numerical investigations have conical aluminum (and cupper) liner and steel casing with PBX explosive charge. The profile and velocity of the jets are measured with flash x-ray and x-ray film system. The mass of the jet tip are estimated from x-ray images by a calibration curve method proposed by our group. Al targets are used to evaluate a penetration performance of the jets. Additionally, we have simulated the initial formation process of the shaped charge jets with Autodyne-2D hydrodynamic code, which proposed important data to compare the experimental one.

  1. Clone history shapes Populus drought responses.

    PubMed

    Raj, Sherosha; Bräutigam, Katharina; Hamanishi, Erin T; Wilkins, Olivia; Thomas, Barb R; Schroeder, William; Mansfield, Shawn D; Plant, Aine L; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2011-07-26

    Just as animal monozygotic twins can experience different environmental conditions by being reared apart, individual genetically identical trees of the genus Populus can also be exposed to contrasting environmental conditions by being grown in different locations. As such, clonally propagated Populus trees provide an opportunity to interrogate the impact of individual environmental history on current response to environmental stimuli. To test the hypothesis that current responses to an environmental stimulus, drought, are contingent on environmental history, the transcriptome- level drought responses of three economically important hybrid genotypes-DN34 (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra), Walker [P. deltoides var. occidentalis × (Populus laurifolia × P. nigra)], and Okanese [Walker × (P. laurifolia × P. nigra)]-derived from two different locations were compared. Strikingly, differences in transcript abundance patterns in response to drought were based on differences in geographic origin of clones for two of the three genotypes. This observation was most pronounced for the genotypes with the longest time since establishment and last common propagation. Differences in genome-wide DNA methylation paralleled the transcriptome level trends, whereby the clones with the most divergent transcriptomes and clone history had the most marked differences in the extent of total DNA methylation, suggesting an epigenomic basis for the clone history-dependent transcriptome divergence. The data provide insights into the interplay between genotype and environment in the ecologically and economically important Populus genus, with implications for the industrial application of Populus trees and the evolution and persistence of these important tree species and their associated hybrids. PMID:21746919

  2. The NURBS curves in modelling the shape of the boundary in the parametric integral equations systems for solving the Laplace equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieniuk, Eugeniusz; Kapturczak, Marta; Sawicki, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    In solving of boundary value problems the shapes of the boundary can be modelled by the curves widely used in computer graphics. In parametric integral equations system (PIES) such curves are directly included into the mathematical formalism. Its simplify the way of definition and modification of the shape of the boundary. Until now in PIES the B-spline, Bézier and Hermite curves were used. Recent developments in the computer graphics paid our attention, therefore we implemented in PIES possibility of defining the shape of boundary using the NURBS curves. The curves will allow us to modeling different shapes more precisely. In this paper we will compare PIES solutions (with applied NURBS) with the solutions existing in the literature.

  3. Urbanisation shapes behavioural responses to a pesticide.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Nedim; Debecker, Sara; Op de Beeck, Lin; Stoks, Robby

    2015-06-01

    The degree of urbanisation is rapidly increasing worldwide. Due to anthropogenic impact, urban populations are exposed to higher levels of contaminants and higher temperatures. Despite this, urbanisation is a largely overlooked spatial component in ecotoxicology. We tested in a common garden rearing experiment whether replicated urban and rural populations of the damselfly Coenagrion puella differ in their vulnerability to sublethal levels of a widespread pesticide, chlorpyrifos, in terms of ecologically relevant behaviours (exploration behaviour, activity, boldness and food intake), and to what extent these patterns are affected by temperature (20 and 24°C). Except boldness, all behaviours were affected by previous pesticide exposure. While the pesticide did not affect exploration behaviour at 20°C, it was associated with increased exploration at 24°C, which may reflect an increased toxicity of chlorpyrifos at higher temperatures. Importantly, rural and urban larvae showed consistently different, sometimes even opposite behavioural responses to pesticide exposure. When exposed to the pesticide, rural larvae decreased activity and food intake at both temperatures; urban larvae instead increased activity at both temperatures and only reduced food intake at the high temperature. This suggests that urban larvae were less affected by the pesticide, which would be consistent with a scenario of local adaptation to higher contaminant levels. Our results highlight that urbanisation may be an important factor to arrive at a spatially explicit ecological risk assessment, and may be an ignored reason why studies on the same species may generate widely different vulnerabilities to pesticides. PMID:25863029

  4. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SHAPE AND ROTATION TO EXPLAIN THE LIGHT CURVE OF NEREID

    SciTech Connect

    Hesselbrock, Andrew J.; Alexander, S. G.; Harp, Thomas W.; Abel, N. P.

    2013-06-15

    The observed photometric variability of Nereid over both short and long time scales has been known for some time and has remained a mystery. Schaefer et al. have documented some twenty years worth of observations that reveal that Nereid's light curve shows both short period intranight variations and long term active and inactive episodes. In this work, we report on a set of computational simulations of both the orbital and rotational motion of Nereid in an effort to understand Nereid's behavior. We model Nereid as an ellipsoid that is subject to torques from other bodies, and we calculate both its orbital and rotational motion. In addition, we only consider the case where Nereid is uniformly reflecting with no albedo variations on its surface. Thus, any brightness variations are caused solely by Nereid's changing orientation. We find for reasonable geometries, orientation, and spin rates that we can reproduce some of the features, but not all, of the observed light curve for Nereid. In particular, we show how active and inactive episodes can arise; however, our calculated light curve differs from observations in other aspects.

  5. AN ANALYSIS OF THE SHAPES OF INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION CURVES. VI. THE NEAR-IR EXTINCTION LAW

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, E. L.; Massa, D. E-mail: massa@derckmassa.net

    2009-07-10

    We combine new observations from the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera of Survey with existing data to investigate the wavelength dependence of near-IR (NIR) extinction. Previous studies suggest a power law form for NIR extinction, with a 'universal' value of the exponent, although some recent observations indicate that significant sight line-to-sight line variability may exist. We show that a power-law model for the NIR extinction provides an excellent fit to most extinction curves, but that the value of the power, {beta}, varies significantly from sight line to sight line. Therefore, it seems that a 'universal NIR extinction law' is not possible. Instead, we find that as {beta} decreases, R(V) {identical_to} A(V)/E(B - V) tends to increase, suggesting that NIR extinction curves which have been considered 'peculiar' may, in fact, be typical for different R(V) values. We show that the power-law parameters can depend on the wavelength interval used to derive them, with the {beta} increasing as longer wavelengths are included. This result implies that extrapolating power-law fits to determine R(V) is unreliable. To avoid this problem, we adopt a different functional form for NIR extinction. This new form mimics a power law whose exponent increases with wavelength, has only two free parameters, can fit all of our curves over a longer wavelength baseline and to higher precision, and produces R(V) values which are consistent with independent estimates and commonly used methods for estimating R(V). Furthermore, unlike the power-law model, it gives R(V)s that are independent of the wavelength interval used to derive them. It also suggests that the relation R(V) = -1.36 E(K-V)/(E(B-V)) - 0.79 can estimate R(V) to {+-}0.12. Finally, we use model extinction curves to show that our extinction curves are in accord with theoretical expectations, and demonstrate how large samples of observational quantities can provide useful constraints on the grain properties.

  6. Differential thermal performance curves in response to different habitats in the parasitoid Venturia canescens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foray, Vincent; Gibert, Patricia; Desouhant, Emmanuel

    2011-08-01

    Environmental variability is expected to be important in shaping performance curves, reaction norms of phenotypic traits related to fitness. Models predict that the breadth of performance curves should increase with environmental variability at the expense of maximal performance. In this study, we compared the thermal performance curves of two sympatric populations of the parasitoid Venturia canescens that were observed under contrasting thermal regimes in their respective preferred habitats and differing in their modes of reproduction. Our results confirm the large effect of developmental temperature on phenotypic traits of insects and demonstrate that thelytokous and arrhenotokous wasps respond differently to temperature during development, in agreement with model predictions. For traits related to fecundity, thelytokous parasitoids, which usually occur in stable thermal conditions, exhibit specialist performance curves, maximising their reproductive success under a restricted range of temperature. In contrast, arrhenotokous parasitoids, which occur in variable climates, exhibit generalist performance curves, in keeping with the hypothesis "jack of all temperatures, master of none".

  7. R-curve response of silicon carbide whisker-reinforced alumina: Microstructural influence

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, E.Y.; Hsueh, C.H.; Becher, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Rising fracture resistance with crack extension (R-curve response) can lead to improvements in the mechanical reliability of ceramics. To understand how microstructures influence the R-curve behavior, direct observations of crack interactions with microstructural features were conducted on SiC whisker-reinforced alumina. The contribution of the dominant toughening mechanisms to the R-curve behavior of these composites is discussed using experimental and theoretical studies.

  8. Assessing response in breast cancer with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: are signal intensity-time curves adequate?

    PubMed

    Woolf, David K; Padhani, Anwar R; Taylor, N Jane; Gogbashian, Andrew; Li, Sonia P; Beresford, Mark J; Ah-See, Mei-Lin; Stirling, James; Collins, David J; Makris, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative DCE-MRI parameters including K(trans) (transfer constant min(-1)) can predict both response and outcome in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Quantitative methods are time-consuming to calculate, requiring expensive software and interpretive expertise. For diagnostic purposes, signal intensity-time curves (SITCs) are used for tissue characterisation. In this study, we compare the ability of NAC-related changes in SITCs with K(trans) to predict response and outcomes. 73 women with primary breast cancer underwent DCE-MRI studies before and after two cycles of NAC. Patients received anthracycline and/or docetaxel-based chemotherapy. At completion of NAC, patients had local treatment with surgery & radiotherapy and further systemic treatments. SITCs for paired DCE-MRI studies were visually scored using a five-curve type classification schema encompassing wash-in and wash-out phases and correlated with K(trans) values and to the endpoints of pathological response, OS and DFS. 58 paired patients studies were evaluable. The median size by MRI measurement for 52 tumours was 38 mm (range 17-86 mm) at baseline and 26 mm (range 10-85 mm) after two cycles of NAC. Median baseline K(trans) (min(-1)) was 0.214 (range 0.085-0.469), and post-two cycles of NAC was 0.128 (range 0.013-0.603). SITC shapes were significantly related to K(trans) values both before (χ (2) = 43.3, P = 0.000) and after two cycles of NAC (χ (2) = 60.5, P = 0.000). Changes in curve shapes were significantly related to changes in K(trans) (χ (2) = 53.5, P = 0.000). Changes in curve shape were significantly correlated with clinical (P = 0.005) and pathological response (P = 0.005). Reductions in curve shape of ≥1 point were significant for overall improved survival using Kaplan-Meier analysis with a 5-year OS of 80.9 versus 68.6 % (P = 0.048). SITCs require no special software to generate and provide a useful method of assessing the

  9. Diffraction by three-dimensional slit-shape curves: decomposition in terms of Airy and Pearcey functions.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Vara, P; Barranco, J Silva; De Los Santos G, S I; Munoz-Lopez, J; Torres-Rodriguez, M A; Xique, R Suarez; Martinez-Niconoff, G

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the diffraction field generated by coherent illumination of a three-dimensional transmittance characterized by a slit-shape curve. Generic features are obtained using the Frenet-Serret equations, which allow a decomposition of the optical field. The analysis is performed by describing the influence of the curvature and torsion on osculating, normal, and rectifying planes. We show that the diffracted field has a decomposition in three optical fields propagating along three optical axes that are mutually perpendicular. The decomposition is in terms of the Pearcey and Airy functions, and the generalized Airy function. Experimental results are shown. PMID:26258341

  10. Simulation of the shape of chaperonins using the small-angle x-ray scattering curves and torus form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Amarantov, S. V.; Naletova, I. N.; Kurochkina, L. P.

    2011-08-15

    The inverse scattering problem has been solved for protein complexes whose surfaces can be described by a set of the simplest doubly connected surfaces in the uniform approximation (a scattering potential inside the molecule is a constant). Solutions of two proteins-well-known GroEL bacterial chaperonin and poor-studied bacteriophage chaperonin, which is a product of 146 gene (gp146)-were taken for the experiment. The shapes of protein complexes have been efficiently reconstructed from the experimental scattering curves. The shell method, the method of the rotation of amino acid sequences with the use of the form factor of an amino acid, and the method of seeking the model parameters of a protein complex with the preliminarily obtained form factor of the model have been used to reconstruct the shape of these particles.

  11. Scalable shape-controlled fabrication of curved microstructures using a femtosecond laser wet-etching process.

    PubMed

    Bian, Hao; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Liu, Hewei; Du, Guangqing; Deng, Zefang; Si, Jinhai; Yun, Feng; Hou, Xun

    2013-07-01

    Materials with curvilinear surface microstructures are highly desirable for micro-optical and biomedical devices. However, realization of such devices efficiently remains technically challenging. This paper demonstrates a facile and flexible method to fabricate curvilinear microstructures with controllable shapes and dimensions. The method composes of femtosecond laser exposures and chemical etching process with the hydrofluoric acid solutions. By fixed-point and step-in laser irradiations followed by the chemical treatments, concave microstructures with different profiles such as spherical, conical, bell-like and parabola were fabricated on silica glasses. The convex structures were replicated on polymers by the casting replication process. In this work, we used this technique to fabricate high-quality microlens arrays and high-aspect-ratio microwells which can be used in 3D cell culture. This approach offers several advantages such as high-efficient, scalable shape-controllable and easy manipulations. PMID:23623098

  12. Reclaimed mineland curve number response to temporal distribution of rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, R.C.; Agouridis, C.T.; Vingralek, P.T.; Fogle, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    The curve number (CN) method is a common technique to estimate runoff volume, and it is widely used in coal mining operations such as those in the Appalachian region of Kentucky. However, very little CN data are available for watersheds disturbed by surface mining and then reclaimed using traditional techniques. Furthermore, as the CN method does not readily account for variations in infiltration rates due to varying rainfall distributions, the selection of a single CN value to encompass all temporal rainfall distributions could lead engineers to substantially under- or over-size water detention structures used in mining operations or other land uses such as development. Using rainfall and runoff data from a surface coal mine located in the Cumberland Plateau of eastern Kentucky, CNs were computed for conventionally reclaimed lands. The effects of temporal rainfall distributions on CNs was also examined by classifying storms as intense, steady, multi-interval intense, or multi-interval steady. Results indicate that CNs for such reclaimed lands ranged from 62 to 94 with a mean value of 85. Temporal rainfall distributions were also shown to significantly affect CN values with intense storms having significantly higher CNs than multi-interval storms. These results indicate that a period of recovery is present between rainfall bursts of a multi-interval storm that allows depressional storage and infiltration rates to rebound. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association.

  13. Optimal control of a universal rotating magnetic vector for petal-shaped capsule robot in curve environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongshun; Bai, Jianwei; Chi, Minglu; Cheng, Cunxin; Wang, Dianlong

    2014-09-01

    Steering control of a capsule robot in curve environment by magnetic navigation is not yet solved completely. A petal-shaped capsule robot with less steering resistance based on multiple wedge effects is presented, and an optimization method with two processes for determining the orientation of a pre-applied universal magnetic spin vector is proposed. To realize quick and non-contact steering swimming, a fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method for optimizing the steering driving angle is presented based on two evaluation indexes including the average steering speed and the average steering trajectory deviation, achieving the initial optimal orientation of a universal magnetic spin vector. To further reduce robotic magnetic vibration, a main target method for optimizing its final orientation, which is used for fine adjustment, is employed under the constrains of the magnetic moments. Swimming experimental results in curve pipe verified the effectiveness of the optimization method, which can be effectively used to realize non-contact steering swimming of the petal-shaped robot and reduce its vibration.

  14. The variation of rotation curve shapes as a signature of the effects of baryons on dark matter density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Chris B.

    2015-12-01

    Rotation curves of galaxies show a wide range of shapes, which can be paramaterized as scatter in Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax , i.e. the ratio of the rotation velocity measured at 1 kpc and the maximum measured rotation velocity. We examine whether the observed scatter can be accounted for by combining scatters in disc scalelengths, the concentration-halo mass relation, and the M⋆-Mhalo relation. We use these scatters to create model galaxy populations; when housed within dark matter haloes that have universal, Navarro, Frenk & White density profiles, the model does not match the lowest observed values of Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax and has too little scatter in Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax compared to observations. By contrast, a model using a mass-dependent dark matter profile, where the inner slope is determined by the ratio of M⋆/Mhalo, produces galaxies with low values of Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax and a much larger scatter, both in agreement with observation. We conclude that the large observed scatter in Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax favours density profiles that are significantly affected by baryonic processes. Alternative dark matter core formation models such as self-interacting dark matter may also account for the observed variation in rotation curve shapes, but these observations may provide important constraints in terms of core sizes, and whether they vary with halo mass and/or merger history.

  15. RASS SOT Webinar - Nonmonotonic Dose Response Curves (NMDRCs) Common after Estrogen or Androgen Signaling Pathway Disruption

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides the listening and viewing audience with Dr Gray's scientific information on the relevance of nonmonotonic dose response curves to the risk assessment of estrogenic and androgenic chemicals

  16. WPerfit: A Program for Computing Parametric Person-Fit Statistics and Plotting Person Response Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo, Urbano

    2000-01-01

    Describes a program for computing different person-fit measures under different parametric item response models for binary items. The indexes can be computed for the Rasch model and the two- and three-parameter logistic models. The program can plot person response curves to allow the researchers to investigate the nonfitting response behavior of…

  17. Curve fitting of aeroelastic transient response data with exponential functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. M.; Desmarais, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    The extraction of frequency, damping, amplitude, and phase information from unforced transient response data is considered. These quantities are obtained from the parameters determined by fitting the digitized time-history data in a least-squares sense with complex exponential functions. The highlights of the method are described, and the results of several test cases are presented. The effects of noise are considered both by using analytical examples with random noise and by estimating the standard deviation of the parameters from maximum-likelihood theory.

  18. Scaling of Perceptual Errors Can Predict the Shape of Neural Tuning Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shouval, Harel Z.; Agarwal, Animesh; Gavornik, Jeffrey P.

    2013-04-01

    Weber’s law, first characterized in the 19th century, states that errors estimating the magnitude of perceptual stimuli scale linearly with stimulus intensity. This linear relationship is found in most sensory modalities, generalizes to temporal interval estimation, and even applies to some abstract variables. Despite its generality and long experimental history, the neural basis of Weber’s law remains unknown. This work presents a simple theory explaining the conditions under which Weber’s law can result from neural variability and predicts that the tuning curves of neural populations which adhere to Weber’s law will have a log-power form with parameters that depend on spike-count statistics. The prevalence of Weber’s law suggests that it might be optimal in some sense. We examine this possibility, using variational calculus, and show that Weber’s law is optimal only when observed real-world variables exhibit power-law statistics with a specific exponent. Our theory explains how physiology gives rise to the behaviorally characterized Weber’s law and may represent a general governing principle relating perception to neural activity.

