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Sample records for response mutants defective

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Transcription Elongation Mutants Are Defective in PUR5 Induction in Response to Nucleotide Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Randal J.; Reines, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of guanine nucleotides. It is a target of therapeutically useful drugs and is implicated in the regulation of cell growth rate. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mutations in components of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription elongation machinery confer increased sensitivity to a drug that inhibits IMPDH, 6-azauracil (6AU), by a mechanism that is poorly understood. This phenotype is thought to reflect the need for an optimally functioning transcription machinery under conditions of lowered intracellular GTP levels. Here we show that in response to the application of IMPDH inhibitors such as 6AU, wild-type yeast strains induce transcription of PUR5, one of four genes encoding IMPDH-related enzymes. Yeast elongation mutants sensitive to 6AU, such as those with a disrupted gene encoding elongation factor SII or those containing amino acid substitutions in Pol II subunits, are defective in PUR5 induction. The inability to fully induce PUR5 correlates with mutations that effect transcription elongation since 6AU-sensitive strains deleted for genes not related to transcription elongation are competent to induce PUR5. DNA encompassing the PUR5 promoter and 5′ untranslated region supports 6AU induction of a luciferase reporter gene in wild-type cells. Thus, yeast sense and respond to nucleotide depletion via a mechanism of transcriptional induction that restores nucleotides to levels required for normal growth. An optimally functioning elongation machinery is critical for this response. PMID:11003640

  2. Epididymis Response Partly Compensates for Spermatozoa Oxidative Defects in snGPx4 and GPx5 Double Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Noblanc, Anaïs; Peltier, Manon; Damon-Soubeyrand, Christelle; Kerchkove, Nicolas; Chabory, Eléonore; Vernet, Patrick; Saez, Fabrice; Cadet, Rémi; Janny, Laurent; Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Conrad, Marcus; Drevet, Joël R.; Kocer, Ayhan

    2012-01-01

    We report here that spermatozoa of mice lacking both the sperm nucleaus glutathione peroxidase 4 (snGPx4) and the epididymal glutathione peroxidase 5 (GPx5) activities display sperm nucleus structural abnormalities including delayed and defective nuclear compaction, nuclear instability and DNA damage. We show that to counteract the GPx activity losses, the epididymis of the double KO animals mounted an antioxydant response resulting in a strong increase in the global H2O2-scavenger activity especially in the cauda epididymis. Quantitative RT-PCR data show that together with the up-regulation of epididymal scavengers (of the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin system as well as glutathione-S-transferases) the epididymis of double mutant animals increased the expression of several disulfide isomerases in an attempt to recover normal disulfide-bridging activity. Despite these compensatory mechanisms cauda-stored spermatozoa of double mutant animals show high levels of DNA oxidation, increased fragmentation and greater susceptibility to nuclear decondensation. Nevertheless, the enzymatic epididymal salvage response is sufficient to maintain full fertility of double KO males whatever their age, crossed with young WT female mice. PMID:22719900

  3. Amphid defective mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    De Riso, L; Ristoratore, F; Sebastiano, M; Bazzicalupo, P

    1994-01-01

    Studies are reported on a chemoreception mutant which arose in a mutator strain. The mutant sensory neurons do not stain with fluoresceine isothiocyanate (Dyf phenotype), hence the name, dyf-1, given to the gene it identifies. The gene maps on LGI, 0.4 map units from dpy-5 on the unc-11 side. The response of mutant worms to various repellents has been studied and shown to be partially altered. Other chemoreception based behaviors are less affected. The cilia of the sensory neurons of the amphid are shorter than normal and the primary defect may be in the capacity of the sheath cells to secrete the matrix material that fills the space between cilia in the amphid channel. Progress toward the molecular cloning of the gene is also reported. Relevant results from other laboratories are briefly reviewed. PMID:7896139

  4. Biofilm formation-defective mutants in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Aroa; Leal-Morales, Antonio; Jiménez-Díaz, Lorena; Platero, Ana I; Bardallo-Pérez, Juan; Díaz-Romero, Alberto; Acemel, Rafael D; Illán, Juan M; Jiménez-López, Julia; Govantes, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Out of 8000 candidates from a genetic screening for Pseudomonas putida KT2442 mutants showing defects in biofilm formation, 40 independent mutants with diminished levels of biofilm were analyzed. Most of these mutants carried insertions in genes of the lap cluster, whose products are responsible for synthesis, export and degradation of the adhesin LapA. All mutants in this class were strongly defective in biofilm formation. Mutants in the flagellar regulatory genes fleQ and flhF showed similar defects to that of the lap mutants. On the contrary, transposon insertions in the flagellar structural genes fliP and flgG, that also impair flagellar motility, had a modest defect in biofilm formation. A mutation in gacS, encoding the sensor element of the GacS/GacA two-component system, also had a moderate effect on biofilm formation. Additional insertions targeted genes involved in cell envelope function: PP3222, encoding the permease element of an ABC-type transporter and tolB, encoding the periplasmic component of the Tol-OprL system required for outer membrane stability. Our results underscore the central role of LapA, suggest cross-regulation between motility and adhesion functions and provide insights on the role of cell envelope trafficking and maintenance for biofilm development in P. putida. PMID:27190143

  5. Increase in chitin as an essential response to defects in assembly of cell wall polymers in the ggp1delta mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Popolo, L; Gilardelli, D; Bonfante, P; Vai, M

    1997-01-01

    The GGP1/GAS1 gene codes for a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma membrane glycoprotein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ggp1delta mutant shows morphogenetic defects which suggest changes in the cell wall matrix. In this work, we have investigated cell wall glucan levels and the increase of chitin in ggp1delta mutant cells. In these cells, the level of alkali-insoluble 1,6-beta-D-glucan was found to be 50% of that of wild-type cells and was responsible for the observed decrease in the total alkali-insoluble glucan. Moreover, the ratio of alkali-soluble to alkali-insoluble glucan almost doubled, suggesting a change in glucan solubility. The increase of chitin in ggp1delta cells was found to be essential since the chs3delta ggp1delta mutations determined a severe reduction in the growth rate and in cell viability. Electron microscopy analysis showed the loss of the typical structure of yeast cell walls. Furthermore, in the chs3delta ggp1delta cells, the level of alkali-insoluble glucan was 57% of that of wild-type cells and the alkali-soluble/alkali-insoluble glucan ratio was doubled. We tested the effect of inhibition of chitin synthesis also by a different approach. The ggp1delta cells were treated with nikkomycin Z, a well-known inhibitor of chitin synthesis, and showed a hypersensitivity to this drug. In addition, studies of genetic interactions with genes related to the construction of the cell wall indicate a synthetic lethal effect of the ggp1delta kre6delta and the ggp1delta pkc1delta combined mutations. Our data point to an involvement of the GGP1 gene product in the cross-links between cell wall glucans (1,3-beta-D-glucans with 1,6-beta-D-glucans and with chitin). Chitin is essential to compensate for the defects due to the lack of Ggp1p. Moreover, the activities of Ggp1p and Chs3p are essential to the formation of the organized structure of the cell wall in vegetative cells. PMID:8990299

  6. 2-O-methylation of fucosyl residues of a rhizobial lipopolysaccharide is increased in response to host exudate and is eliminated in a symbiotically defective mutant.

    PubMed

    Noel, K Dale; Box, Jodie M; Bonne, Valerie J

    2004-03-01

    When Rhizobium etli CE3 was grown in the presence of Phaseolus vulgaris seed extracts containing anthocyanins, its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sugar composition was changed in two ways: greatly decreased content of what is normally the terminal residue of the LPS, di-O-methylfucose, and a doubling of the 2-O-methylation of other fucose residues in the LPS O antigen. R. etli strain CE395 was isolated after Tn5 mutagenesis of strain CE3 by screening for mutant colonies that did not change antigenically in the presence of seed extract. The LPS of this strain completely lacked 2-O-methylfucose, regardless of whether anthocyanins were present during growth. The mutant gave only pseudonodules in association with P. vulgaris. Interpretation of this phenotype was complicated by a second LPS defect exhibited by the mutant: its LPS population had only about 50% of the normal amount of O-antigen-containing LPS (LPS I). The latter defect could be suppressed genetically such that the resulting strain (CE395 alpha 395) synthesized the normal amount of an LPS I that still lacked 2-O-methylfucose residues. Strain CE395 alpha 395 did not elicit pseudonodules but resulted in significantly slower nodule development, fewer nodules, and less nitrogenase activity than lps(+) strains. The relative symbiotic deficiency was more severe when seeds were planted and inoculated with bacteria before they germinated. These results support previous conclusions that the relative amount of LPS I on the bacterial surface is crucial in symbiosis, but LPS structural features, such as 2-O-methylation of fucose, also may facilitate symbiotic interactions. PMID:15006776

  7. 2-O-Methylation of Fucosyl Residues of a Rhizobial Lipopolysaccharide Is Increased in Response to Host Exudate and Is Eliminated in a Symbiotically Defective Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K. Dale; Box, Jodie M.; Bonne, Valerie J.

    2004-01-01

    When Rhizobium etli CE3 was grown in the presence of Phaseolus vulgaris seed extracts containing anthocyanins, its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sugar composition was changed in two ways: greatly decreased content of what is normally the terminal residue of the LPS, di-O-methylfucose, and a doubling of the 2-O-methylation of other fucose residues in the LPS O antigen. R. etli strain CE395 was isolated after Tn5 mutagenesis of strain CE3 by screening for mutant colonies that did not change antigenically in the presence of seed extract. The LPS of this strain completely lacked 2-O-methylfucose, regardless of whether anthocyanins were present during growth. The mutant gave only pseudonodules in association with P. vulgaris. Interpretation of this phenotype was complicated by a second LPS defect exhibited by the mutant: its LPS population had only about 50% of the normal amount of O-antigen-containing LPS (LPS I). The latter defect could be suppressed genetically such that the resulting strain (CE395α395) synthesized the normal amount of an LPS I that still lacked 2-O-methylfucose residues. Strain CE395α395 did not elicit pseudonodules but resulted in significantly slower nodule development, fewer nodules, and less nitrogenase activity than lps+ strains. The relative symbiotic deficiency was more severe when seeds were planted and inoculated with bacteria before they germinated. These results support previous conclusions that the relative amount of LPS I on the bacterial surface is crucial in symbiosis, but LPS structural features, such as 2-O-methylation of fucose, also may facilitate symbiotic interactions. PMID:15006776

  8. Multiple Chemosensory Defects in Daf-11 and Daf-21 Mutants of Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Vowels, J. J.; Thomas, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Phenotypic analysis of the daf-11 and daf-21 mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans suggests that they have defects in components shared by processes analogous to vertebrate taste and olfaction. daf-11 and daf-21 mutations were previously shown to cause inappropriate response to the dauer-inducing pheromone. By mutational analysis and by disabling specific chemosensory sensilla with a laser, we show that neurons in the amphid sensilla are required for this pheromone response. Using behavioral assays, we find that daf-11 and daf-21 mutants are not defective in avoidance of certain non-volatile repellents, but are defective in taxis to non-volatile attractants. In addition, both mutants are defective in taxis to volatile attractants detected primarily by the amphid neuron AWC, but respond normally to volatile attractants detected primarily by AWA. We propose that daf-11 and daf-21 mediate sensory transduction for both volatile and non-volatile compounds in specific amphid neurons. PMID:7828815

  9. Mutant strains of Tetrahymena thermophila defective in thymidine kinase activity: Biochemical and genetic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, K.V.; Pearlman, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    Three mutant strains, one conditional, of Tetrahymena thermophila were defective in thymidine phosphorylating activity in vivo and in thymidine kinase activity in vitro. Nucleoside phosphotransferase activity in mutant cell extracts approached wild-type levels, suggesting that thymidine kinase is responsible for most, if not all, thymidine phosphorylation in vivo. Thymidine kinase activity in extracts of the conditional mutant strain was deficient when the cells were grown or assayed or both at the permissive temperature, implying a structural enzyme defect. Analysis of the reaction products from in vitro assays with partially purified enzymes showed that phosphorylation by thymidine kinase and nucleoside phosphotransferase occurred at the 5' position. Genetic analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was recessive and that mutations in each of the three mutant strains did not complement, suggesting allelism.

  10. Defective Glycinergic Synaptic Transmission in Zebrafish Motility Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Hiromi; Carta, Eloisa; Yamanaka, Iori; Harvey, Robert J.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2009-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo) mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR) β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic transmission due to a lack of synaptic aggregation of GlyRs. Due to the consequent loss of reciprocal inhibition of motor circuits between the two sides of the spinal cord, motor neurons activate simultaneously on both sides resulting in bilateral contraction of axial muscles of beo mutants, eliciting the so-called ‘accordion’ phenotype. Similar defects in GlyR subunit genes have been observed in several mammals and are the basis for human hyperekplexia/startle disease. By contrast, zebrafish shocked (sho) mutants have a defect in slc6a9, encoding GlyT1, a glycine transporter that is expressed by astroglial cells surrounding the glycinergic synapse in the hindbrain and spinal cord. GlyT1 mediates rapid uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft, terminating synaptic transmission. In zebrafish sho mutants, there appears to be elevated extracellular glycine resulting in persistent inhibition of postsynaptic neurons and subsequent reduced motility, causing the ‘twitch-once’ phenotype. We review current knowledge regarding zebrafish ‘accordion’ and ‘twitch-once’ mutants, including beo and sho, and report the identification of a new α2 subunit that revises the phylogeny of zebrafish GlyRs. PMID:20161699

  11. An Arabidopsis mutant defective in the general phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, C C; Vogt, T; Ellis, B E; Somerville, C R

    1992-01-01

    Mutants of Arabidopsis deficient in a major leaf phenylpropanoid ester, 2-O-sinapoyl-L-malate, were identified by thin-layer chromatographic screening of methanolic leaf extracts from several thousand mutagenized plants. Mutations at a locus designated SIN1 also eliminate accumulation of the sinapic acid esters characteristic of seed tissues. Because of increased transparency to UV light, the sin1 mutants exhibit a characteristic red fluorescence under UV light, whereas wild-type plants have a blue-green appearance due to the fluorescence of sinapoyl malate in the upper epidermis. As determined by in vivo radiotracer feeding experiments, precursor supplementation studies, and enzymatic assays, the defect in the sin1 mutants appears to block the conversion of ferulate to 5-hydroxyferulate in the general phenylpropanoid pathway. As a result, the lignin of the mutant lacks the sinapic acid-derived components typical of wild-type lignin. PMID:1477555

  12. Selection and properties of Escherichia coli mutants defective in the synthesis of cyclopropane fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, F; Cronan, J E

    1976-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 defective in the synthesis of cyclopropane fatty acids (CFA) have been selected and isolated by a L-[methyl-3H]methionine suicide procedure. Two mutants were isolated. Stationary-phase cultures of both mutants contain less than 0.7% of the CFA content found in the parental strain. The CFA deficiency is attributed to a deficiency of CFA synthetase activity. Extracts of both mutants contain less than 10% of the CFA synthetase activity found in extracts of the parental strain. Experiments in which parental and mutant extracts were mixed indicate that the lack of activity in the mutant strains is not due to an inhibitor of CFA synthetase present in the mutant extracts. We have not yet detected a physiological phenotype for these mutants. These strains grow normally at various temperatures in a variety of media. We have tested survival (colony-forming ability) in response to (i) prolonged incubation in stationary phase, (ii) exposure to drying, and (iii) exposure to detergents, heavy metals, low pH, high salt concentration, and a variety of other environmental conditions. The survival of both mutants is identical to that of the parental strain under all conditions tested. The compositions (excepting the CFA deficiency) and metabolic turnover rates of the phospholipids of both mutant strains are indistinguishable from those of the wild-type strain. The transport of several amino acids also seems normal in these mutants. PMID:1107324

  13. hydra Mutants of Arabidopsis Are Defective in Sterol Profiles and Auxin and Ethylene Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Souter, Martin; Topping, Jennifer; Pullen, Margaret; Friml, Jiri; Palme, Klaus; Hackett, Rachel; Grierson, Don; Lindsey, Keith

    2002-01-01

    The hydra mutants of Arabidopsis are characterized by a pleiotropic phenotype that shows defective embryonic and seedling cell patterning, morphogenesis, and root growth. We demonstrate that the HYDRA1 gene encodes a Δ8-Δ7 sterol isomerase, whereas HYDRA2 encodes a sterol C14 reductase, previously identified as the FACKEL gene product. Seedlings mutant for each gene are similarly defective in the concentrations of the three major Arabidopsis sterols. Promoter::reporter gene analysis showed misexpression of the auxin-regulated DR5 and ACS1 promoters and of the epidermal cell file–specific GL2 promoter in the mutants. The mutants exhibit enhanced responses to auxin. The phenotypes can be rescued partially by inhibition of auxin and ethylene signaling but not by exogenous sterols or brassinosteroids. We propose a model in which correct sterol profiles are required for regulated auxin and ethylene signaling through effects on membrane function. PMID:12034894

  14. Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with defective vacuolar function

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamoto, K.; Yoshizawa, K.; Ohsumi, Y.; Anraku, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that have a small vacuolar lysine pool were isolated and characterized. Mutant KL97 (lys1 slp1-1) and strain KL197-1A (slp1-1), a prototrophic derivative of KL97, did not grow well in synthetic medium supplemented with 10 mM lysine. Genetic studies indicated that the slp1-1mutation (for small lysine pool) is recessive and is due to a single chromosomal mutation. Mutant KL97 shows the following pleiotropic defects in vacuolar functions. (i) It has small vacuolar pools for lysine, arginine, and histidine. (ii) Its growth is sensitive to lysine, histidine, Ca/sup 2 +/, heavy metal ions, and antibiotics. (iii) It has many small vesicles but no large central vacuole. (iv) It has a normal amount of the vacuolar membrane marker ..cap alpha..-mannosidase but shows reduced activities of the vacuole sap markers proteinase A, proteinase B, and carboxypeptidase Y.

  15. Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with Defects in Acetate Metabolism: Isolation and Characterization of Acn(-) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    McCammon, M. T.

    1996-01-01

    The two carbon compounds, ethanol and acetate, can be oxidatively metabolized as well as assimilated into carbohydrate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of acetate metabolic enzymes among several cellular compartments, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and cytoplasm makes it an intriguing system to study complex metabolic interactions. To investigate the complex process of carbon catabolism and assimilation, mutants unable to grow on acetate were isolated. One hundred five Acn(-) (``ACetate Nonutilizing'') mutants were sorted into 21 complementation groups with an additional 20 single mutants. Five of the groups have defects in TCA cycle enzymes: MDH1, CIT1, ACO1, IDH1, and IDH2. A defect in RTG2, involved in the retrograde communication between the mitochondrion and the nucleus, was also identified. Four genes encode enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis: ICL1, MLS1, MDH2, and PCK1. Five other genes appear to be defective in regulating metabolic activity since elevated levels of enzymes in several metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle, gluconeogenesis, and acetyl-CoA metabolism, were detected in these mutants: ACN8, ACN9, ACN17, ACN18, and ACN42. In summary, this analysis has identified at least 22 and as many as 41 different genes involved in acetate metabolism. PMID:8878673

  16. Identification of Mutants of Arabidopsis Defective in Acclimation of Photosynthesis to the Light Environment1

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Robin G.; Shephard, Freya; Rogers, Jennifer J.M.; Rolfe, Stephen A.; Horton, Peter

    2003-01-01

    In common with many other higher plant species, Arabidopsis undergoes photosynthetic acclimation, altering the composition of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to fluctuations in its growth environment. The changes in photosynthetic function that result from acclimation can be detected in a noninvasive manner by monitoring chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence. This technique has been used to develop a screen that enables the rapid identification of plants defective at ACCLIMATION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS TO THE ENVIRONMENT (APE) loci. The application of this screen to a population of T-DNA-transformed Arabidopsis has successfully led to the identification of a number of mutant lines with altered Chl fluorescence characteristics. Analysis of photosynthesis and pigment composition in leaves from three such mutants showed that they had altered acclimation responses to the growth light environment, each having a distinct acclimation-defective phenotype, demonstrating that screening for mutants using Chl fluorescence is a viable strategy for the investigation of acclimation. Sequencing of the genomic DNA flanking the T-DNA elements showed that in the ape1 mutant, a gene was disrupted that encodes a protein of unknown function but that appears to be specific to photosynthetic organisms, whereas the ape2 mutant carries an insertion in the region of the TPT gene encoding the chloroplast inner envelope triose phosphate/phosphate translocator. PMID:12586872

  17. Defects in Hemopoietic Stem Cell Activity in Ikaros Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nichogiannopoulou, Aliki; Trevisan, Maryanne; Neben, Steve; Friedrich, Christoph; Georgopoulos, Katia

    1999-01-01

    Here we provide evidence that the Ikaros family of DNA binding factors is critical for the activity of hemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the mouse. Mice homozygous for an Ikaros null mutation display a >30-fold reduction in long-term repopulation units, whereas mice homozygous for an Ikaros dominant negative mutation have no measurable activity. The defect in HSC activity is also illustrated by the ability of wild-type marrow to repopulate unconditioned Ikaros mutants. A progressive reduction in multipotent CFU-S14 (colony-forming unit-spleen) progenitors and the earliest erythroid-restricted precursors (BFU-E [burst-forming unit-erythroid]) is also detected in the Ikaros mutant strains consistent with the reduction in HSCs. Nonetheless, the more mature clonogenic erythroid and myeloid precursors are less affected, indicating either the action of a compensatory mechanism to provide more progeny or a negative role of Ikaros at later stages of erythromyeloid differentiation. In Ikaros mutant mice, a decrease in expression of the tyrosine kinase receptors flk-2 and c-kit is observed in the lineage-depleted c-kit+Sca-1+ population that is normally enriched for HSCs and may in part contribute to the early hemopoietic phenotypes manifested in the absence of Ikaros. PMID:10544193

  18. Isolation and characterization of Pichia heedii mutants defective in xylose uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Does, A.L.; Bisson, L.F. )

    1990-11-01

    To investigate the role of xylose uptake in xylose metabolism in yeasts, we isolated a series of mutated strains of the yeast Pichia heedii which are defective in xylose utilization. Four of these demonstrated defects in xylose uptake. Overlaps between the functional or regulatory mechanisms for glucose and xylose uptake may exist in this yeast since some of the mutants defective in xylose uptake were also defective in glucose transport. None of the mutants were defective in xylose reductase or xylitol dehydrogenase activities.

  19. Impaired Cellular Bioenergetics Causes Mitochondrial Calcium Handling Defects in MT-ND5 Mutant Cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Duchen, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause mitochondrial disease, a group of metabolic disorders that affect both children and adults. Interestingly, individual mtDNA mutations can cause very different clinical symptoms, however the factors that determine these phenotypes remain obscure. Defects in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation can disrupt cell signaling pathways, which may shape these disease phenotypes. In particular, mitochondria participate closely in cellular calcium signaling, with profound impact on cell function. Here, we examined the effects of a homoplasmic m.13565C>T mutation in MT-ND5 on cellular calcium handling using transmitochondrial cybrids (ND5 mutant cybrids). We found that the oxidation of NADH and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were significantly reduced in ND5 mutant cybrids. These metabolic defects were associated with a significant decrease in calcium uptake by ND5 mutant mitochondria in response to a calcium transient. Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose did not affect cytosolic calcium levels in control cybrids, but caused an increase in cytosolic calcium in ND5 mutant cybrids. This suggests that glycolytically-generated ATP is required not only to maintain Δψm in ND5 mutant mitochondria but is also critical for regulating cellular calcium homeostasis. We conclude that the m.13565C>T mutation in MT-ND5 causes defects in both mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial calcium sequestration. This disruption of mitochondrial calcium handling, which leads to defects in cellular calcium homeostasis, may be an important contributor to mitochondrial disease pathogenesis. PMID:27110715

  20. Cuticular Defects in Oryza sativa ATP-binding Cassette Transporter G31 Mutant Plants Cause Dwarfism, Elevated Defense Responses and Pathogen Resistance.

    PubMed

    Garroum, Imène; Bidzinski, Przemyslaw; Daraspe, Jean; Mucciolo, Antonio; Humbel, Bruno M; Morel, Jean-Benoit; Nawrath, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    The cuticle covers the surface of the polysaccharide cell wall of leaf epidermal cells and forms an essential diffusion barrier between plant and environment. Homologs of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter AtABCG32/HvABCG31 clade are necessary for the formation of a functional cuticle in both monocots and dicots. Here we characterize the osabcg31 knockout mutant and hairpin RNA interference (RNAi)-down-regulated OsABCG31 plant lines having reduced plant growth and a permeable cuticle. The reduced content of cutin in leaves and structural alterations in the cuticle and at the cuticle-cell wall interface in plants compromised in OsABCG31 expression explain the cuticle permeability. Effects of modifications of the cuticle on plant-microbe interactions were evaluated. The cuticular alterations in OsABCG31-compromised plants did not cause deficiencies in germination of the spores or the formation of appressoria of Magnaporthe oryzae on the leaf surface, but a strong reduction of infection structures inside the plant. Genes involved in pathogen resistance were constitutively up-regulated in OsABCG31-compromised plants, thus being a possible cause of the resistance to M. oryzae and the dwarf growth phenotype. The findings show that in rice an abnormal cuticle formation may affect the signaling of plant growth and defense. PMID:27121976

  1. A rhizobium leguminosarum mutant defective in symbiotic iron acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Nadler, K.D.; Chen, Jing-Wen; John, T.R. ); Johnston, A.W.B. )

    1990-02-01

    Iron acquisition by symbiotic Rhizobium spp. is essential for nitrogen fixation in the legume root nodule symbiosis. Rhizobium leguminosarum 116, an ineffective mutant strain with a defect in iron acquisition, was isolated after nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis of the effective strain 1062. The pop-1 mutation in strain 116 imparted to it a complex phenotype, characteristic of iron deficiency. Several iron(III)-solubilizing agents, such as citrate, hydroxyquinoline, and dihydroxybenzoate, stimulated growth of 116 on low-iron solid medium; anthranilic acid, the R. leguminosarum siderophore, inhibited low-iron growth of 116. The initial rate of {sup 55}Fe uptake by suspensions of iron-starved 116 cells was 10-fold less than that of iron-starved wild-type cells. Electron microscopic observations revealed no morphological abnormalities in the small, white nodules induced by 116. Nodule cortical cells were filled with vesicles containing apparently normal bacteroids. No premature degeneration of bacteroids or of plant cell organelles was evident. The authors mapped pop-1 by R plasmid-mediated conjugation and recombination to the ade-27-rib-2 region of the R. leguminosarum chromosome. No segregation of pop-1 and the symbiotic defect was observed among the recombinants from these crosses. Cosmid pKN1, a pLAFR1 derivative containing a 24-kilobase-pair fragment of R. leguminosarum DNA, conferred on 116 the ability to grow on dipyridyl medium and to fix nitrogen symbiotically.

  2. Mutants of Pseudomonas cepacia G4 defective in catabolism of aromatic compounds and trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, M S; Montgomery, S O; Cuskey, S M; Chapman, P J; Pritchard, P H

    1991-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia G4 possesses a novel pathway of toluene catabolism that is shown to be responsible for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE). This pathway involves conversion of toluene via o-cresol to 3-methylcatechol. In order to determine the enzyme of toluene degradation that is responsible for TCE degradation, chemically induced mutants, blocked in the toluene ortho-monooxygenase (TOM) pathway of G4, were examined. Mutants of the phenotypic class designated TOM A- were all defective in their ability to oxidize toluene, o-cresol, m-cresol, and phenol, suggesting that a single enzyme is responsible for conversion of these compounds to their hydroxylated products (3-methylcatechol from toluene, o-cresol, and m-cresol and catechol from phenol) in the wild type. Mutants of this class did not degrade TCE. Two other mutant classes which were blocked in toluene catabolism, TOM B-, which lacked catechol-2,3-dioxygenase, and TOM C-, which lacked 2-hydroxy-6-oxoheptadienoic acid hydrolase activity, were fully capable of TCE degradation. Therefore, TCE degradation is directly associated with the monooxygenation capability responsible for toluene, cresol, and phenol hydroxylation. PMID:1892384

  3. Germination-defective mutant of Neurospora crassa that responds to siderophores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlang, G.; Williams, N. P.

    1977-01-01

    A conditionally germination-defective mutant of Neurospora crassa has been found to be partially curable by ferricrocin and other siderophores. The mutant conidia rapidly lose their membrane-bound siderophores when suspended in buffer or growth media. Germination is consequently delayed unless large numbers of conidia are present (positive population effect). This indicates that the mutant has a membrane defect involving the siderophore attachment site.

  4. Responses of a triple mutant defective in three iron deficiency-induced Basic Helix-Loop-Helix genes of the subgroup Ib(2) to iron deficiency and salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Felix; Naranjo Arcos, Maria Augusta; Bauer, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that adapt to external stress by inducing molecular and physiological responses that serve to better cope with the adverse growth condition. Upon low supply of the micronutrient iron, plants actively increase the acquisition of soil iron into the root and its mobilization from internal stores. The subgroup Ib(2) BHLH genes function as regulators in this response, however their concrete functions are not fully understood. Here, we analyzed a triple loss of function mutant of BHLH39, BHLH100 and BHLH101 (3xbhlh mutant). We found that this mutant did not have any iron uptake phenotype if iron was provided. However, under iron deficiency the mutant displayed a more severe leaf chlorosis than the wild type. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis revealed that this mutant phenotype resulted in the mis-regulation of 198 genes, out of which only 15% were associated with iron deficiency regulation itself. A detailed analysis revealed potential targets of the bHLH transcription factors as well as genes reflecting an exaggerated iron deficiency response phenotype. Since the BHLH genes of this subgroup have been brought into the context of the plant hormone salicylic acid, we investigated whether the 3xbhlh mutant might have been affected by this plant signaling molecule. Although a very high number of genes responded to SA, also in a differential manner between mutant and wild type, we did not find any indication for an association of the BHLH gene functions in SA responses upon iron deficiency. In summary, our study indicates that the bHLH subgroup Ib(2) transcription factors do not only act in iron acquisition into roots but in other aspects of the adaptation to iron deficiency in roots and leaves. PMID:24919188

  5. Responses of a Triple Mutant Defective in Three Iron Deficiency-Induced BASIC HELIX-LOOP-HELIX Genes of the Subgroup Ib(2) to Iron Deficiency and Salicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Felix; Naranjo Arcos, Maria Augusta; Bauer, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that adapt to external stress by inducing molecular and physiological responses that serve to better cope with the adverse growth condition. Upon low supply of the micronutrient iron, plants actively increase the acquisition of soil iron into the root and its mobilization from internal stores. The subgroup Ib(2) BHLH genes function as regulators in this response, however their concrete functions are not fully understood. Here, we analyzed a triple loss of function mutant of BHLH39, BHLH100 and BHLH101 (3xbhlh mutant). We found that this mutant did not have any iron uptake phenotype if iron was provided. However, under iron deficiency the mutant displayed a more severe leaf chlorosis than the wild type. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis revealed that this mutant phenotype resulted in the mis-regulation of 198 genes, out of which only 15% were associated with iron deficiency regulation itself. A detailed analysis revealed potential targets of the bHLH transcription factors as well as genes reflecting an exaggerated iron deficiency response phenotype. Since the BHLH genes of this subgroup have been brought into the context of the plant hormone salicylic acid, we investigated whether the 3xbhlh mutant might have been affected by this plant signaling molecule. Although a very high number of genes responded to SA, also in a differential manner between mutant and wild type, we did not find any indication for an association of the BHLH gene functions in SA responses upon iron deficiency. In summary, our study indicates that the bHLH subgroup Ib(2) transcription factors do not only act in iron acquisition into roots but in other aspects of the adaptation to iron deficiency in roots and leaves. PMID:24919188

  6. An Epstein-Barr virus mutant produces immunogenic defective particles devoid of viral DNA.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Sophia; Feederle, Regina; Gärtner, Kathrin; Fuchs, Walter; Granzow, Harald; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2013-02-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) from hepatitis B and human papillomaviruses have been successfully used as preventative vaccines against these infectious agents. These VLPs consist of a self-associating capsid polymer formed from a single structure protein and are devoid of viral DNA. Since virions from herpesviruses consist of a large number of molecules of viral and cellular origin, generating VLPs from a subset of these would be a particularly arduous task. Therefore, we have adopted an alternative strategy that consists of producing DNA-free defective virus particles in a cell line infected by a herpesvirus mutant incapable of packaging DNA. We previously reported that an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) mutant devoid of the terminal repeats (ΔTR) that act as packaging signals in herpesviruses produces substantial amounts of VLPs and of light particles (LPs). However, ΔTR virions retained some infectious genomes, and although these mutants had lost their transforming abilities, this poses potential concerns for clinical applications. Therefore, we have constructed a series of mutants that lack proteins involved in maturation and assessed their ability to produce viral DNA-free VLP/LPs. Some of the introduced mutations were deleterious for capsid maturation and virus production. However, deletion of BFLF1/BFRF1A or of BBRF1 resulted in the production of DNA-free VLPs/LPs. The ΔBFLF1/BFRF1A viruses elicited a potent CD4(+) T-cell response that was indistinguishable from the one obtained with wild-type controls. In summary, the defective particles produced by the ΔBFLF1/BFRF1A mutant fulfill the criteria of efficacy and safety expected from a preventative vaccine. PMID:23236073

  7. Genetic and biochemical evidence that gastrulation defects in Pofut2 mutants result from defects in ADAMTS9 secretion.

    PubMed

    Benz, Brian A; Nandadasa, Sumeda; Takeuchi, Megumi; Grady, Richard C; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; LoPilato, Rachel K; Kakuda, Shinako; Somerville, Robert P T; Apte, Suneel S; Haltiwanger, Robert S; Holdener, Bernadette C

    2016-08-01

    Protein O-fucosyltransferase 2 (POFUT2) adds O-linked fucose to Thrombospondin Type 1 Repeats (TSR) in 49 potential target proteins. Nearly half the POFUT2 targets belong to the A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease with ThromboSpondin type-1 motifs (ADAMTS) or ADAMTS-like family of proteins. Both the mouse Pofut2 RST434 gene trap allele and the Adamts9 knockout were reported to result in early embryonic lethality, suggesting that defects in Pofut2 mutant embryos could result from loss of O-fucosylation on ADAMTS9. To address this question, we compared the Pofut2 and Adamts9 knockout phenotypes and used Cre-mediated deletion of Pofut2 and Adamts9 to dissect the tissue-specific role of O-fucosylated ADAMTS9 during gastrulation. Disruption of Pofut2 using the knockout (LoxP) or gene trap (RST434) allele, as well as deletion of Adamts9, resulted in disorganized epithelia (epiblast, extraembryonic ectoderm, and visceral endoderm) and blocked mesoderm formation during gastrulation. The similarity between Pofut2 and Adamts9 mutants suggested that disruption of ADAMTS9 function could be responsible for the gastrulation defects observed in Pofut2 mutants. Consistent with this prediction, CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of POFUT2 in HEK293T cells blocked secretion of ADAMTS9. We determined that Adamts9 was dynamically expressed during mouse gastrulation by trophoblast giant cells, parietal endoderm, the most proximal visceral endoderm adjacent to the ectoplacental cone, extraembryonic mesoderm, and anterior primitive streak. Conditional deletion of either Pofut2 or Adamts9 in the epiblast rescues the gastrulation defects, and identified a new role for O-fucosylated ADAMTS9 during morphogenesis of the amnion and axial mesendoderm. Combined, these results suggested that loss of ADAMTS9 function in the extra embryonic tissue is responsible for gastrulation defects in the Pofut2 knockout. We hypothesize that loss of ADAMTS9 function in the most proximal visceral endoderm leads to slippage of

  8. Insights into prevention of human neural tube defects by folic acid arising from consideration of mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Harris, Muriel J

    2009-04-01

    Almost 30 years after the initial study by Richard W. Smithells and coworkers, it is still unknown how maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation prevents human neural tube defects (NTDs). In this article, questions about human NTD prevention are considered in relation to three groups of mouse models: NTD mutants that respond to folate, NTD mutants and strains that do not respond to folate, and mutants involving folate-pathway genes. Of the 200 mouse NTD mutants, only a few have been tested with folate; half respond and half do not. Among responsive mutants, folic acid supplementation reduces exencephaly and/or spina bifida aperta frequency in the Sp(2H), Sp, Cd, Cited2, Cart1, and Gcn5 mutants. Prevention ranges from 35 to 85%. The responsive Sp(2H) (Pax3) mutant has abnormal folate metabolism, but the responsive Cited2 mutant does not. Neither folic nor folinic acid reduces NTD frequency in Axd, Grhl3, Fkbp8, Map3k4, or Nog mutants or in the curly tail or SELH/Bc strains. Spina bifida frequency is reduced in Axd by methionine and in curly tail by inositol. Exencephaly frequency is reduced in SELH/Bc by an alternative commercial ration. Mutations in folate-pathway genes do not cause NTDs, except for 30% exencephaly in folate-treated Folr1. Among folate-pathway mutants, neural tube closure is normal in Cbs, Folr2, Mthfd1, Mthfd2, Mthfr, and Shmt1 mutants. Embryos die by midgestation in Folr1, Mtr, Mtrr, and RFC1 mutants. The mouse models point to genetic heterogeneity in the ability to respond to folic acid and also to heterogeneity in genetic cause of NTDs that can be prevented by folic acid. PMID:19117321

  9. Salmonella typhimurium mutants defective in acetohydroxy acid synthases I and II.

    PubMed

    Shaw, K J; Berg, C M; Sobol, T J

    1980-03-01

    An analysis of transposon-induced mutants shows that Salmonella typhimurium possesses two major isozymes of acetohydroxy acid synthase, the enzymes which mediate the first common step in isoleucine and valine biosynthesis. A third (minor) acetohydroxy acid synthase is present, but its significance in isoleucine and valine synthesis may be negligible. Mutants defective in acetohydroxy acid synthase II (ilvG::Tn10) require isoleucine, alpha-ketobutyrate, or threonine for growth, a mutant defective in acetohydroxy acid synthase I (ilvB::Tn5) is a prototroph, and a double mutant (ilvG::Tn10 ilvB::Tn5) requires isoleucine plus valine for growth. PMID:6245063

  10. Proton suicide: general method for direct selection of sugar transport- and fermentation-defective mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelman, J.W.; Clark, D.P.

    1984-11-01

    A positive selection procedure was devised for bacterial mutants incapable of producing acid from sugars by fermentation. The method relied on the production of elemental bromine from a mixture of bromide and bromate under acidic conditions. When wild-type Escherichia coli cells were plated on media containing a fermentable sugar and an equimolar mixture of bromide and bromate, most of the cells were killed but a variety of mutants unable to produce acid from the sugar survived. Among these mutants were those defective in (i) sugar uptake, (ii) the glycolytic pathway, and (iii) the excretion. There were also novel mutants with some presumed regulatory defects affecting fermentation.

  11. Detecting Functional Groups of Arabidopsis Mutants by Metabolic Profiling and Evaluation of Pleiotropic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jörg; Börnke, Frederik; Schmiedl, Alfred; Kleine, Tatjana; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic profiles and fingerprints of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with various defects in plastidic sugar metabolism or photosynthesis were analyzed to elucidate if the genetic mutations can be traced by comparing their metabolic status. Using a platform of chromatographic and spectrometric tools data from untargeted full MS scans as well as from selected metabolites including major carbohydrates, phosphorylated intermediates, carboxylates, free amino acids, major antioxidants, and plastidic pigments were evaluated. Our key observations are that by multivariate statistical analysis each mutant can be separated by a unique metabolic signature. Closely related mutants come close. Thus metabolic profiles of sugar mutants are different but more similar than those of photosynthesis mutants. All mutants show pleiotropic responses mirrored in their metabolic status. These pleiotropic responses are typical and can be used for separating and grouping of the mutants. Our findings show that metabolite fingerprints can be taken to classify mutants and hence may be used to sort genes into functional groups. PMID:22639613

  12. Profiling of the toxicity mechanisms of coated and uncoated silver nanoparticles to yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 using a set of its 9 single-gene deletion mutants defective in oxidative stress response, cell wall or membrane integrity and endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Käosaar, Sandra; Kahru, Anne; Mantecca, Paride; Kasemets, Kaja

    2016-09-01

    The widespread use of nanosilver in various antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral products warrants the studies of the toxicity pathways of nanosilver-enabled materials toward microbes and viruses. We profiled the toxicity mechanisms of uncoated, casein-coated, and polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type (wt) and its 9 single-gene deletion mutants defective in oxidative stress (OS) defense, cell wall/membrane integrity, and endocytosis. The 48-h growth inhibition assay in organic-rich growth medium and 24-h cell viability assay in deionized (DI) water were applied whereas AgNO3, H2O2, and SDS served as positive controls. Both coated AgNPs (primary size 8-12nm) were significantly more toxic than the uncoated (~85nm) AgNPs. All studied AgNPs were ~30 times more toxic if exposed to yeast cells in DI water than in the rich growth medium: the IC50 based on nominal concentration of AgNPs in the growth inhibition test ranged from 77 to 576mg Ag/L and in the cell viability test from 2.7 to 18.7mg Ag/L, respectively. Confocal microscopy showed that wt but not endocytosis mutant (end3Δ) internalized AgNPs. Comparison of toxicity patterns of wt and mutant strains defective in OS defense and membrane integrity revealed that the toxicity of the studied AgNPs to S. cerevisiae was not caused by the OS or cell wall/membrane permeabilization. PMID:27260961

  13. Mutants of Saccharomycopsis lipolytica defective in lysine catabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Gaillardin, C; Fournier, P; Sylvestre, G; Heslot, H

    1976-01-01

    Wild-type strains of Saccharomycopsis lipolytica are able to use lysine as a carbon or a nitrogen source, but not as a unique source for both. Mutants were selected that could not use lysine either as a nitrogen or as a carbon source. Some of them, however, utilized N-6-acetyllysine or 5-aminovaleric acid. Many of the mutants appeared to be blocked in both utilizations, suggesting a unique pathway for lysine degradation (either as a carbon or as a nitrogen source). Genetic characterization of these mutants was achieved by complementation and recombination tests. PMID:1245461

  14. Construction and Characterization of Moraxella catarrhalis Mutants Defective in Expression of Transferrin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Nicole R.; Campagnari, Anthony A.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously reported the construction of an isogenic mutant defective in expression of OmpB1, the TbpB homologue, in Moraxella catarrhalis 7169. In this report, we have extended these studies by constructing and characterizing two new isogenic mutants in this clinical isolate. One mutant is defective in expression of TbpA, and the other mutant is defective in expression of both TbpA and TbpB. These isogenic mutants were confirmed by using PCR analysis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and sequencing. In vitro growth studies, comparing all three mutants, demonstrated that the tbpA mutant and the tbpAB mutant were severely limited in their ability to grow with human holotransferrin as the sole source of iron. In contrast, the ompB1 (tbpB) mutant was capable of utilizing iron from human transferrin, although not to the extent of the parental strain. While affinity chromatography with human holotransferrin showed that each Tbp was capable of binding independently to transferrin, solid-phase transferrin binding studies using whole cells demonstrated that the tbpA mutant exhibited binding characteristics similar to those seen with the wild-type bacteria. However, the ompB1 (tbpB) mutant exhibited a diminished capacity for binding transferrin, and no binding was detected with the double mutant. These data suggest that the M. catarrhalis TbpA is necessary for the acquisition of iron from transferrin. In contrast, TbpB is not essential but may serve as a facilitory protein that functions to optimize this process. Together these mutants are essential to provide a more thorough understanding of iron acquisition mechanisms utilized by M. catarrhalis. PMID:10531234

  15. Isolation and characterization of transposon Tn5-induced mutants of Pseudomonas perfectomarina defective in nitrous oxide respiration.

