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Sample records for results phase iva

  1. Properties of the adenovirus IVa2 gene product, an effector of late-phase-dependent activation of the major late promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, P; Kedinger, C

    1996-01-01

    The adenovirus major late promoter is strongly activated after the onset of viral DNA replication. Sequence elements located downstream of the major later promoter start site have previously been shown to be essential for this activation. Two proteins (DEF-A and DEF-B) bind to these elements in a late-phase-dependent manner. DEF-B has been identified as the product of adenovirus intermediate gene IVa2 (pIVa2) (C. Tribouley, P. Lutz, A. Staub, and C. Kedinger, J. Virol. 68:4450-4457, 1994). Here we show that pIVa2, while monomeric in solution, binds to its recognition sequence as a dimer and that two 20-residue amphipathic alpha helices play an essential role in this DNA-binding activity. Attempts to purify DEF-A have failed, but its chromatographic behavior, together with its immunological properties, established that pIVa2 is also a component of this heteromeric protein. In addition, the time course of pIVa2 synthesis during infection correlated with simultaneous detection of the binding of both DEF-A and DEF-B complexes to the downstream elements. Finally, as revealed by immunomicroscopy, pIVa2 is targeted to the nucleus, where it distributes to restricted locations in the nucleoplasm, as well as to the nucleoli. Altogether, these results demonstrate that pIVa2 plays a critical role in the transition from the early to the late phase of the lytic cycle. Furthermore, pIVa2 may serve additional functions yet to be uncovered, as suggested by its presence within the cell nucleolus. PMID:8627656

  2. Metallographic Cooling Rate of IVA Irons Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Goldstein, J. I.; Scott, E. R. D.

    2005-01-01

    There is long standing problem reconciling the chemical evidence that the IVA iron meteorites formed in a core with the diverse cooling rates reported by several researchers. This large inferred range of cooling rates suggests that the IVA irons were distributed at different depths in a parent body with a complex structure when the Widmanstatten pattern formed. On the other hand, some researchers argued that the diverse cooling rates in group IVA result from inaccurate model parameters such as phase diagram, interdiffusion coefficients, and kamacite nucleation and growth mechanisms. In addition, the measured cooling rates may not apply for the same cooling temperature ranges, and the variation in the crystallographic orientations of the Widmanstatten plates on the analysis surface may result in inaccurate measurements of widths needed for the computer simulation models. We have revaluated the major parameters in computer model developed by Hopfe and Goldstein and measured cooling rates for the IVA irons. Such data are useful in evaluating whether these meteorites were part of a single core of a parent body during the formation of the Widmanstatten pattern.

  3. Conversion of IVA Human Computer Model to EVA Use and Evaluation and Comparison of the Result to Existing EVA Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, George S.; Williams, Jermaine C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the methods, rationale, and comparative results of the conversion of an intravehicular (IVA) 3D human computer model (HCM) to extravehicular (EVA) use and compares the converted model to an existing model on another computer platform. The task of accurately modeling a spacesuited human figure in software is daunting: the suit restricts the human's joint range of motion (ROM) and does not have joints collocated with human joints. The modeling of the variety of materials needed to construct a space suit (e. g. metal bearings, rigid fiberglass torso, flexible cloth limbs and rubber coated gloves) attached to a human figure is currently out of reach of desktop computer hardware and software. Therefore a simplified approach was taken. The HCM's body parts were enlarged and the joint ROM was restricted to match the existing spacesuit model. This basic approach could be used to model other restrictive environments in industry such as chemical or fire protective clothing. In summary, the approach provides a moderate fidelity, usable tool which will run on current notebook computers.