  19. Fingerprinting Morphology of Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys Using First Order Reversal Curves (FORC) and Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchin, Igor V.; Lapa, Pavel N.; Krycka, Kathryn L.; Maranville, Brian B.; Monroe, James A.; Franco, Brian E.; Karaman, Ibrahim

    In Ni-Mn-In- and Ni-Mn-Sn-based alloys, two magnetic phases with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange couplings between two nearest Mn atoms can coexist. The interaction between these phases results in exchange bias (EB). The EB field depends on the cluster sizes. Using the first order reversal curve (FORC) analysis of magnetization for Ni-Co-Mn-Sn and Ni-Co-Mn-In samples with different heat treatment, we can obtain information about cluster sizes of the structural phases in these alloys. This is especially important for polycrystalline alloy samples where dark-field images showing different phases are hard to obtain. Such a Ni-Co-Mn-Sn polycrystalline sample was characterized with small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Analyses of the scattering as a function of wavevector transfer in 50 Oe and 15 kOe applied field yield the average magnetic domain size of 21.2 +/-6.6 nm and a polydispersity of 0.32 +/-0.02 at 300 K, in good agreement with our prediction. The temperature evolution of the domain size will be discussed. Using an off-specular reflectometer in transmission geometry, the same sample was measured at a field of 270 Oe and 5.15 kOe. The fit of the 270 Oe data yields grain sizes of approximately 0.11-0.12 μm with polydispersities between 0.98 and 1.27. Supported by Texas A&M University, US-DOE, and US NSF-DMR.

  20. Detecting the subtle shape differences in hemodynamic responses at the group level.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S; Adleman, Nancy E; Leibenluft, Ellen; Cox, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the hemodynamic response (HDR) is still not fully understood due to the multifaceted processes involved. Aside from the overall amplitude, the response may vary across cognitive states, tasks, brain regions, and subjects with respect to characteristics such as rise and fall speed, peak duration, undershoot shape, and overall duration. Here we demonstrate that the fixed-shape (FSM) or adjusted-shape (ASM) methods may fail to detect some shape subtleties (e.g., speed of rise or recovery, or undershoot). In contrast, the estimated-shape method (ESM) through multiple basis functions can provide the opportunity to identify some subtle shape differences and achieve higher statistical power at both individual and group levels. Previously, some dimension reduction approaches focused on the peak magnitude, or made inferences based on the area under the curve (AUC) or interaction, which can lead to potential misidentifications. By adopting a generic framework of multivariate modeling (MVM), we showcase a hybrid approach that is validated by simulations and real data. With the whole HDR shape integrity maintained as input at the group level, the approach allows the investigator to substantiate these more nuanced effects through the unique HDR shape features. Unlike the few analyses that were limited to main effect, two- or three-way interactions, we extend the modeling approach to an inclusive platform that is more adaptable than the conventional GLM. With multiple effect estimates from ESM for each condition, linear mixed-effects (LME) modeling should be used at the group level when there is only one group of subjects without any other explanatory variables. Under other situations, an approximate approach through dimension reduction within the MVM framework can be adopted to achieve a practical equipoise among representation, false positive control, statistical power, and modeling flexibility. The associated program 3dMVM is publicly available as part of the

  1. Detecting the subtle shape differences in hemodynamic responses at the group level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S.; Adleman, Nancy E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Cox, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the hemodynamic response (HDR) is still not fully understood due to the multifaceted processes involved. Aside from the overall amplitude, the response may vary across cognitive states, tasks, brain regions, and subjects with respect to characteristics such as rise and fall speed, peak duration, undershoot shape, and overall duration. Here we demonstrate that the fixed-shape (FSM) or adjusted-shape (ASM) methods may fail to detect some shape subtleties (e.g., speed of rise or recovery, or undershoot). In contrast, the estimated-shape method (ESM) through multiple basis functions can provide the opportunity to identify some subtle shape differences and achieve higher statistical power at both individual and group levels. Previously, some dimension reduction approaches focused on the peak magnitude, or made inferences based on the area under the curve (AUC) or interaction, which can lead to potential misidentifications. By adopting a generic framework of multivariate modeling (MVM), we showcase a hybrid approach that is validated by simulations and real data. With the whole HDR shape integrity maintained as input at the group level, the approach allows the investigator to substantiate these more nuanced effects through the unique HDR shape features. Unlike the few analyses that were limited to main effect, two- or three-way interactions, we extend the modeling approach to an inclusive platform that is more adaptable than the conventional GLM. With multiple effect estimates from ESM for each condition, linear mixed-effects (LME) modeling should be used at the group level when there is only one group of subjects without any other explanatory variables. Under other situations, an approximate approach through dimension reduction within the MVM framework can be adopted to achieve a practical equipoise among representation, false positive control, statistical power, and modeling flexibility. The associated program 3dMVM is publicly available as part of the

  2. An automated fitting procedure and software for dose-response curves with multiphasic features

    PubMed Central

    Veroli, Giovanni Y. Di; Fornari, Chiara; Goldlust, Ian; Mills, Graham; Koh, Siang Boon; Bramhall, Jo L; Richards, Frances M.; Jodrell, Duncan I.

    2015-01-01

    In cancer pharmacology (and many other areas), most dose-response curves are satisfactorily described by a classical Hill equation (i.e. 4 parameters logistical). Nevertheless, there are instances where the marked presence of more than one point of inflection, or the presence of combined agonist and antagonist effects, prevents straight-forward modelling of the data via a standard Hill equation. Here we propose a modified model and automated fitting procedure to describe dose-response curves with multiphasic features. The resulting general model enables interpreting each phase of the dose-response as an independent dose-dependent process. We developed an algorithm which automatically generates and ranks dose-response models with varying degrees of multiphasic features. The algorithm was implemented in new freely available Dr Fit software (sourceforge.net/projects/drfit/). We show how our approach is successful in describing dose-response curves with multiphasic features. Additionally, we analysed a large cancer cell viability screen involving 11650 dose-response curves. Based on our algorithm, we found that 28% of cases were better described by a multiphasic model than by the Hill model. We thus provide a robust approach to fit dose-response curves with various degrees of complexity, which, together with the provided software implementation, should enable a wide audience to easily process their own data. PMID:26424192

  3. 'Abnormal' angle response curves of TW/Rs for near zero tilt and high tilt channeling implants

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Baonian; Gossmann, Hans-Joachim; Toh, Terry; Colombeau, Benjamin; Todorov, Stan; Sinclair, Frank; Shim, Kyu-Ha; Henry, Todd

    2012-11-06

    Angle control has been widely accepted as the key requirement for ion implantation in semiconductor device processing. From an ion implanter point of view, the incident ion direction should be measured and corrected by suitable techniques, such as XP-VPS for the VIISta implanter platform, to ensure precision ion placement in device structures. So called V-curves have been adopted to generate the wafer-based calibration using channeling effects as the Si lattice steer ions into a channeling direction. Thermal Wave (TW) or sheet resistance (Rs) can be used to determine the minimum of the angle response curve. Normally it is expected that the TW and Rs have their respective minima at identical angles. However, the TW and Rs response to the angle variations does depend on factors such as implant species, dose, and wafer temperature. Implant damage accumulation effects have to be considered for data interpretation especially for some 'abnormal' V-curve data. In this paper we will discuss some observed 'abnormal' angle responses, such as a) TW/Rs reverse trend for Arsenic beam, 2) 'W' shape of Rs Boron, and 3) apparent TW/Rs minimum difference for high tilt characterization, along with experimental data and TCAD simulations.

  4. Effect of phase response curve skew on synchronization with and without conduction delays.

    PubMed

    Canavier, Carmen C; Wang, Shuoguo; Chandrasekaran, Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    A central problem in cortical processing including sensory binding and attentional gating is how neurons can synchronize their responses with zero or near-zero time lag. For a spontaneously firing neuron, an input from another neuron can delay or advance the next spike by different amounts depending upon the timing of the input relative to the previous spike. This information constitutes the phase response curve (PRC). We present a simple graphical method for determining the effect of PRC shape on synchronization tendencies and illustrate it using type 1 PRCs, which consist entirely of advances (delays) in response to excitation (inhibition). We obtained the following generic solutions for type 1 PRCs, which include the pulse-coupled leaky integrate and fire model. For pairs with mutual excitation, exact synchrony can be stable for strong coupling because of the stabilizing effect of the causal limit region of the PRC in which an input triggers a spike immediately upon arrival. However, synchrony is unstable for short delays, because delayed inputs arrive during a refractory period and cannot trigger an immediate spike. Right skew destabilizes antiphase and enables modes with time lags that grow as the conduction delay is increased. Therefore, right skew favors near synchrony at short conduction delays and a gradual transition between synchrony and antiphase for pairs coupled by mutual excitation. For pairs with mutual inhibition, zero time lag synchrony is stable for conduction delays ranging from zero to a substantial fraction of the period for pairs. However, for right skew there is a preferred antiphase mode at short delays. In contrast to mutual excitation, left skew destabilizes antiphase for mutual inhibition so that synchrony dominates at short delays as well. These pairwise synchronization tendencies constrain the synchronization properties of neurons embedded in larger networks. PMID:24376399

  5. Fitting photosynthetic carbon dioxide response curves for C(3) leaves.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Thomas D; Bernacchi, Carl J; Farquhar, Graham D; Singsaas, Eric L

    2007-09-01

    Photosynthetic responses to carbon dioxide concentration can provide data on a number of important parameters related to leaf physiology. Methods for fitting a model to such data are briefly described. The method will fit the following parameters: V(cmax), J, TPU, R(d) and g(m)[maximum carboxylation rate allowed by ribulose 1.5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), rate of photosynthetic electron transport (based on NADPH requirement), triose phosphate use, day respiration and mesophyll conductance, respectively]. The method requires at least five data pairs of net CO(2) assimilation (A) and [CO(2)] in the intercellular airspaces of the leaf (C(i)) and requires users to indicate the presumed limiting factor. The output is (1) calculated CO(2) partial pressure at the sites of carboxylation, C(c), (2) values for the five parameters at the measurement temperature and (3) values adjusted to 25 degrees C to facilitate comparisons. Fitting this model is a way of exploring leaf level photosynthesis. However, interpreting leaf level photosynthesis in terms of underlying biochemistry and biophysics is subject to assumptions that hold to a greater or lesser degree, a major assumption being that all parts of the leaf are behaving in the same way at each instant. PMID:17661745

  6. The Curse of Curves: Sex Differences in the Associations Between Body Shape and Pain Expression.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Jacob M; Strenth, Chance R; Mueller, Andrea A; DiDomenico, Jared; Beltran, Diego Guevara; Coulombe, Patrick; Smith, Jane Ellen

    2015-06-01

    This study examines the associations between objective and subjective measurements and impressions of body shape and cold pressor pain reporting in healthy adults. On the basis of sexual selection theory (SST), we hypothesized that body characteristics that are universally preferred by the opposite sex-specifically, lower waist-to-hip ratios (WHR) in women and higher shoulder-to-hip ratios (SHR) in men-and characteristics (e.g., proportion of body fat in women) that infer attractiveness differently across cultures will correspond to higher experimental pain reporting in women and lower pain reporting in males. A convenience sample of young adults (n = 96, 58 females, 18-24 years; mean age = 19.4) was measured for body mass index (BMI), WHR, SHR, and subjective body impressions (SBI), along with cold pressor pain reporting. The findings showed that BMI was positively associated with WHR and less-positive SBI in both sexes. Consistent with SST, however, only BMI and WHR predicted variability in pain expression in women, whereas only SHR predicted variability in men. Subjective body impressions were positively associated with SHR among males and unrelated to WHR among females, yet only females showed a positive association between SBI and higher pain reporting. The findings suggest that sexually selected physical characteristics (WHR and SHR) and culturally influenced somatic (BMI) and psychological (SBI) indicators of attractiveness correspond with variability in pain reporting, potentially reflecting the general tendency for people to express clusters of sexually selected and culturally influenced traits that may include differential pain perception. PMID:26047668

  7. GABAergic inhibition shapes SAM responses in rat auditory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Cai, R; Caspary, D M

    2015-07-23

    Auditory thalamus (medial geniculate body [MGB]) receives ascending inhibitory GABAergic inputs from inferior colliculus (IC) and descending GABAergic projections from the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) with both inputs postulated to play a role in shaping temporal responses. Previous studies suggested that enhanced processing of temporally rich stimuli occurs at the level of MGB, with our recent study demonstrating enhanced GABA sensitivity in MGB compared to IC. The present study used sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM) stimuli to generate modulation transfer functions (MTFs), to examine the role of GABAergic inhibition in shaping the response properties of MGB single units in anesthetized rats. Rate MTFs (rMTFs) were parsed into "bandpass (BP)", "mixed (Mixed)", "highpass (HP)" or "atypical" response types, with most units showing the Mixed response type. GABAA receptor blockade with iontophoretic application of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) antagonist gabazine (GBZ) selectively altered the response properties of most MGB neurons examined. Mixed and HP units showed significant GABAAR-mediated SAM-evoked rate response changes at higher modulation frequencies (fms), which were also altered by N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor blockade (2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5). BP units, and the lower arm of Mixed units responded to GABAAR blockade with increased responses to SAM stimuli at or near the rate best modulation frequency (rBMF). The ability of GABA circuits to shape responses at higher modulation frequencies is an emergent property of MGB units, not observed at lower levels of the auditory pathway and may reflect activation of MGB NMDA receptors (Rabang and Bartlett, 2011; Rabang et al., 2012). Together, GABAARs exert selective rate control over selected fms, generally without changing the units' response type. These results showed that coding of modulated stimuli at the level of auditory thalamus is at least, in part, strongly controlled by GABA

  8. Evaluation of optimum profile modification curves of profile shifted spur gears based on vibration responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Pang, Xu; Feng, Ranjiao; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a mesh stiffness model is developed for profile shifted gears with addendum modifications and tooth profile modifications (TPMs). The time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS), load sharing factor (LSF), loaded static transmission error (LSTE) and non-loaded static transmission error (NLSTE) of a profile shifted spur gear pair with TPMs are obtained by the analytical model. The optimum profile modification curve under different amounts of TPM is determined by analyzing the LSTE first. Then, considering the effect of NLSTE, finite element (FE) model of a geared rotor system is established. The system vibration responses under different TPM curves are analyzed and the optimum modification curve is further evaluated by amplitude frequency responses. The results show that the optimum modification curve is related to the amount of TPM and modification coefficients. The comparison of the optimum profile modification curves is evaluated by LSTE and vibration responses, which shows that the optimum modification curve should be determined by evaluating the vibration response of the geared rotor system in the low mesh frequency range.

  9. Thermomechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, II, Santo A (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses for stabilizing the strain-temperature response for a shape memory alloy are provided. To perform stabilization of a second sample of the shape memory alloy, a first sample of the shape memory alloy is selected for isobaric treatment and the second sample is selected for isothermal treatment. When applying the isobaric treatment to the first sample, a constant stress is applied to the first sample. Temperature is also cycled from a minimum temperature to a maximum temperature until a strain on the first sample stabilizes. Once the strain on the first sample stabilizes, the isothermal treatment is performed on the second sample. During isothermal treatment, different levels of stress on the second sample are applied until a strain on the second sample matches the stabilized strain on the first sample.

  10. Thermomechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo A., II (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses for stabilizing the strain-temperature response for a shape memory alloy are provided. To perform stabilization of a second sample of the shape memory alloy, a first sample of the shape memory alloy is selected for isobaric treatment and the second sample is selected for isothermal treatment. When applying the isobaric treatment to the first sample, a constant stress is applied to the first sample. Temperature is also cycled from a minimum temperature to a maximum temperature until a strain on the first sample stabilizes. Once the strain on the first sample stabilizes, the isothermal treatment is performed on the second sample. During isothermal treatment, different levels of stress on the second sample are applied until a strain on the second sample matches the stabilized strain on the first sample.

  11. Spectral response curve models applied to forest cover-type discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. D.; Lusch, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of remote sensing systems to provide a cost-effective inventory tool in the case of forest resources is currently of interest to a variety of natural resources management agencies. A number of studies have been performed regarding the use of Landsat data for mapping forest resources in Michigan. The present paper is concerned with current research, which has been directed toward the development and evaluation of computer-implemented classifications for the identification and characterization of coniferous forest types in Michigan's northern Lower Peninsula. Attention is given to the characteristic response curves from Landsat MSS data, spectral response curve models, and forest cover-type discrimination. It is found that spectral response curve models can be used to evaluate and explain the characteristic spectral responses of coniferous forest types on a snow-covered, winter Landsat scene.

  12. Bursts shape the NMDA-R mediated spike timing dependent plasticity curve: role of burst interspike interval and GABAergic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cutsuridis, Vassilis

    2012-10-01

    Spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is a synaptic learning rule where the relative timing between the presynaptic and postsynaptic action potentials determines the sign and strength of synaptic plasticity. In its basic form STDP has an asymmetric form which incorporates both persistent increases and persistent decreases in synaptic strength. The basic form of STDP, however, is not a fixed property and depends on the dendritic location. An asymmetric curve is observed in the distal dendrites, whereas a symmetrical one is observed in the proximal ones. A recent computational study has shown that the transition from the asymmetry to symmetry is due to inhibition under certain conditions. Synapses have also been observed to be unreliable at generating plasticity when excitatory postsynaptic potentials and single spikes are paired at low frequencies. Bursts of spikes, however, are reliably signaled because transmitter release is facilitated. This article presents a two-compartment model of the CA1 pyramidal cell. The model is neurophysiologically plausible with its dynamics resulting from the interplay of many ionic and synaptic currents. Plasticity is measured by a deterministic Ca(2+) dynamics model which measures the instantaneous calcium level and its time course in the dendrite and change the strength of the synapse accordingly. The model is validated to match the asymmetrical form of STDP from the pairing of a presynaptic (dendritic) and postsynaptic (somatic) spikes as observed experimentally. With the parameter set unchanged the model investigates how pairing of bursts with single spikes and bursts in the presence or absence of inhibition shapes the STDP curve. The model predicts that inhibition strength and frequency are not the only factors of the asymmetry-to-symmetry switch of the STDP curve. Burst interspike interval is another factor. This study is an important first step towards understanding how STDP is affected under natural firing patterns in vivo

  13. Semiparametric Geographically Weighted Response Curves with Application to Site Specific Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lack of basic knowledge about spatial and treatment varying crop response to irrigation hinders irrigation management and economic analysis for site-specific agriculture. One model that has been postulated for relating crop-specific economic quantities to irrigation is a quadratic response curve of...

  14. Solvent free energy curves for electron transfer reactions: A nonlinear solvent response model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiye, Toshiko

    1996-05-01

    Marcus theory for electron transfer assumes a linear response of the solvent so that both the reactant and product free energy curves are parabolic functions of the solvent polarization, each with the same solvent force constant k characterizing the curvature. Simulation data by other workers indicate that the assumption of parabolic free energy curves is good for the Fe2+-Fe3+ self-exchange reaction but that the k of the reactant and product free energy curves are different for the reaction D0+A0→D1-+A1+. However, the fluctuations sampled in these simulations were not large enough to reach the activation barrier region, which was thus treated either by umbrella sampling or by parabolic extrapolation. Here, we present free energy curves calculated from a simple model of ionic solvation developed in an earlier paper by Hyun, Babu, and Ichiye, which we refer to here as the HBI model. The HBI model describes the nonlinearity of the solvent response due to the orientation of polar solvent molecules. Since it is a continuum model, it may be considered the first-order nonlinear correction to the linear response Born model. Moreover, in the limit of zero charge or infinite radius, the Born model and the Marcus relations are recovered. Here, the full free energy curves are calculated using analytic expressions from the HBI model. The HBI reactant and product curves have different k for D0+A0→D1-+A1+ as in the simulations, but examining the full curves shows they are nonparabolic due to the nonlinear response of the solvent. On the other hand, the HBI curves are close to parabolic for the Fe2+-Fe3+ reaction, also in agreement with simulations, while those for another self-exchange reaction D0-A1+ show greater deviations from parabolic behavior than the Fe2+-Fe3+ reaction. This indicates that transitions from neutral to charged species will have the largest deviations. Thus, the second moment of the polarization is shown to be a measure of the deviation from Marcus

  15. Analysis and comparison of sigmoidal curves: application to dose-response data.

    PubMed

    Meddings, J B; Scott, R B; Fick, G H

    1989-12-01

    A number of physiological or pharmacological studies generate sigmoidal dose-response curves. Ideally, data analysis should provide numerical solutions for curve parameters. In addition, for curves obtained under different experimental conditions, testing for significant differences should be easily performed. We have reviewed the literature over the past 3 years in six journals publishing papers in the field of gastrointestinal physiology and established the curve analysis technique used in each. Using simulated experimental data of known error structure, we have compared these techniques with nonlinear regression analysis. In terms of their ability to provide accurate estimates of ED50 and maximal response, none approached the accuracy and precision of nonlinear regression. This technique is as easily performed as the classic methods and additionally provides an opportunity for rigorous statistical analysis of data. We present a method of determining the significance of differences found in the ED50 and maximal response under different experimental conditions. The method is versatile and applicable to a variety of different physiological and pharmacological dose-response curves. PMID:2610264

  16. Comparative Analysis of Biologically Relevant Response Curves in Gene Expression Experiments: Heteromorphy, Heterochrony, and Heterometry

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stuart G.

