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1

Restoration of Hydrodynamic and Hydrologic Processes in the Chinook River Estuary, Washington – Feasibility Assessment  

SciTech Connect

A hydrodynamic and hydrologic modeling analysis was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of restoring natural estuarine functions and tidal marine wetlands habitat in the Chinook River estuary, located near the mouth of the Columbia River in Washington. The reduction in salmonid populations is attributable primarily to the construction of a Highway 101 overpass across the mouth of the Chinook River in the early 1920s with a tide gate under the overpass. This construction, which was designed to eliminate tidal action in the estuary, has impeded the upstream passage of salmonids. The goal of the Chinook River Restoration Project is to restore tidal functions through the estuary, by removing the tide gate at the mouth of the river, filling drainage ditches, restoring tidal swales, and reforesting riparian areas. The hydrologic model (HEC-HMS) was used to compute Chinook River and tributary inflows for use as input to the hydrodynamic model at the project area boundary. The hydrodynamic model (RMA-10) was used to generate information on water levels, velocities, salinity, and inundation during both normal tides and 100-year storm conditions under existing conditions and under the restoration alternatives. The RMA-10 model was extended well upstream of the normal tidal flats into the watershed domain to correctly simulate flooding anddrainage with tidal effects included, using the wetting and drying schemes. The major conclusion of the hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling study was that restoration of the tidal functions in the Chinook River estuary would be feasible through opening or removal of the tide gate. Implementation of the preferred alternative (removal of the tide gate, restoration of the channel under Hwy 101 to a 200-foot width, and construction of an internal levee inside the project area) would provide the required restorations benefits (inundation, habitat, velocities, and salinity penetration, etc.) and meet flood protection requirements. The alternative design included design of storage such that relatively little difference in the drainage or inundation upstream of Chinook River Valley Road would occur as a result of the proposed restoration activities.

Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Kristanovich, Felix C.

2006-01-01

2

Restoration of Hydrodynamic and Hydrologic Processes in the Chinook River Estuary, Washington – Feasibility Assessment  

SciTech Connect

A hydrodynamic and hydrologic modeling analysis was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of restoring natural estuarine functions and tidal marine wetlands habitat in the Chinook River estuary, located near the mouth of the Columbia River in Washington. The reduction in salmonid populations is attributable primarily to the construction of a Highway 101 overpass across the mouth of the Chinook River in the early 1920s with a tide gate under the overpass. This construction, which was designed to eliminate tidal action in the estuary, has impeded the upstream passage of salmonids. The goal of the Chinook River Restoration Project is to restore tidal functions through the estuary, by removing the tide gate at the mouth of the river, filling drainage ditches, restoring tidal swales, and reforesting riparian areas. The hydrologic model (HEC-HMS) was used to compute Chinook River and tributary inflows for use as input to the hydrodynamic model at the project area boundary. The hydrodynamic model (RMA-10) was used to generate information on water levels, velocities, salinity, and inundation during both normal tides and 100-year storm conditions under existing conditions and under the restoration alternatives. The RMA-10 model was extended well upstream of the normal tidal flats into the watershed domain to correctly simulate flooding and drainage with tidal effects included, using the wetting and drying schemes. The major conclusion of the hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling study was that restoration of the tidal functions in the Chinook River estuary would be feasible through opening or removal of the tide gate. Implementation of the preferred alternative (removal of the tide gate, restoration of the channel under Hwy 101 to a 200-foot width, and construction of an internal levee inside the project area) would provide the required restorations benefits (inundation, habitat, velocities, and salinity penetration, etc.) and meet flood protection requirements. The alternative design included design of storage such that relatively little difference in the drainage or inundation upstream of Chinook River Valley Road would occur as a result of the proposed restoration activities.

Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Kristanovich, Felix C.

2006-08-03

3

Ecological feasibility studies in restoration decision making.  

PubMed

The restoration of degraded systems is essential for maintaining the provision of valuable ecosystem services, including the maintenance of aesthetic values. However, restoration projects often fail to reach desired goals for a variety of ecologic, financial, and social reasons. Feasibility studies that evaluate whether a restoration effort should even be attempted can enhance restoration success by highlighting potential pitfalls and gaps in knowledge before the design phase of a restoration. Feasibility studies also can bring stakeholders together before a restoration project is designed to discuss potential disagreements. For these reasons, a feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of restoring a tidal freshwater marsh in the Potomac River near Alexandria, Virginia. The study focused on science rather than engineering questions, and thus differed in approach from other feasibility studies that are mostly engineering driven. The authors report the framework they used to conduct a feasibility study to inform other potential restoration projects with similar goals. The seven steps of the framework encompass (1) initiation of a feasibility study, (2) compilation of existing data, (3) collection of current site information, (4) examination of case studies, (5) synthesis of information in a handbook, (6) meeting with selected stakeholders, and (7) evaluation of meeting outcomes. By conducting a feasibility study using the seven-step framework, the authors set the stage for conducting future compliance studies and enhancing the chance of a successful restoration. PMID:17453281

Hopfensperger, Kristine N; Engelhardt, Katharina A M; Seagle, Steven W

2007-04-19

4

Ecological Feasibility Studies in Restoration Decision Making  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The restoration of degraded systems is essential for maintaining the provision of valuable ecosystem services, including the maintenance of aesthetic values. However, restoration projects often fail to reach desired goals for a variety of ecologic, financial, and social reasons. Feasibility studies that evaluate whether a restoration effort should even be attempted can enhance restoration success by highlighting potential pitfalls and gaps in knowledge before the design phase of a restoration. Feasibility studies also can bring stakeholders together before a restoration project is designed to discuss potential disagreements. For these reasons, a feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of restoring a tidal freshwater marsh in the Potomac River near Alexandria, Virginia. The study focused on science rather than engineering questions, and thus differed in approach from other feasibility studies that are mostly engineering driven. The authors report the framework they used to conduct a feasibility study to inform other potential restoration projects with similar goals. The seven steps of the framework encompass (1) initiation of a feasibility study, (2) compilation of existing data, (3) collection of current site information, (4) examination of case studies, (5) synthesis of information in a handbook, (6) meeting with selected stakeholders, and (7) evaluation of meeting outcomes. By conducting a feasibility study using the seven-step framework, the authors set the stage for conducting future compliance studies and enhancing the chance of a successful restoration.

Hopfensperger, Kristine N.; Engelhardt, Katharina A. M.; Seagle, Steven W.

2007-06-01

5

The Assessment of Oracy: Feasibility and Methods.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A feasibility study has been conducted in Australia to investigate school and teacher objectives and practices in the development of oracy, to determine oracy skills agreed to be important, and to assess the feasibility and desirability of testing competence in oracy. The need for oracy assessment arises from a need for schools to account for…

Bourke, Sid

6

The Deschutes Estuary Restoration Feasibility Study: development of a process-based morphological model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continual sediment accumulation in Capitol Lake since the damming of the Deschutes River in 1951 has altered the initial morphology of the basin. As part of the Deschutes River Estuary Restoration Feasibility Study, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) is modeling how tidal and storm processes will influence the river, lake and lower Budd Inlet should estuary restoration occur. Understanding

Douglas George; Guy Gelfenbaum; Giles Lesser; Bob Barnard; Steven Morrison

7

Authentic Assessment for Restorative Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Developmental Audit[R] is a comprehensive means of assessment and treatment planning that identifies the coping strategies underlying a youth's maladaptive and self-defeating behavior. This is a strength-based assessment that engages youth in conflict in the process of generating solutions rather than focusing on deficits. This process…

Doerr, Allison

2008-01-01

8

Maxwell Hydroelectric Project Feasibility Assessment Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The results of a feasibility assessment study to determine if it is economical to develop hydroelectric generation at the existing Maxwell Locks and Dam in Pennsylvania on the Monongahela River are summarized. The investigations included site reconnaissan...

1979-01-01

9

Jackson Bluff Hydroelectric Project. Feasibility Assessment Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A feasibility assessment study was conducted to determine if it is economical to reinstall hydroelectric generating units at the existing Jackson Bluff Dam on the Ochlockonee River in Florida. The studies and investigations have included site reconnaissan...

1979-01-01

10

PATHOGEN RISK ASSESSMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

The report evaluates the practicality of formulating guidelines to assess the risk associated with exposure to pathogens in sludge. Risk assessment may be used to determine the likelihood that an environmental agent may cause human disease (that is, potential to cause human cance...

11

Maxwell Hydroelectric Project Feasibility Assessment Report  

SciTech Connect

The results of a feasibility assessment study to determine if it is economical to develop hydroelectric generation at the existing Maxwell Locks and Dam in Pennsylvania on the Monongahela River are summarized. The investigations included site reconnaissance, system loads, growth rate, site hydrology, conceptual project arrangements and layouts, power output, estimates of construction costs and annual costs, economic analyses, development of a design and construction schedule, and a preliminary environmental review of the proposed Maxwell Hydroelectric Project. For the scheduled on-line date of January 1985, the Project is estimated to have a Total Investment Cost of $17,801,000 assuming REA financing at 7% interest rate. The Project is considered technically feasible and without any major environmental issues. It shows economic feasibility providing satisfactory financing terms are available. Such satisfactory financing alternatives include a 7% REA loan or DOE financing under the new National Energy Act with the 25% portion for construction not covered being financed with 7% or lower interest loans (possibly through REA). The 7% rate can also be considered as a combination 5% and 9% financing should the REA deem the project deserving of low interest money. In addition, application should be made to DOE for demonstration grant funds. It should be noted that the feasibility of the Project will be jeopardized if not eliminated should Federal dam-user fees be charged. (LCL)

Not Available

1979-03-01

12

Integrated Assessment of Prevention and Restoration Actions to Combat Desertification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent advances in desertification and land degradation research have provided valuable conceptual and analytical frameworks, degradation indicators, assessment tools and surveillance systems with respect to desertification drivers, processes, and impacts. These findings, together with stakeholders’ perceptions and local/regional knowledge, have helped to define and propose measures and strategies to combat land degradation. However, integrated and comprehensive assessment and evaluation of prevention and restoration strategies and techniques to combat desertification is still lacking, and knowledge on the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of the proposed strategies over a wide range of environmental and socio-economic conditions is very scarce. To address this challenge, we have launched a multinational project (PRACTICE - Prevention and Restoration Actions to Combat Desertification. An Integrated Assessment), funded by the European Commission, in order to link S & T advances and traditional knowledge on prevention and restoration practices to combat desertification with sound implementation, learning and adaptive management, knowledge sharing, and dissemination of best practices. The key activities for pursuing this goal are (1) to establish a platform and information system of long-term monitoring sites for assessing sustainable management and actions to combat desertification, (2) to define an integrated protocol for the assessment of these actions, and (3) to link project assessment and evaluation with training and education, adaptive management, and knowledge sharing and dissemination through a participatory approach involving scientists, managers, technicians, financial officers, and members of the public who are/were impacted by the desertification control projects. Monitoring sites are distributed in the Mediterranean Europe (Greece, Italy, Spain, and Portugal), Africa (Morocco, Namibia, South Africa), Middle East (Israel), China, and South and North America (Chile, Mexico, and USA). PRACTICE integrated assessment protocol (IAPro) assumes the mutual human-environment interactions in land-use/cover change at multiple scales, and therefore adopts an integrated approach, which simultaneously considers both biophysical and socio-economic attributes, for assessing actions to combat desertification. IAPro mostly relies on critical slow variables and particularly exploits long-term monitoring data. Integration of biophysical and socio-economic assessment indicators and stakeholder preferences is based on a participatory multi-criteria decision making process. The process is iterative and provides a framework for knowledge exchange and a path to consensus building.

Bautista, S.; Orr, B. J.; Vallejo, R.

2009-12-01

13

Assessing the restorative components of environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

We used a direct rating approach based on definitions of each construct to measure the four components of a restorative environment proposed by attention restoration theory (ART): being away, extent, fascination, and compatibility. We used the same approach to measure two criterion variables, perceived restorative potential (PRP) of a setting and preference for the setting, as well as four additional

Thomas R. Herzog; Colleen; P. Maguire; Mary B. Nebel

2003-01-01

14

Pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunity assessment in environmental restoration  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories implicitly subscribed to the philosophy of pollution prevention and waste minimization. As a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) offer, Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOA) were conducted at two ER sites and a decontamination and Demolition (D and D) site. The purpose of one of the PPOAs was to identify pollution prevention (P2) opportunities during environmental remediation at the Classified Waste Landfill located at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The remediation activities at this site are scheduled to begin in the fall of 1997. The PPOA included presentations by the team members, a tour of the site, and a brainstorming session to list the waste streams, identify P2 opportunities and rank them in order of priority. Twenty-five P2 opportunities were identified during the brainstorming session of which twenty-two opportunities were selected for further investigation. Those twenty-two opportunities are discussed in this paper. A cost benefit analysis was performed for each P2 opportunity based on the estimated waste volume, feasibility, and cost. Pollution Prevention by Design (P2D) was incorporated into the PPOA to introduce waste minimization techniques that can be used during the planning phase of restoration projects.

Roybal, J.A.; Willison, C.P.

1997-10-01

15

ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF RESTORATION TECHNOLOGIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Numerous stream and riparian restoration projects are being undertaken across the nation at a variety of scales and for disparate reasons. Unfortunately, there are very few studies associated with these restoration efforts which provide a consistent and practical methodology to e...

16

Feasibility of a femoral nerve motor branch for transfer to the pudendal nerve for restoring continence: a cadaveric study  

PubMed Central

Object Nerve transfers are an effective means of restoring control to paralyzed somatic muscle groups and, recently, even denervated detrusor muscle. The authors performed a cadaveric pilot project to examine the feasibility of restoring control to the urethral and anal sphincters using a femoral motor nerve branch to reinnervate the pudendal nerve through a perineal approach. Methods Eleven cadavers were dissected bilaterally to expose the pudendal and femoral nerve branches. Pertinent landmarks and distances that could be used to locate these nerves were assessed and measured, as were nerve cross-sectional areas. Results A long motor branch of the femoral nerve was followed into the distal vastus medialis muscle for a distance of 17.4 ± 0.8 cm, split off from the main femoral nerve trunk, and transferred medially and superiorly to the pudendal nerve in the Alcock canal, a distance of 13.7 ± 0.71 cm. This was performed via a perineal approach. The cross-sectional area of the pudendal nerve was 5.64 ± 0.49 mm2, and the femoral nerve motor branch at the suggested transection site was 4.40 ± 0.41 mm2. Conclusions The use of a femoral nerve motor branch to the vastus medialis muscle for heterotopic nerve transfer to the pudendal nerve is surgically feasible, based on anatomical location and cross-sectional areas.

Barbe, Mary F.; Brown, Justin M.; Pontari, Michel A.; Dean, Gregory E.; Braverman, Alan S.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

2012-01-01

17

77 FR 57074 - Indirect Cost Rates for the Damage Assessment, Remediation, and Restoration Program for Fiscal...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Cost Rates for the Damage Assessment, Remediation, and Restoration Program for Fiscal...Cost Rates for the Damage Assessment, Remediation, and Restoration Program for Fiscal...Administration's (NOAA's) Damage Assessment, Remediation, and Restoration Program...

2012-09-17

18

Integrating natural resource damage assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

NONE

1993-10-01

19

Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many US Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

Not Available

1993-10-01

20

Wind Resource and Feasibility Assessment Report for the Lummi Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the wind resource on the Lummi Indian Reservation (Washington State) and presents the methodology, assumptions, and final results of the wind energy development feasibility assessment, which included an assessment of biological impacts and noise impacts.

DNV Renewables (USA) Inc.; J.C. Brennan & Associates, Inc.; Hamer Environmental L.P.

2012-08-31

21

Hydrodynamic and Ecological Assessment of Nearshore Restoration: A Modeling Study  

SciTech Connect

Along the Pacific Northwest coast, much of the estuarine habitat has been diked over the last century for agricultural land use, residential and commercial development, and transportation corridors. As a result, many of the ecological processes and functions have been disrupted. To protect coastal habitats that are vital to aquatic species, many restoration projects are currently underway to restore the estuarine and coastal ecosystems through dike breaches, setbacks, and removals. Information on physical processes and hydrodynamic conditions are critical for the assessment of the success of restoration actions. Restoration of a 160- acre property at the mouth of the Stillaguamish River in Puget Sound has been proposed. The goal is to restore native tidal habitats and estuary-scale ecological processes by removing the dike. In this study, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was developed for the Stillaguamish River estuary to simulate estuarine processes. The model was calibrated to observed tide, current, and salinity data for existing conditions and applied to simulate the hydrodynamic responses to two restoration alternatives. Responses were evaluated at the scale of the restoration footprint. Model data was combined with biophysical data to predict habitat responses at the site. Results showed that the proposed dike removal would result in desired tidal flushing and conditions that would support four habitat types on the restoration footprint. At the estuary scale, restoration would substantially increase the proportion of area flushed with freshwater (< 5 ppt) at flood tide. Potential implications of predicted changes in salinity and flow dynamics are discussed relative to the distribution of tidal marsh habitat.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Thom, Ronald M.; Fuller, Roger

2010-04-10

22

Economic Feasibility of Recycling Plastic Wastes: Preliminary Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Preliminary conclusions concerning the economic feasibility of recycling plastic wastes are presented. In addition to assessing if current recycle technologies can compete in an economic sense with current disposal technologies, the paper attempts to proj...

T. R. Curlee

1984-01-01

23

Spacecraft Autonomy Concept Validation by Simulation: A Feasibility Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An assessment of the feasibility of simulating the functionality of an autonomous spacecraft and its ground control system by enhancing a simulator and control system is presented. The distributed, hierarchical onboard architecture based on an earlier ESA...

U. Pape A. N. Pidgeon J. Sved R. Wilkeit

1990-01-01

24

Cle Elum Lake Sockeye Salmon Restoration Feasibility Study, 1987-1989 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research activities conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) from July 1988 through March 1989 relating to the Cle Elum Lake sockeye salmon restoration feasibility study. During this period, efforts focused on collection and spawning of adult sockeye salmon from the Wenatchee River, incubation of eggs from the 1988-brood, and the rearing of juveniles from the 1987-brood. In late July and early August 1988, 520 adult sockeye salmon were captured at fishways on the Wenatchee River and transferred to net-pens in Lake Wenatchee. Fish were held to maturity in late September and early October, spawned, and eggs incubated at a quarantine hatchery in Seattle, WA. The 336 sockeye salmon successfully spawned from the net-pens at Lake Wenatchee were surveyed for the presence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) and other replicating viruses. In addition, 13 and 5 sockeye salmon spawners were surveyed from spawning grounds on the White and Little Wenatchee Rivers, respectively, from within the Lake Wenatchee system. 12 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Flagg, Thomas A.

1990-02-01

25

MRS feasibility assessment grant technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

On January 13, 1993, Governor of the State of Utah, Mike Leavitt officially announced that he was opposing a MRS Facility in the State of Utah and informed San Juan County of his decision which will preclude the County from applying for a Phase IIa feasibility grant. A copy of the policy statement made by Governor Leavitt is included in this report. Additionally, a bill in the State House of Representative has been filed opposing the facility. A copy of the bill is also included. The work accomplished under Phase I, indicated that there was about an equal amount of residents in San Juan County opposed and in favor of the facility. There were many concerns and issues presented during the Phase I grant period that would have been continued to Phase IIa, if allowed, including the citizen committee.

Not Available

1993-01-01

26

Restoring Hazardous Spill-Damaged Areas: Technique Identification/Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of this study was to identify and assess methods that could be used to accelerate the restoration of lands damaged by spills of hazardous materials. The literature was reviewed to determine what response methods had been used in the past to clean...

R. S. Wentsel R. H. Foutch W. E. Harward W. E. Jones J. F. Kitchens

1981-01-01

27

Assessing floodplain restoration success using soil morphology indicators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Floodplains are complex ecological systems that fulfil different ecological, economic and social functions related to physical, chemical, and biological processes. The fluvial dynamics of most rivers in industrialized countries have been altered to such an extent that floodplains are now one of the most threatened ecosystems worldwide. This adverse impact has been widely recognized and, nowadays, extensive attempts are underway to return rivers to more natural conditions and restore their ecological quality and essential ecosystem functions. As a consequence, the number of restoration projects worldwide is rapidly increasing. However, despite an estimated global cost of more than 1 billion dollars annually, there is a crucial lack of monitoring and quantitative evaluations. Indeed, most projects are never monitored post-restoration (NRC 1992). In Switzerland, only 35% of the projects include a monitoring program mainly based on flora and fauna (BAFU). The design, selection and optimization of indicators for project monitoring are of major importance for sustainable management of riverine ecosystems. However, despite the growing body of literature on potential indicators and criteria for assessing the success of restoration projects no standardised or generally applicable method exists. Furthermore, soils are rarely considered among the possible indicators despite their crucial roles in ecosystems such as decomposition, supplying resources (habitats, gene pool, biomass, and raw materials), and environmental interactions (storage, filtering, transformation). We therefore hypothesized that soils may constitute an appropriate synthetic and functional indicator for the evaluation of river restoration success, especially in the framework of river widening aiming to increase the terrestrial biodiversity. In agreement with the current concepts of river restoration, we propose an assessment tool for floodplain restoration based on three soil morphology criteria (soil diversity, soil typicality, and soil dynamism) and their associated indicators (for example soil Shannon indexes, frequency of soils with specific characteristics, elevation variations due to the fluvial dynamic). The success of floodplain restoration is assessed through comparisons of these criteria between the restored river sector and a reference that could be a near natural floodplain or an embanked floodplain. As a test case, we used a near natural floodplain along the Rhine River as reference site. We then assessed the performance of the method by assessing how well the selected indicators explained a data set of soil physico-chemical characteristics in a principal component analysis. We applied this pedological tool to assess the efficiency of two rivers widening: the Thur (River Thur, CCES project RECORD: http://www.swiss-experiment.ch/index.php/Record:Home), and the Emme River restorations (http://www.bve.be.ch/site/bve_tba_dok_down_wasserbau_emme.pdf). In agreement with other studies, our results confirmed that these restoration projects were partial success. This study demonstrated that soil morphology presents multiple advantages as an indicator of floodplain restoration: ease of use, spatial delimitation of the floodplain, information on past events and fluvial dynamic, and different spatial levels of observation (topsoil horizons, deep horizons, and complete soil profiles).

Guenat, Claire; Fournier, Bertrand; Bullinger-Weber, Géraldine; Grin, Karin; Pfund, Simona; Mitchell, Edward

2010-05-01

28

Clinical outcomes assessment for articular cartilage restoration.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview and perspective of the available options for clinical outcomes evaluation of articular cartilage repair in the knee. A nonsystematic literature review of reported clinical measures for functional, qualitative, and quantitative structural outcomes evaluation after knee articular cartilage repair was performed. Several outcome scores have been validated for articular cartilage repair in the knee with the International Knee Documentation Committee score, Lysholm score, and Knee injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score being reported most frequently. Activity measures including Tegner and Marx activity scales and the rate of return to sports have direct practical relevance for athletically active patients. Macroscopic and histological assessment provides important structural information about repair cartilage quality and quantity. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome scoring and functional MRI are gaining increasing popularity and promise less invasive systematic assessment. In summary, clinical outcome evaluation after cartilage repair can be performed by various established and validated functional outcome instruments as well as several evolving outcome parameters that provide clinically relevant outcome information for researchers, clinicians, and patients. PMID:23341156

Mithoefer, Kai; Acuna, Marco

2013-01-22

29

Remedidal investigation and feasibility study report for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the remedial investigation (RI) is to collect data necessary to adequately characterize the site for the purpose of developing and evaluating effective remedial alternatives. To characterize the site, the lead agency shall, as appropriate, conduct field investigations, including treatability studies, and conduct a baseline risk assessment. The RI provides information to assess the risks to human health and the environment and to support the development, evaluation, and selection of appropriate response alternatives. The primary objective of the feasibility study (FS) is to ensure that appropriate remedial alternatives are developed and evaluated such that relevant information concerning the remedial action options can be presented to a decision-maker and an appropriate remedy selected. The lead agency may develop a feasibility study to address a specific site problem or the entire site. The development and evaluation of alternatives shall reflect the scope and complexity of the remedial action under consideration and the site problems being addressed. Development of alternatives shall be fully integrated with the site characterization activities of the remedial investigation described in paragraph (d) of this section. The lead agency shall include an alternatives screening step, when needed, to select a reasonable number of alternatives for detailed analysis.

Roeck, F.V.

1994-06-01

30

A framework for assessing the feasibility of malaria elimination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent scale-up of malaria interventions, the ensuing reductions in the malaria burden, and reinvigorated discussions about global eradication have led many countries to consider malaria elimination as an alternative to maintaining control measures indefinitely. Evidence-based guidance to help countries weigh their options is thus urgently needed. A quantitative feasibility assessment that balances the epidemiological situation in a region, the

Bruno Moonen; Justin M Cohen; Andy J Tatem; Jessica Cohen; Simon I Hay; Oliver Sabot; David L Smith

2010-01-01

31

Feasibility and Validity of Computerized Ecological Momentary Assessment in Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Background: Computerized Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMAc) techniques permit the assessment of daily life behaviors and experiences. The present investigation examined the feasibility and validity of this assessment methodology in outpatients with schizophrenia. Methods: Outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (n = 54) received a battery of standard laboratory clinical and functional outcome measures and then completed electronic questionnaires on a personal digital assistant (PDA) microcomputer 4 times per day for 1 week. Results: Generally good compliance (87%) with EMAc was found, and participants rated their experience with the study positively. The data collected in daily life demonstrated expected patterns across the assessment week and were significantly associated with scores from standard laboratory instruments measuring similar constructs. Conclusions: EMAc is a feasible and valid approach to data collection in community-dwelling people with schizophrenia, and it may provide important information that is inaccessible via standard clinical and functional outcome measures administered in the laboratory.

Granholm, Eric; Loh, Catherine; Swendsen, Joel

2008-01-01

32

Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

King, J.W.

1993-08-01

33

Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at several sites owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120(a) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act also subjects DOE to liability under Section 107 of CERCLA for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. The Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process, by which natural resource injuries are determined and compensatory monetary damages are calculated, is not well known or understood by DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. Nevertheless, natural resource liabilities are potentially a significant source of additional monetary claims for CERCLA hazardous substance releases. This paper describes the requirements of NRDA and explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, in order to more quickly restore environmental services at the lowest total cost to the public. The first section of the paper explains the statutory and regulatory mandates for the NRDA process. The second section briefly describes the four phases of the NRDA process, while the third section examines the three steps in the assessment phase in considerable detail. Finally, the last section focuses on the integration of the CERCLA and NRDA processes.

Bascietto, J.J. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (US). RCRA/CERCLA Div.; Dunford, R.W. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (US); Sharples, F.E.; Suter, G.W. II [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US)

1993-06-01

34

Mid-Columbia Coho Salmon Reintroduction Feasibility Project : Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Before the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) decides whether to fund a program to reintroduce coho salmon to mid-Columbia River basin tributaries, research is needed to determine the ecological risks and biological feasibility of such an effort. Since the early 1900s, the native stock of coho has been decimated in the tributaries of the middle reach of the Columbia River. The four Columbia River Treaty Tribes identified coho reintroduction in the mid-Columbia as a priority in the Tribal Restoration Plan. It is a comprehensive plan put forward by the Tribes to restore the Columbia River fisheries. In 1996, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) recommended the tribal mid-Columbia reintroduction project for funding by BPA. It was identified as one of fifteen high-priority supplementation projects for the Columbia River basin, and was incorporated into the NPPC`s Fish and Wildlife Program. The release of coho from lower Columbia hatcheries into mid-Columbia tributaries is also recognized in the Columbia River Fish Management Plan.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State) Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

1999-01-01

35

A fuzzy quality index for the environmental assessment of a restored wetland.  

PubMed

This paper describes the feasibility study for the restoration of agricultural land with a tendency to become waterlogged into a natural wetland, conceived to mitigate floods and to remove nutrients from the water drained from the cultivated plots. The wetland model, developed in aquatox, includes the nutrient dynamics both in the water and in the sediment, and the vegetation that is expected to develop as a consequence of flooding. The model inputs were synthesized from historical time series of rainfall and chemical data collected over the last decade. The model outputs are used to compute a synthetic fuzzy quality index (FQI) to assess the removal efficiency of the wetland. This FQI is based on three main variables describing the ecosystem quality: chlorophyll-a, dissolved oxygen and total suspended solids. This index has the merit of being simple enough to be immediately grasped by non-technical people, like managers and stakeholders, to whom the restoration project is proposed. The simulations, performed under five differing loading scenarios demonstrate the feasibility of this solution, which is robust enough to accommodate a 50% increase in either nitrogen, phosphorous or organic matter. PMID:21902050

Giusti, E; Marsili-Libelli, S; Mattioli, S

2011-01-01

36

The perceived restorativeness of gardens – Assessing the restorativeness of a mixed built and natural scene type  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural environments have been found more restorative than built environments but studies have also highlighted mixed built and natural environments. The aims were to examine the perceived restorativeness of gardens, and evaluate the performance of the Perceived Restorativeness Scale, PRS, when applied to two examples from the same mixed built natural scene type rather than to a contrast between built

Carina Tenngart Ivarsson; Caroline M. Hagerhall

2008-01-01

37

Are Gardens Restorative Environments? - Assessing the Perceived Restorativeness of Two Healing Gardens  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to investigate whether gardens are perceived as restorative and whether different gardens can be more or less restorative. Also, we hypothesized that students in landscape architecture have particular skills in detecting differences in outdoor environments. Forty-one psychology students and 33 landscape architecture students judged two different gardens using the Perceived Restorativeness Scale (PRS). The

Carina Tenngart; Caroline Hagerhall

38

Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this study are to determine the market potential and the technical feasibility of using PFBC ash in high volume ash use applications. The information will be of direct use to the utility industry in assessing the economics of PFBC power generation in light of ash disposal avoidance through ash marketing. In addition, the research is expected to result in the generation of generic data on the use of PFBC ash that could lead to novel processing options and procedures. The specific objectives of the proposed research and demonstration effort are: Define resent and future market potential of PFBC ash for a range of applications (Phase I); assess the technical feasibility of PFBC ash use in construction, civil engineering and agricultural applications (Phase II); and demonstrate the most promising of the market and ash use options in full-scale field demonstrations (Phase III).

Smith, V.E.; Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Georgiou, D.N. [Jacques, Whitford and Associates Ltd., Dartmouth, NS (Canada); Wheeldon, J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1994-10-01

39

The assessment of restoration of habitat in urban wetlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wetlands in urban areas are often restored in an attempt to reduce the loss of such habitats. Unfortunately, the success, or otherwise, of programmes of restoration has rarely been systematically gauged. Through not knowing whether programmes of restoration are successful or not, valuable resources potentially continue to be wasted, wetland habitats remain degraded and the methods of restoration are not

J. E Grayson; M. G Chapman; A. J Underwood

1999-01-01

40

Preliminary Feasibility Study: Transport and Distribution of Dredged Materials by Hovercraft for Wetland Nourishment and Restoration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A variety of mechanisms have resulted in the loss of coastal wetlands. Thin-layer disposal of dredged material has been proposed to maintain and restore wetland areas. Transport of this material into wetlands areas is problematic due to the sensitivity of...

T. J. Olin M. R. Palermo A. C. Gibson

1994-01-01

41

Assessing Success of Instream Structures for Salmonid Stream Restoration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stream restoration is a billion dollar industry in North America; despite this expenditure there remain questions regarding the effectiveness of current techniques such as the installation of instream structures. Assessing the effect that such structures have on physical habitat and on salmonid density are key ways of determining project success. The objectives of this research were to assess the impact of instream structures on physical habitat in the Nicolet River (Quebec) and to analyze physical habitat and fish density data from many stream restoration projects in North America. Results of intensive surveys of the Nicolet River show that the installation of weirs and deflectors results in a greater frequency of pools. These pools have significantly greater depths, lower velocities, larger sediment size and higher percent cover than those without structures. Meta analysis of data from 187 stream restoration projects in North America also show significant increases in percent pool area, average depth, and percent cover as well as decreases in channel width following the installation of structures. The physical changes observed in the Nicolet River resulted in improved trout habitat, as measured by applying habitat preference curves, but uneven stocking practices and fishing pressure confounded attempts to verify differences in trout density based on presence or absence of structures. The meta analysis, however, shows significant increases in salmonid density, measured as fish/m2, following the installation of structures. On average, density increased by 161%. Different structure types result in significantly different changes in physical habitat, with weir structures providing the largest density increase. Multiple linear regression analysis reveals that the combination of change in relative pool area and in width is the best predictor of change in salmonid density (r2=0.511). Instream structures are significantly more successful at increasing brook trout density than cutthroat and steelhead trout or coho salmon. Furthermore, salmonids over 15cm in length show significantly higher increases in density than smaller fish. These results highlight that restoration structures can play an important role in creating better habitat for salmonids and increasing their densities, but much work is needed to determine the best way to rehabilitate disturbed streams for various species.

Whiteway, S.; Biron, P.

2009-05-01

42

Cle Elum Lake Anadromous Salmon Restoration Feasibility Study: Summary of Research, 1986-1999 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this research was to study the feasibility for anadromous salmonids to recolonize the habitat above reservoirs in the Yakima River without disruption to irrigation withdrawals. A primary concern was whether anadromous fish could successfully exit reservoirs and survive downstream passage through the Yakima and Columbia Rivers to the ocean.

Dey, Douglas

2000-04-01

43

Feasibility assessment of electromechanical batteries for electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

We have assessed the current feasibility of substituting multi-shell composite flywheel motor-generators (electromechanical batteries) for electrochemical batteries in electric vehicles. We present two conceptual designs using the latest materials and technology. Feasibility was evaluated in terms of performance predictions based upon consistent and optimistic analytical models of components for these conceptual designs. We review various approaches for performance improvement. The most challenging issues are capital cost and energy storage performance. Energy storage per unit cost favors the electrochemical battery. The power density, specific power, efficiency, and turn-around efficiency can be higher for the electrochemical battery than for projected electrochemical batteries of the future. We conclude that for electric vehicles, electromechanical batteries may be best suited for a hybrid application with electrochemical batteries. This combines the high specific power, power density, and turn-around efficiency possible with the electrochemical battery with the low cost of the electrochemical battery.

Comfort, W.J.; Bumpas, S.E.; Edmunds, T.A.; Hall, A.R.; Lamont, A.D.; McCue, H.K.; Zywicz, E.

1992-05-01

44

Assessment of hydraulic restoration of San Pablo Marsh, California.  

PubMed

Inter-tidal marshes are dynamic diverse ecosystems at the transition zone between terrestrial and ocean environments. Geomorphologically, inter-tidal salt marshes are vegetated land-forms at elevations slightly greater than mean tidal levels that have distributed channels formed under ebb (drainage) tidal flows that widen and deepen in the seaward direction. The drainage channels enable tidal flows to circulate sediments and nutrients through the marsh system during normal tidal events, while depositing sediments during storm or seismic events. This dynamic system encourages considerable biodiversity while simultaneously providing water quality enhancement features that service marsh terrestrial life and marine life in the estuary. Reservoir creation limiting sediment transport, anticipated large increases in sea levels as well as agricultural and urban development have resulted in significant loss of inter-tidal marshes and subsequent adverse impacts on waterfowl, infauna and fisheries. The complex and continuously changing marsh channel hydraulics and sedimentary processes have severely constrained quantitative modeling of these marsh systems such that restoration/creation efforts remain something of an empirical science and further assessments are needed. The purpose of this paper is to outline current understanding of salt marsh hydrodynamics, sediment accretion processes and subsequent response of marsh vegetation to set the stage for assessment of a marsh restoration effort along San Pablo Bay near San Francisco, California. Several kilometers of drainage channels were constructed in a 624 ha disturbed salt marsh to restore tidal circulation and vegetation so as to enhance habitat for threatened species (e.g. clapper rail, harvest mouse, delta smelt and potentially anadromous fish species). Two distinct drainage channel systems ('east' and 'west') were installed having similar channel dimensions common to salt marshes in the region, but having design bankfull tidal prism volumes differing by a factor of two. Following channel excavation, main channel tidal flows and sediment loads as well as marsh sediment accretion rates were monitored to assess the relative success of the excavation in restoring tidal circulation and vegetation (Salicornia spp.) to the marsh. Annual aerial surveys corroborated with ground-truthing indicated that marsh vegetation rapidly expanded, from 40 to 85% coverage several years following excavation. The 'east' channel intake was nearly completely silted in within three years. However, channel surveys and flow measurements indicated that the 'east' channel system tidal prism was only about 1200 m3, more than an order of magnitude less than that of the stable 'west' channel system. Marsh sediment accretion rates were on the order of 7-8 mm yr(-1), a rate common to the Pacific coast region that exceeds estimated sea level rise rates of approximately 2 mm yr(-1). East channel network siltation resulted in storm and spring tidal flood ponding such that marsh vegetation coverage decreased to 51% of the marsh area and related habitat expansion decreased. These results are considered in terms of the primary inter-tidal marsh factors affecting possible restoration/creation strategies. PMID:15473530

Grismer, Mark E; Kollar, J; Syder, J

2004-11-01

45

Cle Elum Lake Restoration Feasibility Study: Fish Husbandry Research, 1988-1991 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are involved in a project to evaluate the feasibility of re-establishing anadromous salmon runs to Cle Elum Lake in the Yakima River Basin of Washington state. Historically, the Yakima River system supported large runs of anadromous salmonids that contributed significantly to the Columbia River harvest. Habitat destruction and overfishing drastically reduced run abundance prior to the early 1900s. Salmon runs were eliminated from upper reaches of the Yakima River Basin with development of irrigation storage reservoirs without fishways in the early 1900s. The goal of the NMFS/BPA project is to determine if it is feasible for anadromous salmonids to recolonize the habitat above Cle Elum Dam under the present format of irrigation water withdrawal from the reservoir. The primary concern is whether anadromous fish can successfully exit Cle Elum Lake and survive downstream passage through the Yakima and Columbia Rivers to the ocean.

Flagg, Thomas A.

1991-09-01

46

Clinical assessment of postoperative sensitivity in posterior composite restorations.  

PubMed

This incidence of postoperative sensitivity was evaluated in resin-based posterior restorations. Two hundred and ninety-two direct restorations were evaluated in premolars and molars. A total of 143 Class I and 149 Class II restorations (MO/OD and MOD) were placed in patients ranging in age from 30 to 50 years. After the cavity preparations were completed, a rubber dam was placed, and the preparations were restored using a total-etch system (Prime & Bond NT) and a resin-based restorative material (TPH Spectrum). The patients were contacted after 24 hours and 7, 30 and 90 days postoperatively and questioned regarding the presence of sensitivity and the stimuli that triggered that sensitivity. The Chi-square and Fisher's Exact Test were used for statistical analysis. Evaluation at 24 hours after restorative treatment revealed statistically significant differences among the types of cavity preparations restored and the occurrence of postoperative sensitivity (p = 0.0003), with a higher frequency of sensitivity in Class II MOD restorations (26%), followed by Class II MO/DO (15%) and Class I restorations (5%). At 7, 30 and 90 days after restorative treatment, there was a decrease in the occurrence of sensitivity for all groups. The percentage of sensitivity among the groups was not significantly different. This study shows that the occurrence of sensitivity is correlated with the complexity of the restoration. PMID:17910217

Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Mestrener, Sandra Rahal; Delício, Giovana; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Sversut; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi

47

A monitoring protocol to assess tidal restoration of salt marshes on local and regional scales  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Assessing the response of salt marshes to tidal restoration relies on comparisons of ecosystem attributes between restored and reference marshes. Although this approach provides an objective basis for judging project success, inferences can be constrained if the high variability of natural marshes masks differences in sampled attributes between restored and reference sites. Furthermore, such assessments are usually focused on a small number of restoration projects in a local area, limiting the ability to address questions regarding the effectiveness of restoration within a broad region. We developed a hierarchical approach to evaluate the performance of tidal restorations at local and regional scales throughout the Gulf of Maine. The cornerstone of the approach is a standard protocol for monitoring restored and reference salt marshes throughout the region. The monitoring protocol was developed by consensus among nearly 50 restoration scientists and practitioners. The protocol is based on a suite of core structural measures that can be applied to any tidal restoration project. The protocol also includes additional functional measures for application to specific projects. Consistent use of the standard protocol to monitor local projects will enable pooling information for regional assessments. Ultimately, it will be possible to establish a range of reference conditions characterizing natural tidal wetlands in the region and to compare performance curves between populations of restored and reference marshes for assessing regional restoration effectiveness.

Neckles, H. A.; Dionne, M. D.; Burdick, D. M.; Roman, C. T.; Buchsbaum, R.; Hutchins, E.

2002-01-01

48

Anatomic feasibility of restoring bladder capacity and voiding following proximal spinal cord injury using a femoral branch to bilateral pelvic nerve transfer: A cadaver study  

PubMed Central

Background Nerve transfers are an effective means of restoring control to paralyzed somatic muscle groups and recently shown to be effective in denervated detrusor muscle in a canine model. Objective A cadaveric project was performed to examine the anatomic feasibility of transferring femoral muscular nerve branches to vesical branches of the pelvic nerve as a method of potentially restoring innervation to control the detrusor muscle in humans using transfer of somatic nerves. Methods Twenty cadavers were dissected bilaterally to expose pelvic and femoral muscular nerve branches. Ease of access and ability to transfer the nerves were assessed, as were nerve cross sectional areas. Results The pelvic nerve was accessed at the base of the bladder, inferior to the ureter and accompanied by inferior vesical vessels. Muscular branches of the femoral nerve to the vastus medialis and intermedius muscles (L3, 4 origins) were followed distally for 17.4 ± 0.8 cm. Two muscle branches were split from the femoral nerve trunk, and tunneled inferior to the inguinal ligament. One was moved medially towards the base of the bladder and linked to the ipsilateral pelvic nerve. The second was tunneled superior to the bladder and linked to the contralateral pelvic nerve. The cross sectional area of the pelvic nerve vesical branch was 2.60 ± 0.169 mm2 (mean ± SEM), and the femoral nerve branches at the suggested transection site was 4.40 ± 0.41 mm2. Conclusion Use of femoral nerve muscular branches from the vastus medialis and intermedius muscles for heterotopic nerve transfer of bilateral pelvic nerves is surgically feasible, based on anatomical location and cross sectional areas.

Brown, Justin M.; Barbe, Mary F.; Albo, Michael E.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

2013-01-01

49

Feasibility of bone assessment with ultrasonic backscatter signals in neonates.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to assess the value of ultrasonic backscatter signals and the backscatter coefficient (BSC) in the analysis of bone status in neonates and to analyze the relationships between the BSC and gestational age, birth weight, length, head circumference and gender. A total of 122 neonates participated in the study, including 83 premature infants and 39 full-term infants. Their BSCs were measured by ultrasound after birth. The results revealed a significant correlation between the BSC and gestational age (R = 0.47, p < 0.001), birth weight (R = 0.47, p < 0.0001) and length at birth (R = 0.43, p < 0.001) at a frequency of 5.0 MHz. This study suggests that the use of ultrasonic backscattering and the BSC is feasible for assessment of the bone status of neonates. PMID:23932274

Zhang, Rong; Ta, Dean; Liu, Chengcheng; Chen, Chao

2013-08-09

50

Application of EPA wetland research program approach to a floodplain wetland restoration assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kolka, R.K., C.C. Trettin, E.A. Nelson, C.D. Barton, and D.E. Fletcher. 2002. Application of the EPA Wetland Research Program Approach to a floodplain wetland restoration assessment. J. Env. Monitoring & Restoration 1(1):37-51.;\\u000a;\\u000aForested wetland restoration assessment is difficult because of the timeframe necessary for the development of a forest ecosystem. The development of a forested wetland ecosystem includes the

R. K. Kolka; C. Trettin; E. Nelson; C. Barton; D. Fletcher

2002-01-01

51

The Modified Model Cavity Method for Assessing Antibacterial Properties of Dental Restorative Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new in vitro method for assessing the antibacterial properties of dental restorative materials is described with ratios of test material\\/ culture medium volume aiming to simulate conditions around a restoration in vivo. Antibacterial activity is determined by the reduction in optical density of the test culture relative to controls. The method was used for assessment of the antibacterial activity

S. D. Meryon; S. G. Johnson

1989-01-01

52

Goree Island Hotel. Feasibility Study for the Planned Restoration of Historic Buildings on Goree Island, Dakar, Senegal, as an 86-Unit Luxury Hotel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report, conducted by Henderson Associates, Inc., was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. It examines the feasibility of restoring historic building into a luxury hotel on Goree Island, Senegal. The report contains information on the site...