  4. Enzyme replacement therapy for treating mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio A syndrome): effect and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Shimada, Tsutomu; Bober, Michael B.; Kubaski, Francyne; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert W.; Khan, Shaukat; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Barrera, Luis A.; Mackenzie, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Following a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo (PBO)-controlled, multinational study in subjects with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA), enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of elosulfase alfa has been approved in several countries. The study was designed to evaluate safety and efficacy of elosulfase alfa in patients with MPS IVA aged 5 years and older. Areas covered Outcomes of clinical trials for MPS IVA have been described. Subjects received either 2.0 mg/kg/week, 2.0 mg/kg/every other week, or PBO, for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance compared to PBO. The 6MWT results improved in patients receiving 2 mg/kg weekly compared to PBO. The every other week regimen resulted in walk distances comparable to PBO. There was no change from baseline in the 3 Min Stair Climb Test in both treatment groups. Following completion of the initial study, patients, who continued to receive elosulfase alfa 2 mg/kg weekly (QW) for another 48 weeks (for a total of up to 72-week exposure), did not show additional improvement on 6MWT. Expert opinion We suggest that ERT is a therapeutic option for MPS IVA, providing a modest effect and the majority of the effects are seen in the soft tissues. PMID:26973801

  5. Phase II Trial of Hyperfractionated IMRT and Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin for Stage III and IVa Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Patrick D.; Papagikos, Michael; Hamann, Sue; Neal, Charles; Meyerson, Martin; Hayes, Neil; Ungaro, Peter; Kotz, Kenneth; Couch, Marion; Pollock, Hoke; Tepper, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Investigate a novel chemoradiation regimen designed to maximize locoregional control (LRC) and minimize toxicity for patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and Methods Patients received hyperfractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (HIMRT) in 1.25 Gy fractions bid to 70 Gy to high-risk planning target volume (PTV). Intermediate and low-risk PTVs received 60 Gy and 50 Gy, at 1.07 and 0.89 Gy per fraction, respectively. Concurrent cisplatin 33 mg/m2/week was started week 1. Patients completed the Quality of Life Radiation Therapy Instrument prior to (PRE), at end of treatment (EOT), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Overall survival (OS), progression-free (PFS), LRC, and toxicities were assessed. Results Thirty of 39 patients (77%) were alive without disease at median follow-up of 37.5 months. Actuarial 3-year OS, PFS, and LRC were 80%, 82%, and 87%, respectively. No failures occurred in the electively irradiated neck and there were no isolated neck failures. Head and neck QOL was significantly worse in 18 of 35 patients (51%): mean 7.8 PRE versus 3.9 EOT. By month 1, H&N QOL returned near baseline: mean 6.2 (sd=1.7). Most common acute grade 3+ toxicities were mucositis (38%), fatigue (28%), dysphagia (28%) and leukopenia (26%). Conclusions Hyperfractionated IMRT with low-dose weekly cisplatin resulted in good LRC with acceptable toxicity and QOL. Lack of elective nodal failures despite very low dose per fraction has led to an attempt to further minimize toxicity by reducing elective nodal doses in our subsequent protocol. PMID:20378262

  6. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for carcinoma of the cervix - Stages IIB, IIIA, IIIB, and IVA: results of a randomized study by the radiation therapy oncology group

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, L.W.; Plenk,H.P.; Hanley, J.A.

    1981-08-01

    A total of 65 patients with Stage IIB, IIIA, IIIB or IVA carcinoma of the cervix were randomized to receive conventional radiation therapy in air or hyperbaric oxygen therapy with radiation at optimal schedules. Seven patients could not be evaluated. Of the 19 patients treated in oxygen, 14 (73%) were living or had died without evidence of disease. Of the 29 patients treated with radiation alone 15 (52%) were alive or had died without evidence of tumor. Two of 29 patients treated in air and 5 of 19 patients treated in oxygen were dead of complications or intercurrent disease. No significant difference in survival could be demonstrated.

