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Sample records for response genes induced

  1. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  2. Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

    1996-10-01

    In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

  3. Early antiviral response and virus-induced genes in fish.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Eloi R; Langevin, Christelle; Benmansour, Abdenour; Boudinot, Pierre

    2011-12-01

    In fish as in mammals, virus infections induce changes in the expression of many host genes. Studies conducted during the last fifteen years revealed a major contribution of the interferon system in fish antiviral response. This review describes the screening methods applied to compare the impact of virus infections on the transcriptome in different fish species. These approaches identified a "core" set of genes that are strongly induced in most viral infections. The "core" interferon-induced genes (ISGs) are generally conserved in vertebrates, some of them inhibiting a wide range of viruses in mammals. A selection of ISGs -PKR, vig-1/viperin, Mx, ISG15 and finTRIMs - is further analyzed here to illustrate the diversity and complexity of the mechanisms involved in establishing an antiviral state. Most of the ISG-based pathways remain to be directly determined in fish. Fish ISGs are often duplicated and the functional specialization of multigenic families will be of particular interest for future studies. PMID:21414349

  4. Relationship between gene responses and symptoms induced by Rice grassy stunt virus

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Kouji; Yoneyama, Kaori; Kondoh, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Takumi; Sasaya, Takahide; Choi, Il-Ryong; Yoneyama, Koichi; Omura, Toshihiro; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2013-01-01

    Rice grassy stunt virus (RGSV) is a serious threat to rice production in Southeast Asia. RGSV is a member of the genus Tenuivirus, and it induces leaf yellowing, stunting, and excess tillering on rice plants. Here we examined gene responses of rice to RGSV infection to gain insight into the gene responses which might be associated with the disease symptoms. The results indicated that (1) many genes related to cell wall synthesis and chlorophyll synthesis were predominantly suppressed by RGSV infection; (2) RGSV infection induced genes associated with tillering process; (3) RGSV activated genes involved in inactivation of gibberellic acid and indole-3-acetic acid; and (4) the genes for strigolactone signaling were suppressed by RGSV. These results suggest that these gene responses to RGSV infection account for the excess tillering specific to RGSV infection as well as other symptoms by RGSV, such as stunting and leaf chlorosis. PMID:24151491

  5. Dual-responsive aggregation-induced emission-active supramolecular nanoparticles for gene delivery and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruijiao; Ravinathan, Screenath P; Xue, Lizhe; Li, Nan; Zhang, Yingjian; Zhou, Linzhu; Cao, Chengxi; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2016-06-28

    Dual-responsive aggregation-induced emission-active supramolecular fluorescent nanoparticles are reported, which have the ability to undergo a unique morphological transition combining with a cooperative optical variation in response to pH and light stimuli. The dynamic supramolecular nanoparticles show excellent biocompatibility and effective plasmid DNA condensation capability, further achieving efficient in vitro gene delivery and bioimaging. PMID:27251637

  6. Analysis of Stress Responsive Genes Induced by Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in BJ Foreskin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Shubhashish; Sharma, Chidananda; Yog, Rajeshwari; Periakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Jejelowo, Olufisayo; Thomas, Renard; Barrera, Enrique V.; Rice-Ficht, Allison C.; Wilson, Bobby L.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is finding its use as a potential technology in consumer products, defense, electronics, and medical applications by exploiting the properties of nanomaterials. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are novel forms of these nanomaterials with potential for large applications. However, the toxicity studies on this material are not explored in detail and therefore limiting its use. It has been earlier reported that single-walled carbon nanotubes induces oxidative stress and also dictates activation of specific signaling pathway in keratinocytes. The present study explores the effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on stress genes in human BJ Foreskin cells. The results show induction of oxidative stress in BJ Foreskin cells by single-walled carbon nanotubes and increase in stress responsive genes. The genes included inducible genes like HMOX1, HMOX2, and Cyp1B1. In addition we validated increase for four genes by SWCNT, namely ATM, CCNC, DNAJB4, and GADD45A by RT-PCR. Moreover results of the altered stress related genes have been discussed and that partially explains some of the toxic responses induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:17450800

  7. DNA vaccination using expression vectors carrying FIV structural genes induces immune response against feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Cuisinier, A M; Mallet, V; Meyer, A; Caldora, C; Aubert, A

    1997-07-01

    Following inactivated virus vaccination trials, the surface glycoprotein gp120 of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was considered as one of the determinants for protection. However, several vaccination trials using recombinant Env protein or some peptides failed to induce protection. To understand the role of the gp120 protein in vivo, we vaccinated cats with naked DNA coding for FIV structural proteins gp120 and p10. We analyzed the ability of these vaccinations to induce immune protection and to influence the onset of infection. Injection in cat muscles of expression vectors coding for the FIV gp120 protein induced a humoral response. Cats immunized twice with the gp120 gene showed different patterns after challenge. Two cats were, like the control cats, infected from the second week after infection onwards. The two others maintained a low proviral load with no modification of their antibody pattern. The immune response induced by gp120 DNA injection could control the level of viral replication. This protective-like immune response was not correlated to the humoral response. All the cats immunized with the gp120 gene followed by the p10 gene were infected, like the control cats, from the second week but they developed a complete humoral response against viral proteins after challenge. Furthermore, they showed a sudden but transient drop of the proviral load at 4 weeks after infection. Under these conditions, one injection of the p10 gene after one injection of the gp120 gene was not sufficient to stimulate protection. On the contrary, after a period, it seems to facilitate virus replication. PMID:9269051

  8. Tamoxifen Induces Expression of Immune Response-Related Genes in Cultured Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schild-Hay, Laura J.; Leil, Tarek A.; Divi, Rao L.; Olivero, Ofelia, A.; Weston, Ainsley; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2008-01-01

    Use of tamoxifen (TAM) is associated with a 50% reduction in breast cancer incidence and an increase in endometrial cancer incidence. Here, we documented TAM-induced gene expression changes in cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells (NHMEC strains numbered 5, 16 and 40), established from tissue taken at reduction mammoplasty from 3 individuals. Cells exposed to 0, 10 or 50 μM TAM for 48 hours were evaluated for (E)-α-(deoxyguanosin-N2-yl)-tamoxifen (dG-N2-TAM) adduct formation by TAM-DNA (DNA modified with dG-N2-TAM) chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA), gene expression changes using NCI DNA-oligonucleotide microarray, and real time (RT)-PCR. At 48 hr, cells exposed to 10 μM and 50 μM TAM were 85.6% and 48.4% viable, respectively, and there were no measurable dG-N2-TAM adducts. For microarray, cells were exposed to 10 μM TAM and genes with expression changes of ≥ 3-fold were as follows: thirteen genes up-regulated and one down-related for strain 16; seventeen genes up-regulated for strain 5; and eleven genes up-regulated for strain 40. Interferon-inducible genes (IFITM1, IFIT1, IFNA1, MXI and GIP3), and a potassium ion channel (KCNJ1) were up-regulated in all 3 strains. No significant expression changes were found for genes related to estrogen or xenobiotic metabolism. RT-PCR revealed up-regulation of interferon α (IFNA1) and confirmed the TAM-induced up-regulation of the genes identified by microarray, with the exception of GIP3 and MX1, which were not up-regulated in strain 40. Induction of interferon-related genes in the three NHMEC strains suggests that, in addition to hormonal effects, TAM exposure may enhance immune response in normal breast tissue. PMID:19155303

  9. Prospective Study of Metal Fume-Induced Responses of Global Gene Expression Profiling in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoxi; Neuberg, Donna; Su, Li; Kim, Jee Young; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Christiani, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Metal particulate inhalation causes pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Our previous results showed that systemic responses to short-term occupational welding-fume exposure could be assessed by microarray analyses in whole-blood total RNA sampled before and after exposure. To expand our understanding of the duration of particulate-induced gene expression changes, we conducted a study using a similar population 1 yr after the original study and extended our observations in the postexposure period. We recruited 15 individuals with welding fume exposure and 7 nonexposed individuals. Thirteen of the 22 individuals (9 in exposed group and 4 in nonexposed group) had been monitored in the previous study. Whole-blood total RNA was analyzed at 3 time points, including baseline, immediately following exposure (approximately 5 h after baseline), and 24 h after baseline, using cDNA microarray technology. We replicated the patterns of Gene Ontology (GO) terms associated with response to stimulus, cell death, phosphorus metabolism, localization, and regulation of biological processes significantly enriched with altered genes in the nonsmoking exposed group. Most of the identified genes had opposite expression changes between the exposure and postexposure periods in nonsmoking welders. In addition, we found dose-dependent patterns that were affected by smoking status. In conclusion, short-term occupational exposure to metal particulates causes systemic responses in the peripheral blood. Furthermore, the acute particulate-induced effects on gene expression profiling were transient in nonsmoking welders, with most effects diminishing within 19 h following exposure. PMID:18951227

  10. Regulatory elements responsible for inducible expression of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, M; Nagata, S

    1990-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an essential role in granulopoiesis during bacterial infection. Macrophages produce G-CSF in response to bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To elucidate the mechanism of the induction of G-CSF gene in macrophages or macrophage-monocytes, we have examined regulatory cis elements in the promoter of mouse G-CSF gene. Analyses of linker-scanning and internal deletion mutants of the G-CSF promoter by the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay have indicated that at least three regulatory elements are indispensable for the LPS-induced expression of the G-CSF gene in macrophages. When one of the three elements was reiterated and placed upstream of the TATA box of the G-CSF promoter, it mediated inducibility as a tissue-specific and orientation-independent enhancer. Although this element contains a conserved NF-kappa B-like binding site, the gel retardation assay and DNA footprint analysis with nuclear extracts from macrophage cell lines demonstrated that nuclear proteins bind to the DNA sequence downstream of the NF-kappa B-like element, but not to the conserved element itself. The DNA sequence of the binding site was found to have some similarities to the LPS-responsive element which was recently identified in the promoter of the mouse class II major histocompatibility gene. Images PMID:1691438

  11. An Arabidopsis ATPase gene involved in nematode-induced syncytium development and abiotic stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad Amjad; Plattner, Stephan; Radakovic, Zoran; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Elashry, Abdelnaser; Grundler, Florian MW; Ammelburg, Moritz; Siddique, Shahid; Bohlmann, Holger

    2013-01-01

    The beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii induces syncytia in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana, which are its only nutrient source. One gene, At1g64110, that is strongly up-regulated in syncytia as shown by RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, in situ RT-PCR and promoter::GUS lines, encodes an AAA+-type ATPase. Expression of two related genes in syncytia, At4g28000 and At5g52882, was not detected or not different from control root segments. Using amiRNA lines and T-DNA mutants, we show that At1g64110 is important for syncytium and nematode development. At1g64110 was also inducible by wounding, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, heat and cold, as well as drought, sodium chloride, abscisic acid and mannitol, indicating involvement of this gene in abiotic stress responses. We confirmed this using two T-DNA mutants that were more sensitive to abscisic acid and sodium chloride during seed germination and root growth. These mutants also developed significantly smaller roots in response to abscisic acid and sodium chloride. An in silico analysis showed that ATPase At1g64110 (and also At4g28000 and At5g52882) belong to the ‘meiotic clade’ of AAA proteins that includes proteins such as Vps4, katanin, spastin and MSP1. PMID:23480402

  12. Hypoxia-induced protein binding to O2-responsive sequences on the tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Norris, M L; Millhorn, D E

    1995-10-01

    We reported recently that the gene that encodes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of catecholamines, is regulated by hypoxia in the dopaminergic cells of the mammalian carotid body (Czyzyk-Krzeska, M. F., Bayliss, D. A., Lawson, E. E. & Millhorn, D. E. (1992) J. Neurochem. 58, 1538-1546) and in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells (Czyzyk-Krzeska, M. F., Furnari, B. A., Lawson, E. E. & Millhorn, D. E. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 760-764). Regulation of this gene during low O2 conditions occurs at both the level of transcription and RNA stability. Increased transcription during hypoxia is regulated by a region of the proximal promoter that extends from -284 to + 27 bases, relative to transcription start site. The present study was undertaken to further characterize the sequences that confer O2 responsiveness of the TH gene and to identify hypoxia-induced protein interactions with these sequences. Results from chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays identified a region between bases -284 and -150 that contains the essential sequences for O2 regulation. This region contains a number of regulatory elements including AP1, AP2, and HIF-1. Gel shift assays revealed enhanced protein interactions at the AP1 and HIF-1 elements of the native gene. Further investigations using supershift and shift-Western analysis showed that c-Fos and JunB bind to the AP1 element during hypoxia and that these protein levels are stimulated by hypoxia. Mutation of the AP1 sequence prevented stimulation of transcription of the TH-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene by hypoxia. PMID:7559551

  13. Identification of rapidly induced genes in the response of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) to water deficit and abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is an important crop, but droughts often affect peanut production. There is a lack of genomic information available for peanut; therefore, little is known about the molecular basis of its drought stress response. Results Previously, we found that peanut stomata close rapidly during water deficit and in response to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment, and many genes show changes in their expression levels. To screen for candidate genes involved in the water deficit response, we used the Illumina HiSeq2000/MiSeq sequencing platform to conduct a global transcriptome analysis of peanut seedlings under water deficit with or without an ABA pretreatment. Three peanut tissues (leaves, roots, and stems) collected at each of three developmental stages (four-leaf, flowering, and podding stages) were used to construct sequence libraries. Then, 4.96 × 107 raw sequence reads were generated and the high quality reads were assembled into 47,842 unigenes. We analyzed these sequence libraries to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) under water deficit with or without ABA pretreatment. In total, 621 genes were induced rapidly (≥1.5 fold change compared with control) under water deficit, 2,665 genes were induced rapidly under water deficit + ABA pretreatment, and 279 genes overlapped between water deficit and water deficit + ABA pretreatment. Of the 279 overlapping genes, 264 showed the same expression pattern and 15 showed opposite expression patterns. Among the DEGs, 257 were highly induced (>5 fold) by water deficit + ABA pretreatment, while 19 were highly induced (>5 fold) by water deficit alone. The genes induced under water deficit + ABA pretreatment included 100 putative transcription factor (TF) genes, while those induced under water deficit alone included only 22 putative TF genes. To validate the transcriptome results, we conducted quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses to quantify the transcript levels of nine

  14. Dexamethasone-induced expression of the glucocorticoid response gene lipocalin 2 in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Owen, H C; Roberts, S J; Ahmed, S F; Farquharson, C

    2008-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are commonly used anti-inflammatory drugs, but long-term use can result in marked growth retardation in children due to their actions on growth plate chondrocytes. To gain an insight into the mechanisms involved in GC-induced growth retardation, we performed Affymetrix microarray analysis of the murine chondrogenic cell line ATDC5, incubated with 10(-6) M dexamethasone (Dex) for 24 h. Downregulated genes included secreted frizzled-related protein and IGF-I, and upregulated genes included serum/GC-regulated kinase, connective-tissue growth factor, and lipocalin 2. Lipocalin 2 expression increased 40-fold after 24-h Dex treatment. Expression increased further after 48-h (75-fold) and 96-h (84-fold) Dex treatment, and this response was Dex concentration dependent. Lipocalin 2 was immunolocalized to both proliferating and hypertrophic growth plate zones, and its expression was increased by Dex in primary chondrocytes at 6 h (3-fold, P < 0.05). The lipocalin 2 response was blocked by the GC-receptor antagonist RU-486 and was increased further by the protein synthesis blocker cycloheximide. Proliferation in lipocalin 2-overexpressing cells was less than in control cells (49%, P < 0.05), and overexpression caused an increase in collagen type X expression (4-fold, P < 0.05). The effects of lipocalin 2 overexpression on chondrocyte proliferation (64%, P < 0.05) and collagen type X expression (8-fold, P < 0.05) were further exacerbated with the addition of 10(-6) M Dex. This synergistic effect may be explained by a further increase in lipocalin 2 expression with Dex treatment of transfected cells (45%, P < 0.05). These results suggest that lipocalin 2 may mediate Dex effects on chondrocytes and provides a potential novel mechanism for GC-induced growth retardation. PMID:18381927

  15. Functional characterization of blue-light-induced responses and PHOTOTROPIN 1 gene in Welwitschia mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Ishishita, Kazuhiro; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Hirose, Yuki; Higa, Takeshi; Doi, Michio; Wada, Masamitsu; Matsushita, Tomonao; Gotoh, Eiji

    2016-03-01

    The blue light (BL) receptor phototropin (phot) is specifically found in green plants; it regulates various BL-induced responses such as phototropism, chloroplast movement, stomatal opening, and leaf flattening. In Arabidopsis thaliana, two phototropins--phot1 and phot2--respond to blue light in overlapping but distinct ways. These BL-receptor-mediated responses enhance the photosynthetic activity of plants under weak light and minimize photodamage under strong light conditions. Welwitschia mirabilis Hook.f. found in the Namib Desert, and it has adapted to severe environmental stresses such as limiting water and strong sunlight. Although the plant has physiologically and ecologically unique features, it is unknown whether phototropin is functional in this plant. In this study, we assessed the functioning of phot-mediated BL responses in W. mirabilis. BL-dependent phototropism and stomatal opening was observed but light-dependent chloroplast movement was not detected. We performed a functional analysis of the PHOT1 gene of W. mirabilis, WmPHOT1, in Arabidopsis thaliana. We generated transgenic A. thaliana lines expressing WmPHOT1 in a phot1 phot2 double mutant background. Several Wmphot1 transgenic plants showed normal growth, although phot1 phot2 double mutant plants showed stunted growth. Furthermore, Wmphot1 transgenic plants showed normal phot1-mediated responses including phototropism, chloroplast accumulation, stomatal opening, and leaf flattening, but lacked the chloroplast avoidance response that is specifically mediated by phot2. Thus, our findings indicate that W. mirabilis possesses typical phot-mediated BL responses that were at least partially mediated by functional phototropin 1, an ortholog of Atphot1. PMID:26858202

  16. Hypoxia-induced endothelial NO synthase gene transcriptional activation is mediated through the tax-responsive element in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiho; Jin, Yoon-Mi; Moon, Je-Sung; Sung, Min-Sun; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2006-06-01

    Although hypoxia is known to induce upregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) gene expression, the underlying mechanism is largely unclear. In this study, we show that hypoxia increases eNOS gene expression through the binding of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein (pCREB) to the eNOS gene promoter. Hypoxia (1% O2) increased both eNOS expression and NO production, peaking at 24 hours, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, and these increases were accompanied by increases in pCREB. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 or transfection with dominant-negative inhibitor of CREB reversed the hypoxia-induced increases in eNOS expression and NO production, with concomitant inhibition of the phosphorylation of CREB induced by hypoxia, suggesting an involvement of protein kinase A/pCREB-mediated pathway. To map the regulatory elements of the eNOS gene responsible for pCREB binding under hypoxia, we constructed an eNOS gene promoter (-1600 to +22 nucleotides) fused with a luciferase reporter gene [pGL2-eNOS(-1600)]. Hypoxia (for 24-hour incubation) increased the promoter activity by 2.36+/-0.18-fold in the bovine aortic endothelial cells transfected with pGL2-eNOS(-1600). However, progressive 5'-deletion from -1600 to -873 completely attenuated the hypoxia-induced increase in promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift, anti-pCREB antibody supershift, and site-specific mutation analyses showed that pCREB is bound to the Tax-responsive element (TRE) site, a cAMP-responsive element-like site, located at -924 to -921 of the eNOS promoter. Our data demonstrate that the interaction between pCREB and the Tax-responsive element site within the eNOS promoter may represent a novel mechanism for the mediation of hypoxia-stimulated eNOS gene expression. PMID:16651461

  17. Cross-species comparison of genomewide gene expression profiles reveals induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive genes in iron-deprived intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zihua; Gulec, Sukru

    2010-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms mediating the induction of metal ion homeostasis-related genes in the mammalian intestine during iron deficiency remain unknown. To elucidate relevant regulatory pathways, genomewide gene expression profiles were determined in fully differentiated human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. Cells were deprived of iron (or not) for 6 or 18 h, and Gene Chip analyses were subsequently performed (Affymetrix). More than 2,000 genes were differentially expressed; genes related to monosaccharide metabolism, regulation of gene expression, hypoxia, and cell death were upregulated, while those related to mitotic cell cycle were downregulated. A large proportion of induced genes are hypoxia responsive, and promoter enrichment analyses revealed a statistical overrepresentation of hypoxia response elements (HREs). Immunoblot experiments demonstrated a >60-fold increase in HIF2α protein abundance in iron-deprived cells; HIF1α levels were unchanged. Furthermore, comparison of the Caco-2 cell data set with a Gene Chip data set from iron-deficient rat intestine revealed 29 common upregulated genes; the majority are hypoxia responsive, and their promoters are enriched for HREs. We conclude that the compensatory response of the intestinal epithelium to iron deprivation relates to hypoxia and that stabilization of HIF2α may be the primary event mediating metabolic and morphological changes observed during iron deficiency. PMID:20702690

  18. Immunogenic response induced by wzm and wzt gene deletion mutants from Brucella abortus S19.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Ran; Yan, Guang-Mou; Zhang, Rui; Lang, Xu-Long; Yang, Yan-Ling; Li, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Si; Qian, Jing; Wang, Xing-Long

    2014-02-01

    Brucellosis is an infectious disease affecting humans and animals worldwide. Effective methods of control include inducing immunity in animals by vaccination and elimination. Brucella abortus S19 is one of the popular vaccines for control of cattle brucellosis, as it has low virulence. In this paper, allelic exchange plasmids of wzm and wzt genes were constructed and partially knocked out to evaluate the effects on the induction of immunity to Brucella abortus S19 mutants. Cytokine secretion in vitro, INF-γ induction in vivo and antibody dynamics were evaluated. These data suggested that the immunity-eliciting ability of the wzm and wzt gene deletion mutants was similar, although reduced compared with the S19 strain. The results demonstrated that the wzt gene may be more important in the regulation of the induction of immunity than the wzm gene. PMID:24247358

  19. Stress-induced expression of NICOTINE2-locus genes and their homologs encoding Ethylene Response Factor transcription factors in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Tsubasa; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Plants have evolved diverse defense metabolites as adaptations to biotic and abiotic stresses. The defense alkaloid nicotine is produced in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) and its biosynthesis is elicited by jasmonates in the roots. At least seven jasmonate-responsive genes that encode transcription factors of the Ethylene Response Factor (ERF) family are clustered at the nicotine-regulatory locus NICOTINE2 (NIC2) in the tobacco genome. A subset of the NIC2-locus ERFs and their homologs, including ERF189 and ERF199, have been shown to be most effective in controlling nicotine biosynthetic pathway genes. Herein reported is that the ERF genes of this group, other than ERF189 and ERF199, were strongly induced by NaCl in tobacco hairy roots, although salt stress had no effect on expression of nicotine biosynthesis genes. Abscisic acid and osmotic stress also increased expression of a subset of these NaCl-inducible ERF genes. Promoter expression analysis in transgenic tobacco hairy roots confirmed that while methyl jasmonate (MJ) activated the promoters of ERF29, ERF210 and ERF199, salt stress up-regulated the promoters of only ERF29 and ERF210, but not ERF199. The protein biosynthesis inhibitor cycloheximide induced expression of the ERFs, and simultaneous addition of MJ and cycloheximide showed synergistic effects. These results indicate that, after several gene duplication events, the NIC2-locus ERFs and possibly their homologs appear to have diverged in their responses to jasmonates and various environmental inputs, including salt stress, and may have evolved to regulate distinct metabolic processes and cellular responses. PMID:24947337

  20. Biological Characterization of Gene Response to Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Martine; Nanchen, Natacha; Preitner, Frédéric; Ibberson, Mark; Roduit, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the most important metabolic substrate of the retina and maintenance of normoglycemia is an essential challenge for diabetic patients. Chronic, exaggerated, glycemic excursions could lead to cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. We recently showed that hypoglycemia induced retinal cell death in mouse via caspase 3 activation and glutathione (GSH) decrease. Ex vivo experiments in 661W photoreceptor cells confirmed the low-glucose induction of death via superoxide production and activation of caspase 3, which was concomitant with a decrease of GSH content. We evaluate herein retinal gene expression 4 h and 48 h after insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Microarray analysis demonstrated clusters of genes whose expression was modified by hypoglycemia and we discuss the potential implication of those genes in retinal cell death. In addition, we identify by gene set enrichment analysis, three important pathways, including lysosomal function, GSH metabolism and apoptotic pathways. Then we tested the effect of recurrent hypoglycemia (three successive 4h periods of hypoglycemia spaced by 48 h recovery) on retinal cell death. Interestingly, exposure to multiple hypoglycemic events prevented GSH decrease and retinal cell death, or adapted the retina to external stress by restoring GSH level comparable to control situation. We hypothesize that scavenger GSH is a key compound in this apoptotic process, and maintaining “normal” GSH level, as well as a strict glycemic control, represents a therapeutic challenge in order to avoid side effects of diabetes, especially diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26918849

  1. Heterografting with nonself rootstocks induces genes involved in stress responses at the graft interface when compared with autografted controls

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Although grafting is widely used in the agriculture of fruit-bearing crops, little is known about graft union formation in particular when two different species are grafted together. It is fascinating that two different plant species brought together can develop harmoniously as one organism for many decades. The objective of this study was to determine whether grafting two different grapevine genotypes alters gene expression at the graft interface in comparison to the presumably wound-like gene expression changes induced in autografts. Gene expression at the graft interface was studied 3, 7, 14, and 28 d after grafting in hetero- and autografts of grapevine (Vitis spp.). Genes differentially expressed between the hetero- and autografts during graft union formation were identified. These genes were clustered according to their expression profile over the time course. MapMan and Gene Ontology enrichment analysis revealed the coordinated upregulation of genes from numerous functional categories related to stress responses in the hetero- compared to the autografts. This indicates that heterografting with nonself rootstocks upregulates stress responses at the graft interface, potentially suggesting that the cells of the graft interface can detect the presence of a nonself grafting partner. PMID:24692649

  2. Adaptive Response of a Gene Network to Environmental Changes by Fitness-Induced Attractor Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Akiko; Urabe, Itaru; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2006-01-01

    Cells switch between various stable genetic programs (attractors) to accommodate environmental conditions. Signal transduction machineries efficiently convey environmental changes to the gene regulation apparatus in order to express the appropriate genetic program. However, since the number of environmental conditions is much larger than that of available genetic programs so that the cell may utilize the same genetic program for a large set of conditions, it may not have evolved a signaling pathway for every environmental condition, notably those that are rarely encountered. Here we show that in the absence of signal transduction, switching to the appropriate attractor state expressing the genes that afford adaptation to the external condition can occur. In a synthetic bistable gene switch in Escherichia coli in which mutually inhibitory operons govern the expression of two genes required in two alternative nutritional environments, cells reliably selected the “adaptive attractor” driven by gene expression noise. A mathematical model suggests that the “non-adaptive attractor” is avoided because in unfavorable conditions, cellular activity is lower, which suppresses mRNA metabolism, leading to larger fluctuations in gene expression. This, in turn, renders the non-adaptive state less stable. Although attractor selection is not as efficient as signal transduction via a dedicated cascade, it is simple and robust, and may represent a primordial mechanism for adaptive responses that preceded the evolution of signaling cascades for the frequently encountered environmental changes. PMID:17183678

  3. Sequence elements in the human osteocalcin gene confer basal activation and inducible response to hormonal vitamin D sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kerner, S.A.; Scott, R.A.; Pike, J.W. )

    1989-06-01

    Osteoblast-specific expression of the bone protein osteocalcin is controlled at the transcriptional level by the steroid hormone 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. As this protein may represent a marker for bone activity in human disease, the authors examined the regulation of its expression at the molecular level by evaluating human osteocalcin gene promoter function. They describe regions within the promoter that contribute to basal expression of the gene in osteoblast-like cells in culture. Further, they define a 21-base-pair DNA element with the sequence 5{prime}-GTGACTCACCGGGTGAACGGG-3{prime}, which acts in cis to mediate 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} inducibility of the osteocalcin gene. This response element bears sequence similarity with other short DNA segments, particularly those for estrogen and thyroid hormone, which act together with their respective trans-acting receptors to modulate gene transcription.

  4. Marek's Disease Virus-Induced Immunosuppression: Array Analysis of Chicken Immune Response Gene Expression Profiling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens induced by a highly cell-associated oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latency infection within CD4+ T cells. Host-virus interaction, immune responses to...

  5. Two genes with similarity to bacterial response regulators are rapidly and specifically induced by cytokinin in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandstatter, I.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Cytokinins are central regulators of plant growth and development, but little is known about their mode of action. By using differential display, we identified a gene, IBC6 (for induced by cytokinin), from etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings, that is induced rapidly by cytokinin. The steady state level of IBC6 mRNA was elevated within 10 min by the exogenous application of cytokinin, and this induction did not require de novo protein synthesis. IBC6 was not induced by other plant hormones or by light. A second Arabidopsis gene with a sequence highly similar to IBC6 was identified. This IBC7 gene also was induced by cytokinin, although with somewhat slower kinetics and to a lesser extent. The pattern of expression of the two genes was similar, with higher expression in leaves, rachises, and flowers and lower transcript levels in roots and siliques. Sequence analysis revealed that IBC6 and IBC7 are similar to the receiver domain of bacterial two-component response regulators. This homology, coupled with previously published work on the CKI1 histidine kinase homolog, suggests that these proteins may play a role in early cytokinin signaling.

  6. Insulin signaling genes modulate nicotine-induced behavioral responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wescott, Seth A; Ronan, Elizabeth A; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2016-02-01

    Insulin signaling has been suggested to modulate nicotine dependence, but the underlying genetic evidence has been lacking. Here, we used the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, to investigate whether genetic alterations in the insulin signaling pathway affect behavioral responses to nicotine. For this, we challenged drug-naive C. elegans with an acute dose of nicotine (100 μmol/l) while recording changes in their locomotion speed. Although nicotine treatment stimulated locomotion speed in wild-type C. elegans, the same treatment reduced locomotion speed in mutants defective in insulin signaling. This phenotype could be suppressed by mutations in daf-16, a gene encoding a FOXO transcription factor that acts downstream of insulin signaling. Our data suggest that insulin signaling genes, daf-2, age-1, pdk-1, akt-1, and akt-2, modulate behavioral responses to nicotine in C. elegans, indicating a genetic link between nicotine behavior and insulin signaling. PMID:26317299

  7. Coregulation of host-response genes in integument: switchover of gene expression correlation pattern and impaired immune responses induced by dipteran parasite infection in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Anitha; Pradeep, Appukuttan Nair R; Awasthi, Arvind K; Murthy, Geetha N; Ponnuvel, Kangayam M; Sasibhushan, Sirigineedi; Rao, Guruprasad C

    2014-05-01

    The activation of host response proteins against parasitic infection is dependent on the coregulation of immune gene expression. The infection of commercially important silkworm Bombyx mori through endoparasite Exorista bombycis enhanced host-response gene expression in integument early in the infection and was lowered asymptotically. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed heterogeneity while explaining ∼80 % variance among expression timings. PCA showed positive and negative correlation with gene expression and differentiated transcriptional timings, and revealed cross talk within the immune system. Pearson correlation analysis showed significant linear correlation (mean R (2) = >0.7; P < 0.004) between the expression of 16 pairs of genes in control, while the relation switched over to curvilinear due to parasitism. The genes showed pleiotropic interaction among them, with four genes each for prophenoloxidase activating enzyme (PPAE) and caspase. Besides, after parasitism, exclusive correlation of five gene pairs including PPAE-Spatzle pair (R (2) = 0.9; P < 0.011) was observed in the integument. In integument, the phenol oxidase (PO) activity showed a positive correlation with the tyrosine level (R (2) = 0.410; P < 0.002) and a curvilinear relation (R (2) = 0.745; P < 0.0002) with the expanding lysis area. The PO activity was positively correlated with BmToll expression and negatively correlated with paralytical peptide expression, revealing polygenic influence. Caspase expression was tightly regulated by signal genes in control integument, whereas they were deregulated after infection. Switchover from linear to curvilinear correlation and the appearance of new gene correlations in parasitized integument revealed deviation from gene coregulation, leading to impaired immune responses, characterized by lowered gene expression and varied phenotypic consequences. PMID:24310719

  8. A Nutrigenomic Framework to Identify Time-Resolving Responses of Hepatic Genes in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Hyoung-Sam; Kim, Eunjung; Jeon, Seon-Min; Kwon, Eun-Young; Shin, Su-Kyung; Paik, Hyojung; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and its related complications have emerged as global health problems; however, the pathophysiological mechanism of obesity is still not fully understood. In this study, C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal (ND) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 20, and 24 weeks and the time course was systemically analyzed specifically for the hepatic transcriptome profile. Genes that were differentially expressed in the HFD-fed mice were clustered into 49 clusters and further classified into 8 different expression patterns: long-term up-regulated (pattern 1), long-term down-regulated (pattern 2), early up-regulated (pattern 3), early down-regulated (pattern 4), late up-regulated (pattern 5), late down-regulated (pattern 6), early up-regulated and late down-regulated (pattern 7), and early down-regulated and late up-regulated (pattern 8) HFD-responsive genes. Within each pattern, genes related with inflammation, insulin resistance, and lipid metabolism were extracted, and then, a protein-protein interaction network was generated. The pattern specific sub-network was as follows: pattern 1, cellular assembly and organization, and immunological disease, pattern 2, lipid metabolism, pattern 3, gene expression and inflammatory response, pattern 4, cell signaling, pattern 5, lipid metabolism, molecular transport, and small molecule biochemistry, pattern 6, protein synthesis and cell-to cell signaling and interaction and pattern 7, cell-to cell signaling, cellular growth and proliferation, and cell death. For pattern 8, no significant sub-networks were identified. Taken together, this suggests that genes involved in regulating gene expression and inflammatory response are up-regulated whereas genes involved in lipid metabolism and protein synthesis are down-regulated during diet-induced obesity development. PMID:23813319

  9. Use of Hydroxyapatite Doping to Enhance Responsiveness of Heat-Inducible Gene Switches to Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fabiilli, Mario L; Phanse, Rahul A; Moncion, Alexander; Fowlkes, J Brian; Franceschi, Renny T

    2016-03-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that ultrasound-based hyperthermia can activate cells containing a heat-activated and ligand-inducible gene switch in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. These engineered cells can be incorporated into hydrogel scaffolds (e.g., fibrin) for in vivo implantation, where ultrasound can be used to non-invasively pattern transgene expression. Due to their high water content, the acoustic attenuation of fibrin scaffolds is low. Thus, long ultrasound exposures and high acoustic intensities are needed to generate sufficient hyperthermia for gene activation. Here, we demonstrate that the attenuation of fibrin scaffolds and the resulting hyperthermia achievable with ultrasound can be increased significantly by doping the fibrin with hydroxyapatite (HA) nanopowder. The attenuation of a 1% (w/v) fibrin scaffold with 5% (w/v) HA was similar to soft tissue. Transgene activation of cells harboring the gene switch occurred at lower acoustic intensities and shorter exposures when the cells were encapsulated in HA-doped fibrin scaffolds versus undoped scaffolds. Inclusion of HA in the fibrin scaffold did not affect the viability of the encapsulated cells. PMID:26712417

  10. Influence of E. coli-induced Prostatic Inflammation on Expression of Androgen-Responsive Genes and Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 Cascade Genes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, Yasuhito; Wang, Zhou; O’Malley, Katherine J.; Tyagi, Pradeep; DeFranco, Donald B.; Gingrich, Jeffrey R.; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Majima, Tsuyoshi; Gotoh, Momokazu; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostatic inflammation is reportedly associated with the development of prostatic hyperplasia. We investigated the effects of prostatic inflammation on expression levels of androgen-responsive genes and growth factors in the rat prostate. Methods Prostatic inflammation was induced by Escherichia coli (strain 1677) injection (0.2 mL of 1 × 108 CFU/mL) into the prostatic urethra of male Sprague-Dawley rats, and ventral lobes of the prostate were harvested on day 84. Rats were given 10 mg/kg celecoxib during the last month in the COX-2 inhibitor treated group. Histopathology and multiplex ELISA for inflammation-related proteins were performed. Glandular epithelial cells and stromal regions were separately isolated using laser-capture microdissection (LCM). Real-time RT-PCR was performed to examine mRNA levels of androgen-responsive genes in the epithelium and TGF-β1 cascade genes in the stroma. Results Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that mild inflammation was distributed diffusely throughout the prostate. Polymorphonuclear cells infiltrated the slightly edematous stroma, but no morphological changes were observed in the epithelium. Immunohistochemically, expression of androgen receptor and TGF-β1 in addition to IL-6 and COX-2 were enhanced in the E. coli inoculated rats. All of these factors were suppressed in the celecoxib-treated rats. Upregulation of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and RANTES in the E. coli-inoculated rats was normalized by celecoxib treatment. Significant upregulation of androgen receptor and androgen-responsive genes such as Eaf2, ELL2, FKBP5, calreticulin and ornithine decarboxylase was observed in the LCM-dissected epithelium. Also TGF-β1 and its downstream cascade genes such as Hic-5, collagen 1, and fibronectin were upregulated significantly in the LCM-dissected stroma. The COX-2 inhibitor treatment suppressed upregulation of these genes. Conclusions Prostatic inflammation changed the expression of androgen-responsive genes in the

  11. A copper-induced metallothionein gene from Exopalaemon carinicauda and its response to heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiquan; Wang, Jing; Gui, Tianshu; Sun, Zheng; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-09-01

    A full-length copper-induced metallothionein (EcMT-Cu) cDNA was obtained from Exopalaemon carinicauda (Holthuis) and it contained a 198 bp open reading frame that encoded a peptide with 65 amino acid residues. Twenty-one cysteines were found in deduced amino acid sequence and the cysteine (Cys)-rich characteristic was also reported in different types of metallothioneins from other species. EcMT-Cu mRNA expression profile showed that it is the hepatopancreas specific gene. The expression of EcMT-Cu was extremely different when shrimp were exposed to seawater containing 50 μM CuSO4 or 2.5 μM CdCl2. The expression of EcMT-Cu in shrimp was significantly up-regulated at 12 and 24 h after exposure to CuSO4, however, its expression was not induced compared to that of pretreatment (p>0.05) when shrimp were exposed to CdCl2. The transcript of EcMT-Cu was found to be extremely low at gastrula and nauplius stage and expression of EcMT-Cu could be detected from egg protozoa stage. PMID:24971556

  12. Gene-metabolite expression in blood can discriminate allergen-induced isolated early from dual asthmatic responses.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit; Yamamoto, Masatsugu; Kam, Sarah H Y; Ruan, Jian; Gauvreau, Gail M; O'Byrne, Paul M; FitzGerald, J Mark; Schellenberg, Robert; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Wojewodka, Gabriella; Kanagaratham, Cynthia; De Sanctis, Juan B; Radzioch, Danuta; Tebbutt, Scott J

    2013-01-01

    Some asthmatic individuals undergoing allergen inhalation challenge develop an isolated early response whereas others develop a dual response (early plus late response). In the present study we have used transcriptomics (microarrays) and metabolomics (mass spectrometry) of peripheral blood to identify molecular patterns that can discriminate allergen-induced isolated early from dual asthmatic responses. Peripheral blood was obtained prior to (pre-) and 2 hours post allergen inhalation challenge from 33 study participants. In an initial cohort of 14 participants, complete blood counts indicated significant differences in neutrophil and lymphocyte counts at pre-challenge between early and dual responders. At post-challenge, significant genes (ALOX15, FADS2 and LPCAT2) and metabolites (lysolipids) were enriched in lipid metabolism pathways. Enzymes encoding for these genes are involved in membrane biogenesis and metabolism of fatty acids into pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators. Correlation analysis indicated a strong negative correlation between ALOX15, FADS2, and IL5RA expression with 2-arachidonoylglycerophosphocholine levels in dual responders. However, measuring arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid levels in a validation cohort of 19 participants indicated that the free form of DHA (nmoles/µg of protein) was significantly (p = 0.03) different between early and dual responders after allergen challenge. Collectively these results may suggest an imbalance in lipid metabolism which dictates pro- (anti-) inflammatory and pro-resolving mechanisms. Future studies with larger sample sizes may reveal novel mechanisms and therapeutic targets of the late phase asthmatic response. PMID:23844124

  13. Study of fibroblast gene expression in response to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide or UVA with skin aging.