1997-01-01

53

[Feasibility assessment of skin permeation for the local anesthetic lidocaine].  

PubMed

In this paper, the feasibility of skin permeation for lidocaine and pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) tape formulation containing lidocaine for skin local anesthetic were assessed. Firstly, in vitro skin permeation of the molecular and ionic forms of lidocaine from water and silicone fluid suspensions was measured using a side-by-side two diffusion cells and excised hairless rat skin. Secondly, PSA tape containing lidocaine was prepared by a general casting method using styrene-isoprene-styrene block copolymer. The in vitro release and skin permeation were evaluated and compared with that of Japan marketed xylocaine jelly. The effect of lidocaine concentration on the steady-state flux of skin permeation from 10% to 60% lidocaine PSA tapes was also evaluated. PMID:8571782

Cheng, Y H; Sugibayashi, K; Morimoto, Y; Liao, G T; Hou, S X

1995-01-01

54

A feasibility study of perennial/annual plant species to restore soils contaminated with heavy metals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A feasibility study was carried out to evaluate the application of perennial/annual plant species in a phytoextraction process of a previously washed industrial urban soil contaminated by nickel, arsenic and cupper. The plant species selected for this study were Ipomea (Ipomea variada); grass (Poa pratensis); grass mixture (Festuca rubra, Cynodon dactylon, Lolium multiforum, Pennisetum sp.); Monks Cress (Tropaeolum majus); ficus (Ficus benajamina) and fern (Pteris cretica). Soil was characterized and it presented the following heavy metals concentrations (dry weight): 80 mg of Ni/kg, 456-656 mg of As/kg and 1684-3166 mg of Cu/kg. Germination and survival in contaminated soil tests were conducted, from these, P. pratensis was discarded and the rest of plant species tested were used for the phytoextraction selection test. After 4 months of growth, biomass production was determined, and content of Ni, As and Cu was analyzed in plant's tissue. Metal biological absorption coefficient (BAC), bio-concentration factor (BCF) and translocation factor (TF), were calculated.Regarding to biomass generation it was observed, in every case, an inhibition of the plant growth compared with blanks sown in a non contaminated soil; inhibition ranged from 22.5% for the Monk cress to 98% for Ipomea. Even though the later presented high BAC, BCF and TF, its growth was severely inhibited, and therefore, due its low biomass generation, it is not recommended for phytoextraction under conditions for this study.Heavy metals concentrations in plant's tissue (dry weight) were as high as 866 mg Cu/kg and 602 mg As/kg for grass mixture; and 825 mg As/kg was observed for Monks cress.Grass mixture and monks cress had high BAC, BCF and TF, also they had high metal concentrations in its plants tissues and the lowest growth inhibition rates; hence the application in phytoextraction processes of these plants is advisable.

Zacarías, Montserrat; Beltrán, Margarita; Gilberto Torres, Luis; González, Abelardo

55

Floodplain Habitat Restoration at Thunder Ranch, Utah. Final Environmental Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program) is proposing to restore endangered fish habitat at 330 acres of Green River bottomlands located on the Thunder Ranch near Jensen, Utah. The Recovery Program acquired a total of 4...

2004-01-01

56

Feasibility of Young Children's Nutrition Assessment on the Web  

PubMed Central

Methods to assess detailed dietary data are cumbersome, expensive and difficult to implement with large samples. The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the feasibility of collecting data from parents on their child’s diet using an online dietary assessment tool. The “Young Children’s Nutrition Assessment on the Web” (YCNA-W), was developed as part of a longitudinal study on familial influences on food intake of preschool children. A sample of 862 parents from 56 nursery schools completed a paper and pencil questionnaire containing sociodemographic variables, a food frequency questionnaire on their child’s diet and psychosocial variables. Subsequently, a subset of parents were asked to either complete a pencil food diary or YCNA-W (n=88); those remaining who provided e-mail addresses were asked to complete the YCNA-W (n=467) and a user-acceptability questionnaire. This resulted in 39 useful paper and pencil diaries, 217 useful YCNA-Ws and 164 user-acceptability questionnaires. Mann-Whitney U tests comparing nutrient (macronutrients, vitamin C, calcium and fiber) and food group intakes of data collected with YCNA-W versus paper and pencil diaries resulted in no significant differences, except for water. Attrition analyses indicated that drop out for the online assessment was associated with gender (father completing the questionnaire), lower social status, being a smoker, and lower nutritional knowledge. The online measure was well received by respondents: the majority found it user-friendly (79%), attractive (68%) and clear (93%). YCNA-W is a promising tool to collect online dietary data in large-scale surveys.

Vereecken, Carine Anna; Covents, Marc; Haynie, Denise; Maes, Lea

2009-01-01

57

Assessment of the Feasibility of Innovative Reusable Launchers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The demand for getting access to space, in particular to Low Earth Orbit, is increasing and fully reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) are likely to play a key role in the development of future space activities. Up until now this kind of space systems has not been successfully carried out: in fact today only the Space Shuttle, which belongs to the old generation of launchers, is operative and furthermore it is not a fully reusable system. In the nineties many studies regarding advanced transatmospheric planes were started, but no one was accomplished because of the technological problems encountered and the high financial resources required with the corresponding industrial risk. One of the most promising project was the Lockheed Venture Star, which seemed to have serious chances to be carried out. Anyway, if this ever happens, it will take quite a long time thus the operative life of Space Shuttle will have to be extended for the International Space Station support. The purpose of the present work is to assess the feasibility of different kinds of advanced reusable launch vehicles to gain access to space and to meet the requirements of today space flight needs, which are mainly safety and affordability. Single stage to orbit (SSTO), two stage to orbit (TSTO) and the so called "one and a half" stage to orbit vehicles are here taken into account to highlight their advantages and disadvantages. The "one and a half" stage to orbit vehicle takes off and climbs to meet a tanker aircraft to be aerially refuelled and then, after disconnecting from the tanker, it flies to reach the orbit. In this case, apart from the space vehicle, also the tanker aircraft needs a dedicated study to examine the problems related to the refuelling at high subsonic speeds and at a height near the tropopause. Only winged vehicles which take off and land horizontally are considered but different architectural layouts and propulsive configurations are hypothesised. Unlike the Venture Star, which takes off like the Space Shuttle, this kind of reusable launch vehicles, called spaceplanes, should all be able to be maintained and operated from airports, thus making the launch and recovery phases easier and more affordable. Apart from being an innovative attempt to get access to space, spaceplanes look likely to revolutionize long distance plane travel, with travel times between any two cities connecting USA, Europe, Japan and Australia being only a few hours. SSTO winged vehicles may be at the margins of feasibility as a reusable SSTO design attempts to take two major steps at once: step one being a fully reusable vehicle and step two being a single-stage reusable vehicle. It is well known that the accomplishment of the SSTO vehicle requires a dramatic effort from the technological point of view even though the integration design appears to be quite easy. If compared to the SSTO, the TSTO reusable vehicle is less technically demanding as, for example, state-of-the-art engines can be used but the integration design is surely more complex. An optimum solution may be represented by the "one and a half" stage to orbit vehicle. In fact getting the "one and a half" reusable vehicle into orbit doesn't look impossible but it surely does look challenging. In this paper the study of the feasibility and the technological assessment of new space systems concepts are accomplished by: The work we are involved in is still under way but the first results we have had are encouraging.

Chiesa, S.; Corpino, S.; Viola, N.

58

Ecological issues related to wetland preservation, restoration, creation and assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A wide range of local, state, federal, and private programs are available to support the national (USA) policy of wetland ‘No Net Loss’. Implementation of programs, however, has resulted in the continued loss of natural wetlands on the premise that restored or created wetlands will replace the functions and values lost by destruction of natural wetlands. What are the ecological

Dennis F Whigham

1999-01-01

59

Experimental assessment of ecological restoration options for compacted forest soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is ecologically undesirable to solve forest soil compaction due to mechanized harvesting at large spatial scales using agricultural mechanical soil loosening techniques. We therefore examined whether a stimulation of biological activity through litter manipulation, liming and\\/or inoculation of the anecic earthworm species Lumbricus terrestris could significantly contribute to the ecological restoration of compacted forest soils by comparing the impact

Evy Ampoorter; An De Schrijver; Pieter De Frenne; Martin Hermy; Kris Verheyen

2011-01-01

60

Installation Restoration Program. Preliminary Assessment: Maryland Air National Guard Base, Martin State Airport, Baltimore, Maryland.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Preliminary Assessment of suspected hazardous waste sites at the Maryland Air National Guard Base, Martin State Airport, Baltimore, Maryland. The study was conducted under the Air National Guard's Installation Restoration Program.

1988-01-01

61

Assessing ecosystem integrity of restored prairie wetlands from species production–diversity relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

We assessed ecosystem integrity in restored prairie wetlands in eastern South Dakota, U.S.A., by examining the relationship between and diatom diversity and production. We asked three questions: (1) Is production related to species diversity? (2) Can production-diversity relationships be used to distinguish between restored and reference wetlands with the purpose of assessing ecological integrity? (3) Are production-diversity relationships influenced by

Paul M. Mayer; Susan M. Galatowitsch

2001-01-01

62

A regional assessment of salt marsh restoration and monitoring in the Gulf of Maine  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We compiled salt marsh monitoring datasets from 36 complete or imminent restoration projects in the Gulf of Maine to assess regional monitoring and restoration practices. Data were organized by functional indicators and restoration project types (culvert replacement, excavation works, or ditch plugging) then pooled to generate mean values for indicators before restoration, after restoration, and at reference sites. Monitoring data were checked against the regional standards of a voluntary protocol for the Gulf of Maine. Data inventories showed that vegetation and salinity indicators were most frequently collected (89 and 78% of sites, respectively), whereas nekton, bird, and hydrologic measures were collected at only about half of the sites. Reference conditions were monitored at 72% of sites. Indicators were analyzed to see if project sites were degraded relative to reference areas and to detect ecological responses to restoration activities. Results showed that compared to reference areas, prerestoration sites had smaller tidal ranges, reduced salinity levels, greater cover of brackish plants species, and lower cover of halophyte plants. Following restoration, physical factors rebounded rapidly with increased flood and salinity levels after about one year, especially for culvert projects. Biological responses were less definitive and occurred over longer time frames. Plant communities trended toward recovered halophytes and reduced brackish species at 3+ years following restoration. Nekton and avian indicators were indistinguishable among reference, impacted, and restored areas. The protocol was successful in demonstrating restoration response for the region, but results were limited by regional inconsistencies in field practices and relatively few multiyear datasets. To improve future assessment capabilities, we encourage greater adherence to the standard protocol throughout the Gulf of Maine salt marsh restoration community.

Konisky, R.A.; Burdick, D. M.; Dionne, M.; Neckles, H. A.

2006-01-01

63

Assessment of the advantages and feasibility of a nuclear rocket  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feasibility of rebuilding and testing a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) for the Mars mission has been investigated. Calculations indicate that an NTR would substantially reduce the earth-orbit assembled mass compared to LOX\\/LHâ systems. The mass savings were 36% and 65% for the cases of total aerobraking and of total propulsive braking respectively. Consequently, the cost savings for a single

Howe

1985-01-01

64

Bullet Trap Feasibility Assessment and Implementation Plan. (Technology Identification).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC) is evaluating the feasibility of using bullet traps on standard Army small arms ranges. Currently on outdoor ranges, shooters fire small arms into earthen berms or far down range into the soil. This deposits lead...

D. D. Evans R. S. Young

1996-01-01

65

Bullet Trap Feasibility Assessment and Implementation Plan. Evaluation Criteria Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC) is evaluating the feasibility of using bullet traps on Army small arms ranges. Currently on outdoor ranges, shooters fire small arms into earthen berms or far down range into the soil. This deposits lead and othe...

D. D. Evans R. S. Young

1996-01-01

66

Assessment of the advantages and feasibility of a nuclear rocket  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of rebuilding and testing a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) for the Mars mission has been investigated. Calculations indicate that an NTR would substantially reduce the earth-orbit assembled mass compared to LOX/LH/sub 2/ systems. The mass savings were 36% and 65% for the cases of total aerobraking and of total propulsive braking respectively. Consequently, the cost savings for a single mission of using an NTR, if aerobraking is feasible, are probably insufficient to warrant the NTR development. If multiple missions are planned or if propulsive braking is desired at Mars and/or at Earth, then the savings of about $7B will easily pay for the NTR development. Estimates of the cost of rebuilding a NTR were based on the previous NERVA program's budget plus additional costs to develop a flight ready engine. The total cost to build the engine would be between $4 to 5B. The concept of developing a full-power test stand at Johnston Atoll in the Pacific appears very feasible. The added expense of building facilities on the island should be less than $1.4B.

Howe, S.D.

1985-01-01

67

Feasibility assessment of Doppler radar long-term physiological measurements.  

PubMed

In this paper we examine the feasibility of applying doppler radar technique for a long-term health monitoring. Doppler radar was used to detect and eliminate periods of significant motion. This technique was verified using a human study on 17 subjects, and it was determined that for 15 out of 17 subjects there was no significant motion for over 85% of the measurement interval in supine positions. Majority of subjects exhibited significantly less motion in supine position, which is promising for sleep monitoring, and monitoring of hospitalized patients. PMID:22254615

Massagram, Wansuree; Lubecke, Victor M; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

2011-01-01

68

Assessing Neuropsychological Performance in a Migrant Farm Working Colonia in Baja California, Mexico: A Feasibility Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neuropsychological impairments (NPI) can lead to difficulties in daily functioning and ultimately contribute to poor health\\u000a outcomes. However, evidence for the feasibility of NPI assessment in resource-limited settings using tests developed in high\\u000a literacy\\/high education cultures is sparse. The main objectives were to: (1) determine the feasibility and appropriateness\\u000a of conducting neuropsychological assessments among a migrant farm worker population in

Chad A. Bousman; Hugo Salgado; Terence Hendrix; Miguel Fraga; Mariana Cherner

69

Environmental management: Integrating ecological evaluation, remediation, restoration, natural resource damage assessment and long-term stewardship on contaminated lands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecological evaluation is essential for remediation, restoration, and Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), and forms the basis for many management practices. These include determining status and trends of biological, physical, or chemical\\/radiological conditions, conducting environmental impact assessments, performing remedial actions should remediation fail, managing ecosystems and wildlife, and assessing the efficacy of remediation, restoration, and long-term stewardship. The objective of

Joanna Burger

2008-01-01

70

Assessment of interfacial defects at composite restorations by swept source optical coherence tomography.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT. In clinical dental practice, it is often difficult or even impossible to detect and assess interfacial adhesive defects at adhesive restorations by means of visual inspection or other established diagnostic methods. However, nondestructive optical coherence tomography (OCT) may provide a better picture in this diagnostic scenario. The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of swept source OCT (SS-OCT) for the nondestructive assessment of interfacial deficiencies at composite restorations and the evaluation of cohesive defects within composite material. Ten class V composite restorations that were not adhesively luted were taken as validation objects and examined for frequency of interfacial gaps, air entrapments, and defects between composite layers using SS-OCT with a 1325-nm center wavelength. Light microscopy was used to inspect for inherent structures. SS-OCT detected 79.5%±1.8% of the total gap lengths at the enamel interface and 70.9%±0.4% at the dentin interface. Additionally, defective structures in composite restorations were displayed. It was shown that OCT imaging has the potential to nondestructively assess the interfacial adaptation of composite restorations and to detect internal defects in the layered composite material. PMID:23877771

Park, Kyung-Jin; Schneider, Hartmut; Haak, Rainer

2013-07-01

71

Feasibility of Using Virtual Reality to Assess Nicotine Cue Reactivity during Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Cue reactivity assessments have been widely used to assess craving and attention to cues among cigarette smokers. Cue reactivity has the potential to offer insights into treatment decisions; however, the use of cue reactivity in treatment studies has been limited. This study assessed the feasibility of using a virtual reality-based cue reactivity…

Kaganoff, Eili; Bordnick, Patrick S.; Carter, Brian Lee

2012-01-01

72

The value of wader foraging behaviour study to assess the success of restored intertidal areas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The loss of intertidal habitat in estuaries has resulted in the need to create new habitats in order to protect waterbird populations. In order to examine the waterbird colonisation of restored intertidal areas created in 2003 through the realignment of the flood defence in the Humber Estuary (UK), the feeding behaviour of Redshank (Tringa totanus) was observed in April 2008. Numbers of pecks, probes and paces (numbers of steps) and the prey intake events were compared between Redshank foraging on the restored mudflat and on the adjacent established mudflat. Redshank prey intake and success rate (prey intake divided by the total numbers of pecks and probes) were significantly lower on the restored mudflat compared to the adjacent established mudflat. Conversely, the number of steps taken while foraging and the number of paces per successful feeding event were significantly greater on the restored mudflat. This shows that focal behaviour in restored intertidal areas can be directly compared with that in natural established mudflat in order to examine differences in foraging behaviour. The findings emphasise that a study of foraging behaviour should be incorporated into the assessment of restoration success of intertidal areas as an indication of habitat quality.

Mander, Lucas; Marie-Orleach, Lucas; Elliott, Mike

2013-10-01

73

MRS feasibility assessment grant technical progress report. Final report  

SciTech Connect

On January 13, 1993, Governor of the State of Utah, Mike Leavitt officially announced that he was opposing a MRS Facility in the State of Utah and informed San Juan County of his decision which will preclude the County from applying for a Phase IIa feasibility grant. A copy of the policy statement made by Governor Leavitt is included in this report. Additionally, a bill in the State House of Representative has been filed opposing the facility. A copy of the bill is also included. The work accomplished under Phase I, indicated that there was about an equal amount of residents in San Juan County opposed and in favor of the facility. There were many concerns and issues presented during the Phase I grant period that would have been continued to Phase IIa, if allowed, including the citizen committee.

Not Available

1993-02-01

74

Feasibility and Limitations of Applying Life Cycle Assessment in Estonia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is an environmental management method for analysis and assessment of the environmental impact caused by product systems. LCA has been in use to a varying extent since the late 1960s. Current dissertation consists of studies on ...

S. Talve

2001-01-01

75

Feasibility assessment of Brassica carinata bioenergy systems in Southern Europe  

Microsoft Academic Search

A detailed reliability assessment was made of electricity generation systems in Spain that are based on Brassica carinata cultivation. The assessment considers the following chain of energy generation: biomass cultivation and harvesting, transportation and electricity generation in biomass power plants (10, 25 and 50MW). Flue gas desulphurisation systems have been included for larger plants following the criteria of the Spanish

Sergio Martínez-Lozano; Carles M. Gasol; Miquel Rigola; Joan Rieradevall; Assumpció Anton; Juan Carrasco; Pilar Ciria; Xavier Gabarrell

2009-01-01

76

Assessing the feasibility of native fish reintroductions: a framework applied to threatened bull trout  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Translocations to recover native fishes have resulted in mixed success. One reason for the failure of these actions is inadequate assessments of their feasibility prior to implementation. Here, we provide a framework developed to assess the feasibility of one type of translocation-reintroduction. The framework was founded on two simple components of feasibility: the potential for recipient habitats to support a reintroduction and the potential of available donor populations to support a reintroduction. Within each component, we developed a series of key questions. The final assessment was based on a scoring system that incorporated consideration of uncertainty in available information. The result was a simple yet transparent system for assessing reintroduction feasibility that can be rapidly applied in practice. We applied this assessment framework to the potential reintroduction of threatened bull trout Salvelinus confluentus into the Clackamas River, Oregon. In this case, the assessment suggested that the degree of feasibility for reintroduction was high based on the potential of recipient habitats and available donor populations. The assessment did not provide a comprehensive treatment of all possible factors that would drive an actual decision to implement a reintroduction,

Dunham, Jason; Gallo, Kirsten; Shively, Dan; Allen, Chris; Goehring, Brad

2011-01-01

77

Wetlands Research Program. Preliminary Feasibility Study: Transport and Distribution of Dredged Materials by Hovercraft for Wetland Nourishment and Restoration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A variety of mechanisms have resulted in the loss of coastal wetlands. Thin-layer disposal of dredged material has been proposed to maintain and restore wetland areas. Transport of this material into wetlands areas is problematic due to the sensitivity of...

T. J. Olin M. R. Palermo A. C. Gibson

1994-01-01

78

Assessing Perceptions about Ecosystem Health and Restoration Options in Three East Coast Estuaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasingly public and governmental agencies are concerned aboutrevitalizing coastal environments. Understanding how the publicuses these areas, and what they see as the most important improvements to these regions is critical to their assessment andmanagement. Uses of three estuaries, and perceptions of possiblemanagement and restoration options, were examined for people whowere interviewed in the New York\\/New Jersey Harbor, Manasquan Inlet, and

Joanna Burger

2003-01-01

79

Emergency Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment Pago Pago Harbor American Samoa, September 1, 1999.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Natural resource Trustees are authorized to act on behalf of the public to assess and recover natural resource damages, and to plan and implement actions to restore natural resources and resource services injured or lost as a result of an incident involvi...

1999-01-01

80

Risk assessment of contact allergens: a feasibility study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Skin sensitization, allergic contact dermatitis, is not a\\u000alife-threatening condition but it can be very impairing. For that reason\\u000acontemporary legislation prescribes the assessment of the skin\\u000asensitizing properties of substances like chemicals, house-hold and\\u000apersonel-care products. In general, skin sensitization is assessed by\\u000aanimal test models. However, the commonly used animal models (guinea pig\\u000aand mouse models) are limited

Iersel AAJ van

2007-01-01

81

Developing Computer Model-Based Assessment of Chemical Reasoning: A Feasibility Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper reports a feasibility study on developing computer model-based assessments of chemical reasoning at the high school level. Computer models are flash and NetLogo environments to make simultaneously available three domains in chemistry: macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic. Students interact with computer models to answer assessment

Liu, Xiufeng; Waight, Noemi; Gregorius, Roberto; Smith, Erica; Park, Mihwa

2012-01-01

82

Feasibility Study for the PISA ICT Literacy Assessment: Report to Network A  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents the findings of a study conducted to explore the feasibility of developing and delivering an assessment of information and communication technology (ICT) literacy for the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). The study was conducted at the request of an expert panel convened by Network A and was funded in…

Lennon, Marylou; Kirsch, Irwin; Von Davier, Matthias; Wagner, Michael; Yamamoto, Kentaro

2003-01-01

83

Online clinical reasoning assessment with the Script Concordance test: a feasibility study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The script concordance (SC) test is an assessment tool that measures capacity to solve ill-defined problems, that is, reasoning in context of uncertainty. This tool has been used up to now mainly in medicine. The purpose of this pilot study is to assess the feasibility of the test delivered on the Web to French urologists. METHODS: The principle of

Louis Sibert; Stefan J Darmoni; Badisse Dahamna; Jacques Weber; Bernard Charlin

2005-01-01

84

The ecohealth assessment and ecological restoration division of urban water system in Beijing  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Evaluating six main rivers and six lakes in Beihuan water system (BWS) and diagnosing the limiting factors of eco-health were conducted for the ecohealth assessment and ecological restoration division of urban water system (UWS) for Beijing. The results indicated that Jingmi River and Nanchang River were in a healthy state, the degree of membership to unhealthy were 0.358, 0.392, respectively; while Yongding River, Beihucheng River, Liangma River, Tongzi River and six lakes were in an unhealthy state, their degree of membership to unhealthy were between 0.459 and 0.927. The order of that was Liangma > Beihucheng > Tongzi > Yongding > six lakes > Jingmi > Nanchang, in which Liangma Rivers of that was over 0.8. The problems of Rivers and lakes in BWS are different. Jingmi River and Nanchang River were ecotype limiting; Yongding River, Tongzi River and six lakes were water quality and ecotype limiting. Beihucheng River and Liangma River were water quantity, water quality and ecotype limiting. BWS could be divided into 3 restoration divisions, pollution control division including Yongding River, Tongzi River and six lakes; Jingmi River and Nanchang River were ecological restoration zone, while Beihucheng River and Liangma River were in comprehensive improvement zone. Restoration potentiality of Jingmi River and Nanchang River were higher, and Liangma River was hardest to restore. The results suggest a new idea to evaluate the impact of human and environmental factors on UWS. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009.

Liu, J.; Ma, M.; Zhang, F.; Yang, Z.; Domagalski, J.

2009-01-01

85

Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Preliminary Assessment of the 291st Combat Communications Squadron Radar Pad at General Lyman Field.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The document identifies ANGRC attempt to assess possible Installation Restoration Program sites at the station. The process involves research via personal interviews, record searches, review historic data, assessing 'As Built Drawings', aerial photographs...

1995-01-01

86

Trajectories of vegetation-based indicators used to assess wetland restoration progress.  

PubMed

Temporal trends in attributes of restored ecosystems have been described conceptually as restoration trajectories. Measures describing the maturity or ecological integrity of a restoration site are often assumed to follow monotonically increasing trajectories over time and to eventually reach an asymptote representative of a reference ecosystem. This assumption of simple, predictable restoration trajectories underpins federal and state policies in the United States that mandate wetland restoration as compensation for wetlands damaged during development. We evaluated the validity of this assumption by tracking changes in 11 indicators of floristic integrity, often used to determine legal compliance, in 29 mitigation wetlands. Each indicator was expressed as a percentile relative to the distribution of that indicator among > 100 naturally occurring reference wetlands. Nonlinear regression was used to fit two alternative restoration trajectories to data from each site: an asymptotic (negative exponential) increase in the indicator over time and a peaked (double exponential) relationship. Depending on the particular indicator, between 48% and 76% of sites displayed trends that were at least moderately well described (R2 > 0.5) by one of the two models. Floristic indicators based on species richness, including native richness, number of native genera, and the floristic quality index, rapidly increased to asymptotes exceeding levels in a majority of reference wetlands. In contrast, indicators based on species composition, including mean coefficient of conservatism and relative importance of perennial species, increased very slowly. Thus, some indicators of restoration progress followed increasing trajectories and achieved or surpassed levels equivalent to high-quality reference sites within five years, whereas others appeared destined to either not reach equivalency or to take much longer than mitigation wetlands are typically monitored. Finally, some indicators of restoration progress, such as relative importance of native species, often increased over the first five to 10 years and then declined, which would result in a misleading assessment of progress if based on typical time scales of monitoring. Therefore, the assumption of simple, rapid, and predictable restoration trajectories that underlies wetland mitigation policy is unrealistic. PMID:20014581

Matthews, Jeffrey W; Spyreas, Greg; Endress, Anton G

2009-12-01

87

Floristic quality assessment of one natural and three restored wetland complexes in North Dakota, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Floristic quality assessment is potentially an important tool for conservation efforts in the northern Great Plains of North America, but it has received little rigorous evaluation. Floristic quality assessments rely on coefficients assigned to each plant species of a region's flora based on the conservatism of each species relative to others in the region. These coefficients of conservatism (C values) are assigned by a panel of experts familiar with a region's flora. The floristic quality assessment method has faced some criticism due to the subjective nature of these assignments. To evaluate the effect of this subjectivity on floristic quality assessments, we performed separate evaluations of the native plant communities in a natural wetland complex and three restored wetland complexes. In our first assessment, we used C values assigned subjectively by the Northern Great Plains Floristic Quality Assessment Panel. We then performed an independent assessment using the observed distributions of species among a group of wetlands that ranged from highly disturbed to largely undisturbed (data-generated C values). Using the panel-assigned C values, mean C values ( ) of the restored wetlands rarely exceeded 3.4 and never exceeded 3.9, with the highest values occurring in the oldest restored complex; all but two wetlands in the natural wetland complex had a greater than 3.9. Floristic quality indices (FQI) for the restored wetlands rarely exceeded 22 and usually reached maximums closer to 19, with higher values occurring again in the oldest restored complex; only two wetlands in the natural complex had an FQI less than 22. We observed that 95% confidence limits for species richness and percent natives overlapped greatly among wetland complexes, whereas confidence limits for both and FQI overlapped little. and FQI values were consistently greater when we used the data-generated C values than when we used the panel-assigned C values; nonetheless, conclusions reached based on these two independent assessment techniques were virtually identical. Our results are consistent with the opinion that coefficients assigned subjectively by expert botanists familiar with a region's flora provide adequate information to perform accurate floristic quality assessments.

Mushet, D. M.; Euliss, N. H., Jr.; Shaffer, T. L.

2002-01-01

88

Assessing significant geomorphic changes and effectiveness of dynamic restoration in a coastal dune ecosystem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A shift from restoring coastal dunes as stabilized landscapes toward more morphodynamic ecosystems is underway. This paper uses results from a recent case study where invasive vegetation was removed from a coastal dune complex in western Canada as a first step in a dynamic ecosystem restoration project. Spatial statistical methods, used in the natural sciences to quantify patterns of significant spatial-temporal changes, are reviewed and the local Moran's Ii spatial autocorrelation statistic is explored for detecting and assessing significant changes. Cluster maps of positive (depositional) and negative (erosional) changes were used to derive statistically significant volumetric changes within discrete geomorphic units (beach, foredune, transgressive dune) over one year following vegetation removal. All units experienced net increases in sediment budgets compared to a pre-restoration surface. The beach experienced the highest episodic erosion and volumetric change and greatest net annual sediment budget. Compared to the beach, the annual sediment budget of the foredune was 19% whereas the transgressive dune was 33%. The foredune recovered rapidly to initial erosion during restoration and subsequent natural events with consistently positive sediment volumes and attained a form similar to that pre-restoration. Aeolian deflation and sand bypassing through the foredune was greatest in the two months following vegetation removal and peak accretion in the transgressive dune resulted from depositional lobes extending from the foredune, smaller dunes migrating within the complex, and growth of a precipitation ridge along the eastern margin. Several methodological and logistical considerations for detecting significant change in dynamic dune landscapes are discussed including sampling strategy design, data normalization and control measures, and incorporating uncertainty and inherent spatial relations within acquired datasets to ensure accuracy and comparability of results. Generally underutilized in coastal geomorphology, spatial autocorrelation methods (e.g., local Moran's Ii) are recommended over spatially uniform threshold approaches for the ability to detect local change processes and explore hypotheses on spatial-temporal dynamics. Finally, several key geomorphic indicators, that are believed to aid in re-establishing ecological conditions and processes that favor more resilient and natural dune ecosystems, are identified for assessing the effectiveness of dynamic restoration projects including: increased aeolian activity, enlarged active sand surface area, positive sediment budgets, increased dune morphodynamics, improved geomorphic diversity, and enhanced geomorphic resilience. Although limited in temporal scope, the case study results show that the initial phase of the restoration treatment was effective in enhancing all indicators except for increasing sand surface area. Given decadal scale observations of climatic changes and longer-term eco-geomorphic trajectory toward stabilization in the region, however, it is unlikely that the geomorphic effectiveness of this restoration effort will continue without continued frequent treatment interventions.

Walker, Ian J.; Eamer, Jordan B. R.; Darke, Ian B.

2013-10-01

89

A feasibility assessment of magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling space power converters  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work performed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) under NASA Contract NAS3-26061, {open_quotes}A Feasibility Assessment of Magnetic Bearings for Free-Piston Stirling Space Engines.{close_quotes} The work was performed over the period from July 1990 through August 1991. The objective of the effort was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery of the type currently being evaluated for possible use in future long-term space missions.

Curwen, P.W.; Rao, D.K.; Wilson, D.S. [Mechanical Technology Inc., Latham, NY (United States)

1992-06-01

90

System dynamic modelling to assess economic viability and risk trade-offs for ecological restoration in South Africa.  

PubMed

Can markets assist by providing support for ecological restoration, and if so, under what conditions? The first step in addressing this question is to develop a consistent methodology for economic evaluation of ecological restoration projects. A risk analysis process was followed in which a system dynamics model was constructed for eight diverse case study sites where ecological restoration is currently being pursued. Restoration costs vary across each of these sites, as do the benefits associated with restored ecosystem functioning. The system dynamics model simulates the ecological, hydrological and economic benefits of ecological restoration and informs a portfolio mapping exercise where payoffs are matched against the likelihood of success of a project, as well as a number of other factors (such as project costs and risk measures). This is the first known application that couples ecological restoration with system dynamics and portfolio mapping. The results suggest an approach that is able to move beyond traditional indicators of project success, since the effect of discounting is virtually eliminated. We conclude that systems dynamic modelling with portfolio mapping can guide decisions on when markets for restoration activities may be feasible. PMID:23524327

Crookes, D J; Blignaut, J N; de Wit, M P; Esler, K J; Le Maitre, D C; Milton, S J; Mitchell, S A; Cloete, J; de Abreu, P; Fourie nee Vlok, H; Gull, K; Marx, D; Mugido, W; Ndhlovu, T; Nowell, M; Pauw, M; Rebelo, A

2013-03-22

91

Implications of global climate change for natural resource damage assessment, restoration, and rehabilitation.  

PubMed

Various international and national regulations hold polluters liable for the cleanup of released hazardous substances and the restoration/rehabilitation of natural resources to preincident baseline conditions, a process often referred to as natural resource damage assessment and restoration (NRDAR). Here, we, the authors, describe how global climate change (GCC) will challenge each of the steps of NRDAR processes and offer eight recommendations to improve these processes in light of GCC. First, we call for a better understanding of the net effects of GCC and contaminants on natural resources. Second, we urge facilities and environmental managers to plan for GCC-related factors that are expected to increase the probability of contaminant releases. Third, we suggest re-evaluating definitions of baseline and reference conditions given that GCC will alter both their trajectories and variability. Fourth, we encourage long-term monitoring to improve the quantification of baseline conditions that will change as climate changes. This will enhance the accuracy of injury assessments, the effectiveness of restoration, and the detection of early warning signs that ecosystems are approaching tipping points. Fifth, in response to or anticipation of GCC, restoration projects may need to be conducted in areas distant from the site of injury or focused on functionally equivalent natural resources; thus, community involvement in NRDAR processes will be increasingly important. Sixth, we promote using NRDAR restoration projects as opportunities to mitigate GCC-related impacts. Seventh, we recommend adaptive management approaches to NRDAR processes and communication of successes and failures widely. Finally, we recommend focusing on managing the stressors that might be exacerbated by GCC, such as pollution and habitat loss, because there is a long history of successfully mitigating these stressors, which can be more easily managed on local scales than climate change. We believe that adoption of these recommendations will lead to a more efficacious NRDAR process, despite the challenges posed by climate change. PMID:23097077

Rohr, Jason R; Johnson, Philip; Hickey, Christopher W; Helm, Roger C; Fritz, Alyce; Brasfield, Sandra

2013-01-01

92

Development of remedial process options: Phase II, Feasibility study: Installation Restoration Program, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This technical memorandum develops process options which are appropriate for environmental restoration activities at Naval Air Station Fallon (NAS Fallon), Nevada. Introduction of contaminants to the environment has resulted from deliberate disposal activities (both through dumping and landfilling) and accidental spills and leaks associated with normal activities at NAS Fallon over its lifetime of operation. Environmental sampling results indicate that the vast majority of contaminants of concern are petroleum hydrocarbon related. These contaminants include JP-4, JP-5, leaded and unleaded gasoline, waste oils and lubricants, hydraulic fluids, and numerous solvents and cleaners. The principal exposure pathways of concern associated with NAS Fallon contaminants appear to be the surface flows and shallow drainage systems to which the base contributes. Available data indicate NAS Fallon IR Program sites are not contributing excessive contamination to surface flows emanating from the base. Contaminants appear to be contained in a relatively immobile state in the shallow subsurface with little or no contaminant migration off site.

Cronk, T.A.; Smuin, D.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schlosser, R.M. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

1991-11-01

93

Habitat-mediated size selection in endangered Atlantic salmon fry: selectional restoration assessment  

PubMed Central

Preservation of adaptive variation is a top priority of many species restoration programs, but most restoration activities are conducted without direct knowledge of selection that might foster or impair adaptation and restoration goals. In this study, we quantified geographic variation in selection on fry size of endangered Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) during the 6-week period immediately following stocking in the wild. We also used a model selection approach to assess whether habitat variables influence patterns of such selection. We found evidence for significant size-selection in five out of six selection trials. Interestingly, the strength and pattern of selection varied extensively among sites, and model selection suggested that this variation in phenotypic selection was related to geographic variation in the presence of large woody debris and the slope of the stream gradient. The strong selection differentials we observed should be a concern for endangered salmon restoration, whether they reflect natural processes and an opportunity to maintain adaptation, or an indicator of the potentially deleterious phenotypic consequences of hatchery practices.

Bailey, Michael M; Kinnison, Michael T

2010-01-01

94

Feasibility of assessing differential pharmacodynamic (PD)\\/adverse events (AE) profiles on CNS agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The AE profile of psychotropics is an important opportunity for differentiation of new drugs in development relative to marketed competitors. This study was designed to assess the feasibility of using different subjective scales as biomarkers of PD response using 4 model CNS drugs.Methods: 20 healthy subjects were randomized in a double-blind, single dose, 5 way crossover study in a

A. Moton; D. Ouellet; R. Morlock; J. Nyberg; D. Feltner

2005-01-01

95

Department of Energy Small-Scale Hydropower Program: Feasibility assessment and technology development summary report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes two subprograms under the US Department of Energy's Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program. These subprograms were part of the financial assistance activities and included the Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) feasibility assessments and the technology development projects. The other major subprograms included engineering research and development, legal and institutional aspects, and technology transfer. These other subprograms are

1991-01-01

96

The feasibility and utility of grocery receipt analyses for dietary assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To establish the feasibility and utility of a simple data collection methodology for dietary assessment. DESIGN: Using a cross-sectional design, trained data collectors approached adults (~20 – 40 years of age) at local grocery stores and asked whether they would volunteer their grocery receipts and answer a few questions for a small stipend ($1). METHODS: The grocery data were

Sarah Levin Martin; Teresa Howell; Yan Duan; Michele Walters

2006-01-01

97

Feasibility assessment of copper-base waste package container materials in a repository in basalt  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of FY 1985 corrosion testing and design development efforts are presented in support of a feasibility assessment of copper-base materials for use in waste container applications for a proposed nuclear waste repository in basalt. Two materials were included in the assessment activities: (1) high purity copper (UNS C10200), and (2) Cupronickel 90-10 (UNS C70600). Testing activities during FY

Anantatmula

1985-01-01

98

Feasibility and acceptance of electronic quality of life assessment in general practice: an implementation study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Patients' health related quality of life (HRQoL) has rarely been systematically monitored in general practice. Electronic tools and practice training might facilitate the routine application of HRQoL questionnaires. Thorough piloting of innovative procedures is strongly recommended before the conduction of large-scale studies. Therefore, we aimed to assess i) the feasibility and acceptance of HRQoL assessment using tablet computers in

Anja Rogausch; Jörg Sigle; Anna Seibert; Sabine Thüring; Michael M Kochen; Wolfgang Himmel

2009-01-01

99

Union County - La Grande, Oregon geothermal district heating: feasibility assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an assessment of geothermal district heating in the City of La Grande, Oregon. Eight study area districts were analyzed to determine their economic feasibility. Results from the analyses conclude that certain districts within the City of La Grande are economically feasible if certain assumptions are correct. Development of geothermal district heating for these areas would provide direct energy and dollar savings to the building owners and would also provide direct and indirect benefits to low and moderate income households within the City.

Jenkins, H. II; Giddings, M.; Hanson, P.

1982-09-01

100

76 FR 61089 - Indirect Cost Rates for the Damage Assessment, Remediation, and Restoration Program for Fiscal...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and Restoration Program for Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010 AGENCY: National Oceanic and...and Restoration Program for Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010...restoration activities for fiscal years (FY) 2009 and 2010. The indirect cost rates...

2011-10-03

101

77 FR 37432 - Final Springfield Plateau Regional Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment and Finding of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FXHC113003000005B-123-FF03E00000] Final Springfield Plateau Regional Restoration Plan and Environmental...availability of the Final Springfield Plateau Regional Restoration Plan (Plan) and...ecological restoration in the Springfield Plateau of southwest Missouri. The Trustees...

2012-06-21

102

A framework for evaluating innovative statistical and risk assessment tools to solve environment restoration problems  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site face complex issues due to history of varied past contaminant disposal practices. Data collection and analysis required for site characterization, pathway modeling, and remediation selection decisions must deal with inherent uncertainties and unique problems associated with the restoration. A framework for working through the statistical aspects of the site characterization and remediation selection problems is needed. This framework would facilitate the selection of appropriate statistical tools for solving unique aspects of the environmental restoration problem. This paper presents a framework for selecting appropriate statistical and risk assessment methods. The following points will be made: (1) pathway modelers and risk assessors often recognize that ``some type`` of statistical methods are required but don`t work with statisticians on tools development in the early planning phases of the project; (2) statistical tools selection and development are problem-specific and often site-specific, further indicating a need for up-front involvement of statisticians; and (3) the right tool, applied in the right way can minimize sampling costs, get as much information as possible out of the data that does exist, provide consistency and defensibility for the results, and given structure and quantitative measures to decision risks and uncertainties.

Hassig, N.L.; Gilbert, R.O.; Pulsipher, B.A.

1991-09-01

103

A framework for evaluating innovative statistical and risk assessment tools to solve environment restoration problems  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site face complex issues due to history of varied past contaminant disposal practices. Data collection and analysis required for site characterization, pathway modeling, and remediation selection decisions must deal with inherent uncertainties and unique problems associated with the restoration. A framework for working through the statistical aspects of the site characterization and remediation selection problems is needed. This framework would facilitate the selection of appropriate statistical tools for solving unique aspects of the environmental restoration problem. This paper presents a framework for selecting appropriate statistical and risk assessment methods. The following points will be made: (1) pathway modelers and risk assessors often recognize that some type'' of statistical methods are required but don't work with statisticians on tools development in the early planning phases of the project; (2) statistical tools selection and development are problem-specific and often site-specific, further indicating a need for up-front involvement of statisticians; and (3) the right tool, applied in the right way can minimize sampling costs, get as much information as possible out of the data that does exist, provide consistency and defensibility for the results, and given structure and quantitative measures to decision risks and uncertainties.

Hassig, N.L.; Gilbert, R.O.; Pulsipher, B.A.

1991-09-01

104

Harnessing Natural Recovery Processes to Improve Restoration Outcomes: An Experimental Assessment of Sponge-Mediated Coral Reef Restoration  

PubMed Central

Background Restoration is increasingly implemented to reestablish habitat structure and function following physical anthropogenic disturbance, but scientific knowledge of effectiveness of methods lags behind demand for guidelines. On coral reefs, recovery is largely dependent on coral reestablishment, and substratum stability is critical to the survival of coral fragments and recruits. Concrete is often used to immobilize rubble, but its ecological performance has not been rigorously evaluated, and restoration has generally fallen short of returning degraded habitat to pre-disturbance conditions. Fragments of erect branching sponges mediate reef recovery by facilitating rubble consolidation, yet such natural processes have been largely overlooked in restoring reefs. Methods On two reefs in Curacao, four treatments - coral rubble alone, rubble seeded with sponge fragments, rubble bound by concrete, and concrete “rubble” bound by concrete - were monitored over four years to investigate rubble consolidation with and without sponges and the ecological performance of treatments in terms of the number and diversity of coral recruits. Species specific rates of sponge fragment attachment to rubble, donor sponge growth and tissue replacement, and fragment survival inside rubble piles were also investigated to evaluate sponge species performance and determine rates for sustainably harvesting tissue. Findings/Significance Rubble piles seeded with sponges retained height and shape to a significantly greater degree, lost fewer replicates to water motion, and were significantly more likely to be consolidated over time than rubble alone. Significantly more corals recruited to sponge-seeded rubble than to all other treatments. Coral diversity was also greatest for rubble with sponges and it was the only treatment to which framework building corals recruited. Differences in overall sponge species performance suggest species selection is important to consider. Employing organisms that jump start successional pathways and facilitate recovery can significantly improve restoration outcomes; however, best practices require techniques be tailored to each system.

Biggs, Brendan C.

2013-01-01

105

Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Facility, Installation 25255, Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Rehoboth National Guard Facility (RNGF) in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for ftirther action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the RNGF property, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities under the control of the MAARNG and the past activities contained within that area.

Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

1993-08-01

106

Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds  

SciTech Connect

On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

None available

1999-07-29

107

Conceptual Assessment Framework for Forested Wetland Restoration: The Pen Branch Experience. Restoration of a Severely Impacted Riparian Wetland System - The Pen Branch Project  

SciTech Connect

Development of an assessment framework and indicators can be used to evaluate effectiveness of wetland restoration. Example of these include index of biotic integrity and the hydrogeomorphic method. Both approaches provide qualitative ranks. We propose a new method based on the EPA wetland research program. Similar to other methods, indexes are compared to reference communities; however, the comparisons are quantitative. In this paper we discuss the results of our framework using the Pen Branch riparian wetland system as an example.

