Science.gov

Sample records for resulting radiation hotspots

  1. Accumulation of radium in ferruginous protein bodies formed in lung tissue: association of resulting radiation hotspots with malignant mesothelioma and other malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Eizo; Makishima, Akio; Hagino, Kyoko; Okabe, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    While exposure to fibers and particles has been proposed to be associated with several different lung malignancies including mesothelioma, the mechanism for the carcinogenesis is not fully understood. Along with mineralogical observation, we have analyzed forty-four major and trace elements in extracted asbestos bodies (fibers and proteins attached to them) with coexisting fiber-free ferruginous protein bodies from extirpative lungs of individuals with malignant mesothelioma. These observations together with patients’ characteristics suggest that inhaled iron-rich asbestos fibers and dust particles, and excess iron deposited by continuous cigarette smoking would induce ferruginous protein body formation resulting in ferritin aggregates in lung tissue. Chemical analysis of ferruginous protein bodies extracted from lung tissues reveals anomalously high concentrations of radioactive radium, reaching millions of times higher concentration than that of seawater. Continuous and prolonged internal exposure to hotspot ionizing radiation from radium and its daughter nuclides could cause strong and frequent DNA damage in lung tissue, initiate different types of tumour cells, including malignant mesothelioma cells, and may cause cancers. PMID:19644223

  2. BENCHMARKING UPGRADED HOTSPOT DOSE CALCULATIONS AGAINST MACCS2 RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Brotherton, Kevin

    2009-04-30

    The radiological consequence of interest for a documented safety analysis (DSA) is the centerline Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) incurred by the Maximally Exposed Offsite Individual (MOI) evaluated at the 95th percentile consequence level. An upgraded version of HotSpot (Version 2.07) has been developed with the capabilities to read site meteorological data and perform the necessary statistical calculations to determine the 95th percentile consequence result. These capabilities should allow HotSpot to join MACCS2 (Version 1.13.1) and GENII (Version 1.485) as radiological consequence toolbox codes in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Central Registry. Using the same meteorological data file, scenarios involving a one curie release of {sup 239}Pu were modeled in both HotSpot and MACCS2. Several sets of release conditions were modeled, and the results compared. In each case, input parameter specifications for each code were chosen to match one another as much as the codes would allow. The results from the two codes are in excellent agreement. Slight differences observed in results are explained by algorithm differences.

  3. Absorption of microwave radiation by the anesthetized rat: electromagnetic and thermal hotspots in body and tail

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; Emmerson, R.Y.; DeWitt, J.R.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1987-01-01

    Anatomic variability in the deposition of radiofrequency electromagnetic energy in mammals has been well documented. A recent study reported specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots in the brain, rectum and tail of rat carcasses exposed to 360- and to 2450-MHz microwave radiation. Regions of intense energy absorption are generally thought to be of little consequence when predicting thermal effects of microwave irradiation because it is presumed that heat transfer via the circulatory system promptly redistributes localized heat to equilibrate tissue temperature within the body. Experiments on anesthetized, male Long-Evans rats (200-260 g) irradiated for 10 or 16 min with 2450, 700, or 360 MHz radiation at SARs of 2 W/kg, 6 W/kg, or 10 W/kg indicated that postirradiation localized temperatures in regions previously shown to exhibit high SARs were appreciably above temperatures at body sites with lower SARs. The postirradiation temperatures in the rectum and tail were significantly higher in rats irradiated at 360 MHz and higher in the tail at 2450 MHz than temperatures resulting from exposure to 700 MHz. This effect was found for whole-body-averaged SARs as low as 6 W/kg at 360 MHz and 10 W/kg at 2450 MHz. In contrast, brain temperatures in the anesthetized rats were not different from those measured in the rest of the body following microwave exposure.

  4. Absorption of microwave radiation by the anesthetized rat: Electromagnetic and thermal hotspots in body and tail

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; Emmerson, R.Y.; DeWitt, J.R.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1987-01-01

    Anatomic variability in the deposition of radiofrequency electromagnetic energy in mammals has been well documented. A recent study reported specific absorption rat (SAR) hotspots in the brain, rectum and tail of rat carcasses exposed to 360- and to 2,450-MHz microwave radiation. Regions of intense energy absorption are generally thought to be of little consequence when predicting thermal effects of microwave irradiation because it is presumed that heat transfer via the circulatory system promptly redistributes localized heat to equilibrate tissue temperature within the body. Experiments on anesthetized, male Long-Evans rats (200-260 g) irradiated for 10 or 16 min with 2,450, 700, or 360 MHz radiation at SARs of 2 W/kg, 6 W/kg, or 10 W/kg indicated that postirradiation localized temperatures in regions previously shown to exhibit high SARs were appreciably above temperatures at body sites with lower SARs. The postirradiation temperatures in the rectum and tail were significantly higher in rats irradiated at 360 MHz and higher in the tail at 2,450 MHz than temperatures resulting from exposure to 700 MHz. The effect was found for whole-body-averages SARs as low as 6 W/kg at 360 MHz and 10 W/g at 2,450 MHz.

  5. First Results from HOTSPOT: The Snake River Plain Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Schmitt, D. R.; Nielson, D.; Evans, J. P.; Christiansen, E. H.; Morgan, L.; Shanks, W. C. Pat; Prokopenko, A. A.; Lachmar, T.; Liberty, L. M.; Blackwell, D. D.; Glen, J. M.; Champion, L. D.; Potter, K. E.; Kessler, J. A.

    2013-03-01

    HOTSPOT is an international collaborative effort to understand the volcanic history of the Snake River Plain (SRP). The SRP overlies a thermal anomaly, the Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot, that is thought to represent a deep-seated mantle plume under North America. The primary goal of this project is to document the volcanic and stratigraphic history of the SRP, which represents the surface expression of this hotspot, and to understand how it affected the evolution of continental crust and mantle. An additional goal is to evaluate the geothermal potential of southern Idaho. Project HOTSPOT has completed three drill holes. (1) The Kimama site is located along the central volcanic axis of the SRP; our goal here was to sample a long-term record of basaltic volcanism in the wake of the SRP hotspot. (2) The Kimberly site is located near the margin of the plain; our goal here was to sample a record of high-temperature rhyolite volcanism associated with the underlying plume. This site was chosen to form a nominally continuous record of volcanism when paired with the Kimama site. (3) The Mountain Home site is located in the western plain; our goal here was to sample the Pliocene-Pleistocene transition in lake sediments at this site and to sample older basalts that underlie the sediments. We report here on our initial results for each site, and on some of the geophysical logging studies carried out as part of this project. doi:10.2204/iodp.sd.15.06.2013

  6. Secondary Hotspots in the South Pacific as a Result of Mantle Plumelets and Lithospheric Extension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A.; Staudigel, H.; Wijbrans, J.; Pringle, M.

    2003-12-01

    By far the largest number of secondary hotspots (cf. Courtillet et al., 2003) can be found in the "South Pacific Thermal and Isotopic Anomaly" (SOPITA) or "Superswell" region. Its Cretaceous counterpart is preserved in a large range of seamounts and guyots found in the "West Pacific Seamount Province" (WPSP). The seamounts in these regions display very distinct and long-lived isotopic signatures (Staudigel et al., 1991; Koppers et al., 2003) that can be used to combine source region chemistry and seamount geochronology to map out mantle melting anomalies over geological time. These mappings may resolve many important questions regarding the stationary character, continuity and longevity of the melting anomalies in the South Pacific mantle - and its secondary hotspots. Of all secondary hotspots that are currently active in the SOPITA we could identify only two hotspots that appear to be long-lived and that have Cretaceous counterparts in the WPSP. Plate reconstructions show that the "HIMU-type" Southern Wake seamounts may have originated from the Mangaia-Rurutu "hotline" in the Cook-Austral Islands, whereas the "EMI-type" Magellan seamounts may have originated from the Rarotonga hotspot. All other hotspots in the SOPITA and WPSP are short-lived (or intermittently active) as evidenced by the presence of numerous seamount trail "segments" representing no more than 10-40 Myr of volcanism. Our observations violate one or more assumptions of the classical Wilson-Morgan hotspot hypothesis: (1) none of the South Pacific hotspots are continuously active, (2) most are short-lived, (3) some show evidence of hotspot motion, and (4) most of them have poor linear age progressions, if any at all. On top of this we have evidence for volcanism along "hotlines" and the "superposition" of hotspots. The simple and elegant "hotspot" model, therefore, seems insufficient to explain the age distribution and source region characteristics of intra-plate volcanoes in the South Pacific. This

  7. ABSORPTION OF MICROWAVE RADIATION BY THE ANESTHETIZED RAT: ELECTROMAGNETIC AND THERMAL HOTSPOTS IN BODY AND TAIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anatomic variability in the deposition of radio frequency electromagnetic energy in mammals as been well documented. ecent study [D'Andrea et al. 1985] reported specific absorption rat (SAR) hotspots in the brain, rectum, and tail of rat carcasses exposed to 360- and to 2,450-MHz...

  8. Correlation Between Interphase Chromatin Structure and - and High-Let Radiation-Induced - and Intra-Chromosome Exchange Hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu; Mangala, Lingegowda; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David

    2012-07-01

    CORRELATION BETWEEN INTERPHASE CHROMATIN STRUCTURE AND LOW- AND HIGH-LET RADIATION-INDUCED INTER- AND INTRA-CHROMOSOME EXCHANGE HOTSPOTS Ye Zhang1,2, Lingegowda S. Mangala1,3, Aroumougame Asaithamby4, David J. Chen4, and Honglu Wu1 1 NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA 2 Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group, Houston, Texas, USA 3 University of Houston Clear Lake, Houston, Texas, USA 4 University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA To investigate the relationship between chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high-LET radiation and chromatin folding, we reconstructed the three dimensional structure of chromosome 3 and measured the physical distances between different regions of this chromosome. Previously, we investigated the location of breaks involved in inter- and intrachromosomal type exchange events in chromosome 3 of human epithelial cells, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. After exposure to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, intra-chromosome exchanges occurred preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11 regions, and the breaks involved in inter-chromosome exchanges occurred in two regions near the telomeres of the chromosome. In this study, human epithelial cells were fixed in G1 phase and interphase chromosomes hybridized with an mBAND probe for chromosome 3 were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope. The 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 with different colored regions was reconstructed, and the distance between different regions was measured. We show that, in most of the G1 cells, the regions containing 3p21 and 3q11 are colocalized in the center of the chromosome domain, whereas, the regions towards the telomeres of the chromosome are located in the peripherals of the chromosome domain. Our results demonstrate that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation-induced inter and intra-chromosome aberrations depends

  9. Toad radiation reveals into-India dispersal as a source of endemism in the Western Ghats-Sri Lanka biodiversity hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Van Bocxlaer, Ines; Biju, SD; Loader, Simon P; Bossuyt, Franky

    2009-01-01

    Background High taxonomic level endemism in the Western Ghats-Sri Lanka biodiversity hotspot has been typically attributed to the subcontinent's geological history of long-term isolation. Subsequent out of – and into India dispersal of species after accretion to the Eurasian mainland is therefore often seen as a biogeographic factor that 'diluted' the composition of previously isolated Indian biota. However, few molecular studies have focussed on into-India dispersal as a possible source of endemism on the subcontinent. Using c. 6000 base pairs of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, we investigated the evolutionary history and biogeography of true toads (Bufonidae), a group that colonized the Indian Subcontinent after the Indo-Asia collision. Results Contrary to previous studies, Old World toads were recovered as a nested clade within New World Bufonidae, indicating a single colonization event. Species currently classified as Ansonia and Pedostibes were both recovered as being non-monophyletic, providing evidence for the independent origin of torrential and arboreal ecomorphs on the Indian subcontinent and in South-East Asia. Our analyses also revealed a previously unrecognized adaptive radiation of toads containing a variety of larval and adult ecomorphs. Molecular dating estimates and biogeographic analyses indicate that the early diversification of this clade happened in the Western Ghats and Sri Lanka during the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene. Conclusion Paleoclimate reconstructions have shown that the Early Neogene of India was marked by major environmental changes, with the transition from a zonal- to the current monsoon-dominated climate. After arrival in the Western Ghats-Sri Lanka hotspot, toads diversified in situ, with only one lineage able to successfully disperse out of these mountains. Consequently, higher taxonomic level endemism on the Indian Subcontinent is not only the result of Cretaceous isolation, but also of invasion, isolation and radiation of

  10. Results and analysis of the hot-spot temperature experiment for a cable-in-conduit conductor with thick conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlak, Kamil; Bruzzone, Pierluigi

    2015-12-01

    In the design of future DEMO fusion reactor a long time constant (∼23 s) is required for an emergency current dump in the toroidal field (TF) coils, e.g. in case of a quench detection. This requirement is driven mainly by imposing a limit on forces on mechanical structures, namely on the vacuum vessel. As a consequence, the superconducting cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC) of the TF coil have to withstand heat dissipation lasting tens of seconds at the section where the quench started. During that time, the heat will be partially absorbed by the (massive) steel conduit and electrical insulation, thus reducing the hot-spot temperature estimated strictly from the enthalpy of the strand bundle. A dedicated experiment has been set up at CRPP to investigate the radial heat propagation and the hot-spot temperature in a CICC with a 10 mm thick steel conduit and a 2 mm thick glass epoxy outer electrical insulation. The medium size, ∅ = 18 mm, NbTi CICC was powered by the operating current of up to 10 kA. The temperature profile was monitored by 10 temperature sensors. The current dump conditions, namely the decay time constant and the quench detection delay, were varied. The experimental results show that the thick conduit significantly contributes to the overall enthalpy balance, and consequently reduces the amount of copper required for the quench protection in superconducting cables for fusion reactors.

  11. The Correlation of Interphase Chromatin Structure with the Radiation-Induced Inter- and Intrachromosome Exchange Hotspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Purgason, Ashley M.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between chromosome aberrations induced by radiation and chromatin folding, we reconstructed three dimensional structure of chromosome 3 and measured the physical distances between different regions of the chromosome. Previously, we have investigated the location of breaks involved in inter- and intrachromosomal type exchange events in human chromosome 3, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, we reported that intra-chromosome exchanges occurred preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11 regions, and the breaks involving in inter-chromosome exchanges occurred in two regions towards the telomeres of the chromosome. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions are located on the same arm of the chromosome. In this study, human epithelial cells were fixed at G1 phase and the interphase cells were hybridized using the XCyte3 mBAND kit from MetaSystems. The z-section images of chromosome 3 were captured with a Leica and an LSM 510 Meta laser scanning confocal microscopes. A total of 100 chromosomes were analyzed. The reconstruction of three dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 with six different colored regions was achieved using the Imaris software. The relative distance between different regions was measured as well. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. The data showed that, in majority of the cells, the regions containing 3p21 and 3q11 are colocalized in the center of the chromosome, whereas, the regions towards the telomeres of the chromosome are either physically wrapping outside the chromosome center or with arms sticking out. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation

  12. APS undulator radiation: First results

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Dejus, R.J.; Hartog, P.D.

    1995-12-31

    The first undulator radiation has been extracted from the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The results from the characterization of this radiation are very satisfactory. With the undulator set at a gap of 15.8 mm (K=1.61), harmonics as high as the 17th were observed using a crystal spectrometer. The angular distribution of the third-harmonic radiation was measured, and the source was imaged using a zone plate to determine the particle beam emittance. The horizontal beam emittance was found to be 6.9 {plus_minus} 1.0 nm-rad, and the vertical emittance coupling was found to be less than 3%. The absolute spectral flux was measured over a wide range of photon energies, and it agrees remarkably well with the theoretical calculations based on the measured undulator magnetic field profile and the measured beam emittance. These results indicate that both the emittance of the electron beam and the undulator magnetic field quality exceed the original specifications.

  13. Observed climate change hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, M.; Palazzi, E.; Hardenberg, J.; Provenzale, A.

    2015-05-01

    We quantify climate change hotspots from observations, taking into account the differences in precipitation and temperature statistics (mean, variability, and extremes) between 1981-2010 and 1951-1980. Areas in the Amazon, the Sahel, tropical West Africa, Indonesia, and central eastern Asia emerge as primary observed hotspots. The main contributing factors are the global increase in mean temperatures, the intensification of extreme hot-season occurrence in low-latitude regions and the decrease of precipitation over central Africa. Temperature and precipitation variability have been substantially stable over the past decades, with only a few areas showing significant changes against the background climate variability. The regions identified from the observations are remarkably similar to those defined from projections of global climate models under a "business-as-usual" scenario, indicating that climate change hotspots are robust and persistent over time. These results provide a useful background to develop global policy decisions on adaptation and mitigation priorities over near-time horizons.

  14. HOTSPOT Health Physics codes for the PC

    SciTech Connect

    Homann, S.G.

    1994-03-01

    The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculation tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes are a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. HOTSPOT programs are reasonably accurate for a timely initial assessment. More importantly, HOTSPOT codes produce a consistent output for the same input assumptions and minimize the probability of errors associated with reading a graph incorrectly or scaling a universal nomogram during an emergency. The HOTSPOT codes are designed for short-term (less than 24 hours) release durations. Users requiring radiological release consequences for release scenarios over a longer time period, e.g., annual windrose data, are directed to such long-term models as CAPP88-PC (Parks, 1992). Users requiring more sophisticated modeling capabilities, e.g., complex terrain; multi-location real-time wind field data; etc., are directed to such capabilities as the Department of Energy`s ARAC computer codes (Sullivan, 1993). Four general programs -- Plume, Explosion, Fire, and Resuspension -- calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Other programs deal with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. Additional programs estimate the dose commitment from the inhalation of any one of the radionuclides listed in the database of radionuclides; calibrate a radiation survey instrument for ground-survey measurements; and screen plutonium uptake in the lung (see FIDLER Calibration and LUNG Screening sections).

  15. Hotspots in Hindsight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, B. R.; Foulger, G. R.; Hatfield, O.; Jackson, S.; Simpson, E.; Einbeck, J.; Moore, A.

    2014-12-01

    Torsvik et al. [2006] suggest that the original locations of large igneous provinces ("LIPs") and kimberlites, and current locations of melting anomalies (hot-spots) lie preferentially above the margins of two Large Lower-Mantle Shear Velocity Provinces" (LLSVPs), at the base of the mantle, and that the correlation has a high significance level (> 99.9999%). They conclude the LLSVP margins are Plume-Generation Zones, and deep-mantle plumes cause hotspots and LIPs. This conclusion raises questions about what physical processes could be responsible, because, for example the LLSVPs are likely dense and not abnormally hot [Trampert et al., 2004]. The supposed LIP-hotspot-LLSVP correlations probably are examples of the "Hindsight Heresy" [Acton, 1959], of basing a statistical test upon the same data sample that led to the initial formulation of a hypothesis. In doing this, many competing hypotheses will have been considered and rejected, but this fact will not be taken into account in statistical assessments. Furthermore, probabilities will be computed for many subsets and combinations of the data, and the best-correlated cases will be cited, but this fact will not be taken into account either. Tests using independent hot-spot catalogs and mantle models suggest that the actual significance levels of the correlations are two or three orders of magnitude smaller than claimed. These tests also show that hot spots correlate well with presumably shallowly rooted features such as spreading plate boundaries. Consideration of the kimberlite dataset in the context of geological setting suggests that their apparent association with the LLSVP margins results from the fact that the Kaapvaal craton, the site of most of the kimberlites considered, lies in Southern Africa. These observations raise questions about the distinction between correlation and causation and underline the necessity to take geological factors into account. Fig: Left: Cumulative distributions of distances from

  16. On the Possible Relation of the Louisville Hotspot and Ontong Java Plateau from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 330 Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Yamazaki, T.; Geldmacher, J.; Scientific Party, E. 3; IODP Expedition 330 Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that the Ontong Java Plateau formed from the plume head of the Louisville mantle plume around 120 Ma. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 330 drilled five different guyots in the Louisville Seamount Trail ranging in age between 80 and 50 Ma. Paleolatitude estimates, 40Ar/39Ar radiometric ages and geochemical data collected during Expedition 330 will provide the ultimate test of whether the oldest Louisville seamounts were formed close to the 18-28°S (with an average of 24±2°) paleolatitude determined from basalt drilled on the Ontong Java Plateau during ODP Leg 192 and whether this Large Igneous Province (LIP) was genetically linked to the Louisville hotspot. If so, this would allow for the possibility that indeed the preceding plume head of the Louisville mantle upwelling caused the massive LIP volcanism forming the Ontong Java Plateau around 120 Ma. The outcome of such a test is of fundamental importance in our understanding of LIP and hotspot formation and lies at the heart of the mantle plume debate.

  17. Processes Driving the Adaptive Radiation of a Tropical Tree (Diospyros, Ebenaceae) in New Caledonia, a Biodiversity Hotspot.

    PubMed

    Paun, Ovidiu; Turner, Barbara; Trucchi, Emiliano; Munzinger, Jérôme; Chase, Mark W; Samuel, Rosabelle

    2016-03-01

    Due to its special geological history, the New Caledonian Archipelago is a mosaic of soil types, and in combination with climatic conditions this results in a heterogeneous environment across relatively small distances. A group of over 20 endemic species of Diospyros (Ebenaceae) has rapidly and recently radiated on the archipelago after a single long-distance dispersal event. Most of the Diospyros species in the radiating group are morphologically and ecologically well differentiated, but they exhibit low levels of DNA variability. To investigate the processes that shaped the diversification of this group we employed restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq). Over 8400 filtered SNPs generally confirm species delimitations and produce a well-supported phylogenetic tree. Our analyses document local introgression, but only a limited potential for gene flow over longer distances. The phylogenetic relationships point to an early regional clustering among populations and species, indicating that allopatric speciation with respect to macrohabitat (i.e., climatic conditions) may have had a role in the initial differentiation within the group. A later, more rapid radiation involved divergence with respect to microhabitat (i.e., soil preference). Several sister species in the group show a parallel divergence in edaphic preference. Searches for genomic regions that are systematically differentiated in this replicated phenotypic divergence pointed to loci potentially involved in ion binding and cellular transport. These loci appear meaningful in the context of adaptations to soil types that differ in heavy-metal and mineral content. Identical nucleotide changes affected only two of these loci, indicating that introgression may have played a limited role in their evolution. Our results suggest that both allopatric diversification and (parapatric) ecological divergence shaped successive rounds of speciation in the Diospyros radiation on New Caledonia. PMID:26430059

  18. Processes Driving the Adaptive Radiation of a Tropical Tree (Diospyros, Ebenaceae) in New Caledonia, a Biodiversity Hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Paun, Ovidiu; Turner, Barbara; Trucchi, Emiliano; Munzinger, Jérôme; Chase, Mark W.; Samuel, Rosabelle

    2016-01-01

    Due to its special geological history, the New Caledonian Archipelago is a mosaic of soil types, and in combination with climatic conditions this results in a heterogeneous environment across relatively small distances. A group of over 20 endemic species of Diospyros (Ebenaceae) has rapidly and recently radiated on the archipelago after a single long-distance dispersal event. Most of the Diospyros species in the radiating group are morphologically and ecologically well differentiated, but they exhibit low levels of DNA variability. To investigate the processes that shaped the diversification of this group we employed restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq). Over 8400 filtered SNPs generally confirm species delimitations and produce a well-supported phylogenetic tree. Our analyses document local introgression, but only a limited potential for gene flow over longer distances. The phylogenetic relationships point to an early regional clustering among populations and species, indicating that allopatric speciation with respect to macrohabitat (i.e., climatic conditions) may have had a role in the initial differentiation within the group. A later, more rapid radiation involved divergence with respect to microhabitat (i.e., soil preference). Several sister species in the group show a parallel divergence in edaphic preference. Searches for genomic regions that are systematically differentiated in this replicated phenotypic divergence pointed to loci potentially involved in ion binding and cellular transport. These loci appear meaningful in the context of adaptations to soil types that differ in heavy-metal and mineral content. Identical nucleotide changes affected only two of these loci, indicating that introgression may have played a limited role in their evolution. Our results suggest that both allopatric diversification and (parapatric) ecological divergence shaped successive rounds of speciation in the Diospyros radiation on New Caledonia. PMID:26430059

  19. Earth Radiation Budget Experiment - Preliminary seasonal results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Harrison, Edwin F.; Lee, Robert B., III

    1990-01-01

    Data from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and from the operational NOAA-9 satellite being placed in the archive of the earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are discussed. The results of the ERBE data validation effort are reviewed along with ERBE solar constant observations and earth-viewing results. The latter include monthly average results for July 1985, annual average clear-sky fluxes, and annual average, zonal, and global results.

  20. Evolution of a hotspot genus: geographic variation in speciation and extinction rates in Banksia (Proteaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hotspots of angiosperm species richness and endemism in Mediterranean-climate regions are among the most striking, but least well-understood, geographic patterns of biodiversity. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of rapid diversification within hotspots, compared to non-hotspot regions, as a major contributor to these patterns. We constructed the first near-complete phylogeny of Banksia (Proteaceae) to test whether diversification rates have differed between lineages confined to the southwest Australian hotspot and those found throughout southern, eastern and northern Australia. We then tested for variation in diversification rates among the bioclimatic zones within the southwest hotspot itself. Results Although Banksia species richness in the southwest is ten times that of the rest of the continent, we find little evidence for more rapid diversification in the southwest, although this result is inconclusive. However, we find firmer support for substantial rate variation within the southwest hotspot, with more rapid diversification in the semi-arid heaths and shrublands, compared to the high-rainfall forests. Most of the Banksia diversity of the southwest appears to be generated in the heaths and shrublands, with a high migration rate out of this zone boosting diversity of the adjacent forest zone. Conclusions The geographic pattern of diversification in Banksia appears more complex than can be characterized by a simple hotspot vs. non-hotspot comparison, but in general, these findings contrast with the view that the high diversity of Mediterranean hotspots is underpinned by rapid radiations. Steady accumulation of species at unexceptional rates, but over long periods of time, may also have contributed substantially to the great botanical richness of these regions. PMID:23957450

  1. HotSpot Health Physics Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-04-18

    The HotSpot Health Physics Codes were created to provide emergency response personnel and emergency planners with a fast, field-portable set of software tools for evaluating insidents involving redioactive material. The software is also used for safety-analysis of facilities handling nuclear material. HotSpot provides a fast and usually conservative means for estimation the radiation effects associated with the short-term (less than 24 hours) atmospheric release of radioactive materials.

  2. HotSpot Health Physics Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-03-02

    The HotSpot Health Physics Codes were created to provide emergency response personnel and emergency planners with a fast, field-portable set of software tools for evaluating incidents involving radioactive material. The software is also used for safety-analysis of facilities handling nuclear material. HotSpot provides a fast and usually conservative means for estimation the radiation effects associated with the short-term (less than 24 hours) atmospheric release of radioactive materials.

  3. Results of radiation treatment of cerebellar medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, H.W.; Maruyama, Y.

    1981-06-01

    A review of 20 patients with medulloblastoma who were treated with radiation treatment at the University of Kentucky Medical Center is presented. The age range was 1.5 to 31 years; only five patients were older than 16 years of age. A relationship between radiation dose and survival was obtained. A 5-year disease-free survival of 80% was obtained with a radiation dose of 5000 rad and more whereas only 15% of patients survived five years with a radiation dose of less than 5000. Treatment failures were mainly a result of local recurrence. This occurred in 78% of patients who were treated with radiation dosage of less than 5000 rad. The development of hydrocephalus appeared to be because of advanced disease and no 5-year survivors were noted in five patients who underwent systemic shunting procedure. A review of published data also supports a dose-dependent 5-year survival. Effective radiation treatment methods, along with doses to 5000 to 5500 rad, appear to lead to long term survival, frequent tumor cure and high performance outcome.

  4. hotspot: software to support sperm-typing for investigating recombination hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Dutheil, Julien Y.; Klötzl, Fabian; Haubold, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: In many organisms, including humans, recombination clusters within recombination hotspots. The standard method for de novo detection of recombinants at hotspots is sperm typing. This relies on allele-specific PCR at single nucleotide polymorphisms. Designing allele-specific primers by hand is time-consuming. We have therefore written a package to support hotspot detection and analysis. Results: hotspot consists of four programs: asp looks up SNPs and designs allele-specific primers; aso constructs allele-specific oligos for mapping recombinants; xov implements a maximum-likelihood method for estimating the crossover rate; six, finally, simulates typing data. Availability and Implementation: hotspot is written in C. Sources are freely available under the GNU General Public License from http://github.com/evolbioinf/hotspot/ Contact: haubold@evolbio.mpg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153632

  5. Evaluating Temporal Consistency in Marine Biodiversity Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Piacenza, Susan E; Thurman, Lindsey L; Barner, Allison K; Benkwitt, Cassandra E; Boersma, Kate S; Cerny-Chipman, Elizabeth B; Ingeman, Kurt E; Kindinger, Tye L; Lindsley, Amy J; Nelson, Jake; Reimer, Jessica N; Rowe, Jennifer C; Shen, Chenchen; Thompson, Kevin A; Heppell, Selina S

    2015-01-01

    With the ongoing crisis of biodiversity loss and limited resources for conservation, the concept of biodiversity hotspots has been useful in determining conservation priority areas. However, there has been limited research into how temporal variability in biodiversity may influence conservation area prioritization. To address this information gap, we present an approach to evaluate the temporal consistency of biodiversity hotspots in large marine ecosystems. Using a large scale, public monitoring dataset collected over an eight year period off the US Pacific Coast, we developed a methodological approach for avoiding biases associated with hotspot delineation. We aggregated benthic fish species data from research trawls and calculated mean hotspot thresholds for fish species richness and Shannon's diversity indices over the eight year dataset. We used a spatial frequency distribution method to assign hotspot designations to the grid cells annually. We found no areas containing consistently high biodiversity through the entire study period based on the mean thresholds, and no grid cell was designated as a hotspot for greater than 50% of the time-series. To test if our approach was sensitive to sampling effort and the geographic extent of the survey, we followed a similar routine for the northern region of the survey area. Our finding of low consistency in benthic fish biodiversity hotspots over time was upheld, regardless of biodiversity metric used, whether thresholds were calculated per year or across all years, or the spatial extent for which we calculated thresholds and identified hotspots. Our results suggest that static measures of benthic fish biodiversity off the US West Coast are insufficient for identification of hotspots and that long-term data are required to appropriately identify patterns of high temporal variability in biodiversity for these highly mobile taxa. Given that ecological communities are responding to a changing climate and other

  6. Evaluating Temporal Consistency in Marine Biodiversity Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Barner, Allison K.; Benkwitt, Cassandra E.; Boersma, Kate S.; Cerny-Chipman, Elizabeth B.; Ingeman, Kurt E.; Kindinger, Tye L.; Lindsley, Amy J.; Nelson, Jake; Reimer, Jessica N.; Rowe, Jennifer C.; Shen, Chenchen; Thompson, Kevin A.; Heppell, Selina S.

    2015-01-01

    With the ongoing crisis of biodiversity loss and limited resources for conservation, the concept of biodiversity hotspots has been useful in determining conservation priority areas. However, there has been limited research into how temporal variability in biodiversity may influence conservation area prioritization. To address this information gap, we present an approach to evaluate the temporal consistency of biodiversity hotspots in large marine ecosystems. Using a large scale, public monitoring dataset collected over an eight year period off the US Pacific Coast, we developed a methodological approach for avoiding biases associated with hotspot delineation. We aggregated benthic fish species data from research trawls and calculated mean hotspot thresholds for fish species richness and Shannon’s diversity indices over the eight year dataset. We used a spatial frequency distribution method to assign hotspot designations to the grid cells annually. We found no areas containing consistently high biodiversity through the entire study period based on the mean thresholds, and no grid cell was designated as a hotspot for greater than 50% of the time-series. To test if our approach was sensitive to sampling effort and the geographic extent of the survey, we followed a similar routine for the northern region of the survey area. Our finding of low consistency in benthic fish biodiversity hotspots over time was upheld, regardless of biodiversity metric used, whether thresholds were calculated per year or across all years, or the spatial extent for which we calculated thresholds and identified hotspots. Our results suggest that static measures of benthic fish biodiversity off the US West Coast are insufficient for identification of hotspots and that long-term data are required to appropriately identify patterns of high temporal variability in biodiversity for these highly mobile taxa. Given that ecological communities are responding to a changing climate and other

  7. Latitudinal Shift of the Hawaiian Hotspot: Motion Relative to Other Hotspots or True Polar Wander?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.; Horner-Johnson, B. C.

    2004-12-01

    Recent results from deep sea drilling confirm a large southward drift of the Hawaiian hotspot since Campanian and Maastrichtian time (ca. 70 to 83 Ma), as was previously found from prior paleomagnetic results from drilling (Kono, 1980; Jackson et al. 1980), from skewness analysis of Pacific magnetic anomalies (Gordon 1982, Petronotis & Gordon 1989, 1999; Petronotis et al. 1992, 1994; Acton & Gordon, 1991; Vasas et al. 1994; Horner-Johnson & Gordon 2003), and from other paleomagnetic and paleolatitude data (Gordon & Cape 1981; Sager & Bleil 1987). This southward drift could have been the result of motion of the Hawaiian hotspot relative to some other hotspots, or of true polar wander, or of both. Tarduno et al. (2003) have recently presented an extreme interpretation of these results as being entirely due to southward motion of the Hawaiian hotspot through the mantle. Here we show that this extreme interpretation is not supported by available data. While the Pacific plate paleomagnetic data are sufficient to show that the Hawaiian hotspot has moved southward relative to the spin axis, alone they cannot be used to demonstrate motion relative to the mantle or relative to other hotspots. To do so, coeval paleomagnetic poles are needed from the continents bordering the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Here we show that few, if any, of the coeval paleomagnetic poles from the continents incorporated into widely used reference paths pass minimum reliability criteria. Thus, the inference of rapid motion of the Hawaiian hotspot relative to the mantle is surely premature and probably incorrect. We further show that other earlier studies purporting to show motion between hotspots from paleomagnetic data are now invalid because of revisions to paleomagnetic poles from the continents or because of flaws in analysis. Updated paleomagnetic analyses indicate that little motion has occurred between Pacific hotspots and non-Pacific hotspots. Instead, available data are consistent with the

  8. Preliminary results of radiation measurements on EURECA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The eleven-month duration of the EURECA mission allows long-term radiation effects to be studied similarly to those of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Basic data can be generated for projections to crew doses and electronic and computer reliability on spacecraft missions. A radiation experiment has been designed for EURECA which uses passive integrating detectors to measure average radiation levels. The components include a Trackoscope, which employs fourteen plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) stacks to measure the angular dependence of high LET (greater than or equal to 6 keV/micro m) radiation. Also included are TLD's for total absorbed doses, thermal/resonance neutron detectors (TRND's) for low energy neutron fluences and a thick PNTD stack for depth dependence measurements. LET spectra are derived from the PNTD measurements. Preliminary TLD results from seven levels within the detector array show that integrated does inside the flight canister varied from 18.8 +/- 0.6 cGy to 38.9 +/- 1.2 cGy. The TLD's oriented toward the least shielded direction averaged 53% higher in dose than those oriented away from the least shielded direction (minimum shielding toward the least shielded direction varied from 1.13 to 7.9 g/cm(exp 2), Al equivalent). The maximum dose rate on EURECA (1.16 mGy/day) was 37% of the maximum measured on LDEF and dose rates at all depths were less than measured on LDEF. The shielding external to the flight canister covered a greater solid angle about the canister than the LDEF experiments.

  9. Preliminary results of radiation measurements on EURECA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The eleven-month duration of the EURECA mission allows long term radiation effects to be studied similarly to those of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Basic data can be generated for projections of crew doses and electronic and computer reliability on spacecraft missions. A radiation experiment has been designed for EURECA which uses passive integrating detectors to measure average radiation levels. The components include a Trackoscope, which employs fourteen plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) stacks to measure the angular dependence of LET (greater than or equal to 6 keV/microns) radiation. Also included are TLD's for total absorbed doses, thermal/resonance neutron detectors (TRND's) for low energy neutron fluences and a thick PNTD stack for depth dependence measurements. LET spectra are derived from the PNTD measurements. Preliminary TLD results from seven levels within the detector array show that integrated doses inside the flight canister varied from 18.8 plus or minus 0.6 cGy to 38.9 plus or minus 1.2 cGy. The TLD's oriented toward the least shielded direction averaged 53 percent higher in dose than those oriented away from the least shielded direction (minimum shielding toward the least shielded direction varied from 1.13 to 7.9 g/cm(exp 2), Al equivalent). The maximum dose rate on EURECA (1.16 mGy/day) was 37 percent of the maximum measured on LDEF and dose rates at all depths were less than measured on LDEF. The shielding external to the flight canister covered a greater solid angle about the canister than in the LDEF experiments.

  10. Patterns of volcanism at oceanic intraplate hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundargi, R.; Hall, P. S.