    PubMed Central

    Zumft, W G; Döhler, K; Körner, H

    1985-01-01

    Transposon (Tn5) mutagenesis of Pseudomonas perfectomarina with the plasmid pSUP2021 [(pBR325-Mob(RP4))::Tn5] and the chromosomally integrated RP4 plasmid in Escherichia coli as the donor, produced three distinct groups of mutants that were defective in nitrous oxide respiration. One group of mutants lacked the structural protein of N2O reductase, the second synthesized a copper-free apoprotein; and a third group expressed a low level of intact enzyme. The mutants provided evidence for N2O being the immediate precursor of dinitrogen in denitrification and documented the essentiality of the copper enzyme. Synthesis of N2O reductase depended strongly on the growth conditions, with N2O-grown cells expressing the lowest level of enzyme. Regulatory responses of mutants elicited by nitrate or oxygen were unaltered when compared with wild-type behavior. Images PMID:2993252

  16. Detection of streptococcal mutants presumed to be defective in sugar catabolism.

    PubMed

    Feary, T W; Mayo, J A

    1984-06-01

    The tetrazolium method for detection of bacterial mutants defective in sugar catabolism was modified for use with streptococci. The critical factors were (i) the concentration of tetrazolium, which must be titrated to determine the optimum concentration for each species or even strain, and (ii) anaerobic incubation of tetrazolium-containing agar plates. When used with standard mutagenesis protocols, this method yielded lactose-negative mutants of nine streptococcal strains representing six species. A collection of lactose-negative mutants of streptococcus, sanguis Challis was characterized and contained phospho-beta-galactosidase, lactose phosphotransferase, and general phosphotransferase mutants. PMID:6378096

  17. Identification and Characterization of Aspergillus Nidulans Mutants Defective in Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, S. D.; Morrell, J. L.; Hamer, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    Filamentous fungi undergo cytokinesis by forming crosswalls termed septa. Here, we describe the genetic and physiological controls governing septation in Aspergillus nidulans. Germinating conidia do not form septa until the completion of their third nuclear division. The first septum is invariantly positioned at the basal end of the germ tube. Block-and-release experiments of nuclear division with benomyl or hydroxyurea, and analysis of various nuclear division mutants demonstrated that septum formation is dependent upon the third mitotic division. Block-and-release experiments with cytochalasin A and the localization of actin in germlings by indirect immunofluorescence showed that actin participated in septum formation. In addition to being concentrated at the growing hyphal tips, a band of actin was also apparent at the site of septum formation. Previous genetic analysis in A. nidulans identified four genes involved in septation (sepA-D). We have screened a new collection of temperature sensitive (ts) mutants of A. nidulans for strains that failed to form septa at the restrictive temperature but were able to complete early nuclear divisions. We identified five new genes designated sepE, G, H, I and J, along with one additional allele of a previously identified septation gene. On the basis of temperature shift experiments, nuclear counts and cell morphology, we sorted these cytokinesis mutants into three phenotypic classes. Interestingly, one class of mutants fails to form septa and fails to progress past the third nuclear division. This class of mutants suggests the existence of a regulatory mechanism in A. nidulans that ensures the continuation of nuclear division following the initiation of cytokinesis. PMID:8150280

  18. Lipopolysaccharide mutants of Rhizobium meliloti are not defective in symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Clover, R.H.; Kieber, J.; Signer, E.R. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Rhizobium meliloti selected primarily for bacteriophage resistance fall into 13 groups. Mutants in the four best-characterized groups (class A, lpsB, lpsC, and class D), which map to the rhizobial chromosome, appear to affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as judged by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies and behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of extracted LPS. Mutations in all 13 groups, in an otherwise wild-type genetic background, are Fix{sup +} on alfalfa. This suggests that LPS does not play a major role in symbiosis. Mutations in lpsB, however, are Fix{sup {minus}} in one particular genetic background, evidently because of the cumulative effect of several independent background mutations. In addition, an auxotrophic mutation evidently equivalent to Escherichia coli carAB is Fix{sup {minus}} on alfalfa.

  19. Correction of hair shaft defects through allele-specific silencing of mutant Krt75

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R.; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yan-Feng; Huang, Lan; Jones, Evan; Zhang, Lianfeng; Clark, Richard A.; Roop, Dennis R.; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in keratin genes can cause a number of inheritable skin disorders characterized by intraepidermal blistering, epidermal hyperkeratosis, or abnormalities in skin appendages, such as nail plate dystrophy and structural defects in hair. Allele-specific silencing of mutant keratins through RNA interference is a promising therapeutic approach for suppressing the expression of mutant keratins and related phenotypes in the epidermis. However, its effectiveness on skin appendages remains to be confirmed in vivo. In this study, we developed allele specific siRNAs capable of selectively suppressing the expression of a mutant Krt75, which causes hair shaft structural defects characterized by the development of blebs along the hair shaft in mice. Hair regenerated from epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cells isolated from mutant Krt75 mouse models reproduced the blebbing phenotype when grafted in vivo. In contrast, mutant cells manipulated with a lentiviral vector expressing mutant Krt75-specific shRNA persistently suppressed this phenotype. The phenotypic correction was associated with significant reduction of mutant Krt75 mRNA in the skin grafts. Thus, data obtained from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing RNA interference to achieve durable correction of hair structural phenotypes through allele-specific silencing of the mutant keratin genes. PMID:26763422

  20. Correction of Hair Shaft Defects through Allele-Specific Silencing of Mutant Krt75.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yanfeng; Huang, Lan; Jones, Evan C; Zhang, Lianfeng; Clark, Richard A; Roop, Dennis R; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in keratin genes can cause a number of inheritable skin disorders characterized by intraepidermal blistering, epidermal hyperkeratosis, or abnormalities in skin appendages, such as nail plate dystrophy and structural defects in hair. Allele-specific silencing of mutant keratins through RNA interference is a promising therapeutic approach for suppressing the expression of mutant keratins and related phenotypes in the epidermis. However, its effectiveness on skin appendages remains to be confirmed in vivo. In this study, we developed allele-specific small interfering RNAs capable of selectively suppressing the expression of a mutant Krt75, which causes hair shaft structural defects characterized by the development of blebs along the hair shaft in mice. Hair regenerated from epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cells isolated from mutant Krt75 mouse models reproduced the blebbing phenotype when grafted in vivo. In contrast, mutant cells manipulated with a lentiviral vector expressing mutant Krt75-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) persistently suppressed this phenotype. The phenotypic correction was associated with a significant reduction of mutant Krt75 mRNA in the skin grafts. Thus, data obtained from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing RNA interference to achieve durable correction of hair structural phenotypes through allele-specific silencing of mutant keratin genes. PMID:26763422

  1. DNA replication defect in Salmonella typhimurium mutants lacking the editing (epsilon) subunit of DNA polymerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Lifsics, M R; Lancy, E D; Maurer, R

    1992-01-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, dnaQ null mutants (encoding the epsilon editing subunit of DNA polymerase III [Pol III]) exhibit a severe growth defect when the genetic background is otherwise wild type. Suppression of the growth defect requires both a mutation affecting the alpha (polymerase) subunit of DNA polymerase III and adequate levels of DNA polymerase I. In the present paper, we report on studies that clarify the nature of the physiological defect imposed by the loss of epsilon and the mechanism of its suppression. Unsuppressed dnaQ mutants exhibited chronic SOS induction, indicating exposure of single-stranded DNA in vivo, most likely as gaps in double-stranded DNA. Suppression of the growth defect was associated with suppression of SOS induction. Thus, Pol I and the mutant Pol III combined to reduce the formation of single-stranded DNA or accelerate its maturation to double-stranded DNA. Studies with mutants in major DNA repair pathways supported the view that the defect in DNA metabolism in dnaQ mutants was at the level of DNA replication rather than of repair. The requirement for Pol I was satisfied by alleles of the gene for Pol I encoding polymerase activity or by rat DNA polymerase beta (which exhibits polymerase activity only). Consequently, normal growth is restored to dnaQ mutants when sufficient polymerase activity is provided and this compensatory polymerase activity can function independently of Pol III. The high level of Pol I polymerase activity may be required to satisfy the increased demand for residual DNA synthesis at regions of single-stranded DNA generated by epsilon-minus pol III. The emphasis on adequate polymerase activity in dnaQ mutants is also observed in the purified alpha subunit containing the suppressor mutation, which exhibits a modestly elevated intrinsic polymerase activity relative to that of wild-type alpha. Images PMID:1400246

  2. Identification of Zebrafish Insertional Mutants With Defects in Visual System Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Jeffrey M.; Perkins, Brian D.; Amsterdam, Adam; Egaña, Ana; Darland, Tristan; Matsui, Jonathan I.; Sciascia, Salvatore; Hopkins, Nancy; Dowling, John E.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic analysis in zebrafish has been instrumental in identifying genes necessary for visual system development and function. Recently, a large-scale retroviral insertional mutagenesis screen, in which 315 different genes were mutated, that resulted in obvious phenotypic defects by 5 days postfertilization was completed. That the disrupted gene has been identified in each of these mutants provides unique resource through which the formation, function, or physiology of individual organ systems can be studied. To that end, a screen for visual system mutants was performed on 250 of the mutants in this collection, examining each of them histologically for morphological defects in the eye and behaviorally for overall visual system function. Forty loci whose disruption resulted in defects in eye development and/or visual function were identified. The mutants have been divided into the following phenotypic classes that show defects in: (1) morphogenesis, (2) growth and central retinal development, (3) the peripheral marginal zone, (4) retinal lamination, (5) the photoreceptor cell layer, (6) the retinal pigment epithelium, (7) the lens, (8) retinal containment, and (9) behavior. The affected genes in these mutants highlight a diverse set of proteins necessary for the development, maintenance, and function of the vertebrate visual system. PMID:15716491

  3. Sim2 mutants have developmental defects not overlapping with those of Sim1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Goshu, Eleni; Jin, Hui; Fasnacht, Rachel; Sepenski, Mike; Michaud, Jacques L; Fan, Chen-Ming

    2002-06-01

    The mouse genome contains two Sim genes, Sim1 and Sim2. They are presumed to be important for central nervous system (CNS) development because they are homologous to the Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene, mutations in which cause a complete loss of CNS midline cells. In the mammalian CNS, Sim2 and Sim1 are coexpressed in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). While Sim1 is essential for the development of the PVN (J. L. Michaud, T. Rosenquist, N. R. May, and C.-M. Fan, Genes Dev. 12:3264-3275, 1998), we report here that Sim2 mutant has a normal PVN. Analyses of the Sim1 and Sim2 compound mutants did not reveal obvious genetic interaction between them in PVN histogenesis. However, Sim2 mutant mice die within 3 days of birth due to lung atelectasis and breathing failure. We attribute the diminished efficacy of lung inflation to the compromised structural components surrounding the pleural cavity, which include rib protrusions, abnormal intercostal muscle attachments, diaphragm hypoplasia, and pleural mesothelium tearing. Although each of these structures is minimally affected, we propose that their combined effects lead to the mechanical failure of lung inflation and death. Sim2 mutants also develop congenital scoliosis, reflected by the unequal sizes of the left and right vertebrae and ribs. The temporal and spatial expression patterns of Sim2 in these skeletal elements suggest that Sim2 regulates their growth and/or integrity. PMID:12024028

  4. Senescence Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with a Defect in Telomere Replication Identify Three Additional Est Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lendvay, T. S.; Morris, D. K.; Sah, J.; Balasubramanian, B.; Lundblad, V.

    1996-01-01

    The primary determinant for telomere replication is the enzyme telomerase, responsible for elongating the G-rich strand of the telomere. The only component of this enzyme that has been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the TLC1 gene, encoding the telomerase RNA subunit. However, a yeast strain defective for the EST1 gene exhibits the same phenotypes (progressively shorter telomeres and a senescence phenotype) as a strain deleted for TLC1, suggesting that EST1 encodes either a component of telomerase or some other factor essential for telomerase function. We designed a multitiered screen that led to the isolation of 22 mutants that display the same phenotypes as est1 and tlc1 mutant strains. These mutations mapped to four complementation groups: the previously identified EST1 gene and three additional genes, called EST2, EST3 and EST4. Cloning of the EST2 gene demonstrated that it encodes a large, extremely basic novel protein with no motifs that provide clues as to function. Epistasis analysis indicated that the four EST genes function in the same pathway for telomere replication as defined by the TLC1 gene, suggesting that the EST genes encode either components of telomerase or factors that positively regulate telomerase activity. PMID:8978029

  5. Lanthionine ketimine ethyl ester partially rescues neurodevelopmental defects in unc-33 (DPYSL2/CRMP2) mutants.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Caleb; Benda, Erica; Hardin, Tyler; Baxter, Taylor; St John, Elizabeth; O'Brien, Sean; Hensley, Kenneth; Holgado, Andrea M

    2013-09-01

    Lanthionine ketimine (LK) is a natural sulfur amino acid metabolite with potent neurotrophic activity. Proteomics indicate that LK interacts with collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2/DPYSL2/UNC-33), a brain-enriched protein that was shown to regulate cytoskeletal remodeling, neuronal morphology, and synaptic function. To elucidate further the molecular interplay and biological action of LK and UNC-33, we began examining the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes in which both LK concentrations and UNC-33 protein were manipulated. To this end, a cell-permeable LK-ester (LKE) was administered to developing C. elegans engineered to express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in cholinergic neurons (strain RM3128) or green fluorescent protein (GFP) in GABAergic neurons (strain CZ1200), and neural morphology was assessed. Fluorescent imaging analyses show that LKE exposure to wild-type animals induced neural commissure outgrowth, crossing over, and bundling in both neurites from GABAergic and cholinergic motor neurons. Additionally, when unc-33(e204) hypomorph mutant nematodes (D389N substitution mutants) were exposed to LKE, both the neuroanatomical defects of incomplete dorsoventral neural commissures and the ventral nerve cord gaps were partially rescued. In contrast, LKE did not rescue ventral nerve cord gaps found in unc-33(mn407) null mutant. Together these data suggest possible functions for LK as a regulator of neuritic elongation, corroborate roles for UNC-33/CRMP2 in the mechanism of LKE activity, and suggest the potential of LKE as a therapeutic molecule for neurological diseases involving CRMP2 dysfunction. PMID:23825043

  6. Nononcogenic deletion mutants of herpesvirus saimiri are defective for in vitro immortalization.

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, R C; Silva, D P; Waldron, L M; Letvin, N L

    1986-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri L-DNA sequences between 0.0 and 4.0 map units (4.5 kilobase pairs) are required for oncogenicity; these sequences are not required for replication of the virus. To investigate the basis for the lack of oncogenicity of mutants with deletions in this region and to study the function of this region, we developed a reliable system for in vitro immortalization by herpesvirus saimiri. In contrast to peripheral blood lymphocytes from cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) and owl monkeys (Aotus sp.), infection of peripheral blood lymphocytes from common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) in vitro with herpesvirus saimiri consistently yielded continuously growing lymphoblastoid cell lines. Such cell lines were established using strains of herpesvirus saimiri from group A and group non-A, non-B; however, repeated attempts to immortalize common marmoset peripheral blood lymphocytes using strains from group B were not successful. Common marmoset cell lines immortalized by herpesvirus saimiri were T12+, T8+, T4-, and B1-, indicating that they were derived from suppressor/cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Cell lines could not be established using the nononcogenic mutants 11att and S4, both of which were derived from the group A strain 11 virus. Strain 11att has a spontaneous deletion and S4 has a constructed deletion in the 0.0 to 4.0 map unit region. Constructed strains which had these deleted sequences restored did immortalize common marmoset peripheral blood lymphocytes. Thus, the nononcogenic deletion mutants are defective for immortalization. This system should facilitate attempts to define the sequences responsible for immortalization and to determine their function. PMID:3003401

  7. Drosophila calmodulin mutants with specific defects in the musculature or in the nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Sullivan, Kathleen M C; Beckingham, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    We have studied lethal mutations in the single calmodulin gene (Cam) of Drosophila to gain insight into the in vivo functions of this important calcium sensor. As a result of maternal calmodulin (CaM) in the mature egg, lethality is delayed until the postembryonic stages. Prior to death in the first larval instar, Cam nulls show a striking behavioral abnormality (spontaneous backward movement) whereas a mutation, Cam7, that results in a single amino acid change (V91G) produces a very different phenotype: short indented pupal cases and pupal death with head eversion defects. We show here that the null behavioral phenotype originates in the nervous system and involves a CaM function that requires calcium binding to all four sites of the protein. Further, backward movement can be induced in hypomorphic mutants by exposure to high light levels. In contrast, the V91G mutation specifically affects the musculature and causes abnormal calcium release in response to depolarization of the muscles. Genetic interaction studies suggest that failed regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor, is the major defect underlying the Cam7 phenotype. PMID:14668380

  8. Twin-arginine translocation system (tat) mutants of Salmonella are attenuated due to envelope defects, not respiratory defects.

    PubMed

    Craig, Maureen; Sadik, Adam Y; Golubeva, Yekaterina A; Tidhar, Avital; Slauch, James M

    2013-09-01

    The twin-arginine translocation system (Tat) transports folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane and is critical to virulence in Salmonella and other pathogens. Experimental and bioinformatic data indicate that 30 proteins are exported via Tat in Salmonella Typhimurium. However, there are no data linking specific Tat substrates with virulence. We inactivated every Tat-exported protein and determined the virulence phenotype of mutant strains. Although a tat mutant is highly attenuated, no single Tat-exported substrate accounts for this virulence phenotype. Rather, the attenuation is due primarily to envelope defects caused by failure to translocate three Tat substrates, the N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases, AmiA and AmiC, and the cell division protein, SufI. Strikingly, neither the amiA amiC nor the sufI mutations alone conferred any virulence defect. Although AmiC and SufI have previously been localized to the divisome, the synthetic phenotypes observed are the first to suggest functional overlap. Many Tat substrates are involved in anaerobic respiration, but we show that a mutant completely deficient in anaerobic respiration retains full virulence in both the oral and systemic phases of infection. Similarly, an obligately aerobic mutant is fully virulent. These results suggest that in the classic mouse model of infection, S. Typhimurium is replicating only in aerobic environments. PMID:23822642

  9. Twin-arginine Translocation System (tat) Mutants of Salmonella are Attenuated Due to Envelope Defects, not Respiratory Defects

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Maureen; Sadik, Adam Y.; Golubeva, Yekaterina A.; Tidhar, Avital; Slauch, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The twin-arginine translocation system (Tat) transports folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane and is critical to virulence in Salmonella and other pathogens. Experimental and bioinformatic data indicate that 30 proteins are exported via Tat in Salmonella Typhimurium. However, there are no data linking specific Tat substrates with virulence. We inactivated every Tat-exported protein and determined the virulence phenotype of mutant strains. Though a tat mutant is highly attenuated, no single Tat-exported substrate accounts for this virulence phenotype. Rather, the attenuation is due primarily to envelope defects caused by failure to translocate three Tat substrates, the N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases, AmiA and AmiC, and the cell division protein, SufI. Strikingly, neither the amiA amiC nor the sufI mutations alone conferred any virulence defect. Although AmiC and SufI have previously been localized to the divisome, the synthetic phenotypes observed are the first to suggest functional overlap. Many Tat substrates are involved in anaerobic respiration, but we show that a mutant completely deficient in anaerobic respiration retains full virulence in both the oral and systemic phases of infection. Similarly, an obligately aerobic mutant is fully virulent. These results suggest that in the classic mouse model of infection, S. Typhimurium is replicating only in aerobic environments. PMID:23822642

  10. Identification and characterization of biofilm formation-defective mutants of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Malamud, Florencia; Homem, Rafael Augusto; Conforte, Valeria Paola; Yaryura, Pablo Marcelo; Castagnaro, Atilio Pedro; Marano, María Rosa; do Amaral, Alexandre Morais; Vojnov, Adrián Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) develops a biofilm structure both in vitro and in vivo. Despite all the progress achieved by studies regarding biofilm formation, many of its mechanisms remain poorly understood. This work focuses on the identification of new genes involved in biofilm formation and how they are related to motility, virulence and chemotaxis in Xcc. A Tn5 library of approximately 6000 Xcc (strain 306) mutants was generated and screened to search for biofilm formation defective strains. We identified 23 genes not previously associated with biofilm formation. The analysis of the 23 mutants not only revealed the involvement of new genes in biofilm formation, but also reinforced the importance of exopolysaccharide production, motility and cell surface structures in this process. This collection of biofilm-defective mutants underscores the multifactorial genetic programme underlying the establishment of biofilm in Xcc. PMID:23813675

  11. Prp8 retinitis pigmentosa mutants cause defects in the transition between the catalytic steps of splicing.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Megan; Guthrie, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing must occur with high fidelity and efficiency for proper gene expression. The spliceosome uses DExD/H box helicases to promote on-pathway interactions while simultaneously minimizing errors. Prp8 and Snu114, an EF2-like GTPase, regulate the activity of the Brr2 helicase, promoting RNA unwinding by Brr2 at appropriate points in the splicing cycle and repressing it at others. Mutations linked to retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a disease that causes blindness in humans, map to the Brr2 regulatory region of Prp8. Previous in vitro studies of homologous mutations inSaccharomyces cerevisiaeshow that Prp8-RP mutants cause defects in spliceosome activation. Here we show that a subset of RP mutations in Prp8 also causes defects in the transition between the first and second catalytic steps of splicing. Though Prp8-RP mutants do not cause defects in splicing fidelity, they result in an overall decrease in splicing efficiency. Furthermore, genetic analyses link Snu114 GTP/GDP occupancy to Prp8-dependent regulation of Brr2. Our results implicate the transition between the first and second catalytic steps as a critical place in the splicing cycle where Prp8-RP mutants influence splicing efficiency. The location of the Prp8-RP mutants, at the "hinge" that links the Prp8 Jab1-MPN regulatory "tail" to the globular portion of the domain, suggests that these Prp8-RP mutants inhibit regulated movement of the Prp8 Jab1/MPN domain into the Brr2 RNA binding channel to transiently inhibit Brr2. Therefore, in Prp8-linked RP, disease likely results not only from defects in spliceosome assembly and activation, but also because of defects in splicing catalysis. PMID:26968627

  12. The Rec102 Mutant of Yeast Is Defective in Meiotic Recombination and Chromosome Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, J.; Engebrecht, J. A.; Roeder, G. S.

    1992-01-01

    A mutation at the REC102 locus was identified in a screen for yeast mutants that produce inviable spores. rec102 spore lethality is rescued by a spo13 mutation, which causes cells to bypass the meiosis I division. The rec102 mutation completely eliminates meiotically induced gene conversion and crossing over but has no effect on mitotic recombination frequencies. Cytological studies indicate that the rec102 mutant makes axial elements (precursors to the synaptonemal complex), but homologous chromosomes fail to synapse. In addition, meiotic chromosome segregation is significantly delayed in rec102 strains. Studies of double and triple mutants indicate that the REC102 protein acts before the RAD52 gene product in the meiotic recombination pathway. The REC102 gene was cloned based on complementation of the mutant defect and the gene was mapped to chromosome XII between CDC25 and STE11. PMID:1732169

  13. How deeply does your mutant sleep? Probing arousal to better understand sleep defects in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Faville, R.; Kottler, B.; Goodhill, G. J.; Shaw, P. J.; van Swinderen, B.

    2015-01-01

    The fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, has become a critical model system for investigating sleep functions. Most studies use duration of inactivity to measure sleep. However, a defining criterion for sleep is decreased behavioral responsiveness to stimuli. Here we introduce the Drosophila ARousal Tracking system (DART), an integrated platform for efficiently tracking and probing arousal levels in animals. This video-based platform delivers positional and locomotion data, behavioral responsiveness to stimuli, sleep intensity measures, and homeostatic regulation effects – all in one combined system. We show how insight into dynamically changing arousal thresholds is crucial for any sleep study in flies. We first find that arousal probing uncovers different sleep intensity profiles among related genetic background strains previously assumed to have equivalent sleep patterns. We then show how sleep duration and sleep intensity can be uncoupled, with distinct manipulations of dopamine function producing opposite effects on sleep duration but similar sleep intensity defects. We conclude by providing a multi-dimensional assessment of combined arousal and locomotion metrics in the mutant and background strains. Our approach opens the door for deeper insights into mechanisms of sleep regulation and provides a new method for investigating the role of different genetic manipulations in controlling sleep and arousal. PMID:25677943

  14. Defective processing of methylated single-stranded DNA by E. coli alkB mutants

    PubMed Central

    Dinglay, Suneet; Trewick, Sarah C.; Lindahl, Tomas; Sedgwick, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli alkB mutants are very sensitive to DNA methylating agents. Despite these mutants being the subject of many studies, no DNA repair or other function has been assigned to the AlkB protein or to its human homolog. Here, we report that reactivation of methylmethanesulfonate (MMS)-treated single-stranded DNA phages, M13, f1, and G4, was decreased dramatically in alkB mutants. No such decrease occurred when using methylated λ phage or M13 duplex DNA. These data show that alkB mutants have a marked defect in processing methylation damage in single-stranded DNA. Recombinant AlkB protein bound more efficiently to single- than double-stranded DNA. The single-strand damage processed by AlkB was primarily cytotoxic and not mutagenic and was induced by SN2 methylating agents, MMS, DMS, and MeI but not by SN1 agent N-methyl-N-nitrosourea or by γ irradiation. Strains lacking other DNA repair activities, alkA tag, xth nfo, uvrA, mutS, and umuC, were not defective in reactivation of methylated M13 phage and did not enhance the defect of an alkB mutant. A recA mutation caused a small but additive defect. Thus, AlkB functions in a novel pathway independent of these activities. We propose that AlkB acts on alkylated single-stranded DNA in replication forks or at transcribed regions. Consistent with this theory, stationary phase alkB cells were less MMS sensitive than rapidly growing cells. PMID:10950872

  15. Isolation of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 mutants defective in bacterial magnetic particle synthesis by transposon mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Wahyudi, A T; Takeyama, H; Matsunaga, T

    2001-01-01

    Nonmagnetic mutants of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 were recovered following mini-Tn5 transposon mutagenesis. Transconjugants with kanamycin resistance were obtained at a frequency of 2.7 x 10(-7) per recipient. Of 3327 transconjugants, 62 were defective for bacterial magnetic particle (BMP) synthesis. The frequency of independent transposition events for nonmagnetic mutants was about 1.4% in transconjugants. Further analysis of DNA sequences flanking transposon by inverted polymerase chain reaction allowed isolation of at least 10 genes or DNA sequences involved in BMP synthesis in M. magneticum AMB-1. PMID:11963843

  16. Isolation and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in the induction of ethylene biosynthesis by cytokinin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, J. P.; Schuerman, P.; Woeste, K.; Brandstatter, I.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Cytokinins elevate ethylene biosynthesis in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings via a post-transcriptional modification of one isoform of the key biosynthetic enzyme ACC synthase. In order to begin to dissect the signaling events leading from cytokinin perception to this modification, we have isolated a series of mutants that lack the ethylene-mediated triple response in the presence of cytokinin due to their failure to increase ethylene biosynthesis. Analysis of genetic complementation and mapping revealed that these Cin mutants (cytokinin-insensitive) represent four distinct complementation groups, one of which, cin4, is allelic to the constitutive photomorphogenic mutant fus9/cop10. The Cin mutants have subtle effects on the morphology of adult plants. We further characterized the Cin mutants by analyzing ethylene biosynthesis in response to various other inducers and in adult tissues, as well as by assaying additional cytokinin responses. The cin3 mutant did not disrupt ethylene biosynthesis under any other conditions, nor did it disrupt any other cytokinin responses. Only cin2 disrupted ethylene biosynthesis in multiple circumstances. cin1 and cin2 made less anthocyanin in response to cytokinin. cin1 also displayed reduced shoot initiation in tissue culture in response to cytokinin, suggesting that it affects a cytokinin signaling element.

  17. Genetic analysis and characterization of a Caulobacter crescentus mutant defective in membrane biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, D; Shaw, P; Letts, V; Henry, S; Shapiro, L

    1984-01-01

    A mutant of Caulobacter crescentus has been isolated which has an auxotrophic requirement for unsaturated fatty acids or biotin for growth on medium containing glucose as the carbon source. This mutant exhibits a pleiotropic phenotype which includes (i) the auxotrophic requirement, (ii) cell death in cultures attempting to grow on glucose in the absence of fatty acids or biotin, and (iii) a major change in the outer membrane protein composition before cell death. This genetic lesion did not appear to affect directly a fatty acid biosynthetic reaction because fatty acid and phospholipid syntheses were found to continue in the absence of supplement. Oleic acid repressed fatty acid biosynthesis and induced fatty acid degradation in the wild-type parent, AE5000 . The mutant strain, AE6000 , was altered in both of these regulatory functions. The AE6000 mutant also showed specific inhibition of the synthesis of outer membrane and flagellar proteins. Total phospholipid, DNA, RNA, and protein syntheses were unaffected. The multiple phenotypes of the AE6000 mutant were found to cosegregate and to map between hclA and lacA on the C. crescentus chromosome. The defect in this mutant appears to be associated with a regulatory function in membrane biogenesis and provides evidence for a direct coordination of membrane protein synthesis and lipid metabolism in C. crescentus. Images PMID:6202671

  18. Aberrant Fat Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans Mutants with Defects in the Defecation Motor Program

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Ming; Gaur, Rahul; Selstam, Eva; Tuck, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which dietary fatty acids are absorbed by the intestine, and the way in which the process is regulated are poorly understood. In a genetic screen for mutations affecting fat accumulation in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans, nematode worms, we have isolated mutations in the aex-5 gene, which encodes a Kex2/subtilisin-family, Ca2+-sensitive proprotein convertase known to be required for maturation of certain neuropeptides, and for a discrete step in an ultradian rhythmic phenomenon called the defecation motor program. We demonstrate that aex-5 mutants have markedly lower steady-state levels of fat in the intestine, and that this defect is associated with a significant reduction in the rate at which labeled fatty acid derivatives are taken up from the intestinal lumen. Other mutations affecting the defecation motor program also affect steady-state levels of triglycerides, suggesting that the program is required per se for the proper accumulation of neutral lipids. Our results suggest that an important function of the defecation motor program in C. elegans is to promote the uptake of an important class of dietary nutrients. They also imply that modulation of the program might be one way in which worms adjust nutrient uptake in response to altered metabolic status. PMID:25849533

  19. Recombinant EDA or Sonic Hedgehog rescue the branching defect in Ectodysplasin A pathway mutant salivary glands in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wells, K L; Mou, C; Headon, D J; Tucker, A S

    2010-10-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is characterized by defective ectodermal organ development. This includes the salivary glands (SGs), which have an important role in lubricating the oral cavity. In humans and mice, HED is caused by mutations in Ectodysplasin A (Eda) pathway genes. Various phenotypes of the mutant mouse Eda(Ta/Ta), which lacks the ligand Eda, can be rescued by maternal injection or in vitro culture supplementation with recombinant EDA. However, the response of the SGs to this treatment has not been investigated. Here, we show that the submandibular glands (SMGs) of Eda(Ta/Ta) mice exhibit impaired branching morphogenesis, and that supplementation of Eda(Ta/Ta) SMG explants with recombinant EDA rescues the defect. Supplementation of Edar(dlJ/dlJ) SMGs with recombinant Sonic hedgehog (Shh) also rescues the defect, whereas treatment with recombinant Fgf8 does not. This work is the first to test the ability of putative Eda target molecules to rescue Eda pathway mutant SMGs. PMID:20803597

  20. Yeast dom34 mutants are defective in multiple developmental pathways and exhibit decreased levels of polyribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, L; Engebrecht, J

    1998-01-01

    The DOM34 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is similar to genes found in diverse eukaryotes and archaebacteria. Analysis of dom34 strains shows that progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle is delayed, mutant cells enter meiosis aberrantly, and their ability to form pseudohyphae is significantly diminisehd. RPS30A, which encodes ribosomal protein S30, was identified in a screen for high-copy suppressors of the dom34delta growth defect. dom34delta mutants display an altered polyribosome profile that is rescued by expression of RPS30A. Taken together, these data indicate that Dom34p functions in protein translation to promote G1 progression and differentiation. A Drosophila homolog of Dom34p, pelota, is required for the proper coordination of meiosis and spermatogenesis. Heterologous expression of pelota in dom34delata mutants restores wild-type growth and differentiation, suggesting conservation of function between the eukaryotic members of the gene family. PMID:9584085

  1. Yeast dom34 mutants are defective in multiple developmental pathways and exhibit decreased levels of polyribosomes.

    PubMed

    Davis, L; Engebrecht, J

    1998-05-01

    The DOM34 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is similar to genes found in diverse eukaryotes and archaebacteria. Analysis of dom34 strains shows that progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle is delayed, mutant cells enter meiosis aberrantly, and their ability to form pseudohyphae is significantly diminisehd. RPS30A, which encodes ribosomal protein S30, was identified in a screen for high-copy suppressors of the dom34delta growth defect. dom34delta mutants display an altered polyribosome profile that is rescued by expression of RPS30A. Taken together, these data indicate that Dom34p functions in protein translation to promote G1 progression and differentiation. A Drosophila homolog of Dom34p, pelota, is required for the proper coordination of meiosis and spermatogenesis. Heterologous expression of pelota in dom34delata mutants restores wild-type growth and differentiation, suggesting conservation of function between the eukaryotic members of the gene family. PMID:9584085

  2. Isolation and Characterization of a Competition-Defective Bradyrhizobium japonicum Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Arvind A.; Tully, Raymond E.; Keister, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    Tn5 mutagenesis was coupled with a competition assay to isolate mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum defective in competitive nodulation. A double selection procedure was used, screening first for altered extracellular polysaccharide production (nonmucoid colony morphology) and then for decreased competitive ability. One mutant, which was examined in detail, was deficient in acidic polysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide production. The wild-type DNA region corresponding to the Tn5 insertion was isolated, mapped, and cloned. A 3.6-kb region, not identified previously as functioning in symbiosis, contained the gene(s) necessary for complementation of the mutation. The mutant was motile, grew normally on minimal medium, and formed nodules on soybean plants which fixed almost as much nitrogen as the wild type during symbiosis. Images PMID:16348601

  3. Bacillus subtilis ccpA gene mutants specifically defective in activation of acetoin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Turinsky, A J; Moir-Blais, T R; Grundy, F J; Henkin, T M

    2000-10-01

    A large number of carbon source utilization pathways are repressed in Bacillus subtilis by the global regulator CcpA, which also acts as an activator of carbon excretion pathways during growth in media containing glucose. In this study, CcpA mutants defective in transcriptional activation of the alsSD operon, which is involved in acetoin biosynthesis, were identified. These mutants retained normal glucose repression of amyE, encoding alpha-amylase, and acsA, encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase, and normal activation of ackA, which is involved in acetate excretion; in these ccpA mutants the CcpA functions of activation of the acetate and acetoin excretion pathways appear to be separated. PMID:10986270

  4. Characterization of a Temperature-sensitive Mutant of Bacillus subtilis Defective in Deoxyribonucleic Acid Replication

    PubMed Central

    Mendelson, Neil H.; Gross, Julian D.

    1967-01-01

    In this paper we present a preliminary characterization of a temperature-sensitive mutant of Bacillus subtilis which appears to be defective in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication at high temperature. When log-phase cells of the mutant were transferred from 30 to 45 C, protein synthesis and ribonucleic acid synthesis continued more or less normally for several hours, whereas DNA synthesis continued at a normal rate for only 20 to 30 min and then was drastically reduced. The amount of DNA synthesized prior to this reduction corresponded approximately to the amount of DNA synthesized under conditions of protein synthesis inhibition by the parent or mutant strain. After 1 hr of growth at high temperature, cells of the mutant showed a pronounced drop in viable count. After 30 or 60 min of growth at high temperature, DNA synthesis could be restored by lowering the temperature. A longer period of growth at 45 C led to a loss of reversibility of DNA synthesis. Spores of the mutant synthesized no DNA when germinated at high temperature, although an outgrowing cell appeared. When spores were germinated at low temperature until DNA synthesis began, and then were transferred to high temperature, macromolecular synthesis continued as the log-phase transfer experiments described above. Images PMID:4964484

  5. Arabidopsis mutant of AtABCG26, an ABC transporter gene, is defective in pollen maturation.

    PubMed

    Kuromori, Takashi; Ito, Takuya; Sugimoto, Eriko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2011-11-01

    In plants, pollen is the male gametophyte that is generated from microspores, which are haploid cells produced after meiosis of diploid pollen mother cells in floral anthers. In normal maturation, microspores interact with the tapetum, which consists of one layer of metabolically active cells enclosing the locule in anthers. The tapetum plays several important roles in the maturation of microspores. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a highly conserved protein super-family that uses the energy released in ATP hydrolysis to transport substrates. The ABC transporter gene family is more diverse in plants than in animals. Previously, we reported that an Arabidopsis half-size type ABC transporter gene, COF1/AtWBC11/AtABCG11, is involved in lipid transport for the construction of cuticle layers and pollen coats in normal organ formation, as compared to CER5/AtWBC12/AtABCG12. However, physiological functions of most other ABCG members are unknown. Here, we identified another family gene, AtABCG26, which is required for pollen development in Arabidopsis. An AtABCG26 mutant developed very few pollen grains, resulting in a male-sterile phenotype. By investigating microspore and pollen development in this mutant, we observed that there was a slight abnormality in tetrad morphology prior to the formation of haploid microspores. At a later stage, we could not detect exine deposition on the microspore surface. During pollen maturation, many grains in the mutant anthers got aborted, and surviving grains were found to be defective in mitosis. Transmission of the mutant allele through male gametophytes appeared to be normal in genetic transmission analysis, supporting the view that the pollen function was disturbed by sporophytic defects in the AtABCG26 mutant. AtABCG26 can be expected to be involved in the transport of substrates such as sporopollenin monomers from tapetum to microspores, which both are plant-specific structures critical to pollen development. PMID

  6. Structural defects of a Pax8 mutant that give rise to congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Tell, G; Pellizzari, L; Esposito, G; Pucillo, C; Macchia, P E; Di Lauro, R; Damante, G

    1999-01-01

    Pax proteins are transcriptional regulators that play important roles during embryogenesis. These proteins recognize specific DNA sequences via a conserved element: the paired domain (Prd domain). The low level of organized secondary structure, in the free state, is a general feature of Prd domains; however, these proteins undergo a dramatic gain in alpha-helical content upon interaction with DNA ('induced fit'). Pax8 is expressed in the developing thyroid, kidney and several areas of the central nervous system. In humans, mutations of the Pax8 gene, which are mapped to the coding region of the Prd domain, give rise to congenital hypothyroidism. Here, we have investigated the molecular defects caused by a mutation in which leucine at position 62 is substituted for an arginine. Leu62 is conserved among Prd domains, and contributes towards the packing together of helices 1 and 3. The binding affinity of the Leu62Arg mutant for a specific DNA sequence (the C sequence of thyroglobulin promoter) is decreased 60-fold with respect to the wild-type Pax8 Prd domain. However, the affinities with which the wild-type and the mutant proteins bind to a non-specific DNA sequence are very similar. CD spectra demonstrate that, in the absence of DNA, both wild-type Pax8 and the Leu62Arg mutant possess a low alpha-helical content; however, in the Leu62Arg mutant, the gain in alpha-helical content upon interaction with DNA is greatly reduced with respect to the wild-type protein. Thus the molecular defect of the Leu62Arg mutant causes a reduced capability for induced fit upon DNA interaction. PMID:10377248

  7. Partially dominant mutant channel defect corresponding with intermediate Long-QT2 phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Yamini; Zheng, Renjian; Walsh, Christine; Tang, YingYing; McDonald, Thomas V.