Kolka, R.; Nelson, E.A.; Trettin, C.C.

2000-10-01

108

Final Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment for Piping Plover ('Charadrius melodus') Impacted by the Bouchard Barge 120 Oil Spill, Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts and Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Final Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment for Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus) (Final RP/EA) has been developed by Federal and state natural resource trustees (Trustees) responsible for restoring natural resources and resource services in...

2012-01-01

109

Defensibility, credibility and feasibility of three standard setting procedures for OSCE: Developing evidence-informed assessments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Standard setting is integral in clinical skill assessments in outcome and competency based MBBS curriculum. To determine the most credible and feasible standard setting method for clinical examinations (OSCEs), the outcomes from three different methods were compared.\\u000aSummary of work: Modified Angoff (MAM), Borderline Group (BGM), and Borderline Regression (BRM) standard setting methods were applied to nine OSCE stations

Elina Tor; Jean MacNish; Alan Wrtight; Carole Steketee

2011-01-01

110

Trajectories of vegetation-based indicators used to assess wetland restoration progress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Temporal trends in attributes of restored ecosystems have been described conceptually as restoration trajectories. Measures describing the maturity or ecological integrity of a restoration site are often assumed to follow monotonically increasing trajectories over time and to eventually reach an asymptote representative of a reference ecosystem. This assumption of simple, predictable restoration trajectories underpins federal and state policies in the

Jeffrey W. Matthews; Greg Spyreas; Anton G. Endress

2009-01-01

111

Installation Restoration Program. Preliminary assessment: 177th Fighter Interceptor Group, New Jersey Air National Guard, Atlantic City International Airport, Atlantic City, New Jersey. Final preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary assessment of suspected hazardous waste sites at the Atlantic City International Airport, Atlantic City, New Jersey is presented. The study was conducted under the Air National Guard's Installation Restoration Program.

Not Available

1989-11-01

112

Feasibility and Reliability of Interactive Voice Response Assessment of HIV Medication Adherence: Research and Clinical Implications  

PubMed Central

Background There are well-documented negative consequences of nonadherence to HIV medications. Telephone-based interactive voice response (IVR) technologies may hold promise for assessing nonadherence in both research and clinical contexts; however, little psychometric research has been conducted on this topic. Objective In the present pilot study, we test the feasibility and reliability of a simplified patient-initiated, daily IVR system with a convenience sample of HIV patients attending a university-affiliated infectious disease clinic. Methods Participants were asked to call in to an IVR system to report adherence daily during 2 weeks of a larger prospective study. Response rates and patterns were analyzed for feasibility and compared to retrospective, self-report timeline follow-back (TLFB) adherence reporting. Results The IVR protocol showed moderate feasibility, with participants reporting adherence behavior on 63.4% of days. However, agreement with TLFB data was low, particularly for days in which participants reported incomplete adherence. Conclusions The IVR protocol tested in the current trial shows some promise. Completion rates were higher than in previous trials. Future research is needed to further enhance the feasibility of IVR for HIV medication adherence and to compare responses to more objective measures on HIV adherence.

Hettema, Jennifer E.; Hosseinbor, Sharzad; Ingersoll, Karen S.

2013-01-01

113

Assessment of Effectiveness and Limitations of Habitat Suitability Models for Wetland Restoration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Habitat suitability index (HSI) models developed for wildlife in the Louisiana Coastal Area Comprehensive Ecosystem Restoration Plan (LCA study) have been assessed for parameter and overall model quality. The success of the suitability models from the South Florida Water Management District for The Everglades restoration project and from the Spatially Explicit Species Index Models (SESI) of the Across Trophic Level System Simulation (ATLSS) Program of Florida warranted investigation with possible application of modeling theory to the current LCA study. General HSI models developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service were also investigated. This report presents examinations of theoretical formulae and comparisons of the models, performed by using diverse hypothetical settings of hydrological/biological ecosystems to highlight weaknesses as well as strengths among the models, limited to the American alligator and selected wading bird species (great blue heron, great egret, and white ibis). Recommendations were made for the LCA study based on these assessments. An enhanced HSI model for the LCA study is proposed for the American alligator, and a new HSI model for wading birds is introduced for the LCA study. Performance comparisons of the proposed models with the other suitability models are made by using the aforementioned hypothetical settings.

Draugelis-Dale, Rassa O.

2008-01-01

114

Feasibility assessment of copper-base waste package container materials in a repository in basalt  

SciTech Connect

The results of FY 1985 corrosion testing and design development efforts are presented in support of a feasibility assessment of copper-base materials for use in waste container applications for a proposed nuclear waste repository in basalt. Two materials were included in the assessment activities: (1) high purity copper (UNS C10200), and (2) Cupronickel 90-10 (UNS C70600). Testing activities during FY 1985 included general corrosion, pitting corrosion, and environmentally assisted cracking studies. The FY 1985 waste package design studies considered consolidated spent nuclear fuel and West Valley high-level waste. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Anantatmula, R.P.

1985-09-01

115

Preliminary assessment report for Fort Jacob F. Wolters, Installation 48555, Mineral Wells, Texas. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (TXARNG) property near Mineral Wells, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort Wolters property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-08-01

116

Preliminary assessment report for Waiawa Gulch, Installation 15080, Pearl City, Oahu, Hawaii. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Hawaii Army National Guard (HIARNG) property near Pearl City, Oahu, Hawaii. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Waiawa Gulch property, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP).

Not Available

1993-08-01

117

Preliminary assessment report for Camp Swift Military Reservation, Installation 48070, Bastrop County, Texas. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard property in Bastrop County, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Camp Swift property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The review of both historical and current practices at the property indicated that the activities at Camp Swift include no operations considered to have an adverse impact to the environment. The recommendation, therefore, is that no further IRP action is necessary at this property.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-08-01

118

Feasibility of precompetition medical assessment at FIFA World Cups for female youth players  

PubMed Central

Background Although most experts agree that preparticipation screening is important to prevent sudden cardiac death in sport, only a few reports have been published on the feasibility of its practical implementation. Methods The football associations participating in the U-17 and U-20 Women's World Cups 2010 were asked to perform a standardised precompetition medical assessment (PCMA) of their players (in total 672). Results Compliance with the requirement for performing the PCMA was high among all teams, particularly from African, Asian and Central/South American countries. No relevant abnormal findings in personal history and clinical cardiological examination were reported. Athletic ECG patterns were frequent, but very few findings were considered to require further investigation. All players were declared as eligible to play. Conclusions Based on the demonstrated feasibility of performing a comprehensive PCMA in elite female youth players, the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) Executive Committee decided to make the PCMA a compulsory requirement for all FIFA competitions.

Dvorak, Jiri; Grimm, Katharina; Schmied, Christian; Junge, Astrid

2012-01-01

119

67 FR 51231 - Notice of Availability of Revised Draft Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Washington (515-883-4400); (5) Lisa Holst, Long Island Sound Study Habitat Restoration, NYSDEC Bureau of Marine...program,'' to determine the functional success of the wetlands restoration. The Trustees have determined, and...

2002-08-07

120

Assessing the reversibility of soil displacement after wheeling in situ on restored soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Land restoration after open-cast mining and construction sites enables maintaining the quantity of agricultural land in the long-term. With the modern gentle restoration techniques, soil is heaped loosely and supposed to consolidate and increase its mechanical resistance in the first few years after restoration. With this study, we investigated the influence of the soil's age after heaping on the susceptibility

Silvia Tobias; Maja Haberecht; Matthias Stettler; Martin Meyer; Hilmar Ingensand

2008-01-01

121

Assessing biomass gains from marsh restoration in Delaware Bay using Ecopath with Ecosim  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Delaware Bay ecosystem has been the focus of extensive habitat restoration efforts to offset finfish losses due to mortality associated with power plant water intake. As a result, a 45km2 or a 3% increase in total marsh area was achieved by 1996–1997 through the restoration efforts of the Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG). To quantify the impact of restoration

M. G. Frisk; T. J. Miller; R. J. Latour; S. J. D. Martell

2011-01-01

122

Feasibility of bone assessment with leaky Lamb wave in bovine cortical bone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) technique is now widely used for non-invasive assessment of osteoporosis. The use of leaky Lamb wave is very attractive since it propagates throughout the cortical thickness of long bones, which means that the entire thickness of bones is interrogated. Feasibility of bone assessment with leaky Lamb wave is investigated in a bone phantom and bovine tibia in vitro using the axial transmission method commonly used to characterize human long bones. The bone phantom consists of Lucite plates with thicknesses of 1, 3, and 5 mm. The results obtained from the bone phantom show that the peak frequencies and amplitudes of excited Lamb modes are strongly dependent on the frequency-thickness product. In the case of the bovine tibia, the S0 Lamb mode may be more sensitive to any change of elastic properties inside the bone plate due to damage or to cortical thickness changes with aging and osteoporosis. This study suggests that leaky Lamb wave is feasible to ultrasonic bone assessment. [Work supported by BK21 Program in Korea.

Lee, Kang Il; Yoon, S. W.

2003-10-01

123

Department of Energy Small-Scale Hydropower Program: Feasibility assessment and technology development summary report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes two subprograms under the US Department of Energy's Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program. These subprograms were part of the financial assistance activities and included the Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) feasibility assessments and the technology development projects. The other major subprograms included engineering research and development, legal and institutional aspects, and technology transfer. These other subprograms are covered in their respective summary reports. The problems of energy availability and increasing costs of energy led to a national effort to develop economical and environmental attractive alternative energy resources. One such alternative involved the utilization of existing dams with hydraulic heads of <65 ft and the capacity to generate hydroelectric power of 15 MW or less. Thus, the PRDA program was initiated along with the Technology Development program. The purpose of the PRDA feasibility studies was to encourage development of renewable hydroelectric resources by providing engineering, economic, environmental, safety, and institutional information. Fifty-five feasibility studies were completed under the PRDA. This report briefly summarizes each of those projects. Many of the PRDA projects went on to become technology development projects. 56 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Rinehart, B.N.

1991-06-01

124

Assessing China's ecological restoration programs: what's been done and what remains to be done?  

PubMed

This article surveys the recent literature that has assessed China's ecological restoration programs, including the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) and the Natural Forest Protection Program (NFPP). Our presumption is that the performance of these programs should be determined by their effectiveness of implementation and significance of impact. Implementation effectiveness can be measured with such indicators as land area converted or conserved, and survival and stocking rates of restored vegetation, while impact significance can be gauged by the induced changes in ecosystem functionality and stability (erosion control, biodiversity protection, etc.) and socioeconomic conditions. Coupling this matrix with an exhaustive search of the publications, we find that: (1) the implementation effectiveness has not been examined as extensively as the impact significance; (2) efforts to assess the impact significance have concentrated on the SLCP, particularly its socioeconomic effects: growth of income, alternative industry, and employment, and likelihood of re-conversion; and (3) most of the socioeconomic studies are based on rural household surveys and discrete choice and difference in differences models. While much has been learned from previous studies, a lot more needs to be done in improving our understanding of the program execution and impacts. Future work should pay more attention to the NFPP and other programs, and the environmental impacts and the implementation effectiveness of all of them. To these ends, analysts must gather more field data regarding the evolving ecosystem conditions and socioeconomic information of higher aggregation, and conduct their research across scales and disciplines, with better application of geospatial technology and more effective modeling. PMID:19847479

Yin, Runsheng; Yin, Guiping; Li, Lanying

2009-10-22

125

Feasibility and validity of accelerometer measurements to assess physical activity in toddlers  

PubMed Central

Background Accelerometers are considered to be the most promising tool for measuring physical activity (PA) in free-living young children. So far, no studies have examined the feasibility and validity of accelerometer measurements in children under 3 years of age. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine the feasibility and validity of accelerometer measurements in toddlers (1- to 3-year olds). Methods Forty-seven toddlers (25 boys; 20 ± 4 months) wore a GT1M ActiGraph accelerometer for 6 consecutive days and parental perceptions of the acceptability of wearing the monitor were assessed to examine feasibility. To investigate the validity of the ActiGraph and the predictive validity of three ActiGraph cut points, accelerometer measurements of 31 toddlers (17 boys; 20 ± 4 months) during free play at child care were compared to directly observed PA, using the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity in Children-Preschool (OSRAC-P). Validity was assessed using Pearson and Spearman correlations and predictive validity using area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC-AUC). Results The feasibility examination indicated that accelerometer measurements of 30 toddlers (63.8%) could be included with a mean registration time of 564 ± 62 min during weekdays and 595 ± 83 min during weekend days. According to the parental reports, 83% perceived wearing the accelerometer as 'not unpleasant and not pleasant' and none as 'unpleasant'. The validity evaluation showed that mean ActiGraph activity counts were significantly and positively associated with mean OSRAC-P activity intensity (r = 0.66; p < 0.001; n = 31). Further, the correlation among the ActiGraph activity counts and the OSRAC-P activity intensity level during each observation interval was significantly positive (? = 0.52; p < 0.001; n = 4218). Finally, the three sedentary cut points exhibited poor to fair classification accuracy (ROC-AUC: 0.56 to 0.71) while the three light PA (ROC-AUC: 0.51 to 0.62) and the three moderate-to-vigorous PA cut points (ROC-AUC: 0.53 to 0.57) demonstrated poor classification accuracy with respect to detecting sedentary behavior, light PA and moderate-to-vigorous PA, respectively. Conclusions The present findings suggest that ActiGraph accelerometer measurements are feasible and valid for quantifying PA in toddlers. However, further research is needed to accurately identify PA intensities in toddlers using accelerometry.

2011-01-01

126

Assessing commercial feasibility: a practical and ethical prerequisite for human clinical testing.  

PubMed

This article proposes that an assessment of commercial feasibility should be integrated as a prerequisite for human clinical testing to improve the quality and relevance of materials being investigated, as an ethical aspect for human subject protection, and as a means of improving accountability where clinical development is funded on promises of successful translational research. A commercial feasibility analysis is not currently required to justify human clinical testing, but is assumed to have been conducted by industry participants, and use of public funds for clinical trials should be defensible in the same manner. Plant-made vaccines (PMVs) are offered in this discussion as a model for evaluating the relevance of commercial feasibility before human clinical testing. PMVs have been proposed as a potential solution for global health, based on a vision of immunizing the world against many infectious diseases. Such a vision depends on translating current knowledge in plant science and immunology into a potent vaccine that can be readily manufactured and distributed to those in need. But new biologics such as PMVs may fail to be manufactured due to financial or logistical reasons--particularly for orphan diseases without sufficient revenue incentive for industry investment--regardless of the effectiveness which might be demonstrated in human clinical testing. Moreover, all potential instruments of global health depend on translational agents well beyond the lab in order to reach those in need. A model compromising five criteria for commercial feasibility is suggested for inclusion by regulators and ethics review boards as part of the review process prior to approval of human clinical testing. Use of this model may help to facilitate safe and appropriate translational research and bring more immediate benefits to those in need. PMID:16578922

Kirk, Dwayne D; Robert, Jason Scott

127

Feasibility, Reproducibility, and Agreement between Different Speckle Tracking Echocardiographic Techniques for the Assessment of Longitudinal Deformation  

PubMed Central

Background. Left ventricular (LV) longitudinal deformation can be assessed with new echocardiographic techniques like triplane echocardiography (3PE) and four-dimensional echocardiography (4DE). We aimed to assess the feasibility, reproducibility, and agreement between these different speckle-tracking techniques for the assessment of longitudinal deformation. Methods. 101 consecutive subjects underwent echocardiographic examination. 2D cine loops from the apical views, a triplane view, and an LV 4D full volume were acquired in all subjects. LV longitudinal strain was obtained for each imaging modality. Results. 2DE analysis of LV strain was feasible in 90/101 subjects, 3PE strain in 89/101, and 4DE strain in 90/101. The mean value of 2DE and 3PE longitudinal strains was significantly higher with respect to 4DE. The relationship between 2DE and 3PE derived strains (r = 0.782) was significantly higher (z = 3.72, P < 0.001) than that between 2DE and 4DE (r = 0.429) and that between 3PE and 4DE (r = 0.510; z = 3.09, P = 0.001). The mean bias between 2DE and 4DE strains was ?6.61 ± 7.31% while ?6.42 ± 6.81% between 3PE and 4DE strains; the bias between 2DE and 3PE strain was of 0.21 ± 4.16%. Intraobserver and interobserver variabilities were acceptable among the techniques. Conclusions. Echocardiographic techniques for the assessment of longitudinal deformation are not interchangeable, and further studies are needed to assess specific reference values.

Mangiafico, Sarah; Bottari, Vera; Tamburino, Corrado

2013-01-01

128

Fast stochastic Wiener filter for superresolution image restoration with information theoretic visual quality assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Super-resolution (SR) refers to reconstructing a single high resolution (HR) image from a set of subsampled, blurred and noisy low resolution (LR) images. The reconstructed image suffers from degradations such as blur, aliasing, photo-detector noise and registration and fusion error. Wiener filter can be used to remove artifacts and enhance the visual quality of the reconstructed images. In this paper, we introduce a new fast stochasticWiener filter for SR reconstruction and restoration that can be implemented efficiently in the frequency domain. Our derivation depends on the continuous-discrete-continuous (CDC) model that represents most of the degradations encountered during the image-gathering and image-display processes. We incorporate a new parameter that accounts for LR images registration and fusion errors. Also, we speeded up the performance of the filter by constraining it to work on small patches of the images. Beside this, we introduce two figures of merits: information rate and maximum realizable fidelity, which can be used to assess the visual quality of the resultant images. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate that the derived Wiener filter that can be implemented efficiently in the frequency domain can reduce aliasing, blurring, and noise and result in a sharper reconstructed image. Also, Quantitative assessment using the proposed figures coincides with the visual qualitative assessment. Finally, we evaluate our filter against other SR techniques and its results were very competitive.

Yousef, Amr H.; Li, Jiang; Karim, Mohammad

2012-05-01

129

Feasibility study to objectively assess activity and location of Hispanic preschoolers: a short communication.  

PubMed

Both physical and social environmental factors influence young children's physical activity, yet little is known about where Hispanic children are more likely to be active. We assessed the feasibility of simultaneously measuring, then processing objective measures of location and physical activity among Hispanic preschool children. Preschool-aged Hispanic children (n = 15) simultaneously wore QStarz BT100X global positioning system (GPS) data loggers and Actigraph GT3X accelerometers for a 24- to 36-hour period, during which time their parents completed a location and travel diary. Data were aggregated to the minute and processed using the personal activity location measurement system (PALMS). Children successfully wore the GPS data loggers and accelerometers simultaneously, 12 of which yielded data that met quality standards. The average percent correspondence between GPS- and diary-based estimates of types of location was high and Kappa statistics were moderate to excellent, ranging from 0.49-0.99. The between-method (GPS monitor, parent-reported diary) correlations of estimated participant-aggregated minutes spent on vehicle-based trips were strong. The simultaneous use of GPS and accelerometers to assess Hispanic preschool children's location and physical activity is feasible. This methodology has the potential to provide more precise findings to inform environmental interventions and policy changes to promote physical activity among Hispanic preschool children. PMID:23733298

O'Connor, Teresia M; Cerin, Ester; Robles, Jessica; Lee, Rebecca E; Kerr, Jacqueline; Butte, Nancy; Mendoza, Jason A; Thompson, Deborah; Baranowski, Tom

2013-05-01

130

Assessment of gene expression in peripheral blood using RNAseq before and after weight restoration in anorexia nervosa.  

PubMed

We examined gene expression in the blood of six females with anorexia nervosa (AN) before and after weight restoration using RNAseq. AN cases (aged 19-39) completed clinical assessments and had blood drawn for RNA at hospital admission (T1,<~75% ideal body weight, IBW) and again at discharge (T2,? ~ 85% IBW). To examine the relationship between weight restoration and differential gene expression, normalized gene expression levels were analyzed using a paired design. We found 564 genes whose expression was nominally significantly different following weight restoration (p<0.01, 231 increased and 333 decreased). With a more stringent significance threshold (false discovery rate q<0.05), 67 genes met criteria for differential expression. Of the top 20 genes, CYP11A1, C16orf11, LINC00235, and CPA3 were down-regulated more than two-fold after weight restoration while multiple olfactory receptor genes (OR52J3, OR51L1, OR51A4, and OR51A2) were up-regulated more than two-fold after weight restoration. Pathway analysis revealed up-regulation of two broad pathways with largely overlapping genes, one related to protein secretion and signaling and the other associated with defense response to bacterial regulation. Although results are preliminary secondary to a small sample size, these data provide initial evidence of transcriptional alterations during weight restoration in AN. PMID:23778302

Kim, Yunjung; Trace, Sara E; Crowley, James J; Brownley, Kimberly A; Hamer, Robert M; Pisetsky, David S; Sullivan, Patrick F; Bulik, Cynthia M

2013-06-15

131

A randomized open trial assessing the feasibility of behavioral activation for pathological grief responding.  

PubMed

This study investigated the feasibility of using behavioral activation to treat enduring postbereavement mental health difficulties using a two-arm, multiple baseline design comparing an immediate start group to a delayed start group at baseline, 12-, 24-, and 36-weeks postrandomization. Participants received 12-14 sessions of behavioral activation within a 12-week intervention period starting immediately after the first assessment or after 12weeks for the delayed start group. Prolonged grief, posttraumatic stress, and depression symptoms were assessed as outcomes. Compared with no treatment, behavioral activation was associated with large reductions in prolonged, complicated, or traumatic grief; posttraumatic stress disorder; and depression symptoms in the intent-to-treat analyses. Seventy percent of the completer sample at posttreatment and 75 percent at follow-up responded to treatment with 45 percent at posttreatment and 40 percent at follow-up being classified as evidencing high-end state functioning at 12-week follow-up. PMID:24094789

Papa, Anthony; Sewell, M Todd; Garrison-Diehn, Christina; Rummel, Clair

2013-04-26

132

Lifestyle referral assessment in an acute cardiology setting: study protocol for a randomized controlled feasibility trial  

PubMed Central

Background Lifestyle and behaviour change are important factors in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and reduction of premature mortality. Public health initiatives have focused on opportunities for healthcare staff to deliver lifestyle advice routinely in primary and secondary care but there is no consistent approach to onward referrals and the rate of uptake of advice remains low. We do not know if advice is more effective in supporting behaviour change when a systematic approach is taken that includes identification of barriers to change, directing patients toward services, referral to services, and feedback on outcome. Methods and design This is a single-centre, randomized, unblinded feasibility trial in an acute hospital setting which aims to assess the feasibility of a definitive trial and provide proof of concept for the systematic delivery of individualized lifestyle advice in patients managed through an acute cardiology in-patient service. Patients will be recruited before discharge and randomized to two groups. A control group will receive the usual lifestyle assessment and referral, while an intervention group will receive the usual assessment plus the new individualized lifestyle assessment and referral. The new assessment will inform assignment of each patient to one of three categories based on personal barriers to change. Patients may be referred to a formal lifestyle-change programme, through the ‘Leeds Let’s Change’ website, or they may be guided in self-management, using goal setting, or they may be assigned to a ‘deferment’ category, for reassessment at follow-up. These latter patients will be given a contact card for the ‘Leeds Let’s Change’ service. Discussion Lifestyle change is an important mechanism for improving health and wellbeing across the population but there are widely acknowledged difficulties in addressing lifestyle factors with patients and supporting behaviour change. A systematic approach to assessment would facilitate audit and provide an indicator of the quality of care. The new assessment template has been designed to be quick and easy to use in practice and could, for example, be added to a primary care consultation or form part of a nursing discharge assessment in an acute setting. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41781196.

2013-01-01

133

An Evaluation of the Feasibility, Validity, and Reliability of Laparoscopic Skills Assessment in the Operating Room  

PubMed Central

Objective: To assess the use of a synchronized video-based motion tracking device for objective, instant, and automated assessment of laparoscopic skill in the operating room. Summary Background Data: The assessment of technical skills is fundamental to recognition of proficient surgical practice. It is necessary to demonstrate the validity, reliability, and feasibility of any tool to be applied for objective measurement of performance. Methods: Nineteen subjects, divided into 13 experienced (performed >100 laparoscopic cholecystectomies) and 6 inexperienced (performed <10 LCs) surgeons completed LCs on 53 patients who all had a diagnosis of biliary colic. Each procedure was recorded with the ROVIMAS video-based motion tracking device to provide an objective measure of the surgeon's dexterity. Each video was also rated by 2 experienced observers on a previously validated operative assessment scale. Results: There were significant differences for motion tracking parameters between the 2 groups of surgeons for the Calot triangle dissection part of procedure for time taken (P = 0.002), total path length (P = 0.026), and number of movements (P = 0.005). Both motion tracking and video-based assessment displayed intertest reliability, and there were good correlations between the 2 modes of assessment (r = 0.4 to 0.7, P < 0.01). Conclusions: An instant, objective, valid, and reliable mode of assessment of laparoscopic performance in the operating room has been defined. This may serve to reduce the time taken for technical skills assessment, and subsequently lead to accurate and efficient audit and credentialing of surgeons for independent practice.

Aggarwal, Rajesh; Grantcharov, Teodor; Moorthy, Krishna; Milland, Thor; Papasavas, Pavlos; Dosis, Aristotelis; Bello, Fernando; Darzi, Ara

2007-01-01

134

Preliminary assessment report for Olney Military Reservation, Installation 24175, Olney, Maryland. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Maryland Army National Guard property near Olney, Maryland. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies Phase I of the US Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program for Olney Military Reservation property. Olney Military Reservation is an 8-acre site located in the southwestern portion of Maryland, about six miles northwest of Washington, DC, in Montgomery County. The major facilities included in this PA comprise the administration building, barracks, and motor repair shops. The environmentally significant operations associated with the property are underground and aboveground storage tanks, a vehicle wash rack, a flammable materials storage area (a lean-to structure), and a hazardous materials storage building. The review of both historical and current practices at the property indicates that Olney Military Reservation property poses no immediate threat to human health or the environment. Argonne`s reviewers noted several historical potential threats to the environment that have occurred at the property that installation personnel have corrected or eliminated.

Hansen, J.; Rose, C.

1993-07-01

135

Preliminary assessment report for Redmond Army National Guard Facility, Installation 53120, Redmond, Washington. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Washington Army National Guard (WAARNG) property in Redmond, Washington. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Redmond ARNG property, Phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) supply/storage of hazardous materials, (2) weapons cleaning, (3) the underground storage tanks (USTs), and (4) the use of herbicides. These ESOs are no longer active because of the closure of OMS 10 activities in 1988.

Ketels, P.; Aggarwal, P.

1993-08-01

136

Ecosystem-based assessment indices of restoration for Daya Bay near a nuclear power plant in South China.  

PubMed

China has adopted nuclear power generation as one of the strategic energy sources to resolve the dilemma between its ever-growing energy demand and the associated environmental issues. To achieve the latter, a systematic assessment of the state of the ecosystem near nuclear power plants and its restoration via ongoing recovery actions would be highly desirable and much needed. Current assessment methods are mostly based on the individual components of the ecosystem and the methods are therefore not integrated. In this paper, we report a set of system-based assessment indices to study the restoration of Daya Bay in Guangdong, China where a nuclear power plant has been in operation for 15 years. The results show that decades of intensive exploitation by the various coastal activities have pushed Daya Bay's ecosystem away from its baseline and its structure and functions are impaired; ecosystem restoration does not make up for the weakening of the ecological carrying capacity due to anthropogenic sea-use, nonetheless, the potential for recovery still exists. The case study suggests that the system-based indices can provide integrated information for ecosystem restoration assessment and management. PMID:20806960

Chen, Xiaoyan; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong; Fang, Hongda; Chen, Zhenhua; Xu, Zhanzhou

2010-10-01

137

Assessment of the restoration of a degraded semi-humid evergreen broadleaf forest ecosystem by combined single-indicator and comprehensive model method  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted a long-term restoration experiment in the degraded ecosystems of a semi-humid evergreen broadleaf forest in Muding County, Yunan Province, China. We used single-indicator assessment and our newly established comprehensive assessment model to compare the effects of four types of management (different historical disturbances+restoration measures) on forest restoration based on a vegetation survey. (1) Species richness in each of

Zhenhong Wang; Chuanqun Daun; Li Yuan; Jing Rao; Zizong Zhou; Ju Li; Chengbo Yang; Wanying Xu

2010-01-01

138

[Is it necessary to assess experimentally and clinically restorative materials already on the market?].  

PubMed

The precondition for introducing medical products, e.g. new filling materials, in the European Union is their safety, not their clinical reliability. The latter arises from longitudinal studies and is assessed on the basis of available standards or, if not existant, on formulated quality guidelines. In the case of the specific products Ariston Liner and Ariston pHc (Vivadent, Schaan, FL), designed as an amalgam substitute, the material combination did not correspond to the Swiss standard 2 of restorative dentistry. Although after a short-term application testing on caries free premolars the pulp and dentin were free from inflammation and bacteria, the material combination clinically failed within the 18 months control period with a cumulative failure rate of 16.1% due to marginal caries. After six months of function the subjectively assessed sensitivity tended to increase. Gap formations and porous zones were detected in the composite-tooth-interface in vitro as well as in vivo. Neither the lining, designed to ensure the passage of cations and anions out of the filling material, nor the concept of an adequate caries protective effect proved successful. Marginal caries and hypersensitivity of teeth were the main reasons for the replacement of this amalgam substitute. The specific material combination was withdrawn from the market. As long as laboratory methods cannot substitute clinical evaluations, the introduction of new materials or systems into the market should be supported by short-term clinical studies and the further quality assessment should result from intermediate to long-term longitudinal studies. In this respect guidelines are valuable, such as the Swiss guidelines concerning materials as amalgam substitute. PMID:15587599

Merte, Ilka; Schneider, Hartmut; Merte, Knut

2004-01-01

139

Market Assessment and Technical Feasibility Study of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash Use  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy Technology Center (METC), has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) ashes. The assessment is designed to address six applications, including: (1) structural fill, (2) road base construction, (3) supplementary cementing materials in portland cement, (4) synthetic aggregate, and (5) agricultural/soil amendment applications. Ash from low-sulfur subbituminous coal-fired Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, and ash from the high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired American Electric Power (AEP) bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing. This paper addresses the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC unit using low- sulfur coal and limestone sorbent (karhula ash) and high-sulfur coal and dolomite sorbents (AEP Tidd ash).

Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

1996-12-31

140

Feasibility of Ecological Momentary Assessment Using Cellular Telephones in Methamphetamine Dependent Subjects.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Predictors of relapse to methamphetamine use are poorly understood. State variables may play an important role in relapse, but they have been difficult to measure at frequent intervals in outpatients. METHODS: We conducted a feasibility study of the use of cellular telephones to collect state variable data from outpatients. Six subjects in treatment for methamphetamine dependence were called three times per weekday for approximately seven weeks. Seven questionnaires were administered that assessed craving, stress, affect, and current type of location and social environment. RESULTS: 395/606 (65%) of calls attempted were completed. The mean time to complete each call was 4.9 (s.d. 1.8) minutes and the mean time to complete each item was 8.4 (s.d. 4.8) seconds. Subjects rated the acceptability of the procedures as good. All six cellular phones and battery chargers were returned undamaged. CONCLUSION: Cellular telephones are a feasible method for collecting state data from methamphetamine dependent outpatients. PMID:19997532

Galloway, Gantt P; Didier, Ryne; Garrison, Kathleen; Mendelson, John

2008-01-01

141

Applications of Genomic Technologies to Ecological Risk Assessments at Remediation \\/ Restoration Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

How genomic technologies contribute to remediation programs now and in the future is the focus of this chapter. It first reviews the remediation and restoration or recovery process, the use of genomic technologies as the remediative process itself, and then identifies opportunities within remediation\\/restoration where genomic technologies can be used to resolve particular issues and how the research needs can

Ann L. Miracle; Clive Evans; Elizabeth Ferguson; Bruce Greenberg; Peter Kille; Anton Schaeffner; Mark Sprenger; Ronny van Aerle; Donald Versteeg

2008-01-01

142

Space-time integration to assess ecological response to river restoration efforts  

Microsoft Academic Search

To detect impacts of restoration measures on populations or ecosystem processes in rivers and watersheds, we must 1) relate local changes in state across the watershed to trajectories over time at downstream receiving points; and 2) distinguish responses to restoration measures from background fluctuations. Both tasks are challenging because of the extreme spatial heterogeneity and complex dynamics of watersheds and

M. E. Power; P. Wilcock; W. E. Dietrich; W. Palen; C. Bode

2005-01-01

143

76 FR 65182 - Indirect Cost Rates for the Damage Assessment, Remediation, and Restoration Program for Fiscal...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and Restoration Program for Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010 AGENCY: National Oceanic and...restoration activities for fiscal years (FY) 2009 and 2010. The indirect cost rates for...2008 rates was published on November 16, 2009 (74 FR 58948). Cotton's reports...

2011-10-20

144

Nature versus nurture: Functional assessment of restoration effects on wetland services using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Land-use change has altered the ability of wetlands to provide vital services such as nutrient retention. While compensatory practices attempt to restore degraded wetlands and their functions, it is difficult to evaluate the recovery of soil biogeochemical functions that are critical for restoration of ecosystem services. Using solution 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, we examined the chemical forms of phosphorus

P. V. Sundareshwar; C. J. Richardson; Robert A. Gleason; Perry J. Pellechia; Shawn Honomichl

2009-01-01

145

Assessing ex vivo dental biofilms and in vivo composite restorations using cross-polarization optical coherence tomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A cross-polarization 1310-nm optical coherence tomography system (CP-OCT), using a beam splitter based design, was used to assess ex vivo growth of complex multi-species dental biofilms. These biofilm microcosms were derived from plaque samples along the interface of composite or amalgam restoration in children with a history of early childhood caries. This paper presents a method of measuring the mean biofilm height of mature biofilms using CP-OCT. For our in vivo application, the novel swept source based CP-OCT intraoral probe (Santec Co. Komaki, Japan) dimensions and system image acquisition speed (20 image frames/second) allowed imaging pediatric subjects as young as 4 years old. The subsurface enamel under the interface of composite resin restorations of pediatric subjects were imaged using CP-OCT. Cavitated secondary caries is clearly evident from sound resin composite restorations.

Jones, R.; Aparicio, C.; Chityala, R.; Chen, R.; Fok, A.; Rudney, J.

2012-02-01

146

Feasibility studies of Bragg probe for noninvasive carotid pulse waveform assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The arterial stiffness evaluation is largely reported as an independent predictor of cardiovascular diseases. The central pulse waveform can provide important data about arterial health and has been studied in patients with several pathologies, such as diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and hypertension. The implementation and feasibility studies of a fiber Bragg grating probe for noninvasive monitoring of the carotid pulse are described based on fiber Bragg grating technology. Assessment tests were carried out in carotids of different volunteers and it was possible to detect the carotid pulse waveform in all subjects. In one of the subjects, the sensor was also tested in terms of repeatability. Although further tests will be required for clinical investigation, the first studies suggest that the developed sensor can be a valid alternative to electromechanical tonometers.

Leitão, Cátia; Bilro, Lúcia; Alberto, Nélia; Antunes, Paulo; Lima, Hugo; André, Paulo S.; Nogueira, Rogério; Pinto, João L.

2013-01-01

147

Assessing the feasibility of controlling Aedes aegypti with transgenic methods: a model-based evaluation.  

PubMed

Suppression of dengue and malaria through releases of genetically engineered mosquitoes might soon become feasible. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes carrying a conditionally lethal transgene have recently been used to suppress local vector populations in small-scale field releases. Prior to releases of transgenic insects on a wider scale, however, most regulatory authorities will require additional evidence that suppression will be effective in natural heterogeneous habitats. We use a spatially explicit stochastic model of an Ae. aegypti population in Iquitos, Peru, along with an uncertainty analysis of its predictions, to quantitatively assess the outcome of varied operational approaches for releases of transgenic strains with conditional death of females. We show that population elimination might be an unrealistic objective in heterogeneous populations. We demonstrate that substantial suppression can nonetheless be achieved if releases are deployed in a uniform spatial pattern using strains combining multiple lethal elements, illustrating the importance of detailed spatial models for guiding genetic mosquito control strategies. PMID:23284949

Legros, Mathieu; Xu, Chonggang; Okamoto, Kenichi; Scott, Thomas W; Morrison, Amy C; Lloyd, Alun L; Gould, Fred

2012-12-21

148

Mid-Columbia Coho Reintroduction Feasibility Project : Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund research for 2 to 3 years on the feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon into mid-Columbia River basin tributaries. The research would take place in the Methow and Wenatchee river basins in Chelan and Okanogan Counties, Washington. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1282) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation; Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife

1999-04-01

149

Assessment of the feasibility of developing a Hanford Site weld modeling program  

SciTech Connect

Welding on the Hanford Site is an everyday occurrence, and most of the weldments made on site are relatively straightforward. Groove geometries, fillers, and wleding techniques and parameters are normally decided by experience or handbook advice. However, there are other weldments that might employ new materials, as well as one-of-a-kind welding situations. Implementation of a verified analytical weld assessment method would allow optimization of weld metal and heat-affected zone microstructure, and of variables that affect structural deformation and residual stresses. Realistic prediction of weldment thermal and strain history will require the use of a finite element model. Microstructure and resultant properties can be predicted using complex computer-based microstructure evolution models, literature-based empirical equations, or experimentally established behaviors. This report examines the feasibility of developing analytical methods for establishing weld parameter envelopes in new, complex welded configurations.

Atteridge, D.G.; Anderson, W.E.; Klein, R.F.

1986-11-01

150

Nature versus nurture: Functional assessment of restoration effects on wetland services using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Land-use change has altered the ability of wetlands to provide vital services such as nutrient retention. While compensatory practices attempt to restore degraded wetlands and their functions, it is difficult to evaluate the recovery of soil biogeochemical functions that are critical for restoration of ecosystem services. Using solution 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, we examined the chemical forms of phosphorus (P) in soils from wetlands located across a land-use gradient. We report that soil P diversity, a functional attribute, was lowest in farmland, and greatest in native wetlands. Soil P diversity increased with age of restoration, indicating restoration of biogeochemical function. The trend in soil P diversity was similar to documented trends in soil bacterial taxonomic composition but opposite that of soil bacterial diversity at our study sites. These findings provide insights into links between ecosystem structure and function and provide a tool for evaluating the success of ecosystem restoration efforts.

Sundareshwar, P. V.; Richardson, C. J.; Gleason, Robert A.; Pellechia, Perry J.; Honomichl, Shawn

2009-02-01

151

Nature versus nurture: functional assessment of restoration effects on wetland services using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Land-use change has altered the ability of wetlands to provide vital services such as nutrient retention. While compensatory practices attempt to restore degraded wetlands and their functions, it is difficult to evaluate the recovery of soil biogeochemical functions that are critical for restoration of ecosystem services. Using solution 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, we examined the chemical forms of phosphorus (P) in soils from wetlands located across a land-use gradient. We report that soil P diversity, a functional attribute, was lowest in farmland, and greatest in native wetlands. Soil P diversity increased with age of restoration, indicating restoration of biogeochemical function. The trend in soil P diversity was similar to documented trends in soil bacterial taxonomic composition but opposite that of soil bacterial diversity at our study sites. These findings provide insights into links between ecosystem structure and function and provide a tool for evaluating the success of ecosystem restoration efforts. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

Sundareshwar, P. V.; Richardson, C. J.; Gleason, R. A.; Pellechia, P. J.; Honomichl, S.

2009-01-01

152

Feasibility and Pilot Study of the Pediatric Anesthesia NeuroDevelopment Assessment (PANDA) Project  

PubMed Central

Background Animal studies have documented that exposure of the developing brain to commonly used anesthetic agents induce neurotoxicity and late abnormal neurobehavioral functions as adults. Results from clinical studies have all been performed using existing datasets, and produced inconsistent results. To provide more definitive evidence to address the clinical relevance of anesthetic neurotoxicity in children, an interdisciplinary team of investigators designed and developed the Pediatric Anesthesia NeuroDevelopment Assessment (PANDA) project. We present pilot study results in 28 sibling pairs recruited and tested at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and Children’s Hospital of Boston (CHB) for the PANDA project. Methods The PANDA project uses an ambi-directional cohort design. We performed prospective neuropsychological assessment in 28 exposed-unexposed sibling pairs ages 6–11 years old. The exposed siblings were ASA 1 or 2 and had received a single episode of anesthesia for inguinal hernia repair prior to age 36 months and the unexposed siblings had no anesthesia before age 36 months. All sibling pairs were English speaking and were 36 weeks gestational age or greater. Each sibling pair underwent direct testing using WASI and NEPSY II, and the parents completed questionnaires related to behavior using CBCL and Conners’ rating. Data are presented as means ± SD. We conducted descriptive analyses of demographic data. We compared exposed and unexposed sibling groups on WASI and NEPSY II, and total and T-scores from CBCL and Conners’ as continuous data by paired t test between. A P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results Following IRB approval for the study at both CUMC and CHB, the full PANDA study protocol was implemented to perform a pilot feasibility study. Our success rate was 96.7% in obtaining detailed medical and anesthesia records in our historical cohort. Scores for verbal IQ (Exposed=106.1±16.3,Unexposed=109.2±17.9), performance IQ (Exposed=109.1±16.0, Unexposed=113.9±15.9) and full IQ (Exposed=108.2±14.0, Unexposed=112.8±16.8) were comparable between siblings. There were no differences between the two groups in T scores for any of the NEPSY II sub-domains, CBCL or Conners’. An abstraction protocol with web-based electronic data capture forms also was developed in conjunction with the International Center for Health Outcomes and Innovation Research (InCHOIR). Conclusions The pilot study provided useful information for feasibility to recruit the sample size and to obtain relevant clinical data. For the final study protocol, both the neuropsychological battery and the age range for testing were revised. Our results confirmed the feasibility of our study approach, and yielded pilot data from neuropsychological testing.

Sun, Lena S.; Li, Guohua; DiMaggio, Charles J.; Byrne, Mary W.; Ing, Caleb; Miller, Tonya LK; Bellinger, David C.; Han, Sena; McGowan, Francis X.

2012-01-01

153

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 3. Risk assessment information. Appendixes E, F  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 3 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-03-01

154

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 3: Appendixes E and F -- Risk assessment information  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-06-01

155

Environmental Assessment for the Arra Rogue River Restoration-Gold Ray Dam Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2009, Jackson County applied for and received a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coastal and Marine Habitat Restoration Project Grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to remove the Gold Ray Dam for the purpo...

2010-01-01

156

Restoration of Westslope Cutthroat Trout in the East Fork Specimen Creek Watershed: Environmental Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Park Service (NPS) proposes to restore native westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisii, WCT) in the East Fork Specimen Creek watershed in Yellowstone National Park (Yellowstone or park). By an Act of Congress on March 1, 1872, Y...

2006-01-01

157

Assessing the Potential for Salmon Recovery via Floodplain Restoration: A Multitrophic Level Comparison of Dredge-Mined to Reference Segments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pre-restoration studies typically focus on physical habitat, rather than the food-base that supports aquatic species. However, both food and habitat are necessary to support the species that habitat restoration is frequently aimed at recovering. Here we evaluate if and how the productivity of the food-base that supports fish production is impaired in a dredge-mined floodplain within the Yankee Fork Salmon River (YFSR), Idaho (USA); a site where past restoration has occurred and where more has been proposed to help recover anadromous salmonids. Utilizing an ecosystem approach, we found that the dredged segment had comparable terrestrial leaf and invertebrate inputs, aquatic primary producer biomass, and production of aquatic invertebrates relative to five reference floodplains. Thus, the food-base in the dredged segment did not necessarily appear impaired. On the other hand, we observed that off-channel aquatic habitats were frequently important to productivity in reference floodplains, and the connection of these habitats in the dredged segment via previous restoration increased invertebrate productivity by 58%. However, using a simple bioenergetic model, we estimated that the invertebrate food-base was at least 4× larger than present demand for food by fish in dredged and reference segments. In the context of salmon recovery efforts, this observation questions whether additional food-base productivity provided by further habitat restoration would be warranted in the YFSR. Together, our findings highlight the importance of studies that assess the aquatic food-base, and emphasize the need for more robust ecosystem models that evaluate factors potentially limiting fish populations that are the target of restoration.