    PubMed

    Hazane-Puch, Florence; Bonnet, Mathilde; Valenti, Kita; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Kurfurst, Robin; Favier, Alain; Sauvaigo, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    The skin aging process, implying oxidative stress, is associated with specific gene expression. Ultraviolet A (UVA) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) making them relevant in the study of skin cell responses to oxidative stresses. To investigate transcript expression associated with chronological skin aging and its modulation by two oxidative stresses, cDNA micro-arrays, composed of a set of 81 expressed sequence tag (EST) clones, were used to probe the patterns of transcript expression in human fibroblasts of five young (< 21 years-old) and five older (> 50 years-old) healthy females at basal levels and 24 h after exposure to UVA (7 J/cm2) and H(2)O(2) (20 mM). At the basal state, 22% of total genes were up-regulated in the older group. Although both stresses led to the same cell mortality, H(2)O(2) induced a stronger modulation of gene expression than UVA, with 19.5% of transcripts up-regulated versus 4%. The aging process affected the response to H(2)O(2) and even though cells from old donors presented higher basal levels of transcripts they were not able to regulate them in response to the stress. Interestingly, UVA had a specific strong inhibitory effect on the expression of chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 2 (CCL2) transcript, suggesting a possible mechanism for its anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory roles. PMID:20299309

  14. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Induces a Unique Pulmonary Inflammatory Response: Role of Bacterial Gene Expression in Temporal Regulation of Host Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Kathie-Anne; Olsufka, Rachael; Kuestner, Rolf E.; Cho, Ji Hoon; Li, Hong; Zornetzer, Gregory A.; Wang, Kai; Skerrett, Shawn J.; Ozinsky, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to Francisella tularensis is associated with severe lung pathology and a high mortality rate. The lack of induction of classical inflammatory mediators, including IL1-β and TNF-α, during early infection has led to the suggestion that F. tularensis evades detection by host innate immune surveillance and/or actively suppresses inflammation. To gain more insight into the host response to Francisella infection during the acute stage, transcriptomic analysis was performed on lung tissue from mice exposed to virulent (Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis SchuS4). Despite an extensive transcriptional response in the lungs of animals as early as 4 hrs post-exposure, Francisella tularensis was associated with an almost complete lack of induction of immune-related genes during the initial 24 hrs post-exposure. This broad subversion of innate immune responses was particularly evident when compared to the pulmonary inflammatory response induced by other lethal (Yersinia pestis) and non-lethal (Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) pulmonary infections. However, the unique induction of a subset of inflammation-related genes suggests a role for dysregulation of lymphocyte function and anti-inflammatory pathways in the extreme virulence of Francisella. Subsequent activation of a classical inflammatory response 48 hrs post-exposure was associated with altered abundance of Francisella-specific transcripts, including those associated with bacterial surface components. In summary, virulent Francisella induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response characterized by temporal regulation of innate immune pathways correlating with altered bacterial gene expression patterns. This study represents the first simultaneous measurement of both host and Francisella transcriptome changes that occur during in vivo infection and identifies potential bacterial virulence factors responsible for regulation of host inflammatory pathways. PMID:23690939

  15. Adenovirus vector induced Innate Immune responses: Impact upon efficacy and toxicity in gene therapy and vaccine applications

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Zachary C.; Appledorn, Daniel M.; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Extensively characterized, modified, and employed for a variety of purposes, Adenovirus (Ad) vectors are generally regarded as having great potential by many applied virologists who wish to manipulate and use viral biology to achieve beneficial clinical outcomes. Despite widespread functional prominence and utility, (i.e.: Ad based clinical trials have begun to progress to critical Phase III levels, it has recently become apparent that investigations regarding the innate immune response to Ads may reveal not only reasons behind previous failures, but also reveal novel insights that will allow for safer, more efficacious uses of this important gene transfer platform. Insights gained by the exploration of Ad induced innate immune responses will likely be most important to the fields of vaccine development, since Ad based vaccines are highly acknowledged as one of the more promising vaccine platforms in development today. Adenovirus is currently known to interact with several different extracellular, intracellular, and membrane bound innate immune sensing systems. Past and recent studies involving manipulation of the Ad infectious cycle as well as use of different mutants have shed light on some of the initiation mechanisms underlying Ad induced immune responses. More recent studies using microarray based analyses, genetically modified cell lines and/or mouse mutants, and advanced generation Ad vectors have revealed important new insights into the scope and mechanism of this cellular defensive response. This review is an attempt to synthesize these studies, update Ad biologists to the current knowledge surrounding these increasingly important issues, as well point areas where future research should be directed. It should also serve as a sobering reality to researchers exploring the use of any gene transfer vector, as to the complexities potentially involved when contemplating use of such vectors for human applications. PMID:18036698

  16. PGC-1alpha induces dynamic protein interactions on the ERRalpha gene multi-hormone response element nucleosome in kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liangli; Li, Yin; Hu, Peng; Teng, Christina T

    2008-12-15

    ERR (oestrogen-related receptor)-alpha modulates the oestrogen signalling pathway and regulates genes participating in the physiological energy balance programme. Oestrogen and PGC-1alpha (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha), the master regulator of the energy homoeostasis programme, both regulate the expression of ERRalpha through the MHRE (multi-hormone response element) of the ERRalpha gene. Although the molecular mechanism of oestrogen action on ERRalpha regulation is well characterized, the mechanism of PGC-1alpha induction is unclear. In this study, we examine chromatin structural changes and protein interactions at the MHRE nucleosome in response to PGC-1alpha expression in HK2 human kidney cells. We mapped the nucleosome positions of the ERRalpha gene promoter and examined the changes of histone acetylation in response to PGC-1alpha expression. The interactions of DNA-binding proteins, ERRalpha and ERRgamma, co-activators {CBP [CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein)-binding protein], p300, PCAF (p300/CBP-associated factor)}, co-repressor [RIP140 (receptor-interacting protein of 140 kDa)] and RNA polymerase II at the MHRE nucleosome region were investigated over time before and after PGC-1alpha expression in the HK2 cells. We found a dynamic cyclic interaction of these proteins shortly after PGC-1alpha expression and a slower cycling interaction, with fewer proteins involved, 20 h later. By using the siRNA (small interfering RNA) knockdown approach, we discovered that ERRgamma was involved in the initial phase, but not in the later phase, of PGC-1alpha-induced ERRalpha expression. PMID:18673300

  17. Gene Expression Profile Changes and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Kidane, Yared; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. In addition, DNA in space can be damaged by toxic chemicals or reactive oxygen species generated due to increased levels of environmental and psychological stresses. Understanding the impact of spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, on cellular responses to DNA damage affects the accuracy of the radiation risk assessment for astronauts and the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and microgravity have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damage, confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) flown on the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB). Damages in the DNA were quantified by immunofluorescence staining for ?-H2AX, which showed similar percentages of different types of stained cells between flight and ground. However, there was a slight shift in the distribution of the ?-H2AX foci number in the flown cells with countable foci. Comparison of the cells in confluent and in exponential growth conditions indicated that the proliferation rate between flight and the ground may be responsible for such a shift. A microarray analysis of gene expressions in response to bleomycin treatment was also performed. Comparison of the responsive pathways between the flown and ground cells showed similar responses with the p53 network being the top upstream regulator. Similar responses at the RNA level between different gravity conditions were also observed with a PCR array analysis containing a set of genes involved in DNA damage signaling; with BBC3, CDKN1A, PCNA and PPM1D being significantly

  18. Cadmium-induced ethylene production and responses in Arabidopsis thaliana rely on ACS2 and ACS6 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic activities cause metal pollution worldwide. Plants can absorb and accumulate these metals through their root system, inducing stress as a result of excess metal concentrations inside the plant. Ethylene is a regulator of multiple plant processes, and is affected by many biotic and abiotic stresses. Increased ethylene levels have been observed after exposure to excess metals but it remains unclear how the increased ethylene levels are achieved at the molecular level. In this study, the effects of cadmium (Cd) exposure on the production of ethylene and its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), and on the expression of the ACC Synthase (ACS) and ACC Oxidase (ACO) multigene families were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Increased ethylene release after Cd exposure was directly measurable in a system using rockwool-cultivated plants; enhanced levels of the ethylene precursor ACC together with higher mRNA levels of ethylene responsive genes: ACO2, ETR2 and ERF1 also indicated increased ethylene production in hydroponic culture. Regarding underlying mechanisms, it was found that the transcript levels of ACO2 and ACO4, the most abundantly expressed members of the ACO multigene family, were increased upon Cd exposure. ACC synthesis is the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and transcript levels of both ACS2 and ACS6 showed the highest increase and became the most abundant isoforms after Cd exposure, suggesting their importance in the Cd-induced increase of ethylene production. Conclusions Cadmium induced the biosynthesis of ACC and ethylene in Arabidopsis thaliana plants mainly via the increased expression of ACS2 and ACS6. This was confirmed in the acs2-1acs6-1 double knockout mutants, which showed a decreased ethylene production, positively affecting leaf biomass and resulting in a delayed induction of ethylene responsive gene expressions without significant differences in Cd contents between wild-type and

  19. DNA damage-responsive Drosophila melanogaster gene is also induced by heat shock

    SciTech Connect

    Vivino, A.A.; Smith, M.D.; Minton, K.W.

    1986-12-01

    A gene isolated by screening Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells for DNA damage regulation was also found to be regulated by heat shock. After UV irradiation or heat shock, induction is at the transcriptional level and results in the accumulation of a 1.0-kilobase polyadenylated transcript. The restriction map of the clone bears no resemblance to the known heat shock genes, which are shown to be uninduced by UV irradiation.

  20. Promoter structures and differential responses to viral and non-viral inducers of chicken melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Xin; Zuo, Er-Wei; He, Ying; Chen, Dong-Yang; Long, Xie; Chen, Mei-Juan; Li, Ting-Ting; Yang, Xiao-Gan; Xu, Hui-Yan; Lu, Sheng-Sheng; Zhang, Ming; Lu, Ke-Huan; Lu, Yang-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) is a member of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) family and plays a pivotal role in the anti-viral innate immune response. As RIG-I is absent in chickens, MDA5 is hypothesized to be important in detecting viral nucleic acids in the cytoplasm. However, the molecular mechanism of the regulation of chicken MDA5 (chMDA5) expression has yet to be fully elucidated. With this in mind, a ∼2.5kb chMDA5 gene promoter region was examined and PCR amplified to assess its role in immune response. A chMDA5 promoter reporter plasmid (piggybac-MDA5-DsRed) was constructed and transfected into DF-1 cells to establish a Piggybac-MDA5-DsRed cell line. The MDA5 promoter activity was extremely low under basal condition, but was dramatically increased when cells were stimulated with polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), interferon beta (IFN-β) or Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV). The DsRed mRNA level represented the promoter activity and was remarkably increased, which matched the expression of endogenous MDA5. However, Infectious Bronchitis Virus (IBV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) failed to increase the MDA5 promoter activity and the expression of endogenous MDA5. The results indicated that the promoter and the Piggybac-MDA5-DsRed cell line could be utilized to determine whether a ligand regulates MDA5 expression. For the first time, this study provides a tool for testing chMDA5 expression and regulation. PMID:27327127

  1. HLA class II genes modulate vaccine-induced antibody responses to affect HIV-1 acquisition.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Heather A; Tomaras, Georgia D; Geraghty, Daniel E; Apps, Richard; Fong, Youyi; Ehrenberg, Philip K; Rolland, Morgane; Kijak, Gustavo H; Krebs, Shelly J; Nelson, Wyatt; DeCamp, Allan; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Ferrari, Guido; McElrath, M Juliana; Montefiori, David C; Bailer, Robert T; Koup, Richard A; O'Connell, Robert J; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Gilbert, Peter B; Kim, Jerome H; Thomas, Rasmi

    2015-07-15

    In the RV144 vaccine trial, two antibody responses were found to correlate with HIV-1 acquisition. Because human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted CD4(+) T cells are involved in antibody production, we tested whether HLA class II genotypes affected HIV-1-specific antibody levels and HIV-1 acquisition in 760 individuals. Indeed, antibody responses correlated with acquisition only in the presence of single host HLA alleles. Envelope (Env)-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were associated with increased risk of acquisition specifically in individuals with DQB1*06. IgG antibody responses to Env amino acid positions 120 to 204 were higher and were associated with decreased risk of acquisition and increased vaccine efficacy only in the presence of DPB1*13. Screening IgG responses to overlapping peptides spanning Env 120-204 and viral sequence analysis of infected individuals defined differences in vaccine response that were associated with the presence of DPB1*13 and could be responsible for the protection observed. Overall, the underlying genetic findings indicate that HLA class II modulated the quantity, quality, and efficacy of antibody responses in the RV144 trial. PMID:26180102

  2. HLA class II genes modulate vaccine-induced antibody responses to affect HIV-1 acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Heather A.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Geraghty, Daniel E.; Apps, Richard; Fong, Youyi; Ehrenberg, Philip K.; Rolland, Morgane; Kijak, Gustavo H.; Krebs, Shelly J.; Nelson, Wyatt; DeCamp, Allan; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Ferrari, Guido; Juliana McElrath, M.; Montefiori, David C.; Bailer, Robert T.; Koup, Richard A.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Gilbert, Peter B.; Kim, Jerome H.; Thomas, Rasmi

    2016-01-01

    In the RV144 vaccine trial, two antibody responses were found to correlate with HIV-1 acquisition. Because human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II–restricted CD4+ T cells are involved in antibody production, we tested whether HLA class II genotypes affected HIV-1–specific antibody levels and HIV-1 acquisition in 760 individuals. Indeed, antibody responses correlated with acquisition only in the presence of single host HLA alleles. Envelope (Env)–specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were associated with increased risk of acquisition specifically in individuals with DQB1*06. IgG antibody responses to Env amino acid positions 120 to 204 were higher and were associated with decreased risk of acquisition and increased vaccine efficacy only in the presence of DPB1*13. Screening IgG responses to overlapping peptides spanning Env 120–204 and viral sequence analysis of infected individuals defined differences in vaccine response that were associated with the presence of DPB1*13 and could be responsible for the protection observed. Overall, the underlying genetic findings indicate that HLA class II modulated the quantity, quality, and efficacy of antibody responses in the RV144 trial. PMID:26180102

  3. BET Inhibition Attenuates Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammatory Response by Suppressing Inflammatory Gene Transcription and Enhancer Activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinjing; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Xiangming; Chen, Ruichuan; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2016-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. H. pylori-initiated chronic gastritis is characterized by enhanced expression of many NF-κB-regulated inflammatory cytokines. Brd4 has emerged as an important NF-κB regulator and regulates the expression of many NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. In this study, we demonstrated that Brd4 was not only actively involved in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene mRNA transcription but also H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene enhancer RNA (eRNA) synthesis. Suppression of H. pylori-induced eRNA synthesis impaired H. pylori-induced mRNA synthesis. Furthermore, H. pylori stimulated NF-κB-dependent recruitment of Brd4 to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes to facilitate the RNA polymerase II-mediated eRNA and mRNA synthesis. Inhibition of Brd4 by JQ1 attenuated H. pylori-induced eRNA and mRNA synthesis for a subset of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. JQ1 also inhibited H. pylori-induced interaction between Brd4 and RelA and the recruitment of Brd4 and RNA polymerase II to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes. Finally, we demonstrated that JQ1 suppressed inflammatory gene expression, inflammation, and cell proliferation in H. pylori-infected mice. These studies highlight the importance of Brd4 in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene expression and suggest that Brd4 could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of H. pylori-triggered inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27084101

  4. Loss of the starvation-induced gene Rack1 leads to glycogen deficiency and impaired autophagic responses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Érdi, Balázs; Nagy, Péter; Zvara, Ágnes; Varga, Ágnes; Pircs, Karolina; Ménesi, Dalma; Puskás, László G.; Juhász, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy delivers cytoplasmic material for lysosomal degradation in eukaryotic cells. Starvation induces high levels of autophagy to promote survival in the lack of nutrients. We compared genome-wide transcriptional profiles of fed and starved control, autophagy-deficient Atg7 and Atg1 null mutant Drosophila larvae to search for novel regulators of autophagy. Genes involved in catabolic processes including autophagy were transcriptionally upregulated in all cases. We also detected repression of genes involved in DNA replication in autophagy mutants compared with control animals. The expression of Rack1 (receptor of activated protein kinase C 1) increased 4.1- to 5.5-fold during nutrient deprivation in all three genotypes. The scaffold protein Rack1 plays a role in a wide range of processes including translation, cell adhesion and migration, cell survival and cancer. Loss of Rack1 led to attenuated autophagic response to starvation, and glycogen stores were decreased 11.8-fold in Rack1 mutant cells. Endogenous Rack1 partially colocalized with GFP-Atg8a and early autophagic structures on the ultrastructural level, suggesting its involvement in autophagosome formation. Endogenous Rack1 also showed a high degree of colocalization with glycogen particles in the larval fat body, and with Shaggy, the Drosophila homolog of glycogen synthase kinase 3B (GSK-3B). Our results, for the first time, demonstrated the fundamental role of Rack1 in autophagy and glycogen synthesis. PMID:22562043

  5. The tobacco Cel7 gene promoter is auxin-responsive and locally induced in nematode feeding sites of heterologous plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence suggests that plant cell wall modifying enzymes induced by root-parasitic nematodes play important roles in feeding cell formation. We previously identified a tobacco endo-B-1,4-glucanase (cellulase) gene, NtCel7, that was strongly induced in both root-knot and cyst nematode feedi...

  6. Immune responses induced by DNA vaccines bearing Spike gene of PEDV combined with porcine IL-18

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is the causative agent of porcine epidemic diarrhea, a highly contagious enteric disease of swine. The Spike (S) protein is one of the main structural proteins of PEDV capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies in vivo. Herein, we generated three distinct DNA ...

  7. "Bad genes" & criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    González-Tapia, María Isabel; Obsuth, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The genetics of the accused is trying to break into the courts. To date several candidate genes have been put forward and their links to antisocial behavior have been examined and documented with some consistency. In this paper, we focus on the so called "warrior gene", or the low-activity allele of the MAOA gene, which has been most consistently related to human behavior and specifically to violence and antisocial behavior. In preparing this paper we had two objectives. First, to summarize and analyze the current scientific evidence, in order to gain an in depth understanding of the state of the issue and determine whether a dominant line of generally accepted scientific knowledge in this field can be asserted. Second, to derive conclusions and put forward recommendations related to the use of genetic information, specifically the presence of the low-activity genotype of the MAOA gene, in modulation of criminal responsibility in European and US courts. PMID:25708001

  8. Regulation of glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit gene expression: identification of a unique xenobiotic-responsive element controlling inducible expression by planar aromatic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Rushmore, T H; King, R G; Paulson, K E; Pickett, C B

    1990-01-01

    We have identified a region in the 5' flanking sequence of the glutathione S-transferase (RX:glutathione R-transferase, EC 2.5.1.18) Ya subunit gene that contains a unique xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE). The regulatory region spans nucleotides -722 to -682 of the 5' flanking sequence and is responsible for part of the basal level as well as inducible expression of the Ya subunit gene by planar aromatic compounds such as beta-naphthoflavone (beta-NF) and 3-methyl-cholanthrene. The DNA sequence of this region (beta-NF-responsive element) is distinct from the DNA sequence of the XRE found in the cytochrome P-450 IA1 gene. In addition to the region containing the beta-NF-responsive element, two other regulatory regions of the Ya subunit gene have been identified. One region spans nucleotides -867 to -857 and has a DNA sequence with identity to the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 recognition motif found in several liver-specific genes. The second region spans nucleotides -908 to -899 and contains a DNA sequence with identity to the XRE found in the cytochrome P-450 IA1 gene. The XRE sequence also contributes to part of the responsiveness of the Ya subunit gene to planar aromatic compounds. Our data suggest that regulation of gene expression by planar aromatic compounds can be mediated by a DNA sequence that is distinct from the XRE sequence. Images PMID:2160079

  9. CELLULAR DAMAGE AND WOUND RESPONSIVE GENE INDUCTION IN WEEDS TREATED WITH NEP1, A NECROSIS INDUCING PEPTIDE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The necrosis and ethylene inducing protein (Nep1) isolated from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. erythroxyli causes cell death in many dicot plant species including weed species. Although many of the plant responses to Nep1 are similar to elicited responses leading to induction of plant defense responses,...

  10. Induced transcriptional profiling of phenylpropanoid pathway genes increased flavonoid and lignin content in Arabidopsis leaves in response to microbial products

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The production and use of biologically derived soil additives is one of the fastest growing sectors of the fertilizer industry. These products have been shown to improve crop yields while at the same time reducing fertilizer inputs to and nutrient loss from cropland. The mechanisms driving the changes in primary productivity and soil processes are poorly understood and little is known about changes in secondary productivity associated with the use of microbial products. Here we investigate secondary metabolic responses to a biologically derived soil additive by monitoring changes in the phenlypropanoid (PP) pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results This study was designed to test the influence of one of these products (Soil Builder™-AF, SB) on secondary metabolism after being applied at different times. One time (TI) application of SB to Arabidopsis increased the accumulation of flavonoids compared to multiple (TII) applications of the same products. Fourteen phenolic compounds including flavonols and anothocyanins were identified by mass spectrometry. Kaempferol-3,7-O-bis-α-L-rhamnoside and quercetin 3,7-dirhamnoside, the major compounds, increased 3-fold and 4-fold, respectively compared to control in the TI treatment. The most abundant anthocyanin was cyanidin 3-rhamnoglucoside, which increased 3-fold and 2-fold in TI compared to the control and TII, respectively. Simultaneously, the expression of genes coding for key enzymes in the PP pathway (phenylalanine ammonia lyase, cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, chalcone synthase, flavonoid-3′-O-hydroxylase, flavonol synthase1 and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase) and regulatory genes (production of anthocyanin pigment2, MYB12, MYB113, MYB114, EGL3, and TT8) were up-regulated in both treatments (TI and TII). Furthermore, application of TI and TII induced expression of the lignin pathway genes (hydroxyl cinamyl transferase, caffeyl-CoA O-methyl transferase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, cinnamyl-CoA reductase

  11. Expression of a Grapevine NAC Transcription Factor Gene Is Induced in Response to Powdery Mildew Colonization in Salicylic Acid-Independent Manner.

    PubMed

    Toth, Zsofia; Winterhagen, Patrick; Kalapos, Balazs; Su, Yingcai; Kovacs, Laszlo; Kiss, Erzsebet

    2016-01-01

    Tissue colonization by grape powdery mildew (PM) pathogen Erysiphe necator (Schw.) Burr triggers a major remodeling of the transcriptome in the susceptible grapevine Vitis vinifera L. While changes in the expression of many genes bear the signature of salicylic acid (SA) mediated regulation, the breadth of PM-induced changes suggests the involvement of additional regulatory networks. To explore PM-associated gene regulation mediated by other SA-independent systems, we designed a microarray experiment to distinguish between transcriptome changes induced by E. necator colonization and those triggered by elevated SA levels. We found that the majority of genes responded to both SA and PM, but certain genes were responsive to PM infection alone. Among them, we identified genes of stilbene synthases, PR-10 proteins, and several transcription factors. The microarray results demonstrated that the regulation of these genes is either independent of SA, or dependent, but SA alone is insufficient to bring about their regulation. We inserted the promoter-reporter fusion of a PM-responsive transcription factor gene into a wild-type and two SA-signaling deficient Arabidopsis lines and challenged the resulting transgenic plants with an Arabidopsis-adapted PM pathogen. Our results provide experimental evidence that this grape gene promoter is activated by the pathogen in a SA-independent manner. PMID:27488171

  12. Expression of a Grapevine NAC Transcription Factor Gene Is Induced in Response to Powdery Mildew Colonization in Salicylic Acid-Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Zsofia; Winterhagen, Patrick; Kalapos, Balazs; Su, Yingcai; Kovacs, Laszlo; Kiss, Erzsebet

    2016-01-01

    Tissue colonization by grape powdery mildew (PM) pathogen Erysiphe necator (Schw.) Burr triggers a major remodeling of the transcriptome in the susceptible grapevine Vitis vinifera L. While changes in the expression of many genes bear the signature of salicylic acid (SA) mediated regulation, the breadth of PM-induced changes suggests the involvement of additional regulatory networks. To explore PM-associated gene regulation mediated by other SA-independent systems, we designed a microarray experiment to distinguish between transcriptome changes induced by E. necator colonization and those triggered by elevated SA levels. We found that the majority of genes responded to both SA and PM, but certain genes were responsive to PM infection alone. Among them, we identified genes of stilbene synthases, PR-10 proteins, and several transcription factors. The microarray results demonstrated that the regulation of these genes is either independent of SA, or dependent, but SA alone is insufficient to bring about their regulation. We inserted the promoter-reporter fusion of a PM-responsive transcription factor gene into a wild-type and two SA-signaling deficient Arabidopsis lines and challenged the resulting transgenic plants with an Arabidopsis-adapted PM pathogen. Our results provide experimental evidence that this grape gene promoter is activated by the pathogen in a SA-independent manner. PMID:27488171

  13. Virus induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis gene homologues in wheat identify genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat, functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for wheat breeding. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited tra...

  14. Effect of SMAD7 gene overexpression on TGF-β1-induced profibrotic responses in fibroblasts derived from Peyronie's plaque

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min Ji; Song, Kang-Moon; Park, Jin-Mi; Kwon, Mi-Hye; Kwon, Ki-Dong; Park, Soo-Hwan; Ryu, Dong-Soo; Ryu, Ji-Kan; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) has been identified as one of the most important fibrogenic cytokines associated with Peyronie's disease (PD). The mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 7 (SMAD7) is an inhibitory Smad protein that blocks TGF-β signaling pathway. The aim of this study was to examine the anti-fibrotic effect of the SMAD7 gene in primary fibroblasts derived from human PD plaques. PD fibroblasts were pretreated with the SMAD7 gene and then stimulated with TGF-β1. Treated fibroblasts were used for Western blotting, fluorescent immunocytochemistry, hydroxyproline determination, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling assays. Overexpression of the SMAD7 gene inhibited TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of SMAD2 and SMAD3, transdifferentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, and quashed TGF-β1-induced production of extracellular matrix protein and hydroxyproline. Overexpression of the SMAD7 gene decreased the expression of cyclin D1 (a positive cell cycle regulator) and induced the expression of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1, which is known to terminate Smad-mediated transcription, in PD fibroblasts. These findings suggest that the blocking of the TGF-β pathway by use of SMAD7 may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PD. PMID:25532569

  15. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Fusakio, Michael E.; Willy, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T.; Al Baghdadi, Rana J. T.; Adams, Christopher M.; Anthony, Tracy G.; Wek, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins—PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6—is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera. PMID:26960794

  16. Myristicin from nutmeg induces apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway and down regulates genes of the DNA damage response pathways in human leukaemia K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Célia; Doran, Carolina; Silva, Inês C; Miranda, Claudia; Rueff, José; Rodrigues, António S

    2014-07-25

    Myristicin, an allylbenzene, is a major active component of various spices, such as nutmeg and cinnamon, plants from the Umbelliferae family or in some essential oils, such as oils of clove or marjoram. Human exposure to myristicin is low but widespread due to consumption of these spices and essential oils, added to food (e.g. cola drinks) or in traditional medicine. Occasionally high dose exposure occurs, leading to various clinical symptoms, however the molecular mechanisms underlying them are unknown. Our previous studies revealed that myristicin is not genotoxic and yet presented apoptotic activity. Therefore, in this work we assessed the apoptotic mechanisms induced by myristicin in human leukaemia cells. In order to gain further insight on the potential of myristicin to modulate gene expression we also analysed alterations in expression of 84 genes associated with the DNA damage response pathway. The results obtained show that myristicin can induce apoptosis as characterised by alterations in the mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, PARP-cleavage and DNA fragmentation. The gene expression profile revealed an overall down regulation of DNA damage response genes after exposure to myristicin, with significant under-expression of genes associated with nucleotide excision repair (ERCC1), double strand break repair (RAD50, RAD51) and DNA damage signalling (ATM) and stress response (GADD45A, GADD45G). On the whole, we demonstrate that myristicin can alter mitochondrial membrane function, induce apoptosis and modulate gene expression in human leukaemia K562 cells. This study provides further detail on the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological activity of myristicin. PMID:24792648

  17. Analysis of Magnaporthe oryzae Genome Reveals a Fungal Effector, Which Is Able to Induce Resistance Response in Transgenic Rice Line Containing Resistance Gene, Pi54

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Soham; Singh, Pankaj K.; Gupta, Deepak K.; Mahato, Ajay K.; Sarkar, Chiranjib; Rathour, Rajeev; Singh, Nagendra K.; Sharma, Tilak R.

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most important diseases of rice. Pi54, a rice gene that imparts resistance to M. oryzae isolates prevalent in India, was already cloned but its avirulent counterpart in the pathogen was not known. After decoding the whole genome of an avirulent isolate of M. oryzae, we predicted 11440 protein coding genes and then identified four candidate effector proteins which are exclusively expressed in the infectious structure, appresoria. In silico protein modeling followed by interaction analysis between Pi54 protein model and selected four candidate effector proteins models revealed that Mo-01947_9 protein model encoded by a gene located at chromosome 4 of M. oryzae, interacted best at the Leucine Rich Repeat domain of Pi54 protein model. Yeast-two-hybrid analysis showed that Mo-01947_9 protein physically interacts with Pi54 protein. Nicotiana benthamiana leaf infiltration assay confirmed induction of hypersensitive response in the presence of Pi54 gene in a heterologous system. Genetic complementation test also proved that Mo-01947_9 protein induces avirulence response in the pathogen in presence of Pi54 gene. Here, we report identification and cloning of a new fungal effector gene which interacts with blast resistance gene Pi54 in rice. PMID:27551285

  18. Analysis of Magnaporthe oryzae Genome Reveals a Fungal Effector, Which Is Able to Induce Resistance Response in Transgenic Rice Line Containing Resistance Gene, Pi54.

    PubMed

    Ray, Soham; Singh, Pankaj K; Gupta, Deepak K; Mahato, Ajay K; Sarkar, Chiranjib; Rathour, Rajeev; Singh, Nagendra K; Sharma, Tilak R

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most important diseases of rice. Pi54, a rice gene that imparts resistance to M. oryzae isolates prevalent in India, was already cloned but its avirulent counterpart in the pathogen was not known. After decoding the whole genome of an avirulent isolate of M. oryzae, we predicted 11440 protein coding genes and then identified four candidate effector proteins which are exclusively expressed in the infectious structure, appresoria. In silico protein modeling followed by interaction analysis between Pi54 protein model and selected four candidate effector proteins models revealed that Mo-01947_9 protein model encoded by a gene located at chromosome 4 of M. oryzae, interacted best at the Leucine Rich Repeat domain of Pi54 protein model. Yeast-two-hybrid analysis showed that Mo-01947_9 protein physically interacts with Pi54 protein. Nicotiana benthamiana leaf infiltration assay confirmed induction of hypersensitive response in the presence of Pi54 gene in a heterologous system. Genetic complementation test also proved that Mo-01947_9 protein induces avirulence response in the pathogen in presence of Pi54 gene. Here, we report identification and cloning of a new fungal effector gene which interacts with blast resistance gene Pi54 in rice. PMID:27551285

  19. Characterization of Changes in Global Genes Expression in the Distal Colon of Loperamide-Induced Constipation SD Rats in Response to the Laxative Effects of Liriope platyphylla

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Eun; Park, So Hae; Kwak, Moon Hwa; Go, Jun; Koh, Eun Kyoung; Song, Sung Hwa; Sung, Ji Eun; Lee, Hee Seob; Hong, Jin Tae; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the changes in global gene expression in the distal colon of constipated SD rats in response to the laxative effects of aqueous extracts of Liriope platyphylla (AEtLP), including isoflavone, saponin, oligosaccharide, succinic acid and hydroxyproline, the total RNA extracted from the distal colon of AEtLP-treated constipation rats was hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays. The AEtLP treated rats showed an increase in the number of stools, mucosa thickness, flat luminal surface thickness, mucin secretion, and crypt number. Overall, compared to the controls, 581 genes were up-regulated and 216 genes were down-regulated by the constipation induced by loperamide in the constipated rats. After the AEtLP treatment, 67 genes were up-regulated and 421 genes were down-regulated. Among the transcripts up-regulated by constipation, 89 were significantly down-regulated and 22 were recovered to the normal levels by the AEtLP treatment. The major genes in the down-regulated categories included Slc9a5, klk10, Fgf15, and Alpi, whereas the major genes in the recovered categories were Cyp2b2, Ace, G6pc, and Setbp1. On the other hand, after the AEtLP treatment, ten of these genes down-regulated by constipation were up-regulated significantly and five were recovered to the normal levels. The major genes in the up-regulated categories included Serpina3n, Lcn2 and Slc5a8, whereas the major genes in the recovered categories were Tmem45a, Rerg and Rgc32. These results indicate that several gene functional groups and individual genes as constipation biomarkers respond to an AEtLP treatment in constipated model rats. PMID:26151867

  20. mRNA Noise Reveals that Activators Induce a Biphasic Response in the Promoter Kinetics of Highly Regulated Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katie; To, Tsz-Leung; Maheshri, Narendra

    2012-02-01

    A dominant source of fluctuations in gene expression is thought to be the process of transcription. The statistics of these fluctuations arise from the kinetics of transcription. Multiple studies suggest the bulk of fluctuations can be understood by a simple process where genes are inactive for exponentially distributed times punctuated by geometric bursts of mRNA. Yet it's largely unknown how cis and trans factors affect the two lumped kinetic parameters, burst size and burst frequency, that describe this process. Importantly, how these parameters are regulated in a single gene can qualitatively affect the dynamical behavior of the network it is embedded within. Here, we ask whether transcriptional activators increase gene expression by increasing the burst size or burst frequency. We do so by deducing these parameters from steady-state mRNA distributions measured in individual yeast cells using single molecule mRNA FISH. We find that for both a synthetic and natural promoter, activators appear to first increase burst size, then burst frequency. We suggest this biphasic response may be common to all highly regulated genes and was previously unappreciated because of measurement techniques. Furthermore, its origins appear to relate to cis events at the promoter, and may arise from combinations of basal and activator-dependent bursts. Our measurements shed new light on transcriptional mechanisms and should assist in building synthetic promoters with tunable statistics.