    2011-01-01

    Background The hereditary Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) is a common cardiac disorder where ventricular repolarization is delayed, abnormally prolonging the QTc interval on ECG. LQTS is linked to various genetic loci including the KCNH2 (HERG) gene that encodes the α–subunit of the cardiac potassium channel that carries IKr. Here we report and characterize a novel pathologic missense mutation, G816V HERG, in a patient with sudden cardiac death. Methods Autopsy-derived tissue sample was used for DNA extraction and sequencing from an unexpected sudden death victim. The G816V HERG mutation was studied using heterologous expression in mammalian cell culture, whole cell patch clamp, confocal immunofluorescence, and immunochemical analyses. Results The mutant G816V HERG channel has reduced protein expression and shows a trafficking defective phenotype that is incapable of carrying current when expressed at physiological temperatures. The mutant channel showed reduced cell surface localization compared to wild-type HERG (WT HERG) but the mutant and wild-type subunits are capable of interacting. Expression studies at reduced temperatures enabled partial rescue of the trafficking defect with appearance of potassium currents albeit with reduced current density and altered voltage-dependent activation. Lastly, we examined a potential role for hypokalemia as a contributory factor to the patient’s lethal arrhythmia by possible low-potassium induced degradation of WT HERG and haplo-insufficiency of G816V HERG. Conclusion The G816V mutation in HERG causes a trafficking defect which acts in a partially dominant-negative manner. This intermediate severity defect agrees with the mild clinical presentation in other family members harboring the same mutation. Possible hypokalemia in the proband induced WT HERG degradation combined with haplo-insufficiency may have further compromised repolarization reserve and contributed to the lethal arrhythmia. PMID:21951015

  8. Defective calmodulin-dependent rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish sensory hair cell mutants.

    PubMed

    Seiler, C; Nicolson, T

    1999-11-15

    Vertebrate mechanosensory hair cells contain a narrow "pericuticular" zone which is densely populated with small vesicles between the cuticular plate and cellular junctions near the apical surface. The presence of many cytoplasmic vesicles suggests that the apical surface of hair cells has a high turnover rate. The significance of intense membrane trafficking at the apical surface is not known. Using a marker of endocytosis, the styryl dye FM1-43, this report shows that rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells is calcium and calmodulin dependent and is partially blocked by the presence of amiloride and dihydrostreptomycin, known inhibitors of mechanotransduction channels. As seen in lateral line hair cells, sensory hair cells within the larval otic capsule also exhibit rapid apical endocytosis. Defects in internalization of the dye in both lateral line and inner ear hair cells were found in five zebrafish auditory/vestibular mutants: sputnik, mariner, orbiter, mercury, and skylab. In addition, lateral line hair cells in these mutants were not sensitive to prolonged exposure to streptomycin, which is toxic to hair cells. The presence of endocytic defects in the majority of zebrafish mechanosensory mutants points to a important role of apical endocytosis in hair cell function. PMID:10526320

  9. Podospora anserina mutant defective in protoperithecium formation, ascospore germination, and cell regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Durrens, P; Laigret, F; Labarère, J; Bernet, J

    1979-01-01

    A mutant (modx) was selected on the basis of the suppression of self-lysis due to a recessive mutation (modB). modx, a dominant mutation, reduced hyphal branching from nonapical cells, abolished protoperithecium formation, and induced the death of stationary cells only when these were isolated to obtain further development. Mutant ascospores, formed in the fruiting bodies which occasionally occur under specific conditions (32 degrees C on starved medium), showed a delay in the germination process (up to 3 months instead of about 5 h for wild-type ascospores) when submitted to incubation under standard conditions (26 degrees C on germination medium) and failed to germinate at 18 degrees C. Revertants from modx strains, selected on the basis of the suppression of the nonrenewal of growth from stationary cells, were wild type for all the other three defects. Indirect arguments suggested that the modx mutant strain might be defective in the control of a specific class of stable messenger ribonucleic acids which would be essential for the physiology of ascospores and stationary cells. Images PMID:118158

  10. Modulation of lipid metabolic defects rescues cleft palate in Tgfbr2 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Junichi; Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C; Ho, Thach-Vu; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A; Chai, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) receptor type II (TGFBR2) cause Loeys-Dietz syndrome, characterized by craniofacial and cardiovascular abnormalities. Mice with a deletion of Tgfbr2 in cranial neural crest cells (Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice) develop cleft palate as the result of abnormal TGFβ signaling activation. However, little is known about metabolic processes downstream of TGFβ signaling during palatogenesis. Here, we show that Tgfbr2 mutant palatal mesenchymal cells spontaneously accumulate lipid droplets, resulting from reduced lipolysis activity. Tgfbr2 mutant palatal mesenchymal cells failed to respond to the cell proliferation stimulator sonic hedgehog, derived from the palatal epithelium. Treatment with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor or telmisartan, a modulator of p38 MAPK activation and lipid metabolism, blocked abnormal TGFβ-mediated p38 MAPK activation, restoring lipid metabolism and cell proliferation activity both in vitro and in vivo. Our results highlight the influence of alternative TGFβ signaling on lipid metabolic activities, as well as how lipid metabolic defects can affect cell proliferation and adversely impact palatogenesis. This discovery has broader implications for the understanding of metabolic defects and potential prevention of congenital birth defects. PMID:23975680

  11. Revertant mutants modify, but do not rescue, the gating defect of the cystic fibrosis mutant G551D-CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhe; Pissarra, Luísa S; Farinha, Carlos M; Liu, Jia; Cai, Zhiwei; Thibodeau, Patrick H; Amaral, Margarida D; Sheppard, David N

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by dysfunction of the epithelial anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). One strategy to restore function to CF mutants is to suppress defects in CFTR processing and function using revertant mutations. Here, we investigate the effects of the revertant mutations G550E and 4RK (the simultaneous disruption of four arginine-framed tripeptides (AFTs): R29K, R516K, R555K and R766K) on the CF mutant G551D, which impairs severely channel gating without altering protein processing and which affects a residue in the same α-helix as G550 and R555. Both G550E and 4RK augmented strongly CFTR-mediated iodide efflux from BHK cells expressing G551D-CFTR. To learn how revertant mutations influence G551D-CFTR function, we studied protein processing and single-channel behaviour. Neither G550E nor 4RK altered the expression and maturation of G551D-CFTR protein. By contrast, both revertants had marked effects on G551D-CFTR channel gating, increasing strongly opening frequency, while 4RK also diminished noticeably the duration of channel openings. Because G551D-CFTR channel gating is ATP independent, we investigated whether revertant mutations restore ATP dependence to G551D-CFTR. Like wild-type CFTR, the activity of 4RK-G551D-CFTR varied with ATP concentration, suggesting that 4RK confers some ATP dependence on the G551D-CFTR channel. Thus, the revertant mutations G550E and 4RK alter the gating pattern and ATP dependence of G551D-CFTR without restoring single-channel activity to wild-type levels. Based on their impact on the CF mutants F508del and G551D, we conclude that G550E and 4RK have direct effects on CFTR structure, but that their action on CFTR processing and channel function is CF mutation specific. PMID:24591578

  12. Chromosome instability mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are defective in microtubule-mediated processes.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, M A; Stearns, T; Botstein, D

    1990-01-01

    By using a multiply marked supernumerary chromosome III as an indicator, we isolated mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that display increased rates of chromosome loss. In addition to mutations in the tubulin-encoding TUB genes, we found mutations in the CIN1, CIN2, and CIN4 genes. These genes have been defined independently by mutations causing benomyl supersensitivity and are distinct from other known yeast genes that affect chromosome segregation. Detailed phenotypic characterization of cin mutants revealed several other phenotypes similar to those of tub mutants. Null alleles of these genes caused cold sensitivity for viability. At 11 degrees C, cin mutants arrest at the mitosis stage of their cell cycle because of loss of most microtubule structure. cin1, cin2, and cin4 mutations also cause defects in two other microtubule-mediated processes, nuclear migration and nuclear fusion (karyogamy). Overproduction of the CIN1 gene product was found to cause the same phenotype as loss of function, supersensitivity to benomyl. Our findings suggest that the CIN1, CIN2, and CIN4 proteins contribute to microtubule stability either by regulating the activity of a yeast microtubule component or as structural components of microtubules. Images PMID:2403635

  13. Isolation and characterization of a mutant defective in triacylglycerol accumulation in nitrogen-starved Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chun-Hsien; Kanehara, Kazue; Nakamura, Yuki

    2016-09-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG), a major source of biodiesel production, accumulates in nitrogen-starved Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. However, the metabolic pathway of starch-to-TAG conversion remains elusive because an enzyme that affects the starch degradation is unknown. Here, we isolated a new class of mutant bgal1, which expressed an overaccumulation of starch granules and defective photosynthetic growth. The bgal1 was a null mutant of a previously uncharacterized β-galactosidase-like gene (Cre02.g119700), which decreased total β-galactosidase activity 40% of the wild type. Upon nitrogen starvation, the bgal1 mutant showed decreased TAG accumulation mainly due to the reduced flux of de novo TAG biosynthesis evidenced by increased unsaturation of fatty acid composition in TAG and reduced TAG accumulation by additional supplementation of acetate to the culture media. Metabolomic analysis of the bgal1 mutant showed significantly reduced levels of metabolites following the hydrolysis of starch and substrates for TAG accumulation, whereas metabolites in TCA cycle were unaffected. Upon nitrogen starvation, while levels of glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate and acetyl-CoA remained lower, most of the other metabolites in glycolysis were increased but those in the TCA cycle were decreased, supporting TAG accumulation. We suggest that BGAL1 may be involved in the degradation of starch, which affects TAG accumulation in nitrogen-starved C. reinhardtii. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27060488

  14. Cell mutants defective in synthesizing a heparan sulfate proteoglycan with regions of defined monosaccharide sequence

    SciTech Connect

    De Agostini, A.L.; Lau, H.K.; Leone, C.; Youssoufian, H. ); Rosenberg, R.D. Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1990-12-01

    The authors have demonstrated that mouse LTA cells synthesize cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with regions of defined monosaccharide sequence that specifically interact with antithrombin (HSPG{sup act}). It remains unclear how HSPG{sup act} can be generated by a biosynthetic pathway with no simple template for directing the ordered assembly of monosaccharide units. To examine this issue, they treated LTA cells with ethyl methanesulfonate and then isolated seven stable mutants that synthesize only 8 - 27% of the wild-type HSPG{sup act} but produce normal amounts of other HSPGs. These mutants are recessive in nature and fall into at least two different complementation groups. The delineation of the molecular basis of these defects should help to elucidate the manner by which cells synthesize HSPGs with regions of defined monosaccharide sequence.

  15. Isolation and characterization of symbiotic mutants of bradyrhizobium sp. (Arachis) strain NC92: mutants with host-specific defects in nodulation and nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, K J; Anjaiah, V; Nambiar, P T; Ausubel, F M

    1987-01-01

    Random transposon Tn5 mutagenesis of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Arachis) strain NC92, a member of the cowpea cross-inoculation group, was carried out, and kanamycin-resistant transconjugants were tested for their symbiotic phenotype on three host plants: groundnut, siratro, and pigeonpea. Two nodulation (Nod- phenotype) mutants were isolated. One is unable to nodulate all three hosts and appears to contain an insertion in one of the common nodulation genes (nodABCD); the other is a host-specific nodulation mutant that fails to nodulate pigeonpea, elicits uninvaded nodules on siratro, and elicits normal, nitrogen-fixing nodules on groundnut. In addition, nine mutants defective in nitrogen fixation (Fix- phenotype) were isolated. Three fail to supply symbiotically fixed nitrogen to all three host plants. Surprisingly, nodules elicited by one of these mutants exhibit high levels of acetylene reduction activity, demonstrating the presence of the enzyme nitrogenase. Three more mutants have partially effective phenotypes (Fix +/-) in symbiosis with all three host plants. The remaining three mutants fail to supply fixed nitrogen to one of the host plants tested while remaining partially or fully effective on the other two hosts; two of these mutants are Fix- in pigeonpea and Fix +/- on groundnut and on siratro, whereas the other one is Fix- on groundnut but Fix+ on siratro and on pigeonpea. These latter mutants also retain significant nodule acetylene reduction activity, even in the ineffective symbioses. Such bacterial host-specific fixation (Hsf) mutants have not previously been reported. Images PMID:3032910

  16. prlA suppression of defective export of maltose-binding protein in secB mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Francetić, O; Hanson, M P; Kumamoto, C A

    1993-07-01

    An Escherichia coli strain containing a signal sequence mutation in the periplasmic maltose-binding protein (MBP) (malE18-1) and a point mutation in the soluble export factor SecB (secBL75Q) is completely defective in export of MBP and unable to grow on maltose (Mal- phenotype). We isolated 95 spontaneous Mal+ revertants and characterized them genetically. Three types of extragenic suppressors were identified: informational (missense) suppressors, a bypass suppressor conferring the Mal+ phenotype in the absence of MBP, and suppressors affecting the prlA gene, which encodes a component of the protein export apparatus. In this study, a novel prlA allele, designated prlA1001 and mapping in the putative second transmembrane domain of the PrlA (SecY) protein, was found. In addition, we isolated a mutation designated prlA1024 which is identical to prlA4-2, the mutation responsible for the signal sequence suppression in the prlA4 (prlA4-1 prlA4-2) double mutant (T. Sako and T. Iino, J. Bacteriol. 170:5389-5391, 1988). Comparison of the prlA1024 mutant and the prlA4 double mutant provides a possible explanation for the isolation of these prlA alleles. PMID:8320219

  17. A pqr2 mutant encodes a defective polyamine transporter and is negatively affected by ABA for paraquat resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuchao; Hu, Huizhen; Wang, Youmei; Xu, Zhengdan; Zha, Yi; Cai, Xiwen; Peng, Liangcai; Feng, Shengqiu

    2016-09-01

    Despite the paraquat-resistant mutants that have been reported in plants, this study identified a novel A. thaliana mutant (pqr2) from an XVE inducible activation library based on its resistance to 2 μM paraquat. The pqr2 mutant exhibited a termination mutation in the exon of AT1G31830/PAR1/PQR2, encoded a polyamine uptake transporter AtPUT2/PAR1/PQR2. The PQR2 mutation could largely reduce superoxide accumulation and cell death in the pqr2 plants under paraquat treatment. Moreover, compared with wild type, the pqr2 mutant exhibited much reduced tolerance to putrescine, a classic polyamine compound, which confirmed that PQR2 encoded a defective polyamine transporter. Notably, co-treated with ABA and paraquat, both pqr2 mutant and wild type exhibited a lethal phenotype from seed germination, but the wild type like pqr2 mutant, could remain paraquat-resistance while co-treated with high dosage of Na2WO4, an ABA synthesis inhibitor. Gene expression analysis suggested that ABA signaling should widely regulate paraquat-responsive genes distinctively in wild type and pqr2 mutant. Hence, this study has for the first time reported about ABA negative effect on paraquat-resistance in A. thaliana, providing insight into the ABA signaling involved in the oxidative stress responses induced by paraquat in plants. PMID:27229891

  18. Properties of proteins and the glassy matrix in maturation-defective mutant seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wolkers, W F; Alberda, M; Koornneef, M; Léon-Kloosterziel, K M; Hoekstra, F A

    1998-10-01

    In situ Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy was used to study the heat stability of proteins and hydrogen bonding interactions in dry maturation-defective mutant seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana. alpha-Helical, turn and beta-sheet conformations were the major protein secondary structures in all of these seeds. On heating, intermolecular extended beta-sheet structures, typical of protein denaturation, were formed in abscisic acid-insensitive (abi3) and leafy cotyledon (lec) mutant seeds. Proteins in dry wild-type seeds did not denature up to 150 degrees C, but those in dry desiccation-sensitive, lec1-1, lec1-3 and abi3-5 seeds did at 68, 89 and 87 degrees C, respectively. In the desiccation-tolerant abi3-7 and abi3-1 seeds, denaturation commenced above 120 and 135 degrees C, respectively. Seeds of the aba1-1 abi3-1 double mutant showed signs of denaturation already upon drying. The molecular packing in the seeds was studied by observing the shift in the position of the OH-stretching vibration band with temperature. The maximal rate of change of this band with temperature was much higher in the desiccation-sensitive abi3-5, aba1-1 abi3-1, lec1-1, and lec1-3 mutant seeds than in the desiccation-tolerant wild-type, abi3-1, abi3-7, and lec2-1 seeds. We interpret this to mean that the molecular packing density is higher in dry desiccation-tolerant than in dry desiccation-sensitive seeds, which is associated with a higher or lower protein denaturation temperature, respectively. The results are discussed in relation to the physiological and biochemical characteristics of these mutant seeds. PMID:9839460

  19. Isolation of NAD cycle mutants defective in nicotinamide mononucleotide deamidase in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Cheng, W; Roth, J

    1995-12-01

    The NAD or pyridine nucleotide cycle is the sequence of reactions involved in the breakdown of NAD to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and regeneration of NAD. This cycle is fivefold more active during aerobic growth of Salmonella typhimurium and under this condition breaks down half of the NAD pool every 90 min. DNA ligase is known to convert NAD to NMN but is only a minor contributor to the NAD cycle during aerobic growth. The dominant aerobic route of NMN formation is otherwise uncharacterized. Accumulated NMN generated by either of these routes is potentially dangerous in that it can inhibit the essential enzyme DNA ligase. The reactions which recycle NMN to NAD may serve to minimize the inhibition of ligase and other enzymes by accumulated NMN. The predominant recycling reaction in S. typhimurium appears to be NMN deamidase, which converts NMN directly to the biosynthetic intermediate nicotinic acid mononucleotide. Mutants defective in this recycling step were isolated and characterized. By starting with a ligase-deficient (lig mutant) parent strain that requires deamidase to assimilate exogenous NMN, two classes of mutants that are unable to grow on minimal NMN media were isolated. One class (pncC) maps at 83.7 min and shows only 2% of the wild-type levels of NMN deamidase. Under aerobic conditions, a lig+ allele allows a pncC mutant to grow on NMN and restores some deamidase activity. This growth ability and enzyme activity are not found in lig+ strains grown without oxygen. This suggests that the existence of a second NMN deamidase (pncL) dependent on ligase and stimulated during aerobic growth. The second class of mutants (pncD) gains a requirement for isoleucine plus valine with growth in the presence of exogenous NMN. We propose that pncD mutations reduce the activity of an ilv biosynthetic enzyme that is naturally sensitive to inhibition by NMN. PMID:7592458

  20. Expression of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus RNase H Rescues the Growth Defect of an Escherichia coli Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Andrew G.

    2001-01-01

    A 157-amino-acid fragment of Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase encoding RNase H is shown to rescue the growth-defective phenotype of an Escherichia coli mutant. In vitro assays of the recombinant wild-type protein purified from the conditionally defective mutant confirm that it is catalytically active. Mutagenesis of one of the presumptive RNase H-catalytic residues results in production of a protein variant incapable of rescue and which lacks activity in vitro. Analyses of additional active site mutants demonstrate that their encoded variant proteins lack robust activity yet are able to rescue the bacterial mutant. These results suggest that genetic complementation may be useful for in vivo screening of mutant viral RNase H gene fragments and in evaluating their function under conditions that more closely mimic physiological conditions. The rescue system may also be useful in verifying the functional outcomes of mutations based on protein structural predictions and modeling. PMID:11390625

  1. Brucella abortus Cyclic β-1,2-Glucan Mutants Have Reduced Virulence in Mice and Are Defective in Intracellular Replication in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Briones, Gabriel; Iñón de Iannino, Nora; Roset, Mara; Vigliocco, Ana; Paulo, Patricia Silva; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2001-01-01

    Null cyclic β-1,2-glucan synthetase mutants (cgs mutants) were obtained from Brucella abortus virulent strain 2308 and from B. abortus attenuated vaccinal strain S19. Both mutants show greater sensitivity to surfactants like deoxycholic acid, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and Zwittergent than the parental strains, suggesting cell surface alterations. Although not to the same extent, both mutants display reduced virulence in mice and defective intracellular multiplication in HeLa cells. The B. abortus S19 cgs mutant was completely cleared from the spleens of mice after 4 weeks, while the 2308 mutant showed a 1.5-log reduction of the number of brucellae isolated from the spleens after 12 weeks. These results suggest that cyclic β-1,2-glucan plays an important role in the residual virulence of the attenuated B. abortus S19 strain. Although the cgs mutant was cleared from the spleens earlier than the wild-type parental strain (B. abortus S19) and produced less inflammatory response, its ability to confer protection against the virulent strain B. abortus 2308 was fully retained. Equivalent levels of induction of spleen gamma interferon mRNA and anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) subtype antibodies were observed in mice injected with B. abortus S19 or the cgs mutant. However, the titer of anti-LPS antibodies of the IgG1 subtype induced by the cgs mutant was lower than that observed with the parental S19 strain, thus suggesting that the cgs mutant induces a relatively exclusive Th1 response. PMID:11401996

  2. Ceramides And Stress Signalling Intersect With Autophagic Defects In Neurodegenerative Drosophila blue cheese (bchs) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Hebbar, Sarita; Sahoo, Ishtapran; Matysik, Artur; Argudo Garcia, Irene; Osborne, Kathleen Amy; Papan, Cyrus; Torta, Federico; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Fun, Xiu Hui; Wenk, Markus R; Shevchenko, Andrej; Schwudke, Dominik; Kraut, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites are involved in the regulation of autophagy, a degradative recycling process that is required to prevent neuronal degeneration. Drosophila blue cheese mutants neurodegenerate due to perturbations in autophagic flux, and consequent accumulation of ubiquitinated aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that blue cheese mutant brains exhibit an elevation in total ceramide levels; surprisingly, however, degeneration is ameliorated when the pool of available ceramides is further increased, and exacerbated when ceramide levels are decreased by altering sphingolipid catabolism or blocking de novo synthesis. Exogenous ceramide is seen to accumulate in autophagosomes, which are fewer in number and show less efficient clearance in blue cheese mutant neurons. Sphingolipid metabolism is also shifted away from salvage toward de novo pathways, while pro-growth Akt and MAP pathways are down-regulated, and ER stress is increased. All these defects are reversed under genetic rescue conditions that increase ceramide generation from salvage pathways. This constellation of effects suggests a possible mechanism whereby the observed deficit in a potentially ceramide-releasing autophagic pathway impedes survival signaling and exacerbates neuronal death. PMID:26639035

  3. Mutants defective in secretory/vacuolar pathways in the EUROFAN collection of yeast disruptants.

    PubMed

    Avaro, Sandrine; Belgareh-Touzé, Naïma; Sibella-Argüelles, Carla; Volland, Christiane; Haguenauer-Tsapis, Rosine

    2002-03-15

    We have screened the EUROFAN (European Functional Analysis Network) deletion strain collection for yeast mutants defective in secretory/vacuolar pathways and/or associated biochemical modifications. We used systematic Western immunoblotting to analyse the electrophoretic pattern of several markers of the secretory/vacuolar pathways, the soluble alpha-factor, the periplasmic glycoprotein invertase, the plasma membrane GPI-anchored protein Gas1p, and two vacuolar proteins, the soluble carboxypeptidase Y and the membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase, which are targeted to the vacuole by different pathways. We also used colony immunoblotting to monitor the secretion of carboxypeptidase Y into the medium, to identify disruptants impaired in vacuolar targeting. We identified 25 mutants among the 631 deletion strains. Nine of these mutants were disrupted in genes identified in recent years on the basis of their involvement in trafficking (VPS53, VAC7, VAM6, APM3, SYS1), or glycosylation (ALG12, ALG9, OST4, ROT2). Three of these genes were identified on the basis of trafficking defects by ourselves and others within the EUROFAN project (TLG2, RCY1, MON2). The deletion of ERV29, which encodes a COPII vesicle protein, impaired carboxypeptidase Y trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. We also identified eight unknown ORFs, the deletion of which reduced Golgi glycosylation or impaired the Golgi to vacuole trafficking of carboxypeptidase Y. YJR044c, which we identified as a new VPS gene, encodes a protein with numerous homologues of unknown function in sequence databases. PMID:11870858

  4. Temperature-Sensitive Divisionless Mutant of Bacillus subtilis Defective in the Initiation of Septation

    PubMed Central

    Breakefield, Xandra O.; Landman, Otto E.

    1973-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive divisionless mutant of Bacillus subtilis 168, tms-12, is shown to be defective in an early step in septum formation at the restrictive temperature. The nature of this defect has been studied by comparing the growth and composition of mutant and wild-type (tms-12+) cells at the restrictive (48 C) and permissive (34 C) temperatures. At 48 C, tms-12 cells grow as nonseptate, multinucleate filaments. Filamentation does not appear to be a result of alterations in properties of the cell wall, since the ratio of mucopeptide to teichoic acid, the autolytic activity, and the ability of the walls to protect cells against osmotic shock are comparable in tms-12 filaments and tms-12+ bacilli grown at 48 C. Synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid and the segregation of nucleoids also proceed normally during filamentation. The synthesis of membrane, however, is delayed during filamentation of tms-12. No gross alterations were observed in the protein or lipid composition of membranes isolated from mutant filaments. Septum formation resumes when filaments are returned to 34 C and appears to be associated with an increased synthesis of membrane. The occurrence of septa was monitored both by microscopic observation of cross walls and by assays of the number of viable protoplasts released from bacillary filaments upon removal of the cell wall. Septation recovery can be blocked by inhibitors of ribonucleic acid and protein synthesis added during, but not after, the first 7 min of recovery at 34 C. By contrast, inhibition of deoxyribonucleic synthesis does not block recovery. Images PMID:4570614

  5. The unfolded protein response selectively targets active smoothened mutants.

    PubMed

    Marada, Suresh; Stewart, Daniel P; Bodeen, William J; Han, Young-Goo; Ogden, Stacey K

    2013-06-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway, an essential regulator of developmental patterning, has been implicated in playing causative and survival roles in a range of human cancers. The signal-transducing component of the pathway, Smoothened, has revealed itself to be an efficacious therapeutic target in combating oncogenic signaling. However, therapeutic challenges remain in cases where tumors acquire resistance to Smoothened antagonists, and also in cases where signaling is driven by active Smoothened mutants that exhibit reduced sensitivity to these compounds. We previously demonstrated that active Smoothened mutants are subjected to prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention, likely due to their mutations triggering conformation shifts that are detected by ER quality control. We attempted to exploit this biology and demonstrate that deregulated Hedgehog signaling driven by active Smoothened mutants is specifically attenuated by ER stressors that induce the unfolded protein response (UPR). Upon UPR induction, active Smoothened mutants are targeted by ER-associated degradation, resulting in attenuation of inappropriate pathway activity. Accordingly, we found that the UPR agonist thapsigargin attenuated mutant Smoothened-induced phenotypes in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster. Wild-type Smoothened and physiological Hedgehog patterning were not affected, suggesting that UPR modulation may provide a novel therapeutic window to be evaluated for targeting active Smoothened mutants in disease. PMID:23572559

  6. Enhanced Biofilm Formation by Escherichia coli LPS Mutants Defective in Hep Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Ryoma; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major component of the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and its polysaccharide portion is situated at the outermost region. We investigated the relationship between the polysaccharide portion of LPS and biofilm formation using a series of Escherichia coli mutants defective in genes earlier shown to affect the LPS sugar compositions. Biofilm formation by a deep rough LPS mutant, the hldE strain, was strongly enhanced in comparison with the parental strain and other LPS mutants. The hldE strain also showed a phenotype of increased auto-aggregation and stronger cell surface hydrophobicity compared to the wild-type. Similar results were obtained with another deep rough LPS mutant, the waaC strain whose LPS showed same molecular mass as that of the hldE strain. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and biofilm formation assay using DNase I revealed that biofilm formation by the hldE strain was dependent on extracellular DNA. Furthermore, a loss of flagella and an increase in amount of outer membrane vesicles in case of the hldE strain were also observed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. In addition, we demonstrated that a mutation in the hldE locus, which alters the LPS structure, caused changes in both expression and properties of several surface bacterial factors involved in biofilm formation and virulence. We suggest that the implication of these results should be considered in the context of biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces, which is frequently associated with nosocominal infections such as the catheter-associated infections. PMID:23284671

  7. A defective mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Gallinarum in cobalamin biosynthesis is avirulent in chickens

    PubMed Central

    de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Arguello, Yuli Melisa Sierra; Berchieri Junior, Ângelo; Lemos, Manuel Victor Franco; Barrow, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (SG) is a fowl typhoid agent in chickens and is a severe disease with worldwide economic impact as its mortality may reach up to 80%. It is one of a small group of serovars that typically produces typhoid-like infections in a narrow range of host species and which therefore represents a good model for human typhoid. The survival mechanisms are not considered to be virulent mechanisms but are essential for the life of the bacterium. Mutants of Salmonella Gallinarum containing defective genes, related to cobalamin biosynthesis and which Salmonella spp. has to be produced to survive when it is in an anaerobic environment, were produced in this study. Salmonella Gallinarum is an intracellular parasite. Therefore, this study could provide information about whether vitamin B12 biosynthesis might be essential to its survival in the host. The results showed that the singular deletion in cbiA or cobS genes did not interfere in the life of Salmonella Gallinarum in the host, perhaps because single deletion is not enough to impede vitamin B12 biosynthesis. It was noticed that diluted SG mutants with single deletion produced higher mortality than the wild strain of SG. When double mutation was carried out, the Salmonella Gallinarum mutant was unable to provoke mortality in susceptible chickens. This work showed that B12 biosynthesis is a very important step in the metabolism of Salmonella Gallinarum during the infection of the chickens. Further research on bacterium physiology should be carried out to elucidate the events described in this research and to assess the mutant as a vaccine strain. PMID:24031393

  8. Heterotaxy and complex structural heart defects in a mutant mouse model of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Serena Y.; Rosenthal, Julie; Zhao, Xiao-Qing; Francis, Richard J.; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Sabol, Steven L.; Linask, Kaari L.; Bracero, Luciann; Connelly, Patricia S.; Daniels, Mathew P.; Yu, Qing; Omran, Heymut; Leatherbury, Linda; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2007-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with ciliary defects and situs inversus totalis, the complete mirror image reversal of internal organ situs (positioning). A variable incidence of heterotaxy, or irregular organ situs, also has been reported in PCD patients, but it is not known whether this is elicited by the PCD-causing genetic lesion. We studied a mouse model of PCD with a recessive mutation in Dnahc5, a dynein gene commonly mutated in PCD. Analysis of homozygous mutant embryos from 18 litters yielded 25% with normal organ situs, 35% with situs inversus totalis, and 40% with heterotaxy. Embryos with heterotaxy had complex structural heart defects that included discordant atrioventricular and ventricular outflow situs and atrial/pulmonary isomerisms. Variable combinations of a distinct set of cardiovascular anomalies were observed, including superior-inferior ventricles, great artery alignment defects, and interrupted inferior vena cava with azygos continuation. The surprisingly high incidence of heterotaxy led us to evaluate the diagnosis of PCD. PCD was confirmed by EM, which revealed missing outer dynein arms in the respiratory cilia. Ciliary dyskinesia was observed by videomicroscopy. These findings show that Dnahc5 is required for the specification of left-right asymmetry and suggest that the PCD-causing Dnahc5 mutation may also be associated with heterotaxy. PMID:18037990

  9. Maize reas1 Mutant Stimulates Ribosome Use Efficiency and Triggers Distinct Transcriptional and Translational Responses.

    PubMed

    Qi, Weiwei; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Qun; Li, Xia; Yao, Dongsheng; Jin, Ying; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guifeng; Song, Rentao

    2016-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental cellular process in all cells. Impaired ribosome biogenesis causes developmental defects; however, its molecular and cellular bases are not fully understood. We cloned a gene responsible for a maize (Zea mays) small seed mutant, dek* (for defective kernel), and found that it encodes Ribosome export associated1 (ZmReas1). Reas1 is an AAA-ATPase that controls 60S ribosome export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after ribosome maturation. dek* is a weak mutant allele with decreased Reas1 function. In dek* cells, mature 60S ribosome subunits are reduced in the nucleus and cytoplasm, but the proportion of actively translating polyribosomes in cytosol is significantly increased. Reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and the increased elongation factor 1α level indicate an enhancement of general translational efficiency in dek* cells. The mutation also triggers dramatic changes in differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs. Discrepancy was observed between differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs, indicating distinct cellular responses at transcription and translation levels to the stress of defective ribosome processing. DNA replication and nucleosome assembly-related gene expression are selectively suppressed at the translational level, resulting in inhibited cell growth and proliferation in dek* cells. This study provides insight into cellular responses due to impaired ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26645456

  10. Defective copper transport in the copt5 mutant affects cadmium tolerance.

    PubMed

    Carrió-Seguí, Angela; Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Sanz, Amparo; Peñarrubia, Lola

    2015-03-01

    Cadmium toxicity interferes with essential metal homeostasis, which is a problem for both plant nutrition and the consumption of healthy food by humans. Copper uptake is performed by the members of the Arabidopsis high affinity copper transporter (COPT) family. One of the members, COPT5, is involved in copper recycling from the vacuole toward the cytosolic compartment. We show herein that copt5 mutants are more sensitive to cadmium stress than wild-type plants, as indicated by reduced growth. Exacerbated cadmium toxicity in copt5 mutants is due specifically to altered copper traffic through the COPT5 transporter. Three different processes which have been shown to affect cadmium tolerance are altered in copt5 mutants. First, ethylene biosynthesis diminishes under copper deficiency and, in the presence of cadmium, ethylene production diminishes further. Copper deficiency responses are also attenuated under cadmium treatment. Remarkably, while copt5 roots present higher oxidative stress toxicity symptoms than controls, aerial copt5 parts display lower oxidative stress, as seen by reduced cadmium delivery to shoots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that copper transport plays a key role in cadmium resistance, and suggest that oxidative stress triggers an NADPH oxidase-mediated signaling pathway, which contributes to cadmium translocation and basal plant resistance. The slightly lower cadmium levels that reach aerial parts in the copt5 mutants, irrespective of the copper content in the media, suggest a new biotechnological approach to minimize toxic cadmium entry into food chains. PMID:25432970

  11. A receptor-like kinase mutant with absent endodermal diffusion barrier displays selective nutrient homeostasis defects

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Alexandre; Barberon, Marie; Alassimone, Julien; Kalmbach, Lothar; Lee, Yuree; Vermeer, Joop EM; Yamazaki, Misako; Li, Guowei; Maurel, Christophe; Takano, Junpei; Kamiya, Takehiro; Salt, David E; Roppolo, Daniele; Geldner, Niko

    2014-01-01

    The endodermis represents the main barrier to extracellular diffusion in plant roots, and it is central to current models of plant nutrient uptake. Despite this, little is known about the genes setting up this endodermal barrier. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of a strong barrier mutant, schengen3 (sgn3). We observe a surprising ability of the mutant to maintain nutrient homeostasis, but demonstrate a major defect in maintaining sufficient levels of the macronutrient potassium. We show that SGN3/GASSHO1 is a receptor-like kinase that is necessary for localizing CASPARIAN STRIP DOMAIN PROTEINS (CASPs)—major players of endodermal differentiation—into an uninterrupted, ring-like domain. SGN3 appears to localize into a broader band, embedding growing CASP microdomains. The discovery of SGN3 strongly advances our ability to interrogate mechanisms of plant nutrient homeostasis and provides a novel actor for localized microdomain formation at the endodermal plasma membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03115.001 PMID:25233277

  12. Overproduction of stomatal lineage cells in Arabidopsis mutants defective in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Chizuko; Miki, Daisuke; Zheng, Zhimin; Ma, Jun; Wang, Jing; Yang, Zhenbiao; Dong, Juan; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a reversible epigenetic mark regulating genome stability and function in many eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, active DNA demethylation depends on the function of the ROS1 subfamily of genes that encode 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases/lyases. ROS1-mediated DNA demethylation plays a critical role in the regulation of transgenes, transposable elements and some endogenous genes, but there have been no reports of clear developmental phenotypes in ros1 mutant plants. Here we report that, in the ros1 mutant, the promoter region of the peptide ligand gene EPF2 is hypermethylated, which greatly reduces EPF2 expression and thereby leads to a phenotype of overproduction of stomatal lineage cells. EPF2 gene expression in ros1 is restored and the defective epidermal cell patterning is suppressed by mutations in genes in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway. Our results show that active DNA demethylation combats the activity of RNA-directed DNA methylation to influence the initiation of stomatal lineage cells. PMID:24898766

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Mutants Defective in Seed Coat Mucilage Secretory Cell Development in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Western, Tamara L.; Burn, Joanne; Tan, Wei Ling; Skinner, Debra J.; Martin-McCaffrey, Luke; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Haughn, George W.

    2001-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, fertilization induces the epidermal cells of the outer ovule integument to differentiate into a specialized seed coat cell type producing extracellular pectinaceous mucilage and a volcano-shaped secondary cell wall. Differentiation involves a regulated series of cytological events including growth, cytoplasmic rearrangement, mucilage synthesis, and secondary cell wall production. We have tested the potential of Arabidopsis seed coat epidermal cells as a model system for the genetic analysis of these processes. A screen for mutants defective in seed mucilage identified five novel genes (MUCILAGE-MODIFIED [MUM]1–5). The seed coat development of these mutants, and that of three previously identified ones (TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1, GLABRA2, and APETALA2) were characterized. Our results show that the genes identified define several events in seed coat differentiation. Although APETALA2 is needed for differentiation of both outer layers of the seed coat, TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1, GLABRA2, and MUM4 are required for complete mucilage synthesis and cytoplasmic rearrangement. MUM3 and MUM5 may be involved in the regulation of mucilage composition, whereas MUM1 and MUM2 appear to play novel roles in post-synthesis cell wall modifications necessary for mucilage extrusion. PMID:11706181

  14. Positive selection of mutants defective in transcriptional repression of riboflavin synthesis by iron in the flavinogenic yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Boretsky, Yuriy R; Kapustyak, Kostyantyn Y; Fayura, Lyubov R; Stasyk, Oleh V; Stenchuk, Mykola M; Bobak, Yaroslav P; Drobot, Lyudmyla B; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2005-06-01

    It is known for many years that iron represses synthesis of riboflavin (RF) and most of RF-synthesizing enzymes in several yeast species, known as flavinogenic yeasts. However, the mechanism of such repression is not known. We have found that iron represses transcription of RIB1 and RIB7 genes coding for the first and the last enzymes of RF biosynthesis in the model flavinogenic organism Pichia guilliermondii. To decipher molecular mechanisms of iron-dependent repression, isolation and study of the regulatory mutants defective in corresponding regulation is desirable. However, no suitable methods for isolation of such mutants were previously available. We have produced a single-point transition mutation in the RIB1 gene. The corresponding rib1-86 mutant exhibits leaky phenotype and is unable to grow in iron-sufficient minimal medium without exogenous RF. However, it can grow in minimal iron-deficient medium without RF, or in iron-sufficient medium upon introduction of the previously-isolated regulatory mutation rib81, which leads to increase in RF production. Using the rib1-86 mutant as parental strain, a collection of mutants able to grow in iron-sufficient medium without exogenous RF has been isolated. The mutants appeared to be defective in regulation of RF biosynthesis and iron homeostasis and were divided into six new complementation groups. Study of one corresponding mutant, red6, showed derepression of RIB1 mRNA synthesis in iron-sufficient medium. PMID:15925311

  15. Mutant Huntingtin and Elusive Defects in Oxidative Metabolism and Mitochondrial Calcium Handling.

    PubMed

    Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2016-07-01

    Elongation of a polyglutamine (polyQ) stretch in huntingtin protein (Htt) is linked to Huntington's disease (HD) pathogenesis. The mutation in Htt correlates with neuronal dysfunction in the striatum and cerebral cortex and eventually leads to neuronal cell death. The exact mechanisms of the injurious effect of mutant Htt (mHtt) on neurons are not completely understood but might include aberrant gene transcription, defective autophagy, abnormal mitochondrial biogenesis, anomalous mitochondrial dynamics, and trafficking. In addition, deficiency in oxidative metabolism and defects in mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling are considered essential contributing factors to neuronal dysfunction in HD and, consequently, in HD pathogenesis. Since the discovery of the mutation in Htt, the questions whether mHtt affects oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling and, if it does, what mechanisms could be involved were in focus of numerous investigations. However, despite significant research efforts, the detrimental effect of mHtt and the mechanisms by which mHtt might impair oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling remain elusive. In this paper, I will briefly review studies aimed at clarifying the consequences of mHtt interaction with mitochondria and discuss experimental results supporting or arguing against the mHtt effects on oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling. PMID:25941077

  16. Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum Due to Defective Glial Wedge Formation in Lhx2 Mutant Mice.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Gregory A; Hirokawa, Karla E; Chuang, Tony M; Urbina, Cecilia; Patel, Fenil; Fong, Jeanette; Funatsu, Nobuo; Monuki, Edwin S

    2015-09-01

    Establishment of the corpus callosum involves coordination between callosal projection neurons and multiple midline structures, including the glial wedge (GW) rostrally and hippocampal commissure caudally. GW defects have been associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). Here we show that conditional Lhx2 inactivation in cortical radial glia using Emx1-Cre or Nestin-Cre drivers results in ACC. The ACC phenotype was characterized by aberrant ventrally projecting callosal axons rather than Probst bundles, and was 100% penetrant on 2 different mouse strain backgrounds. Lhx2 inactivation in postmitotic cortical neurons using Nex-Cre mice did not result in ACC, suggesting that the mutant phenotype was not autonomous to the callosal projection neurons. Instead, ACC was associated with an absent hippocampal commissure and a markedly reduced to absent GW. Expression studies demonstrated strong Lhx2 expression in the normal GW and in its radial glial progenitors, with absence of Lhx2 resulting in normal Emx1 and Sox2 expression, but premature exit from the cell cycle based on EdU-Ki67 double labeling. These studies define essential roles for Lhx2 in GW, hippocampal commissure, and corpus callosum formation, and suggest that defects in radial GW progenitors can give rise to ACC. PMID:24781987

  17. Novel Genes Involved in Endosomal Traffic in Yeast Revealed by Suppression of a Targeting-defective Plasma Membrane ATPase Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen-jie; Chang, Amy

    1997-01-01

    A novel genetic selection was used to identify genes regulating traffic in the yeast endosomal system. We took advantage of a temperature-sensitive mutant in PMA1, encoding the plasma membrane ATPase, in which newly synthesized Pma1 is mislocalized to the vacuole via the endosome. Diversion of mutant Pma1 from vacuolar delivery and rerouting to the plasma membrane is a major mechanism of suppression of pma1ts. 16 independent suppressor of pma1 (sop) mutants were isolated. Identification of the corresponding genes reveals eight that are identical with VPS genes required for delivery of newly synthesized vacuolar proteins. A second group of SOP genes participates in vacuolar delivery of mutant Pma1 but is not essential for delivery of the vacuolar protease carboxypeptidase Y. Because the biosynthetic pathway to the vacuole intersects with the endocytic pathway, internalization of a bulk membrane endocytic marker FM 4-64 was assayed in the sop mutants. By this means, defective endosome-to-vacuole trafficking was revealed in a subset of sop mutants. Another subset of sop mutants displays perturbed trafficking between endosome and Golgi: impaired pro-α factor processing in these strains was found to be due to defective recycling of the trans-Golgi protease Kex2. One of these strains defective in Kex2 trafficking carries a mutation in SOP2, encoding a homologue of mammalian synaptojanin (implicated in synaptic vesicle endocytosis and recycling). Thus, cell surface delivery of mutant Pma1 can occur as a consequence of disturbances at several different sites in the endosomal system. PMID:9265642

  18. Reduced naphthylphthalamic acid binding in the tir3 mutant of Arabidopsis is associated with a reduction in polar auxin transport and diverse morphological defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruegger, M.; Dewey, E.; Hobbie, L.; Brown, D.; Bernasconi, P.; Turner, J.; Muday, G.; Estelle, M.