  7. Role of elosulfase alfa in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Regier, Debra S; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA or Morquio A) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease which results in a striking skeletal phenotype, but does not negatively impact the intellect of the patient. MPS IVA has a phenotypic continuum that ranges from a severe and rapidly progressing form to a slowly progressive form. The clinical diagnosis is often made in the preschool years based on abnormal bone findings on physical examination and dysplasia on radiographic imaging. Supportive care has been the mainstay in caring for patients. Orthopedic physicians often form the core of the care team due to the early and severe skeletal abnormalities; however, systemic disease is common and requires aggressive monitoring and management. Interdisciplinary care teams often consist of medical geneticists, cardiologists, pulmonary specialists, gastroenterologists, otolaryngologists, audiologists, and ophthalmologists. With the US Food and Drug Administration's approval of elosulfase alfa, patients >5 years of age now have access to this medication from the time of diagnosis. The clinical trial with once weekly intravenous dosing (2.0 mg/kg per week) showed improvement in the 6-minute walk test. The composite end point analysis to evaluate the combining changes from baseline in 6-minute walk test, 3-minute stair climb test, and respiratory function showed that at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg per week, subjects performed better when compared to placebo. This indication was clinically meaningful in the treatment group. The treatment was generally well tolerated, and the uncommon infusion reactions responded well to traditional enzyme replacement therapy infusion reaction management algorithms. Currently, clinical trials are underway to determine the efficacy and safety in MPS IVA patients <5 years of age. PMID:27366102

  8. Role of elosulfase alfa in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA

    PubMed Central

    Regier, Debra S; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA or Morquio A) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease which results in a striking skeletal phenotype, but does not negatively impact the intellect of the patient. MPS IVA has a phenotypic continuum that ranges from a severe and rapidly progressing form to a slowly progressive form. The clinical diagnosis is often made in the preschool years based on abnormal bone findings on physical examination and dysplasia on radiographic imaging. Supportive care has been the mainstay in caring for patients. Orthopedic physicians often form the core of the care team due to the early and severe skeletal abnormalities; however, systemic disease is common and requires aggressive monitoring and management. Interdisciplinary care teams often consist of medical geneticists, cardiologists, pulmonary specialists, gastroenterologists, otolaryngologists, audiologists, and ophthalmologists. With the US Food and Drug Administration’s approval of elosulfase alfa, patients >5 years of age now have access to this medication from the time of diagnosis. The clinical trial with once weekly intravenous dosing (2.0 mg/kg per week) showed improvement in the 6-minute walk test. The composite end point analysis to evaluate the combining changes from baseline in 6-minute walk test, 3-minute stair climb test, and respiratory function showed that at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg per week, subjects performed better when compared to placebo. This indication was clinically meaningful in the treatment group. The treatment was generally well tolerated, and the uncommon infusion reactions responded well to traditional enzyme replacement therapy infusion reaction management algorithms. Currently, clinical trials are underway to determine the efficacy and safety in MPS IVA patients <5 years of age. PMID:27366102

  9. Preserving subject variability in group fMRI analysis: performance evaluation of GICA vs. IVA

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Andrew M.; Anderson, Mathew; Miller, Robyn L.; Adalı, Tülay; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2014-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a widely applied technique to derive functionally connected brain networks from fMRI data. Group ICA (GICA) and Independent Vector Analysis (IVA) are extensions of ICA that enable users to perform group fMRI analyses; however a full comparison of the performance limits of GICA and IVA has not been investigated. Recent interest in resting state fMRI data with potentially higher degree of subject variability makes the evaluation of the above techniques important. In this paper we compare component estimation accuracies of GICA and an improved version of IVA using simulated fMRI datasets. We systematically change the degree of inter-subject spatial variability of components and evaluate estimation accuracy over all spatial maps (SMs) and time courses (TCs) of the decomposition. Our results indicate the following: (1) at low levels of SM variability or when just one SM is varied, both GICA and IVA perform well, (2) at higher levels of SM variability or when more than one SMs are varied, IVA continues to perform well but GICA yields SM estimates that are composites of other SMs with errors in TCs, (3) both GICA and IVA remove spatial correlations of overlapping SMs and introduce artificial correlations in their TCs, (4) if number of SMs is over estimated, IVA continues to perform well but GICA introduces artifacts in the varying and extra SMs with artificial correlations in the TCs of extra components, and (5) in the absence or presence of SMs unique to one subject, GICA produces errors in TCs and IVA estimates are accurate. In summary, our simulation experiments (both simplistic and realistic) and our holistic analyses approach indicate that IVA produces results that are closer to ground truth and thereby better preserves subject variability. The improved version of IVA is now packaged into the GIFT toolbox (http://mialab.mrn.org/software/gift). PMID:25018704