    2014-01-01

    To gain biological insights, investigators sometimes compare sequences of gene expression measurements under two scenarios (such as two drugs or species). For this situation, we developed an algorithm to fit, identify, and compare biologically relevant response curves in terms of heteromorphy (different curves), heterochrony (different transition times), and heterometry (different magnitudes). The curves are flat, linear, sigmoid, hockey-stick (sigmoid missing a steady state), transient (sigmoid missing two steady states), impulse (with peak or trough), step (with intermediate-level plateau), impulse+ (impulse with an extra parameter), step+ (step with an extra parameter), further characterized by upward or downward trend. To reduce overfitting, we fit the curves to every other response, evaluated the fit in the remaining responses, and identified the most parsimonious curves that yielded a good fit. We measured goodness of fit using a statistic comparable over different genes, namely the square root of the mean squared prediction error as a percentage of the range of responses, which we call the relative prediction error (RPE). We illustrated the algorithm using data on gene expression at 14 times in the embryonic development in two species of frogs. Software written in Mathematica is freely available.

  17. Thermo-Mechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo

    2013-01-01

    This innovation is capable of significantly reducing the amount of time required to stabilize the strain-temperature response of a shape memory alloy (SMA). Unlike traditional stabilization processes that take days to weeks to achieve stabilized response, this innovation accomplishes stabilization in a matter of minutes, thus making it highly useful for the successful and practical implementation of SMA-based technologies in real-world applications. The innovation can also be applied to complex geometry components, not just simple geometries like wires or rods.

  18. Thermal response of novel shape memory polymer-shape memory alloy hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Takashima, Kazuto; Mukai, Toshiharu

    2014-03-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMP) and shape memory alloys (SMA) have both been proven important smart materials in their own fields. Shape memory polymers can be formed into complex three-dimensional structures and can undergo shape programming and large strain recovery. These are especially important for deployable structures including those for space applications and micro-structures such as stents. Shape memory alloys on the other hand are readily exploitable in a range of applications where simple, silent, light-weight and low-cost repeatable actuation is required. These include servos, valves and mobile robotic artificial muscles. Despite their differences, one important commonality between SMPs and SMAs is that they are both typically activated by thermal energy. Given this common characteristic it is important to consider how these two will behave when in close environmental proximity, and hence exposed to the same thermal stimulus, and when they are incorporated into a hybrid SMA-SMP structure. In this paper we propose and examine the operation of SMA-SMP hybrids. The relationship between the two temperatures Tg, the glass transition temperature of the polymer, and Ta, the nominal austenite to martensite transition temperature of the alloy is considered. We examine how the choice of these two temperatures affects the thermal response of the hybrid. Electrical stimulation of the SMA is also considered as a method not only of actuating the SMA but also of inducing heating in the surrounding polymer, with consequent effects on actuator behaviour. Likewise by varying the rate and degree of thermal stimulation of the SMA significantly different actuation and structural stiffness can be achieved. Novel SMP-SMA hybrid actuators and structures have many ready applications in deployable structures, robotics and tuneable engineering systems.

  19. Intestinal Microbiota: Shaping local and systemic immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Michael; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the fundamental role of commensal microbes in the maintenance of host homeostasis. For instances, commensals can play a major role in the control of host defense, metabolism and tissue development. Over the past few years, abundant experimental data also support their central role in the induction and control of both innate and adaptive responses. It is now clearly established that commensals are not equal in their capacity to trigger control regulatory or effector responses, however, the molecular basis of these differences has only recently begun to be explored. This review will discuss recent findings evaluating how commensals shape both effector and regulatory responses at steady state and during infections and the consequence of this effect on local and systemic protective and inflammatory responses. PMID:22178452

  20. Potential oscillations and S-shaped polarization curve in the continuous electro-oxidation of CO on platinum single-crystal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Koper, Marc T.M.; Schmidt, Thomas J.; Markovic, Nenad M.; Ross, Philip N.

    2001-03-01

    The occurrence of an S-shaped polarization curve in a simple model for the continuous electrochemical oxidation of CO on a platinum electrode is discussed. In the model, the S-shaped polarization curve is caused by the competitive Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism between surface-bonded CO and OH. The reaction is studied experimentally on single-crystal platinum rotating disk electrodes in perchloric and sulfuric acid solution, and it is shown that the voltammetry is in good agreement with the model predictions. When studied under current-controlled conditions, a fast galvanodynamic scan indeed suggests the existence of the S-shaped polarization curve. At lower scan rates, however, irregularities and small-amplitude irregular fluctuations or oscillations in potential are observed. Very regular potential oscillations under current-controlled conditions are observed only on Pt(111) in sulfuric acid. The possible origin of these irregularities and oscillations is discussed in relation to the existing theories of electrochemical instabilities.

  1. Shakedown response of conditioned shape memory alloy wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher B.; Shaw, John A.

    2008-03-01

    A series of experiments is presented examining the thermo-electro-mechanical response of commercially-available, conditioned, shape memory alloy (SMA) wires (Flexinol, from Dynalloy, Corp.) during cyclic thermomechanical loading. A specialized experimental setup enables temperature control via a thermoelectric/heatsink in thermal contact with the wire specimen during various modes of testing. It allows simultaneous measurement of elongation, load, strain and resistivity in a selected gage length. It also allows full-field optical and infrared imaging to be performed during testing. A moderately high transition temperature NiTi-based shape memory wire (90C Flexinol) is characterized first by differential scanning calorimetry and a series of isothermal experiments over a range of temperatures. Subsequent experiments examine the shakedown behavior over a range of dead loading temperature cycles. Results show a significant two-way shape memory effect, suggesting that both residual stresses and locked-in oriented Martensite are considerable in this commercial alloy. Repeatable behavior (little shakedown) is confirmed at relatively low stress levels, but significant evolution in the response (shakedown behavior) exists at higher stress levels during the first several temperature cycles.

  2. Photic entrainment of Period mutant mice is predicted from their phase response curves

    PubMed Central

    Pendergast, Julie S.; Friday, Rio C.; Yamazaki, Shin

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental property of circadian clocks is that they entrain to environmental cues. The circadian genes, Period1 and Period2, are involved in entrainment of the mammalian circadian system. To investigate the roles of the Period genes in photic entrainment, we constructed phase response curves (PRC) to light pulses for C57BL/6J wild-type, Per1−/−, Per2−/−, and Per3−/− mice and tested whether the PRCs accurately predict entrainment to non-24 light-dark cycles (T-cycles) and constant light (LL). The PRCs of wild-type and Per3−/− mice are similar in shape and amplitude and have relatively large delay zones and small advance zones, resulting in successful entrainment to T26, but not T21, with similar phase angles. Per1−/− mice have a high-amplitude PRC, resulting in entrainment to a broad range of T-cycles. Per2−/− mice also entrain to a wide range of T-cycles because the advance portion of their PRC is larger than wild-types. Period aftereffects following entrainment to T-cycles were similar among all genotypes. We found that the ratio of the advance portion to the delay portion of the PRC accurately predicts the lengthening of the period of the activity rhythm in LL. Wild-type, Per1−/−, and Per3−/− mice had larger delay zones than advance zones and lengthened (>24hrs) periods in LL, while Per2−/− mice had delay and advance zones that were equal in size and no period lengthening in LL. Together, these results demonstrate that PRCs are powerful tools for predicting and understanding photic entrainment of circadian mutant mice. PMID:20826680

  3. Regular variability of the shape of the primary minimum of the orbital light curve of SS 433 with the phase of the precessional period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherepashchuk, A. M.; Yarlikov, S. F.

    1991-01-01

    The regular variations of the shape of the primary minimum of the orbital 13.082-day light curve of SS 433 with the phase of the 162.5-day processional period were discovered by analysis of the photometrical databank. The regular variability of the shape of the primary minimum of the discovered light curve of SS 433 reflects displacement with the 26-day double orbital period of at least two hot bright spots on the surface of the processional accretional disk and their eclipse by a normal star. Other aspects of the investigation are further discussed.

  4. No evidence for a J-shaped curve in treated hypertensive patients with increased cardiovascular risk: The VALUE trial.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Berge, Eivind; Bangalore, Sripal; Messerli, Franz H; Mancia, Giuseppe; Holzhauer, Björn; Hua, Tsushung A; Zappe, Dion; Zanchetti, Alberto; Weber, Michael A; Julius, Stevo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have debated the notion that low blood pressure (BP) during treatment, particularly diastolic (DBP), is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We evaluated the impact of low BP on cardiovascular outcomes in a high-risk population of 15,244 hypertensive patients, almost half of whom had a history of coronary artery disease (CAD). In the prospective Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use Evaluation (VALUE) trial, patients were randomized to valsartan or amlodipine regimens and followed for 4.2 years (mean) with no difference in the primary cardiovascular endpoint. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the relationship between average on-treatment BP and clinical outcomes. The relationship between BP and cardiovascular events was adjusted for age, gender and body mass index, and baseline qualifying risk factors and diseases (smoking, high total cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, proteinuria, CAD, previous stroke and left ventricular hypertrophy). DBP ≥ 90 mmHg, compared with < 90 mmHg, was associated with increased incidence of the primary cardiovascular endpoint (all cardiac events); however, DBP < 70 mmHg, compared with ≥ 70 mmHg, was not associated with increased incidence after covariate adjustment (no J-shaped curve). Similar results were observed for death, myocardial infarction (MI), heart failure and stroke, considered separately. Nadir for MI was at DBP of 76 mmHg and for stroke 60 mmHg. The ratio of MI to stroke increased with lower DBP. In CAD patients the MI to stroke ratio was more pronounced than in patients without CAD but there was no significant J-curve in either group. Systolic BP ≥ 150 but not < 130 mmHg, compared with 130-149 mmHg, similarly was associated with increased risk for primary outcome. In conclusion, patients in BP strata ≥ 150/90 mmHg, but not patients in BP strata < 130/70 mmHg, were at increased risk for adverse outcomes in

  5. Effect of shaping sensor data on pilot response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Roger M.

    1990-01-01

    The pilot of a modern jet aircraft is subjected to varying workloads while being responsible for multiple, ongoing tasks. The ability to associate the pilot's responses with the task/situation, by modifying the way information is presented relative to the task, could provide a means of reducing workload. To examine the feasibility of this concept, a real time simulation study was undertaken to determine whether preprocessing of sensor data would affect pilot response. Results indicated that preprocessing could be an effective way to tailor the pilot's response to displayed data. The effects of three transformations or shaping functions were evaluated with respect to the pilot's ability to predict and detect out-of-tolerance conditions while monitoring an electronic engine display. Two nonlinear transformations, on being the inverse of the other, were compared to a linear transformation. Results indicate that a nonlinear transformation that increases the rate-or-change of output relative to input tends to advance the prediction response and improve the detection response, while a nonlinear transformation that decreases the rate-of-change of output relative to input tends to lengthen the prediction response and make detection more difficult.

  6. YIELD RESPONSE CURVES OF CROPS EXPOSED TO SO2 TIME SERIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six species (alfalfa, onion, lettuce, radish, red clover, Douglas fir) were exposed in field growth chambers to both constant concentration and stochastic S02 time series. Yield response curves were generated with median concentrations ranging from 0 to 20 pphm. Constant concentr...

  7. Item Response Theory with Estimation of the Latent Density Using Davidian Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.; Lin, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Davidian-curve item response theory (DC-IRT) is introduced, evaluated with simulations, and illustrated using data from the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality Entitlement scale. DC-IRT is a method for fitting unidimensional IRT models with maximum marginal likelihood estimation, in which the latent density is estimated,…

  8. Measurement Error in Nonparametric Item Response Curve Estimation. Research Report. ETS RR-11-28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Hongwen; Sinharay, Sandip

    2011-01-01

    Nonparametric, or kernel, estimation of item response curve (IRC) is a concern theoretically and operationally. Accuracy of this estimation, often used in item analysis in testing programs, is biased when the observed scores are used as the regressor because the observed scores are contaminated by measurement error. In this study, we investigate…

  9. J-R Curve Determination for Disk-shaped Compact Specimens Based on the Normalization Method and Direct Current Potential Drop Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A

    2014-01-01

    Material ductile fracture toughness can be described by J-integral versus crack extension relationship (J-R curve). As a conventional J-R curve measurement method, unloading compliance (UC) becomes impractical in elevated temperature testing due to relaxation of the material and a friction induced back-up shape of the J-R curve. In addition, the UC method may underpredict the crack extension for standard disk-shaped compact (DC(T)) specimens. In order to address these issues, the normalization method and direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique were applied for determining J-R curves at 24 C and 500 C for 0.18T DC(T) specimens made from type 316L stainless steel. For comparison purchase, the UC method was also applied in 24 C tests. The normalization method was able to yield valid J-R curves in all tests. The J-R curves from the DCPD technique need adjustment to account for the potential drop induced by plastic deformation, crack blunting, etc. and after applying a newly-developed DCPD adjustment procedure, the post-adjusted DCPD J-R curves essentially matched J-R curves from the normalization method. In contrast, the UC method underpredicted the crack extension in all tests resulting in substantial deviation in the derived J-R curves manifested by high Jq values than the normalization or DCPD method. Only for tests where the UC method underpredicted the crack extension by a very small value, J-R curves determined by the UC method were similar to those determined by the normalization or DCPD method.

  10. Changes in the survival curve shape of E. coli cells following irradiation in the presence of uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R F; Patel, K B; Evans, M D

    1985-10-01

    Four uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation (UOP) (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2,4-dinitrophenol, 4-hydroxybenzylidenemalonitrile and N-phenylanthranilic acid) have been found to alter the shape of the radiation survival curves of several cell lines of E. coli when present during irradiation in oxia. Incubation of cells with high concentrations of UOP for 30 min before irradiation induced an increase in extrapolation number (n) in cell lines AB 1157 (wild-type), AB 1886(uvrA-) and KMBL(polA-) but not GR 501(lig-)ts, AB 2463(recA-) and AB 2480(uvrA-recA-). In addition the UOP all effect a decrease in mean lethal dose (D0) even when tested at low concentrations or short contact times. Studies with wild-type cells correlate the increase in n with measured increased levels of ATP (above oxic control cells) produced upon incubation with UOP. The increased levels of ATP most likely arise from the UOP overstimulating glycolysis. The decrease in D0 cannot be associated with any of the repair pathways investigated and it is concluded that the highly lipophilic UOP directly or indirectly potentiate other target(s) to radiation damage as well as DNA under oxic conditions. Treatment of the cells with UOP did not result in the deleterious depletion of energy substrates, loss of non-protein thiols or the production of cytotoxins upon irradiation. PMID:3899961

  11. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  12. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E.

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  13. Fast-Response-Time Shape-Memory-Effect Foam Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bulk shape memory alloys, such as Nitinol or CuAlZn, display strong recovery forces undergoing a phase transformation after being strained in their martensitic state. These recovery forces are used for actuation. As the phase transformation is thermally driven, the response time of the actuation can be slow, as the heat must be passively inserted or removed from the alloy. Shape memory alloy TiNi torque tubes have been investigated for at least 20 years and have demonstrated high actuation forces [3,000 in.-lb (approximately equal to 340 N-m) torques] and are very lightweight. However, they are not easy to attach to existing structures. Adhesives will fail in shear at low-torque loads and the TiNi is not weldable, so that mechanical crimp fits have been generally used. These are not reliable, especially in vibratory environments. The TiNi is also slow to heat up, as it can only be heated indirectly using heater and cooling must be done passively. This has restricted their use to on-off actuators where cycle times of approximately one minute is acceptable. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) has been used in the past to make porous TiNi metal foams. Shape Change Technologies has been able to train SHS derived TiNi to exhibit the shape memory effect. As it is an open-celled material, fast response times were observed when the material was heated using hot and cold fluids. A methodology was developed to make the open-celled porous TiNi foams as a tube with integrated hexagonal ends, which then becomes a torsional actuator with fast response times. Under processing developed independently, researchers were able to verify torques of 84 in.-lb (approximately equal to 9.5 Nm) using an actuator weighing 1.3 oz (approximately equal to 37 g) with very fast (less than 1/16th of a second) initial response times when hot and cold fluids were used to facilitate heat transfer. Integrated structural connections were added as part of the net shape process, eliminating

  14. Shape sensitivity analysis of flutter response of a laminated wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergen, Fred D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the shape sensitivity of a wing aeroelastic response with respect to changes in geometric shape. Yates' modified strip method is used in conjunction with Giles' equivalent plate analysis to predict the flutter speed, frequency, and reduced frequency of the wing. Three methods are used to calculate the sensitivity of the eigenvalue. The first method is purely a finite difference calculation of the eigenvalue derivative directly from the solution of the flutter problem corresponding to the two different values of the shape parameters. The second method uses an analytic expression for the eigenvalue sensitivities of a general complex matrix, where the derivatives of the aerodynamic, mass, and stiffness matrices are computed using a finite difference approximation. The third method also uses an analytic expression for the eigenvalue sensitivities, but the aerodynamic matrix is computed analytically. All three methods are found to be in good agreement with each other. The sensitivities of the eigenvalues were used to predict the flutter speed, frequency, and reduced frequency. These approximations were found to be in good agreement with those obtained using a complete reanalysis.