    1997-01-01

    Polar auxin transport plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and development. To identify genes involved in this process, we have developed a genetic procedure to screen for mutants of Arabidopsis that are altered in their response to auxin transport inhibitors. We recovered a total of 16 independent mutants that defined seven genes, called TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE (TIR) genes. Recessive mutations in one of these genes, TIR3, result in altered responses to transport inhibitors, a reduction in polar auxin transport, and a variety of morphological defects that can be ascribed to changes in indole-3-acetic acid distribution. Most dramatically, tir3 seedlings are strongly deficient in lateral root production, a process that is known to depend on polar auxin transport from the shoot into the root. In addition, tir3 plants display a reduction in apical dominance as well as decreased elongation of siliques, pedicels, roots, and the inflorescence. Biochemical studies indicate that tir3 plants have a reduced number of N-1-naphthylphthalamic (NPA) binding sites, suggesting that the TIR3 gene is required for expression, localization, or stabilization of the NPA binding protein (NBP). Alternatively, the TIR3 gene may encode the NBP. Because the tir3 mutants have a substantial defect in NPA binding, their phenotype provides genetic evidence for a role for the NBP in plant growth and development.

  19. Reduced naphthylphthalamic acid binding in the tir3 mutant of Arabidopsis is associated with a reduction in polar auxin transport and diverse morphological defects.

    PubMed Central

    Ruegger, M; Dewey, E; Hobbie, L; Brown, D; Bernasconi, P; Turner, J; Muday, G; Estelle, M

    1997-01-01

    Polar auxin transport plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and development. To identify genes involved in this process, we have developed a genetic procedure to screen for mutants of Arabidopsis that are altered in their response to auxin transport inhibitors. We recovered a total of 16 independent mutants that defined seven genes, called TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE (TIR) genes. Recessive mutations in one of these genes, TIR3, result in altered responses to transport inhibitors, a reduction in polar auxin transport, and a variety of morphological defects that can be ascribed to changes in indole-3-acetic acid distribution. Most dramatically, tir3 seedlings are strongly deficient in lateral root production, a process that is known to depend on polar auxin transport from the shoot into the root. In addition, tir3 plants display a reduction in apical dominance as well as decreased elongation of siliques, pedicels, roots, and the inflorescence. Biochemical studies indicate that tir3 plants have a reduced number of N-1-naphthylphthalamic (NPA) binding sites, suggesting that the TIR3 gene is required for expression, localization, or stabilization of the NPA binding protein (NBP). Alternatively, the TIR3 gene may encode the NBP. Because the tir3 mutants have a substantial defect in NPA binding, their phenotype provides genetic evidence for a role for the NBP in plant growth and development. PMID:9165751

  20. Isolation and characterization of a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant defective in the second step of glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, V L; Zhang, H; Harreman, M

    1996-01-01

    Mutant cell lines defective in the biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) described to date were isolated by selecting cells which no longer expressed one or more endogenous GPI-anchored proteins on their surface. In this study, a new mutant in this pathway was isolated from ethylmethane-sulphonate-mutagenized Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) as a marker of GPI-anchored proteins. A three-step protocol was employed. In the first step, cells with decreased surface expression of PLAP were selected by four rounds of complement-mediated lysis with an anti-(alkaline phosphatase) antibody. The surviving cells were cloned by limiting dilution and those with low levels of total alkaline phosphatase activity were selected in the second step. Finally, the ability of each clone to synthesize the first three intermediates in GPI biosynthesis in vitro was assessed to determine which cells with low alkaline phosphatase activity harboured a defect in one of these reactions. Of 230 potential mutants, one was defective in the second step of GPI biosynthesis. Microsomes from this mutant, designated G9PLAP.85, were completely unable to deacetylate either endogenous GlcNAc-phosphatidylinositol (PI) synthesized from UDP[6-3H]GlcNAc or exogenous GlcNAc-PI added directly to the membranes. Complementation analysis with the Thy-1-deficient murine lymphoma cells demonstrated that G9PLAP.85 has a molecular defect distinct from these previously described mutants. Therefore, these results suggest that mutants in GPI biosynthesis could be selected from almost any cell line expressing a GPI-anchored marker protein. PMID:8546692

  1. Reversion of a transcriptionally defective MHC class II-negative human B-cell mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Ombra, M N; Perfetto, C; Autiero, M; Anzisi, A M; Pasquinelli, R; Maffei, A; Del Pozzo, G; Guardiola, J

    1993-01-01

    RJ2.2.5, a mutant derived from the human B-lymphoma cell, Raji, is unable to express the MHC class II genes because of a recessive transcriptional defect attributed to the lack of an activator function. We report the isolation of a RJ2.2.5 revertant, namely AR, in which the expression of the mRNAs encoded by these genes is restored. Comparison of the binding of nuclear extracts or of partially purified nuclear preparations from the wild-type, the mutant and the revertant cells to a conserved MHC class II promoter element, the X-box, showed no alteration in the mobility of the complexes thus formed. However, in extracts from RJ2.2.5, and other MHC class II negative cell lines, such as HeLa, the amount of complex observed was significantly higher than in wild-type Raji cells. Furthermore, the binding activity exhibited by the AR revertant was lower than that of the RJ2.2.5 and higher than that of Raji. The use of specific monoclonal antibodies indicated that in all cases c-Jun and c-Fos or antigenically related proteins were required for binding. An inverse correlation between the level of DNA-protein complex formed and the level of MHC class II gene mRNA expressed in the three cell lines was apparent, suggesting that overexpression of a DNA binding factor forming complexes with class II promoter elements may cause repression of MHC class II transcription. A model which reconciles the previously ascertained recessivity of the phenotype of the mutation carried by RJ2.2.5 with the findings reported here is discussed. Images PMID:8441650

  2. Characterization of the lipopolysaccharide from a Rhizobium phaseoli mutant that is defective in infection thread development.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, R W; Kalembasa, S; Turowski, D; Pachori, P; Noel, K D

    1987-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from a Rhizobium phaseoli mutant, CE109, was isolated and compared with that of its wild-type parent, CE3. A previous report has shown that the mutant is defective in infection thread development, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows that it has an altered LPS (K. D. Noel, K. A. VandenBosch, and B. Kulpaca, J. Bacteriol. 168:1392-1462, 1986). Mild acid hydrolysis of the CE3 LPS released a polysaccharide and an oligosaccharide, PS1 and PS2, respectively. Mild acid hydrolysis of CE109 LPS released only an oligosaccharide. Chemical and immunochemical analyses showed that CE3-PS1 is the antigenic O chain of this strain and that CE109 LPS does not contain any of the major sugar components of CE3-PS1. CE109 oligosaccharide was identical in composition to CE3-PS2. The lipid A's from both strains were very similar in composition, with only minor quantitative variations. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CE3 and CE109 LPSs showed that CE3 LPS separated into two bands, LPS I and LPS II, while CE109 had two bands which migrated to positions similar to that of LPS II. Immunoblotting with anti-CE3 antiserum showed that LPS I contains the antigenic O chain of CE3, PS1. Anti-CE109 antiserum interacted strongly with both CE109 LPS bands and CE3 LPS II and interacted weakly with CE3 LPS I. Mild-acid hydrolysis of CE3 LPS I, extracted from the polyacrylamide gel, showed that it contained both PS1 and PS2. The results in this report showed that CE109 LPS consists of only the lipid A core and is missing the antigenic O chain. Images PMID:3667520

  3. Analysis of the DNA replication competence of the xrs-5 mutant cells defective in Ku86.

    PubMed

    Matheos, Diamanto; Novac, Olivia; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2003-01-01

    The radiosensitive mutant xrs-5, a derivative of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K1 cell line, is defective in DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. The defective phenotypes of xrs-5 cells are complemented by the 86 kDa subunit of Ku antigen. OBA is a protein, previously purified from HeLa cells, that binds in a sequence-specific manner to mammalian origins of DNA replication. The DNA-binding subunit of OBA has been identified as Ku86. We tested the xrs-5 cell line for its ability to replicate a mammalian origin-containing plasmid, p186, in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, the p186 episomal DNA replication in transfected xrs-5 cells was reduced by 45% when compared with the CHO K1 cells transfected with p186. In vitro, although total and cytoplasmic cell extracts from xrs-5 cells replicated the p186 with the same efficiency as the parental CHO K1 cell extracts, xrs-5 nuclear extracts did not possess any detectable replication activity. Addition of affinity-purified OBA/Ku restored replication in the xrs-5 nuclear extract reaction. Western blot analyses showed that the levels of other replication proteins (Orc2, PCNA, DNA polymerase epsilon and delta, Primase and Topoisomerase IIalpha) were comparable in both the xrs-5 mutant and CHO K1 wild-type cell lines. In addition, the in vivo association of Ku with the DHFR origin-containing sequence (oribeta) was examined in both the CHO K1 and xrs-5 cell lines by a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Anti-Ku antibodies did not immunoprecipitate a detectable amount of Ku from the xrs-5 cells in the origin-containing sequence, in contrast to the CHO K1 cells, wherein Ku was found to be associated with the oribeta origin. The data implicate Ku antigen in in vivo and in vitro DNA replication and suggest the existence of another protein with Ku-like functions in the xrs-5 cells. PMID:12456721

  4. A prl mutation in SecY suppresses secretion and virulence defects of Listeria monocytogenes secA2 mutants.

    PubMed

    Durack, Juliana; Burke, Thomas P; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2015-03-01

    The bulk of bacterial protein secretion occurs through the conserved SecY translocation channel that is powered by SecA-dependent ATP hydrolysis. Many Gram-positive bacteria, including the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, possess an additional nonessential specialized ATPase, SecA2. SecA2-dependent secretion is required for normal cell morphology and virulence in L. monocytogenes; however, the mechanism of export via this pathway is poorly understood. L. monocytogenes secA2 mutants form rough colonies, have septation defects, are impaired for swarming motility, and form small plaques in tissue culture cells. In this study, 70 spontaneous mutants were isolated that restored swarming motility to L. monocytogenes secA2 mutants. Most of the mutants had smooth colony morphology and septated normally, but all were lysozyme sensitive. Five representative mutants were subjected to whole-genome sequencing. Four of the five had mutations in proteins encoded by the lmo2769 operon that conferred lysozyme sensitivity and increased swarming but did not rescue virulence defects. A point mutation in secY was identified that conferred smooth colony morphology to secA2 mutants, restored wild-type plaque formation, and increased virulence in mice. This secY mutation resembled a prl suppressor known to expand the repertoire of proteins secreted through the SecY translocation complex. Accordingly, the ΔsecA2prlA1 mutant showed wild-type secretion levels of P60, an established SecA2-dependent secreted autolysin. Although the prl mutation largely suppressed almost all of the measurable SecA2-dependent traits, the ΔsecA2prlA1 mutant was still less virulent in vivo than the wild-type strain, suggesting that SecA2 function was still required for pathogenesis. PMID:25535272

  5. Purification of a. beta. -amylase that accumulates in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in starch metabolism. [Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D.; Preiss, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Amylase activity is elevated 5- to 10-fold in leaves of several different Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in starch metabolism when they are grown under a 12-hour photoperiod. Activity is also increased when plants are grown under higher light intensity. It was previously determined that the elevated activity was an extrachloroplastic {beta}-(exo)amylase. Due to the location of this enzyme outside the chloroplast, its function is not known. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity from leaves of both a starchless mutant deficient in plastid phosphoglucomutase and from the wild type using polyethylene glycol fractionation and cyclohexaamylose affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of the {beta}-amylase from both sources was 55,000 daltons as determined by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gel filtration studies indicated that the enzyme was a monomer. The specific activities of the purified protein from mutant and wild-type sources, their substrate specificities, and K{sub m} for amylopectin were identical. Based on these results it was concluded that the mutant contained an increased level of {beta}-amylase protein. Enzyme neutralization studies using a polyclonal antiserum raised to purified {beta}-amylase showed that in each of two starchless mutants, one starch deficient mutant and one starch overproducing mutant, the elevated amylase activity was due to elevated {beta}-amylase protein.

  6. Isolation and characterization of Francisella novicida mutants defective in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cowley, S C; Gray, C J; Nano, F E

    2000-01-01

    In order to identify genes involved in LPS biosynthesis we isolated random mutants generated by transposon insertion in Francisella novicida. The resulting mutant bank yielded mutants with three distinct LPS phenotypes, and three representative mutants were chosen for further study. One mutant that had short O-antigen chains was sensitive to serum; this mutant and one other were more sensitive to killing by deoxycholate than control strains. The third mutant was resistant to deoxycholate killing but slightly sensitive to serum. The three mutants varied in their ability to grow in macrophages. The DNA sequences interrupted by the transposon in two of the three mutants showed similarity to known LPS biosynthetic genes at the deduced amino acid level. PMID:10612732

  7. Medicago truncatula Mtha1-2 mutants loose metabolic responses to mycorrhizal colonization.

    PubMed

    Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Sieh, Daniela; Zöller, Daniela; Hoefgen, Rainer; Krajinski, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    Bidirectional nutrient transfer is one of the key features of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Recently we were able to identify a Medicago truncatula mutant (mtha1-2) that is defective in the uptake of phosphate from the periarbuscular space due to a lack of the energy providing proton gradient provided by the symbiosis specific proton ATPase MtHA1 In order to further characterize the impact of fungal colonization on the plant metabolic status, without the beneficial aspect of improved mineral nutrition, we performed leaf ion analyses in mutant and wildtype plants with and without fungal colonization. Although frequency of fungal colonization was unaltered, the mutant did not show a positive growth response to mycorrhizal colonization. This indicates that nutrient transfer into the plant cell fails in the truncated arbuscules due to lacking expression of a functional MtHA1 protein. The leaves of wildtype plants showed clear metabolic responses to root mycorrhizal colonization, whereas no changes of leaf metabolite levels of mycorrhizal mtha1-2 plants were detected, even though they were colonized. These results show that MtHa1 is indispensable for a functional mycorrhizal symbiosis and, moreover, suggest that fungal root colonization per se does not depend on nutrient transfer to the plant host. PMID:25751449

  8. Isolation and characterisation of transport-defective substrate-binding mutants of the tetracycline antiporter TetA(B).

    PubMed

    Wright, David J; Tate, Christopher G

    2015-10-01

    The tetracycline antiporter TetA(B) is a member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily which confers tetracycline resistance to cells by coupling the efflux of tetracycline to the influx of protons down their chemical potential gradient. Although it is a medically important transporter, its structure has yet to be determined. One possibility for why this has proven difficult is that the transporter may be conformationally heterogeneous in the purified state. To overcome this, we developed two strategies to rapidly identify TetA(B) mutants that were transport-defective and that could still bind tetracycline. Up to 9 amino acid residues could be deleted from the loop between transmembrane α-helices 6 and 7 with only a slight decrease in affinity of tetracycline binding as measured by isothermal titration calorimetry, although the mutant was transport-defective. Scanning mutagenesis where all the residues between 2 and 389 were mutated to either valine, alanine or glycine (VAG scan) identified 15 mutants that were significantly impaired in tetracycline transport. Of these mutants, 12 showed no evidence of tetracycline binding by isothermal titration calorimetry performed on the purified transporters. In contrast, the mutants G44V and G346V bound tetracycline 4-5 fold more weakly than TetA(B), with Kds of 28 μM and 36 μM, respectively, whereas the mutant R70G bound tetracycline 3-fold more strongly (Kd 2.1 μM). Systematic mutagenesis is thus an effective strategy for isolating transporter mutants that may be conformationally constrained and which represent attractive targets for crystallisation and structure determination. PMID:26143388

  9. A lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-resistant mutant isolated from a macrophagelike cell line, J774.1, exhibits an altered activated-macrophage phenotype in response to LPS.

    PubMed

    Amano, F; Akamatsu, Y

    1991-06-01

    A bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-resistant mutant was isolated from murine macrophagelike cell line J774.1. The mutant showed selective resistance to LPS and lipid A and was almost 10(5)- to 10(6)-fold more resistant than the parent; it grew even in the presence of 1 mg of Escherichia coli O55:B5 LPS per liter, whereas the parent did not grow with less than 10 ng of LPS per milliliter. We next examined the mutant for activation of various functions of macrophages on LPS treatment. This LPS-resistant mutant secreted interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor almost as effectively as the parent did. The mutant cells also changed transiently from a round to a spread form; however, they became round again afterwards. The mutant cells secreted less arachidonic acid in response to LPS. These results also suggest that this LPS-resistant mutant responds to LPS and shows activation of some macrophage functions. However, this mutant did not exhibit elevation of O2- generation or H2O2 generation after LPS treatment. Also, treatment of the mutant cells with murine recombinant gamma interferon was partly able to correct the defect in O(2-)-generating activity in response to LPS, suggesting that this defect is probably due to some of the LPS signal pathways. This implies that there is some correlation between O2- metabolism in LPS-activated macrophages and decreases in cell growth and viability. PMID:1645329

  10. Functional complementation of a nitrate reductase defective mutant of a green alga Dunaliella viridis by introducing the nitrate reductase gene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Gao, Xiaoshu; Li, Qiyun; Zhang, Qingqi; Xu, Zhengkai

    2006-08-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes NAD (P) H dependent reduction of nitrate to nitrite. Transformation systems have been established in several species of green algae by nitrate reductase gene functional complementation. In this report, an endogenous NR cDNA (3.4 kb) and a genomic fragment (14.6 kb) containing the NR gene (DvNIA1) were isolated from the D. viridis cDNA and genomic libraries respectively. Southern blot and Northern blot analyses showed that this gene exists as a single copy in D. viridis and is induced by nitrate. To obtain a NR defective mutant as a recipient strain, D. viridis cells were treated with a chemical mutagen and then cultured on a chlorate-containing plate to enrich chlorate tolerant mutants. Southern analysis showed that one isolate, B14, had a deletion in the DvNIA1 gene region. Using electroporation conditions determined in this laboratory, plasmid pDVNR containing the intact DvNIA1 gene has been electroporated into the defective mutant B14. Strains retaining a nitrate assimilation phenotype were obtained from nitrate plates after spreading the electroporated cells. In some individual strains, transcription of the introduced gene was detected. NR activity in these strains was slightly higher than that in the defective B14 cell, but excretion of nitrite into culture media was almost as high as that of the wild-type cell. Possible episomal presence of the introduced DNA in D. viridis is discussed. PMID:16797881

  11. Unbalance of L-lysine flux in Corynebacterium glutamicum and its use for the isolation of excretion-defective mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Vrljic, M; Kronemeyer, W; Sahm, H; Eggeling, L

    1995-01-01

    We found that the simple addition of L-methionine to the wild type of Corynebacterium glutamicum results in excretion of the cellular building block L-lysine up to rates of 2.5 nmol/min/mg (dry weight). Biochemical analyses revealed that L-methionine represses the homoserine dehydrogenase activity and reduces the intracellular L-threonine level from 7 to less than 2 mM. Since L-lysine synthesis is regulated mainly by L-threonine (plus L-lysine) availability, the result is enhanced flux towards L-lysine. This indicates a delicate and not well controlled type of flux control at the branch point of aspartate semialdehyde conversion to either L-lysine or L-threonine, probably due to the absence of isoenzymes in C. glutamicum. The inducible system of L-lysine excretion discovered was used to isolate mutants defective in the excretion of this amino acid. One such mutant characterized in detail accumulated 174 mM L-lysine in its cytosol without extracellular excretion of L-lysine, whereas the wild type accumulated 53 mM L-lysine in the cytosol and 5.9 mM L-lysine in the medium. The mutant was unaffected in L-lysine uptake or L-isoleucine or L-glutamate excretion, and also the membrane potential was unaltered. This mutant therefore represents a strain with a defect in an excretion system for the primary metabolite L-lysine. PMID:7608075

  12. Genetic control of chromosome breakage and rejoining in Drosophila melanogaster: spontaneous chromosome aberrations in X-linked mutants defective in DNA metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, M

    1979-01-01

    Eight X-linked recombination-defective meiotic mutants (representing five loci) and 12 X-linked mutagen-sensitive mutants (representing seven loci) of Drosophila melanogaster have been examined cytologically in neuroblast metaphases for their effects on the frequencies and types of spontaneous chromosome aberrations. Twelve mutants, representing five loci, significantly increase the frequency of chromosomal aberrations. The mutants at these five loci, however, differ markedly both in the types of aberrations produced and the localization of their effects along the chromosome. According to these criteria, the mutants can be assigned to four groups: (i) mutants producing almost exclusively chromatid breaks in both euchromatin and heterochromatin; (ii) mutants producing chromatid and isochromatid breaks in both euchromatin and heterochromatin; (iii) mutants producing chromatid mutants producing chromatid and isochromatid breaks clustered in the heterochromatin. Images PMID:108678

  13. A Carotenoid-Deficient Mutant in Pantoea sp. YR343, a Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, Is Defective in Root Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Bible, Amber N.; Fletcher, Sarah J.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Jawdy, Sara S.; Weston, David J.; Engle, Nancy L.; Tschaplinski, Timothy; Masyuko, Rachel; Polisetti, Sneha; Bohn, Paul W.; Coutinho, Teresa A.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    The complex interactions between plants and their microbiome can have a profound effect on the health and productivity of the plant host. A better understanding of the microbial mechanisms that promote plant health and stress tolerance will enable strategies for improving the productivity of economically important plants. Pantoea sp. YR343 is a motile, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the roots of Populus deltoides that possesses the ability to solubilize phosphate and produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Pantoea sp. YR343 readily colonizes plant roots and does not appear to be pathogenic when applied to the leaves or roots of selected plant hosts. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in plant association and rhizosphere survival by Pantoea sp. YR343, we constructed a mutant in which the crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was deleted. Phytoene synthase is responsible for converting geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to phytoene, an important precursor to the production of carotenoids. As predicted, the ΔcrtB mutant is defective in carotenoid production, and shows increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, we find that the ΔcrtB mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and production of IAA. Finally we demonstrate that the ΔcrtB mutant shows reduced colonization of plant roots. Taken together, these data suggest that carotenoids are important for plant association and/or rhizosphere survival in Pantoea sp. YR343. PMID:27148182

  14. A Carotenoid-Deficient Mutant in Pantoea sp. YR343, a Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, Is Defective in Root Colonization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bible, Amber; Fletcher, Sarah J; Pelletier, Dale A; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Jawdy, Sara; Weston, David; Engle, Nancy L.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Masyuko, Rachel; Polisetti, Sneha; et al

    2016-04-18

    The complex interactions between plants and their microbiome can have a profound effect on the health and productivity of the plant host. A better understanding of the microbial mechanisms that promote plant health and stress tolerance will enable strategies for improving the productivity of economically-important plants. Pantoea sp. YR343 is a motile, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the roots of Populus deltoides that possesses the ability to solubilize phosphate and produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid. Pantoea sp. YR343 readily colonizes plant roots and does not appear to be pathogenic when applied to the leaves or roots of selected plant hosts. Tomore » better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in plant association and rhizosphere survival by Pantoea sp. YR343, we constructed a mutant in which the crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was deleted. Phytoene synthase is responsible for converting geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to phytoene, an important precursor to the production of carotenoids. As predicted, the ΔcrtB mutant is defective in carotenoid production, and shows increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, we find that the ΔcrtB mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Finally we demonstrate that the ΔcrtB mutant shows reduced colonization of plant roots. Taken together, these data suggest that carotenoids are important for plant association and/or rhizosphere survival in Pantoea sp. YR343.« less

  15. A Carotenoid-Deficient Mutant in Pantoea sp. YR343, a Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, Is Defective in Root Colonization.

    PubMed

    Bible, Amber N; Fletcher, Sarah J; Pelletier, Dale A; Schadt, Christopher W; Jawdy, Sara S; Weston, David J; Engle, Nancy L; Tschaplinski, Timothy; Masyuko, Rachel; Polisetti, Sneha; Bohn, Paul W; Coutinho, Teresa A; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    The complex interactions between plants and their microbiome can have a profound effect on the health and productivity of the plant host. A better understanding of the microbial mechanisms that promote plant health and stress tolerance will enable strategies for improving the productivity of economically important plants. Pantoea sp. YR343 is a motile, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the roots of Populus deltoides that possesses the ability to solubilize phosphate and produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Pantoea sp. YR343 readily colonizes plant roots and does not appear to be pathogenic when applied to the leaves or roots of selected plant hosts. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in plant association and rhizosphere survival by Pantoea sp. YR343, we constructed a mutant in which the crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was deleted. Phytoene synthase is responsible for converting geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to phytoene, an important precursor to the production of carotenoids. As predicted, the ΔcrtB mutant is defective in carotenoid production, and shows increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, we find that the ΔcrtB mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and production of IAA. Finally we demonstrate that the ΔcrtB mutant shows reduced colonization of plant roots. Taken together, these data suggest that carotenoids are important for plant association and/or rhizosphere survival in Pantoea sp. YR343. PMID:27148182

  16. Suppression of proliferative defects associated with processing-defective lamin A mutants by hTERT or inactivation of p53.

    PubMed

    Kudlow, Brian A; Stanfel, Monique N; Burtner, Christopher R; Johnston, Elijah D; Kennedy, Brian K

    2008-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare, debilitating disease with early mortality and rapid onset of aging-associated pathologies. It is linked to mutations in LMNA, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins. The most frequent HGPS-associated LMNA mutation results in a protein, termed progerin, with an internal 50 amino acid deletion and, unlike normal A-type lamins, stable farnesylation. The cellular consequences of progerin expression underlying the HGPS phenotype remain poorly understood. Here, we stably expressed lamin A mutants, including progerin, in otherwise identical primary human fibroblasts to compare the effects of different mutants on nuclear morphology and cell proliferation. We find that expression of progerin leads to inhibition of proliferation in a high percentage of cells and slightly premature senescence in the population. Expression of a stably farnesylated mutant of lamin A phenocopied the immediate proliferative defects but did not result in premature senescence. Either p53 inhibition or, more surprisingly, expression of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) suppressed the early proliferative defects associated with progerin expression. These findings lead us to propose that progerin may interfere with telomere structure or metabolism in a manner suppressible by increased telomerase levels and possibly link mechanisms leading to progeroid phenotypes to those of cell immortalization. PMID:18843043

  17. SPN1, a conserved gene identified by suppression of a postrecruitment-defective yeast TATA-binding protein mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Fischbeck, Julie A; Kraemer, Susan M; Stargell, Laurie A

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about TATA-binding protein (TBP) functions after recruitment to the TATA element, although several TBP mutants display postrecruitment defects. Here we describe a genetic screen for suppressors of a postrecruitment-defective TBP allele. Suppression was achieved by a single point mutation in a previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, SPN1 (suppresses postrecruitment functions gene number 1). SPN1 is an essential yeast gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. The suppressing mutation in SPN1 substitutes an asparagine for an invariant lysine at position 192 (spn1(K192N)). The spn1(K192N) strain is able to suppress additional alleles of TBP that possess postrecruitment defects, but not a TBP allele that is postrecruitment competent. In addition, Spn1p does not stably associate with TFIID in vivo. Cells containing the spn1(K192N) allele exhibit a temperature-sensitive phenotype and some defects in activated transcription, whereas constitutive transcription appears relatively robust in the mutant background. Consistent with an important role in postrecruitment functions, transcription from the CYC1 promoter, which has been shown to be regulated by postrecruitment mechanisms, is enhanced in spn1(K192N) cells. Moreover, we find that SPN1 is a member of the SPT gene family, further supporting a functional requirement for the SPN1 gene product in transcriptional processes. PMID:12524336

  18. Kharon1 Null Mutants of Leishmania mexicana Are Avirulent in Mice and Exhibit a Cytokinesis Defect within Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Marco A.; Valli, Jessica; Gluenz, Eva; Landfear, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    In a variety of eukaryotes, flagella play important roles both in motility and as sensory organelles that monitor the extracellular environment. In the parasitic protozoan Leishmania mexicana, one glucose transporter isoform, LmxGT1, is targeted selectively to the flagellar membrane where it appears to play a role in glucose sensing. Trafficking of LmxGT1 to the flagellar membrane is dependent upon interaction with the KHARON1 protein that is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme. Remarkably, while Δkharon1 null mutants are viable as insect stage promastigotes, they are unable to survive as amastigotes inside host macrophages. Although Δkharon1 promastigotes enter macrophages and transform into amastigotes, these intracellular parasites are unable to execute cytokinesis and form multinucleate cells before dying. Notably, extracellular axenic amastigotes of Δkharon1 mutants replicate and divide normally, indicating a defect in the mutants that is only exhibited in the intra-macrophage environment. Although the flagella of Δkharon1 amastigotes adhere to the phagolysomal membrane of host macrophages, the morphology of the mutant flagella is often distorted. Additionally, these null mutants are completely avirulent following injection into BALB/c mice, underscoring the critical role of the KHARON1 protein for viability of intracellular amastigotes and disease in the animal model of leishmaniasis. PMID:26266938

  19. INI1/hSNF5-interaction defective HIV-1 IN mutants exhibit impaired particle morphology, reverse transcription and integration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Retroviral integrase catalyzes integration of viral DNA into the host genome. Integrase interactor (INI)1/hSNF5 is a host factor that binds to HIV-1 IN within the context of Gag-Pol and is specifically incorporated into HIV-1 virions during assembly. Previous studies have indicated that INI1/hSNF5 is required for late events in vivo and for integration in vitro. To determine the effects of disrupting the IN-INI1 interaction on the assembly and infectivity of HIV-1 particles, we isolated mutants of IN that are defective for binding to INI1/hSNF5 and tested their effects on HIV-1 replication. Results A reverse yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify INI1-interaction defective IN mutants (IID-IN). Since protein-protein interactions depend on the surface residues, the IID-IN mutants that showed high surface accessibility on IN crystal structures (K71R, K111E, Q137R, D202G, and S147G) were selected for further study. In vitro interaction studies demonstrated that IID-IN mutants exhibit variable degrees of interaction with INI1. The mutations were engineered into HIV-1NL4-3 and HIV-Luc viruses and tested for their effects on virus replication. HIV-1 harboring IID-IN mutations were defective for replication in both multi- and single-round infection assays. The infectivity defects were correlated to the degree of INI1 interaction of the IID-IN mutants. Highly defective IID-IN mutants were blocked at early and late reverse transcription, whereas partially defective IID-IN mutants proceeded through reverse transcription and nuclear localization, but were partially impaired for integration. Electron microscopic analysis of mutant particles indicated that highly interaction-defective IID-IN mutants produced morphologically aberrant virions, whereas the partially defective mutants produced normal virions. All of the IID-IN mutant particles exhibited normal capsid stability and reverse transcriptase activity in vitro. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that a

  20. C. elegans ten-1 is synthetic lethal with mutations in cytoskeleton regulators, and enhances many axon guidance defective mutants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Teneurins are transmembrane proteins that assist morphogenetic processes in many organisms. ten-1 is the C. elegans teneurin homolog with two transcripts, ten-1a and ten-1b, that respectively encode a long (TEN-1L) and short (TEN-1S) form of the protein. We previously isolated a C. elegans mutant where one pharyngeal neuron was frequently misplaced, and now show that it corresponds to a novel allele of ten-1. Results The novel ten-1(et5) allele is a hypomorph since its post-embryonic phenotype is weaker than the null alleles ten-1(ok641) and ten-1(tm651). ten-1 mutants have defects in all pharyngeal neurons that we examined, and in vivo reporters show that only the long form of the ten-1 gene is expressed in the pharynx, specifically in six marginal cells and the M2 neurons. Defects in the pharyngeal M2 neurons were enhanced when the ten-1(ok641) mutation was combined with mutations in the following genes: mig-14, unc-5, unc-51, unc-52 and unc-129. None of the body neurons examined show any defects in the ten-1(ok641) mutant, but genetic interaction studies reveal that ten-1(ok641) is synthetic lethal with sax-3, unc-34 and unc-73, and examination of the hypodermal cells in embryos of the ten-1(ok641) mutant point to a role of ten-1 during hypodermal cell morphogenesis. Conclusions Our results are consistent with ten-1 normally providing a function complementary to the cytoskeletal remodeling processes that occur in migrating cells or cells undergoing morphogenesis. It is possible that ten-1 influences the composition/distribution of extracellular matrix. PMID:20497576

  1. A Laboratory Exercise for Isolation and Characterizing Microbial Mutants with Metabolic Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doe, Frank J.; Leslie, John F.

    1993-01-01

    Describes science experiments for undergraduate biology instruction on the concepts of mutation and characterization of the resulting mutant strains. The filamentous fungi "Fusarium moniliforme" is used to illustrate the induction of mutants (mutagenesis), identification of the mutated gene, construction of a biochemical pathway, and genetic…

  2. pH-Responsive Pharmacological Chaperones for Rescuing Mutant Glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Mena-Barragán, Teresa; Narita, Aya; Matias, Dino; Tiscornia, Gustavo; Nanba, Eiji; Ohno, Kousaku; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Higaki, Katsumi; Garcia Fernández, José Manuel; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen

    2015-09-28

    A general approach is reported for the design of small-molecule competitive inhibitors of lysosomal glycosidases programmed to 1) promote correct folding of mutant enzymes at the endoplasmic reticulum, 2) facilitate trafficking, and 3) undergo dissociation and self-inactivation at the lysosome. The strategy is based on the incorporation of an orthoester segment into iminosugar conjugates to switch the nature of the aglycone moiety from hydrophobic to hydrophilic in the pH 7 to pH 5 window, which has a dramatic effect on the enzyme binding affinity. As a proof of concept, new highly pH-responsive glycomimetics targeting human glucocerebrosidase or α-galactosidase with strong potential as pharmacological chaperones for Gaucher or Fabry disease, respectively, were developed. PMID:26386364

  3. Two distinct genetic loci regulating class II gene expression are defective in human mutant and patient cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Accolla, R S; Pious, D; Zegers, B J; Strominger, J L

    1988-01-01

    Heterokaryons were prepared and analyzed shortly after cell fusion using two mutant class-II-negative human B cell lines (RJ 2.2.5 and 6.1.6) and a cell line (TF) from a patient with a class-II-negative Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome. The resulting transient heterokaryons were analyzed by using an anti-HLA-DR monoclonal antibody to assess the cell surface expression of HLA-DR (the major subtype of class II antigens) by immunofluorescence microscopy and by using uniformly 32P-labeled SP6 RNA probes in Northern blots and RNase protection assays to assess mRNA synthesis. We find that class II gene expression in a B cell line from a Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome patient (TF) is rescued by a B cell line which expresses class II antigens indicating that this disease, at least in part, is caused by a defect(s) in a genetic locus encoding a factor(s) necessary for class II gene expression. Secondly, reciprocal genetic complementation was demonstrated in the heterokaryons 6.1.6 x RJ 2.2.5 and TF x RJ 2.2.5 (but not in TF x 6.1.6) by detection of cell surface DR by immunofluorescence microscopy and by a novel class II mRNA typing technique which allows characterization of distinct class II alleles. Thus, the two mutants generated in vitro have defects at two different genetic loci encoding specific regulatory factors necessary for human class II gene expression. One of these mutant cell lines, but not the other, complements the defect in the patient cell line, TF. Images PMID:2458252

  4. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 Restores the Expression of Auxin-Responsive Genes in Mutant Arabidopsis Leaf Mesophyll ProtoplastsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shucai; Tiwari, Shiv B.; Hagen, Gretchen; Guilfoyle, Tom J.

    2005-01-01

    AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 (ARF7) is one of five ARF transcriptional activators in Arabidopsis thaliana that is proposed to regulate auxin-responsive expression of genes containing TGTCTC auxin response elements in their promoters. An Arabidopsis mutant (nonphototropic hypocotyl4-1 [nph4-1]) that is a null for ARF7 showed strongly reduced expression of integrated auxin-responsive reporter genes and natural genes that were monitored in Arabidopsis leaf mesophyll protoplasts. Expression of the reporter and natural genes was restored in an auxin-dependent manner when protoplasts were transfected with a 35S:ARF7 effector gene, encoding a full-length ARF7 protein. Transfection of effector genes encoding other ARF activators restored auxin-responsive gene expression to varying degrees, but less than that observed with the ARF7 effector gene. Arabidopsis lines that were null for ARF6, ARF8, or ARF19 were not defective in expression of the reporter and natural auxin response genes assayed in mesophyll protoplasts, suggesting that ARF7 plays a major role in regulating expression of a subset of auxin response genes in leaf mesophyll cells. Auxin-responsive gene expression was induced in wild-type protoplasts and restored in nph4-1 protoplasts only with auxin and not with other hormones, including brassinolide. In the presence of auxin, however, brassinolide modestly enhanced auxin-responsive gene expression. PMID:15923351

  5. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase lambda mutant is mildly sensitive to DNA double strand breaks but defective in integration of a transgene

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tomoyuki; Angelis, Karel J.; Britt, Anne B.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA double-strand break (DSB) is a critical type of damage, and can be induced by both endogenous sources (e.g., errors of oxidative metabolism, transposable elements, programmed meiotic breaks, or perturbation of the DNA replication fork) and exogenous sources (e.g., ionizing radiation or radiomimetic chemicals). Although higher plants, like mammals, are thought to preferentially repair DSBs via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), much remains unclear about plant DSB repair pathways. Our reverse genetic approach suggests that DNA polymerase λ is involved in DSB repair in Arabidopsis. The Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant (atpolλ-1) displayed sensitivity to both gamma-irradiation and treatment with radiomimetic reagents, but not to other DNA damaging treatments. The atpolλ-1 mutant showed a moderate sensitivity to DSBs, while Arabidopsis Ku70 and DNA ligase 4 mutants (atku70-3 and atlig4-2), both of which play critical roles in NHEJ, exhibited a hypersensitivity to these treatments. The atpolλ-1/atlig4-2 double mutant exhibited a higher sensitivity to DSBs than each single mutant, but the atku70/atpolλ-1 showed similar sensitivity to the atku70-3 mutant. We showed that transcription of the DNA ligase 1, DNA ligase 6, and Wee1 genes was quickly induced by BLM in several NHEJ deficient mutants in contrast to wild-type. Finally, the T-DNA transformation efficiency dropped in NHEJ deficient mutants and the lowest transformation efficiency was scored in the atpolλ-1/atlig4-2 double mutant. These results imply that AtPolλ is involved in both DSB repair and DNA damage response pathway. PMID:26074930

  6. Mutants of Phycomyces blakesleeanus Defective in Acetyl-CoA Synthetase

    PubMed

    Garre; Torres-Martinez

    1996-03-01

    Nine mutants of the filamentous fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus have been isolated on the basis of their resistance to fluoroacetate. None of the isolates uses acetate as the sole carbon source. Genetic complementation experiments revealed that all the mutants belong to the same complementation group. Biochemical analysis indicated that the acetate-induced acetyl-CoA synthetase activity is abolished in all nine mutants, thus suggesting that they are affected in the gene coding for acetyl-CoA synthetase (facA). PMID:8812287

  7. Characterization and virulence properties of Erwinia chrysanthemi lipopolysaccharide-defective, phi EC2-resistant mutants.