    2013-12-01

    One of the defining characteristics of plume-fed hotspots is the formation of a linear chain of age-progressive volcanoes [Wilson, 1963; Morgan, 1972; Courtillot et al, 2003]. However, in detail, the spatial distribution of volcanoes at oceanic hotspots is often complex and rarely takes the form of a simple linear array. Volcanoes at Hawaii, the archetype of plume-fed hotspots, have long been recognized to form two separate linear arrays, known as the Loa and Kea trends [Jackson, 1972]. Recent studies have suggested that volcanism at several additional hotspots, including the Samoa [Workman et al., 2004], Marquesas [Chauvel et al., 2009; Huang et al., 2011], and Society [Payne et al., 2012] hotspots, may also be loosely organized into sub-parallel trends. We have undertaken a systemic characterization of the spatial distribution of recent (3 Ma - present) magmatism, as reflected in bathymetry and topography, at a number of oceanic intraplate hotspots. We find that the average across-track (i.e., perpendicular to plate motion) bathymetric profile shows a distinct dual peak pattern at many hotspots. Characteristic spacing between peaks ranges from ~20 - 60 km and does not correlate with the age of the plate, as would be expected if the distribution of volcanism was being controlled by the elastic thickness of the plate [ten Brink, 1991]. Likewise, peak spacing does not appear to correlate with plate speed in the HS3 reference frame [Gripp and Gordon, 2002]. Spacing at individual hotspots does, however, correlate well with calculated plume buoyancy flux. This suggests that the time-averaged pattern, of dual-chain volcanism at the surface is reflects a bifurcated distribution of melting in the mantle rather than melt transport processes through the lithosphere. We propose that the dual-chain pattern of volcanism at hotspots results from the creation of a highly viscous plug of buoyant, dehydrated residuum that extends downwards from the base of the lithosphere

  11. Spectral investigation of hot-spot and cavity resonance effects on the terahertz radiation emitted from high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ single crystal mesa structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadowaki, Kazuo; Watanabe, Chiharu; Minami, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Klemm, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) electromagnetic radiation emitted from high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ mesa structures in the case of single mesa and series-connected mesas is investigated by the FTIR spectroscopic technique while observing its temperature distribution simultaneously by a SiC photoluminescence technique. Changing the bias level, sudden jumps of the hot-spot position were clearly observed. Although the radiation intensity changes drastically associated with the jump of the hot spot position, the frequency is unaffected as long as the voltage per junction is kept constant. Since the frequency of the intense radiation satisfies the cavity resonance condition, we confirmed that the cavity resonance is of primarily importance for the synchronization of whole intrinsic Josephson junctions in the mesa for high power radiation. This work was supported in part by the Grant-in-Aid for challenging Exploratory Research, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  12. Warfare in biodiversity hotspots.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Thor; Brooks, Thomas M; Da Fonseca, Gustavo A B; Hoffmann, Michael; Lamoreux, John F; Machlis, Gary; Mittermeier, Cristina G; Mittermeier, Russell A; Pilgrim, John D

    2009-06-01

    Conservation efforts are only as sustainable as the social and political context within which they take place. The weakening or collapse of sociopolitical frameworks during wartime can lead to habitat destruction and the erosion of conservation policies, but in some cases, may also confer ecological benefits through altered settlement patterns and reduced resource exploitation. Over 90% of the major armed conflicts between 1950 and 2000 occurred within countries containing biodiversity hotspots, and more than 80% took place directly within hotspot areas. Less than one-third of the 34 recognized hotspots escaped significant conflict during this period, and most suffered repeated episodes of violence. This pattern was remarkably consistent over these 5 decades. Evidence from the war-torn Eastern Afromontane hotspot suggests that biodiversity conservation is improved when international nongovernmental organizations support local protected area staff and remain engaged throughout the conflict. With biodiversity hotspots concentrated in politically volatile regions, the conservation community must maintain continuous involvement during periods of war, and biodiversity conservation should be incorporated into military, reconstruction, and humanitarian programs in the world's conflict zones. PMID:19236450

  13. Concentrator hot-spot testing, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a study to determine the hot-spot susceptibility of concentrator cells, to provide a hot-spot qualification test for concentrator modules, and to provide guidelines for reducing hot-spot susceptibility are presented. Hot-spot heating occurs in a photovoltaic module when the short-circuit current of a cell is lower than the string operating current forcing the cell into reverse bias with a concurrent power dissipation. Although the basis for the concentrator module hot-spot qualification test is the test developed for flat-plate modules, issues, such as providing cell illumination, introduce additional complexities into the testing procedure. The same general guidelines apply for protecting concentrator modules from hot-spot stressing as apply to flat-plate modules. Therefore, recommendations are made on the number of bypass diodes required per given number of series cells per module or source circuit. In addition, a new method for determining the cell temperature in the laboratory or in the field is discussed.

  14. The effects of acid leaching on 40Ar/39Ar age dating results using samples from the Walvis Ridge hotspot trail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klath, J. F.; Koppers, A. A.; Heaton, D. E.; Schnur, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we systematically explore how acid leaching can be used to reduce the negative effects of seawater alteration on the 40Ar/39Ar age dating of submarine basalts. Koppers et al (2000) showed that acid leaching of groundmass samples generated more consistent ages as well as ages more concordant with phenocrystic mineral phases, compared to samples that were left untreated. By studying the effects of progressively increasing the strength and length of acid treatment, we will show how acid leaching of groundmass separates reduces alteration while leaving the initial eruption signature intact. Samples were chosen from the Walvis ridge hotspot trail in the southeast Atlantic. Three samples were selected based on degree and style of alteration. Two samples (basalt and basaltic andesite) appear highly altered in thin section. The basalt contains diffuse iddingsite alteration that is pervasive throughout the groundmass. The basaltic andesite displays focused secondary mineral phases within and around abundant vesicles. The third sample, a trachyte, shows relatively minor degrees of alteration in thin section. These groundmass separates were divided into four splits and treated with a progressively stronger acid and for longer duration. One split from each rock was left untreated to act as a baseline. Of the other three splits from each sample, one was treated with a mild leach (1N HCl and 1N HNO3), one a strong leach (1N HCl, 1N HNO3, 6N HCl, and 3N HNO3), and lastly the strong leach performed twice. The samples were then handpicked to remove any remaining visible alteration. The untreated samples were picked as well, removing the most distinctly altered grains. All splits were analyzed by electron microprobe, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and the incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar dating method. We will report on the results of an image analysis of microprobe backscatter images and elemental maps taken of individual groundmass grains. This analysis will show the location

  15. Evaluating the Persistence of Shoreline Change Hotspots, Northern North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, J. H.; Farris, A. S.; Sullivan, C.

    2002-12-01

    series and a three-year series of beach profiles surveyed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the 1970's. We find the mean shoreline position for each series through time-averaging, greatly reducing the variance due to short-term reversible hotspots and other sources of shoreline position variability. We then find shoreline change as the difference between the two series' mean shorelines, with shoreline change significance estimated with a standard t-test. Observations show that short-term reversible hotspots have both fixed and changing locations. Some hotspots repeatedly occur at fixed locations through multiple storms, while others occur only once, with the hotspot/coldspot pattern completely reorganized from one storm to the next. At a broader spatial scale (10's of km), there are zones where hotspots typically occur (with or without fixed locations for individual hotspots), while in other zones we have never observed hotspots during our three years of observations. Long-term hotspots also have both fixed and non-fixed characteristics, although the paucity of data relevant to this temporal scale make conclusions difficult. However, a preliminary comparison between our long-term change results (found as described above), and shoreline change results previously published by the State of North Carolina for a 50-year period ending in 1992, suggests that while the overall patterns of shoreline change (hotspots and coldspots) have remained the same, there is also some evidence for the along-coast migration of several of the most significant erosional hotspots.

  16. Breast tomography with synchrotron radiation: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Silvia; Longo, Renata; Dreossi, Diego; Montanari, Francesco; Olivo, Alessandro; Arfelli, Fulvia; Bergamaschi, Anna; Poropat, Paolo; Rigon, Luigi; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Dalla Palma, Ludovico; Castelli, Edoardo

    2004-05-01

    A system for in vivo breast imaging with monochromatic x-rays has been designed and built at the synchrotron radiation facility Elettra in Trieste (Italy) and will be operational in 2004. The system design involves the possibility of performing both planar mammography and breast tomography. In the present work, the first results obtained with a test set-up for breast tomography are shown and discussed. Tomographic images of in vitro breasts were acquired using monochromatic x-ray beams in the energy range 20-28 keV and a linear array silicon pixel detector. Tomograms were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection algorithms; the effect of different filters was evaluated. The attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissue were measured, and a quantitative comparison of images acquired at different energies was performed by calculating the differential signal-to-noise ratio of fibroglandular details in adipose tissue. All images required a dose comparable to the dose delivered in clinical, conventional mammography and showed a high resolution of the breast structures without the overlapping effects that limit the visibility of the structures in 2D mammography. A quantitative evaluation of the images proves that the image quality at a given dose increases in the considered energy range and for the considered breast sizes. This work is dedicated to the memory of Paolo Poropat, who died tragically on June 8th, 2002. He was a brilliant experimental scientist and gave relevant contributions to the fields of high energy physics and medical physics. He had a very rich and versatile personality, a brilliant character, a big vitality. We will never forget him, his love of life, the passion and the enthusiasm he put into everything he did.

  17. Yellowstone Hotspot Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. B.; Farrell, J.; Massin, F.; Chang, W.; Puskas, C. M.; Steinberger, B. M.; Husen, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Yellowstone hotspot results from the interaction of a mantle plume with the overriding N. America plate producing a ~300-m high topographic swell centered on the Late Quaternary Yellowstone volcanic field. The Yellowstone area is dominated by earthquake swarms including a deadly M7.3 earthquake, extraordinary high heat flow up to ~40,000 mWm-2, and unprecedented episodes of crustal deformation. Seismic tomography and gravity data reveal a crustal magma reservoir, 6 to 15 km deep beneath the Yellowstone caldera but extending laterally ~20 km NE of the caldera and is ~30% larger than previously hypothesized. Kinematically, deformation of Yellowstone is dominated by regional crustal extension at up to ~0.4 cm/yr but with superimposed decadal-scale uplift and subsidence episodes, averaging ~2 cm/yr from 1923. From 2004 to 2009 Yellowstone experienced an accelerated uplift episode of up to 7 cm/yr whose source is modeled as magmatic recharge of a sill at the top of the crustal magma reservoir at 8-10-km depth. New mantle tomography suggest that Yellowstone volcanism is fed by an upper-mantle plume-shaped low velocity body that is composed of melt "blobs", extending from 80 km to 650 km in depth, tilting 60° NW, but then reversing tilt to ~60° SE to a depth of ~1500 km. Moreover, images of upper mantle conductivity from inversion of MT data reveal a high conductivity annulus around the north side of the plume in the upper mantle to resolved depths of ~300 km. On a larger scale, upper mantle flow beneath the western U.S. is characterized by eastward flow beneath Yellowstone at 5 cm/yr that deflects the plume to the west, and is underlain by a deeper zone of westerly return flow in the lower mantle reversing the deflection of the plume body to the SE. Dynamic modeling of the Yellowstone plume including a +15 m geoid anomaly reveals low excess plume temperatures, up to 150°K, consistent with a weak buoyancy flux of ~0.25 Mg/s. Integrated kinematic modeling of GPS

  18. A coalescent model of recombination hotspots.

    PubMed Central

    Wiuf, Carsten; Posada, David

    2003-01-01

    Recent experimental findings suggest that the assumption of a homogeneous recombination rate along the human genome is too naive. These findings point to block-structured recombination rates; certain regions (called hotspots) are more prone than other regions to recombination. In this report a coalescent model incorporating hotspot or block-structured recombination is developed and investigated analytically as well as by simulation. Our main results can be summarized as follows: (1) The expected number of recombination events is much lower in a model with pure hotspot recombination than in a model with pure homogeneous recombination, (2) hotspots give rise to large variation in recombination rates along the genome as well as in the number of historical recombination events, and (3) the size of a (nonrecombining) block in the hotspot model is likely to be overestimated grossly when estimated from SNP data. The results are discussed with reference to the current debate about block-structured recombination and, in addition, the results are compared to genome-wide variation in recombination rates. A number of new analytical results about the model are derived. PMID:12750351

  19. The unusual Samoan hotspot: A "hotspot highway" juxtaposed with a trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. G.; Konter, J. G.; Koppers, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Oceanic hotspots are fed by (relatively) stationary, upwelling mantle plumes that melt beneath mobile tectonic plates. This mechanism results in the generation of a linear chain of volcanoes exhibiting a clear age progression: the islands and seamounts should be increasingly older with increasing distance from the inferred location of the mantle plume. Located in the southwest Pacific, the Cook-Austral volcanic islands and seamounts were long thought to lack a clear age progression, and it has been argued that the Cook-Austral volcanic chain is an example of a hotspot not fed by a mantle plume. However, work by Chauvel et al (1997) showed that the Cook-Austral volcanoes have been generated by three distinct, co-linear mantle plumes spaced by ~1000 km, resulting in 3 overlapping hotspot tracks. Critically, the volcanoes generated by each hotspot exhibit a clear age progression that emerges from its respective plume. Using plate motion models, the reconstructed tracks of the three Cook-Austral hotspots backtrack through the region of the Pacific plate now occupied by the Samoan hotspot between 10 and 40 Ma (Konter et al., 2008). Owing to the unusual number of hotspots (Samoa is the fourth) that have been hosted in the region, we refer to this corridor of the Pacific plate as the "hotspot highway." The Samoan hotspot is burning through and thus crosscutting the trails of the older Cook-Austral hotspots. Consistent with this hypothesis, Jackson et al. (2010) reported volcanic features from the Cook-Austral hotspots in the Samoan region, including three seamounts and one atoll with geochemical affinities to the Cook-Austral hotspot. The Pacific lithosphere was likely "preconditioned" (metasomatized) by the three Cook-Australs hotspots before the arrival of the Samoan plume into the region, yet geochemical signatures associated with the Cook-Austral hotspot pedigrees are not evident in Samoan shield lavas. However, Samoan rejuvenated lavas exhibit a clear EMI (enriched

  20. Evolutionary hotspots in the Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, Amy G.; Inman, Richard D.; Barr, Kelly R.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Esque, Todd C.; Hathaway, Stacie A.; Wood, Dustin A.; Medica, Philip A.; Breinholt, Jesse W.; Stephen, Catherine L.; Gottscho, Andrew D.; Marks, Sharyn B.; Jennings, W. Bryan; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity within species provides the raw material for adaptation and evolution. Just as regions of high species diversity are conservation targets, identifying regions containing high genetic diversity and divergence within and among populations may be important to protect future evolutionary potential. When multiple co-distributed species show spatial overlap in high genetic diversity and divergence, these regions can be considered evolutionary hotspots. We mapped spatial population genetic structure for 17 animal species across the Mojave Desert, USA. We analyzed these in concurrence and located 10 regions of high genetic diversity, divergence or both among species. These were mainly concentrated along the western and southern boundaries where ecotones between mountain, grassland and desert habitat are prevalent, and along the Colorado River. We evaluated the extent to which these hotspots overlapped protected lands and utility-scale renewable energy development projects of the Bureau of Land Management. While 30–40% of the total hotspot area was categorized as protected, between 3–7% overlapped with proposed renewable energy project footprints, and up to 17% overlapped with project footprints combined with transmission corridors. Overlap of evolutionary hotspots with renewable energy development mainly occurred in 6 of the 10 identified hotspots. Resulting GIS-based maps can be incorporated into ongoing landscape planning efforts and highlight specific regions where further investigation of impacts to population persistence and genetic connectivity may be warranted.

  1. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  2. Recent Radiation Test Results for Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Topper, Alyson D.; Casey, Megan C.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Phan, Anthony M.; Kim, Hak S.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Single-event effect (SEE) and total ionizing dose (TID) test results are presented for various hardened and commercial power metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), including vertical planar, trench, superjunction, and lateral process designs.

  3. Medulloblastoma: treatment results with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lowery, G.S.; Ferree, C.R.; Raben, M.

    1981-09-01

    The treatment results in 18 patients with medulloblastoma were reviewed retrospectively. All patients were treated postoperatively with simultaneous craniospinal irradiation. Forty-four percent of the total group were alive without evidence of disease. Six of the 12 patients eligible for analysis at three years after completion of treatment had continuous disease-free survival. Six patients with intracranial recurrence received a second course of whole-brain irradiation, and two these are alive.

  4. Ultrasonic radiation from wedges of cubic profile: Experimental results.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian E; Remillieux, Marcel C; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Ulrich, T J; Pieczonka, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the increase in ultrasonic radiation obtained from a wedge of cubic profile relative to a plate of uniform thickness. The wedge of cubic profile provides high efficiency sound radiation matching layer from a mounted piezoelectric transducer into the surrounding air. Previous research on structures with indentations of power-law profile has focused on vibration mitigation using the so called "acoustic black-hole" effect, whereas here such structures are used to enhance ultrasonic radiation. The work provides experimental verification of the numerical results of Remillieux et al. (2014). PMID:26166628

  5. Models for the hotspot distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Jurdy, D.M. ); Stefanick, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Published hotspot catalogues all show a hemispheric concentration beyond what can be expected by chance. Cumulative distributions about the center of concentration are described by a power law with a fractal dimension closer to 1 than 2. Random sets of the corresponding sizes do not show this effect. A simple shift of the random sets away from a point would produce distributions similar to those of hotspot sets. The possible relation of the hotspots to the locations of ridges and subduction zones is tested using large sets of randomly-generated points to estimate areas within given distances of the plate boundaries. The probability of finding the observed number of hotspots within 10 of the ridges is about what is expected.

  6. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Brawley, Otis W.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Thomas, Charles R.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  7. Non-Scanning Radiometer Results for Earth Radiation Budget Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Green, Richard N.; Lee, Robert B., III; Bess, T. Dale; Rutan, David

    1992-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) included non-scanning radiometers (Luther, 1986) flown aboard a dedicated mission of Earth Radiation Budget Satellite, and the NOAA-9 and -10 operational meteorological spacecraft (Barkstrom and Smith, 1986). The radiometers first began providing Earth radiation budget data in November 1984 and have remained operational, providing a record of nearly 8 years of data to date for researchers. Although they do not produce measurements with the resolution given by the scanning radiometers, the results from the non-scanning radiometers are extremely useful for climate research involving long-term radiation data sets. This paper discusses the non-scanning radiometers, their stability, the method of analyzing the data, and brief scientific results from the data.

  8. Comparative phylogeography of oceanic archipelagos: Hotspots for inferences of evolutionary process

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Kerry L.; Gillespie, Rosemary G.

    2016-01-01

    Remote island archipelagos offer superb opportunities to study the evolution of community assembly because of their relatively young and simple communities where speciation contributes to the origin and evolution of community structure. There is great potential for common phylogeographic patterns among remote archipelagos that originate through hotspot volcanism, particularly when the islands formed are spatially isolated and linearly arranged. The progression rule is characterized by a phylogeographic concordance between island age and lineage age in a species radiation. Progression is most likely to arise when a species radiation begins on an older island before the emergence of younger islands of a hotspot archipelago. In the simplest form of progression, colonization of younger islands as they emerge and offer appropriate habitat, is coincident with cladogenesis. In this paper, we review recent discoveries of the progression rule on seven hotspot archipelagos. We then discuss advantages that progression offers to the study of community assembly, and insights that community dynamics may offer toward understanding the evolution of progression. We describe results from two compelling cases of progression where the mosaic genome may offer insights into contrasting demographic histories that shed light on mechanisms of speciation and progression on remote archipelagos. PMID:27432948

  9. Comparative phylogeography of oceanic archipelagos: Hotspots for inferences of evolutionary process.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kerry L; Gillespie, Rosemary G

    2016-07-19

    Remote island archipelagos offer superb opportunities to study the evolution of community assembly because of their relatively young and simple communities where speciation contributes to the origin and evolution of community structure. There is great potential for common phylogeographic patterns among remote archipelagos that originate through hotspot volcanism, particularly when the islands formed are spatially isolated and linearly arranged. The progression rule is characterized by a phylogeographic concordance between island age and lineage age in a species radiation. Progression is most likely to arise when a species radiation begins on an older island before the emergence of younger islands of a hotspot archipelago. In the simplest form of progression, colonization of younger islands as they emerge and offer appropriate habitat, is coincident with cladogenesis. In this paper, we review recent discoveries of the progression rule on seven hotspot archipelagos. We then discuss advantages that progression offers to the study of community assembly, and insights that community dynamics may offer toward understanding the evolution of progression. We describe results from two compelling cases of progression where the mosaic genome may offer insights into contrasting demographic histories that shed light on mechanisms of speciation and progression on remote archipelagos. PMID:27432948

  10. Hot-spot durability testing of amorphous cells and modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Charles; Jetter, Elizabeth

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a study to determine the hot-spot susceptibility of amorphous-silicon (a-Si) cells and modules, and to provide guidelines for reducing that susceptibility. Amorphous-Si cells are shown to have hot-spot susceptibility levels similar to crystalline-silicon (C-Si) cells. This premise leads to the fact that the same general guidelines must apply to protecting a-Si cells from hot-spot stressing that apply to C-Si cells. Recommendations are made on ways of reducing a-Si module hot-spot susceptibility including the traditional method of using bypass diodes and a new method unique to thin-film cells, limiting the string current by limiting cell area.

  11. Fish-derived nutrient hotspots shape coral reef benthic communities.

    PubMed

    Shantz, Andrew A; Ladd, Mark C; Schrack, Elizabeth; Burkepile, Deron E

    2015-12-01

    Animal-derived nutrients play an important role in structuring nutrient regimes within and between ecosystems. When animals undergo repetitive, aggregating behavior through time, they can create nutrient hotspots where rates of biogeochemical activity are higher than those found in the surrounding environment. In turn, these hotspots can influence ecosystem processes and community structure. We examined the potential for reef fishes from the family Haemulidae (grunts) to create nutrient hotspots and the potential impact of these hotspots on reef communities. To do so, we tracked the schooling locations of diurnally migrating grunts, which shelter at reef sites during the day but forage off reef each night, and measured the impact of these fish schools on benthic communities. We found that grunt schools showed a high degree of site fidelity, repeatedly returning to the same coral heads. These aggregations created nutrient hotspots around coral heads where nitrogen and phosphorus delivery was roughly 10 and 7 times the respective rates of delivery to structurally similar sites that lacked schools of these fishes. In turn, grazing rates of herbivorous fishes at grunt-derived hotspots were approximately 3 times those of sites where grunts were rare. These differences in nutrient delivery and grazing led to distinct benthic communities with higher cover of crustose coralline algae and less total algal abundance at grunt aggregation sites. Importantly, coral growth was roughly 1.5 times greater at grunt hotspots, likely due to the important nutrient subsidy. Our results suggest that schooling reef fish and their nutrient subsidies play an important role in mediating community structure on coral reefs and that overfishing may have important negative consequences on ecosystem functions. As such, management strategies must consider mesopredatory fishes in addition to current protection often offered to herbivores and top-tier predators. Furthermore, our results suggest that

  12. Linking the Galapagos hotspot and the Caribbean Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerlich, Rainer; Clark, Stuart R.; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2014-05-01

    Wide agreement exists that the Caribbean plate has a Pacific origin and that parts of it depict an igneous Plateau of up to 20 km thick crust. However, the origin of this thickened crust remains debated. One of the first suggestions for its origin was the arrival of a plume, whose remnant might be the Galapagos hotspot. More recently, it has been argued that reconstruction models predicted the Galapagos hotspot a thousand or more kilometres away from the Caribbean plate at the time of Plateau formation (~88 ?? 94 Ma). These authors primarily relied on the Caribbean Plateau moving into its present position relative to the Americas only in the last few million years. Secondarily, the authors assumed that the hotspot was fixed in an Indian-Atlantic hotspot reference frame. Here, we explore the idea that the Plateau moved into position around the time of the initiation of convergence between the North and South America, about 54.5 Ma. In addition, we adopt a fixed Pacific hotspot reference frame and compare our results to the recently developed Global Moving Hotspot Reference Frame. We show that both frames lead to good correlations between the paleo-positions of the Caribbean Plate and the Galapagos hotspot. As this result is consistent with abundant geochemical evidence that lends support for both a plume origin as well as the similarity between the Galapagos hotspot and rocks from the Plateau itself, we argue that alternative mechanisms to explain the thickened crust of the Caribbean Plateau are unnecessary. Additionally, based on our new plate reconstruction model, we present an age distribution of the lithosphere underneath the thickened crust of the Caribbean Plateau that has remained speculative until now.

  13. The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: Results from Phase I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Mlawer, Eli; Delamere, Jennifer; Shippert, Timothy; Cole, Jason; Iacono, Michael; Jin, Zhonghai; Li, Jiangnan; Manners, James; Raisanen, Petri; Rose, Fred; Zhang, Yuanchong; Wilson Michael J.; Rossow, William

    2011-01-01

    The computer codes that calculate the energy budget of solar and thermal radiation in Global Climate Models (GCMs), our most advanced tools for predicting climate change, have to be computationally efficient in order to not impose undue computational burden to climate simulations. By using approximations to gain execution speed, these codes sacrifice accuracy compared to more accurate, but also much slower, alternatives. International efforts to evaluate the approximate schemes have taken place in the past, but they have suffered from the drawback that the accurate standards were not validated themselves for performance. The manuscript summarizes the main results of the first phase of an effort called "Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes" (CIRC) where the cases chosen to evaluate the approximate models are based on observations and where we have ensured that the accurate models perform well when compared to solar and thermal radiation measurements. The effort is endorsed by international organizations such as the GEWEX Radiation Panel and the International Radiation Commission and has a dedicated website (i.e., http://circ.gsfc.nasa.gov) where interested scientists can freely download data and obtain more information about the effort's modus operandi and objectives. In a paper published in the March 2010 issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society only a brief overview of CIRC was provided with some sample results. In this paper the analysis of submissions of 11 solar and 13 thermal infrared codes relative to accurate reference calculations obtained by so-called "line-by-line" radiation codes is much more detailed. We demonstrate that, while performance of the approximate codes continues to improve, significant issues still remain to be addressed for satisfactory performance within GCMs. We hope that by identifying and quantifying shortcomings, the paper will help establish performance standards to objectively assess radiation code quality

  14. NASA Space Radiation Risk Project: Overview and Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, Steve R.; Chappell, Lori J.; George, Kerry A.; Hada, Megumi; Hu, Shaowen; Kidane, Yared H.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Kovyrshina, Tatiana; Norman, Ryan B.; Nounu, Hatem N.; Peterson, Leif E.; Plante, Ianik; Pluth, Janice M.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Scott Carnell, Lisa A.; Slaba, Tony C.; Sridharan, Deepa; Xu, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Risk project is responsible for integrating new experimental and computational results into models to predict risk of cancer and acute radiation syndrome (ARS) for use in mission planning and systems design, as well as current space operations. The project has several parallel efforts focused on proving NASA's radiation risk projection capability in both the near and long term. This presentation will give an overview, with select results from these efforts including the following topics: verification, validation, and streamlining the transition of models to use in decision making; relative biological effectiveness and dose rate effect estimation using a combination of stochastic track structure simulations, DNA damage model calculations and experimental data; ARS model improvements; pathway analysis from gene expression data sets; solar particle event probabilistic exposure calculation including correlated uncertainties for use in design optimization.

  15. Stable recombination hotspots in birds

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sonal; Leffler, Ellen M.; Sannareddy, Keerthi; Turner, Isaac; Venn, Oliver; Hooper, Daniel M.; Strand, Alva I.; Li, Qiye; Raney, Brian; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.; Griffith, Simon C.; McVean, Gil; Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein PRDM9 has a critical role in specifying meiotic recombination hotspots in mice and apes, but appears to be absent from other vertebrate species, including birds. To study the evolution and determinants of recombination in species lacking PRDM9, we inferred fine-scale genetic maps from population resequencing data for two bird species, the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata and the long-tailed finch Poephila acuticauda. We find that both species have hotspots, which are enriched near functional genomic elements. Unlike in mice and apes, the two species share most hotspots, with conservation seemingly extending over tens of millions of years. These observations suggest that in the absence of PRDM9, recombination targets functional features that both enable access to the genome and constrain its evolution. PMID:26586757

  16. Stable recombination hotspots in birds.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sonal; Leffler, Ellen M; Sannareddy, Keerthi; Turner, Isaac; Venn, Oliver; Hooper, Daniel M; Strand, Alva I; Li, Qiye; Raney, Brian; Balakrishnan, Christopher N; Griffith, Simon C; McVean, Gil; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-11-20

    The DNA-binding protein PRDM9 has a critical role in specifying meiotic recombination hotspots in mice and apes, but it appears to be absent from other vertebrate species, including birds. To study the evolution and determinants of recombination in species lacking the gene that encodes PRDM9, we inferred fine-scale genetic maps from population resequencing data for two bird species: the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, and the long-tailed finch, Poephila acuticauda. We found that both species have recombination hotspots, which are enriched near functional genomic elements. Unlike in mice and apes, most hotspots are shared between the two species, and their conservation seems to extend over tens of millions of years. These observations suggest that in the absence of PRDM9, recombination targets functional features that both enable access to the genome and constrain its evolution. PMID:26586757

  17. Acute Radiation Effects Resulting from Exposure to Solar Particle Event-Like Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann; Cengel, Keith

    2012-07-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animal models exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. As part of this program, FDA-approved drugs that may prevent and/or mitigate ARS symptoms are being evaluated. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations, gamma rays or electrons). The ARS is a phased syndrome which often includes vomiting and fatigue. Other acute adverse biologic effects of concern are the loss of hematopoietic cells, which can result in compromised bone marrow and immune cell functions. There is also concern for skin damage from high SPE radiation doses, including burns, and resulting immune system dysfunction. Using 3 separate animal model systems (ferrets, mice and pigs), the major ARS biologic endpoints being evaluated are: 1) vomiting/retching and fatigue, 2) hematologic changes (with focus on white blood cells) and immune system changes resulting from exposure to SPE radiation with and without reduced weightbearing conditions, and 3) skin injury and related immune system functions. In all of these areas of research, statistically significant adverse health effects have been observed in animals exposed to SPE-like radiation. Countermeasures for the management of ARS symptoms are being evaluated. New research findings from the past grant year will be discussed. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the NSBRI Center of Acute

  18. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.; Seaton, Michael; Todorov, Ilian; Nordlund, Kai; Dove, Martin T.; Trachenko, Kostya

    2014-02-28

    Zirconia has been viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and was consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as a nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with the account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely disjoint from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  19. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: Modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkadoula, E.; Devanathan, R.; Weber, W. J.; Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T.; Nordlund, K.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-02-01

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution, and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  20. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Evangelia; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J; Seaton, M; Todorov, I T; Nordlund, Kai; Dove, Martin T; Trachenko, Kostya

    2014-01-01

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We nd that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  1. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: Modeling results

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, E.; Devanathan, R.; Weber, W. J.; Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T.; Nordlund, K.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-02-28

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1–0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution, and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  2. The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: Results from Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Oreopoulos, L.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Delamere, Jennifer; Shippert, Timothy R.; Cole, Jason; Fomin, Boris; Iacono, Michael J.; Jin, Zhonghai; Li, Jiangning; Manners, James; Raisanen, Petri; Rose, Fred; Zhang, Yuanchong; Wilson, Michael J.; Rossow, William B.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from Phase I of the Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes (CIRC), intended as an evolving and regularly updated reference source for evaluation of radiative transfer (RT) codes used in Global Climate Models. CIRC differs from previous intercomparisons in that it relies on an observationally validated catalogue of cases. The seven CIRC Phase I baseline cases, five cloud-free, and two with overcast liquid clouds, are built around observations by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program that satisfy the goals of Phase I, namely to examine radiative transfer (RT) model performance in realistic, yet not overly complex, atmospheric conditions. In addition to the seven baseline cases, additional idealized "subcases" are also examined to facilitate intrepretation of the causes of model errors. In addition to summarizing individual model performance with respect to reference line-by-line calculations and inter-model differences, we also highlight RT model behavior for conditions of doubled CO2, aspects of utilizing a spectral specification of surface albedo, and the impact of the inclusion of scattering in the thermal infrared. Our analysis suggests that RT models should work towards improving their calculation of diffuse shortwave flux, shortwave absorption, treatment of spectral surface albedo, and shortwave CO2 forcing. On the other hand, LW calculations appear to be significantly closer to the reference results. By enhancing the range of conditions under which participating codes are tested, future CIRC phases will hopefully allow even more rigorous examination of RT code performance.

  3. Socioeconomic Context and the Food Landscape in Texas: Results from Hotspot Analysis and Border/Non-Border Comparison of Unhealthy Food Environments

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Jennifer J.; Abdelbary, Bassent; Klaas, Kelly; Tapia, Beatriz; Sexton, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the food landscape of Texas using the CDC’s Modified Retail Food Environment (mRFEI) and to make comparisons by border/non-border. Methods: The Modified Retail Food Environment index (mRFEI (2008)) is an index developed by the CDC that measures what percent of the total food vendors in a census track sell healthy food. The range of values is 0 (unhealthy areas with limited access to fruits and vegetables) to (100—Healthy). These data were linked to 2010 US Census socioeconomic and ethnic concentration data. Spatial analysis and GIS techniques were applied to assess the differences between border and non-border regions. Variables of interest were mRFEI score, median income, total population, percent total population less than five years, median age, % receiving food stamps, % Hispanic, and % with a bachelor degree. Results: Findings from this study reveal that food environment in Texas tends to be characteristic of a “food desert”. Analysis also demonstrates differences by border/non-border location and percent of the population that is foreign born and by percent of families who receive food stamps. Conclusions: Identifying the relationship between socioeconomic disparity, ethnic concentration and mRFEI score could be a fundamental step in improving health in disadvantage communities, particularly those on the Texas-Mexico border. PMID:24865399

  4. Aesthetic results following partial mastectomy and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matory, W.E. Jr.; Wertheimer, M.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Walton, R.L.; Love, S.; Matory, W.E.

    1990-05-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the aesthetic changes inherent in partial mastectomy followed by radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I and stage II breast cancer. A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project Protocol B-06 was undertaken in 57 patients from 1984 to the present. The size of mastectomy varied between 2 x 1 cm and 15 x 8 cm. Objective aesthetic outcome, as determined by physical and photographic examination, was influenced primarily by surgical technique as opposed to the effects of radiation. These technical factors included orientation of resections, breast size relative to size of resection, location of tumor, and extent and orientation of axillary dissection. Regarding cosmesis, 80 percent of patients treated in this study judged their result to be excellent or good, in comparison to 50 percent excellent or good as judged by the plastic surgeon. Only 10 percent would consider mastectomy with reconstruction for contralateral disease. Asymmetry and contour abnormalities are far more common than noted in the radiation therapy literature. Patients satisfaction with lumpectomy and radiation, however, is very high. This satisfaction is not necessarily based on objective criteria defining aesthetic parameters, but is strongly influenced by retainment of the breast as an original body part.

  5. Recent results about fan noise: Its generation, radiation and suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Fan noise including its generation, radiation characteristics, and suppression by acoustic treatment is studied. In fan noise generation, results from engine and fan experiments, using inflow control measures to suppress noise sources related to inflow distortion and turbulence, are described. The suppression of sources related to inflow allows the experiments to focus on the fan or engine internal sources. Some of the experiments incorporated pressure sensors on the fan blades to sample the flow disturbances encountered by the blades. From these data some inferences can be drawn about the origins of the disturbances. Also, hot wire measurements of a fan rotor wake field are presented and related to the fan's noise signature. The radiation and the suppression of fan noise are dependent on the acoustic modes generated by the fan. Fan noise suppression and radiation is described by relating these phenomena to the mode cutoff ratio parameter. In addition to its utility in acoustic treatment design and performance prediction, cutoff ratio was useful in developing a simple description of the radiation pattern for broadband fan noise. Some of the findings using the cutoff ratio parameter are presented.

  6. Ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis: radiation studies in Neurospora predictive for results in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; DeMarini, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Ionizing radiation was the first mutagen discovered and was used to develop the first mutagenicity assay. In the ensuing 70+ years, ionizing radiation became a fundamental tool in understanding mutagenesis and is still a subject of intensive research. Frederick de Serres et al. developed and used the Neurospora crassa ad-3 system initially to explore the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. Using this system, de Serres et al. demonstrated the dependence of the frequency and spectra of mutations induced by ionizing radiation on the dose, dose rate, radiation quality, repair capabilities of the cells, and the target gene employed. This work in Neurospora predicted the subsequent observations of the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Modeled originally on the mouse specific-locus system developed by William L. Russell, the N. crassa ad-3 system developed by de Serres has itself served as a model for interpreting the results in subsequent systems in mammalian cells. This review describes the primary findings on the nature of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in the N. crassa ad-3 system and the parallel observations made years later in mammalian cells.