Bellmore, J. Ryan; Baxter, Colden V.; Ray, Andrew M.; Denny, Lytle; Tardy, Kurt; Galloway, Evelyn

2012-03-01

158

Feasibility of ecological momentary assessment of hearing difficulties encountered by hearing aid users  

PubMed Central

Objectives Measurement of outcomes has become increasingly important to assess the benefit of audiologic rehabilitation, including hearing aids, in adults. Data from questionnaires, however, are based on retrospective recall of events and experiences, and often can be inaccurate. Questionnaires also do not capture the daily variation that typically occurs in relevant events and experiences. Clinical researchers in a variety of fields have turned to a methodology known as ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to assess quotidian experiences associated with health problems. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using EMA to obtain real-time responses from hearing aid users describing their experiences with challenging hearing situations. Design This study required three phases: (1) develop EMA methodology to assess hearing difficulties experienced by hearing aid users; (2) utilize focus groups to refine the methodology; and (3) test the methodology with 24 hearing aid users. Phase 3 participants carried a personal digital assistant (PDA) 12 hr per day for 2 wk. The PDA alerted participants to respond to questions four times a day. Each assessment started with a question to determine if a hearing problem was experienced since the last alert. If “yes,” then up to 23 questions (depending on contingent response branching) obtained details about the situation. If “no,” then up to 11 questions obtained information that would help to explain why hearing was not a problem. Each participant completed the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE) both before and after the 2-wk EMA testing period to evaluate for “reactivity” (exacerbation of self-perceived hearing problems that could result from the repeated assessments). Results Participants responded to the alerts with a 77% compliance rate, providing a total of 991 completed momentary assessments (mean = 43.1 per participant). A substantial amount of data was obtained with the methodology. Notably, participants reported a “hearing problem situation since the last alert” 37.6% of the time (372 responses). The most common problem situation involved “face-to-face conversation” (53.8% of the time). The next most common problem situation was “telephone conversation” (17.2%) followed by “TV, radio, iPod, etc.” (15.3%), “environmental sounds” (9.7%), and “movies, lecture, etc.” (4.0%). Comparison of pre- and post-EMA mean HHIE scores revealed no significant difference (p>.05), indicating that reactivity did not occur for this group. It should be noted, however, that 37.5% of participants reported a greater sense of awareness regarding their hearing loss and use of hearing aids. Conclusions Results showed participants were compliant, gave positive feedback, and did not demonstrate reactivity based on pre- and post-HHIE scores. We conclude that EMA methodology is feasible with patients who use hearing aids and could potentially inform hearing healthcare (HHC) services. The next step is to develop and evaluate EMA protocols that provide detailed daily patient information to audiologists at each stage of HHC. The advantages of such an approach would be to obtain real-life outcome measures, and to determine within- and between-day variability in outcomes and associated factors. Such information currently is not available from patients who seek and use HHC services.

Galvez, Gino; Turbin, Mitchel B.; Thielman, Emily J.; Istvan, Joseph A.; Andrews, Judy A.; Henry, James A.

2012-01-01

159

Supraspinatus and infraspinatus weakness in overhead athletes with scapular dyskinesis: strength assessment before and after restoration of scapular musculature balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

A disturbance in scapulohumeral rhythm may cause negative biomechanic effects on rotator cuff (RC). Alteration in scapular\\u000a motion and shoulder pain can influence RC strength. Purpose of this study was to assess supraspinatus and infraspinatus strength\\u000a in 29 overhead athletes with scapular dyskinesis, before and after 3 and 6 months of rehabilitation aimed to restore scapular\\u000a musculature balance. A passive posterior

Giovanni Merolla; Elisa De Santis; Fabrizio Campi; Paolo Paladini; Giuseppe Porcellini

2010-01-01

160

Cascadia GeoSciences: Community-Based Earth Science Research Focused on Geologic Hazard Assessment and Environmental Restoration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cascadia GeoSciences (CG) is a new non-profit membership governed corporation whose main objectives are to conduct and promote interdisciplinary community based earth science research. The primary focus of CG is on geologic hazard assessment and environmental restoration in the Western U.S. The primary geographic region of interest is Humboldt Bay, NW California, within the southern Cascadia subduction zone (SCSZ). This

T. B. Williams; J. R. Patton; T. H. Leroy

2007-01-01

161

Momentary Assessment of Adults' Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior: Feasibility and Validity  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Mobile phones are ubiquitous and easy to use, and thus have the capacity to collect real-time data from large numbers of people. Research tested the feasibility and validity of an Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) self-report protocol using electronic surveys on mobile phones to assess adults’ physical activity and sedentary behaviors. Methods: Adults (N?=?110; 73% female, 30% Hispanic, 62% overweight/obese) completed a 4-day signal-contingent EMA protocol (Saturday–Tuesday) with eight surveys randomly spaced throughout each day. EMA items assessed current activity (e.g., Watching TV/Movies, Reading/Computer, Physical Activity/Exercise). EMA responses were time-matched to minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary activity (SA) measured by accelerometer immediately before and after each EMA prompt. Results: Unanswered EMA prompts had greater MVPA (±15?min) than answered EMA prompts (p?=?0.029) for under/normal weight participants, indicating that activity level might influence the likelihood of responding. The 15-min. intervals before versus after the EMA-reported physical activity (n?=?296 occasions) did not differ in MVPA (p?>?0.05), suggesting that prompting did not disrupt physical activity. SA decreased after EMA-reported sedentary behavior (n?=?904 occasions; p?

Dunton, Genevieve Fridlund; Liao, Yue; Kawabata, Keito; Intille, Stephen

2012-01-01

162

Momentary assessment of adults' physical activity and sedentary behavior: feasibility and validity.  

PubMed

Introduction: Mobile phones are ubiquitous and easy to use, and thus have the capacity to collect real-time data from large numbers of people. Research tested the feasibility and validity of an Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) self-report protocol using electronic surveys on mobile phones to assess adults' physical activity and sedentary behaviors. Methods: Adults (N?=?110; 73% female, 30% Hispanic, 62% overweight/obese) completed a 4-day signal-contingent EMA protocol (Saturday-Tuesday) with eight surveys randomly spaced throughout each day. EMA items assessed current activity (e.g., Watching TV/Movies, Reading/Computer, Physical Activity/Exercise). EMA responses were time-matched to minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary activity (SA) measured by accelerometer immediately before and after each EMA prompt. Results: Unanswered EMA prompts had greater MVPA (±15?min) than answered EMA prompts (p?=?0.029) for under/normal weight participants, indicating that activity level might influence the likelihood of responding. The 15-min. intervals before versus after the EMA-reported physical activity (n?=?296 occasions) did not differ in MVPA (p?>?0.05), suggesting that prompting did not disrupt physical activity. SA decreased after EMA-reported sedentary behavior (n?=?904 occasions; p?

Dunton, Genevieve Fridlund; Liao, Yue; Kawabata, Keito; Intille, Stephen

2012-07-30

163

A comparative assessment of genetic diversity among differently-aged populations of Spartina alterniflora on restored versus natural wetlands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We collected naturally recolonizing Spartina alterniflora (smooth cord grass) from each of three restored sites and one undisturbed reference site in southwestern Louisiana to assess the impact of wetland restoration on genetic diversity. We used amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) to produce 94 polymorphic genetic markers, which were used to characterize genetic diversity as average heterozygosity and the proportion of polymorphic loci . Overall our findings indicate that restored populations of S. alterniflora maintain levels of genetic diversity comparable to natural populations, which should provide some measure of resistance against environmental disturbances. Diversity estimates were lowest for the natural reference site ( = 0.1059; = 0.2763), whereas estimates for the three restored sites ranged from = 0.1148 to 0.1256 and = 0.3114 to 0.3202. All sites maintained sufficiently high diversity levels to suggest significant rates of outcrossing. Overall, genetic differentiation among populations was small (Weir and Cockerham's ?? = 0.0645), with the values from each pairwise comparison among the populations increasing with the geographic distance between sites (range = 0.0490-0.1101). These values indicate an average migration rate of 3.6 migrants, either pollen or seeds, per generation.

Travis, S. E.; Proffitt, C. E.; Lowenfeld, R. C.; Mitchell, T. W.

2002-01-01

164

A feasibility study on assessing public health impacts of cumulative air pollution reduction activities in a small geographic area  

EPA Science Inventory

Background and Objective: The rnain objective ofthis study was to examine the feasibility ofconducting a local (e.g., city level) assessment ofthe public health impacts ofcumulative air pollution reduction activities (a.k.a. accountability) from the federal, state, local and vo...

165

Analysis of deforestation patterns in the Baekdudaegan preservation area using land cover classification and change detection techniques; the feasibility of restoration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Baekdudaegan Mountain Range is a backbone of the Korean Peninsula which has special spiritual and sentimental significance for Koreans and significant ecological value to diverse organisms. Despite the importance of this region, however, the natural environment of Baekdudaegan has been severely threatened by a variety of human activity and tremendous forest fires. To make management and restoration plans for

Hui-Cheul Jung; Dong-Kun Lee; Seong-Woo Jeon; Won-Kyong Song

2005-01-01

166

The feasibility of dental strontium analysis for diet-assessment of human populations.  

PubMed

It has been suggested that bone and dental strontium contents of extinct terrestrial vertebrates vary in direct proportion to the strontium levels present in the animals' diets. It has been hypothesized that these trace quantities decrease as one moves upward along the food chain--herbivores having more strontium than primary carnivores, primary carnivores more than secondary carnivores, and so on. The present study was designed to determine the feasibility of dental strontium analysis for diet-assessment of human fossil populations. Human vegetarian and nonvegetarian teeth were analyzed for strontium. It was hoped that by comparing the strontium levels of these two groups, one might determine conclusively whether the nature of diet plays an important role in the determination of dental strontium levels within a species. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to analyze seven vegetarian and seven nonvegetarian teeth. Strontium levels varied considerably within both groups of teeth and no significant difference in strontium levels existed between the vegetarian and nonvegetarian teeth. These results suggest that dental strontium analysis may not be a useful indicator of the dietary habits of human fossil populations. PMID:7416240

Elias, M

1980-07-01

167

Feasibility of bone assessment with leaky Lamb waves in bone phantoms and a bovine tibia.  

PubMed

In this study, the effect of cortical thickness variation on the propagation of leaky Lamb waves is investigated by using an axial transmission technique commonly used to characterize long bones. Three Lucite plates with thicknesses of 1, 3, and 5 mm as bone phantoms and one bovine tibia with a cortical thickness of 2 mm were used at various low frequencies. Experimental measurements in bone phantoms show that the peak frequency and amplitude of excited Lamb modes strongly depend on the thickness of the Lucite plate. In the bovine tibia, the S0 and A0 Lamb modes are consistently observed in the frequency-thickness region from 0.2 to 1.0 MHz mm, and can be effectively launched at a frequency of 200 kHz, suggesting 200 kHz to be the optimal signal frequency for in vivo clinical applications. It can be also seen that both modes are affected by the frequency-thickness product, but the effect is greater for the A0 mode. Hence, the A0 Lamb mode seems more sensitive to cortical thickness change due to aging and osteoporosis. This study suggests that the use of leaky Lamb waves is feasible for ultrasonic bone assessment. PMID:15237845

Lee, K I; Yoon, Suk Wang

2004-06-01

168

Feasibility of bone assessment with leaky Lamb waves in bone phantoms and a bovine tibia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, the effect of cortical thickness variation on the propagation of leaky Lamb waves is investigated by using an axial transmission technique commonly used to characterize long bones. Three Lucite™ plates with thicknesses of 1, 3, and 5 mm as bone phantoms and one bovine tibia with a cortical thickness of 2 mm were used at various low frequencies. Experimental measurements in bone phantoms show that the peak frequency and amplitude of excited Lamb modes strongly depend on the thickness of the Lucite plate. In the bovine tibia, the S0 and A0 Lamb modes are consistently observed in the frequency-thickness region from 0.2 to 1.0 MHz mm, and can be effectively launched at a frequency of 200 kHz, suggesting 200 kHz to be the optimal signal frequency for in vivo clinical applications. It can be also seen that both modes are affected by the frequency-thickness product, but the effect is greater for the A0 mode. Hence, the A0 Lamb mode seems more sensitive to cortical thickness change due to aging and osteoporosis. This study suggests that the use of leaky Lamb waves is feasible for ultrasonic bone assessment.

Lee, K. I.; Yoon, Suk Wang

2004-06-01

169

Coronary artery anomalies and variants: technical feasibility of assessment with coronary MR angiography at 3 T.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to prospectively use a whole-heart three-dimensional (3D) coronary magnetic resonance (MR) angiography technique specifically adapted for use at 3 T and a parallel imaging technique (sensitivity encoding) to evaluate coronary arterial anomalies and variants (CAAV). This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the local institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from all participants. Twenty-two participants (11 men, 11 women; age range, 18-62 years) were included. Ten participants were healthy volunteers, whereas 12 participants were patients suspected of having CAAV. Coronary MR angiography was performed with a 3-T MR imager. A 3D free-breathing navigator-gated and vector electrocardiographically-gated segmented k-space gradient-echo sequence with adiabatic T2 preparation pulse and parallel imaging (sensitivity encoding) was used. Whole-heart acquisitions (repetition time msec/echo time msec, 4/1.35; 20 degrees flip angle; 1 x 1 x 2-mm acquired voxel size) lasted 10-12 minutes. Mean examination time was 41 minutes +/- 14 (standard deviation). Findings included aneurysms, ectasia, arteriovenous fistulas, and anomalous origins. The 3D whole-heart acquisitions developed for use with 3 T are feasible for use in the assessment of CAAV. PMID:18372470

Gharib, Ahmed M; Ho, Vincent B; Rosing, Douglas R; Herzka, Daniel A; Stuber, Matthias; Arai, Andrew E; Pettigrew, Roderic I

2008-04-01

170

Restoring force development by titin/connectin and assessment of Ig domain unfolding.  

PubMed

Titin/connectin is the main determinant of physiological levels of passive muscle force. This force is generated by the extensible I-band region of the molecule, which is composed of serially-linked immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains and several unique sequence elements. Here we address the role of titin/connectin in sarcomeres shortened to below the slack length (length attained by an un-activated cell in absence of external forces). Such shortened cells develop so-called restoring forces that re-extend the cells upon relaxation. The experiments that we present are based on a high throughput method with a rapid solution switching system which allows unattached single cardiac myocytes to be activated (resulting in shortening below the slack length) and then to be rapidly relaxed while their maximal re-lengthening velocity is measured at the sarcomere level (dSL/dtmax), with high-resolution imaging techniques. Experiments were carried out on myocytes that express different isoforms of titin/connectin. We measured the relation between dSL/dtmax and the minimal SL during contraction (SLmin) and determined the slope of this relation as a measure of 'restoring stiffness.' We found that the restoring stiffness correlates with the isoform expression profile with myocytes that express high levels of the stiff isoform (N2B) having the highest restoring stiffness. These results support the notion that titin/connectin is a bi-directional spring that develops passive force when stretched above the slack length and restoring force when shortened to below this length. We also discuss in detail the mechanisms that underlie titin/connectin's restoring force development and focus on whether or not unfolding of Ig domains plays a role. PMID:16470334

Preetha, Nair; Yiming, Wu; Helmes, Michiel; Norio, Fukuda; Siegfried, Labeit; Granzier, Henk

2005-01-01

171

Are Wildfire Mitigation and Restoration of Historic Forest Structure Compatible? A Spatial Modeling Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to catastrophic wildfires, wide-reaching forest management policies have been enacted in recent years, most notably the Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003. A key premise underlying these policies is that fire suppression has resulted in denser forests than were present historically in some western forest types. Therefore, although reducing the threat of wildfire is the primary goal, forest

Rutherford V. Platt; Thomas T. Veblen; Rosemary L. Sherriff

2006-01-01

172

Vision restoration therapy (VRT) efficacy as assessed by comparative perimetric analysis and subjective questionnaires  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: We wished to evaluate the efficacy of vision restoration therapy (VRT) in patients with post-chiasmatic brain damage using different functional perimetric tests. These were compared with measures of subjective vision and reaction time. Methods: An open trial was conducted with hemianopia\\/scotoma (n =16) patients. Before and after 6 months of VRT results of high resolution (HRP) and Tuebingen automated

Bernhard A. Sabel; Sigrid Kenkel; Erich Kasten

173

The Religious Freedom Restoration Act and Prisons and Jails: An Assessment and a Proposal  

Microsoft Academic Search

In November of 1993, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) was signed into law by the President. Its purpose was to overrule a 1990 Supreme Court decision and require government to satisfy a compelling interest test when its laws or actions place a substantial burden on an individual's exercise of personal religious beliefs. This article explores the impact of RFRA

Jack E. Call; Charles Samarkos

1995-01-01

174

National fire danger assessment and ecosystem restoration using remote sensing and ecological modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hazardous fuel reduction, ecosystem rehabilitation and restoration, and firefighting safety, are land management priorities emphasized by recent national fire policies such as the National Fire Plan. Implementation of these policies requires geospatial data of vegetation conditions, fire fuels, risks, and ecosystem status developed consistently nationwide that can be used at multiple scales (i.e., local, regional, and national). A new research

Z. Zhu; M. Rollins

2004-01-01

175

Ten Year Historical Perspective of the NOAA Damage Assessment and Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United States Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA) was enacted to reduce the probability of oil spills in U.S. waters. A key provision of the legislation enables recovery of damages for restoration of injured natural resources and lost services due to oil spills. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) developed regulations that set out a process for determining

Linda B Burlington

1999-01-01

176

Assessing the feasibility of native fish reintroductions: a framework and example applied to bull trout in the Clackamas River, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In a species conservation context, translocations can be an important tool, but they frequently fail to successfully establish new populations. We consider the case of reintroductions for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), a federally-listed threatened species with a widespread but declining distribution in western North America. Our specific objectives in this work were to: 1) develop a general framework for assessing the feasibility of reintroduction for bull trout, 2) provide a detailed example of implementing this framework to assess the feasibility of reintroducing bull trout in the Clackamas River, Oregon, and 3) discuss the implications of this effort in the more general context of fish reintroductions as a conservation tool. Review of several case histories and our assessment of the Clackamas River suggest that an attempt to reintroduce bull trout could be successful, assuming adequate resources are committed to the subsequent stages of implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Dunham, Jason; Gallo, Kirsten

2008-01-01

177

A technique for in vitro fit assessment of multi-unit screw-retained implant restorations: Application of a triple-scan protocol  

PubMed Central

Recent advances in industrial non-contact scanners offer unprecedented opportunities for quality assessment of dental restorations. The majority of investigations published to date are limited to local two-dimensional results. A triple-scan protocol for virtual fit assessment of multi-unit screw-retained implant restorations is presented in this technical report. The advantages for application in biomechanical research include detailed three-dimensional information on internal component congruence in implant superstructures to be used in mathematical models.

Karl, Matthias; Wichmann, Manfred; Matta, Ragai E

2012-01-01

178

Pilot in Command: A Feasibility Assessment of Autonomous Flight Management Operations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Several years of NASA research have produced the air traffic management operational concept of Autonomous Flight Management with high potential for operational feasibility, significant system and user benefits, and safety. Among the chief potential benefi...

D. J. Wing M. G. Ballin K. Krishnamurthy

2004-01-01

179

Feasibility and validity of accelerometer measurements to assess physical activity in toddlers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Accelerometers are considered to be the most promising tool for measuring physical activity (PA) in free-living young children.\\u000a So far, no studies have examined the feasibility and validity of accelerometer measurements in children under 3 years of age.\\u000a Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine the feasibility and validity of accelerometer measurements in toddlers\\u000a (1- to 3-year

Eveline Van Cauwenberghe; Jessica Gubbels; Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij; Greet Cardon

2011-01-01

180

Feasibility of aortic valve assessment with low dose prospectively triggered adaptive systolic (PTAS) cardiac computed tomography angiography  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) is feasible for aortic valve evaluation, but retrospective gated protocols required high radiation doses for aortic valve assessment. A prospectively triggered adaptive systolic (PTAS) cardiac CT protocol was recently described in arrhythmia using second-generation dual-source CT. In this study, we sought to evaluate the feasibility of PTAS CTA to assess the aortic valve at a low radiation dose. Findings A retrospective cohort of 29 consecutive patients whom underwent PTAS protocols for clinical indications other than aortic valve assessment and whom also received echocardiography within 2 months of CT, was identified. Images were reviewed for aortic valve morphology (tricuspid/bicuspid/prosthetic) and stenosis (AS) by experienced blinded readers. Accuracy versus echocardiography and radiation doses were assessed. All PTAS coronary CTAs were clinically diagnostic with 0 un-evaluable coronary segments. The accuracy of PTAS for aortic valve morphology was 92.6%, and for exclusion of severe AS was 93.1%. Two exams were un-evaluable for the aortic valve due to inadequate number of phases archived for interpretation. Total radiation dose was a median of 2.8 mSv (interquartile range 1.4–4.4 mSv). Conclusions PTAS CTA protocols using second-generation dual-source CT for aortic valve evaluation are feasible at low doses. This protocol should be investigated further in larger cohorts.

2013-01-01

181

Assessing data quality for a federal environmental restoration project: Rationalizing the requirements of multiple clients  

SciTech Connect

Most environmental restoration projects at federal facilities face the difficult task of melding the quality assurance (QA) requirements of multiple clients, as well as dealing with historical data that are often of unknown quality. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we have successfully integrated the requirements of our multiple clients by carefully developing a QA program that efficiently meets our clients` needs. The Site 300 Experimental Test Site is operated by LLNL in support of its national defense program. The responsibility for conducting environmental contaminant investigations and restoration at Site 300 is vested in the Site 300 Environmental Restoration Project (Site 300 ERP) of LLNL`s Environmental Restoration Division. LLNL Site 300 ERP must comply with the QA requirements of several clients, which include: the LLNL Environmental Protection Department, the DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency-Region IX (EPA), the California Regional Water Quality Control Board -- Central Valley Region, and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control. This comprehensive QA program was used to determine the acceptability of historical data. The Site 300 ERP began soil and ground water investigations in 1982. However, we did not begin receiving analytical quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) data until 1989; therefore, the pre-1989 data that were collected are of unknown quality. The US EPA QAMS-005/80 defines data quality as the totality of features and characteristics of data that bears on its ability to satisfy a given purpose. In the current context, the characteristics of major importance are accuracy, precision, completeness, representativeness, and comparability. Using our established QA program, we determined the quality of this historical data based on its comparability to the post-1989 data. By accepting this historical data, we were able to save a considerable amount of money in recharacterization costs.

Kiszka, V.R.; Carlsen, T.M.

1994-07-01

182

Integrated monitoring and assessment of soil restoration treatments in the Lake Tahoe Basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Revegetation and soil restoration efforts, often associated with erosion control measures on disturbed soils, are rarely monitored\\u000a or otherwise evaluated in terms of improved hydrologic, much less, ecologic function and longer term sustainability. As in\\u000a many watersheds, sediment is a key parameter of concern in the Tahoe Basin, particularly fine sediments less than about ten\\u000a microns. Numerous erosion control measures

M. E. Grismer; C. Schnurrenberger; R. Arst; M. P. Hogan

2009-01-01

183

An assessment of structural attributes and ecosystem function in restored Virginia coalfield streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

As human populations continue to grow, expanding energy needs enhance freshwater resource conservation challenges. Mining\\u000a for coal has significantly altered the landscape in the United States’ Appalachian region, with significant negative effects\\u000a on downstream water quality and ecosystem function. With recent policy changes concerning the impacts of coal mining on aquatic\\u000a ecosystems, many coal companies choose to restore sections of

Robert M. NorthingtonErnest; Ernest F. Benfield; Stephen H. Schoenholtz; Anthony J. Timpano; Jackson R. Webster; Carl Zipper

2011-01-01

184

Stream Habitat Assessment Project: Prince William Sound and Lower Kenai Peninsula. Restoration Project 93051. EXXON VALDEZ Oil Spill Restoration Project Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Habitat and Restoration Division, conducted surveys of anadromous fish streams in Prince William Sound and Lower Kenai Peninsula from August 2 to September 23, 1993. These surveys focused on Chenega, Eyak and Tatile...

K. Sundet M. N. Kuwada J. Barnhart

1994-01-01

185

Assessing the relationship between Section 404 and wetland losses: A feasibility study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary objective of the Clean Water Act of 1977 (33 U.S.C. 1251) is to restore and maintain the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of the Nation's waters. Section 404 of the Act regulates the discharge of dredged or fill materials into wetlands and represents the primary Federal authority for regulation of wetland alterations. Since its inception, the Section 404

J. E. Roelle; D. A. Asherin; D. N. Gladwin

1989-01-01

186

Feasibility of quantitative ultrasound measurements on the humerus of newborn infants for the assessment of the skeletal status  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantitative ultrasound (QUS), although widely used in adults has, so far, been scarcely employed in newborn infants and children. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of the use of QUS in newborn children and the factors influencing QUS parameters. In 140 consecutive healthy full-term newborn babies (76 male and 64 female; gestational age: 39.5±1.5 weeks) QUS parameters were assessed

S. Gonnelli; A. Montagnani; L. Gennari; S. Martini; D. Merlotti; C. Cepollaro; S. Perrone; G. Buonocore; R. Nuti

2004-01-01

187

Surface roughness of glass-ceramic insert-composite restorations: assessing several polishing techniques.  

PubMed

The authors compared the effectiveness of seven polishing methods on glass-ceramic insert-composite restorations placed in plastic resin squares. The polishing methods used carbide dental finishing burs and diamond polishing paste, diamond abrasive finishing burs and diamond polishing paste, diamond abrasive finishing burs and composite resin finishing disks, diamond abrasive finishing burs and composite resin polishing points, diamond abrasive finishing burs only, diamond abrasive finishing burs followed by resin impregnated disks and an aluminum oxide polishing abrasive paste, and diamond abrasive finishing burs followed by diamond polishing paste. All systems achieved comparable smoothness except the carbide finishing burs, which damaged the insert-composite margin. PMID:8908919

Ashe, M J; Tripp, G A; Eichmiller, F C; George, L A; Meiers, J C

1996-10-01

188

Crop Residues as Energy Sources: Assessing the Cost and Energy Feasibility of Direct Firing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crop residue is a renewable resource that could supply various energy products to an agricultural region. The feasibility of such an effort depends upon the agricultural characteristics of the region, the use of current energy products, alternate conversion technologies, and the operation of the supporting activities which collect, compact, and ship the residue on its journey from the field to

PATRICK J. STARR; DEAN W. FINN-CARLSON; CHRISTOPHER J. NACHTSHEIM

1978-01-01

189

Assessing the Feasibility of Extracting Clinical Information to Create Quality Indicators from Primary Healthcare Practice EMRs.  

PubMed

In 2011, a panel of primary healthcare (PHC) providers in Nova Scotia rated 19 of 35 selected Canadian Institute for Health Information (2006) clinical quality indicators (QIs) as "acceptable." In this study, the authors explored the feasibility of extracting electronic medical record (EMR) data required to create these PHC QI measures. PMID:24034775

Burge, Fred; Lawson, Beverley; Van Aarsen, Kristine; Putnam, Wayne

2013-01-01

190

Feasibility of using impedance-based damage assessment for pipeline structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY This paper presents the feasibility of using an impedance-based health monitoring technique in moni- toring a critical civil facility. Theobje ctiveof this re se arch is to utilizethecapability of theimpe dance method in identifying structural damage in those areas where a very quick condition monitoring is urgently needed, such as in a post-earthquake analysis of a pipeline system. The

Harley H. Cudney; Daniel J. Inman

2001-01-01

191

PILOT IN COMMAND: A FEASIBILITY ASSESSMENT OF AUTONOMOUS FLIGHT MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several years of NASA research have produced the air traffic management operational concept of 'Autonomous Flight Management' with high potential for operational feasibility, significant system and user benefits, and safety. Among the chief potential benefits are demand-adaptive or 'scalable' capacity, user flexibility and autonomy that may finally enable truly successful business strategies, and compatibility with current-day operations such that the

David J. Wing; Mark G. Ballin; Karthik Krishnamurthy

192

Feasibility of a liver transcriptomics approach to assess bovine treatment with the prohormone dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Within the European Union the use of growth promoting agents in animal production is prohibited. Illegal use of natural prohormones like dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is hard to prove since prohormones are strongly metabolized in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of a novel effect-based approach for monitoring abuse of DHEA. Changes in gene expression profiles were studied

Jeroen CW Rijk; Peter JM Hendriksen; Johan M Van Hende; Maria J Groot; Michel WF Nielen

2010-01-01

193

43 CFR 11.93 - Post-assessment phase-restoration plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Post-Assessment...the amount of the award of a natural resource damage claim as authorized...monies will be used to address natural resources, specifically what...

2012-10-01

194

43 CFR 11.93 - Post-assessment phase-restoration plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Post-Assessment...the amount of the award of a natural resource damage claim as authorized...monies will be used to address natural resources, specifically what...

2011-10-01

195

Biological Production of Methane from Lunar Mission Solid Waste: An Initial Feasibility Assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A preliminary assessment was made of the potential for biological production of methane from solid waste generated during an early planetary base mission to the moon. This analysis includes: 1) estimation of the amount of biodegradable solid waste generated, 2) background on the potential biodegradability of plastics given their significance in solid wastes, and 3) calculation of potential methane production from the estimate of biodegradable waste. The completed analysis will also include the feasibility of biological methane production costs associated with the biological processing of the solid waste. NASA workshops and Advanced Life Support documentation have estimated the projected amount of solid wastes generated for specific space missions. From one workshop, waste estimates were made for a 180 day transit mission to Mars. The amount of plastic packaging material was not specified, but our visual examination of trash returned from stocktickerSTS missions indicated a large percentage would be plastic film. This plastic, which is not biodegradable, would amount to 1.526 kgdw crew-1 d-1 or 6.10 kgdw d-1 for a crew of 4. Over a mission of 10 days this would amount to 61 kgdw of plastics and for an 180 day lunar surface habitation it would be nearly 1100 kgdw . Approx. 24 % of this waste estimate would be biodegradable (human fecal waste, food waste, and paper), but if plastic packaging was replaced with biodegradable plastic, then 91% would be biodegradable. Plastics are man-made long chain polymeric molecules, and can be divided into two main groups; thermoplastics and thermoset plastics. Thermoplastics comprise over 90% of total plastic use in the placecountry-regionUnited States and are derived from polymerization of olefins via breakage of the double bond and subsequent formation of additional carbon to carbon bonds. The resulting sole-carbon chain polymers are highly resistant to biodegradation and hydrolytic cleavage. Common thermoplastics include low density polyethylene (packaging, bags), high density polyethylene (bottles, containers, pipes), polystyrene (tanks, containers), polypropylene (tanks, containers), and polyvinylchloride (pipes, containers). Thermoset plastics are formed by the condensation of alcohols or amines to form polyesters or polyamides, and are typically solidified after heating. As opposed to the linear structure of thermoplastic, thermoset plastics have a cross-linked structure which results in higher strength. The most common thermoset plastic is polyurethane which is used for coatings, insulation, paints, and packing. Given both the concerns over pollution reduction and energy conservation, significant efforts are underway on Earth to evaluate biodegradable plastics made from renewable feedstocks; the following summarizes the current state of these efforts. Production of biodegradable plastics involves either the introduction of biodegradable or photo-oxidizable components into the polymer chain or the use of biodegradable polymers themselves. The first approach is based on the observation that polyolefins of low molecular weight (<500 Da) are biodegradable. Insertion of structures susceptible to either photoor chemical degradation within the overall polyolefins chain (which are of 4 - 28 kDa molecular weight), can produce segments sufficiently small to be assimilated and degraded by microorganisms. Biodegradable polymers based strictly on nonpetroleum, biologically-based material have been developed, including some which are used to make currently marketed products. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are polyesters which are accumulated as carbon storage materials by microorganisms under nutrient limiting conditions. MirelTM , a "bioplastic" based on stocktickerPHA produced from microbial fermentation of sugars or oils from vegetables crops, is being produced by TellesTM . The company markets MirelTM bioplastics for use in molding, coatings, films, adhesives, and fibers. Another type of bioplastic is based on polylactic acid, or stocktickerPLA. Starch, typically from corn, is f

Strayer, Richard; Garland, Jay; Janine, Captain

196

Electric power distribution network restoration: a survey of papers and a review of the restoration problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

This survey addresses the problem of supply restoration following an outage in an electric distribution system. Operator decision support for the restoration of supply after an outage is an active research area. This is significant for enhancing supply continuity and achieving better efficiency. It is important for operators to reach a feasible and speedily implementable restoration plan to restore the

S ?ur?i?; C. S Özveren; L Crowe; P. K. L Lo

1995-01-01

197

Photoreceptor rearrangement and vision restoration in eyes with outer retinopathy: Quantitative assessment by fractal analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The differentiation between normal and abnormal photoreceptor rearrangement before and after treatments may improve understanding on the sequence of events involved in the visual field defects. In this study, we evaluated a fractal analysis approach to quantify photoreceptor rearrangement and vision restoration. We analyzed Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) data from an individual with outer retinopathy before and after treatment. The outer nuclear layer (ONL) was delineated from the rest of the retinal structure by using a custom-built segmentation algorithm. We then determined the fractal box dimension of the ONL's outline using the box counting method. Thickness and reflectance of the ONL were also calculated. Our results showed that the ONL's fractal dimension, thickness and relative reflectivity decreased after treatment. These early results showed that ONL's fractal dimension could be used as an index of photoreceptor rearrangement, which might lead to a more effective approach to therapy and improved diagnosis.

Cabrera Debuc, Delia; Tchitnga, Robert

2009-03-01

198

In vivo assessment of secondary caries and dentin characteristics after traditional amalgam restorations  

PubMed Central

Objective This study aimed to evaluate in vivo the occurrence of secondary caries and dentin characteristics in permanent molars after traditional amalgam restorations, by means of clinical visual examination, radiographs and laser-induced fluorescence (LF) (DIAGNOdent). Methods: Thirty first permanent molars of 30 schoolchildren in the 7 to14 year-old age group were included. Caries was removed by hand. Thus, indirect pulp capping was performed with glass-ionomer cement (GIC), the cavity was varnished and amalgam filled. LF was measured before and after cavity preparation and after a 12-month observation period. Dentin color after cavity preparation and after the 12-month observation period was recorded. Recurrent caries was also investigated by visual clinical and radiographic examinations, in addition to dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping. Data was analyzed by ANOVA for repeated measurements, paired “t” test and descriptive statistic. Results: There were statistically significant differences (P<.05) among LF scores for dentin in all periods evaluated, with the lowest scores shown after 12 month of observation. There was no statistical difference between dentin color after cavity preparation and following 12 months of observation. Moreover, there was no recurrent caries attack at 12-month follow-up; dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping was similar between baseline and final observation periods. It was concluded that the clinical restorative procedure using hand caries removal, indirect pulp capping with GIC, varnishing and amalgam filling the cavity did not provide secondary caries and increased dentin mineral content after 12 months.

de Assuncao Pinheiro, Isauremi Vieira; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; de Lima, Kenio Costa

2012-01-01

199

Assessment of the need for and feasibility of establishing a national reactor engineering simulator facility  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted by the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Power Systems to determine the need for and feasibility of establishing a reactor engineering simulator facility at a National Laboratory. Input was obtained from a wide cross section of the Nation's nuclear industry, the Department's National Laboratories, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in carrying out this study. Based on this input, the Department concludes that the proposed facility would not significantly contribute to the capability of the Nation's nuclear industry or the Department to foster research in generic design improvements and simplifications. Furthermore, the Department concludes that such a facility, although it is theoretically feasible, is not practical from an engineering viewpoint, and the significant national effort and expense, which would be required to develop, construct, and operate such a facility, is not justified.

Not Available

1981-12-01

200

Electronic Diaries: A Feasible Method of Assessing Emotional Experiences in Youth?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary goal of this study was to examine whether electronic diaries are a feasible method of monitoring transitory emotional\\u000a states with a school-age, community sample of youth. A second goal was to examine preliminary relations between indices of\\u000a emotional functioning captured via electronic diaries and other measures of child emotional and psychological functioning.\\u000a Participants included 38 youth between the

Cynthia Suveg; Mary Payne; Kristel Thomassin; Marni L. Jacob

2010-01-01

201

Assessment of the advantages and feasibility of a nuclear rocket for a manned Mars mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feasibility of rebuilding and testing a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) for the Mars mission was investigted. Calculations indicate that an NTR would substantially reduce the Earth-orbit assemble mass compared to LOX\\/LH2 systems. The mass savings were 36 and 65% for the cases of total aerobraking and of total propulsive braking respectively. Consequently, the cost savings for a single mission

Steven D. Howe

1986-01-01

202

Feasibility Assessment of CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Recovery in Gas Shale Reservoirs  

Microsoft Academic Search

CO2 sequestration and enhanced methane recovery may be feasible in unconventional, organic-rich, gas shale reservoirs in which the methane is stored as an adsorbed phase. Previous studies have shown that organic-rich, Appalachian Devonian shales adsorb approximately five times more carbon dioxide than methane at reservoir conditions. However, the enhanced recovery and sequestration concept has not yet been tested for gas

J. P. Vermylen; P. N. Hagin; M. D. Zoback

2008-01-01

203

Feasibility Assessment of CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Recovery in Gas Shale Reservoirs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CO2 sequestration and enhanced methane recovery may be feasible in unconventional, organic-rich, gas shale reservoirs in which the methane is stored as an adsorbed phase. Previous studies have shown that organic-rich, Appalachian Devonian shales adsorb approximately five times more carbon dioxide than methane at reservoir conditions. However, the enhanced recovery and sequestration concept has not yet been tested for gas shale reservoirs under realistic flow and production conditions. Using the lessons learned from previous studies on enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) as a starting point, we are conducting laboratory experiments, reservoir modeling, and fluid flow simulations to test the feasibility of sequestration and enhanced recovery in gas shales. Our laboratory work investigates both adsorption and mechanical properties of shale samples to use as inputs for fluid flow simulation. Static and dynamic mechanical properties of shale samples are measured using a triaxial press under realistic reservoir conditions with varying gas saturations and compositions. Adsorption is simultaneously measured using standard, static, volumetric techniques. Permeability is measured using pulse decay methods calibrated to standard Darcy flow measurements. Fluid flow simulations are conducted using the reservoir simulator GEM that has successfully modeled enhanced recovery in coal. The results of the flow simulation are combined with the laboratory results to determine if enhanced recovery and CO2 sequestration is feasible in gas shale reservoirs.

Vermylen, J. P.; Hagin, P. N.; Zoback, M. D.

2008-12-01

204

Iterative image restoration algorithms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This tutorial paper discusses the use of successive-approximation- based iterative restoration algorithms for the removal of linear blurs and noise from images. Iterative algorithms are particularly attractive for this application because they allow for the incorporation of prior knowledge about the class of feasible solutions, because they can be used to remove nonstationary blurs, and because they are fairly robust

Aggelos K. Katsaggelos

205

Using conservation value to assess land restoration and management alternatives across a degraded oak savanna landscape  

USGS Publications Warehouse

1. Managers considering restoration of landscapes often face a fundamental challenge - what should be the habitat composition of the restored landscape? We present a method for evaluating an important conservation trade-off inherent in making that decision. 2. Oak savannas and grasslands were historically widespread across central North America but are now rare. Today, in north-west Indiana, USA, habitats spanning a range of woody vegetation density, from nearly treeless open habitats to forests, occur across the conserved landscape where savannas probably once dominated. To understand the benefits of different potential landscape compositions, we evaluated how different proportions of five habitats - open, savanna, woodland, scrub and forest - might affect the conservation value of the north-west Indiana landscape for birds. Two variables of potential conservation importance were examined: species diversity, a measure of avian community richness, and conservation index, the percentage of a bird species' global population occurring on a hectare of landscape, summed across all bird species present. Higher values of conservation index were associated with higher local densities of globally more rare and more threatened species. 3. Conservation index and species diversity were correlated negatively across hypothetical landscapes composed of different proportions of the five habitats. Therefore, a management trade-off existed between conservation index and species diversity because landscapes that maximized species diversity differed from landscapes that maximized conservation index. 4. A landscape of 50% open, 22% savanna, 15% scrub and 13% forest was predicted to represent a compromise at which conservation index and species diversity reached the same percentage of their maxima. In contrast, the current landscape is dominated by forest. 5. Synthesis and applications. We quantified the trade-off between two potential aspects of a landscape's conservation value for birds - the landscape's ability to promote avian species diversity and the landscape's use by threatened avian species. This quantification allowed us to evaluate the ability of different landscape compositions to achieve preferable trade-off compromises, such as maximizing diversity for a given level of landscape use by threatened species. Managers can use these trade-off results to determine which landscape compositions are associated with particular conservation and management priorities.

Grundel, R.; Pavlovic, N. B.

2008-01-01

206

Feasibility of Web-based Technology to Assess Adherence to Clinic Appointments in Youth with Sickle Cell Disease  

PubMed Central

Web-based tools to improve clinic attendance have been effectively used in pediatric conditions but have not been tested in pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD). The goal of this pilot study was to assess barriers to clinic attendance and the feasibility of a web-based assessment tool to promote problem-solving around clinic appointments. Study participants included 30 youth with SCD (M=11.7±3.5 years; 57% male; 60% HbSS; 20% HbSC; 17% HB+Thal) and their primary caregivers. Medical chart review indicated that 61% of participants attended at least two SCD clinic appointments in the past year. The primary barrier to clinic attendance was inability to take off from work/school (33%). Regarding feasibility and acceptability, the computerized program was well-received by patients and caregivers, with youth and caregivers reporting a high degree of usefulness and preference for computerized assessment. Results suggest that this innovative approach shows promise and should be tested on a larger sample of youth with SCD.

Modi, Avani C.; Crosby, Lori E.; Hines, Janelle; Drotar, Dennis; Mitchell, Monica J.

2011-01-01

207

Locks and Dam 1 (Ford Dam), Mississippi River, draft feasibility report and environmental assessment for hydropower  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a detailed evaluation of additional hydropower potential at Locks and Dam 1. An earlier evaluation in a reconnaissance level report (September 1981) indicated preliminary feasibility for added hydropower at this Federal navigation project site. The original Federal navigation locks and dam project included a foundation for a hydropower plant to be developed by non-Federal interests. The existing hydropower plant and equipment are owned and operated by the Ford Motor Company. The existing four turbines generate a combined nameplate capacity of 14.4 MW (megawatts).

Not Available

1984-08-01

208

MARKET ASSESSMENT AND TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY STUDY OF PRESSURIZED FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION ASH USE  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute, in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler International, Inc. and the US Department of Energy, has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC ashes. Ashes from the Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot-scale circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, combusting (1) low-sulfur subbituminous and (2) high-sulfur bituminous coal, and ash from the AEP's high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing at WR1. The technical feasibility study examined the use of PFBC ash in construction-related applications, including its use as a cementing material in concrete and use in cement manufacturing, fill and embankment materials, soil stabilization agent, and use in synthetic aggregate production. Testing was also conducted to determine the technical feasibility of PFBC ash as a soil amendment for acidic and sodic problem soils and spoils encountered in agricultural and reclamation applications. The results of the technical feasibility testing indicated the following conclusions. PFBC ash does not meet the chemical requirements as a pozzolan for cement replacement. However, it does appear that potential may exist for its use in cement production as a pozzolan and/or as a set retardant. PFBC ash shows relatively high strength development, low expansion, and low permeability properties that make its use in fills and embankments promising. Testing has also indicated that PFBC ash, when mixed with low amounts of lime, develops high strengths, suitable for soil stabilization applications and synthetic aggregate production. Synthetic aggregate produced from PFBC ash is capable of meeting ASTM/AASHTO specifications for many construction applications. The residual calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in the PFE3C ash has been shown to be of value in making PFBC ash a suitable soil amendment for acidic and sodic problem soils and mine spoils. In conclusion, PFBC ash represents a viable material for use in currently established applications for conventional coal combustion ashes. As such, PFBC ash should be viewed as a valuable resource, and commercial opportunities for these materials should be explored for planned PFBC installations.

A.E. Bland; T.H. Brown

1997-04-01

209

The Imperial Stress Assessment Tool (ISAT): A Feasible, Reliable and Valid Approach to Measuring Stress in the Operating Room  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Stress can impair surgical performance and may compromise patient safety. This prospective, cross-sectional study describes\\u000a the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Imperial Stress Assessment Tool (ISAT) as an approach to measuring stress\\u000a during surgery.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A total of 54 procedures were observed with 11 surgeons (4 attendings, 4 senior residents and 3 junior residents) in a large\\u000a university teaching hospital

Sonal Arora; Tanya Tierney; Nick Sevdalis; Rajesh Aggarwal; Debra Nestel; Maria Woloshynowych; Ara Darzi; Roger Kneebone

2010-01-01

210

Annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for FY 1992. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of the investigations and monitoring, conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented can be used to develop a conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. Groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface water monitoring results are described.