  15. Frequency tuning curves of the dolphin's hearing: envelope-following response study.

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Y; Klishin, V O

    1996-04-01

    Simultaneous tone-tone masking in conjunction with the envelope-following response (EFR) recording was used to obtain tuning curves in dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). The EFR was evoked by amplitude-modulated probes of various frequencies. A modulation rate of 600 Hz was found to fit the requirement to have a narrow spectrum and evoke EFR of large amplitude. Tuning curves were obtained within the frequency range from 11.2 to 110 kHz. The Q10 values of the obtained tuning curves varied from 12-14 at the 11.2 kHz center frequency to 17-20 at the 64-90 kHz frequencies. PMID:8847667

  16. Northern elephant seal platelets: analysis of shape change and response to platelet agonists.

    PubMed

    Field, C L; Walker, N J; Tablin, F

    2001-02-15

    Blood platelets have a vital role in the maintenance of normal mammalian hemostasis. Rapid pressure changes and temperatures lower than 20 degrees C cause activation of human and terrestrial mammal platelets. Elephant seals are routinely subjected to pressures as high as 150 atm, yet do not suffer from the thrombotic effects of platelet activation associated with rapid decompression. We examined the ultrastructure of Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) platelets and their functional and morphological response to various platelet agonists. Unstimulated elephant seal platelets are discoid cells, with a microtubule coil, randomly dispersed alpha and dense granules, and glycogen granules. There are well-defined areas of membranous invaginations that indicate the presence of an open canalicular system (OCS). Aggregometry was used to determine the response of elephant seal platelets to various platelet agonists. Dose-dependent curves were generated for thrombin, collagen, and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Platelet response to thrombin was dose-dependent and was maximal at 2.5 U/ml. Platelets collected in sodium citrate had blunted responses to both ADP and collagen. ADP stimulation caused only reversible, primary activation (shape change) at > or = 5 microM, while platelets did not aggregate in response to any concentration of collagen. Platelets collected in sodium heparin did respond fully to both to ADP and collagen. There was small, reversible shape change in response to ristocetin, but no response to epinephrine. Decreased sensitivity of elephant seal platelets to agonists may be a protective mechanism developed in response to rapid pressure changes and cold temperatures associated with adaptation to an extreme environment. PMID:11248288

  17. Maintaining convex interface shapes during electrodynamic gradient freeze growth of cadmium zinc telluride using a dynamic, bell-curve furnace profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Yeckel, Andrew; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2012-09-01

    A novel, bell-curve furnace temperature profile is presented and predicted to achieve macroscopically convex solid-liquid interface shapes during melt growth of CZT in an EDG furnace. A strategy is also presented to dynamically adapt this furnace profile so that uniform, convex interface shapes are maintained through an entire growth run. This approach represents a significant advance over traditional gradient-freeze profiles, which always yield concave interface shapes, and static heat transfer designs, such as pedestal design, that achieve convex interfaces over only a small portion of the growth run. Importantly, this strategy may be applied to any Bridgman configuration that utilizes multiple, controllable heating zones. Realizing a convex solidification interface via this adaptive bell-curve furnace profile is postulated to result in better crystallinity and higher yields than conventional CZT growth techniques.

  18. Adaptive shaping of cortical response selectivity in the vibrissa pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He J. V.; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    One embodiment of context-dependent sensory processing is bottom-up adaptation, where persistent stimuli decrease neuronal firing rate over hundreds of milliseconds. Adaptation is not, however, simply the fatigue of the sensory pathway, but shapes the information flow and selectivity to stimulus features. Adaptation enhances spatial discriminability (distinguishing stimulus location) while degrading detectability (reporting presence of the stimulus), for both the ideal observer of the cortex and awake, behaving animals. However, how the dynamics of the adaptation shape the cortical response and this detection and discrimination tradeoff is unknown, as is to what degree this phenomenon occurs on a continuum as opposed to a switching of processing modes. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in anesthetized rats to capture the temporal and spatial characteristics of the cortical response to tactile inputs, we showed that the suppression of the cortical response, in both magnitude and spatial spread, is continuously modulated by the increasing amount of energy in the adapting stimulus, which is nonuniquely determined by its frequency and velocity. Single-trial ideal observer analysis demonstrated a tradeoff between detectability and spatial discriminability up to a moderate amount of adaptation, which corresponds to the frequency range in natural whisking. This was accompanied by a decrease in both detectability and discriminability with high-energy adaptation, which indicates a more complex coupling between detection and discrimination than a simple switching of modes. Taken together, the results suggest that adaptation operates on a continuum and modulates the tradeoff between detectability and discriminability that has implications for information processing in ethological contexts. PMID:25787959

  19. Dynamic response and optimal design of curved metallic sandwich panels under blast loading.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chang; Yang, Shu; Yang, Li-Jun; Han, Shou-Hong; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2014-01-01

    It is important to understand the effect of curvature on the blast response of curved structures so as to seek the optimal configurations of such structures with improved blast resistance. In this study, the dynamic response and protective performance of a type of curved metallic sandwich panel subjected to air blast loading were examined using LS-DYNA. The numerical methods were validated using experimental data in the literature. The curved panel consisted of an aluminum alloy outer face and a rolled homogeneous armour (RHA) steel inner face in addition to a closed-cell aluminum foam core. The results showed that the configuration of a "soft" outer face and a "hard" inner face worked well for the curved sandwich panel against air blast loading in terms of maximum deflection (MaxD) and energy absorption. The panel curvature was found to have a monotonic effect on the specific energy absorption (SEA) and a nonmonotonic effect on the MaxD of the panel. Based on artificial neural network (ANN) metamodels, multiobjective optimization designs of the panel were carried out. The optimization results revealed the trade-off relationships between the blast-resistant and the lightweight objectives and showed the great use of Pareto front in such design circumstances. PMID:25126606

  20. Dynamic Response and Optimal Design of Curved Metallic Sandwich Panels under Blast Loading

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu; Han, Shou-Hong; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2014-01-01

    It is important to understand the effect of curvature on the blast response of curved structures so as to seek the optimal configurations of such structures with improved blast resistance. In this study, the dynamic response and protective performance of a type of curved metallic sandwich panel subjected to air blast loading were examined using LS-DYNA. The numerical methods were validated using experimental data in the literature. The curved panel consisted of an aluminum alloy outer face and a rolled homogeneous armour (RHA) steel inner face in addition to a closed-cell aluminum foam core. The results showed that the configuration of a “soft” outer face and a “hard” inner face worked well for the curved sandwich panel against air blast loading in terms of maximum deflection (MaxD) and energy absorption. The panel curvature was found to have a monotonic effect on the specific energy absorption (SEA) and a nonmonotonic effect on the MaxD of the panel. Based on artificial neural network (ANN) metamodels, multiobjective optimization designs of the panel were carried out. The optimization results revealed the trade-off relationships between the blast-resistant and the lightweight objectives and showed the great use of Pareto front in such design circumstances. PMID:25126606

  1. On the phenomenon of curved microcracks in /(S)/90n/s laminates - Their shapes, initiation angles and locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shoufeng; Bark, Jong S.; Nairn, John A.

    1993-01-01

    A variational analysis of the stress state in microcracked cross-ply laminates has been used to investigate the phenomenon of curved microcracking in /(S)/90n/s laminates. Previous investigators proposed that the initiation and orientation of curved microcracks are controlled by local maxima and stress trajectories of the principal stresses. We have implemented a principal stress model using a variational mechanics stress analysis and we were able to make predictions about curved microcracks. The predictions agree well with experimental observations and therefore support the assertion that the variational analysis gives an accurate stress state that is useful for modeling the microcracking properties of cross-ply laminates. An important prediction about curved microcracks is that they are a late stage of microcracking damage. They occur only when the crack density of straight microcracks exceeds the critical crack density for curved microcracking. The predicted critical crack density for curved microcracking agrees well with experimental observations.

  2. Perceived trustworthiness shapes neural empathic responses toward others' pain.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Paola; Meconi, Federica

    2015-12-01

    As might be expected, neural empathic responses toward someone in pain are shaped by the affective/social relationship between the observer and the suffering person. Brain activity associated with empathy is sensitive to previous knowledge on the other's social conduct, such that, for instance, an unfair person in pain elicits in the observer reduced activations of empathy-related brain regions compared to a fair person. We conjectured that even in the absence of information on the personality and social behavior of an individual, empathy might be modulated by the 'first impression' based on other's physical facial features, such that the other is perceived as trustworthy or untrustworthy. By means of event-related potentials technique, we monitored in two experiments the neural empathic responses associated with the pain of trustworthy and untrustworthy faces, either computerized and parametrically manipulated (Experiment 1) and real faces (Experiment 2) in a cue-based paradigm. We observed P3 empathic reactions towards individuals looking trustworthy whereas the reactions towards individuals looking untrustworthy were negligible, if not null. An additional experiment (Experiment 3) was conducted in order to substantiate our conclusions by demonstrating that the experimental paradigm we designed did very likely activate an empathic response. PMID:26514617

  3. Proteasome function shapes innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Meiners, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome system degrades more than 80% of intracellular proteins into small peptides. Accordingly, the proteasome is involved in many essential cellular functions, such as protein quality control, transcription, immune responses, cell signaling, and apoptosis. Moreover, degradation products are loaded onto major histocompatibility class I molecules to communicate the intracellular protein composition to the immune system. The standard 20S proteasome core complex contains three distinct catalytic active sites that are exchanged upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines to form the so-called immunoproteasome. Immunoproteasomes are constitutively expressed in immune cells and have different proteolytic activities compared with standard proteasomes. They are rapidly induced in parenchymal cells upon intracellular pathogen infection and are crucial for priming effective CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses against infected cells. Beyond shaping these adaptive immune reactions, immunoproteasomes also regulate the function of immune cells by degradation of inflammatory and immune mediators. Accordingly, they emerge as novel regulators of innate immune responses. The recently unraveled impairment of immunoproteasome function by environmental challenges and by genetic variations of immunoproteasome genes might represent a currently underestimated risk factor for the development and progression of lung diseases. In particular, immunoproteasome dysfunction will dampen resolution of infections, thereby promoting exacerbations, may foster autoimmunity in chronic lung diseases, and possibly contributes to immune evasion of tumor cells. Novel pharmacological tools, such as site-specific inhibitors of the immunoproteasome, as well as activity-based probes, however, hold promises as innovative therapeutic drugs for respiratory diseases and biomarker profiling, respectively. PMID:27343191

  4. Yield response curves of crops exposed to SO 2 time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Male, Larry; Preston, Eric; Neely, Grady

    Six species (alfalfa, onion, lettuce, radish, red clover, Douglas fir) were exposed in field growth chambers to both constant concentration and stochastic SO 2 time series. Yield response curves were generated with median concentrations ranging from 0 to 20 pphm. Constant concentration treatments were found to underestimate yield loss compared with the pollutant time series treatments. An heuristic model of plant assimilation of SO 2 is presented to explain this result.

  5. Thermal responses of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Kenichi

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) proposed by the authors. The SMA artificial anal sphincter has the function of occlusion at body temperature and can be opened with a thermal transformation induced deformation of SMAs to solve the problem of severe fecal incontinence. The investigation of its thermal behavior is of great importance in terms of practical use in living bodies as a prosthesis. In this work, a previously proposed phenomenological model was applied to simulate the thermal responses of SMA plates that had undergone thermally induced transformation. The numerical approach for considering the thermal interaction between the prosthesis and surrounding tissues was discussed based on the classical bio-heat equation. Numerical predictions on both in vitro and in vivo cases were verified by experiments with acceptable agreements. The thermal responses of the SMA artificial anal sphincter were discussed based on the simulation results, with the values of the applied power and the geometric configuration of thermal insulation as parameters. The results obtained in the present work provided a framework for the further design of SMA artificial sphincters to meet demands from the viewpoint of thermal compatibility as prostheses.

  6. Quantitative aspects of informed consent: considering the dose response curve when estimating quantity of information.

    PubMed

    Lynöe, N; Hoeyer, K

    2005-12-01

    Information is usually supposed to be a prerequisite for people making decisions on whether or not to participate in a clinical trial. Previously conducted studies and research ethics scandals indicate that participants have sometimes lacked important pieces of information. Over the past few decades the quantity of information believed to be adequate has increased significantly, and in some instances a new maxim seems to be in place: the more information, the better the ethics in terms of respecting a participant's autonomy. The authors hypothesise that the dose-response curve from pharmacology or toxicology serves as a model to illustrate that a large amount of written information does not equal optimality. Using the curve as a pedagogical analogy when teaching ethics to students in clinical sciences, and also in engaging in dialogue with research institutions, may promote reflection on how to adjust information in relation to the preferences of individual participants, thereby transgressing the maxim that more information means better ethics. PMID:16319241

  7. An Invert U-Shaped Curve: Relationship Between Fasting Plasma Glucose and Serum Uric Acid Concentration in a Large Health Check-Up Population in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haibo; Zha, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Yu; Liu, Mengxue; Guo, Rui; Wen, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There are some published studies focus on the invert U-shaped relationship between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and serum uric acid (UA), while the threshold value and gender differences of this relationship were still obscure. We aimed to explore the dose–response relation between FPG level and serum UA concentration by conducted this epidemiological research in a large health check-up population in China. A total of 237,703 people were collected from January 2011 to July 2014 in our cross-sectional study; 100,348 subjects age 18 to 89 years and without known diabetes were included for the current analysis. One-way analysis of variance, generalized additive models, and 2-piecewise linear regression model were used. The mean concentration of UA with FPG of <6.1, 6.1 to 6.9, and ≥7.0 mmol/L was 240.9, 260.2, and 259.6 μmol/L in women and 349.0, 360.8, and 331.0 μmol/L in men. An invert U-shape with a threshold FPG of 7.5 (women)/6.5 (men) mmol/L was observed in the regression curve of FPG and UA, even after adjusting for potential confounders. The adjusted regression coefficients were 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5 to 3.4, P < 0.001) for FPG < 7.5 mmol/L, −3.2 (95% CI: −5.0 to −1.3, P < 0.001) for FPG ≥ 7.5 mmol/L in women; while 0.8 (95% CI: −0.4 to 2.0, P = 0.19) for FPG < 6.5 mmol/L, −7.1 (95% CI: −8.0 to −6.1, P < 0.001) for FPG ≥ 6.5 mmol/L in men. Furthermore, the interaction between different FPG level and sex was significant (P < 0.05). An invert U-shape with a threshold of FPG was existed for serum UA level in Chinese adults age 18 to 89 years without known diabetes, and significant gender differences were found. Future researches should pay more attention to this relationship. PMID:27100447

  8. An Invert U-Shaped Curve: Relationship Between Fasting Plasma Glucose and Serum Uric Acid Concentration in a Large Health Check-Up Population in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Haibo; Zha, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Yu; Liu, Mengxue; Guo, Rui; Wen, Yufeng

    2016-04-01

    There are some published studies focus on the invert U-shaped relationship between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and serum uric acid (UA), while the threshold value and gender differences of this relationship were still obscure. We aimed to explore the dose-response relation between FPG level and serum UA concentration by conducted this epidemiological research in a large health check-up population in China.A total of 237,703 people were collected from January 2011 to July 2014 in our cross-sectional study; 100,348 subjects age 18 to 89 years and without known diabetes were included for the current analysis. One-way analysis of variance, generalized additive models, and 2-piecewise linear regression model were used.The mean concentration of UA with FPG of <6.1, 6.1 to 6.9, and ≥7.0 mmol/L was 240.9, 260.2, and 259.6 μmol/L in women and 349.0, 360.8, and 331.0 μmol/L in men. An invert U-shape with a threshold FPG of 7.5 (women)/6.5 (men) mmol/L was observed in the regression curve of FPG and UA, even after adjusting for potential confounders. The adjusted regression coefficients were 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5 to 3.4, P < 0.001) for FPG < 7.5 mmol/L, -3.2 (95% CI: -5.0 to -1.3, P < 0.001) for FPG ≥ 7.5 mmol/L in women; while 0.8 (95% CI: -0.4 to 2.0, P = 0.19) for FPG < 6.5 mmol/L, -7.1 (95% CI: -8.0 to -6.1, P < 0.001) for FPG ≥ 6.5 mmol/L in men. Furthermore, the interaction between different FPG level and sex was significant (P < 0.05).An invert U-shape with a threshold of FPG was existed for serum UA level in Chinese adults age 18 to 89 years without known diabetes, and significant gender differences were found. Future researches should pay more attention to this relationship. PMID:27100447

  9. On the Firing Rate Dependency of the Phase Response Curve of Rat Purkinje Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Couto, João; Linaro, Daniele; De Schutter, E; Giugliano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous spiking during cerebellar tasks has been observed across Purkinje cells: however, little is known about the intrinsic cellular mechanisms responsible for its initiation, cessation and stability. The Phase Response Curve (PRC), a simple input-output characterization of single cells, can provide insights into individual and collective properties of neurons and networks, by quantifying the impact of an infinitesimal depolarizing current pulse on the time of occurrence of subsequent action potentials, while a neuron is firing tonically. Recently, the PRC theory applied to cerebellar Purkinje cells revealed that these behave as phase-independent integrators at low firing rates, and switch to a phase-dependent mode at high rates. Given the implications for computation and information processing in the cerebellum and the possible role of synchrony in the communication with its post-synaptic targets, we further explored the firing rate dependency of the PRC in Purkinje cells. We isolated key factors for the experimental estimation of the PRC and developed a closed-loop approach to reliably compute the PRC across diverse firing rates in the same cell. Our results show unambiguously that the PRC of individual Purkinje cells is firing rate dependent and that it smoothly transitions from phase independent integrator to a phase dependent mode. Using computational models we show that neither channel noise nor a realistic cell morphology are responsible for the rate dependent shift in the phase response curve. PMID:25775448

  10. No-threshold dose-response curves for nongenotoxic chemicals: Findings and applications for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, Daniel M. . E-mail: dansheeh@swbell.net

    2006-01-15

    We tested the hypothesis that no threshold exists when estradiol acts through the same mechanism as an active endogenous estrogen. A Michaelis-Menten (MM) equation accounting for response saturation, background effects, and endogenous estrogen level fit a turtle sex-reversal data set with no threshold and estimated the endogenous dose. Additionally, 31 diverse literature dose-response data sets were analyzed by adding a term for nonhormonal background; good fits were obtained but endogenous dose estimations were not significant due to low resolving power. No thresholds were observed. Data sets were plotted using a normalized MM equation; all 178 data points were accommodated on a single graph. Response rates from {approx}1% to >95% were well fit. The findings contradict the threshold assumption and low-dose safety. Calculating risk and assuming additivity of effects from multiple chemicals acting through the same mechanism rather than assuming a safe dose for nonthresholded curves is appropriate.

  11. Type curve analysis of inertial effects in the response of a well to a slug test.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The water level response to a slug or bailer test in a well completed in a confined aquifer, has been evaluated taking into account well-bore storage and inertial effects of the water column in the well. The response range, from overdamped with negligible inertial effects to damped oscillations, was covered employing numerical inversions of the Laplace-transform solution. By scaling the time with respect to the undamped natural period of the well-aquifer system and by using the damping parameter for a second-order damped, inertial-elastic system, a set of type curves was constructed that enables water level response data from a slug or bailer test to be analyzed under conditions where the inertial parameter is large.-from Author

  12. Curve fitting toxicity test data: Which comes first, the dose response or the model?

    SciTech Connect

    Gully, J.; Baird, R.; Bottomley, J.

    1995-12-31

    The probit model frequently does not fit the concentration-response curve of NPDES toxicity test data and non-parametric models must be used instead. The non-parametric models, trimmed Spearman-Karber, IC{sub p}, and linear interpolation, all require a monotonic concentration-response. Any deviation from a monotonic response is smoothed to obtain the desired concentration-response characteristics. Inaccurate point estimates may result from such procedures and can contribute to imprecision in replicate tests. The following study analyzed reference toxicant and effluent data from giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera), purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), red abalone (Haliotis rufescens), and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) bioassays using commercially available curve fitting software. The purpose was to search for alternative parametric models which would reduce the use of non-parametric models for point estimate analysis of toxicity data. Two non-linear models, power and logistic dose-response, were selected as possible alternatives to the probit model based upon their toxicological plausibility and ability to model most data sets examined. Unlike non-parametric procedures, these and all parametric models can be statistically evaluated for fit and significance. The use of the power or logistic dose response models increased the percentage of parametric model fits for each protocol and toxicant combination examined. The precision of the selected non-linear models was also compared with the EPA recommended point estimation models at several effect.levels. In general, precision of the alternative models was equal to or better than the traditional methods. Finally, use of the alternative models usually produced more plausible point estimates in data sets where the effects of smoothing and non-parametric modeling made the point estimate results suspect.