  7. Results from radiation monitoring equipment experiment on STS-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, R. G.; Amico, R. L.; Brown, V. L.; Kidd, V. R.

    1984-07-01

    The results from the Radiation Equipment Monitoring (RME) experiment, flown onboard STS-8 are presented and discussed. The RME consists of the HRM-III gamma ray counter and PRM neutron/proton dosimeter. The gamma ray data agree wtih data from previous flights. Large increases in count rates are observed when the Orbiter is in the South Atlantic Anomaly. Neutron/proton dosage is consistent with NASA predictions for STS-8.

  8. Fixed Hot-spots Gone With Wind? Clues From Paleomagnetic Investigations of Large Igneous Provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Ernesto, M.

    2013-05-01

    Paleomagnetic studies of Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) 197 on samples from the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount chain suggested that these rocks formed much farther north than the hotspot currently beneath Hawaii. These findings indicate that the hotspot, once thought to be fixed beneath the Earth's crust, actually jumped southward rapidly. Here we report paleomagnetic evidence that is consistence with these findings and suggests that rapid hotspots motion (also southward jumps) occurred while the massive Ontong Java (OJP), Kerguelen Plateau (KP), and Parana Magmatic Province (PMP) large igneous provinces formed. The paleomagnetic paleolatitude for the OJP is ~20 farther north than those predicted by the Louisville hotspot model. The difference between the paleomagnetic and hotspot calculated paleolatitudes cannot be explained by true polar wander estimates derived from other lithospheric plates. Our results are therefore consistent with and extend the Emperor-Hawaiian hotspot features in the northern Pacific Ocean that suggest Late Cretaceous to Eocene motion of Pacific hotspots. Compared to the latitude of the Kerguelen hotspot, the paleolatitudes of the central and northern Kerguelen Plateau obtained by ODP Leg 183 are further north. This difference also indicates a southward movement of the Kerguelen hotspot since the Cretaceous relative to the spin axis of the Earth. Numerical modeling of plume conduit motion in a large-scale mantle flow also predicts southward motion of the Kerguelen hotspot, which is consistent with paleomagnetic results. Likewise, paleomagnetic results from PMP reveal significant southward movement of the Tristan da Cunha hotspot in the Cretaceous. Elucidating how large igneous province formation and mantle dynamics are related and whether hotspots moved at comparable rates during other times are challenges for future research.

  9. Electron Energy Distribution in Hotspots of Cygnus A:Filling the Gap with Spitzer Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Cheung, C.C.; Harris, D.E.; Ostrowski, M.

    2007-03-06

    Here we present Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of Cyg A with the Infrared Array Camera at 4.5 {micro}m and 8.0 {micro}m, resulting in the detection of the high-energy tails or cut-offs in the synchrotron spectra for all four hotspots of this archetype radio galaxy. When combined with the other data collected (and re-analyzed) from the literature, our observations allow for detailed modeling of the broad-band (radio-to-X-ray) emission for the brightest spots A and D. We confirm that the X-ray flux detected previously from these features is consistent with the synchrotron self-Compton radiation for the magnetic field intensity B {approx} 170 {micro}G in spot A, and B {approx} 270 {micro}G in spot D. We also find that the energy density of the emitting electrons is most likely larger by a factor of a few than the energy density of the hotspots magnetic field. We construct energy spectra of the radiating ultrarelativistic electrons. We find that for both hotspots A and D these spectra are consistent with a broken power-law extending from at least 100MeV up to {approx} 100GeV, and that the spectral break corresponds almost exactly to the proton rest energy of {approx} 1GeV. We argue that the shape of the electron continuum most likely reflects two different regimes of the electron acceleration process taking place at mildly relativistic shocks, rather than resulting from radiative cooling and/or absorption e.ects. In this picture the protons inertia defines the critical energy for the hotspot electrons above which Fermi-type acceleration processes may play a major role, but below which the operating acceleration mechanism has to be of a different type. At energies {approx}> 100 GeV, the electron spectra cut-off/steepen again, most likely as a result of spectral aging due to radiative loss effects. We discuss several implications of the presented analysis for the physics of extragalactic jets.

  10. Accounting for false negatives in hotspot detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sego, Landon H.; Wilson, John E.

    2007-08-28

    Hotspot sampling designs are used in environmental sampling to identify the location of one (or more) contiguous regions of elevated contamination. These regions are known as hotspots. The problem of how to calculate the probability of detecting an elliptical hotspot using a rectangular or triangular grid of sampling points was addressed by Singer and Wickman in 1969. This approach presumed that any sample which coincided with a hotspot would detect the hotspot without error. However, for many sampling methodologies, there is a chance that the hotspot will not be detected even though it has been sampled directly--a false negative. We present a mathematical solution and a numerical algorithm which account for false negatives when calculating the probability of detecting hotspots that are circular in shape.

  11. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith; Roses, Daniel; Speyer, James; Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  12. Results of Tests on Radiators for Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, H C; James, W S; Kleinschmidt, R V

    1920-01-01

    Part 1 is to present the results of tests on 56 types of core in a form convenient for use in the study of the performance of and possible improvements in existing designs. Working rules are given by which the data contained in the report may be used, and the most obvious conclusions as to the behavior of cores are summarized. Part 2 presents the results of tests made to determine the pressure necessary to produce water flows up to 50 gallons per minute through an 8-inch square section of radiator core. These data are of special value in evaluating the hydraulic head against which the circulating pump is required to operate.

  13. Sampling effects on the identification of roadkill hotspots: Implications for survey design.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sara M; Marques, J Tiago; Lourenço, André; Medinas, Denis; Barbosa, A Márcia; Beja, Pedro; Mira, António

    2015-10-01

    Although locating wildlife roadkill hotspots is essential to mitigate road impacts, the influence of study design on hotspot identification remains uncertain. We evaluated how sampling frequency affects the accuracy of hotspot identification, using a dataset of vertebrate roadkills (n = 4427) recorded over a year of daily surveys along 37 km of roads. "True" hotspots were identified using this baseline dataset, as the 500-m segments where the number of road-killed vertebrates exceeded the upper 95% confidence limit of the mean, assuming a Poisson distribution of road-kills per segment. "Estimated" hotspots were identified likewise, using datasets representing progressively lower sampling frequencies, which were produced by extracting data from the baseline dataset at appropriate time intervals (1-30 days). Overall, 24.3% of segments were "true" hotspots, concentrating 40.4% of roadkills. For different groups, "true" hotspots accounted from 6.8% (bats) to 29.7% (small birds) of road segments, concentrating from <40% (frogs and toads, snakes) to >60% (lizards, lagomorphs, carnivores) of roadkills. Spatial congruence between "true" and "estimated" hotspots declined rapidly with increasing time interval between surveys, due primarily to increasing false negatives (i.e., missing "true" hotspots). There were also false positives (i.e., wrong "estimated" hotspots), particularly at low sampling frequencies. Spatial accuracy decay with increasing time interval between surveys was higher for smaller-bodied (amphibians, reptiles, small birds, small mammals) than for larger-bodied species (birds of prey, hedgehogs, lagomorphs, carnivores). Results suggest that widely used surveys at weekly or longer intervals may produce poor estimates of roadkill hotspots, particularly for small-bodied species. Surveying daily or at two-day intervals may be required to achieve high accuracy in hotspot identification for multiple species. PMID:26232568

  14. Assigning a Price to Radiative Forcing: Methods, Results, and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, D. A.; Howarth, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change mitigation frameworks have increasingly begun to include components that involve active management of the land surface. Predominantly, these programs focus on the sequestration of greenhouse gasses in vegetation and soils, generating offset credits for projects which demonstrate considerable storage. However, it is widely known that biogeophysical interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere, such as latent and sensible heat flux, albedo radiative forcing, and surface roughness, can in many cases outweigh the influence of greenhouse gas storage on global and local climate. Surface albedo, in particular, has attracted attention in the context of these frameworks because it has been shown to influence the overall climate benefits of high-latitude forest growth through tradeoffs between carbon sequestration and radiative forcing from seasonal snow cover albedo. Here we review a methodology for pricing albedo-related radiative forcing through the use of an integrated assessment model, present the results under several emissions and social preference scenarios, and describe the implications that this pricing methodology may have on forest land management in the Northeastern United States. Additionally, we investigate the consequences of projected decreased winter precipitation on the net climate benefits of snow albedo throughout the state of New Hampshire, USA.

  15. Outlier Detection on Hotspots Data in Riau Province using DBSCAN Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukmasetya, Pristi; Sitanggang, Imas S.

    2016-01-01

    Indonesia has serious problems in forest fires. One of the potential factors which indicates forest fires is hotspot. Hotspot is a forest fires indicator that detects a location with relatively higher temperature in comparison with nearby positions. One possible prevention efforts for forest fires is by detecting outliers on hotspots data. This study detects outlier on hotspots data in Riau Province in between year 2001 to 2012 using the DBSCAN algorithm and determines the distribution of outlier hotspots by region and time. The experiment results show that the highest occurrence of outliers is in 2005. The number of outliers on hotspots data reaches 1241 hotspots with the sum of square error (SSE) is 0.084. Outlier hotspots in Riau Province in 2005 spread across 11 districts/cities and 136 districts. In 2005 the highest outlier are found in Rokan Hulu with the number of outliers is 186 points. The highest frequency of hotspot that is considered as outliers is found in August 2005, with a total of 355 outliers in which as many 97 of these outliers are occurred in Rokan Hulu District.

  16. Study of hotspot repair using cellular automata method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Norimasa; Takeuchi, Kanji; Sakurai, Mitsuo; Itoh, Takahisa; Okada, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-01

    In advanced semiconductor manufacturing, model-based optical proximity correction is commonly used to compensate for image errors. The final pattern is generated using correction values determined by lithography simulation. Image errors such as patterns with insufficient correction or patterns with excessive correction can be generated. These patterns with errors are called hotspots. Such errors are conventionally detected by lithography simulation of OPC patterns. When a hotspot is detected by lithography simulation, it has to be repaired manually or by repeated use of OPC tool. However, it is difficult to obtain correct pattern for a complicated shape, and the correction procedure may require a significant amount of additional processing. In order to solve this issue, we examine application of cellular automata (CA) method for hotspot correction. It is known that CA method can be used for weather or traffic analysis and prediction. In this report, we studied the CA method for deriving simple hotspot repair rule based on lattice cell-like models for light intensity distribution and OPC patterns. We will report on the results of hotspot correction technique with the OPC pattern using CA method.

  17. Distribution, congruence, and hotspots of higher plants in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Li, Jinya; Liu, Huiyuan; Qin, Haining

    2016-01-01

    Identifying biodiversity hotspots has become a central issue in setting up priority protection areas, especially as financial resources for biological diversity conservation are limited. Taking China’s Higher Plants Red List (CHPRL), including Bryophytes, Ferns, Gymnosperms, Angiosperms, as the data source, we analyzed the geographic patterns of species richness, endemism, and endangerment via data processing at a fine grid-scale with an average edge length of 30 km based on three aspects of richness information: species richness, endemic species richness, and threatened species richness. We sought to test the accuracy of hotspots used in identifying conservation priorities with regard to higher plants. Next, we tested the congruence of the three aspects and made a comparison of the similarities and differences between the hotspots described in this paper and those in previous studies. We found that over 90% of threatened species in China are concentrated. While a high spatial congruence is observed among the three measures, there is a low congruence between two different sets of hotspots. Our results suggest that biodiversity information should be considered when identifying biological hotspots. Other factors, such as scales, should be included as well to develop biodiversity conservation plans in accordance with the region’s specific conditions. PMID:26750244

  18. Distribution, congruence, and hotspots of higher plants in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Li, Jinya; Liu, Huiyuan; Qin, Haining

    2016-01-01

    Identifying biodiversity hotspots has become a central issue in setting up priority protection areas, especially as financial resources for biological diversity conservation are limited. Taking China's Higher Plants Red List (CHPRL), including Bryophytes, Ferns, Gymnosperms, Angiosperms, as the data source, we analyzed the geographic patterns of species richness, endemism, and endangerment via data processing at a fine grid-scale with an average edge length of 30 km based on three aspects of richness information: species richness, endemic species richness, and threatened species richness. We sought to test the accuracy of hotspots used in identifying conservation priorities with regard to higher plants. Next, we tested the congruence of the three aspects and made a comparison of the similarities and differences between the hotspots described in this paper and those in previous studies. We found that over 90% of threatened species in China are concentrated. While a high spatial congruence is observed among the three measures, there is a low congruence between two different sets of hotspots. Our results suggest that biodiversity information should be considered when identifying biological hotspots. Other factors, such as scales, should be included as well to develop biodiversity conservation plans in accordance with the region's specific conditions. PMID:26750244

  19. Distribution, congruence, and hotspots of higher plants in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lina; Li, Jinya; Liu, Huiyuan; Qin, Haining

    2016-01-01

    Identifying biodiversity hotspots has become a central issue in setting up priority protection areas, especially as financial resources for biological diversity conservation are limited. Taking China’s Higher Plants Red List (CHPRL), including Bryophytes, Ferns, Gymnosperms, Angiosperms, as the data source, we analyzed the geographic patterns of species richness, endemism, and endangerment via data processing at a fine grid-scale with an average edge length of 30 km based on three aspects of richness information: species richness, endemic species richness, and threatened species richness. We sought to test the accuracy of hotspots used in identifying conservation priorities with regard to higher plants. Next, we tested the congruence of the three aspects and made a comparison of the similarities and differences between the hotspots described in this paper and those in previous studies. We found that over 90% of threatened species in China are concentrated. While a high spatial congruence is observed among the three measures, there is a low congruence between two different sets of hotspots. Our results suggest that biodiversity information should be considered when identifying biological hotspots. Other factors, such as scales, should be included as well to develop biodiversity conservation plans in accordance with the region’s specific conditions.

  20. High coverage of litho hotspot detection by weak pattern scoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinho; Kim, NamJae; Kang, Jae-hyun; Paek, Seung Weon; Kwon, Steve; Shafee, Marwah; Madkour, Kareem; ElManhawy, Wael; Kwan, Joe; Brunet, Jean-Marie

    2015-03-01

    Achieving lithographic printability at advanced nodes (14nm and beyond) can impose significant restrictions on physical design, including large numbers of complex design rule checks (DRC) and compute-intensive detailed process model checking. Early identifying of yield-limiter hotspots is essential for both foundries and designers to significantly improve process maturity. A real challenge is to scan the design space to identify hotspots, and decide the proper course of action regarding each hotspot. Building a scored pattern library with real candidates for hotspots for both foundries and designers is of great value. Foundries are looking for the most used patterns to optimize their technology for and identify patterns that should be forbidden, while designers are looking for the patterns that are sensitive to their neighboring context to perform lithographic simulation with their context to decide if they are hotspots or not.[1] In this paper we propose a framework to data mine designs to obtain set of representative patterns of each design, our aim is to sample the designs at locations that can be potential yield limiting. Though our aim is to keep the total number of patterns as small as possible to limit the complexity, still the designer is free to generate layouts results in several million of patterns that define the whole design space. In order to handle the large number of patterns that represent the design building block constructs, we need to prioritize the patterns according to their importance. The proposed pattern classification methodology depends on giving scores to each pattern according to the severity of hotspots they cause, the probability of their presence in the design and the likelihood of causing a hotspot. The paper also shows how the scoring scheme helps foundries to optimize their master pattern libraries and priorities their efforts in 14nm technology and beyond. Moreover, the paper demonstrates how the hotspot scoring helps in

  1. Where are the lightning hotspots on Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, R. I.; Goodman, S. J.; Buechler, D. E.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The first lightning observations from space date from the early 1960s and more than a dozen spacecraft orbiting the Earth have flown instruments that recorded lightning signals from thunderstorms over the past 45 years. In this respect, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), having just completed its mission (1997-2015), provides the longest and best total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning data base over the tropics.We present a 16 year (1998-2013) reprocessed data set to create very high resolution (0.1°) TRMM LIS total lightning climatology. This detailed very high resolution climatology is used to identify the Earth's lightning hotspots and other regional features. Earlier studies located the lightning hotspot within the Congo Basin in Africa, but our very high resolution lightning climatology found that the highest lightning flash rate on Earth actually occurs in Venezuela over Lake Maracaibo, with a distinct maximum during the night. The higher resolution dataset clearly shows that similar phenomenon also occurs over other inland lakes with similar conditions, i.e., locally forced convergent flow over a warm lake surface which drives deep nocturnal convection. Although Africa does not have the top lightning hotspot, it comes in a close second and it is the continent with the highest number of lightning hotspots, followed by Asia, South America, North America, and Oceania. We also present climatological maps for local hour and month of lightning maxima, along with a ranking of the highest five hundred lightning maxima, focusing discussion on each continent's 10 highest lightning maxima. Most of the highest continental maxima are located near major mountain ranges, revealing the importance of local topography in thunderstorm development. These results are especially relevant in anticipation of the upcoming availability of continuous total lightning observations from the Geostationary Lightning Mapping (GLM

  2. Hotspots within hotspots? Hammerhead shark movements around Wolf Island, Galapagos Marine Reserve.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Alex; Ketchum, James; Klimley, A Peter; Espinoza, Eduardo; Peñaherrera, Cesar

    2010-01-01

    Are pelagic species such as sharks and tuna distributed homogenously or heterogeneously in the oceans? Large assemblages of these species have been observed at seamounts and offshore islands in the eastern tropical Pacific, which are considered hotspots of pelagic biodiversity. Is the species distribution uniform at these hotspots or do species aggregate at a finer spatial scale at these sites? We employed three techniques to demonstrate that the aggregations of scalloped hammerhead sharks, Sphyrna lewini, and other pelagic species were confined to the southeastern corner of Wolf Island in the Galapagos Marine Reserve. Coded ultrasonic transmitters were placed on individuals at this site and at another aggregation site at Darwin Island, separated from Wolf by 40 km, and they were detected by monitors moored at the southeastern corner of Wolf Island and rarely by monitors deployed at other sites around the island. Hammerhead sharks, carrying depth-sensing continual transmitters, were tracked for two-day periods in a vessel and shown to reside a disproportionately large fraction of their time at the southeastern corner. Visual censuses were carried out seasonally at the eight monitor sites at Wolf Island, recording the abundance of one species of tuna, four species of jacks, and a number of other species. The highest diversity and abundance of these species occurred in the southeastern corner of the island. Our results support the use of hammerhead sharks as indicator and umbrella species for pelagic hotspots on a fine scale. PMID:24391250

  3. 29 years of surprises from hotspots: A personal perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Students Of Eao, .; Okal, E. A.

    2003-12-01

    I arrived at Caltech on 26 August 1974, to begin my graduate studies at the Seismo Lab, then under the Directorship of Don L. Anderson. These were the days, among other topics, of Don's famous multilingual footnote on the "definition..., antecedents..., supporters and detractors" of the concept of "plume" [GSA Bull., 86, p. 1593, 1975], and even though I was not to set foot on a hotspot island until my first trip to Tahiti in December 1977 (those stopovers at Keflavik on the 199-dollar Loftleidir runs did not really count), I quickly acquired a mild form of Don's contagious fascination for the activity and structure of hotspots. As a tribute to Don, I have chosen to recap here a few surprising results obtained, with the help of my students, past and present, over several decades of work on the seismological sources and structures in the neighborhood of hotspot islands.

  4. Titanium-Water Thermosyphon Gamma Radiation Effects and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanzi, James L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Goodenow, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in heat rejection systems for fission power systems. Their proximity to the nuclear reactor will result in some exposure to gamma irradiation. Non-condensable gas formation from radiation may breakdown water over time and render a portion of the thermosyphon condenser inoperable. A series of developmental thermosyphons were operated at nominal operating temperature with accelerated gamma irradiation exposures on the same order of magnitude that is expected in eight years of heat rejection system operation. Temperature data were obtained during exposure at three locations on each thermosyphon; evaporator, condenser, and condenser end cap. Some non-condensable gas was evident, however thermosyphon performance was not affected because the non-condensable gas was compressed into the fill tube region at the top of the thermosyphon, away from the heat rejecting fin. The trend appeared to be an increasing amount of non-condensable gas formation with increasing gamma irradiation dose. Hydrogen is thought to be the most likely candidate for the non-condensable gas and hydrogen is known to diffuse through grain boundaries. Post-exposure evaluation of selected thermosyphons at temperature and in a vacuum chamber revealed that the non-condensable gas likely diffused out of the thermosyphons over a relatively short period of time. Further research shows a number of experimental and theoretical examples of radiolysis occurring through gamma radiation alone in pure water.

  5. Titanium-Water Thermosyphon Gamma Radiation Exposure and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanzi, James, L.A; Jaworske, Donald, A.; Goodenow, Debra, A.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in heat rejection systems for fission power systems. Their proximity to the nuclear reactor will result in some gamma irradiation. Noncondensable gas formation from radiation-induced breakdown of water over time may render portions of the thermosyphon condenser inoperable. A series of developmental thermosyphons were operated at nominal operating temperature under accelerated gamma irradiation, with exposures on the same order of magnitude as that expected in 8 years of heat rejection system operation. Temperature data were obtained during exposure at three locations on each thermosyphon: evaporator, condenser, and condenser end cap. Some noncondensable gas was evident; however, thermosyphon performance was not affected because the noncondensable gas was compressed into the fill tube region at the top of the thermosyphon, away from the heat rejecting fin. The trend appeared to be an increasing amount of noncondensable gas formation with increasing gamma irradiation dose. Hydrogen is thought to be the most likely candidate for the noncondensable gas and hydrogen is known to diffuse through grain boundaries. Post-exposure evaluation of one thermosyphon in a vacuum chamber and at temperature revealed that the noncondensable gas diffused out of the thermosyphon over a relatively short period of time. Further research shows a number of experimental and theoretical examples of radiolysis occurring through gamma radiation alone in pure water.

  6. The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment - Early validation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.; Barkstrom, B. R.; Harrison, E. F.; Huck, F. O.; Cess, R.; Coakley, J.; Duncan, C.; King, M.; Mecherikunnel, A.; Gruber, A.

    1986-01-01

    The primary techniques used to obtain and validate the data of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are described, together with preliminary results of the validation. The ERBE consists of radiometers aboard the ERB Satellite, dedicated to a 57-deg orbit, and each of the two NOAA meteorological spacecraft (NOAA 9 and NOAA G) in near polar orbits. The radiometers include scanning narrow field-of-view (FOV) and nadir-looking wide and medium FOV radiometers, and a solar monitoring channel. Measurements of the solar constant by the solar monitors, and the wide and medium FOV radiometers of the ERB and the NOAA 9 spacecraft agree within a fraction of a percent. Comparison of the wide and medium FOV radiometers with the scanning radiometers showed an agreement of 1 to 4 percent. The multiple ERBE satellites are acquiring the first global measurements of regional scale-diurnal variations in the earth's radiation budget. These were verified by comparison with the high-temporal-resolution geostationary satellite data.

  7. Contrasted patterns of hyperdiversification in Mediterranean hotspots.

    PubMed

    Sauquet, Hervé; Weston, Peter H; Anderson, Cajsa Lisa; Barker, Nigel P; Cantrill, David J; Mast, Austin R; Savolainen, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Dating the Tree of Life has now become central to relating patterns of biodiversity to key processes in Earth history such as plate tectonics and climate change. Regions with a Mediterranean climate have long been noted for their exceptional species richness and high endemism. How and when these biota assembled can only be answered with a good understanding of the sequence of divergence times for each of their components. A critical aspect of dating by using molecular sequence divergence is the incorporation of multiple suitable age constraints. Here, we show that only rigorous phylogenetic analysis of fossil taxa can lead to solid calibration and, in turn, stable age estimates, regardless of which of 3 relaxed clock-dating methods is used. We find that Proteaceae, a model plant group for the Mediterranean hotspots of the Southern Hemisphere with a very rich pollen fossil record, diversified under higher rates in the Cape Floristic Region and Southwest Australia than in any other area of their total distribution. Our results highlight key differences between Mediterranean hotspots and indicate that Southwest Australian biota are the most phylogenetically diverse but include numerous lineages with low diversification rates. PMID:19116275

  8. Macroscopic hotspots identification: A Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction approach.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ni; Huang, Helai; Lee, Jaeyoung; Gao, Mingyun; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    This study proposes a Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction approach for hotspot identification by applying the full Bayesian (FB) technique in the context of macroscopic safety analysis. Compared with the emerging Bayesian spatial and temporal approach, the Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction model contributes to a detailed understanding of differential trends through analyzing and mapping probabilities of area-specific crash trends as differing from the mean trend and highlights specific locations where crash occurrence is deteriorating or improving over time. With traffic analysis zones (TAZs) crash data collected in Florida, an empirical analysis was conducted to evaluate the following three approaches for hotspot identification: FB ranking using a Poisson-lognormal (PLN) model, FB ranking using a Bayesian spatial and temporal (B-ST) model and FB ranking using a Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction (B-ST-I) model. The results show that (a) the models accounting for space-time effects perform better in safety ranking than does the PLN model, and (b) the FB approach using the B-ST-I model significantly outperforms the B-ST approach in correctly identifying hotspots by explicitly accounting for the space-time variation in addition to the stable spatial/temporal patterns of crash occurrence. In practice, the B-ST-I approach plays key roles in addressing two issues: (a) how the identified hotspots have evolved over time and (b) the identification of areas that, whilst not yet hotspots, show a tendency to become hotspots. Finally, it can provide guidance to policy decision makers to efficiently improve zonal-level safety. PMID:27110645

  9. The earth radiation budget experiment: Early validation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Harrison, Edwin F.

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) consists of radiometers on a dedicated spacecraft in a 57° inclination orbit, which has a precessional period of 2 months, and on two NOAA operational meteorological spacecraft in near polar orbits. The radiometers include scanning narrow field-of-view (FOV) and nadir-looking wide and medium FOV radiometers covering the ranges 0.2 to 5 μm and 5 to 50 μm and a solar monitoring channel. This paper describes the validation procedures and preliminary results. Each of the radiometer channels underwent extensive ground calibration, and the instrument packages include in-flight calibration facilities which, to date, show negligible changes of the instruments in orbit, except for gradual degradation of the suprasil dome of the shortwave wide FOV (about 4% per year). Measurements of the solar constant by the solar monitors, wide FOV, and medium FOV radiometers of two spacecraft agree to a fraction of a percent. Intercomparisons of the wide and medium FOV radiometers with the scanning radiometers show agreement of 1 to 4%. The multiple ERBE satellites are acquiring the first global measurements of regional scale diurnal variations in the Earth's radiation budget. These diurnal variations are verified by comparison with high temporal resolution geostationary satellite data. Other principal investigators of the ERBE Science Team are: R. Cess, SUNY, Stoneybrook; J. Coakley, NCAR; C. Duncan, M. King and A Mecherikunnel, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA; A. Gruber and A.J. Miller, NOAA; D. Hartmann, U. Washington; F.B. House, Drexel U.; F.O. Huck, Langley Research Center, NASA; G. Hunt, Imperial College, London U.; R. Kandel and A. Berroir, Laboratory of Dynamic Meteorology, Ecole Polytechique; V. Ramanathan, U. Chicago; E. Raschke, U. of Cologne; W.L. Smith, U. of Wisconsin and T.H. Vonder Haar, Colorado State U.

  10. Yellowstone hotspot-continental lithosphere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Marlon M.; Hanan, Barry B.; Shervais, John W.

    2014-03-01

    The Snake River Plain represents 17 m.y. of volcanic activity that took place as the North American continent migrated over a relatively fixed magma source, or hotspot. We present new Pb, Sr, and Nd data for a suite of 25 basalts collected from Western and Central Snake River Plain (SRP). The new isotope data, combined with previously published data from the SRP, provide a traverse of the Wyoming craton margin, from the 87Sr/86Sr = 0.706 line boundary of western SRP with Phanerozoic accreted terranes, east through the central and eastern SRP, to the Yellowstone Plateau. Low-K basalts from the western SRP, overlain by high-K basalts, provide a temporal record of regional source variation from ∼16.8 to 0.2 Ma. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the new and previously published SRP basalt Pb isotopes reveals that >97% of the total variability is accounted for by mixing between three end-members and is consistent with a sublithospheric Yellowstone hotspot mantle source with a radiogenic isotope composition similar to the mantle source of the early Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and two continental lithosphere end-members, heterogeneous in age and composition. We use the SRP Pb, Sr, and Nd isotope data to model the Yellowstone Hotspot-continental lithosphere interaction by three component mixing between two continental lithospheric components, Archean lithosphere (CL1) that represents older lithosphere underlying the Yellowstone Plateau in the east, and Paleoproterozoic lithosphere (CL2) representing the younger lithosphere underlying the SRP in the west near the craton margin, and a sublithospheric end-member, representing the Yellowstone hotspot (PL). The results suggest a continuous flow of PL material westward as the NA continental lithosphere migrated over the upwelling hotspot along a shoaling gradient in the sub-continental mantle lithosphere. The model shows a decrease in Total Lithosphere end-members (CL1 + CL2) and the Lithosphere Ratio (CL1/CL2

  11. Cloud Computing Application for Hotspot Clustering Using Recursive Density Based Clustering (RDBC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoso, Aries; Khiyarin Nisa, Karlina

    2016-01-01

    Indonesia has vast areas of tropical forest, but are often burned which causes extensive damage to property and human life. Monitoring hotspots can be one of the forest fire management. Each hotspot is recorded in dataset so that it can be processed and analyzed. This research aims to build a cloud computing application which visualizes hotspots clustering. This application uses the R programming language with Shiny web framework and implements Recursive Density Based Clustering (RDBC) algorithm. Clustering is done on hotspot dataset of the Kalimantan Island and South Sumatra Province to find the spread pattern of hotspots. The clustering results are evaluated using the Silhouette's Coefficient (SC) which yield best value 0.3220798 for Kalimantan dataset. Clustering pattern are displayed in the form of web pages so that it can be widely accessed and become the reference for fire occurrence prediction.

  12. HotSpot Software Configuration Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the software configuration management procedures used to ensure that the HotSpot dispersion model meets the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot for consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendations 1 and 3 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  13. HotSpot Software Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Test Plan (STP) describes the procedures used to verify and validate that the HotSpot Health Physics Codes meet the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot conducting consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendation 2 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  14. How Radiation Oncologists Would Disclose Errors: Results of a Survey of Radiation Oncologists and Trainees

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Suzanne B.; Yu, James B.; Chagpar, Anees

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To analyze error disclosure attitudes of radiation oncologists and to correlate error disclosure beliefs with survey-assessed disclosure behavior. Methods and Materials: With institutional review board exemption, an anonymous online survey was devised. An email invitation was sent to radiation oncologists (American Society for Radiation Oncology [ASTRO] gold medal winners, program directors and chair persons of academic institutions, and former ASTRO lecturers) and residents. A disclosure score was calculated based on the number or full, partial, or no disclosure responses chosen to the vignette-based questions, and correlation was attempted with attitudes toward error disclosure. Results: The survey received 176 responses: 94.8% of respondents considered themselves more likely to disclose in the setting of a serious medical error; 72.7% of respondents did not feel it mattered who was responsible for the error in deciding to disclose, and 3.9% felt more likely to disclose if someone else was responsible; 38.0% of respondents felt that disclosure increased the likelihood of a lawsuit, and 32.4% felt disclosure decreased the likelihood of lawsuit; 71.6% of respondents felt near misses should not be disclosed; 51.7% thought that minor errors should not be disclosed; 64.7% viewed disclosure as an opportunity for forgiveness from the patient; and 44.6% considered the patient's level of confidence in them to be a factor in disclosure. For a scenario that could be considerable, a non-harmful error, 78.9% of respondents would not contact the family. Respondents with high disclosure scores were more likely to feel that disclosure was an opportunity for forgiveness (P=.003) and to have never seen major medical errors (P=.004). Conclusions: The surveyed radiation oncologists chose to respond with full disclosure at a high rate, although ideal disclosure practices were not uniformly adhered to beyond the initial decision to disclose the occurrence of the error.

  15. Preliminary results of a three-dimensional radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hirok, W.

    1995-09-01

    Clouds act as the primary modulator of the Earth`s radiation at the top of the atmosphere, within the atmospheric column, and at the Earth`s surface. They interact with both shortwave and longwave radiation, but it is primarily in the case of shortwave where most of the uncertainty lies because of the difficulties in treating scattered solar radiation. To understand cloud-radiative interactions, radiative transfer models portray clouds as plane-parallel homogeneous entities to ease the computational physics. Unfortunately, clouds are far from being homogeneous, and large differences between measurement and theory point to a stronger need to understand and model cloud macrophysical properties. In an attempt to better comprehend the role of cloud morphology on the 3-dimensional radiation field, a Monte Carlo model has been developed. This model can simulate broadband shortwave radiation fluxes while incorporating all of the major atmospheric constituents. The model is used to investigate the cloud absorption anomaly where cloud absorption measurements exceed theoretical estimates and to examine the efficacy of ERBE measurements and cloud field experiments. 3 figs.

  16. Microbial hotspots and hot moments in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2015-04-01

    Soils are the most heterogeneous parts of the biosphere, with an extremely high differentiation of properties and processes within nano- to macroscales. The spatial and temporal heterogeneity of input of labile organics by plants creates microbial hotspots over short periods of time - the hot moments. We define microbial hotspots as small soil volumes with much faster process rates and much more intensive interactions compared to the average soil conditions. Such hotspots are found in the rhizosphere, detritusphere, biopores (including drilosphere) and on aggregate surfaces, but hotspots are frequently of mixed origin. Hot moments are short-term events or sequences of events inducing accelerated process rates as compared to the averaged rates. Thus, hotspots and hot moments are defined by dynamic characteristics, i.e. by process rates. For this hotspot concept we extensively reviewed and examined the localization and size of hotspots, spatial distribution and visualization approaches, transport of labile C to and from hotspots, lifetime and process intensities, with a special focus on process rates and microbial activities. The fraction of active microorganisms in hotspots is 2-20 times higher than in the bulk soil, and their specific activities (i.e. respiration, microbial growth, mineralization potential, enzyme activities, RNA/DNA ratio) may also be much higher. The duration of hot moments in the rhizosphere is limited and is controlled by the length of the input of labile organics. It can last a few hours up to a few days. In the detritusphere, however, the duration of hot moments is regulated by the output - by decomposition rates of litter - and lasts for weeks and months. Hot moments induce succession in microbial communities and intense intra- and interspecific competition affecting C use efficiency, microbial growth and turnover. The faster turnover and lower C use efficiency in hotspots counterbalances the high C inputs, leading to the absence of strong

  17. Radiative shocks on large scale lasers. Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leygnac, S.; Bouquet, S.; Stehle, C.; Barroso, P.; Batani, D.; Benuzzi, A.; Cathala, B.; Chièze, J.-P.; Fleury, X.; Grandjouan, N.; Grenier, J.; Hall, T.; Henry, E.; Koenig, M.; Lafon, J. P. J.; Malka, V.; Marchet, B.; Merdji, H.; Michaut, C.; Poles, L.; Thais, F.

    2001-05-01

    Radiative shocks, those structure is strongly influenced by the radiation field, are present in various astrophysical objects (circumstellar envelopes of variable stars, supernovae ...). Their modeling is very difficult and thus will take benefit from experimental informations. This approach is now possible using large scale lasers. Preliminary experiments have been performed with the nanosecond LULI laser at Ecole Polytechnique (France) in 2000. A radiative shock has been obtained in a low pressure xenon cell. The preparation of such experiments and their interpretation is performed using analytical calculations and numerical simulations.

  18. Application of terahertz radiation to soil measurements: initial results.

    PubMed

    Dworak, Volker; Augustin, Sven; Gebbers, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Developing soil sensors with the possibility of continuous online measurement is a major challenge in soil science. Terahertz (THz) electromagnetic radiation may provide the opportunity for the measurement of organic material density, water content and other soil parameters at different soil depths. Penetration depth and information content is important for a functional soil sensor. Therefore, we present initial research on the analysis of absorption coefficients of four different soil samples by means of THz transmission measurements. An optimized soil sample holder to determine absorption coefficients was used. This setup improves data acquisition because interface reflections can be neglected. Frequencies of 340 GHz to 360 GHz and 1.627 THz to 2.523 THz provided information about an existing frequency dependency. The results demonstrate the potential of this THz approach for both soil analysis and imaging of buried objects. Therefore, the THz approach allows different soil samples to be distinguished according to their different absorption properties so that relations among soil parameters may be established in future. PMID:22163737

  19. Radiation Control on Uzbekistan Borders - Results and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Petrenko, Vitaliy; Yuldashev, Bekhzod; Ismailov, Ulughbek; Shipilov, Nikolay; Chipizubov, Sergey; Avezov, Anvar

    2009-12-02

    The measures and actions on prevention, detection and response to criminal or unauthorized acts involving radioactive materials in Uzbekistan are presented. In frames of program of radiation monitoring to prevent illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials main customs border checkpoints were equipped with commercial radiation portal monitors. Special radiation monitors elaborated and manufactured in INP AS RU are installed in INP(main gates, research reactor and laboratory building) to provide nuclear security of Institute facilities. The experience of Uzbekistan in establishing radiation monitoring systems on its borders, their operation and maintenance would be useful for realization of proposed plan of strengthening measures to prevent illicit trafficking in Republics of Central Asia region.