  1. Constitutive or Inducible Protective Mechanisms against UV-B Radiation in the Brown Alga Fucus vesiculosus? A Study of Gene Expression and Phlorotannin Content Responses

    PubMed Central

    Creis, Emeline; Delage, Ludovic; Charton, Sophie; Goulitquer, Sophie; Leblanc, Catherine; Potin, Philippe; Ar Gall, Erwan

    2015-01-01

    A role as UV sunscreens has been suggested for phlorotannins, the phenolic compounds that accumulate in brown algae in response to a number of external stimuli and take part in cell wall structure. After exposure of the intertidal brown alga Fucus vesiculosus to artificial UV-B radiation, we examined its physiological responses by following the transcript level of the pksIII gene encoding a phloroglucinol synthase, likely to be involved in the first step of phlorotannins biosynthesis. We also monitored the expression of three targeted genes, encoding a heat shock protein (hsp70), which is involved in global stress responses, an aryl sulfotransferase (ast), which could be involved in the sulfation of phlorotannins, and a vanadium bromoperoxidase (vbpo), which can potentially participate in the scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and in the cross-linking and condensation of phlorotannins. We investigated whether transcriptional regulation of these genes is correlated with an induction of phlorotannin accumulation by establishing metabolite profiling of purified fractions of low molecular weight phlorotannins. Our findings demonstrated that a high dose of UV-B radiation induced a significant overexpression of hsp70 after 12 and 24 hours following the exposure to the UV-B treatment, compared to control treatment. The physiological performance of algae quantified by the photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm) was slightly reduced. However UV-B treatment did not induce the accumulation of soluble phlorotannins in F. vesiculosus during the kinetics of four weeks, a result that may be related to the lack of induction of the pksIII gene expression. Taken together these results suggest a constitutive accumulation of phlorotannins occurring during the development of F.vesiculosus, rather than inducible processes. Gene expression studies and phlorotannin profiling provide here complementary approaches to global quantifications currently used in studies of phenolic compounds

  2. The characterization of six auxin-induced tomato GH3 genes uncovers a member, SlGH3.4, strongly responsive to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dehua; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Aiqun; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Jianjian; Liu, Junli; Gu, Mian; Sun, Shubin; Xu, Guohua

    2015-04-01

    In plants, the GH3 gene family is widely considered to be involved in a broad range of plant physiological processes, through modulation of hormonal homeostasis. Multiple GH3 genes have been functionally characterized in several plant species; however, to date, limited works to study the GH3 genes in tomato have been reported. Here, we characterize the expression and regulatory profiles of six tomato GH3 genes, SlGH3.2, SlGH3.3, SlGH3.4, SlGH3.7, SlGH3.9 and SlGH3.15, in response to different phytohormone applications and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization. All six GH3 genes showed inducible responses to external IAA, and three members were significantly up-regulated in response to AM symbiosis. In particular, SlGH3.4, the transcripts of which were barely detectable under normal growth conditions, was strongly activated in the IAA-treated and AM fungal-colonized roots. A comparison of the SlGH3.4 expression in wild-type plants and M161, a mutant with a defect in AM symbiosis, confirmed that SlGH3.4 expression is highly correlated to mycorrhizal colonization. Histochemical staining demonstrated that a 2,258 bp SlGH3.4 promoter fragment could drive β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression strongly in root tips, steles and cortical cells of IAA-treated roots, but predominantly in the fungal-colonized cells of mycorrhizal roots. A truncated 654 bp promoter failed to direct GUS expression in IAA-treated roots, but maintained the symbiosis-induced activity in mycorrhizal roots. In summary, our results suggest that a mycorrhizal signaling pathway that is at least partially independent of the auxin signaling pathway has evolved for the co-regulation of the auxin- and mycorrhiza-activated GH3 genes in plants. PMID:25535196

  3. Sonicated Protein Fractions of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Induce Inflammatory Responses and Differential Gene Expression in a Murine Alveolar Macrophage Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Damte, Dereje; Lee, Seung-Jin; Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2015-12-28

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is known to cause porcine enzootic pneumonia (EP), an important disease in swine production. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of sonicated protein fractions of M. hyopneumoniae on inflammatory response and gene expression in the murine alveolar macrophage MH-S cell line. The effects of sonicated protein fractions and intact M. hyopneumoniae on the gene expression of cytokines and iNOS were assessed using RT-PCR. The Annealing Control Primer (ACP)-based PCR method was used to screen differentially expressed genes. Increased transcription of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA was observed after exposure to the supernatant (SPT), precipitant (PPT), and intact M. hyopneumoniae protein. A time-dependent analysis of the mRNA expression revealed an upregulation after 4 h for IL-6 and iNOS and after 12 h for IL-1β and TNF-α, for both SPT and PPT; the fold change in COX-2 expression was less. A dose- and time-dependent correlation was observed in nitrite (NO) production for both protein fractions; however, there was no significant difference between the effects of the two protein fractions. In a differential gene analysis, PCR revealed differential expression for nine gene bands after 3 h of stimulation - only one gene was downregulated, while the remaining eight were upregulated. The results of this study provide insights that help improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of and macrophage defenses against M. hyopneumoniae assault, and suggest targets for future studies on therapeutic interventions for M. hyopneumoniae infections. PMID:26370797

  4. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals signal transduction components required for the Pvr9-mediated hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Choi, Hoseong; Choi, Doil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to pathogens mediated by plant resistance (R) proteins requires different signaling transduction components and pathways. Our previous studies revealed that a potyvirus resistance gene in pepper, Pvr9, confers a hypersensitive response (HR) to pepper mottle virus in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our results show that the Pvr9-mediated HR against pepper mottle virus infection requires HSP90, SGT1, NDR1, but not EDS1. These results suggest that the Pvr9-mediated HR is possibly related to the SA pathway but not the ET, JA, ROS or NO pathways. PMID:27236305

  5. The LIM protein leupaxin is enriched in smooth muscle and functions as an serum response factor cofactor to induce smooth muscle cell gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Sundberg-Smith, Liisa J; DiMichele, Laura A; Sayers, Rebecca L; Mack, Christopher P; Taylor, Joan M

    2008-06-20

    Leupaxin is a LIM domain-containing adapter protein belonging to the paxillin family that has been previously reported to be preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cells. Herein, we identified leupaxin in a screen for focal adhesion kinase binding partners in aortic smooth muscle, and we show that leupaxin is enriched in human and mouse vascular smooth muscle and that leupaxin expression is dynamically regulated during development. In addition, our studies reveal that leupaxin can undergo cytoplasmic/nuclear shuttling and functions as an serum response factor cofactor in the nucleus. We found that leupaxin forms a complex with serum response factor and associates with CArG-containing regions of smooth muscle promoters and that ectopic expression of leupaxin induces smooth muscle marker gene expression in both 10T1/2 cells and rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Subsequent studies indicated that enhanced focal adhesion kinase activity (induced by fibronectin or expression of constitutively active focal adhesion kinase) attenuates the nuclear accumulation of leupaxin and limits the ability of leupaxin to enhance serum response factor-dependent gene transcription. Thus, these studies indicate that modulation of the subcellular localization of serum response factor cofactors is 1 mechanism by which extracellular matrix-dependent signals may regulate phenotypic switching of smooth muscle cells. PMID:18497331

  6. Local and systemic mycorrhiza-induced protection against the ectoparasitic nematode Xiphinema index involves priming of defence gene responses in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhipeng; Fayolle, Léon; van Tuinen, Diederik; Chatagnier, Odile; Gianinazzi, Silvio; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne

    2012-01-01

    The ectoparasitic dagger nematode (Xiphinema index), vector of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), provokes gall formation and can cause severe damage to the root system of grapevines. Mycorrhiza formation by Glomus (syn. Rhizophagus) intraradices BEG141 reduced both gall formation on roots of the grapevine rootstock SO4 (Vitis berlandieri×V. riparia) and nematode number in the surrounding soil. Suppressive effects increased with time and were greater when the nematode was post-inoculated rather than co-inoculated with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus. Using a split-root system, decreased X. index development was shown in mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal parts of mycorrhizal root systems, indicating that both local and systemic induced bioprotection mechanisms were active against the ectoparasitic nematode. Expression analyses of ESTs (expressed sequence tags) generated in an SSH (subtractive suppressive hybridization) library, representing plant genes up-regulated during mycorrhiza-induced control of X. index, and of described grapevine defence genes showed activation of chitinase 1b, pathogenesis-related 10, glutathione S-transferase, stilbene synthase 1, 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase, and a heat shock proein 70-interacting protein in association with the observed local and/or systemic induced bioprotection against the nematode. Overall, the data suggest priming of grapevine defence responses by the AM fungus and transmission of a plant-mediated signal to non-mycorrhizal tissues. Grapevine gene responses during AM-induced local and systemic bioprotection against X. index point to biological processes that are related either to direct effects on the nematode or to protection against nematode-imposed stress to maintain root tissue integrity. PMID:22407649

  7. Apyrase Suppression Raises Extracellular ATP Levels and Induces Gene Expression and Cell Wall Changes Characteristic of Stress Responses1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Min Hui; Wu, Jian; Yao, Jianchao; Gallardo, Ignacio F.; Dugger, Jason W.; Webb, Lauren J.; Huang, James; Salmi, Mari L.; Song, Jawon; Clark, Greg; Roux, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells release ATP into their extracellular matrix as they grow, and extracellular ATP (eATP) can modulate the rate of cell growth in diverse tissues. Two closely related apyrases (APYs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), APY1 and APY2, function, in part, to control the concentration of eATP. The expression of APY1/APY2 can be inhibited by RNA interference, and this suppression leads to an increase in the concentration of eATP in the extracellular medium and severely reduces growth. To clarify how the suppression of APY1 and APY2 is linked to growth inhibition, the gene expression changes that occur in seedlings when apyrase expression is suppressed were assayed by microarray and quantitative real-time-PCR analyses. The most significant gene expression changes induced by APY suppression were in genes involved in biotic stress responses, which include those genes regulating wall composition and extensibility. These expression changes predicted specific chemical changes in the walls of mutant seedlings, and two of these changes, wall lignification and decreased methyl ester bonds, were verified by direct analyses. Taken together, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that APY1, APY2, and eATP play important roles in the signaling steps that link biotic stresses to plant defense responses and growth changes. PMID:24550243

  8. Induced pluripotency with endogenous and inducible genes

    SciTech Connect

    Duinsbergen, Dirk; Eriksson, Malin; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Frisen, Jonas; Mikkers, Harald

    2008-10-15

    The recent discovery that two partly overlapping sets of four genes induce nuclear reprogramming of mouse and even human cells has opened up new possibilities for cell replacement therapies. Although the combination of genes that induce pluripotency differs to some extent, Oct4 and Sox2 appear to be a prerequisite. The introduction of four genes, several of which been linked with cancer, using retroviral approaches is however unlikely to be suitable for future clinical applications. Towards developing a safer reprogramming protocol, we investigated whether cell types that express one of the most critical reprogramming genes endogenously are predisposed to reprogramming. We show here that three of the original four pluripotency transcription factors (Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc or MYCER{sup TAM}) induced reprogramming of mouse neural stem (NS) cells exploiting endogenous SoxB1 protein levels in these cells. The reprogrammed neural stem cells differentiated into cells of each germ layer in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to mouse development in vivo. Thus a combinatorial approach taking advantage of endogenously expressed genes and inducible transgenes may contribute to the development of improved reprogramming protocols.

  9. Up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress induced genes of the unfolded protein response in the liver of periparturient dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In dairy cows, the periparturient phase is a stressful period, which is commonly associated with strong metabolic adaptations and the development of pathophysiologic conditions and disorders. Some of the symptoms occurring in the liver, such as the development of fatty liver, are similar to those observed under the condition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Therefore, we hypothesized, that in the liver of dairy cows ER stress is induced during the periparturient phase, which in turn leads to an induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR). In order to investigate this hypothesis, we determined relative mRNA concentrations of 14 genes of the ER stress-induced UPR in liver biopsy samples of 13 dairy cows at 3 wk antepartum and 1, 5 and 14 wk postpartum. Results We found, that the mRNA concentrations of 13 out of the 14 genes involved in the UPR in the liver were significantly increased (1.9 to 4.0 fold) at 1 wk postpartum compared to 3 wk antepartum. From 1 wk postpartum to later lactation, mRNA concentrations of all the genes considered were declining. Moreover, at 1 wk postpartum, mRNA concentration of the spliced variant of XBP1 was increased in comparison to 3 wk antepartum, indicating that splicing of XBP1 – a hallmark of ER stress - was induced following the onset of lactation. Conclusion The present study reveals, that ER stress might be induced during the periparturient phase in the liver of dairy cows. We assume that the ER stress-induced UPR might contribute to the pathophysiologic conditions commonly observed in the liver of periparturient cows, such as the development of fatty liver, ketosis or inflammation. PMID:24555446

  10. The quorum sensing luxS gene is induced in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM in response to Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Moslehi-Jenabian, Saloomeh; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2011-10-01

    The luxS gene involved in quorum sensing has been shown to control different behaviour of probiotic lactobacilli. In this study we investigated if luxS in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM was up-regulated in response to Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e. The two bacterial strains were grown in mono- and co-culture and the growth of both bacteria and the transcriptional level of luxS in L. acidophilus cells were monitored. Contrary to L. acidophilus, the growth of L. monocytogenes was significantly affected by co-cultivation. Transcriptional analysis showed that the expression of luxS increased during exponential growth in L. acidophilus cells with the highest level in the late-exponential growth phase, decreasing in the stationary phase. Following co-cultivation with L. monocytogenes, the transcriptional level of luxS increased significantly in mid-exponential growing cells of L. acidophilus after incubation with viable L. monocytogenes cells and by addition of cell-free culture supernatant of L. monocytogenes, whereas incubation with heat killed cells of L. monocytogenes had no effect on the transcriptional level. This could indicate that the up-regulation of luxS is due to a response to a secreted compound produced by L. monocytogenes cells. PMID:21784546

  11. ERGDB: Estrogen Responsive Genes Database.

    PubMed

    Tang, Suisheng; Han, Hao; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2004-01-01

    ERGDB is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to genes responsive to estrogen. Genes included in ERGDB are those whose expression levels are experimentally proven to be either up-regulated or down-regulated by estrogen. Genes included are identified based on publications from the PubMed database and each record has been manually examined, evaluated and selected for inclusion by biologists. ERGDB aims to be a unified gateway to store, search, retrieve and update information about estrogen responsive genes. Each record contains links to relevant databases, such as GenBank, LocusLink, Refseq, PubMed and ATCC. The unique feature of ERGDB is that it contains information on the dependence of gene reactions on experimental conditions. In addition to basic information about the genes, information for each record includes gene functional description, experimental methods used, tissue or cell type, gene reaction, estrogen exposure time and the summary of putative estrogen response elements if the gene's promoter sequence was available. Through a web interface at http://sdmc.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/ergdb/ cgi-bin/explore.pl users can either browse or query ERGDB. Access is free for academic and non-profit users. PMID:14681475

  12. Identification of low Ca(2+) stress-induced embryo apoptosis response genes in Arachis hypogaea by SSH-associated library lift (SSHaLL).

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Zhang, Chong; Cai, Tie Cheng; Deng, Ye; Zhou, Shuangbiao; Zheng, Yixiong; Ma, Shiwei; Tang, Ronghua; Varshney, Rajeev K; Zhuang, Weijian

    2016-02-01

    Calcium is a universal signal in the regulation of wide aspects in biology, but few are known about the function of calcium in the control of early embryo development. Ca(2+) deficiency in soil induces early embryo abortion in peanut, producing empty pods, which is a general problem; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, embryo abortion was characterized to be caused by apoptosis marked with cell wall degradation. Using a method of SSH cDNA libraries associated with library lift (SSHaLL), 62 differentially expressed genes were isolated from young peanut embryos. These genes were classified to be stress responses, catabolic process, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, embryo morphogenesis, regulation, etc. The cell retardation with cell wall degradation was caused by up-regulated cell wall hydrolases and down-regulated cellular synthases genes. HsfA4a, which was characterized to be important to embryo development, was significantly down-regulated under Ca(2+) -deficient conditions from 15 days after pegging (DAP) to 30 DAP. Two AhCYP707A4 genes, encoding abscisic acid (ABA) 8'-hydroxylases, key enzymes for ABA catabolism, were up-regulated by 21-fold under Ca(2+) -deficient conditions upstream of HsfA4a, reducing the ABA level in early embryos. Over-expression of AhCYP707A4 in Nicotiana benthamiana showed a phenotype of low ABA content with high numbers of aborted embryos, small pods and less seeds, which confirms that AhCYP707A4 is a key player in regulation of Ca(2+) deficiency-induced embryo abortion via ABA-mediated apoptosis. The results elucidated the mechanism of low Ca(2+) -induced embryo abortion and described the method for other fields of study. PMID:26079063

  13. The Roles of ATF3, an Adaptive-Response Gene, in High-Fat-Diet-Induced Diabetes and Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zmuda, Erik J.; Qi, Ling; Zhu, Michael X.; Mirmira, Raghavendra G.; Montminy, Marc R.; Hai, Tsonwin

    2010-01-01

    Most people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have reduced β-cell mass, and apoptosis is a key factor for this reduction. Previously, we showed that ATF3, an adaptive-response gene, is induced by various stress signals relevant to T2D, such as high glucose and high fatty acid. Because ATF3 is proapoptotic in β-cells, we tested the hypothesis that ATF3 plays a detrimental role and contributes to the development of T2D. We compared wild-type (WT) and ATF3 knockout (KO) mice in an animal model for T2D, high-fat diet-induced diabetes. We also used INS-1 β-cells and primary islets to analyze the roles of ATF3 in β-cell function, including insulin gene expression and glucose-induced insulin secretion. Surprisingly, WT mice performed better in glucose tolerance test than KO mice, suggesting a protective, rather than detrimental, role of ATF3. At 12 wk on high-fat diet, no β-cell apoptosis was observed, and the WT and KO mice had comparable β-cell areas. However, ATF3 deficiency significantly reduced serum insulin levels in the KO mice without affecting insulin sensitivity, suggesting reduced β-cell function in the KO mice. Analyses using INS-1 cells and primary islets support the notion that this defect is due, at least partly, to reduced insulin gene transcription in the KO islets without detectable reduction in glucose-induced calcium influx, a critical step for insulin secretion. In conclusion, our results support a model in which, before apoptosis becomes obvious, expression of ATF3 can be beneficial by helping β-cells to cope with higher metabolic demand. PMID:20519332

  14. Identification of genes involved in low aminoglycoside-induced SOS response in Vibrio cholerae: a role for transcription stalling and Mfd helicase

    PubMed Central

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Babosan, Anamaria; Mazel, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MIC) of antibiotics play a very important role in selection and development of resistances. Unlike Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae induces its SOS response in presence of sub-MIC aminoglycosides. A role for oxidized guanine residues was observed, but the mechanisms of this induction remained unclear. To select for V. cholerae mutants that do not induce low aminoglycoside-mediated SOS induction, we developed a genetic screen that renders induction of SOS lethal. We identified genes involved in this pathway using two strategies, inactivation by transposition and gene overexpression. Interestingly, we obtained mutants inactivated for the expression of proteins known to destabilize the RNA polymerase complex. Reconstruction of the corresponding mutants confirmed their specific involvement in induction of SOS by low aminoglycoside concentrations. We propose that DNA lesions formed on aminoglycoside treatment are repaired through the formation of single-stranded DNA intermediates, inducing SOS. Inactivation of functions that dislodge RNA polymerase leads to prolonged stalling on these lesions, which hampers SOS induction and repair and reduces viability under antibiotic stress. The importance of these mechanisms is illustrated by a reduction of aminoglycoside sub-MIC. Our results point to a central role for transcription blocking at DNA lesions in SOS induction, so far underestimated. PMID:24319148

  15. Temporal gene expression in the hippocampus and peripheral organs to endoxin-induced systemic inflammatory response in caspase-1 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Mastronardi, Claudio Alberto; Paz-Filho, Gilberto; Zanoni, Martina; Molano-González, Nicolas; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Licinio, Julio; Wong, Ma-Li

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Caspase-1 (casp1), a key protease involved during systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), controls the brain expression of a set of eight genes: Nos2 and Ptgs2 (nitric oxide synthase 2 and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2, two inducible enzymes), Cxcl1 and Cxcl10 (C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 1 and ligand 10), Tgtp and Gbp2 (T cell specific GTPase 1 and guanylate binding protein 2, two GTPases), Adamts1 (a disintegrin-like and metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1 motif, 1, a metalloprotease), and Il1rn (interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist). Our objective was to ascertain whether casp1 also controlled the peripheral expression of these genes and, if so, to compare their central vs. peripheral patterns of gene expression in immune and endocrine tissues during SIRS. Methods Wild-type (wt) and casp1 knockout (casp1−/−) mice were injected with either saline or a high dose of endotoxin/lypopolysaccharide (LPS; 800μg/mice i.p). Saline-injected mice were immediately euthanized after injection, whereas LPS-injected mice were sacrificed 6 and 12h after LPS administration. Hippocampal, splenic and adrenal gene expressions were determined by real-time PCR. Results Overall, casp1−/− mice showed a lower inflammatory response than wt mice. The expression level of powerful proinflammatory factors such as Nos2 and Ptgs2 was reduced in casp1−/− mice. Moreover, a hierarchical clustering analysis aimed at studying patterns of gene co-expression revealed large alterations in the hippocampal pattern of casp1−/− mice. Surprisingly, the expression of Adamts1was increased in the hippocampus and adrenals of casp1−/− mice. Conclusions The resilience of casp1−/− mice to SIRS lethality is associated with a lower inflammatory response, loss of hippocampal gene co-expression patterns, and increased hippocampal Adamts1 gene expression. The latter might be beneficial for casp1−/− mice, since ADAMTS1 is likely to play a role in neuronal

  16. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  17. SLCO1B1 and SLC19A1 Gene Variants and Irinotecan-Induced Rapid Response and Survival: A Prospective Multicenter Pharmacogenetics Study of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xin; Yu, Qianqian; Feng, Jueping; Ma, Hong; Dai, Jing; Li, Min; Chen, Jigui; Zang, Aihua; Wang, Qian; Ge, Shuwang; Qin, Kai; Cai, Juan; Yuan, Xianglin

    2013-01-01

    Background Rapid response to chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients (response within 12 weeks of chemotherapy) may increase the chance of complete resection and improved survival. Few molecular markers predict irinotecan-induced rapid response and survival. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in solute carrier genes are reported to correlate with the variable pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and folate in cancer patients. This study aims to evaluate the predictive role of 3 SNPs in mCRC patients treated with irinotecan and fluoropyrimidine-containing regimens. Materials and Methods Three SNPs were selected and genotyped in 137 mCRC patients from a Chinese prospective multicenter trial (NCT01282658). The chi-squared test, univariate and multivariable logistic regression model, and receiver operating characteristic analysis were used to evaluate correlations between the genotypes and rapid response. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the associations between genotypes and survival outcomes. Benjamini and Hochberg False Discovery Rate correction was used in multiple testing Results Genotype GA/AA of SNP rs2306283 of the gene SLCO1B1 and genotype GG of SNP rs1051266 of the gene SLC19A1 were associated with a higher rapid response rate (odds ratio [OR] =3.583 and 3.521, 95%CI =1.301-9.871 and 1.271-9.804, p=0.011 and p=0.013, respectively). The response rate was 70% in patients with both genotypes, compared with only 19.7% in the remaining patients (OR = 9.489, 95%CI = 2.191-41.093, Fisher's exact test p=0.002). Their significances were all maintained even after multiple testing (all pc < 0.05). The rs2306283 GA/AA genotype was also an independent prognostic factor of longer progression-free survival (PFS) (hazard ratio = 0.402, 95%CI = 0.171-0.945, p=0.037). None of the SNPs predicted overall survival. Conclusions Polymorphisms of solute carriers’ may be useful to predict rapid response to

  18. Gene expression profiling of Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammation in human whole blood: The role of complement and CD14-mediated innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lau, Corinna; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Holden, Marit; Nygård, Ståle; Fure, Hilde; Lappegård, Knut Tore; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Hovig, Eivind; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-09-01

    Non-sterile pathogen-induced sepsis and sterile inflammation like in trauma or ischemia-reperfusion injury may both coincide with the life threatening systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multi-organ failure. Consequently, there is an urgent need for specific biomarkers in order to distinguish sepsis from sterile conditions. The overall aim of this study was to uncover putative sepsis biomarkers and biomarker pathways, as well as to test the efficacy of combined inhibition of innate immunity key players complement and Toll-like receptor co-receptor CD14 as a possible therapeutic regimen for sepsis. We performed whole blood gene expression analyses using microarray in order to profile Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammatory responses in an ex vivo human whole blood model. The experiments were performed in the presence or absence of inhibitors of complement proteins (C3 and CD88 (C5a receptor 1)) and CD14, alone or in combination. In addition, we used blood from a C5-deficient donor. Anti-coagulated whole blood was challenged with heat-inactivated Escherichia coli for 2 h, total RNA was isolated and microarray analyses were performed on the Affymetrix GeneChip Gene 1.0 ST Array platform. The initial experiments were performed in duplicates using blood from two healthy donors. C5-deficiency is very rare, and only one donor could be recruited. In order to increase statistical power, a technical replicate of the C5-deficient samples was run. Subsequently, log2-transformed intensities were processed by robust multichip analysis and filtered using a threshold of four. In total, 73 microarray chips were run and analyzed. The normalized and filtered raw data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and are accessible with GEO Series accession number GSE55537. Linear models for microarray data were applied to estimate fold changes between data sets and the respective multiple testing adjusted p-values (FDR q-values). The interpretation of the

  19. Calmodulin of the tropical sea cucumber: Gene structure, inducible expression and contribution to nitric oxide production and pathogen clearance during immune response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Ren, Chunhua; Li, Wuhu; Jiang, Xiao; Xia, Jianjun; Wong, Nai-Kei; Hu, Chaoqun

    2015-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential second messenger protein that transduces calcium signals by binding calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and modulating its interactions with various target proteins. In contrast to vertebrates, where CaM is well established as a cofactor for Ca(2+)-dependent physiological and cellular functions including host defense, there is a paucity of understanding on CaM in invertebrates (such as echinoderms) in response to immune challenge or microbial infections. In this study, we obtained and described the gene sequence of CaM from the tropical sea cucumber Stichopus monotuberculatus, a promising yet poorly characterized aquacultural species. mRNA expression of StmCaM could be detected in the intestine and coelomic fluid after Vibrio alginolyticus injection. Transcriptional and translational expression of StmCaM was inducible in nature, as evidenced by the expression patterns in primary coelomocytes following Vibrio challenge. This response could be mimicked by the Vibrio cells membrane components or lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and blocked by co-treatment of the LPS-neutralizing agent polymyxin B (PMB). Furthermore, inhibition of CaM activity by incubation with its inhibitor trifluoroperazine dihydrochloride (TFP) blunted the production of Vibrio-induced nitric oxide (NO) and augmented the survival of invading Vibrio in coelomocytes. Collectively, our study here supplied the first evidence for echinoderm CaM participation in innate immunity, and provided a functional link between CaM expression and antibacterial NO production in sea cucumber. PMID:25913576

  20. [Genes Responsible for Epileptic Syndromes].

    PubMed

    Kato, Mitsuhiro

    2016-02-01

    The first causative gene for epileptic syndrome was revealed 20 years ago. Since then, many genes responsible for epileptic syndrome, particularly sporadic epileptic encephalopathies, such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, and focal cortical dysplasia, have been identified. Although epilepsy was recognized as a channelopathy in the beginning stages of gene discovery, other molecular mechanisms for epileptic syndromes, such as interneuronopathy, synaptic vesicle release, and mTOR signal transduction, are emerging. A new technique for gene analysis using the next-generation sequencer is now available for clinical purpose abroad and precision medicine based on the molecular mechanisms has started. Infrastructural development of the official framework, from molecular diagnosis to personalized therapy, is urgently required in Japan. PMID:26873236

  1. Immune Responses Induced by Gene Gun or Intramuscular Injection of DNA Vaccines That Express Immunogenic Regions of the Serine Repeat Antigen from Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Belperron, Alexia A.; Feltquate, David; Fox, Barbara A.; Horii, Toshihiro; Bzik, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The liver- and blood-stage-expressed serine repeat antigen (SERA) of Plasmodium falciparum is a candidate protein for a human malaria vaccine. We compared the immune responses induced in mice immunized with SERA-expressing plasmid DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular (i.m.) injection or delivered intradermally by Gene Gun immunization. Mice were immunized with a pcdna3 plasmid encoding the entire 47-kDa domain of SERA (amino acids 17 to 382) or the N-terminal domain (amino acids 17 to 110) of SERA. Minimal antibody responses were detected following DNA vaccination with the N-terminal domain of SERA, suggesting that the N-terminal domain alone is not highly immunogenic by this route of vaccine delivery. Immunization of mice by Gene Gun delivery of the 47-kDa domain of SERA elicited a significantly higher serum antibody titer to the antigen than immunization of mice by i.m. injection with the same plasmid did. The predominant isotype subclass of the antibodies elicited to the SERA protein following i.m. and Gene Gun immunizations with SERA plasmid DNA was immunoglobulin G1. Coimmunization of mice with SERA plasmid DNA and a plasmid expressing the hepatitis B surface antigen (pCMV-s) by the i.m. route resulted in higher anti-SERA titers than those generated in mice immunized with the SERA DNA plasmid alone. Vaccination with DNA may provide a viable alternative or may be used in conjunction with protein-based subunit vaccines to maximize the efficacy of a human malaria vaccine that includes immunogenic regions of the SERA protein. PMID:10496891

  2. Immune responses induced by gene gun or intramuscular injection of DNA vaccines that express immunogenic regions of the serine repeat antigen from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Belperron, A A; Feltquate, D; Fox, B A; Horii, T; Bzik, D J

    1999-10-01

    The liver- and blood-stage-expressed serine repeat antigen (SERA) of Plasmodium falciparum is a candidate protein for a human malaria vaccine. We compared the immune responses induced in mice immunized with SERA-expressing plasmid DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular (i.m.) injection or delivered intradermally by Gene Gun immunization. Mice were immunized with a pcdna3 plasmid encoding the entire 47-kDa domain of SERA (amino acids 17 to 382) or the N-terminal domain (amino acids 17 to 110) of SERA. Minimal antibody responses were detected following DNA vaccination with the N-terminal domain of SERA, suggesting that the N-terminal domain alone is not highly immunogenic by this route of vaccine delivery. Immunization of mice by Gene Gun delivery of the 47-kDa domain of SERA elicited a significantly higher serum antibody titer to the antigen than immunization of mice by i.m. injection with the same plasmid did. The predominant isotype subclass of the antibodies elicited to the SERA protein following i.m. and Gene Gun immunizations with SERA plasmid DNA was immunoglobulin G1. Coimmunization of mice with SERA plasmid DNA and a plasmid expressing the hepatitis B surface antigen (pCMV-s) by the i.m. route resulted in higher anti-SERA titers than those generated in mice immunized with the SERA DNA plasmid alone. Vaccination with DNA may provide a viable alternative or may be used in conjunction with protein-based subunit vaccines to maximize the efficacy of a human malaria vaccine that includes immunogenic regions of the SERA protein. PMID:10496891

  3. DNA-damage response gene GADD45A induces differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells without inhibiting cell cycle or survival.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Susanne; Thalheimer, Frederic B; Haetscher, Nadine; Rehage, Maike; Schroeder, Timm; Rieger, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood cell production life-long by their unique abilities of self-renewal and differentiation into all blood cell lineages. Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is induced by genotoxic stress in HSCs. GADD45A has been implicated in cell cycle control, cell death and senescence, as well as in DNA-damage repair. In general, GADD45A provides cellular stability by either arresting the cell cycle progression until DNA damage is repaired or, in cases of fatal damage, by inducing apoptosis. However, the function of GADD45A in hematopoiesis remains controversial. We revealed the changes in murine HSC fate control orchestrated by the expression of GADD45A at single cell resolution. In contrast to other cellular systems, GADD45A expression did not cause a cell cycle arrest or an alteration in the decision between cell survival and apoptosis in HSCs. Strikingly, GADD45A strongly induced and accelerated the differentiation program in HSCs. Continuous tracking of individual HSCs and their progeny via time-lapse microscopy elucidated that once GADD45A was expressed, HSCs differentiate into committed progenitors within 29 hours. GADD45A-expressing HSCs failed to long-term reconstitute the blood of recipients by inducing multilineage differentiation in vivo. Importantly, γ-irradiation of HSCs induced their differentiation by upregulating endogenous GADD45A. The differentiation induction by GADD45A was transmitted by activating p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and allowed the generation of megakaryocytic-erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages. These data indicate that genotoxic stress-induced GADD45A expression in HSCs prevents their fatal transformation by directing them into differentiation and thereby clearing them from the system. Stem Cells 2016;34:699-710. PMID:26731607

  4. DNA‐damage response gene GADD45A induces differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells without inhibiting cell cycle or survival

    PubMed Central

    Wingert, Susanne; Thalheimer, Frederic B.; Haetscher, Nadine; Rehage, Maike; Schroeder, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood cell production life‐long by their unique abilities of self‐renewal and differentiation into all blood cell lineages. Growth arrest and DNA‐damage‐inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is induced by genotoxic stress in HSCs. GADD45A has been implicated in cell cycle control, cell death and senescence, as well as in DNA‐damage repair. In general, GADD45A provides cellular stability by either arresting the cell cycle progression until DNA damage is repaired or, in cases of fatal damage, by inducing apoptosis. However, the function of GADD45A in hematopoiesis remains controversial. We revealed the changes in murine HSC fate control orchestrated by the expression of GADD45A at single cell resolution. In contrast to other cellular systems, GADD45A expression did not cause a cell cycle arrest or an alteration in the decision between cell survival and apoptosis in HSCs. Strikingly, GADD45A strongly induced and accelerated the differentiation program in HSCs. Continuous tracking of individual HSCs and their progeny via time‐lapse microscopy elucidated that once GADD45A was expressed, HSCs differentiate into committed progenitors within 29 hours. GADD45A‐expressing HSCs failed to long‐term reconstitute the blood of recipients by inducing multilineage differentiation in vivo. Importantly, γ‐irradiation of HSCs induced their differentiation by upregulating endogenous GADD45A. The differentiation induction by GADD45A was transmitted by activating p38 Mitogen‐activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and allowed the generation of megakaryocytic‐erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages. These data indicate that genotoxic stress‐induced GADD45A expression in HSCs prevents their fatal transformation by directing them into differentiation and thereby clearing them from the system. Stem Cells 2016;34:699–710 PMID:26731607

  5. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Bum; Seronello, Scott; Mayer, Wasima; Ojcius, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) actively evades host interferon (IFN) responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP) from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and poly(IC). The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain) were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity. PMID:27404108

  6. Glutathione-mediated regulation of nitric oxide, S-nitrosothiol and redox homeostasis confers cadmium tolerance by inducing transcription factors and stress response genes in tomato.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Kamrul; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Fanan; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Zhou, Jie; Xu, Ming-Xing; Yu, Jing-Quan; Xia, Xiao-Jian

    2016-10-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a critical role in plant growth, development and responses to stress. However, the mechanism by which GSH regulates tolerance to cadmium (Cd) stress still remains unclear. Here we show that inhibition of GSH biosynthesis by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) aggravated Cd toxicity by increasing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reducing contents of nitric oxide (NO) and S-nitrosothiol (SNO) in tomato roots. In contrast, exogenous GSH alleviated Cd toxicity by substantially minimizing ROS accumulation and increasing contents of NO and SNO, and activities of antioxidant enzymes that eventually reduced oxidative stress. GSH-induced enhancement in Cd tolerance was closely associated with the upregulation of transcripts of several transcription factors such as ETHYLENE RESPONSIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR 1 (ERF1), ERF2, MYB1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR- AIM1 and R2R3-MYB TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR- AN2, and some stress response genes. In addition, GSH modulated the cellular redox balance through maintaining increased GSH: GSSG and AsA: DHA ratios, and also increased phytochelatins contents. Nonetheless, GSH-induced alleviation of Cd phytotoxicity was also associated with increased sequestration of Cd into cell walls and vacuoles but not with Cd accumulation. Under Cd stress, while treatment with BSO slightly decreased vacuolar fraction of Cd, combined treatment with BSO and GSH noticeably increased that fraction. Our results suggest that GSH increases tomato tolerance to Cd stress not only by promoting the chelation and sequestration of Cd but also by stimulating NO, SNO and the antioxidant system through a redox-dependent mechanism. PMID:27472435

  7. The Cellular Response to Oxidatively Induced DNA Damage and Polymorphism of Some DNA Repair Genes Associated with Clinicopathological Features of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Savina, Nataliya V.; Nikitchenko, Nataliya V.; Kuzhir, Tatyana D.; Rolevich, Alexander I.; Krasny, Sergei A.; Goncharova, Roza I.

    2016-01-01

    Genome instability and impaired DNA repair are hallmarks of carcinogenesis. The study was aimed at evaluating the DNA damage response in H2O2-treated lymphocytes using the alkaline comet assay in bladder cancer (BC) patients as compared to clinically healthy controls, elderly persons, and individuals with chronic inflammations. Polymorphism in DNA repair genes involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and base excision repair (BER) was studied using the PCR-RFLP method in the Belarusian population to elucidate the possible association of their variations with both bladder cancer risk and clinicopathological features of tumors. The increased level of H2O2-induced DNA damage and a higher proportion of individuals sensitive to oxidative stress were found among BC patients as compared to other groups under study. Heterozygosity in the XPD gene (codon 751) increased cancer risk: OR (95% CI) = 1.36 (1.03–1.81), p = 0.031. The frequency of the XPD 312Asn allele was significantly higher in T ≥ 2 high grade than in T ≥ 2 low grade tumors (p = 0.036); the ERCC6 1097Val/Val genotype was strongly associated with muscle-invasive tumors. Combinations of homozygous wild type alleles occurred with the increased frequency in patients with non-muscle-invasive tumors suggesting that the maintenance of normal DNA repair activity may prevent cancer progression. PMID:26649138

  8. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor interacts with estrogen receptor, binds to estrogen response elements and half-sites, and inhibits estrogen-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Klinge, C M; Silver, B F; Driscoll, M D; Sathya, G; Bambara, R A; Hilf, R

    1997-12-12

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor (COUP-TF) was identified as a low abundance protein in bovine uterus that co-purified with estrogen receptor (ER) in a ligand-independent manner and was separated from the ER by its lower retention on estrogen response element (ERE)-Sepharose. In gel mobility shift assays, COUP-TF bound as an apparent dimer to ERE and ERE half-sites. COUP-TF bound to an ERE half-site with high affinity, Kd = 1.24 nM. In contrast, ER did not bind a single ERE half-site. None of the class II nuclear receptors analyzed, i.e. retinoic acid receptor, retinoid X receptor, thyroid receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, or vitamin D receptor, were constituents of the COUP-TF.DNA binding complex detected in gel mobility shift assays. Direct interaction of COUP-TF with ER was indicated by GST "pull-down" and co-immunoprecipitation assays. The nature of the ER ligand influenced COUP-TF-ERE half-site binding. When ER was liganded by the antiestrogen 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), COUP-TF-half-site interaction decreased. Conversely, COUP-TF transcribed and translated in vitro enhanced the ERE binding of purified estradiol (E2)-liganded ER but not 4-OHT-liganded ER. Co-transfection of ER-expressing MCF-7 human breast cancer cells with an expression vector for COUP-TFI resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of E2-induced expression of a luciferase reporter gene under the control of three tandem copies of EREc38. The ability of COUP-TF to bind specifically to EREs and half-sites, to interact with ER, and to inhibit E2-induced gene expression suggests COUP-TF regulates ER action by both direct DNA binding competition and through protein-protein interactions. PMID:9395481

  9. Dral Is a P53-Responsive Gene Whose Four and a Half Lim Domain Protein Product Induces Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Florence A.; McLoughlin, Patricia; Ehler, Elisabeth; de Giovanni, Carla; Schäfer, Beat W.

    2000-01-01

    DRAL is a four and a half LIM domain protein identified because of its differential expression between normal human myoblasts and the malignant counterparts, rhabdomyosarcoma cells. In the current study, we demonstrate that transcription of the DRAL gene can be stimulated by p53, since transient expression of functional p53 in rhabdomyosarcoma cells as well as stimulation of endogenous p53 by ionizing radiation in wild-type cells enhances DRAL mRNA levels. In support of these observations, five potential p53 target sites could be identified in the promoter region of the human DRAL gene. To obtain insight into the possible functions of DRAL, ectopic expression experiments were performed. Interestingly, DRAL expression efficiently triggered apoptosis in three cell lines of different origin to the extent that no cells could be generated that stably overexpressed this protein. However, transient transfection experiments as well as immunofluorescence staining of the endogenous protein allowed for the localization of DRAL in different cellular compartments, namely cytoplasm, nucleus, focal contacts, as well as Z-discs and to a lesser extent the M-bands in cardiac myofibrils. These data suggest that downregulation of DRAL might be involved in tumor development. Furthermore, DRAL expression might be important for heart function. PMID:11062252

  10. Comparative analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocyte response induced by dendritic cells pulsed with recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying α-fetoprotein gene or cancer cell lysate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Ma, Ping; Li, Jun; Song, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and difficult to treat types of cancer worldwide. Antigen‑targeted immunotherapy has the potential to be a novel and effective adjuvant for use in HCC. In the present study, recombinant adeno‑associated virus carrying the α‑fetoprotein gene (rAAV/AFP) and cancer cell lysates were used to pulse antigen‑presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in order to stimulate a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response against HCC. rAAV/AFP‑pulsed and cancer cell lysate‑pulsed DCs resulted in a mature DC phenotype with high expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, MHC class II, CD80, CD83 and CD86 molecules. However, rAAV/AFP‑pulsed DCs exhibited superiority over cancer cell lysate‑pulsed DCs in terms of stimulating proliferation of T cells, activating T cells to secret interferon‑γ (IFN‑γ) and inducing an AFP‑specific MHC class I‑restricted CTL response. The current data suggest that pulsing of DCs using rAAV/AFP is more effective than the cancer cell lysate‑pulsing technique, and that this technique may be used for the development of immunotherapy in AFP‑positive HCC. PMID:25484119

  11. Lipopolysaccharide-induced early response genes in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells implicate GLG1/E-selectin as a key ligand–receptor interaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study uses a systems biology approach, integrating global gene expression information and knowledge of the regulatory events in cells to identify transcription networks controlling peripheral blood mononuclear cells’ (PBMCs) immune response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to identify the molecu...