  13. Dose-response curve of a microfluidic magnetic bead-based surface coverage sandwich assay.

    PubMed

    Cornaglia, Matteo; Trouillon, Raphaël; Tekin, H Cumhur; Lehnert, Thomas; Gijs, Martin A M

    2015-09-25

    Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles ('magnetic beads') have been used to advantage in many microfluidic devices for sensitive antigen (Ag) detection. Today, assays that use as read-out of the signal the number count of immobilized beads on a surface for quantification of a sample's analyte concentration have been among the most sensitive and have allowed protein detection lower than the fgmL(-1) concentration range. Recently, we have proposed in this category a magnetic bead surface coverage assay (Tekin et al., 2013 [1]), in which 'large' (2.8μm) antibody (Ab)-functionalized magnetic beads captured their Ag from a serum and these Ag-carrying beads were subsequently exposed to a surface pattern of fixed 'small' (1.0μm) Ab-coated magnetic beads. When the system was exposed to a magnetic induction field, the magnet dipole attractive interactions between the two bead types were used as a handle to approach both bead surfaces and assist with Ag-Ab immunocomplex formation, while unspecific binding (in absence of an Ag) of a large bead was reduced by exploiting viscous drag flow. The dose-response curve of this type of assay had two remarkable features: (i) its ability to detect an output signal (i.e. bead number count) for very low Ag concentrations, and (ii) an output signal of the assay that was non-linear with respect to Ag concentration. We explain here the observed dose-response curves and show that the type of interactions and the concept of our assay are in favour of detecting the lowest analyte concentrations (where typically either zero or one Ag is carried per large bead), while higher concentrations are less efficiently detected. We propose a random walk process for the Ag-carrying bead over the magnetic landscape of small beads and this model description explains the enhanced overall capture probability of this assay and its particular non-linear dose response curves. PMID:25817550

  14. Natural twilight phase-response curves for the cave-dwelling bat, Hipposideros speoris.

    PubMed

    Vanlalnghaka, C; Keny, V L; Satralkar, M K; Khare, P V; Pujari, P D; Joshi, D S

    2005-01-01

    Phase-response curves (PRCs) for the circadian rhythm of flight activity of the microchiropteran bat (Hipposideros speoris) were determined in a cave, employing discrete natural dawn and dusk twilight pulses. These PRCs are reported for the first time for any circadian system and they are unlike other PRCs constructed for nocturnal mammals. Dawn and dusk twilight pulses evoked advance and delay phase shifts, respectively. Advance phase shifts were followed by 3 to 4 advancing transients and a subsequent shortening of free-running period (tau); whereas, the delay phase shifts were instantaneous without any transients but with a subsequent lengthening of tau. PMID:16298767

  15. The dose-response curve of the gravitropic reaction: a re-analysis.

    PubMed

    Perbal, Gérald; Jeune, Bernard; Lefranc, Agnès; Carnero-Diaz, Eugénie; Driss-Ecole, Dominique

    2002-03-01

    The dose-response curve of the gravitropic reaction is often used to evaluate the gravisensing of plant organs. It has been proposed (Larsen 1957) that the response (curvature) varies linearly as a function of the logarithm of the dose of gravistimulus. As this model fitted correctly most of the data obtained in the literature, the presentation time (tp, minimal duration of stimulation in the gravitational field to induce a response) or the presentation dose (dp, minimal quantity in g.s of stimulation to induce a response) were estimated by extrapolating down to zero curvature the straight line representing the response as a function of the logarithm of the stimulus. This method was preferred to a direct measurement of dp or tp with minute stimulations, since very slight gravitropic response cannot be distinguished from the background oscillations of the extremity of the organs. In the present review, it is shown that generally the logarithmic model (L) does not fit the experimental data published in the literature as well as the hyperbolic model (H). The H model in its simplest form is related to a response in which a ligand-receptor system is the limiting phase in the cascade of events leading to the response (Weyers et al. 1987). However, it is demonstrated that the differential growth, responsible for the curvature (and the angle of curvature), would vary as a hyperbolic function of the dose of stimulation, even if several steps involving ligand-receptor systems are responsible for the gravitropic curvature. In the H model, there is theoretically no presentation time (or presentation dose) since the curve passes through the origin. The value of the derivative of the H function equals a/b and represents the slope of the cune at the origin. It could be therefore used to estimate gravisensitivity. This provides a measurement of graviresponsiveness for threshold doses of stimulation. These results imply that the presentation time (or presentation dose) derived from

  16. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses

  17. Light-, pH- and thermal-responsive hydrogels with the triple-shape memory effect.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yao-Yu; Gong, Xiao-Lei; Kang, Yang; Jiang, Zhi-Chao; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Bang-Jing

    2016-08-23

    Light-, pH- and thermal-responsive hydrogels were prepared by introducing dansyl-aggregations and azo-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes as switches. The resulting material showed dual shape memory behavior in response to light, pH or temperature, respectively, and exhibits the triple-shape memory effect in response to light and pH sequentially. PMID:27366796

  18. Response to Martini and Habeck: Semiochemical dose-response curves fit by kinetic formation functions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Martini and Habeck (2014) correctly describe the conceptual simulation model of Byers (2013) where molecules in an odor filament pass by an antenna causing an electrophysiological antennographic (EAG) response that is proportional to how many of the receptors are hit at least once by a molecule. Inc...

  19. Linearization of dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Aldelaijan, Saad; DeBlois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan; Chan, Maria F.; Lewis, Dave

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Despite numerous advantages of radiochromic film dosimeter (high spatial resolution, near tissue equivalence, low energy dependence) to measure a relative dose distribution with film, one needs to first measure an absolute dose (following previously established reference dosimetry protocol) and then convert measured absolute dose values into relative doses. In this work, we present result of our efforts to obtain a functional form that would linearize the inherently nonlinear dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system. Methods: Functional form [{zeta}= (-1){center_dot}netOD{sup (2/3)}/ln(netOD)] was derived from calibration curves of various previously established radiochromic film dosimetry systems. In order to test the invariance of the proposed functional form with respect to the film model used we tested it with three different GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign film models (EBT, EBT2, and EBT3) irradiated to various doses and scanned on a same scanner. For one of the film models (EBT2), we tested the invariance of the functional form to the scanner model used by scanning irradiated film pieces with three different flatbed scanner models (Epson V700, 1680, and 10000XL). To test our hypothesis that the proposed functional argument linearizes the response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system, verification tests have been performed in clinical applications: percent depth dose measurements, IMRT quality assurance (QA), and brachytherapy QA. Results: Obtained R{sup 2} values indicate that the choice of the functional form of the new argument appropriately linearizes the dose response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system we used. The linear behavior was insensitive to both film model and flatbed scanner model used. Measured PDD values using the green channel response of the GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign EBT3 film model are well within {+-}2% window of the local relative dose value when compared to the tabulated Cobalt-60 data. It was also

  20. Does the U in the U-Shaped Curve Also Stand for Universal? Reflections on Provisional Doubts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jessica

    1997-01-01

    Critiques the attempt by David Pariser and Axel van den Berg to apply the author's methods to a cross-cultural study. Argues that their study is too flawed to be definitive. Suggests means to test the universality of the U-curve as a cognitive development pattern or an artifact of culturally defined aesthetics. (DSK)

  1. Concentration Response Curve for Ozone Realted Mortality at High Concentrations for presentation at International Society for Environmental Epidemiology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentration Response Curve for Ozone related Mortality at High Concentrations Ana G. Rappold, James Crooks, Lucas M. Neas Background Rising temperatures and decreased global circulation in the upcoming decades are expected to have a detrimental impact on air quality, particular...

  2. Scaling the Non-linear Impact Response of Flat and Curved Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Feraboli, Paolo; Jackson, Wade C.

    2005-01-01

    The application of scaling laws to thin flat and curved composite panels exhibiting nonlinear response when subjected to low-velocity transverse impact is investigated. Previous research has shown that the elastic impact response of structural configurations exhibiting geometrically linear response can be effectively scaled. In the present paper, a preliminary experimental study is presented to assess the applicability of the scaling laws to structural configurations exhibiting geometrically nonlinear deformations. The effect of damage on the scalability of the structural response characteristics, and the effect of scale on damage development are also investigated. Damage is evaluated using conventional methods including C-scan, specimen de-plying and visual inspection of the impacted panels. Coefficient of restitution and normalized contact duration are also used to assess the extent of damage. The results confirm the validity of the scaling parameters for elastic impacts. However, for the panels considered in the study, the extent and manifestation of damage do not scale according to the scaling laws. Furthermore, the results indicate that even though the damage does not scale, the overall panel response characteristics, as indicated by contact force profiles, do scale for some levels of damage.

  3. Anisotropic responsive microgels with tuneable shape and interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crassous, Jérôme J.; Mihut, Adriana M.; Månsson, Linda K.; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Highly monodisperse polystyrene/poly(N-isopropylmethacrylamide) (PS-PNIPMAM) core-shell composite microgels were synthesized and further nanoengineered in either ellipsoidal, faceted or bowl-shaped particles. Beside their anisotropy in shape, the microgel design enables an exquisite control of the particle conformation, size and interactions from swollen and hydrophilic to collapsed and hydrophobic using temperature as an external control variable. The post-processing procedures and the characterization of the different particles are first presented. Their potential as model systems for the investigation of the effects of anisotropic shape and interactions on the phase behavior is further demonstrated. Finally, the self-assembly of bowl-shaped composite microgel particles is discussed, where the temperature and an external AC electric field are employed to control the interactions from repulsive to attractive and from soft repulsive to dipolar, respectively.Highly monodisperse polystyrene/poly(N-isopropylmethacrylamide) (PS-PNIPMAM) core-shell composite microgels were synthesized and further nanoengineered in either ellipsoidal, faceted or bowl-shaped particles. Beside their anisotropy in shape, the microgel design enables an exquisite control of the particle conformation, size and interactions from swollen and hydrophilic to collapsed and hydrophobic using temperature as an external control variable. The post-processing procedures and the characterization of the different particles are first presented. Their potential as model systems for the investigation of the effects of anisotropic shape and interactions on the phase behavior is further demonstrated. Finally, the self-assembly of bowl-shaped composite microgel particles is discussed, where the temperature and an external AC electric field are employed to control the interactions from repulsive to attractive and from soft repulsive to dipolar, respectively. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  4. Shaping ability of Reciproc and TF Adaptive systems in severely curved canals of rapid microCT-based prototyping molar replicas

    PubMed Central

    ORDINOLA-ZAPATA, Ronald; BRAMANTE, Clovis Monteiro; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Húngaro; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; JARAMILLO, David; VERSIANI, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the shaping ability of Reciproc and Twisted-File Adaptive systems in rapid prototyping replicas. Material and Methods: Two mandibular molars showing S-shaped and 62-degree curvatures in the mesial root were scanned by using a microcomputed tomography (μCT) system. The data were exported in the stereolitograhic format and 20 samples of each molar were printed at 16 µm resolution. The mesial canals of 10 replicas of each specimen were prepared with each system. Transportation was measured by overlapping radiographs taken before and after preparation and resin thickness after instrumentation was measured by μCT. Results: Both systems maintained the original shape of the apical third in both anatomies (P>0.05). Overall, considering the resin thickness in the 62-degree replicas, no statistical difference was found between the systems (P>0.05). In the S-shaped curvature replica, Reciproc significantly decreased the thickness of the resin walls in comparison with TF Adaptive. Conclusions: The evaluated systems were able to maintain the original shape at the apical third of severely curved mesial canals of molar replicas. PMID:24918662

  5. Segmentation of neuronal structures using SARSA (λ)-based boundary amendment with reinforced gradient-descent curve shape fitting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Shen, Bairong

    2014-01-01

    The segmentation of structures in electron microscopy (EM) images is very important for neurobiological research. The low resolution neuronal EM images contain noise and generally few features are available for segmentation, therefore application of the conventional approaches to identify the neuron structure from EM images is not successful. We therefore present a multi-scale fused structure boundary detection algorithm in this study. In the algorithm, we generate an EM image Gaussian pyramid first, then at each level of the pyramid, we utilize Laplacian of Gaussian function (LoG) to attain structure boundary, we finally assemble the detected boundaries by using fusion algorithm to attain a combined neuron structure image. Since the obtained neuron structures usually have gaps, we put forward a reinforcement learning-based boundary amendment method to connect the gaps in the detected boundaries. We use a SARSA (λ)-based curve traveling and amendment approach derived from reinforcement learning to repair the incomplete curves. Using this algorithm, a moving point starts from one end of the incomplete curve and walks through the image where the decisions are supervised by the approximated curve model, with the aim of minimizing the connection cost until the gap is closed. Our approach provided stable and efficient structure segmentation. The test results using 30 EM images from ISBI 2012 indicated that both of our approaches, i.e., with or without boundary amendment, performed better than six conventional boundary detection approaches. In particular, after amendment, the Rand error and warping error, which are the most important performance measurements during structure segmentation, were reduced to very low values. The comparison with the benchmark method of ISBI 2012 and the recent developed methods also indicates that our method performs better for the accurate identification of substructures in EM images and therefore useful for the identification of imaging

  6. Segmentation of Neuronal Structures Using SARSA (λ)-Based Boundary Amendment with Reinforced Gradient-Descent Curve Shape Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Shen, Bairong

    2014-01-01

    The segmentation of structures in electron microscopy (EM) images is very important for neurobiological research. The low resolution neuronal EM images contain noise and generally few features are available for segmentation, therefore application of the conventional approaches to identify the neuron structure from EM images is not successful. We therefore present a multi-scale fused structure boundary detection algorithm in this study. In the algorithm, we generate an EM image Gaussian pyramid first, then at each level of the pyramid, we utilize Laplacian of Gaussian function (LoG) to attain structure boundary, we finally assemble the detected boundaries by using fusion algorithm to attain a combined neuron structure image. Since the obtained neuron structures usually have gaps, we put forward a reinforcement learning-based boundary amendment method to connect the gaps in the detected boundaries. We use a SARSA (λ)-based curve traveling and amendment approach derived from reinforcement learning to repair the incomplete curves. Using this algorithm, a moving point starts from one end of the incomplete curve and walks through the image where the decisions are supervised by the approximated curve model, with the aim of minimizing the connection cost until the gap is closed. Our approach provided stable and efficient structure segmentation. The test results using 30 EM images from ISBI 2012 indicated that both of our approaches, i.e., with or without boundary amendment, performed better than six conventional boundary detection approaches. In particular, after amendment, the Rand error and warping error, which are the most important performance measurements during structure segmentation, were reduced to very low values. The comparison with the benchmark method of ISBI 2012 and the recent developed methods also indicates that our method performs better for the accurate identification of substructures in EM images and therefore useful for the identification of imaging

  7. Effect of crystal shape on neutron rocking curves of perfect single crystals designed for ultra-small-angle scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, A. K.; Rehm, C.

    2014-07-01

    The present study has been conducted in the framework of the channel-cut crystal design for the Kookaburra ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) instrument to be installed at the OPAL reactor of ANSTO. This facility is based on the classical Bonse-Hart method that uses two multiple-reflection crystal systems. The dynamical theory of diffraction by perfect crystals distinguishes two cases: the Darwin case applying to infinitely thick crystals and the Ewald solution for very small absorption taking into account the reflection from the rear face of a plane-parallel crystal reflecting in Bragg geometry. The former is preferable because it yields narrower rocking curves. To prevent the neutrons to "see" the rear face, grooves were machined into the backside of perfect Si test crystals for single reflection and filled with neutron absorbing material. These samples were examined at the S18 instrument of the Institut Laue-Langevin. Unexpectedly the crystals with empty slots showed an increase of the rocking curve width. When filling the slots with an absorber the widths decreased, but without reaching that of the Darwin curve. Understanding the results and achieving a successful crystal design call for the development of a theory that permits to describe neutron diffraction from crystals with a structured back face.

  8. POD curves for non-maximizable ultrasonic responses: Statistical derivation and application to solid freight axles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carboni, Michele; Cantini, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    The most relevant standards on ultrasonic testing, and an effective inspection practice, require the maximization of echo responses due to indications before their evaluation in terms of amplitude and size. This is achieved effectively pointing the acoustic axis of the sound beam to the indication, in a way to get back the maximum possible sound energy. Considering some operative cases, however, such a response maximization is not always feasible, mainly due to geometrical constraints impeding the inspection of the whole control area with a constant sensitivity. The traditional end inspection of solid railway axles by a rotating probe mounting conventional sensors falls back into this kind of inspections. In particular, inspection angles are fixed and the probe holder cannot move along the axle allowing response maximization of in-service damages located, for example, along the cylindrical body. It follows some control areas cannot be inspected using the maximum sound pressure. The present research shows how the derivation of "Probability of Detection" curves for non-maximizable ultrasonic responses cannot be carried out by the traditional statistical approach and a novel one, of the "Model-Assisted Probability of Detection" kind, is consequently proposed based on experiments and numerical simulations.

  9. Curve Number and Peakflow Responses Following the Cerro Grande Fire on a Small Watershed.

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, E. P.; Hawkins, Richard H.

    2005-01-01

    The Curve Number (CN) method is routinely used to estimate runoff and peakflows following forest fires, but there has been essentially no literature on the estimated value and temporal variation of CNs following wildland fires. In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned the headwaters of the major watersheds that cross Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a stream gauging network presented an opportunity to assess CNs following the fire. Analysis of rainfall-runoff events indicated that the pre-fire watershed response was complacent or limited watershed area contributed to runoff. The post-fire response indicated that the complacent behavior continued so the watershed response was not dramatically changed. Peakflows did increase by 2 orders of magnitude following the fire, and this was hypothesized to be a function of increase in runoff volume and changes in watershed network allowing more efficient delivery of runoff. More observations and analyses following fires are needed to support definition of CNs for post-fire response and mitigation efforts.

  10. Thermal and Mechanical Buckling and Postbuckling Responses of Selected Curved Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breivik, Nicole L.; Hyer, Michael W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an experimental and numerical study of the buckling and postbuckling responses of selected unstiffened curved composite panels subjected to mechanical end shortening and a uniform temperature increase are presented. The uniform temperature increase induces thermal stresses in the panel when the axial displacement is constrained. An apparatus for testing curved panels at elevated temperature is described, numerical results generated by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code are presented. Several analytical modeling refinements that provide more accurate representation of the actual experimental conditions, and the relative contribution of each refinement, are discussed. Experimental results and numerical predictions are presented and compared for three loading conditions including mechanical end shortening alone, heating the panels to 250 F followed by mechanical end shortening, and heating the panels to 400 F. Changes in the coefficients of thermal expansion were observed as temperature was increased above 330 F. The effects of these changes on the experimental results are discussed for temperatures up to 400 F.

  11. Plant community response to landscape connectivity and patch shape.

    SciTech Connect

    Damschen, Ellen I.