  20. Radiation Control on Uzbekistan Borders—Results and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, Vitaliy; Yuldashev, Bekhzod; Ismailov, Ulughbek; Shipilov, Nikolay; Chipizubov, Sergey; Avezov, Anvar

    2009-12-01

    The measures and actions on prevention, detection and response to criminal or unauthorized acts involving radioactive materials in Uzbekistan are presented. In frames of program of radiation monitoring to prevent illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials main customs border checkpoints were equipped with commercial radiation portal monitors. Special radiation monitors elaborated and manufactured in INP AS RU are installed in INP(main gates, research reactor and laboratory building) to provide nuclear security of Institute facilities. The experience of Uzbekistan in establishing radiation monitoring systems on its borders, their operation and maintenance would be useful for realization of proposed plan of strengthening measures to prevent illicit trafficking in Republics of Central Asia region.

  1. Summary of current radiation dosimetry results on manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the experimental data existing on radiation levels inside orbiting spacecraft are currently limited. However, it is recognized that perhaps the single most important constraint to long-term manned space activity may be related to the complex space radiation environment. For this reason, it is important to know the radiological parameters which determine the biological effects of space radiation on humans. Attention is given to radiation dose measurements, LET (linear energy transfer) spectra for HZE particles, and dosimetry data from U.S. manned spaceflights. In particular, data are now available on dose rates in spacecraft at low altitudes (less than 300 km), while insufficient measurements exist for high altitude and high inclination orbits, geostationary orbits, and many orbits in between. Very little data exist on neutron dose and spectra.

  2. Detecting Recombination Hotspots from Patterns of Linkage Disequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jeffrey D; Stevison, Laurie S

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies, it has become increasingly easy to use whole-genome sequencing of unrelated individuals to assay patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) across the genome. One type of analysis that is commonly performed is to estimate local recombination rates and identify recombination hotspots from patterns of LD. One method for detecting recombination hotspots, LDhot, has been used in a handful of species to further our understanding of the basic biology of recombination. For the most part, the effectiveness of this method (e.g., power and false positive rate) is unknown. In this study, we run extensive simulations to compare the effectiveness of three different implementations of LDhot. We find large differences in the power and false positive rates of these different approaches, as well as a strong sensitivity to the window size used (with smaller window sizes leading to more accurate estimation of hotspot locations). We also compared our LDhot simulation results with comparable simulation results obtained from a Bayesian maximum-likelihood approach for identifying hotspots. Surprisingly, we found that the latter computationally intensive approach had substantially lower power over the parameter values considered in our simulations. PMID:27226166

  3. Detecting Recombination Hotspots from Patterns of Linkage Disequilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Jeffrey D.; Stevison, Laurie S.

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies, it has become increasingly easy to use whole-genome sequencing of unrelated individuals to assay patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) across the genome. One type of analysis that is commonly performed is to estimate local recombination rates and identify recombination hotspots from patterns of LD. One method for detecting recombination hotspots, LDhot, has been used in a handful of species to further our understanding of the basic biology of recombination. For the most part, the effectiveness of this method (e.g., power and false positive rate) is unknown. In this study, we run extensive simulations to compare the effectiveness of three different implementations of LDhot. We find large differences in the power and false positive rates of these different approaches, as well as a strong sensitivity to the window size used (with smaller window sizes leading to more accurate estimation of hotspot locations). We also compared our LDhot simulation results with comparable simulation results obtained from a Bayesian maximum-likelihood approach for identifying hotspots. Surprisingly, we found that the latter computationally intensive approach had substantially lower power over the parameter values considered in our simulations. PMID:27226166

  4. Interpretation of the high conductive anomaly of the Society hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Noriko; Tarits, Pascal; Baba, Kiyoshi; Utada, Hisashi; Suetsugu, Daisuke

    2016-04-01

    The mantle upwellings are one of the most important features for understanding the mantle dynamics. A large-scale mantle upwelling beneath the French Polynesia region in the South Pacific has been suggested from seismic studies, which is called the South Pacific superplume, and a slow velocity anomaly continues from the core mantle boundary to the upper mantle just beneath the Society hotspot (e.g., Suetsugu et al., 2009). However, the previous studies are not enough to understand the geometry, temperature, and composition of the Society hotspot. Then, we carried out the TIARES project that composed of multi-sensor stations that include broadband ocean bottom seismometers, ocean bottom electromagnetometers (OBEMs), and differential pressure gauges from 2009 to 2010 (Suetsugu et al., 2012). We have analyzed marine magnetotelluric data obtained totally 20 sites around the Society hotspot, and revealed a three-dimensional shaped high conductive anomaly, like a thumb, beneath the Society hotspot (see detail in session GD8.3/EMRP4.9/SM7.6). In order to clarify the cause of the high conductivity, water content, melt fraction, and H2O and CO2 contents in the upper mantle were estimated by adopting results of rock experiments at high temperatures and pressures. As a result, the upper mantle in the high conductive anomaly involves more water, melt, H2O, and CO2 rather than that in the surrounding area. Furthermore, temperature of high conductive anomaly might be higher than the surrounding area.

  5. The Making of a Productivity Hotspot in the Coastal Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Dana K.; Peckham, S. Hoyt; Foley, David G.; Palacios, Daniel M.; Lavaniegos, Bertha E.; Durazo, Reginaldo; Nichols, Wallace J.; Croll, Donald A.; Bograd, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Highly productive hotspots in the ocean often occur where complex physical forcing mechanisms lead to aggregation of primary and secondary producers. Understanding how hotspots persist, however, requires combining knowledge of the spatio-temporal linkages between geomorphology, physical forcing, and biological responses with the physiological requirements and movement of top predators. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we integrate remotely sensed oceanography, ship surveys, and satellite telemetry to show how local geomorphology interacts with physical forcing to create a region with locally enhanced upwelling and an adjacent upwelling shadow that promotes retentive circulation, enhanced year-round primary production, and prey aggregation. These conditions provide an area within the upwelling shadow where physiologically optimal water temperatures can be found adjacent to a region of enhanced prey availability, resulting in a foraging hotspot for loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) off the Baja California peninsula, Mexico. Significance/Conclusions We have identified the set of conditions that lead to a persistent top predator hotspot, which increases our understanding of how highly migratory species exploit productive regions of the ocean. These results will aid in the development of spatially and environmentally explicit management strategies for marine species of conservation concern. PMID:22132156

  6. Central Indian Ridge and Reunion Hotspot in Rodrigues Area : Another Type of Ridge - Hotspot Interaction ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DYMENT, J.; HEMOND, C.; GUILLOU, H.; MAIA, M.; BRIAIS, A.; GENTE, P.

    2001-12-01

    The Rodrigues Ridge is an E-W volcanic structure which extends at 19° S from the Mascarene Plateau (59° 30'E) to 100 km East of Rodrigues Island (64° 30'E). It is neither parallel to seafloor spreading flow-lines nor to the "absolute" motion of Africa in the hotspot reference frame. 39Ar-40Ar dating of dredged samples has shown that the whole ridge formed at 8-10 Ma, suggesting a rather rapid emplacement between the former position of the Reunion hotspot and the nearest segment of the CIR at 10-8 Ma. This rules out the hypothesis that the Rodrigues Ridge was progressively built near the CIR axis, at the end of a "channeled" asthenospheric flow originating from Reunion hotspot. Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes show gradual fading of the Reunion hotspot influence with increasing distance from the Mascarene Plateau. Signs for a more recent activity are the Rodrigues Island, dated about 1 Ma, and a set of recently discovered en-echelon volcanic ridges, the Three Magi and Gasitao Ridges. They extend the Rodrigues Ridge up to the CIR axis. These ridges display a clear sigmoid shape and align along an E-W direction at 19° 40'S. Another parallel, less prominent volcanic alignment is observed about 30 km north, at 19° 25'S. K-Ar dating (Cassignol method) provides ages of 0.4 and 1.8 Ma for the easternmost Gasitao Ridge. This second age is slightly younger than that of the underlying crust given by the magnetic anomalies. Isotopic compositions are intermediate between those measured on Rodrigues Ridge and the CIR axis. The lack of conjugate bathymetric feature and the age measured on the Gasitao Ridge demonstrate that it was built off axis, in the close vicinity of the CIR. The sigmoid morphology and en-echelon alignment of Three Magi and Gasitao Ridges suggest that they correspond to tension cracks filled by magmas resulting from decompression melting of underlying mantle. Repetition of such magmatic events results in increasing volume as ridges get older, in agreement with the

  7. Are hotspots of evolutionary potential adequately protected in southern California?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, A.G.; Bohonak, A.J.; Hathaway, S.A.; Boys, J.; Fisher, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    Reserves are often designed to protect rare habitats, or "typical" exemplars of ecoregions and geomorphic provinces. This approach focuses on current patterns of organismal and ecosystem-level biodiversity, but typically ignores the evolutionary processes that control the gain and loss of biodiversity at these and other levels (e.g., genetic, ecological). In order to include evolutionary processes in conservation planning efforts, their spatial components must first be identified and mapped. We describe a GIS-based approach for explicitly mapping patterns of genetic divergence and diversity for multiple species (a "multi-species genetic landscape"). Using this approach, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA datasets from 21 vertebrate and invertebrate species in southern California to identify areas with common phylogeographic breaks and high intrapopulation diversity. The result is an evolutionary framework for southern California within which patterns of genetic diversity can be analyzed in the context of historical processes, future evolutionary potential and current reserve design. Our multi-species genetic landscapes pinpoint six hotspots where interpopulation genetic divergence is consistently high, five evolutionary hotspots within which genetic connectivity is high, and three hotspots where intrapopulation genetic diversity is high. These 14 hotspots can be grouped into eight geographic areas, of which five largely are unprotected at this time. The multi-species genetic landscape approach may provide an avenue to readily incorporate measures of evolutionary process into GIS-based systematic conservation assessment and land-use planning.

  8. Fabrication of Regolith-Derived Radiation Shields: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantovani, James G.; Sibille, Laurent; Townsend, Ivan I.; Delgado, Armando; Grossman, Kevin D.; Hatcher, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the Earth, Mars and asteroids do not have a magnetosphere to protect humans, mechanisms and electronics from damaging Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). This presents one of the highest risks to crew and onboard electronics during interplanetary journeys. The goal of this project is to evaluate the effectiveness of carbonaceous asteroids and other hydrogen-rich materials as potential radiation shielding materials, which ultimately could be tested during planned crewed missions to a captured asteroid fragment (ARM). This type of investigation represents an initial effort to develop radiation shield material compositions, production methods and technologies, and optimization methodology for manufacturing radiation shields in deep space for large exploration human missions or by emerging new industries seeking to stage their spacecraft for the exploitation of the resources of asteroids. Carbonaceous chondrites (C-type) are of particular interest as sources of compounds such as water ice and hydrogen-rich carbon molecules, which can provide sufficient low Z element density to provide radiation protection at adequate shield thicknesses.

  9. Methodology and software to detect viral integration site hot-spots

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modern gene therapy methods have limited control over where a therapeutic viral vector inserts into the host genome. Vector integration can activate local gene expression, which can cause cancer if the vector inserts near an oncogene. Viral integration hot-spots or 'common insertion sites' (CIS) are scrutinized to evaluate and predict patient safety. CIS are typically defined by a minimum density of insertions (such as 2-4 within a 30-100 kb region), which unfortunately depends on the total number of observed VIS. This is problematic for comparing hot-spot distributions across data sets and patients, where the VIS numbers may vary. Results We develop two new methods for defining hot-spots that are relatively independent of data set size. Both methods operate on distributions of VIS across consecutive 1 Mb 'bins' of the genome. The first method 'z-threshold' tallies the number of VIS per bin, converts these counts to z-scores, and applies a threshold to define high density bins. The second method 'BCP' applies a Bayesian change-point model to the z-scores to define hot-spots. The novel hot-spot methods are compared with a conventional CIS method using simulated data sets and data sets from five published human studies, including the X-linked ALD (adrenoleukodystrophy), CGD (chronic granulomatous disease) and SCID-X1 (X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency) trials. The BCP analysis of the human X-linked ALD data for two patients separately (774 and 1627 VIS) and combined (2401 VIS) resulted in 5-6 hot-spots covering 0.17-0.251% of the genome and containing 5.56-7.74% of the total VIS. In comparison, the CIS analysis resulted in 12-110 hot-spots covering 0.018-0.246% of the genome and containing 5.81-22.7% of the VIS, corresponding to a greater number of hot-spots as the data set size increased. Our hot-spot methods enable one to evaluate the extent of VIS clustering, and formally compare data sets in terms of hot-spot overlap. Finally, we show that the

  10. The Martian Radiation Environment Experiment -- Results and Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T. F.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Saganti, P.; Andersen, V.; Lee, K. T.; Pinsky, L. S.; Atwell, W.; Turner, R.

    2004-05-01

    Ionizing radiation in space presents a potentially serious health hazard to astronauts on long-duration missions. Missions that take humans outside the geomagnetosphere (which provides significant shielding for crews in low-Earth orbit) are of particular concern. A mission to Mars would expose a crew to a substantial radiation dose from high-energy heavy ions in the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR). Though not expected to cause acute effects, such exposures might endanger the long-term health of crewmembers, leading to increased risk of late effects such as cancer and cataract. Since the biological effects of these ions are not well understood, NASA cannot yet specify career limits for deep-space missions. While ground-based research in radiobiology continues, it is necessary to characterize the radiation field on the Martian surface. This is determined by the radiation incident on the top of the Martian atmosphere, the transmission properties of the atmosphere, and the production of secondary particles (neutrons in particular) in the upper part of the surface. The Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE), aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, has returned the first detailed measurements of the radiation field incident on the atmosphere. MARIE consists of a stack of silicon charged-particle detectors, designed to measure the nearly-constant flux of energetic Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and intermittent Solar Particle Events (SPE). The detector is optimized for the detection of solar protons and helium in the energy range from 30 to 75 MeV/nucleon, though higher energies and heavier ions are also detected. Despite considerable uncertainties in data normalization, the measured dose agrees with model calculations, to an accuracy well within the (conservatively) estimated errors. As of this writing (Feb. 2004), MARIE is off, having sustained damage during the large Solar Particle Event of Oct. 29, 2003. Attempts to recover the instrument will resume in the

  11. Threats from climate change to terrestrial vertebrate hotspots in Europe.

    PubMed

    Maiorano, Luigi; Amori, Giovanni; Capula, Massimo; Falcucci, Alessandra; Masi, Monica; Montemaggiori, Alessandro; Pottier, Julien; Psomas, Achilleas; Rondinini, Carlo; Russo, Danilo; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Boitani, Luigi; Guisan, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    We identified hotspots of terrestrial vertebrate species diversity in Europe and adjacent islands. Moreover, we assessed the extent to which by the end of the 21(st) century such hotspots will be exposed to average monthly temperature and precipitation patterns which can be regarded as extreme if compared to the climate experienced during 1950-2000. In particular, we considered the entire European sub-continent plus Turkey and a total of 1149 species of terrestrial vertebrates. For each species, we developed species-specific expert-based distribution models (validated against field data) which we used to calculate species richness maps for mammals, breeding birds, amphibians, and reptiles. Considering four global circulation model outputs and three emission scenarios, we generated an index of risk of exposure to extreme climates, and we used a bivariate local Moran's I to identify the areas with a significant association between hotspots of diversity and high risk of exposure to extreme climates. Our results outline that the Mediterranean basin represents both an important hotspot for biodiversity and especially for threatened species for all taxa. In particular, the Iberian and Italian peninsulas host particularly high species richness as measured over all groups, while the eastern Mediterranean basin is particularly rich in amphibians and reptiles; the islands (both Macaronesian and Mediterranean) host the highest richness of threatened species for all taxa occurs. Our results suggest that the main hotspots of biodiversity for terrestrial vertebrates may be extensively influenced by the climate change projected to occur over the coming decades, especially in the Mediterranean bioregion, posing serious concerns for biodiversity conservation. PMID:24066162

  12. Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Maiorano, Luigi; Amori, Giovanni; Capula, Massimo; Falcucci, Alessandra; Masi, Monica; Montemaggiori, Alessandro; Pottier, Julien; Psomas, Achilleas; Rondinini, Carlo; Russo, Danilo; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    2013-01-01

    We identified hotspots of terrestrial vertebrate species diversity in Europe and adjacent islands. Moreover, we assessed the extent to which by the end of the 21st century such hotspots will be exposed to average monthly temperature and precipitation patterns which can be regarded as extreme if compared to the climate experienced during 1950-2000. In particular, we considered the entire European sub-continent plus Turkey and a total of 1149 species of terrestrial vertebrates. For each species, we developed species-specific expert-based distribution models (validated against field data) which we used to calculate species richness maps for mammals, breeding birds, amphibians, and reptiles. Considering four global circulation model outputs and three emission scenarios, we generated an index of risk of exposure to extreme climates, and we used a bivariate local Moran’s I to identify the areas with a significant association between hotspots of diversity and high risk of exposure to extreme climates. Our results outline that the Mediterranean basin represents both an important hotspot for biodiversity and especially for threatened species for all taxa. In particular, the Iberian and Italian peninsulas host particularly high species richness as measured over all groups, while the eastern Mediterranean basin is particularly rich in amphibians and reptiles; the islands (both Macaronesian and Mediterranean) host the highest richness of threatened species for all taxa occurs. Our results suggest that the main hotspots of biodiversity for terrestrial vertebrates may be extensively influenced by the climate change projected to occur over the coming decades, especially in the Mediterranean bioregion, posing serious concerns for biodiversity conservation. PMID:24066162

  13. Revisiting Hotspots and Mantle Plumes: Some Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. D.; White-Gaynor, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Sleep (1990) used gravity, topography and heat flow from 37 hotspots to ``constrain the mechanism for swell uplift and to obtain fluxes and excess temperatures of mantle plumes,'' complementing a previous analysis by Davies (1988). We repeat that analysis for the same 37 hotspots using gravity from EGM2008 and topography from ETOPO1 (Amante and Eakins, 2009). EGM2008 is complete to spherical harmonic degree and order 2159, or roughly 20 km spatial resolution (Pavlis et al., 2012). The vertical accuracy of ETOPO1 is on the order of 10 meters. With these new models we hope to improve the uplift and subsidence rates along all 37 hotspot tracks--one of the major limitations the previous work. For example, of the 37 hotspots considered Sleep ranked only 7 with good reliability while 14 were fair and 16 were poor. With this new information we can compare and contrast hotspots with various other groupings of hotspots based on tomographic images of mantle structure (Montelli et al, 2003), primary versus secondary hotspots (Courtillot et al., 2003) or relationship to cratonic boundaries (King, 2008). One encounters some puzzles when attempting to reconcile buoyancy fluxes with other groupings of hotspots and/or observations. For example, Coutillot et al.'s seven primary hotspots include: Afar, Easter, Hawaii, Iceland, Louisville, Réunion, and Tristan. Sleep (1990) categorized the reliability of the buoyancy flux calculated by from Afar, Hawaii, Iceland, and Réunion as good, while Tristan and Easter were fair and Louisville was poor. The calculated buoyancy fluxes from Macdonald and Marqueses (both listed as fair) are twice as large as those from Iceland, Tristan, and Réunion. While we recognize that these observations cannot uniquely constrain the origin of these anomalies, better observations should help test various hypotheses.

  14. Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

  15. Radiation Effects on Nematodes: Results from IML-1 Esperiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, G. A.; Schubert, W. W.; Kazarians, G. A.; Righards, G. F.; Benton, E. V; Benton, E. R.; Henke, R.

    1993-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to natural space radiation using the ESA Biorack facility aboard Spacelab on International Microgravity Laboratory 1, STS-42. For the major experimental objective dormant animals were suspended in buffer or on agar or immobilized next to CR-39 plactic nuclear track detectors to correlate fluence of HZE particles with genetic events.

  16. Regional Climate Change Hotspots over Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anber, U.; Zakey, A.; Abd El Wahab, M.

    2009-04-01

    Regional Climate Change Index (RCCI), is developed based on regional mean precipitation change, mean surface air temperature change, and change in precipitation and temperature interannual variability. The RCCI is a comparative index designed to identify the most responsive regions to climate change, or Hot- Spots. The RCCI is calculated for Seven land regions over North Africa and Arabian region from the latest set of climate change projections by 14 global climates for the A1B, A2 and B1 IPCC emission scenarios. The concept of climate change can be approaches from the viewpoint of vulnerability or from that of climate response. In the former case a Hot-Spot can be defined as a region for which potential climate change impacts on the environment or different activity sectors can be particularly pronounced. In the other case, a Hot-Spot can be defined as a region whose climate is especially responsive to global change. In particular, the characterization of climate change response-based Hot-Spot can provide key information to identify and investigate climate change Hot-Spots based on results from multi-model ensemble of climate change simulations performed by modeling groups from around the world as contributions to the Fourth Assessment Report of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). A Regional Climate Change Index (RCCI) is defined based on four variables: change in regional mean surface air temperature relative to the global average temperature change ( or Regional Warming Amplification Factor, RWAF ), change in mean regional precipitation (P % , of present day value ), change in regional surface air temperature interannual variability (T % ,of present day value), change in regional precipitation interannual variability (P % ,of present day value ). In the definition of the RCCI it is important to include quantities other than mean change because often mean changes are not the only important factors for specific impacts. We thus also include inter

  17. Regional Climate Change Hotspots over Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anber, U.

    2009-04-01

    Regional Climate Change Index (RCCI), is developed based on regional mean precipitation change, mean surface air temperature change, and change in precipitation and temperature interannual variability. The RCCI is a comparative index designed to identify the most responsive regions to climate change, or Hot- Spots. The RCCI is calculated for Seven land regions over North Africa and Arabian region from the latest set of climate change projections by 14 global climates for the A1B, A2 and B1 IPCC emission scenarios. The concept of climate change can be approaches from the viewpoint of vulnerability or from that of climate response. In the former case a Hot-Spot can be defined as a region for which potential climate change impacts on the environment or different activity sectors can be particularly pronounced. In the other case, a Hot-Spot can be defined as a region whose climate is especially responsive to global change. In particular, the characterization of climate change response-based Hot-Spot can provide key information to identify and investigate climate change Hot-Spots based on results from multi-model ensemble of climate change simulations performed by modeling groups from around the world as contributions to the Assessment Report of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). A Regional Climate Change Index (RCCI) is defined based on four variables: change in regional mean surface air temperature relative to the global average temperature change ( or Regional Warming Amplification Factor, RWAF ), change in mean regional precipitation ( , of present day value ), change in regional surface air temperature interannual variability ( ,of present day value), change in regional precipitation interannual variability ( , of present day value ). In the definition of the RCCI it is important to include quantities other than mean change because often mean changes are not the only important factors for specific impacts. We thus also include inter annual

  18. Dissipation and displacement of hotspots in reaction-diffusion models of crime.

    PubMed

    Short, Martin B; Brantingham, P Jeffrey; Bertozzi, Andrea L; Tita, George E

    2010-03-01

    The mechanisms driving the nucleation, spread, and dissipation of crime hotspots are poorly understood. As a consequence, the ability of law enforcement agencies to use mapped crime patterns to design crime prevention strategies is severely hampered. We also lack robust expectations about how different policing interventions should impact crime. Here we present a mathematical framework based on reaction-diffusion partial differential equations for studying the dynamics of crime hotspots. The system of equations is based on empirical evidence for how offenders move and mix with potential victims or targets. Analysis shows that crime hotspots form when the enhanced risk of repeat crimes diffuses locally, but not so far as to bind distant crime together. Crime hotspots may form as either supercritical or subcritical bifurcations, the latter the result of large spikes in crime that override linearly stable, uniform crime distributions. Our mathematical methods show that subcritical crime hotspots may be permanently eradicated with police suppression, whereas supercritical hotspots are displaced following a characteristic spatial pattern. Our results thus provide a mechanistic explanation for recent failures to observe crime displacement in experimental field tests of hotspot policing. PMID:20176972

  19. Results from the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment MARIE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T.; Cucinotta, F.; Saganti, P.; Andersen, V.; Lee, K.; Pinsky, L.; Atwell, W.; Turner, R.

    2003-01-01

    One of the three science instruments aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment, MARIE. MARIE consists of a stack of silicon detectors, augmented by a Cerenkov detector. MARIE is designed to measure a portion of the particle spectrum of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR), as well as the high fluxes of low-energy protons (energies less than about 100 MeV) that are intermittently produced by active regions on the sun in Solar Particle Events (SPE). MARIE is providing the first detailed information about the radiation environment near Mars.measurements. MARIE has been operating successfully for nearly a year. Solar particle events of considerable interest have been observed, and data have been obtained that will yield GCR spectra from a novel observation point in the solar system.

  20. Transport implications of hydrodynamic mix on hot-spot performance in inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xianzhu

    2014-10-01

    In an inertial confinement fusion target, energy loss due to thermal conduction from the hot-spot will inevitably ablate fuel ice into the hot-spot, resulting in a more massive but cooler hot-spot, which negatively impacts fusion yield. Hydrodynamic mix due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the gas-ice interface can aggravate the problem via an increased gas-ice interfacial area across which energy transfer from the hot-spot and ice can be enhanced. We quantify this mix-enhanced transport effect on hot-spot fusion-performance degradation using contrasting 1-D and 2-D hydrodynamic simulations, and identify its dependence on effective acceleration, Atwood number, and ablation speed. In the presence of magnetic fields, the thermal conduction is reduced which reduces the effect of ablative stabilization on mix mitigation while also reducing the amount of cold fuel being ablated into the hot-spot. A characterization of the transport enhanced mix characteristics with and without magnetic fields is performed to identify a regime where fusion-performance degradation is reduced by mix mitigation, through which the amount of cold fuel being ablated into the hot-spot is minimized.

  1. CONSERVATION. Genetic assignment of large seizures of elephant ivory reveals Africa's major poaching hotspots.

    PubMed

    Wasser, S K; Brown, L; Mailand, C; Mondol, S; Clark, W; Laurie, C; Weir, B S

    2015-07-01

    Poaching of elephants is now occurring at rates that threaten African populations with extinction. Identifying the number and location of Africa's major poaching hotspots may assist efforts to end poaching and facilitate recovery of elephant populations. We genetically assign origin to 28 large ivory seizures (≥0.5 metric tons) made between 1996 and 2014, also testing assignment accuracy. Results suggest that the major poaching hotspots in Africa may be currently concentrated in as few as two areas. Increasing law enforcement in these two hotspots could help curtail future elephant losses across Africa and disrupt this organized transnational crime. PMID:26089357

  2. Hot-Spot Mix in Ignition-Scale Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.

    2011-10-01

    Ignition of an inertial confinement fusion target depends on the formation of a central hot spot with sufficient temperature and areal density. Radiative and conductive losses from the hot spot can be enhanced by hydrodynamic instabilities. The concentric spherical layers of current National Ignition Facility ignition targets consist of a plastic ablator surrounding a thin shell of cryogenic thermonuclear fuel (i.e., hydrogen isotopes), with fuel vapor filling the interior volume.The ablator is doped with Ge to minimize preheat of the ablator closest to the DT ice caused by Au M-band emission from the hohlraum x-ray drive. Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by high-mode (50 < λ < 200) ablator-surface perturbations can cause Ge-doped ablator to mix into the interior of the shell at the end of the acceleration phase. As the shell decelerates, it compresses the fuel vapor, forming a hot spot. K-shell line emission from the ionized Ge that has penetrated into the hot spot provides an experimental signature of hot-spot mix. The Ge emission from tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and DT cryogenic targets and gas-filled plastic-shell capsules, which replace the THD layer with a mass-equivalent CH layer, was examined. The amount of hot-spot mix mass, estimated from the Ge K-shell line brightness using a detailed atomic physics code, is typically below the 100-ng allowance for hot-spot mix.1 Predictions of a simple mix model, based on linear growth of the measured surface-mass modulations, are consistent with the experimental results. The measured dependence of hot-spot mix on the implosion velocity and on the high-mode ablator-surface perturbations will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302. In collaboration with the National Ignition Campaign Mix Working Group. S. W. Haan et. al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011>).

  3. Results of a Division of Radiation Protection scrap yard exercise.

    PubMed

    James, J D

    2001-02-01

    For years the Division of Radiation Protection (DRP) has participated in exercises, which are required by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to demonstrate our ability to deal with an accident at a nuclear power plant. These demonstrations are defined by objectives and are structured such that they offer little opportunity to practice for real-world radiological events in the exercise. Since real-world radiological incidents do occur throughout the year, this exercise was designed to be as realistic as possible. A scrap yard incident was chosen as the most probable type of event. The exercise was conducted on May 5 and 6, 1999. PMID:11197512

  4. Summary of current radiation dosimetry results on manned spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, E. V.

    Measurements of radiation exposures aboard manned space flights of various altitudes, orbital inclinations and durations were performed by means of passive radiation detectors, thermoluminescent detectors (TLD's), and in some cases by active electronic counters. The TLD's and electronic counters covered the lower portion of the LET (linear energy transfer) spectra, while the nuclear track detectors measured high-LET produced by HZE particles. In Spacelab (SL-1), TLD's recorded a range of 102 to 190 millirad, yielding an average low-LET dose rate of 11.2 mrad per day inside the module, about twice the dose rate measured on previous space shuttle flights. Because of a higher inclination of the SL-1 orbit (57° versus 28.5° for previous shuttle flights), substantial fluxes of highly ionizing HZE particles were also observed, yielding an overall average mission dose-equivalent of about 135 millirem, about three times higher than measured on previous shuttle missions. A dose rate more than an order of magnitude higher than for any other space shuttle flight was obtained for mission STS-41C, reflecting the highest orbital altitude to date of 519 km.

  5. Radiation effects in nematodes: Results from IML-1 experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, G. A.; Schubert, W. W.; Kazarians, G. A.; Richards, G. F.; Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Henke, R.

    1994-10-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to natural space radiation using the ESA Biorack facility aboard Spacelab on International Microgravity Laboratory 1, STS-42. For the major experimental objective dormant animals were suspended in buffer or on agar or immobilized next to CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors to correlate fluence of HZE particles with genetic events. This configuration was used to isolate mutations in a set of 350 essential genes as well as in the unc-22 structural gene. From flight samples 13 mutants in the unc-22 gene were isolated along with 53 lethal mutations from autosomal regions balanced by a translocation eT1 (III;V). Preliminary analysis suggests that mutants from worms correlated with specific cosmic ray tracks may have a higher proportion of rearrangements than those isolated from tube cultures on a randomly sampled basis. Flight sample mutation rate was approximately 8-fold higher than ground controls which exhibited laboratory spontaneous frequencies.

  6. Radiation effects in nematodes: Results from IML-1 experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, G. A.; Schubert, W. W.; Kazarians, G. A.; Richards, G. F.; Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Henke, R.

    1994-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to natural space radiation using the ESA biorack facility aboard Spacelab on International Microgravity Laboratory 1, STS-42. For the major experimental objective dormant animals were suspended in buffer or on agar or immobilized next to CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors to correlate fluence of HZE particles with genetic events. This configuration was used to isolate mutations in a set of 350 essential genes as well as in the unc-22 structural gene. From flight samples 13 mutants in the unc-22 gene were isolated along with 53 lethal mutations from autosomal regions balanced by a translocation eT1(III;V). Preliminary analysis suggests that mutants from worms correlated with specific cosmic ray tracks may have a higher proportion of rearrangements than those isolated from tube cultures on a randomly sampled basis. Flight sample mutation rate was approximately 8-fold higher than ground controls which exhibited laboratory spontaneous frequencies.

  7. Radiation effects in nematodes: results from IML-1 experiments.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G A; Schubert, W W; Kazarians, G A; Richards, G F; Benton, E V; Benton, E R; Henke, R

    1994-10-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to natural space radiation using the ESA Biorack facility aboard Spacelab on International Microgravity Laboratory 1, STS-42. For the major experimental objective dormant animals were suspended in buffer or on agar or immobilized next to CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors to correlate fluence of HZE particles with genetic events. This configuration was used to isolate mutations in a set of 350 essential genes as well as in the unc-22 structural gene. From flight samples 13 mutants in the unc-22 gene were isolated along with 53 lethal mutations from autosomal regions balanced by a translocation eT1(III;V). Preliminary analysis suggests that mutants from worms correlated with specific cosmic ray tracks may have a higher proportion of rearrangements than those isolated from tube cultures on a randomly sampled basis. Right sample mutation rate was approximately 8-fold higher than ground controls which exhibited laboratory spontaneous frequencies. PMID:11540032

  8. Long-lived but Discontinuous Hotspot Volcanism of the South Pacific Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A.; Staudigel, H.; Wijbrans, J.; Pringle, M.

    2001-12-01

    with their own distinct isotope signature and only intermittently active over geological time. We pose that their resulting long-lived but discontinuous volcanism should be considered another end-member type of hotspot volcanism - as opposed to the strong and continuous Hawaiian-type hotspots.

  9. The Measurement of Hot-spots in Granulated Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proud, William; Field, John

    2001-06-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is one of the components of the most widely used explosive in the world ammonium nitrate: fuel oil mixtures (ANFO). By itself, it is an oxygen negative explosive with a large critical diameter. Hot-spots are produced in explosives by various means including gas space collapse, localised shear or friction. If these hot-spots reach critical conditions of size, temperature and duration size reaction can grow. This deflagration stage may eventually transition to detonation. This paper describes a system and presents results where high-speed image intensified photography is used to monitor the number and growth of hot spots in granular AN under a range of different impact pressures. The results can be used in detonation codes to provide a more accurate and realistic description of the initiation process.

  10. A micro-epidemiological analysis of febrile malaria in Coastal Kenya showing hotspots within hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Bejon, Philip; Williams, Thomas N; Nyundo, Christopher; Hay, Simon I; Benz, David; Gething, Peter W; Otiende, Mark; Peshu, Judy; Bashraheil, Mahfudh; Greenhouse, Bryan; Bousema, Teun; Bauni, Evasius; Marsh, Kevin; Smith, David L; Borrmann, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Malaria transmission is spatially heterogeneous. This reduces the efficacy of control strategies, but focusing control strategies on clusters or ‘hotspots’ of transmission may be highly effective. Among 1500 homesteads in coastal Kenya we calculated (a) the fraction of febrile children with positive malaria smears per homestead, and (b) the mean age of children with malaria per homestead. These two measures were inversely correlated, indicating that children in homesteads at higher transmission acquire immunity more rapidly. This inverse correlation increased gradually with increasing spatial scale of analysis, and hotspots of febrile malaria were identified at every scale. We found hotspots within hotspots, down to the level of an individual homestead. Febrile malaria hotspots were temporally unstable, but 4 km radius hotspots could be targeted for 1 month following 1 month periods of surveillance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02130.001 PMID:24843017

  11. Regional differences in recombination hotspots between two chicken populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although several genetic linkage maps of the chicken genome have been published, the resolution of these maps is limited and does not allow the precise identification of recombination hotspots. The availability of more than 3.2 million SNPs in the chicken genome and the recent advances in high throughput genotyping techniques enabled us to increase marker density for the construction of a high-resolution linkage map of the chicken genome. This high-resolution linkage map allowed us to study recombination hotspots across the genome between two chicken populations: a purebred broiler line and a broiler × broiler cross. In total, 1,619 animals from the two different broiler populations were genotyped with 17,790 SNPs. Results The resulting linkage map comprises 13,340 SNPs. Although 360 polymorphic SNPs that had not been assigned to a known chromosome on chicken genome build WASHUC2 were included in this study, no new linkage groups were found. The resulting linkage map is composed of 31 linkage groups, with a total length of 3,054 cM for the sex-average map of the combined population. The sex-average linkage map of the purebred broiler line is 686 cM smaller than the linkage map of the broiler × broiler cross. Conclusions In this study, we present a linkage map of the chicken genome at a substantially higher resolution than previously published linkage maps. Regional differences in recombination hotspots between the two mapping populations were observed in several chromosomes near the telomere of the p arm; the sex-specific analysis revealed that these regional differences were mainly caused by female-specific recombination hotspots in the broiler × broiler cross. PMID:20141624

  12. The Measurement of Hot-Spots in Granulated Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proud, W. G.

    2002-07-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is one of the components of the most widely used explosive in the world namely, ammonium nitrate: fuel oil mixtures (ANFO). By itself, it is an oxygen positive explosive with a large critical diameter. Hot-spots are produced in explosives by various means including gas space collapse, localised shear or friction. If these hot-spots reach critical conditions of size, temperature and duration reaction can grow. This deflagration stage may eventually transition to detonation. This paper describes high-speed image-intensified photography study in which the number and growth of hot spots in granular AN are monitored for a range of different impact pressures. The results can be used in detonation codes to provide a more accurate and realistic description of the initiation process.