  12. IL-10 induces gene expression in macrophages: partial overlap with IL-5 but not with IL-4 induced genes.

    PubMed

    Stumpo, Rita; Kauer, Manfred; Martin, Stephan; Kolb, Hubert

    2003-10-01

    The hypothesis that IL-10, in addition to down-regulating pro-inflammatory activities of macrophages, induces an alternative state of macrophage reactivity was tested. We therefore conducted a systematic search for genes induced by IL-10 using the method of suppression subtractive hybridisation. Of an initial 1,300 candidate clones obtained, several screening rounds led to the identification of 51 clones which were reproducibly at least twofold up-regulated in mouse J774 macrophages in response to treatment with IL-10. Of these, 41 genes were homologous to known genes involved in cell metabolism or immunoregulation, five contained novel sequences and another five were homologous to ESTs without known function. One major finding was that about 25% of the IL-10 genes were also found expressed in response to IFNgamma, and several of these also reappeared in IL-4 or IL-5 induced mRNA species. Hence, Th1 and Th2 type cytokines may elicit a common basal activation response in macrophages. The second major finding was that 57% of IL-10 induced genes reappeared in IL-5 induced mRNA but no more than 18% were also found in IL-4 induced mRNA of J774 cells. We conclude that the gene expression response to IL-10 in macrophages is partially different from the response to IL-5 and is substantially different from the response to IL-4, which suggests an unexpected diversity of biological phenotypes induced by different Th2 type cytokines. PMID:14561490

  13. Analysis of anamnestic immune responses in adult horses and priming in neonates induced by a DNA vaccine expressing the vapA gene of Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Lopez, A Marianela; Hines, Melissa T; Palmer, Guy H; Knowles, Donald P; Alperin, Debra C; Hines, Stephen A

    2003-09-01

    Rhodococcus equi remains one of the most important pathogens of early life in horses, yet conventional vaccines to prevent rhodococcal pneumonia have not been successful. DNA vaccination offers an alternative to conventional vaccines with specific advantages for immunization of neonates. We developed a DNA vaccine expressing the vapA gene (pVR1055vapA) that induced an anamnestic response characterized by virulence associated protein A (VapA)-specific IgG antibodies in sera and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as VapA-specific proliferation of pulmonary lymphocytes when tested in adult ponies. In contrast, none of the adults receiving the control plasmid responded. To determine if pVR1055vapA induced VapA-specific responses in the foal, the targeted age group for vaccination against R. equi, 10 naïve foals were randomly assigned at birth to two groups of five. At 8-15 days of age (day 1), foals were vaccinated by intranasal and intradermal (i.d.) routes with either pVR1055vapA or the negative control pVR1055vapA_rev. All foals were DNA boosted at day 14 and protein boosted at day 30 with either recombinant VapA or recombinant CAT (control group). Prior to the protein boost, neither group developed VapA-specific immune responses. However, at day 45, two of the VR1055vapA-vaccinated foals had increased titers of VapA-specific IgGb, IgM and IgGa in the sera, and IgG in the BALF. The induction of the opsonizing isotypes IgGa and IgGb has been previously shown to be associated with protection against R. equi. No VapA-specific immune responses were detected in the control group. This study indicates that the DNA vaccine effectively stimulates anamnestic systemic and pulmonary immune responses in adult horses. The results in foals suggest that the DNA vaccine also primed a subset of immunized neonates. These data support further development and modification to produce a DNA vaccine to more effectively prime neonatal foals. PMID:12922115

  14. Gravity-Induced Gene Expression in Plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Heber, Steffen; Howard, Brian; Myburg-Nichols, Henrietta; Hammond, Rebecca; Salinas-Mondragon, Raul; Brown, Christopher S.

    Plants sense changes in their orientation towards the vector of gravity and respond with directional growth. Several metabolites in the signal transduction cascade have been identified. However, very little is known about the interaction between these sensing and signal transduction events and even less is known about their role in the differential growth response. Gravity induced changes in transcript abundance have been identified in Arabidopsis whole seedlings and root apices (Moseyko et al. 2002; Kimbrough et al. 2004). Gravity induced transcript abundance changes can be observed within less than 1 min after stimulation (Salinas-Mondragon et al. 2005). Gene expression however requires not only transcription but also translation of the mRNA. Translation can only occur when mRNA is associated with ribosomes, even though not all mRNA associated with ribosomes is actively translated. To approximate translational capacity we quantified whole genome transcript abundances in corn stem pulvini during the first hour after gravity stimulation in total and poly-ribosomal fractions. As in Arabidopsis root apices, transcript abundances of several clusters of genes responded to gravity stimulation. The vast majority of these transcripts were also found to associate with polyribosomes in the same temporal and quantitative pattern. These genes are transcriptionally regulated by gravity stimulation, but do not exhibit translational regulation. However, a small group of genes showed increased transcriptional regulation after gravity stimulation, but no association with polysomes. These transcripts likely are translationally repressed. The mechanism of translational repression for these transcripts is unknown. Based on the hypothesis that the genes essential for gravitropic responses should be expressed in most or all species, we compared the temporal gravity induced expression pattern of all orthologs identified between maize and Arabidopsis. A small group of genes showed high

  15. Gene 33/Mig-6, a transcriptionally inducible adapter protein that binds GTP-Cdc42 and activates SAPK/JNK. A potential marker transcript for chronic pathologic conditions, such as diabetic nephropathy. Possible role in the response to persistent stress.

    PubMed

    Makkinje, A; Quinn, D A; Chen, A; Cadilla, C L; Force, T; Bonventre, J V; Kyriakis, J M

    2000-06-01

    Chronic stresses, including the mechanical strain caused by hypertension or excess pulmonary ventilation pressure, lead to important clinical consequences, including hypertrophy and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Pathologic hypertrophy contributes to decreased organ function and, ultimately, organ failure; and cardiac and diabetic renal hypertrophy are major causes of morbidity and morality in the developed world. Likewise, acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious potential side effect of mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Whereas the deleterious effects of chronic stress are well established, the molecular mechanisms by which these stresses affect cell function are still poorly characterized. gene 33 (also called mitogen-inducible gene-6, mig-6) is an immediate early gene that is transcriptionally induced by a divergent array of extracellular stimuli. The physiologic function of Gene 33 is unknown. Here we show that gene 33 mRNA levels increase sharply in response to a set of commonly occurring chronic stress stimuli: mechanical strain, vasoactive peptides, and diabetic nephropathy. Induction of gene 33 requires the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs)/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases. This expression pattern suggests that gene 33 is a potential marker for diabetic nephropathy and other pathologic responses to persistent sublethal stress. The structure of Gene 33 indicates an adapter protein capable of binding monomeric GTPases of the Rho subfamily. Consistent with this, Gene 33 interacts in vivo and, in a GTP-dependent manner, in vitro with Cdc42Hs; and transient expression of Gene 33 results in the selective activation of the SAPKs. These results imply a reciprocal, positive feedback relationship between Gene 33 expression and SAPK activation. Expression of Gene 33 at sufficient levels may enable a compensatory reprogramming of cellular function in response to chronic stress, which may have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:10749885

  16. The surgically induced stress response.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A; Herndon, David N

    2013-09-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes that induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Burn injuries provide an extreme model of trauma induced stress responses that can be used to study the long-term effects of a prolonged stress response. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to confer improved chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  17. Early induced protein 1 (PrELIP1) and other photosynthetic, stress and epigenetic regulation genes are involved in Pinus radiata D. don UV-B radiation response.

    PubMed

    Valledor, Luis; Cañal, María Jesús; Pascual, Jesús; Rodríguez, Roberto; Meijón, Mónica

    2012-11-01

    The continuous atmospheric and environmental deterioration is likely to increase, among others, the influx of ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation. The plants have photoprotective responses, which are complex mechanisms involving different physiological responses, to avoid the damages caused by this radiation that may lead to plant death. We have studied the adaptive responses to UV-B in Pinus radiata, given the importance of this species in conifer forests and reforestation programs. We analyzed the photosynthetic activity, pigments content, and gene expression of candidate genes related to photosynthesis, stress and gene regulation in needles exposed to UV-B during a 96 h time course. The results reveal a clear increase of pigments under UV-B stress while photosynthetic activity decreased. The expression levels of the studied genes drastically changed after UV-B exposure, were stress related genes were upregulated while photosynthesis (RBCA and RBCS) and epigenetic regulation were downregulated (MSI1, CSDP2, SHM4). The novel gene PrELIP1, fully sequenced for this work, was upregulated and expressed mainly in the palisade parenchyma of needles. This gene has conserved domains related to the dissipation of the UV-B radiation that give to this protein a key role during photoprotection response of the needles in Pinus radiata. PMID:22471584

  18. GhCAX3 Gene, a Novel Ca2+/H+ Exchanger from Cotton, Confers Regulation of Cold Response and ABA Induced Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    He, Liangrong; Zhang, Wenwen; He, Xin; Zhang, Xianlong; Yang, Xiyan; Zhu, Longfu

    2013-01-01

    As a second messenger, Ca2+ plays a major role in cold induced transduction via stimulus-specific increases in [Ca2+]cyt, which is called calcium signature. During this process, CAXs (Ca2+/H+ exchangers) play critical role. For the first time, a putative Ca2+/H+ exchanger GhCAX3 gene from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. ‘YZ-1′) was isolated and characterized. It was highly expressed in all tissues of cotton except roots and fibers. This gene may act as a regulator in cotton’s response to abiotic stresses as it could be up-regulated by Ca2+, NaCl, ABA and cold stress. Similar to other CAXs, it was proved that GhCAX3 also had Ca2+ transport activity and the N-terminal regulatory region (NRR) through yeast complementation assay. Over-expression of GhCAX3 in tobacco showed less sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and seedling stages, and the phenotypic difference between wild type (WT) and transgenic plants was more significant when the NRR was truncated. Furthermore, GhCAX3 conferred cold tolerance in yeast as well as in tobacco seedlings based on physiological and molecular studies. However, transgenic plant seeds showed more sensitivity to cold stress compared to WT during seed germination, especially when expressed in N-terminal truncated version. Finally, the extent of sensitivity in transgenic lines was more severe than that in WT line under sodium tungstate treatment (an ABA repressor), indicating that ABA could alleviate cold sensitivity of GhCAX3 seeds, especially in short of its NRR. Meanwhile, we also found that overexpression of GhCAX3 could enhance some cold and ABA responsive marker genes. Taken together, these results suggested that GhCAX3 plays important roles in the cross-talk of ABA and cold signal transduction, and compared to full-length of GhCAX3, the absence of NRR could enhance the tolerance or sensitivity to cold stress, depending on seedling’s developmental stages. PMID:23776653

  19. Biphasic response of checkpoint control proteins in hyperoxia: Exposure to lower levels of oxygen induces genome maintenance genes in experimental baboon BPD

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kumuda C.; Wasnick, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Breathing high concentrations of oxygen (hyperoxia) causes lung injury and is associated with lung diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborns (PPHN). Hyperoxia (95–100%O2) causes DNA damage and growth arrest of lung cells and consequently cells die by apoptosis or necrosis. Although supplemental oxygen therapy is clinically important, the level and duration of hyperoxic exposure that would allow lung cells to reenter the cell cycle remains unclear. We hypothesized that cells exposed lower concentrations of hyperoxia will retain the capacity to enter cell cycle when recovered in room air. We employed varying concentrations of oxygen (21–95%) to determine the response of lung cells to hyperoxia. Our results indicate that cells were growth arrested and failed to reenter the cell cycle when exposed to greater than 60% oxygen. Cell cycle checkpoint proteins were increased in a biphasic manner, increasing until 70% oxygen, but declined in greater than 90% oxygen. Microarray analysis shows that there is significant decrease in the abundance of Cdks 6–8 and retinoblastoma protein (Rb), p107 and p130 in exposure to 90% oxygen for 48 hours. We further tested the effect of clinically relevant as needed oxygen [(pro-re-nada (prn)] in premature infant (125d and 140d) baboon model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The microarray results show that 6 or 14d PRN oxygen exposed animals had induced expression of chromosomal maintenance genes (MCMs), genes related to anti-inflammation, proliferation and differentiation. PMID:24939362

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Gene 3 (EBI3) Blocking Leads to Induce Antitumor Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Response and Suppress Tumor Growth in Colorectal Cancer by Bidirectional Reciprocal-Regulation STAT3 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yanfang; Chen, Qianqian; Du, Wenjing; Chen, Can; Li, Feifei; Yang, Jingying; Peng, Jianyu; Kang, Dongping; Lin, Bihua; Chai, Xingxing; Zhou, Keyuan; Zeng, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) is a member of the interleukin-12 (IL-12) family structural subunit and can form a heterodimer with IL-27p28 and IL-12p35 subunit to build IL-27 and IL-35, respectively. However, IL-27 stimulates whereas IL-35 inhibits antitumor T cell responses. To date, little is known about the role of EBI3 in tumor microenvironment. In this study, firstly we assessed EBI3, IL-27p28, IL-12p35, gp130, and p-STAT3 expression with clinicopathological parameters of colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues; then we evaluated the antitumor T cell responses and tumor growth with a EBI3 blocking peptide. We found that elevated EBI3 may be associated with IL-12p35, gp130, and p-STAT3 to promote CRC progression. EBI3 blocking peptide promoted antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response by inducing Granzyme B, IFN-γ production, and p-STAT3 expression and inhibited CRC cell proliferation and tumor growth to associate with suppressing gp130 and p-STAT3 expression. Taken together, these results suggest that EBI3 may mediate a bidirectional reciprocal-regulation STAT3 signaling pathway to assist the tumor escape immune surveillance in CRC. PMID:27247488

  1. Injury-induced immune responses in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Yvan; Buzgariu, Wanda; Reiter, Silke; Galliot, Brigitte

    2014-08-01

    The impact of injury-induced immune responses on animal regenerative processes is highly variable, positive or negative depending on the context. This likely reflects the complexity of the innate immune system that behaves as a sentinel in the transition from injury to regeneration. Early-branching invertebrates with high regenerative potential as Hydra provide a unique framework to dissect how injury-induced immune responses impact regeneration. A series of early cellular events likely require an efficient immune response after amputation, as antimicrobial defence, epithelial cell stretching for wound closure, migration of interstitial progenitors toward the wound, cell death, phagocytosis of cell debris, or reconstruction of the extracellular matrix. The analysis of the injury-induced transcriptomic modulations of 2636 genes annotated as immune genes in Hydra identified 43 genes showing an immediate/early pulse regulation in all regenerative contexts examined. These regulations point to an enhanced cytoprotection via ROS signaling (Nrf, C/EBP, p62/SQSMT1-l2), TNFR and TLR signaling (TNFR16-like, TRAF2l, TRAF5l, jun, fos-related, SIK2, ATF1/CREB, LRRC28, LRRC40, LRRK2), proteasomal activity (p62/SQSMT1-l1, Ced6/Gulf, NEDD8-conjugating enzyme Ubc12), stress proteins (CRYAB1, CRYAB2, HSP16.2, DnaJB9, HSP90a1), all potentially regulating NF-κB activity. Other genes encoding immune-annotated proteins such as NPYR4, GTPases, Swap70, the antiproliferative BTG1, enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (5-lipoxygenase, ACSF4), secreted clotting factors, secreted peptidases are also pulse regulated upon bisection. By contrast, metalloproteinases and antimicrobial peptide genes largely follow a context-dependent regulation, whereas the protease inhibitor α2macroglobulin gene exhibits a sustained up-regulation. Hence a complex immune response to injury is linked to wound healing and regeneration in Hydra. PMID:25086685

  2. MNK1-induced eIF-4E phosphorylation in myeloma cells: a pathway mediating IL-6-induced expansion and expression of genes involved in metabolic and proteotoxic responses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yijiang; Frost, Patrick; Hoang, Bao; Yang, Yonghui; Bardeleben, Carolyne; Gera, Joseph; Lichtenstein, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Because multiple myeloma (MM) cells are at risk for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, they require a carefully regulated mechanism to promote protein translation of selected transcripts when proliferation is stimulated. MAPK-interacting kinases (MNKs) may provide this mechanism by enhancing cap-dependent translation of a small number of critical transcripts. We, thus, tested whether MNKs played a role in MM responses to the myeloma growth factor interleukin-6 (IL-6). IL-6 activated MNK1 phosphorylation and induced phosphorylation of its substrate, eIF-4E, in MM lines and primary specimens. MNK paralysis, achieved pharmacologically or by shRNA, prevented MM expansion stimulated by IL-6. A phosphodefective eIF-4E mutant also prevented the IL-6 response, supporting the notion that MNK's role was via phosphorylation of eIF-4E. Both pharmacological MNK inhibition and expression of the phosphodefective eIF-4E mutant inhibited MM growth in mice. Although critical for IL-6-induced expansion, eIF-4E phosphorylation had no significant effect on global translation or Ig expression. Deep sequencing of ribosome-protected mRNAs revealed a repertoire of genes involved in metabolic processes and ER stress modulation whose translation was regulated by eIF-4E phosphorylation. These data indicate MM cells exploit the MNK/eIF-4E pathway for selective mRNA translation without enhancing global translation and risking ER stress. PMID:24714040

  3. Transfer RNA Derived Small RNAs Targeting Defense Responsive Genes Are Induced during Phytophthora capsici Infection in Black Pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    PubMed

    Asha, Srinivasan; Soniya, Eppurath V

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs derived from transfer RNAs were recently assigned as potential gene regulatory candidates for various stress responses in eukaryotes. In this study, we report on the cloning and identification of tRNA derived small RNAs from black pepper plants in response to the infection of the quick wilt pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. 5'tRFs cloned from black pepper were validated as highly expressed during P. capsici infection. A high-throughput systematic analysis of the small RNAome (sRNAome) revealed the predominance of 5'tRFs in the infected leaf and root. The abundance of 5'tRFs in the sRNAome and the defense responsive genes as their potential targets indicated their regulatory role during stress response in black pepper. The 5'Ala(CGC) tRF mediated cleavage was experimentally mapped at the tRF binding sites on the mRNA targets of Non-expresser of pathogenesis related protein (NPR1), which was down-regulated during pathogen infection. Comparative sRNAome further demonstrated sequence conservation of 5'Ala tRFs across the angiosperm plant groups, and many important genes in the defense response were identified in silico as their potential targets. Our findings uncovered the diversity, differential expression and stress responsive functional role of tRNA-derived small RNAs during Phytophthora infection in black pepper. PMID:27313593

  4. Transfer RNA Derived Small RNAs Targeting Defense Responsive Genes Are Induced during Phytophthora capsici Infection in Black Pepper (Piper nigrum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Asha, Srinivasan; Soniya, Eppurath V.

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs derived from transfer RNAs were recently assigned as potential gene regulatory candidates for various stress responses in eukaryotes. In this study, we report on the cloning and identification of tRNA derived small RNAs from black pepper plants in response to the infection of the quick wilt pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. 5′tRFs cloned from black pepper were validated as highly expressed during P. capsici infection. A high-throughput systematic analysis of the small RNAome (sRNAome) revealed the predominance of 5′tRFs in the infected leaf and root. The abundance of 5′tRFs in the sRNAome and the defense responsive genes as their potential targets indicated their regulatory role during stress response in black pepper. The 5′AlaCGC tRF mediated cleavage was experimentally mapped at the tRF binding sites on the mRNA targets of Non-expresser of pathogenesis related protein (NPR1), which was down-regulated during pathogen infection. Comparative sRNAome further demonstrated sequence conservation of 5′Ala tRFs across the angiosperm plant groups, and many important genes in the defense response were identified in silico as their potential targets. Our findings uncovered the diversity, differential expression and stress responsive functional role of tRNA-derived small RNAs during Phytophthora infection in black pepper. PMID:27313593

  5. The Surgically Induced Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes which induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to improve chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  6. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  7. GENE METHYLATION CHANGES IN TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES INDUCED BY ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The choice of a dose-response model used for extrapolation can be influenced by knowledge of mechanism of action. We have already showed that arsenic affects methylation of the human p53 gene promoter. Evidence that genes other than the p53 tumor suppressor gene are affected woul...

  8. Changes in DNA methylation and gene expression during 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced suppression of the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IgM response in splenocytes.

    PubMed

    McClure, Emily A; North, Colin M; Kaminski, Norbert E; Goodman, Jay I

    2011-04-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a bacterial endotoxin and a potent B-cell activator capable of inducing a humoral immune response. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a well-established immunotoxicant that can suppress humoral immune responses, including those initiated by LPS stimulation. In murine models, TCDD-induced suppression of the LPS-activated primary immunoglobulin M (IgM) response is observed both in vivo and in vitro and is typically evaluated as a decrease in the number of IgM antibody-forming cells. The TCDD-induced suppression of the primary humoral immune response occurs, at least in part, upstream of IgM production. The current study was designed as an initial test of our hypothesis that altered DNA methylation, an epigenetic event, is involved in the LPS-induced IgM response by splenocytes as is the suppression of this response by TCDD. Splenocyte-derived DNA from mice treated in vivo with sesame oil + PBS, LPS, TCDD, or LPS + TCDD was used for the current investigation. DNA methylation was evaluated using a technique that permits assessment of the methylation status of multiple genomic regions simultaneously in an unbiased fashion (no specific genes or genomic regions are preselected). Additionally, the expression of selected genes was determined. Our results indicate that treatment with LPS or TCDD can alter DNA methylation and, importantly, combined TCDD + LPS results in altered DNA methylation that was not simply the addition of the changes discerned in the individual treatment groups. Thus, we have identified cross talk between LPS and TCDD at the level of DNA methylation and gene expression. PMID:21212295

  9. pOp6/LhGR: a stringently regulated and highly responsive dexamethasone-inducible gene expression system for tobacco.

    PubMed

    Samalova, Marketa; Brzobohaty, Bretislav; Moore, Ian

    2005-03-01

    We describe pOp/LhGR, a dexamethasone-inducible derivative of the pOp/LhG4 transcription activation system, and its use in tobacco to regulate expression of uidA (encoding beta-glucuronidase; GUS) and the cytokinin-biosnythetic gene ipt. The pOp/LhGR system exhibited stringent regulation and strong induced phenotypes in soil and tissue culture. In conjunction with an improved target promoter, pOp6, that carries six copies of an optimized lac operator sequence the pOp6/LhGR system directed induced GUS activities that exceeded those obtained with pOp/LhG4 or the CaMV 35S promoter but without increased uninduced activity. A single dose of dexamethasone was sufficient to direct cytotoxic levels of ipt expression in soil-grown plants although uninduced plants grew normally throughout a complete life cycle. In vitro, induced transcripts were detectable within an hour of dexamethasone application and 1 nM dexamethasone was sufficient for half maximal induction of GUS activity. Various methods of dexamethasone application were successfully applied under tissue culture and greenhouse conditions. We observed no inhibitory effects of dexamethasone or LhGR on plant development even with the highest concentrations of inducer, although tobacco seedlings were adversely affected by ethanol used as a solvent for dexamethasone stock solutions. The pOp/LhGR system provides a highly sensitive, efficient, and tightly regulated chemically inducible transgene expression system for tobacco plants. PMID:15743454

  10. Interferon γ-inducible Protein (IFI) 16 Transcriptionally Regulates Type I Interferons and Other Interferon-stimulated Genes and Controls the Interferon Response to both DNA and RNA Viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mikayla R.; Sharma, Shruti; Atianand, Maninjay; Jensen, Søren B.; Carpenter, Susan; Knipe, David M.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.

    2014-01-01

    The interferon γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) has recently been linked to the detection of nuclear and cytosolic DNA during infection with herpes simplex virus-1 and HIV. IFI16 binds dsDNA via HIN200 domains and activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), leading to TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator)-binding kinase-1 (TBK1)-dependent phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and transcription of type I interferons (IFNs) and related genes. To better understand the role of IFI16 in coordinating type I IFN gene regulation, we generated cell lines with stable knockdown of IFI16 and examined responses to DNA and RNA viruses as well as cyclic dinucleotides. As expected, stable knockdown of IFI16 led to a severely attenuated type I IFN response to DNA ligands and viruses. In contrast, expression of the NF-κB-regulated cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β was unaffected in IFI16 knockdown cells, suggesting that the role of IFI16 in sensing these triggers was unique to the type I IFN pathway. Surprisingly, we also found that knockdown of IFI16 led to a severe attenuation of IFN-α and the IFN-stimulated gene retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) in response to cyclic GMP-AMP, a second messenger produced by cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) as well as RNA ligands and viruses. Analysis of IFI16 knockdown cells revealed compromised occupancy of RNA polymerase II on the IFN-α promoter in these cells, suggesting that transcription of IFN-stimulated genes is dependent on IFI16. These results indicate a broader role for IFI16 in the regulation of the type I IFN response to RNA and DNA viruses in antiviral immunity. PMID:25002588

  11. Cold-responsive gene regulation during cold acclimation in plants.

    PubMed

    Lissarre, Mickael; Ohta, Masaru; Sato, Aiko; Miura, Kenji

    2010-08-01

    Regulation of the transcriptome is necessary for plants to acquire cold tolerance, and cold induces several genes via a cold signaling pathway. The transcription factors CBF/DREB1 (C-repeat binding factor/dehydration responsive element binding1) and ICE1 (inducer of CBF expression1) have important roles in the regulation of cold-responsive gene expression. ICE1 is post-translationally regulated by ubiquitylation-mediated proteolysis and sumoylation. This mini-review highlights some recent studies on plant cold signaling. The relationships among cold signaling, salicylic acid accumulation and stomatal development are also discussed. PMID:20699657

  12. Reconstruction of Gene Networks of Iron Response in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P; Luo, Feng; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin Koo; Gao, Haichun; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    It is of great interest to study the iron response of the -proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis since it possesses a high content of iron and is capable of utilizing iron for anaerobic respiration. We report here that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. To gain more insights into the bacterial response to iron, temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, resulting in identification of iron-responsive biological pathways in a gene co-expression network. Iron acquisition systems, including genes unique to S. oneidensis, were rapidly and strongly induced by iron depletion, and repressed by iron repletion. Some were required for iron depletion, as exemplified by the mutational analysis of the putative siderophore biosynthesis protein SO3032. Unexpectedly, a number of genes related to anaerobic energy metabolism were repressed by iron depletion and induced by repletion, which might be due to the iron storage potential of their protein products. Other iron-responsive biological pathways include protein degradation, aerobic energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Furthermore, sequence motifs enriched in gene clusters as well as their corresponding DNA-binding proteins (Fur, CRP and RpoH) were identified, resulting in a regulatory network of iron response in S. oneidensis. Together, this work provides an overview of iron response and reveals novel features in S. oneidensis, including Shewanella-specific iron acquisition systems, and suggests the intimate relationship between anaerobic energy metabolism and iron response.

  13. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  14. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  15. Five-aza-2′-deoxycytidine-induced hypomethylation of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase gene is responsible for cell death of myelodysplasia/leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsujioka, Takayuki; Yokoi, Akira; Itano, Yoshitaro; Takahashi, Kentaro; Ouchida, Mamoru; Okamoto, Shuichiro; Kondo, Toshinori; Suemori, Shin-ichiro; Tohyama, Yumi; Tohyama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMT inhibitors) are administered for high-risk MDS, but their action mechanisms are not fully understood. Hence, we performed a genome-wide DNA methylation assay and focused on cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) among the genes whose expression was up-regulated and whose promoter region was hypomethylated after decitabine (DAC) treatment in vitro. CH25H catalyzes hydroxylation of cholesterol and produces 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-OHC). Although CH25H mRNA expression level was originally low in MDS/leukemia cell lines, exposure to DNMT inhibitors enhanced CH25H mRNA expression. The promoter region of CH25H was originally hypermethylated in HL-60 and MDS-L cells, but DAC treatment induced their hypomethylation together with increased CH25H mRNA expression, activation of CH25H-oxysterol pathway, 25-OHC production and apoptotic cell death. We further confirmed that normal CD34-positive cells revealed hypomethylated status of the promoter region of CH25H gene. CH25H-knockdown by transfection of shRNA lentiviral vector into the cell lines partially protected the cells from DAC-induced cell death. Exogenous addition of 25-OHC suppressed leukemic cell growth. The present study raises a possibility that DNMT inhibitors activate CH25H-oxysterol pathway by their hypomethylating mechanism and induce leukemic cell death. Further investigations of the promoter analysis of CH25H gene and therapeutic effects of DNMT inhibitors on MDS/leukemia will be warranted. PMID:26577244

  16. The novel white spot syndrome virus-induced gene, PmERP15, encodes an ER stress-responsive protein in black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Leu, Jiann-Horng; Liu, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Wang, Yu-Bin; Lin, Chung-Yen; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2015-04-01

    By microarray screening, we identified a white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-strongly induced novel gene in gills of Penaeus monodon. The gene, PmERP15, encodes a putative transmembrane protein of 15 kDa, which only showed some degree of similarity (54-59%) to several unknown insect proteins, but had no hits to shrimp proteins. RT-PCR showed that PmERP15 was highly expressed in the hemocytes, heart and lymphoid organs, and that WSSV-induced strong expression of PmERP15 was evident in all tissues examined. Western blot analysis likewise showed that WSSV strongly up-regulated PmERP15 protein levels. In WSSV-infected hemocytes, immunofluorescence staining showed that PmERP15 protein was colocalized with an ER enzyme, protein disulfide isomerase, and in Sf9 insect cells, PmERP15-EGFP fusion protein colocalized with ER -Tracker™ Red dye as well. GRP78, an ER stress marker, was found to be up-regulated in WSSV-infected P. monodon, and both PmERP15 and GRP78 were up-regulated in shrimp injected with ER stress inducers tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Silencing experiments showed that although PmERP15 dsRNA-injected shrimp succumbed to WSSV infection more rapidly, the WSSV copy number had no significant changes. These results suggest that PmERP15 is an ER stress-induced, ER resident protein, and its induction in WSSV-infected shrimp is caused by the ER stress triggered by WSSV infection. Furthermore, although PmERP15 has no role in WSSV multiplication, its presence is essential for the survival of WSSV-infected shrimp. PMID:25499032

  17. Vaccinia viruses with a serpin gene deletion and expressing IFN-γ induce potent immune responses without detectable replication in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Fatema A.; Verardi, Paulo H.; Chan, Kenneth S.; Peng, Yue; Jones, Leslie A.; Yilma, Tilahun D.

    2005-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop safe and efficacious vaccine and immunotherapeutic vectors, we constructed recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) vaccines lacking either the B13R (SPI-2) or the B22R (SPI-1) immune-modulating gene and coexpressing IFN-γ. B13R and B22R are nonessential VV immune-modulating genes that have antiapoptotic and antiinflammatory properties with sequence homology to serine protease inhibitors (serpins). IFN-γ is a cytokine with potent immunoregulatory, antineoplastic, and antiviral properties. We observed that these rVVs with a deletion in a serpin gene and expressing IFN-γ replicated to high titers in tissue culture yet were avirulent in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent mice with no detectable viral replication in these animals. A single immunization elicited potent humoral, T helper, and cytotoxic T cell immune responses in mice despite the absence of any detectable virus replication in vivo. IFN-γ coexpression and the inactivation of one or more VV immune-modulating genes provide an optimized method for increasing the safety while maintaining the efficacy of rVV vaccines. This strategy provides a method for developing highly safe and efficacious vaccines for smallpox and other diseases and immunotherapeutic vectors. PMID:15705716

  18. Deletion of the α-(1,3)-Glucan Synthase Genes Induces a Restructuring of the Conidial Cell Wall Responsible for the Avirulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Beauvais, Anne; Bozza, Silvia; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Formosa, Céline; Balloy, Viviane; Henry, Christine; Roberson, Robert W.; Dague, Etienne; Chignard, Michel; Brakhage, Axel A.; Romani, Luigina; Latgé, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    α-(1,3)-Glucan is a major component of the cell wall of Aspergillus fumigatus, an opportunistic human fungal pathogen. There are three genes (AGS1, AGS2 and AGS3) controlling the biosynthesis of α-(1,3)-glucan in this fungal species. Deletion of all the three AGS genes resulted in a triple mutant that was devoid of α-(1,3)-glucan in its cell wall; however, its growth and germination was identical to that of the parental strain in vitro. In the experimental murine aspergillosis model, this mutant was less pathogenic than the parental strain. The AGS deletion resulted in an extensive structural modification of the conidial cell wall, especially conidial surface where the rodlet layer was covered by an amorphous glycoprotein matrix. This surface modification was responsible for viability reduction of conidia in vivo, which explains decrease in the virulence of triple agsΔ mutant. PMID:24244155

  19. Responses of a triple mutant defective in three iron deficiency-induced Basic Helix-Loop-Helix genes of the subgroup Ib(2) to iron deficiency and salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Felix; Naranjo Arcos, Maria Augusta; Bauer, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that adapt to external stress by inducing molecular and physiological responses that serve to better cope with the adverse growth condition. Upon low supply of the micronutrient iron, plants actively increase the acquisition of soil iron into the root and its mobilization from internal stores. The subgroup Ib(2) BHLH genes function as regulators in this response, however their concrete functions are not fully understood. Here, we analyzed a triple loss of function mutant of BHLH39, BHLH100 and BHLH101 (3xbhlh mutant). We found that this mutant did not have any iron uptake phenotype if iron was provided. However, under iron deficiency the mutant displayed a more severe leaf chlorosis than the wild type. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis revealed that this mutant phenotype resulted in the mis-regulation of 198 genes, out of which only 15% were associated with iron deficiency regulation itself. A detailed analysis revealed potential targets of the bHLH transcription factors as well as genes reflecting an exaggerated iron deficiency response phenotype. Since the BHLH genes of this subgroup have been brought into the context of the plant hormone salicylic acid, we investigated whether the 3xbhlh mutant might have been affected by this plant signaling molecule. Although a very high number of genes responded to SA, also in a differential manner between mutant and wild type, we did not find any indication for an association of the BHLH gene functions in SA responses upon iron deficiency. In summary, our study indicates that the bHLH subgroup Ib(2) transcription factors do not only act in iron acquisition into roots but in other aspects of the adaptation to iron deficiency in roots and leaves. PMID:24919188

  20. Responses of a Triple Mutant Defective in Three Iron Deficiency-Induced BASIC HELIX-LOOP-HELIX Genes of the Subgroup Ib(2) to Iron Deficiency and Salicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Felix; Naranjo Arcos, Maria Augusta; Bauer, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that adapt to external stress by inducing molecular and physiological responses that serve to better cope with the adverse growth condition. Upon low supply of the micronutrient iron, plants actively increase the acquisition of soil iron into the root and its mobilization from internal stores. The subgroup Ib(2) BHLH genes function as regulators in this response, however their concrete functions are not fully understood. Here, we analyzed a triple loss of function mutant of BHLH39, BHLH100 and BHLH101 (3xbhlh mutant). We found that this mutant did not have any iron uptake phenotype if iron was provided. However, under iron deficiency the mutant displayed a more severe leaf chlorosis than the wild type. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis revealed that this mutant phenotype resulted in the mis-regulation of 198 genes, out of which only 15% were associated with iron deficiency regulation itself. A detailed analysis revealed potential targets of the bHLH transcription factors as well as genes reflecting an exaggerated iron deficiency response phenotype. Since the BHLH genes of this subgroup have been brought into the context of the plant hormone salicylic acid, we investigated whether the 3xbhlh mutant might have been affected by this plant signaling molecule. Although a very high number of genes responded to SA, also in a differential manner between mutant and wild type, we did not find any indication for an association of the BHLH gene functions in SA responses upon iron deficiency. In summary, our study indicates that the bHLH subgroup Ib(2) transcription factors do not only act in iron acquisition into roots but in other aspects of the adaptation to iron deficiency in roots and leaves. PMID:24919188

  1. Virus-induced gene complementation in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jinhua; Chen, Weiwei; Shen, Jiajia; Qin, Cheng; Lai, Tongfei; Zhang, Pengcheng; Wang, Ying; Wu, Chaoqun; Yang, Xin; Hong, Yiguo

    2013-01-01

    Virus-induced gene complementation (VIGC), a plant virus technology based on Potato virus X for transient overexpression of endogenous genes complemented tomato mutants, resulting in non-ripening fruits to ripen. This efficient “gain-of-function” approach involves no stable transformation, and reveals a fruit-specific transcriptional network that may exist among key transcription factors in modulating tomato ripening. Thus, VIGC represents a novel and feasible strategy for gene functional analysis in plants. PMID:24305652

  2. Suppression subtractive hybridization identifies genes induced in response to UV-B irradiation in apple skin: isolation of a putative UDP-glucose 4-epimerase.

    PubMed

    Ban, Yusuke; Honda, Chikako; Bessho, Hideo; Pang, Xiao-Ming; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2007-01-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) successfully identified 11 cDNAs in apple skin with highly induced expression as a result of ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation. Apart from three putative flavonoid biosynthetic genes, chalcone synthase (CHS; A5C), flavanone-3-hydroxylase (F3H; B5F), and flavonol synthase (FLS; D1F), five clones (A1H, A10E, B11G, D5F, and D11H) were induced by low temperature (17 degrees C) as well, which is also known to induce anthocyanin accumulation in apple skin. Moreover, four clones (A1H, A10E, B11G, and D11H), showing higher expression levels in the skin, accumulated higher anthocyanin concentrations than their counterparts. Of the four clones, only A10E, a putative UDP-glucose 4-epimerase (UGE), was deemed to play an important role in anthocyanin accumulation in apple skin based on the facts that: (i) its transcription level was higher in the deep red cultivar, 'Jonathan', than in the pale red cultivar, 'Tsugaru'; and (ii) it could reversibly catalyse UDP-glucose to UDP-galactose, and the latter molecule is a major sugar donor for cyanidin-glycoside in apple. Therefore, the full-length cDNA of A10E was isolated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and designated as MdUGE1. Further analysis demonstrated that UGE enzymatic activity was positively correlated with anthocyanin accumulation in apple skin. Thus, MdUGE1 isolated by SSH could play an important role in anthocyanin biosynthesis in apple skin in concert with other flavonoid biosynthetic genes. PMID:17404384

  3. Immune responses in rats and sheep induced by a DNA vaccine containing the phosphoglycerate kinase gene of Fasciola hepatica and liver fluke infection.