    2005-07-01

    Ph.D Dissertation. North Carolina State University. Raleigh, North Carolina. 135 pp. Abstract. Land transformation is the single most important factor promoting the global loss of terrestrial biological diversity. Remaining habitat fragments contain more edges, less interior habitat, and are more isolated from other habitat fragments, all of which decrease rates of colonization following local extinctions, reduce reproductive rates and gene flow between populations, and ultimately lead to species extinctions. The best approach to prevent species loss, therefore, is to preserve greater areas of habitat. In many cases, however, habitat has already been fragmented and strategies are needed to configure and manage the remaining land. Land managers often create reserve networks that incorporate the use of landscape corridors, linear strips of habitat connecting isolated patches, to reduce species loss by increasing colonizations and decreasing extinctions. Most empirical tests of corridors have been limited to individuals and populations, leaving corridor effects on diversity largely unknown, especially at large spatial scales. Additionally, only a handful of studies have examined corridor effects on plants, which may be especially sensitive to the abiotic changes resulting from alterations in patch shape due to dispersal limitation. Using one of the best-replicated, large-scale habitat fragmentation experiments, I tested explicitly for corridor effects on plant community diversity and composition by examining the established plant community and the soil seedbank. My experimental design distinguished among the three possible ways corridors can affect between-patch processes: by acting as a movement conduit between connected patches (“connectivity effects”), by increasing area alone (“area effects”), and by intercepting organisms moving across the landscape and filtering them into connected patches (“drift-fence effects”). Additionally, I tested for the

  12. Nonlinear and snap-through responses of curved panels to intense acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. F.

    1989-01-01

    Assuming a single-mode transverse displacement, a simple formula is derived for the transverse load-displacement relationship of a plate under in-plane compression. The formula is used to derive a simple analytical expression for the nonlinear dynamic response of postbuckled plates under sinusoidal or random excitation. The highly nonlinear motion of snap-through can be easily interpreted using the single-mode formula. Experimental results are obtained with buckled and cylindrical aluminum panels using discrete frequency and broadband excitation of mechanical and acoustic forces. Some important effects of the snap-through motion on the dynamic response of the postbuckled plates are described. Static tests were used to identify the deformation shape during snap-through.

  13. Fertilizer Response Curves for Commercial Southern Forest Species Defined with an Un-Replicated Experimental Design.

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Mark; Aubrey, Doug; Coyle, David, R.; Daniels, Richard, F.

    2005-11-01

    There has been recent interest in use of non-replicated regression experimental designs in forestry, as the need for replication in experimental design is burdensome on limited research budgets. We wanted to determine the interacting effects of soil moisture and nutrient availability on the production of various southeastern forest trees (two clones of Populus deltoides, open pollinated Platanus occidentalis, Liquidambar styraciflua and Pinus taeda). Additionally, we required an understanding of the fertilizer response curve. To accomplish both objectives we developed a composite design that includes a core ANOVA approach to consider treatment interactions, with the addition of non-replicated regression plots receiving a range of fertilizer levels for the primary irrigation treatment.

  14. Clinical application of Chamomilla recutita in phlebitis: dose response curve study.

    PubMed

    Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz Dos; Carvalho, Emilia Campos de; Bueno, Paula Carolina Pires; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp

    2011-01-01

    This experimental and dose-response curve study aimed to carry out the quality control of the Chamomilla recutita sample, as well as to estimate the ideal dose, for anti-inflammatory effect, of the extract of its capitula, in patients with phlebitis due to peripheral intravenous infusion of antineoplastic chemotherapy and to evaluate the toxicity of this extract in human beings. The therapeutic efficacy, concerning the anti-inflammatory potential, of different doses of Chamomilla recutita extract were analyzed and compared in 25 patients. The time of regression of phlebitis was shorter for groups with 2.5% concentration (mean=29.2h, standard deviation = 8.98) and 5% concentration (mean = 38.8h, standard deviation = 17.47). Local toxicity was almost not observed. This research contributes to the innovation of the nursing clinical practice, since it suggests an alternative for the treatment of phlebitis through the clinical use of phytotherapeutic drugs. PMID:21412623

  15. Melatonin shifts human circadian rhythms according to a phase-response curve.

    PubMed

    Lewy, A J; Ahmed, S; Jackson, J M; Sack, R L

    1992-10-01

    A physiological dose of orally administered melatonin shifts circadian rhythms in humans according to a phase-response curve (PRC) that is nearly opposite in phase with the PRCs for light exposure: melatonin delays circadian rhythms when administered in the morning and advances them when administered in the afternoon or early evening. The human melatonin PRC provides critical information for using melatonin to treat circadian phase sleep and mood disorders, as well as maladaptation to shift work and transmeridional air travel. The human melatonin PRC also provides the strongest evidence to date for a function of endogenous melatonin and its suppression by light in augmenting entrainment of circadian rhythms by the light-dark cycle. PMID:1394610

  16. Evaluation of alternative model selection criteria in the analysis of unimodal response curves using CART

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ribic, C.A.; Miller, T.W.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated CART performance with a unimodal response curve for one continuous response and four continuous explanatory variables, where two variables were important (ie directly related to the response) and the other two were not. We explored performance under three relationship strengths and two explanatory variable conditions: equal importance and one variable four times as important as the other. We compared CART variable selection performance using three tree-selection rules ('minimum risk', 'minimum risk complexity', 'one standard error') to stepwise polynomial ordinary least squares (OLS) under four sample size conditions. The one-standard-error and minimum-risk-complexity methods performed about as well as stepwise OLS with large sample sizes when the relationship was strong. With weaker relationships, equally important explanatory variables and larger sample sizes, the one-standard-error and minimum-risk-complexity rules performed better than stepwise OLS. With weaker relationships and explanatory variables of unequal importance, tree-structured methods did not perform as well as stepwise OLS. Comparing performance within tree-structured methods, with a strong relationship and equally important explanatory variables, the one-standard-error-rule was more likely to choose the correct model than were the other tree-selection rules 1) with weaker relationships and equally important explanatory variables; and 2) under all relationship strengths when explanatory variables were of unequal importance and sample sizes were lower.

  17. Characterization of Nonlinear Rate Dependent Response of Shape Memory Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Brent; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Chen, Yi-Chao; Whitley, Karen S.

    2007-01-01

    Shape Memory Polymers (SMPs) are a class of polymers, which can undergo deformation in a flexible state at elevated temperatures, and when cooled below the glass transition temperature, while retaining their deformed shape, will enter and remain in a rigid state. Upon heating above the glass transition temperature, the shape memory polymer will return to its original, unaltered shape. SMPs have been reported to recover strains of over 400%. It is important to understand the stress and strain recovery behavior of SMPs to better develop constitutive models which predict material behavior. Initial modeling efforts did not account for large deformations beyond 25% strain. However, a model under current development is capable of describing large deformations of the material. This model considers the coexisting active (rubber) and frozen (glass) phases of the polymer, as well as the transitions between the material phases. The constitutive equations at the continuum level are established with internal state variables to describe the microstructural changes associated with the phase transitions. For small deformations, the model reduces to a linear model that agrees with those reported in the literature. Thermomechanical characterization is necessary for the development, calibration, and validation of a constitutive model. The experimental data reported in this paper will assist in model development by providing a better understanding of the stress and strain recovery behavior of the material. This paper presents the testing techniques used to characterize the thermomechanical material properties of a shape memory polymer (SMP) and also presents the resulting data. An innovative visual-photographic apparatus, known as a Vision Image Correlation (VIC) system was used to measure the strain. The details of this technique will also be presented in this paper. A series of tensile tests were performed on specimens such that strain levels of 10, 25, 50, and 100% were applied to

  18. Shape-independent object category responses revealed by MEG and fMRI decoding.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Daniel; Azzalini, Damiano C; Peelen, Marius V

    2016-04-01

    Neuroimaging research has identified category-specific neural response patterns to a limited set of object categories. For example, faces, bodies, and scenes evoke activity patterns in visual cortex that are uniquely traceable in space and time. It is currently debated whether these apparently categorical responses truly reflect selectivity for categories or instead reflect selectivity for category-associated shape properties. In the present study, we used a cross-classification approach on functional MRI (fMRI) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data to reveal both category-independent shape responses and shape-independent category responses. Participants viewed human body parts (hands and torsos) and pieces of clothing that were closely shape-matched to the body parts (gloves and shirts). Category-independent shape responses were revealed by training multivariate classifiers on discriminating shape within one category (e.g., hands versus torsos) and testing these classifiers on discriminating shape within the other category (e.g., gloves versus shirts). This analysis revealed significant decoding in large clusters in visual cortex (fMRI) starting from 90 ms after stimulus onset (MEG). Shape-independent category responses were revealed by training classifiers on discriminating object category (bodies and clothes) within one shape (e.g., hands versus gloves) and testing these classifiers on discriminating category within the other shape (e.g., torsos versus shirts). This analysis revealed significant decoding in bilateral occipitotemporal cortex (fMRI) and from 130 to 200 ms after stimulus onset (MEG). Together, these findings provide evidence for concurrent shape and category selectivity in high-level visual cortex, including category-level responses that are not fully explicable by two-dimensional shape properties. PMID:26740535

  19. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    A rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for a curved orthogrid panel typical of launch vehicle skin structures. Several test article configurations were produced by adding component equipment of differing weights to the flight-like vehicle panel. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was employed to describe the assumed correlation of phased input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application demonstrates the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software modules developed for the RPTF method can be easily adapted for

  20. Complex, non-monotonic dose-response curves with multiple maxima: Do we (ever) sample densely enough?

    PubMed Central

    Cvrčková, Fatima; Luštinec, Jiří; Žárský, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    We usually expect the dose-response curves of biological responses to quantifiable stimuli to be simple, either monotonic or exhibiting a single maximum or minimum. Deviations are often viewed as experimental noise. However, detailed measurements in plant primary tissue cultures (stem pith explants of kale and tobacco) exposed to varying doses of sucrose, cytokinins (BA or kinetin) or auxins (IAA or NAA) revealed that growth and several biochemical parameters exhibit multiple reproducible, statistically significant maxima over a wide range of exogenous substance concentrations. This results in complex, non-monotonic dose-response curves, reminiscent of previous reports of analogous observations in both metazoan and plant systems responding to diverse pharmacological treatments. These findings suggest the existence of a hitherto neglected class of biological phenomena resulting in dose-response curves exhibiting periodic patterns of maxima and minima, whose causes remain so far uncharacterized, partly due to insufficient sampling frequency used in many studies. PMID:26336980

  1. Smoking and cotton dust effects in cotton textile workers: an analysis of the shape of the maximum expiratory flow volume curve

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, E.N.; Kapp, M.C.; Maunder, L.R.; Beck, G.; Witek, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    Cotton textile workers have an increased prevalence of both obstructive and restrictive lung function patterns when compared to control subjects. Similar abnormal lung function patterns may occur with other respiratory diseases, notably those associated with cigarette smoking. The shape of the maximum expiratory flow volume (MEFV) curve has been used to characterize patterns of lung function abnormality. The authors defined a new functional parameter (angle ..beta..) related to the shape of the MEFV curve in order better to characterize the respiratory effects of cotton dust exposure. In this study, 477 cotton textile workers, both current smokers and never smokers 45 years and older, were compared to 932 similarly aged control subjects from three communities: Lebanon and Ansonia, CT, and Winnsboro, SC. Smokers, regardless of their occupational exposure or sex, have smaller values of ..beta.. than do nonsmokers. Cotton textile workers who have more abnormal lung function than do controls, cannot be distinguished from controls by ..beta... They suggest that such functional differences between cotton and smoking effects may reflect injury to different portions of the bronchial tree.

  2. SmartShape™ technology. Modifying the shape of the beef cuberoll and the consumer response to shaped scotch fillet steaks.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Johanne; van de Ven, Remy; Hopkins, David L

    2014-03-01

    SmartShape™ is a novel meat processing technology that uses air pressure to compress and elongate whole cold-boned primals and packages them to retain form. A two stage study was conducted. The first stage established the ability of the SmartShape™ treated beef cube roll (m. longissimus lumborum) to retain shape in a commercial setting. Twelve hours chilling time following treatment was found to be adequate for steaks to retain their shape for up to 24h after slicing. Steak shape and size did not change substantially until after cooking, when the steaks looked less formed. In the second stage a survey was conducted of 421 consumers to clarify the response to the shaping of a subset of raw and cooked scotch fillet steaks. There was no difference in preference for shaped or control steaks. A secondary survey found that informed consumers were more amenable to the SmartShape™ scotch fillet steaks presented here, but would not pay a premium for them. PMID:24334030

  3. Evaluation of the Phase-Dependent Rhythm Control of Human Walking Using Phase Response Curves

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Aoi, Shinya; Imai, Takashi; Aoyagi, Toshio; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Humans and animals control their walking rhythms to maintain motion in a variable environment. The neural mechanism for controlling rhythm has been investigated in many studies using mechanical and electrical stimulation. However, quantitative evaluation of rhythm variation in response to perturbation at various timings has rarely been investigated. Such a characteristic of rhythm is described by the phase response curve (PRC). Dynamical simulations of human skeletal models with changing walking rhythms (phase reset) described a relation between the effective phase reset on stability and PRC, and phase reset around touch-down was shown to improve stability. A PRC of human walking was estimated by pulling the swing leg, but such perturbations hardly influenced the stance leg, so the relation between the PRC and walking events was difficult to discuss. This research thus examines human response to variations in floor velocity. Such perturbation yields another problem, in that the swing leg is indirectly (and weakly) perturbed, so the precision of PRC decreases. To solve this problem, this research adopts the weighted spike-triggered average (WSTA) method. In the WSTA method, a sequential pulsed perturbation is used for stimulation. This is in contrast with the conventional impulse method, which applies an intermittent impulsive perturbation. The WSTA method can be used to analyze responses to a large number of perturbations for each sequence. In the experiment, perturbations are applied to walking subjects by rapidly accelerating and decelerating a treadmill belt, and measured data are analyzed by the WSTA and impulse methods. The PRC obtained by the WSTA method had clear and stable waveforms with a higher temporal resolution than those obtained by the impulse method. By investigation of the rhythm transition for each phase of walking using the obtained PRC, a rhythm change that extends the touch-down and mid-single support phases is found to occur. PMID:27203839

  4. Evaluation of the Phase-Dependent Rhythm Control of Human Walking Using Phase Response Curves.

    PubMed

    Funato, Tetsuro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Aoi, Shinya; Imai, Takashi; Aoyagi, Toshio; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Humans and animals control their walking rhythms to maintain motion in a variable environment. The neural mechanism for controlling rhythm has been investigated in many studies using mechanical and electrical stimulation. However, quantitative evaluation of rhythm variation in response to perturbation at various timings has rarely been investigated. Such a characteristic of rhythm is described by the phase response curve (PRC). Dynamical simulations of human skeletal models with changing walking rhythms (phase reset) described a relation between the effective phase reset on stability and PRC, and phase reset around touch-down was shown to improve stability. A PRC of human walking was estimated by pulling the swing leg, but such perturbations hardly influenced the stance leg, so the relation between the PRC and walking events was difficult to discuss. This research thus examines human response to variations in floor velocity. Such perturbation yields another problem, in that the swing leg is indirectly (and weakly) perturbed, so the precision of PRC decreases. To solve this problem, this research adopts the weighted spike-triggered average (WSTA) method. In the WSTA method, a sequential pulsed perturbation is used for stimulation. This is in contrast with the conventional impulse method, which applies an intermittent impulsive perturbation. The WSTA method can be used to analyze responses to a large number of perturbations for each sequence. In the experiment, perturbations are applied to walking subjects by rapidly accelerating and decelerating a treadmill belt, and measured data are analyzed by the WSTA and impulse methods. The PRC obtained by the WSTA method had clear and stable waveforms with a higher temporal resolution than those obtained by the impulse method. By investigation of the rhythm transition for each phase of walking using the obtained PRC, a rhythm change that extends the touch-down and mid-single support phases is found to occur. PMID:27203839

  5. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity.

  6. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Convolution effect on TCR log response curve and the correction method for it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Liu, L. J.; Gao, J.

    2016-09-01

    Through-casing resistivity (TCR) logging has been successfully used in production wells for the dynamic monitoring of oil pools and the distribution of the residual oil, but its vertical resolution has limited its efficiency in identification of thin beds. The vertical resolution is limited by the distortion phenomenon of vertical response of TCR logging. The distortion phenomenon was studied in this work. It was found that the vertical response curve of TCR logging is the convolution of the true formation resistivity and the convolution function of TCR logging tool. Due to the effect of convolution, the measurement error at thin beds can reach 30% or even bigger. Thus the information of thin bed might be covered up very likely. The convolution function of TCR logging tool was obtained in both continuous and discrete way in this work. Through modified Lyle-Kalman deconvolution method, the true formation resistivity can be optimally estimated, so this inverse algorithm can correct the error caused by the convolution effect. Thus it can improve the vertical resolution of TCR logging tool for identification of thin beds.

  8. Making Sense of Shape: An Analysis of Children's Written Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walcott, Crystal; Mohr, Doris; Kastberg, Signe E.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examine a large set of student responses to a constructed-response geometry item on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) administered in 1992 and 1996. The item asks students to name the similarities and differences between a parallelogram and a rectangle of equal area presented side by side on a grid. Through…

  9. Framing Obesity: How News Frames Shape Attributions and Behavioral Responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ye; Krakow, Melinda; John, Kevin K; Liu, Miao; Weaver, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Based on a public health model of obesity, this study set out to examine whether a news article reporting the obesity issue in a societal versus individual frame would increase perceptions of societal responsibilities for the obesity problem and motivate responsibility-taking behaviors. Responsibility-taking behaviors were examined at 3 levels: personal, interpersonal, and societal. Data from a Web-based experiment revealed significant framing effects on behaviors via causal and treatment responsibility attributions. The societal frame increased societal causal and treatment attribution, which led to greater likelihoods of interpersonal and social responsibility-taking behaviors as well as personal behaviors. Our findings suggest that news framing can be an effective venue for raising awareness of obesity as a societal issue and mobilizing collective efforts. PMID:26375052

  10. Functionally grading the shape memory response in NiTi films: Laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnbaum, A. J.; Satoh, G.; Yao, Y. L.

    2009-08-01

    A new process and mechanism are presented for controlling the shape memory response spatially within monolithic NiTi thin film structures. This technique is shown to effectively control the martensitic phase transformation temperature and exhibits control over aspects of the mechanical and shape memory responses as well. Specifically, the martensitic phase transformation temperature decreases with incident laser energy density. Concomitant modifications are observed in both the mechanical and shape memory responses in laser processed films. Analysis and characterization are performed via temperature controlled optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and nanoindentation.

  11. Functionally grading the shape memory response in NiTi films: Laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, A. J.; Satoh, G.; Yao, Y. L.

    2009-08-15

    A new process and mechanism are presented for controlling the shape memory response spatially within monolithic NiTi thin film structures. This technique is shown to effectively control the martensitic phase transformation temperature and exhibits control over aspects of the mechanical and shape memory responses as well. Specifically, the martensitic phase transformation temperature decreases with incident laser energy density. Concomitant modifications are observed in both the mechanical and shape memory responses in laser processed films. Analysis and characterization are performed via temperature controlled optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and nanoindentation.