  13. Interventions to reduce suicides at suicide hotspots: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Suicide hotspots’ include tall structures (for example, bridges and cliffs), railway tracks, and isolated locations (for example, rural car parks) which offer direct means for suicide or seclusion that prevents intervention. Methods We searched Medline for studies that could inform the following question: ‘What interventions are available to reduce suicides at hotspots, and are they effective?’ Results There are four main approaches: (a) restricting access to means (through installation of physical barriers); (b) encouraging help-seeking (by placement of signs and telephones); (c) increasing the likelihood of intervention by a third party (through surveillance and staff training); and (d) encouraging responsible media reporting of suicide (through guidelines for journalists). There is relatively strong evidence that reducing access to means can avert suicides at hotspots without substitution effects. The evidence is weaker for the other approaches, although they show promise. Conclusions More well-designed intervention studies are needed to strengthen this evidence base. PMID:23496989

  14. Mouse tetrad analysis provides insights into recombination mechanisms and hotspot evolutionary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Francesca; Baudat, Frédéric; Grey, Corinne; Keeney, Scott; de Massy, Bernard; Jasin, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The ability to examine all chromatids from a single meiosis in yeast tetrads has been indispensable for defining mechanisms of homologous recombination initiated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Using a broadly applicable strategy for the analysis of chromatids from a single meiosis at two recombination hotspots in mouse oocytes and spermatocytes, we demonstrate here the unidirectional transfer of information — gene conversion — in both crossovers and noncrossovers. Whereas gene conversion in crossovers is associated with reciprocal exchange, the unbroken chromatid is not altered in noncrossover gene conversions, providing strong evidence that noncrossovers arise from a distinct pathway. Gene conversion frequently spares the binding site of the hotspot-specifying protein PRDM9 with the result that erosion of the hotspot is slowed. Thus, mouse tetrad analysis demonstrates how unique aspects of mammalian recombination mechanisms shape hotspot evolutionary dynamics. PMID:25151354

  15. Determination of hot-spot susceptibility of multistring photovoltaic modules in a central-station application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Weaver, R. W.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Spencer, R.; Arnett, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Part of the effort of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA) includes a program to improve module and array reliability. A collaborative activity with industry dealing with the problem of hot-spot heating due to the shadowing of photovoltaic cells in modules and arrays containing several paralleled cell strings is described. The use of multiparallel strings in large central-station arrays introduces the likelihood of unequal current sharing and increased heating levels. Test results that relate power dissipated, current imbalance, cross-strapping frequency, and shadow configuration to hot-spot heating levels are presented. Recommendations for circuit design configurations appropriate to central-station applications that reduce the risk of hot-spot problems are offered. Guidelines are provided for developing hot-spot tests for arrays when current imbalance is a threat.

  16. Characterizing local biological hotspots in the Gulf of Maine using remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribera, Marta M.

    Researchers increasingly advocate the use of ecosystem-based management (EBM) for managing complex marine ecosystems. This approach requires managers to focus on processes and cross-scale interactions, rather than individual components. However, they often lack appropriate tools and data sources to pursue this change in management approach. One method that has been proposed to understand the ecological complexity inherent in marine ecosystems is the study of biological hotspots. Biological hotspots are locations where organisms from different trophic levels aggregate to feed on abundant supplies, and they are considered a first step toward understanding the processes driving spatial and temporal heterogeneity in marine systems. Biological hotspots are supported by phytoplankton aggregations, which are characterized by high spatial and temporal variability. As a result, methods developed to locate biological hotspots in relatively stable terrestrial systems are not well suited for more dynamic marine ecosystems. The main objective of this thesis is thus to identify and characterize local-scale biological hotspots in the western side of the Gulf of Maine. The first chapter describes a new methodological framework with the steps needed to locate these types of hotspots in marine ecosystems using remote sensing datasets. Then, in the second chapter these hotspots are characterized using a novel metric that uses time series information and spatial statistics to account for both the temporal variability and spatial structure of these marine aggregations. This metric redefines biological hotspots as areas with a high probability of exhibiting positive anomalies of productivity compared to the expected regional seasonal pattern. Finally, the third chapter compares the resulting biological hotspots to fishery-dependent abundance indices of surface and benthic predators to determine the effect of the location and magnitude of phytoplankton aggregations on the rest of the

  17. Recombination hotspots: Models and tools for detection.

    PubMed

    Paul, Prosenjit; Nag, Debjyoti; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2016-04-01

    Recombination hotspots are the regions within the genome where the rate, and the frequency of recombination are optimum with a size varying from 1 to 2kb. The recombination event is mediated by the double-stranded break formation, guided by the combined enzymatic action of DNA topoisomerase and Spo 11 endonuclease. These regions are distributed non-uniformly throughout the human genome and cause distortions in the genetic map. Numerous lines of evidence suggest that the number of hotspots known in humans has increased manifold in recent years. A few facts about the hotspot evolutions were also put forward, indicating the differences in the hotspot position between chimpanzees and humans. In mice, recombination hot spots were found to be clustered within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. Several models, that help explain meiotic recombination has been proposed. Moreover, scientists also developed some computational tools to locate the hotspot position and estimate their recombination rate in humans is of great interest to population and medical geneticists. Here we reviewed the molecular mechanisms, models and in silico prediction techniques of hot spot residues. PMID:26991854

  18. Limited Latitudinal Motion of the Louisville Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Yamazaki, T.; Geldmacher, J.; Gee, J. S.; Pressling, N.; Hoshi, H.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 330 drilled five different guyots in the Louisville Seamount Trail ranging in age between 80 and 50 Ma. Two of the primary goals of this expedition were to attain high-quality estimates of the Louisville hotspot paleolatitudes using paleomagnetic measurements and to improve our knowledge of the overall age progression using high-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. With these data we can provide the unique record of the paleolatitude shift (or lack thereof) of the Louisville mantle plume and compare it with the ~15° paleolatitude shift observed for seamounts in the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Trail over the same time period. We show that the Louisville hotspot remained within ~3° of its present-day ~51°S latitude between 70 and 50 Ma, although we cannot discount more significant southward motion since 74 Ma. Our new paleolatitude and age data suggest there has been significant inter-hotspot motion between the Hawaiian and Louisville hotspots in this time interval. We therefore conclude that the Louisville and Hawaiian hotspots moved independently and not as part of a large-scale mantle wind.

  19. Predator diversity hotspots in the blue ocean.

    PubMed

    Worm, Boris; Lotze, Heike K; Myers, Ransom A

    2003-08-19

    Concentrations of biodiversity, or hotspots, represent conservation priorities in terrestrial ecosystems but remain largely unexplored in marine habitats. In the open ocean, many large predators such as tunas, sharks, billfishes, and sea turtles are of current conservation concern because of their vulnerability to overfishing and ecosystem role. Here we use scientific-observer records from pelagic longline fisheries in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans to show that oceanic predators concentrate in distinct diversity hotspots. Predator diversity consistently peaks at intermediate latitudes (20-30 degrees N and S), where tropical and temperate species ranges overlap. Individual hotspots are found close to prominent habitat features such as reefs, shelf breaks, or seamounts and often coincide with zooplankton and coral reef hotspots. Closed-area models in the northwest Atlantic predict that protection of hotspots outperforms other area closures in safeguarding threatened pelagic predators from ecological extinction. We conclude that the seemingly monotonous landscape of the open ocean shows rich structure in species diversity and that these features should be used to focus future conservation efforts. PMID:12907699

  20. Probing Hotspot Conditions in Spherically Shock Compressed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Benjamin; Nilsen, J.; Kritcher, A. L.; Swift, D.; Rygg, J. R.; Collins, G. W.; Divol, L.; Falcone, R. W.; Gaffney, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hatarik, R.; Hawreliak, J.; Khan, S.; Kraus, D.; Landen, O. L.; Masters, N.; Nagel, S. R.; Pardini, T.; Zimmerman, G.; Doeppner, T.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of an approach to experimentally determine the conditions in the center of a CD2 sphere that has been compressed to petapascal pressures by spherically converging shocks. By measuring the hotspot size using penumbral imaging, hotspot temperature using two-color spectroscopy, the neutron yield from DD nuclear reactions and the x-ray burn width, we infer average hotspot densities of 43 g/cm3 at 1.6 keV temperature. These conditions correspond to pressures of 4.4 petapascal (44 Gbar) in an ideal gas and 3.5 petapascal from independently performed rad.-hydro. simulations. The experimentally determined neutron yield, temperature and density constrain the EOS in a regime that exceeds previously reported pressures obtained in carbon EOS measurements by three orders of magnitude. The results show a path for constraining the EOS of matter at conditions that have been inaccessible with state-of-the-art experimental EOS techniques. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and LDRD Grant 13-ERD-073

  1. Analysis of microstructure-dependent shock dissipation and hot-spot formation in granular metalized explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthy, Sunada; Gonthier, Keith A.

    2016-07-01

    Variations in the microstructure of granular explosives (i.e., particle packing density, size, shape, and composition) can affect their shock sensitivity by altering thermomechanical fields at the particle-scale during pore collapse within shocks. If the deformation rate is fast, hot-spots can form, ignite, and interact, resulting in burn at the macro-scale. In this study, a two-dimensional finite and discrete element technique is used to simulate and examine shock-induced dissipation and hot-spot formation within low density explosives (68%-84% theoretical maximum density (TMD)) consisting of large ensembles of HMX (C4H8N8O8) and aluminum (Al) particles (size ˜ 60 -360 μm). Emphasis is placed on identifying how the inclusion of Al influences effective shock dissipation and hot-spot fields relative to equivalent ensembles of neat/pure HMX for shocks that are sufficiently strong to eliminate porosity. Spatially distributed hot-spot fields are characterized by their number density and area fraction enabling their dynamics to be described in terms of nucleation, growth, and agglomeration-dominated phases with increasing shock strength. For fixed shock particle speed, predictions indicate that decreasing packing density enhances shock dissipation and hot-spot formation, and that the inclusion of Al increases dissipation relative to neat HMX by pressure enhanced compaction resulting in fewer but larger HMX hot-spots. Ensembles having bimodal particle sizes are shown to significantly affect hot-spot dynamics by altering the spatial distribution of hot-spots behind shocks.

  2. High-resolution characterization of CPD hotspot formation in human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Anamaria G.; Morris, Robert T.; Wyrick, John J.; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Repair of DNA lesions must occur within the chromatin landscape and is associated with alterations in histone modifications and nucleosome rearrangement. To directly associate these chromatin features with DNA damage and repair, it is necessary to be able to map DNA adducts. We have developed a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD)-specific immunoprecipitation method and mapped ultraviolet damage hotspots across human chromosomes 1 and 6. CPD hotspots occur almost equally in genic and intergenic regions. However, these hotspots are significantly more prevalent adjacent to repeat elements, especially Alu repeats. Nucleosome mapping studies indicate that nucleosomes are consistently positioned at Alu elements where CPD hotspots form, but by 2 h post-irradiation, these same regions are significantly depleted of nucleosomes. These results indicate that nucleosomes associated with hotspots of CPD formation are readily rearranged, potentially making them accessible to DNA repair machinery. Our results represent the first chromosome scale map of ultraviolet-induced DNA lesions in the human genome, and reveal the sequence features and dynamic chromatin changes associated with CPD hotspots. PMID:24137003

  3. Evolution of midplate hotspot swells: Numerical solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Mian; Chase, Clement G.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of midplate hotspot swells on an oceanic plate moving over a hot, upwelling mantle plume is numerically simulated. The plume supplies a Gaussian-shaped thermal perturbation and thermally-induced dynamic support. The lithosphere is treated as a thermal boundary layer with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity. The two fundamental mechanisms of transferring heat, conduction and convection, during the interaction of the lithosphere with the mantle plume are considered. The transient heat transfer equations, with boundary conditions varying in both time and space, are solved in cylindrical coordinates using the finite difference ADI (alternating direction implicit) method on a 100 x 100 grid. The topography, geoid anomaly, and heat flow anomaly of the Hawaiian swell and the Bermuda rise are used to constrain the models. Results confirm the conclusion of previous works that the Hawaiian swell can not be explained by conductive heating alone, even if extremely high thermal perturbation is allowed. On the other hand, the model of convective thinning predicts successfully the topography, geoid anomaly, and the heat flow anomaly around the Hawaiian islands, as well as the changes in the topography and anomalous heat flow along the Hawaiian volcanic chain.

  4. A hotspot model for leaf canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.

    1991-01-01

    The hotspot effect, which provides important information about canopy structure, is modeled using general principles of environmental physics as driven by parameters of interest in remote sensing, such as leaf size, leaf shape, leaf area index, and leaf angle distribution. Specific examples are derived for canopies of horizontal leaves. The hotspot effect is implemented within the framework of the model developed by Suits (1972) for a canopy of leaves to illustrate what might occur in an agricultural crop. Because the hotspot effect arises from very basic geometrical principles and is scale-free, it occurs similarly in woodlands, forests, crops, rough soil surfaces, and clouds. The scaling principles advanced are also significant factors in the production of image spatial and angular variance and covariance which can be used to assess land cover structure through remote sensing.

  5. Plate tectonics and hotspots: the third dimension.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L; Tanimoto, T; Zhang, Y S

    1992-06-19

    High-resolution seismic tomographic models of the upper mantle provide powerful new constraints on theories of plate tectonics and hotspots. Midocean ridges have extremely low seismic velocities to a depth of 100 kilometers. These low velocities imply partial melting. At greater depths, low-velocity and high-velocity anomalies record, respectively, previous positions of migrating ridges and trenches. Extensional, rifting, and hotspot regions have deep (> 200 kilometers) low-velocity anomalies. The upper mantle is characterized by vast domains of high temperature rather than small regions surrounding hotspots; the asthenosphere is not homogeneous or isothermal. Extensive magmatism requires a combination of hot upper mantle and suitable lithospheric conditions. High-velocity regions of the upper 200 kilometers of the mantle correlate with Archean cratons. PMID:17841084

  6. On localised hotspots of an urban crime model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David J. B.; O'Farrell, Hayley

    2013-06-01

    We investigate stationary, spatially localised crime hotspots on the real line and the plane of an urban crime model of Short et al. [M. Short, M. DÓrsogna, A statistical model of criminal behavior, Mathematical Models and Methods in Applied Sciences 18 (2008) 1249-1267]. Extending the weakly nonlinear analysis of Short et al., we show in one-dimension that localised hotspots should bifurcate off the background spatially homogeneous state at a Turing instability provided the bifurcation is subcritical. Using path-following techniques, we continue these hotspots and show that the bifurcating pulses can undergo the process of homoclinic snaking near the singular limit. We analyse the singular limit to explain the existence of spike solutions and compare the analytical results with the numerical computations. In two-dimensions, we show that localised radial spots should also bifurcate off the spatially homogeneous background state. Localised planar hexagon fronts and hexagon patches are found and depending on the proximity to the singular limit these solutions either undergo homoclinic snaking or act like “multi-spot” solutions. Finally, we discuss applications of these localised patterns in the urban crime context and the full agent-based model.

  7. Mometasone Furoate Cream Reduces Acute Radiation Dermatitis in Patients Receiving Breast Radiation Therapy: Results of a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hindley, Andrew; Zain, Zakiyah; Wood, Lisa; Whitehead, Anne; Sanneh, Alison; Barber, David; Hornsby, Ruth

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: We wanted to confirm the benefit of mometasone furoate (MF) in preventing acute radiation reactions, as shown in a previous study (Boström et al, Radiother Oncol 2001;59:257-265). Methods and Materials: The study was a double-blind comparison of MF with D (Diprobase), administered daily from the start of radiation therapy for 5 weeks in patients receiving breast radiation therapy, 40 Gy in 2.67-Gy fractions daily over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was mean modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. Results: Mean RTOG scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.046). Maximum RTOG and mean erythema scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.018 and P=.012, respectively). The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score was significantly less for MF than for D at weeks 4 and 5 when corrected for Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire scores. Conclusions: MF cream significantly reduces radiation dermatitis when applied to the breast during and after radiation therapy. For the first time, we have shown a significantly beneficial effect on quality of life using a validated instrument (DLQI), for a topical steroid cream. We believe that application of this cream should be the standard of care where radiation dermatitis is expected.

  8. Role of hydrodynamic instability growth in hot-spot mass gain and fusion performance of inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2014-10-15

    In an inertial confinement fusion target, energy loss due to thermal conduction from the hot-spot will inevitably ablate fuel ice into the hot-spot, resulting in a more massive but cooler hot-spot, which negatively impacts fusion yield. Hydrodynamic mix due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the gas-ice interface can aggravate the problem via an increased gas-ice interfacial area across which energy transfer from the hot-spot and ice can be enhanced. Here, this mix-enhanced transport effect on hot-spot fusion-performance degradation is quantified using contrasting 1D and 2D hydrodynamic simulations, and its dependence on effective acceleration, Atwood number, and ablation speed is identified.

  9. Some new results on irradiation characteristics of synthetic quartz crystals and their application to radiation hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadur, H.; Parshad, R.

    1983-01-01

    The paper reports some new results on irradiation characteristics of synthetic quartz crystals and their application to radiation hardening. The present results show how the frequency shift in quartz crystals can be influenced by heat processing prior to irradiation and how this procedure can lead to radiation hardening for obtaining precise frequencies and time intervals from quartz oscillators in space.

  10. Biogeographic methods identify gymnosperm biodiversity hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Medina, Raúl; Morrone, Juan J.; Luna Vega, Isolda

    2001-10-01

    A remarkable congruence among areas of endemism, panbiogeographic nodes, and refugia in western North America, Japan, south-western China, Tasmania, and New Caledonia indicates that these areas deserve special status for conservation. Here we propose that areas identified by different biogeographic methods are significant candidates for designation as hotspots.

  11. Results of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) Survey of Radiation Oncology Residency Program Directors

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor Abdel-Wahab, May; Spangler, Ann E.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To survey the radiation oncology residency program directors on the topics of departmental and institutional support systems, residency program structure, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, and challenges as program director. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed by the leadership of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs to all radiation oncology program directors. Summary statistics, medians, and ranges were collated from responses. Results: Radiation oncology program directors had implemented all current required aspects of the ACGME Outcome Project into their training curriculum. Didactic curricula were similar across programs nationally, but research requirements and resources varied widely. Program directors responded that implementation of the ACGME Outcome Project and the external review process were among their greatest challenges. Protected time was the top priority for program directors. Conclusions: The Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs recommends that all radiation oncology program directors have protected time and an administrative stipend to support their important administrative and educational role. Departments and institutions should provide adequate and equitable resources to the program directors and residents to meet increasingly demanding training program requirements.

  12. Radiation Testing on State-of-the-Art CMOS: Challenges, Plans, and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2009-01-01

    At GOMAC 2007 and 2008, we discussed a variety of challenges for radiation testing of modern semiconductor devices and technologies [1, 2]. In this presentation, we provide more specific details in this on-going investigation focusing on out-of-the-box lessons observed for providing radiation effects assurances as well as preliminary test results.

  13. Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Sam; Deschrijver, Dirk; Verloock, Leen; Dhaene, Tom; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a novel methodology is proposed to create heat maps that accurately pinpoint the outdoor locations with elevated exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in an extensive urban region (or, hotspots), and that would allow local authorities and epidemiologists to efficiently assess the locations and spectral composition of these hotspots, while at the same time developing a global picture of the exposure in the area. Moreover, no prior knowledge about the presence of radiofrequency radiation sources (e.g., base station parameters) is required. After building a surrogate model from the available data using kriging, the proposed method makes use of an iterative sampling strategy that selects new measurement locations at spots which are deemed to contain the most valuable information-inside hotspots or in search of them-based on the prediction uncertainty of the model. The method was tested and validated in an urban subarea of Ghent, Belgium with a size of approximately 1 km2. In total, 600 input and 50 validation measurements were performed using a broadband probe. Five hotspots were discovered and assessed, with maximum total electric-field strengths ranging from 1.3 to 3.1 V/m, satisfying the reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection for exposure of the general public to RF-EMF. Spectrum analyzer measurements in these hotspots revealed five radiofrequency signals with a relevant contribution to the exposure. The radiofrequency radiation emitted by 900 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) base stations was always dominant, with contributions ranging from 45% to 100%. Finally, validation of the subsequent surrogate models shows high prediction accuracy, with the final model featuring an average relative error of less than 2dB (factor 1.26 in electric-field strength), a correlation coefficient of 0.7, and a specificity of 0.96. PMID:23759207

  14. Juniper Pollen Hotspots in the Southwest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunderson, L. D.; VandeWater, P.; Luvall, J.; Levetin, E.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Juniperus pollen is a major allergen in Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. While the bulk of pollen may be released in rural areas, large amounts of pollen can be transported to urban areas. Major juniper species in the region include: Juniperus ashei, J. virginiana, J. pinchotii, and J. monosperma. Pollen release is virtually continuous beginning in late September with J. pinchotii and ending in May with J. monosperma. Urban areas in the region were evaluated for the potential of overlapping seasons in order to inform sensitive individuals. Methods: Burkard volumetric pollen traps were established for two consecutive spring seasons at 6 sites in northern New Mexico and 6 sites for two consecutive winter and fall seasons in Texas and Oklahoma Standard methods were used in the preparation and analysis of slides. Results: The Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex is home to over 6 million people. It is adjacent to populations of J. pinchotii, J. virginiana, and J. ashei. Peak concentration near Dallas for J. ashei in 2011 was 5891 pollen grains/m3 in January 7th. The peak date for J. pinchotii at an upwind sampling location in San Marcos, TX was November 1, 2010 and peak for J. virginiana at a nearby station in Tulsa, OK was November 1, 2010 and peak for J. virginiana at a nearby station in Tulsa, OK was February 20, 2011. Amarillo, TX is adjacent to J. pinchotii, J. ashei, and J. monosperma populations and may be subject to juniper pollen from September through May. Conclusions: Considering the overlapping distributions of juniper trees and the overlapping temporal release of pollen, sensitive patients may benefit from avoiding hotspots.

  15. Automated hotspot analysis with aerial image CD metrology for advanced logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttgereit, Ute; Trautzsch, Thomas; Kim, Min-ho; Seo, Jung-Uk; Yoon, Young-Keun; Han, Hak-Seung; Chung, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Meyers, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Continuously shrinking designs by further extension of 193nm technology lead to a much higher probability of hotspots especially for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. The CD of these potential hotspots needs to be precisely controlled and measured on the mask. On top of that, the feature complexity increases due to high OPC load in the logic mask design which is an additional challenge for CD metrology. Therefore the hotspot measurements have been performed on WLCD from ZEISS, which provides the benefit of reduced complexity by measuring the CD in the aerial image and qualifying the printing relevant CD. This is especially of advantage for complex 2D feature measurements. Additionally, the data preparation for CD measurement becomes more critical due to the larger amount of CD measurements and the increasing feature diversity. For the data preparation this means to identify these hotspots and mark them automatically with the correct marker required to make the feature specific CD measurement successful. Currently available methods can address generic pattern but cannot deal with the pattern diversity of the hotspots. The paper will explore a method how to overcome those limitations and to enhance the time-to-result in the marking process dramatically. For the marking process the Synopsys WLCD Output Module was utilized, which is an interface between the CATS mask data prep software and the WLCD metrology tool. It translates the CATS marking directly into an executable WLCD measurement job including CD analysis. The paper will describe the utilized method and flow for the hotspot measurement. Additionally, the achieved results on hotspot measurements utilizing this method will be presented.

  16. Continuous representation of tumor microvessel density and detection of angiogenic hotspots in histological whole-slide images

    PubMed Central

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Marx, Alexander; Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino Carlos; Schad, Lothar R.; Zöllner, Frank Gerrit; Weis, Cleo-Aron

    2015-01-01

    Blood vessels in solid tumors are not randomly distributed, but are clustered in angiogenic hotspots. Tumor microvessel density (MVD) within these hotspots correlates with patient survival and is widely used both in diagnostic routine and in clinical trials. Still, these hotspots are usually subjectively defined. There is no unbiased, continuous and explicit representation of tumor vessel distribution in histological whole slide images. This shortcoming distorts angiogenesis measurements and may account for ambiguous results in the literature. In the present study, we describe and evaluate a new method that eliminates this bias and makes angiogenesis quantification more objective and more efficient. Our approach involves automatic slide scanning, automatic image analysis and spatial statistical analysis. By comparing a continuous MVD function of the actual sample to random point patterns, we introduce an objective criterion for hotspot detection: An angiogenic hotspot is defined as a clustering of blood vessels that is very unlikely to occur randomly. We evaluate the proposed method in N=11 images of human colorectal carcinoma samples and compare the results to a blinded human observer. For the first time, we demonstrate the existence of statistically significant hotspots in tumor images and provide a tool to accurately detect these hotspots. PMID:26061817

  17. Multifaceted diversity-area relationships reveal global hotspots of mammalian species, trait and lineage diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mazel, Florent; Guilhaumon, François; Mouquet, Nicolas; Devictor, Vincent; Gravel, Dominique; Renaud, Julien; Cianciaruso, Marcus Vinicius; Loyola, Rafael Dias; Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre Felizola; Mouillot, David; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Aim To define biome-scale hotspots of phylogenetic and functional mammalian biodiversity (PD and FD, respectively) and compare them to ‘classical’ hotspots based on species richness (SR) only. Location Global Methods SR, PD & FD were computed for 782 terrestrial ecoregions using distribution ranges of 4616 mammalian species. We used a set of comprehensive diversity indices unified by a recent framework that incorporates the species relative coverage in each ecoregion. We build large-scale multifaceted diversity-area relationships to rank ecoregions according to their levels of biodiversity while accounting for the effect of area on each diversity facet. Finally we defined hotspots as the top-ranked ecoregions. Results While ignoring species relative coverage led to a relative good congruence between biome top ranked SR, PD and FD hotspots, ecoregions harboring a rich and abundantly represented evolutionary history and functional diversity did not match with top ranked ecoregions defined by species richness. More importantly PD and FD hotspots showed important spatial mismatches. We also found that FD and PD generally reached their maximum values faster than species richness as a function of area. Main conclusions The fact that PD/FD reach faster their maximal value than SR may suggest that the two former facets might be less vulnerable to habitat loss than the latter. While this point is expected, it is the first time that it is quantified at global scale and should have important consequences in conservation. Incorporating species relative coverage into the delineation of multifaceted hotspots of diversity lead to weak congruence between SR, PD and FD hotspots. This means that maximizing species number may fail at preserving those nodes (in the phylogenetic or functional tree) that are relatively abundant in the ecoregion. As a consequence it may be of prime importance to adopt a multifaceted biodiversity perspective to inform conservation strategies at global

  18. Uncovering zoonoses awareness in an emerging disease 'hotspot'.

    PubMed

    Paige, Sarah B; Malavé, Carly; Mbabazi, Edith; Mayer, Jonathan; Goldberg, Tony L

    2015-03-01

    Emerging infectious diseases from animals pose significant and increasing threats to human health; places of risk are simultaneously viewed as conservation and emerging disease 'hotspots'. The One World/One Health paradigm is an 'assemblage' discipline. Extensive research from the natural and social sciences, as well as public health have contributed to designing surveillance and response policy within the One World/One Health framework. However, little research has been undertaken that considers the lives of those who experience risk in hotspots on a daily basis. As a result, policymakers and practitioners are unable to fully comprehend the social and ecological processes that catalyze cross-species pathogen exchange. This study examined local populations' comprehension of zoonotic disease. From October 2008-May 2009 we collected data from people living on the periphery of Kibale National Park, in western Uganda. We administered a survey to 72 individuals and conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 14 individuals. Results from the survey showed respondents had statistically significant awareness that transmission of diseases from animals was possible compared to those who did not think such transmission was possible (x(2) = 30.68, df = 1, p < 0.05). However, individual characteristics such as gender, occupation, location, and age were not significantly predictive of awareness. Both quantitative and qualitative data show local people are aware of zoonoses and provided biomedically accurate examples of possible infections and corresponding animal sources (e.g., worm infection from pigs and Ebola from primates). Qualitative data also revealed expectations about the role of the State in managing the prevention of zoonoses from wildlife. As a result of this research, we recommend meaningful discourse with people living at the frontlines of animal contact in emerging disease and conservation hotspots in order to develop informed and relevant zoonoses

  19. Some new results on the frequency characteristics on quartz crystals irradiated by ionizing and particle radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadur, H.; Parshad, R.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency behavior of AT-cut quartz crystals irradiated by X -, gamma rays and fast neutrons. Initial instability in frequency for gamma and neutron irradiated crystals was found. All the different radiations first give a negative frequency shift at lower doses which are followed by positive frequency shift for increased doses. Results are explained in terms of the fundamental crystal structure. Applications of the frequency results for radiation hardening are proposed.

  20. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR): Analysis, Results, and Lessons Learned From the June 1997 ER-2 Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W. (Editor); Jones, I. W. (Editor); Maiden, D. L. (Editor); Goldhagen, P. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The United States initiated a program to assess the technology required for an environmentally safe and operationally efficient High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) for entrance on the world market after the turn of the century. Due to the changing regulations on radiation exposures and the growing concerns over uncertainty in our knowledge of atmospheric radiations, the NASA High Speed Research Project Office (HSRPO) commissioned a review of "Radiation Exposure and High-Altitude Flight" by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). On the basis of the NCRP recommendations, the HSRPO funded a flight experiment to resolve the environmental uncertainty in the atmospheric ionizing radiation levels as a step in developing an approach to minimize the radiation impact on HSCT operations. To minimize costs in this project, an international investigator approach was taken to assure coverage with instrument sensitivity across the range of particle types and energies to allow unique characterization of the diverse radiation components. The present workshop is a result of the flight measurements made at the maximum intensity of the solar cycle modulated background radiation levels during the month of June 1997.

  1. Results and toxicity of the treatment of anal canal carcinoma by radiation therapy or radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cummings, B; Keane, T; Thomas, G; Harwood, A; Rider, W

    1984-11-15

    The results of treating anal canal carcinoma by radical external beam radiation alone (RT) or by combined 5-fluorouracil, mitomycin C and radiation (FUMIR), were compared in nonrandomized groups of patients treated in a single center. In each treatment regimen, surgery was reserved for those patients with residual carcinoma. The uncorrected 5-year survival rate in each group was approximately 70%, but primary tumor control was achieved in 93% (28/30) with FUMIR compared to 60% (15/25) treated with RT. Acute hematologic and enterocolic toxicity with uninterrupted external beam radiation courses of 5000 cGy in 4 weeks plus chemotherapy led to the adoption of split-course treatment. Serious late toxicity requiring surgical intervention occurred in 3 of 25 following RT, and in 5 of 30 following FUMIR. Colostomies were needed as part of treatment for residual carcinoma or for the management of treatment-related toxicity in 11 of 25 treated by RT and have been required to date in 4 of 30 treated by FUMIR. The improvement in the primary tumor control rate and the reduction in the number of patients requiring colostomy when compared with the results of RT favor combined chemotherapy and radiation as the initial treatment for anal canal carcinoma. PMID:6435851

  2. Evidence that the maximum electron energy in hotspots of FR II galaxies is not determined by synchrotron cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araudo, Anabella T.; Bell, Anthony R.; Crilly, Aidan; Blundell, Katherine M.

    2016-05-01

    It has been suggested that relativistic shocks in extragalactic sources may accelerate the highest energy cosmic rays. The maximum energy to which cosmic rays can be accelerated depends on the structure of magnetic turbulence near the shock but recent theoretical advances indicate that relativistic shocks are probably unable to accelerate particles to energies much larger than a PeV. We study the hotspots of powerful radiogalaxies, where electrons accelerated at the termination shock emit synchrotron radiation. The turnover of the synchrotron spectrum is typically observed between infrared and optical frequencies, indicating that the maximum energy of non-thermal electrons accelerated at the shock is ≲ TeV for a canonical magnetic field of ˜100 μG. Based on theoretical considerations we show that this maximum energy cannot be constrained by synchrotron losses as usually assumed, unless the jet density is unreasonably large and most of the jet upstream energy goes to non-thermal particles. We test this result by considering a sample of hotspots observed with high spatial resolution at radio, infrared and optical wavelengths.

  3. Evidence that the maximum electron energy in hotspots of FR II galaxies is not determined by synchrotron cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araudo, Anabella T.; Bell, Anthony R.; Crilly, Aidan; Blundell, Katherine M.

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested that relativistic shocks in extragalactic sources may accelerate the highest energy cosmic rays. The maximum energy to which cosmic rays can be accelerated depends on the structure of magnetic turbulence near the shock but recent theoretical advances indicate that relativistic shocks are probably unable to accelerate particles to energies much larger than a PeV. We study the hotspots of powerful radiogalaxies, where electrons accelerated at the termination shock emit synchrotron radiation. The turnover of the synchrotron spectrum is typically observed between infrared and optical frequencies, indicating that the maximum energy of non-thermal electrons accelerated at the shock is < TeV for a canonical magnetic field of ~100 micro Gauss. Based on theoretical considerations we show that this maximum energy cannot be constrained by synchrotron losses as usually assumed, unless the jet density is unreasonably large and most of the jet upstream energy goes to non-thermal particles. We test this result by considering a sample of hotspots observed with high spatial resolution at radio, infrared and optical wavelengths.

  4. Evidence that the maximum electron energy in hotspots of FR II galaxies is not determined by synchrotron cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araudo, Anabella T.; Bell, Anthony R.; Crilly, Aidan; Blundell, Katherine M.

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested that relativistic shocks in extragalactic sources may accelerate the highest energy cosmic rays. The maximum energy to which cosmic rays can be accelerated depends on the structure of magnetic turbulence near the shock but recent theoretical advances indicate that relativistic shocks are probably unable to accelerate particles to energies much larger than a PeV. We study the hotspots of powerful radiogalaxies, where electrons accelerated at the termination shock emit synchrotron radiation. The turnover of the synchrotron spectrum is typically observed between infrared and optical frequencies, indicating that the maximum energy of non-thermal electrons accelerated at the shock is ≲ TeV for a canonical magnetic field of ˜100 μG. Based on theoretical considerations we show that this maximum energy cannot be constrained by synchrotron losses as usually assumed, unless the jet density is unreasonably large and most of the jet upstream energy goes to non-thermal particles. We test this result by considering a sample of hotspots observed with high spatial resolution at radio, infrared and optical wavelengths.

  5. Forecasting hotspots using predictive visual analytics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejewski, Ross; Hafen, Ryan; Rudolph, Stephen; Cleveland, William; Ebert, David

    2014-12-30

    A method for forecasting hotspots is provided. The method may include the steps of receiving input data at an input of the computational device, generating a temporal prediction based on the input data, generating a geospatial prediction based on the input data, and generating output data based on the time series and geospatial predictions. The output data may be configured to display at least one user interface at an output of the computational device.

  6. The history, hotspots, and trends of electrocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiang-Lin; Liu, Guo-Zhen; Tong, Yun-Hai; Yan, Hong; Xu, Zhi; Chen, Qi; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Wang, Hong-Bo; Tan, Shao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) has broad applications in clinical diagnosis and prognosis of cardiovascular disease. Many researchers have contributed to its progressive development. To commemorate those pioneers, and to better study and promote the use of ECG, we reviewed and present here a systematic introduction about the history, hotspots, and trends of ECG. In the historical part, information including the invention, improvement, and extensive applications of ECG, such as in long QT syndrome (LQTS), angina, and myocardial infarction (MI), are chronologically presented. New technologies and applications from the 1990s are also introduced. In the second part, we use the bibliometric analysis method to analyze the hotspots in the field of ECG-related research. By using total citations and year-specific total citations as our main criteria, four key hotspots in ECG-related research were identified from 11 articles, including atrial fibrillation, LQTS, angina and MI, and heart rate variability. Recent studies in those four areas are also reported. In the final part, we discuss the future trends concerning ECG-related research. The authors believe that improvement of the ECG instrumentation, big data mining for ECG, and the accuracy of diagnosis and application will be areas of continuous concern. PMID:26345622

  7. The history, hotspots, and trends of electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang-Lin; Liu, Guo-Zhen; Tong, Yun-Hai; Yan, Hong; Xu, Zhi; Chen, Qi; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Wang, Hong-Bo; Tan, Shao-Hua

    2015-07-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) has broad applications in clinical diagnosis and prognosis of cardiovascular disease. Many researchers have contributed to its progressive development. To commemorate those pioneers, and to better study and promote the use of ECG, we reviewed and present here a systematic introduction about the history, hotspots, and trends of ECG. In the historical part, information including the invention, improvement, and extensive applications of ECG, such as in long QT syndrome (LQTS), angina, and myocardial infarction (MI), are chronologically presented. New technologies and applications from the 1990s are also introduced. In the second part, we use the bibliometric analysis method to analyze the hotspots in the field of ECG-related research. By using total citations and year-specific total citations as our main criteria, four key hotspots in ECG-related research were identified from 11 articles, including atrial fibrillation, LQTS, angina and MI, and heart rate variability. Recent studies in those four areas are also reported. In the final part, we discuss the future trends concerning ECG-related research. The authors believe that improvement of the ECG instrumentation, big data mining for ECG, and the accuracy of diagnosis and application will be areas of continuous concern. PMID:26345622

  8. RESULTS OF THE NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY BEAM STUDIES PROGRAM AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,K.A.AHRENS,L.BEUTTENMULLER,R.H.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. The purpose of the NSRL Beam Studies Program is to develop a clear understanding of the beams delivered to the facility, to fully characterize those beams, and to develop new capabilities in the interest of understanding the radiation environment in space. In this report we will describe the first results from this program.