    PubMed

    Wesołowska, Agnieszka; Zawistowska-Deniziak, Anna; Norbury, Luke J; Wilkowski, Przemysław; Januszkiewicz, Kamil; Pyziel, Anna M; Zygner, Wojciech; Wędrychowicz, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Immune responses of rats and sheep following vaccination with cDNA encoding phosphoglycerate kinase of Fasciola hepatica (cDNA-FhPGK/pCMV) and F. hepatica infection were investigated in the present study. cDNA-FhPGK/pCMV vaccinated female Sprague-Dawley rats were better protected by vaccination than their male counterparts - 48% reduction in fluke burden for females and no protection for males when compared with appropriate infection control groups. Moreover, male rats developed marked leukocytosis during the study with higher neutrophil, eosinophil and monocyte responses than females. Additionally, dynamics of eosinophil and monocyte responses varied between sexes. Increased titres of anti-FhPGK IgG1 and IgG2a correlated with the protective effect of vaccination that was observed among female rats. In the case of male sheep, no differences in worm burdens and in the course of the immune response were observed following vaccination. Titres of specific antibodies detected were low, and cellular responses were not significant. Apparently, sheep immune responses induced by cDNA-FhPGK/pCMV vaccination are not effective at controlling F. hepatica infection. Poor immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in large animals is still a major obstacle of this technology that has to be overcome. PMID:27078643

  4. Early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) regulates pro-inflammatory gene expression in response to palmitate and TNF alpha in human placenta cells and is induced in obese placenta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal obesity has been hypothesized to induce a pro-inflammatory response in the placenta. However, the specific factors contributing to this pro-infalmmatory response are yet to be determined. Our objective was to examine the effects of palmitic acid (PA), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alph...

  5. Evaluation of the systemic acute phase response and endometrial gene expression of serum amyloid A and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in mares with experimentally induced endometritis.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, Mette; Mette, Christoffersen; Baagoe, Camilla Dooleweerdt; Camilla Dooleweerdt, Baagoe; Jacobsen, Stine; Stine, Jacobsen; Bojesen, Anders Miki; Anders Miki, Bojesen; Petersen, Morten Roenn; Morten Roenn, Petersen; Lehn-Jensen, Henrik; Henrik, Lehn-Jensen

    2010-11-15

    Infectious infertility in the mare is clinically well described, little is however known about the systemic acute phase reaction (APR) and local immunological responses accompanying equine endometritis. The aim of this study was to monitor selected markers of the APR in the systemic circulation and to correlate them to the local innate immune response in the uterus during infectious endometritis. Six adult standard bred mares received an intrauterine infusion of 10(9)CFU Escherichia coli. Blood samples were obtained before (0 h) and 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h post inoculation (pi), and endometrial biopsies were sampled before, and 3, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h pi. The infectious endometritis elicited a systemic APR with significantly increased concentrations of the acute phase proteins (APPs) serum amyloid A (SAA) and fibrinogen. Relative gene expression analyses were performed on extracted RNA from endometrial biopsies using quantitative real-time PCR and specific primers for SAA and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Expression of SAA was significantly up-regulated at 3 and 12h pi, and a significant up-regulated expression of IL-1β, TNFα, IL-8 and IL-10 was observed at 3h pi. Plasma concentration of SAA was significantly correlated to endometrial SAA expression. The results of the present study demonstrate that endometritis gives rise to a systemic APR and an up-regulated endometrial gene expression of SAA and several pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Understanding endometrial expression of acute phase proteins and selected cytokines contributing to uterine immunity in equine endometritis could improve understanding of events leading to infertility in the mare and help identify candidate genes of mediators/markers for diagnostic use. PMID:20728224

  6. Retinoic acid activates human inducible nitric oxide synthase gene through binding of RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer to a novel retinoic acid response element in the promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Fang; Liu Yan; Liu Li; Wu Kailang; Wei Wei; Zhu Ying . E-mail: yingzhu@whu.edu.cn; Wu Jianguo . E-mail: wu9988@vip.sina.com

    2007-04-06

    Human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) catalyzes nitric oxide (NO) which has a significant effect on tumor suppression and cancer therapy. Here we revealed the detailed molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of hiNOS expression induced by retinoic acid (RA). We showed that RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer was important in hiNOS promoter activation, hiNOS protein expression, and NO production. Serial deletion and site-directed mutation analysis revealed two half-sites of retinoic acid response element (RARE) spaced by 5 bp located at -172 to -156 in the hiNOS promoter. EMSA and ChIP assays demonstrated that RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} directly bound to this RARE of hiNOS promoter. Our results suggested the identification of a novel RARE in the hiNOS promoter and the roles of the nuclear receptors (RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha}) in the induction of hiNOS by RA.

  7. Promoter analysis of TCDD-inducible genes in a thymic epithelial cell line indicates the potential for cell-specific transcription factor crosstalk in the AhR response

    SciTech Connect

    Frericks, Markus; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Esser, Charlotte

    2008-10-15

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR{sup 1}) by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) elicits severe immunosuppression accompanied by thymic atrophy. Previous evidence suggests that TCDD targets both thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells. The AhR induces cell-specific changes in gene transcription via binding to the dioxin response element DRE; however, the underlying specificity-mechanisms, in particular with regard to the role of promoter element context, and possible transcription factor crosstalk remain poorly understood. Global gene expression in the cortical thymic epithelial cell line ET at 2, 4, and 6 h following 5 nM TCDD exposure resulted in differential regulation of 201 genes. JASPAR and TRANSFAC mapped the statistically over-represented promoter elements in the regulated genes to specific transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a regulatory role in AhR signaling. Over-represented elements included the xenobiotic response element XRE, NF{kappa}B-Rel, HRE, PPAR{gamma}, GR, PAX-4 and estrogen receptor binding sites. Co-treatment experiments with TCDD and CoCl{sub 2}, to induce hypoxia, or TCDD and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) indicated crosstalk between AhR and Hif or ER, in agreement with other experimental models. The computational identification of TFBS and the demonstration of interaction confirm their interactions with AhR signaling and suggest that the other over-represented elements may also be important in the immunosuppressive effects elicited by TCDD. In conclusion, we demonstrated the importance of promoter element cooperation in the shaping of a cell-specific AhR response. Our findings regarding the transcriptional changes in cortical epithelial cells are congruent with the well-known thymotoxic TCDD-phenotype, and useful in new hypothesis generation of the role of cortical TECs in TCDD toxicity.

  8. Retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptor (RLR)-mediated antiviral innate immune responses in the lower respiratory tract: Roles of TRAF3 and TRAF5.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yuki; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Satoh, Tsugumi; Hayakari, Ryo; Furudate, Ken; Xing, Fei; Yoshida, Hidemi; Tanji, Kunikazu; Mizukami, Hiroki; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Ito, Etsuro

    2015-11-13

    Upon viral infection, the cytoplasmic viral sensor retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) recognizes viral RNA to activate antiviral signaling to induce type I interferon (IFN). RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) activate antiviral signaling in a tissue-specific manner. The molecular mechanism underlying antiviral signaling in the respiratory system remains unclear. We studied antiviral signaling in the lower respiratory tract (LRT), which is the site of many harmful viral infections. Epithelial cells of the LRT can be roughly divided into two groups: bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) and pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). These two cell types exhibit different phenotypes; therefore, we hypothesized that these cells may play different roles in antiviral innate immunity. We found that BECs exhibited higher antiviral activity than AECs. TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) has been shown to be a crucial molecule in RLR signaling. The expression levels of TRAF3 and TRAF5, which have conserved domains that are nearly identical, in the LRT were examined. We found that the bronchus exhibited the highest expression levels of TRAF3 and TRAF5 in the LRT. These findings suggest the importance of the bronchus in antiviral innate immunity in the LRT and indicate that TRAF3 and TRAF5 may contribute to RLR signaling. PMID:26454171

  9. The cytochrome P450 2AA gene cluster in zebrafish (Danio rerio); expression of CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2 and response to phenobarbital-type inducers

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Akira; Bainy, Afonso C.D.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2 gene family is the largest and most diverse CYP gene family in vertebrates. In zebrafish, we have identified 10 genes in a new subfamily CYP2AA, which does not show orthology to any human or other mammalian CYP genes. Here we report evolutionary and structural relationships of the 10 CYP2AA genes and expression of the first two genes, CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2. Parsimony reconstruction of the tandem duplication pattern for the CYP2AA cluster suggests that CYP2AA1, CYP2AA2 and CYP2AA3 likely arose in the earlier duplication events and thus are most diverged in function from the other CYP2AAs. On the other hand, CYP2AA8 and CYP2AA9 are genes that arose in the latest duplication event, implying functional similarity between these two CYPs. A molecular model of CYP2AA1 showing the sequence conservation across the CYP2AA cluster reveals that the regions with the highest variability within the cluster map into CYP2AA1 near the substrate access channels, suggesting differing substrate specificity. Zebrafish CYP2AA1 transcript was expressed predominantly in intestine, while CYP2AA2 was most highly expressed in kidney, suggesting differing roles in physiology. In liver CYP2AA2 expression but not that of CYP2AA1, was increased by 1,4-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) and, to a lesser extent, by phenobarbital (PB). In contrast, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) increased CYP2AA1, but not CYP2AA2 in liver. The results identify a CYP2 subfamily in zebrafish that includes genes apparently induced by PB-type chemicals and PXR agonists, the first concrete in vivo evidence for a PB-type response in fish. PMID:23726801

  10. Synapsins are late activity-induced genes regulated by birdsong

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Tarciso A. F.; Mello, Claudio V.

    2008-01-01

    The consolidation of long-lasting sensory memories requires the activation of gene expression programs in the brain. In spite of considerable knowledge about the early components of this response, little is known about late components (i.e. genes regulated 2-6 hr after stimulation) and the relationship between early and late genes. Birdsong represents one of the best natural behaviors to study sensory-induced gene expression in awake, freely behaving animals. Here we show that the expression of several isoforms of synapsins, a group of phosphoproteins thought to regulate the dynamics of synaptic vesicle storage and release, is induced by auditory stimulation with birdsong in the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM) of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) brain. This induction occurs mainly in excitatory (non-GABAergic) neurons and is modulated (suppressed) by early song-inducible proteins. We also show that ZENK, an early song-inducible transcription factor, interacts with the syn3 promoter in vivo, consistent with a direct regulatory effect and an emerging novel view of ZENK action. These results demonstrate that synapsins are a late component of the genomic response to neuronal activation and that their expression depends on a complex set of regulatory interactions between early and late regulated genes. PMID:19005052

  11. Macrophage Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Response to EMCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Zachary R.; Corbett, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The expression and production of type 1 interferon is the classic cellular response to virus infection. In addition to this antiviral response, virus infection also stimulates the production of proinflammatory mediators. In this review, the pathways controlling the induction of inflammatory genes and the roles that these inflammatory mediators contribute to host defense against viral pathogens will be discussed. Specific focus will be on the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5, as a signaling receptor controlling the activation of pathways leading to virus-induced inflammatory gene expression. PMID:26295266

  12. Tumour suppressor genes in chemotherapeutic drug response

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Dulcie; Visser-Grieve, Stacy; Yang, Xiaolong

    2012-01-01

    Since cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, there is an urgent need to find better treatments. Currently, the use of chemotherapeutics remains the predominant option for cancer therapy. However, one of the major obstacles for successful cancer therapy using these chemotherapeutics is that patients often do not respond or eventually develop resistance after initial treatment. Therefore identification of genes involved in chemotherapeutic response is critical for predicting tumour response and treating drug-resistant cancer patients. A group of genes commonly lost or inactivated are tumour suppressor genes, which can promote the initiation and progression of cancer through regulation of various biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell death and cell migration/invasion. Recently, mounting evidence suggests that these tumour suppressor genes also play a very important role in the response of cancers to a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs. In the present review, we will provide a comprehensive overview on how major tumour suppressor genes [Rb (retinoblastoma), p53 family, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, BRCA1 (breast-cancer susceptibility gene 1), PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10), Hippo pathway, etc.] are involved in chemotherapeutic drug response and discuss their applications in predicting the clinical outcome of chemotherapy for cancer patients. We also propose that tumour suppressor genes are critical chemotherapeutic targets for the successful treatment of drug-resistant cancer patients in future applications. PMID:22762204

  13. High magnetic field induced changes of gene expression in arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J; Meisel, Mark W

    2006-01-01

    Background High magnetic fields are becoming increasingly prevalent components of non-invasive, biomedical imaging tools (such as MRI), thus, an understanding of the molecular impacts associated with these field strengths in biological systems is of central importance. The biological impact of magnetic field strengths up to 30 Tesla were investigated in this study through the use of transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Methods Magnetic field induced Adh/GUS activity was evaluated with histochemical staining to assess tissue specific expression and distribution, and with quantitative, spectrofluometric assays to measure degree of activation. The evaluation of global changes in the Arabidopsis genome in response to exposure to high magnetic fields was facilitated with Affymetrix Gene Chip microarrays. Quantitative analyses of gene expression were performed with quantitative real-time polymerase-chain-reaction (qRT-PCR). Results Field strengths in excess of about 15 Tesla induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. From the microarray analyses that surveyed 8000 genes, 114 genes were differentially expressed to a degree greater than 2.5 fold over the control. These results were quantitatively corroborated by qRT-PCR examination of 4 of the 114 genes. Conclusion The data suggest that magnetic fields in excess of 15 Tesla have far-reaching effect on the genome. The wide-spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism, are prominent examples. The roles of magnetic field orientation of macromolecules and magnetophoretic effects are discussed as possible factors that contribute to the mounting of this response. PMID:17187667

  14. Ask1 Gene Deletion Blocks Maternal Diabetes–Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Developing Embryo by Disrupting the Unfolded Protein Response Signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Wu, Yanqing; Gu, Hui; Reece, E. Albert; Fang, Shengyun; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat; Aberdeen, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis signal–regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is activated by various stresses. The link between ASK1 activation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, two causal events in diabetic embryopathy, has not been determined. We sought to investigate whether ASK1 is involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) that leads to ER stress. Deleting Ask1 abrogated diabetes-induced UPR by suppressing phosphorylation of inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α), and double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) blocked the mitochondrial translocation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 members and ER stress. ASK1 participated in the IRE1α signalosome, and removing ASK1 abrogated the proapoptotic kinase activity of IRE1α. Ask1 deletion suppressed diabetes-induced IRE1α endoriboneclease activities, which led to X-box binding protein 1 mRNA cleavage, an ER stress marker, decreased expression of microRNAs, and increased expression of a miR-17 target, thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip), a thioredoxin binding protein, which enhanced ASK1 activation by disrupting the thioredoxin-ASK1 complexes. ASK1 is essential for the assembly and function of the IRE1α signalosome, which forms a positive feedback loop with ASK1 through Txnip. ASK1 knockdown in C17.2 neural stem cells diminished high glucose– or tunicamycin-induced IRE1α activation, which further supports our hypothesis that ASK1 plays a causal role in diabetes-induced ER stress and apoptosis. PMID:25249581

  15. The cytochrome P450 2AA gene cluster in zebrafish (Danio rerio): Expression of CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2 and response to phenobarbital-type inducers

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Akira; Bainy, Afonso C.D.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2013-10-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2 gene family is the largest and most diverse CYP gene family in vertebrates. In zebrafish, we have identified 10 genes in a new subfamily, CYP2AA, which does not show orthology to any human or other mammalian CYP genes. Here we report evolutionary and structural relationships of the 10 CYP2AA genes and expression of the first two genes, CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2. Parsimony reconstruction of the tandem duplication pattern for the CYP2AA cluster suggests that CYP2AA1, CYP2AA2 and CYP2AA3 likely arose in the earlier duplication events and thus are most diverged in function from the other CYP2AAs. On the other hand, CYP2AA8 and CYP2AA9 are genes that arose in the latest duplication event, implying functional similarity between these two CYPs. A molecular model of CYP2AA1 showing the sequence conservation across the CYP2AA cluster reveals that the regions with the highest variability within the cluster map onto CYP2AA1 near the substrate access channels, suggesting differing substrate specificities. Zebrafish CYP2AA1 transcript was expressed predominantly in the intestine, while CYP2AA2 was most highly expressed in the kidney, suggesting differing roles in physiology. In the liver CYP2AA2 expression but not that of CYP2AA1, was increased by 1,4-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) and, to a lesser extent, by phenobarbital (PB). In contrast, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) increased CYP2AA1 expression, but not CYP2AA2 in the liver. The results identify a CYP2 subfamily in zebrafish that includes genes apparently induced by PB-type chemicals and PXR agonists, the first concrete in vivo evidence for a PB-type response in fish. - Highlights: • A tandemly duplicated cluster of ten CYP2AA genes was described in zebrafish. • Parsimony and duplication analyses suggest pathways to CYP2AA diversity. • Homology models reveal amino acid positions possibly related to functional diversity. • The CYP2AA locus does not share synteny with

  16. Radiation response and regulation of apoptosis induced by a combination of TRAIL and CHX in cells lacking mitochondrial DNA: A role for NF-{kappa}B-STAT3-directed gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladimir N. Ghandhi, Shanaz A.; Zhou, Hongning; Huang, Sarah X.; Chai, Yunfei; Amundson, Sally A.; Hei, Tom K.

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depleted ({rho}{sup 0}) human skin fibroblasts (HSF) with suppressed oxidative phosphorylation were characterized by significant changes in the expression of 2100 nuclear genes, encoding numerous protein classes, in NF-{kappa}B and STAT3 signaling pathways, and by decreased activity of mitochondrial death pathway, compared to the parental {rho}{sup +} HSF. In contrast, the extrinsic TRAIL/TRAIL-Receptor mediated death pathway remained highly active, and exogenous TRAIL in a combination with cycloheximide (CHX) induced higher levels of apoptosis in {rho}{sup 0} cells compared to {rho}{sup +} HSF. Global gene expression analysis using microarray and qRT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA expression levels of many growth factors and their adaptor proteins (FGF13, HGF, IGFBP4, IGFBP6, and IGFL2), cytokines (IL6, {Oota}L17{Beta}, {Oota}L18, {Oota}L19, and {Oota}L28{Beta}) and cytokine receptors (IL1R1, IL21R, and IL31RA) were substantially decreased after mitochondrial DNA depletion. Some of these genes were targets of NF-{kappa}B and STAT3, and their protein products could regulate the STAT3 signaling pathway. Alpha-irradiation further induced expression of several NF-{kappa}B/STAT3 target genes, including IL1A, IL1B, IL6, PTGS2/COX2 and MMP12, in {rho}{sup +} HSF, but this response was substantially decreased in {rho}{sup 0} HSF. Suppression of the IKK-NF-{kappa}B pathway by the small molecular inhibitor BMS-345541 and of the JAK2-STAT3 pathway by AG490 dramatically increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the control and irradiated {rho}{sup +} HSF. Inhibitory antibodies against IL6, the main activator of JAK2-STAT3 pathway, added into the cell media, also increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HSF, especially after alpha-irradiation. Collectively, our results indicated that NF-{kappa}B activation was partially lost in {rho}{sup 0} HSF resulting in downregulation of the basal or radiation-induced expression of numerous NF-{kappa}B targets, further suppressing IL6

  17. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 Restores the Expression of Auxin-Responsive Genes in Mutant Arabidopsis Leaf Mesophyll ProtoplastsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shucai; Tiwari, Shiv B.; Hagen, Gretchen; Guilfoyle, Tom J.

    2005-01-01

    AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 (ARF7) is one of five ARF transcriptional activators in Arabidopsis thaliana that is proposed to regulate auxin-responsive expression of genes containing TGTCTC auxin response elements in their promoters. An Arabidopsis mutant (nonphototropic hypocotyl4-1 [nph4-1]) that is a null for ARF7 showed strongly reduced expression of integrated auxin-responsive reporter genes and natural genes that were monitored in Arabidopsis leaf mesophyll protoplasts. Expression of the reporter and natural genes was restored in an auxin-dependent manner when protoplasts were transfected with a 35S:ARF7 effector gene, encoding a full-length ARF7 protein. Transfection of effector genes encoding other ARF activators restored auxin-responsive gene expression to varying degrees, but less than that observed with the ARF7 effector gene. Arabidopsis lines that were null for ARF6, ARF8, or ARF19 were not defective in expression of the reporter and natural auxin response genes assayed in mesophyll protoplasts, suggesting that ARF7 plays a major role in regulating expression of a subset of auxin response genes in leaf mesophyll cells. Auxin-responsive gene expression was induced in wild-type protoplasts and restored in nph4-1 protoplasts only with auxin and not with other hormones, including brassinolide. In the presence of auxin, however, brassinolide modestly enhanced auxin-responsive gene expression. PMID:15923351

  18. The Arabidopsis Stress Responsive Gene Database

    PubMed Central

    Borkotoky, Subhomoi; Saravanan, Vijayakumar; Jaiswal, Amit; Das, Bipul; Selvaraj, Suresh; Murali, Ayaluru; Lakshmi, P. T. V.

    2013-01-01

    Plants in nature may face a wide range of favorable or unfavorable biotic and abiotic factors during their life cycle. Any of these factors may cause stress in plants; therefore, they have to be more adaptable to stressful environments and must acquire greater response to different stresses. The objective of this study is to retrieve and arrange data from the literature in a standardized electronic format for the development of information resources on potential stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. This provides a powerful mean for manipulation, comparison, search, and retrieval of records describing the nature of various stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. The database is based exclusively on published stress tolerance genes associated with plants. PMID:23573074

  19. Transcriptional Response of Selenopolypeptide Genes and Selenocysteine Biosynthesis Machinery Genes in Escherichia coli during Selenite Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Tetteh, Antonia Y.; Sun, Katherine H.; Kittur, Farooqahmed S.; Ibeanu, Gordon C.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria can reduce toxic selenite into less toxic, elemental selenium (Se0), but the mechanism on how bacterial cells reduce selenite at molecular level is still not clear. We used Escherichia coli strain K12, a common bacterial strain, as a model to study its growth response to sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) treatment and then used quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to quantify transcript levels of three E. coli selenopolypeptide genes and a set of machinery genes for selenocysteine (SeCys) biosynthesis and incorporation into polypeptides, whose involvements in the selenite reduction are largely unknown. We determined that 5 mM Na2SeO3 treatment inhibited growth by ∼50% while 0.001 to 0.01 mM treatments stimulated cell growth by ∼30%. Under 50% inhibitory or 30% stimulatory Na2SeO3 concentration, selenopolypeptide genes (fdnG, fdoG, and fdhF) whose products require SeCys but not SeCys biosynthesis machinery genes were found to be induced ≥2-fold. In addition, one sulfur (S) metabolic gene iscS and two previously reported selenite-responsive genes sodA and gutS were also induced ≥2-fold under 50% inhibitory concentration. Our findings provide insight about the detoxification of selenite in E. coli via induction of these genes involved in the selenite reduction process. PMID:24839442

  20. Risperidone induces long-lasting changes in the conditioned avoidance response and accumbal gene expression selectively in animals treated as adolescents.

    PubMed

    Moe, Aung Aung Kywe; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Alexander, Suzanne; Cui, Xiaoying; Burne, Thomas H J; Eyles, Darryl W

    2016-09-01

    Adolescence is a period of dynamic remodeling and maturation in the brain. Exposure to psychotropic drugs during adolescence can potentially alter neural maturation in the adolescent brain subsequently altering neural function at maturity. In this regard, antipsychotic drugs (APDs) are important given a notable global increase in prescription of these APDs to adolescents for a variety of behavioural symptoms and conditions over the past twenty years. However, there is a paucity of data on the long-term consequences of APDs on the adolescent brain. In this preclinical study, we have examined whether the adolescent brain is more susceptible than the adult brain to long-term neural changes induced by risperidone, which is the APD most frequently prescribed to adolescents. Rats were chronically treated (21 days) with 1.3 mg/kg/day risperidone or vehicle either as adolescents (postnatal day (PND) 36-56)) or adults (PND80-100). Behaviour was assessed using the well-described suppression of the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) by APDs. We examined CAR after all animals had reached maturity (PND127). We show that mature rats treated with risperidone as adolescents had increased CAR suppression compared to adults when rechallenged with this same drug. In the nucleus accumbens, significant downregulation of serotonergic 5HT2A receptors and catechol-o-methyl transferase mRNA levels was observed only in the adolescent treated animals. Impaired 5HT2A receptor signaling may explain the increased CAR suppression observed in rats treated with risperidone as adolescents. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), however, did not detect any risperidone-induced long-term brain structural change at maturity. These findings confirm that APD administration during adolescence may produce long-term behavioural and neurochemical alterations. PMID:27130903

  1. Temperature-Responsive Gene Silencing by a Smart Polymer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingming; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-03-16

    Intracellular siRNA release is a crucial step in efficient gene silencing mediated by cationic polymers. Here, we show an example of temperature change-induced intracellular siRNA release and silencing using a temperature-responsive polymer consisting of dendrimer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and phenylboronic acid. The smart polymer can trigger the release of loaded siRNA in a controlled manner upon cooling the surrounding solution below its lower critical solution temperature. Gene silencing efficacy of the polymer was significantly increased by cool treatment after its cellular uptake. The polymer and the cool treatment cause minimal toxicity to the transfected cells. The results provide a facile and promising strategy to design stimuli-responsive polymers for efficient gene silencing. PMID:26783999

  2. Androgen-responsive gene database: integrated knowledge on androgen-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei; Ma, Yunsheng; Chen, Congcong; Fu, Xuping; Yang, Shu; Li, Xia; Yu, Guohua; Mao, Yumin; Xie, Yi; Li, Yao

    2009-11-01

    Androgen signaling plays an important role in many biological processes. Androgen Responsive Gene Database (ARGDB) is devoted to providing integrated knowledge on androgen-controlled genes. Gene records were collected on the basis of PubMed literature collections. More than 6000 abstracts and 950 original publications were manually screened, leading to 1785 human genes, 993 mouse genes, and 583 rat genes finally included in the database. All the collected genes were experimentally proved to be regulated by androgen at the expression level or to contain androgen-responsive regions. For each gene important details of the androgen regulation experiments were collected from references, such as expression change, androgen-responsive sequence, response time, tissue/cell type, experimental method, ligand identity, and androgen amount, which will facilitate further evaluation by researchers. Furthermore, the database was integrated with multiple annotation resources, including National Center for Biotechnology Information, Gene Ontology, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway, to reveal the biological characteristics and significance of androgen-regulated genes. The ARGDB web site is mainly composed of the Browse, Search, Element Scan, and Submission modules. It is user friendly and freely accessible at http://argdb.fudan.edu.cn. Preliminary analysis of the collected data was performed. Many disease pathways, such as prostate carcinogenesis, were found to be enriched in androgen-regulated genes. The discovered androgen-response motifs were similar to those in previous reports. The analysis results are displayed in the web site. In conclusion, ARGDB provides a unified gateway to storage, retrieval, and update of information on androgen-regulated genes. PMID:19762544

  3. A peptide tetramer Tk-tPN induces tolerance of cardiac allografting by conversion of type 1 to type 2 immune responses via the Toll-like receptor 2 signal-promoted activation of the MCP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuoqing; Yang, Neng; Zhou, Ling; Gu, Peng; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Yun; Zhou, Peijun; Lu, Liming; Chou, Kuang-Yen

    2016-03-01

    The plant protein trichosanthin (Tk) and its derived peptide tetramer Tk-tPN have been shown to stimulate the type 2 immune responses for treating autoimmune disease. This work explores the possibility of using Tk-tPN as a non-toxic immunosuppressant to induce transplantation tolerance using the mechanisms by which T-cell-mediated immune responses are transferred from type 1 to type 2 through innate immunity-related pathways. Immunocytes and cytokine secretions involved in the mouse cardiac allografting model with Tk-tPN treatment were characterized. Identification of critical genes and analysis of their functions through Toll-like receptor (TLR) -initiated signalling and the possible epigenetic changes were performed. Mean survival times of the cardiac allografts were delayed from 7.7 ± 0.3 days (control) to 22.7 ± 3.9 days (P < 0.01) or 79.1 ± 19.2 days (P < 0.0001) when Tk-tPN was introduced into the recipients alone or together with rapamycin, respectively. The grafting tolerance was donor-specific. The secretion pattern of the type 1 cytokine/transcription factor (IL-2(+) IFN-γ(+) T-bet(+)), which is responsible for the acute graft rejection, was shifted to the type 2 factor (IL-4(+) IL-10(+) Gata3+), together with a selective expansion of the IL-4/IL-10-producing CD8+ CD28- regulatory T-cell subset. A TLR2-initiated high expression of chemokine gene MCP1 was detectable simultaneously. Epigenetically Tk/Tk-tPN could also acetylate the histone H3K9 of MCP1 promoter to skew the immunity towards T helper type 2 responses. Tk/Tk-tPN is therefore capable of down-regulating the type 1 response-dominant rejection of cardiac allografts by evoking type 2 immunity through the activation of a TLR2-initiated signalling pathway and MCP1 gene to expand the IL-4/IL-10-secreting CD8+ CD28- regulatory T cells. Tk-tPN could be a promising novel immunosuppressant to induce tolerance in allotransplantation. PMID:26694804

  4. Search for hepatopancreatic ecdysteroid-responsive genes during the crayfish molt cycle: from a single gene to multigenicity.

    PubMed

    Shechter, Assaf; Tom, Moshe; Yudkovski, Yana; Weil, Simy; Chang, Sharon A; Chang, Ernest S; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Berman, Amir; Sagi, Amir

    2007-10-01

    The expression of the vitellogenin gene of the red-claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (CqVg) was previously demonstrated in male crayfish during an endocrinologically induced molt cycle. The hypothesis that this expression is under the direct control of ecdysteroids was tested in this study both in vivo and in vitro. Unlike vitellogenin of insects, CqVg was not found to be ecdysteroid-responsive. Thus, a multigenic approach was employed for the identification of other hepatopancreatic ecdysteroid-responsive genes by a cDNA microarray. For the purposes of this study, a multi-parametric molt-staging technique, based on X-ray detection of gastrolith growth, was developed. To identify ecdysteroid-responsive genes during premolt, the molt cycle was induced by two manipulations, 20-hydroxyecdysone administration and X-organ-sinus gland complex removal; both resulted in significant elevation of ecdysteroids. Two clusters of affected genes (129 and 122 genes, respectively) were revealed by the microarray. It is suggested that only genes belonging to similarly responsive (up- or downregulated) gene clusters in both manipulations (102 genes) could be considered putative ecdysteroid-responsive genes. Some of these ecdysteroid-responsive genes showed homology to genes controlling chitin metabolism, proteases and other cellular activities, while 56.8% were unknown. The majority of the genes were downregulated, presumably by an energetic shift of the hepatopancreas prior to ecdysis. The effect of 20-hydroxyecdysone on representative genes from this group was confirmed in vitro using a hepatopancreas tissue culture. This approach for ecdysteroid-responsive gene identification could also be implemented in other tissues for the elucidation of ecdysteroid-specific signaling pathways during the crustacean molt cycle. PMID:17921154

  5. Identification of Novel Defense Response Genes in Medicago truncatula for Improving Disease Resistance in Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of plants by pathogens initiates a cascade of defense responses that halt or limit pathogen growth. However, the role of many of the genes induced by pathogens is unknown. Transcript profiling was used to identify genes associated with defense responses in the model legume Medicago truncat...

  6. Are solar UV-B- and UV-A-dependent gene expression and metabolite accumulation in Arabidopsis mediated by the stress response regulator RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1?

    PubMed

    Morales, Luis O; Brosché, Mikael; Vainonen, Julia P; Sipari, Nina; Lindfors, Anders V; Strid, Åke; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    Wavelengths in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the solar spectrum, UV-B (280-315 nm) and UV-A (315-400 nm), are key environmental signals modifying several aspects of plant physiology. Despite significant advances in the understanding of plant responses to UV-B and the identification of signalling components involved, there is limited information on the molecular mechanisms that control UV-B signalling in plants under natural sunlight. Here, we aimed to corroborate the previous suggested role for RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) in UV-B signalling under full spectrum sunlight. Wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the rcd1-1 mutant were used in an experimental design outdoors where UV-B and UV-A irradiances were manipulated using plastic films, and gene expression, PYRIDOXINE BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PDX1) accumulation and metabolite profiles were analysed in the leaves. At the level of transcription, RCD1 was not directly involved in the solar UV-B regulation of genes with functions in UV acclimation, hormone signalling and stress-related markers. Furthermore, RCD1 had no role on PDX1 accumulation but modulated the UV-B induction of flavonoid accumulation in leaves of Arabidopsis exposed to solar UV. We conclude that RCD1 does not play an active role in UV-B signalling but rather modulates UV-B responses under full spectrum sunlight. PMID:24689869

  7. Interpreting physiological responses to environmental change through gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Gracey, Andrew Y

    2007-05-01

    Identification of differentially expressed genes in response to environmental change offers insights into the roles of the transcriptome in the regulation of physiological responses. A variety of methods are now available to implement large-scale gene expression screens, and each method has specific advantages and disadvantages. Construction of custom cDNA microarrays remains the most popular route to implement expression screens in the non-model organisms favored by comparative physiologists, and we highlight some factors that should be considered when embarking along this path. Using a carp cDNA microarray, we have undertaken a broad, system-wide gene expression screen to investigate the physiological mechanisms underlying cold and hypoxia acclimation. This dataset provides a starting point from which to explore a range of specific mechanistic hypotheses at all levels of organization, from individual biochemical pathways to the level of the whole organism. We demonstrate the utility of two data analysis methods, Gene Ontology profiling and rank-based statistical methods, to summarize the probable physiological function of acclimation-induced gene expression changes, and to prioritize specific genes as candidates for further study. PMID:17449823

  8. Insulin Response Genes in Different Stages of Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, N; Barros, S P; Zhang, S; Moss, K L; Phillips, S T; Offenbacher, S

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial infections are known to alter glucose metabolism within tissues via mechanisms of inflammation. We conducted this study to examine whether insulin response genes are differentially expressed in gingival tissues, comparing samples from experimental gingivitis and periodontitis subjects to those from healthy individuals. Total RNA was extracted from gingival biopsies from 26 participants: 8 periodontally healthy, 9 experimental gingivitis, and 9 periodontitis subjects. Gene expression patterns were evaluated with a polymerase chain reaction array panel to examine 84 candidate genes involved with glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and obesity. Array data were evaluated with a t test adjusted by the false discover rate (P < 0.05), and ingenuity pathway analysis was performed for statistical testing of pathways. Although tissue samples were not sufficient to enable protein quantification, we confirmed the upregulation of the key gene using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated primary gingival epithelial cells by Western blot. The mRNA expression patterns of genes that are associated with insulin response and glucose metabolism are markedly different in experimental gingivitis subjects compared with healthy controls. Thirty-two genes are upregulated significantly by at least 2-fold, adjusted for false discover rate (P < 0.05). Periodontitis subjects show similar but attenuated changes in gene expression patterns, and no genes meet the significance criteria. Ingenuity pathway analysis demonstrates significant activation of the carbohydrate metabolism network in experimental gingivitis but not in periodontitis. G6PD protein increases in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation in primary gingival epithelial cells, which is in the same direction as upregulated mRNA in tissues. Acute gingival inflammation may be associated with tissue metabolism changes, but these changes are not evident in chronic periodontitis. This study suggests that acute gingival inflammation

  9. Tetracycline inducible gene manipulation in serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tillmann; Renzland, Insa; Baur, Max; Mönks, Simon; Herrmann, Elke; Huppert, Verena; Nürnberg, Frank; Schönig, Kai; Bartsch, Dusan

    2012-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) neuronal system has important and diverse physiological functions throughout development and adulthood. Its dysregulation during development or later in adulthood has been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Transgenic animal models designed to study the contribution of serotonergic susceptibility genes to a pathological phenotype should ideally allow to study candidate gene overexpression or gene knockout selectively in serotonergic neurons at any desired time during life. For this purpose, conditional expression systems such as the tet-system are preferable. Here, we generated a transactivator (tTA) mouse line (TPH2-tTA) that allows temporal and spatial control of tetracycline (Ptet) controlled transgene expression as well as gene deletion in 5-HT neurons. The tTA cDNA was inserted into a 196 kb PAC containing a genomic mouse Tph2 fragment (177 kb) by homologous recombination in E. coli. For functional analysis of Ptet-controlled transgene expression, TPH2-tTA mice were crossed to a Ptet-regulated lacZ reporter line (Ptet-nLacZ). In adult double-transgenic TPH2-tTA/Ptet-nLacZ mice, TPH2-tTA founder line L62-20 showed strong serotonergic β-galactosidase expression which could be completely suppressed with doxycycline (Dox). Furthermore, Ptet-regulated gene expression could be reversibly activated or inactivated when Dox was either withdrawn or added to the system. For functional analysis of Ptet-controlled, Cre-mediated gene deletion, TPH2-tTA mice (L62-20) were crossed to double transgenic Ptet-Cre/R26R reporter mice to generate TPH2-tTA/Ptet-Cre/R26R mice. Without Dox, 5-HT specific recombination started at E12.5. With permanent Dox administration, Ptet-controlled Cre-mediated recombination was absent. Dox withdrawal either postnatally or during adulthood induced efficient recombination in serotonergic neurons of all raphe nuclei, respectively. In the enteric nervous system, recombination could not be detected. We generated a

  10. HIFU-induced gene activation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Zhong, Pei; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan

    2001-05-01

    This work investigated the inducible gene activation in cancer cells that were sublethally injured during HIFU treatment. HeLa cells were transfected by an adenovirus vector that encodes GFP under the control of hsp70B promoter, leading to about 65% transfection efficiency. A volume of 10 μL transfected HeLa cells in suspension (5×107 cells/ml) were placed at the bottom of a PCR tube so that the cell suspension could be heated to a peak temperature of 50°C, 60°C, and 70°C for 120, 10, and 1 s, respectively, by a focused 1.1-MHz HIFU transducer operated at a peak negative pressure of -2.7 MPa at different duty cycles. One day after HIFU treatment, cell viability was determined to be 63%, 35%, and 18%, respectively, based on Trypan Blue exclusion test. Importantly, in all test groups, inducible GFP expression was detected in about 40%-50% of the surviving cells with GFP intensity increased by 25-fold based on flow cytometry analysis. These results demonstrate that even under the short exposure duration of HIFU treatment, inducible gene expression could be produced in sublethally injured cell population in vitro. Further studies are underway to explore the optimal HIFU condition for gene activation in vivo.

  11. Salt induced gene expression in Prosopis farcta

    SciTech Connect

    Heimer, I.M.; Golan, A.; Lips, H.

    1987-04-01

    The authors hypothesize that in facultative halophytes, the genes which impart salt tolerance are expressed when the plants are exposed to salt. As a first step towards possible identification of these genes, they examined salt induced changes of gene expression in the facultative halophyte Prosopis farcta at the protein level, by SDS-PAGE. Exposure to salt of aseptically grown, two-week old seedlings, was carried out in one of two ways: (1) a one step transfer of seedlings from medium without salt to that with the indicated concentrations followed by 5 hr or 24 hr incubation periods. During the last 2 hrs of each incubation period the seedlings were pulse-labelled with /sup 35/S Sulfate or L-Methionine; (2) a gradual increase of the salt concentration at 50 mM increments at 2-4 day intervals. Two days after reaching the desired salt concentration, the seedlings were pulse-labelled for 2 hrs with /sup 35/S sulfate or L-methionine. Protein from roots were extracted and analyzed. Polypeptides were visualized by staining with coomassie blue or by fluorography. Qualitative as well as quantitative changes of gene expression as induced by salt could be observed. Their significance regarding salt tolerance will be discussed.