  10. Phase II Trial of Hyperfractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin for Stage III and IVa Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, Patrick D.; Papagikos, Michael; Hamann, Sue; Neal, Charles; Meyerson, Martin; Hayes, Neil; Ungaro, Peter; Kotz, Kenneth; Couch, Marion; Pollock, Hoke; Tepper, Joel

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate a novel chemoradiation regimen designed to maximize locoregional control (LRC) and minimize toxicity for patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Patients received hyperfractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (HIMRT) in 1.25-Gy fractions b.i.d. to 70 Gy to high-risk planning target volume (PTV). Intermediate and low-risk PTVs received 60 Gy and 50 Gy, at 1.07, and 0.89 Gy per fraction, respectively. Concurrent cisplatin 33 mg/m{sup 2}/week was started Week 1. Patients completed the Quality of Life Radiation Therapy Instrument pretreatment (PRE), at end of treatment (EOT), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Overall survival (OS), progression-free (PFS), LRC, and toxicities were assessed. Results: Of 39 patients, 30 (77%) were alive without disease at median follow-up of 37.5 months. Actuarial 3-year OS, PFS, and LRC were 80%, 82%, and 87%, respectively. No failures occurred in the electively irradiated neck and there were no isolated neck failures. Head and neck QOL was significantly worse in 18 of 35 patients (51%): mean 7.8 PRE vs. 3.9 EOT. By month 1, H and N QOL returned near baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 1.7). The most common acute Grade 3+ toxicities were mucositis (38%), fatigue (28%), dysphagia (28%), and leukopenia (26%). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated IMRT with low-dose weekly cisplatin resulted in good LRC with acceptable toxicity and QOL. Lack of elective nodal failures despite very low dose per fraction has led to an attempt to further minimize toxicity by reducing elective nodal doses in our subsequent protocol.

  11. Molecular analysis of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: Common mutations and racial difference

    SciTech Connect

    Tomatsu, S.; Hori, T.; Nakashima, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine -6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Studies on the molecular basis of MPS IVA have been facilitated following cloning of the full-length cDNA and genomic DNA. In this study we detected mutations from 20 Caucasian and 19 Japanese MPS IVA patients using SSCP system and compared mutations of Caucasian origin with those of Japanese origin. The results showed the presence of 16 various mutations (3 small, deletions, 2 nonsense and 11 missense mutations) for Caucasian patients and 15 (1 deletion, 1 large alteration and 13 missense mutations) for Japanese. Moreover, two common mutations existed; one is double gene deletion characteristic for Japanese (6 alleles; 15%) and the other is a point mutation (1113F A{yields}T transition) characteristic for Caucasian (9 alleles; 22.5%). And the clear genotype/phenotype relationship among 1342delCA, IVS1(-2), P151S, Q148X, R386C, I113F, Q473X, W220G, P151L, A291T, R90W, and P77R, for a severe type, G96B N204K and V138A for a milder type, was observed. Only R386 mutation was seen in both of the populations. Further, the precise DNA analysis for double gene deletion of a common double gene deletion has been performed by defining the breakpoints and the results showed that one deletion was caused by homologous recombination due to Alu repetitive sequences and the other was due to nonhomologous recombination of short direct repeat. Haplotype analysis for six alleles with double deletion were different, indicating the different origin of this mutation or the frequent recombination events before a mutational event. Thus the mutations in GALNS gene are very heterogeneous and the racial difference is characteristic.