    PubMed

    Schoonejans, E; Expert, D; Toussaint, A

    1987-09-01

    Outer membrane alterations were characterized in spontaneous mutants of the Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937jRH, which were selected for resistance to bacteriophage phi EC2. All but one of the mutants analyzed were affected in their lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure, lacking the entire heterogeneous region of apparent high molecular weight present in the wild-type E. chrysanthemi LPS. At least two 3937jRH mutants, one selected as phi EC2 resistant (RH6065) and the other previously selected (D. Expert and A. Toussaint, J. Bacteriol. 163:221-227, 1985) as bacteriocin resistant (R1456), were cross-resistant to bacteriophage Mu and had rough LPSs with an altered core structure. Two phi EC2r mutants (RH6053 and RH6065) were most severely affected in their outer membrane integrity and also lost their virulence on saintpaulia plants, although they still possessed normal extracellular levels of pectinolytic and cellulolytic activities. The two Mur mutants RH6065 and R1456 were also able to induce systemic resistance in the challenged plant. All the other phi EC2r mutants retained the virulence of 393jRH. PMID:3624200

  8. An update to the list of mouse mutants with neural tube closure defects and advances toward a complete genetic perspective of neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Harris, Muriel J; Juriloff, Diana M

    2010-08-01

    The number of mouse mutants and strains with neural tube defects (NTDs) now exceeds 240, including 205 representing specific genes, 30 for unidentified genes, and 9 multifactorial strains. These mutants identify genes needed for embryonic neural tube closure. Reports of 50 new NTD mutants since our 2007 review (Harris and Juriloff, 2007) were considered in relation to the previously reviewed mutants to obtain new insights into mechanisms of NTD etiology. In addition to null mutations, some are hypomorphs or conditional mutants. Some mutations do not cause NTDs on their own, but do so in digenic, trigenic, and oligogenic combinations, an etiology that likely parallels the nature of genetic etiology of human NTDs. Mutants that have only exencephaly are fourfold more frequent than those that have spina bifida aperta with or without exencephaly. Many diverse cellular functions and biochemical pathways are involved; the NTD mutants draw new attention to chromatin modification (epigenetics), the protease-activated receptor cascade, and the ciliopathies. Few mutants directly involve folate metabolism. Prevention of NTDs by maternal folate supplementation has been tested in 13 mutants and reduces NTD frequency in six diverse mutants. Inositol reduces spina bifida aperta frequency in the curly tail mutant, and three new mutants involve inositol metabolism. The many NTD mutants are the foundation for a future complete genetic understanding of the processes of neural fold elevation and fusion along mechanistically distinct cranial-caudal segments of the neural tube, and they point to several candidate processes for study in human NTD etiology. PMID:20740593

  9. A Glycosylation Mutant of Trypanosoma brucei Links Social Motility Defects In Vitro to Impaired Colonization of Tsetse Flies In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Imhof, Simon; Vu, Xuan Lan; Bütikofer, Peter; Roditi, Isabel

    2015-06-01

    Transmission of African trypanosomes by tsetse flies requires that the parasites migrate out of the midgut lumen and colonize the ectoperitrophic space. Early procyclic culture forms correspond to trypanosomes in the lumen; on agarose plates they exhibit social motility, migrating en masse as radial projections from an inoculation site. We show that an Rft1(-/-) mutant needs to reach a greater threshold number before migration begins, and that it forms fewer projections than its wild-type parent. The mutant is also up to 4 times less efficient at establishing midgut infections. Ectopic expression of Rft1 rescues social motility defects and restores the ability to colonize the fly. These results are consistent with social motility reflecting movement to the ectoperitrophic space, implicate N-glycans in the signaling cascades for migration in vivo and in vitro, and provide the first evidence that parasite-parasite interactions determine the success of transmission by the insect host. PMID:25862152

  10. A Porphyromonas gingivalis Mutant Defective in a Putative Glycosyltransferase Exhibits Defective Biosynthesis of the Polysaccharide Portions of Lipopolysaccharide, Decreased Gingipain Activities, Strong Autoaggregation, and Increased Biofilm Formation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Mikiyo; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Noiri, Yuichiro; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Nakayama, Koji

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen in periodontal disease, one of the biofilm-caused infectious diseases. The bacterium possesses potential virulence factors, including fimbriae, proteinases, hemagglutinin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and outer membrane vesicles, and some of these factors are associated with biofilm formation; however, the precise mechanism of biofilm formation is still unknown. Colonial pigmentation of the bacterium on blood agar plates is related to its virulence. In this study, we isolated a nonpigmented mutant that had an insertion mutation within the new gene PGN_1251 (gtfB) by screening a transposon insertion library. The gene shares homology with genes encoding glycosyltransferase 1 of several bacteria. The gtfB mutant was defective in biosynthesis of both LPSs containing O side chain polysaccharide (O-LPS) and anionic polysaccharide (A-LPS). The defect in the gene resulted in a complete loss of surface-associated gingipain proteinases, strong autoaggregation, and a marked increase in biofilm formation, suggesting that polysaccharide portions of LPSs influence attachment of gingipain proteinases to the cell surface, autoaggregation, and biofilm formation of P. gingivalis. PMID:20624909

  11. Rescue of mutant fitness defects using in vitro reconstituted designer transposons in Mycoplasma mycoides

    PubMed Central

    Karas, Bogumil J.; Wise, Kim S.; Sun, Lijie; Venter, J. Craig; Glass, John I.; Hutchison, Clyde A.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Suzuki, Yo

    2014-01-01

    With only hundreds of genes contained within their genomes, mycoplasmas have become model organisms for precise understanding of cellular processes, as well as platform organisms for predictable engineering of microbial functions for mission-critical applications. Despite the availability of “whole genome writing” in Mycoplasma mycoides, some traditional methods for genetic engineering are underdeveloped in mycoplasmas. Here we demonstrate two facile transposon-mediated approaches for introducing genes into the synthetic cell based on M. mycoides. The marker-less approach involves preparing a fragment containing only a small genomic region of interest with flanking transposase-binding sites, followed by in vitro transposase loading and introduction into the cells. The marker-driven approach involves cloning an open reading frame (ORF) of interest into a vector containing a marker for mycoplasma transformation, as well as sites for transposase loading and random genomic integration. An innovative feature of this construct is to use a single promoter to express the transformation marker and the introduced ORF. The marker-driven approach can be conveniently applied to any exogenous or synthetic gene without any information on the effect of the gene on the strain, whereas the marker-less approach requires that the fragment has a recognizable effect. Using the marker-less method, we found that a region containing the nusG gene rescues a slow growth phenotype of a strain containing a larger deletion encompassing this gene. Using the marker-driven approach, we better defined this finding, thereby establishing that nusG is required for a normal growth rate in synthetic M. mycoides. These methods are suitable for complementation tests to identify genes responsible for assorted functions lacking in deletion mutants. These approaches are also expected to facilitate rapid testing of various natural and engineered genes or gene clusters from numerous sources in M. mycoides

  12. Maize reas1 Mutant Stimulates Ribosome Use Efficiency and Triggers Distinct Transcriptional and Translational Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Weiwei; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Qun; Li, Xia; Yao, Dongsheng; Jin, Ying; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental cellular process in all cells. Impaired ribosome biogenesis causes developmental defects; however, its molecular and cellular bases are not fully understood. We cloned a gene responsible for a maize (Zea mays) small seed mutant, dek* (for defective kernel), and found that it encodes Ribosome export associated1 (ZmReas1). Reas1 is an AAA-ATPase that controls 60S ribosome export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after ribosome maturation. dek* is a weak mutant allele with decreased Reas1 function. In dek* cells, mature 60S ribosome subunits are reduced in the nucleus and cytoplasm, but the proportion of actively translating polyribosomes in cytosol is significantly increased. Reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and the increased elongation factor 1α level indicate an enhancement of general translational efficiency in dek* cells. The mutation also triggers dramatic changes in differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs. Discrepancy was observed between differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs, indicating distinct cellular responses at transcription and translation levels to the stress of defective ribosome processing. DNA replication and nucleosome assembly-related gene expression are selectively suppressed at the translational level, resulting in inhibited cell growth and proliferation in dek* cells. This study provides insight into cellular responses due to impaired ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26645456

  13. Uncovering DELLA-Independent Gibberellin Responses by Characterizing New Tomato procera Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Livne, Sivan; Lor, Vai S.; Nir, Ido; Eliaz, Natanella; Aharoni, Asaph; Olszewski, Neil E.; Eshed, Yuval; Weiss, David

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellin (GA) regulates plant development primarily by triggering the degradation/deactivation of the DELLA proteins. However, it remains unclear whether all GA responses are regulated by DELLAs. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has a single DELLA gene named PROCERA (PRO), and its recessive pro allele exhibits constitutive GA activity but retains responsiveness to external GA. In the loss-of-function mutant proΔGRAS, all examined GA developmental responses were considerably enhanced relative to pro and a defect in seed desiccation tolerance was uncovered. As pro, but not proΔGRAS, elongation was promoted by GA treatment, pro may retain residual DELLA activity. In agreement with homeostatic feedback regulation of the GA biosynthetic pathway, we found that GA20oxidase1 expression was suppressed in proΔGRAS and was not affected by exogenous GA3. In contrast, expression of GA2oxidase4 was not affected by the elevated GA signaling in proΔGRAS but was strongly induced by exogenous GA3. Since a similar response was found in Arabidopsis thaliana plants with impaired activity of all five DELLA genes, we suggest that homeostatic GA responses are regulated by both DELLA-dependent and -independent pathways. Transcriptome analysis of GA-treated proΔGRAS leaves suggests that 5% of all GA-regulated genes in tomato are DELLA independent. PMID:26036254

  14. Mouse Slc9a8 Mutants Exhibit Retinal Defects Due to Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jadeja, Shalini; Barnard, Alun R.; McKie, Lisa; Cross, Sally H.; White, Jacqueline K.; Robertson, Morag; Budd, Peter S.; MacLaren, Robert E.; Jackson, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. As part of a large scale systematic screen to determine the effects of gene knockout mutations in mice, a retinal phenotype was found in mice lacking the Slc9a8 gene, encoding the sodium/hydrogen ion exchange protein NHE8. We aimed to characterize the mutant phenotype and the role of sodium/hydrogen ion exchange in retinal function. Methods. Detailed histology characterized the pathological consequences of Slc9a8 mutation, and retinal function was assessed by electroretinography (ERG). A conditional allele was used to identify the cells in which NHE8 function is critical for retinal function, and mutant cells analyzed for the effect of the mutation on endosomes. Results. Histology of mutant retinas reveals a separation of photoreceptors from the RPE and infiltration by macrophages. There is a small reduction in photoreceptor length and a mislocalization of visual pigments. The ERG testing reveals a deficit in rod and cone pathway function. The RPE shows abnormal morphology, and mutation of Slc9a8 in only RPE cells recapitulates the mutant phenotype. The NHE8 protein localizes to endosomes, and mutant cells have much smaller recycling endosomes. Conclusions. The NHE8 protein is required in the RPE to maintain correct regulation of endosomal volume and/or pH which is essential for the cellular integrity and subsequent function of RPE. PMID:25736793

  15. Endogenic oxidative stress response contributes to glutathione over-accumulation in mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y518.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yibo; Sun, Jiang; Zhu, Yingyue; Wang, Limei; Qi, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Mechanisms of glutathione (GSH) over-accumulation in mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y518 screened by ultraviolet and nitrosoguanidine-induced random mutagenesis were studied. Y518 accumulated higher levels of GSH and L-cysteine than its wild-type strain. RNA-Seq and pathway enrichment analysis indicated a difference in the expression of key genes involved in cysteine production, the GSH biosynthesis pathway, and antioxidation processes. GSH1, MET17, CYS4, GPX2, CTT1, TRX2, and SOD1 and the transcriptional activators SKN7 and YAP1 were up-regulated in the mutant. Moreover, Y518 showed a dysfunctional respiratory chain resulting from dramatically weakened activity of complex III and significant elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. The supplementation of antimycin A in the culture of the parent strain showed equivalent changes of ROS and GSH level. This study indicates that defective complex III prompts abundant endogenic ROS generation, which triggers an oxidative stress response and upregulation of gene expression associated with GSH biosynthesis. This finding may be helpful for developing new strategies for GSH fermentation process optimization or metabolic engineering. PMID:25998657

  16. Defects and rescue of the minor salivary glands in Eda pathway mutants.

    PubMed

    Wells, K L; Mou, C; Headon, D J; Tucker, A S

    2011-01-15

    Despite their importance to oral health, the mechanisms of minor salivary gland (SG) development are largely unexplored. Here we present in vivo and in vitro analyses of developing minor SGs in wild type and mutant mice. Eda, Shh and Fgf signalling pathway genes are expressed in these glands from an early stage of development. Developing minor SGs are absent in Eda pathway mutant embryos, and these mice exhibit a dysplastic circumvallate papilla with disrupted Shh expression. Supplementation of Eda pathway mutant minor SG explants with recombinant EDA rescues minor SG induction. Supplementation with Fgf8 or Shh, previously reported targets of Eda signalling, leads to induction of gland like structures in a few cases, but these fail to develop into minor SGs. PMID:20969842

  17. Lactose permease of Escherichia coli: properties of mutants defective in substrate translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Overath, P; Weigel, U; Neuhaus, J M; Soppa, J; Seckler, R; Riede, I; Bocklage, H; Müller-Hill, B; Aichele, G; Wright, J K

    1987-01-01

    Mutants of lactose permease of Escherichia coli with amino acid changes (Gly-24----Glu; Gly-24----Arg; Pro-28---Ser; Gly-24, Pro-28----Glu-Ser and Gly-24, Pro-28----Arg-Ser) within a putative membrane-spanning alpha-helix (Phe-Gly-Leu-Phe-Phe-Phe-Phe-Tyr-Phe-Phe-Ile-Met-Gly- Ala-Tyr-Phe-Pro-Phe-Phe-Pro-Ile) are incorporated into the cytoplasmic membrane. The mutant proteins retain the ability to bind galactosides, and the affinity for several substrates is actually increased. However, the rate of active transport is decreased to 0.01% of the wild-type rate in the mutants carrying Arg-24 or Arg-24, Ser-28. Kinetic analysis demonstrates that the two mutants require 10 min to cause occupied binding sites for galactoside and H+ to change their exposure from the periplasm to the cytoplasm as compared to 50 ms in the wild type. The effect is less pronounced when these sites are unoccupied. PMID:3303027

  18. Structural alterations of the nucleolus in mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, M; Nogi, Y; Clark, M W; Nomura, M

    1993-01-01

    We have previously constructed mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which the gene for the second-largest subunit of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is deleted. In these mutants, rRNA is synthesized by RNA polymerase II from a hybrid gene consisting of the 35S rRNA coding region fused to the GAL7 promoter on a plasmid. These strains thus grow in galactose but not glucose media. By immunofluorescence microscopy using antibodies against the known nucleolar proteins SSB1 and fibrillarin, we found that the intact crescent-shaped nucleolar structure is absent in these mutants; instead, several granules (called mininucleolar bodies [MNBs]) that stained with these antibodies were seen in the nucleus. Conversion of the intact nucleolar structure to MNBs was also observed in Pol I temperature-sensitive mutants at nonpermissive temperatures. These MNBs may structurally resemble prenucleolar bodies observed in higher eukaryotic cells and may represent a constituent of the normal nucleolus. Furthermore, cells under certain conditions that inhibit rRNA synthesis did not cause conversion of the nucleolus to MNBs. Thus, the role of Pol I in the maintenance of the intact nucleolar structure might include a role as a structural element in addition to (or instead of) a functional role to produce rRNA transcripts. Our study also shows that the intact nucleolar structure is not absolutely required for rRNA processing, ribosome assembly, or cell growth and that MNBs are possibly functional in rRNA processing in the Pol I deletion mutants. Images PMID:8455621

  19. Compromised Catalysis and Potential Folding Defects in in Vitro Studies of Missense Mutants Associated with Hereditary Phosphoglucomutase 1 Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yingying; Stiers, Kyle M.; Kain, Bailee N.; Beamer, Lesa J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have identified phosphoglucomutase 1 (PGM1) deficiency as an inherited metabolic disorder in humans. Affected patients show multiple disease phenotypes, including dilated cardiomyopathy, exercise intolerance, and hepatopathy, reflecting the central role of the enzyme in glucose metabolism. We present here the first in vitro biochemical characterization of 13 missense mutations involved in PGM1 deficiency. The biochemical phenotypes of the PGM1 mutants cluster into two groups: those with compromised catalysis and those with possible folding defects. Relative to the recombinant wild-type enzyme, certain missense mutants show greatly decreased expression of soluble protein and/or increased aggregation. In contrast, other missense variants are well behaved in solution, but show dramatic reductions in enzyme activity, with kcat/Km often <1.5% of wild-type. Modest changes in protein conformation and flexibility are also apparent in some of the catalytically impaired variants. In the case of the G291R mutant, severely compromised activity is linked to the inability of a key active site serine to be phosphorylated, a prerequisite for catalysis. Our results complement previous in vivo studies, which suggest that both protein misfolding and catalytic impairment may play a role in PGM1 deficiency. PMID:25288802

  20. Deletion of a Cys-His motif from the Alpharetrovirus nucleocapsid domain reveals late domain mutant-like budding defects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Linial, Maxine L

    2006-03-30

    The Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag polyprotein is the only protein required for virus assembly and release. We previously found that deletion of either one of the two Cys-His (CH) motifs in the RSV nucleocapsid (NC) protein did not abrogate Gag-Gag interactions, RNA binding, or packaging but greatly reduced virus production (E-G. Lee, A. Alidina et al., J. Virol. 77: 2010-2020, 2003). In this report, we have further investigated the effects of mutations in the CH motifs on virus assembly and release. Precise deletion of either CH motif, without affecting surrounding basic residues, reduced virus production by approximately 10-fold, similar to levels seen for late (L) domain mutants. Strikingly, transmission electron microscopy revealed that virions of both DeltaCH1 and DeltaCH2 mutants were assembled normally at the plasma membrane but were arrested in budding. Virus particles remained tethered to the membrane or to each other, reminiscent of L domain mutants, although the release defect appears to be independent of the L domain functions. Therefore, two CH motifs are likely to be required for budding independent of a requirement for either Gag-Gag interactions or RNA packaging. PMID:16406458

  1. Deletion of a Cys-His motif from the Alpharetrovirus nucleocapsid domain reveals late domain mutant-like budding defects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Linial, Maxine L. . E-mail: mlinial@fhcrc.org

    2006-03-30

    The Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag polyprotein is the only protein required for virus assembly and release. We previously found that deletion of either one of the two Cys-His (CH) motifs in the RSV nucleocapsid (NC) protein did not abrogate Gag-Gag interactions, RNA binding, or packaging but greatly reduced virus production (E-G. Lee, A. Alidina et al., J. Virol. 77: 2010-2020, 2003). In this report, we have further investigated the effects of mutations in the CH motifs on virus assembly and release. Precise deletion of either CH motif, without affecting surrounding basic residues, reduced virus production by approximately 10-fold, similar to levels seen for late (L) domain mutants. Strikingly, transmission electron microscopy revealed that virions of both {delta}CH1 and {delta}CH2 mutants were assembled normally at the plasma membrane but were arrested in budding. Virus particles remained tethered to the membrane or to each other, reminiscent of L domain mutants, although the release defect appears to be independent of the L domain functions. Therefore, two CH motifs are likely to be required for budding independent of a requirement for either Gag-Gag interactions or RNA packaging.

  2. The Cell Wall Arabinose-Deficient Arabidopsis thaliana Mutant murus5 Encodes a Defective Allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2.

    PubMed

    Dugard, Christopher K; Mertz, Rachel A; Rayon, Catherine; Mercadante, Davide; Hart, Christopher; Benatti, Matheus R; Olek, Anna T; SanMiguel, Phillip J; Cooper, Bruce R; Reiter, Wolf-Dieter; McCann, Maureen C; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2016-07-01

    Traditional marker-based mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to determine that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) low cell wall arabinose mutant murus5 (mur5) encodes a defective allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2 (RGP2). Marker analysis of 13 F2 confirmed mutant progeny from a recombinant mapping population gave a rough map position on the upper arm of chromosome 5, and deep sequencing of DNA from these 13 lines gave five candidate genes with G→A (C→T) transitions predicted to result in amino acid changes. Of these five, only insertional mutant alleles of RGP2, a gene that encodes a UDP-arabinose mutase that interconverts UDP-arabinopyranose and UDP-arabinofuranose, exhibited the low cell wall arabinose phenotype. The identities of mur5 and two SALK insertional alleles were confirmed by allelism tests and overexpression of wild-type RGP2 complementary DNA placed under the control of the 35S promoter in the three alleles. The mur5 mutation results in the conversion of cysteine-257 to tyrosine-257 within a conserved hydrophobic cluster predicted to be distal to the active site and essential for protein stability and possible heterodimerization with other isoforms of RGP. PMID:27217494

  3. Unidirectional startle responses and disrupted left-right coordination of motor behaviors in robo3 mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Harold A.; Johnson, Stephen L.; Granato, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Roundabout (Robo) family of receptors and their Slit ligands play well-established roles in axonal guidance, including in humans where horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is caused by mutations in the robo3 gene. While significant progress has been made towards understanding the mechanism by which Robo receptors establish commissural projections in the central nervous system, less is known about how these projections contribute to neural circuits mediating behavior. Here we report cloning of the zebrafish behavioral mutant twitch twice and show that twitch twice encodes robo3. We demonstrate that in mutant hindbrains the axons of an identified pair of neurons, the Mauthner cells, fail to cross the midline. The Mauthner neurons are essential for the startle response, and in twitch twice/robo3 mutants misguidance of the Mauthner axons results in a unidirectional startle response. Moreover, we show that twitch twice mutants exhibit normal visual acuity but display defects in horizontal eye movements, suggesting a specific and critical role for twitch twice/robo3 in sensory guided behavior. PMID:19496826

  4. Re-expression of ABP-120 rescues cytoskeletal, motility, and phagocytosis defects of ABP-120- Dictyostelium mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D; Wessels, D; Soll, D R; Hartwig, J; Condeelis, J

    1996-01-01

    The actin binding protein ABP-120 has been proposed to cross-link actin filaments in nascent pseudopods, in a step required for normal pseudopod extension in motile Dictyostelium amoebae. To test this hypothesis, cell lines that lack ABP-120 were created independently either by chemical mutagenesis or homologous recombination. Different phenotypes were reported in these two studies. The chemical mutant shows only a subtle defect in actin cross-linking, while the homologous recombinant mutants show profound defects in actin cross-linking, cytoskeletal structure, pseudopod number and size, cell motility and chemotaxis and, as shown here, phagocytosis. To resolve the controversy as to what the ABP-120- phenotype is, ABP-120 was re-expressed in an ABP-120- cell line created by homologous recombination. Two independently "rescued" cell lines that express wild-type levels of ABP-120 were analyzed. In both rescued cell lines, actin incorporation into the cytoskeleton, pseudopod formation, cell morphology, instantaneous velocity, phagocytosis, and chemotaxis were restored to wild-type levels. There is no alteration in the expression levels of several related actin binding proteins in either the original ABP-120- cell line or in the rescued cell lines, leading to the conclusion that neither the aberrant phenotype observed in ABP-120- cells nor the normal phenotype reasserted in rescued cells can be attributed to alterations in the levels of other abundant and related actin binding proteins. Re-expression of ABP-120 in ABP-120- cells reestablishes normal structural and behavioral parameters, demonstrating that the severity and properties of the structural and behavioral defects of ABP-120- cell lines produced by homologous recombination are the direct result of the absence of ABP-120. Images PMID:8744952

  5. Correlation of Recombinant Integrase Activity and Functional Preintegration Complex Formation during Acute Infection by Replication-Defective Integrase Mutant Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Koh, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies characterized two types of replication-defective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase mutants: class I, which are specifically blocked at the integration step, and class II, which harbor additional virion production and/or reverse transcription defects. Class I mutant enzymes supported little if any metal ion-dependent 3′-processing and DNA strand transfer activities in vitro, whereas class II enzymes displayed partial or full catalytic function in studies with simplified assay designs, suggesting that defective interaction(s) with heterologous integrase binding proteins might underlie the class II mutant viral phenotype. To address this hypothesis, class I and II mutant enzymes were interrogated under expanded sets of in vitro conditions. The majority failed to catalyze the concerted integration of two viral DNA ends into target DNA, highlighting defective integrase function as the root cause of most class II in addition to all class I mutant virus infection defects. One mutant protein, K264E, in contrast, could support the wild-type level of concerted integration activity. After accounting for its inherent reverse transcription defect, HIV-1K264E moreover formed preintegration complexes that supported the efficient integration of endogenous viral DNA in vitro and normal levels and sequences of 2-long terminal repeat-containing circle junctions during acute infection. K264E integrase furthermore efficiently interacted in vitro with two heterologous binding partners, LEDGF/p75 and reverse transcriptase. Our results underscore the physiological relevance of concerted integration assays for tests of integrase mutant function and suggest that the K264E mutation disrupts an interaction with an intranuclear integrase binding partner that is important for HIV-1 integration. PMID:22278243

  6. Using mycorrhiza-defective mutant genotypes of non-legume plant species to study the formation and functioning of arbuscular mycorrhiza: a review.

    PubMed

    Watts-Williams, Stephanie J; Cavagnaro, Timothy R

    2015-11-01

    A significant challenge facing the study of arbuscular mycorrhiza is the establishment of suitable non-mycorrhizal treatments that can be compared with mycorrhizal treatments. A number of options are available, including soil disinfection or sterilisation, comparison of constitutively mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plant species, comparison of plants grown in soils with different inoculum potential and the comparison of mycorrhiza-defective mutant genotypes with their mycorrhizal wild-type progenitors. Each option has its inherent advantages and limitations. Here, the potential to use mycorrhiza-defective mutant and wild-type genotype plant pairs as tools to study the functioning of mycorrhiza is reviewed. The emphasis of this review is placed on non-legume plant species, as mycorrhiza-defective plant genotypes in legumes have recently been extensively reviewed. It is concluded that non-legume mycorrhiza-defective mutant and wild-type pairs are useful tools in the study of mycorrhiza. However, the mutant genotypes should be well characterised and, ideally, meet a number of key criteria. The generation of more mycorrhiza-defective mutant genotypes in agronomically important plant species would be of benefit, as would be more research using these genotype pairs, especially under field conditions. PMID:25862569

  7. A proteome analysis of the response of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa oxyR mutant to iron limitation.

    PubMed

    Vinckx, Tiffany; Wei, Qing; Matthijs, Sandra; Noben, Jean-Paul; Daniels, Ruth; Cornelis, Pierre

    2011-06-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa the response to oxidative stress is orchestrated by the LysR regulator OxyR by activation of the transcription of two catalase genes (katA and katB), of the alkyl-hydroxyperoxidases ahpCF and ahpB. Next to the expected high sensitivity to oxidative stress generated by reactive oxygen species (ROS: H(2)O(2), O(2)(-)), the oxyR mutant shows a defective growth under conditions of iron limitation (Vinckx et al. 2008). Although production and uptake of the siderophore pyoverdine is not affected by the absence of oxyR, the mutant is unable to satisfy its need for iron when grown under iron limiting conditions. In order to get a better insight into the effects caused by iron limitation on the physiological response of the oxyR mutant we decided to compare the proteomes of the wild type and the mutant grown in the iron-poor casamino acids medium (CAA), in CAA plus H(2)O(2), and in CAA plus the strong iron chelator ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid) (EDDHA). Especially in the presence of hydrogen peroxide the oxyR cells increase the production of stress proteins (Dps and IbpA). The superoxide dismutase SodM is produced in higher amounts in the oxyR mutant grown in CAA plus H(2)O(2). The PchB protein, a isochorismate-pyruvate lyase involved in the siderophore pyochelin biosynthesis is not detectable in the extracts from the oxyR mutant grown in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. When cells were grown in the presence of EDDHA, we observed a reduction of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur), and an increase in the two subunits of the succinyl-CoA synthetase and the fumarase FumC1. PMID:21207115

  8. Light-induced dynamic changes of NADPH fluorescence in Synechocystis PCC 6803 and its ndhB-defective mutant M55.

    PubMed

    Mi, H; Klughammer, C; Schreiber, U

    2000-10-01

    Blue-green fluorescence emission of intact cells of Synechocystis PCC6803 and of its ndhB-defective mutant M55 was measured with a standard pulse-amplitude-modulation chlorophyll fluorometer equipped with a new type of emitter-detector unit featuring pulse-modulated UV-A measuring light and a photomultiplier detector. A special illumination program of repetitive saturating light pulses with intermittent dark periods (10 s light, 40 s dark) was applied to elicit dynamic fluorescence changes under conditions of quasi-stationary illumination. The observed effects of artificial electron acceptors and inhibitors on the responses of wild-type and mutant M55 cells lead to the conclusion that changes of NAD(P)H fluorescence are measured. In control samples, a rapid phase of light-driven NADP reduction is overlapped by a somewhat slower phase of NADPH oxidation which is suppressed by iodoacetic acid and, hence, appears to reflect NADPH oxidation by the Calvin cycle. Mercury chloride transforms the light-driven positive response into a negative one, suggesting that inhibition of NADP reduction at the acceptor side of PSI leads to reduction of molecular oxygen, with the hydrogen peroxide formed (via superoxide) causing rapid oxidation of NADPH. The new fluorescence approach opens the way for new insights into the complex interactions between photosynthetic and respiratory pathways in cyanobacteria. PMID:11148271

  9. Negative feedback-defective PRPS1 mutants drive thiopurine resistance in relapsed childhood ALL

    PubMed Central

    Li, Benshang; Li, Hui; Bai, Yun; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Yang, Jun J; Chen, Yao; Lu, Gang; Tzoneva, Gannie; Ma, Xiaotu; Wu, Tongmin; Li, Wenjing; Lu, Haisong; Ding, Lixia; Liang, Huanhuan; Huang, Xiaohang; Yang, Minjun; Jin, Lei; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shuting; Du, Alicia; Shen, Shuhong; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jing; von Stackelberg, Arend; Gu, Longjun; Zhang, Jinghui; Ferrando, Adolfo; Tang, Jingyan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Bin-Bing S.

    2015-01-01

    Relapse is the leading cause of mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among chemotherapeutics, thiopurines are key drugs in the backbone of ALL combination therapy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified relapse-specific mutations in phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRPS1), a rate-limiting purine biosynthesis enzyme, in 24/358 (6.7%) relapse B-ALL cases. All individuals who harbored PRPS1 mutations relapsed early on-treatment, and mutated ALL clones expanded exponentially prior to clinical relapse. Our functional analyses of PRPS1 mutants uncovered a new chemotherapy resistance mechanism involving reduced feedback inhibition of de novo purine biosynthesis and competitive inhibition of thiopurine activation. Notably, the de novo purine synthesis inhibitor lometrexol can effectively abrogate PRPS1 mutant-driven drug resistance. Overall these results highlight the importance of constitutive activation of de novo purine pathway in thiopurine resistance, and offer therapeutic strategies for the treatment of relapsed and resistant ALL. PMID:25962120

  10. Acyl-chain remodeling of dioctanoyl-phosphatidylcholine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant defective in de novo and salvage phosphatidylcholine synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kishino, Hideyuki; Eguchi, Hiroki; Takagi, Keiko; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Ohta, Akinori

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • Dioctanoyl-PC (diC8PC) supported growth of a yeast mutant defective in PC synthesis. • diC8PC was converted to PC species containing longer acyl residues in the mutant. • Both acyl residues of diC8PC were replaced by longer fatty acids in vitro. • This system will contribute to the elucidation of the acyl chain remodeling of PC. - Abstract: A yeast strain, in which endogenous phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis is controllable, was constructed by the replacement of the promoter of PCT1, encoding CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, with GAL1 promoter in a double deletion mutant of PEM1 and PEM2, encoding phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase and phospholipid methyltransferase, respectively. This mutant did not grow in the glucose-containing medium, but the addition of dioctanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (diC8PC) supported its growth. Analyses of the metabolism of {sup 13}C-labeled diC8PC ((methyl-{sup 13}C){sub 3}-diC8PC) in this strain using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry revealed that it was converted to PC species containing acyl residues of 16 or 18 carbons at both sn-1 and sn-2 positions. In addition, both acyl residues of (methyl-{sup 13}C){sub 3}-diC8PC were replaced with 16:1 acyl chains in the in vitro reaction using the yeast cell extract in the presence of palmitoleoyl-CoA. These results indicate that PC containing short acyl residues was remodeled to those with acyl chains of physiological length in yeast.

  11. Identification and molecular characterization of a novel Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant defective in chlorophyll biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Mautusi

    2013-01-01

    The green micro-alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an elegant model organism to study all aspects of oxygenic photosynthesis. Chlorophyll (Chl) and heme are major tetrapyrroles that play an essential role in energy metabolism in photosynthetic organisms and are synthesized via a common branched tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway. One of the enzymes in the pathway is Mg chelatase (MgChel) which inserts Mg 2+ into protoporphyrin IX (PPIX, proto) to form magnesium-protoporphyrin IX (MgPPIX, Mgproto), the first biosynthetic intermediate in the Chl branch. MgChel is a multimeric enzyme that consists of three subunits designated CHLD, CHLI and CHLH. Plants have two isozymes of CHLI (CHLI1 and CHLI2) which are 70%-81% identical in protein sequences. Although the functional role of CHLI1 is well characterized, that of CHLI2 is not. We have isolated a non-photosynthetic light sensitive mutant 5A7 by random DNA insertional mutagenesis that is devoid of any detectable Chl. PCR based analyses show that 5A7 is missing the CHLI1 gene and at least eight additional functionally uncharacterized genes. 5A7 has an intact CHLI2 gene. Complementation with a functional copy of the CHLI1 gene restored Chl biosynthesis, photo-autotrophic growth and light tolerance in 5A7. We have identified the first chli1 (chli1-1) mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and in green algae. Our results show that in the wild type Chlamydomonas CHLI2 protein amount is lower than that of CHLI1 and the chli1-1 mutant has a drastic reduction in CHLI2 protein levels although it possesses the CHLI2 gene. Our chli1-1 mutant opens up new avenues to explore the functional roles of CHLI1 and CHLI2 in Chl biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas, which has never been studied before. PMID:24555064

  12. Virulence of a Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 mutant defective in the prtH gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, H M; Schenkein, H A; Morgan, R M; Bailey, K A; Berry, C R; Macrina, F L

    1995-01-01

    In a previous study we cloned and determined the nucleotide sequence of the prtH gene from Porphyromonas gingivalis W83. This gene specifies a 97-kDa protease which is normally found in the membrane vesicles produced by P. gingivalis and which cleaves the C3 complement protein under defined conditions. We developed a novel ermF-ermAM antibiotic resistance gene cassette, which was used with the cloned prtH gene to prepare an insertionally inactivated allele of this gene. This genetic construct was introduced by electroporation into P. gingivalis W83 in order to create a protease-deficient mutant by recombinational allelic exchange. The mutant strain, designated V2296, was compared with the parent strain W83 for proteolytic activity and virulence. Extracellular protein preparations from V2296 showed decreased proteolytic activity compared with preparations from W83. Casein substrate zymography revealed that the 97-kDa proteolytic component as well as a 45-kDa protease was missing in the mutant. In in vivo experiments using a mouse model, V2296 was dramatically reduced in virulence compared with the wild-type W83 strain. A molecular survey of several clinical isolates of P. gingivalis using the prtH gene as a probe suggested that prtH gene sequences were conserved and that they may have been present in multiple copies. Two of 10 isolates did not hybridize with the prtH gene probe. These strains, like the V2296 mutant, also displayed decreased virulence in the mouse model. Taken together, these results suggest an important role for P. gingivalis proteases in soft tissue infections and specifically indicate that the prtH gene product is a virulence factor. PMID:7890419

  13. Pronounced and extensive microtubule defects in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae DIS3 mutant.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah B; Kiss, Daniel L; Turk, Edward; Tartakoff, Alan M; Andrulis, Erik D

    2011-11-01

    Subunits of the RNA processing exosome assemble into structurally distinct protein complexes that function in disparate cellular compartments and RNA metabolic pathways. Here, in a genetic, cell biological and transcriptomic analysis, we examined the role of Dis3, an essential polypeptide with endo- and 3'→5' exo-ribonuclease activity, in cell cycle progression. We present several lines of evidence that perturbation of DIS3 affects microtubule (MT) localization and structure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells with a DIS3 mutant: (a) accumulate anaphase and pre-anaphase mitotic spindles; (b) exhibit spindles that are misorientated and displaced from the bud neck; (c) harbour elongated spindle-associated astral MTs; (d) have an increased G1 astral MT length and number; and (e) are hypersensitive to MT poisons. Mutations in the core exosome genes RRP4 and MTR3 and the exosome cofactor gene MTR4, but not other exosome subunit gene mutants, also elicit MT phenotypes. RNA deep sequencing analysis (RNA-seq) shows broad changes in the levels of cell cycle- and MT-related transcripts in mutant strains. Collectively, the data presented in this study suggest an evolutionarily conserved role for Dis3 in linking RNA metabolism, MTs and cell cycle progression. PMID:21919057

  14. Strong morphological defects in conditional Arabidopsis abp1 knock-down mutants generated in absence of functional ABP1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Friml, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The Auxin Binding Protein 1 (ABP1) is one of the most studied proteins in plants. Since decades ago, it has been the prime receptor candidate for the plant hormone auxin with a plethora of described functions in auxin signaling and development. The developmental importance of ABP1 has recently been questioned by identification of Arabidopsis thaliana abp1 knock-out alleles that show no obvious phenotypes under normal growth conditions. In this study, we examined the contradiction between the normal growth and development of the abp1 knock-outs and the strong morphological defects observed in three different ethanol-inducible abp1 knock-down mutants ( abp1-AS, SS12K, SS12S). By analyzing segregating populations of abp1 knock-out vs. abp1 knock-down crosses we show that the strong morphological defects that were believed to be the result of conditional down-regulation of ABP1 can be reproduced also in the absence of the functional ABP1 protein. This data suggests that the phenotypes in  abp1 knock-down lines are due to the off-target effects and asks for further reflections on the biological function of ABP1 or alternative explanations for the missing phenotypic defects in the abp1 loss-of-function alleles. PMID:26925228

  15. Maize mutants lacking chloroplast FtsY exhibit pleiotropic defects in the biogenesis of thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Yukari; Hirohashi, Toshiya; Kikuchi, Shingo; Belcher, Susan; Osborne, Erin; Yano, Satoshi; Terashima, Ichiro; Barkan, Alice; Nakai, Masato

    2004-01-01

    A chloroplast signal recognition particle (SRP) that is related to the SRP involved in secretion in bacteria and eukaryotic cells is used for the insertion of light-harvesting chlorophyll proteins (LHCPs) into the thylakoid membranes. A conserved component of the SRP mechanism is a membrane-bound SRP receptor, denoted FtsY in bacteria. Plant genomes encode FtsY homologs that are targeted to the chloroplast (cpFtsY). To investigate the in vivo roles of cpFtsY, we characterized maize cpFtsY and maize mutants having a Mu transposon insertion in the corresponding gene (chloroplast SRP receptor1, or csr1). Maize cpFtsY accumulates to much higher levels in leaf tissue than in roots and stems. Interestingly, it is present at similar levels in etiolated and green leaf tissue and was found to bind the prolamellar bodies of etioplasts. A null cpFtsY mutant, csr1-1, showed a substantial loss of leaf chlorophyll, whereas a "leaky" allele, csr1-3, conditioned a more moderate chlorophyll deficiency. Both alleles caused the loss of various LHCPs and the thylakoid-bound photosynthetic enzyme complexes and were seedling lethal. By contrast, levels of the membrane-bound components of the thylakoid protein transport machineries were not altered. The thylakoid membranes in csr1-1 chloroplasts were unstacked and reduced in abundance, but the prolamellar bodies in mutant etioplasts appeared normal. These results demonstrate the essentiality of cpFtsY for the biogenesis not only of the LHCPs but also for the assembly of the other membrane-bound components of the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:14688289

  16. Tritium suicide selection of mammalian cell mutants defective in the transport of neutral amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, M C; Slayman, C W; Adelberg, E A

    1977-01-01

    Mouse lymphocytic cells of the established line GF-14 were allowed to accumulate intracellular 3H-labeled aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), frozen, and stored over liquid N2. After internal radiation had reduced survival to 1 in 10(4), survivors were plated and tested for their ability to transport AIB. Out of 200 clones tested, two (designated GF-17 and GF-18) were found to have reductions to 13-35% of the parent in the rate of transport of AIB, L-alanine, L-proline, and L-serine; GF-18 also showed significant reductions in the rate of transport of L-glutamate and DL-cysteine. Little or no change was observed for 10 other amino acids or for thymidine. Kinetic analyses revealed that the mutants were not altered in Km for AIB uptake, but had Vmax values approximately 20% the value of the parent strain, GF-14, suggesting that either the number of AIB transport sites or the turnover rate of the sites has been reduced in the two mutants. PMID:200920

  17. Negative feedback-defective PRPS1 mutants drive thiopurine resistance in relapsed childhood ALL.

    PubMed

    Li, Benshang; Li, Hui; Bai, Yun; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Yang, Jun J; Chen, Yao; Lu, Gang; Tzoneva, Gannie; Ma, Xiaotu; Wu, Tongmin; Li, Wenjing; Lu, Haisong; Ding, Lixia; Liang, Huanhuan; Huang, Xiaohang; Yang, Minjun; Jin, Lei; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shuting; Du, Alicia; Shen, Shuhong; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jing; von Stackelberg, Arend; Gu, Longjun; Zhang, Jinghui; Ferrando, Adolfo; Tang, Jingyan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Bin-Bing S

    2015-06-01

    Relapse is the leading cause of mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among chemotherapeutics, thiopurines are key drugs in ALL combination therapy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified relapse-specific mutations in the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 gene (PRPS1), which encodes a rate-limiting purine biosynthesis enzyme, in 24/358 (6.7%) relapsed childhood B cell ALL (B-ALL) cases. All individuals who harbored PRPS1 mutations relapsed early during treatment, and mutated ALL clones expanded exponentially before clinical relapse. Our functional analyses of PRPS1 mutants uncovered a new chemotherapy-resistance mechanism involving reduced feedback inhibition of de novo purine biosynthesis and competitive inhibition of thiopurine activation. Notably, the de novo purine synthesis inhibitor lometrexol effectively abrogated PRPS1 mutant-driven drug resistance. These results highlight the importance of constitutive activation of the de novo purine synthesis pathway in thiopurine resistance, and they offer therapeutic strategies for the treatment of relapsed and thiopurine-resistant ALL. PMID:25962120

  18. Characterization of the Two Maize Embryo-Lethal Defective Kernel Mutants Rgh*-1210 and Fl*-1253b: Effects on Embryo and Gametophyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J. K.; Sheridan, W. F.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the effects on embryonic and gametophytic development of two nonallelic defective-kernel mutants of maize. Earlier studies indicated that both mutants are abnormal in embryonic morphogenesis as well as in the formation of their endosperm. Mutant rgh*-1210 embryos depart from the normal embryogenic pathway at the proembryo and transition stage, by developing meristematic lobes and losing bilateral symmetry. They continue growth as irregular cell masses that enlarge and become necrotic. Somatic embryos arising in rgh*-1210 callus cultures display the rgh*-1210 mutant phenotype. Mutant fl*-1253B embryos are variably blocked from the coleoptilar stage through stage 2. Following formation of the shoot apex in the mutant embryos the leaf primordia and tissues surrounding the embryonic axis continue growth and cell division, while the scutellum ceases development and becomes hypertrophied. Mutant fl*-1253B embryos are unable to germinate, either in mutant kernels or as immature embryos in culture, and the mutant scutellar tissue does not produce regenerable callus. Expression of the fl*-1253B locus during male gametophytic development is revealed by a marked reduction in pollen transmission as a result of mutant expression during the interval between meiosis and the initiation of pollen tube growth. In both mutants, there is considerable proliferation of the aleurone cells of the endosperm. Mutant expression of rgh*-1210 in the female gametophyte is revealed by the abnormal antipodal cells of the embryo sac. These results show that these two gene loci play unique and crucial roles in normal morphogenesis of the embryo. In addition, it is evident that both mutants are pleiotropic in affecting the development of the endosperm and gametophyte as well as the embryo. These pleiotropisms suggest some commonality in the gene regulation of development in these three tissues. PMID:17246478