  9. The impact of hotspot-targeted interventions on malaria transmission: study protocol for a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria transmission is highly heterogeneous in most settings, resulting in the formation of recognizable malaria hotspots. Targeting these hotspots might represent a highly efficacious way of controlling or eliminating malaria if the hotspots fuel malaria transmission to the wider community. Methods/design Hotspots of malaria will be determined based on spatial patterns in age-adjusted prevalence and density of antibodies against malaria antigens apical membrane antigen-1 and merozoite surface protein-1. The community effect of interventions targeted at these hotspots will be determined. The intervention will comprise larviciding, focal screening and treatment of the human population, distribution of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets and indoor residual spraying. The impact of the intervention will be determined inside and up to 500 m outside the targeted hotspots by PCR-based parasite prevalence in cross-sectional surveys, malaria morbidity by passive case detection in selected facilities and entomological monitoring of larval and adult Anopheles populations. Discussion This study aims to provide direct evidence for a community effect of hotspot-targeted interventions. The trial is powered to detect large effects on malaria transmission in the context of ongoing malaria interventions. Follow-up studies will be needed to determine the effect of individual components of the interventions and the cost-effectiveness of a hotspot-targeted approach, where savings made by reducing the number of compounds that need to receive interventions should outweigh the costs of hotspot-detection. Trial registration NCT01575613. The protocol was registered online on 20 March 2012; the first community was randomized on 26 March 2012. PMID:23374910

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION MONITORING IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - HISTORY AND RESULTS 25 YEARS AFTER

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    This article describes results of the radiation environmental monitoring performed in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ) during the period following the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. This article presents a brief overview of five comprehensive reports generated under Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 (Washington Savannah River Company LLC, Subcontract No. AC55559N, SOW No. ON8778) and summarizes characteristics of the ChEZ and its post-accident status and the history of development of the radiation monitoring research in the ChEZ is described. This article addresses characteristics of the radiation monitoring in the ChEZ, its major goals and objectives, and changes of these goals and objectives in the course of time, depending on the tasks associated with the phase of mitigation of the ChNPP accident consequences. The results of the radiation monitoring in the ChEZ during the last 25 years are also provided.

  11. Depth-based hotspot identification and multivariate ranking using the full Bayes approach.

    PubMed

    El-Basyouny, Karim; Sayed, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    Although the multivariate structure of traffic accidents has been recognized in the safety literature for over a decade now, univariate identification and ranking of hotspots is still dominant. The present paper advocates the use of multivariate identification and ranking of hotspots based on statistical depth functions, which are useful tools for non-parametric multivariate analysis as they provide center-out ordering of multivariate data. Thus, a depth-based multivariate method is proposed for the identification and ranking of hotspots using the full Bayes (FB) approach. The proposed method is applied to a sample of 236 signalized intersections in the Greater Vancouver Area. Various multivariate Poisson log-normal (MVPLN) models were used for data analysis. For each model, the FB posterior estimates were obtained using the Markov Chains Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques and several goodness-of-fit measures were used for model selection. Using a depth threshold of 0.025, the proposed method identified 26 intersections (11%) as potential hotspots. The choice of a depth threshold is a delicate decision and it is suggested to determine the threshold according to the amount of funding available for safety improvement, which is the usual practice in univariate hotspot identification (HSID). Also, the results show that the performance of the proposed multivariate depth-based FB HSID method is superior to that of an analogous method based on the depths of accident frequency (AF) in terms of sensitivity, specificity and the sum of norms (lengths) of Poisson mean vectors. PMID:23018036

  12. Four individually druggable MET hotspots mediate HGF-driven tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Basilico, Cristina; Hultberg, Anna; Blanchetot, Christophe; de Jonge, Natalie; Festjens, Els; Hanssens, Valérie; Osepa, Sjudry-Ilona; De Boeck, Gitte; Mira, Alessia; Cazzanti, Manuela; Morello, Virginia; Dreier, Torsten; Saunders, Michael; de Haard, Hans; Michieli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Activation of MET by HGF plays a key role in tumor progression. Using a recently developed llama platform that generates human-like immunoglobulins, we selected 68 different antibodies that compete with HGF for binding to MET. HGF-competing antibodies recognized 4 distinct hotspots localized in different MET domains. We identified 1 hotspot that coincides with the known HGF β chain binding site on blades 2–3 of the SEMA domain β-propeller. We determined that a second and a third hotspot lie within blade 5 of the SEMA domain and IPT domains 2–3, both of which are thought to bind to HGF α chain. Characterization of the fourth hotspot revealed a region across the PSI-IPT 1 domains not previously associated with HGF binding. Individual or combined targeting of these hotspots effectively interrupted HGF/MET signaling in multiple cell-based biochemical and biological assays. Selected antibodies directed against SEMA blades 2–3 and the PSI-IPT 1 region inhibited brain invasion and prolonged survival in a glioblastoma multiforme model, prevented metastatic disease following neoadjuvant therapy in a triple-negative mammary carcinoma model, and suppressed cancer cell dissemination to the liver in a KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer model. These results identify multiple regions of MET responsible for HGF-mediated tumor progression, unraveling the complexity of HGF-MET interaction, and provide selective molecular tools for targeting MET activity in cancer. PMID:24865428

  13. The Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain: Hotspot volcanism with mid-ocean ridge basalt affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Desonie, D.L.; Duncan, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Cobb hotspot, currently located beneath Axial seamount on the Juan de Fuca ridge, has the temporal but not the isotopic characteristics usually attributed to a mantle plume. The earlier volcanic products of the hotspot, form eight volcanoes in the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount (CES) chain, show a westward age progression away from the hotspot and a westward increase in the age difference between the seamounts and the crust on which they formed. These results are consistent with movement of the Pacific plate over a fixed Cobb hotspot and eventual encroachment by the westwardly migrating Juan de Fuca ridge. CES lavas are slightly enriched in alkalies and incompatible elements relative to those of the Juan de Fuca ridge but they have Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions virtually identical to those found along the ridge. Therefore, Cobb hotspot is a stationary, upper mantle melting anomaly whose volcanic products show strong mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) affinity. These observations can be explained by low degrees of partial melting of entrained heterogeneous upper mantle MORB source material within a thermally driven lower mantle diapir or by an intrinsic MORB-like composition of the deeper mantle source region from which northeast Pacific plumes rise.

  14. A novel approach for hot-spot removal for sub-100nm manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Melody; Anderson, Melissa; Lai, Weinong; Wu, Clive; Tsao, Becky; Chu, Chih-wei; Lin, Char; Chou, Jacky; Tsai, Sidney

    2006-10-01

    Recent advances in lithography simulation have made full-chip lithography rule checking (LRC) practical and even mandatory for many fabs, especially those operating with half-pitches under 100nm. These LRCs routinely identify marginal or even fatal manufacturability problems (hot-spots), especially when simulated through process corners. Until recently, when hot-spots were identified, the only options were to reject the tapeout for additional layout modifications, re-run OPC with a different recipe, or use a DRC-tool to do "blind" cut-and-paste repairs under the assumption that making fatal errors non-fatal is sufficient to make them "good." Using a commercial LRC tool, we will inspect OPC data on a production design to identify a typical volume of real and potential hot-spots. Next, using Halo-Fix from Aprio Technologies, we will apply local repairs, choosing rule-based or model-based repair strategies as appropriate for each type of hot-spot. Using this method, "intelligent" changes in the hot-spot areas can be made which accurately account for lithography interactions and process variations, in order to optimize for manufacturing robustness. To verify that the repairs are acceptable, LRCs will be performed and the results analyzed.

  15. Identifying Genetic Hotspots by Mapping Molecular Diversity of Widespread Trees: When Commonness Matters.

    PubMed

    Souto, Cintia P; Mathiasen, Paula; Acosta, María Cristina; Quiroga, María Paula; Vidal-Russell, Romina; Echeverría, Cristian; Premoli, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Conservation planning requires setting priorities at the same spatial scale at which decision-making processes are undertaken considering all levels of biodiversity, but current methods for identifying biodiversity hotspots ignore its genetic component. We developed a fine-scale approach based on the definition of genetic hotspots, which have high genetic diversity and unique variants that represent their evolutionary potential and evolutionary novelties. Our hypothesis is that wide-ranging taxa with similar ecological tolerances, yet of phylogenetically independent lineages, have been and currently are shaped by ecological and evolutionary forces that result in geographically concordant genetic patterns. We mapped previously published genetic diversity and unique variants of biparentally inherited markers and chloroplast sequences for 9 species from 188 and 275 populations, respectively, of the 4 woody dominant families of the austral temperate forest, an area considered a biodiversity hotspot. Spatial distribution patterns of genetic polymorphisms differed among taxa according to their ecological tolerances. Eight genetic hotspots were detected and we recommend conservation actions for some in the southern Coastal Range in Chile. Existing spatially explicit genetic data from multiple populations and species can help to identify biodiversity hotspots and guide conservation actions to establish science-based protected areas that will preserve the evolutionary potential of key habitats and species. PMID:26245788

  16. A multigroup radiation diffusion test problem: Comparison of code results with analytic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Harte, J A; Bolstad, J H; Offner, S R

    2006-12-21

    We consider a 1D, slab-symmetric test problem for the multigroup radiation diffusion and matter energy balance equations. The test simulates diffusion of energy from a hot central region. Opacities vary with the cube of the frequency and radiation emission is given by a Wien spectrum. We compare results from two LLNL codes, Raptor and Lasnex, with tabular data that define the analytic solution.

  17. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1: Correlation of tumor and cell culture results

    SciTech Connect

    Moulder, J.E.; Hopwood, L.E.; Volk, D.M.; Davies, B.M. )

    1991-02-01

    The RIF-1 tumor line contains cells that are resistant to various anti-neoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), adriamycin (ADR), and etoposide (VP16). The frequency of these drug-resistant cells is increased after irradiation. The frequency of drug-resistant cells and the magnitude of radiation-induced drug resistance are different in cell culture than in tumors. The dose-response and expression time relationships for radiation induction of drug resistance observed in RIF-1 tumors are unusual.We hypothesize that at high radiation doses in vivo, we are selecting for cells that are both drug resistant and radiation resistant due to microenvironmental factors, whereas at low radiation doses in vivo and all radiation doses in vitro, we are observing true mutants. These studies indicate that there can be significant differences in drug-resistance frequencies between tumors and their cell lines of origin, and that radiation induction of drug resistance depends significantly on whether the induction is done in tumors or in cell culture. These results imply that theories about the induction of drug resistance that are based on cell culture studies may be inapplicable to the induction of drug resistance in tumors.

  18. Amifostine (ETHYOL) protects rats from mucositis resulting from fractionated or hyperfractionated radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Cassatt, David R.; McCarthy, Michael P. . E-mail: mccarthym@medimmune.com

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: The cytoprotective drug amifostine (Ethyol) protects rats from oral mucositis resulting from a single dose of {gamma}-irradiation. We expanded earlier studies to determine whether multiple doses of amifostine protect against fractionated or hyperfractionated radiation and whether the active metabolite of amifostine (WR-1065) accumulates in tissues upon repeated administration. Methods and materials: Rats received amifostine daily for 5 days in conjunction with a 1-week fractionated radiation schedule and were evaluated for oral mucositis. Rats also received amifostine before the am or pm exposure or b.i.d. in conjunction with hyperfractionated radiation. To determine the pharmacokinetics of WR-1065 after repeated dosing, amifostine was given 5 days a week for 1 or 3 weeks, and rat tissue and plasma were collected at intervals during and after treatment and analyzed for WR-1065. Results: Amifostine protected rats from mucositis resulting from fractionated or hyperfractionated radiation. When the number of days of amifostine administration was reduced, protection was diminished. A dose of 100 mg/kg given in the morning or 2 doses at 50 mg/kg provided the best protection against hyperfractionated radiation. WR-1065 did not accumulate in tissues or tumor upon repeated administration. Conclusions: Amifostine prevented radiation-induced mucositis in a rat model; protection was dose and schedule dependent.

  19. Hydrothermal Manganese Mineralization Near the Samoan Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, J. R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Hart, S. R.; Dunham, R.

    2006-12-01

    The thickest beds of hydrothermal manganese oxides recovered to date from the global ocean were collected from a volcanic cone in the south Pacific. In April 2005, samples were dredged aboard the R.V. Kilo Moana from a volcanic cone on the lower flank of Tulaga seamount (about 2,700 m water depth; 14° 39.222' S; 170° 1.730' W), located 115 km SW of Vailulu'u, the volcanically and hydrothermally active center of the Samoan hotspot. Additional hydrothermal manganese samples were collected off Ofu Island (dredge Alia 107), 72 km to the WSW of Vailulu'u. Manganese-oxide beds up to 9 cm thick are composed of birnessite and 10 Å manganates. Some layers consist of Mn-oxide columnar structures 4 cm long and 1 cm wide, which have not been described previously. The mean Mn and Fe contents of 18 samples are 51 weight percent and 0.76 weight percent, respectively. Elevated concentrations of Li (mean 0.11 wt. percent) are indicators of a hydrothermal origin, and distinguishes these samples, along with the high Mn and low Fe contents, from hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts. Other enriched elements include Ba (mean 0.14 percent), Cu (249 ppm), Mo (451 ppm), Ni (400 ppm), Zn (394 ppm), V (214 ppm), and W (132 ppm). Chondrite-normalized REE patterns show large negative Ce anomalies and LREE enrichments, both characteristic of hydrothermal Mn deposits. Small negative Eu anomalies are not typical of hydrothermal deposits and can be explained either by the absence of leaching of plagioclase by the hydrothermal fluids or by the precipitation of Eu-rich minerals, such as barite and anhydrite, at depth. The high base-metal contents indicate that sulfides are not forming deeper in the hydrothermal system or that such deposits are being leached by the ascending fluids. Textures of the thickest Mn deposits indicate that the Mn oxides formed below the seabed from ascending fluids during multiple phases of waxing and waning hydrothermal pulses. The deposits were later exposed at the seafloor by

  20. The Rurutu Hotspot: Isotopic and Trace Element Evidence of HIMU Hotspot Volcanism in the Tuvalu Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, V.; Konter, J. G.; Konrad, K.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jackson, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Current Pacific absolute plate motion (APM) models include 2 major, long-lived hotspot tracks: the ~85 Ma Hawaiian-Emperor and the ~76 Ma Louisville tracks. Prior to ~50 Ma, these two hotspot tracks show significant inter-hotspot drift, mainly due to large southern motion of the Hawaiian hotspot [1,2]. A third track would allow for a more robust evaluation of the relationship between APM models and inter-hotspot drift. We present trace element and Pb isotope evidence for a potential third long-lived Pacific hotspot trail—the Rurutu hotspot—anchored in the Cook-Austral Islands. Based on high 206Pb/204Pb ratios, 70-55 Ma volcanism in the Gilbert Ridge has been linked to the Rurutu hotspot [3]. The Gilbert Ridge may continue south into the Tuvalu Islands, where APM models predict that the Rurutu hotspot track captures the change in Pacific plate motion around 50 Ma at the intersection of Tuvalu and Samoa. Sampling of the deep submarine flanks of atolls and seamounts in Tuvalu and westernmost Samoa took place during the 2013 RR1310 (R/V Roger Revelle) expedition. We present new Pb isotope and HFSE trace element data on 28 samples that support a Rurutu origin for Tuvalu volcanism and confirm HIMU signatures previously observed in 5 Tuvalu samples (206Pb/204Pb >20.1, several >21.0; 87Sr/86Sr < 0.705). Statistical tests indicate that Tuvalu HFSE element ratios show similarities with Cook-Austral HIMU and differences with Samoa EMII volcanism. Low Hf/Nb ratios are often a predictor of HIMU samples (206Pb/204Pb > 20.8). Moderately HIMU compositions (206Pb/204Pb = 20.0) correspond to slightly higher Hf/Nb. In an effort to test if compositional agreement with the Cook-Australs is reflected in an age progression, 40Ar/39Ar ages will be presented by Konrad et al. (this volume). [1] Tarduno et al., (2003) DOI:10.1126/science.1086442 [2] Koppers et al., (2012) DOI: 10.1038/ngeo1638 [3] Konter et al., (2008) DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2008.08.023

  1. Deriving Arctic Cloud Microphysics at Barrow, Alaska. Algorithms, Results, and Radiative Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.; Zwink, Alexander; Thieman, Mandana M.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Shippert, Timothy

    2015-07-01

    Cloud phase and microphysical properties control the radiative effects of clouds in the climate system and are therefore crucial to characterize in a variety of conditions and locations. An Arctic-specific, ground-based, multi-sensor cloud retrieval system is described here and applied to two years of observations from Barrow, Alaska. Over these two years, clouds occurred 75% of the time, with cloud ice and liquid each occurring nearly 60% of the time. Liquid water occurred at least 25% of the time even in the winter, and existed up to heights of 8 km. The vertically integrated mass of liquid was typically larger than that of ice. While it is generally difficult to evaluate the overall uncertainty of a comprehensive cloud retrieval system of this type, radiative flux closure analyses were performed where flux calculations using the derived microphysical properties were compared to measurements at the surface and top-of-atmosphere. Radiative closure biases were generally smaller for cloudy scenes relative to clear skies, while the variability of flux closure results was only moderately larger than under clear skies. The best closure at the surface was obtained for liquid-containing clouds. Radiative closure results were compared to those based on a similar, yet simpler, cloud retrieval system. These comparisons demonstrated the importance of accurate cloud phase classification, and specifically the identification of liquid water, for determining radiative fluxes. Enhanced retrievals of liquid water path for thin clouds were also shown to improve radiative flux calculations.

  2. HAMLET -Human Model MATROSHKA for Radiation Exposure Determination of Astronauts -Current status and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Guenther; Berger, Thomas; Bilski, Pawel; Burmeister, Soenke; Labrenz, Johannes; Hager, Luke; Palfalvi, Jozsef K.; Hajek, Michael; Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    contribute essentially to radiation risk estimations for future interplanetary space exploration by humans, putting them on a solid experimental and theoretical basis. The talk will give an overview of the current status of the MATROSHKA data evaluation and results and comparisons of the first three MTR experimental phases (MTR-1, 2A and 2B). The HAMLET project is funded by the European Commission under the EUs Seventh Frame-work Programme (FP7) under Project Nr: 218817 and coordinated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) http://www-fp7-hamlet.eu

  3. Molecular architecture of transcription factor hotspots in early adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Baek, Songjoon; Rabiee, Atefeh; Nielsen, Ronni; Traynor, Sofie; Clark, Nicholas; Sandelin, Albin; Jensen, Ole N; Sung, Myong-Hee; Hager, Gordon L; Mandrup, Susanne

    2014-06-12

    Transcription factors have recently been shown to colocalize in hotspot regions of the genome, which are further clustered into super-enhancers. However, the detailed molecular organization of transcription factors at hotspot regions is poorly defined. Here, we have used digital genomic footprinting to precisely define factor localization at a genome-wide level during the early phase of 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation, which allows us to obtain detailed molecular insight into how transcription factors target hotspots. We demonstrate the formation of ATF-C/EBP heterodimers at a composite motif on chromatin, and we suggest that this may be a general mechanism for integrating external signals on chromatin. Furthermore, we find evidence of extensive recruitment of transcription factors to hotspots through alternative mechanisms not involving their known motifs and demonstrate that these alternative binding events are functionally important for hotspot formation and activity. Taken together, these findings provide a framework for understanding transcription factor cooperativity in hotspots. PMID:24857666

  4. Research on hotspot discovery in internet public opinions based on improved K-means.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gensheng

    2013-01-01

    How to discover hotspot in the Internet public opinions effectively is a hot research field for the researchers related which plays a key role for governments and corporations to find useful information from mass data in the Internet. An improved K-means algorithm for hotspot discovery in internet public opinions is presented based on the analysis of existing defects and calculation principle of original K-means algorithm. First, some new methods are designed to preprocess website texts, select and express the characteristics of website texts, and define the similarity between two website texts, respectively. Second, clustering principle and the method of initial classification centers selection are analyzed and improved in order to overcome the limitations of original K-means algorithm. Finally, the experimental results verify that the improved algorithm can improve the clustering stability and classification accuracy of hotspot discovery in internet public opinions when used in practice. PMID:24106496

  5. Porous Au-Ag Nanospheres with High-Density and Highly Accessible Hotspots for SERS Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Bai, Yaocai; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Zhongbo; Fan, Qikui; Zheng, Haoquan; Yin, Yadong; Gao, Chuanbo

    2016-06-01

    Colloidal plasmonic metal nanoparticles have enabled surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for a variety of analytical applications. While great efforts have been made to create hotspots for amplifying Raman signals, it remains a great challenge to ensure their high density and accessibility for improved sensitivity of the analysis. Here we report a dealloying process for the fabrication of porous Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles containing abundant inherent hotspots, which were encased in ultrathin hollow silica shells so that the need of conventional organic capping ligands for stabilization is eliminated, producing colloidal plasmonic nanoparticles with clean surface and thus high accessibility of the hotspots. As a result, these novel nanostructures show excellent SERS activity with an enhancement factor of ∼1.3 × 10(7) on a single particle basis (off-resonant condition), promising high applicability in many SERS-based analytical and biomedical applications. PMID:27192436

  6. Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Aerts, Sam Deschrijver, Dirk; Verloock, Leen; Dhaene, Tom; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-10-15

    In this study, a novel methodology is proposed to create heat maps that accurately pinpoint the outdoor locations with elevated exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in an extensive urban region (or, hotspots), and that would allow local authorities and epidemiologists to efficiently assess the locations and spectral composition of these hotspots, while at the same time developing a global picture of the exposure in the area. Moreover, no prior knowledge about the presence of radiofrequency radiation sources (e.g., base station parameters) is required. After building a surrogate model from the available data using kriging, the proposed method makes use of an iterative sampling strategy that selects new measurement locations at spots which are deemed to contain the most valuable information—inside hotspots or in search of them—based on the prediction uncertainty of the model. The method was tested and validated in an urban subarea of Ghent, Belgium with a size of approximately 1 km{sup 2}. In total, 600 input and 50 validation measurements were performed using a broadband probe. Five hotspots were discovered and assessed, with maximum total electric-field strengths ranging from 1.3 to 3.1 V/m, satisfying the reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection for exposure of the general public to RF-EMF. Spectrum analyzer measurements in these hotspots revealed five radiofrequency signals with a relevant contribution to the exposure. The radiofrequency radiation emitted by 900 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) base stations was always dominant, with contributions ranging from 45% to 100%. Finally, validation of the subsequent surrogate models shows high prediction accuracy, with the final model featuring an average relative error of less than 2 dB (factor 1.26 in electric-field strength), a correlation coefficient of 0.7, and a specificity of 0.96. -- Highlights: • We present an

  7. Results of radiation hardness tests and performance tests of the HS9008RH flash ADC

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, S.; Tarle, G. . Physics Dept.); Crawley, H.B.; McKay, R.; Meyer, W.T.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Thomas, W.D. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Ames Lab., IA )

    1994-08-01

    Results from tests characterizing the performance and radiation hardness of the HS9008RH flash analog to digital converter (FADC) are presented. These tests were performed primarily to evaluate the suitability of this device for use in the GEM Central Tracker at the SSC experiment. Basic performance characteristics and susceptibility of these characteristics to radiation were examined. Performance test results indicate that the device integral nonlinearity is sampling rate dependent and worsens rapidly above rate of 15 megasamples per second (MSPS). No degradation in performance of the device was observed after its exposure of up to 81 Mrad of 1.25 MeV [gamma] radiation from a [sup 60]Co source. Exposure of the device to a reactor fast neutron fluence (E > 100keV) of 5 [times] 10[sup 14]/cm[sup 2] resulted in no significant observed performance degradation as well.

  8. Hotspot quantification of myocardial focal tracer uptake from molecular targeted SPECT/CT images: experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sahul, Zakir; Weyman, Christopher A.; Ryder, William J.; Dione, Donald P.; Dobrucki, Lawrence W.; Mekkaoui, Choukri; Brennan, Matthew P.; Hu, Xiaoyue; Hawley, Christi; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a new single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) hotspot quantification method incorporating extra cardiac activity correction and hotspot normal limit estimation. The method was validated for estimation accuracy of myocardial tracer focal uptake in a chronic canine model of myocardial infarction (MI). Dogs (n = 4) at 2 weeks post MI were injected with Tl-201 and a Tc-99m-labeled hotspot tracer targeted at matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). An external point source filled with Tc-99m was used for a reference of absolute radioactivity. Dual-isotope (Tc-99m/Tl-201) SPECT images were acquired simultaneously followed by an X-ray CT acquisition. Dogs were sacrificed after imaging for myocardial gamma well counting. Images were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction (AC) and without AC (NAC) and were quantified using our quantification method. Normal limits for myocardial hotspot uptake were estimated based on 3 different schemes: maximum entropy, meansquared-error minimization (MSEM) and global minimization. Absolute myocardial hotspot uptake was quantified from SPECT images using the normal limits and compared with well-counted radioactivity on a segment-by-segment basis (n = 12 segments/dog). Radioactivity was expressed as % injected dose (%ID). There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.78-0.92) between the estimated activity (%ID) derived using the SPECT quantitative approach and well-counting, independent of AC. However, SPECT quantification without AC resulted in the significant underestimation of radioactivity. Quantification using SPECT with AC and the MSEM normal limit yielded the best results compared with well-counting. In conclusion, focal myocardial "hotspot" uptake of a targeted radiotracer can be accurately quantified in vivo using a method that incorporates SPECT imaging with AC, an external reference, background scatter compensation, and a suitable normal limit. This hybrid SPECT/CT approach allows for the serial

  9. SU-E-T-200: IBA ProteusOne Compact Proton Therapy System Radiation Survey Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Syh, J; Syh, J; White, M; Patel, B; Song, X; Wu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study summarizes the results of an initial radiation survey of the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center in Shreveport, Louisiana. The facility houses an IBA ProteusOne compact single room proton therapy unit coupled with a C230 cyclotron that operates at a maximum energy of 230 MeV. Methods: A calibrated survey meter was used for the photon measurements to obtain reliable results. A neutron detector was used as the measuring instrument for neutrons. The locations of the survey and measurements were planned carefully in order to get a proper evaluation of the facility shielding configuration. The walls, ceiling, vault entrance, and the adjacent environment were each surveyed with suitable measurement instruments. A total of 22 locations were chosen for radiation survey. Dose equivalent values were calculated for both the photon and the neutron radiation using measured data. Results: All measured dose values are presented in millisievert per year. The highest dose measured at the vault entrance is 0.34 mSv/year. A dedicated shielding door was not present at the time of the measurement. The vault entrance area is considered as a controlled area. The shielding design goals are not to exceed 5 mSv/year for the controlled area and 1 mSv/year the uncontrolled area. The total combined neutron and photon dose equivalent values were found to be compliant with the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality radiation protection regulatory codes. Conclusion: In our efforts to evaluate the radiation levels at the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center proton treatment facility, we have found that all the measured values of the radiation shielding are below the critical radiation limits per year. Since the total dose measured at the vault entrance is below the shielding design goal, a shielding door is not required at this proton treatment vault.

  10. What, When, Where, and Why of Secondary Hawaiian Hotspot Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. O.; Ito, G.; Applegate, B.; Weis, D.; Swinnard, L.; Flinders, A.; Hanano, D.; Nobre-Silva, I.; Bianco, T.; Naumann, T.; Geist, D.; Blay, C.; Sciaroni, L.; Maerschalk, C.; Harpp, K.; Christensen, B.

    2007-12-01

    Secondary hotspot volcanism occurs on most oceanic island groups (Hawaii, Canary, Society) but its origins remain enigmatic. A 28-day marine expedition used multibeam bathymetry and acoustic imagery to map the extent of submarine volcanic fields around the northern Hawaiian Islands (Kauai, Niihau and Kaula), and the JASON2 ROV to sample many volcanoes to characterize the petrology, geochemistry (major and trace elements, and isotopes) and ages of the lavas from these volcanoes. Our integrated geological, geochemical and geophysical study attempts to examine the what (compositions and source), where (distribution and volumes), when (ages), and why (mechanisms) of secondary volcanism on and around the northern Hawaiian Islands. A first-order objective was to establish how the submarine volcanism relates in space, time, volume, and composition to the nearby shield volcanoes and their associated onshore secondary volcanism. Our surveying and sampling revealed major fields of submarine volcanoes extending from the shallow slopes of these islands to more than 100 km offshore. These discoveries dramatically expand the volumetric importance, distribution and geodynamic framework for Hawaiian secondary volcanism. New maps and rock petrology on the samples collected will be used to evaluate currently proposed mechanisms for secondary volcanism and to consider new models such as small-scale mantle convection driven by thermal and melt-induced buoyancy to produce the huge volume of newly discovered lava. Our results seem to indicate substantial revisions are needed to our current perceptions of hotspot dynamics for Hawaii and possibly elsewhere.

  11. Can we detect oceanic biodiversity hotspots from space?

    PubMed

    De Monte, Silvia; Soccodato, Alice; Alvain, Séverine; d'Ovidio, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the variability of marine biodiversity is a central issue in microbiology. Current observational programs are based on in situ studies, but their implementation at the global scale is particularly challenging, owing to the ocean extent, its temporal variability and the heterogeneity of the data sources on which compilations are built. Here, we explore the possibility of identifying phytoplanktonic biodiversity hotspots from satellite. We define a Shannon entropy index based on patchiness in ocean color bio-optical anomalies. This index provides a high resolution (1 degree) global coverage. It shows a relation to temperature and mid-latitude maxima in accordance with those previously evidenced in microbiological biodiversity model and observational studies. Regional maxima are in remarkable agreement with several known biodiversity hotspots for plankton organisms and even for higher levels of the marine trophic chain, as well as with some in situ planktonic biodiversity estimates (from Atlantic Meridional Transect cruise). These results encourage to explore marine biodiversity with a coordinated effort of the molecular, ecological and remote sensing communities. PMID:23635866

  12. Hotspots, polar wander, Mesozoic convection and the geoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The geoid bears little relation to present tectonic features of the earth other than trenches. The Mesozoic supercontinent of Pangea, however, apparently occupied a central position in the Atlantic-African geoid high. This and the equatorial Pacific geoid high contain most of the world's hotspots. The plateaus and rises in the western Pacific formed in the Pacific geoid high and this may have been the early Mesozoic position of Pacifica, the fragments of which are now the Pacific rim portions of the continents. Geoid highs which are unrelated to present subduction zones may be the former sites of continental aggregations and mantle insulation and, therefore, hotter than normal mantle. The pent-up heat causes rifts and hotspots and results in extensive uplift, magmatism, fragmentation and dispersal of the continents and the subsequent formation of plateaus, aseismic ridges and seamount chains. Convection in the uppermantle would then be due to lateral temperature gradients as well as heating from below and would be intrinsically episodic.

  13. Hotspots of nitrous oxide and methane flux in urban watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groffman, P. M.; Bettez, N. D.; Duncan, J. M.; Band, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Urban and suburban watersheds have spatially and temporally dynamic soil, vegetation and hydrologic conditions that create a marked "hotspot" distribution of trace gas fluxes. In the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, one of two urban long-term ecological research (LTER) projects funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, we have established long-term study plots in forests, grasslands (lawns), wetlands and riparian zones and have made monthly in situ measurements of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and methane flux since 1998. These long-term observations have produced several interesting results. First, there is marked variation in methane flux, with rural forest having higher uptake than urban forests and lawns having no uptake. Nitrous oxide fluxes are lower than expected given high rates of atmospheric deposition to forests and fertilization of lawns. However, key landscape features such as degraded riparian zones, stormwater detention basin wetlands and natural hummock and hollow riparian wetlands are hotspots of nitrous oxide and/or methane production. These features can be detected and quantified using new geographic characterization techniques (LiDAR, topographic index) and then modeled using ecohydrological models (RHESSys). Combining long-term biogeochemical measurements with these new geographic and modeling tools can improve our understanding and quantification of trace gas fluxes from urban ecosystems.

  14. Venus: Mantle convection, hotspots, and tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The putative paradigm that planets of the same size and mass have the same tectonic style led to the adaptation of the mechanisms of terrestrial plate tectonics as the a priori model of the way Venus should behave. Data acquired over the last decade by Pioneer Venus, Venera, and ground-based radar have modified this view sharply and have illuminated the lack of detailed understanding of the plate tectonic mechanism. For reference, terrestrial mechanisms are briefly reviewed. Venusian lithospheric divergence, hotspot model, and horizontal deformation theories are proposed and examined.

  15. [Inversion of LAI by considering the hotspot effect for different geometrical wheat].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Yao-Hong; Huang, Wen-Jiang; Jing, Yuan-Shu; Peng, Dai-Liang; Wang, Li; Song, Xiao-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Aimed to deal with the limitation of canopy geometry to crop LAI inversion accuracy a new LAI inversion method for different geometrical winter wheat was proposed based on hotspot indices with field-measured experimental data. The present paper analyzed bidirectional reflectance characteristics of erective and loose varieties at red (680 nm) and NIR wavelengths (800 nm and 860 nm) and developed modified normalized difference between hotspot and dark-spot (MNDHD) and hotspot and dark-spot ratio index (HDRI) using hotspot and dark-spot index (HDS) and normalized difference between hotspot and dark-spot (NDHD) for reference. Combined indices were proposed in the form of the product between HDS, NDHD, MNDHD, HDRI and three ordinary vegetation indices NDVI, SR and EVI to inverse LAI for erective and loose wheat. The analysis results showed that LAI inversion accuracy of erective wheat Jing411 were 0.9431 and 0.9092 retrieved from the combined indices between NDVI and MNDHD and HDRI at 860 nm which were better than that of HDS and NDHD, the LAI inversion accuracy of loose wheat Zhongyou9507 were 0.9648 and 0.8956 retrieved from the combined indices between SR and HDRI and MNDHD at 800 nm which were also higher than that of HDS and NDHD. It was finally concluded that the combined indices between hotspot-signature indices and ordinary vegetation indices were feasible enough to inverse LAI for different crop geometrical wheat and multiangle remote sensing data was much more advantageous than perpendicular observation data to extract crop structural parameters. PMID:24783562

  16. Comparative phylogeography reveals deep lineages and regional evolutionary hotspots in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Dustin A.; Vandergast, Amy G.; Barr, Kelly R.; Inman, Richard D.; Esque, Todd C.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: We explored lineage diversification within desert-dwelling fauna. Our goals were (1) to determine whether phylogenetic lineages and population expansions were consistent with younger Pleistocene climate fluctuation hypotheses or much older events predicted by pre-Pleistocene vicariance hypotheses, (2) to assess concordance in spatial patterns of genetic divergence and diversity among species and (3) to identify regional evolutionary hotspots of divergence and diversity and assess their conservation status. Location: Mojave, Colorado, and Sonoran Deserts, USA. Methods: We analysed previously published gene sequence data for twelve species. We used Bayesian gene tree methods to estimate lineages and divergence times. Within each lineage, we tested for population expansion and age of expansion using coalescent approaches. We mapped interpopulation genetic divergence and intra-population genetic diversity in a GIS to identify hotspots of highest genetic divergence and diversity and to assess whether protected lands overlapped with evolutionary hotspots. Results: In seven of the 12 species, lineage divergence substantially predated the Pleistocene. Historical population expansion was found in eight species, but expansion events postdated the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in only four. For all species assessed, six hotspots of high genetic divergence and diversity were concentrated in the Colorado Desert, along the Colorado River and in the Mojave/Sonoran ecotone. At least some proportion of the land within each recovered hotspot was categorized as protected, yet four of the six also overlapped with major areas of human development. Main conclusions: Most of the species studied here diversified into distinct Mojave and Sonoran lineages prior to the LGM – supporting older diversification hypotheses. Several evolutionary hotspots were recovered but are not strategically paired with areas of protected land. Long-term preservation of species-level biodiversity would

  17. Verification of radiative transfer results by inserting them into the RTE: A demonstration for Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollstein, André

    2012-10-01

    The verification of a new or updated radiative transfer model (RTM) is one of the important steps in its development; this is usually achieved by comparisons with real measurements or published tables of generally accepted radiative transfer results. If such tables do not exist, verification becomes more complicated and an external review of the implementation is often unpractical due to the sheer amount and complexity of the code. The presented verification approach is to “simply” insert results of radiative transfer (RT) calculations into the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The evaluation of the RTE consists of numerically calculating partial derivatives and integrals, which is much simpler to implement than a solution of the RTE. Presented is a demonstration of this approach for a case of Rayleigh scattering in a plane parallel atmosphere, which showed only very small deviation from the radiative transfer equation.This approach has two key benefits. First, its implementation into a high level computer language can be very short (≈60 lines in MATHEMATICA) and clear compared to a full RTM; and such code is much more easy to review. Second, this approach can be easily extended to cases where no other independent RT implementation is available for validation. The proposed implementation and data are provided with this paper.