Clapp, R.B. [ed.

1992-09-01

211

75 FR 29336 - Penobscot River Restoration Trust; Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Assessment  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...prepared an Final Environmental Assessment (FEA) for an application filed by the Penobscot...Comprehensive Settlement Agreement. The FEA evaluates the environmental impacts that...the licensee's proposed surrenders. The FEA finds that approval of the application...

2010-05-25

212

Feasibility of assessing dermal exposure to PAHs of workers on gaswork sites--the SOLEX study.  

PubMed

Population exposure to pollutants in soil is an important public health concern. Difficult to measure, it is usually estimated using multimedia models. Modeling data predict that the skin surface is a predominant exposure route in roughly 15% of the US Superfund sites. Nonetheless, no study has confirmed these predictions. The SOLEX study was an opportunity to study the feasibility of estimating the cutaneous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs: all 16 of the United States Environmental Protection Agency list) load of workers at three former manufactured gas sites, one of those being under remediation. Over two measurement periods (November 1997 and June 1998), 30 and 28 volunteers, respectively, were equipped for a single day work with five pads that collected soil particles and were placed at the neck, shoulder, wrist, groin, and ankle. Pad contamination was observed for six of the nine workers on the site being remediated but not on other sites. The wrist pad was most often affected, followed by the neck pad, these are, the exposed regions of the body. The PAHs most frequently identified were anthracene, fluoranthene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene, at concentrations relatively high. In conclusion, this study showed that estimating skin exposure to soil pollutants is feasible. Secondly, it suggested that only subjects in close contact with the soil had a detectable exposure to PAHs. Extension of this approach to other exposure settings is warranted, especially among children playing in polluted public or private gardens, because their games lead to frequent contact with the soil. PMID:11194162

Dor, F; Jongeneelen, F; Zmirou, D; Empereur-Bissonnet, P; Nedellec, V; Haguenoer, J M; Person, A; Ferguson, C; Dab, W

2000-12-18

213

Survey and evaluation of instream habitat and stock restoration techniques for wild pink and chum salmon. Restoration study number 105-1 (restoration project 93063). Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report  

SciTech Connect

This project is the result of a three-year survey of the Exxon Valdez oil spill impact area to identify appropriate and cost-effective instream habitat restoration techniques for salmon, including spawning channels and improvement of fish passage through fish ladders or step-pool structures to overcome physical or hydrological barriers. Additional wild salmon stock rehabilitation measures include stream-side incubation boxes, remote egg-taking, incubation at existing hatcheries for fry stocking in oil-impacted streams, and fry rearing. Study results include the identification of the most promising instream habitat restoration projects in each of the spill-impacted areas.

Willette, T.M.; Dudiak, N.C.; Honnold, S.G.; Carpenter, G.; Dickson, M.

1995-08-01

214

Assessing the potential to restore historic grazing ecosystems with tortoise ecological replacements.  

PubMed

The extinction of large herbivores, often keystone species, can dramatically modify plant communities and impose key biotic thresholds that may prevent an ecosystem returning to its previous state and threaten native biodiversity. A potentially innovative, yet controversial, landscape-based long-term restoration approach is to replace missing plant-herbivore interactions with non-native herbivores. Aldabran giant (Aldabrachelys gigantea) and Madagascan radiated (Astrochelys radiata) tortoises, taxonomically and functionally similar to the extinct Mauritian giant tortoises (Cylindraspis spp.), were introduced to Round Island, Mauritius, in 2007 to control the non-native plants that were threatening persistence of native species. We monitored the response of the plant community to tortoise grazing for 11 months in enclosures before the tortoises were released and, compared the cost of using tortoises as weeders with the cost of using manual labor. At the end of this period, plant biomass; vegetation height and cover; and adult, seedling, flower, and seed abundance were 3-136 times greater in adjacent control plots than in the tortoise enclosures. After their release, the free-roaming tortoises grazed on most non-native plants and significantly reduced vegetation cover, height, and seed production, reflecting findings from the enclosure study. The tortoises generally did not eat native species, although they consumed those native species that increased in abundance following the eradication of mammalian herbivores. Our results suggest that introduced non-native tortoises are a more cost-effective approach to control non-native vegetation than manual weeding. Numerous long-term outcomes (e.g., change in species composition and soil seed bank) are possible following tortoise releases. Monitoring and adaptive management are needed to ensure that the replacement herbivores promote the recovery of native plants. PMID:23773124

Griffiths, Christine J; Zuël, Nicolas; Jones, Carl G; Ahamud, Zairabee; Harris, Stephen

2013-06-14

215

Feasibility of Assessing Public Health Impacts of Air Pollution Reduction Programs on a Local Scale: New Haven Case Study  

PubMed Central

Background New approaches to link health surveillance data with environmental and population exposure information are needed to examine the health benefits of risk management decisions. Objective We examined the feasibility of conducting a local assessment of the public health impacts of cumulative air pollution reduction activities from federal, state, local, and voluntary actions in the City of New Haven, Connecticut (USA). Methods Using a hybrid modeling approach that combines regional and local-scale air quality data, we estimated ambient concentrations for multiple air pollutants [e.g., PM2.5 (particulate matter ? 2.5 ?m in aerodynamic diameter), NOx (nitrogen oxides)] for baseline year 2001 and projected emissions for 2010, 2020, and 2030. We assessed the feasibility of detecting health improvements in relation to reductions in air pollution for 26 different pollutant–health outcome linkages using both sample size and exploratory epidemiological simulations to further inform decision-making needs. Results Model projections suggested decreases (~ 10–60%) in pollutant concentrations, mainly attributable to decreases in pollutants from local sources between 2001 and 2010. Models indicated considerable spatial variability in the concentrations of most pollutants. Sample size analyses supported the feasibility of identifying linkages between reductions in NOx and improvements in all-cause mortality, prevalence of asthma in children and adults, and cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations. Conclusion Substantial reductions in air pollution (e.g., ~ 60% for NOx) are needed to detect health impacts of environmental actions using traditional epidemiological study designs in small communities like New Haven. In contrast, exploratory epidemiological simulations suggest that it may be possible to demonstrate the health impacts of PM reductions by predicting intraurban pollution gradients within New Haven using coupled models.

Lobdell, Danelle T.; Isakov, Vlad; Baxter, Lisa; Touma, Jawad S.; Smuts, Mary Beth; Ozkaynak, Haluk

2011-01-01

216

Can we import quality tools? a feasibility study of European practice assessment in a country with less organised general practice  

PubMed Central

Background Quality is on the agenda of European general practice (GP). European researchers have, in collaboration, developed tools to assess quality of GPs. In this feasibility study, we tested the European Practice Assessment (EPA) in a one-off project in Belgium, where general practice has a low level of GP organisation. Methods A framework for feasibility analysis included describing the recruiting of participants, a brief telephone study survey among non-responders, organisational and logistic problems. Using field notes and focus groups, we studied the participants' opinions. Results In this study, only 36 of 1000 invited practices agreed to participate. Co-ordination, administrative work, practice visits and organisational problems required several days per practice. The researchers further encountered technical problems, for instance when entering the data and uploading to the web-based server. In subsequent qualitative analysis using two focus groups, most participant GPs expressed a positive feeling after the EPA procedure. In the short period of follow-up, only a few GPs reported improvements after the visit. The participant GPs suggested that follow-up and coaching would probably facilitate the implementation of changes. Conclusion This feasibility study shows that prior interest in EPA is low in the GP community. We encountered a number of logistic and organisational problems. It proved attractive to participants, but it can be augmented by coaching of participants in more than a one-off project to identify and achieve targets for quality improvement. In the absence of commitment of the government, a network of universities and one scientific organisation will offer EPA as a service to training practices.

Remmen, Roy; Seuntjens, Luc; Paulus, Dominique; Pestiaux, Dominique; Knops, Klaus; Bruel, Ann Van den

2009-01-01

217

Watershed Restoration Project  

SciTech Connect

In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds’ ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

2007-09-27

218

Environmental assessment of the Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is managed and operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of the Lockheed Martin Company. SNL/NM is located on land controlled by DOE within the boundaries of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The major responsibilities of SNL/NM are the support of national security and energy projects. This report provides an environmental assessment of proposed remedial action activities at the solid waste management units at SNL/NM. A risk assessment of health hazards is also discussed.

NONE

1996-03-01

219

Assessing the economic and environmental feasibility of utility scaled PV electricity production in the state of Georgia.  

PubMed

Photovoltaic (PV) technology, an increasingly popular source for renewable energy, is being deployed in places with solar insolation that is comparable to that in state of Georgia. This study assesses the feasibility and environmental impact of utility scale photovoltaic (PV) electricity production in Georgia by assessing the economic costs, avoided costs, health benefits, and environmental benefits. The cost of PV used in this study is 3.52 $/kW. The RETScreen model was employed to analyze the impact of incentives on the economic viability of the plants that produce 93 GWh, 371 GWh, and 1,484 GWh, respectively. 57% of the capital cost is required in the form of incentives or subsidies to make the projects economically feasible. The high estimated cost of cleaning the equivalent amount of emissions from a coal-fired power plant is $14.5 million, $58 million, and $232 million for a 50 MW, 200 MW, and 800 MW plant, respectively Avoided costs in health damages are estimated to be $28 million, $112 million, and $449 million and the numbers of jobs to be created are 2,500, 10,000, and 40,000 for 50 MW, 200 MW, and 800 MW plants, respectively. And, the cumulative value of renewable energy credits from a 50 MW, 200 MW, and a 800 MW plant are $59 million, $237 million, and $789 million, respectively. PMID:23741866

Taylor, Ruthie; Critttenden, John

2012-01-01

220

Accuracy and feasibility of video analysis for assessing hamstring flexibility and validity of the sit-and-reach test.  

PubMed

The accuracy of video analysis of the passive straight-leg raise test (PSLR) and the validity of the sit-and-reach test (SR) were tested in 60 men and women. Computer software measured static hip-joint flexion accurately. High within-session reliability of the PSLR was demonstrated (R > .97). Test-retest (separate days) reliability for SR was high in men (R = .97) and women R = .98) moderate for PSLR in men (R = .79) and women (R = .89). SR validity (PSLR as criterion) was higher in women (Day 1, r = .69; Day 2, r = .81) than men (Day 1, r = .64; Day 2, r = .66). In conclusion, video analysis is accurate and feasible for assessing static joint angles, PSLR and SR tests are very reliable methods for assessing flexibility, and the SR validity for hamstring flexibility was found to be moderate in women and low in men. PMID:22276403

Mier, Constance M

2011-12-01

221

Assessing Feigned Cognitive Impairment in Defendants Hospitalized for Competency Restoration: Further Validation of the TOMI  

Microsoft Academic Search

Valid screens for feigned cognitive impairment are a fundamental component of any forensic assessment. The TOMI is a verbally administered, two-alternative forced-choice screen for feigned cognitive impairment in competence to stand trial (CST) evaluations. The present study provided further validation for the use of this tool in a sample of 82 forensic inpatients, the second investigation of the TOMI in

Lori H. Colwell; Kevin Colwell

2011-01-01

222

An introductory guide to uncertainty analysis in environmental and health risk assessment. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

To compensate for the potential for overly conservative estimates of risk using standard US Environmental Protection Agency methods, an uncertainty analysis should be performed as an integral part of each risk assessment. Uncertainty analyses allow one to obtain quantitative results in the form of confidence intervals that will aid in decision making and will provide guidance for the acquisition of additional data. To perform an uncertainty analysis, one must frequently rely on subjective judgment in the absence of data to estimate the range and a probability distribution describing the extent of uncertainty about a true but unknown value for each parameter of interest. This information is formulated from professional judgment based on an extensive review of literature, analysis of the data, and interviews with experts. Various analytical and numerical techniques are available to allow statistical propagation of the uncertainty in the model parameters to a statement of uncertainty in the risk to a potentially exposed individual. Although analytical methods may be straightforward for relatively simple models, they rapidly become complicated for more involved risk assessments. Because of the tedious efforts required to mathematically derive analytical approaches to propagate uncertainty in complicated risk assessments, numerical methods such as Monte Carlo simulation should be employed. The primary objective of this report is to provide an introductory guide for performing uncertainty analysis in risk assessments being performed for Superfund sites.

Hoffman, F.O.; Hammonds, J.S.

1992-10-01

223

RESTORING WILD SALMON TO THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST: WHAT DOES RISK ASSESSMENT OFFER?  

EPA Science Inventory

Over the past two decades, risk assessment has become the most popular analytic approach to evaluate ecological policy options. Its principal use has been to evaluate relatively simple technical questions (e.g., regulatory actions associated with specific chemicals or hazardous ...

224

Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and sustainability.

Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

2013-10-01

225

Systematic comprehensive geriatric assessment in elderly patients on chronic dialysis: a cross-sectional comparative and feasibility study  

PubMed Central

Background Elderly dialysis patients are prone to disabilities and functional decline. This aggravates their last period of life. It would be valuable to be able to preserve daily function and quality of life. Identification of domains requiring additional attention is not common practice in standard care. Therefore, we performed a systematic Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) to assess physical and psychosocial function and tested its feasibility in daily practice. The CGA is used more frequently in the assessment of elderly cancer patients, and we therefore compared the outcomes to this group. Methods A cross-sectional, multicenter study, between June 1st and September 31st, 2009, in four Dutch outpatient dialysis units. Fifty patients aged 65?years or above who received dialysis because of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were randomly included. We assessed the CGA during a systematic interview with patients and their caregivers. The cancer patients had had a similar CGA in an earlier study. We compared prevalences between groups. Results In the dialysis population (68.0% 75?years or above, 76.6% on haemodialysis) caregivers often observed behavioral changes, such as deviant eating habits (34.0%) and irritability (27.7%). In 84.4%, caregivers felt overburdened by the situation of their family member. Somatic and psychosocial conditions were frequently found (polypharmacy (94.6%), depression (24.5%)) and prevalence of most geriatric conditions was comparable to those in elderly cancer patients. Conclusions Geriatric conditions were highly prevalent among elderly dialysis patients and prevalences were comparable in both populations. The CGA proved feasible for recognition of these conditions and of overburdened caregivers. This could prevent further functional decline and preserve quality of life.

2012-01-01

226

Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential for TVA's John Sevier and Kingston Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This is a preliminary assessment of the potential for geologic carbon sequestration for the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) John Sevier and Kingston power plants. The purpose of this assessment is to make a 'first cut' determination of whether there is sufficient potential for geologic carbon sequestration within 200 miles of the plants for TVA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to proceed with a joint proposal for a larger project with a strong carbon management element. This assessment does not consider alternative technologies for carbon capture, but assumes the existence of a segregated CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration.

Smith, Ellen D [ORNL; Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL

2008-03-01

227

Implementation of the natural resource damage assessment rule. Workshop summary; interim notification policy: Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

Regulations have been promulgated by the Department of Interior (DOI) which provide an administrative process whereby natural resource trustees may establish the type and extent of injury and evaluate the damages to natural resources. These regulations provide an optional mechanism for Natural Resource Damage Assessments (NRDAs), with four major components. A workshop was held to develop recommendations for DOE-OR regarding implementation of the DOI NRDA regulations at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The attendants were divided into three working groups to consider (1) administrative/legal requirements, (2) ecological assessments, and (3) the NRDA/economic evaluation process. This report supplies an overview of the DOI NRDA regulations as well as summaries of the consensus of each of the three working groups.

Not Available

1991-11-01

228

Assessing and Restoring the Health of Urban Streams in the Puget Sound Basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid urbanization threatens the biota of streams and rivers around the globe. Efforts to manage urban streams traditionally take an engineering approach focused on stormwater runoff, physical channel condition, and chemical water quality. Our objective was to use the biology of streams—measured with the multimetric benthic index of biological integrity (B-IBI) based on benthic macroinvertebrates—to assess stream health. From 1997

Sarah A. Morley; James R. Karr

2002-01-01

229

U.S. Department of Energy worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with environmental restoration and waste management  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM). The methodology is appropriate for estimating worker risks across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex at both programmatic and site-specific levels. This document supports the worker health risk methodology used to perform the human health risk assessment portion of the DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) although it has applications beyond the PEIS, such as installation-wide worker risk assessments, screening-level assessments, and site-specific assessments.

Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.; Travis, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Risk Management; Simek, M.A.; Sutherland, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Scofield, P.A. [Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (United States)

1995-06-01

230

Thermal hydraulic feasibility assessment of the hot conditioning system and process  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project was established to develop engineered solutions for the expedited removal, stabilization, and storage of spent nuclear fuel from the K Basins at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. A series of analyses have been completed investigating the thermal-hydraulic performance and feasibility of the proposed Hot Conditioning System and process for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The analyses were performed using a series of thermal-hydraulic models that could respond to all process and safety-related issues that may arise pertaining to the Hot Conditioning System. The subject efforts focus on independently investigating, quantifying, and establishing the governing heat production and removal mechanisms, flow distributions within the multi-canister overpack, and performing process simulations for various purge gases under consideration for the Hot Conditioning System, as well as obtaining preliminary results for comparison with and verification of other analyses, and providing technology- based recommendations for consideration and incorporation into the Hot Conditioning System design bases.

Heard, F.J.

1996-10-10

231

ASSESSING THE FEASIBILITY OF COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION BY MAGNETIC TURBULENCE AT THE GALACTIC CENTER  

SciTech Connect

The presence of relativistic particles at the center of our Galaxy is evidenced by the diffuse TeV emission detected from the inner {approx}2 Degree-Sign of the Galaxy. Although it is not yet entirely clear whether the origin of the TeV photons is due to hadronic or leptonic interactions, the tight correlation of the intensity distribution with the distribution of molecular gas along the Galactic ridge strongly points to a pionic-decay process involving relativistic protons. In previous work, we concluded that point-source candidates, such as the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* (identified with the High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) source J1745-290) or the pulsar wind nebulae dispersed along the Galactic plane, could not account for the observed diffuse TeV emission from this region. Motivated by this result, we consider here the feasibility that the cosmic rays populating the Galactic center region are accelerated in situ by magnetic turbulence. Our results indicate that even in a highly conductive environment, this mechanism is efficient enough to energize protons within the intercloud medium to the {approx}>TeV energies required to produce the HESS emission.

Fatuzzo, M. [Physics Deparment, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH 45207 (United States); Melia, F., E-mail: fatuzzo@xavier.edu, E-mail: fmelia@email.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Math Program, and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, AZ 85721 (United States)

2012-05-01

232

An introductory guide to uncertainty analysis in environmental and health risk assessment. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents guidelines for evaluating uncertainty in mathematical equations and computer models applied to assess human health and environmental risk. Uncertainty analyses involve the propagation of uncertainty in model parameters and model structure to obtain confidence statements for the estimate of risk and identify the model components of dominant importance. Uncertainty analyses are required when there is no a priori knowledge about uncertainty in the risk estimate and when there is a chance that the failure to assess uncertainty may affect the selection of wrong options for risk reduction. Uncertainty analyses are effective when they are conducted in an iterative mode. When the uncertainty in the risk estimate is intolerable for decision-making, additional data are acquired for the dominant model components that contribute most to uncertainty. This process is repeated until the level of residual uncertainty can be tolerated. A analytical and numerical methods for error propagation are presented along with methods for identifying the most important contributors to uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulation with either Simple Random Sampling (SRS) or Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) is proposed as the most robust method for propagating uncertainty through either simple or complex models. A distinction is made between simulating a stochastically varying assessment endpoint (i.e., the distribution of individual risks in an exposed population) and quantifying uncertainty due to lack of knowledge about a fixed but unknown quantity (e.g., a specific individual, the maximally exposed individual, or the mean, median, or 95%-tile of the distribution of exposed individuals). Emphasis is placed on the need for subjective judgement to quantify uncertainty when relevant data are absent or incomplete.

Hammonds, J.S.; Hoffman, F.O.; Bartell, S.M.

1994-12-01

233

Establishing the Feasibility of Direct Observation in the Assessment of Tics in Children with Chronic Tic Disorders  

PubMed Central

Behavior analysis has been at the forefront in establishing effective treatments for children and adults with chronic tic disorders. As is customary in behavior analysis, the efficacy of these treatments has been established using direct-observation assessment methods. Although behavior-analytic treatments have enjoyed acceptance and integration into mainstream health care practices for tic disorders (e.g., psychiatry and neurology), the use of direct observation as a primary assessment tool has been neglected in favor of less objective methods. Hesitation to use direct observation appears to stem largely from concerns about the generalizability of clinic observations to other settings (e.g., home) and a lack of consensus regarding the most appropriate and feasible techniques for conducting and scoring direct observation. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate and establish a reliable, valid, and feasible direct-observation protocol capable of being transported to research and clinical settings. A total of 43 children with tic disorders, collected from two outpatient specialty clinics, were assessed using direct (videotape samples) and indirect (Yale Global Tic Severity Scale; YGTSS) methods. Videotaped observation samples were collected across 3 consecutive weeks and two different settings (clinic and home), were scored using both exact frequency counts and partial-interval coding, and were compared to data from a common indirect measure of tic severity (the YGTSS). In addition, various lengths of videotaped segments were scored to determine the optimal observation length. Results show that (a) clinic-based observations correspond well to home-based observations, (b) brief direct-observation segments scored with time-sampling methods reliably quantified tics, and (c) indirect methods did not consistently correspond with the direct methods.

Himle, Michael B; Chang, Susanna; Woods, Douglas W; Pearlman, Amanda; Buzzella, Brian; Bunaciu, Liviu; Piacentini, John C

2006-01-01

234

Restoration Ecology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While not a panacea, the emerging field of restoration ecology provides an important tool for environmental conservation and contributes greatly to our understanding of ecology.The first Web site is the home page of the Society for Ecological Restoration, offering a good starting point for exploring this relatively new discipline (1). The next site (2) provides an overview of the University of Wisconsin's Center for Restoration Ecology, "the first comprehensive, interdisciplinary research team assembled to advance the science and technology of ecosystem restoration." The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration outlines its plans for coastal and estuarine restoration in this Web site (3). The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois has implemented one of the largest tallgrass prairie restorations to date (4). The Kissimmee River Restoration Web site (5) provides a detailed look at this incredibly ambitious dam removal and wetland restoration project in Florida. The next Web site (6) offers a visually-attractive introduction to the restoration efforts of the nonprofit organization RESTORE, focusing on the forests of Maine. The Wildlands Project, another restoration-oriented nonprofit organization, describes its vision of ecosystem conservation in this Web site, which includes a personal brief from distinguished biologist E. O. Wilson. (7). The Wildwood project of the Scottish organization Carrifran offers an interesting contrast to restoration efforts in the US, as much of Scotland has been denuded of its original forests for thousands of years (8).

Sohmer, Rachel.

2002-01-01

235

Preliminary assessment report for Florence Military Reservation, Installation 04080, Florence, Arizona. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Arizona Army National Guard property near Florence, Arizona. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. Florence Military Reservation is a 5,655-acre site located in the southern portion of Arizona, about 65 mi southeast of Phoenix, in the county of Pinal. Florence Military Reservation includes Unit Training Equipment Site (UTES) 1, an artillery firing range, and ammunition storage. The subject of this PA is the UTES. The environmentally significant operations associated with the UTES property are (1) vehicle maintenance and refueling, (2) supply/storage of materials, and (3) the vehicle washrack.

Not Available

1993-08-01

236

Stream habitat assessment project: Prince William Sound and lower Kenai Peninsula. Restoration project 93051. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project final report  

SciTech Connect

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Habitat and Restoration Division, conducted surveys of anadromous fish streams in Prince William Sound and Lower Kenai Peninsula from August 2 to September 23, 1993. These surveys focused on Chenega, Eyak and Tatilek corporation lands and Chugach Alaska Corporation lands in Prince William Sound, and on Port Graham and English Bay corporation lands on the lower Kenai Peninsula in order to document anadromous fish distribution and habitat on private lands throughout the spill area. 180 new anadromous fish streams were documented totalling approximately 57 km (35 miles). Pink and coho salmon were the principal fish species found, followed by chum salmon, sockeye salmon, Dolly Varden, rainbow trout, cutthroat trout, stickleback and sculpin, and in intertidal channels, juvenile founder.

Sundet, K.; Kuwada, M.N.; Barnhart, J.

1994-04-01

237

Assessment of the feasibility of developing a Hanford Site weld modeling program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Welding on the Hanford Site is an everyday occurrence, and most of the weldments made on site are relatively straightforward. Groove geometries, fillers, and wleding techniques and parameters are normally decided by experience or handbook advice. However, there are other weldments that might employ new materials, as well as one-of-a-kind welding situations. Implementation of a verified analytical weld assessment method

D. G. Atteridge; W. E. Anderson; R. F. Klein

1986-01-01

238

Biological Production of Methane from Lunar Mission Solid Waste: An Initial Feasibility Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A preliminary assessment was made of the potential for biological production of methane from solid waste generated during an early planetary base mission to the moon. This analysis includes: 1) estimation of the amount of biodegradable solid waste generated, 2) background on the potential biodegradability of plastics given their significance in solid wastes, and 3) calculation of potential methane production

Richard Strayer; Jay Garland; Captain Janine

2008-01-01

239

Investigating the Feasibility of Using Digital Representations of Work for Performance Assessment in Engineering  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper reports on the results of a 3-year study conducted at the Centre for Schooling and Learning Technologies (CSaLT) at Edith Cowan University in collaboration with the Curriculum Council of Western Australia which concerns the potential to use digital technologies to represent the output from assessment tasks in the senior secondary…

Williams, P. John

2012-01-01

240

Exploring the Feasibility of Assessing Perceived Parental Rearing Styles in Spanish Children With Theembu  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most of the available data on the dimensional structure underlying the EMBU - an originally Swedish measure designed to assess one's recollections concerning one's parents' rearing behaviour - has been obtained with adults or adolescents. In the present study, using exploratory factor analysis, an attempt was made to determine the EMBU factorial structure in a Spanish sample of children aged

J. Castro; J. Toro; J. Van der Ende; W. A. Arrindell

1993-01-01

241

Feasibility Assessment of Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head\\/Low Power Resources, DOE\\/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine

Douglas G. Hall

2006-01-01

242

A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

SciTech Connect

Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

Marmorek, David

2004-03-01

243

Assessment of feasibility of a district heating and cooling system for Ecorse, Michigan. Final report, 1981-1982  

SciTech Connect

The City of Ecorse is an older industrial suburb of Detroit with an economy much related to the automobile industry. Ecorse conducted an assessment of the feasibility of building a district heating system which would service an 80 acre redevelopment area in the heart of the community. The system would utilize waste heat in the form of hot water from either of two electric generating plants, or a steel mill, or a nearby chemical plant located within the city. The estimated price of cogenerated thermal energy from one of the power plants was quite competitive. However, the 1980-1985 economy of Ecorse was so weak that the study found no real customer base for the heat in the target redevelopment area.

Hock, M.J.; Cason, D. Jr

1982-10-01

244

Feasibility assessment of piezoelectric crystals as chemical warfare agent sensors. Final report, 1 August 1983-31 August 1985  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of a vibrating piezoelectric crystal as a CW agent detector was assessed by applying CW agent-sensitive coatings to the crystal and testing the detector with 0.3 mg/cum of GB (Sarin). Eight different coating materials were selected, based on previous data with G-agent simulants. No responses were observed to 0.3 mg/cum. GB, but three costings (XAD-4/Cu(2=)-diamine, polyethylenemaleate, and succinyl choline chloride) gave responses of -59 Hz, -22 Hz, and =11 Hz, respectively, to 10 mg/cm.of DIMP (diisopropyl methylphosphonate). Circuit optimization and the use of an operating frequency higher than 9 MHz is recommended to enhance sensitivity. Far-term recommendations are to apply the same coatings to a high-frequency (e.g., 300 MHz) surface acoustic-wave device and test again with CW agents.

Balog, P.P.; Stanford, T.B.; Nordstrom, R.J.; Burgener, R.C.

1986-04-01

245

Assessment of district heating and cooling project feasibility in the city of San Jose: Final report, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an investigation to identify and evaluate the feasibility of potential district cooling and heating projects in San Jose, California. Three such candidate projects have been identified with the focus on district cooling: the Thunderbird Golf Course Redevelopment site; an 8-block area of downtown San Jose east and north of the new convention center complex; and a block in the Rincon de Los Esteros District bounded by the Guadelupe River, Trimble Road, Component Drive, and North 1st Street. The downtown San Jose and Thunderbird potential projects consider a new central chiller plant in each case, while the Rincon district system considers the utilization of existing facilities' chilled water plants. The study assesses the potential cooling loads, develops in conceptual form the distribution system and central plant designs and implementation plans, and evaluates the system's economics in each case.

Not Available

1988-02-29

246

Feasibility Assessment of Data-Driven Models in Predicting Pollution Trends of Omerli Lake, Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data-driven models are commonly used in a wide range of disciplines, including environmental engineering. To analyze Omerli\\u000a Lake’s historic water pollution status, this study monitors data for dissolved oxygen, 5-day biochemical oxygen demand, ammonium\\u000a nitrogen, nitrite nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, and ortho phosphate. The quality of the lake water is assessed based on measurements\\u000a of dissolved oxygen. The collected data are

Atilla Akkoyunlu; Muhammed Ernur Akiner

2010-01-01

247

The Feasibility of Computerized Patient Self-assessment at Mental Health Clinics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  Improving the quality of care for severe mental illness (SMI) has been difficult because patients’ clinical information is\\u000a not readily available. Audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) supports data collection by asking patients waiting\\u000a for appointments clinical questions visually and aurally. It has improved outcomes for many disorders. While reliable and\\u000a accurate for SMI in research settings, this study assesses questions about

Matthew Chinman; Joseph Hassell; Jennifer Magnabosco; Nancy Nowlin-Finch; Susan Marusak; Alexander S. Young

2007-01-01

248

The feasibility of using cellular phones to collect ecological momentary assessment data: Application to alcohol consumption  

Microsoft Academic Search

The limitations of paper-and-pencil self-monitoring (PM) are leading to the use of more sophisticated techniques. PM was compared with cellular phone monitoring (CM) to collect ecological momentary assessment data on alcohol use. Twenty social drinkers were randomly assigned to the 2 groups, and their drinking was monitored for 14 days. PM participants recorded data on cards. CM participants carried telephones

R. Lorraine Collins; Todd B. Kashdan; Gernot Gollnisch

2003-01-01

249

The Feasibility of Using Cellular Phones to Collect Ecological Momentary Assessment Data: Application to Alcohol Consumption  

Microsoft Academic Search

The limitations of paper-and-pencil self-monitoring (PM) are leading to the use of more sophisticated techniques. PM was compared with cellular phone monitoring (CM) to collect ecological momentary assessment data on alcohol use. Twenty social drinkers were randomly assigned to the 2 groups, and their drinking was monitored for 14 days. PM participants recorded data on cards. CM participants carried telephones

R. Lorraine Collins; Todd B. Kashdan; Gernot Gollnisch

2003-01-01

250

Nurse-led implementation of the single assessment process in primary care: a descriptive feasibility study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: to determine the resources required to carry out the single assessment process in primary care. Design: prospective descriptive study. Setting: one urban primary care practice, Southampton. Participants: nine hundred and forty-four people aged 70+ years, registered with the practice, not living in a residential\\/ nursing home, or terminally ill. Intervention: participants were sent the six-item Sherbrooke questionnaire (case-finding tool).

HELEN C. ROBERTS; ZOE M. HEMSLEY; GWEN THOMAS; PHILIP MEAKINS; JACKIE POWELL; JUDY ROBISON

2006-01-01

251

ASSESSMENT SYSTEM FOR FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS OF NATIONAL R&D PROGRAMS: THE CASE OF KOREA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most assessments for R&D programs are conducted for on-going or finished programs. In order to streamline national R&D programs, Korean government is making a challenging attempt. It enacted a law for ex ante evaluation for national R&D programs and KISTEP, which specializes in evaluation and planning for R&D programs, took charge of the important role.KISTEP created and developed guidelines for

YOON BEEN LEE; JIYOUNG PARK

2011-01-01

252

ASSESSMENT OF NEAR-STREAM GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTION (GSI) OF A DEGRADED STREAM BEFORE RESTORATION  

EPA Science Inventory

In Fall 2001, EPA undertook an intensive collaborative research effort with the USGS and the Institute of Ecosystem Studies (IES) to evaluate the impact of restoration on water quality at a degraded stream in an urban watershed using a before/after stream restoration study design...

253

Technical Feasibility Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting on the Golden Gate Bridge  

SciTech Connect

Subsequent to preliminary investigations by the Golden Gate Bridge Highway & Transportation District (GGB), in coordination with Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), the GATEWAY Demonstration program was asked to evaluate the technical feasibility of replacing existing roadway lighting on the bridge with products utilizing LED technology. GGB and PG&E also indicated interest in induction (i.e., electrodeless fluorescent) technology, since both light source types feature rated lifetimes significantly exceeding those of the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) and low-pressure sodium (LPS) products. The goal of the study was to identify any solutions which would reduce energy use and maintenance without compromising the quantity or quality of existing illumination. Products used for roadway lighting on the historic bridge must be installed within the existing amber-lensed shoebox-style luminaire housings. It was determined that induction technology does not appear to represent a viable alternative for the roadway luminaires in this application; any energy savings would be attributable to a reduction in light levels. Although no suitable LED retrofit kits were identified for installation within existing luminaire housings, several complete LED luminaires were found to offer energy savings of 6-18%, suggesting custom LED retrofit kits could be developed to match or exceed the performance of the existing shoeboxes. Luminaires utilizing ceramic metal halide (CMH) were also evaluated, and some were found to offer 28% energy savings, but these products might actually increase maintenance due to the shorter rated lamp life. Plasma technology was evaluated, as well, but no suitable products were identified. Analysis provided in this report was completed in May 2012. Although LED technologies are expected to become increasingly viable over time, and product mock-ups may reveal near-term solutions, some options not currently considered by GGB may ultimately merit evaluation. For example, it would be preferable in terms of performance to simply replace existing luminaires (some of which may already be nearing end of life) with fully-integrated LED or CMH luminaires rather than replacing internal components. Among other benefits, this would allow reputable manufacturers to offer standard warranties for their products. Similarly, the amber lenses might be reformulated such that they do not render white light sources in a greenish cast, thereby allowing the use of off-the-shelf LED or CMH products. Last, it should be noted that the existing amber-lensed shoeboxes bear no daytime resemblance to the LPS luminaires originally used to light the roadway.

Tuenge, Jason R.

2012-09-01

254

Assessing feasibility of real-time ultrasound monitoring in stereotactic body radiotherapy of liver tumors.  

PubMed

To monitor tumor motion during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with liver cancer, an integrated ultrasound and kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (KV-CBCT) system has been proposed. The presence of an ultrasound probe may interfere with the radiation beams. The purpose of this study is to minimize this interference by altering orientations of the ultrasound probe and directions of radiation beams while not compromising the quality of SBRT plans. Ten patients, who received SBRT of liver cancer, were randomly selected for this study. To simulate the presence of an ultrasound probe, a virtual probe was oriented either parallel or vertical to the longitudinal axis of the patient's body and was added on the surface of the patient's body at the nearest location to the tumor. For both the parallel and vertical probe orientations, 2 new SBRT (Probe-Para and Probe-Vert) plans that minimize the interference between the probe and radiation beams were created for each patient. These SBRT plans were compared to the original clinically accepted SBRT plans, with a treatment goal of 37.5?Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 3 fractions. Specific dosimetric endpoints were evaluated, including doses to 95% (D95), of the PTV plan conformal index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and relevant endpoint doses to organs at risk. For 2 patients with superficially located tumors, no clinically acceptable SBRT plans could be produced without the interference between the probe and radiation beams. For the remaining 8 patients, the Probe-Para plans allowed 7 patients to be treated with coplanar radiation beams (without moving the treatment couch during treatment) and 1 patient to be treated with non-coplanar beams (by moving the treatment couch during treatment). The Probe-Vert plans allowed 2 patients to be treated with coplanar beams and 6 patients to be treated with non-coplanar beams. The average D95 of the PTV were 38.63?Gy ±?0.14 (? =?0.65) for Probe-Para plans, 38.48?Gy ±?0.31 (? =?0.33) for Probe-Vert plans, and 38.72?Gy ±?0.14 for clinical SBRT plans. There were no significant differences (p >?0.05) in CI and HI of all SBRT plans. The endpoint doses to the liver, heart, esophagus, right kidney, and stomach also had no significant differences (p?> 0.05). Except for superficial lesions, real-time ultrasound monitoring during liver SBRT is clinically feasible. Placing the ultrasound probe parallel to the longitudinal axis of the patient allows a greater probability of utilizing preferred coplanar beams. PMID:23369158

Zhong, Yahua; Stephans, Kevin; Qi, Peng; Yu, Naiching; Wong, John; Xia, Ping

2013-01-25

255

Computer Program for Assessing the Economic Feasibility of Solar Energy for Single-Family Residences and Light Commercial Applications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The technical feasibility of utilizing solar energy to meet domestic space heating and hot water loads for single family residences and light commercial applications has been clearly demonstrated. However, the economic feasibility is a complex problem req...

J. A. Forney D. Walker M. Lanier

1979-01-01

256

Installation Restoration Program (IRP) preliminary assessment of the 291st combat communications squadron. 291st combat communications squadron Hilo Air National Guard Station, Hawaii Air National Guard, Hilo, Hawaii. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The document identifies ANGRC attempt to assess possible installation restoration program sites at the station. The process involves research via personal interviews, record searches, review historic data, assessing `As Built Drawings`, Aerial photographs, and a site visit.

NONE

1995-01-01

257

MNA® Mini Nutritional Assessment as a nutritional screening tool for hospitalized older adults; rationales and feasibility.  

PubMed

The high prevalence of malnutrition in the growing population of older adults makes malnutrition screening critical, especially in hospitalized elderly patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of the MNA® Mini Nutritional Assessment in hospitalized older adults for rapid evaluation of nutritional risk. A prospective cohort study was made of 106 patients 65 years old or older admitted to an internal medicine ward of a tertiary-care teaching hospital to evaluate the use of the short form, or screening phase, of the MNA-SF. In the first 48 hours of admission, the full MNA questionnaire was administered and laboratory tests and a dermatologic evaluation were made. The MNA score showed that 77% of the patients were at risk of malnutrition or were frankly malnourished. Low blood levels of albumin, cholesterol and vitamins A and D showed a statistically significant association with malnutrition or risk of malnutrition. Separate evaluation of the MNA-SF showed that it was accurate, sensitive and had predictive value for the screening process. Routine use of the MNA-SF questionnaire by admission nurses to screen patients is recommended. Patients with MNA-SF scores of 11 or lower should be specifically assessed by the nutritional intervention team. PMID:23478714

Calvo, I; Olivar, J; Martínez, E; Rico, A; Díaz, J; Gimena, M

258

Approach and strategy for performing ecological risk assessments for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office Environmental Restoration Program. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to supplement exiting US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance for ecological risk assessment at hazardous waste sites by providing guidance that is more specific and more tailored to US Department of Energy sites than the guidance available from the EPA. However, it is a conceptual strategy document and does not include specific guidance on data, assumptions, and models. That detailed guidance is under development and will be presented in subsequent documents. Ecological risk assessments are equal to human health risk assessments in regulatory importance and can use many of the same data and some of the same estimation methods. However, they also have peculiar data needs and methods. Ecological risk assessments begin with an initial scoping phase, termed hazard definition, that characterizes the sources, the potentially environment, and the assessment endpoints. In the subsequent measurement and estimation phase, in which data are obtained concerning source of the endpoint biota to the contaminants and the effects of those exposures, and assumptions and models are used to relate the data to the desired exposure and effects parameters. Finally, in an integration phase, termed risk characterization, the various exposure and effects estimates are combined to infer the existence, cause, magnitude, and extent of effects of contaminants on the ecological endpoints. This phase is much more complicated for ecological risk assessments than for human health assessments because more types of data are available. Ecological risk assessments estimate effects using laboratory toxicity test results, like human health assessments, but also use results of ambient toxicity tests and biological surveys.

Suter, G.W. II; Redfearn, A.; White, R.K.; Shaw, R.A.

1992-07-01

259

Issues in design and analysis of a randomized clinical trial to assess the safety of dental amalgam restorations in children.  

PubMed

The Casa Pia Study of the Health Effects of Dental Amalgams in Children is a randomized clinical trial designed to assess the safety of low-level mercury exposure from dental amalgam restorations in children. It is being carried out in 507 students (8 to 12 years of age at enrollment) of the Casa Pia school system in Lisbon, Portugal, by an interdisciplinary collaborative research team from the University of Washington (Seattle) and the University of Lisbon, with funding from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. Since the goal of the trial is to assess the safety of a treatment currently in use, rather than the efficacy of an experimental treatment, unique design issues come into play. The requirements to identify as participants children who have extensive unmet dental treatment needs and who can be followed for 7 years after initial treatment are somewhat in conflict, since those with the most treatment needs are usually in lower socioeconomic categories and more difficult to track. The identification of a primary study outcome measure around which to design the trial is problematic, since there is little evidence to indicate how health effects from such low-level exposure would be manifested. The solution involves the use of multiple outcomes. Since there are concerns about safety, multiple interim comparisons over time between treatment groups are called for which, in conjunction with the use of multiple outcomes, require an extension of statistical methodology to meet this requirement. Ethical questions that have to be addressed include whether assent of the children participating is required or appropriate, and whether the director of the school system, who is the legal guardian for approximately 20% of the students who are wards of the state and live in school residences, should provide consent for such a large number of children. Approaches taken to address these and other design issues are described. PMID:12057882

DeRouen, Timothy A; Leroux, Brian G; Martin, Michael D; Townes, Brenda D; Woods, James S; Leitão, Jorge; Castro-Caldas, Alexandre; Braveman, Norman

2002-06-01

260

Rapid mass-transit system, Jakarta, Indonesia: Assessment of project feasibility. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The project involves the mass transit system being planned for the city of Jakarta and the metropolitan area known as JABOTABEK. A great demand for transportation services, heavily congested streets and roads and critical air pollution conditions require urgent attention to finding prudent and adequate solutions. In addition, the issue of long term funding sources also needs to be investigated to assure total implementation of current plans and future expansions. Along these lines a component of the Mission was to investigate the potential joint real estate development opportunities. Development was also to be reviewed as an important growth management tool to be implemented as an integral part of the transit system. The Definitional Mission was conducted for the purpose of assessing the mass transit system plans in the city of Jakarta.

Bravo, R.V.; Stevenson, R.R.

1992-03-01

261

Feasibility Assessment of Micro-Electrode Chip Assay as a Method of Detecting Neurotoxicity in vitro  

PubMed Central

Detection and characterization of chemically induced toxic effects in the nervous system represent a challenge for the hazard assessment of chemicals. In vivo, neurotoxicological assessments exploit the fact that the activity of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system has functional consequences. And so far, no in vitro method for evaluating the neurotoxic hazard has yet been validated and accepted for regulatory purpose. The micro-electrode array (MEA) assay consists of a culture chamber into which an integrated array of micro-electrodes is capable of measuring extracellular electrophysiology (spikes and bursts) from electro-active tissues. A wide variety of electrically excitable biological tissues may be placed onto the chips including primary cultures of nervous system tissue. Recordings from this type of in vitro cultured system are non-invasive, give label free evaluations and provide a higher throughput than conventional electrophysiological techniques. In this paper, 20 substances were tested in a blinded study for their toxicity and dose–response curves were obtained from fetal rat cortical neuronal networks coupled to MEAs. The experimental procedure consisted of evaluating the firing activity (spiking rate) and modification/reduction in response to chemical administration. Native/reference activity, 30?min of activity recording per dilution, plus the recovery points (after 24?h) were recorded. The preliminary data, using a set of chemicals with different mode-of-actions (13 known to be neurotoxic, 2 non-neuroactive and not toxic, and 5 non-neuroactive but toxic) show good predictivity (sensitivity: 0.77; specificity: 0.86; accuracy: 0.85). Thus, the MEA with a neuronal network has the potency to become an effective tool to evaluate the neurotoxicity of substances in vitro.

Defranchi, Enrico; Novellino, Antonio; Whelan, Maurice; Vogel, Sandra; Ramirez, Tzutzuy; van Ravenzwaay, Ben; Landsiedel, Robert

2011-01-01

262

Utility and feasibility of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (MSK US) in rheumatology practice in Canada: needs assessment.  