  12. Identification of a negative response element in the human inducible nitric-oxide synthase (hiNOS) promoter: The role of NF-κB-repressing factor (NRF) in basal repression of the hiNOS gene

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xuesheng; Guo, Zhong; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab; Hauser, Hansjorg; Ganster, Ray; Shao, Lifang; Geller, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Although nuclear factor (NF)-κB plays a central role in mediating cytokine-stimulated human inducible nitric-oxide synthase (hiNOS) gene transcription, very little is known about the factors involved in silencing of the hiNOS promoter. NF-κB-repressing factor (NRF) interacts with a specific negative regulatory element (NRE) to mediate transcriptional repression of certain NF-κB responsive genes. By sequence comparison with the IFN-β and IL-8 promoters, we identified an NRE in the hiNOS promoter located at −6.7 kb upstream. In A549 and HeLa human cells, constitutive NRF mRNA expression is detected by RT-PCR. Gel shift assay showed constitutive NRF binding to the hiNOS NRE. Mutation of the −6.7-kb NRE site in the hiNOS promoter resulted in loss of NRF binding and increased basal but not cytokine-stimulated hiNOS transcription in promoter transfection experiments. Interestingly, overexpression of NRF suppressed both basal and cytokine-induced hiNOS promoter activity that depended on an intact cis-acting NRE motif. By using stably transformed HeLa cells with the tetracycline on/off expression system, reduction of cellular NRF by expressing antisense NRF increased basal iNOS promoter activity and resulted in constitutive iNOS mRNA expression. These data demonstrate that the transacting NRF protein is involved in constitutive silencing of the hiNOS gene by binding to a cis-acting NRE upstream in the hiNOS promoter. PMID:12381793

  13. Identification and functional analysis of light-responsive unique or paralogous gene family members in rice using a near genomic gene microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a NSF45K-gene-microarray, we performed expression-profiling experiments on 2-week-old light- and dark-grown rice leaf tissue to identify mutants of light-responsive genes. We identified 356 genes that were at least 8-fold light induced genes at FDR of 1.00E-06. Then, we screened rice T-DNA i...

  14. Cold Responsive Gene Expression Profiling of Sugarcane and Saccharum spontaneum with Functional Analysis of a Cold Inducible Saccharum Homolog of NOD26-Like Intrinsic Protein to Salt and Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Won; Benatti, Thiago R.; Marconi, Thiago; Yu, Qingyi; Solis-Gracia, Nora; Mora, Victoria; da Silva, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of sugarcane hybrid CP72-1210 (cold susceptible) and Saccharum spontaneum TUS05-05 (cold tolerant) using Sugarcane Assembled Sequences (SAS) from SUCEST-FUN Database showed that a total of 35,340 and 34,698 SAS genes, respectively, were expressed before and after chilling stress. The analysis revealed that more than 600 genes are differentially expressed in each genotype after chilling stress. Blast2Go annotation revealed that the major difference in gene expression profiles between CP72-1210 and TUS05-05 after chilling stress are present in the genes related to the transmembrane transporter activity. To further investigate the relevance of transmembrane transporter activity against abiotic stress tolerance, a S. spontaneum homolog of a NOD26-like major intrinsic protein gene (SspNIP2) was selected for functional analysis, of which expression was induced after chilling stress in the cold tolerant TUS05-05. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that SspNIP2 expression was increased ~2.5 fold at 30 minutes after cold treatment and stayed induced throughout the 24 hours of cold treatment. The amino acid sequence analysis of the cloned SspNIP2 confirmed the presence of six transmembrane domains and two NPA (Asn-Pro-Ala) motifs, signature features of major intrinsic protein families. Amino acid analysis confirmed that four amino acids, comprising the ar/R (aromatic residue/arginine) region responsible for the substrate specificity among MIPs, are conserved among monocot silicon transporters and SspNIP2. Salinity stress test on SspNIP2 transgenic tobacco plants resulted in more vigorous transgenic lines than the non-transgenic tobacco plants, suggesting some degree of tolerance to salt stress conferred by SspNIP2. SspNIP2-transgenic plants, exposed to 2 weeks of water stress without irrigation, developed various degrees of water stress symptom. The water stress test confirmed that the SspNIP2 transgenic lines had lower evapotranspiration rates than non

  15. Microarray studies of psychostimulant-induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yuferov, Vadim; Nielsen, David; Butelman, Eduardo; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2005-03-01

    Alterations in the expression of multiple genes in many brain regions are likely to contribute to psychostimulant-induced behaviours. Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for the simultaneous interrogation of gene expression levels of a large number of genes. Several recent experimental studies, reviewed here, demonstrate the power, limitations and progress of microarray technology in the field of psychostimulant addiction. These studies vary in the paradigms of cocaine or amphetamine administration, drug doses, route and also mode of administration, duration of treatment, animal species, brain regions studied and time of tissue collection after final drug administration. The studies also utilize different microarray platforms and statistical techniques for analysis of differentially expressed genes. These variables influence substantially the results of these studies. It is clear that current microarray techniques cannot detect small changes reliably in gene expression of genes with low expression levels, including functionally significant changes in components of major neurotransmission systems such as glutamate, dopamine, opioid and GABA receptors, especially those that may occur after chronic drug administration or drug withdrawal. However, the microarray studies reviewed here showed cocaine- or amphetamine-induced alterations in the expression of numerous genes involved in the modulation of neuronal growth, cytoskeletal structures, synaptogenesis, signal transduction, apoptosis and cell metabolism. Application of laser capture microdissection and single-cell cDNA amplification may greatly enhance microarray studies of gene expression profiling. The combination of rapidly evolving microarray technology with established methods of neuroscience, molecular biology and genetics, as well as appropriate behavioural models of drug reinforcement, may provide a productive approach for delineating the neurobiological underpinnings of drug responses that lead to

  16. Virus-induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana gene homologues in wheat identifies genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lapitan, Nora

    2013-01-01

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat (Triticum aestivumI L.), functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for breeding. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited transformation potential that hamper functional validation studies in wheat. In this study, three potential candidate genes shown to be involved in abiotic stress response pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana were selected for VIGS experiments in wheat. These include Era1 (enhanced response to abscisic acid), Cyp707a (ABA 8’-hydroxylase), and Sal1 (inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase). Gene homologues for these three genes were identified in wheat and cloned in the viral vector barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) in the antisense direction, followed by rub inoculation of BSMV viral RNA transcripts onto wheat plants. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that VIGS-treated wheat plants had significant reductions in target gene transcripts. When VIGS-treated plants generated for Era1 and Sal1 were subjected to limiting water conditions, they showed increased relative water content, improved water use efficiency, reduced gas exchange, and better vigour compared to water-stressed control plants inoculated with RNA from the empty viral vector (BSMV0). In comparison, the Cyp707a-silenced plants showed no improvement over BSMV0-inoculated plants under limited water condition. These results indicate that Era1 and Sal1 play important roles in conferring drought tolerance in wheat. Other traits affected by Era1 silencing were also studied. Delayed seed germination in Era1-silenced plants suggests this gene may be a useful target for developing resistance to pre-harvest sprouting. PMID:23364940

  17. Applications and advantages of virus-induced gene silencing for gene function studies in plants.

    PubMed

    Burch-Smith, Tessa M; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Martin, Gregory B; Dinesh-Kumar, S P

    2004-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a recently developed gene transcript suppression technique for characterizing the function of plant genes. The approach involves cloning a short sequence of a targeted plant gene into a viral delivery vector. The vector is used to infect a young plant, and in a few weeks natural defense mechanisms of the plant directed at suppressing virus replication also result in specific degradation of mRNAs from the endogenous plant gene that is targeted for silencing. VIGS is rapid (3-4 weeks from infection to silencing), does not require development of stable transformants, allows characterization of phenotypes that might be lethal in stable lines, and offers the potential to silence either individual or multiple members of a gene family. Here we briefly review the discoveries that led to the development of VIGS and what is known about the experimental requirements for effective silencing. We describe the methodology of VIGS and how it can be optimized and used for both forward and reverse genetics studies. Advantages and disadvantages of VIGS compared with other loss-of-function approaches available for plants are discussed, along with how the limitations of VIGS might be overcome. Examples are reviewed where VIGS has been used to provide important new insights into the roles of specific genes in plant development and plant defense responses. Finally, we examine the future prospects for VIGS as a powerful tool for assessing and characterizing the function of plant genes. PMID:15315635

  18. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R. . E-mail: nerurkar@pbrc.hawaii.edu

    2006-02-20

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML.

  19. Targeted gene silencing to induce permanent sterility.

    PubMed

    Dissen, G A; Lomniczi, A; Boudreau, R L; Chen, Y H; Davidson, B L; Ojeda, S R

    2012-08-01

    A non-surgical method to induce sterility would be a useful tool to control feral populations of animals. Our laboratories have experience with approaches aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A combination/modification of these methods may provide a useful framework for the design of approaches that can be used to sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed, it has to meet several conditions: it needs to target a gene essential for fertility. It must involve a method that can selectively silence the gene of interest. It also needs to deliver the silencing agent via a minimally invasive method. Finally, the silencing effect needs to be sustained for many years, so that expansion of the targeted population can be effectively prevented. In this article, we discuss this subject and provide a succinct account of our previous experience with: (i) molecular reagents able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction and (ii) molecular reagents able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy. PMID:22827375

  20. Gene-Specific Involvement of β-Oxidation in Wound-Activated Responses in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, M. Cruz; Martínez, Cristina; Buchala, Antony; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; León, José

    2004-01-01

    The coordinated induced expression of β-oxidation genes is essential to provide the energy supply for germination and postgerminative development. However, very little is known about other functions of β-oxidation in nonreserve organs. We have identified a gene-specific pattern of induced β-oxidation gene expression in wounded leaves of Arabidopsis. Mechanical damage triggered the local and systemic induction of only ACX1 among acyl-coenzyme A oxidase (ACX) genes, and KAT2/PED1 among 3-ketoacyl-coenzyme A thiolase (KAT) genes in Arabidopsis. In turn, wounding induced KAT5/PKT2 only systemically. Although most of the β-oxidation genes were activated by wound-related factors such as dehydration and abscisic acid, jasmonic acid (JA) induced only ACX1 and KAT5. Reduced expression of ACX1 or KAT2 genes, in transgenic plants expressing their corresponding mRNAs in antisense orientation, correlated with defective wound-activated synthesis of JA and with reduced expression of JA-responsive genes. Induced expression of JA-responsive genes by exogenous application of JA was unaffected in those transgenic plants, suggesting that ACX1 and KAT2 play a major role in driving wound-activated responses by participating in the biosynthesis of JA in wounded Arabidopsis plants. PMID:15141068

  1. Pneumococcal Hydrogen Peroxide–Induced Stress Signaling Regulates Inflammatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Loose, Maria; Hudel, Martina; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Garcia, Ernesto; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Lucas, Rudolf; Chakraborty, Trinad; Pillich, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Microbial infections can induce aberrant responses in cellular stress pathways, leading to translational attenuation, metabolic restriction, and activation of oxidative stress, with detrimental effects on cell survival. Here we show that infection of human airway epithelial cells with Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress, activation of mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, and regulation of their respective target genes. We identify pneumococcal H2O2 as the causative agent for these responses, as both catalase-treated and pyruvate oxidase-deficient bacteria lacked these activities. Pneumococcal H2O2 induced nuclear NF-κB translocation and transcription of proinflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of translational arrest and ER stress by salubrinal or of MAPK signaling pathways attenuate cytokine transcription. These results provide strong evidence for the notion that inhibition of translation is an important host pathway in monitoring harmful pathogen-associated activities, thereby enabling differentiation between pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. PMID:25183769

  2. Transposable Elements Contribute to Activation of Maize Genes in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Makarevitch, Irina; Waters, Amanda J.; West, Patrick T.; Stitzer, Michelle; Hirsch, Candice N.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Springer, Nathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for a large portion of the genome in many eukaryotic species. Despite their reputation as “junk” DNA or genomic parasites deleterious for the host, TEs have complex interactions with host genes and the potential to contribute to regulatory variation in gene expression. It has been hypothesized that TEs and genes they insert near may be transcriptionally activated in response to stress conditions. The maize genome, with many different types of TEs interspersed with genes, provides an ideal system to study the genome-wide influence of TEs on gene regulation. To analyze the magnitude of the TE effect on gene expression response to environmental changes, we profiled gene and TE transcript levels in maize seedlings exposed to a number of abiotic stresses. Many genes exhibit up- or down-regulation in response to these stress conditions. The analysis of TE families inserted within upstream regions of up-regulated genes revealed that between four and nine different TE families are associated with up-regulated gene expression in each of these stress conditions, affecting up to 20% of the genes up-regulated in response to abiotic stress, and as many as 33% of genes that are only expressed in response to stress. Expression of many of these same TE families also responds to the same stress conditions. The analysis of the stress-induced transcripts and proximity of the transposon to the gene suggests that these TEs may provide local enhancer activities that stimulate stress-responsive gene expression. Our data on allelic variation for insertions of several of these TEs show strong correlation between the presence of TE insertions and stress-responsive up-regulation of gene expression. Our findings suggest that TEs provide an important source of allelic regulatory variation in gene response to abiotic stress in maize. PMID:25569788

  3. Mitochondrial gene expression, antioxidant responses, and histopathology after cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Al Kaddissi, Simone; Legeay, Alexia; Elia, Antonia Concetta; Gonzalez, Patrice; Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Simon, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigates cadmium effects on the transcription of mitochondrial genes of Procambarus clarkii after acute (0.05, 0.5, and 5 mg Cd/L; 4-10 days) and chronic exposures (10 μg Cd/L; 30-60 days). Transcriptional responses of cox1, atp6, and 12S using quantitative real-time RT-PCR were assessed in gills and hepatopancreas. Additionally, the expression levels of genes involved in detoxification and/or oxidative stress responses [mt, sod(Mn)] and enzymatic activities of antioxidants (SOD, CAT, GPX, and GST) were analyzed. The histopathological effects in hepatopancreas of crayfish were evaluated by light microscopy. Relationships between endpoints at different levels of biological organization and Cd bioaccumulation were also examined. Cd induced high levels of bioaccumulation, which was followed by mitochondrial dysfunction and histological alterations in both experiments. Moreover, perturbations in the defence mechanisms against oxidative stress tended to increase with time. Results also showed that molecular responses can vary depending on the intensity and duration of the chemical stress applied to the organisms and that the study of mt gene expression levels seemed to be the best tool to assess Cd intoxication. PMID:23065898

  4. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Ornametal Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) provides an attractive tool for high throughput analysis of the functional effects of gene knock-down. Virus genomes are engineered to include fragments of target host genes, and the infected plant recognizes and silences the target genes as part of its viral defe...

  5. Virus-Induced gene silencing in ornamental plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) provides an attractive tool for high throughput analysis of the functional effects of gene knock-down. Virus genomes are engineered to include fragments of target host genes, and the infected plant recognizes and silences the target genes as part of its viral defe...

  6. Sex of the cell dictates its response: differential gene expression and sensitivity to cell death inducing stress in male and female cells.

    PubMed

    Penaloza, Carlos; Estevez, Brian; Orlanski, Shari; Sikorska, Marianna; Walker, Roy; Smith, Catherine; Smith, Brandon; Lockshin, Richard A; Zakeri, Zahra

    2009-06-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are typically attributed to the hormonal differences arising once sex differentiation has occurred. However, in some sexually dimorphic diseases that differ in frequency but not severity, the differences cannot be logically connected to the sex hormones. Therefore, we asked whether any aspect of sexual dimorphism could be attributed to chromosomal rather than hormonal differences. Cells taken from mice at d 10.5 postconception (PC) before sexual differentiation, at d 17.5 PC after the first embryonic assertion of sexual hormones, and at postnatal day 17 (puberty) were cultured and exposed to 400 microM ethanol or 20 microM camptothecin or to infection with influenza A virus (multiplicity of infection of 5). The results showed that untreated male and female cells of the same age grew at similar rates and manifested similar morphology. However, they responded differently to the applied stressors, even before the production of fetal sex hormones. Furthermore, microarray and qPCR analyses of the whole 10.5 PC embryos also revealed differences in gene expression between male and female tissues. Likewise, the exposure of cells isolated from fetuses and adolescent mice to the stressors and/or sex hormones yielded expression patterns that reflected chromosomal sex, with ethanol feminizing male cells and masculinizing female cells. We conclude that cells differ innately according to sex irrespective of their history of exposure to sex hormones. These differences may have consequences in the course of sexually dimorphic diseases and their therapy. PMID:19190082

  7. Identification of Estrogen Response Element in Aquaporin-3 Gene that Mediates Estrogen-induced Cell Migration and Invasion in Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Zhou, Jun; Shi, Shuai; Xu, Hai-Yan; Qu, Fan; Zhang, Dan; Chen, Yi-Ding; Yang, Jing; Huang, He-Feng; Sheng, Jian-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that aquaporins (AQPs) may facilitate tumor development. The molecular pathways connecting the pathological functions of AQPs are unclear and need to be better defined. This study aimed to investigate whether AQP3, one of the AQPs expressed highly in breast cancer, had any clinical implication in estrogen-receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, and explore the regulatory mechanisms of AQP3 in estrogen-related breast cancer progression. Here we show that AQP3 is an important enforcer of migration and invasion in breast cancer. We, for the first time, reported that ER-positive breast cancer tissues obtained from premenopausal patients had higher AQP3 expression when compared to those obtained from postmenopausal patients. Estrogen directly upregulates AQP3 by activating ERE in the promoter of the AQP3 gene. The upregulation of AQP3 can influence the expression of molecules related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the reorganization of actin-cytoskeleton, resulting in enhancement of cell migration and invasion in ER-positive breast cancer cells. PMID:26219409

  8. CXCR4 gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    LaRocca, Thomas J.; Jeong, Dongtak; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Lee, Ahyoung; Chen, JiQiu; Hajjar, Roger J.; Tarzami, Sima T.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell and gene therapies are being pursued as strategies for repairing damaged cardiac tissue following myocardial infarction in an attempt to prevent heart failure. The chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) and its ligand, CXCL12, play a critical role in stem cell recruitment post-acute myocardial infarction. Whereas progenitor cell migration via the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is well characterized, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of CXCR4 mediated modulation of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. We used gene therapy to test the effects of CXCR4 gene delivery on adverse ventricular remodeling due to pressure overload. We assessed the effect of cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 during trans-aortic constriction (TAC) using a cardiotropic adeno-associated viral vector (AAV9) carrying the CXCR4 gene. Cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 in mice with pressure overload prevented ventricular remodeling, preserved capillary density and maintained function as determined by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamics. In isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes, CXCL12 treatment prevented isoproterenol induced hypertrophy and interrupted the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Finally, a complex involving the L-type calcium channel, β2-adenoreceptor, and CXCR4 (Cav1.2/β2AR/CXCR4) was identified in healthy cardiac myocytes and was shown to dissociate as a consequence of heart failure. CXCR4 administered to the heart via gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure. The identification of CXCR4 participation in a Cav1.2-β2AR regulatory complex provides further insight into the mechanism by which CXCR4 modulates calcium homeostasis and chronic pressure overload responses in the cardiac myocyte. Together these results suggest AAV9.CXCR4 gene therapy is a potential therapeutic approach for congestive heart failure. PMID:22668785

  9. Octylphenol induced gene expression in testes of Frog, Rana chensinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinyi; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Yuhui

    2016-06-01

    Octylphenol (OP) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC), which can disrupt the reproductive system. To understand the effect of OP, a subtractive cDNA library was constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify alterations of gene transcription in the testes of the frog Rana chensinensis after OP exposure. Two hundred positive clones were selected and 134 sequences of gene fragments were produced from the subtractive library randomly. These genes were identified to be involved in metabolic process, cellular process, biological regulation, stimulus, immune system and female pregnancy process. In order to verify the efficiency of the subtractive cDNA library, PSG9 and PAPP-A were analyzed further as two representatives of differentially expressed transcription genes using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Our result was the first successful construction of the subtractive cDNA library in frog testes after OP treatment. Based on this cDNA library, OP was shown to affect multiple physiological processes including inducing immune response, disrupting the steroid hormone synthesis and influencing spermatogenesis in the testis by up-regulation of specific genes. PMID:26896894

  10. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Gate, Laurent . E-mail: laurent.gate@inrs.fr; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Herve; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stephane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 {sup o}C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  11. Bifidobacterium bifidum actively changes the gene expression profile induced by Lactobacillus acidophilus in murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Gudrun; Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen Fink, Lisbeth; Jarmer, Hanne; Nøhr Nielsen, Birgit; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal regulatory role in activation of both the innate as well as the adaptive immune system by responding to environmental microorganisms. We have previously shown that Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a strong production of the pro-inflammatory and Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12 in DC, whereas bifidobacteria do not induce IL-12 but inhibit the IL-12 production induced by lactobacilli. In the present study, genome-wide microarrays were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of murine DC stimulated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium bifidum Z9. L. acidophilus NCFM strongly induced expression of interferon (IFN)-beta, other virus defence genes, and cytokine and chemokine genes related to the innate and the adaptive immune response. By contrast, B. bifidum Z9 up-regulated genes encoding cytokines and chemokines related to the innate immune response. Moreover, B. bifidum Z9 inhibited the expression of the Th1-promoting genes induced by L. acidophilus NCFM and had an additive effect on genes of the innate immune response and Th2 skewing genes. The gene encoding Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a transcription factor regulating the activation of JNK, was one of the few genes only induced by B. bifidum Z9. Neutralization of IFN-beta abrogated L. acidophilus NCFM-induced expression of Th1-skewing genes, and blocking of the JNK pathway completely inhibited the expression of IFN-beta. Our results indicate that B. bifidum Z9 actively inhibits the expression of genes related to the adaptive immune system in murine dendritic cells and that JPD2 via blocking of IFN-beta plays a central role in this regulatory mechanism. PMID:20548777

  12. Gene expression changes in female zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain in response to acute exposure to methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, Catherine A.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Martyniuk, Chris; Knoebl, Iris; Pope, Marie; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxicant and endocrine disruptor that accumulates in aquatic systems. Previous studies have shown suppression of hormone levels in both male and female fish, suggesting effects on gonadotropin regulation in the brain. The gene expression profile in adult female zebrafish whole brain induced by acute (96 h) MeHg exposure was investigated. Fish were exposed by injection to 0 or 0.5(mu or u)g MeHg/g. Gene expression changes in the brain were examined using a 22,000-feature zebrafish microarray. At a significance level of pgenes were up-regulated and 76 genes were down-regulated in response to MeHg exposure. Individual genes exhibiting altered expression in response to MeHg exposure implicate effects on glutathione metabolism in the mechanism of MeHg neurotoxicity. Gene ontology (GO) terms significantly enriched among altered genes included protein folding, cell redox homeostasis, and steroid biosynthetic process. The most affected biological functions were related to nervous system development and function, as well as lipid metabolism and molecular transport. These results support the involvement of oxidative stress and effects on protein structure in the mechanism of action of MeHg in the female brain. Future studies will compare the gene expression profile induced in response to MeHg with that induced by other toxicants and will investigate responsive genes as potential biomarkers of MeHg exposure.

  13. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN FEMALE ZEBRAFISH (DANIO RERIO) BRAIN IN RESPONSE TO ACUTE EXPOSURE TO METHYLMERCURY

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Catherine A.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Martyniuk, Chris; Knoebl, Iris; Pope, Marie; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxicant and endocrine disruptor that accumulates in aquatic systems. Previous studies have shown suppression of hormone levels in both male and female fish, suggesting effects on gonadotropin regulation in the brain. The gene expression profile in adult female zebrafish whole brain induced by acute (96 hr) MeHg exposure was investigated. Fish were exposed by injection to 0 or 0.5 μg MeHg/g. Gene expression changes in the brain were examined using a 22,000 feature zebrafish microarray. At a significance level of p<0.01, 79 genes were up-regulated and 76 genes were down-regulated in response to MeHg exposure. Individual genes exhibiting altered expression in response to MeHg exposure implicate effects on glutathione metabolism in the mechanism of MeHg neurotoxicity. Gene ontology (GO) terms significantly enriched among altered genes included protein folding, cell redox homeostasis, and steroid biosynthetic process. The most affected biological functions were related to the nervous system development and function, as well as lipid metabolism and molecular transport. These results support the involvement of oxidative stress and effects on protein structure in the mechanism of action of MeHg in the female brain. Future studies will compare the gene expression profile induced in response to MeHg with that induced by other toxicants and investigate responsive genes as potential biomarkers of MeHg exposure. PMID:21082716

  14. Cellular responses to oxidative stress: the [Ah] gene battery as a paradigm.

    PubMed Central

    Nebert, D W; Petersen, D D; Fornace, A J

    1990-01-01

    A major source of oxidative stress in animals is plant stress metabolites, also termed phytoalexins. The aromatic hydrocarbon-responsive [Ah] gene battery is considered here as a model system in which we can study metabolically coordinated enzymes that respond to phytoalexin-induced oxidative stress. In the mouse, the [Ah] battery comprises at least six genes: two Phase I genes, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2; and four Phase II genes, Nmo-1, Aldh-1, Ugt-1, and Gt-1. All six genes appear to be regulated positively by inducers such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other ligands of the Ah receptor. In the absence of foreign inducer, the control of Nmo-1 gene expression is independent of the control of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 gene expression. The radiation deletion homozygote c14CoS/c14CoS mouse is lacking about 1.1 centiMorgans of chromosome 7. Although having no detectable CYP1A1 or CYP1A2 activation, the untreated c14CoS/c14CoS mouse exhibits markedly elevated transcripts of the Nmo-1 gene and three growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible (gadd) genes. These data suggest that the missing region on chromosome 7 in the c14CoS/c14CoS mouse contains a gene(s), which we propose to call Nmo-1n, encoding a trans-acting factor(s) that is a negative effector of the Nmo-1 and gadd genes. The three other [Ah] battery Phase II genes behave similarly to Nmo-1 in the c14CoS/c14CoS mouse. This coordinated response to oxidative stress and DNA damage, by way of the release of a mammalian battery of genes from negative control, bears an interesting resemblance to the SOS response in bacteria. PMID:2272308

  15. Response to Nodal morphogen gradient is determined by the kinetics of target gene induction

    PubMed Central

    Dubrulle, Julien; Jordan, Benjamin M; Akhmetova, Laila; Farrell, Jeffrey A; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna; Schier, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    Morphogen gradients expose cells to different signal concentrations and induce target genes with different ranges of expression. To determine how the Nodal morphogen gradient induces distinct gene expression patterns during zebrafish embryogenesis, we measured the activation dynamics of the signal transducer Smad2 and the expression kinetics of long- and short-range target genes. We found that threshold models based on ligand concentration are insufficient to predict the response of target genes. Instead, morphogen interpretation is shaped by the kinetics of target gene induction: the higher the rate of transcription and the earlier the onset of induction, the greater the spatial range of expression. Thus, the timing and magnitude of target gene expression can be used to modulate the range of expression and diversify the response to morphogen gradients. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05042.001 PMID:25869585

  16. Stress, and pathogen response gene expression in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Immune suppression in microgravity has been well documented. With the advent of human exploration and long-term space travel, the immune system of the astronaut must be optimally maintained. It is important to investigate the expression patterns of cytokine genes, because they are directly related to immune response. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), also called stress proteins, are a group of proteins that are present in the cells of every life form. These proteins are induced when a cell responds to stressors such as heat, cold and oxygen deprivation. Microgravity is another stressor that may regulate HSPs. Heat shock proteins trigger immune response through activities that occur both inside the cell (intracellular) and outside the cell (extracellular). Knowledge about these two gene groups could lead to establishment of a blueprint of the immune response and adaptation-related genes in the microgravity environment. Methods: Human peripheral blood cells were cultured in 1g (T flask) and modeled microgravity (MMG, rotating-wall vessel) for 24 and 72 hours. Cell samples were collected and subjected to gene array analysis using the Affymetrix HG_U95 array. Data was collected and subjected to a two-way analysis of variance. The genes related to immune and stress responses were analyzed. Results and Conclusions: HSP70 was up-regulated by more than two fold in microgravity culture, while HSP90 was significantly down-regulated. HSP70 is not typically expressed in all kinds of cells, but it is expressed at high levels in stress conditions. HSP70 participates in translation, protein translocation, proteolysis and protein folding, suppressing aggregation and reactivating denatured proteins. Increased serum HSP70 levels correlate with a better outcome for heat-stroke or severe trauma patients. At the same time, elevated serum levels of HSP70 have been detected in patients with peripheral or renal vascular disease. HSP90 has been identified in the cytosol, nucleus and

  17. Silencing in Apolygus lucorum of the olfactory coreceptor Orco gene by RNA interference induces EAG response declining to two putative semiochemicals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-Le; Zhu, Xiao-Qiang; Gu, Shao-Hua; Cui, Huan-huan; Guo, Yu-Yuan; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) (Hemiptera: Miridae) is an agronomically important pest that causes severe economic damage to the cotton, fruit, and vegetable industries. Similar to other insects, A. lucorum can perceive and discriminate olfactory cues. A highly conserved and broadly expressed olfactory coreceptor (Orco) is crucial for insect olfaction, and Orco orthologs have been identified in several insect species. In this study, a homology-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was utilized to identify AlucOrco, an Orco ortholog essential for olfaction in A. lucorum. AlucOrco shares significant sequence homology with known Orco proteins in other insects. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that AlucOrco was abundantly expressed in adult A. lucorum. AlucOrco expression level was the highest in the antennae; by contrast, AlucOrco showed negligible expression level in other tissues. We injected AlucOrco siRNA into the conjunctivum between the prothorax and mesothorax of A. lucorum and evaluated its expression 36 h after RNA interference. The results of qRT-PCR demonstrated that the level of mRNA expression was significantly reduced (>90%) in AlucOrco siRNA-treated A. lucorum than in water-injected and non-injected controls. The electroantennogram responses of A. lucorum to two putative semiochemicals, trans-2-hexenal and trans-2-hexenyl butyrate, were also reduced significantly (∼80%) in RNAi-treated A. lucorum than in the controls. These results suggest that AlucOrco is crucial in mediating odorant perception of A. lucorum, especially in perceiving trans-2-hexenal and trans-2-hexenyl butyrate. PMID:24216470

  18. Identification and characterization of a novel NOD-like receptor family CARD domain containing 3 gene in response to extracellular ATP stimulation and its role in regulating LPS-induced innate immune response in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) head kidney macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Chen, Xiaoli; Hao, Gaixiang; Geng, Xuyun; Zhan, Wenbin; Sun, Jinsheng

    2016-03-01

    Nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) family with a caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) containing 3 (NLRC3) protein is an important cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that negatively regulates innate immune response in mammals. Hitherto, the immunological significance of NLRC3 protein in fish remains largely uncharacterized. Here we identified and characterized a novel NLRC3 gene (named poNLRC3) implicated in regulation of fish innate immunity from Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. The poNLRC3 protein is a cytoplasmic protein with an undefined N-terminal domain, a NACHT domain, a fish-specific NACHT associated domain, six LRR motifs, and a C-terminal fish-specific PYR/SPYR (B30.2) domain but only shares less than 40% sequence identities with the known Japanese flounder NLRC proteins. poNLRC3 gene is ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissues and is dominantly expressed in the Japanese flounder head kidney macrophages (HKMs). We for the first time showed that poNLRC3 expression was significantly modulated by the stimulation of extracellular ATP, an important danger/damage-associated molecular pattern in activating innate immunity in P. olivaceus. Importantly, we revealed that poNLRC3 plays an important role in positively regulating ATP-induced IL-1beta and IL-6 gene expression, suggesting the involvement of poNLRC3 in extracellular ATP-mediated immune signaling. In addition, we showed that poNLRC3 mRNA expression was up-regulated in response to LPS and Edwardsiella tarda immune challenges. Finally, we showed that down-regulating the endogenous poNLRC3 expression with small interfering RNA significantly reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine gene expression in the Japanese flounder HKM cells. Altogether, we have identified a novel inducible fish NLR member, poNLRC3, which is involved in extracellular ATP-mediated immune signaling and may positively regulate the LPS-induced innate immune response in the Japanese

  19. The HIF1alpha-inducible pro-cell death gene BNIP3 is a novel target of SIM2s repression through cross-talk on the hypoxia response element.

    PubMed

    Farrall, A L; Whitelaw, M L

    2009-10-15

    The short isoform of single-minded 2 (SIM2s), a basic helix-loop-helix/PAS (bHLH/PAS) transcription factor, is upregulated in pancreatic and prostate tumours; however, a mechanistic role for SIM2s in these cancers is unknown. Microarray studies in prostate DU145 cells identified the pro-cell death gene, BNIP3 (Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa interacting protein 3), as a novel putative target of SIM2s repression. Further validation showed BNIP3 repression in several prostate and pancreatic carcinoma-derived cell lines with ectopic expression of human SIM2s. BNIP3 levels are enhanced in prostate carcinoma cells upon short interfering (si)RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous SIM2s. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter studies show that SIM2s represses BNIP3 through its activities at the proximal promoter hypoxia response element (HRE), the site through which the bHLH/PAS family member, hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF1alpha), induces BNIP3. SIM2s attenuates BNIP3 hypoxic induction via the HRE, and increased hypoxic induction of BNIP3 occurs with siRNA knockdown of endogenous SIM2s in prostate PC3AR+ cells. BNIP3 is implicated in hypoxia-induced cell death processes. Prolonged treatment of PC3AR+ cells with hypoxia mimetics, DP and DMOG, confers hypoxia-induced autophagy, measured by enhanced LC3-II levels and SQSTM1/p62 turnover. We show that PC3AR+ cells expressing ectopic SIM2s have enhanced survival in these conditions. Induction of LC3-II and turnover of SQSTM1/p62 are attenuated in PC3AR+/SIM2s DMOG and hypoxia-treated cells, suggesting that SIM2s may attenuate autophagic cell death processes, perhaps through BNIP3 repression. These data show, for the first time, SIM2s cross-talk on an endogenous HRE. SIM2s' functional interference with HIF1alpha activities on BNIP3 may indicate a novel role for SIM2s in promoting tumourigenesis. PMID:19668230

  20. Infrared laser-induced gene expression in targeted single cells of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Toyoda, Naoya; Shimojou, Masaki; Takagi, Shin

    2013-05-01

    Since the dawn of transgenic technology some 40 years ago, biologists have sought ways to manipulate, at their discretion, the expression of particular genes of interest in living organisms. The infrared laser-evoked gene operator (IR-LEGO) is a recently developed system for inducing gene expression in living organisms in a targeted fashion. It exploits the highly efficient capacity of an infrared laser for heating cells, to provide a high level of gene expression driven by heat-inducible promoters. By irradiating living specimens with a laser under a microscope, heat shock responses can be induced in individual cells, thereby inducing a particular gene, under the control of a heat shock promoter, in specifically targeted cells. In this review we first summarize previous attempts to drive transgene expression in organisms by using heat shock promoters, and then introduce the basic principle of the IR-LEGO system, and its applications. PMID:23614811

  1. A specific library of randomly integrated reporter genes for the isolation of inducible functions by cell sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Lapeyre, J.N.; Marini, F.; Gratzner, H.G. AMC ImmunoDiagnostics, Houston, TX )

    1993-01-01

    A library of cells containing randomly integrated reporter genes has been constructed. The purpose of this library is to enable the isolation of genes of interest which are inducible by radiation, biological response modifiers, cytokines, or other agents. These genes are located near reporter genes which can be induced by the upstream promoter of the gene of interest. The reporter gene, Lac Z, was randomly inserted into the genome by retroviral transduction and subsequent selection of the neo[sup r] gene with gentamycin. Studies of radiation inducible genes were undertaken, whereby cells with the radiation sensitive function were isolated by sorting the cells fluorescent after staining with the beta gal substrate, fluorescein digalactoside (FDG). This gene-tagging approach is an improvement over the cDNA library subtraction protocol in that a single library of cells with random marker gene integration can be repeatedly and sequentially probed by sorting under different, selective conditions, dependent upon the genes to be characterized.

  2. The bat gene of Halobacterium halobium encodes a trans-acting oxygen inducibility factor.

    PubMed Central

    Gropp, F; Betlach, M C

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen and light affect the expression of the bacterioopsin gene (bop), which encodes a light-driven proton pump in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium. This response is thought to be mediated by a set of genes located adjacent to the bop gene. DNA fragments containing either the bop gene or the entire bop gene cluster reversed the phenotype of purple membrane-deficient strains with mutations in the bop gene. Purple membrane synthesis was constitutive in one of these strains transformed with the bop gene alone. The same strain transformed with the bop gene cluster was inducible by low oxygen tension. Moreover, another strain that constitutively expresses purple membrane remained constitutive when transformed with the bop gene alone but the phenotype of the strain changed to inducible when transformed with the bop gene cluster. Additional experiments have confirmed that one of the genes of the bop gene cluster, the bat gene, encodes a trans-acting factor that is necessary and sufficient to confer inducibility of purple membrane synthesis by low oxygen tension. Images PMID:8202511

  3. Gene expression profiling and mechanism study of neural stem cells response to surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Yao, Shenglian; Meng, Qingyuan; Yu, Xiaolong; Wang, Xiumei; Cui, Fuzhai

    2014-01-01

    To declare the mechanisms of neural stem cells (NSCs) in response to material surface chemistry, NSCs were exposed to the self-assemble monolayers of alkanethiolates on gold surfaces terminated with amine (NH2), hydroxyl (OH) and methyl (CH3) for analysis. The morphological responses of NSCs were recorded; the gene expression profilings were detected by genechips; the gene expressions data of NSCs responded to different chemical groups were declared through the gene ontology term and pathway analyses. It showed that cells behaved dissimilar on the three chemical groups, the adhesion, proliferation and migration were easier on the NH2 and OH groups; the gene expressions of NSCs were induced differently, either, involved in several functional processes and signaling pathways. CH3 group induced genes enriched much in chemistry reactions and death processes, whereas many genes of cellular nucleotide metabolism were down-regulated. NH2 group induced NSCs to express many genes of receptors on membrane, and participated in cellular signal transduction of cell adhesion and interactions, or associated with axon growth. OH group was similar to NH2 group to induce the membrane response, but it also down regulated metabolism of cells. Therefore, it declared the chemical groups affected NSCs through inner way and the NH2, OH and CH3 groups triggered the cellular gene expression in different signaling pathways. PMID:26816623

  4. Light-dependent expression of flg22-induced defense genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Satoshi; Aoyama, Mayu; Nakai, Kana; Shimotani, Koji; Yamasaki, Kanako; Sato, Masa H.; Tojo, Daisuke; Suwastika, I. Nengah; Nomura, Hironari; Shiina, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts have been reported to generate retrograde immune signals that activate defense gene expression in the nucleus. However, the roles of light and photosynthesis in plant immunity remain largely elusive. In this study, we evaluated the effects of light on the expression of defense genes induced by flg22, a peptide derived from bacterial flagellins which acts as a potent elicitor in plants. Whole-transcriptome analysis of flg22-treated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under light and dark conditions for 30 min revealed that a number of (30%) genes strongly induced by flg22 (>4.0) require light for their rapid expression, whereas flg22-repressed genes include a significant number of genes that are down-regulated by light. Furthermore, light is responsible for the flg22-induced accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), indicating that light is indispensable for basal defense responses in plants. To elucidate the role of photosynthesis in defense, we further examined flg22-induced defense gene expression in the presence of specific inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport: 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) and 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB). Light-dependent expression of defense genes was largely suppressed by DBMIB, but only partially suppressed by DCMU. These findings suggest that photosynthetic electron flow plays a role in controlling the light-dependent expression of flg22-inducible defense genes. PMID:25346742

  5. Roles of defense response genes in plant-microbe interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarray technology was used to identify genes associated with disease defense responses in the model legume Medicago truncatula. We compared transcript profiles from leaves inoculated with Colletotrichum trifolii and Erysiphe pisi and roots infected with Phytophthora medicaginis to identify genes...