  12. Interaction sites of DivIVA and RodA from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Sieger, Boris; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Elongation growth in actinobacteria is localized at the cell poles. This is in contrast to many classical model organisms where insertion of new cell wall material is localized around the lateral site. We previously described a role of RodA from Corynebacterium glutamicum in apical cell growth and morphogenesis. Deletion of rodA had drastic effects on morphology and growth, likely a result from misregulation of penicillin-binding proteins and cell wall precursor delivery. We identified the interaction of RodA with the polar scaffold protein DivIVA, thus explaining subcellular localization of RodA to the cell poles. In this study, we describe this interaction in detail and map the interaction sites of DivIVA and RodA. A single amino acid residue in the N-terminal domain of DivIVA was found to be crucial for the interaction with RodA. The interaction site of RodA was mapped to its cytoplasmic, C-terminal domain, in a region encompassing the last 10 amino acids (AAs). Deletion of these 10 AAs significantly decreased the interaction efficiency with DivIVA. Our results corroborate the interaction of DivIVA and RodA, underscoring the important role of DivIVA as a spatial organizer of the elongation machinery in Corynebacterineae. PMID:25709601

  13. Architecture of the type IVa pilus machine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Wei; Rettberg, Lee A; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Iwasa, Janet; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Jensen, Grant J

    2016-03-11

    Type IVa pili are filamentous cell surface structures observed in many bacteria. They pull cells forward by extending, adhering to surfaces, and then retracting. We used cryo-electron tomography of intact Myxococcus xanthus cells to visualize type IVa pili and the protein machine that assembles and retracts them (the type IVa pilus machine, or T4PM) in situ, in both the piliated and nonpiliated states, at a resolution of 3 to 4 nanometers. We found that T4PM comprises an outer membrane pore, four interconnected ring structures in the periplasm and cytoplasm, a cytoplasmic disc and dome, and a periplasmic stem. By systematically imaging mutants lacking defined T4PM proteins or with individual proteins fused to tags, we mapped the locations of all 10 T4PM core components and the minor pilins, thereby providing insights into pilus assembly, structure, and function. PMID:26965631

  14. Robonaut 2 on the International Space Station: Status Update and Preparations for IVA Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlstrom, Thomas D.; Diftler, Myron E.; Berka, Reginald B.; Badger, Julia M.; Yayathi, Sandeep; Curtis, Andrew W.; Joyce, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Robotics engineers, ground controllers and International Space Station (ISS) crew have been running successful experiments using Robonaut 2 (R2) on-board the ISS for more than a year. This humanoid upper body robot continues to expand its list of achievements and its capabilities to safely demonstrate maintenance and servicing tasks while working alongside human crewmembers. The next phase of the ISS R2 project will transition from a stationary Intra Vehicular Activity (IVA) upper body using a power/data umbilical, to an IVA mobile system with legs for repositioning, a battery backpack power supply, and wireless communications. These upgrades will enable the R2 team to evaluate hardware performance and to develop additional control algorithms and control verification techniques with R2 inside the ISS in preparation for the Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) phase of R2 operations. As R2 becomes more capable in assisting with maintenance tasks, with minimal supervision, including repositioning itself to different work sites, the ISS crew will be burdened with fewer maintenance chores, leaving them more time to conduct other activities. R2's developers at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) are preparing the R2 IVA mobility hardware and software upgrades for delivery to the ISS in late 2013. This paper summarizes R2 ISS achievements to date, briefly describes the R2 IVA mobility upgrades, and discusses the R2 IVA mobility objectives and plans.