  12. The response of spit shapes to wave-angle climates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashton, A.D.; Murray, A.B.; Littlewood, R.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate spit formation and evolution in light of the high-wave-angle instability in shoreline shape arising from a maximizing angle for wave-driven alongshore sediment transport. Single spits emerge in a simple one-contour line numerical model that evolves the coast using morphodynamic feedbacks and a 'climate' of waves approaching the shore from variable directions. Analysis of sediment transport and shoreline stability metrics illustrate how spits can be generated, demonstrating how waves from all angles can play a role in spit formation and evolution. Simulations suggest that regardless of whether high- or low-angle waves dominate relative to the general shoreline trend, as spits extend offshore, they tend to orient themselves such that most of their coast barely experiences low-angle waves and alongshore sediment transport to the spit end is maximized. This 'graded' spit shape minimizes gradients in sediment flux, while the recurve at the spit end experiences larger gradients and a region of high-angle instability. Examining hindcast wave data, similar trends are seen along the natural example of Long Point, Lake Erie, Canada. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  13. Bacterial lifestyle shapes the regulation of stringent response activation

    PubMed Central

    Boutte, Cara C.; Crosson, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria inhabit enormously diverse niches and have a correspondingly large array of regulatory mechanisms to adapt to often inhospitable and variable environments. The stringent response allows bacteria to quickly reprogram transcription in response to changes in nutrient availability. Although the proteins controlling this response are conserved in almost all bacterial species, recent work has illuminated considerable diversity in the starvation cues and regulatory mechanisms that activate stringent signaling proteins in bacteria from different environments. In this review we describe the signals and genetic circuitries that control the stringent signaling systems of a copiotroph, a bacteriovore, an oligotroph and a mammalian pathogen – Escherichia coli, Myxococcus xanthus, Caulobacter crescentus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively – and discuss how control of the stringent response in these species is adapted to their particular lifestyles. PMID:23419217

  14. Constrained Ordination Analysis with Enrichment of Bell-Shaped Response Functions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Thas, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Constrained ordination methods aims at finding an environmental gradient along which the species abundances are maximally separated. The species response functions, which describe the expected abundance as a function of the environmental score, are according to the ecological fundamental niche theory only meaningful if they are bell-shaped. Many classical model-based ordination methods, however, use quadratic regression models without imposing the bell-shape and thus allowing for meaningless U-shaped response functions. The analysis output (e.g. a biplot) may therefore be potentially misleading and the conclusions are prone to errors. In this paper we present a log-likelihood ratio criterion with a penalisation term to enforce more bell-shaped response shapes. We report the results of a simulation study and apply our method to metagenomics data from microbial ecology. PMID:27100464

  15. Constrained Ordination Analysis with Enrichment of Bell-Shaped Response Functions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingjie; Thas, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Constrained ordination methods aims at finding an environmental gradient along which the species abundances are maximally separated. The species response functions, which describe the expected abundance as a function of the environmental score, are according to the ecological fundamental niche theory only meaningful if they are bell-shaped. Many classical model-based ordination methods, however, use quadratic regression models without imposing the bell-shape and thus allowing for meaningless U-shaped response functions. The analysis output (e.g. a biplot) may therefore be potentially misleading and the conclusions are prone to errors. In this paper we present a log-likelihood ratio criterion with a penalisation term to enforce more bell-shaped response shapes. We report the results of a simulation study and apply our method to metagenomics data from microbial ecology. PMID:27100464

  16. Hydrothermal fabrication of octahedral-shaped Fe3O4 nanoparticles and their magnetorheological response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H. S.; Choi, H. J.

    2015-05-01

    Octahedral-shaped Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized in the presence of 1,3-diaminopropane using a hydrothermal method and assessed as a potential magnetorheological (MR) material. Their morphology, crystal structure, and magnetic properties were examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometry, respectively. The MR characteristics of the octahedral-shaped, Fe3O4 nanoparticle-based MR particles when dispersed in silicone oil with a 10 vol. % particle concentration were examined using a rotational rheometer under an external magnetic field. The resulting MR fluids exhibited a Bingham-like behavior with a distinctive yield stress from their flow curves.

  17. Reliable estimation of biochemical parameters from C3 leaf photosynthesis-intercellular carbon dioxide response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, Stan D; Gu, Lianhong; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Tu, Kevin; Law, Beverly E.

    2010-01-01

    The Farquhar-von Caemmerer-Berry (FvCB) model of photosynthesis is a change-point model and structurally overparameterized for interpreting the response of leaf net assimilation (A) to intercellular CO{sub 2} concentration (Ci). The use of conventional fitting methods may lead not only to incorrect parameters but also several previously unrecognized consequences. For example, the relationships between key parameters may be fixed computationally and certain fits may be produced in which the estimated parameters result in contradictory identification of the limitation states of the data. Here we describe a new approach that is better suited to the FvCB model characteristics. It consists of four main steps: (1) enumeration of all possible distributions of limitation states; (2) fitting the FvCB model to each limitation state distribution by minimizing a distribution-wise cost function that has desirable properties for parameter estimation; (3) identification and correction of inadmissible fits; and (4) selection of the best fit from all possible limitation state distributions. The new approach implemented theoretical parameter resolvability with numerical procedures that maximally use the information content of the data. It was tested with model simulations, sampled A/Ci curves, and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of different tree species. The new approach is accessible through the automated website leafweb.ornl.gov.

  18. Frequency response of curved bilayer microcantilevers with applications to surface stress measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi Sohi, Ali; Nieva, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Bilayer microcantilevers are normally curved because of fabrication-induced stresses. When used in biological/chemical sensing applications, the absorption of target agents onto the functionalized surface of the microcantilever creates a surface stress that shifts its resonance frequency. Despite numerous efforts, the mechanisms of surface stress-induced shift in the resonance frequency of microcantilevers remain elusive. To address this problem, this work presents a detailed analysis of the frequency response of microcantilevers, with different width-to-thickness ratios and curvature levels, using classical lamination theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz method. Based on the results of this analysis, a new relationship between resonance frequency shift and curvature variation due to differential surface stress loading is established. By comparing the strain energies associated with the in-plane and out-of-plane displacements of the microcantilever at different curvature levels, a new implicit model for surface stress-induced resonance frequency shift in microcantilevers is presented. Verified against the results of experiments carried out on gold/polysilicon microcantilevers, the new model is expected to provide a better understanding of surface stress-microcantilever resonator interaction, which is critical to systematic optimization of resonance-based micro sensors.

  19. Dose-response curve slope helps predict therapeutic potency and breadth of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicholas E; Montefiori, David C; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) with remarkable potency, breadth and epitope diversity has rejuvenated interest in immunotherapeutic strategies. Potencies defined by in vitro IC50 and IC80 values (50 and 80% inhibitory concentrations) figure prominently into the selection of clinical candidates; however, much higher therapeutic levels will be required to reduce multiple logs of virus and impede escape. Here we predict bnAb potency at therapeutic levels by analysing dose-response curve slopes, and show that slope is independent of IC50/IC80 and specifically relates to bnAb epitope class. With few exceptions, CD4-binding site and V3-glycan bnAbs exhibit slopes >1, indicative of higher expected therapeutic effectiveness, whereas V2-glycan, gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and gp120-gp41 bnAbs exhibit less favourable slopes <1. Our results indicate that slope is one major predictor of both potency and breadth for bnAbs at clinically relevant concentrations, and may better coordinate the relationship between bnAb epitope structure and therapeutic expectations. PMID:26416571

  20. Dose–response curve slope helps predict therapeutic potency and breadth of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Nicholas E.; Montefiori, David C.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) with remarkable potency, breadth and epitope diversity has rejuvenated interest in immunotherapeutic strategies. Potencies defined by in vitro IC50 and IC80 values (50 and 80% inhibitory concentrations) figure prominently into the selection of clinical candidates; however, much higher therapeutic levels will be required to reduce multiple logs of virus and impede escape. Here we predict bnAb potency at therapeutic levels by analysing dose–response curve slopes, and show that slope is independent of IC50/IC80 and specifically relates to bnAb epitope class. With few exceptions, CD4-binding site and V3-glycan bnAbs exhibit slopes >1, indicative of higher expected therapeutic effectiveness, whereas V2-glycan, gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and gp120–gp41 bnAbs exhibit less favourable slopes <1. Our results indicate that slope is one major predictor of both potency and breadth for bnAbs at clinically relevant concentrations, and may better coordinate the relationship between bnAb epitope structure and therapeutic expectations. PMID:26416571

  1. Climate change affects the outcome of competitive interactions-an application of principal response curves.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Einar; Vandvik, Vigdis

    2004-05-01

    It has been hypothesised that climate change may affect vegetation by changing the outcome of competitive interactions. We use a space-for-time approach to evaluate this hypothesis in the context of alpine time-of-snowmelt gradients. Principal response curves, a multivariate repeated-measurement analysis technique, are used to analyse for compositional differences in local ridge-to-snowbed gradients among 100 m altitudinal bands from 1,140 to 1,550 m a.s.l., corresponding to a temperature gradient of 2.5 degrees C (local lapse rate is 0.6 degrees C). The interaction between time-of-snowmelt and altitude is strongly significant statistically, indicating that the altitudinal gradient cannot be explained simply by the physiological responses of the species, but that there are also changes in the outcome of competitive interactions. At higher altitudes, there is a decrease in the time-of-snowmelt ranges of species which have intermediate times-of-snowmelt optima, whereas snowbed (chinophilous) species have wider time-of-snowmelt ranges. As snowbed species can survive, grow and reproduce at very early snow-free sites at high altitudes, the most likely explanation for their absence from all but the latest time-of-snowmelt habitats at lower altitudes is competitive exclusion by more vigorous lee-side species. This suggests that with future climate change snowbed species will experience, in addition to habitat fragmentation and reduced size of habitats due to increased temperature and snowmelt, an indirect effect due to competitive exclusion from late-snowmelt sites by species that have their optima outside snowbeds. PMID:15021981

  2. Culture Shapes Empathic Responses to Physical and Social Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates the extent to which cultural background moderates empathy in response to observing someone undergoing physical or social pain. In 3 studies, we demonstrate that, East Asian and White British participants differ in both affective and cognitive components of their empathic reactions in response to someone else’s pain. Compared with East Asian participants, British participants report greater empathic concern and show lower empathic accuracy. More important, findings cannot be explained by an in-group advantage effect. Potential reasons for observed cultural differences are discussed. PMID:26950365

  3. Culture shapes empathic responses to physical and social pain.

    PubMed

    Atkins, David; Uskul, Ayse K; Cooper, Nicholas R

    2016-08-01

    The present research investigates the extent to which cultural background moderates empathy in response to observing someone undergoing physical or social pain. In 3 studies, we demonstrate that East Asian and White British participants differ in both affective and cognitive components of their empathic reactions in response to someone else's pain. Compared with East Asian participants, British participants report greater empathic concern and show lower empathic accuracy. More important, findings cannot be explained by an in-group advantage effect. Potential reasons for observed cultural differences are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26950365

  4. Pyrene-Bridged Boron Subphthalocyanine Dimers: Combination of Planar and Bowl-Shaped π-Conjugated Systems for Creating Uniquely Curved π-Conjugated Systems.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shota; Kage, Yuto; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Nagao; Shimizu, Soji

    2016-06-01

    Pyrene-bridged boron subphthalocyanine dimers were synthesized from a mixed-condensation reaction of 2,7-di-tert-butyl-4,5,9,10-tetracyanopyrene and tetrafluorophthalonitrile, and their syn and anti isomers arising from the result of connecting two bowl-shaped boron subphthalocyanine molecules were successfully separated. Expansion of the conjugated system of boron subphthalocyanine through a pyrene bridge caused a redshift of the Q band absorption relative to the parent pyrene-fused monomer, whereas combining the curved π-conjugation of boron subphthalocyanine with the planar π-conjugation of pyrene enabled facile embracement of C60 molecules, owing to the enhanced concave-convex π-π stacking interactions. PMID:27120415

  5. The experimental cascade curves of EAS at E sub 0 10(17) eV obtained by the method of detection of Cherenkov pulse shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomin, Y. A.; Kalmykov, G. B.; Khristiansen, M. V.; Motova, M. V.; Nechin, Y. A.; Prosin, V. V.; Zhukov, V. Y.; Efimov, N. N.; Grigoriev, V. M.; Nikiforova, E. S.

    1985-01-01

    The individual cascade curves of EAS with E sub 0 10 to the 17th power eV/I to 3/ were studied by detection of EAS Cherenkov light pulses. The scintillators located at the center of the Yakutsk EAS array within a 500-m radius circle were used to select the showers and to determine the main EAS parameters. The individual cascade curves N(t) were obtained using the EAS Cherenkov light pulses satisfying the following requirements: (1) the signal-to-noise ratio fm/delta sub n 15, (2) the EAS axis-detector distance tau sub 350 m, (3) the zenith angle theta 30 deg, (4) the probability for EAS to be detected by scintillators W 0.8. Condition (1) arises from the desire to reduce the amplitude distortion of Cherenkov pulses due to noise and determines the range of EAS sizes, N(t). The resolution times of the Cherenkov pulse shape detectors are tau sub 0 approx. 23 ns which results in distortion of a pulse during the process of the detection. The distortion of pulses due to the finiteness of tau sub 0 value was estimated. It is shown that the rise time of pulse becomes greater as tau sub 0.5/tau sub 0 ratio decreases.

  6. Novel competitors shape species' responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jake M; Diez, Jeffrey M; Levine, Jonathan M

    2015-09-24

    Understanding how species respond to climate change is critical for forecasting the future dynamics and distribution of pests, diseases and biological diversity. Although ecologists have long acknowledged species' direct physiological and demographic responses to climate, more recent work suggests that these direct responses can be overwhelmed by indirect effects mediated via other interacting community members. Theory suggests that some of the most dramatic impacts of community change will probably arise through the assembly of novel species combinations after asynchronous migrations with climate. Empirical tests of this prediction are rare, as existing work focuses on the effects of changing interactions between competitors that co-occur today. To explore how species' responses to climate warming depend on how their competitors migrate to track climate, we transplanted alpine plant species and intact plant communities along a climate gradient in the Swiss Alps. Here we show that when alpine plants were transplanted to warmer climates to simulate a migration failure, their performance was strongly reduced by novel competitors that could migrate upwards from lower elevation; these effects generally exceeded the impact of warming on competition with current competitors. In contrast, when we grew the focal plants under their current climate to simulate climate tracking, a shift in the competitive environment to novel high-elevation competitors had little to no effect. This asymmetry in the importance of changing competitor identity at the leading versus trailing range edges is best explained by the degree of functional similarity between current and novel competitors. We conclude that accounting for novel competitive interactions may be essential to predict species' responses to climate change accurately. PMID:26374998

  7. A dose-response curve for biodosimetry from a 6 MV electron linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Pinto, M M P; Cadena, M; Santos, N; Fernandes, T S; Borges, E; Amaral, A

    2015-10-01

    Biological dosimetry (biodosimetry) is based on the investigation of radiation-induced biological effects (biomarkers), mainly dicentric chromosomes, in order to correlate them with radiation dose. To interpret the dicentric score in terms of absorbed dose, a calibration curve is needed. Each curve should be constructed with respect to basic physical parameters, such as the type of ionizing radiation characterized by low or high linear energy transfer (LET) and dose rate. This study was designed to obtain dose calibration curves by scoring of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with a 6 MV electron linear accelerator (Mevatron M, Siemens, USA). Two software programs, CABAS (Chromosomal Aberration Calculation Software) and Dose Estimate, were used to generate the curve. The two software programs are discussed; the results obtained were compared with each other and with other published low LET radiation curves. Both software programs resulted in identical linear and quadratic terms for the curve presented here, which was in good agreement with published curves for similar radiation quality and dose rates. PMID:26445334

  8. Genetic variances, heritabilities and maternal effects on body weight, breast meat yield, meat quality traits and the shape of the growth curve in turkey birds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Turkey is an important agricultural species and is largely used as a meat bird. In 2004, turkey represented 6.5% of the world poultry meat production. The world-wide turkey population has rapidly grown due to increased commercial farming. Due to the high demand for turkey meat from both consumers and industry global turkey stocks increased from 100 million in 1970 to over 276 million in 2004. This rapidly increasing importance of turkeys was a reason to design this study for the estimation of genetic parameters that control body weight, body composition, meat quality traits and parameters that shape the growth curve in turkey birds. Results The average heritability estimate for body weight traits was 0.38, except for early weights that were strongly affected by maternal effects. This study showed that body weight traits, upper asymptote (a growth curve trait), percent breast meat and redness of meat had high heritability whereas heritabilities of breast length, breast width, percent drip loss, ultimate pH, lightness and yellowness of meat were medium to low. We found high positive genetic and phenotypic correlations between body weight, upper asymptote, most breast meat yield traits and percent drip loss but percent drip loss was found strongly negatively correlated with ultimate pH. Percent breast meat, however, showed genetic correlations close to zero with body weight traits and upper asymptote. Conclusion The results of this analysis and the growth curve from the studied population of turkey birds suggest that the turkey birds could be selected for breeding between 60 and 80 days of age in order to improve overall production and the production of desirable cuts of meat. The continuous selection of birds within this age range could promote high growth rates but specific attention to meat quality would be needed to avoid a negative impact on the quality of meat. PMID:21266032

  9. Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory (RC-IRT) to Detect and Correct for Nonnormal Latent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2006-01-01

    Popular methods for fitting unidimensional item response theory (IRT) models to data assume that the latent variable is normally distributed in the population of respondents, but this can be unreasonable for some variables. Ramsay-curve IRT (RC-IRT) was developed to detect and correct for this nonnormality. The primary aims of this article are to…

  10. Standard Errors and Confidence Intervals from Bootstrapping for Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory Model Item Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Fei; Skorupski, William P.; Hoyle, Larry; Kingston, Neal M.

    2011-01-01

    Ramsay-curve item response theory (RC-IRT) is a nonparametric procedure that estimates the latent trait using splines, and no distributional assumption about the latent trait is required. For item parameters of the two-parameter logistic (2-PL), three-parameter logistic (3-PL), and polytomous IRT models, RC-IRT can provide more accurate estimates…

  11. A phase response curve to single bright light pulses in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S.; Jewett, Megan E.; Cajochen, Christian; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The circadian pacemaker is differentially sensitive to the resetting effects of retinal light exposure, depending upon the circadian phase at which the light exposure occurs. Previously reported human phase response curves (PRCs) to single bright light exposures have employed small sample sizes, and were often based on relatively imprecise estimates of circadian phase and phase resetting. In the present study, 21 healthy, entrained subjects underwent pre- and post-stimulus constant routines (CRs) in dim light (approximately 2-7 lx) with maintained wakefulness in a semi-recumbent posture. The 6.7 h bright light exposure stimulus consisted of alternating 6 min fixed gaze (approximately 10 000 lx) and free gaze (approximately 5000-9000 lx) exposures. Light exposures were scheduled across the circadian cycle in different subjects so as to derive a PRC. Plasma melatonin was used to determine the phase of the onset, offset, and midpoint of the melatonin profiles during the CRs. Phase shifts were calculated as the difference in phase between the pre- and post-stimulus CRs. The resultant PRC of the midpoint of the melatonin rhythm revealed a characteristic type 1 PRC with a significant peak-to-trough amplitude of 5.02 h. Phase delays occurred when the light stimulus was centred prior to the critical phase at the core body temperature minimum, phase advances occurred when the light stimulus was centred after the critical phase, and no phase shift occurred at the critical phase. During the subjective day, no prolonged 'dead zone' of photic insensitivity was apparent. Phase shifts derived using the melatonin onsets showed larger magnitudes than those derived from the melatonin offsets. These data provide a comprehensive characterization of the human PRC under highly controlled laboratory conditions.