PubMed

The utility of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSK US) is being extensively explored and evaluated amongst European rheumatologists. However, utilization of MSK US by rheumatologists in Canada is much less common. This study aimed to evaluate the current use of MSK US in Canadian rheumatology practice, to determine beliefs and attitudes towards MSK US, and to determine factors that may encourage or limit its use. A 13-question needs assessment questionnaire was developed. All Canadian rheumatologists were invited via e-mail to participate in the survey. The overall response rate was 156/470 (33%). Fifty-one percent of participants used MSK US in their clinical practice. Lack of training appeared to be the main obstacle to its current use. Eighty-three percent believed that MSK US should be performed by rheumatologists and expressed a willingness to learn the technique. Skills offering greatest clinical utility were the assessment of inflammatory arthritis in small joints (i.e., hands (metacarpophalyngeal and proximal interphalangeal joints), wrists, feet (metatarsophalyngeal), shoulders, and ankles. Limited available time, equipment costs, and difficulties with billing were the main obstacles to MSK US utilization in the clinical setting. There is a great level of interest in learning and applying MSK US in Canadian rheumatology practice. The balance between added clinical value and lack of remuneration, equipment associated costs, and time to complete training is the major limiting factor influencing rheumatologists' willingness to take on MSK US. Training programs must be relevant to rheumatologists' needs before MSK US will be adopted into routine clinical practice in Canada. PMID:21484225

Larché, Maggie J; McDonald-Blumer, Heather; Bruns, Alessandra; Roth, Johannes; Khy, Visithan; de Brum-Fernandes, Artur J; Wakefield, Richard J; Brown, Andrew K; Bykerk, Vivian

2011-04-12

263

Sealed restorations: 5-year results.  

PubMed

This clinical study determined the feasibility of a sealed resin composite restoration to arrest dental caries using a minimal tooth preparation: a bevel in enamel only without removal of the carious lesion. These ultra-conservative sealed composite restorations placed over caries (CompS/C) were compared with ultra-conservative sealed amalgam restorations (AGS) that had no "extension for prevention". The CompS/C restorations were also compared with the traditional (unsealed) amalgam restorations (AGU) with the "extension for prevention" outline form. Caries progress, as determined by standardized radiographs, revealed that after 5 years caries remained arrested under the CompS/C restorations; the marginal integrity was similar for the CompS/C and the AGS groups, and exhibited highly significant superiority to the AGU restorations (Chi square, P less than = 0.00004). Complete sealant retention over the amalgam restorations (AGS group) was less than over the composite restorations (CompS/C), and conversely, partial sealant retention was higher for the AGS group. Sealants also appeared to protect the posterior composite restorations against wear. PMID:1524744

Mertz-Fairhurst, E J; Richards, E E; Williams, J E; Smith, C D; Mackert, J R; Schuster, G S; Sherrer, J D; O'Dell, N L; Pierce, K L; Wenner, K K

1992-02-01

264

Feasibility assessment of optical technologies for reliable high capacity feeder links  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Space telecom scenarios like data relay satellite and broadband/broadcast service providers require reliable feeder links with high bandwidth/data rate for the communication between ground station and satellite. Free space optical communication (FSOC) is an attractive alternative to microwave links, improving performance by offering abundant bandwidth at small apertures of the optical terminals. At the same time Near-Earth communication by FSOC avoids interference with other services and is free of regulatory issues. The drawback however is the impairment by the laser propagation through the atmosphere at optical wavelengths. Also to be considered are questions of eye safety for ground personnel and aviation. In this paper we assess the user requirements for typical space telecom scenarios and compare these requirements with solutions using optical data links through the atmosphere. We suggest a site diversity scheme with a number of ground stations and a switching scheme using two optical terminals on-board the satellite. Considering the technology trade-offs between four different optical wavelengths we recommend the future use of 1.5 µm laser technology and calculate a link budget for an atmospheric condition of light haze on the optical path. By comparing link budgets we show an outlook to the future potential use of 10 µm laser technology.

Witternigg, Norbert; Schönhuber, Michael; Leitgeb, Erich; Plank, Thomas

2013-08-01

265

Understanding and assessing the feasibility of ocean iron fertilization to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Regardless of the strategy for fossil fuel use, atmospheric CO2 is predicted to increase and then decrease such that after 10,000 years, levels will still be much higher than pre-industrial. The objectives of geoengineering CO2 reduction techniques are to reduce the rate of CO2 increase and the height of the CO2 peak. Because the oceans represent such a large reservoir of carbon, small perturbations of the system could cause large changes to carbon flows. The objective of ocean carbon sequestration would be to encourage the oceans to take up carbon at a faster rate than they currently do but with predictable and acceptable consequences. From iron addition experiments in the laboratory and in the open ocean and from studies where there are natural additions of iron to the ocean several conclusions can be drawn. Relief of iron stress increases the biomass of marine phytoplankton and as a consequence reduces surface water CO2. This leads to increased export of carbon from the upper ocean and probably enhanced sequestration in the deep ocean. However, the experiments were not planned from the perspective of geoengineering and conclusions about the potential of this approach as a means of reducing atmospheric CO2 have large uncertainties. In addition, few experiments have addressed the unintended consequences of deliberate additions. This has been a major focus of recent discussion of a risk assessment framework for experimentation by the London Convention and London Protocol. Given the uncertainties, there is an urgent requirement to carry out more studies on ocean iron fertilization with three clear objectives 1: To develop coupled global scale computation models so that predictions can become more reliable and so that in situ experiments are effective. 2: To carry out experiments on a sufficiently large scale and duration to determine the extent, efficiencies and time scales of carbon sequestration. 3: To explore the consequences of ocean iron fertilization, and not just carbon uptake from the atmosphere and sequestration in the deep ocean. The ISIS consortium (In Situ Iron Studies) of 13 institutions worldwide was formed in 2011 specifically to promote such studies so that informed decisions will be possible in the future. The mission statement is: "To resolve the impact of iron fertilization on marine ecosystems, to quantify its potential for removal of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and to improve our collective understanding of the changing ocean."

Buesseler, K.; Lampitt, R. S.; de Baar, H. J.; Blain, S.; Chai, F.; Coale, K. H.; Dai, M.; Karl, D. M.; Leinen, M.; Lohan, M. C.; Rothstein, L.; Trull, T. W.; Whaley, D.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Zhou, M.

2011-12-01

266

Voice restoration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surgical prosthetic voice restoration is the best possible option for patients to regain oral communication after total laryngectomy. It is considered to be the present “gold standard” for voice rehabilitation of laryngectomized individuals. Surgical prosthetic voice restoration, in essence, is always achievable in patients fit enough to tolerate total laryngectomy and motivated to regain optimal oral communication. Surgical prosthetic voice

F. J. M. Hilgers; A. J. M. Balm; Brekel van den M. W. M; I. B. Tan

2010-01-01

267

Shoreline assessment and oil removal; ADEC in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Restoration Project. Final report restoration project 94266b  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 1994, a five person crew from the village of Chenega under the direction of an on site manager from the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation conducted manual treatment, debris and rebar removal and ground surveys at 11 subdivisions in Prince William Sound. Fourteen sites within 4 different shoreline subdivisions with persistent surface asphalt were manually treated to accelerate natural degradation. Removal of flagging and other miscellaneous shoreline debris left by cleanup and damage assessment crews was undertaken as possible. Six additional shoreline subdivisions near the village of Chenega were assessed because of the ongoing concern for subsistence and recreational resources within close proximity to the village. A comparison of the sites from 1993 to 1994 showed that little to no improvement had occurred at these sites.

Munson, D.R.

1996-03-01

268

Assessing the health and development of ART-conceived young adults: A study of feasibility, parent recall, and acceptability  

PubMed Central

Background Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) to treat infertility have been available for nearly three decades. There have been a number of systematic comparisons of the health and development of ART-conceived with spontaneously-conceived (SC) children. Data are equivocal, some finding no differences and others that there are more health and developmental problems in the ART group. It is agreed that perinatal mortality and morbidity are worse after assisted than spontaneous conception and the impact of the hormonally altered intrauterine environment on puberty and later fertility of offspring are unknown. To date however, there has been no investigation of the health and development of ART-conceived young adults, including from the world's few prospective cohorts of ART conceived children. Obtaining these data requires contact to be made with people at least twenty years after discharge from the treating service. Given the ethical difficulties of approaching families to participate in research up to two decades after cessation of treatment, the aim of this exploratory qualitative investigation was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of approaching mothers treated for infertility prior to 1988, and their recall of the health and development of their ART-conceived young adult children. Methods Mothers treated for infertility at the Royal Women's Hospital Reproductive Biology Unit in Melbourne, Australia prior to 1988 were approached by a senior clinician and invited to participate in individual semi-structured interviews which could include their partners and/or young adult children if they wished. Recruitment continued until theoretic saturation had been reached. Results Ten mothers, two of their husbands and five young adults participated in interviews, and the health and development of 15 ART-conceived young adults were described. The experience of conception, pregnancy, birth and the health and development of the children were recalled vividly and in detail. Families were pleased to have been approached and supported the need for systematic data collection. Mode of conception had been disclosed from childhood to all the offspring. Conclusion With careful and sensitive recruitment strategies it is feasible and acceptable to contact women treated for infertility at least two decades ago and their families, to assess the health and development of ART-conceived young adults.

Fisher, Jane RW; Hammarberg, Karin; Baker, HW Gordon; McBain, John C

2008-01-01

269

Assessment of channel dynamics, in-stream structures and post-project channel adjustments in North Carolina and its implications to effective stream restoration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Site assessment and monitoring data were analyzed for 26 stream restoration projects in North Carolina where the channel was\\u000a reconfigured. Post-project changes in channel capacity were highly variable from site to site, but more than 60% of the projects\\u000a underwent, on average at a given site, at least a 20% change in channel capacity. An analysis of site and basin

Jerry R. Miller; R. Craig Kochel

2010-01-01

270

Use of conjoint analysis to assess HIV vaccine acceptability: feasibility of an innovation in the assessment of consumer health-care preferences  

PubMed Central

Summary Engaging consumers in prospectively shaping strategies for dissemination of health-care innovations may help to ensure acceptability. We examined the feasibility of using conjoint analysis to assess future HIV vaccine acceptability among three diverse communities: a multiethnic sample in Los Angeles, CA, USA (n = 143); a Thai resident sample in Los Angeles (three groups; n = 27) and an Aboriginal peoples sample in Toronto (n = 13). Efficacy had the greatest impact on acceptability for all three groups, followed by cross-clade protection, side-effects and duration of protection in the Los Angeles sample; side-effects and duration of protection in the Thai-Los Angeles sample; and number of doses and duration of protection in the Aboriginal peoples-Toronto sample. Conjoint analysis provided insights into universal and population-specific preferences among diverse end users of future HIV vaccines, with implications for evidence-informed targeting of dissemination efforts to optimize vaccine uptake.

Lee, S J; Newman, P A; Comulada, W S; Cunningham, W E; Duan, N

2012-01-01

271

Sonographic Assessment of Axillary Lymph Nodes After a Mammographically Recommended Breast Sonogram for Women 55 Years and Older: A Feasibility Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sonographic guidelines have been provided for assessing lymph nodes both in the axilla and other areas of the body. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using sonography and Doppler to provide diagnostic nodal information for women 55 years and older. The authors conducted a retrospective longitudinal study of a group of women 55 years and

Kevin D. Evans; Xiaobai Li; Suzanne R. Robertson; Ashley M. Boyd; Michael Knopp

2007-01-01

272

Multiple sclerosis in Stockholm County. A pilot study exploring the feasibility of assessment of impairment, disability and handicap by home visits  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: A pilot study performed within Stockholm County to evaluate the feasibility of collecting data using a comprehensive evaluation package administered in the home environment to assess impairment, disability and handicap in order to explore the consequences of multiple sclerosis (MS). Design: Home visits to 26 purposefully selected MS patients with different levels of disability, in both ordinary and sheltered

U Einarsson; K Gottberg; S Fredrikson; G Bergendal; L von Koch; L Widén Holmqvist

2003-01-01

273

Feasibility of mitral flow assessment by echo-contrast ultrasound, part II: experimental study on a mechanical model of the left heart  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feasibility of assessing mitral flow by means of ultrasonic monitoring of backscattered power from an echo-contrast agent in the left atrium and left ventricle was studied. A mechanical model of the left heart was built in which two thin rubber balloons connected to each other in a feedback loop via two artificial heart valves mimicked the left atrium and

Bronislav Herman; Shmuel Einav; Zvi Vered

2000-01-01

274

Assessing the Acceptability and Feasibility of a School-Located Influenza Vaccination Program with Third-Party Billing in Elementary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study qualitatively assesses the acceptability and feasibility of a school-located vaccination for influenza (SLIV) project that was conducted in New York State in 2009-2011, from the perspectives of project participants with different roles. Fourteen in-depth semistructured interviews with participating schools' personnel and the mass…

Christensen, Julie J.; Humiston, Sharon G.; Long, Christine E.; Kennedy, Allison M.; DiMattia, Kimberly; Kolasa, Maureen S.

2012-01-01

275

Technical Feasibility of Reporting YITS 2010 Skill Assessment Results on the PISA 2000 Reading Scale. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 69  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines the feasibility of reporting scores of a test based on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2000 instrument that was administered to a sample of 25-year-old Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) respondents on the PISA scale. Each of these respondents also participated in PISA 2000. The study examines the…

Cartwright, Fernando

2012-01-01

276

Feasibility Assessment of Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants  

SciTech Connect

Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MW) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MW) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in an appendix. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

Douglas G. Hall

2006-01-01

277

Assessment of atrial regional and global electromechanical function by tissue velocity echocardiography: a feasibility study on healthy individuals  

PubMed Central

Background The appropriate evaluation of atrial electrical function is only possible by means of invasive electrophysiology techniques, which are expensive and therefore not suitable for widespread use. Mechanical atrial function is mainly determined from atrial volumes and volume-derived indices that are load-dependent, time-consuming and difficult to reproduce because they are observer-dependent. Aims To assess the feasibility of tissue velocity echocardiography (TVE) to evaluate atrial electromechanical function in young, healthy volunteers. Subjects and methods We studied 37 healthy individuals: 28 men and nine women with a mean age of 29 years (range 20–47). Standard two-dimensional (2-D) and Doppler echocardiograms with superimposed TVE images were performed. Standard echocardiographic images were digitized during three consecutive cardiac cycles in cine-loop format for off-line analysis. Several indices of regional atrial electrical and mechanical function were derived from both 2-D and TVE modalities. Results Some TVE-derived variables indirectly reflected the atrial electrical activation that follows the known activation process as revealed by invasive electrophysiology. Regionally, the atrium shows an upward movement of its walls at the region near the atrio-ventricular ring with a reduction of this movement towards the upper levels of the atrial walls. The atrial mechanical function as assessed by several TVE-derived indices was quite similar in all left atrium (LA) walls. However, all such indices were higher in the right (RA) than the LA. There were no correlations between the 2-D- and TVE-derived variables expressing atrial mechanical function. Values of measurement error and repeatability were good for atrial mechanical function, but only acceptable for atrial electrical function. Conclusion TVE may provide a simple, easy to obtain, reproducible, repeatable and potentially clinically useful tool for quantifying atrial electromechanical function.

Quintana, Miguel; Lindell, Peter; Saha, Samir K; del Furia, Francesca; Lind, Britta; Govind, Satish; Brodin, Lars-Ake

2005-01-01

278

Real-time risk assessment in seismic early warning and rapid response: a feasibility study in Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquake early warning systems (EEWS) are considered to be an effective, pragmatic, and viable tool for seismic risk reduction in cities. While standard EEWS approaches focus on the real-time estimation of an earthquake's location and magnitude, innovative developments in EEWS include the capacity for the rapid assessment of damage. Clearly, for all public authorities that are engaged in coordinating emergency activities during and soon after earthquakes, real-time information about the potential damage distribution within a city is invaluable. In this work, we present a first attempt to design an early warning and rapid response procedure for real-time risk assessment. In particular, the procedure uses typical real-time information (i.e., P-wave arrival times and early waveforms) derived from a regional seismic network for locating and evaluating the size of an earthquake, information which in turn is exploited for extracting a risk map representing the potential distribution of damage from a dataset of predicted scenarios compiled for the target city. A feasibility study of the procedure is presented for the city of Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan, which is surrounded by the Kyrgyz seismic network by mimicking the ground motion associated with two historical events that occurred close to Bishkek, namely the 1911 Kemin ( M = 8.2; ±0.2) and the 1885 Belovodsk ( M = 6.9; ±0.5) earthquakes. Various methodologies from previous studies were considered when planning the implementation of the early warning and rapid response procedure for real-time risk assessment: the Satriano et al. (Bull Seismol Soc Am 98(3):1482-1494, 2008) approach to real-time earthquake location; the Caprio et al. (Geophys Res Lett 38:L02301, 2011) approach for estimating moment magnitude in real time; the EXSIM method for ground motion simulation (Motazedian and Atkinson, Bull Seismol Soc Am 95:995-1010, 2005); the Sokolov (Earthquake Spectra 161: 679-694, 2002) approach for estimating intensity from Fourier amplitude spectra; and the Tyagunov et al. (Nat Hazard Earth Syst Sci 6:573-586, 2006) approach for risk computation. Innovatively, all these methods are jointly applied to assess in real time the seismic risk of a particular target site, namely the city of Bishkek. Finally, the site amplification and vulnerability datasets considered in the proposed methodology are taken from previous studies, i.e., Parolai et al. (Bull Seismol Soc Am, 2010) and Bindi et al. (Soil Dyn Earthq Eng, 2011), respectively.

Picozzi, M.; Bindi, D.; Pittore, M.; Kieling, K.; Parolai, S.

2013-04-01

279

Assessing the reduction of the hydrological connectivity of gully systems through vegetation restoration: field experiments and numerical modelling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Restoration of degraded land in the Southern Ecuadorian Andes has led to alterations in the functioning of degraded catchments. Recovery of vegetation on areas affected by overgrazing, as well as the reforestation or afforestation of gully areas have given rise to modifications of hydrological connectivity within the catchments. Recent research has highlighted the ability of gully channels to trap sediment eroded from steep slopes, especially if vegetation is established along the gully bed. However, vegetation cover not only induces sediment deposition in the gully bed, but may also have a potential to reduce runoff water volume. The performance of gully beds in reducing the transfer of runoff was investigated by conducting controlled concentrated flow experiments in the field. Experimental field data for nine gullies were derived by pouring concentrated inflow into the upstream end and measuring the outflow at the downstream end of the channel. Two consecutive flow experiments per gully were carried out, so that data for dry and wet soil conditions were collected. The hydrological response to concentrated flow was estimated for each experiment by calculating its cumulative infiltration coefficient, IC (%). The results showed a great difference in IC between dry and wet soil conditions. The IC for wet soil conditions was on average 24%, whereas it was 60% for dry conditions. Gullies with more than 50% surface vegetation cover exhibit the highest cumulative infiltration coefficients (81% for dry runs, and 34% for wet runs), but runoff transmission losses were not as clearly related to vegetation cover as sediment storage as shown in Molina et al. (2009). The experimental field data of 16 experiments were used to calibrate a hydrological model developed by Fiener and Auerswald (2005) in order to simulate the transfer of concentrated flow along the gully beds. The calibrated model was able to simulate the transfer of runoff water well, as the error on the simulated total outflow volumes is below 13% for 15 out of 16 cases. However, predicting infiltration amounts is difficult: the high sensitivity of model results to some crucial hydraulic parameters (runoff width, hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity) is one of the reasons why the relationships between model parameter values and gully features are relatively weak. The results obtained from the field experiments show that gully systems are key elements in the hydrological connectivity of degraded landscapes. The transfer of overland flow and sediment from the slopes towards the river system highly depends on the presence/absence of vegetation in the gully beds and should therefore be accounted for in assessments of landscape degradation and/or recovery.

Molina, A.; Govers, G.; van den Putte, A.; Poesen, J.; Vanacker, V.

2009-10-01

280

Diffusive flux of selenium between lake sediment and overlying water: Assessing restoration alternatives for the Salton Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elevated concentrations of selenium are a concern for humans and wildlife at the Salton Sea, a large salt lake in the desert of southeastern California. As the lake is highly eutrophic and has become too saline for most fish, various restoration alternatives have been proposed. These would alter the water quality, volume, depth, and surface area of the Salton Sea

Earl R. Byron; Harry M. Ohlendorf

2007-01-01

281

Damage assessment in townships using VHSR data; The effect of Operation Murambatsvina \\/ Restore Order in Harare, Zimbabwe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Operation Murambatsvina, also known as Operation Restore Order, has been a country wide operation carried out by the Zimbabwean Government of forced mass evictions, the demolition of homes and informal businesses. This paper presents first steps towards a transferable and robust change analysis approach for detecting and quantifying damages. The method used for damage detection combines object-based image analysis and

Elisabeth Schöpfer; Dirk Tiede; Stefan Lang; Peter Zeil

2007-01-01

282

FROM RESTORING FLORIDA'S EVERGLADES TO ASSESSING OUR NATION'S ECOLOGICAL CONDITION: SCIENCE PROVIDES THE BASIS FOR UNDERSTANDING AND POLICY  

EPA Science Inventory

Based on first hand experiences, Dr. Fontaine will provide a personal and insightful look at major environmental research and restoration programs he has been involved in. Starting with a visual tour through the Florida Everglades and a discussion of the $12 B science-based rest...

283

A study to assess the feasibility of undertaking a randomized controlled trial of adherence with eye drops in glaucoma patients  

PubMed Central

Background Adherence with therapy could influence the progression of glaucoma and ultimately affect the onset of visual impairment in some individuals. This feasibility study evaluated the measures to be used for a future randomized controlled trial assessing the effects of group-based education on adherence with eye drops. Methods People diagnosed with glaucoma within the previous 12 months attending a regional ophthalmology clinic in the North West of England were recruited. A two-session education program delivered one week apart had been devised as part of a previous project. A combined adult learning and health needs approach to education was taken. Outcomes measured were knowledge of glaucoma, self-report of adherence, illness perception, beliefs about medicines, patient enablement, and general health (Short Form-12). Adherence was also measured objectively using a Medical Events Monitoring System device. Results Twenty-six participants consented to undertake the educational program and 19 produced analyzable data. Knowledge of glaucoma, illness perception, beliefs about medicine, and patient enablement all showed statistically significant improvements after education. Mean adherence with eye drops was maintained above 85% before and for 3 months after attendance at the educational program. Self-report exaggerated adherence by at least 10% when compared with the objective Medical Events Monitoring System data, and in fact the kappa agreement was zero. Conclusion All questionnaires other than the Short Form-12 were considered to be valuable measures and use of a Medical Events Monitoring System device was considered to be an objective surrogate measure for adherence with eye drops. A multicenter, randomized, controlled equivalence trial of group versus individualized education using adherence as the primary outcome is the next step.

Richardson, Cliff; Brunton, Lisa; Olleveant, Nicola; Henson, David B; Pilling, Mark; Mottershead, Jane; Fenerty, Cecilia H; Spencer, Anne Fiona; Waterman, Heather

2013-01-01

284

Sealed restorations: 4-year results.  

PubMed

The overall objective of this clinical study was to determine the feasibility of using a sealed composite restoration to arrest caries. This objective was to be achieved using minimal tooth preparation for Class I lesions, without the traditional Class I cavity preparation and without the removal of the carious lesion. The minimal tooth preparation consisted of no [corrected] removal of the carious lesion, bevel in enamel only, and usually not requiring any anesthetic injection. These ultra-conservative sealed composite restorations placed over caries (CompS/C) were compared with ultra-conservative sealed amalgam restorations (AGS) and with the traditional (unsealed) amalgam restorations (AGU). This study showed that: 1) caries is arrested under the CompS/C restoration for a period of 4 years; 2) sealant retention is similar in both the CompS/C and the AGS groups; 3) the marginal integrity of the AGS restorations is markedly superior to that of the AGU restorations; and 4) sealant appears to prevent wear of posterior composite restorations. PMID:2003895

Mertz-Fairhurst, E J; Williams, J E; Pierce, K L; Smith, C D; Schuster, G S; Mackert, J R; Sherrer, J D; Wenner, K K; Richards, E E; Davis, Q B

1991-02-01

285

Feasibility of an intracranial EEG-fMRI protocol at 3T: risk assessment and image quality.  

PubMed

Integrating intracranial EEG (iEEG) with functional MRI (iEEG-fMRI) may help elucidate mechanisms underlying the generation of seizures. However, the introduction of iEEG electrodes in the MR environment has inherent risk and data quality implications that require consideration prior to clinical use. Previous studies of subdural and depth electrodes have confirmed low risk under specific circumstances at 1.5T and 3T. However, no studies have assessed risk and image quality related to the feasibility of a full iEEG-fMRI protocol. To this end, commercially available platinum subdural grid/strip electrodes (4×5 grid or 1×8 strip) and 4 or 6-contact depth electrodes were secured to the surface of a custom-made phantom mimicking the conductivity of the human brain. Electrode displacement, temperature increase of electrodes and surrounding phantom material, and voltage fluctuations in electrode contacts were measured in a GE Discovery MR750 3T MR scanner during a variety of imaging sequences, typical of an iEEG-fMRI protocol. An electrode grid was also used to quantify the spatial extent of susceptibility artifact. The spatial extent of susceptibility artifact in the presence of an electrode was also assessed for typical imaging parameters that maximize BOLD sensitivity at 3T (TR=1500 ms; TE=30 ms; slice thickness=4mm; matrix=64×64; field-of-view=24 cm). Under standard conditions, all electrodes exhibited no measurable displacement and no clinically significant temperature increase (<1°C) during scans employed in a typical iEEG-fMRI experiment, including 60 min of continuous fMRI. However, high SAR sequences, such as fast spin-echo (FSE), produced significant heating in almost all scenarios (>2.0°C) that in some cases exceeded 10°C. Induced voltages in the frequency range that could elicit neuronal stimulation (<10 kHz) were well below the threshold of 100 mV. fMRI signal intensity was significantly reduced within 20mm of the electrodes for the imaging parameters used in this study. Thus, for the conditions tested, a full iEEG-fMRI protocol poses a low risk at 3T; however, fMRI sensitivity may be reduced immediately adjacent to the electrodes. In addition, high SAR sequences must be avoided. PMID:22902923

Boucousis, Shannon M; Beers, Craig A; Cunningham, Cameron J B; Gaxiola-Valdez, Ismael; Pittman, Daniel J; Goodyear, Bradley G; Federico, Paolo

2012-08-10

286

Annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for FY 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of the investigations and monitoring, conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented can be used to develop a conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. Groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface water monitoring results are described.

Clapp, R.B. (ed.)

1992-09-01

287

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek in Association with Restoration Effors; US Geological Survey Reports, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective was to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the third year of at least a five-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Munz, Carrie S. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

2006-02-01

288

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1914. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for future genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the first year of a three-year study, this report is restricted to describing our work on the first two objectives only.

Connolly, Patrick J. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

2003-01-01

289

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the second year of at least a three-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

Connolly, Patrick J. (US Geological Survey, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Western Fisheries Research Center, Cook, WA)

2003-12-01

290

Report to the Government of Jamaica coal feasibility study and financing plan. Phase 2, volume 2, appendix A. Associated environmental impact assessment. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The report shows the results of a study conducted to determine the feasibility of an oil-to-coal conversion program for Jamaica`s major energy consuming facilities. This report, which is Phase II of the study, prepares the specifications for the principal equipment and develops financing and implementation plans for the project. This is Volume 2 and it contains the Appendix-Associated Environmental Impact Assessment.

NONE

1983-09-01

291

Single-Well-Gas-Sparging Tests for Assessing the Feasibility of In-situ Aerobic Treatment of CAH Mixtures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Single-well-gas-sparge tests were performed to assess the feasibility of in-situ aerobic cometabolism of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs), such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), using propane and methane as growth substrates. The tests were performed in the saturate zone at the McClellan Air Force Base, CA. The effectiveness of gas sparging to stimulate indigenous propane-utilizers or methane-utilizers was evaluated in standard monitoring wells. Transport characteristics of dissolved solutes [sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 or bromide (tracer), propane or methane (growth substrate), ethylene, propylene (nontoxic surrogates to probe for CAH transformation activity), and dissolved oxygen], were evaluated by push-pull transport tests. Mass balance showed about 90% of the injected bromide and about 80% of the injected SF6 were recovered, and the recoveries of other solutes were comparable with bromide and SF6. The transport tests demonstrated that bromide and SF6 could be used as conservative tracers for biological activity tests and that little loss of the dissolved gaseous substrates prior to biostimulation occurred. The dissolved gases were also conservatively transported indicating negligible trapped gas was present in the aquifer prior to sparging. A series of gas-sparging biostimulation tests were performed by sparging propane-(or methane)-oxygen-argon-SF6 gas mixture at specific depth intervals using a "straddle" packer. Temporal groundwater samples were obtained from the injection well under natural gradient "drift" conditions. Biostimulation was demonstrated with repeated gas sparging tests where the time to deplete methane and propane concentrations decreased compared to SF6. Gas sparging activity tests were performed using the same procedures as the gas-sparging biostimulation tests, except that ethylene and propylene were included in the sparging gas mixtures. Propane (or methane) utilization, DO consumption, and ethylene and propylene cometabolism were well demonstrated. The stimulated propane- and methane-utilizers cometabolized ethylene and propylene to produce ethylene oxide and propylene oxide as cometabolic by-products. The results confirmed the biostimulation of indigenous microorganisms with cometabolism ability. When acetylene was included in the sparge gas mixture, propane and methane utilization and ethylene and propylene transformation were effectively blocked, indicating monooxygenase enzymes were involved

Kim, Y.; Istok, J.; Semprini, L.

2002-12-01

292

Natural restoration  

SciTech Connect

After a company pays millions of dollars to clean up contaminated site, its liability may not be over. It may have to spend tens of millions more to restore damaged natural resources under an oft-overlooked Superfund program. Examples of liability are cited in this report from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a pcb leak which contaminated a harbor.

Kamlet, K.S.

1993-02-01

293

Assessment of the feasibility of utilizing Landsat for detection and monitoring of landfills in a statewide GIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Use of satellite data could be beneficial and cost effective in detecting and monitoring landfills in a state-wide geographic information system (GIS). To assure the feasibility of this approach, multitemporal Landsat data were used to detect several selected active and inactive landfills in central and southwest Missouri. The landfills were visually delineated from aerial photography of approximately the same two

E. Johnson; M. Klein; K. Mickus

1993-01-01

294

Feasibility, validity and reliability of the plank isometric hold as a field-based assessment of torso muscular endurance for children 8-12 years of age.  

PubMed

This project examined the feasibility, validity, and reliability of the plank isometric hold for children 8-12 years of age. 1502 children (52.5% female) performed partial curl-up and/or plank protocols to assess plank feasibility (n = 823, 52.1% girls), validity (n = 641, 54.1% girls) and reliability (n = 111, 47.8% girls). 12% (n = 52/431) of children could not perform a partial curl-up, but virtually all children (n = 1066/1084) could attain a nonzero score for the plank. Plank performance without time limit was influenced by small effects with age (? = 6.86; p < .001, ?(2) = 0.03), flexibility (? = 0.79; p < .001, ?(2) = 0.03), and medium effects with cardiovascular endurance (? = 1.07; p < .001, ?(2) = 0.08), and waist circumference (? = -0.92; p < .001, ?(2) = 0.06). Interrater (ICC = 0.62; CI = 0.50, 0.75), intra-rater (ICC = 0.83; CI = 0.73, 0.90) and test-retest (ICC = 0.63; CI = 0.46, 0.75) reliability were acceptable for the plank without time limit. These data suggest the plank without time limit is a feasible, valid and reliable assessment of torso muscular endurance for children 8-12 years of age. PMID:23877226

Boyer, Charles; Tremblay, Mark; Saunders, Travis J; McFarlane, Allison; Borghese, Michael; Lloyd, Meghann; Longmuir, Pat

2013-07-12

295

Assessing the acceptability and feasibility of a school-located influenza vaccination program with third-party billing in elementary schools.  

PubMed

This study qualitatively assesses the acceptability and feasibility of a school-located vaccination for influenza (SLIV) project that was conducted in New York State in 2009-2011, from the perspectives of project participants with different roles. Fourteen in-depth semistructured interviews with participating schools' personnel and the mass vaccinator were tape-recorded and transcribed. Interviewees were randomly selected from stratified lists and included five principals, five school nurses, two school administrators, and two lead personnel from the mass vaccinator. A content analysis of transcripts from the interviews was completed and several themes emerged. All participants generally found the SLIV project acceptable. School personnel and the vaccinator viewed the SLIV project process as feasible and beneficial. However, the vaccinator identified difficulties with third-party billing as a potential threat to sustainability. PMID:22786984

Christensen, Julie J; Humiston, Sharon G; Long, Christine E; Kennedy, Allison M; Dimattia, Kimberly; Kolasa, Maureen S

2012-07-11

296

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; Underwood Conservation District, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect

The White Salmon River Watershed Enhancement Project (WSRWEP) began in 1993 through efforts of the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), local stakeholders and various agencies. Early accomplishments of the project included the formation of a multi-stakeholder watershed management committee (WMC) and technical advisory committee (TAC), completion of several baseline assessments, drafting of a watershed management plan, and beginning implementation of the plan. Since inception, the effort has utilized the support of various government/private grants, and local in-kind contributions to accomplish project goals. The WMC and its partners utilize a four-pronged approach for achieving watershed enhancement: on-ground restoration, extension of technical and financial assistance to cooperators, community and environmental education, and assessment/monitoring to develop strategies and track the success of ongoing work. Project activities are generally targeted to sub-basins and stream reaches within the White Salmon watershed that exhibit important water quality and fish/wildlife habitat problems. Such project prioritization is being conducted with the active input of both the White Salmon WMC and TAC. An important current phase of the WSRWEP targets detailed monitoring and assessment of the Rattlesnake Creek sub-basin, and is the focus of this report. The 'Assessment of Rattlesnake Creek in Relation to Restoration Efforts' project (BPA Project ID Number 21009) was identified and prioritized for accomplishment by the White Salmon River TAC in January of 2000. Rationale for the project stemmed from the group's realization that Condit Dam on the lower White Salmon is scheduled for removal, or fish passage retrofitting, within the near future. Given this eventuality, the TAC identified the current lack of understanding regarding both potential anadromous habitat and existing native fish and habitat conditions above Condit Dam (RM 3.2) as an important need. In response to the TAC's determination, the US Geological Survey (USGS), Yakama Nation (YN) and UCD began work to develop the current project that is intended to address the above. The overall goal of the Rattlesnake Creek assessment is to document existing riparian habitat and water quality conditions, native fish populations, and future restoration sites before future return of anadromous fish to the basin above RM 3.2. Since the project is jointly enacted by the USGS, YN and UCD, a high degree of shared planning and joint implementation is applied during completion of tasks. In general, the USGS and YN are cooperatively working to monitor and assess fish populations and riparian habitat conditions within the drainage and adjacent sections of the White Salmon. The UCD is generally responsible for assessing water quality, mapping stream channel geomorphology to enable future restoration planning, and measuring the ratios of carbon and nitrogen isotopes at various trophic levels The remainder of this report provides a summary of significant activities achieved by the UCD under BPA Project 21009 during the first project year. The report follows the FY 2001 UCD/BPA contract Statement of Work (SOW) format. Discussion of major problems encountered, changes in the work plan and schedule deviations are noted in italics after the description of accomplishments for each task.

Stampfli, Steve

2004-02-01

297

An assessment of the feasibility of health authorities generating unpaid mass media publicity in the long term  

Microsoft Academic Search

Generating unpaid mass media coverage has been shown to be the most cost-effective method of reducing smoking prevalence. This study looks at the feasibility of generating such unpaid coverage over a prolonged period. Press releases, letters for publication and articles on tobacco-related items Were sent to the local media by an initiative co-ordinated by a health authority cancer-prevention project. Between

Jennifer Mindell

1997-01-01

298

FY 1985 status report on feasibility assessment of copper-base waste package container materials in a tuff repository  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report discusses progress made during the first year of a two-year study on the feasibility of using copper or a copper-base alloy as a container material for a waste package in a potential repository in tuff rock at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. The expected corrosion and oxidation performances of oxygen-free copper, aluminum bronze, and 70% copper-30% nickel

McCright

1985-01-01

299

Histological assessment of the distal 'doughnut' in patients undergoing stapled restorative proctocolectomy with high or low anal transection.  

PubMed

A non-randomized prospective study of 38 patients, 32 with ulcerative colitis and six with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), who underwent high or low anal transection during stapled restorative proctocolectomy was undertaken. The median (range) height of the staple line 6 months after operation was 5.2 (3.2-6.0) cm after high transection compared with 2.9 (1.8-3.6) cm after low transection. Nineteen of 20 patients after high anal transection had columnar epithelium in the distal 'doughnut' versus 16 of 18 after low transection. Active colitis was present in 12 of 19 'doughnuts' in patients with high anal transection and columnar mucosa and in seven of 16 after low transection. Nine patients (high transection two, low transection seven; P < 0.05) had striated muscle in the stapled distal 'doughnut'. Dysplasia was found in the resected colon in one patient with ulcerative colitis and adenocarcinoma in two colectomy specimens (ulcerative colitis, one; FAP, one). No dysplasia or carcinoma was seen in any of the 'doughnuts' from patients with ulcerative colitis. Four patients with FAP (high transection, two; low transection, two) had microadenoma in the distal 'doughnut'. Despite attempts to place a stapled pouch-anal anastomosis below the anal transition zone, it was not possible to remove columnar mucosa completely from the remaining anal canal in most patients (16 of 18). High anal transection and pouch-anal anastomosis should be the preferred option in restorative proctocolectomy, as a dentate-line anastomosis may not fully eliminate columnar epithelium and may involve resection of some of the external sphincter. PMID:8044617

Deen, K I; Hubscher, S; Bain, I; Patel, R; Keighley, M R

1994-06-01

300

Economic Assessment of Competing Technologies for Coastal Restoration. Selected Paper Prepared for Presentation at the Southern Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meeting, Birmingham, AL, February 4-7, 2012.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) was established in an attempt to integrate programs for habitat restoration and infrastructure protection. The Authority has begun aligning the state's coa...

D. R. Petroliz H. Wang R. H. Caffey

2012-01-01

301

Vegetative Ecological Characteristics of Restored Reed ( Phragmites australis) Wetlands in the Yellow River Delta, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we compared ecological characteristics of wetland vegetation in a series of restoration projects that were carried out in the wetlands of Yellow River Delta. The investigated characteristics include plant composition structure, species diversity and community similarity in three kinds of Phragmites australis wetlands, i.e. restored P. australis wetlands (R1, R2, R3 and R4: restored in 2002, 2005, 2007 and 2009, respectively), natural P. australis wetland (N) and degraded P. australis wetland (D) to assess the process of wetlands restoration. The coverage of the R1 was 99%, which was similar to natural wetland. Among all studied wetlands, the highest and lowest stem density was observed in R1 and R2, respectively, Plant height and stem diameter show the same trend as N > R2 > R1 > R3 > D > R4. Species diversity of restored P. australis wetlands became closed to natural wetland. Both species richness and Shannon-Wiener index had similar tendency: increased first and then decreased with restored time. The highest species richness and species diversity were observed in R2, while the lowest values of those parameters were found in natural P. australis wetland. Similarity indexes between restored wetlands and natural wetland increased with the restoration time, but they were still less than 50%. The results indicate that the vegetation of P. australis wetlands has experienced a great improvement after several years' restoration, and it is feasible to restored degraded P. australis wetlands by pouring fresh water into those wetlands in the Yellow River Delta. However, it is notable that costal degraded P. australis wetland in this region may take years to decades to reach the status of natural wetland.

Wang, Xuehong; Yu, Junbao; Zhou, Di; Dong, Hongfang; Li, Yunzhao; Lin, Qianxin; Guan, Bo; Wang, Yongli

2012-02-01

302

Vegetative ecological characteristics of restored reed (Phragmites australis) wetlands in the Yellow River Delta, China.  

PubMed

In this study, we compared ecological characteristics of wetland vegetation in a series of restoration projects that were carried out in the wetlands of Yellow River Delta. The investigated characteristics include plant composition structure, species diversity and community similarity in three kinds of Phragmites australis wetlands, i.e. restored P. australis wetlands (R1, R2, R3 and R4: restored in 2002, 2005, 2007 and 2009, respectively), natural P. australis wetland (N) and degraded P. australis wetland (D) to assess the process of wetlands restoration. The coverage of the R1 was 99%, which was similar to natural wetland. Among all studied wetlands, the highest and lowest stem density was observed in R1 and R2, respectively, Plant height and stem diameter show the same trend as N > R2 > R1 > R3 > D > R4. Species diversity of restored P. australis wetlands became closed to natural wetland. Both species richness and Shannon-Wiener index had similar tendency: increased first and then decreased with restored time. The highest species richness and species diversity were observed in R2, while the lowest values of those parameters were found in natural P. australis wetland. Similarity indexes between restored wetlands and natural wetland increased with the restoration time, but they were still less than 50%. The results indicate that the vegetation of P. australis wetlands has experienced a great improvement after several years' restoration, and it is feasible to restored degraded P. australis wetlands by pouring fresh water into those wetlands in the Yellow River Delta. However, it is notable that costal degraded P. australis wetland in this region may take years to decades to reach the status of natural wetland. PMID:21968874

Wang, Xuehong; Yu, Junbao; Zhou, Di; Dong, Hongfang; Li, Yunzhao; Lin, Qianxin; Guan, Bo; Wang, Yongli

2011-10-04

303

Assessing the economic feasibility of regional deep saline aquifer CO 2 injection and storage: A geomechanics-based workflow applied to the Rose Run sandstone in Eastern Ohio, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Typical top-down regional assessments of CO2 storage feasibility are sufficient for determining the maximum volumetric capacity of deep saline aquifers. However, they do not reflect the regional economic feasibility of storage. This is controlled, in part, by the number and type of injection wells that are necessary to achieve regional CO2 storage goals. In contrast, the geomechanics-based assessment workflow that

Amie Lucier; Mark Zoback

2008-01-01

304

Restoration or Renovation? Evaluating Restorative Justice Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Critics of restorative justice claim that its popularity is based on 'humanistic sentiment' and suggest that the process is incapable of achieving its aim of restoring victims and offenders. The current study sought to establish if restorative justice is capable of restoring victims and offenders in a meaningful manner, or if the process simply results in a superficial renovation of

Jaimie P. Beven; Guy Hall; Irene Froyland; Brian Steels; Dorothy Goulding

2005-01-01

305

Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Training Center, Georgia Army National Guard, Fort Stewart, Georgia. Installation restoration program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard (GAARNG) facility near Hinesville, Georgia, known as the National Guard Training Center (NGTC). Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a priority basis for completing corrective actions (where necessary) in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining previous site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the NGTC. Preliminary assessment site score sheet information is also provided for the NGTC. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of Fort Stewart completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on the NGTC area for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of Fort Stewart.

Not Available

1993-07-01

306

Approach and strategy for performing ecological risk assessments for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to supplement exiting US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance for ecological risk assessment at hazardous waste sites by providing guidance that is more specific and more tailored to US Department of Energy sites than the guidance available from the EPA. However, it is a conceptual strategy document and does not include specific guidance on data, assumptions, and models. That detailed guidance is under development and will be presented in subsequent documents. Ecological risk assessments are equal to human health risk assessments in regulatory importance and can use many of the same data and some of the same estimation methods. However, they also have peculiar data needs and methods. Ecological risk assessments begin with an initial scoping phase, termed hazard definition, that characterizes the sources, the potentially environment, and the assessment endpoints. In the subsequent measurement and estimation phase, in which data are obtained concerning source of the endpoint biota to the contaminants and the effects of those exposures, and assumptions and models are used to relate the data to the desired exposure and effects parameters. Finally, in an integration phase, termed risk characterization, the various exposure and effects estimates are combined to infer the existence, cause, magnitude, and extent of effects of contaminants on the ecological endpoints. This phase is much more complicated for ecological risk assessments than for human health assessments because more types of data are available. Ecological risk assessments estimate effects using laboratory toxicity test results, like human health assessments, but also use results of ambient toxicity tests and biological surveys.

Suter, G.W. II; Redfearn, A.; White, R.K.; Shaw, R.A.

1992-07-01

307

Ex vivo water exchange performance and short-term clinical feasibility assessment of newly developed heat and moisture exchangers for pulmonary rehabilitation after total laryngectomy.  