  15. Atypical presentation of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T

    2016-09-01

    A 14 year old patient with short stature, type I diabetes, and cataracts was referred for evaluation of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Radiography was suggestive of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with decreased bone mineral density for age. Targeted molecular and biochemical testing were normal in this patient. Whole exome sequencing was performed and showed compound heterozygosity for previously reported pathogenic GALNS variants which were diagnostic of mucopolysaccharidosis, type IVA (Morquio A). While this case describes neither a novel condition nor a new mutation, it does illustrate three important points in the diagnosis of patients with atypical forms of MPS IVA. First, that in many instances urine glycosaminoglycan analysis is not sufficient to rule out MPS IVA as a potential diagnosis. Patients in whom biochemical screening is advised should have measurement of leukocyte enzymatic activity. Second, that in patients with radiographic evidence of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with additional features or with normal targeted testing, MPS IVA should remain in the differential diagnosis. Third, that whole exome sequencing represents a viable diagnostic platform for evaluation of patients with unknown skeletal or metabolic disease. PMID:27331011

  16. The IVA Parent Body: Evidence from Silicate-Bearing Group IVA Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulff-Moller, F.; Kallemeyn, G. W.; Rasmussen, K. L.

    1992-07-01

    The IVA iron meteorites Steinbach (SB), Sao Joao Nepomuceno (SJN), Gibeon and Bishop Canyon are unusual in their contents of silicates. SB is particularly rich in silicates (ca. 50 wt%) and was long classified as a stony iron (Dorfler et al., 1965) but the metal fraction is typical of group IVA iron meteorites (Schaudy et al., 1972). The SB and SJN contain low-Ca pyroxene and tridymite in roughly equal proportions, whereas only tridymite is found in the two other meteorites. Reid et al. (1974) found that coexisting orthopyroxene and clinopyroxenes in SB (En 85) were formed in a narrow two-phase field at 1200 degrees C and preserved by comparatively rapid cooling. We present cooling rate estimates as well as minor element data for the silicates obtained by electron microprobe and trace elements (REE and siderophiles) for the bulk silicate fraction by INAA. The coarse granular texture of the silicates and the presence of finely dispersed sulfide inclusions in the pyroxenes might suggest a cumulate origin, but the high proportion of tridymite combined with MgO-rich pyroxene is unusual if a chondritic magma is assumed. One way of forming excess tridymite is by extreme reduction of a pallasite-type metal/olivine mixture. Our INAA data on SB bulk silicates show a pattern of REE and Sc, Cr, and Mn, which is qualitatively consistent with orthopyroxene that crystallized from a moderately evolved magma with chondritic REE levels. The incompatible elements (including Cr!) in SB pyroxene are correlated and vary up to a factor of 5 (eg., Ti and Al), whereas Ca shows a bimodal variation corresponding roughly to the coexisting orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene. The minor element variations in SB pyroxene thus resemble magmatic zoning. The SJN pyroxene is marginally more MgO-rich (En 86) and shows a similar bimodal Ca distribution although it is possibly one phase. If correct, this suggests slower cooling at a higher temperature than SB. References: Dorfler G., Hecht F. and

  17. The thermal evolution of IVA iron meteorites: Evidence from metallographic cooling rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Kaare L.; Ulff-Møller, Finn; Haack, Henning

    1995-07-01

    Metallographic cooling rates of group IVA iron meteorites have been recalculated based on the most recent Ni diffusion coefficients and phase diagram. The cooling rates are revised upwards by a factor of ca. 15 relative to previous estimates. A large range in cooling rate is found in the low-Ni part of group IVA (Ni < 8.4 wt%), while the high-Ni part shows approximately constant cooling rates. Undercooling is observed only in the high-Ni IVA members. Some of the taenite lamellae in the high-Ni IVA irons, which were apparently affected by moderate undercooling, can, alternatively, be interpreted to have experienced a nonlinear cooling history. The variation in cooling rate of the entire group IVA spans two orders of magnitude (19-3400 K/My). This span is still so large that it constitutes severe problems for both a core origin model and a raisin-bread model but seemingly it does not contradict a model where the parent body is broken up and reassembled after core crystallization but prior to Widmanstätten pattern formation.