  19. Development and analysis of a transformation-defective mutant of Harvey murine sarcoma tk virus and its gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, M O; Hager, G L; Lowe, R; Scolnick, E M

    1985-01-01

    The Harvey murine sarcoma virus has been cloned and induces focus formation on NIH 3T3 cells. Recombinants of this virus have been constructed which include the thymidine kinase gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 in a downstream linkage with the p21 ras gene of Harvey murine sarcoma virus. Harvey murine sarcoma tk virus rescued from cells transfected with this construct is both thymidine kinase positive and focus inducing in in vitro transmission studies. The hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine selectability of the thymidine kinase gene carried by this virus has been exploited to develop three mutants defective in the p21 ras sequence. All three are focus negative and thymidine kinase positive when transmitted to suitable cells. Of these, only one encodes a p22 that is immunologically related to p21. This mutant has been used to explore the relationship between the known characteristics of p21 and cellular transformation. Data presented herein indicate that the p21 of Harvey murine sarcoma virus consists of at least two domains, one which specifies the guanine nucleotide-binding activity of p21 and the other which is involved in p21-membrane association in transformed cells. Images PMID:2985821

  20. A single mutation results in diploid gamete formation and parthenogenesis in a Drosophila yemanuclein-alpha meiosis I defective mutant

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sexual reproduction relies on two key events: formation of cells with a haploid genome (the gametes) and restoration of diploidy after fertilization. Therefore the underlying mechanisms must have been evolutionary linked and there is a need for evidence that could support such a model. Results We describe the identification and the characterization of yem1, the first yem-alpha mutant allele (V478E), which to some extent affects diploidy reduction and its restoration. Yem-alpha is a member of the Ubinuclein/HPC2 family of proteins that have recently been implicated in playing roles in chromatin remodeling in concert with HIRA histone chaperone. The yem1 mutant females exhibited disrupted chromosome behavior in the first meiotic division and produced very low numbers of viable progeny. Unexpectedly these progeny did not display paternal chromosome markers, suggesting that they developed from diploid gametes that underwent gynogenesis, a form of parthenogenesis that requires fertilization. Conclusions We focus here on the analysis of the meiotic defects exhibited by yem1 oocytes that could account for the formation of diploid gametes. Our results suggest that yem1 affects chromosome segregation presumably by affecting kinetochores function in the first meiotic division. This work paves the way to further investigations on the evolution of the mechanisms that support sexual reproduction. PMID:21080953

  1. Effect of lectin on nodulation by wild-type Bradyrhizobium japonicum and a nodulation-defective mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Halverson, L J; Stacey, G

    1986-01-01

    The nodulation characteristics of wild-type Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 and mutant strain HS111 were examined. Mutant strain HS111 exhibits a delayed-nodulation phenotype, a result of its inability to initiate successful nodulation promptly following inoculation of the soybean root. Previously, we showed that the defect in initiation of infection leading to subsequent nodulation which is found in HS111 can be phenotypically reversed by pretreatment with soybean root exudate or soybean seed lectin. This effect is not seen after pretreatment with root exudates and lectins obtained from other plant species. Treatment of strain HS111 with as little as 10 soybean seed lectin molecules per bacterium (3.3 X 10 (-12) M) resulted in enhancement of nodule formation. Pretreatment of wild-type B. japonicum USDA 110 with soybean root exudate or seed lectin increased nodule numbers twofold on 6-week-old plants. Wild-type strain USDA 110 cells inoculated at 10(4) cells per seedling exhibited a delay in initiation of infection leading to subsequent nodulation. Wild-type cells pretreated in soybean root exudates or seed lectin did not exhibit a delay in nodulation at this cell concentration. Mutant strain HS111 pretreated in seed lectin for 0 or 1 h, followed by washing with the hapten D-galactose to remove the lectin, exhibited a delay in initiation of nodulation. Phenotypic reversal of the delayed-nodulation phenotype exhibited by strain HS111 was seen if incubation was continued for an additional 71 h in plant nutrient solution following 1 h of lectin pretreatment. Reversal of the delayed-nodulation phenotype of HS111 through lectin pretreatment was prevented by chloramphenicol or rifampin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3707122

  2. Molecular characterization of V59E NIS, a Na+/I- symporter mutant that causes congenital I- transport defect.

    PubMed

    Reed-Tsur, Mia D; De la Vieja, Antonio; Ginter, Christopher S; Carrasco, Nancy

    2008-06-01

    I(-) is actively transported into thyrocytes via the Na+/I(-) symporter (NIS), a key glycoprotein located on the basolateral plasma membrane. The cDNA encoding rat NIS was identified in our laboratory, where an extensive structure/function characterization of NIS is being conducted. Several NIS mutants have been identified as causes of congenital I(-) transport defect (ITD), including V59E NIS. ITD is characterized by low thyroid I(-) uptake, low saliva/plasma I(-) ratio, hypothyroidism, and goiter and may cause mental retardation if untreated. Studies of other ITD-causing NIS mutants have revealed valuable information regarding NIS structure/function. V59E NIS was reported to exhibit as much as 30% of the activity of wild-type NIS. However, this observation was at variance with the patients' phenotype of total lack of activity. We have thoroughly characterized V59E NIS and studied several amino acid substitutions at position 59. We demonstrated that, in contrast to the previous report, V59E NIS is inactive, although it is properly targeted to the plasma membrane. Glu and all other charged amino acids or Pro at position 59 also yielded nonfunctional NIS proteins. However, I(-) uptake was rescued to different degrees by the other substitutions. Although the Km values for Na+ and I(-) were not altered in these active mutants, we found that the structural requirement for NIS function at position 59 is a neutral, helix-promoting amino acid. This result suggests that the region that contains V59 may be involved in intramembrane helix-helix interactions during the transport cycle without being in direct contact with the substrates. PMID:18339708

  3. Anti-HIV Activity of Defective Cyanovirin-N Mutants Is Restored by Dimerization*

    PubMed Central

    Matei, Elena; Zheng, Andrew; Furey, William; Rose, Jeremy; Aiken, Christopher; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CV-N) is a two-domain, cyanobacterial protein that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) at nanomolar concentrations by binding to high mannose sugars on the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120. The wild type protein can exist as a monomer or a domain-swapped dimer with the monomer and dimer containing two or four sugar binding sites, respectively, one on each domain. Here we demonstrate that monomeric, single binding site mutants are completely inactive and that a single site, whether located on domain A or B, is insufficient to impart the antiviral activity. Linking inactive, monomeric proteins in a head-to-head fashion by an intermolecular disulfide bond or by creating an exclusively domain-swapped dimer via a hinge residue deletion restored antiviral activity to levels similar to that of wild type CV-N. These findings demonstrate unequivocally that multisite binding by CV-N type lectins is necessary for viral inhibition. PMID:20147291

  4. Irxl1 mutant mice show reduced tendon differentiation and no patterning defects in musculoskeletal system development.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Wataru; Machii, Masashi; Xue, XiaoDong; Sultana, Nishat; Hikosaka, Keisuke; Sharkar, Mohammad T K; Uezato, Tadayoshi; Matsuda, Masashi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Miura, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Irxl1 (Iroquois-related homeobox like-1) is a newly identified three amino-acid loop extension (TALE) homeobox gene, which is expressed in various mesoderm-derived tissues, particularly in the progenitors of the musculoskeletal system. To analyze the roles of Irxl1 during embryonic development, we generated mice carrying a null allele of Irxl1. Mice homozygous for the targeted allele were viable, fertile, and showed reduced tendon differentiation. Skeletal morphology and skeletal muscle weight in Irxl1-knockout mice appeared normal. Expression patterns of several marker genes for cartilage, tendon, and muscle progenitors in homozygous mutant embryos were unchanged. These results suggest that Irxl1 is required for the tendon differentiation but dispensable for the patterning of the musculoskeletal system in development. PMID:21254332

  5. Expression of a nuclear-encoded psbH gene complements the plastidic RNA processing defect in the PSII mutant hcf107 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Levey, Tatjana; Westhoff, Peter; Meierhoff, Karin

    2014-10-01

    The helical-repeat RNA-binding protein HCF107 is required for processing, stabilization and translation of plastid-encoded psbH mRNA. The psbH gene encodes a small, hydrophilic subunit of the PSII complex and is part of the plastidic psbB-psbT-psbH-petB-petD transcription unit. In Arabidopsis hcf107 mutants, only trace amounts of PSII proteins can be detected. Beside drastically reduced synthesis of PsbH, the synthesis of CP47 was also reduced in these mutants, although the corresponding psbB transcripts accumulate to wild type levels. This situation raises the question, whether the reduction of CP47 is a direct consequence of the mutation, based on targeting of HCF107 to the psbB mRNA, or a secondary affect due to the absent PsbH. To clarify this issue we introduced a chimeric psbH construct comprising a sequence encoding a chloroplast transit peptide into the hcf107-2 background. We found that the nucleus-localized psbH was able to complement the mutant defect resulting in photoautotrophic plants. The PSII proteins CP47 and D1 accumulated to barely half of the wild type level. Further experiments showed that cytosolically synthesized PsbH was imported into chloroplasts and assembled into PSII complexes. Using this approach, we showed that the tetratricopeptide repeat protein HCF107 of Arabidopsis is only responsible for expression of PsbH and not for synthesis of CP47. In addition the data suggest the necessity of the small, one-helix membrane spanning protein PsbH for the accumulation of CP47 in higher plants. PMID:25081859

  6. Chlorophyll Deficiency in the Maize elongated mesocotyl2 Mutant Is Caused by a Defective Heme Oxygenase and Delaying Grana Stacking

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dianyi; Zheng, Xu; Li, Liang; Lin, Wanhuang; Xie, Wenjun; Yang, Jianping; Chen, Shaojiang; Jin, Weiwei

    2013-01-01

    Background Etiolated seedlings initiate grana stacking and chlorophyll biosynthesis in parallel with the first exposure to light, during which phytochromes play an important role. Functional phytochromes are biosynthesized separately for two components. One phytochrome is biosynthesized for apoprotein and the other is biosynthesized for the chromophore that includes heme oxygenase (HO). Methodology/Principal Finding We isolated a ho1 homolog by map-based cloning of a maize elongated mesocotyl2 (elm2) mutant. cDNA sequencing of the ho1 homolog in elm2 revealed a 31 bp deletion. De-etiolation responses to red and far-red light were disrupted in elm2 seedlings, with a pronounced elongation of the mesocotyl. The endogenous HO activity in the elm2 mutant decreased remarkably. Transgenic complementation further confirmed the dysfunction in the maize ho1 gene. Moreover, non-appressed thylakoids were specifically stacked at the seedling stage in the elm2 mutant. Conclusion The 31 bp deletion in the ho1 gene resulted in a decrease in endogenous HO activity and disrupted the de-etiolation responses to red and far-red light. The specific stacking of non-appressed thylakoids suggested that the chlorophyll biosynthesis regulated by HO1 is achieved by coordinating the heme level with the regulation of grana stacking. PMID:24244620

  7. ERAD and protein import defects in a sec61 mutant lacking ER-lumenal loop 7

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Sec61 channel mediates protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane during secretory protein biogenesis, and likely also during export of misfolded proteins for ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The mechanisms of channel opening for the different modes of translocation are not understood so far, but the position of the large ER-lumenal loop 7 of Sec61p suggests a decisive role. Results We show here that the Y345H mutation in L7 which causes diabetes in the mouse displays no ER import defects in yeast, but a delay in misfolded protein export. A complete deletion of L7 in Sec61p resulted in viable, cold- and tunicamycin-hypersensitive yeast cells with strong defects in posttranslational protein import of soluble proteins into the ER, and in ERAD of soluble substrates. Membrane protein ERAD was only moderately slower in sec61∆L7 than in wildtype cells. Although Sec61∆L7 channels were unstable in detergent, co-translational protein integration into the ER membrane, proteasome binding to Sec61∆L7 channels, and formation of hetero-heptameric Sec complexes were not affected. Conclusions We conclude that L7 of Sec61p is required for initiation of posttranslational soluble protein import into and misfolded soluble protein export from the ER, suggesting a key role for L7 in transverse gating of the Sec61 channel. PMID:24314051

  8. Delayed Induction of Human NTE (PNPLA6) Rescues Neurodegeneration and Mobility Defects of Drosophila swiss cheese (sws) Mutants.

    PubMed

    Sujkowski, Alyson; Rainier, Shirley; Fink, John K; Wessells, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Human PNPLA6 gene encodes Neuropathy Target Esterase protein (NTE). PNPLA6 gene mutations cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG39 HSP), Gordon-Holmes syndrome, Boucher-Neuhäuser syndromes, Laurence-Moon syndrome, and Oliver-McFarlane syndrome. Mutations in the Drosophila NTE homolog swiss cheese (sws) cause early-onset, progressive behavioral defects and neurodegeneration characterized by vacuole formation. We investigated sws5 flies and show for the first time that this allele causes progressive vacuolar formation in the brain and progressive deterioration of negative geotaxis speed and endurance. We demonstrate that inducible, neuron-specific expression of full-length human wildtype NTE reduces vacuole formation and substantially rescues mobility. Indeed, neuron-specific expression of wildtype human NTE is capable of rescuing mobility defects after 10 days of adult life at 29°C, when significant degeneration has already occurred, and significantly extends longevity of mutants at 25°C. These results raise the exciting possibility that late induction of NTE function may reduce or ameliorate neurodegeneration in humans even after symptoms begin. In addition, these results highlight the utility of negative geotaxis endurance as a new assay for longitudinal tracking of degenerative phenotypes in Drosophila. PMID:26671664

  9. Delayed Induction of Human NTE (PNPLA6) Rescues Neurodegeneration and Mobility Defects of Drosophila swiss cheese (sws) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Sujkowski, Alyson; Rainier, Shirley; Fink, John K.; Wessells, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Human PNPLA6 gene encodes Neuropathy Target Esterase protein (NTE). PNPLA6 gene mutations cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG39 HSP), Gordon-Holmes syndrome, Boucher-Neuhäuser syndromes, Laurence-Moon syndrome, and Oliver-McFarlane syndrome. Mutations in the Drosophila NTE homolog swiss cheese (sws) cause early-onset, progressive behavioral defects and neurodegeneration characterized by vacuole formation. We investigated sws5 flies and show for the first time that this allele causes progressive vacuolar formation in the brain and progressive deterioration of negative geotaxis speed and endurance. We demonstrate that inducible, neuron-specific expression of full-length human wildtype NTE reduces vacuole formation and substantially rescues mobility. Indeed, neuron-specific expression of wildtype human NTE is capable of rescuing mobility defects after 10 days of adult life at 29°C, when significant degeneration has already occurred, and significantly extends longevity of mutants at 25°C. These results raise the exciting possibility that late induction of NTE function may reduce or ameliorate neurodegeneration in humans even after symptoms begin. In addition, these results highlight the utility of negative geotaxis endurance as a new assay for longitudinal tracking of degenerative phenotypes in Drosophila. PMID:26671664

  10. Defects of mutant DNMT1 are linked to a spectrum of neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Baets, Jonathan; Duan, Xiaohui; Wu, Yanhong; Smith, Gordon; Seeley, William W.; Mademan, Inès; McGrath, Nicole M.; Beadell, Noah C.; Khoury, Julie; Botuyan, Maria-Victoria; Mer, Georges; Worrell, Gregory A.; Hojo, Kaori; DeLeon, Jessica; Laura, Matilde; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim; Van den Bergh, Peter; Merrill, Shana L.; Reilly, Mary M.; Houlden, Henry; Grossman, Murray; Scherer, Steven S.; De Jonghe, Peter; Dyck, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a broader than previously appreciated clinical spectrum for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1E (HSAN1E) and a potential pathogenic mechanism for DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) mutations. The clinical presentations and genetic characteristics of nine newly identified HSAN1E kinships (45 affected subjects) were investigated. Five novel mutations of DNMT1 were discovered; p.C353F, p.T481P, p.P491L, p.Y524D and p.I531N, all within the target-sequence domain, and two mutations (p.T481P, p.P491L) arising de novo. Recently, HSAN1E has been suggested as an allelic disorder of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy. Our results indicate that all the mutations causal for HSAN1E are located in the middle part or N-terminus end of the TS domain, whereas all the mutations causal for autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy are located in the C-terminus end of the TS domain. The impact of the seven causal mutations in this cohort was studied by cellular localization experiments. The binding efficiency of the mutant DNMT proteins at the replication foci and heterochromatin were evaluated. Phenotypic characterizations included electromyography, brain magnetic resonance and nuclear imaging, electroencephalography, sural nerve biopsies, sleep evaluation and neuropsychometric testing. The average survival of HSAN1E was 53.6 years. [standard deviation = 7.7, range 43–75 years], and mean onset age was 37.7 years. (standard deviation = 8.6, range 18–51 years). Expanded phenotypes include myoclonic seizures, auditory or visual hallucinations, and renal failure. Hypersomnia, rapid eye movement sleep disorder and/or narcolepsy were identified in 11 subjects. Global brain atrophy was found in 12 of 14 who had brain MRI. EEGs showed low frequency (delta waves) frontal-predominant abnormality in five of six patients. Marked variability in cognitive deficits was observed, but the majority of patients (89%) developed

  11. Defects of mutant DNMT1 are linked to a spectrum of neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Baets, Jonathan; Duan, Xiaohui; Wu, Yanhong; Smith, Gordon; Seeley, William W.; Mademan, Inès; McGrath, Nicole M.; Beadell, Noah C.; Khoury, Julie; Botuyan, Maria-Victoria; Mer, Georges; Worrell, Gregory A.; Hojo, Kaori; DeLeon, Jessica; Laura, Matilde; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim; Van den Bergh, Peter; Merrill, Shana L.; Reilly, Mary M.; Houlden, Henry; Grossman, Murray; Scherer, Steven S.; De Jonghe, Peter; Dyck, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a broader than previously appreciated clinical spectrum for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1E (HSAN1E) and a potential pathogenic mechanism for DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) mutations. The clinical presentations and genetic characteristics of nine newly identified HSAN1E kinships (45 affected subjects) were investigated. Five novel mutations of DNMT1 were discovered; p.C353F, p.T481P, p.P491L, p.Y524D and p.I531N, all within the target-sequence domain, and two mutations (p.T481P, p.P491L) arising de novo. Recently, HSAN1E has been suggested as an allelic disorder of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy. Our results indicate that all the mutations causal for HSAN1E are located in the middle part or N-terminus end of the TS domain, whereas all the mutations causal for autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy are located in the C-terminus end of the TS domain. The impact of the seven causal mutations in this cohort was studied by cellular localization experiments. The binding efficiency of the mutant DNMT proteins at the replication foci and heterochromatin were evaluated. Phenotypic characterizations included electromyography, brain magnetic resonance and nuclear imaging, electroencephalography, sural nerve biopsies, sleep evaluation and neuropsychometric testing. The average survival of HSAN1E was 53.6 years. [standard deviation = 7.7, range 43–75 years], and mean onset age was 37.7 years. (standard deviation = 8.6, range 18–51 years). Expanded phenotypes include myoclonic seizures, auditory or visual hallucinations, and renal failure. Hypersomnia, rapid eye movement sleep disorder and/or narcolepsy were identified in 11 subjects. Global brain atrophy was found in 12 of 14 who had brain MRI. EEGs showed low frequency (delta waves) frontal-predominant abnormality in five of six patients. Marked variability in cognitive deficits was observed, but the majority of patients (89%) developed

  12. Defects of mutant DNMT1 are linked to a spectrum of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Baets, Jonathan; Duan, Xiaohui; Wu, Yanhong; Smith, Gordon; Seeley, William W; Mademan, Inès; McGrath, Nicole M; Beadell, Noah C; Khoury, Julie; Botuyan, Maria-Victoria; Mer, Georges; Worrell, Gregory A; Hojo, Kaori; DeLeon, Jessica; Laura, Matilde; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim; Van den Bergh, Peter; Merrill, Shana L; Reilly, Mary M; Houlden, Henry; Grossman, Murray; Scherer, Steven S; De Jonghe, Peter; Dyck, Peter J; Klein, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    We report a broader than previously appreciated clinical spectrum for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1E (HSAN1E) and a potential pathogenic mechanism for DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) mutations. The clinical presentations and genetic characteristics of nine newly identified HSAN1E kinships (45 affected subjects) were investigated. Five novel mutations of DNMT1 were discovered; p.C353F, p.T481P, p.P491L, p.Y524D and p.I531N, all within the target-sequence domain, and two mutations (p.T481P, p.P491L) arising de novo. Recently, HSAN1E has been suggested as an allelic disorder of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy. Our results indicate that all the mutations causal for HSAN1E are located in the middle part or N-terminus end of the TS domain, whereas all the mutations causal for autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy are located in the C-terminus end of the TS domain. The impact of the seven causal mutations in this cohort was studied by cellular localization experiments. The binding efficiency of the mutant DNMT proteins at the replication foci and heterochromatin were evaluated. Phenotypic characterizations included electromyography, brain magnetic resonance and nuclear imaging, electroencephalography, sural nerve biopsies, sleep evaluation and neuropsychometric testing. The average survival of HSAN1E was 53.6 years. [standard deviation = 7.7, range 43-75 years], and mean onset age was 37.7 years. (standard deviation = 8.6, range 18-51 years). Expanded phenotypes include myoclonic seizures, auditory or visual hallucinations, and renal failure. Hypersomnia, rapid eye movement sleep disorder and/or narcolepsy were identified in 11 subjects. Global brain atrophy was found in 12 of 14 who had brain MRI. EEGs showed low frequency (delta waves) frontal-predominant abnormality in five of six patients. Marked variability in cognitive deficits was observed, but the majority of patients (89%) developed

  13. A mutation affecting carbon catabolite repression suppresses growth defects in pyruvate carboxylase mutants from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, M A; Gamo, F J; Gancedo, C

    1995-12-18

    Yeasts with disruptions in the genes PYC1 and PYC2 encoding the isoenzymes of pyruvate carboxylase cannot grow in a glucose-ammonium medium (Stucka et al. (1991) Mol. Gen. Genet. 229, 307-315). We have isolated a dominant mutation, BPC1-1, that allows growth in this medium of yeasts with interrupted PYC1 and PYC2 genes. The BPC1-1 mutation abolishes catabolite repression of a series of genes and allows expression of the enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle during growth in glucose. A functional glyoxylate cycle is necessary for suppression as a disruption of gene ICL1 encoding isocitrate lyase abolished the phenotypic effect of BPC1-1 on growth in glucose-ammonium. Concurrent expression from constitutive promoters of genes ICL1 and MLS1 (encoding malate synthase) also suppressed the growth phenotype of pyc1 pyc2 mutants. The mutation BPC1-1 is either allelic or closely linked to the mutation DGT1-1. PMID:8543050

  14. Identification of temperature-sensitive mutants of vaccinia virus that are defective in conversion of concatemeric replicative intermediates to the mature linear DNA genome.

    PubMed Central

    DeLange, A M

    1989-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to screen temperature-sensitive mutants of vaccinia virus for the ability to convert replicated viral DNA into mature linear 185-kilobase hairpin-terminated genomes. Of 30 mutually noncomplementing mutants tested, 5 displayed a temperature-sensitive defect in the resolution of the telomere fusion configuration within concatemeric replicative intermediates, resulting in a failure to convert such intermediates to the linear monomeric genome. Adjacent genomic units in the concatemeric arrays generated in these mutants were arranged in both tandem and inverted orientations. The observation that four of the five mutants had a severe general defect in the synthesis of the late class of viral proteins suggests that at least one late protein is directly required to resolve the telomere fusion intermediate to hairpin termini. The identification of such telomere resolution proteins should be facilitated by genetic and molecular characterization of resolution-defective mutants, such as C63, in which late protein synthesis is not severely affected. Images PMID:2724409

  15. Draft Genome Sequences for Clostridium thermocellum Wild-Type Strain YS and Derived Cellulose Adhesion-Defective Mutant Strain AD2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Lamed, Raphael; Morag, Ely; Borovok, Ilya; Shoham, Yuval; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Yang, Zamin; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Keller, Martin; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum wild-type strain YS is an anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium capable of directly converting cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Strain YS and a derived cellulose adhesion-defective mutant strain AD2 played pivotal roles in describing the original cellulosome concept. We present their draft genome sequences.

  16. Growth, photosynthesis, nitrogen partitioning and responses to CO2 enrichment in barley mutants lacking NADH-dependent nitrate reductase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined plant growth, photosynthesis and leaf constituents of both the wild type (WT) and two mutant lines of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Steptoe) with defects in NADH-dependent nitrate reductase (NADH-NAR) activity. The first mutant, nar1, had a lesion within the NAR structural gene and the...

  17. A GAPDH Mutant Defective in Src-Dependent Tyrosine Phosphorylation Impedes Rab2-Mediated Events

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, Ellen J.; Artalejo, Cristina R.

    2013-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has multiple intracellular activities in addition to its role in gluconeogenesis. Indeed, we have reported that GAPDH is required for Rab2-mediated retrograde transport from vesicular tubular clusters (VTCs). These diverse GAPDH activities are the result of post-translational modifications that confer a new function to the enzyme. In that regard, GAPDH is tyrosine phosphorylated by Src. To establish the functional significance of this modification for GAPDH activity in Rab2-dependent events, an amino acid substitution was made at tyrosine 41 (GAPDH Y41F). The inability of Src to phosphorylate purified recombinant GAPDH Y41F was confirmed in an in vitro kinase assay. The mutant was then employed in a quantitative membrane-binding assay that measures Rab2 recruitment of soluble components to VTCs. As we observed with GAPDH wild type, Rab2 promoted GAPDH Y41F binding to membranes in a dose-dependent manner indicating that GAPDH tyrosine phosphorylation is not required for VTC association. However, GAPDH was tyrosine phosphorylated on VTCs. Importantly, GAPDH Y41F blocked VSV-G transport in an assay that reconstitutes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi trafficking indicating that phosphorylation of tyrosine 41 is essential for GAPDH activity in the early secretory pathway. The block in transport is due to the decreased binding of atypical protein kinase C iota/lambda (aPKCι/λ) to GAPDH Y41F, which reduces β-COP association with the VTC and subsequent formation of Rab2-mediated retrograde vesicles. Our results suggest that Src plays a pivotal role in regulating the interaction of Rab2 effectors on the VTC. PMID:17488287

  18. Structural alterations in mutant precursors of the yeast tRNALeu3 gene which behave as defective substrates for a highly purified splicing endoribonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Attardi, D G; Margarit, I; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1985-01-01

    We have produced a highly purified preparation of the Xenopus laevis splicing endonuclease (XlaI RNase). The purified enzyme correctly cleaves tRNA precursors, creating substrates for subsequent ligation. The 5'-half molecules have a 2',3' cyclic phosphate at their 3' termini. Assuming that splicing enzymes recognize primarily structural elements in the 'mature domain', we have been studying the conformation of three splicing-defective precursors made from mutants of the yeast tRNALeu3 gene. The mutations alter base-pairing in the D-stem region and two of the mutants are absolute defectives. Enzymatic probing of the structures of the altered tRNA precursors shows that the structural perturbations in these mutants are localized on the 'inside' of the 'L'-shaped three-dimensional structure. The implications of this finding for the recognition process are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3937725

  19. Genetically engineered SCN5A mutant pig hearts exhibit conduction defects and arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Park, David S.; Cerrone, Marina; Morley, Gregory; Vasquez, Carolina; Fowler, Steven; Liu, Nian; Bernstein, Scott A.; Liu, Fang-Yu; Zhang, Jie; Rogers, Christopher S.; Priori, Silvia G.; Chinitz, Larry A.; Fishman, Glenn I.

    2014-01-01

    SCN5A encodes the α subunit of the major cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5. Mutations in SCN5A are associated with conduction disease and ventricular fibrillation (VF); however, the mechanisms that link loss of sodium channel function to arrhythmic instability remain unresolved. Here, we generated a large-animal model of a human cardiac sodium channelopathy in pigs, which have cardiac structure and function similar to humans, to better define the arrhythmic substrate. We introduced a nonsense mutation originally identified in a child with Brugada syndrome into the orthologous position (E558X) in the pig SCN5A gene. SCN5AE558X/+ pigs exhibited conduction abnormalities in the absence of cardiac structural defects. Sudden cardiac death was not observed in young pigs; however, Langendorff-perfused SCN5AE558X/+ hearts had an increased propensity for pacing-induced or spontaneous VF initiated by short-coupled ventricular premature beats. Optical mapping during VF showed that activity often began as an organized focal source or broad wavefront on the right ventricular (RV) free wall. Together, the results from this study demonstrate that the SCN5AE558X/+ pig model accurately phenocopies many aspects of human cardiac sodium channelopathy, including conduction slowing and increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:25500882

  20. Genetically engineered SCN5A mutant pig hearts exhibit conduction defects and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Park, David S; Cerrone, Marina; Morley, Gregory; Vasquez, Carolina; Fowler, Steven; Liu, Nian; Bernstein, Scott A; Liu, Fang-Yu; Zhang, Jie; Rogers, Christopher S; Priori, Silvia G; Chinitz, Larry A; Fishman, Glenn I

    2015-01-01

    SCN5A encodes the α subunit of the major cardiac sodium channel Na(V)1.5. Mutations in SCN5A are associated with conduction disease and ventricular fibrillation (VF); however, the mechanisms that link loss of sodium channel function to arrhythmic instability remain unresolved. Here, we generated a large-animal model of a human cardiac sodium channelopathy in pigs, which have cardiac structure and function similar to humans, to better define the arrhythmic substrate. We introduced a nonsense mutation originally identified in a child with Brugada syndrome into the orthologous position (E558X) in the pig SCN5A gene. SCN5A(E558X/+) pigs exhibited conduction abnormalities in the absence of cardiac structural defects. Sudden cardiac death was not observed in young pigs; however, Langendorff-perfused SCN5A(E558X/+) hearts had an increased propensity for pacing-induced or spontaneous VF initiated by short-coupled ventricular premature beats. Optical mapping during VF showed that activity often began as an organized focal source or broad wavefront on the right ventricular (RV) free wall. Together, the results from this study demonstrate that the SCN5A(E558X/+) pig model accurately phenocopies many aspects of human cardiac sodium channelopathy, including conduction slowing and increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:25500882

  1. An ALS-Linked Mutant SOD1 Produces a Locomotor Defect Associated with Aggregation and Synaptic Dysfunction When Expressed in Neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiou; Farr, George W.; Hall, David H.; Li, Fei; Furtak, Krystyna; Dreier, Lars; Horwich, Arthur L.

    2009-01-01

    The nature of toxic effects exerted on neurons by misfolded proteins, occurring in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, is poorly understood. One approach to this problem is to measure effects when such proteins are expressed in heterologous neurons. We report on effects of an ALS-associated, misfolding-prone mutant human SOD1, G85R, when expressed in the neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. Stable mutant transgenic animals, but not wild-type human SOD1 transgenics, exhibited a strong locomotor defect associated with the presence, specifically in mutant animals, of both soluble oligomers and insoluble aggregates of G85R protein. A whole-genome RNAi screen identified chaperones and other components whose deficiency increased aggregation and further diminished locomotion. The nature of the locomotor defect was investigated. Mutant animals were resistant to paralysis by the cholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb, while exhibiting normal sensitivity to the cholinergic agonist levamisole and normal muscle morphology. When fluorescently labeled presynaptic components were examined in the dorsal nerve cord, decreased numbers of puncta corresponding to neuromuscular junctions were observed in mutant animals and brightness was also diminished. At the EM level, mutant animals exhibited a reduced number of synaptic vesicles. Neurotoxicity in this system thus appears to be mediated by misfolded SOD1 and is exerted on synaptic vesicle biogenesis and/or trafficking. PMID:19165329

  2. An ALS-linked mutant SOD1 produces a locomotor defect associated with aggregation and synaptic dysfunction when expressed in neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiou; Farr, George W; Hall, David H; Li, Fei; Furtak, Krystyna; Dreier, Lars; Horwich, Arthur L

    2009-01-01

    The nature of toxic effects exerted on neurons by misfolded proteins, occurring in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, is poorly understood. One approach to this problem is to measure effects when such proteins are expressed in heterologous neurons. We report on effects of an ALS-associated, misfolding-prone mutant human SOD1, G85R, when expressed in the neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. Stable mutant transgenic animals, but not wild-type human SOD1 transgenics, exhibited a strong locomotor defect associated with the presence, specifically in mutant animals, of both soluble oligomers and insoluble aggregates of G85R protein. A whole-genome RNAi screen identified chaperones and other components whose deficiency increased aggregation and further diminished locomotion. The nature of the locomotor defect was investigated. Mutant animals were resistant to paralysis by the cholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb, while exhibiting normal sensitivity to the cholinergic agonist levamisole and normal muscle morphology. When fluorescently labeled presynaptic components were examined in the dorsal nerve cord, decreased numbers of puncta corresponding to neuromuscular junctions were observed in mutant animals and brightness was also diminished. At the EM level, mutant animals exhibited a reduced number of synaptic vesicles. Neurotoxicity in this system thus appears to be mediated by misfolded SOD1 and is exerted on synaptic vesicle biogenesis and/or trafficking. PMID:19165329

  3. Intra-host competition between nef-defective escape mutants and wild-type human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Altes, H K; Jansen, V A

    2000-01-01

    Various forms of nef genes with deletions at conserved positions along the sequence have been reported to persist in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected patients. We investigate the forces maintaining such variants in the proviral population. The main selection pressures are preservation of function and host immune response. The crippled Nef protein might have fewer epitopes, and as such be less visible to the specific immune response, but it will lose some function. Does a trade-off between avoidance of the immune response and loss of function explain the dynamics of the crippled virus found in the patients? To answer this question, we formulated a deterministic model of the virus-host interactions. We found that when the crippled protein presents few epitopes and suffers little loss of function, the two viral types can coexist. Otherwise, the wild-type comes to prevail. The mutant form might initially dominate, but as the selective pressure by the CD84+ T cells decreases over the course of infection, the advantage for the crippled form of losing epitopes disappears. Hence, we go from a situation of coexistence of wild-type and mutant, to a situation of only full-length nef. The results are discussed in the context of the suggested use of live attenuated vaccines having deletions in nef. PMID:10687825

  4. Mutant huntingtin causes defective actin remodeling during stress: defining a new role for transglutaminase 2 in neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Munsie, Lise; Caron, Nicholas; Atwal, Randy Singh; Marsden, Ian; Wild, Edward J.; Bamburg, James R.; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Truant, Ray

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG tract in the Interesting transcript 15 (IT15) gene encoding the 350 kDa huntingtin protein. Cellular stresses can trigger the release of huntingtin from the endoplasmic reticulum, allowing huntingtin nuclear entry. Here, we show that endogenous, full-length huntingtin localizes to nuclear cofilin–actin rods during stress and is required for the proper stress response involving actin remodeling. Mutant huntingtin induces a dominant, persistent nuclear rod phenotype similar to that described in Alzheimer's disease for cytoplasmic cofilin–actin rods. Using live cell temporal studies, we show that this stress response is similarly impaired when mutant huntingtin is present, or when normal huntingtin levels are reduced. In clinical lymphocyte samples from HD patients, we have quantitatively detected cross-linked complexes of actin and cofilin with complex formation varying in correlation with disease progression. By live cell fluorescence lifetime imaging measurement–Förster resonant energy transfer studies and western blot assays, we quantitatively observed that stress-activated tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is responsible for the actin–cofilin covalent cross-linking observed in HD. These data support a direct role for huntingtin in nuclear actin re-organization, and describe a new pathogenic mechanism for aberrant TG2 enzymatic hyperactivity in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21355047

  5. myosin 7aa(-/-) mutant zebrafish show mild photoreceptor degeneration and reduced electroretinographic responses.

    PubMed

    Wasfy, Meagan M; Matsui, Jonathan I; Miller, Jessica; Dowling, John E; Perkins, Brian D

    2014-05-01

    Mutations in myosin VIIa (MYO7A) cause Usher Syndrome 1B (USH1B), a disease characterized by the combination of sensorineural hearing loss and visual impairment termed retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Although the shaker-1 mouse model of USH1B exists, only minor defects in the retina have been observed during its lifespan. Previous studies of the zebrafish mariner mutant, which also carries a mutation in myo7aa, revealed balance and hearing defects in the mutants but the retinal phenotype has not been described. We found elevated cell death in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of myo7aa(-/-) mutants. While myo7aa(-/-) mutants retained visual behaviors in the optokinetic reflex (OKR) assay, electroretinogram (ERG) recordings revealed a significant decrease in both a- and b-wave amplitudes in mutant animals, but not a change in ERG threshold sensitivity. Immunohistochemistry showed mislocalization of rod and blue cone opsins and reduced expression of rod-specific markers in the myo7aa(-/-) ONL, providing further evidence that the photoreceptor degeneration observed represents the initial stages of the RP. Further, constant light exposure resulted in widespread photoreceptor degeneration and the appearance of large holes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). No differences were observed in the retinomotor movements of the photoreceptors or in melanosome migration within the RPE, suggesting that myo7aa(-/-) does not function in these processes in teleosts. These results indicate that the zebrafish myo7aa(-/-) mutant is a useful animal model for the RP seen in humans with USH1B. PMID:24698764

  6. myosin 7aa−/− mutant zebrafish show mild photoreceptor degeneration and reduced electroretinographic responses

    PubMed Central

    Wasfy, Meagan M.; Matsui, Jonathan I.; Miller, Jessica; Dowling, John E.; Perkins, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in myosin VIIa (MYO7A) cause Usher syndrome 1B (USH1B), a disease characterized by the combination of sensorineural hearing loss and visual impairment termed retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Although the shaker-1 mouse model of USH1B exists, only minor defects in the retina have been observed during its lifespan. Previous studies of the zebrafish mariner mutant, which also carries a mutation in myo7aa, revealed balance and hearing defects in the mutants but the retinal phenotype has not been described. We found elevated cell death in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of myo7aa−/− mutants. While myo7aa−/− mutants retained visual behaviors in the optokinetic reflex (OKR) assay, electroretinogram (ERG) recordings revealed a significant decrease in both a- and b-wave amplitudes in mutant animals, but not a change in ERG threshold sensitivity. Immunohistochemistry showed mislocalization of rod and blue cone opsins and reduced expression of rod-specific markers in the myo7aa−/− ONL, providing further evidence that the photoreceptor degeneration observed represents the initial stages of the RP. Further, constant light exposure resulted in widespread photoreceptor degeneration and the appearance of large holes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). No differences were observed in the retinomotor movements of the photoreceptors or in melanosome migration within the RPE, suggesting that myo7aa−/− does not function in these processes in teleosts. These results indicate that the zebrafish myo7aa−/− mutant is a useful animal model for the RP seen in humans with USH1B. PMID:24698764

  7. PTEN Redundancy: Overexpressing lpten, a Homolog of Dictyostelium discoideum ptenA, the Ortholog of Human PTEN, Rescues All Behavioral Defects of the Mutant ptenA−

    PubMed Central

    Lusche, Daniel F.; Wessels, Deborah; Richardson, Nicole A.; Russell, Kanoe B.; Hanson, Brett M.; Soll, Benjamin A.; Lin, Benjamin H.; Soll, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN are associated with a significant proportion of human cancers. Because the human genome also contains several homologs of PTEN, we considered the hypothesis that if a homolog, functionally redundant with PTEN, can be overexpressed, it may rescue the defects of a PTEN mutant. We have performed an initial test of this hypothesis in the model system Dictyostelium discoideum, which contains an ortholog of human PTEN, ptenA. Deletion of ptenA results in defects in motility, chemotaxis, aggregation and multicellular morphogenesis. D. discoideum also contains lpten, a newly discovered homolog of ptenA. Overexpressing lpten completely rescues all developmental and behavioral defects of the D. discoideum mutant ptenA−. This hypothesis must now be tested in human cells. PMID:25247494

  8. Improved cell survival by the reduction of immediate-early gene expression in replication-defective mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 but not by mutation of the virion host shutoff function.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P A; Wang, M J; Friedmann, T

    1994-01-01

    Derivatives of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) have elicited considerable interest as gene transfer vectors because of their ability to infect a wide range of cell types efficiently, including fully differentiated neurons. However, it has been found that infection of many types of cell with vectors derived from replication-defective mutants of HSV-1 is associated with cytopathic effects (CPE). We have previously shown that viral gene expression played an important role in the induction of CPE caused by an HSV-1 mutant deleted for the essential immediate-early gene 3 (IE 3) (P.A. Johnson, A. Miyanohara, F. Levine, T. Cahill, and T. Friedmann, J. Virol. 66:2952-2965, 1992). We have investigated which viral genes might be responsible for CPE by comparing the ability of each of the individual genes expressed by an IE 3 deletion mutant during a nonproductive infection to inhibit biochemical transformation after cotransfection of BHK or CV-1 cells with a selectable marker gene. Transfection of IE genes 1,2, and 4 individually all caused a marked inhibition of colony formation, while transfection of IE 5 and the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase had little effect. These results suggested that it would be necessary to mutate or reduce the expression of nearly all HSV-1 IE genes to reduce virus-induced CPE. Therefore, we have used VP16 mutants, which are unable to transinduce IE gene expression (C. I. Ace, T. A. McKee, J. M. Ryan, J. M. Cameron, and C. M. Preston, J. Virol. 63:2260-2269, 1989), to derive two replication-defective strains: 14H delta 3, which is deleted for both copies of IE 3, and in 1850 delta 42, which has a deletion in the essential early gene UL42. The IE 3-VP16 double mutant, 14H delta 3, is significantly less toxic than a single IE 3 deletion mutant over a range of multiplicities of infection, as measured in a cell-killing assay, and has an enhanced ability to persist in infected cells in a biologically retrievable form. In contrast, the UL

  9. Herpes simplex virus mutants defective in the virion-associated shutoff of host polypeptide synthesis and exhibiting abnormal synthesis of alpha (immediate early) viral polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Read, G S; Frenkel, N

    1983-01-01

    Six mutants isolated from herpes simplex virus type 1 were judged to be defective with respect to the virion-associated function acting to rapidly shut off host polypeptide synthesis in herpes simplex virus-infected cells. The mutants were capable of proper entry into the cells, but, unlike the parent wild-type virus, they failed to shut off host polypeptide syntehsis in the presence of actinomycin D. They were consequently designated as virion-associated host shutoff (vhs) mutants. In the presence of actinomycin D, three of the mutants, vhs1, -2, and -3, failed to shut off the host at both 34 and 39 degrees C, whereas vhs4, -5, and -6 exhibited a temperature-dependent vhs phenotype. Since the mutants were capable of growth at 34 degrees C, it appeared that the vhs function was not essential for virus replication in cultured cells. Temperature-shift experiments performed with the vhs4 mutant showed that an active vhs function was required throughout the shutoff process and that, once established, the translational shutoff could not be reversed. In the absence of actinomycin D, the mutants induced a generalized, secondary shutoff of host translation, which required the synthesis of beta (early) or gamma (late) viral polypeptide(s). The vhs mutants appeared to be defective also with respect to post-transcriptional shutoff of alpha (immediate early) viral gene expression, since (i) cells infected with mutant viruses overproduced alpha viral polypeptides, (ii) there was an increased functional stability of alpha mRNA in the vhs1 mutant virus-infected cells, and (iii) superinfection of vhs1-infected cells with wild-type virus, in the presence of actinomycin D, resulted in a more pronounced shutoff of alpha polypeptide synthesis from preformed alpha mRNA than equivalent superinfection with vhs1 virus. The data suggest that the synthesis of alpha polypeptides in wild-type virus infections is subject to a negative post-transcriptional control involving viral gene product

  10. Characterization of papillomavirus E1 helicase mutants defective for interaction with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9.