PubMed

Laryngectomized patients suffer from respiratory complaints due to insufficient warming and humidification of inspired air in the upper respiratory tract. Improvement of pulmonary humidification with significant reduction of pulmonary complaints is achieved by the application of a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) over the tracheostoma. The aim of this study was to determine whether the new Provox HMEs (XM-HME and XF-HME) have a better water exchange performance than their predecessors (R-HME and L-HME, respectively; Atos Medical, Hörby, Sweden). The other aim was to assess the short-term clinical feasibility of these HMEs. The XM-HME and XF-HME were weighed at the end of inspiration and at the end of expiration at different breathing volumes produced by a healthy volunteer. The associations between weight changes, breathing volume and absolute humidity were determined using both linear and non-linear mixed effects models. Study-specific questionnaires and tally sheets were used in the clinical feasibility study. The weight change of the XM-HME is 3.6 mg, this is significantly higher than that of the R-HME (2.0 mg). The weight change of the XF-HME (2.0 mg) was not significantly higher than that of the L-HME (1.8 mg). The absolute humidity values of both XM- and XF-HME were significantly higher than that of their predecessors. The clinical feasibility study did not reveal any practical problems over the course of 3 weeks. The XM-HME has a significantly better water exchange performance than its predecessor (R-HME). Both newly designed HMEs did succeed in the clinical feasibility study. PMID:23636480

van den Boer, Cindy; Muller, Sara H; Vincent, Andrew D; Züchner, Klaus; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Hilgers, Frans J M

2013-05-01

308

Stream habitat assessment project: Afognak Island. Restoration study number 47. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report  

SciTech Connect

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Habitat and Restoration Division, conducted surveys of anadromous fish streams on Afognak Island from July 6 to September 1, 1992. These surveys focused on Afognak Native Corporation and Afognak Joint Venture lands in order to document anadromous fish distribution and habitat on private lands throughout the spill area. 167 new anadromous fish streams were documented totalling approximately 56 km (35 miles). Dolly Varden and coho salmon were the principal fish species found, followed by pink salmon, sockeye salmon, chum salmon, rainbow trout, stickleback and sculpin. The study additionally found 34 streams that have a high potential for rehabilitation.

Kuwada, M.N.; Sundet, K.

1993-02-01

309

FY 1985 status report on feasibility assessment of copper-base waste package container materials in a tuff repository  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses progress made during the first year of a two-year study on the feasibility of using copper or a copper-base alloy as a container material for a waste package in a potential repository in tuff rock at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. The expected corrosion and oxidation performances of oxygen-free copper, aluminum bronze, and 70% copper-30% nickel are presented; a test plan for determining whether copper or one of the alloys can meet the containment requirements is outlined. Some preliminary corrosion test data are presented and discussed. Fabrication and joining techniques for forming waste package containers are descibed. Preliminary test data and analyses indicate that copper and copper-base alloys have several attractive features as waste package container materials, but additional work is needed before definitive conclusions can be made on the feasibility of using copper or a copper-base alloy for containers. Plans for work to be undertaken in the second year are indicated.

McCright, R.D.

1985-09-30

310

Physical fitness before and after weight restoration in anorexia nervosa.  

PubMed

Aim: The aims of this paper were: 1) to evaluate the feasibility of test for evaluating physical fitness (PF) in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN); 2) to investigate the effects of nutritional rehabilitation in this population of patients; and 3) to compare their level of fitness scores (at baseline and after weight restoration) with an age-matched healthy control group. Methods: PF was assessed with an adapted version of the Eurofit Physical Fitness Test Battery (EPFTB) administered to 37 consecutive female AN patients, at baseline and after weight restoration, and to 57 healthy age-matched females. Results: The inpatient treatment, based on cognitive behavior therapy, was associated with a significant improvement in BMI (from 14.5±1.5 to 18.8±1.1, P<0.001) and in 5 out of 6 EPFTB tests (P<0.05) in the AN group. However, both in pre and post, AN patients showed significant lower EPFTB than the control group (all P<0.001) with the exception of the Sit-Up score. Conclusion: Results indicated that PF is lower in AN patients than in controls both at baseline and after weight restoration. Future studies should evaluate if the inclusion of an individualized health-enhancing physical activity program might improve the restoration of physical fitness. PMID:23828287

Alberti, M; Galvani, C; Capelli, C; Lanza, M; El Ghoch, M; Calugi, S; Dalle Grave, R

2013-08-01

311

Monitoring Dietary Intake and Physical Activity Electronically: Feasibility, Usability, and Ecological Validity of a Mobile-Based Ecological Momentary Assessment Tool  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the growing body of research on complex lifestyle behaviors (eg, Dietary Intake [DI] and Physical Activity [PA]), monitoring of these behaviors has been hampered by a lack of suitable methods. A possible solution to this deficiency is mobile-based Ecological Momentary Assessment (mEMA), which enables researchers to collect data on participants’ states in real-time by means of a smartphone application. However, feasibility, usability, and ecological validity need to be anticipated and managed in order to enhance the validity of mEMA. Objective To examine the feasibility, usability, and ecological validity of a mEMA application (app) with regard to DI and PA among Dutch vocational education students. Methods The students (n=30) participated in the mEMA study for seven consecutive days. They downloaded the mEMA app on their smartphone. Feasibility and usability of the mEMA app were evaluated by completing an online evaluation after seven days of participation. Ecological validity was measured by assessing the degree to which the content of the mEMA app approximated the real-world setting that was being examined, through several multiple-choice questions. Results Compliance rates, as registered by the mEMA app, declined 46% over a seven-day period, while self-reported compliance, as measured with an online evaluation questionnaire afterwards, indicated a smaller decrease in compliance (29%). The students evaluated the mEMA app as feasible and usable. Ecological validity analyses showed that all DI and almost all PA multiple-choice options were covered with the compound response categories. Conclusions The mEMA app offers the opportunity to assess complex health behaviors (eg, DI and PA) in real-time settings, in which specifically routinized behaviors are involved. However, the mEMA app faced several challenges that needed to be overcome in order to improve its validity. Overall, the present study showed that the mEMA app is a usable and ecologically valid tool to measure DI and PA behaviors among vocational education students, but compliance is still limited.

Paulussen, Theo; Kok, Gerjo; Van Empelen, Pepijn

2013-01-01

312

Assessment of the safety and feasibility of administering anti-pyretic therapy in critically ill adults: study protocol of a randomized trial  

PubMed Central

Background Fever is one of the most commonly observed abnormal signs in patients with critical illness. However, there is a paucity of evidence to guide the management of febrile patients without acute brain injury and little is known about the biologic response to treatment of fever. As such, observational studies suggest that the treatment of fever is inconsistent. This pilot clinical trial will assess the safety and feasibility of treating febrile critically ill adult patients with an aggressive versus a permissive temperature control strategy. The biologic response to these two different temperature control strategies will also be assessed through analysis of a panel of inflammatory mediators. Findings The study population will include febrile adult patients admitted to one of two general medical-surgical intensive care units (ICUs) in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Patients will be randomized to either an aggressive or permissive fever treatment strategy. The aggressive group will receive acetaminophen 650 mg enterally every 6 hours upon reaching a temperature ? 38.3°C and external cooling will be initiated for temperatures ? 39.5°C, whereas the permissive group will receive acetaminophen 650 mg every 6 hours upon reaching a temperature ? 40.0°C and external cooling for temperatures ? 40.5°C. The study will take place over 12 months with the goal of enrolling 120 patients. The primary outcome will be 28-day mortality after study enrolment, with secondary outcomes that will include markers of feasibility (e.g. the enrolment rate, and the number of protocol violations), and levels of select inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators. Discussion Results from this study will lead to a better understanding of the inflammatory effects of anti-pyretic therapy and will evaluate the feasibility of a future clinical trial to establish the best treatment of fever observed in nearly one half of patients admitted to adult ICUs. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01173367

2012-01-01

313

Feasibility assessment of coal-integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power technology for India. Final report. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The document is the final report of a feasibility study conducted by Fluor Daniel for the Petroleum Authority of India. The purpose of the study was to determine the high priority projects for gas pipeline expansion. The high priority projects identified as a result of the study are: a new pipeline from the Erawan Complex to Khanow; a new pipeline from the 'B' structure to the Erawon Complex; and the modernization of the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA)/Telecommunications system. The document discusses the economic and technical feasbility of each of these projects. In addition, other topics, such as current and projected gas supply, projected gas demand and sources of additional gas, are discussed.

Not Available

1991-06-01

314

Assessment of Students' Personal Development as Part of Preparation for Professional Work--Is It Desirable and Is It Feasible?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the issues that arise when development of personal attributes is identified as one of the goals of a new undergraduate medical program. Concludes that such personal learning should be assessed, but that the purpose should not be to certify competence but to harness the powerful effects of assessment onto an important aspect of practice…

Toohey, Susan

2002-01-01

315

Visual field expansion after visual restoration therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine whether visual field expansion occurs with visual restoration therapy (VRT), using fundus-controlled microperimetry to assess visual fields.Design: This longitudinal cohort analysis assesses patients’ visual fields before and after visual restoration therapy using microperimetry and standard high-resolution perimetry.Subjects: Seven patients with stroke-induced homonymous field cuts were studied.Intervention: Visual restoration therapy is a computerized, home-based treatment aimed at reducing

Randolph S Marshall; Mohamad Chmayssani; Katherine A OBrien; Catherine Handy; Vivienne C Greenstein

2010-01-01

316

Assessing Prey and Competitor/Predators of Pink Salmon Fry. 'Exxon Valdez' Oil Spill Restoration Project Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Multi-frequency acoustic/net sampling assessments of the pink salmon food supply and predators were conducted in Prince William Sound during spring 2001. Five cruises were completed between April 18 and June 15,200 1. The results of this monitoring were i...

G. L. Thomas R. E. Thorne

2002-01-01

317

Installation Restoration Program. Preliminary assessment: 192nd Tactical Fighter Group, Virginia Air National Guard, Richmond International Airport, Sandston, Virginia. Final preliminary Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The 192nd Tactical Fighter Group (TFG) is located at the Virginia Air National Guard Base, Richmond International Airport, Sandston, Virginia. The unit has been active at the Richmond International Airport since 1947, and over the years a variety of military aircraft have been located and serviced there. Both the past and current operations involve the use of hazardous materials and disposal of hazardous wastes. The Department of Defense (DoD)Installation Restoration Program (IRP) is a comprehensive program designed to: identify and fully evaluate suspected problems associated with past hazardous waste disposal and/or spill sites on DoD installations; and control hazards to human health and welfare to the environment that may have resulted from these past practices.

Not Available

1989-02-01

318

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 38th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXXVIII) that were received on or before June 2, 1993.

Sanderson, C.G.; Klusek, C.S.

1993-07-01

319

Preliminary assessment report for Bee Caves Armory (former Nike BG-80 Fire Control Facility), Installation 48055, Austin, Texas. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (ARNG) property in Austin, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing, preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining, site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Bee Caves Armory property, the requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. Of concern is the potential for hazardous waste to be present on the property as a result of the former Nike Missile Base operations or in the form of original construction materials. Environmentally sensitive operations associated with the property from that period include (1) underground fuel storage, (2) hazardous materials storage/use, (3) disposal of hazardous waste and (4) release of hazardous waste water.

Dennis, C.

1993-08-01

320

Installation-Restoration Program. Preliminary assessment for the 153rd Tactical Airlift Group, Wyoming Air National Guard, Cheyenne Municipal Airport, Cheyenne, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Materials Technical Center (HMTC) was retained in September 1987 to conduct the Installation-Restoration Program (IRP) Preliminary Assessment of the 153rd Tactical Airlift Group (TAG), Wyoming Air National Guard, Cheyenne Municipal Airport, Cheyenne, Wyoming. The Preliminary Assessment included: an onsite visit, including interviews with 15 present and past Base personnel and 2 airport personnel conducted by HMTC personnel during 13-16 October 1987; the acquisition and analysis of pertinent information and records on hazardous materials use, and hazardous-waste generation and disposal at the Base; the acquisition and analysis of available geological, hydrological, meteorological development, and environmental data from pertinent Federal, State, and local agencies; and the identification of sites on the Base that may be potentially contaminated with hazardous materials/hazardous wastes (HM/HW). Past Base operations involved the use and disposal of materials and wastes that subsequently were categorized as hazardous. The major operations of the 153rd TAG that have used and disposed of these materials and wastes are flightline, NDI, avionics, AGE, airframe, electrical, engine and propulsion, nose dock and fuel cell, phase dock, pneudraulics, POL and refueling, repair and reclamation, photography lab, clinic, and vehicle maintenance. Waste oils, recovered fuels, spent cleaners, strippers, photographic chemicals, acids, and solvents were generated by these activities.

Not Available

1988-03-01

321

The feasibility of applying immature yard-waste compost to remove nitrate from agricultural drainage effluents: A preliminary assessment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nitrate is a major agricultural pollutant found in drainage waters. Immature yard-waste compost was selected as a filter media to study its feasibility for removing nitrate from drainage water. Different operation parameters were tested to examine the denitrification efficiency, including the amounts of compost packed in columns, the flow rate, and the compost storage periods. The experimental results suggested that hydraulic retention time was the major factor to determine the extent of nitrate removal, although the amount of compost packed could also contribute to the nitrate removal efficiency. The effluent nitrate concentration increased as the flow rate decreased, and the compost column reduced nitrate concentrations from 20 mg/L to less than 5 mg/L within 1.5 h. The solution pH increased at the onset of experiment because of denitrification, but stabilized at a pH of about 7.8, suggesting that the compost had a buffering capacity to maintain a suitable pH for denitrification. Storing compost under air-dried conditions may diminish the extent nitrate removed initially, but the effects were not apparent after longer applications. It appeared that immature yard-waste compost may be a suitable material to remove nitrate from tile drainage water because of its relatively large organic carbon content, high microbial activity, and buffering capacity. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Tsui, L.; Krapac, I. G.; Roy, W. R.

2007-01-01

322

An Assessment of Water Quality, Physical Habitat, and Biological Integrity of an Urban Stream in Wichita, Kansas, Prior to Restoration Improvements (Phase I)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urban development alters the natural hydrological conditions of many streams and rivers often resulting in the degradation\\u000a of water quality, physical habitat, and biotic integrity of lotic systems. Restoration projects attempt to improve and maintain\\u000a the ecological integrity of urban streams; however, few projects have quantified improvements to stream ecology following\\u000a implementation of restoration measures. This paper summarizes pre-restoration data

N. M. Davis; V. Weaver; K. Parks; M. J. Lydy

2003-01-01

323

Hydrodynamic Modeling Analysis of Tidal Wetland Restoration in Snohomish River, Washington  

SciTech Connect

To re-establish the intertidal wetlands with full tidal interaction and improve salmonid rearing habitat in the Lower Snohomish River estuary, a diked wetland along Union Slough of the Snohomish River was restored by breaching the existing dike and constructing bridges across the breaches. However, post-restoration monitoring indicated that the restored project site could not drain as efficiently as desired. To improve the drainage conditions at the restoration site during low tides, a modeling study was conducted to evaluate additional restoration scenarios and to provide recommendations for finish-grade ground elevations to achieve the desired drainage. To accurately simulate the drainage of the project site, an unstructured-grid hydrodynamic model with fine-grid resolution down to a few meters was used in this study. The model was first validated with observed water level data collected in the project site and then applied to assess the feasibility of different proposed restoration scenarios. A spatial varying bottom roughness option in the model is also implemented to better represent the high roughness due to the presence of dense vegetation in the project site. The methodology, error statistics of model validation and uncertainty of the modeling analysis are presented and discussed.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2012-03-07

324

Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility 2, Installation 25075, Westover Air Force Base, Chicopee, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Army Aviation Support Facility 2 (AASF 2) near Chicopee, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF 2 is a 10-acre site located in the western portion of Massachusetts, in the town of Chicopee, in the county of Hampden. The facilities included in this PA are Building 7400, adjacent paved areas, grassy areas, and the hazardous waste drum storage buildings. The environmentally significant operations (ESOS) associated with the property are (1) the waste drum storage area, (2) abandoned underground storage tanks (USTs), and (3) refueling activities.

Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.

1993-08-01

325

Establishing the Feasibility of Direct Observation in the Assessment of Tics in Children with Chronic Tic Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Behavior analysis has been at the forefront in establishing effective treatments for children and adults with chronic tic disorders. As is customary in behavior analysis, the efficacy of these treatments has been established using direct-observation assessment methods. Although behavior-analytic treatments have enjoyed acceptance and integration…

Himle, Michael B.; Chang, Susanna; Woods, Douglas W.; Pearlman, Amanda; Buzzella, Brian; Bunaciu, Liviu; Piacentini, John C.

2006-01-01

326

A virtual reality paradigm for the assessment and rehabilitation of executive function deficits post stroke: Feasibility study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to perform successive or simultaneous tasks is a common and necessary aspect of everyday life. This ability is often impaired in people suffering from brain lesions affecting, in particular, the frontal regions. The assessment and recovery of executive functions and dual task abilities conducted in laboratory settings do not always succeed, in part, due to the ecological and

Laura Carelli; Francesca Morganti; P. L. Weiss; Rachel Kizony; Giuseppe Riva

2008-01-01

327

Development of a Hydrologic Model to Assess the Feasibility of Water Leasing in the Middle Rio Grande Basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The demand for water in the southwestern United States has increased in tandem with a rapid growth of population over the past 50 years. With ever increasing demands being placed on available water supplies, improving water management becomes crucial to the sustainability of the region's water resources. The National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center (STC) for the Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA) is interested in the feasibility of water leasing as a method for more efficiently distributing water among competing users. Economists working on the project will run water leasing simulations in an auction-type environment to understand the pros and cons of water leasing in a free market system. To include hydrologic processes in the water leasing simulations, an MMS-PRMS hydrologic model was developed for a portion of the Middle Rio Grande Basin (MRGB) near Albuquerque, New Mexico. This portion of the MRGB contains a detailed network of diversions, canals, and drains that transport water through the system. In order to capture the complexity of the system, the model was developed using the highest resolution information available. In the model, each Hydrologic Response Unit (HRU) is represented as a trader. To achieve the 15 trader limit desired by economists, the model structure was simplified using two basic constraints; 1) HRUs having a common source and point of return to the river were lumped; and 2) HRUs with less than 20% agricultural land use were omitted from the auction simulations. A new Evapotranspiration (ET) module was implemented in the model to better estimate ET associated with different crops. Modules were also developed so that the end user has the flexibility to manipulate water deliveries based on crop type and land use. The MMS- PRMS model for the MRGB should help economists determine if the incentive to profit by selling or buying water can make more efficient use of the available water supply.

Garner, C. B.; Boyle, D. P.; Lamorey, G. W.; Bassett, S. D.

2007-12-01

328

Flathead Renewable Energy Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The study shall assess the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on lands selected and owned by the Salish and Kootenai Tribes and shall examine the potential for the development of solar and biomass resources located on Tribal Lands.

Belvin Pete: Ed McCarthy; Krista Gordon; Chris Bergen; Rhett Good

2006-10-03

329

Assessing the Feasibility of Using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel Assemblies  

SciTech Connect

Neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA) is an active-interrogation nondestructive assay (NDA) technique capable of assaying spent nuclear fuel to determine plutonium content. Prior experimental work has definitively shown the technique capable of assaying plutonium isotope composition in spent-fuel pins to a precision of approximately 3%, with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters. As a Grand Challenge to investigate NDA options for assaying spent fuel assemblies (SFAs) in the commercial fuel cycle, Idaho National Laboratory has explored the feasibility of using NRTA to assay plutonium in a whole SFA. The goal is to achieve a Pu assay precision of 1%. The NRTA technique uses low-energy neutrons from 0.1-40 eV, at the bottom end of the actinide-resonance range, in a time-of-flight arrangement. Isotopic composition is determined by relating absorption of the incident neutrons to the macroscopic cross-section of the actinides of interest in the material, and then using this information to determine the areal density of the isotopes in the SFA. The neutrons used for NRTA are produced using a pulsed, accelerator-based neutron source. Distinguishable resonances exist for both the plutonium (239,240,241,242Pu) and uranium (235,236,238U) isotopes of interest in spent fuel. Additionally, in this energy range resonances exists for six important fission products (99Tc, 103Rh, 131Xe, 133Cs, 145Nd, and 152Sm) which provide additional information to support spent fuel plutonium assay determinations. Based on extensive modeling of the problem using Monte Carlo-based simulation codes, our preliminary results suggest that by rotating an SFA to acquire four symmetric views, sufficient neutron transmission can be achieved to assay a SFA. In this approach multiple scan information for the same pins may also be unfolded to potentially allow the determination of plutonium for sub-regions of the assembly. For a 17 ? 17 pressurized water reactor SFA, a simplistic preliminary analysis indicates the mass of 239Pu may be determined with a precision on the order of 5%, without the need for operator-supplied fuel information or operational histories. This paper will present our work to date on this topic, indicate our preliminary findings for a conceptual assay approach, discuss resilience against spoofing, and outline our future plans for evaluating the NRTA technique for SFA plutonium determination.

D. L. Chichester; J. W. Sterbentz

2012-07-01

330

Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay gliadin assessment in processed food products available for persons with celiac disease: a feasibility study for developing a gluten-free food database.  

PubMed

Inappropriate food labeling and unwillingness of food companies to officially register their own gluten-free products in the Greek National Food Intolerance Database (NFID) result in a limited range of processed food products available for persons with celiac disease (CDP). The objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of developing a gluten-free food product database based on the assessment of the gluten content in processed foods available for CDP. Gluten was assessed in 41 processed food products available for CDP. Group A consisted of 26 products for CDP included in the NFID, and group B contained 15 food products for CDP not registered in the NFID but listed in the safe lists of the local Celiac Association (CA). High-sensitivity ?-gliadin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for analysis. Gluten was lower than 20 ppm in 37 of 41 analyzed products (90.2%): in 24 of 26 (92.3%) products in group A and in 13 of 15 (86.7%) products in group B (P = .61). No significant difference was found between the 2 groups regarding gluten content. No product in either group contained gluten in excess of 100 ppm. Most of the analyzed products included in the Greek NFID or listed in the lists of the local CA, even those not officially labeled "gluten free," can be safely consumed by CDP. The use of commercially available ?-gliadin ELISA is able to identify those products that contain inappropriate levels of gluten, making feasible it to develop an integrated gluten-free processed food database. PMID:21952119

Agakidis, Charalampos; Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Kalaitsidou, Marina; Papadopoulos, Theodoros; Savvidou, Afroditi; Daskalou, Efstratia; Dimitrios, Triantafyllou

2011-09-27

331

Concurrent Measurement of "Real-World" Stress and Arousal in Individuals With Psychosis: Assessing the Feasibility and Validity of a Novel Methodology  

PubMed Central

Background: Psychosis has been repeatedly suggested to be affected by increases in stress and arousal. However, there is a dearth of evidence supporting the temporal link between stress, arousal, and psychosis during “real-world” functioning. This paucity of evidence may stem from limitations of current research methodologies. Our aim is to the test the feasibility and validity of a novel methodology designed to measure concurrent stress and arousal in individuals with psychosis during “real-world” daily functioning. Method: Twenty patients with psychosis completed a 36-hour ambulatory assessment of stress and arousal. We used experience sampling method with palm computers to assess stress (10 times per day, 10 AM ? 10 PM) along with concurrent ambulatory measurement of cardiac autonomic regulation using a Holter monitor. The clocks of the palm computer and Holter monitor were synchronized, allowing the temporal linking of the stress and arousal data. We used power spectral analysis to determine the parasympathetic contributions to autonomic regulation and sympathovagal balance during 5 minutes before and after each experience sample. Results: Patients completed 79% of the experience samples (75% with a valid concurrent arousal data). Momentary increases in stress had inverse correlation with concurrent parasympathetic activity (??=??.27, P < .0001) and positive correlation with sympathovagal balance (? = .19, P = .0008). Stress and heart rate were not significantly related (? = ?.05, P = .3875). Conclusion: The findings support the feasibility and validity of our methodology in individuals with psychosis. The methodology offers a novel way to study in high time resolution the concurrent, “real-world” interactions between stress, arousal, and psychosis. The authors discuss the methodology's potential applications and future research directions.

Kimhy, David; Delespaul, Philippe; Ahn, Hongshik; Cai, Shengnan; Shikhman, Marina; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Malaspina, Dolores; Sloan, Richard P.

2010-01-01

332

Suggestions for improvement of the methodology and use of MEPAS, the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) has been evaluated for the purpose of determining if the current ranking of waste sites is realistic and reliable. There are two main reasons for the uncertainty of the rankings identified in this study: the use of the hazard potential index (HPI) and the user input. The HPI contributes to unreliable rankings because risks to human populations are summarized in a single numerical value. A final result from MEPAS should include risks to the maximally exposed individual, average individual, and the population (noting the population size) so that users can evaluate and weigh these risks. Examination of user input indicates that exposure pathways and exposed populations were sometimes arbitrarily selected. Users must be better informed about the characteristics of the waste site and its potential interaction with human populations for realistic input to the MEPAS model to be developed. Without realistic and consistent input to the MEPAS, or any model, reliable results cannot be expected and any prioritizations based on the results will be questionable.

Shevenell, L.; Hoffman, F.O.

1992-04-01

333

Assessment of radiopacity of restorative composite resins with various target distances and exposure times and a modified aluminum step wedge  

PubMed Central

Purpose ANSI/ADA has established standards for adequate radiopacity. This study was aimed to assess the changes in radiopacity of composite resins according to various tube-target distances and exposure times. Materials and Methods Five 1-mm thick samples of Filtek P60 and Clearfil composite resins were prepared and exposed with six tube-target distance/exposure time setups (i.e., 40 cm, 0.2 seconds; 30 cm, 0.2 seconds; 30 cm, 0.16 seconds, 30 cm, 0.12 seconds; 15 cm, 0.2 seconds; 15 cm, 0.12 seconds) performing at 70 kVp and 7 mA along with a 12-step aluminum stepwedge (1 mm incremental steps) using a PSP digital sensor. Thereafter, the radiopacities measured with Digora for Windows software 2.5 were converted to absorbencies (i.e., A=-log (1-G/255)), where A is the absorbency and G is the measured gray scale). Furthermore, the linear regression model of aluminum thickness and absorbency was developed and used to convert the radiopacity of dental materials to the equivalent aluminum thickness. In addition, all calculations were compared with those obtained from a modified 3-step stepwedge (i.e., using data for the 2nd, 5th, and 8th steps). Results The radiopacities of the composite resins differed significantly with various setups (p<0.001) and between the materials (p<0.001). The best predicted model was obtained for the 30 cm 0.2 seconds setup (R2=0.999). Data from the reduced modified stepwedge was remarkable and comparable with the 12-step stepwedge. Conclusion Within the limits of the present study, our findings support that various setups might influence the radiopacity of dental materials on digital radiographs.

Poorsattar Bejeh Mir, Morvarid

2012-01-01

334

[Temporal stability of river ecological restoration based on the assessment of contingent valuation method: a case study of shanghai urban river].  

PubMed

Whether the assessment results of Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) have temporal stability is an important issue in examining the reliability of CVM findings, and also, is critical to decide whether CVM can be applied to evaluate the ecosystem services value in China. Taking the ecological restoration along the Caohejing River in Shanghai as a case, three CVM survey schemes with one month apart and two years apart were designed. Then, 426, 498, and 200 questionnaires in these surveys were comparatively analyzed, respectively. The mean values of the willingness to pay (WTP) from the three surveys were 14. 2, 14. 1, and 18. 0 RMB, and the median values were 5, 5, and 10 RMB, respectively. With the comparison of the WTP distribution and the main statistics, the analysis of the factors affecting the WTP, and the test of the significances of temporal variables, it was found that the CVM results from the surveys with one-month apart had temporal stability, while those from the surveys with two years apart presented definite difference. PMID:23898647

Zhang, Yi-Fei; Wang, Dan

2013-04-01

335

Restoring afforested peat bogs: results of current research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The value of peat bogs as open habitats and stores of carbon may be lost if they are planted with trees. The number of bogs being restored is increasing but still modest in scale relative to the area of afforested peatland. Research is currently being carried out to determine the feasibility and methodology for restoring afforested bogs. Two experiments were

Russell Anderson

336

Feasibility of residential curtailment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feasibility of residential curtailment plans which would lead to a reduction in gas consumption by residential customers is assessed. An average use curtailment plan as outlined in the staff proposal in PUCO Case No. 75-901-GA-C01 and curtailment plans based on historic use were analyzed. These approaches are characterized by the imposition of price penalties to induce conservation. The primary

J. R. Devanney; C. R. Scott; M. A. Walters; G. D. Ball; R. R. Konst

2008-01-01

337

Ultraconservative sealed restorations: three-year results.  

PubMed

The overall objective of this clinical study was to determine the feasibility of using a sealed composite restoration to arrest caries without the removal of the carious lesion and without the traditional cavity preparation. The minimal tooth preparation (a bevel in enamel) usually did not require any anesthetic injection and conserved tooth structure. These ultraconservative sealed composite restorations placed over caries (CompS/C) have been compared with ultraconservative sealed amalgam restorations (AGS) and with the traditional outline form (unsealed) amalgam restorations (AGU). This clinical study has shown that: (1) caries can be arrested by the CompS/C restoration for a period of three years; (2) the marginal integrity of the AGS restorations showed a definite trend toward improvement as compared to the AGU restorations; and (3) complete sealant retention over posterior restorations was similar in both the CompS/C and the AGS groups during the first two years; however, at Year 3 complete sealant retention was 16 percent higher in the CompS/C than in the AGS group. PMID:1941777

Mertz-Fairhurst, E J; Williams, J E; Schuster, G S; Smith, C D; Pierce, K L; Mackert, J R; Sherrer, J D; Wenner, K K; Davis, Q B; Garman, T A

1991-01-01

338

Feasibility study on the use of probabilistic migration modeling in support of exposure assessment from food contact materials.  

PubMed

The use of probabilistic approaches in exposure assessments of contaminants migrating from food packages is of increasing interest but the lack of concentration or migration data is often referred as a limitation. Data accounting for the variability and uncertainty that can be expected in migration, for example, due to heterogeneity in the packaging system, variation of the temperature along the distribution chain, and different time of consumption of each individual package, are required for probabilistic analysis. The objective of this work was to characterize quantitatively the uncertainty and variability in estimates of migration. A Monte Carlo simulation was applied to a typical solution of the Fick's law with given variability in the input parameters. The analysis was performed based on experimental data of a model system (migration of Irgafos 168 from polyethylene into isooctane) and illustrates how important sources of variability and uncertainty can be identified in order to refine analyses. For long migration times and controlled conditions of temperature the affinity of the migrant to the food can be the major factor determining the variability in the migration values (more than 70% of variance). In situations where both the time of consumption and temperature can vary, these factors can be responsible, respectively, for more than 60% and 20% of the variance in the migration estimates. The approach presented can be used with databases from consumption surveys to yield a true probabilistic estimate of exposure. PMID:20409038

Poças, Maria F; Oliveira, Jorge C; Brandsch, Rainer; Hogg, Timothy

2010-04-08

339

Feasibility of Using Intravascular Ultrasonography for Assessment of Giant Cavernous Aneurysm after Endovascular Treatment: A Technical Report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS) has been shown as a valuable adjunct imaging tool during endovascular procedures but its value in detection of any recurrence during follow up after endovascular coil embolization of large and giant intracranial aneurysms is not reported. Methods A 41 years old man who had been treated using stent assisted coil embolization for cavernous segment aneurysm of the left internal carotid artery underwent 60 month angiographic follow up. Concurrently, IVUS catheter was advanced under fluoroscopic guidance inside the cavernous portion of the left internal carotid artery. Then IVUS images were used to visualize the stent, coil loops, and aneurysm neck. Results The angiographic images were limited because of superimposition of the aneurysm on the parent vessel in all projections. IVUS images demonstrated that the stent was patent along its whole length and there was no sign of stent deformity or in-stent thrombosis. Loops of the coil were visualized as hyperechoic signals inside the aneurysm and there was no sign of herniated loops of coil inside the stent. Conclusion In this case report, we observed that adjunct use of IVUS can provide valuable information not ascertained by angiography during follow up assessment of coil embolized aneurysm.

Majidi, Shahram; Grigoryan, Mikayel; Tekle, Wondwossen G; Watanabe, Masaki; Qureshi, Adnan I

2012-01-01

340

Balanced Propofol Sedation in Patients Undergoing EUS-FNA: A Pilot Study to Assess Feasibility and Safety  

PubMed Central

Introduction and aims. Balanced propofol sedation (BPS) administered by gastroenterologists has gained popularity in endoscopic procedures. Few studies exist about the safety of this approach during endosonography with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). We assessed the safety of BPS in EUS-FNA. Materials and methods. 112 consecutive patients, referred to our unit to perform EUS-FNA, from February 2008 to December 2009, were sedated with BPS. A second gastroenterologist administered the drugs and monitorized the patient. Results. All the 112 patients (62 males, mean age 58.35) completed the examination. The mean dose of midazolam and propofol was, respectively, of 2.1?mg (range 1–4?mg) and 350?mg (range 180–400). All patients received oxygen with a mean flux of 4 liter/minute (range 2–6 liters/minute). The mean recovery time after procedure was 25 minutes (range 18–45 minutes). No major complications related to sedation were registered during all procedures. The oxygen saturation of all patients never reduced to less than 85%. Blood systolic pressure during and after the procedure never reduced to less than 100?mmHg. Conclusions. In our experience BPS administered by non-anaesthesiologists provided safe and successful sedation in patients undergoing EUS-FNA.

Pagano, N.; Arosio, M.; Romeo, F.; Rando, G.; Del Conte, G.; Carlino, A.; Strangio, G.; Vitetta, E.; Malesci, A.; Repici, A.

2011-01-01

341

Amide proton transfer imaging of the breast at 3 T: establishing reproducibility and possible feasibility assessing chemotherapy response.  

PubMed

Chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging can generate contrast that is sensitive to amide protons associated with proteins and peptides (termed amide proton transfer, APT). In breast cancer, APT contrast may report on underlying changes in microstructural tissue composition. However, to date, there have been no developments or applications of APT chemical exchange saturation transfer to breast cancer. As a result, the aims of this study were to (i) experimentally explore optimal scan parameters for breast chemical exchange saturation transfer near the amide resonance at 3 T, (ii) establish the reliability of APT imaging of healthy fibroglandular tissue, and (iii) demonstrate preliminary results on APT changes in locally advanced breast cancer observed during the course of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Chemical exchange saturation transfer measurements were experimentally optimized on cross-linked bovine serum albumin phantoms, and the reliability of APT imaging was assessed in 10 women with no history of breast disease. The mean difference between test-retest APT values was not significantly different from zero, and the individual difference values were not dependent on the average APT value. The 95% confidence interval limits were ±0.70% (? = 0.05), and the repeatability was 1.91. APT measurements were also performed in three women before and after one cycle of chemotherapy. Following therapy, APT increased in the one patient with progressive disease and decreased in the two patients with a partial or complete response. Together, these results suggest that APT imaging may report on treatment response in these patients. PMID:22907893

Dula, Adrienne N; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Dortch, Richard D; Dewey, Blake E; Whisenant, Jennifer G; Ayers, Gregory D; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Smith, Seth A

2012-08-20

342

Feasibility study to support a threshold of sensitization concern concept in risk assessment based on human data.  

PubMed

In analogy to the Threshold of Toxicological Concern concept, a Threshold of Sensitization Concern (TSC) concept is proposed for chemicals with respect to their ability to induce an allergic contact dermatitis. Recently, the derivation of a dermal sensitization threshold was suggested based on an evaluation of animal data. In order to establish the concept with human data, we conducted a meta-analysis taking into account No Expected Sensitization Induction Levels for fragrance ingredients from the IFRA/RIFM dataset. Based on a statistical analysis by applying Sensitization Assessment Factors that account for interindividual variability and different exposure conditions, TSC values of 0.91 or 0.30 lg/cm2 can be derived in terms of amount per skin area. TSC values are compared with typical exposure levels of cosmetic products. A substance can be considered to be virtually safe if the quotient of exposure level and TSC is < 1. The findings derived from human data include several conservative assumptions and largely support the dermal sensitization thresholds previously derived from animal data. The TSC concept might in principle be used for any untested chemical and therefore help in some cases to waive animal testing. PMID:19680631

Keller, Detlef; Krauledat, Matthias; Scheel, Julia

2009-12-01

343

Web-based sex diaries and young adult men who have sex with men: assessing feasibility, reactivity, and data agreement.  

PubMed

We compared quantitative diary data with retrospective survey data collected from a cohort of young adult men who have sex with men (MSM) in Seattle, Washington. Ninety-five MSM, aged 16-30 years, completed web-based surveys every 3 months and were randomized to 4 diary submission schedules: every 2 weeks, once a week, twice a week, or never. We calculated diary completion rates and assessed agreement between daily diary data and aggregate retrospective survey data for sexual behavior measures. Over 6 months, 78 % of participants completed at least 80 % of their diary days, and the 2-week schedule had the highest and most consistent completion rate. The majority of sexual behavior and substance use measures had strong agreement between the diary and retrospective survey data (i.e., kappa >0.80 or concordance correlation coefficient ?0.75), although we observed poorer agreement for some measures of numbers of anal sex acts. There were no significant differences in mean responses across diary schedules. We observed some evidence of reactivity (i.e., a difference in behavior associated with diary completion). Participants not assigned diaries reported significantly more unprotected anal sex acts and were more likely to be newly diagnosed with HIV or another sexually transmitted infection compared to those assigned active diary schedules. This study suggests that sexual behavior data collected from young adult MSM during 3-month retrospective survey-an interval commonly used in sexual behavior research-are likely valid. Diaries, however, may have greater utility in sexual behavioral research in which counts, timing, sequence, or within-person variation over time are of particular import. PMID:22926939

Glick, Sara Nelson; Winer, Rachel L; Golden, Matthew R

2012-08-28

344

Assessment of feasibility in determining of Cr in Gannan Navel Orange treated in controlled conditions by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Heavy metal element chromium (Cr) contained in Gannan Navel Orange fruits treated with contaminant in controlled lab conditions were analyzed by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The purpose of this work was to provide an assessment of the performance of LIBS in investigating heavy metals in natural organic materials through a direct comparison of the analytical results. The LIBS spectra of samples were collected by optimized experimental parameters and the characteristic spectral lines of two triplet bands at 357.87 nm, 359.35 nm and 360.53 nm and 425.43 nm, 427.48 nm and 428.97 nm were identified distinctly. The Cr I 425.43 nm was selected as analytical line. The concentrations of Cr element were determined by AAS. The relative standard deviation (RSD) values were analyzed and the results demonstrated that there are much more room to promote in LIBS measuring. The calibration curve between the LIBS intensity and AAS concentration was constructed about Cr element. The results show LIBS signal intensity linear dependence on the concentration of Cr. Quantitative analytical results by the curve were validated with AAS measurements. The presented results showed that the standard deviations of the LIBS measurements are in general much larger than those of AAS measurements. Mostly, this contributes to matrix effect of samples and instability of LIBS. In a word, the obtained results between LIBS and AAS demonstrate the capacity of LIBS in the determination of the concentrations of Cr in oranges. Further work are being continued in our laboratory for further improvement of the sensitivity of LIBS, and for direct analysis of heavy metals in natural agricultural products without contamination treatment.

Yao, Mingyin; Huang, Lin; Zheng, Jianhong; Fan, Shiquan; Liu, Muhua

2013-11-01

345

DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOCOLS AND DECISION SUPPORT TOOLS FOR ASSESSING WATERSHED SYSTEM ASSIMILATIVE CAPACITY (SAC), IN SUPPORT OF RISK-BASED ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT/RESTORATION PRACTICES  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) has instituted a program for Risk Management Research for Ecosystem Restoration in Watersheds. This program is one component of the Office of Research and Development Ecosystem Protection Research Program. As part of this...

346

Restorative Effects of Natural Environment Experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The utility of different theoretical models of restorative experience was explored in a quasi-experimental field study and a true experiment. The former included wilderness backpacking and nonwilderness vacation conditions, as well as a control condition in which participants continued with their daily routines. The latter had urban environment, natural environment, and passive relaxation conditions. Multimethod assessments of restoration consisted of

Terry Hartig; Marlis Mang; Gary W. Evans

1991-01-01

347

Integrating Environmental Restoration and Ecological Restoration: Long-Term Stewardship at the Department of Energy.  

PubMed

With the ending of the Cold War, several federal agencies are reclaiming land through remediation and restoration and are considering potential future land uses that are compatible with current uses and local needs. Some sites are sufficiently contaminated that it is likely that the responsible federal agency will retain control over the land for the foreseeable future, providing them with a stewardship mission. This is particularly true of some of the larger Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contaminated during the production of nuclear weapons. The use of the term "restoration" is explored in this paper because the word means different things to the public, ecologists, and environmental managers responsible for contaminated sites, such as Superfund sites and the DOE facilities. While environmental restoration usually refers to remediation and removal of hazardous wastes, ecological restoration refers to the broader process of repairing damaged ecosystems and enhancing their productivity and/or biodiversity. The goals of the two types of restoration can be melded by considering environmental restoration as a special case of ecological restoration, one that involves risk reduction from hazardous wastes, and by broadening environmental restoration to include a more extensive problem-formulation phase (both temporal and spatial), which includes the goal of reestablishing a functioning ecosystem after remediation. Further, evaluating options for the desired post remediation result will inform managers and policy-makers concerning the feasibility and efficacy of environmental restoration itself. PMID:10982725

BURGER

2000-11-01

348

15 CFR 990.56 - Restoration selection-use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration project.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration...the equivalent of the injured natural resources and services and compensate...to, the same or comparable natural resources and services as those...

2013-01-01

349

Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

Watson, J.S.

1992-11-01

350

Technical and economic analyses to assess the feasibility of using propellant - No. 2 fuel-oil slurries as supplemental fuels. Final report, Nov 90-Sep 91  

SciTech Connect

There is currently a large inventory of obsolete conventional munitions and waste propellants. Current alternatives to storage are open burning/open detonation (OB/OD) and incineration to reduce the inventory of these materials. Since environmental impact of OB/OD is under intense scrutiny, the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency is conducting a program to determine the feasibility of using propellants as supplemental fuels for the Army's industrial combustors. The first propellant studied was a nitrocellulose containing 13.15% nitrogen by weight. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the physical and chemical characteristics, as well as the chemical compatibility, of nitrocellulose-solvent-No. 2 fuel oil solutions. Unfortunately, the tests using nitrocellulose indicated that solvation and mixing with No.2 fuel oil is questionable from a cost standpoint due to the low solubility of this material; an economic analysis did indicate potential cost effectiveness using propellant-No. 2 fuel oil slurries as supplemental fuels. A second project assessed the technical, economic, and safety aspects of using propellant-No. 2 fuel oil slurries as supplemental fuels. Materials studies were nitrocellulose, nitroguanidine, and AA2 double-base propellant. Similar laboratory tests were again conducted. This report discusses results from these tests as well as from an economic analysis of the process.

Norwood, V.M.; Craft, D.J.; McGill, K.E.

1991-09-01

351

Preliminary Evidence for Feasibility, Use, and Acceptability of Individualized Texting for Adherence Building for Antiretroviral Adherence and Substance Use Assessment among HIV-Infected Methamphetamine Users.  

PubMed

The feasibility, use, and acceptability of text messages to track methamphetamine use and promote antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence among HIV-infected methamphetamine users was examined. From an ongoing randomized controlled trial, 30-day text response rates of participants assigned to the intervention (individualized texting for adherence building (iTAB), n = 20) were compared to those in the active comparison condition (n = 9). Both groups received daily texts assessing methamphetamine use, and the iTAB group additionally received personalized daily ART adherence reminder texts. Response rate for methamphetamine use texts was 72.9% with methamphetamine use endorsed 14.7% of the time. Text-derived methamphetamine use data was correlated with data from a structured substance use interview covering the same time period (P < 0.05). The iTAB group responded to 69.0% of adherence reminder texts; among those responses, 81.8% endorsed taking ART medication. Standardized feedback questionnaire responses indicated little difficulty with the texts, satisfaction with the study, and beliefs that future text-based interventions would be helpful. Moreover, most participants believed the intervention reduced methamphetamine use and improved adherence. Qualitative feedback regarding the intervention was positive. Future studies will refine and improve iTAB for optimal acceptability and efficacy. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01317277. PMID:24078868

Moore, David J; Montoya, Jessica L; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Rooney, Alexandra; Gouaux, Ben; Georges, Shereen; Depp, Colin A; Atkinson, J Hampton; Tmarc Group, The

2013-09-03

352

Spatial assessment of the economic feasibility of short rotation coppice on radioactively contaminated land in Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia. I. Model description and scenario analysis.  