  18. Preliminary Results on Design and Implementation of a Solar Radiation Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Mugur C.; Damian, Mihai; Jäntschi, Lorentz

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a solar radiation monitoring system, using two scientific pyranometers and an on-line computer home-made data acquisition system. The first pyranometer measures the global solar radiation and the other one, which is shaded, measure the diffuse radiation. The values of total and diffuse solar radiation are continuously stored into a database on a server. Original software was created for data acquisition and interrogation of the created system. The server application acquires the data from pyranometers and stores it into a database with a baud rate of one record at 50 seconds. The client-server application queries the database and provides descriptive statistics. A web interface allow to any user to define the including criteria and to obtain the results. In terms of results, the system is able to provide direct, diffuse and total radiation intensities as time series. Our client-server application computes also derivate heats. The ability of the system to evaluate the local solar energy potential is highlighted.

  19. Exome-Scale Discovery of Hotspot Mutation Regions in Human Cancer Using 3D Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Tokheim, Collin; Bhattacharya, Rohit; Niknafs, Noushin; Gygax, Derek M; Kim, Rick; Ryan, Michael; Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    The impact of somatic missense mutation on cancer etiology and progression is often difficult to interpret. One common approach for assessing the contribution of missense mutations in carcinogenesis is to identify genes mutated with statistically nonrandom frequencies. Even given the large number of sequenced cancer samples currently available, this approach remains underpowered to detect drivers, particularly in less studied cancer types. Alternative statistical and bioinformatic approaches are needed. One approach to increase power is to focus on localized regions of increased missense mutation density or hotspot regions, rather than a whole gene or protein domain. Detecting missense mutation hotspot regions in three-dimensional (3D) protein structure may also be beneficial because linear sequence alone does not fully describe the biologically relevant organization of codons. Here, we present a novel and statistically rigorous algorithm for detecting missense mutation hotspot regions in 3D protein structures. We analyzed approximately 3 × 10(5) mutations from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 216 tumor-type-specific hotspot regions. In addition to experimentally determined protein structures, we considered high-quality structural models, which increase genomic coverage from approximately 5,000 to more than 15,000 genes. We provide new evidence that 3D mutation analysis has unique advantages. It enables discovery of hotspot regions in many more genes than previously shown and increases sensitivity to hotspot regions in tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Although hotspot regions have long been known to exist in both TSGs and oncogenes, we provide the first report that they have different characteristic properties in the two types of driver genes. We show how cancer researchers can use our results to link 3D protein structure and the biologic functions of missense mutations in cancer, and to generate testable hypotheses about driver mechanisms. Our results

  20. DNA barcoding of Rhododendron (Ericaceae), the largest Chinese plant genus in biodiversity hotspots of the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li-Jun; Liu, Jie; Möller, Michael; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Li, De-Zhu; Gao, Lian-Ming

    2015-07-01

    The Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains encompass two global biodiversity hotspots with high levels of biodiversity and endemism. This area is one of the diversification centres of the genus Rhododendron, which is recognized as one of the most taxonomically challenging plant taxa due to recent adaptive radiations and rampant hybridization. In this study, four DNA barcodes were evaluated on 531 samples representing 173 species of seven sections of four subgenera in Rhododendron, with a high sampling density from the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains employing three analytical methods. The varied approaches (nj, pwg and blast) had different species identification powers with blast performing best. With the pwg analysis, the discrimination rates for single barcodes varied from 12.21% to 25.19% with ITS < rbcL < matK < psbA-trnH. Combinations of ITS + psbA-trnH + matK and the four barcodes showed the highest discrimination ability (both 41.98%) among all possible combinations. As a single barcode, psbA-trnH performed best with a relatively high performance (25.19%). Overall, the three-marker combination of ITS + psbA-trnH + matK was found to be the best DNA barcode for identifying Rhododendron species. The relatively low discriminative efficiency of DNA barcoding in this genus (~42%) may possibly be attributable to too low sequence divergences as a result of a long generation time of Rhododendron and complex speciation patterns involving recent radiations and hybridizations. Taking the morphology, distribution range and habitat of the species into account, DNA barcoding provided additional information for species identification and delivered a preliminary assessment of biodiversity for the large genus Rhododendron in the biodiversity hotspots of the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains. PMID:25469426

  1. Upscaling methane emission hotspots in boreal peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresto Aleina, Fabio; Runkle, Benjamin R. K.; Brücher, Tim; Kleinen, Thomas; Brovkin, Victor

    2016-03-01

    Upscaling the properties and effects of small-scale surface heterogeneities to larger scales is a challenging issue in land surface modeling. We developed a novel approach to upscale local methane emissions in a boreal peatland from the micro-topographic scale to the landscape scale. We based this new parameterization on the analysis of the water table pattern generated by the Hummock-Hollow model, a micro-topography resolving model for peatland hydrology. We introduce this parameterization of methane hotspots in a global model-like version of the Hummock-Hollow model that underestimates methane emissions. We tested the robustness of the parameterization by simulating methane emissions for the next century, forcing the model with three different RCP scenarios. The Hotspot parameterization, despite being calibrated for the 1976-2005 climatology, mimics the output of the micro-topography resolving model for all the simulated scenarios. The new approach bridges the scale gap of methane emissions between this version of the model and the configuration explicitly resolving micro-topography.

  2. Upscaling methane emission hotspots in boreal peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresto Aleina, F.; Runkle, B. R. K.; Brücher, T.; Kleinen, T.; Brovkin, V.

    2015-10-01

    Upscaling the properties and the effects of small-scale surface heterogeneities to larger scales is a challenging issue in land surface modeling. We developed a novel approach to upscale local methane emissions in a boreal peatland from the micro-topographic scale to the landscape-scale. We based this new parameterization on the analysis of the water table pattern generated by the Hummock-Hollow model, a micro-topography resolving model for peatland hydrology. We introduce this parameterization of methane hotspots in a global model-like version of the Hummock-Hollow model, that underestimates methane emissions. We tested the robustness of the parameterization by simulating methane emissions for the next century forcing the model with three different RCP scenarios. The Hotspot parameterization, despite being calibrated for the 1976-2005 climatology, mimics the output of the micro-topography resolving model for all the simulated scenarios. The new approach bridges the scale gap of methane emissions between this version of the model and the configuration explicitly resolving micro-topography.

  3. Recent results in the radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for special applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hummel, D.O.

    1980-01-01

    Certain economic considerations relative to production of radicals on a large-industrial scale using different types of radiation indicate that current use of electron accelerators in at least 9 out of 10 radiation-chemical processes reflects use of the most economical method of irradiation. Fluorine-containing monomers and monomer mixtures belong to a class of systems intensively studied for the radiation-initiated synthesis of polymers with good thermal, mechanical, and chemical properties. Results of detailed investigations of the vinylfluoride-vinylidene-fluoride system and subsequent grafting with hydrophylic monomers are presented. Studies of grafting in the system polyethylene-hexafluoroacetone was found to follow a chain mechanism, with the branches consisting of only one monomer unit each. Cationic grafting was observed during irradiation of ..cap alpha..-methylstyrene, vinylbutylether, or isobutene in the presence of polyethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, or PVC. Grafting of the fiber/monomer systems, cellulose with styrene, vinylfluoride, ethylacrylate or acrylamide; wool with styrene; polypropylene with vinylchloride and vinylidenechloride; poly(ethylene terephthalate) with styrene, acrylic and methacrylic acid, acrylic acid plus acrylonitrile, and N-vinylpyrrolidone have all been investigated recently. Radiation synthesis and modification of membranes and resins and the radiation-grafting of enzymes have also been reported. 75 references. (BLM)

  4. Results of the 2004 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shilpen . E-mail: spatel@umm.edu; Jagsi, Reshma; Wilson, John; Frank, Steven; Thakkar, Vipul V.; Hansen, Eric K.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to document adequacy of training, career plans after residency, use of the in-service examination, and motivation for choice of radiation oncology as a specialty. Methods and Materials: In 2004, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology residents in the United States. Results: The survey was returned by 297 residents (response rate, 54%). Of the respondents, 29% were female and 71% male. The most popular career choice was joining an established private practice (38%), followed by a permanent academic career (29%). Residents for whom a permanent academic career was not their first choice were asked whether improvements in certain areas would have led them to be more likely to pursue an academic career. The most commonly chosen factors that would have had a strong or moderate influence included higher salary (81%), choice of geographic location (76%), faculty encouragement (68%), and less time commitment (68%). Of respondents in the first 3 years of training, 78% believed that they had received adequate training to proceed to the next level of training. Of those in their fourth year of training, 75% believed that they had received adequate training to enter practice. Conclusions: Multiple factors affect the educational environment of physicians in training. Data describing concerns unique to resident physicians in radiation oncology are limited. The current survey was designed to explore a variety of issues confronting radiation oncology residents. Training programs and the Residency Review Committee should consider these results when developing new policies to improve the educational experiences of residents in radiation oncology.

  5. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties and Direct Radiative Effects: Key Results from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. A.; Hignett, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Durkee, P. A.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate in potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative Forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the observed climate change of the past century and in predicting, future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) has endorsed a series of multiplatform aerosol field campaigns. The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) were the first IGAC campaigns to address the impact of anthropogenic aerosols. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 gathered extensive data sets on aerosol properties and radiative effects. TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the eastern United States over the western Atlantic Ocean, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols carried over the eastern Atlantic from both European urban/industrial and African mineral sources. These aerosols often have a marked influence on the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by satellites, as illustrated in Figure 1. Shown there are contours of aerosol optical depth derived from radiances measured by the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA-11 satellite. The contours readily show that aerosols originating in North America, Europe, and Africa impact the radiative properties of air over the North Atlantic. However, the accurate derivation of flux chances, or radiative forcing, from the satellite-measured radiances or 'etrieved optical depths remains a difficult challenge. In this paper we summarize key Initial results from TARFOX and, to a lesser extent ACE-2, with a focus on those results that allow an improved assessment of the flux changes caused by North Atlantic aerosols at middle and high latitudes.

  6. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties and Direct Radiative Effects: Key Results from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, Robert A.; Hignett, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate In potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the observed climate change of the past century and in predicting future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) has endorsed a series of multiplatform aerosol field campaigns. The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) were the first IGAC campaigns to address the impact of anthropogenic aerosols, Both TARFOX and ACE-2 gathered extensive data sets on aerosol properties and radiative effects, TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the eastern United States over the western Atlantic Ocean, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols carried over the eastern Atlantic from both European urban/industrial and African mineral sources. These aerosols often have a marked influence on the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by satellites. Shown there are contours of aerosol optical depth derived from radiances measured by the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA-11 satellite. The contours readily show that aerosols originating in North America, Europe, and Africa impact the radiative properties of air over the North Atlantic. However, the accurate derivation of flux changes, or radiative forcing, from the satellite measured radiances or retrieved optical depths remains a difficult challenge. In this paper we summarize key initial results from TARFOX and, to a lesser extent, ACE-2, with a focus on those results that allow an improved assessment of the flux changes caused by North Atlantic aerosols at middle latitudes.

  7. What do Patients Want From Their Radiation Oncologist? Initial Results From a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Ajay K.; Heron, Dwight E.; Flickinger, John C.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To assess patients' initial physician preferences using a newly developed instrument. Methods and Materials: A total of 182 patients with a primary diagnosis of prostate, breast, or lung cancer referred for consultation to University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute Department of Radiation Oncology enrolled in our institutional review board-approved protocol. All patients completed patient preference instrument surveys before meeting their radiation oncologist. Survey responses to 10 statements were categorized into three groups (agree, neutral, or disagree), and the association of survey responses by cancer site was tested with chi-squared tests. Results: Ninety-nine percent of all patients preferred to be addressed by their first name in encounters with their radiation oncologist. There were significant associations of Item 3 (hand holding) with gender (p = 0.039) and education (p = 0.028). The responses to Item 5, a statement that patients would feel uncomfortable if the radiation oncologist offered to hug them at the end of treatment, was significantly associated with disease site (p < 0.0001). Further analysis was performed for Item 5 and revealed that the male lung cancer patients had a much higher rate of disagreement with Item 5 compared with prostate cancer patients (37% vs. 18%). Conclusions: Results of this study may afford greater insight and foster better understanding of what patients want from their radiation oncologist. For breast, lung, and prostate cancer patients, initial preferences for their radiation oncologist are generally similar, according to this tool. However, there are important difference among cancer sites (and gender) regarding physical contact at the end of treatment.

  8. A lithography aware design optimization using foundry-certified models and hotspot detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karklin, L.; Arkhipov, A.; Blakely, D.; Dingenen, M.; Mehrotra, A.; Watson, B.; Zelnik, C.; Cote, M.; Hurat, P.

    2007-10-01

    An automated litho-aware design migration solution has been implemented to enable designers to port existing IP layouts (custom, library, and block) to nanometer technologies while optimizing layout printability and silicon yield. With rapidly shrinking technology nodes, the industry consolidation toward fabless or fab-lite manufacturing, demand for second-sourcing and dramatic increase in cost of IP development, the automation of "vertical" (between nodes) and 'horizontal" (between chip manufacturers) migration becomes a very important task. The challenge comes from the fact that even within the same technology node design and process-induced rules deviate substantially among different IDMs and foundries, which leads to costly, error-prone and time consuming design modifications. At the same time, fast and reliable adjustments to design and ability to switch between processes and chip manufacturers could represent significant improvement to TTM, and respectively improving ROI. Using conservative rules (or restricted design rules) is not always a viable option because of the area, performance and yield penalties. The difficulty of migration is augmented by the fact that design rules are not sufficient to guaranty good printability, maximum process window and high yield. Model-based detection of lithography-induced systematic yield-limiting defects (a.k.a. hotspots) is becoming a vital part of the design-for-manufacturing flow for advanced technology nodes at 65nm and below. Driven by customer demand, a collaborative effort between EDA vendors provides a complete design-for-manufacturing migration solution that allows sub-65 nanometer designers to comprehensively address the impact of manufacturing variations on design yield and performance during layout migration. First, the physical hard IP is migrated from its existing 90nm process to a more advanced 65 and 45 nm processes, resulting in an area-optimized DRC-clean 65nm design retaining the original hierarchy to

  9. Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Dysfunction Results From p53-Dependent Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, Jennifer L.; Grundmann, Oliver; Burd, Randy; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer causes adverse secondary side effects in the salivary glands and results in diminished quality of life for the patient. A previous in vivo study in parotid salivary glands demonstrated that targeted head-and-neck irradiation resulted in marked increases in phosphorylated p53 (serine{sup 18}) and apoptosis, which was suppressed in transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active mutant of Akt1 (myr-Akt1). Methods and Materials: Transgenic and knockout mouse models were exposed to irradiation, and p53-mediated transcription, apoptosis, and salivary gland dysfunction were analyzed. Results: The proapoptotic p53 target genes PUMA and Bax were induced in parotid salivary glands of mice at early time points after therapeutic radiation. This dose-dependent induction requires expression of p53 because no radiation-induced expression of PUMA and Bax was observed in p53-/- mice. Radiation also induced apoptosis in the parotid gland in a dose-dependent manner, which was p53 dependent. Furthermore, expression of p53 was required for the acute and chronic loss of salivary function after irradiation. In contrast, apoptosis was not induced in p53-/- mice, and their salivary function was preserved after radiation exposure. Conclusions: Apoptosis in the salivary glands after therapeutic head-and-neck irradiation is mediated by p53 and corresponds to salivary gland dysfunction in vivo.

  10. Performance characteristics and radiation damage results from the Fermilab E706 silicon microstrip detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, E.; Mani, S.; Orris, D.; Shepard, P. F.; Weerasundara, P. D.; Choudhary, B. C.; Joshi, U.; Kapoor, V.; Shivpuri, R.; Baker, W.; Berg, D.; Carey, D.; Johnstone, C.; Nelson, C.; Bromberg, C.; Brown, D.; Huston, J.; Miller, R.; Nguyen, A.; Benson, R.; Lukens, P.; Ruddick, K.; Alverson, G.; Faissler, W.; Garelick, D.; Glaubman, M.; Kourbanis, I.; Lirakis, C.; Pothier, E.; Sinanidis, A.; Wu, G.-H.; Yasuda, T.; Yosef, C.; Easo, S.; Hartman, K.; Oh, B. Y.; Toothacker, W.; Whitmore, J.; Ballocchi, G.; Debarbaro, L.; Desoi, W.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferbel, T.; Ginther, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lobkowicz, F.; Mansour, J.; Pedeville, G.; Prebys, E.; Skow, D.; Slattery, P.; Varelas, N.; Zielinski, M.

    1989-07-01

    A charged particle spectrometer containing a 7120-channel silicon microstrip detector system, one component of Fermilab experiment E706 to study direct photon production in hadron-hadron collisions, was utilized in a run in which 6 million events were recorded. We describe the silicon system, provide early results of track and vertex reconstruction, and present data on the radiation damage to the silicon wafers resulting from the narrow high intensity beam.

  11. Characteristics of suicide hotspots on the Belgian railway network.

    PubMed

    Debbaut, Kevin; Krysinska, Karolina; Andriessen, Karl

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, railway suicide accounted for 5.3% of all suicides in Belgium. In 2008, Infrabel (Manager of the Belgian Railway Infrastructure) introduced a railway suicide prevention programme, including identification of suicide hotspots, i.e., areas of the railway network with an elevated incidence of suicide. The study presents an analysis of 43 suicide hotspots based on Infrabel data collected during field visits and semi-structured interviews conducted in mental health facilities in the vicinity of the hotspots. Three major characteristics of the hotspots were accessibility, anonymity, and vicinity of a mental health institution. The interviews identified several risk and protective factors for railway suicide, including the training of staff, introduction of a suicide prevention policy, and the role of the media. In conclusion, a comprehensive railway suicide prevention programme should continuously safeguard and monitor hotspots, and should be embedded in a comprehensive suicide prevention programme in the community. PMID:24020492

  12. The Manihiki Plateau - a key to missing hotspot tracks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, R.; Uenzelmann-Neben, G.

    2016-04-01

    A Neogene magmatic reactivation of the Manihiki Plateau, a Large Igneous Province (LIP) in the central Pacific, is studied using seismic reflection data. Igneous diapirs have been identified exclusively within a narrow WNW-ESE striking corridor in the southern High Plateau (HP), which is parallel to the Neogene Pacific Plate motion and overlaps with an extrapolation of the Society Islands Hotspot path. The igneous diapirs are characterized by a narrow width (>5 km), penetration of the Neogene sediments, and they become progressively younger towards the East (23-10 Ma). The magmatic source appears to be of small lateral extent, which leads to the conclusion that the diapirs represent Neogene hotspot volcanism within a LIP, and thus may be an older, previously unknown extension of the Society Islands Hotspot track (>4.5 Ma). Comparing hotspot volcanism within oceanic and continental lithosphere, we further conclude that hotspot volcanism within LIP crust has similarities to tectonically faulted continental crust.

  13. Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine With Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer: Phase I Trial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Czito, Brian G. . E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu; Bendell, Johanna C.; Willett, Christopher G.; Morse, Michael A.; Blobe, Gerard C.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Thomas, John; Ludwig, Kirk A.; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Ashton, Jill; Yu Daohai; Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is associated with poor outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Bevacizumab, a VEGF inhibitor, enhances the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on tumor cytotoxicity in preclinical models, including colorectal cancer. A Phase I trial was undertaken to evaluate the combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum were eligible. Pretreatment staging included computerized tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical evaluation. Patients received 50.4 Gy of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the tumor in 28 fractions. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab were administered concurrently with radiation therapy. After EBRT completion, patients were restaged and evaluated for surgery. Primary endpoints included the determination of dose-limiting toxicity and a recommended Phase II dose, non dose-limiting toxicity, and preliminary radiographic and pathologic response rates. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled. All were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Dose level 2 was associated with unacceptable toxicity (primarily diarrhea). Dose level 1 had an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended Phase II dose in our study was bevacizumab 15 mg/kg Day 1 + 10 mg/kg Days 8 and 22, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly, and capecitabine 625 mg/m{sup 2} bid during radiation days. Six patients had clinical responses. Two patients had a pathologic complete response, and 3 had microscopic disease only. One patient experienced a postoperative abscess, one a syncopal episode during adjuvant chemotherapy, and one a subclinical myocardial infarction during adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions: The combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in rectal cancer was tolerable, with encouraging response rates. Further

  14. Overview of the Liulin type instruments for space radiation measurement and their scientific results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachev, T. P.; Semkova, J. V.; Tomov, B. T.; Matviichuk, Yu. N.; Dimitrov, P. G.; Koleva, R. T.; Malchev, St.; Bankov, N. G.; Shurshakov, V. A.; Benghin, V. V.; Yarmanova, E. N.; Ivanova, O. A.; Häder, D.-P.; Lebert, M.; Schuster, M. T.; Reitz, G.; Horneck, G.; Uchihori, Y.; Kitamura, H.; Ploc, O.; Cubancak, J.; Nikolaev, I.

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is recognized to be one of the main health concerns for humans in the space radiation environment. Estimation of space radiation effects on health requires the accurate knowledge of the accumulated absorbed dose, which depends on the global space radiation distribution, solar cycle and local shielding generated by the 3D mass distribution of the space vehicle. This paper presents an overview of the spectrometer-dosimeters of the Liulin type, which were developed in the late 1980s and have been in use since then. Two major measurement systems have been developed by our team. The first one is based on one silicon detector and is known as a Liulin-type deposited energy spectrometer (DES) (Dachev et al., 2002, 2003), while the second one is a dosimetric telescope (DT) with two or three silicon detectors. The Liulin-type instruments were calibrated using a number of radioactive sources and particle accelerators. The main results of the calibrations are presented in the paper. In the last section of the paper some of the most significant scientific results obtained in space and on aircraft, balloon and rocket flights since 1989 are presented.

  15. Overview of the Liulin type instruments for space radiation measurement and their scientific results.

    PubMed

    Dachev, T P; Semkova, J V; Tomov, B T; Matviichuk, Yu N; Dimitrov, P G; Koleva, R T; Malchev, St; Bankov, N G; Shurshakov, V A; Benghin, V V; Yarmanova, E N; Ivanova, O A; Häder, D-P; Lebert, M; Schuster, M T; Reitz, G; Horneck, G; Uchihori, Y; Kitamura, H; Ploc, O; Cubancak, J; Nikolaev, I

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is recognized to be one of the main health concerns for humans in the space radiation environment. Estimation of space radiation effects on health requires the accurate knowledge of the accumulated absorbed dose, which depends on the global space radiation distribution, solar cycle and local shielding generated by the 3D mass distribution of the space vehicle. This paper presents an overview of the spectrometer-dosimeters of the Liulin type, which were developed in the late 1980s and have been in use since then. Two major measurement systems have been developed by our team. The first one is based on one silicon detector and is known as a Liulin-type deposited energy spectrometer (DES) (Dachev et al., 2002, 2003), while the second one is a dosimetric telescope (DT) with two or three silicon detectors. The Liulin-type instruments were calibrated using a number of radioactive sources and particle accelerators. The main results of the calibrations are presented in the paper. In the last section of the paper some of the most significant scientific results obtained in space and on aircraft, balloon and rocket flights since 1989 are presented. PMID:26177624

  16. Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise: Results from the second phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinty, B.; Widlowski, J.-L.; Taberner, M.; Gobron, N.; Verstraete, M. M.; Disney, M.; Gascon, F.; Gastellu, J.-P.; Jiang, L.; Kuusk, A.; Lewis, P.; Li, X.; Ni-Meister, W.; Nilson, T.; North, P.; Qin, W.; Su, L.; Tang, S.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Yan, G.; Zang, H.

    2004-03-01

    The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) initiative is a community-driven exercise to benchmark the models of radiation transfer (RT) used to represent the reflectance of terrestrial surfaces. Systematic model intercomparisons started in 1999 as a self-organized, open-access, voluntary activity of the RT modeling community. The results of the first phase were published by [2001]. The present paper describes the benchmarking protocol and the results achieved during the second phase, which took place during 2002. This second phase included two major components: The first one included a rerun of all direct-mode tests proposed during the first phase, to accommodate the evaluation of models that have been upgraded since, and the participation of new models into the entire exercise. The second component was designed to probe the performance of three-dimensional models in complex heterogeneous environments, which closely mimic the observations of actual space instruments operating at various spatial resolutions over forest canopy systems. Phases 1 and 2 of RAMI both confirm not only that a majority of the radiation transfer models participating in RAMI are in good agreement between themselves for relatively simple radiation transfer problems but also that these models exhibit significant discrepancies when considering more complex but nevertheless realistic geophysical scenarios. Specific recommendations are provided to guide the future of this benchmarking program (Phase 3 and beyond).

  17. Modelling Regional Hotspots of Water Pollution Induced by Salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malsy, M.; Floerke, M.

    2014-12-01

    Insufficient water quality is one of the main global topics causing risk to human health, biodiversity, and food security. At this, salinization of water and land resources is widely spread especially in arid to semi-arid climates, where salinization, often induced by irrigation agriculture, is a fundamental aspect of land degradation. High salinity is crucial to water use for drinking, irrigation, and industrial purposes, and therefore poses a risk to human health and ecosystem status. However, salinization is also an economic problem, in particular in those regions where agriculture makes a significant contribution to the economy and/or where agriculture is mainly based on irrigation. Agricultural production is exposed to high salinity of irrigation water resulting in lower yields. Hence, not only the quantity of irrigation water is of importance for growing cops but also its quality, which may further reduce the available resources. Thereby a major concern for food production and security persists, as irrigated agriculture accounts for over 30% of the total agricultural production. In this study, the large scale water quality model WorldQual was applied to simulate recent total dissolved solids (TDS) loadings and in-stream concentrations from point and diffuse sources to get an insight on potential environmental impacts as well as risks to food security. Regional focus in this study is on developing countries, as these are most threatened by water pollution. Furthermore, insufficient water quality for irrigation and therefore restrictions in irrigation water use were examined, indicating limitations to crop production. For this purpose, model simulations were conducted for the year 2010 to show the recent status of surface water quality and to identify hotspots and main causes of pollution. Our results show that salinity hotspots mainly occur in peak irrigation regions as irrigated agriculture is by far the dominant sector contributing to water abstractions as

  18. Identification of genomic functional hotspots with copy number alteration in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Copy number alterations (CNAs) can be observed in most of cancer patients. Several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes with CNAs have been identified in different kinds of tumor. However, the systematic survey of CNA-affected functions is still lack. By employing systems biology approaches, instead of examining individual genes, we directly identified the functional hotspots on human genome. A total of 838 hotspots on human genome with 540 enriched Gene Ontology functions were identified. Seventy-six aCGH array data of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors were employed in this study. A total of 150 regions which putatively affected by CNAs and the encoded functions were identified. Our results indicate that two immune related hotspots had copy number alterations in most of patients. In addition, our data implied that these immune-related regions might be involved in HCC oncogenesis. Also, we identified 39 hotspots of which copy number status were associated with patient survival. Our data implied that copy number alterations of the regions may contribute in the dysregulation of the encoded functions. These results further demonstrated that our method enables researchers to survey biological functions of CNAs and to construct regulation hypothesis at pathway and functional levels. PMID:24160471

  19. Treatment planning systems for external whole brain radiation therapy: With and without MLC (multi leaf collimator) optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiyono, T.; Budi, W. S.; Hidayanto, E.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation therapy for brain malignancy is done by giving a dose of radiation to a whole volume of the brain (WBRT) followed by a booster at the primary tumor with more advanced techniques. Two external radiation fields given from the right and left side. Because the shape of the head, there will be an unavoidable hotspot radiation dose of greater than 107%. This study aims to optimize planning of radiation therapy using field in field multi-leaf collimator technique. A study of 15 WBRT samples with CT slices is done by adding some segments of radiation in each field of radiation and delivering appropriate dose weighting using a TPS precise plan Elekta R 2.15. Results showed that this optimization a more homogeneous radiation on CTV target volume, lower dose in healthy tissue, and reduced hotspots in CTV target volume. Comparison results of field in field multi segmented MLC technique with standard conventional technique for WBRT are: higher average minimum dose (77.25% ± 0:47%) vs (60% ± 3:35%); lower average maximum dose (110.27% ± 0.26%) vs (114.53% ± 1.56%); lower hotspot volume (5.71% vs 27.43%); and lower dose on eye lenses (right eye: 9.52% vs 18.20%); (left eye: 8.60% vs 16.53%).

  20. Are Hotspots Always Hotspots? The Relationship between Diversity, Resource and Ecosystem Functions in the Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Link, Heike; Piepenburg, Dieter; Archambault, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The diversity-ecosystem function relationship is an important topic in ecology but has not received much attention in Arctic environments, and has rarely been tested for its stability in time. We studied the temporal variability of benthic ecosystem functioning at hotspots (sites with high benthic boundary fluxes) and coldspots (sites with lower fluxes) across two years in the Canadian Arctic. Benthic remineralisation function was measured as fluxes of oxygen, silicic acid, phosphate, nitrate and nitrite at the sediment-water interface. In addition we determined sediment pigment concentration and taxonomic and functional macrobenthic diversity. To separate temporal from spatial variability, we sampled the same nine sites from the Mackenzie Shelf to Baffin Bay during the same season (summer or fall) in 2008 and 2009. We observed that temporal variability of benthic remineralisation function at hotspots is higher than at coldspots and that taxonomic and functional macrobenthic diversity did not change significantly between years. Temporal variability of food availability (i.e., sediment surface pigment concentration) seemed higher at coldspot than at hotspot areas. Sediment chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration, taxonomic richness, total abundance, water depth and abundance of the largest gallery-burrowing polychaete Lumbrineristetraura together explained 42% of the total variation in fluxes. Food supply proxies (i.e., sediment Chl a and depth) split hot- from coldspot stations and explained variation on the axis of temporal variability, and macrofaunal community parameters explained variation mostly along the axis separating eastern from western sites with hot- or coldspot regimes. We conclude that variability in benthic remineralisation function, food supply and diversity will react to climate change on different time scales, and that their interactive effects may hide the detection of progressive change, particularly at hotspots. Time-series of benthic functions and

  1. Upscaling methane emission hotspots in boreal peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresto Aleina, Fabio; Runkle, Benjamin R. K.; Bruecher, Tim; Kleinen, Thomas; Brovkin, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Small-scale surface heterogeneities can influence land-atmosphere fluxes and therefore carbon, water and energy budgets on a larger scale. This effect is of particular relevance for high-latitude ecosystems, because of the great amount of carbon stored in their soils. Upscaling such small-scale surface heterogeneities and their effects to larger scales is a challenging issue in land surface modeling. We developed a novel approach to upscale local methane emissions in a boreal peatland from the micro-topographic scale to the landscape-scale. We based this parameterization on the analysis of the water table pattern generated by the Hummock-Hollow model (Cresto Aleina et al., 2015), a micro-topography resolving model for peatland hydrology and methane emissions. By computing the water table at the micro-topographic scale, the Hummock-Hollow model is able to describe the effects of micro-topography on hydrology and methane emissions in a typical boreal peatland. We introduce the new parameterization of methane hotspots in a global model-like version of the Hummock-Hollow model. This latter version underestimates methane emissions because of the lack of representation of micro-topographic controls on peatland hydrology. We tested the robustness of the parameterization by simulating methane emissions for the present day and for the next century, forcing the model with three different RCP scenarios. The Hotspot parameterization, despite being calibrated for the 1976-2005 climatology, mimics the output of the micro-topography resolving model for all the simulated scenarios. The new approach bridges the scale gap of methane emissions between this version of the model and the configuration explicitly resolving micro-topography.

  2. Future hotspots of terrestrial mammal loss.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Piero; Pressey, Robert L; Giorgini, Daniele; Maiorano, Luigi; Bakkenes, Michel; Boitani, Luigi; Alkemade, Rob; Falcucci, Alessandra; Chiozza, Federica; Rondinini, Carlo

    2011-09-27

    Current levels of endangerment and historical trends of species and habitats are the main criteria used to direct conservation efforts globally. Estimates of future declines, which might indicate different priorities than past declines, have been limited by the lack of appropriate data and models. Given that much of conservation is about anticipating and responding to future threats, our inability to look forward at a global scale has been a major constraint on effective action. Here, we assess the geography and extent of projected future changes in suitable habitat for terrestrial mammals within their present ranges. We used a global earth-system model, IMAGE, coupled with fine-scale habitat suitability models and parametrized according to four global scenarios of human development. We identified the most affected countries by 2050 for each scenario, assuming that no additional conservation actions other than those described in the scenarios take place. We found that, with some exceptions, most of the countries with the largest predicted losses of suitable habitat for mammals are in Africa and the Americas. African and North American countries were also predicted to host the most species with large proportional global declines. Most of the countries we identified as future hotspots of terrestrial mammal loss have little or no overlap with the present global conservation priorities, thus confirming the need for forward-looking analyses in conservation priority setting. The expected growth in human populations and consumption in hotspots of future mammal loss mean that local conservation actions such as protected areas might not be sufficient to mitigate losses. Other policies, directed towards the root causes of biodiversity loss, are required, both in Africa and other parts of the world. PMID:21844048

  3. Future hotspots of terrestrial mammal loss

    PubMed Central

    Visconti, Piero; Pressey, Robert L.; Giorgini, Daniele; Maiorano, Luigi; Bakkenes, Michel; Boitani, Luigi; Alkemade, Rob; Falcucci, Alessandra; Chiozza, Federica; Rondinini, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Current levels of endangerment and historical trends of species and habitats are the main criteria used to direct conservation efforts globally. Estimates of future declines, which might indicate different priorities than past declines, have been limited by the lack of appropriate data and models. Given that much of conservation is about anticipating and responding to future threats, our inability to look forward at a global scale has been a major constraint on effective action. Here, we assess the geography and extent of projected future changes in suitable habitat for terrestrial mammals within their present ranges. We used a global earth-system model, IMAGE, coupled with fine-scale habitat suitability models and parametrized according to four global scenarios of human development. We identified the most affected countries by 2050 for each scenario, assuming that no additional conservation actions other than those described in the scenarios take place. We found that, with some exceptions, most of the countries with the largest predicted losses of suitable habitat for mammals are in Africa and the Americas. African and North American countries were also predicted to host the most species with large proportional global declines. Most of the countries we identified as future hotspots of terrestrial mammal loss have little or no overlap with the present global conservation priorities, thus confirming the need for forward-looking analyses in conservation priority setting. The expected growth in human populations and consumption in hotspots of future mammal loss mean that local conservation actions such as protected areas might not be sufficient to mitigate losses. Other policies, directed towards the root causes of biodiversity loss, are required, both in Africa and other parts of the world. PMID:21844048

  4. Hotspots of land use change in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuemmerle, Tobias; Levers, Christian; Erb, Karlheinz; Estel, Stephan; Jepsen, Martin R.; Müller, Daniel; Plutzar, Christoph; Stürck, Julia; Verkerk, Pieter J.; Verburg, Peter H.; Reenberg, Anette

    2016-06-01

    Assessing changes in the extent and management intensity of land use is crucial to understanding land-system dynamics and their environmental and social outcomes. Yet, changes in the spatial patterns of land management intensity, and thus how they might relate to changes in the extent of land uses, remains unclear for many world regions. We compiled and analyzed high-resolution, spatially-explicit land-use change indicators capturing changes in both the extent and management intensity of cropland, grazing land, forests, and urban areas for all of Europe for the period 1990–2006. Based on these indicators, we identified hotspots of change and explored the spatial concordance of area versus intensity changes. We found a clear East–West divide with regard to agriculture, with stronger cropland declines and lower management intensity in the East compared to the West. Yet, these patterns were not uniform and diverging patterns of intensification in areas highly suitable for farming, and disintensification and cropland contraction in more marginal areas emerged. Despite the moderate overall rates of change, many regions in Europe fell into at least one land-use change hotspot during 1990–2006, often related to a spatial reorganization of land use (i.e., co-occurring area decline and intensification or co-occurring area increase and disintensification). Our analyses highlighted the diverse spatial patterns and heterogeneity of land-use changes in Europe, and the importance of jointly considering changes in the extent and management intensity of land use, as well as feedbacks among land-use sectors. Given this spatial differentiation of land-use change, and thus its environmental impacts, spatially-explicit assessments of land-use dynamics are important for context-specific, regionalized land-use policy making.