    PubMed

    Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Brault, Karine; Titolo, Steve; Howley, Peter M; Archambault, Jacques

    2009-12-20

    The E1 helicase from BPV and HPV16 interacts with Ubc9 to facilitate viral genome replication. We report that HPV11 E1 also interacts with Ubc9 in vitro and in the yeast two-hybrid system. Residues in E1 involved in oligomerization (353-435) were sufficient for binding to Ubc9 in vitro, but the origin-binding and ATPase domains were additionally required in yeast. Nuclear accumulation of BPV E1 was shown previously to depend on its interaction with Ubc9 and sumoylation on lysine 514. In contrast, HPV11 and HPV16 E1 mutants defective for Ubc9 binding remained nuclear even when the SUMO pathway was inhibited. Furthermore, we found that K514 in BPV E1 and the analogous K559 in HPV11 E1 are not essential for nuclear accumulation of E1. These results suggest that the interaction of E1 with Ubc9 is not essential for its nuclear accumulation but, rather, depends on its oligomerization and binding to DNA and ATP. PMID:19836047

  11. Characterization of papillomavirus E1 helicase mutants defective for interaction with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9

    SciTech Connect

    Fradet-Turcotte, Amelie; Brault, Karine; Titolo, Steve; Howley, Peter M.; Archambault, Jacques

    2009-12-20

    The E1 helicase from BPV and HPV16 interacts with Ubc9 to facilitate viral genome replication. We report that HPV11 E1 also interacts with Ubc9 in vitro and in the yeast two-hybrid system. Residues in E1 involved in oligomerization (353-435) were sufficient for binding to Ubc9 in vitro, but the origin-binding and ATPase domains were additionally required in yeast. Nuclear accumulation of BPV E1 was shown previously to depend on its interaction with Ubc9 and sumoylation on lysine 514. In contrast, HPV11 and HPV16 E1 mutants defective for Ubc9 binding remained nuclear even when the SUMO pathway was inhibited. Furthermore, we found that K514 in BPV E1 and the analogous K559 in HPV11 E1 are not essential for nuclear accumulation of E1. These results suggest that the interaction of E1 with Ubc9 is not essential for its nuclear accumulation but, rather, depends on its oligomerization and binding to DNA and ATP.

  12. High-Throughput Cloning of Temperature-Sensitive Caenorhabditis elegans Mutants with Adult Syncytial Germline Membrane Architecture Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, Josh; Yochem, John; Chuang, Chien-Hui; Sugioka, Kenji; Connolly, Amy A.; Bowerman, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The adult Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite gonad consists of two mirror-symmetric U-shaped arms, with germline nuclei located peripherally in the distal regions of each arm. The nuclei are housed within membrane cubicles that are open to the center, forming a syncytium with a shared cytoplasmic core called the rachis. As the distal germline nuclei progress through meiotic prophase, they move proximally and eventually cellularize as their compartments grow in size. The development and maintenance of this complex and dynamic germline membrane architecture are relatively unexplored, and we have used a forward genetic screen to identify 20 temperature-sensitive mutations in 19 essential genes that cause defects in the germline membrane architecture. Using a combined genome-wide SNP mapping and whole genome sequencing strategy, we have identified the causal mutations in 10 of these mutants. Four of the genes we have identified are conserved, with orthologs known to be involved in membrane biology, and are required for proper development or maintenance of the adult germline membrane architecture. This work provides a starting point for further investigation of the mechanisms that control the dynamics of syncytial membrane architecture during adult oogenesis. PMID:26311651

  13. Endometrial cancer-associated mutants of SPOP are defective in regulating estrogen receptor-α protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Gao, K; Jin, X; Ma, J; Peng, J; Wumaier, R; Tang, Y; Zhang, Y; An, J; Yan, Q; Dong, Y; Huang, H; Yu, L; Wang, C

    2015-01-01

    Increasing amounts of evidence strongly suggests that dysregulation of ubiquitin-proteasome system is closely associated with cancer pathogenesis. Speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) is an adapter protein of the CUL3-based E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes. It selectively recruits substrates for their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. Recently, several exome-sequencing studies of endometrial cancer revealed high frequency somatic mutations in SPOP (5.7-10%). However, how SPOP mutations contribute to endometrial cancer remains unknown. Here, we identified estrogen receptor-α (ERα), a major endometrial cancer promoter, as a substrate for the SPOP-CUL3-RBX1 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. SPOP specifically recognizes multiple Ser/Thr (S/T)-rich degrons located in the AF2 domain of ERα, and triggers ERα degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. SPOP depletion by siRNAs promotes endometrial cells growth. Strikingly, endometrial cancer-associated mutants of SPOP are defective in regulating ERα degradation and ubiquitination. Furthermore, we found that SPOP participates in estrogen-induced ERα degradation and transactivation. Our study revealed novel molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of ERα protein homeostasis in physiological and pathological conditions, and provided insights in understanding the relationship between SPOP mutations and the development of endometrial cancer. PMID:25766326

  14. Glycosylation defects and virulence phenotypes of Leishmania mexicana phosphomannomutase and dolicholphosphate-mannose synthase gene deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Garami, A; Mehlert, A; Ilg, T

    2001-12-01

    Leishmania parasites synthesize an abundance of mannose (Man)-containing glycoconjugates thought to be essential for virulence to the mammalian host and for viability. These glycoconjugates include lipophosphoglycan (LPG), proteophosphoglycans (PPGs), glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins, glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPLs), and N-glycans. A prerequisite for their biosynthesis is an ample supply of the Man donors GDP-Man and dolicholphosphate-Man. We have cloned from Leishmania mexicana the gene encoding the enzyme phosphomannomutase (PMM) and the previously described dolicholphosphate-Man synthase gene (DPMS) that are involved in Man activation. Surprisingly, gene deletion experiments resulted in viable parasite lines lacking the respective open reading frames (DeltaPMM and DeltaDPMS), a result against expectation and in contrast to the lethal phenotype observed in gene deletion experiments with fungi. L. mexicana DeltaDPMS exhibits a selective defect in LPG, protein GPI anchor, and GIPL biosynthesis, but despite the absence of these structures, which have been implicated in parasite virulence and viability, the mutant remains infectious to macrophages and mice. By contrast, L. mexicana DeltaPMM are largely devoid of all known Man-containing glycoconjugates and are unable to establish an infection in mouse macrophages or the living animal. Our results define Man activation leading to GDP-Man as a virulence pathway in Leishmania. PMID:11689705

  15. Bacillus subtilis Mutants with Knockouts of the Genes Encoding Ribonucleases RNase Y and RNase J1 Are Viable, with Major Defects in Cell Morphology, Sporulation, and Competence

    PubMed Central

    Figaro, Sabine; Durand, Sylvain; Gilet, Laetitia; Cayet, Nadège; Sachse, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The genes encoding the ribonucleases RNase J1 and RNase Y have long been considered essential for Bacillus subtilis cell viability, even before there was concrete knowledge of their function as two of the most important enzymes for RNA turnover in this organism. Here we show that this characterization is incorrect and that ΔrnjA and Δrny mutants are both viable. As expected, both strains grow relatively slowly, with doubling times in the hour range in rich medium. Knockout mutants have major defects in their sporulation and competence development programs. Both mutants are hypersensitive to a wide range of antibiotics and have dramatic alterations to their cell morphologies, suggestive of cell envelope defects. Indeed, RNase Y mutants are significantly smaller in diameter than wild-type strains and have a very disordered peptidoglycan layer. Strains lacking RNase J1 form long filaments in tight spirals, reminiscent of mutants of the actin-like proteins (Mre) involved in cell shape determination. Finally, we combined the rnjA and rny mutations with mutations in other components of the degradation machinery and show that many of these strains are also viable. The implications for the two known RNA degradation pathways of B. subtilis are discussed. PMID:23504012

  16. Identification of six loci in which mutations partially restore peroxisome biogenesis and/or alleviate the metabolic defect of pex2 mutants in podospora.

    PubMed Central

    Ruprich-Robert, Gwenaël; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique; Zickler, Denise; Panvier-Adoutte, Arlette; Picard, Marguerite

    2002-01-01

    Peroxins (PEX) are proteins required for peroxisome biogenesis. Mutations in PEX genes cause lethal diseases in humans, metabolic defects in yeasts, and developmental disfunctions in plants and filamentous fungi. Here we describe the first large-scale screening for suppressors of a pex mutation. In Podospora anserina, pex2 mutants exhibit a metabolic defect [inability to grow on medium containing oleic acid (OA medium) as sole carbon source] and a developmental defect (inability to differentiate asci in homozygous crosses). Sixty-three mutations able to restore growth of pex2 mutants on OA medium have been analyzed. They fall in six loci (suo1 to suo6) and act as dominant, allele-nonspecific suppressors. Most suo mutations have pleiotropic effects in a pex2(+) background: formation of unripe ascospores (all loci except suo5 and suo6), impaired growth on OA medium (all loci except suo4 and suo6), or sexual defects (suo4). Using immunofluorescence and GFP staining, we show that peroxisome biogenesis is partially restored along with a low level of ascus differentiation in pex2 mutant strains carrying either the suo5 or the suo6 mutations. The data are discussed with respect to beta-oxidation of fatty acids, peroxisome biogenesis, and cell differentiation. PMID:12136013

  17. Diseases Associated with Defective Responses to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    O’Driscoll, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Within the last decade, multiple novel congenital human disorders have been described with genetic defects in known and/or novel components of several well-known DNA repair and damage response pathways. Examples include disorders of impaired nucleotide excision repair, DNA double-strand and single-strand break repair, as well as compromised DNA damage-induced signal transduction including phosphorylation and ubiquitination. These conditions further reinforce the importance of multiple genome stability pathways for health and development in humans. Furthermore, these conditions inform our knowledge of the biology of the mechanics of genome stability and in some cases provide potential routes to help exploit these pathways therapeutically. Here, I will review a selection of these exciting findings from the perspective of the disorders themselves, describing how they were identified, how genotype informs phenotype, and how these defects contribute to our growing understanding of genome stability pathways. PMID:23209155

  18. Ambroxol-induced rescue of defective glucocerebrosidase is associated with increased LIMP-2 and saposin C levels in GBA1 mutant Parkinson's disease cells.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Giulia; Ghezzi, Cristina; Zangaglia, Roberta; Levandis, Giovanna; Pacchetti, Claudio; Blandini, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    Heterozygous mutations in GBA1 gene, encoding for lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase), are a major risk factor for sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). Defective GCase has been reported in fibroblasts of GBA1-mutant PD patients and pharmacological chaperone ambroxol has been shown to correct such defect. To further explore this issue, we investigated GCase and elements supporting GCase function and trafficking in fibroblasts from sporadic PD patients--with or without heterozygous GBA1 mutations--and healthy subjects, in basal conditions and following in vitro exposure to ambroxol. We assessed protein levels of GCase, lysosomal integral membrane protein-2 (LIMP-2), which mediates GCase trafficking to lysosomes, GCase endogenous activator saposin (Sap) C and parkin, which is involved in degradation of defective GCase. We also measured activities of GCase and cathepsin D, which cleaves Sap C from precursor prosaposin. GCase activity was reduced in fibroblasts from GBA1-mutant patients and ambroxol corrected this defect. Ambroxol increased cathepsin D activity, GCase and Sap C protein levels in all groups, while LIMP-2 levels were increased only in GBA1-mutant PD fibroblasts. Parkin levels were slightly increased only in the PD group without GBA1 mutations and were not significantly modified by ambroxol. Our study confirms that GCase activity is deficient in fibroblasts of GBA1-mutant PD patients and that ambroxol corrects this defect. The drug increased Sap C and LIMP-2 protein levels, without interfering with parkin. These results confirm that chemical chaperone ambroxol modulates lysosomal markers, further highlighting targets that may be exploited for innovative PD therapeutic strategies. PMID:26094596

  19. Flocculation-Related Gene Identification by Whole-Genome Sequencing of Thauera aminoaromatica MZ1T Floc-Defective Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Allen, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Thauera aminoaromatica MZ1T, a floc-forming bacterium isolated from an industrial activated-sludge wastewater treatment plant, overproduces exopolysaccharide (EPS), leading to viscous bulking. This phenomenon results in poor sludge settling and dewatering during the clarification process. To identify genes responsible for bacterial flocculation, a whole-genome phenotypic-sequencing technique was applied. Genomic DNA of MZ1T flocculation-deficient mutants was subjected to massively parallel sequencing. The resultant high-quality reads were assembled and compared to the reference genome of the wild type (WT). We identified nine nonsynonymous mutations and one nonsense mutation putatively involved in EPS biosynthesis. Complementation of the nonsense mutation located in an EPS deacetylase gene restored the flocculating phenotype. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of EPS isolated from the wild type showed a reduced C=O peak of the N-acetyl group at 1,665 cm−1 compared to the spectra of MZ1T floc-deficient mutant EPS, suggesting that the WT EPS was partially deacetylated. Gene expression analysis also demonstrated that the putative deacetylase gene transcript increased before flocculation occurred. These data suggest that targeting deacetylation processes via direct chemical modification of EPS or enzyme inhibition may prove useful in combating viscous bulking in this and related bacteria. PMID:26712552

  20. Flocculation-Related Gene Identification by Whole-Genome Sequencing of Thauera aminoaromatica MZ1T Floc-Defective Mutants.

    PubMed

    Prombutara, P; Allen, M S

    2015-01-01

    Thauera aminoaromatica MZ1T, a floc-forming bacterium isolated from an industrial activated-sludge wastewater treatment plant, overproduces exopolysaccharide (EPS), leading to viscous bulking. This phenomenon results in poor sludge settling and dewatering during the clarification process. To identify genes responsible for bacterial flocculation, a whole-genome phenotypic-sequencing technique was applied. Genomic DNA of MZ1T flocculation-deficient mutants was subjected to massively parallel sequencing. The resultant high-quality reads were assembled and compared to the reference genome of the wild type (WT). We identified nine nonsynonymous mutations and one nonsense mutation putatively involved in EPS biosynthesis. Complementation of the nonsense mutation located in an EPS deacetylase gene restored the flocculating phenotype. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of EPS isolated from the wild type showed a reduced C=O peak of the N-acetyl group at 1,665 cm(-1) compared to the spectra of MZ1T floc-deficient mutant EPS, suggesting that the WT EPS was partially deacetylated. Gene expression analysis also demonstrated that the putative deacetylase gene transcript increased before flocculation occurred. These data suggest that targeting deacetylation processes via direct chemical modification of EPS or enzyme inhibition may prove useful in combating viscous bulking in this and related bacteria. PMID:26712552

  1. Cyclopropane fatty acid synthase mutants of probiotic human-derived Lactobacillus reuteri are defective in TNF inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Saulnier, Delphine; Thomas, Carissa M; Versalovic, James

    2011-01-01

    Although commensal microbes have been shown to modulate host immune responses, many of the bacterial factors that mediate immune regulation remain unidentified. Select strains of human-derived Lactobacillus reuteri synthesize immunomodulins that potently inhibit production of the inflammatory cytokine TNF. In this study, genetic and genomic approaches were used to identify and investigate L. reuteri genes required for human TNF immunomodulatory activity. Analysis of membrane fatty acids from multiple L. reuteri strains cultured in MRS medium showed that only TNF inhibitory strains produced the cyclopropane fatty acid (CFA) lactobacillic acid. The enzyme cyclopropane fatty acid synthase is required for synthesis of CFAs such as lactobacillic acid, therefore the cfa gene was inactivated and supernatants from the cfa mutant strain were assayed for TNF inhibitory activity. We found that supernatants from the wild-type strain, but not the cfa mutant, suppressed TNF production by activated THP-1 human monocytoid cells. Although this suggested a direct role for lactobacillic acid in immunomodulation, purified lactobacillic acid did not suppress TNF at physiologically relevant concentrations. We further analyzed TNF inhibitory and TNF non-inhibitory strains under different growth conditions and found that lactobacillic acid production did not correlate with TNF inhibition. These results indicate that cfa indirectly contributed to L. reuteri immunomodulatory activity and suggest that other mechanisms, such as decreased membrane fluidity or altered expression of immunomodulins, result in the loss of TNF inhibitory activity. By increasing our understanding of immunomodulation by probiotic species, beneficial microbes can be rationally selected to alleviate intestinal inflammation. PMID:21637024

  2. Aberrant Double-Strand Break Repair Resulting in Half Crossovers in Mutants Defective for Rad51 or the DNA Polymerase δ Complex▿

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine E.; Lam, Alicia F.; Symington, Lorraine S.

    2009-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an error-free mechanism for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Most DSB repair events occur by gene conversion limiting loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for markers downstream of the site of repair and restricting deleterious chromosome rearrangements. DSBs with only one end available for repair undergo strand invasion into a homologous duplex DNA, followed by replication to the chromosome end (break-induced replication [BIR]), leading to LOH for all markers downstream of the site of strand invasion. Using a transformation-based assay system, we show that most of the apparent BIR events that arise in diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae rad51Δ mutants are due to half crossovers instead of BIR. These events lead to extensive LOH because one arm of chromosome III is deleted. This outcome is also observed in pol32Δ and pol3-ct mutants, defective for components of the DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ) complex. The half crossovers formed in Pol δ complex mutants show evidence of limited homology-dependent DNA synthesis and are partially Mus81 dependent, suggesting that strand invasion occurs and the stalled intermediate is subsequently cleaved. In contrast to rad51Δ mutants, the Pol δ complex mutants are proficient for repair of a 238-bp gap by gene conversion. Thus, the BIR defect observed for rad51 mutants is due to strand invasion failure, whereas the Pol δ complex mutants are proficient for strand invasion but unable to complete extensive tracts of recombination-initiated DNA synthesis. PMID:19139272

  3. Unveiling the degradative route of the V247M α-sarcoglycan mutant responsible for LGMD-2D.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Elisa; Fanin, Marina; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Betto, Romeo; Sandonà, Dorianna

    2014-07-15

    Many membrane and secretory proteins that fail to pass quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are dislocated into the cytosol and degraded by the proteasome. In applying rigid rules, however, quality control sometimes discharges proteins that, even though defective, retain their function. The unnecessary removal of such proteins represents the pathogenetic hallmark of diverse genetic diseases, in the case of ΔF508 mutant of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator being probably the best known example. Recently, the inappropriate proteasomal degradation of skeletal muscle sarcoglycans (α, β, γ and δ) with missense mutation has been proposed to be at the bases of mild-to-severe forms of limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) known as type 2D, 2E, 2C and 2F, respectively. The quality control pathway responsible for sarcoglycan mutant disposal, however, is so far unexplored. Here we reveal key components of the degradative route of V247M α-sarcoglycan mutant, the second most frequently reported mutation in LGMD-2D. The disclosure of the pathway, which is led by the E3 ligases HRD1 and RFP2, permits to identify new potential druggable targets of a disease for which no effective therapy is at present available. Notably, we show that the pharmacological inhibition of HRD1 activity rescues the expression of V247-α-sarcoglycan both in a heterologous cell model and in myotubes derived from a LGMD-2D patient carrying the L31P/V247M mutations. This represents the first evidence that the activity of E3 ligases, the enzymes in charge of mutant fate, can be eligible for drug interventions to treat sarcoglycanopathy. PMID:24565866

  4. Structural Studies of Lipopolysaccharide-defective Mutants from Brucella melitensis Identify a Core Oligosaccharide Critical in Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Carolina; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Ståhle, Jonas; Holst, Otto; Iriarte, Maite; Zhao, Yun; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Hanniffy, Seán; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moriyón, Ignacio; Widmalm, Göran

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the lipooligosaccharides from Brucella melitensis mutants affected in the WbkD and ManBcore proteins have been fully characterized using NMR spectroscopy. The results revealed that disruption of wbkD gives rise to a rough lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) with a complete core structure (β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-α-Kdop-(2→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)-β-d-GlcpN-(1→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)]-β-d-GlcpN-(1→3)-α-d-Manp-(1→5)]-α-Kdop-(2→6)-β-d-GlcpN3N4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN3N1P), in addition to components lacking one of the terminal β-d-GlcpN and/or the β-d-Glcp residues (48 and 17%, respectively). These structures were identical to those of the R-LPS from B. melitensis EP, a strain simultaneously expressing both smooth and R-LPS, also studied herein. In contrast, disruption of manBcore gives rise to a deep-rough pentasaccharide core (β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-α-Kdop-(2→4)-α-Kdop-(2→6)-β-d-GlcpN3N4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN3N1P) as the major component (63%), as well as a minor tetrasaccharide component lacking the terminal β-d-Glcp residue (37%). These results are in agreement with the predicted functions of the WbkD (glycosyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of the O-antigen) and ManBcore proteins (phosphomannomutase involved in the biosynthesis of a mannosyl precursor needed for the biosynthesis of the core and O-antigen). We also report that deletion of B. melitensis wadC removes the core oligosaccharide branch not linked to the O-antigen causing an increase in overall negative charge of the remaining LPS inner section. This is in agreement with the mannosyltransferase role predicted for WadC and the lack of GlcpN residues in the defective core oligosaccharide. Despite carrying the O-antigen essential in B. melitensis virulence, the core deficiency in the wadC mutant structure resulted in a more efficient detection by innate immunity and attenuation, proving the role of the β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)-β-d-GlcpN-(1→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)]-β-d-GlcpN-(1→3)-

  5. An efficient deletion mutant packaging system for defective herpes simplex virus vectors: Potential applications to human gene therapy and neuronal physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, A.I.; Keyomarsi, K.; Bryan, J.; Pardee, A.B. )

    1990-11-01

    The authors have previously described a defective herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vector system that permits that introduction of virtually any gene into nonmitotic cells. pHSVlac, the prototype vector, stably expresses Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase from a constitutive promoter in many human cell lines, in cultured rat neurons from throughout the nervous system, and in cells in the adult rat brain. HSV-1 vectors expressing other genes may prove useful for studying neuronal physiology or performing human gene therapy for neurological diseases, such as Parkinson disease or brain tumors. A HSV-1 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant, ts K, has been used as helper virus; ts mutants revert to wild type. In contrast, HSV-1 deletion mutants essentially cannot revert to wild type; therefore, use of a deletion mutant as helper virus might permit human gene therapy with HSV-1 vectors. They now report an efficient packaging system for HSV-1 VECTORS USING A DELETION MUTANT, d30EBA, as helper virus; virus is grown on the complementing cell line M64A. pHSVlac virus prepared using the deletion mutant packaging system stably expresses {beta}-galactosidase in cultured rat sympathetic neurons and glia. Both D30EBA and ts K contain a mutation in the IE3 gene of HSV-1 strain 17 and have the same phenotype; therefore, changing the helper virus from ts K to D30EBA does not alter the host range or other properties of the HSV-1 vector system.

  6. Severity of infantile nystagmus syndrome-like ocular motor phenotype is linked to the extent of the underlying optic nerve projection defect in zebrafish belladonna mutant.

    PubMed

    Huber-Reggi, Sabina P; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Grimm, Lea; Straumann, Dominik; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Huang, Melody Ying-Yu

    2012-12-12

    Infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS), formerly known as congenital nystagmus, is an ocular motor disorder in humans characterized by spontaneous eye oscillations (SOs) and, in several cases, reversed optokinetic response (OKR). Its etiology and pathomechanism is largely unknown, but misrouting of the optic nerve has been observed in some patients. Likewise, optic nerve misrouting, a reversed OKR and SOs with INS-like waveforms are observed in zebrafish belladonna (bel) mutants. We aimed to investigate whether and how misrouting of the optic nerve correlates with the ocular motor behaviors in bel larvae. OKR and SOs were quantified and subsequently the optic nerve fibers were stained with fluorescent lipophilic dyes. Eye velocity during OKR was reduced in larvae with few misprojecting optic nerve fibers and reversed in larvae with a substantial fraction of misprojecting fibers. All larvae with reversed OKR also displayed SOs. A stronger reversed OKR correlated with more frequent SOs. Since we did not find a correlation between additional retinal defects and ocular motor behavior, we suggest that axon misrouting is in fact origin of INS in the zebrafish animal model. Depending on the ratio between misprojecting ipsilateral and correctly projecting contralateral fibers, the negative feedback loop normally regulating OKR can turn into a positive loop, resulting in an increase in retinal slip. Our data not only give new insights into the etiology of INS but may also be of interest for studies on how the brain deals with and adapts to conflicting inputs. PMID:23238723

  7. Expression of a putative ATPase suppresses the growth defect of a yeast potassium transport mutant: identification of a mammalian member of the Clp/HSP104 family.

    PubMed

    Périer, F; Radeke, C M; Raab-Graham, K F; Vandenberg, C A

    1995-01-23

    A cDNA encoding a novel mammalian member of the Clp/HSP104 family was isolated from a mouse macrophage-like cell line (J774.1) cDNA library by suppression of the growth defect of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae trk1 trk2 double mutant. The full-length version of this cDNA, termed SKD3, encodes a putative 76-kDa protein of 677 amino acids (aa). The deduced aa sequence of the SKD3 polypeptide contains four ankyrin-like repeats in the N-terminal domain and a single ATP-binding consensus site in the C-terminal domain. The 378-aa C-terminal domain of SKD3 has 57-64% similarity (30-40% identity) with members of the Clp/HSP104 family, including the ClpA regulatory subunit of the Clp protease and S. cerevisiae heat-shock protein 104. Northern analysis showed that the 2.3-kb SKD3 transcript is present in a wide variety of tissues, is abundant in mouse heart, skeletal muscle and kidney, and is most abundant in testis. Members of the Clp/HSP104 family have been identified previously from bacteria, yeast and chloroplasts, and are ATPases regulating Clp protease activity and specificity, or mediating cellular responses involved in thermotolerance. SKD3 is the first member of this protein family identified in a higher eukaryote. PMID:7835694

  8. Genetic analysis of calcium spiking responses in nodulation mutants of Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Wais, Rebecca J.; Galera, Christine; Oldroyd, Giles; Catoira, Romy; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Cook, Douglas; Gough, Clare; Dénarié, Jean; Long, Sharon R.

    2000-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti results in the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of the host plant. The early stages of nodule formation are induced by bacteria via lipochitooligosaccharide signals known as Nod factors (NFs). These NFs are structurally specific for bacterium–host pairs and are sufficient to cause a range of early responses involved in the host developmental program. Early events in the signal transduction of NFs are not well defined. We have previously reported that Medicago sativa root hairs exposed to NF display sharp oscillations of cytoplasmic calcium ion concentration (calcium spiking). To assess the possible role of calcium spiking in the nodulation response, we analyzed M. truncatula mutants in five complementation groups. Each of the plant mutants is completely Nod− and is blocked at early stages of the symbiosis. We defined two genes, DMI1 and DMI2, required in common for early steps of infection and nodulation and for calcium spiking. Another mutant, altered in the DMI3 gene, has a similar mutant phenotype to dmi1 and dmi2 mutants but displays normal calcium spiking. The calcium behavior thus implies that the DMI3 gene acts either downstream of calcium spiking or downstream of a common branch point for the calcium response and the later nodulation responses. Two additional mutants, altered in the NSP and HCL genes, which show root hair branching in response to NF, are normal for calcium spiking. This system provides an opportunity to use genetics to study ligand-stimulated calcium spiking as a signal transduction event. PMID:11078514

  9. Identification and characterization of a double-stranded RNA- reovirus temperature-sensitive mutant defective in minor core protein mu2.

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, K M

    1996-01-01

    A newly identified temperature-sensitive mutant whose defect was mapped to the reovirus M1 gene (minor core protein mu2) was studied to better understand the functions of this virion protein. Sequence determination of the Ml gene of this mutant (tsH11.2) revealed a predicted methionine-to-threonine alteration at amino acid 399 and a change from proline to histidine at amino acid 414. The mutant made normal amounts of single-stranded RNA, both in in vitro transcriptase assays and in infected cells, and normal amounts of progeny viral protein at early times in a restrictive infection. However, tsH11.2 produced neither detectable progeny protein nor double-stranded RNA at late times in a restrictive infection. These studies indicate that mu2 plays a role in the conversion of reovirus mRNA to progeny double-stranded RNA. PMID:8676444

  10. Deletion of the cardiolipin-specific phospholipase Cld1 rescues growth and life span defects in the tafazzin mutant: implications for Barth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ye, Cunqi; Lou, Wenjia; Li, Yiran; Chatzispyrou, Iliana A; Hüttemann, Maik; Lee, Icksoo; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Vaz, Frédéric M; Chen, Shuliang; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2014-02-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) that is synthesized de novo is deacylated to monolysocardiolipin (MLCL), which is reacylated by tafazzin. Remodeled CL contains mostly unsaturated fatty acids. In eukaryotes, loss of tafazzin leads to growth and respiration defects, and in humans, this results in the life-threatening disorder Barth syndrome. Tafazzin deficiency causes a decrease in the CL/MLCL ratio and decreased unsaturated CL species. Which of these biochemical outcomes contributes to the physiological defects is not known. Yeast cells have a single CL-specific phospholipase, Cld1, that can be exploited to distinguish between these outcomes. The cld1Δ mutant has decreased unsaturated CL, but the CL/MLCL ratio is similar to that of wild type cells. We show that cld1Δ rescues growth, life span, and respiratory defects of the taz1Δ mutant. This suggests that defective growth and respiration in tafazzin-deficient cells are caused by the decreased CL/MLCL ratio and not by a deficiency in unsaturated CL. CLD1 expression is increased during respiratory growth and regulated by the heme activator protein transcriptional activation complex. Overexpression of CLD1 leads to decreased mitochondrial respiration and growth and instability of mitochondrial DNA. However, ATP concentrations are maintained by increasing glycolysis. We conclude that transcriptional regulation of Cld1-mediated deacylation of CL influences energy metabolism by modulating the relative contribution of glycolysis and respiration. PMID:24318983

  11. Isolation and characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mRNA transport-defective (mtr) mutants [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1994 Sep;126(6):1627

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms of mRNA transport in eukaryotes, we have isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants which accumulate poly(A)+ RNA in the nucleus at the restrictive temperature. A total of 21 recessive mutants were isolated and classified into 16 complementation groups. Backcrossed mRNA transport- defective strains from each complementation group have been analyzed. A strain which is ts for heat shock transcription factor was also analyzed since it also shows nuclear accumulation of poly(A)+ RNA at 37 degrees C. At 37 degrees C the mRNA of each mutant is characterized by atypically long polyA tails. Unlike ts pre-mRNA splicing mutants, these strains do not interrupt splicing of pre-mRNA at 37 degrees C; however four strains accumulate oversized RNA polymerase II transcripts. Some show inhibition of rRNA processing and a further subset of these strains is also characterized by inhibition of tRNA maturation. Several strains accumulate nuclear proteins in the cytoplasm when incubated at semipermissive temperature. Remarkably, many strains exhibit nucleolar fragmentation or enlargement at the restrictive temperature. Most strains show dramatic ultrastructural alterations of the nucleoplasm or nuclear membrane. Distinct mutants accumulate poly(A)+ RNA in characteristic patterns in the nucleus. PMID:8045930

  12. Assembly-defective point mutants of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag precursor phenotypically expressed in recombinant baculovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S S; Boulanger, P

    1993-01-01

    Two substitution mutants of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene product were isolated after nitrous acid mutagenesis of a recombinant baculovirus expressing a non-N-myristylated, p6-deleted Gag precursor (Pr49). Both mutants failed to assemble intracellular Gag virus-like particles, as does the parental recombinant, and therefore expressed a self-assembly defective (Sad) phenotype in insect cells. The mutations consisted of nonconservative changes involving highly conserved hydrophobic residues in the p24 domain, Leu to Pro at position 268 (L268P) and Leu to Ser at amino acid 322 (L322S). Experimental data suggested that the two mutated residues belonged to functionally different regions of the Gag precursor. (i) A partial complementation effect between the two mutants for Gag precursor assembly was observed in coinfection experiments. (ii) The two mutations showed different phenotypes when placed in the N-myristylated context, of which only the L268P mutation abolished extracellular budding and release of Gag particles at the plasma membrane. Both L268P and L322S mutants had a trans-dominant negative effect on the intracellular assembly of a non-N-myristylated, full-length (Pr55) Gag precursor expressed by a coinfecting recombinant. None of the mutants, however, showed any detectable effect in trans on membrane targeting and budding of the coexpressed N-myristylated wild-type Gag precursor. Images PMID:8474175

  13. Genome-wide transcriptional response of an avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) pst mutant

    PubMed Central

    Crépin, Sébastien; Lamarche, Martin G; Garneau, Philippe; Séguin, Julie; Proulx, Julie; Dozois, Charles M; Harel, Josée

    2008-01-01

    Background Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) are associated with extraintestinal diseases in poultry. The pstSCAB-phoU operon belongs to the Pho regulon and encodes the phosphate specific transport (Pst) system. A functional Pst system is required for full virulence in APEC and other bacteria and contributes to resistance of APEC to serum, to cationic antimicrobial peptides and acid shock. The global mechanisms contributing to the attenuation and decreased resistance of the APEC pst mutant to environmental stresses have not been investigated at the transcriptional level. To determine the global effect of a pst mutation on gene expression, we compared the transcriptomes of APEC strain χ7122 and its isogenic pst mutant (K3) grown in phosphate-rich medium. Results Overall, 470 genes were differentially expressed by at least 1.5-fold. Interestingly, the pst mutant not only induced systems involved in phosphate acquisition and metabolism, despite phosphate availability, but also modulated stress response mechanisms. Indeed, transcriptional changes in genes associated with the general stress responses, including the oxidative stress response were among the major differences observed. Accordingly, the K3 strain was less resistant to reactive oxygen species (ROS) than the wild-type strain. In addition, the pst mutant demonstrated reduced expression of genes involved in lipopolysaccharide modifications and coding for cell surface components such as type 1 and F9 fimbriae. Phenotypic tests also established that the pst mutant was impaired in its capacity to produce type 1 fimbriae, as demonstrated by western blotting and agglutination of yeast cells, when compared to wild-type APEC strain χ7122. Conclusion Overall, our data elucidated the effects of a pst mutation on the transcriptional response, and further support the role of the Pho regulon as part of a complex network contributing to phosphate homeostasis, adaptive stress responses, and E. coli virulence. PMID:19038054

  14. PRODUCTION, CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF VIRULENCE OF AN ADHESION DEFECTIVE MUTANT OF FLAVOBACTERIUM COLUMNARE PRODUCED BY B-LACTUM SELECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate mutants of Flavobacterium columnare, the causative agent of columnaris disease in fish. Serial passage on ampicillin ( -lactam) enriched modified Hsu-Shotts medium resulted in a F. columnare mutant that differed from the parent strain in colony morph...

  15. TORC1 Suppression Predicts Responsiveness to RAF and MEK Inhibition in BRAF-Mutant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Ryan B.; Rothenberg, Stephen Michael; Hata, Aaron N.; Faber, Anthony C.; Piris, Adriano; Nazarian, Rosalynn M.; Brown, Ronald D.; Godfrey, Jason T.; Winokur, Daniel; Walsh, John; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Settleman, Jeffrey; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Haber, Daniel A.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    RAF and MEK (mitogen-activated or extracellular signal–regulated protein kinase kinase) inhibitors are effective in treating patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma. However, most responses are partial and short-lived, and many patients fail to respond at all. We found that suppression of TORC1 activity in response to RAF or MEK inhibitors, as measured by decreased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (P-S6), effectively predicted induction of cell death by the inhibitor in BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines. In resistant melanomas, TORC1 activity was maintained after treatment with RAF or MEK inhibitors, in some cases despite robust suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. In in vivo mouse models, suppression of TORC1 after MAPK inhibition was necessary for induction of apoptosis and tumor response. Finally, in paired biopsies obtained from patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma before treatment and after initiation of RAF inhibitor therapy, P-S6 suppression predicted significantly improved progression-free survival. Such a change in P-S6 could be readily monitored in real time by serial fine-needle aspiration biopsies, making quantitation of P-S6 a valuable biomarker to guide treatment in BRAF-mutant melanoma. PMID:23903755

  16. A conditionally lethal mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium induces a protective response in mice.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A; Villagra, Nicolás A; Jerez, Sebastián A; Fuentes, Juan A; Mora, Guido C

    2016-02-01

    Here we present the design of a conditionally lethal mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) which growth depends on tetracycline (Tet). Four mutants of S. Typhimurium, with Tet-conditional growth, were created by inserting the tetRA cassette. Three of the mutants presented a conditional-lethal phenotype in vitro. One mutant in the yabB gene remained conditional inside cells and did not persisted after 24 h in cell cultures. The capacity of S. Typhimurium yabB::tetRA to invade deep organs was investigated in intraperitoneally (IP) infected mice fed with or without chlortetracycline (CTet), a Tet analog with lower antibiotic activity. The yabB::tetRA mutant was undetectable in liver or spleen of animals under normal diet, while in mice under diet including CTet, yabB::tetRA invaded at a level comparable to the WT in mice under normal diet. Moreover, yabB::tetRA produced a strong humoral-immunoresponse after one IP immunization with 10(6) bacteria, measured as serum reactivity against S. Typhimurium whole cell extract. By contrast, oral immunization with 10(6) bacteria was weaker and variable on inducing antibodies. Consistently, IP infected mice were fully protected in a challenge with 10(4) oral S. Typhimurium, while protection was partial in orally immunized mice. Our data indicate that S. Typhimurium yabB::tetRA is a conditionally attenuated strain capable of inducing a protective response in mice in non-permissive conditions. PMID:26792728

  17. Defects in a New Class of Sulfate/Anion Transporter Link Sulfur Acclimation Responses to Intracellular Glutathione Levels and Cell Cycle Control1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Su-Chiung; Chung, Chin-Lin; Chen, Chun-Han; Lopez-Paz, Cristina; Umen, James G.