  18. CAPTURING SUBJECT VARIABILITY IN FMRI DATA : A GRAPH-THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF GICA VS. IVA

    PubMed Central

    Laney, Jonathan; Westlake, Kelly; Ma, Sai; Woytowicz, Elizabeth; Calhoun, Vince D.; Adalı, Tülay

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies using simulated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data show that independent vector analysis (IVA) is a superior solution for capturing spatial subject variability when compared with the widely used group independent component analysis (GICA). Retaining such variability is of fundamental importance for identifying spatially localized group differences in intrinsic brain networks. New Methods Few studies on capturing subject variability and order selection have evaluated real fMRI data. Comparison of multivariate components generated by multiple algorithms is not straightforward. The main difficulties are finding concise methods to extract meaningful features and comparing multiple components despite lack of a ground truth. In this paper, we present a graph-theoretic approach to effectively compare the ability of multiple multivariate algorithms to capture subject variability for real fMRI data for effective group comparisons. Results Discriminating trends in features calculated from IVA- and GICA-generated components show that IVA better preserves the qualities of centrality and small worldness in fMRI data. IVA also produced components with more activated voxels leading to larger area under the curve (AUC) values. Comparison with Existing Method IVA is compared with widely used GICA for the purpose of group discrimination in terms of graph-theoretic features. In addition, masks are applied for motor related components generated by both algorithms. Conclusions Results show IVA better captures subject variability producing more activated voxels and generating components with less mutual information in the spatial domain than Group ICA. IVA-generated components result in smaller p-values and clearer trends in graph-theoretic features. PMID:25797843

  19. Determination and validation of chikusetsusaponin IVa in rat plasma by UPLC-MS/MS and its application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Shi-Ping; Guo, Mei-Hua; Wang, Zhuo

    2016-09-01

    A novel, sensitive and rapid ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method for the quantification of chikusetsusaponin IVa (CHS-IVa) in rat plasma was established and validated. Plasma samples were pre-treated by precipitation of protein with acetonitrile and chromatographed on a Waters Symmetry C18 analytical column (4.6 × 50 mm, i.d., 3.5 μm) using a mobile phase consisting of methanol and water containing 0.05% formic acid (55:45, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. The deprotonated molecular ions [M - H](-) were employed in electrospray negative ionization mode and selected reaction monitoring transitions were performed for detection. The calibration curves exhibited good linearity (r > 0.99) over the range of 0.5-1000 ng/mL for CHS-IVa. The recoveries of CHS-IVa were >92.5% and exhibited no severe matrix effect. This method was successfully applied in the pharmacokinetic study of CHS-IVa in rats. For oral administration, the plasma concentrations of CHS-IVa increased to a peak value at 0.35 ± 0.14 h, followed by a gradual decrease to the lower limit of quantitation in 24 h. For intravenous administration, the plasma concentrations of CHS-IVa decreased quickly (t1/2 , 1.59 ± 0.25 h). The absolute bioavailability of CHS-IVa in rats was 8.63%. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26864353

  20. Floodplain evolution in a confluence zone: Paraná and Ivaí rivers, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Eduardo Souza de; Santos, Manoel Luis dos; Cremon, Édipo Henrique; Stevaux, José Cândido

    2016-03-01

    In this study we investigated floodplain development at the confluence of the Paraná and Ivaí rivers, Brazil. We evaluated paleochannels with sedimentary facies and morphometry from cartographic products, which enabled us to identify compartments that indicate homologous morphogenesis. These results contributed to the distinction in the floodplain of areas reworked by the Paraná, Ivaí, or both river systems. Additionally, investigations that included dating deposits on the terrace that borders the floodplain and an alluvial fan (also in contact with the floodplain) reinforced the interpretation of the fluvial landscape. The identified stages of geomorphological evolution demonstrated the existence of a paleoconfluence of the Paraná and Ivaí rivers during the late Pleistocene that was located 6 km upstream from the current confluence. This paleoconfluence displays a different configuration in relation to the current confluence, and its features resemble and contribute to understanding the former braided channel pattern of the Paraná River. The abandonments of the Paraná River channels identified in this study were initial and crucial process in the development of the floodplain. This channel change favored the formation of extensive wetlands and consequently the confluence migration, which resulted in the fluvial reworking indicated by the paleochannels of the Ivaí River. Another implication from the confluence migration was a base level fall, which contributed to maintaining the stability of the Ivaí River and its embedded meanders. In addition, investigations of an alluvial fan in the Paraná River valley provided evidence of massive deposition of sediments from a tributary of the Ivaí River onto the floodplain, which is associated with a regional dry period in the late Holocene as well as neotectonic control.