  6. Gene Expression Profiles of Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts in Response to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Szmolka, Ama; Wiener, Zoltán; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Varmuzova, Karolina; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The response of chicken to non-typhoidal Salmonella infection is becoming well characterised but the role of particular cell types in this response is still far from being understood. Therefore, in this study we characterised the response of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) to infection with two different S. Enteritidis strains by microarray analysis. The expression of chicken genes identified as significantly up- or down-regulated (≥3-fold) by microarray analysis was verified by real-time PCR followed by functional classification of the genes and prediction of interactions between the proteins using Gene Ontology and STRING Database. Finally the expression of the newly identified genes was tested in HD11 macrophages and in vivo in chickens. Altogether 19 genes were induced in CEFs after S. Enteritidis infection. Twelve of them were also induced in HD11 macrophages and thirteen in the caecum of orally infected chickens. The majority of these genes were assigned different functions in the immune response, however five of them (LOC101750351, K123, BU460569, MOBKL2C and G0S2) have not been associated with the response of chicken to Salmonella infection so far. K123 and G0S2 were the only ’non-immune’ genes inducible by S. Enteritidis in fibroblasts, HD11 macrophages and in the caecum after oral infection. The function of K123 is unknown but G0S2 is involved in lipid metabolism and in β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria. PMID:26046914

  7. The chemical defensome: Environmental sensing and response genes in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, J.V.; Hamdoun, A.; Cole, B.J.; Howard-Ashby, M.; Nebert, D.W.; Scally, M.; Dean, M.; Epel, D.; Hahn, M.E.; Stegeman, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Metazoan genomes contain large numbers of genes that participate in responses to environmental stressors. We surveyed the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome for homologs of gene families thought to protect against chemical stressors; these genes collectively comprise the ‘chemical defensome.’ Chemical defense genes include cytochromes P450 and other oxidases, various conjugating enzymes, ATP-dependent efflux transporters, oxidative detoxification proteins, and transcription factors that regulate these genes. Together such genes account for more than 400 genes in the sea urchin genome. The transcription factors include homologs of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, hypoxia-inducible factor, nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2, heat shock factor, and nuclear hormone receptors, which regulate stress-response genes in vertebrates. Some defense gene families, including the ABCC, the UGT, and the CYP families, have undergone expansion in the urchin relative to other deuterostome genomes, whereas the stress sensor gene families do not show such expansion. More than half of the defense genes are expressed during embryonic or larval life stages, indicating their importance during development. This genome-wide survey of chemical defense genes in the sea urchin reveals evolutionary conservation of this network combined with lineage-specific diversification that together suggest the importance of these chemical stress sensing and response mechanisms in early deuterostomes. These results should facilitate future studies on the evolution of chemical defense gene networks and the role of these networks in protecting embryos from chemical stress during development. PMID:17097629

  8. Identification of Chromosomal Shigella flexneri Genes Induced by the Eukaryotic Intracellular Environment

    PubMed Central

    Runyen-Janecky, L. J.; Payne, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    Upon entry into the eukaryotic cytosol, the facultative intracellular bacterium Shigella flexneri is exposed to an environment that may necessitate the expression of particular genes for it to survive and grow intracellularly. To identify genes that are induced in response to the intracellular environment, we screened a library containing fragments of the S. flexneri chromosome fused to a promoterless green fluorescent protein gene (gfp). Bacteria containing promoter fusions that had a higher level of gfp expression when S. flexneri was intracellular (in Henle cells) than when S. flexneri was extracellular (in Luria-Bertani broth) were isolated by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Nine different genes with increased expression in Henle cells were identified. Several genes (uhpT, bioA, and lysA) were involved in metabolic processes. The uhpT gene, which encoded a sugar phosphate transporter, was the most frequently isolated gene and was induced by glucose-6-phosphate in vitro. Two of the intracellularly induced genes (pstS and phoA) encode proteins involved in phosphate acquisition and were induced by phosphate limitation in vitro. Additionally, three iron-regulated genes (sufA, sitA, and fhuA) were identified. The sufA promoter was derepressed in iron-limiting media and was also induced by oxidative stress. To determine whether intracellularly induced genes are required for survival or growth in the intracellular environment, we constructed mutations in the S. flexneri uhpT and pstS genes by allelic exchange. The uhpT mutant could not use glucose-6-phosphate as a sole carbon source in vitro but exhibited normal plaque formation on Henle cell monolayers. The pstS mutant had no apparent growth defect in low-phosphate media in vitro but formed smaller plaques on Henle cell monolayers than the parent strain. Both mutants were as effective as the parent strain in inducing apoptosis in a macrophage cell line. PMID:12117948

  9. Triplex-Induced DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Faye A.; Tiwari, Meetu Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Cellular DNA damage response is critical to preserving genomic integrity following exposure to genotoxic stress. A complex series of networks and signaling pathways become activated after DNA damage and trigger the appropriate cellular response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis. The response elicited is dependent upon the type and extent of damage sustained, with the ultimate goal of preventing propagation of the damaged DNA. A major focus of our studies is to determine the cellular pathways involved in processing damage induced by altered helical structures, specifically triplexes. Our lab has demonstrated that the TFIIH factor XPD occupies a central role in triggering apoptosis in response to triplex-induced DNA strand breaks. We have shown that XPD co-localizes with γH2AX, and its presence is required for the phosphorylation of H2AX tyrosine142, which stimulates the signaling pathway to recruit pro-apoptotic factors to the damage site. Herein, we examine the cellular pathways activated in response to triplex formation and discuss our finding that suggests that XPD-dependent apoptosis plays a role in preserving genomic integrity in the presence of excessive structurally induced DNA damage. PMID:24348211

  10. A Drosophila immune response against Ras-induced overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Hauling, Thomas; Krautz, Robert; Markus, Robert; Volkenhoff, Anne; Kucerova, Lucie; Theopold, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our goal is to characterize the innate immune response against the early stage of tumor development. For this, animal models where genetic changes in specific cells and tissues can be performed in a controlled way have become increasingly important, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Many tumor mutants in Drosophila affect the germline and, as a consequence, also the immune system itself, making it difficult to ascribe their phenotype to a specific tissue. Only during the past decade, mutations have been induced systematically in somatic cells to study the control of tumorous growth by neighboring cells and by immune cells. Here we show that upon ectopic expression of a dominant-active form of the Ras oncogene (RasV12), both imaginal discs and salivary glands are affected. Particularly, the glands increase in size, express metalloproteinases and display apoptotic markers. This leads to a strong cellular response, which has many hallmarks of the granuloma-like encapsulation reaction, usually mounted by the insect against larger foreign objects. RNA sequencing of the fat body reveals a characteristic humoral immune response. In addition we also identify genes that are specifically induced upon expression of RasV12. As a proof-of-principle, we show that one of the induced genes (santa-maria), which encodes a scavenger receptor, modulates damage to the salivary glands. The list of genes we have identified provides a rich source for further functional characterization. Our hope is that this will lead to a better understanding of the earliest stage of innate immune responses against tumors with implications for mammalian immunity. PMID:24659248

  11. Physiological responses induced by pleasant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Watanuki, Shigeki; Kim, Yeon-Kyu

    2005-01-01

    The specific physiological responses induced by pleasant stimuli were investigated in this study. Various physiological responses of the brain (encephaloelectrogram; EEG), autonomic nervous system (ANS), immune system and endocrine system were monitored when pleasant stimuli such as odors, emotional pictures and rakugo, a typical Japanese comical story-telling, were presented to subjects. The results revealed that (i) EEG activities of the left frontal brain region were enhanced by a pleasant odor; (ii) emotional pictures related to primitive element such as nudes and erotic couples elevated vasomotor sympathetic nervous activity; and (iii) an increase in secretory immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) and a decrease in salivary cortisol (s-cortisol) were induced by rakugo-derived linguistic pleasant emotion. Pleasant emotion is complicated state. However, by considering the evolutionary history of human being, it is possible to assess and evaluate pleasant emotion from certain physiological responses by appropriately summating various physiological parameters. PMID:15684559

  12. Compression loading-induced stress responses in intervertebral disc cells encapsulated in 3D collagen constructs

    PubMed Central

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Cells protect themselves from stresses through a cellular stress response. In the interverebral disc, such response was also demonstrated to be induced by various environmental stresses. However, whether compression loading will cause cellular stress response in the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) is not well studied. By using an in vitro collagen microencapsulation model, we investigated the effect of compression loading on the stress response of NPCs. Cell viability tests, and gene and protein expression experiments were conducted, with primers for the heat shock response (HSR: HSP70, HSF1, HSP27 and HSP90), and unfolded protein response (UPR: GRP78, GRP94, ATF4 and CHOP) genes and an antibody to HSP72. Different gene expression patterns occurred due to loading type throughout experiments. Increasing the loading strain for a short duration did not increase the stress response genes significantly, but over longer durations, HSP70 and HSP27 were upregulated. Longer loading durations also resulted in a continuous upregulation of HSR genes and downregulation of UPR genes, even after load removal. The rate of apoptosis did not increase significantly after loading, suggesting that stress response genes might play a role in cell survival following mechanical stress. These results demonstrate how mechanical stress might induce and control the expression of HSR and UPR genes in NPCs. PMID:27197886

  13. Compression loading-induced stress responses in intervertebral disc cells encapsulated in 3D collagen constructs.

    PubMed

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Cells protect themselves from stresses through a cellular stress response. In the interverebral disc, such response was also demonstrated to be induced by various environmental stresses. However, whether compression loading will cause cellular stress response in the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) is not well studied. By using an in vitro collagen microencapsulation model, we investigated the effect of compression loading on the stress response of NPCs. Cell viability tests, and gene and protein expression experiments were conducted, with primers for the heat shock response (HSR: HSP70, HSF1, HSP27 and HSP90), and unfolded protein response (UPR: GRP78, GRP94, ATF4 and CHOP) genes and an antibody to HSP72. Different gene expression patterns occurred due to loading type throughout experiments. Increasing the loading strain for a short duration did not increase the stress response genes significantly, but over longer durations, HSP70 and HSP27 were upregulated. Longer loading durations also resulted in a continuous upregulation of HSR genes and downregulation of UPR genes, even after load removal. The rate of apoptosis did not increase significantly after loading, suggesting that stress response genes might play a role in cell survival following mechanical stress. These results demonstrate how mechanical stress might induce and control the expression of HSR and UPR genes in NPCs. PMID:27197886

  14. Co-expression of soybean Dicer-like genes in response to stress and development.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Shaun J; Kantar, Michael B; Yoon, Han W; Whaley, Adam M; Schlueter, Jessica A; Stupar, Robert M

    2012-11-01

    Regulation of gene transcription and post-transcriptional processes is critical for proper development, genome integrity, and stress responses in plants. Many genes involved in the key processes of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation have been well studied in model diploid organisms. However, gene and genome duplication may alter the function of the genes involved in these processes. To address this question, we assayed the stress-induced transcription patterns of duplicated gene pairs involved in RNAi and DNA methylation processes in the paleopolyploid soybean. Real-time quantitative PCR and Sequenom MassARRAY expression assays were used to profile the relative expression ratios of eight gene pairs across eight different biotic and abiotic stress conditions. The transcriptional responses to stress for genes involved in DNA methylation, RNAi processing, and miRNA processing were compared. The strongest evidence for pairwise co-expression in response to stresses was exhibited by non-paralogous Dicer-like (DCL) genes GmDCL2a-GmDCL3a and GmDCL1b-GmDCL2b, most profoundly in root tissues. Among homoeologous or paralogous DCL genes, the Dicer-like 2 (DCL2) gene pair exhibited the strongest response to stress and most conserved co-expression pattern. This was surprising because the DCL2 duplication event is more ancient than the other DCL duplications. Possible mechanisms that may be driving the DCL2 co-expression are discussed. PMID:22527487

  15. [Identification of Sorghum genes responsible for resistance to Green bug].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, E E

    2000-04-01

    Genes responsible for resistance to greenbug (Schizaphis graminum Rond.) were identified in sorghum. The dominant (Sgr1) and recessive (Sgr2) genes for resistance were revealed in sample k-457 (PI264453, United States). The samples i-589430 (PI264453, Spain) and k-3852 (Sarvasi, Hungary) carry gene Sgr1. These accessions are assumed to also have gene Sgr2. The samples k-9921 (Shallu, United States) and k-9922 (KS-30, United States) have incompletely dominant resistance gene Sgr3. A symbol Sgr4 was assigned to the dominant gene from sample k-6694 (Deer, United States). The dominant Sgr5 and recessive Sgr6 genes were revealed in the samples k-1362 (Durra Belaya, Syria) and k-1240 (Dzhugara Belaya, China). The cultivar Sorgogradskoe (k-9436, Rostovskaya oblast) has gene Sgr5. The samples k-10092 (Odesskii 360, Ukraine) and k-5091 (Cherhata, Marocco) are assumed to have genes Sgr5 and Sgr6. Sample k-924 (Dzhugara Belaya, China) is protected by the dominant gene Srg7 and recessive gene Sgr8. Sample k-923 (Dzhugara Belaya, China) has at least one of these genes. Two dominant complementary genes for resistance (Sgr9 and Sgr10) were revealed in sample k-930 (Dzhugara Belaya, China). One of two dominant genes of sample k-1237 (Dzhugara Belaya, China) was assigned the symbol Sgr11. Genes Sgr5-Sgr11 responsible for resistance to greenbug are new and were not previously used in breeding. PMID:10822813

  16. Spatial Control of Gene Expression within a Scaffold by Localized Inducer Release

    PubMed Central

    Baraniak, Priya R.; Nelson, Devin M.; Leeson, Cory E.; Katakam, Anand K.; Friz, Jennifer L.; Cress, Dean E.; Hong, Yi; Guan, Jianjun; Wagner, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression can be controlled in genetically modified cells by employing an inducer/promoter system where presence of the inducer molecule regulates the timing and level of gene expression. By applying the principles of controlled release, it should be possible to control gene expression on a biomaterial surface by the presence or absence of inducer release from the underlying material matrix, thus avoiding alternative techniques that rely upon uptake of relatively labile DNA from material surfaces. To evaluate this concept, a modified ecdysone-responsive gene expression system was transfected into B16 murine cells and the ability of an inducer ligand, which was released from elastomeric poly(ester urethane) urea (PEUU), to initiate gene expression was studied. The synthetic inducer ligand was first loaded into PEUU to demonstrate extended release of the bioactive molecule at various loading densities over a one year period in vitro. Patterning films of PEUU variably-loaded with inducer resulted in spatially controlled cell expression of the gene product (green fluorescent protein, GFP). In porous scaffolds made from PEUU by salt leaching, where the central region was exclusively loaded with inducer, cells expressed GFP predominately in the loaded central regions whereas expression was minimal in outer regions where ligand was omitted. This scaffold system may ultimately provide a means to precisely control progenitor cell commitment in a spatially-defined manner in vivo for soft tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:21269687

  17. TNFα signals through specialized factories where responsive coding and miRNA genes are transcribed

    PubMed Central

    Papantonis, Argyris; Kohro, Takahide; Baboo, Sabyasachi; Larkin, Joshua D; Deng, Binwei; Short, Patrick; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Taylor, Stephen; Kanki, Yasuharu; Kobayashi, Mika; Li, Guoliang; Poh, Huay-Mei; Ruan, Xiaoan; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Ruan, Yijun; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Wada, Youichiro; Cook, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a potent cytokine that signals through nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) to activate a subset of human genes. It is usually assumed that this involves RNA polymerases transcribing responsive genes wherever they might be in the nucleus. Using primary human endothelial cells, variants of chromosome conformation capture (including 4C and chromatin interaction analysis with paired-end tag sequencing), and fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect single nascent transcripts, we show that TNFα induces responsive genes to congregate in discrete ‘NFκB factories'. Some factories further specialize in transcribing responsive genes encoding micro-RNAs that target downregulated mRNAs. We expect all signalling pathways to contain this extra leg, where responding genes are transcribed in analogous specialized factories. PMID:23103767

  18. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  19. Regulation of endogenous human gene expression by ligand-inducible TALE transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Sirk, Shannon J; Lamb, Brian M; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-10-17

    The construction of increasingly sophisticated synthetic biological circuits is dependent on the development of extensible tools capable of providing specific control of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic transcription factors that activate gene expression in response to extracellular chemical stimuli. These inducible activators consist of customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins combined with steroid hormone receptor ligand-binding domains. We demonstrate that these ligand-responsive TALE transcription factors allow for tunable and conditional control of gene activation and can be used to regulate the expression of endogenous genes in human cells. Since TALEs can be designed to recognize any contiguous DNA sequence, the conditional gene regulatory system described herein will enable the design of advanced synthetic gene networks. PMID:24251925

  20. Thermally induced osteocyte damage initiates pro-osteoclastogenic gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eimear B; Tallon, David; Cheung, Wing-Yee; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Kennedy, Oran D; McNamara, Laoise M

    2016-06-01

    Bone is often subject to harsh temperatures during orthopaedic procedures resulting in thermally induced bone damage, which may affect the healing response. Postsurgical healing of bone is essential to the success of surgery, therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced responses of bone cells to clinically relevant temperatures in vivo is required. Osteocytes have been shown to be integrally involved in the bone remodelling cascade, via apoptosis, in micro-damage systems. However, it is unknown whether this relationship is similar following thermal damage. Sprague-Dawley rat tibia were exposed to clinically relevant temperatures (47°C or 60°C) to investigate the role of osteocytes in modulating remodelling related factors. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify osteocyte thermal damage (activated caspase-3). Thermally induced pro-osteoclastogenic genes (Rankl, Opg and M-csf), in addition to genes known to mediate osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation via prostaglandin production (Cox2), vascularization (Vegf) and inflammatory (Il1a) responses, were investigated using gene expression analysis. The results demonstrate that heat-treatment induced significant bone tissue and cellular damage. Pro-osteoclastogenic genes were upregulated depending on the amount of temperature elevation compared with the control. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate the in vivo effect of thermally induced osteocyte damage on the gene expression profile. PMID:27335224

  1. Cigarette Smoke Modulates Expression of Human Rhinovirus-Induced Airway Epithelial Host Defense Genes

    PubMed Central

    Proud, David; Hudy, Magdalena H.; Wiehler, Shahina; Zaheer, Raza S.; Amin, Minaa A.; Pelikan, Jonathan B.; Tacon, Claire E.; Tonsaker, Tabitha O.; Walker, Brandie L.; Kooi, Cora; Traves, Suzanne L.; Leigh, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections trigger acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. The human airway epithelial cell is the primary site of HRV infection and responds to infection with altered expression of multiple genes, the products of which could regulate the outcome to infection. Cigarette smoking aggravates asthma symptoms, and is also the predominant risk factor for the development and progression of COPD. We, therefore, examined whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) modulates viral responses by altering HRV-induced epithelial gene expression. Primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to medium alone, CSE alone, purified HRV-16 alone or to HRV-16+ CSE. After 24 h, supernatants were collected and total cellular RNA was isolated. Gene array analysis was performed to examine mRNA expression. Additional experiments, using real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and/or western blotting, validated altered expression of selected gene products. CSE and HRV-16 each induced groups of genes that were largely independent of each other. When compared to gene expression in response to CSE alone, cells treated with HRV+CSE showed no obvious differences in CSE-induced gene expression. By contrast, compared to gene induction in response to HRV-16 alone, cells exposed to HRV+CSE showed marked suppression of expression of a number of HRV-induced genes associated with various functions, including antiviral defenses, inflammation, viral signaling and airway remodeling. These changes were not associated with altered expression of type I or type III interferons. Thus, CSE alters epithelial responses to HRV infection in a manner that may negatively impact antiviral and host defense outcomes. PMID:22808255

  2. Requirement for metabolic activation of acetylaminofluorene to induce multidrug gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gant, T W; Schrenk, D; Silverman, J A; Thorgeirsson, S S

    1994-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that several xenobiotics can induce multidrug (mdr) gene expression in cultures of primary isolated hepatocytes. One of the best of these xenobiotic inducers in rat hepatocytes is 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), which induces mdr expression by an enhancement of mdr gene transcription. In all species studied to date, AAF is extensively and variously metabolized. In this study we have sought to determine if AAF per se or a metabolite is responsible for mediating the increase in mdr gene transcription and expression. This study demonstrates that AAF per se is not active, but that the effect of AAF we have observed on mdr gene transcription and expression in the rat is due to the formation of a reactive metabolite(s). Our data indicate that this reactive metabolite is probably N-acetoxy-2-aminofluorene or the sulfate ester of N-hydroxy-AAF. The requirement for the formation of one of these metabolites may explain the differences in species response to AAF, in terms of mdr gene expression, that we have observed. We hypothesize that the mechanism by which mdr gene transcription is increased in response to AAF involves a covalent interaction between a reactive metabolite and an mdr gene regulatory protein. Our current work is concerned with the exploration of this hypothesis. PMID:7889850

  3. Silver nanoparticles induce endoplasmatic reticulum stress response in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Verena; Capelle, Martinus; Fent, Karl

    2013-10-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) find increasing applications, and therefore humans and the environment are increasingly exposed to them. However, potential toxicological implications are not sufficiently known. Here we investigate effects of AgNPs (average size 120 nm) on zebrafish in vitro and in vivo, and compare them to human hepatoma cells (Huh7). AgNPs are incorporated in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) and Huh7, and in zebrafish embryos. In ZFL cells AgNPs lead to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress response, and TNF-α. Transcriptional alterations also occur in pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax. The transcriptional profile differed in ZFL and Huh7 cells. In ZFL cells, the ER stress marker BiP is induced, concomitant with the ER stress marker ATF-6 and spliced XBP-1 after 6 h and 24 h exposure to 0.5 g/L and 0.05 g/L AgNPs, respectively. This indicates the induction of different pathways of the ER stress response. Moreover, AgNPs induce TNF-α. In zebrafish embryos exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs hatching was affected and morphological defects occurred at high concentrations. ER stress related gene transcripts BiP and Synv are significantly up-regulated after 24 h at 0.1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs. Furthermore, transcriptional alterations occurred in the pro-apoptotic genes Noxa and p21. The ER stress response was strong in ZFL cells and occurred in zebrafish embryos as well. Our data demonstrate for the first time that AgNPs lead to induction of ER stress in zebrafish. The induction of ER stress can have several consequences including the activation of apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. - Highlights: • Effects of silver nanoparticles (120 nm AgNPs) are investigated in zebrafish. • AgNPs induce all ER stress reponses in vitro in zebrafish liver cells. • AgNPs induce weak ER stress in zebrafish embryos. • AgNPs induce oxidative stress and transcripts of pro-apoptosis genes.

  4. Bioinformatics Analysis of Estrogen-Responsive Genes.

    PubMed

    Handel, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroid hormone that plays critical roles in a myriad of intracellular pathways. The expression of many genes is regulated through the steroid hormone receptors ESR1 and ESR2. These bind to DNA and modulate the expression of target genes. Identification of estrogen target genes is greatly facilitated by the use of transcriptomic methods, such as RNA-seq and expression microarrays, and chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). Combining transcriptomic and ChIP-seq data enables a distinction to be drawn between direct and indirect estrogen target genes. This chapter discusses some methods of identifying estrogen target genes that do not require any expertise in programming languages or complex bioinformatics. PMID:26585125

  5. DNA array analysis of gene expression in response to UV irradiation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Quillardet, Philippe; Rouffaud, Marie-Ange; Bouige, Philippe

    2003-10-01

    The capacity of DNA macroarrays that contain all 4290 predicted open reading frames of the E. coli K12 genome was evaluated by measuring changes in gene expression in response to irradiation by ultraviolet light (UV). UV and other DNA damaging agents are known to trigger the induction of the SOS response. This is a coordinated increase in the level of expression of a set of approximately 30 unlinked genes, the SOS genes, negatively regulated by the LexA repressor. The analysis was performed on a set of isogenic strains with mutations that affect expression of genes of the SOS system: (i) the lexA+ strain, in which the SOS system can be induced after DNA damage, (ii) lexAind- mutants in which the SOS system cannot be induced, and (iii) lexAdef mutants in which the SOS system is induced constitutively. We found that a large set of genes appeared to be either upregulated or downregulated following UV irradiation. Among the genes which appeared to be upregulated in a LexA-dependent manner, we correctly identified 9 out of 27 SOS genes printed on the arrays and one gene containing a LexA binding site. One gene, dnaN, encoding the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, was identified as an upregulated gene in a LexA-independent manner. Our results were compared to those of similar studies previously published. Although the SOS response as a whole could not be illustrated by using DNA arrays, the data suggest that regulation of some SOS genes might be more complex than previously thought. PMID:14527657

  6. Identification of the Regulator Gene Responsible for the Acetone-Responsive Expression of the Binuclear Iron Monooxygenase Gene Cluster in Mycobacteria ▿

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Toshiki; Hirose, Satomi; Semba, Hisashi; Kino, Kuniki

    2011-01-01

    The mimABCD gene cluster encodes the binuclear iron monooxygenase that oxidizes propane and phenol in Mycobacterium smegmatis strain MC2 155 and Mycobacterium goodii strain 12523. Interestingly, expression of the mimABCD gene cluster is induced by acetone. In this study, we investigated the regulator gene responsible for this acetone-responsive expression. In the genome sequence of M. smegmatis strain MC2 155, the mimABCD gene cluster is preceded by a gene designated mimR, which is divergently transcribed. Sequence analysis revealed that MimR exhibits amino acid similarity with the NtrC family of transcriptional activators, including AcxR and AcoR, which are involved in acetone and acetoin metabolism, respectively. Unexpectedly, many homologs of the mimR gene were also found in the sequenced genomes of actinomycetes. A plasmid carrying a transcriptional fusion of the intergenic region between the mimR and mimA genes with a promoterless green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was constructed and introduced into M. smegmatis strain MC2 155. Using a GFP reporter system, we confirmed by deletion and complementation analyses that the mimR gene product is the positive regulator of the mimABCD gene cluster expression that is responsive to acetone. M. goodii strain 12523 also utilized the same regulatory system as M. smegmatis strain MC2 155. Although transcriptional activators of the NtrC family generally control transcription using the σ54 factor, a gene encoding the σ54 factor was absent from the genome sequence of M. smegmatis strain MC2 155. These results suggest the presence of a novel regulatory system in actinomycetes, including mycobacteria. PMID:21856847

  7. Regulation of the human stress response gene GADD153 expression: role of ETS1 and FLI-1 gene products.

    PubMed

    Seth, A; Giunta, S; Franceschil, C; Kola, I; Venanzoni, M C

    1999-09-01

    We have previously shown that ETS transcription factors, regulate cell growth and differentiation, and ETS1 and ETS2 are able to transcriptionally regulate wt p53 gene expression. In the present study we show that the ETS transcription factors also play a role in regulating expression of GADD153, a wt p53 inducible gene, which induces growth arrest and apoptosis in response to stress signals or DNA damage. We report the presence of a single EBS in the human GADD153 promoter, and that the GADD45 gene promoter lacks EBSs. The GADD153 promoter EBS shows a very high affinity for ETS1 and FLI-1 gene products. In addition, our data show that both ETS1 and FLI-1 strongly activate transcription of the GADD153 EBS linked to the CAT reporter gene. Our results also demonstrate how ETS1 and FLI-1 specifically regulate GADD153 expression. In addition, ectopic ETS2 protein expression resulted in only a weak induction of the same CAT reporter construct. The ETS1 and FLI-1 proteins provide a novel mechanism of activation for GADD153, allowing these two ETS genes to control its expression during cell growth and differentiation, rather than in response to oxidative stress. PMID:10510472

  8. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K.; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘how’ gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  9. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  10. Global Gene-Expression Analysis to Identify Differentially Expressed Genes Critical for the Heat Stress Response in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiangshu; Yi, Hankuil; Lee, Jeongyeo; Nou, Ill-Sup; Han, Ching-Tack; Hur, Yoonkang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide dissection of the heat stress response (HSR) is necessary to overcome problems in crop production caused by global warming. To identify HSR genes, we profiled gene expression in two Chinese cabbage inbred lines with different thermotolerances, Chiifu and Kenshin. Many genes exhibited >2-fold changes in expression upon exposure to 0.5- 4 h at 45°C (high temperature, HT): 5.2% (2,142 genes) in Chiifu and 3.7% (1,535 genes) in Kenshin. The most enriched GO (Gene Ontology) items included 'response to heat', 'response to reactive oxygen species (ROS)', 'response to temperature stimulus', 'response to abiotic stimulus', and 'MAPKKK cascade'. In both lines, the genes most highly induced by HT encoded small heat shock proteins (Hsps) and heat shock factor (Hsf)-like proteins such as HsfB2A (Bra029292), whereas high-molecular weight Hsps were constitutively expressed. Other upstream HSR components were also up-regulated: ROS-scavenging genes like glutathione peroxidase 2 (BrGPX2, Bra022853), protein kinases, and phosphatases. Among heat stress (HS) marker genes in Arabidopsis, only exportin 1A (XPO1A) (Bra008580, Bra006382) can be applied to B. rapa for basal thermotolerance (BT) and short-term acquired thermotolerance (SAT) gene. CYP707A3 (Bra025083, Bra021965), which is involved in the dehydration response in Arabidopsis, was associated with membrane leakage in both lines following HS. Although many transcription factors (TF) genes, including DREB2A (Bra005852), were involved in HS tolerance in both lines, Bra024224 (MYB41) and Bra021735 (a bZIP/AIR1 [Anthocyanin-Impaired-Response-1]) were specific to Kenshin. Several candidate TFs involved in thermotolerance were confirmed as HSR genes by real-time PCR, and these assignments were further supported by promoter analysis. Although some of our findings are similar to those obtained using other plant species, clear differences in Brassica rapa reveal a distinct HSR in this species. Our data could also provide a

  11. Global Gene-Expression Analysis to Identify Differentially Expressed Genes Critical for the Heat Stress Response in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiangshu; Yi, Hankuil; Lee, Jeongyeo; Nou, Ill-Sup; Han, Ching-Tack; Hur, Yoonkang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide dissection of the heat stress response (HSR) is necessary to overcome problems in crop production caused by global warming. To identify HSR genes, we profiled gene expression in two Chinese cabbage inbred lines with different thermotolerances, Chiifu and Kenshin. Many genes exhibited >2-fold changes in expression upon exposure to 0.5– 4 h at 45°C (high temperature, HT): 5.2% (2,142 genes) in Chiifu and 3.7% (1,535 genes) in Kenshin. The most enriched GO (Gene Ontology) items included ‘response to heat’, ‘response to reactive oxygen species (ROS)’, ‘response to temperature stimulus’, ‘response to abiotic stimulus’, and ‘MAPKKK cascade’. In both lines, the genes most highly induced by HT encoded small heat shock proteins (Hsps) and heat shock factor (Hsf)-like proteins such as HsfB2A (Bra029292), whereas high-molecular weight Hsps were constitutively expressed. Other upstream HSR components were also up-regulated: ROS-scavenging genes like glutathione peroxidase 2 (BrGPX2, Bra022853), protein kinases, and phosphatases. Among heat stress (HS) marker genes in Arabidopsis, only exportin 1A (XPO1A) (Bra008580, Bra006382) can be applied to B. rapa for basal thermotolerance (BT) and short-term acquired thermotolerance (SAT) gene. CYP707A3 (Bra025083, Bra021965), which is involved in the dehydration response in Arabidopsis, was associated with membrane leakage in both lines following HS. Although many transcription factors (TF) genes, including DREB2A (Bra005852), were involved in HS tolerance in both lines, Bra024224 (MYB41) and Bra021735 (a bZIP/AIR1 [Anthocyanin-Impaired-Response-1]) were specific to Kenshin. Several candidate TFs involved in thermotolerance were confirmed as HSR genes by real-time PCR, and these assignments were further supported by promoter analysis. Although some of our findings are similar to those obtained using other plant species, clear differences in Brassica rapa reveal a distinct HSR in this species. Our data

  12. Probiotic bacteria change Escherichia coli-induced gene expression in cultured colonocytes: Implications in intestinal pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Pinaki; Braileanu, Gheorghe T; Chen, Hegang; Stine, O Colin

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the change in eukaryotic gene expression profile in Caco-2 cells after infection with strains of Escherichia coli and commensal probiotic bacteria. METHODS: A 19200 gene/expressed sequence tag gene chip was used to examine expression of genes after infection of Caco-2 cells with strains of normal flora E. coli, Lactobacillus plantarum, and a combination of the two. RESULTS: The cDNA microarray revealed up-regulation of 155 and down-regulation of 177 genes by E. coli. L. plantarum up-regulated 45 and down-regulated 36 genes. During mixed infection, 27 genes were up-regulated and 59 were down-regulated, with nullification of stimulatory/inhibitory effects on most of the genes. Expression of several new genes was noted in this group. CONCLUSION: The commensal bacterial strains used in this study induced the expression of a large number of genes in colonocyte-like cultured cells and changed the expression of several genes involved in important cellular processes such as regulation of transcription, protein biosynthesis, metabolism, cell adhesion, ubiquitination, and apoptosis. Such changes induced by the presence of probiotic bacteria may shape the physiologic and pathologic responses they trigger in the host. PMID:18081226

  13. Identification of novel light-induced genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Porterfield, Veronica M; Piontkivska, Helen; Mintz, Eric M

    2007-01-01

    Background The transmission of information about the photic environment to the circadian clock involves a complex array of neurotransmitters, receptors, and second messenger systems. Exposure of an animal to light during the subjective night initiates rapid transcription of a number of immediate-early genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Some of these genes have known roles in entraining the circadian clock, while others have unknown functions. Using laser capture microscopy, microarray analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR, we performed a comprehensive screen for changes in gene expression immediately following a 30 minute light pulse in suprachiasmatic nucleus of mice. Results The results of the microarray screen successfully identified previously known light-induced genes as well as several novel genes that may be important in the circadian clock. Newly identified light-induced genes include early growth response 2, proviral integration site 3, growth-arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 beta, and TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Comparative analysis of promoter sequences revealed the presence of evolutionarily conserved CRE and associated TATA box elements in most of the light-induced genes, while other core clock genes generally lack this combination of promoter elements. Conclusion The photic signalling cascade in the suprachiasmatic nucleus activates an array of immediate-early genes, most of which have unknown functions in the circadian clock. Detected evolutionary conservation of CRE and TATA box elements in promoters of light-induced genes suggest that the functional role of these elements has likely remained the same over evolutionary time across mammalian orders. PMID:18021443

  14. Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Glutathione Metabolism, and Lipid Peroxidation in the Cf-Gene-Dependent Defense Response of Tomato Cotyledons Induced by Race-Specific Elicitors of Cladosporium fulvum.

    PubMed Central

    May, M. J.; Hammond-Kosack, K. E.; Jones, JDG.

    1996-01-01

    The chronological order of responses to Cladosporium fulvum (Cooke) (Cf) race-specific elicitors was assessed in cotyledons of three near-isogenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) lines carrying either Cf-9 or Cf-2 or no Cf gene. The responses observed were dependent on the presence of a Cf gene, Avr-gene product dose injected, and the relative humidity (RH) of the growth chamber. At ambient RH, superoxide formation and lipid peroxidation occurred after 2 h (Cf9) and 4 h (Cf2). At elevated RH (98%) and at lower avirulence elicitor dose, Cf-Avr-dependent lipid peroxidation was considerably attenuated. Significant electrolyte leakage occurred by 18 h but only at the lower RH. Total glutathione levels began to increase 2 to 4 h and 4 to 8 h after challenge of Cf9 and Cf2 cells, respectively, and by 48 h reached 665 and 570% of initial levels. A large proportion of this accumulation (87%) was as oxidized glutathione. When the RH was increased to 98%, increases in glutathione levels were strongly attenuated. Increased lipoxygenase enzyme activity was detected 8 h postchallenge in either incompatible interaction. These results indicate that the activation of the Cf-Avr-mediated defense response results in severe oxidative stress. PMID:12226267

  15. The cytoskeleton enhances gene expression in the response to the Harpin elicitor in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Fei; Chang, Xiao-Li; Nick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The cytoskeleton undergoes dramatic reorganization during plant defence. This response is generally interpreted as part of the cellular repolarization establishing physical barriers against the invading pathogen. To gain insight into the functional significance of cytoskeletal responses for defence, two Vitis cell cultures that differ in their microtubular dynamics were used, and the cytoskeletal response to the elicitor Harpin in parallel to alkalinization of the medium as a fast response, and the activation of defence-related genes were followed. In one cell line derived from the grapevine cultivar ‘Pinot Noir’, microtubules contained mostly tyrosinylated α-tubulin, indicating high microtubular turnover, whereas in another cell line derived from the wild grapevine V. rupestris, the α-tubulin was strongly detyrosinated, indicating low microtubular turnover. The cortical microtubules were disrupted and actin filaments were bundled in both cell lines, but the responses were elevated in V. rupestris as compared with V. vinifera cv. ‘Pinot Noir’. The cytoskeletal responsiveness correlated with elicitor-induced alkalinization and the expression of defence genes. Using resveratrol synthase and stilbene synthase as examples, it could be shown that pharmacological manipulation of microtubules could induce gene expression in the absence of elicitor. These findings are discussed with respect to a role for microtubules as positive regulators of defence-induced gene expression. PMID:20675535

  16. Validation of a set of reference genes to study response to herbicide stress in grasses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-target-site based resistance to herbicides is a major threat to the chemical control of agronomically noxious weeds. This adaptive trait is endowed by differences in the expression of a number of genes in plants that are resistant or sensitive to herbicides. Quantification of the expression of such genes requires normalising qPCR data using reference genes with stable expression in the system studied as internal standards. The aim of this study was to validate reference genes in Alopecurus myosuroides, a grass (Poaceae) weed of economic and agronomic importance with no genomic resources. Results The stability of 11 candidate reference genes was assessed in plants resistant or sensitive to herbicides subjected or not to herbicide stress using the complementary statistical methods implemented by NormFinder, BestKeeper and geNorm. Ubiquitin, beta-tubulin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were identified as the best reference genes. The reference gene set accuracy was confirmed by analysing the expression of the gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a major herbicide target enzyme, and of an herbicide-induced gene encoding a glutathione-S-transferase. Conclusions This is the first study describing a set of reference genes (ubiquitin, beta-tubulin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) with a stable expression under herbicide stress in grasses. These genes are also candidate reference genes of choice for studies seeking to identify stress-responsive genes in grasses. PMID:22233533

  17. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in barley seedling leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is one of the most potent reverse genetics technologies for gene functional characterization. This method exploits a dsRNA-mediated antiviral defense mechanism in plants. Using this method allows researchers to generate rapid phenotypic data in a relatively rapid ...