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified a mutation, suppressor of mating type locus3 15-1 (smt15-1), that partially suppresses the cell cycle defects caused by loss of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor-related protein encoded by the MAT3 gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. smt15-1 single mutants were also found to have a cell cycle defect leading to a small-cell phenotype. SMT15 belongs to a previously uncharacterized subfamily of putative membrane-localized sulfate/anion transporters that contain a sulfate transporter domain and are found in a widely distributed subset of eukaryotes and bacteria. Although we observed that smt15-1 has a defect in acclimation to sulfur-limited growth conditions, sulfur acclimation (sac) mutants, which are more severely defective for acclimation to sulfur limitation, do not have cell cycle defects and cannot suppress mat3. Moreover, we found that smt15-1, but not sac mutants, overaccumulates glutathione. In wild-type cells, glutathione fluctuated during the cell cycle, with highest levels in mid G1 phase and lower levels during S and M phases, while in smt15-1, glutathione levels remained elevated during S and M. In addition to increased total glutathione levels, smt15-1 cells had an increased reduced-to-oxidized glutathione redox ratio throughout the cell cycle. These data suggest a role for SMT15 in maintaining glutathione homeostasis that impacts the cell cycle and sulfur acclimation responses. PMID:25361960

  18. Characterization of a mutant cell line that does not activate NF-kappaB in response to multiple stimuli.

    PubMed Central

    Courtois, G; Whiteside, S T; Sibley, C H; Israel, A

    1997-01-01

    Numerous genes required during the immune or inflammation response as well as the adhesion process are regulated by nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). Associated with its inhibitor, I kappaB, NF-kappaB resides as an inactive form in the cytoplasm. Upon stimulation by various agents, I kappaB is proteolyzed and NF-kappaB translocates to the nucleus, where it activates its target genes. The transduction pathways that lead to I kappaB inactivation remain poorly understood. In this study, we have characterized a cellular mutant, the 70/Z3-derived 1.3E2 murine pre-B cell line, that does not activate NF-kappaB in response to several stimuli. We demonstrate that upon stimulation by lipopolysaccharide, Taxol, phorbol myristate acetate, interleukin-1, or double-stranded RNA, I kappaB alpha is not degraded, as a result of an absence of induced phosphorylation on serines 32 and 36. Neither a mutation in I kappaB alpha nor a mutation in p50 or relA, the two major subunits of NF-kappaB in this cell line, accounts for this phosphorylation defect. As well as culminating in the inducible phosphorylation of I kappaB alpha on serines 32 and 36, all the stimuli that are inactive on 1.3E2 cells exhibit a sensitivity to the antioxidant pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). In contrast, stimuli such as hyperosmotic shock or phosphatase inhibitors, which use PDTC-insensitive pathways, induce I kappaB alpha degradation in 1.3E2. Analysis of the redox status of 1.3E2 does not reveal any difference from wild-type 70Z/3. We also report that the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-derived Tax trans-activator induces NF-kappaB activity in 1.3E2, suggesting that this viral protein does not operate via the defective pathway. Finally, we show that two other I kappaB molecules, I kappaB beta and the recently identified I kappaB epsilon, are not degraded in the 1.3E2 cell line following stimulation. Our results demonstrate that 1.3E2 is a cellular transduction mutant exhibiting a defect in a

  19. The Arabidopsis her1 mutant implicates GABA in E-2-hexenal responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, Rossana; Rauwerda, Han; Struys, Eduard A; Jakobs, Cornelis; Triantaphylidès, Christian; Haring, Michel A; Schuurink, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    When wounded or attacked by herbivores or pathogens, plants produce a blend of six-carbon alcohols, aldehydes and esters, known as C6-volatiles. Undamaged plants, when exposed to C6-volatiles, respond by inducing defense-related genes and secondary metabolites, suggesting that C6-volatiles can act as signaling molecules regulating plant defense responses. However, to date, the molecular mechanisms by which plants perceive and respond to these volatiles are unknown. To elucidate such mechanisms, we decided to isolate Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in which responses to C6-volatiles were altered. We observed that treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings with the C6-volatile E-2-hexenal inhibits root elongation. Among C6-volatiles this response is specific to E-2-hexenal, and is not dependent on ethylene, jasmonic and salicylic acid. Using this bioassay, we isolated 18 E-2-hexenal-response (her) mutants that showed sustained root growth after E-2-hexenal treatment. Here, we focused on the molecular characterization of one of these mutants, her1. Microarray and map-based cloning revealed that her1 encodes a gamma-amino butyric acid transaminase (GABA-TP), an enzyme that degrades GABA. As a consequence of the mutation, her1 plants accumulate high GABA levels in all their organs. Based on the observation that E-2-hexenal treatment induces GABA accumulation, and that high GABA levels confer resistance to E-2-hexenal, we propose a role for GABA in mediating E-2-hexenal responses. PMID:17971036

  20. Functional Genomics Screening Utilizing Mutant Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Identifies Novel Radiation-Response Genes

    PubMed Central

    Loesch, Kimberly; Galaviz, Stacy; Hamoui, Zaher; Clanton, Ryan; Akabani, Gamal; Deveau, Michael; DeJesus, Michael; Ioerger, Thomas; Sacchettini, James C.; Wallis, Deeann

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic determinants of radiation response is crucial to optimizing and individualizing radiotherapy for cancer patients. In order to identify genes that are involved in enhanced sensitivity or resistance to radiation, a library of stable mutant murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs), each with a defined mutation, was screened for cell viability and gene expression in response to radiation exposure. We focused on a cancer-relevant subset of over 500 mutant ESC lines. We identified 13 genes; 7 genes that have been previously implicated in radiation response and 6 other genes that have never been implicated in radiation response. After screening, proteomic analysis showed enrichment for genes involved in cellular component disassembly (e.g. Dstn and Pex14) and regulation of growth (e.g. Adnp2, Epc1, and Ing4). Overall, the best targets with the highest potential for sensitizing cancer cells to radiation were Dstn and Map2k6, and the best targets for enhancing resistance to radiation were Iqgap and Vcan. Hence, we provide compelling evidence that screening mutant ESCs is a powerful approach to identify genes that alter radiation response. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to define genetic variants or therapeutic targets that will enhance clinical therapy. PMID:25853515

  1. Differential Impact of LPG-and PG-Deficient Leishmania major Mutants on the Immune Response of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Asha; Hickerson, Suzanne; Mostrom, Janet; Turco, Salvatore J.; Beverley, Stephen M.; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Background Leishmania major infection induces robust interleukin-12 (IL12) production in human dendritic cells (hDC), ultimately resulting in Th1-mediated immunity and clinical resolution. The surface of Leishmania parasites is covered in a dense glycocalyx consisting of primarily lipophosphoglycan (LPG) and other phosphoglycan-containing molecules (PGs), making these glycoconjugates the likely pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS) responsible for IL12 induction. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we explored the role of parasite glycoconjugates on the hDC IL12 response by generating L. major Friedlin V1 mutants defective in LPG alone, (FV1 lpg1-), or generally deficient for all PGs, (FV1 lpg2-). Infection with metacyclic, infective stage, L. major or purified LPG induced high levels of IL12B subunit gene transcripts in hDCs, which was abrogated with FV1 lpg1- infections. In contrast, hDC infections with FV1 lpg2- displayed increased IL12B expression, suggesting other PG-related/LPG2 dependent molecules may act to dampen the immune response. Global transcriptional profiling comparing WT, FV1 lpg1-, FV1 lpg2- infections revealed that FV1 lpg1- mutants entered hDCs in a silent fashion as indicated by repression of gene expression. Transcription factor binding site analysis suggests that LPG recognition by hDCs induces IL-12 in a signaling cascade resulting in Nuclear Factor κ B (NFκB) and Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF) mediated transcription. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that L. major LPG is a major PAMP recognized by hDC to induce IL12-mediated protective immunity and that there is a complex interplay between PG-baring Leishmania surface glycoconjugates that result in modulation of host cellular IL12. PMID:26630499

  2. Characterization of mec1 Kinase-Deficient Mutants and of New Hypomorphic mec1 Alleles Impairing Subsets of the DNA Damage Response Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Paciotti, Vera; Clerici, Michela; Scotti, Maddalena; Lucchini, Giovanna; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2001-01-01

    DNA damage checkpoints lead to the inhibition of cell cycle progression following DNA damage. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mec1 checkpoint protein, a phosphatidylinositol kinase-related protein, is required for transient cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage or DNA replication defects. We show that mec1 kinase-deficient (mec1kd) mutants are indistinguishable from mec1Δ cells, indicating that the Mec1 conserved kinase domain is required for all known Mec1 functions, including cell viability and proper DNA damage response. Mec1kd variants maintain the ability to physically interact with both Ddc2 and wild-type Mec1 and cause dominant checkpoint defects when overproduced in MEC1 cells, impairing the ability of cells to slow down S phase entry and progression after DNA damage in G1 or during S phase. Conversely, an excess of Mec1kd in MEC1 cells does not abrogate the G2/M checkpoint, suggesting that Mec1 functions required for response to aberrant DNA structures during specific cell cycle stages can be separable. In agreement with this hypothesis, we describe two new hypomorphic mec1 mutants that are completely defective in the G1/S and intra-S DNA damage checkpoints but properly delay nuclear division after UV irradiation in G2. The finding that these mutants, although indistinguishable from mec1Δ cells with respect to the ability to replicate a damaged DNA template, do not lose viability after UV light and methyl methanesulfonate treatment suggests that checkpoint impairments do not necessarily result in hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. PMID:11359899

  3. The roles of RgpB and Kgp in late onset gingipain activity in the vimA-defective mutant of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83.

    PubMed

    Dou, Y; Robles, A; Roy, F; Aruni, A W; Sandberg, L; Nothnagel, E; Fletcher, H M

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that VimA, an acetyltransferase, can modulate gingipain biogenesis in Porphyromonas gingivalis. Inactivation of the vimA gene resulted in isogenic mutants that showed a late onset of gingipain activity that only occurred during the stationary growth phase. To further elucidate the role and contribution of the gingipains in this VimA-dependent process, isogenic mutants defective in the gingipain genes in the vimA-deficient genetic background were evaluated. In contrast with the wild-type strain, RgpB and Kgp gingipain activities were absent in exponential phase in the ∆rgpA::tetQ-vimA::ermF mutant. However, these activities increased to 31 and 53%, respectively, of that of the wild-type during stationary phase. In the ∆rgpA::cat-∆kgp::tetQ-vimA::ermF mutant, the RgpB protein was observed in the extracellular fraction but no activity was present even at the stationary growth phase. There was no gingipain activity observed in the ∆rgpB::cat-∆kgp::tetQ-vimA::ermF mutant whereas Kgp activity in ∆rgpA::cat-∆rgpB::tetQ-vimA::ermF mutant was 24% of the wild-type at late stationary phase. In contrast to RgpA, the glycosylation profile of the RgpB catalytic domain from both W83 and P. gingivalis FLL92 (vimA::ermF) showed similarity. Taken together, the results suggest multiple gingipain activation pathways in P. gingivalis. Whereas the maturation pathways for RgpA and RgpB are different, the late-onset gingipain activity in the vimA-defective mutant was due to activation/maturation of RgpB and Kgp. Moreover, unlike RgpA, which is VimA-dependent, the maturation/activation pathways for RgpB and Kgp are interdependent in the absence VimA. PMID:25858089

  4. The utilization of fructose by Escherichia coli. Properties of a mutant defective in fructose 1-phosphate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ferenci, T; Kornberg, H L

    1973-02-01

    1. The isolation and properties of a mutant of Escherichia coli devoid of fructose 1-phosphate kinase activity are described. 2. This mutant grew in media containing any one of a variety of substances, including hexoses, hexose 6-phosphates, sugar acids and glucogenic substrates, at rates not significantly different from those at which the parent organism grew on these substrates. However, only the parent grew on fructose or fructose 1-phosphate. 3. Fructose and fructose 1-phosphate inhibit the growth of the mutant, but not of its parent, on other carbon sources. 4. Even though not previously exposed to fructose, the mutant took up [(14)C]fructose rapidly but to only a small extent: [(14)C]fructose 1-phosphate was identified as the predominant labelled product. In contrast, the equally rapid but more extensive uptake of [(14)C]fructose by the parent organism required prior growth in the presence of fructose. PMID:4579702

  5. Use of adhesion-defective mutants of Staphylococcus aureus to define the role of specific plasma proteins in promoting bacterial adhesion to canine arteriovenous shunts.

    PubMed Central

    Vaudaux, P E; François, P; Proctor, R A; McDevitt, D; Foster, T J; Albrecht, R M; Lew, D P; Wabers, H; Cooper, S L

    1995-01-01

    We used an ex vivo canine arteriovenous shunt model, previously developed to study plasma protein adsorption and thrombogenesis on polymeric biomaterials, to define the role of host proteins in promoting adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus. Either polyethylene or polyvinyl chloride tubings were exposed to canine blood for 5, 15, or 60 min at a flow rate of 300 ml/min and then were flushed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), cut into 1.5-cm segments, and stored at -70 degrees C. After thawing, each segment was preincubated in 0.5% albumin in PBS to prevent nonspecific staphylococcal attachment to surfaces that were not exposed to blood. Each segment was then incubated with 4 x 10(6) CFU of [3H]thymidine-labelled S. aureus per ml for 60 min at 37 degrees C in an in vitro adhesion assay. Two site-specific mutants of S. aureus were tested: one specifically defective in adhesion to surface-bound fibronectin (FnAd-def) and the other defective in adhesion to fibrinogen (FgAD-def) [corrected]. Compared with their respective parental strains, the FgAd-def, but not the FnAd-def, mutant of S. aureus showed a strong (> 80%) decrease in attachment to ex vivo tubings. The adhesion of each strain of S. aureus onto polyethylene was consistently more than twofold higher than the adhesion onto polyvinyl chloride segments exposed to flowing blood for 5 or 15 min, but adhesion became similar to that on polyvinyl chloride after 60 min of exposure. In conclusion, the specific adhesion-defective mutants of S. aureus suggested that fibrinogen was the most active adhesion-promoting protein in a short-term blood-material interaction. The experimental approach described in this study should prove useful for screening materials thought to be resistant to protein-mediated staphylococcal adhesion and colonization. PMID:7822026

  6. Streptococcus salivarius mutants defective in mannose phosphotransferase systems show reduced sensitivity to mutacins I-T9 and R-3B.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Guillaume G; Frenette, Michel; Lavoie, Marc C

    2010-08-01

    Twenty-four mutacin-producing Streptococcus mutans strains were screened for their propensity to produce class II one-peptide bacteriocin using a deferred antagonism assay. Streptococcus salivarius and 3 mutants defective in their mannose phosphotransferase systems (mannose-PTS) were used as sensitive strains to identify which mannose-PTS could act as the docking site for class II one-peptide bacteriocin activity. We observed that only 2 strains of S. mutans, T9 and 3B, potentially produce class II one-peptide bacteriocin, namely mutacins I-T9 and R-3B, but with no preference for any mannose-PTS complex as a target. PMID:20725132

  7. nip, a Symbiotic Medicago truncatula Mutant That Forms Root Nodules with Aberrant Infection Threads and Plant Defense-Like Response1

    PubMed Central

    Veereshlingam, Harita; Haynes, Janine G.; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Cook, Douglas R.; Sherrier, D. Janine; Dickstein, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis, we isolated and studied a novel symbiotic mutant of the model legume Medicago truncatula, designated nip (numerous infections and polyphenolics). When grown on nitrogen-free media in the presence of the compatible bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nip mutant showed nitrogen deficiency symptoms. The mutant failed to form pink nitrogen-fixing nodules that occur in the wild-type symbiosis, but instead developed small bump-like nodules on its roots that were blocked at an early stage of development. Examination of the nip nodules by light microscopy after staining with X-Gal for S. meliloti expressing a constitutive GUS gene, by confocal microscopy following staining with SYTO-13, and by electron microscopy revealed that nip initiated symbiotic interactions and formed nodule primordia and infection threads. The infection threads in nip proliferated abnormally and very rarely deposited rhizobia into plant host cells; rhizobia failed to differentiate further in these cases. nip nodules contained autofluorescent cells and accumulated a brown pigment. Histochemical staining of nip nodules revealed this pigment to be polyphenolic accumulation. RNA blot analyses demonstrated that nip nodules expressed only a subset of genes associated with nodule organogenesis, as well as elevated expression of a host defense-associated phenylalanine ammonia lyase gene. nip plants were observed to have abnormal lateral roots. nip plant root growth and nodulation responded normally to ethylene inhibitors and precursors. Allelism tests showed that nip complements 14 other M. truncatula nodulation mutants but not latd, a mutant with a more severe nodulation phenotype as well as primary and lateral root defects. Thus, the nip mutant defines a new locus, NIP, required for appropriate infection thread development during invasion of the nascent nodule by rhizobia, normal lateral root elongation, and normal regulation of host defense-like responses

  8. Molecular Pathways: Targeting the Dependence of Mutant RAS Cancers on the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Grabocka, Elda; Commisso, Cosimo; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2014-01-01

    Of the genes mutated in cancer, RAS remains the most elusive to target. Recent technological advances and discoveries have greatly expanded our knowledge of the biology of oncogenic Ras and its role in cancer. As such, it has become apparent that a property that intimately accompanies RAS-driven tumorigenesis is the dependence of RAS mutant cells on a number of non-oncogenic signaling pathways. These dependencies arise as a means of adaptation to Ras-driven intracellular stresses and represent unique vulnerabilities of mutant RAS cancers. A number of studies have highlighted the dependence of mutant RAS cancers on the DNA damage response and identified the molecular pathways that mediate this process including signaling from wild-type Ras isoforms, ATR/Chk1, and DNA damage repair pathways. Here we review these findings, and discuss the combinatorial use of DNA damaging chemotherapy with blockade of wild-type H- and N-Ras signaling by farnesyltransferase inhibitors, Chk1 inhibitors, or small molecule targeting DNA damage repair as potential strategies through which the dependence of RAS cancers on the DNA damage response can be harnessed for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25424849

  9. 49 CFR 210.7 - Responsibility for noise defective railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Responsibility for noise defective railroad...) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD NOISE EMISSION COMPLIANCE REGULATIONS General Provisions § 210.7 Responsibility for noise defective railroad equipment. Any...

  10. 49 CFR 210.7 - Responsibility for noise defective railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Responsibility for noise defective railroad...) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD NOISE EMISSION COMPLIANCE REGULATIONS General Provisions § 210.7 Responsibility for noise defective railroad equipment. Any...

  11. 49 CFR 210.7 - Responsibility for noise defective railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Responsibility for noise defective railroad...) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD NOISE EMISSION COMPLIANCE REGULATIONS General Provisions § 210.7 Responsibility for noise defective railroad equipment. Any...

  12. 49 CFR 210.7 - Responsibility for noise defective railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Responsibility for noise defective railroad...) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD NOISE EMISSION COMPLIANCE REGULATIONS General Provisions § 210.7 Responsibility for noise defective railroad equipment. Any...

  13. 49 CFR 210.7 - Responsibility for noise defective railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Responsibility for noise defective railroad...) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD NOISE EMISSION COMPLIANCE REGULATIONS General Provisions § 210.7 Responsibility for noise defective railroad equipment. Any...

  14. A phenotype survey of 36 mutant mouse strains with gene-targeted defects in glycosyltransferases or glycan-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Sally L; Le, Dzung; Long, Jeffrey M; Sobieszczuk, Peter; Ma, Bo; Tian, Hua; Fang, Xiaoqun; Paulson, James C; Marth, Jamey D; Varki, Nissi

    2013-01-01

    The consortium for functional glycomics (CFG) was a large research initiative providing networking and resources for investigators studying the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins in health and disease. Starting in 2001, six scientific cores were established to generate data, materials and new technologies. By the end of funding in 2011, the mouse phenotype core (MPC) submitted data to a website from the phenotype screen of 36 mutant mouse strains deficient in a gene for either a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or glycosyltransferase (GT). Each mutant strain was allotted three months for analysis and screened by standard phenotype assays used in the fields of immunology, histology, hematology, coagulation, serum chemistry, metabolism and behavior. Twenty of the deficient mouse strains had been studied in other laboratories, and additional tests were performed on these strains to confirm previous observations and discover new data. The CFG constructed 16 new homozygous mutant mouse strains and completed the initial phenotype screen of the majority of these new mutant strains. In total, >300 phenotype changes were observed, but considering the over 100 assays performed on each strain, most of the phenotypes were unchanged. Phenotype differences include abnormal testis morphology in GlcNAcT9- and Siglec-H-deficient mice and lethality in Pomgnt1-deficient mice. The numerous altered phenotypes discovered, along with the consideration of the significant findings of normality, will provide a platform for future characterization to understand the important roles of glycans and GBPs in the mechanisms of health and disease. PMID:23118208

  15. The HIV-1 Integrase Mutant R263A/K264A Is 2-fold Defective for TRN-SR2 Binding and Viral Nuclear Import*

    PubMed Central

    De Houwer, Stéphanie; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Thys, Wannes; Rocha, Susana; Dirix, Lieve; Gijsbers, Rik; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2014-01-01

    Transportin-SR2 (Tnpo3, TRN-SR2), a human karyopherin encoded by the TNPO3 gene, has been identified as a cellular cofactor of HIV-1 replication, specifically interacting with HIV-1 integrase (IN). Whether this interaction mediates the nuclear import of HIV remains controversial. We previously characterized the TRN-SR2 binding interface in IN and introduced mutations at these positions to corroborate the biological relevance of the interaction. The pleiotropic nature of IN mutations complicated the interpretation. Indeed, all previously tested IN interaction mutants also affected RT. Here we report on a virus with a pair of IN mutations, INR263A/K264A, that significantly reduce interaction with TRN-SR2. The virus retains wild-type reverse transcription activity but displays a block in nuclear import and integration, as measured by quantitative PCR. The defect in integration of this mutant resulted in a smaller increase in the number of two-long terminal repeat circles than for virus specifically blocked at integration by raltegravir or catalytic site mutations (IND64N/D116N/E152Q). Finally, using an eGFP-IN-labeled HIV fluorescence-based import assay, the defect in nuclear import was corroborated. These data altogether underscore the importance of the HIV-IN TRN-SR2 protein-protein interaction for HIV nuclear import and validate the IN/TRN-SR2 interaction interface as a promising target for future antiviral therapy. PMID:25063804

  16. Defective Hyphal Induction of a Candida albicans Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate 5-Kinase Null Mutant on Solid Media Does Not Lead to Decreased Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Augsten, Martin; Hübner, Claudia; Nguyen, Monika; Künkel, Waldemar; Härtl, Albert; Eck, Raimund

    2002-01-01

    A phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] 5-kinase gene (CaFAB1) of the most important human pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans, was cloned and sequenced. An open reading frame was detected which encodes a 2,369-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 268 kDa and a relative isoelectric point of 6.76. This protein exhibits 38% overall amino acid sequence identity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fab1p. We localized the CaFAB1 gene on chromosome R. To determine the influence of the PI(3)P 5-kinase CaFab1p on processes involved in C. albicans morphogenesis and pathogenicity, we sequentially disrupted both copies of the gene. Homozygous deletion of C. albicans CaFAB1 resulted in a mutant strain which exhibited defects in morphogenesis. A Cafab1 null mutant had enlarged vacuoles, an acidification defect, and increased generation times and was unable to form hyphae on different solid media. The sensitivities to hyperosmotic and high-temperature stresses, adherence, and virulence compared to those of wild-type strain SC5314 were not affected. PMID:12117957

  17. Analysis of Candida albicans Mutants Defective in the Cdk8 Module of Mediator Reveal Links between Metabolism and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Allia K.; Morales, Diana K.; Liu, Zhongle; Grahl, Nora; Zhang, Anda; Willger, Sven D.; Myers, Lawrence C.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilm formation is a key virulence trait that involves hyphal growth and adhesin expression. Pyocyanin (PYO), a phenazine secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inhibits both C. albicans biofilm formation and development of wrinkled colonies. Using a genetic screen, we identified two mutants, ssn3Δ/Δ and ssn8Δ/Δ, which continued to wrinkle in the presence of PYO. Ssn8 is a cyclin-like protein and Ssn3 is similar to cyclin-dependent kinases; both proteins are part of the heterotetrameric Cdk8 module that forms a complex with the transcriptional co-regulator, Mediator. Ssn3 kinase activity was also required for PYO sensitivity as a kinase dead mutant maintained a wrinkled colony morphology in the presence of PYO. Furthermore, similar phenotypes were observed in mutants lacking the other two components of the Cdk8 module—Srb8 and Srb9. Through metabolomics analyses and biochemical assays, we showed that a compromised Cdk8 module led to increases in glucose consumption, glycolysis-related transcripts, oxidative metabolism and ATP levels even in the presence of PYO. In the mutant, inhibition of respiration to levels comparable to the PYO-treated wild type inhibited wrinkled colony development. Several lines of evidence suggest that PYO does not act through Cdk8. Lastly, the ssn3 mutant was a hyperbiofilm former, and maintained higher biofilm formation in the presence of PYO than the wild type. Together these data provide novel insights into the role of the Cdk8 module of Mediator in regulation of C. albicans physiology and the links between respiratory activity and both wrinkled colony and biofilm development. PMID:25275466

  18. Paramecium calmodulin mutants defective in ion channel regulation can bind calcium and undergo calcium-induced conformational switching.

    PubMed

    Jaren, O R; Harmon, S; Chen, A F; Shea, M A

    2000-06-13

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential eukaryotic protein that binds calcium ions cooperatively at four EF-hand binding sites to regulate signal transduction pathways. Interactions between the apo domains of vertebrate CaM reduce the calcium affinities of sites I and II below their intrinsic values, allowing sequential opening of the two hydrophobic clefts in CaM. Viable domain-specific mutants of Parameciumcalmodulin (PCaM) differentially affect ion channels and provide a unique opportunity to dissect the roles of the two highly homologous half-molecule domains. Calcium binding induced an increase in the level of ordered secondary structure and a decrease in Stokes radius in these mutants; such changes were identical in direction to those of wild type CaM, but the magnitude depended on the mutation. Calcium titrations monitored by changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of Y138 in site IV showed that the affinities of sites III and IV of wild type PCaM were (i) higher than those of the same sites in rat CaM, (ii) equivalent to those of the same sites in PCaM mutants altered between sites I and II, and (iii) higher than those of PCaM mutants modified in sites III and IV. Thus, calcium saturation drove all mutants to undergo conformational switching in the same direction but not to the same extent as wild type PCaM. The disruption of the allosteric mechanism that is manifest as faulty channel regulation may be explained by altered properties of switching among the 14 possible partially saturated species of PCaM rather than by an inability to adopt two end-state conformations or target interactions similar to those of the wild type protein. PMID:10841769

  19. Trafficking defect of mutant kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) proteins associated with distal renal tubular acidosis and Southeast Asian ovalocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Udomchaiprasertkul, Wandee; Noisakran, Sansanee; Rungroj, Nanyawan; Akkarapatumwong, Varaporn; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2006-11-24

    Compound heterozygous anion exchanger 1 (AE1) SAO/G701D mutations result in distal renal tubular acidosis with Southeast Asian ovalocytosis. Interaction, trafficking and localization of wild-type and mutant (SAO and G701D) kAE1 proteins fused with hemagglutinin, six-histidine, Myc, or green fluorescence protein (GFP) were examined in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. When individually expressed, wild-type kAE1 was localized at cell surface while mutant kAE1 SAO and G701D were intracellularly retained. When co-expressed, wild-type kAE1 could form heterodimer with kAE1 SAO or kAE1 G701D and could rescue mutant kAE1 proteins to express on the cell surface. Co-expression of kAE1 SAO and kAE1 G701D also resulted in heterodimer formation but intracellular retention without cell surface expression, suggesting their trafficking defect and failure to rescue each other to the plasma membrane, most likely the molecular mechanism of the disease in the compound heterozygous condition. PMID:17027918

  20. The Cell Wall Arabinose-Deficient Arabidopsis thaliana Mutant murus5 Encodes a Defective Allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE21[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dugard, Christopher K.; Olek, Anna T.; Cooper, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional marker-based mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to determine that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) low cell wall arabinose mutant murus5 (mur5) encodes a defective allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2 (RGP2). Marker analysis of 13 F2 confirmed mutant progeny from a recombinant mapping population gave a rough map position on the upper arm of chromosome 5, and deep sequencing of DNA from these 13 lines gave five candidate genes with G→A (C→T) transitions predicted to result in amino acid changes. Of these five, only insertional mutant alleles of RGP2, a gene that encodes a UDP-arabinose mutase that interconverts UDP-arabinopyranose and UDP-arabinofuranose, exhibited the low cell wall arabinose phenotype. The identities of mur5 and two SALK insertional alleles were confirmed by allelism tests and overexpression of wild-type RGP2 complementary DNA placed under the control of the 35S promoter in the three alleles. The mur5 mutation results in the conversion of cysteine-257 to tyrosine-257 within a conserved hydrophobic cluster predicted to be distal to the active site and essential for protein stability and possible heterodimerization with other isoforms of RGP. PMID:27217494

  1. Protein glycosylation defects in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mnn7 mutant class. Support for the stop signal proposed for regulation of outer chain elongation.

    PubMed

    Ballou, L; Alvarado, E; Tsai, P K; Dell, A; Ballou, C E

    1989-07-15

    Total cell mannoprotein was isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae X2180 mutants that have defects in elongation of the outer chain attached to the N-linked core oligosaccharides (mnn7, mnn8, mnn9, and mnn10) (Ballou, L., Cohen, R. E., and Ballou, C. E. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 5986-5991). Comparison of the oligosaccharides released by endoglucosaminidase H digestion confirmed that the mnn9 mutation eliminates all but two mannoses of the outer chain, whereas the mnn8 and mnn10 strains produce outer chains of variable but similar lengths. The isolate designated mnn7 was found to be allelic with mnn8. Haploid mutants of the type mnn8 mnn9 or mnn9 mnn10 had the mnn9 phenotype, which established that the mnn9 defect is dominant and presumably acts at a processing step prior to the steps affected by mnn8 and mnn10. Analysis of the mnn1 mnn2 mnn10 oligosaccharides revealed that the heterogeneous outer chain contained 6-16 alpha 1----6-linked mannose units and each was terminated by a single alpha 1----2-linked mannose unit, whereas the core lacked one such unit that was present in the mnn9 oligosaccharide. The results are consistent with and support the hypothesis (Gopal, P. K., and Ballou, C. E. (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 8824-8828) that addition of such a side-chain mannose unit is associated with termination of outer chain elongation in these mutants and may serve as a stop signal that regulates outer chain synthesis in the parent wild-type strain. PMID:2663843

  2. The Walker A motif mutation recA4159 abolishes the SOS response and recombination in a recA730 mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Šimatović, Ana; Mitrikeski, Petar T; Vlašić, Ignacija; Sopta, Mary; Brčić-Kostić, Krunoslav

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, the RecA protein forms recombinogenic filaments required for the SOS response and DNA recombination. In order to form a recombinogenic filament, wild type RecA needs to bind ATP and to interact with mediator proteins. The RecA730 protein is a mutant version of RecA with superior catalytic abilities, allowing filament formation without the help of mediator proteins. The mechanism of RecA730 filament formation is not well understood, and the question remains as to whether the RecA730 protein requires ATP binding in order to become competent for filament formation. We examined two mutants, recA730,4159 (presumed to be defective for ATP binding) and recA730,2201 (defective for ATP hydrolysis), and show that they have different properties with respect to SOS induction, conjugational recombination and double-strand break repair. We show that ATP binding is essential for all RecA730 functions, while ATP hydrolysis is required only for double-strand break repair. Our results emphasize the similarity of the SOS response and conjugational recombination, neither of which requires ATP hydrolysis by RecA730. PMID:27130282

  3. Pseudo-constitutivity of nitrate-responsive genes in nitrate reductase mutants

    PubMed Central

    Schinko, Thorsten; Gallmetzer, Andreas; Amillis, Sotiris; Strauss, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    that transporter-mediated NO3- accumulation in NR deficient mutants, originating from traces of nitrate in the media, is responsible for the constitutive expression of NirA-regulated genes, and the associated phenotype is thus termed “pseudo-constitutive”. PMID:23454548

  4. Correction of Mutant p63 in EEC Syndrome Using siRNA Mediated Allele-Specific Silencing Restores Defective Stem Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Barbaro, Vanessa; Nasti, Annamaria A; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Ferrari, Stefano; Migliorati, Angelo; Raffa, Paolo; Lariccia, Vincenzo; Nespeca, Patrizia; Biasolo, Mariangela; Willoughby, Colin E; Ponzin, Diego; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina; Di Iorio, Enzo

    2016-06-01

    Ectrodactyly-Ectodermal dysplasia-Clefting (EEC) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by heterozygous mutations in the p63 gene and characterized by limb defects, orofacial clefting, ectodermal dysplasia, and ocular defects. Patients develop progressive total bilateral limbal stem cell deficiency, which eventually results in corneal blindness. Medical and surgical treatments are ineffective and of limited benefit. Oral mucosa epithelial stem cells (OMESCs) represent an alternative source of stem cells capable of regenerating the corneal epithelium and, combined with gene therapy, could provide an attractive therapeutic avenue. OMESCs from EEC patients carrying the most severe p63 mutations (p.R279H and p.R304Q) were characterized and the genetic defect of p.R279H silenced using allele-specific (AS) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Systematic screening of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-siRNAs against R279H-p63 allele in (i) stable WT-ΔNp63α-RFP and R279H-ΔNp63α-EGFP cell lines, (ii) transient doubly transfected cell lines, and (iii) p.R279H OMESCs, identified a number of potent siRNA inhibitors for the mutant allele, which had no effect on wild-type p63. In addition, siRNA treatment led to longer acquired life span of mutated stem cells compared to controls, less accelerated stem cell differentiation in vitro, reduced proliferation properties, and effective ability in correcting the epithelial hypoplasia, thus giving rise to full thickness stratified and differentiated epithelia. This study demonstrates the phenotypic correction of mutant stem cells (OMESCs) in EEC syndrome by means of siRNA mediated AS silencing with restoration of function. The application of siRNA, alone or in combination with cell-based therapies, offers a therapeutic strategy for corneal blindness in EEC syndrome. Stem Cells 2016;34:1588-1600. PMID:26891374

  5. Acidithiobacillus caldus Sulfur Oxidation Model Based on Transcriptome Analysis between the Wild Type and Sulfur Oxygenase Reductase Defective Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Linxu; Ren, Yilin; Lin, Jianqun; Liu, Xiangmei; Pang, Xin; Lin, Jianqiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Acidithiobacillus caldus (A. caldus) is widely used in bio-leaching. It gains energy and electrons from oxidation of elemental sulfur and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs) for carbon dioxide fixation and growth. Genomic analyses suggest that its sulfur oxidation system involves a truncated sulfur oxidation (Sox) system (omitting SoxCD), non-Sox sulfur oxidation system similar to the sulfur oxidation in A. ferrooxidans, and sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR). The complexity of the sulfur oxidation system of A. caldus generates a big obstacle on the research of its sulfur oxidation mechanism. However, the development of genetic manipulation method for A. caldus in recent years provides powerful tools for constructing genetic mutants to study the sulfur oxidation system. Results An A. caldus mutant lacking the sulfur oxygenase reductase gene (sor) was created and its growth abilities were measured in media using elemental sulfur (S0) and tetrathionate (K2S4O6) as the substrates, respectively. Then, comparative transcriptome analysis (microarrays and real-time quantitative PCR) of the wild type and the Δsor mutant in S0 and K2S4O6 media were employed to detect the differentially expressed genes involved in sulfur oxidation. SOR was concluded to oxidize the cytoplasmic elemental sulfur, but could not couple the sulfur oxidation with the electron transfer chain or substrate-level phosphorylation. Other elemental sulfur oxidation pathways including sulfur diooxygenase (SDO) and heterodisulfide reductase (HDR), the truncated Sox pathway, and the S4I pathway for hydrolysis of tetrathionate and oxidation of thiosulfate in A. caldus are proposed according to expression patterns of sulfur oxidation genes and growth abilities of the wild type and the mutant in different substrates media. Conclusion An integrated sulfur oxidation model with various sulfur oxidation pathways of A. caldus is proposed and the features of this model are summarized. PMID:22984393

  6. Kinetic and structural analysis of mutant CD4 receptors that are defective in HIV gp120 binding

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Myszka, David G.; Tendian, Susan W.; Brouillette, Christie G.; Sweet, Ray W.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    1996-01-01

    The T-cell antigen coreceptor CD4 also serves as the receptor for the envelope glycoprotein gp120 of HIV. Extensive mutational analysis of CD4 has implicated residues from a portion of the extracellular amino-terminal domain (D1) in gp120 binding. However, none of these proteins has been fully characterized biophysically, and thus the precise effects on molecular structure and binding interactions are unknown. In the present study, we produced soluble versions of three mutant CD4 molecules (F43V, G47S, and A55F) and characterized their structural properties, thermostability, and ability to bind gp120. Crystallographic and thermodynamic analysis showed minimal structural alterations in the F43V and G47S mutant proteins, which have solvent-exposed mutant side chains. In contrast, some degree of disorder appears to exist in the folded state of A55F, as a result of mutating a buried side chain. Real time kinetic measurements of the interaction of the mutant proteins with gp120 showed affinity decreases of 5-fold for G47S, 50-fold for A55F, and 200-fold for F43V. Although both rate constants for the binding reaction were affected by these mutations, the loss in affinity was mainly due to a decrease in on rates, with less drastic changes occurring in the off rates. These observations suggest the involvement of conformational adaptation in the CD4–gp120 interaction. Together, the structural and kinetic data confirm that F43V is a critical residue in gp120 recognition site, which may also include main chain interactions at residue Gly-47. PMID:8986758

  7. Invasion of minor veins of tobacco leaves inoculated with tobacco mosaic virus mutants defective in phloem-dependent movement.

    PubMed Central

    Ding, X; Shintaku, M H; Carter, S A; Nelson, R S

    1996-01-01

    To fully understand vascular transport of plant viruses, the viral and host proteins, their structures and functions, and the specific vascular cells in which these factors function must be determined. We report here on the ability of various cDNA-derived coat protein (CP) mutants of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to invade vascular cells in minor veins of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi nn. The mutant viruses we studied, TMV CP-O, U1mCP15-17, and SNC015, respectively, encode a CP from a different tobamovirus (i.e., from odontoglossum ringspot virus) resulting in the formation of non-native capsids, a mutant CP that accumulates in aggregates but does not encapsidate the viral RNA, or no CP. TMV CP-O is impaired in phloem-dependent movement, whereas U1mCP15-17 and SNC015 do not accumulate by phloem-dependent movement. In developmentally-defined studies using immunocytochemical analyses we determined that all of these mutants invaded vascular parenchyma cells within minor veins in inoculated leaves. In addition, we determined that the CPs of TMV CP-O and U1mCP15-17 were present in companion (C) cells of minor veins in inoculated leaves, although more rarely than CP of wild-type virus. These results indicate that the movement of TMV into minor veins does not require the CP, and an encapsidation-competent CP is not required for, but may increase the efficiency of, movement into the conducting complex of the phloem (i.e., the C cell/sieve element complex). Also, a host factor(s) functions at or beyond the C cell/sieve element interface with other cells to allow efficient phloem-dependent accumulation of TMV CP-O. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855325

  8. Brainstem Respiratory Oscillators Develop Independently of Neuronal Migration Defects in the Wnt/PCP Mouse Mutant looptail

    PubMed Central

    Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Bouvier, Julien; Glasco, Derrick M.; Stewart, Michelle E.; Dean, Charlotte; Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Champagnat, Jean; Fortin, Gilles; Chandrasekhar, Anand

    2012-01-01

    The proper development and maturation of neuronal circuits require precise migration of component neurons from their birthplace (germinal zone) to their final positions. Little is known about the effects of aberrant neuronal position on the functioning of organized neuronal groups, especially in mammals. Here, we investigated the formation and properties of brainstem respiratory neurons in looptail (Lp) mutant mice in which facial motor neurons closely apposed to some respiratory neurons fail to migrate due to loss of function of the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) protein Vangl2. Using calcium imaging and immunostaining on embryonic hindbrain preparations, we found that respiratory neurons constituting the embryonic parafacial oscillator (e-pF) settled at the ventral surface of the medulla in Vangl2Lp/+ and Vangl2Lp/Lp embryos despite the failure of tangential migration of its normally adjacent facial motor nucleus. Anatomically, the e-pF neurons were displaced medially in Lp/+ embryos and rostro-medially Lp/Lp embryos. Pharmacological treatments showed that the e-pF oscillator exhibited characteristic network properties in both Lp/+ and Lp/Lp embryos. Furthermore, using hindbrain slices, we found that the other respiratory oscillator, the preBötzinger complex, was also anatomically and functionally established in Lp mutants. Importantly, the displaced e-pF oscillator established functional connections with the preBötC oscillator in Lp/+ mutants. Our data highlight the robustness of the developmental processes that assemble the neuronal networks mediating an essential physiological function. PMID:22363567

  9. A Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant with a defective inositol monophosphate phosphatase gene homolog has altered cell envelope permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Parish, T; Liu, J; Nikaido, H; Stoker, N G

    1997-01-01

    A bacteriophage infection mutant (strain LIMP7) of Mycobacterium smegmatis was isolated following transposon mutagenesis. The mutant showed an unusual phenotype, in that all phages tested produced larger plaques on this strain compared to the parent strain. Other phenotypic characteristics of the mutant were slower growth, increased clumping in liquid culture, increased resistance to chloramphenicol and erythromycin, and increased sensitivity to isoniazid and several beta-lactam antibiotics. Permeability studies showed decreases in the accumulation of lipophilic molecules (norfloxacin and chenodeoxycholate) and a small increase with hydrophilic molecules (cephaloridine); taken together, these characteristics indicate an altered cell envelope. The DNA adjacent to the transposon in LIMP7 was cloned and was shown to be highly similar to genes encoding bacterial and mammalian inositol monophosphate phosphatases. Inositol is important in mycobacteria as a component of the major thiol mycothiol and also in the cell wall, with phosphatidylinositol anchoring lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in the cell envelope. In LIMP7, levels of phosphatidylinositol dimannoside, the precursor of LAM, were less than half of those in the wild-type strain, confirming that the mutation had affected the synthesis of inositol-containing molecules. The impA gene is located within the histidine biosynthesis operon in both M. smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, lying between the hisA and hisF genes. PMID:9401044

  10. Mouse hitchhiker mutants have spina bifida, dorso-ventral patterning defects and polydactyly: identification of Tulp3 as a novel negative regulator of the Sonic hedgehog pathway

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Victoria L.; Damrau, Christine; Paudyal, Anju; Reeve, Benjamin; Grimes, Daniel T.; Stewart, Michelle E.; Williams, Debbie J.; Siggers, Pam; Greenfield, Andy; Murdoch, Jennifer N.

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling pathway is essential for embryonic development and the patterning of multiple organs. Disruption or activation of Shh signalling leads to multiple birth defects, including holoprosencephaly, neural tube defects and polydactyly, and in adults results in tumours of the skin or central nervous system. Genetic approaches with model organisms continue to identify novel components of the pathway, including key molecules that function as positive or negative regulators of Shh signalling. Data presented here define Tulp3 as a novel negative regulator of the Shh pathway. We have identified a new mouse mutant that is a strongly hypomorphic allele of Tulp3 and which exhibits expansion of ventral markers in the caudal spinal cord, as well as neural tube defects and preaxial polydactyly, consistent with increased Shh signalling. We demonstrate that Tulp3 acts genetically downstream of Shh and Smoothened (Smo) in neural tube patterning and exhibits a genetic interaction with Gli3 in limb development. We show that Tulp3 does not appear to alter expression or processing of Gli3, and we demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of other negative regulators (Rab23, Fkbp8, Thm1, Sufu and PKA) is not affected. We discuss the possible mechanism of action of Tulp3 in Shh-mediated signalling in light of these new data. PMID:19223390