PubMed

The economic feasibility of short rotation coppice (SRC) production and energy conversion in areas contaminated by Chernobyl-derived (137)Cs was evaluated taking the spatial variability of environmental conditions into account. Two sequential GIS-embedded submodels were developed for a spatial assessment, which allow for spatial variation in soil contamination, soil type, and land use. These models were applied for four SRC production and four energy conversion scenarios for the entire contaminated area of Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia and for a part of the Bragin district, Belarus. It was concluded that in general medium-scale SRC production using local machines is most profitable. The areas near Chernobyl are not suitable for SRC production since the contamination levels in SRC wood exceed the intervention limit. Large scale SRC production is not profitable in areas where dry and sandy soils predominate. If the soil contamination does not exceed the intervention limit and sufficient SRC wood is available, all energy conversion scenarios are profitable. PMID:15294354

Perk Mv, Marcel van der; Burema, Jiske; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Goor, François; Timofeyev, Sergei

2004-09-01

353

Preliminary Evidence for Feasibility, Use, and Acceptability of Individualized Texting for Adherence Building for Antiretroviral Adherence and Substance Use Assessment among HIV-Infected Methamphetamine Users  

PubMed Central

The feasibility, use, and acceptability of text messages to track methamphetamine use and promote antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence among HIV-infected methamphetamine users was examined. From an ongoing randomized controlled trial, 30-day text response rates of participants assigned to the intervention (individualized texting for adherence building (iTAB), n = 20) were compared to those in the active comparison condition (n = 9). Both groups received daily texts assessing methamphetamine use, and the iTAB group additionally received personalized daily ART adherence reminder texts. Response rate for methamphetamine use texts was 72.9% with methamphetamine use endorsed 14.7% of the time. Text-derived methamphetamine use data was correlated with data from a structured substance use interview covering the same time period (P < 0.05). The iTAB group responded to 69.0% of adherence reminder texts; among those responses, 81.8% endorsed taking ART medication. Standardized feedback questionnaire responses indicated little difficulty with the texts, satisfaction with the study, and beliefs that future text-based interventions would be helpful. Moreover, most participants believed the intervention reduced methamphetamine use and improved adherence. Qualitative feedback regarding the intervention was positive. Future studies will refine and improve iTAB for optimal acceptability and efficacy. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01317277.

Moore, David J.; Montoya, Jessica L.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Depp, Colin A.; Atkinson, J. Hampton; TMARC Group, The

2013-01-01

354

Pharmacy on Demand Feasibility Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

DARPA's DSO has expressed interest in technologies to engineer field medical therapies at the point of care, such as production of multiple drugs from a single precursor and to drastically reduce the logistics burden of medical treatment in the field. Pha...

R. L. Newton S. Broadwater

2008-01-01

355

Restoration Planned for Shoreline Protecting Kennedy Infrastructure  

NASA Website

Scientists are assessing damage caused by storms, such Hurricane Sandy, along a stretch of shoreline at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Plans are being developed to restore dunes near Launch Pads 39A and B.

356

Feasibility of community-based screening for cardiovascular disease risk in an ethnic community: the South Asian Cardiovascular Health Assessment and Management Program (SA-CHAMP)  

PubMed Central

Background South Asian Canadians experience disproportionately high rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The goal of this qualitative study was to determine the feasibility of implementing a sustainable, culturally adapted, community-based CVD risk factor screening program for this population. Methods South Asians (? 45?years) in Calgary, Alberta underwent opportunistic cardiovascular risk factor screening by lay trained volunteers at local religious facilities. Those with elevated blood pressure (BP) or???1 risk factor underwent point of care cholesterol testing, 10-year CVD risk calculation, counseling, and referral to family physicians and local culturally tailored chronic disease management (CDM) programs. Participants were invited for re-screening and were surveyed about health system follow-up, satisfaction with the program and suggestions for improvement. Changes in risk factors from baseline were estimated using McNemar’s test (proportions) and paired t-tests (continuous measures). Results Baseline assessment was completed for 238 participants (median age 64?years, 51% female). Mean TC, HDL and TC/HDL were 5.41?mmol/L, 1.12?mmol/L and 4.7, respectively. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures (mmHg) were 129 and 75 respectively. Blood pressure and TC/HDL ratios exceeded recommended targets in 36% and 58%, respectively, and 76% were at high risk for CVD. Ninety-nine participants (47% female) attended re-screening. 82% had accessed health care providers, 22% reported medication changes and 3.5% had attended the CDM programs. While BP remained unchanged, TC and TC/HDL decreased and HDL increased significantly (mean differences: -0.52?mmol/L, -1.04 and +0.07?mmol/L, respectively). Participants were very satisfied (80%) or satisfied (20%) with the project. Participants suggested screening sessions and CDM programs be more accessible by: delivering evening or weekends programs at more sites, providing transportation, offering multilingual programs/translation assistance, reducing screening wait times and increasing numbers of project staff. Conclusions SA-CHAMP demonstrated the feasibility and value of implementing a lay volunteer–led, culturally adapted, sustainable community-based CVD risk factor screening program in South Asian places of worship in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Subsequent screening and CDM programs were refined based on the learnings from this study. Further research is needed to determine physician and patient factors associated with uptake of and adherence to risk reduction strategies.

2013-01-01

357

Can the benefits of physical seabed restoration justify the costs? An assessment of a disused aggregate extraction site off the Thames Estuary, UK.  

PubMed

Physical and biological seabed impacts can persist long after the cessation of marine aggregate dredging. Whilst small-scale experimental studies have shown that it may be possible to mitigate such impacts, it is unclear whether the costs of restoration are justified on an industrial scale. Here we explore this question using a case study off the Thames Estuary, UK. By understanding the nature and scale of persistent impacts, we identify possible techniques to restore the physical properties of the seabed, and the costs and the likelihood of success. An analysis of the ecosystem services and goods/benefits produced by the site is used to determine whether intervention is justified. Whilst a comparison of costs and benefits at this site suggests restoration would not be warranted, the analysis is site-specific. We emphasise the need to better define what is, and is not, an acceptable seabed condition post-dredging. PMID:24011661

Cooper, Keith; Burdon, Daryl; Atkins, Jonathan P; Weiss, Laura; Somerfield, Paul; Elliott, Michael; Turner, Kerry; Ware, Suzanne; Vivian, Chris

2013-09-04

358

Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

2005-07-31

359

Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

Toni Osterhout

2005-01-01

360

Developing political intelligence for making feasible decisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this research is to propose a model for acquiring political intelligence by describing steps for assessing feasibility that can be used to systematically evaluate a situation. The paper also aims to discuss individual and situational biases to acquiring an accurate political feasibility assessment. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A pre- and post-test method was used to compare a

Susan M. Adams; Alberto Zanzi

2006-01-01

361

SEQUENCING A 1.3 MB CONTIG SPANNING THE RF1 FERTILITY RESTORER LOCUS AS A PROTOTYPE TO ASSESS COMPLEX-GENOME COVERAGE STRATEGIES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In T-cytoplasm maize, Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is attributed to the presence of the unique mitochondrial gene, T-urf13. Full suppression of T-urf13-mediated CMS is directed by the combined action of dominant alleles of the nuclear (fertility restorer) genes, rf1 and rf2a. To facilitate a c...

362

Tidal saltmarsh fragmentation and persistence of San Pablo Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia samuelis): Assessing benefits of wetland restoration in San Francisco Bay  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The San Pablo Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia samuelis) is one of three morphologically distinct Song Sparrow subspecies in tidal marshes of the San Francisco Bay estuary. These subspecies are rare, because as the human population has grown, diking and development have resulted in loss of 79% of the historic tidal marshes. Hundreds of projects have been proposed in the past decade to restore tidal marshes and benefit endemic populations. To evaluate the value of these restoration projects for Song Sparrows, we developed a population viability analysis (PVA) model to examine persistence of samuelis subspecies in relation to parcel size, connectivity, and catastrophe in San Pablo Bay. A total of 101 wetland parcels were identified from coverages of modern and historic tidal marshes. Parcels were grouped into eight fragments in the historical landscape and 10 in the present landscape. Fragments were defined as a group of parcels separated by >1 km, a distance that precluded regular interchange. Simulations indicated that the historic (circa 1850) samuelis population was three times larger than the modern population. However, only very high levels (>70% mortality) of catastrophe would threaten their persistence. Persistence of populations was sensitive to parcel size at a carrying capacity of <10 pairs, but connectivity of parcels was found to have little importance because habitats were dominated by a few large parcels. Our analysis indicates little risk of extinction of the samuelis subspecies with the current extent of tidal marshes, but the vulnerability of the small-est parcels suggests that restoration should create larger continuous tracts. Thus, PVA models may be useful tools for balancing the costs and benefits of restoring habitats for threatened tidal-marsh populations in wetland restoration planning.

Takekawa, J. Y.; Sacks, B. N.; Woo, I.; Johnson, M. L.; Wylie, G. D.

2006-01-01

363

Assessment of feasibility to use computer aided texture analysis based tool for parametric images of suspicious lesions in DCE-MR mammography.  

PubMed

Our aim was to analyze the feasibility of computer aided malignant tumor detection using the traditional texture analysis applied on two-compartment-based parameter pseudoimages of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) breast image data. A major contribution of this research will be the through-plane assessment capability. Texture analysis was performed on two-compartment-based pseudo images of DCE-MRI datasets of breast data of eight subjects. The resulting texture parameter pseudo images were inputted to a feedforward neural network classification system which uses the manual segmentations of a primary radiologist as a gold standard, and each voxel was assigned as malignant or nonmalignant. The classification results were compared with the lesions manually segmented by a second radiologist. Results show that the mean true positive fraction (TPF) and false positive fraction (FPF) performance of the classifier vs. primary radiologist is statistically as good as the mean TPF and FPF performance of the second radiologist vs. primary radiologist with a confidence interval of 95% using a one-sample t-test with ? = 0.05. In the experiment implemented on all of the eight subjects, all malignant tumors marked by the primary radiologist were classified to be malignant by the computer classifier. Our results have shown that neural network classification using the textural parameters for automated screening of two-compartment-based parameter pseudo images of DCE-MRI as input data can be a supportive tool for the radiologists in the preassessment stage to show the possible cancerous regions and in the postassessment stage to review the segmentations especially in analyzing complex DCE-MRI cases. PMID:23653668

Kale, Mehmet Cemil; Fleig, John David; Imal, Naz?m

2013-04-09

364

Feasibility of assessing the public health impacts of air pollution reduction programs on a local scale: New Haven accountability case study  

EPA Science Inventory

Background: New approaches on how to link health surveillance data with environmental and population exposure information are needed in order to examine the health benefits of risk management decisions. Objective: This study's objective was to examine the feasibility of conductin...

365

15 CFR 990.42 - Determination to conduct restoration planning.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Preassessment Phase § 990.42 Determination to conduct restoration planning....

2013-01-01

366

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; Underwood Conservation District, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect

This project addresses existing habitat conditions, fish population status, and restoration priority sites within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed, a sub-basin of the White Salmon River. Our partners in this project are the United States Geological Service (USGS), and the Yakama Indian Nation (YIN). Underwood Conservation District (UCD) is involved in the project via accomplishment of water quality monitoring, sampling for stable isotopes, and characterization of the watershed geomorphology. These work items are part of an effort to characterize the stream and riparian habitat conditions in Rattlesnake Creek, to help guide habitat and fish restoration work. Water chemistry and temperature information is being collected both on Rattlesnake Creek, and on other tributaries and the main stem of the White Salmon River. Information on the entire system enables us to compare results obtained from Rattlesnake Creek with the rest of the White Salmon system. Water chemistry and temperature data have been collected in a manner that is comparable with data gathered in previous years. The results from data gathered in the 2001-2002 performance period are reported in appendix A at the end of this 2002-2003 report. Additional work being conducted as part of this study includes; an estimate of salmonid population abundance (YIN and USGS); a determination of fish species composition, distribution, and life history (YIN and USGS), and a determination of existing kinds, distribution, and severity of fish diseases (YIN and USGS). The overall objective is to utilize the above information to prioritize restoration efforts in Rattlesnake Creek.

White, Jim

2004-02-01

367

Detailed dynamic performance analysis and feasibility assessment of emerging optical switching and its impact on the performance of a fully reconfigurable WDM transport network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis presents a detailed dynamic performance analysis and feasibility assessment of emerging optical switching and its impact on the performance of reconfigurable WDM transport networks. Specifically, this thesis compares and examines the potential of both existing and emerging WDM switching technologies and characterizes a novel prototype liquid crystal crossconnect. This work examines and identifies EDFA dynamic response to different reconfiguration scenarios (switching) and how this might impact the overall network performance. Each network reconfiguration scenario is shown to cause its own network performance degradation, and requires a different set of EDFA engineering design rules to mitigate this effect. The main objective is to maintain a constant per channel output power in case of a network reconfiguration (adding/dropping of channels) as well as how to identify and recover from failures in the network. This thesis will present the first experimental study of an all-optical feedback technique for stabilizing the per-channel output both for single amplifier and cascade of amplifiers. This technique is simple, inexpensive, and robust, requiring neither monitoring of the amplifier output nor any active feedback. One of the great virtues of this technique is that only the first in a chain of amplifiers needs to be modified. Two different all- optical methods of controlling transient power excursions of surviving channels in a chain of EDFAs when switching occurs as a result of the adding or dropping of channels is presented and compared. The focus is on the dynamic effects due to the switching of channels. This study is then extended to look at dynamic effects in self-healing WDM ring networks where fault recovery is achieved through a protection switching mechanism, and how the interaction between the switching dynamics and the dynamics of the EDFAs affects our ability to detect and recover from failures. The ability to detect failures such as fiber cuts is complicated by the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise from the same EDFAs that make WDM possible. We will examine the fundamental difficulties that this ASE imposes on some schemes for detecting failures and propose our novel method that overcomes these difficulties.

Richards, Dwight Hugh

1999-07-01

368

Setting River Restoration Priorities: A Review of Approaches and a General Protocol for Identifying and Prioritizing Actions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Implicit in the question, “How should I prioritize restoration actions?” is often the unstated question, “What should I restore?” Distinguishing between these questions helps clarify the restoration planning process, which has four distinct steps: (1) identify the restoration goal, (2) select a project prioritization approach that is consistent with the goal, (3) use watershed assessments to identify restoration actions, and

T. Beechie; G. Pess; P. Roni; G. Giannico

2008-01-01

369

Assessment of a Pilot Demonstration: A Test of the Need for and Feasibility of Conducting an EPSDT Developmental Program in Cooperation with the D.C. Public Schools.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study was conducted to evaluate the availability of developmental programs and services to school children in the District of Columbia and to determine if it would be feasible for an outside agency to conduct a supplementary developmental program in con...

1976-01-01

370

Feasibility Assessment for the Harvest and Storage of Stormwater from the Nova Canal System for Use as a Reclaimed Water Supplemental Source in Volusia County.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document reports on an investigation of the feasibility of diverting stormwater from the Nova Canal basin drainage system to supplement regional reclaimed water systems, or other non-potable uses. The Nova Canal drainage basin is located in east-cent...

2009-01-01

371

A Scientific Workflow Used as a Computational Tool to Assess the Response of the Californian San Joaquin River to Flow Restoration Efforts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The San Joaquin River (SJR) restoration effort began in October 2009 with the onset of federally mandated continuous flow. A key objective of the effort is to restore and maintain fish populations in the main stem of the San Joaquin River, from below the Friant Dam to the confluence of the Merced River. In addition to the renewed flows, the restoration effort has brought about several upgraded and new water quality monitoring stations equipped with dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature sensors. As the SJR response to the restoration efforts will be dictated by a complex combination of hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes, we propose monitoring whole-stream metabolism as an integrative ecological indicator. Here, we develop and test a near-real time scientific workflow to facilitate the observation of the spatio-temporal distribution of whole-stream metabolism estimates using available monitoring station flow and water quality data. The scientific objective is to identify correlations between whole-stream metabolism estimates and the seasonally variable flow and flow disturbances (e.g., flood-control releases), which are the primary driver of stream ecosystems. To accomplish this requires overcoming technical challenges in terms of both data collection and data analysis because (1) the information required for this multi-site, long-term study, originates from different sources with the implication of different associated properties (data integrity, sampling intervals, units), and (2) the variability of the interim flows requires adaptive model selection within the framework of the metabolism calculations. These challenges are addressed by using a scientific workflow in which semantic metadata is generated as the data is prepared and then subsequently used to select and configure models, effectively customizing them to the current data. Data preparation involves the extraction, cleaning, normalization and integration of the data coming from sensors and third-party data sources. In this process, the metadata captured includes sensor specifications, data types, data properties, and process documentation, and is passed along with the data within the workflow system, automating whole-stream metabolism estimates by the optimal modeling approach. This presentation will describe the architecture of the whole-stream metabolism workflow and present typical results from the scientific study.

Villamizar, S. R.; Gil, Y.; Szekely, P.; Ratnakar, V.; Gupta, S.; Muslea, M.; Silva, F.; Harmon, T.

2011-12-01

372

Power system restoration issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some of the problems encountered in the three phases of power system restoration (PSR) are described. The three phases are planning for restart and reintegration of the bulk power supply, actions during system degradations for saving and retaining critical sources of power, and restoration when the power system has stabilized at some degraded level. Common concerns found in several PSR

M. M. Adibi; R. J. Kafka

1991-01-01

373

Orthodontically Assisted Restorative Dentistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

As treatment expectations of dental patients continue to escalate we, as restorative dentists, must provide an inter- disciplinary treatment approach to ensure optimum results for our patients. In recent years the disciplines of perio- dontics, endodontics and oral surgery have continued to develop closer working relationships with the field of restorative dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not the common relationship that

Donald F. Reikie

2001-01-01

374

Turbo image restoration  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new iterative processing for image restoration is proposed based on the turbo iterative principle. For this purpose, two uncorrelated component images issued from an original image are differently filtered and the pieces of information extracted from both filters are mutually exchanged in the iterative process. This scheme has achieved much better performances and reduced computational cost in restoring images

Hong Sun; Henri MAITRE; Bao Guan

2003-01-01

375

4 Restorative approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Restorative justice in African states has gained a signifi cant profi le through transitional justice process, but remains very much at the fringes of main- stream practice in criminal justice systems. Th is article reviews the challenges faced by criminal justice systems in the contemporary African state and the promise of restorative justice from both theory and practice, using Uganda

Simon Robins

376

Technologies for lake restoration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lakes are suffering from different stress factors and need to be restored using different approaches. The eutrophication remains as the main water quality management problem for inland waters: both lakes and reservoirs. The way to curb the degradation is to stop the nutrient sources and to accelerate the restoration with help of in-lake technologies. Especially lakes with a long retention

Helmut KLAPPER

2003-01-01

377

Digital image restoration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article introduces digital image restoration to the reader who is just beginning in this field, and provides a review and analysis for the reader who may already be well-versed in image restoration. The perspective on the topic is one that comes primarily from work done in the field of signal processing. Thus, many of the techniques and works cited

MARK R. BANHAM; A. K. Katsaggelos

1997-01-01

378

Restorative Dementia Gardens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent neuropsychological research suggests that attention function has significant predictive value in diagnosing dementia in the preclinical phase. Given this ongoing, and presumably progressively declining function in people with dementia, it makes sense to more fully understand the ways in which natural settings may restore attentional capacity. This article explores the design implications of Kaplan's Attention Restoration Theory (ART) for

Keith Diaz Moore

2007-01-01

379

Acceptance and Discomfort from Atraumatic Restorative Treatment in Secondary School Students in Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To assess the level of acceptance and discomfort experienced by secondary school students when undergoing an atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restoration. Subjects and Methods: Ninety secondary school students, aged 14 and 15 years, were included in the study. The ART restorations were prepared in 90 cavities and restored using an encapsulated high-viscosity glass ionomer. The depth of the cavities

A. Farag; J. E. F. M. Frencken

2009-01-01

380

Experiencing the Restorative Components of Wilderness Environments: Does Congestion Interfere and Does Length of Exposure Matter?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wilderness should provide opportunities for stress reduction and restoration of mental fatigue. Visitors, surveyed as they exited wilderness trailheads, were asked for self-assessments of stress reduction and mental rejuvenation and the extent to which they experienced various restorative components of the environment—attributes deemed by attention restorative theory to be conducive to restoration. Day and overnight hikers on both very high

David N. Cole; Troy E. Hall

2010-01-01

381

Ecological restoration: guidance from theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of the science and practice of ecosystem restoration led me to identify key ecological theories and concepts that are relevant to planning, implementing, and sustaining restoration efforts. From experience with actual restoration projects, I provide guidance for improving the restoration process. Despite an abundance of theory and guidance, restoration goals are not always achieved, and path- ways toward

Joy B. Zedler

382

Forensic or archaeological issue: is chemical analysis of dental restorations helpful in assessing time since death and identification of skeletonized human remains?  

PubMed

In 2011, small mass grave with completely skeletonized remains was discovered in Belgrade suburb. An eyewitness claimed that skeletons belonged to German soldiers killed in WWII. Anthropologists were engaged to investigate whether the skeletal remains correspond to the indicated German group or represent more recent case requiring court trial. Numerous dental restorations were noticed. Owing to the fact that different dental materials were used in dental practice at certain times, the aim of this study was to explore whether analysis of dental restorations could help in identification and estimation of time since death. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry revealed that dental fillings corresponded to copper amalgam, conventional silver amalgam, silicophosphate cement, and zinc phosphate cement. Chemical results combined with anthropological and historical facts suggest that the individuals lived before the 1960s in country with well-developed dental service at that time. Therefore, chemical analysis of dental fillings was useful to distinguish between skeletal remains that are too old to be of forensic interest and the remains relevant to legal investigations. PMID:23866008

Zelic, Ksenija; Djonic, Danijela; Neskovic, Olivera; Stoiljkovic, Milovan; Nikolic, Slobodan; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Djuric, Marija

2013-07-18

383

Survey of Image Restoration Techniques.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The survey of image restoration techniques presents a concise overview of the most useful restoration methods. Linear spatially invariant and linear spatially variant image restoration techniques are described and the strengths and weaknesses of each appr...

P. K. Murphy

1988-01-01

384

15 CFR 990.15 - Considerations to facilitate restoration.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction...expediting restoration of injured natural resources and services, including...Pre-incident plans may identify natural resource damage assessment teams,...

2013-01-01

385

Rheumatoid cachexia, central obesity and malnutrition in patients with low-active rheumatoid arthritis: feasibility of anthropometry, Mini Nutritional Assessment and body composition techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and aims  The concurrent decrease in fat free mass (FFM) and increase in fat mass (FM), including central obesity, in patients with\\u000a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be related to increased cardiovascular morbidity as well as to functional decline. The objectives\\u000a of this study were to evaluate body composition and nutritional status in patients with RA and the feasibility of bioelectrical

Ann-Charlotte Elkan; Inga-Lill Engvall; Tommy Cederholm; Ingiäld Hafström

2009-01-01

386

Assessment of technical and economic feasibility of zinc\\/bromine batteries for utility load leveling. Final report. [1. 28 kWh  

Microsoft Academic Search

This feasibility study was undertaken to determine the viability of zinc\\/bromine batteries for utility load-leveling applications. Gould's preliminary comparisons of bromine and chlorine as positive reactants in flowing electrolyte cells led to promising proposals for storing bromine, minimizing self-discharge, controlling zinc dendrites, and developing a cost-effective cell design. These were major shortcomings discovered in previous work by other investigators. Principal

Putt

1979-01-01

387

A Feasibility Study of Nuclear Fireball Simulation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the initial phase of an experimental program designed to assess the feasibility of simulating the thermal environment of a high-temperature nuclear fireball. A high-performance, explosively driven shock tube is used to produce tempera...

D. W. Baum S. P. Gill

1970-01-01

388

Solar Cookers for Haiti, A Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objectives of the study were to assess the feasibility of applying solar cookers extensively in rural Haiti, and to present a preliminary design for a solar cooker based on Haitian requirements. Two such designs are presented herein. (Color illustrati...

T. E. Bowman J. R. Sharber J. H. Blatt

1977-01-01

389

15 CFR 990.54 - Restoration selection-evaluation of alternatives.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...compensating for interim losses; (3) The likelihood of success of each alternative; (4) The extent to which each alternative...needed to identify and evaluate the feasibility and likelihood of success of restoration alternatives, trustees may implement...

2013-01-01

390

Bacterial penetration of restored cavities.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to assess the quality of the marginal seals of 7 restoratives by means of a bacterial penetration test in vitro. Sixty intact premolars and third molars that were scheduled for extraction were used in the test. There were 2 experimental groups of teeth, as follows: (1) A class V conventional cavity and a wedge erosion cavity were prepared on the buccal surface and the lingual surface, respectively, of each tooth. (2) A class V conventional cavity and a wedge erosion cavity were prepared on the buccal surface and the lingual surface, respectively, of each tooth with a completely removed enamel layer. The cavities were then reconstructed with different restorative materials. The quality of the marginal seals was evaluated by submerging the teeth in a bacterial suspension and incubating them in an anaerobic milieu at 37 degrees C for 20 hours. The teeth were subsequently processed for histologic data and bacterial staining. The best marginal sealing in both the wedge erosion and the class V cavities was provided by the Herculite/Optibond system and the Valux Plus/Scotchbond Multipurpose system. Bacterial penetration was slightly greater with the Luxat compomer and the Dyrect compomer, as well as with Vitremer glass ionomer cement and Fuji LC glass ionomer cement. The bacterial penetration test showed that the use of restorative material does not entirely eliminate microleakage. PMID:11250635

Zivkovi?, S; Bojovi?, S; Pavlica, D

2001-03-01

391

Restoration of Mangrove Habitat.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This technical note provides general guidelines for restoration of mangrove habitat. In the United States, mangroves naturally occur in Florida, Louisiana, and Texas. They also occur naturally in other areas that fall under Corps of Engineers jurisdiction...

R. Lewis B. Streever R. F. Theriot

2000-01-01

392

Great Lakes Restoration Crosscut.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This crosscut budget provides information on Federal funding for Great Lakes restoration work in the following formats: Total Federal funding by agency, which includes national and Great Lakes programs, as well as Great Lakes projects, FYs 2004 enacted-20...

2008-01-01

393

Restoration of ailing wetlands.  

PubMed

It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes) can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide. PMID:22291573

Schmitz, Oswald J

2012-01-24

394

BALTIMORE STREAM RESTORATION PROJECT  

EPA Science Inventory

26 Feb 2003 Approach - We will employ a 4-tiered research approach to investigate restoration effects on hydrology and stream water quality: 1) monitoring ground water and surface water, 2) quantifying denitrification activity, 3) measuring carbon supply and rete...

395

Restorer: Four Color Chart  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Restorer is a visualization technique for indicating the location of missing data in a scientific visualization. Rather than filling missing data regions with interpolated data colored with the same scale as real data or simply leaving such regions empty, the restorer technique fills the regions with interpolated data colored with a color table with only luminance values. This technique allows missing data to be indicated clearly without distracting from the content of the real data.

Cavallo, John; Shiri, Shahram; Twiddy, Ray

1994-08-24

396

Preliminary report on the ecological assessment of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

In support of the remedial investigation for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5, staff of the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted preliminary ecological assessment activities. A screening level ecological risk assessment has been completed, ambient toxicity tests have been conducted on streams and seeps within WAG 5, WAG 5 has been surveyed for rare and endangered

T. L. Ashwood; G. W. II Suter; A. J. Stewart

1992-01-01

397

Preliminary assessment report for Bee Caves Armory (former Nike BG80 Fire Control Facility), Installation 48055, Austin, Texas. Installation Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (ARNG) property in Austin, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing, preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The

1993-01-01

398

Restoring accommodation: surgical technique and preliminary evaluation in rabbits  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose is to evaluate an innovative surgical technique for phaco-ersatz, a cataract surgery designed to restore accommodation. Techniques for very small capsulorhexis as well as the refilling procedure were developed. This study evaluates the feasibility and reproducibility of the surgical technique.

Tahi, Hassan; Chapon, Pascal F.; Hamaoui, Marie; Lee, William E.; Holden, Brien; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

1999-06-01

399

Assessment of Instream Restoration in the Cache River, Illinois: Macroinvertebrate Community Structure on Rock Weirs Compared to Snag and Streambed Habitats  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rock weirs were constructed in a degraded section of the Cache River in southern Illinois in 2001 and 2003 to prevent channel incision and protect riparian wetlands. We sampled macroinvertebrates in two older weirs and in two sites downstream of the restored section in April 2003, October 2003, and April 2004 to evaluate differences in community structure between weir, snag, and streambed (scoured clay) habitats. Three recently constructed weirs were also sampled in April 2004. Functional composition differed among sample dates and habitats. Although collector-gatherers consistently dominated streambed habitats, functional composition on weirs and snags was more variable. Filterer and predator biomass was generally higher on weirs, and snags harbored the only shredders collected in the system (Pycnopsyche spp.). Weirs generally supported higher biomass of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera than other habitats. For example, mean EPT biomass on weirs in 2003 (April=187 mgAFDM/m2; October=899 mgAFDM/m2) was 4 to 10-fold higher than EPT biomass in snag or streambed habitats. Late instar Pycnopsyche contributed 41% of snag biomass in April 2004, resulting in EPT biomass similar to rock weirs. Results indicate rock weirs provide suitable stable substrate for macroinvertebrates and may enhance populations of sensitive EPT taxa in degraded systems.

Walther, D. A.; Whiles, M. R.

2005-05-01

400

Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Phase I. Assessment of the Potential for Groundwater Contamination, Edwards Air Force Base Waste Disposal Site Evaluations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Envirodyne Engineers, Inc. (EEI) evaluated the potential for groundwater contamination at nine hazardous waste storage and disposal sites at Edwards Air Force Base, California. This evaluation consisted of an Initial Assessment Survey based on published a...

1981-01-01

401

EVALUATING THE FEASIBILITY OF PLANTING AQUATIC PLANTS IN SHALLOW MISSISSIPPI LAKES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Planting aquatic plants is a technique used to restore native aquatic plant communities in lakes lacking aquatic plants. However, the feasibility of using this restoration technique in Mississippi lakes has not been evaluated. We conducted two exclosure experiments to evaluate the success of plantin...

402

Functional tooth restoration by allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell-based bio-root regeneration in swine.  

PubMed

Our previous proof-of-concept study showed the feasibility of regenerating the dental stem cell-based bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) structure in a large animal model. Here, we used allogeneic dental mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate bio-root, and then installed a crown on the bio-root to restore tooth function. A root shape hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate scaffold containing dental pulp stem cells was covered by a Vc-induced periodontal ligament stem cell sheet and implanted into a newly generated jaw bone implant socket. Six months after implantation, a prefabricated porcelain crown was cemented to the implant and subjected to tooth function. Clinical, radiological, histological, ultrastructural, systemic immunological evaluations and mechanical properties were analyzed for dynamic changes in the bio-root structure. The regenerated bio-root exhibited characteristics of a normal tooth after 6 months of use, including dentinal tubule-like and functional periodontal ligament-like structures. No immunological response to the bio-roots was observed. We developed a standard stem cell procedure for bio-root regeneration to restore adult tooth function. This study is the first to successfully regenerate a functional bio-root structure for artificial crown restoration by using allogeneic dental stem cells and Vc-induced cell sheet, and assess the recipient immune response in a preclinical model. PMID:23363023

Wei, Fulan; Song, Tieli; Ding, Gang; Xu, Junji; Liu, Yi; Liu, Dayong; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei; Shi, Songtao; Wang, Songlin

2013-03-15

403

Concepts, problems and opportunities for use of annihilation energy: An annotated briefing on near-term RDT/E to assess feasibility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This note discussed several issues inherent in exploiting the energy released when matter and antimatter annihilate. It reviews some of the fundamental difficulties in produding Antimatter and means for storing it. If these difficulties have satisfactory solutions, a number of applications for antimatter are likely to emerge. The note emphasizes the fundamental importance of the very large classes of interesting research efforts underlying applications goals, and the anticipated rapid growth of science needs for antimatter at low energies. The authors suggests a near-term program to resovle the current uncertainities of suitable production and storage technologies, so that basic feasiblity of application of antimatter can be decided, and decisions on whether to undertake expanded production with appropriate storage can be objectively made.

Augenstein, B. W.

1985-06-01

404

Wide area restoration following biological contamination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current understanding of how to restore a wide area that has been contaminated following a large biological attack is limited. The Department of Homeland Security and Department of Defense are executing a four-year collaborative program named the Interagency Biological Restoration Demonstration (IBRD) program. This program is aimed at developing technologies, methods, plans and policies necessary to restore a wide area, including military installations and critical infrastructures, in the event of a large outdoor aerosol release of anthrax. The IBRD program partner pilot city is the Seattle Urban Area to include Fort Lewis, WA and McChord Air Force Base. A front-end systems analysis was conducted as part of IBRD, to: 1) assess existing technologies and processes for wide area restoration; from this, 2) develop an "as-is" decision framework for wide area restoration; and 3) identify and prioritize capability gaps. Qualitative assessments and quantitative analyses, including sensitivity, timeline and case study analyses, were conducted to evaluate existing processes and rank capability gaps. This paper describes the approach and results from this front-end systems analysis.

Yang, Lynn; Hibbard, Wilthea; Edwards, Donna; Franco, David; Fruetel, Julie; Tucker, Mark; Einfeld, Wayne; Knowlton, Robert; Brown, Gary; Brockmann, John; Greenwalt, Robert; Miles, Robin; Raber, Ellen; Carlsen, Tina; Krauter, Paula; Dillon, Michael; MacQueen, Don; Intrepido, Tony; Hoppes, Bill; Wilson, Wendy; Mancieri, Sav

2008-05-01

405

Assessment of safety and feasibility of a new technical variant of gastropexy for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: an experience with 435 cases  

PubMed Central

Background Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG) performed through the Introducer Technique is associated with lower risk of surgical infection when compared to the Pull Technique. Its use is less widespread as the fixation of the stomach to the abdominal wall is a stage of the procedure that is difficult to be performed. We present a new technical variant of gastropexy which is fast and easy to be performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of a new technical variant of gastropexy in patients submitted to gastrostomy performed through the Introducer Technique. Methods All the patients submitted to PEG through the Introducer Technique were evaluated using a new technical variant of gastropexy, which consists of two parallel stitches of trasfixation sutures involving the abdominal wall and the gastric wall, performed with a long curved needle. Prophylactic antibiotics were not used. Demographic aspects, initial diagnosis, indication, sedation doses, morbidity and surgical mortality were all analyzed. Results Four hundred and thirty-five consecutive PEGs performed between June 2004 and May 2007 were studied. Nearly all the cases consisted of patients presenting malignant neoplasia, 79.5% of which sited in the head and neck. The main indication of PEG was dysphagia, found in 346 patients (79.5%). There were 12 complications (2.8%) in 11 patients, from which only one patient had peristomal infection (0.2%). There was one death related to the procedure. Conclusion Gastropexy with the technical variant described here is easy to be performed and was feasible and safe in the present study. PEG performed by the Introducer Technique with this type of gastropexy was associated with low rates of wound infection even without the use of prophylactic antibiotics.

2009-01-01

406

Preliminary report on the ecological assessment of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

In support of the remedial investigation for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5, staff of the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted preliminary ecological assessment activities. A screening level ecological risk assessment has been completed, ambient toxicity tests have been conducted on streams and seeps within WAG 5, WAG 5 has been surveyed for rare and endangered species and wetlands, and wild turkeys that may feed on contaminated vegetation and insects in WAG 5 have been screened for beta-emitting isotopes and {sup 137}Cs. The screening-level ecological risk assessment identified some data gaps that were addressed in the ecological assessment plan. These include gaps in data on the toxicity of surface water and soil within WAG 5 and on the status of rare and endangered species. In addition, the screening-level risk assessment identified the need for data on the level of contaminants in wild turkeys that may be consumed by predatory wildlife and humans. Three rounds of ambient toxicity tests on six streams and seeps, using the microcrustacean Ceriodaphnia, have identified potential toxicity in three of the sample sites. Further tests are required to identify the toxicant. No rare or endangered animal species have been identified in the WAG 5 area.

Ashwood, T.L.; Suter, G.W. II; Stewart, A.J.

1992-09-01

407

RESTORATION PLUS: A COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM TO DEVELOP AND EVALUATE ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT OPTIONS TO ACHIEVE ECOLOGICALLY AND ECONOMICALLY SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA is evaluating ecosystem restoration and management techniques to ensure they create sustainable solutions for degraded watersheds. ORD NRMRL initiated the Restoration Plus (RePlus) program in 2002 to a) evaluate ecosystem restoration and management options, b) assess the non-...

408

Adaptive Restoration of Airborne Daedalus AADS1268 ATM Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect

To incorporate the georegistration and restoration processes into airborne data processing in support of U.S. Department of Energy's nuclear emergency response task, we developed an adaptive restoration filter for airborne Daedalus AADS1268 ATM thermal data based on the Wiener filtering theory. Preliminary assessment shows that this filter enhances the detectability of small weak thermal anomalies in AADS1268 thermal images.

D. Yuan; E. Doak; P. Guss; A. Will

2002-01-01

409

Quantitative methods of measuring restorative components in urban public parks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper demonstrates how quantitative methods can be used in a landscape architecture study. Three different methods to determine how people evaluate the psychological restoration\\/relaxation potential of small urban parks, as described in attention restoration theory, were assessed. The methods presented and evaluated are: ratings of environments based on quantified photos, eye tracking and choice-based conjoint analysis. Ratings of environments

Helena Nordh

2012-01-01

410

The provisional restoration.  

PubMed

The utilization of properly fabricated provisional prosthodontic appliances will permit a higher rate of success of the definitive treatment. This phase of restorative treatment should not be merely considered a temporary treatment but as a template for the ensuing prosthesis. The information that is obtained in this phase of treatment will reduce the problems that may be encountered in the definitive treatment. This article has discussed the function and requirements of both provisional, fixed restorations and transitional removable partial dentures. The methods of fabrication and the materials employed have been enumerated. PMID:3301433

Vahidi, F

1987-07-01

411

Subsurface Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action Plan/ Environmental Assessment and Decision Document, Operable Unit No. 2. Volume 2, Appendices: Final: Environmental Restoration Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The subject Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action plan/Environmental Assessment (IM/IRAP/EA) addresses residual free-phase volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination suspected in the subsurface within an area identified as Operable Unit No. 2 (OU2)....

1992-01-01

412

Final Report and Strategic Plan on the Feasibility Study to Assess Geothermal Potential on Warm Springs Reservation Lands. Report No. DOE/GO/15177  

SciTech Connect

In 2005 the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Tribal Council authorized an evaluation of the geothermal development potential on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises obtained a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to conduct a geological assessment and development estimate. Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises utilized a team of expert consultants to conduct the study and develop a strategic plan. The resource assessment work was completed in 2006 by GeothermEx Inc., a consulting company specializing in geothermal resource assessments worldwide. The GeothermEx report indicates there is a 90% probability that a commercial geothermal resource exists on tribal lands in the Mt. Jefferson area. The geothermal resource assessment and other cost, risk and constraints information has been incorporated into the strategic plan.

James Manion, Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises; David McClain, McClain & Associates

2007-05-17

413

Alloys for prosthodontic restorations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The numbers and types of alloys for prosthodontic restorations have increased dramatically over the past 25 years, making selection of an alloy for a given clinical situation difficult. Factors such as cost, the need for better strength, and worries about alloy corrosion have pressured the alloy market to change significantly. A number of properties—including yield strength, hardness, elastic modulus, microstructural

John C. Wataha

2002-01-01

414

Nonstationary iterative image restoration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces different types of nonstationary constrained iterative image restoration algorithms. The adaptivity of the algorithm is introduced by the constraint operator which incorporates properties of the response of the human visual system. The properties of the visual system are represented by noise masking and visibility functions. A new way of computing the masking function is also introduced. The

A. Katsaggelos; J. Biemond; R. M. Mersereau; R. W. Schafer

1985-01-01

415

Restoring Fossil Creek  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Fossil Creek had been dammed for the past 90 years, and plans were underway to restore the stream. The creek runs through Central Arizona and flows from the high plateaus to the desert, cutting through the same formations that form the Grand Canyon. This article discusses the Fossil Creek monitoring project. In this project, students and teachers…

Flaccus, Kathleen; Vlieg, Julie; Marks, Jane C.; LeRoy, Carri J.

2004-01-01

416

Restoration of face images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Restoration techniques are applied to degraded face samples. The techniques considered are those of Wiener Filtering, Lucy Richardson deconvolution, Blind deconvolution and Constrained least squares filtering (CLSF). Images degraded by low blur, high blur and low blur with noise are experimented with and the results are expounded.

Srinivasan, Aparna

2011-12-01

417

Restoring Fossil Creek  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fossil Creek had been dammed for the past 90 years, and plans were underway to restore the stream. The creek runs through Central Arizona and flows from the high plateaus to the desert, cutting through the same formations that form the Grand Canyon. This article discusses the Fossil Creek monitoring project. In this project, students and teachers…

Flaccus, Kathleen; Vlieg, Julie; Marks, Jane C.; LeRoy, Carri J.

2004-01-01

418

Inevitability of Balance Restoration  

PubMed Central

Prolonged imbalance between input and output of any element in a living organism is incompatible with life. The duration of imbalance varies, but eventually balance is achieved. This rule applies to any quantifiable element in a compartment of finite capacity. Transient discrepancies occur regularly, but given sufficient time, balance is always achieved, because permanent imbalance is impossible, and the mechanism for eventual restoration of balance is foolproof. The kidney is a central player for balance restoration of fluid and electrolytes, but the smartness of the kidney is not the reason for perfect balance. The kidney merely accelerates the process. The most crucial element of the control system is that discrepancy between intake and output inevitably leads to a change in total content of the element in the system, and uncorrected balance has a cumulative effect on the overall content of the element. In a living organism, the speed of restoration of balance depends on the permissible duration of imbalance without death or severe disability. The three main factors that influence the speed of balance restoration are: magnitude of flux, basal store, and capacity for additional storage. For most electrolytes, total capacity is such that a substantial discrepancy is not possible for more than a week or two. Most control mechanisms correct abnormality partially. The infinite gain control mechanism is unique in that abnormality is completely corrected upon completion of compensation.

2010-01-01

419

Arthroscopic ultrasound technique for simultaneous quantitative assessment of articular cartilage and subchondral bone: an in vitro and in vivo feasibility study.  

PubMed

Traditional arthroscopic examination is subjective and poorly reproducible. Recently, we introduced an arthroscopic ultrasound method for quantitative diagnostics of cartilage lesions. Here we describe our investigation of the feasibility of ultrasound arthroscopy for simultaneous measurements of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Human osteochondral samples (n = 13) were imaged using a clinical 9-MHz ultrasound system. Ultrasound reflection coefficients (R, IRC), the ultrasound roughness index (URI) and the apparent integrated backscattering coefficient (AIB) were determined for both tissues. Mechanical testing, histologic analyses and micro-scale computed tomography imaging were the reference methods. Ultrasound arthroscopies were conducted on two patients. The ultrasound reflection coefficient correlated with the Mankin score and Young's modulus of cartilage (|r| > 0.56, p < 0.05). Ultrasound parameters (R, IRC, AIB) for subchondral bone correlated with the bone surface/volume ratio (|r| > 0.70, p < 0.05) and trabecular thickness (|r| > 0.59, p < 0.05). Furthermore, R and subchondral bone mineral density were significantly correlated (|r| > 0.65, p < 0.05). Arthroscopic ultrasound examination provided diagnostically valuable information on cartilage and subchondral bone in vivo. PMID:23743098

Liukkonen, J; Hirvasniemi, J; Joukainen, A; Penttilä, P; Virén, T; Saarakkala, S; Kröger, H; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

2013-06-04

420

14. EAST ELEVATION, COTTAGE. EXTERIOR NEARLY RESTORED. INTERIOR UNDERGOING RESTORATION. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. EAST ELEVATION, COTTAGE. EXTERIOR NEARLY RESTORED. INTERIOR UNDERGOING RESTORATION. EUCALYPTUS TREE PLANTED BY GERTRUDE KEIL PLANNED FOR REMOVAL. - Gold Ridge Farm, 7777 Bodega Avenue, Sebastopol, Sonoma County, CA

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