  18. Tomato Whole Genome Transcriptional Response to Tetranychus urticae Identifies Divergence of Spider Mite-Induced Responses Between Tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Martel, Catherine; Zhurov, Vladimir; Navarro, Marie; Martinez, Manuel; Cazaux, Marc; Auger, Philippe; Migeon, Alain; Santamaria, M Estrella; Wybouw, Nicky; Diaz, Isabel; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Navajas, Maria; Grbic, Miodrag; Grbic, Vojislava

    2015-03-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is one of the most significant mite pests in agriculture, feeding on more than 1,100 plant hosts, including model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum. Here, we describe timecourse tomato transcriptional responses to spider mite feeding and compare them with Arabidopsis in order to determine conserved and divergent defense responses to this pest. To refine the involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in mite-induced responses and to improve tomato Gene Ontology annotations, we analyzed transcriptional changes in the tomato JA-signaling mutant defenseless1 (def-1) upon JA treatment and spider mite herbivory. Overlay of differentially expressed genes (DEG) identified in def-1 onto those from the timecourse experiment established that JA controls expression of the majority of genes differentially regulated by herbivory. Comparison of defense responses between tomato and Arabidopsis highlighted 96 orthologous genes (of 2,133 DEG) that were recruited for defense against spider mites in both species. These genes, involved in biosynthesis of JA, phenylpropanoids, flavonoids, and terpenoids, represent the conserved core of induced defenses. The remaining tomato DEG support the establishment of tomato-specific defenses, indicating profound divergence of spider mite-induced responses between tomato and Arabidopsis. PMID:25679539

  19. Chromium stress response effect on signal transduction and expression of signaling genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Ngoc-Nam; Huang, Tsai-Lien; Chi, Wen-Chang; Fu, Shih-Feng; Chen, Chi-Chien; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2014-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a non-essential metal for normal plants and is toxic to plants at high concentrations. However, signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms of its action on cell function and gene expression remain elusive. In this study, we found that Cr(VI) induced endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Ca(2+) accumulation and activated NADPH oxidase and calcium-dependent protein kinase. We investigated global transcriptional changes in rice roots by microarray analysis. Gene expression profiling indicated activation of abscisic acid-, ethylene- and jasmonic acid-mediated signaling and inactivation of gibberellic acid-related pathways in Cr(VI) stress-treated rice roots. Genes encoding signaling components such as the protein kinases domain of unknown function 26, receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, LRK10-like kinase type 2 and protein phosphatase 2C, as well as transcription factors WRKY and apetala2/ethylene response factor were predominant during Cr(VI) stress. Genes involved in vesicle trafficking were subjected to functional characterization. Pretreating rice roots with a vesicle trafficking inhibitor, brefeldin A, effectively reduced Cr(VI)-induced ROS production. Suppression of the vesicle trafficking gene, Exo70, by virus-induced gene silencing strategies revealed that vesicle trafficking is required for mediation of Cr(VI)-induced ROS production. Taken together, these findings shed light on the molecular mechanisms in signaling pathways and transcriptional regulation in response to Cr stress in plants. PMID:24033343

  20. HOS1, a genetic locus involved in cold-responsive gene expression in arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Ishitani, M; Xiong, L; Lee, H; Stevenson, B; Zhu, J K

    1998-01-01

    Low-temperature stress induces the expression of a variety of genes in plants. However, the signal transduction pathway(s) that activates gene expression under cold stress is poorly understood. Mutants defective in cold signaling should facilitate molecular analysis of plant responses to low temperature and eventually lead to the identification and cloning of a cold stress receptor(s) and intracellular signaling components. In this study, we characterize a plant mutant affected in its response to low temperatures. The Arabidopsis hos1-1 mutation identified by luciferase imaging causes superinduction of cold-responsive genes, such as RD29A, COR47, COR15A, KIN1, and ADH. Although these genes are also induced by abscisic acid, high salt, or polyethylene glycol in addition to cold, the hos1-1 mutation only enhances their expression under cold stress. Genetic analysis revealed that hos1-1 is a single recessive mutation in a nuclear gene. Our studies using the firefly luciferase reporter gene under the control of the cold-responsive RD29A promoter have indicated that cold-responsive genes can be induced by temperatures as high as 19 degrees C in hos1-1 plants. In contrast, wild-type plants do not express the luciferase reporter at 10 degrees C or higher. Compared with the wild type, hos1-1 plants are l ess cold hardy. Nonetheless, after 2 days of cold acclimation, hos1-1 plants acquired the same degree of freezing tolerance as did the wild type. The hos1-1 plants flowered earlier than did the wild-type plants and appeared constitutively vernalized. Taken together, our findings show that the HOS1 locus is an important negative regulator of cold signal transduction in plant cells and that it plays critical roles in controlling gene expression under cold stress, freezing tolerance, and flowering time. PMID:9668134

  1. Global gene expression response to telomerase in bovine adrenocortical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perrault, Steven D.; Hornsby, Peter J.; Betts, Dean H. . E-mail: bettsd@uoguelph.ca

    2005-09-30

    The infinite proliferative capability of most immortalized cells is dependent upon the presence of the enzyme telomerase and its ability to maintain telomere length and structure. However, telomerase may be involved in a greater system than telomere length regulation, as recent evidence has shown it capable of increasing wound healing in vivo, and improving cellular proliferation rate and survival from apoptosis in vitro. Here, we describe the global gene expression response to ectopic telomerase expression in an in vitro bovine adrenocortical cell model. Telomerase-immortalized cells showed an increased ability for proliferation and survival in minimal essential medium above cells transgenic for GFP. cDNA microarray analyses revealed an altered cell state indicative of increased adrenocortical cell proliferation regulated by the IGF2 pathway and alterations in members of the TGF-B family. As well, we identified alterations in genes associated with development and wound healing that support a model that high telomerase expression induces a highly adaptable, progenitor-like state.

  2. Comparative Digital Gene Expression Analysis of the Arabidopsis Response to Volatiles Emitted by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hai-Ting; Zhao, Xia; Shang, Qian-Han; Wang, Yun; Guo, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Yu-Bao; Xie, Zhong-Kui; Wang, Ruo-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Some plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) regulated plant growth and elicited plant basal immunity by volatiles. The response mechanism to the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens volatiles in plant has not been well studied. We conducted global gene expression profiling in Arabidopsis after treatment with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 volatiles by Illumina Digital Gene Expression (DGE) profiling of different growth stages (seedling and mature) and tissues (leaves and roots). Compared with the control, 1,507 and 820 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in leaves and roots at the seedling stage, respectively, while 1,512 and 367 DEGs were identified in leaves and roots at the mature stage. Seventeen genes with different regulatory patterns were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Numerous DEGs were enriched for plant hormones, cell wall modifications, and protection against stress situations, which suggests that volatiles have effects on plant growth and immunity. Moreover, analyzes of transcriptome difference in tissues and growth stage using DGE profiling showed that the plant response might be tissue-specific and/or growth stage-specific. Thus, genes encoding flavonoid biosynthesis were downregulated in leaves and upregulated in roots, thereby indicating tissue-specific responses to volatiles. Genes related to photosynthesis were downregulated at the seedling stage and upregulated at the mature stage, respectively, thereby suggesting growth period-specific responses. In addition, the emission of bacterial volatiles significantly induced killing of cells of other organism pathway with up-regulated genes in leaves and the other three pathways (defense response to nematode, cell morphogenesis involved in differentiation and trichoblast differentiation) with up-regulated genes were significantly enriched in roots. Interestingly, some important alterations in the expression of growth-related genes, metabolic pathways, defense response to biotic

  3. Comparative Digital Gene Expression Analysis of the Arabidopsis Response to Volatiles Emitted by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hai-Ting; Zhao, Xia; Shang, Qian-Han; Wang, Yun; Guo, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Yu-Bao; Xie, Zhong-Kui; Wang, Ruo-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Some plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) regulated plant growth and elicited plant basal immunity by volatiles. The response mechanism to the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens volatiles in plant has not been well studied. We conducted global gene expression profiling in Arabidopsis after treatment with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 volatiles by Illumina Digital Gene Expression (DGE) profiling of different growth stages (seedling and mature) and tissues (leaves and roots). Compared with the control, 1,507 and 820 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in leaves and roots at the seedling stage, respectively, while 1,512 and 367 DEGs were identified in leaves and roots at the mature stage. Seventeen genes with different regulatory patterns were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Numerous DEGs were enriched for plant hormones, cell wall modifications, and protection against stress situations, which suggests that volatiles have effects on plant growth and immunity. Moreover, analyzes of transcriptome difference in tissues and growth stage using DGE profiling showed that the plant response might be tissue-specific and/or growth stage-specific. Thus, genes encoding flavonoid biosynthesis were downregulated in leaves and upregulated in roots, thereby indicating tissue-specific responses to volatiles. Genes related to photosynthesis were downregulated at the seedling stage and upregulated at the mature stage, respectively, thereby suggesting growth period-specific responses. In addition, the emission of bacterial volatiles significantly induced killing of cells of other organism pathway with up-regulated genes in leaves and the other three pathways (defense response to nematode, cell morphogenesis involved in differentiation and trichoblast differentiation) with up-regulated genes were significantly enriched in roots. Interestingly, some important alterations in the expression of growth-related genes, metabolic pathways, defense response to biotic

  4. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions. PMID:26926999

  5. Synthetic riboswitches that induce gene expression in diverse bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Topp, Shana; Reynoso, Colleen M K; Seeliger, Jessica C; Goldlust, Ian S; Desai, Shawn K; Murat, Dorothée; Shen, Aimee; Puri, Aaron W; Komeili, Arash; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Scott, June R; Gallivan, Justin P

    2010-12-01

    We developed a series of ligand-inducible riboswitches that control gene expression in diverse species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including human pathogens that have few or no previously reported inducible expression systems. We anticipate that these riboswitches will be useful tools for genetic studies in a wide range of bacteria. PMID:20935124

  6. SOS Response Induces Persistence to Fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dörr, Tobias; Lewis, Kim; Vulić, Marin

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria can survive antibiotic treatment without acquiring heritable antibiotic resistance. We investigated persistence to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli. Our data show that a majority of persisters to ciprofloxacin were formed upon exposure to the antibiotic, in a manner dependent on the SOS gene network. These findings reveal an active and inducible mechanism of persister formation mediated by the SOS response, challenging the prevailing view that persisters are pre-existing and formed purely by stochastic means. SOS-induced persistence is a novel mechanism by which cells can counteract DNA damage and promote survival to fluoroquinolones. This unique survival mechanism may be an important factor influencing the outcome of antibiotic therapy in vivo. PMID:20011100

  7. Silver nanoparticles induce endoplasmatic reticulum stress response in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Christen, Verena; Capelle, Martinus; Fent, Karl

    2013-10-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) find increasing applications, and therefore humans and the environment are increasingly exposed to them. However, potential toxicological implications are not sufficiently known. Here we investigate effects of AgNPs (average size 120 nm) on zebrafish in vitro and in vivo, and compare them to human hepatoma cells (Huh7). AgNPs are incorporated in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) and Huh7, and in zebrafish embryos. In ZFL cells AgNPs lead to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress response, and TNF-α. Transcriptional alterations also occur in pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax. The transcriptional profile differed in ZFL and Huh7 cells. In ZFL cells, the ER stress marker BiP is induced, concomitant with the ER stress marker ATF-6 and spliced XBP-1 after 6h and 24h exposure to 0.5 g/L and 0.05 g/L AgNPs, respectively. This indicates the induction of different pathways of the ER stress response. Moreover, AgNPs induce TNF-α. In zebrafish embryos exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 5mg/L AgNPs hatching was affected and morphological defects occurred at high concentrations. ER stress related gene transcripts BiP and Synv are significantly up-regulated after 24h at 0.1 and 5mg/L AgNPs. Furthermore, transcriptional alterations occurred in the pro-apoptotic genes Noxa and p21. The ER stress response was strong in ZFL cells and occurred in zebrafish embryos as well. Our data demonstrate for the first time that AgNPs lead to induction of ER stress in zebrafish. The induction of ER stress can have several consequences including the activation of apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. PMID:23800688

  8. Induction of Senescence and Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in Tomato in Response to Monoterpene

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinay; Kumar, Anil; Irfan, Mohammad; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Chakraborty, Subhra; Datta, Asis

    2013-01-01

    Monoterpenes, which are among the major components of plant essential oils, are known for their ecological roles as well for pharmaceutical properties. Geraniol, an acyclic monoterpene induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis/senescence in various cancer cells and plants; however, the genes involved in the process and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment of tomato plants with geraniol results in induction of senescence due to a substantial alteration in transcriptome. We have identified several geraniol-responsive protein encoding genes in tomato using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) approach. These genes comprise of various components of signal transduction, cellular metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ethylene signalling, apoptosis and DNA damage response. Upregulation of NADPH oxidase and antioxidant genes, and increase in ROS level after geraniol treatment point towards the involvement of ROS in geraniol-mediated senescence. The delayed onset of seedling death and induced expression of geraniol-responsive genes in geraniol-treated ethylene receptor mutant (Nr) suggest that geraniol-mediated senescence involves both ethylene dependent and independent pathways. Moreover, expression analysis during tomato ripening revealed that geraniol-responsive genes are also associated with the natural organ senescence process. PMID:24098759

  9. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  10. Gene expression during imidacloprid-induced hormesis in green peach aphid.

    PubMed

    Ayyanath, Murali-Mohan; Cutler, G Christopher; Scott-Dupree, Cynthia D; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan; Kandasamy, Saveetha; Prithiviraj, Kalyani

    2014-07-01

    Imidacloprid-induced hormesis in the form of stimulated reproduction has previously been reported in green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. Changes in gene expression accompanying this hormetic response have not been previously investigated. In this study, expression of stress response (Hsp60), dispersal (OSD, TOL and ANT), and developmental (FPPS I) genes were examined for two generations during imidacloprid-induced reproductive stimulation in M. persicae. Global DNA methylation was also measured to test the hypothesis that changes in gene expression are heritable. At hormetic concentrations, down-regulation of Hsp60 was followed by up-regulation of this gene in the subsequent generation. Likewise, expression of dispersal-related genes and FPPS I varied with concentration, life stage, and generation. These results indicate that reproductive hormesis in M. persicae is accompanied by a complex transgenerational pattern of up- and down-regulation of genes that likely reflects trade-offs in gene expression and related physiological processes during the phenotypic dose-response. Moreover, DNA methylation in second generation M. persicae occurred at higher doses than in first-generation aphids, suggesting that heritable adaptability to low doses of the stressor might have occurred. PMID:25249837

  11. The Transcriptional Response of Caenorhabditis elegans to Ivermectin Exposure Identifies Novel Genes Involved in the Response to Reduced Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Steven T.; Ivens, Al; Butler, Victoria; Ravikumar, Sai P.; Laing, Roz; Woods, Debra J.; Gilleard, John S.

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the transcriptional response of Caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to the anthelmintic drug ivermectin (IVM) using whole genome microarrays and real-time QPCR. Our original aim was to identify candidate molecules involved in IVM metabolism and/or excretion. For this reason the IVM tolerant strain, DA1316, was used to minimise transcriptomic changes related to the phenotype of drug exposure. However, unlike equivalent work with benzimidazole drugs, very few of the induced genes were members of xenobiotic metabolising enzyme families. Instead, the transcriptional response was dominated by genes associated with fat mobilization and fatty acid metabolism including catalase, esterase, and fatty acid CoA synthetase genes. This is consistent with the reduction in pharyngeal pumping, and consequential reduction in food intake, upon exposure of DA1316 worms to IVM. Genes with the highest fold change in response to IVM exposure, cyp-37B1, mtl-1 and scl-2, were comparably up-regulated in response to short–term food withdrawal (4 hr) independent of IVM exposure, and GFP reporter constructs confirm their expression in tissues associated with fat storage (intestine and hypodermis). These experiments have serendipitously identified novel genes involved in an early response of C. elegans to reduced food intake and may provide insight into similar processes in higher organisms. PMID:22348077

  12. RelA-Induced Interferon Response Negatively Regulates Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kochupurakkal, Bose S.; Wang, Zhigang C.; Hua, Tony; Culhane, Aedin C.; Rodig, Scott J.; Rajkovic-Molek, Koraljka; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Richardson, Andrea L.; Biswas, Debajit K.; Iglehart, J. Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Both oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities are attributed to the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway. Moreover, NF-kB may positively or negatively regulate proliferation. The molecular determinants of these opposing roles of NF-kB are unclear. Using primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as a model, we show that increased RelA levels and consequent increase in basal transcriptional activity of RelA induces IRF1, a target gene. Induced IRF1 upregulates STAT1 and IRF7, and in consort, these factors induce the expression of interferon response genes. Activation of the interferon pathway down-regulates CDK4 and up-regulates p27 resulting in Rb hypo-phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. Stimulation of HMEC with IFN-γ elicits similar phenotypic and molecular changes suggesting that basal activity of RelA and IFN-γ converge on IRF1 to regulate proliferation. The anti-proliferative RelA-IRF1-CDK4 signaling axis is retained in ER+/HER2- breast tumors analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Using immuno-histochemical analysis of breast tumors, we confirm the negative correlation between RelA levels and proliferation rate in ER+/HER2- breast tumors. These findings attribute an anti-proliferative tumor-suppressor role to basal RelA activity. Inactivation of Rb, down-regulation of RelA or IRF1, or upregulation of CDK4 or IRF2 rescues the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 induced proliferation arrest in HMEC and are points of disruption in aggressive tumors. Activity of the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 axis may explain favorable response to CDK4/6 inhibition observed in patients with ER+ Rb competent tumors. PMID:26460486

  13. RelA-Induced Interferon Response Negatively Regulates Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kochupurakkal, Bose S; Wang, Zhigang C; Hua, Tony; Culhane, Aedin C; Rodig, Scott J; Rajkovic-Molek, Koraljka; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Richardson, Andrea L; Biswas, Debajit K; Iglehart, J Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Both oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities are attributed to the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway. Moreover, NF-kB may positively or negatively regulate proliferation. The molecular determinants of these opposing roles of NF-kB are unclear. Using primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as a model, we show that increased RelA levels and consequent increase in basal transcriptional activity of RelA induces IRF1, a target gene. Induced IRF1 upregulates STAT1 and IRF7, and in consort, these factors induce the expression of interferon response genes. Activation of the interferon pathway down-regulates CDK4 and up-regulates p27 resulting in Rb hypo-phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. Stimulation of HMEC with IFN-γ elicits similar phenotypic and molecular changes suggesting that basal activity of RelA and IFN-γ converge on IRF1 to regulate proliferation. The anti-proliferative RelA-IRF1-CDK4 signaling axis is retained in ER+/HER2- breast tumors analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Using immuno-histochemical analysis of breast tumors, we confirm the negative correlation between RelA levels and proliferation rate in ER+/HER2- breast tumors. These findings attribute an anti-proliferative tumor-suppressor role to basal RelA activity. Inactivation of Rb, down-regulation of RelA or IRF1, or upregulation of CDK4 or IRF2 rescues the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 induced proliferation arrest in HMEC and are points of disruption in aggressive tumors. Activity of the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 axis may explain favorable response to CDK4/6 inhibition observed in patients with ER+ Rb competent tumors. PMID:26460486

  14. Moderate malnutrition in rats induces somatic gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Martínez, M Monserrat; Cortés-Barberena, Edith; Cervantes-Ríos, Elsa; Del Carmen García-Rodríguez, María; Rodríguez-Cruz, Leonor; Ortiz-Muñiz, Rocío

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between malnutrition and genetic damage has been widely studied in human and animal models, leading to the observation that interactions between genotoxic exposure and micronutrient status appear to affect genomic stability. A new assay has been developed that uses the phosphatidylinositol glycan class A gene (Pig-a) as a reporter for measuring in vivo gene mutation. The Pig-a assay can be employed to evaluate mutant frequencies (MFs) in peripheral blood reticulocytes (RETs) and erythrocytes (RBCs) using flow cytometry. In the present study, we assessed the effects of malnutrition on mutagenic susceptibility by exposing undernourished (UN) and well-nourished (WN) rats to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and measuring Pig-a MFs. Two week-old UN and WN male Han-Wistar rats were treated daily with 0, 20, or 40mg/kg ENU for 3 consecutive days. Blood was collected from the tail vein one day before ENU treatment (Day-1) and after ENU administration on Days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56 and 63. Pig-a MFs were measured in RETs and RBCs as the RET(CD59-) and RBC(CD59-) frequencies. In the vehicle control groups, the frequencies of mutant RETs and RBCs were significantly higher in UN rats compared with WN rats at all sampling times. The ENU treatments increased RET and RBC MFs starting at Day 7. Although ENU-induced Pig-a MFs were consistently lower in UN rats than in WN rats, these differences were not significant. To understand these responses, further studies should use other mutagens and nucleated surrogate cells and examine the types of mutations induced in UN and WN rats. PMID:26994962

  15. [Stress response genes expression analysis of barley Hordeum vulgare under space flight environment].

    PubMed

    Shagimardanova, E I; Gusev, O A; Sychev, V N; Levinskikh, M A; Sharipova, M R; Il'inskaia, O N; Bingham, G; Sugimoto, M

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptome of barley Hordeum vulgare grown aboard International Space Station (ISS) was analyzed by means of microarray. It was revealed 500 genes with mRNA level, changed more than two folds in space environment. Among them are genes encoding stress response proteins, videlicet Heat Shock Proteins (HSP), Pathogenesis-Related Proteins (PR) and Antioxidant Proteins. Further analysis of these genes by real time PCR showed enhanced transcription level of Reactive oxygen Species (ROS) scavenging genes. The mRNA level of superoxide dismutase (sod) was 6 folds higher in space environment when compare to Earth conditions. Glutamyl transferase gene expression was enhanced 24 times in space. Transcription of catalase gene (cat) was increased 18 times and of ascorbate peroxidase was increased 3 times in space in comparison with ground control. For the first time it was shown that space flight environment may induce oxidative stress in plants. PMID:21090239

  16. The acid adaptive tolerance response in Campylobacter jejuni induces a global response, as suggested by proteomics and microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Varsaki, Athanasia; Murphy, Caroline; Barczynska, Alicja; Jordan, Kieran; Carroll, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni CI 120 is a natural isolate obtained during poultry processing and has the ability to induce an acid tolerance response (ATR) to acid + aerobic conditions in early stationary phase. Other strains tested they did not induce an ATR or they induced it in exponential phase. Campylobacter spp. do not contain the genes that encode the global stationary phase stress response mechanism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genes that are involved in the C. jejuni CI 120 early stationary phase ATR, as it seems to be expressing a novel mechanism of stress tolerance. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to examine the expression profile of cytosolic proteins during the C. jejuni CI 120 adaptation to acid + aerobic stress and microarrays to determine the genes that participate in the ATR. The results indicate induction of a global response that activated a number of stress responses, including several genes encoding surface components and genes involved with iron uptake. The findings of this study provide new insights into stress tolerance of C. jejuni, contribute to a better knowledge of the physiology of this bacterium and highlight the diversity among different strains. PMID:26221965

  17. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, N; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K; Yokota, Y; Yokoyama, M; Matsuo, M

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resulted in the production of truncated dystrophin mRNA, although the consensus sequences for splicing at both ends of exon 27 were unaltered. To determine how E1211X induced exon 27 skipping, the splicing enhancer activity of purine-rich region within exon 27 was examined in an in vitro splicing system using chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA. The mutant sequence containing G3839T abolished splicing enhancer activity of the wild-type purine-rich sequence for the upstream intron in this chimeric pre-mRNA. An artificial polypurine oligonucleotide mimicking the purine-rich sequence of exon 27 also showed enhancer activity that was suppressed by the introduction of a T nucleotide. Furthermore, the splicing enhancer activity was more markedly inhibited when a nonsense codon was created by the inserted T residue. This is the first evidence that partial skipping of an exon harboring a nonsense mutation is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence. PMID:9410897

  18. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shiga, N; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K; Yokota, Y; Yokoyama, M; Matsuo, M

    1997-11-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resulted in the production of truncated dystrophin mRNA, although the consensus sequences for splicing at both ends of exon 27 were unaltered. To determine how E1211X induced exon 27 skipping, the splicing enhancer activity of purine-rich region within exon 27 was examined in an in vitro splicing system using chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA. The mutant sequence containing G3839T abolished splicing enhancer activity of the wild-type purine-rich sequence for the upstream intron in this chimeric pre-mRNA. An artificial polypurine oligonucleotide mimicking the purine-rich sequence of exon 27 also showed enhancer activity that was suppressed by the introduction of a T nucleotide. Furthermore, the splicing enhancer activity was more markedly inhibited when a nonsense codon was created by the inserted T residue. This is the first evidence that partial skipping of an exon harboring a nonsense mutation is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence. PMID:9410897

  19. Mapping the genes for haloperidol-induced catalepsy.

    PubMed

    Kanes, S; Dains, K; Cipp, L; Gatley, J; Hitzemann, B; Rasmussen, E; Sanderson, S; Silverman, M; Hitzemann, R

    1996-05-01

    The strain means for haloperidol-induced catalepsy were determined in the 26 strain BXD recombinant inbred series. The ED50 values ranged from 0.55 mg/kg (strain 30) to 7.9 mg/kg (strain 2). Heritability for the catalepsy response was 0.78 and the number of effective loci was estimated to be four. The strain means were correlated with the strain distribution patterns for 1300 marker loci of known chromosomal location and polymorphic between the C57Bl/6J and DBA/2J strains. Six quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were identified at P < .01. Two of the six QTLs were confirmed in a sample of B6XD2 F2 animals (n = 144), phenotyped for haloperidol response and genotyped for microsatellites closely linked to the QTLs. The confirmed QTL on chromosome 4 is near the b locus. The confirmed QTL on chromosome 9 is closely linked to Drd2, the D2 dopamine receptor gene. One hundred of the F2 individuals were phenotyped for D2 dopamine receptor binding using the ligand [125I] epidepride as the ligand. Consistent with previous results, the nonresponsive F2 individuals showed modestly higher receptor binding in all brain regions examined: the nucleus accumbens core, the nucleus accumbens shell, the lateral caudate putamen, the dorsomedial caudate putamen, the substantia nigra zona compacta and the ventral tegmental area. The DBA/2J allele of the chromosome 9 QTL was associated with higher receptor binding in all brain areas except the ventral tegmental area. Overall, the data illustrate that either near or part of Drd2 is a QTL which has significant effects on both haloperidol response and D2 dopamine receptor binding. However, the data also illustrate that most of the genetic variance in either haloperidol response or D2 dopamine receptor binding is not associated with Drd2. PMID:8627512

  20. Transcriptional 'memory' of a stress: transient chromatin and memory (epigenetic) marks at stress-response genes.

    PubMed

    Avramova, Zoya

    2015-07-01

    Drought, salinity, extreme temperature variations, pathogen and herbivory attacks are recurring environmental stresses experienced by plants throughout their life. To survive repeated stresses, plants provide responses that may be different from their response during the first encounter with the stress. A different response to a similar stress represents the concept of 'stress memory'. A coordinated reaction at the organismal, cellular and gene/genome levels is thought to increase survival chances by improving the plant's tolerance/avoidance abilities. Ultimately, stress memory may provide a mechanism for acclimation and adaptation. At the molecular level, the concept of stress memory indicates that the mechanisms responsible for memory-type transcription during repeated stresses are not based on repetitive activation of the same response pathways activated by the first stress. Some recent advances in the search for transcription 'memory factors' are discussed with an emphasis on super-induced dehydration stress memory response genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:25788029

  1. Arsenic- and cadmium-induced toxicogenomic response in mouse embryos undergoing neurulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Joshua F.; Yu, Xiaozhong; Moreira, Estefania G.; Hong, Sungwoo; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2011-01-15

    Arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) are well-characterized teratogens in animal models inducing embryotoxicity and neural tube defects (NTDs) when exposed during neurulation. Toxicological research is needed to resolve the specific biological processes and associated molecular pathways underlying metal-induced toxicity during this timeframe in gestational development. In this study, we investigated the dose-dependent effects of As and Cd on gene expression in C57BL/6J mouse embryos exposed in utero during neurulation (GD8) to identify significantly altered genes and corresponding biological processes associated with embryotoxicity. We quantitatively examined the toxicogenomic dose-response relationship at the gene level. Our results suggest that As and Cd induce dose-dependent gene expression alterations representing shared (cell cycle, response to UV, glutathione metabolism, RNA processing) and unique (alcohol/sugar metabolism) biological processes, which serve as robust indicators of metal-induced developmental toxicity and indicate underlying embryotoxic effects. Our observations also correlate well with previously identified impacts of As and Cd on specific genes associated with metal-induced toxicity (Cdkn1a, Mt1). In summary, we have identified in a quantitative manner As and Cd induced dose-dependent effects on gene expression in mouse embryos during a peak window of sensitivity to embryotoxicity and NTDs in the sensitive C57BL/6J strain.

  2. Arsenic- and Cadmium-Induced Toxicogenomic Response in Mouse Embryos Undergoing Neurulation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joshua F.; Yu, Xiaozhong; Moreira, Estefania G.; Hong, Sungwoo; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) are well-characterized teratogens in animal models inducing embryotoxicity and neural tube defects (NTDs) when exposed during neurulation. Toxicological research is needed to resolve the specific biological processes and associated molecular pathways underlying metal-induced toxicity during this timeframe in gestational development. In this study, we investigated the dose-dependent effects of As and Cd on gene expression in C57BL/6J mouse embryos exposed in utero during neurulation (GD8) to identify significantly altered genes and corresponding biological processes associated with embryotoxicity. We quantitatively examined the toxicogenomic dose-response relationship at the gene level. Our results suggest As and Cd induce dose-dependent gene expression alterations representing shared (cell cycle, response to UV, glutathione metabolism, RNA processing) and unique (alcohol/sugar metabolism) biological processes, which serve as robust indicators of metal-induced developmental toxicity and indicate underlying embryotoxic effects. Our observations also correlate well with previously identified impacts of As and Cd on specific genes associated with metal-induced toxicity (Cdkn1a, Mt1). In summary, we have identified in a quantitative manner As and Cd induced dose-dependent effects on gene expression in mouse embryos during a peak window of sensitivity to embryotoxicity and NTDs in the sensitive C57BL/6J strain. PMID:20883709

  3. Expression profiling of genes regulated by Fra-1/AP-1 transcription factor during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Fra-1/AP-1 transcription factor regulates the expression of genes controlling various processes including migration, invasion, and survival as well as extracellular remodeling. We recently demonstrated that loss of Fra-1 leads to exacerbated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, accompanied by enhanced expression of various inflammatory and fibrotic genes. To better understand the molecular mechanisms by which Fra-1 confers protection during bleomycin-induced lung injury, genome-wide mRNA expression profiling was performed. Results We found that Fra-1 regulates gene expression programs that include: 1) several cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation, 2) several genes involved in the extracellular remodeling and cell adhesion, and 3) several genes involved in programmed cell death. Conclusion Loss of Fra-1 leads to the enhanced expression of genes regulating inflammation and immune responses and decreased the expression of genes involved in apoptosis, suggesting that this transcription factor distinctly modulates early pro-fibrotic cellular responses. PMID:23758685

  4. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during osmotic stress responses by the mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Ortells, M Carmen; Morancho, Beatriz; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Viollet, Benoit; Laderoute, Keith R; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2012-05-01

    Although stress can suppress growth and proliferation, cells can induce adaptive responses that allow them to maintain these functions under stress. While numerous studies have focused on the inhibitory effects of stress on cell growth, less is known on how growth-promoting pathways influence stress responses. We have approached this question by analyzing the effect of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central growth controller, on the osmotic stress response. Our results showed that mammalian cells exposed to moderate hypertonicity maintained active mTOR, which was required to sustain their cell size and proliferative capacity. Moreover, mTOR regulated the induction of diverse osmostress response genes, including targets of the tonicity-responsive transcription factor NFAT5 as well as NFAT5-independent genes. Genes sensitive to mTOR-included regulators of stress responses, growth and proliferation. Among them, we identified REDD1 and REDD2, which had been previously characterized as mTOR inhibitors in other stress contexts. We observed that mTOR facilitated transcription-permissive conditions for several osmoresponsive genes by enhancing histone H4 acetylation and the recruitment of RNA polymerase II. Altogether, these results reveal a previously unappreciated role of mTOR in regulating transcriptional mechanisms that control gene expression during cellular stress responses. PMID:22287635

  5. De Novo Assembled Wheat Transcriptomes Delineate Differentially Expressed Host Genes in Response to Leaf Rust Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Jyoti; Kumari, Supriya; Kumar, Manish; Poddar, Raju; Balyan, Harindra Singh; Gupta, Puspendra Kumar; Prabhu, Kumble Vinod; Mukhopadhyay, Kunal

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens like Puccinia triticina, the causal organism for leaf rust, extensively damages wheat production. The interaction at molecular level between wheat and the pathogen is complex and less explored. The pathogen induced response was characterized using mock- or pathogen inoculated near-isogenic wheat lines (with or without seedling leaf rust resistance gene Lr28). Four Serial Analysis of Gene Expression libraries were prepared from mock- and pathogen inoculated plants and were subjected to Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection, which generated a total of 165,767,777 reads, each 35 bases long. The reads were processed and multiple k-mers were attempted for de novo transcript assembly; 22 k-mers showed the best results. Altogether 21,345 contigs were generated and functionally characterized by gene ontology annotation, mining for transcription factors and resistance genes. Expression analysis among the four libraries showed extensive alterations in the transcriptome in response to pathogen infection, reflecting reorganizations in major biological processes and metabolic pathways. Role of auxin in determining pathogenesis in susceptible and resistant lines were imperative. The qPCR expression study of four LRR-RLK (Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinases) genes showed higher expression at 24 hrs after inoculation with pathogen. In summary, the conceptual model of induced resistance in wheat contributes insights on defense responses and imparts knowledge of Puccinia triticina-induced defense transcripts in wheat plants. PMID:26840746

  6. De Novo Assembled Wheat Transcriptomes Delineate Differentially Expressed Host Genes in Response to Leaf Rust Infection.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Saket; Singh, Dharmendra; Pathak, Jyoti; Kumari, Supriya; Kumar, Manish; Poddar, Raju; Balyan, Harindra Singh; Gupta, Puspendra Kumar; Prabhu, Kumble Vinod; Mukhopadhyay, Kunal

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens like Puccinia triticina, the causal organism for leaf rust, extensively damages wheat production. The interaction at molecular level between wheat and the pathogen is complex and less explored. The pathogen induced response was characterized using mock- or pathogen inoculated near-isogenic wheat lines (with or without seedling leaf rust resistance gene Lr28). Four Serial Analysis of Gene Expression libraries were prepared from mock- and pathogen inoculated plants and were subjected to Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection, which generated a total of 165,767,777 reads, each 35 bases long. The reads were processed and multiple k-mers were attempted for de novo transcript assembly; 22 k-mers showed the best results. Altogether 21,345 contigs were generated and functionally characterized by gene ontology annotation, mining for transcription factors and resistance genes. Expression analysis among the four libraries showed extensive alterations in the transcriptome in response to pathogen infection, reflecting reorganizations in major biological processes and metabolic pathways. Role of auxin in determining pathogenesis in susceptible and resistant lines were imperative. The qPCR expression study of four LRR-RLK (Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinases) genes showed higher expression at 24 hrs after inoculation with pathogen. In summary, the conceptual model of induced resistance in wheat contributes insights on defense responses and imparts knowledge of Puccinia triticina-induced defense transcripts in wheat plants. PMID:26840746

  7. Antipsychotic Induced Gene Regulation in Multiple Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Girgenti, Matthew James; Nisenbaum, Laura K.; Bymaster, Franklin; Terwilliger, Rosemarie; Duman, Ronald S; Newton, Samuel Sathyanesan

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs is not well understood. Their complex receptor affinity profiles indicate that their action could extend beyond dopamine receptor blockade. Single gene expression studies and high-throughput gene profiling have shown the induction of genes from several molecular classes and functional categories. Using a focused microarray approach we investigated gene regulation in rat striatum, frontal cortex and hippocampus after chronic administration of haloperidol or olanzapine. Regulated genes were validated by in-situ hybridization, realtime PCR and immunohistochemistry. Only limited overlap was observed in genes regulated by haloperidol and olanzapine. Both drugs elicited maximal gene regulation in the striatum and least in the hippocampus. Striatal gene induction by haloperidol was predominantly in neurotransmitter signaling, G-protein coupled receptors and transcription factors. Olanzapine prominently induced retinoic acid and trophic factor signaling genes in the frontal cortex. The data also revealed the induction of several genes that could be targeted in future drug development efforts. The study uncovered the induction of several novel genes, including somatostatin receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The results demonstrating the regulation of multiple receptors and transcription factors suggests that both typical and atypical antipsychotics could possess a complex molecular mechanism of action. PMID:20070867

  8. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M. ); Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following [gamma]-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of [beta]-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following [gamma]-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not [gamma]-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to [gamma] rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  9. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following {gamma}-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of {beta}-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following {gamma}-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not {gamma}-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to {gamma} rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  10. ABI3 mediates dehydration stress recovery response in Arabidopsis thaliana by regulating expression of downstream genes.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Sonia; Sengupta, Sourabh; Ray, Anagh; Nag Chaudhuri, Ronita

    2016-09-01

    ABI3, originally discovered as a seed-specific transcription factor is now implicated to act beyond seed physiology, especially during abiotic stress. In non-seed plants, ABI3 is known to act in desiccation stress signaling. Here we show that ABI3 plays a role in dehydration stress response in Arabidopsis. ABI3 gene was upregulated during dehydration stress and its expression was maintained during subsequent stress recovery phases. Comparative gene expression studies in response to dehydration stress and stress recovery were done with genes which had potential ABI3 binding sites in their upstream regulatory regions. Such studies showed that several genes including known seed-specific factors like CRUCIFERIN1, CRUCIFERIN3 and LEA-group of genes like LEA76, LEA6, DEHYDRIN LEA and LEA-LIKE got upregulated in an ABI3-dependent manner, especially during the stress recovery phase. ABI3 got recruited to regions upstream to the transcription start site of these genes during dehydration stress response through direct or indirect DNA binding. Interestingly, ABI3 also binds to its own promoter region during such stress signaling. Nucleosomes covering potential ABI3 binding sites in the upstream sequences of the above-mentioned genes alter positions, and show increased H3 K9 acetylation during stress-induced transcription. ABI3 thus mediates dehydration stress signaling in Arabidopsis through regulation of a group of genes that play a role primarily during stress recovery phase. PMID:27457990