  12. A three pulse phase response curve to three milligrams of melatonin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Helen J; Revell, Victoria L; Eastman, Charmane I

    2008-01-01

    Exogenous melatonin is increasingly used for its phase shifting and soporific effects. We generated a three pulse phase response curve (PRC) to exogenous melatonin (3 mg) by administering it to free-running subjects. Young healthy subjects (n = 27) participated in two 5 day laboratory sessions, each preceded by at least a week of habitual, but fixed sleep. Each 5 day laboratory session started and ended with a phase assessment to measure the circadian rhythm of endogenous melatonin in dim light using 30 min saliva samples. In between were three days in an ultradian dim light (< 150 lux)–dark cycle (LD 2.5 : 1.5) during which each subject took one pill per day at the same clock time (3 mg melatonin or placebo, double blind, counterbalanced). Each individual's phase shift to exogenous melatonin was corrected by subtracting their phase shift to placebo (a free-run). The resulting PRC has a phase advance portion peaking about 5 h before the dim light melatonin onset, in the afternoon. The phase delay portion peaks about 11 h after the dim light melatonin onset, shortly after the usual time of morning awakening. A dead zone of minimal phase shifts occurred around the first half of habitual sleep. The fitted maximum advance and delay shifts were 1.8 h and 1.3 h, respectively. This new PRC will aid in determining the optimal time to administer exogenous melatonin to achieve desired phase shifts and demonstrates that using exogenous melatonin as a sleep aid at night has minimal phase shifting effects. PMID:18006583

  13. The influence of higher harmonic flow forces on the response of a curved circular cylinder undergoing vortex-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Aghazadeh, Banafsheh; Budz, Collin; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2015-09-01

    Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a curved circular cylinder (a quarter of a ring, with no extension added to either end) free to oscillate in the crossflow direction was studied experimentally. Both the concave and the convex orientations (with respect to the oncoming flow direction) were considered. As expected, the amplitude of oscillations in both configurations was decreased compared to a vertical cylinder with the same mass ratio. Flow visualizations showed that the vortices were shed in parallel to the curved cylinder, when the cylinder was free to oscillate. The sudden jump in the phase difference between the flow forces and the cylinder displacement observed in the VIV of vertical cylinders was not observed in the curved cylinders. Higher harmonic force components at frequencies twice and three times the frequency of oscillations were observed in flow forces acting on the vertical cylinder, as well as the curved cylinder. Asymmetry in the wake was responsible for the 2nd harmonic force component and the relative velocity of the structure with respect to the oncoming flow was responsible for the 3rd harmonic force component. The lock-in occurred over the same range of reduced velocities for the curved cylinder in the convex orientation as for a vertical cylinder, but it was extended to higher reduced velocities for a curved cylinder in the concave orientation. Higher harmonic force components were found to be responsible for the extended lock-in range in the concave orientation. Within this range, the higher harmonic forces were even larger than the first harmonic force and the structure was being excited mainly by these higher harmonic forces.

  14. Modal Response of Trapezoidal Wing Structures Using Second Order Shape Sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Youhua; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2000-01-01

    The modal response of wing structures is very important for assessing their dynamic response including dynamic aeroelastic instabilities. Moreover, in a recent study an efficient structural optimization approach was developed using structural modes to represent the static aeroelastic wing response (both displacement and stress). In this paper, the modal response of general trapezoidal wing structures is approximated using shape sensitivities up to the 2nd order. Also different approaches of computing the derivatives are investigated.

  15. Chiral Molecular Optical Response to Nano-Shaped Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Chernyak, Vladimir; Rouxel, Jeremy; Mukamel, Shaul

    Chiral linear optical signals are an important spectroscopic tool for biomolecules and chemical sensing applications. Exact expressions are derived which express these signals as a convolution of a non-local linear susceptibility of matter with a non-local intrinsic property of the electric field. The chiral response can be enhanced and optimized using nano-optical fields with strong spatial variation. The approach is based on a gauge invariant calculation using the minimal coupling Hamiltonian. The multipolar expansion is avoided and all multipoles are naturally incorporated. We apply these expression to achiral (planar) and chiral (dihedral angle of 45°) bi-phenyl as a physically intuitive illustration. The support of National Science Foundation (Grant No. CHE-1361516) and the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Dept. of Energy (award # DE-FG02-4ER15571).

  16. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  17. Reconfigurable photonic crystals enabled by pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Taylor, Curtis; Basile, Vito; Jiang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Smart shape-memory polymers can memorize and recover their permanent shape in response to an external stimulus (for example, heat). They have been extensively exploited for a wide spectrum of applications ranging from biomedical devices to aerospace morphing structures. However, most of the existing shape-memory polymers are thermoresponsive and their performance is hindered by heat-demanding programming and recovery steps. Although pressure is an easily adjustable process variable such as temperature, pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers are largely unexplored. Here we report a series of shape-memory polymers that enable unusual ‘cold' programming and instantaneous shape recovery triggered by applying a contact pressure at ambient conditions. Moreover, the interdisciplinary integration of scientific principles drawn from two disparate fields—the fast-growing photonic crystal and shape-memory polymer technologies—enables fabrication of reconfigurable photonic crystals and simultaneously provides a simple and sensitive optical technique for investigating the intriguing shape-memory effects at nanoscale. PMID:26074349

  18. Reconfigurable photonic crystals enabled by pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Taylor, Curtis; Basile, Vito; Jiang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Smart shape-memory polymers can memorize and recover their permanent shape in response to an external stimulus (for example, heat). They have been extensively exploited for a wide spectrum of applications ranging from biomedical devices to aerospace morphing structures. However, most of the existing shape-memory polymers are thermoresponsive and their performance is hindered by heat-demanding programming and recovery steps. Although pressure is an easily adjustable process variable such as temperature, pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers are largely unexplored. Here we report a series of shape-memory polymers that enable unusual 'cold' programming and instantaneous shape recovery triggered by applying a contact pressure at ambient conditions. Moreover, the interdisciplinary integration of scientific principles drawn from two disparate fields--the fast-growing photonic crystal and shape-memory polymer technologies--enables fabrication of reconfigurable photonic crystals and simultaneously provides a simple and sensitive optical technique for investigating the intriguing shape-memory effects at nanoscale. PMID:26074349

  19. Reconfigurable photonic crystals enabled by pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Taylor, Curtis; Basile, Vito; Jiang, Peng

    2015-06-01

    Smart shape-memory polymers can memorize and recover their permanent shape in response to an external stimulus (for example, heat). They have been extensively exploited for a wide spectrum of applications ranging from biomedical devices to aerospace morphing structures. However, most of the existing shape-memory polymers are thermoresponsive and their performance is hindered by heat-demanding programming and recovery steps. Although pressure is an easily adjustable process variable such as temperature, pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers are largely unexplored. Here we report a series of shape-memory polymers that enable unusual `cold' programming and instantaneous shape recovery triggered by applying a contact pressure at ambient conditions. Moreover, the interdisciplinary integration of scientific principles drawn from two disparate fields--the fast-growing photonic crystal and shape-memory polymer technologies--enables fabrication of reconfigurable photonic crystals and simultaneously provides a simple and sensitive optical technique for investigating the intriguing shape-memory effects at nanoscale.

  20. 3D Printed Reversible Shape Changing Components with Stimuli Responsive Materials.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yiqi; Ding, Zhen; Yuan, Chao; Ai, Shigang; Isakov, Michael; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-01-01

    The creation of reversibly-actuating components that alter their shapes in a controllable manner in response to environmental stimuli is a grand challenge in active materials, structures, and robotics. Here we demonstrate a new reversible shape-changing component design concept enabled by 3D printing two stimuli responsive polymers-shape memory polymers and hydrogels-in prescribed 3D architectures. This approach uses the swelling of a hydrogel as the driving force for the shape change, and the temperature-dependent modulus of a shape memory polymer to regulate the time of such shape change. Controlling the temperature and aqueous environment allows switching between two stable configurations - the structures are relatively stiff and can carry load in each - without any mechanical loading and unloading. Specific shape changing scenarios, e.g., based on bending, or twisting in prescribed directions, are enabled via the controlled interplay between the active materials and the 3D printed architectures. The physical phenomena are complex and nonintuitive, and so to help understand the interplay of geometric, material, and environmental stimuli parameters we develop 3D nonlinear finite element models. Finally, we create several 2D and 3D shape changing components that demonstrate the role of key parameters and illustrate the broad application potential of the proposed approach. PMID:27109063

  1. 3D Printed Reversible Shape Changing Components with Stimuli Responsive Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yiqi; Ding, Zhen; Yuan, Chao; Ai, Shigang; Isakov, Michael; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-01-01

    The creation of reversibly-actuating components that alter their shapes in a controllable manner in response to environmental stimuli is a grand challenge in active materials, structures, and robotics. Here we demonstrate a new reversible shape-changing component design concept enabled by 3D printing two stimuli responsive polymers—shape memory polymers and hydrogels—in prescribed 3D architectures. This approach uses the swelling of a hydrogel as the driving force for the shape change, and the temperature-dependent modulus of a shape memory polymer to regulate the time of such shape change. Controlling the temperature and aqueous environment allows switching between two stable configurations – the structures are relatively stiff and can carry load in each – without any mechanical loading and unloading. Specific shape changing scenarios, e.g., based on bending, or twisting in prescribed directions, are enabled via the controlled interplay between the active materials and the 3D printed architectures. The physical phenomena are complex and nonintuitive, and so to help understand the interplay of geometric, material, and environmental stimuli parameters we develop 3D nonlinear finite element models. Finally, we create several 2D and 3D shape changing components that demonstrate the role of key parameters and illustrate the broad application potential of the proposed approach. PMID:27109063

  2. 3D Printed Reversible Shape Changing Components with Stimuli Responsive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yiqi; Ding, Zhen; Yuan, Chao; Ai, Shigang; Isakov, Michael; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-04-01

    The creation of reversibly-actuating components that alter their shapes in a controllable manner in response to environmental stimuli is a grand challenge in active materials, structures, and robotics. Here we demonstrate a new reversible shape-changing component design concept enabled by 3D printing two stimuli responsive polymers—shape memory polymers and hydrogels—in prescribed 3D architectures. This approach uses the swelling of a hydrogel as the driving force for the shape change, and the temperature-dependent modulus of a shape memory polymer to regulate the time of such shape change. Controlling the temperature and aqueous environment allows switching between two stable configurations – the structures are relatively stiff and can carry load in each – without any mechanical loading and unloading. Specific shape changing scenarios, e.g., based on bending, or twisting in prescribed directions, are enabled via the controlled interplay between the active materials and the 3D printed architectures. The physical phenomena are complex and nonintuitive, and so to help understand the interplay of geometric, material, and environmental stimuli parameters we develop 3D nonlinear finite element models. Finally, we create several 2D and 3D shape changing components that demonstrate the role of key parameters and illustrate the broad application potential of the proposed approach.

  3. CurveP Method for Rendering High-Throughput Screening Dose-Response Data into Digital Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Sedykh, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The nature of high-throughput screening (HTS) puts certain limits on optimal test conditions for each particular sample, therefore, on top of usual data normalization, additional parsing is often needed to account for incomplete read outs or various artifacts that arise from signal interferences.CurveP is a heuristic, user-tunable, curve-cleaning algorithm that attempts to find a minimum set of corrections, which would give a monotonic dose-response curve. After applying the corrections, the algorithm proceeds to calculate a set of numeric features, which can be used as a fingerprint characterizing the sample, or as a vector of independent variables (e.g., molecular descriptors in case of chemical substances testing). The resulting output can be a part of HTS data analysis or can be used as input for a broad spectrum of computational applications, such as Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) modeling, computational toxicology, bio- and cheminformatics. PMID:27518631

  4. BY HOW MUCH DO SHAPES OF TOXICOLOGICAL DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS VARY? (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints showed that the shapes of the dose-response relationships were surprisingly homogenous. The datasets were selected on the sole criterion that they were expected to provide relatively good in...

  5. Frequency response functions of shape features from full-field vibration measurements using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weizhuo; Mottershead, John E.; Siebert, Thorsten; Pipino, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    The availability of high speed digital cameras has enabled three-dimensional (3D) vibration measurement by stereography and digital image correlation (DIC). The 3D DIC technique provides non-contact full-field measurements on complex surfaces whereas conventional modal testing methods employ point-wise frequency response functions. It is proposed to identify the modal properties by utilising the domain-wise responses captured by a DIC system. This idea will be illustrated by a case study in the form a car bonnet of 3D irregular shape typical of many engineering structures. The full-field measured data are highly redundant, but the application of image processing using functional transformation enables the extraction of a small number of shape features without any significant loss of information from the raw DIC data. The complex bonnet surface on which the displacement responses are measured is essentially a 2-manifold. It is possible to apply surface parameterisation to 'flatten' the 3D surface to form a 2D planar domain. Well-developed image processing techniques are defined on planar domains and used to extract features from the displacement patterns on the surface of a specimen. An adaptive geometric moment descriptor (AGMD), defined on surface parametric space, is able to extract shape features from a series of full-field transient responses under random excitation. Results show the effectiveness of the AGMD and the obtained shape features are demonstrated to be succinct and efficient. Approximately 14 thousand data points of raw DIC measurement are represented by 20 shape feature terms at each time step. Shape-descriptor frequency response functions (SD-FRFs) of the response field and the loading field are derived in the shape feature space. It is seen that the SD-FRF has a similar format to the conventional receptance FRF. The usual modal identification procedure is applied to determine the natural frequencies, damping factors and eigen-shape-feature vectors

  6. Plant Photosynthesis-Irradiance Curve Responses to Pollution Show Non-Competitive Inhibited Michaelis Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Maozi; Wang, Zhiwei; He, Lingchao; Xu, Kang; Cheng, Dongliang; Wang, Genxuan

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis-irradiance (PI) curves are extensively used in field and laboratory research to evaluate the photon-use efficiency of plants. However, most existing models for PI curves focus on the relationship between the photosynthetic rate (Pn) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and do not take account of the influence of environmental factors on the curve. In the present study, we used a new non-competitive inhibited Michaelis-Menten model (NIMM) to predict the co-variation of Pn, PAR, and the relative pollution index (I). We then evaluated the model with published data and our own experimental data. The results indicate that the Pn of plants decreased with increasing I in the environment and, as predicted, were all fitted well by the NIMM model. Therefore, our model provides a robust basis to evaluate and understand the influence of environmental pollution on plant photosynthesis. PMID:26561863

  7. Large-Scale, Complex Shaped Coastline Responses to Different Forms of Local Shoreline Stabilization and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ells, K.; Murray, A. B.; Slott, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Nowhere is the importance of research addressing the dynamics of coupled human-landscape processes more pronounced than on the world’s coasts, where human shoreline stabilization alters the natural evolution of the coastline on large spatial and temporal scales. Slott et al. (2010) extended a recently developed large-scale coastline evolution model to include the effects of beach ‘nourishment’ (importing sand into the nearshore system at a long term rate sufficient to counteract shoreline erosion) on a complex-shaped coastline, finding a surprising human signal over large (100s km) distances (Figure 1); even localized shoreline stabilization efforts, when maintained over decadal time scales, can significantly affect the regional pattern of coastline morphological adjustment in response to changing storm behaviors (Slott, et al., 2010). In this work, we examine the effects of shoreline-stabilization method that involve hard structures, such as sea walls and groyne fields. These methods differ significantly from beach nourishment in terms of large-scale impacts; they hold the shoreline location fixed without adding a flux of sediment into the system. Like beach nourishment, these human manipulations have widespread, significant effects on shoreline change rates, even when the manipulations only occur locally. However, the effects on large-scale coastline morphodynamics also exhibit interesting differences when compared to the beach nourishment case. References Slott, Jordan, A. B. Murray, Andrew Ashton, 2010. Large-Scale Responses of Complex-Shaped Coastlines to Local Shoreline Stabilization and Climate Change, Journal of Geophysical Research—Earth Surface. Figure 1. Evolution of a cuspate-cape shoreline in response to ongoing beach nourishment over 200 years, for six different site selections. a. Initial model shoreline, developed in response to a wave climate approximating recent conditions off of the Carolina coast, USA. b. The influence that beach

  8. Fast Response Shape Memory Effect Titanium Nickel (TiNi) Foam Torque Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Shape Change Technologies has developed a process to manufacture net-shaped TiNi foam torque tubes that demonstrate the shape memory effect. The torque tubes dramatically reduce response time by a factor of 10. This Phase II project matured the actuator technology by rigorously characterizing the process to optimize the quality of the TiNi and developing a set of metrics to provide ISO 9002 quality assurance. A laboratory virtual instrument engineering workbench (LabVIEW'TM')-based, real-time control of the torsional actuators was developed. These actuators were developed with The Boeing Company for aerospace applications.

  9. Birefringence imaging and orientation of laser patterned β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals with bending and curved shapes in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuki; Honma, Tsuyoshi; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2013-11-15

    Nonlinear optical β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals (β-BBO) with bending and curved shapes were patterned at the surface of 8Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}–42BaO–50B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass by laser irradiations (Yb:YVO{sub 4} laser with a wavelength of 1080 nm, power of 0.8 W, and scanning speed of 4 μm/s), and the orientation state of β-BBO crystals was examined from the birefringence imaging obtained by polarization optical microscope (POM) observations. The formation (crystallization) of β-BBO crystals follows along laser scanning direction even if the laser scanning direction changes at a certain point within the bending angle of 60°. The birefringence images indicate that the formation of highly c-axis oriented β-BBO crystals follows along laser scanning direction even if the laser scanning direction changes, and in particular the direction of the c-axis of β-BBO crystals changes gradually at the bending point. The model for the orientation of the c-axis of β-BBO near the bending point is proposed. The present study proposes that the laser-induced crystallization opens a new door for the science and technology in crystal growth engineering. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the birefringence images obtained by the Abrio IM imaging system (λ=546 nm) for the laser-patterned β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystal line with the bending angle of 45° in the glass. The relation between the direction of slow axis and color is also shown. It is demonstrated that the formation (crystallization) of highly c-axis oriented β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals follows along laser scanning direction even if the laser scanning direction changes. Display Omitted - Highlights: • β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals with bending and curved shapes were patterned by laser irradiations. • The orientation was examined from the birefringence imaging. • Highly c-axis oriented crystals follows along laser scanning direction. • The c-axis direction changes gradually at the bending point. • The

  10. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Light Curves from a Lorentz-boosted Simulation Frame and the Shape of the Jet Break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The early stages of decelerating gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow jets have been notoriously difficult to resolve numerically using two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations even at very high resolution, due to the extreme thinness of the blast wave and high outflow Lorentz factors. However, these resolution issues can be avoided by performing the simulations in a boosted frame, which makes it possible to calculate afterglow light curves from numerically computed flows in sufficient detail to accurately quantify the shape of the jet break and the post-break steepening of the light curve. Here, we study afterglow jet breaks for jets with opening angles of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 radians decelerating in a surrounding medium of constant density, observed at various angles ranging from on-axis to the edge of the jet. A single set of scale-invariant functions describing the time evolution of afterglow synchrotron spectral break frequencies and peak flux, depending only on jet opening angle and observer angle, are all that is needed to reconstruct light curves for arbitrary explosion energy, circumburst density and synchrotron particle distribution power law slope p. These functions are presented in the paper. Their time evolutions change directly following the jet break, although an earlier reported temporary post-break steepening of the cooling break is found to have been resolution-induced. We compare synthetic light curves to fit functions using sharp power law breaks as well as smooth power law transitions. We confirm our earlier finding that the measured jet break time is very sensitive to the angle of the observer and can be postponed significantly. We find that the difference in temporal indices across the jet break is larger than theoretically anticipated and is about -(0.5 + 0.5p) below the cooling break and about -(0.25 + 0.5p) above the cooling break, both leading to post-break slopes of roughly about 0.25 - 1.3p, although different observer angles, jet opening