  5. Methane Hotspots in the Los Angeles Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Bush, S.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Lai, C.; Kort, E. A.; Blake, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne observations show that Los Angeles (LA) is a large source of methane to the atmosphere, yet the sources of excess methane from the urban area are poorly constrained. We used a mobile laboratory, a Ford Transit van equipped with cavity ring down spectrometers (Picarro, Inc.), to measure greenhouse gases (CH4, CO2, and CO) mole fractions in LA. On-road surveys across the LA Basin were conducted seasonally to determine patterns of CH4 enrichment in space and over time, with a focus on quantifying methane leaks from known sources. We found fugitive leaks and elevated CH4 concentrations throughout the LA Basin. Some were associated with known sources, such as landfills, wastewater treatment, and oil and gas infrastructure, while others had an unknown origin. Urban CH4 enrichment varied over the course of the year, largely due to seasonal changes in meteorological conditions. Nevertheless, our mobile surveys revealed CH4 hotspots (>200 ppb elevated with respect to background levels) that persisted among seasons. High CH4 concentrations were most easily predicted by proximity to methane sources, particularly near the coast, while elevated CH4 levels were more evenly dispersed in inland areas. CH4 hotspots had a disproportionate impact on excess methane relative to the area they accounted for, typically providing more than a quarter of excess methane measured on a transect. These data improve estimates of the relative roles of specific leaks and emission sectors to LA's excess methane. Depending on the cost of reducing these CH4 leaks, a focus on CH4 emissions may prove an effective way to reduce LA's greenhouse gas emissions in the near term.

  6. Urban rivers as hotspots of regional nitrogen pollution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Wu, Yiyun; Gu, Baojing

    2015-10-01

    Excess nitrogen inputs to terrestrial ecosystems via human activities have deteriorated water qualities on regional scales. Urban areas as settlements of over half global population, however, were usually not considered in the analysis of regional water pollution. Here, we used a 72-month monitoring data of water qualities in Hangzhou, China to test the role of urban rives in regional nitrogen pollution and how they response to the changes of human activities. Concentrations of ammonium nitrogen in urban rivers were 3-5 times higher than that in regional rivers. Urban rivers have become pools of reactive nitrogen and hotspots of regional pollution. Moreover, this river pollution is not being measured by current surface water monitoring networks that are designed to measure broader regional patterns, resulting in an underestimation of regional pollution. This is crucial to urban environment not only in China, but also in other countries, where urban rivers are seriously polluted. PMID:26057476

  7. Lagrangian Hotspots of In-Use NOX Emissions from Transit Buses.

    PubMed

    Kotz, Andrew J; Kittelson, David B; Northrop, William F

    2016-06-01

    In-use, spatiotemporal NOX emissions were measured from a conventional powertrain transit bus and a series electric hybrid bus over gradients of route kinetic intensity and ambient temperature. This paper introduces a new method for identifying NOX emissions hotspots along a bus route using high fidelity Lagrangian vehicle data to explore spatial interactions that may influence emissions production. Our study shows that the studied transit buses emit higher than regulated emissions because on-route operation does not accurately represent the range of engine operation tested according to regulatory standards. Using the Lagrangian hotspot detection, we demonstrate that NOX hotspots occurred at bus stops, during cold starts, on inclines, and for accelerations. On the selected routes, bus stops resulted in 3.3 times the route averaged emissions factor in grams/km without significant dependence on bus type or climate. The buses also emitted 2.3 times the route averaged NOX emissions factor at the beginning of each route due to cold selective catalytic reduction aftertreatment temperature. The Lagrangian hotspot detection technique demonstrated here could be employed in future connected vehicles empowered by advances in computational power, data storage capability, and improved sensor technology to optimize emissions as a function of spatial location. PMID:27135811

  8. Hotspots, Lifelines, and the Safrr Haywired Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, J. L.; Porter, K.

    2014-12-01

    Though California has experienced many large earthquakes (San Francisco, 1906; Loma Prieta, 1989; Northridge, 1994), the San Francisco Bay Area has not had a damaging earthquake for 25 years. Earthquake risk and surging reliance on smartphones and the Internet to handle everyday tasks raise the question: is an increasingly technology-reliant Bay Area prepared for potential infrastructure impacts caused by a major earthquake? How will a major earthquake on the Hayward Fault affect lifelines (roads, power, water, communication, etc.)? The U.S. Geological Survey Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) program's Haywired disaster scenario, a hypothetical two-year earthquake sequence triggered by a M7.05 mainshock on the Hayward Fault, addresses these and other questions. We explore four geographic aspects of lifeline damage from earthquakes: (1) geographic lifeline concentrations, (2) areas where lifelines pass through high shaking or potential ground-failure zones, (3) areas with diminished lifeline service demand due to severe building damage, and (4) areas with increased lifeline service demand due to displaced residents and businesses. Potential mainshock lifeline vulnerability and spatial demand changes will be discerned by superimposing earthquake shaking, liquefaction probability, and landslide probability damage thresholds with lifeline concentrations and with large-capacity shelters. Intersecting high hazard levels and lifeline clusters represent potential lifeline susceptibility hotspots. We will also analyze possible temporal vulnerability and demand changes using an aftershock shaking threshold. The results of this analysis will inform regional lifeline resilience initiatives and response and recovery planning, as well as reveal potential redundancies and weaknesses for Bay Area lifelines. Identified spatial and temporal hotspots can provide stakeholders with a reference for possible systemic vulnerability resulting from an earthquake sequence.

  9. Future of Endemic Flora of Biodiversity Hotspots in India

    PubMed Central

    Chitale, Vishwas Sudhir; Behera, Mukund Dev; Roy, Partha Sarthi

    2014-01-01

    India is one of the 12 mega biodiversity countries of the world, which represents 11% of world's flora in about 2.4% of global land mass. Approximately 28% of the total Indian flora and 33% of angiosperms occurring in India are endemic. Higher human population density in biodiversity hotspots in India puts undue pressure on these sensitive eco-regions. In the present study, we predict the future distribution of 637 endemic plant species from three biodiversity hotspots in India; Himalaya, Western Ghats, Indo-Burma, based on A1B scenario for year 2050 and 2080. We develop individual variable based models as well as mixed models in MaxEnt by combining ten least co-related bioclimatic variables, two disturbance variables and one physiography variable as predictor variables. The projected changes suggest that the endemic flora will be adversely impacted, even under such a moderate climate scenario. The future distribution is predicted to shift in northern and north-eastern direction in Himalaya and Indo-Burma, while in southern and south-western direction in Western Ghats, due to cooler climatic conditions in these regions. In the future distribution of endemic plants, we observe a significant shift and reduction in the distribution range compared to the present distribution. The model predicts a 23.99% range reduction and a 7.70% range expansion in future distribution by 2050, while a 41.34% range reduction and a 24.10% range expansion by 2080. Integration of disturbance and physiography variables along with bioclimatic variables in the models improved the prediction accuracy. Mixed models provide most accurate results for most of the combinations of climatic and non-climatic variables as compared to individual variable based models. We conclude that a) regions with cooler climates and higher moisture availability could serve as refugia for endemic plants in future climatic conditions; b) mixed models provide more accurate results, compared to single variable based

  10. Future of endemic flora of biodiversity hotspots in India.

    PubMed

    Chitale, Vishwas Sudhir; Behera, Mukund Dev; Roy, Partha Sarthi

    2014-01-01

    India is one of the 12 mega biodiversity countries of the world, which represents 11% of world's flora in about 2.4% of global land mass. Approximately 28% of the total Indian flora and 33% of angiosperms occurring in India are endemic. Higher human population density in biodiversity hotspots in India puts undue pressure on these sensitive eco-regions. In the present study, we predict the future distribution of 637 endemic plant species from three biodiversity hotspots in India; Himalaya, Western Ghats, Indo-Burma, based on A1B scenario for year 2050 and 2080. We develop individual variable based models as well as mixed models in MaxEnt by combining ten least co-related bioclimatic variables, two disturbance variables and one physiography variable as predictor variables. The projected changes suggest that the endemic flora will be adversely impacted, even under such a moderate climate scenario. The future distribution is predicted to shift in northern and north-eastern direction in Himalaya and Indo-Burma, while in southern and south-western direction in Western Ghats, due to cooler climatic conditions in these regions. In the future distribution of endemic plants, we observe a significant shift and reduction in the distribution range compared to the present distribution. The model predicts a 23.99% range reduction and a 7.70% range expansion in future distribution by 2050, while a 41.34% range reduction and a 24.10% range expansion by 2080. Integration of disturbance and physiography variables along with bioclimatic variables in the models improved the prediction accuracy. Mixed models provide most accurate results for most of the combinations of climatic and non-climatic variables as compared to individual variable based models. We conclude that a) regions with cooler climates and higher moisture availability could serve as refugia for endemic plants in future climatic conditions; b) mixed models provide more accurate results, compared to single variable based

  11. Tabulation of Mie scattering calculation results for microwave radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hwa-Young M.; Prasad, N.

    1988-01-01

    In microwave radiative transfer model simulations, the Mie calculations usually consume the majority of the computer time necessary for the calculations (70 to 86 percent for frequencies ranging from 6.6 to 183 GHz). For a large array of atmospheric profiles, the repeated calculations of the Mie codes make the radiative transfer computations not only expensive, but sometimes impossible. It is desirable, therefore, to develop a set of Mie tables to replace the Mie codes for the designated ranges of temperature and frequency in the microwave radiative transfer calculation. Results of using the Mie tables in the transfer calculations show that the total CPU time (IBM 3081) used for the modeling simulation is reduced by a factor of 7 to 16, depending on the frequency. The tables are tested by computing the upwelling radiance of 144 atmospheric profiles generated by a 3-D cloud model (Tao, 1986). Results are compared with those using Mie quantities computed from the Mie codes. The bias and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the model results using the Mie tables, in general, are less than 1 K except for 37 and 90 GHz. Overall, neither the bias nor RMSD is worse than 1.7 K for any frequency and any viewing angle.

  12. A biophysical model for estimating the frequency of radiation-induced mutations resulting from chromosomal translocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco

    Gene mutations can be induced by radiation as a result of chromosomal translocations. A biophysical model is developed to estimate the frequency of this type of mutation induced by low-LET radiation. Mutations resulting from translocations are assumed to be formed by misrejoining of two DNA double strand breaks (DSB), one within the gene and one on a different chromosome. The chromosome containing the gene is assumed to occupy a spherical territory and does not overlap spatially with other chromosomes. Misrejoining between two DSB can occur only if the two DSB are closer than an interaction distance at the time of their induction. Applying the model to mutations of the hprt gene induced in G0 human lymphocyte cells by low-LET radiation, it is calculated that mutations resulting from translocations account for about 14% of the total mutations. The value of the interaction distance is determined to be 0.6 μm by comparing with the observed frequency of translocations in the X-chromosome.

  13. Effects of Canary hotspot volcanism on structure of oceanic crust off Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, James S.; Rabinowitz, Philip D.; Austin, James A., Jr.

    1991-07-01

    Analysis of over 6400 km of multichannel seismics (MCS) and 50 sonobuoy reflection and refraction experiments reduced both in the domain of X-T and tau-p shows that a region within the Jurassic Quiet Zone off Morocco underwent dramatic changes as a result of the passage of the lithosphere over the Canary hotspot commencing approximately 60 Ma. A seismic unit (UCF), interpreted as volcanic in origin, is observed within the sediments in a region characterized by a broad bathymetric swell. It shows diffractions from its upper surface and an internally chaotic seismic facies and pinches out between sedimentary units of continuous, subparallel facies. A velocity inversion is noted between the UCF (4.7km/s) and the underlying sediment (3.1 km/s). The UCF is time transgressive; it lies near the Cretaceous/s Tertiary boundary in the northern portion of the study area and is younger to the south. Kinematic studies of the movement of the Canary hotspot relative to Africa show that the hotspot first appeared off NW Africa about 60 Ma and was located beneath oceanic crust in the region where the UCF is observed. Depth-to-basement measurements in areas not effected by the hotspot show a consistent linear trend of increased depth with age. In areas effected by the hotspot the thermal rejuvenation is evident as basement depths shoal with increased proximity to the present hotspot. The reheating of the crust resets the thermal age of the lithosphere with many of the properties of crust of a younger age. Subsidence curves of the reheated crust off Morocco show good correlation to subsidence curves of other reheated crust on a global basis. A zone characterized by high crustal velocities, (7.1-7.4 km/s) and greater crustal thicknesses (by ˜1-2 km) is observed in an area that corresponds to the bathymetric swell, the region of the UCF, and the reelevated basement. The high velocities and increased crustal thickness are interpreted to be the result of underplating and assimilation of

  14. Modelling Hotspots for Invasive Alien Plants in India.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Dibyendu; Tiwary, Raghuvar; Barik, Saroj Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Identification of invasion hotspots that support multiple invasive alien species (IAS) is a pre-requisite for control and management of invasion. However, till recently it remained a methodological challenge to precisely determine such invasive hotspots. We identified the hotspots of alien species invasion in India through Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) using species occurrence data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). The predicted area of invasion for selected species were classified into 4 categories based on number of model agreements for a region i.e. high, medium, low and very low. About 49% of the total geographical area of India was predicted to be prone to invasion at moderate to high levels of climatic suitability. The intersection of anthropogenic biomes and ecoregions with the regions of 'high' climatic suitability was classified as hotspot of alien plant invasion. Nineteen of 47 ecoregions of India, harboured such hotspots. Most ecologically sensitive regions of India, including the 'biodiversity hotspots' and coastal regions coincide with invasion hotspots, indicating their vulnerability to alien plant invasion. Besides demonstrating the usefulness of ENM and open source data for IAS management, the present study provides a knowledge base for guiding the formulation of an effective policy and management strategy for controlling the invasive alien species. PMID:26230513

  15. Modelling Hotspots for Invasive Alien Plants in India

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Dibyendu; Tiwary, Raghuvar; Barik, Saroj Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Identification of invasion hotspots that support multiple invasive alien species (IAS) is a pre-requisite for control and management of invasion. However, till recently it remained a methodological challenge to precisely determine such invasive hotspots. We identified the hotspots of alien species invasion in India through Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) using species occurrence data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). The predicted area of invasion for selected species were classified into 4 categories based on number of model agreements for a region i.e. high, medium, low and very low. About 49% of the total geographical area of India was predicted to be prone to invasion at moderate to high levels of climatic suitability. The intersection of anthropogenic biomes and ecoregions with the regions of 'high' climatic suitability was classified as hotspot of alien plant invasion. Nineteen of 47 ecoregions of India, harboured such hotspots. Most ecologically sensitive regions of India, including the 'biodiversity hotspots' and coastal regions coincide with invasion hotspots, indicating their vulnerability to alien plant invasion. Besides demonstrating the usefulness of ENM and open source data for IAS management, the present study provides a knowledge base for guiding the formulation of an effective policy and management strategy for controlling the invasive alien species. PMID:26230513

  16. Analysis of MIR-18 results for physical and biological dosimetry: radiation shielding effectiveness in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Williams, J. R.; Dicello, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    We compare models of radiation transport and biological response to physical and biological dosimetry results from astronauts on the Mir space station. Transport models are shown to be in good agreement with physical measurements and indicate that the ratio of equivalent dose from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to protons is about 3/2:1 and that this ratio will increase for exposures to internal organs. Two biological response models are used to compare to the Mir biodosimetry for chromosome aberration in lymphocyte cells; a track-structure model and the linear-quadratic model with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent weighting coefficients. These models are fit to in vitro data for aberration formation in human lymphocytes by photons and charged particles. Both models are found to be in reasonable agreement with data for aberrations in lymphocytes of Mir crew members: however there are differences between the use of LET dependent weighting factors and track structure models for assigning radiation quality factors. The major difference in the models is the increased effectiveness predicted by the track model for low charge and energy ions with LET near 10 keV/micrometers. The results of our calculations indicate that aluminum shielding, although providing important mitigation of the effects of trapped radiation, provides no protective effect from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in low-earth orbit (LEO) using either equivalent dose or the number of chromosome aberrations as a measure until about 100 g/cm 2 of material is used.

  17. Analysis of MIR-18 results for physical and biological dosimetry: radiation shielding effectiveness in LEO.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W; Williams, J R; Dicello, J F

    2000-06-01

    We compare models of radiation transport and biological response to physical and biological dosimetry results from astronauts on the Mir space station. Transport models are shown to be in good agreement with physical measurements and indicate that the ratio of equivalent dose from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to protons is about 3/2:1 and that this ratio will increase for exposures to internal organs. Two biological response models are used to compare to the Mir biodosimetry for chromosome aberration in lymphocyte cells; a track-structure model and the linear-quadratic model with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent weighting coefficients. These models are fit to in vitro data for aberration formation in human lymphocytes by photons and charged particles. Both models are found to be in reasonable agreement with data for aberrations in lymphocytes of Mir crew members: however there are differences between the use of LET dependent weighting factors and track structure models for assigning radiation quality factors. The major difference in the models is the increased effectiveness predicted by the track model for low charge and energy ions with LET near 10 keV/micrometers. The results of our calculations indicate that aluminum shielding, although providing important mitigation of the effects of trapped radiation, provides no protective effect from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in low-earth orbit (LEO) using either equivalent dose or the number of chromosome aberrations as a measure until about 100 g/cm 2 of material is used. PMID:11543368

  18. Ecohydrological Interfaces as Dynamic Hotspots of Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ecohydrological interfaces, represent the boundaries between water-dependent ecosystems that can alter substantially the fluxes of energy and matter. There is still a critical gap of understanding the organisational principles of the drivers and controls of spatially and temporally variable ecohydrological interface functions. This knowledge gap limits our capacity to efficiently quantify, predict and manage the services provided by complex ecosystems. Many ecohydrological interfaces are characterized by step changes in microbial metabolic activity, steep redox gradients and often even thermodynamic phase shifts, for instance at the interfaces between atmosphere and water or soil matrix and macro-pores interfaces. This paper integrates investigations from point scale microcosm experiments with reach and subcatchment scale tracer experiments and numerical modeling studies to elaborate similarities in the drivers and controls that constitute the enhanced biogeochemical activity of different types of ecohydrologica interfaces across a range of spatial and temporal scales. We therefore combine smart metabolic activity tracers to quantify the impact of bioturbating benthic fauna onto ecosystem respiration and oxygen consumption and investigate at larger scale, how microbial metabolic activity and carbon turnover at the water-sediment interface are controlled by sediment physical and chemical properties as well as water temperatures. Numerical modeling confirmed that experimentally identified hotspots of streambed biogeochemical cycling were controlled by patterns of physical properties such as hydraulic conductivities or bioavailability of organic matter, impacting on residence time distributions and hence reaction times. In contrast to previous research, our investigations thus confirmed that small-scale variability of physical and chemical interface properties had a major impact on biogeochemical processing at the investigated ecohydrological interfaces. Our results

  19. Ecohydrological Interfaces as Dynamic Hotspots of Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Stefan; Lewandowski, Joerg; Hannah, David; McDonald, Karlie; Folegot, Silvia; Baranov, Victor

    2016-04-01

    . Our results furthermore indicate that to fully understand spatial patterns and temporal dynamics of ecohydrological interface functioning, including hotspots and hot moments, detailed knowledge of the impacts of biological behavior on the physic-chemical ecosystem conditions, and vice-versa, is required.

  20. Hot-spot mix in ignition-scale implosions on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Ralph, J.; Scott, H.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; and others

    2012-05-15

    Ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target depends on the formation of a central hot spot with sufficient temperature and areal density. Radiative and conductive losses from the hot spot can be enhanced by hydrodynamic instabilities. The concentric spherical layers of current National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition targets consist of a plastic ablator surrounding a thin shell of cryogenic thermonuclear fuel (i.e., hydrogen isotopes), with fuel vapor filling the interior volume [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. The Rev. 5 ablator is doped with Ge to minimize preheat of the ablator closest to the DT ice caused by Au M-band emission from the hohlraum x-ray drive [D. S. Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 052703 (2010)]. Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by high-mode () ablator-surface perturbations can cause Ge-doped ablator to mix into the interior of the shell at the end of the acceleration phase [B. A. Hammel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056310 (2011)]. As the shell decelerates, it compresses the fuel vapor, forming a hot spot. K-shell line emission from the ionized Ge that has penetrated into the hot spot provides an experimental signature of hot-spot mix. The Ge emission from tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) cryogenic targets and gas-filled plastic-shell capsules, which replace the THD layer with a mass-equivalent CH layer, was examined. The inferred amount of hot-spot-mix mass, estimated from the Ge K-shell line brightness using a detailed atomic physics code [J. J. MacFarlane et al., High Energy Density Phys. 3, 181 (2006)], is typically below the 75-ng allowance for hot-spot mix [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. Predictions of a simple mix model, based on linear growth of the measured surface-mass modulations, are consistent with the experimental results.

  1. Hot-spot mix in ignition-scale implosions on the NIFa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Ralph, J.; Scott, H.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Golovkin, I. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Izumi, N.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Mancini, R. C.; McCrory, R. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nikroo, A.; Peterson, K. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Springer, P.; Town, R. P. J.

    2012-05-01

    Ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target depends on the formation of a central hot spot with sufficient temperature and areal density. Radiative and conductive losses from the hot spot can be enhanced by hydrodynamic instabilities. The concentric spherical layers of current National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition targets consist of a plastic ablator surrounding a thin shell of cryogenic thermonuclear fuel (i.e., hydrogen isotopes), with fuel vapor filling the interior volume [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. The Rev. 5 ablator is doped with Ge to minimize preheat of the ablator closest to the DT ice caused by Au M-band emission from the hohlraum x-ray drive [D. S. Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 052703 (2010)]. Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by high-mode (50<ℓ<200) ablator-surface perturbations can cause Ge-doped ablator to mix into the interior of the shell at the end of the acceleration phase [B. A. Hammel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056310 (2011)]. As the shell decelerates, it compresses the fuel vapor, forming a hot spot. K-shell line emission from the ionized Ge that has penetrated into the hot spot provides an experimental signature of hot-spot mix. The Ge emission from tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) cryogenic targets and gas-filled plastic-shell capsules, which replace the THD layer with a mass-equivalent CH layer, was examined. The inferred amount of hot-spot-mix mass, estimated from the Ge K-shell line brightness using a detailed atomic physics code [J. J. MacFarlane et al., High Energy Density Phys. 3, 181 (2006)], is typically below the 75-ng allowance for hot-spot mix [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. Predictions of a simple mix model, based on linear growth of the measured surface-mass modulations, are consistent with the experimental results.

  2. Conservative surgery for low rectal carcinoma after high-dose radiation. Functional and oncologic results.

    PubMed Central

    Rouanet, P; Fabre, J M; Dubois, J B; Dravet, F; Saint Aubert, B; Pradel, J; Ychou, M; Solassol, C; Pujol, H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Using a prospective, nonrandomized study, the authors evaluated the morbidity and functional and oncologic results of conservative surgery for cancer of the lower third of the rectum after high-dose radiation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Colo-anal anastomosis has made sphincter conservation for low rectal carcinoma technically feasible. The limits to conservative surgery currently are oncologic rather than technical. Adjuvant radiotherapy has proven its benefit in terms of regional control, with a dose relationship. METHODS: Since June 1990, 27 patients with distal rectal adenocarcinoma were treated by preoperative radiotherapy (40 + 20 Gy delivered with three fields) and curative surgery. The mean distance from the anal verge was 47 mm (27-57 mm), and none of the tumors were fixed (15 T2, 12 T3). RESULTS: Mortality and morbidity were not increased by high-dose preoperative radiation. Twenty-one patients underwent conservative surgery (78%-17 total proctectomies and colo-anal anastomoses, 4 trans-anal resections). After colo-anal anastomosis, all patients with colonic pouch had good results; two patients had moderate results and one patient had poor results after straight colo-anal anastomosis. With a mean follow-up of 24 months, the authors noted 1 postoperative death, 2 disease-linked deaths, 1 controlled regional recurrence, 2 evolutive patients with pulmonary metastases, and 21 disease-free patients. CONCLUSIONS: These first results confirm the possibility of conservative surgery for low rectal carcinoma after high-dose radiation. A prospective, randomized trial could be induced to determine the real role of the 20 Gy boost on the sphincter-saving decision. PMID:7826163

  3. Late rectal and bladder toxicity following radiation therapy for prostate cancer: Predictive factors and treatment results

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Raspall, Rafael; Inoriza, José Maria; Rosello-Serrano, Alvaro; Auñón-Sanz, Carmen; Garcia-Martin, Pilar; Oliu-Isern, Gemma

    2013-01-01

    Aim This study aimed at investigating factors associated to late rectal and bladder toxicity following radiation therapy and the effectiveness of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) when toxicity is grade ≥2. Background Radiation is frequently used for prostate cancer, but a 5–20% incidence of late radiation proctitis and cystitis exists. Some clinical and dosimetric factors have been defined without a full agreement. For patients diagnosed of late chronic proctitis and/or cystitis grade ≥2 treatment is not well defined. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) has been used, but its effectiveness is not well known. Materials and methods 257 patients were treated with radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Clinical, pharmacological and dosimetric parameters were collected. Patients having a grade ≥2 toxicity were treated with HBOT. Results of the intervention were measured by monitoring toxicity by Common Toxicity Criteria v3 (CTCv3). Results Late rectal toxicity was related to the volume irradiated, i.e. V50 > 53.64 (p = 0.013); V60 > 38.59% (p = 0.005); V65 > 31.09% (p = 0.002) and V70 > 22.81% (p = 0.012). We could not correlate the volume for bladder. A total of 24 (9.3%) patients experienced a grade ≥2. Only the use of dicumarinic treatment was significant for late rectal toxicity (p = 0.014). A total of 14 patients needed HBOT. Final percentage of patients with a persistent toxicity grade ≥2 was 4.5%. Conclusion Rectal volume irradiated and dicumarinic treatment were associated to late rectal/bladder toxicity. When toxicity grade ≥2 is diagnosed, HBOT significantly ameliorate symptoms. PMID:24416567

  4. Three-dimensional hotspots in evaporating nanoparticle sols for ultrahigh Raman scattering: solid-liquid interface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yudie; Han, Zhenzhen; Liu, Honglin; He, Shengnan; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) hotspots for ultrahigh surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been experimentally demonstrated by evaporating a droplet of citrate-Ag sols on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic flat surfaces. Interestingly, the hydrophobic surface increased the Raman enhancement by two orders of magnitude and exhibits a better signal stability than the hydrophilic one. This study highlights the differences between hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces in enhanced Raman scattering by the use of extremely diluted rhodamine 6G (R6G) as the SERS reporter. In situ synchrotron-radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SR-SAXS) was employed to explore the evolution of the 3D geometry of Ag nanoparticles in a single droplet and verify the influence mechanism of these two kinds of surface. The ideal situation of 3D self-assembly of nanoparticles in the evaporation process is a collaborative behaviour, but our results evidenced that a progressive 3D self-assembly of nanoparticles was more preferred due to the interface effects. Our experimental data derived from in situ SR-SAXS reveals that a truly distinct 3D geometry of the Ag particles develops during the evaporation process on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. In this type of 3D geometry, the increased uniformity of the interparticle distance induced a sharp peak of the SR-SAXS signal, differing significantly from the dry state. In particular, the fluorosilylated surface reduces the interaction with particles and decreases the electrostatic adsorption on the flat surface, which helps to control the interparticle distance to remain within a small range, produce a larger number of hotspots in 3D space, and amplify the SERS enhancement accordingly.Three-dimensional (3D) hotspots for ultrahigh surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been experimentally demonstrated by evaporating a droplet of citrate-Ag sols on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic flat surfaces. Interestingly, the hydrophobic surface

  5. Effect of vortex hotspots on the radio-frequency surface resistance of superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    A. Gurevich, G. Ciovati

    2013-02-01

    We present detailed experimental and theoretical investigations of hotspots produced by trapped vortex bundles and their effect on the radio-frequency (rf) surface resistance R{sub s} of superconductors at low temperatures. Our measurements of R{sub s}, combined with the temperature mapping and laser scanning of a 2.36-mm-thick Nb plate incorporated into a 3.3-GHz Nb resonator cavity cooled by the superfluid He at 2 K, revealed spatial scales and temperature distributions of hotspots and showed that they can be moved or split by thermal gradients produced by the scanning laser beam. These results, along with the observed hysteretic field dependence of R{sub s} which can be tuned by the scanning laser beam, show that the hotspots in our Nb sample are due to trapped vortex bundles which contain ∼10{sup 6} vortices spread over regions ∼0.1–1 cm. We calculated the frequency dependence of the rf power dissipated by oscillating vortex segments trapped between nanoscale pinning centers, taking into account all bending modes and the nonlocal line tension of the vortex driven by rf Meissner currents. We also calculated the temperature distributions caused by trapped vortex hotspots, and suggested a method of reconstructing the spatial distribution of vortex dissipation sources from the observed temperature maps. Vortex hotspots can dominate the residual surface resistance at low temperatures and give rise to a significant dependence of R{sub s} on the rf field amplitude H{sub p}, which can have important implications for the rf resonating cavities used in particle accelerators and for thin-film structures used in quantum computing and photon detectors.

  6. Climate change hotspots in the CMIP5 global climate model ensemble.

    PubMed

    Diffenbaugh, Noah S; Giorgi, Filippo

    2012-01-10

    We use a statistical metric of multi-dimensional climate change to quantify the emergence of global climate change hotspots in the CMIP5 climate model ensemble. Our hotspot metric extends previous work through the inclusion of extreme seasonal temperature and precipitation, which exert critical influence on climate change impacts. The results identify areas of the Amazon, the Sahel and tropical West Africa, Indonesia, and the Tibetan Plateau as persistent regional climate change hotspots throughout the 21(st) century of the RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 forcing pathways. In addition, areas of southern Africa, the Mediterranean, the Arctic, and Central America/western North America also emerge as prominent regional climate change hotspots in response to intermediate and high levels of forcing. Comparisons of different periods of the two forcing pathways suggest that the pattern of aggregate change is fairly robust to the level of global warming below approximately 2°C of global warming (relative to the late-20(th)-century baseline), but not at the higher levels of global warming that occur in the late-21(st)-century period of the RCP8.5 pathway, with areas of southern Africa, the Mediterranean, and the Arctic exhibiting particular intensification of relative aggregate climate change in response to high levels of forcing. Although specific impacts will clearly be shaped by the interaction of climate change with human and biological vulnerabilities, our identification of climate change hotspots can help to inform mitigation and adaptation decisions by quantifying the rate, magnitude and causes of the aggregate climate response in different parts of the world. PMID:24014154

  7. A Chromosomal Rearrangement Hotspot Can Be Identified from Population Genetic Variation and Is Coincident with a Hotspot for Allelic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Sarah J.; Khajavi, Mehrdad; Lupski, James R.; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2006-01-01

    Insights into the origins of structural variation and the mutational mechanisms underlying genomic disorders would be greatly improved by a genomewide map of hotspots of nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Moreover, our understanding of sequence variation within the duplicated sequences that are substrates for NAHR lags far behind that of sequence variation within the single-copy portion of the genome. Perhaps the best-characterized NAHR hotspot lies within the 24-kb-long Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A)–repeats (REPs) that sponsor deletions and duplications that cause peripheral neuropathies. We investigated structural and sequence diversity within the CMT1A-REPs, both within and between species. We discovered a high frequency of retroelement insertions, accelerated sequence evolution after duplication, extensive paralogous gene conversion, and a greater than twofold enrichment of SNPs in humans relative to the genome average. We identified an allelic recombination hotspot underlying the known NAHR hotspot, which suggests that the two processes are intimately related. Finally, we used our data to develop a novel method for inferring the location of an NAHR hotspot from sequence variation within segmental duplications and applied it to identify a putative NAHR hotspot within the LCR22 repeats that sponsor velocardiofacial syndrome deletions. We propose that a large-scale project to map sequence variation within segmental duplications would reveal a wealth of novel chromosomal-rearrangement hotspots. PMID:17033965

  8. Detection of Tuberculosis Infection Hotspots Using Activity Spaces Based Spatial Approach in an Urban Tokyo, from 2003 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Kiyohiko; Ohkado, Akihiro; Uchimura, Kazuhiro; Murase, Yoshiro; Tatsumi, Yuriko; Kayebeta, Aya; Watanabe, Yu; Ishikawa, Nobukatsu

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying ongoing tuberculosis infection sites is crucial for breaking chains of transmission in tuberculosis-prevalent urban areas. Previous studies have pointed out that detection of local accumulation of tuberculosis patients based on their residential addresses may be limited by a lack of matching between residences and tuberculosis infection sites. This study aimed to identify possible tuberculosis hotspots using TB genotype clustering statuses and a concept of “activity space”, a place where patients spend most of their waking hours. We further compared the spatial distribution by different residential statuses and describe urban environmental features of the detected hotspots. Methods Culture-positive tuberculosis patients notified to Shinjuku city from 2003 to 2011 were enrolled in this case-based cross-sectional study, and their demographic and clinical information, TB genotype clustering statuses, and activity space were collected. Spatial statistics (Global Moran’s I and Getis-Ord Gi* statistics) identified significant hotspots in 152 census tracts, and urban environmental features and tuberculosis patients’ characteristics in these hotspots were assessed. Results Of the enrolled 643 culture-positive tuberculosis patients, 416 (64.2%) were general inhabitants, 42 (6.5%) were foreign-born people, and 184 were homeless people (28.6%). The percentage of overall genotype clustering was 43.7%. Genotype-clustered general inhabitants and homeless people formed significant hotspots around a major railway station, whereas the non-clustered general inhabitants formed no hotspots. This suggested the detected hotspots of activity spaces may reflect ongoing tuberculosis transmission sites and were characterized by smaller residential floor size and a higher proportion of non-working households. Conclusions Activity space-based spatial analysis suggested possible TB transmission sites around the major railway station and it can assist in further

  9. Selective fallopian tube catheterisation in female infertility: clinical results and absorbed radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Ishiguchi, T; Maekoshi, H; Ando, Y; Tsuzaka, M; Tamiya, T; Suganuma, N; Ishigaki, T

    1996-01-01

    Clinical results of fluoroscopic fallopian tube catheterisation and absorbed radiation doses during the procedure were evaluated in 30 infertility patients with unilateral or bilateral tubal obstruction documented on hysterosalpingography. The staged technique consisted of contrast injection through an intrauterine catheter with a vacuum cup device, ostial salpingography with the wedged catheter, and selective salpingography with a coaxial microcatheter. Of 45 fallopian tubes examined, 35 (78%) were demonstrated by the procedure, and at least one tube was newly demonstrated in 26 patients (87%). Six of these patients conceived spontaneously in the follow-up period of 1-11 months. Four pregnancies were intrauterine and 2 were ectopic. This technique provided accurate and detailed information in the diagnosis and treatment of tubal obstruction in infertility patients. The absorbed radiation dose to the ovary in the average standardised procedure was estimated to be 0.9 cGy. Further improvement in the X-ray equipment and technique is required to reduce the radiation dose. PMID:8798025

  10. Airborne gamma radiation measurements of soil moisture during FIFE: Activities and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Eugene L.

    1992-01-01

    Soil moisture measurements were obtained during the summer of 1987 and 1989 near Manhattan, Kansas, using the National Weather Service (NWS) airborne gamma radiation system. A network of 24 flight lines were established over the research area. Airborne surveys were flown daily during two intensive field campaigns. The data collected was sufficient to modify the NWS standard operational method for estimating soil moisture for the Field Experiment (FIFE) flight lines. The average root mean square error of the soil moisture estimates for shorter FIFE flight lines was found to be 2.5 percent, compared with a reported value of 3.9 percent for NWS flight lines. Techniques were developed to compute soil moisture estimates for portions of the flight lines. Results of comparisons of the airborne gamma radiation soil moisture estimates with those obtained using the NASA Pushbroom Microwave Radiation (PBMR) system and hydrological model are presented. The airborne soil moisture measurements, and real averages computed using all remotely sensed and ground data, have been in support of the research of the many FIFE investigators whose overall goal was the upscale integration of models and the application of satellite remote sensing.