  1. 129I interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II results

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.I.; Caffee, M.W.; Proctor, I.D.

    1997-07-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129I was organized and conducted. A total of nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic `standard type` materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129I/127I ratios of the samples varied from 10`-8 to 10`-14. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the environmental samples. The 129I AMS measurements obtained at different laboratories for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the comparison, AgI was prepared from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves) by three separate laboratories. Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then redistributed to the participating 129I AMS facilities and 129I/127I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  2. The Morquio A syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IVA) gene maps to 16q24. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.; Xiaohui Guo; Orsborn, A.M.; Sutherland, G.R.; Callen, D.F.; Hopwood, J.J.; Morris, C.P. )

    1993-01-01

    The gene for N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase, the deficiency of which results in Morquio A syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA), was assigned to chromosome 16 at band q24.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Localization to this band was confirmed by PCR analysis of a somatic cell hybrid panel used for fine mapping of chromosome 16. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Fibroid Ablation: Phase II and Phase III Results

    PubMed Central

    Pemueller, Rodolfo Robles; Garza Leal, José Gerardo; Abbott, Karen R.; Falls, Janice L.; Macer, James

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To review phase II and phase III treatments of symptomatic uterine fibroids (myomas) using laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA). Methods: We performed a retrospective, multicenter clinical analysis of 206 consecutive cases of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic RFVTA of symptomatic myomas conducted on an outpatient basis under two phase II studies at 2 sites (n = 69) and one phase III study at 11 sites (n = 137). Descriptive and exploratory, general trend, and matched-pair analyses were applied. Results: From baseline to 12 months in the phase II study, the mean transformed symptom severity scores improved from 53.9 to 8.8 (P < .001) (n = 57), health-related quality-of-life scores improved from 48.5 to 92.0 (P < .001) (n = 57), and mean uterine volume decreased from 204.4 cm3 to 151.4 cm3 (P = .008) (n = 58). Patients missed a median of 4 days of work (range, 2–10 days). The rate of possible device-related adverse events was 1.4% (1 of 69). In the phase III study, approximately 98% of patients were assessed at 12 months, and their transformed symptom severity scores, health-related quality-of-life scores, mean decrease in uterine volume, and mean menstrual bleeding reduction were also significant. Patients in phase III missed a median of 5 days of work (range, 1–29 days). The rate of periprocedural device-related adverse events was 3.5% (5 of 137). Despite the enrollment requirement for patients in both phases to have completed childbearing, 4 pregnancies occurred within the first year after treatment. Conclusions: RFVTA does not require any uterine incisions and provides a uterine-sparing procedure with rapid recovery, significant reduction in uterine size, significant reduction or elimination of myoma symptoms, and significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24960480

  4. Study of space shuttle EVA/IVA support requirements. Volume 1: Technical summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, R. J.; Wood, P. W., Jr.; Cox, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Results are summarized which were obtained for equipment requirements for the space shuttle EVA/IVA pressure suit, life support system, mobility aids, vehicle support provisions, and energy 4 support. An initial study of tasks, guidelines, and constraints and a special task on the impact of a 10 psia orbiter cabin atmosphere are included. Supporting studies not related exclusively to any one group of equipment requirements are also summarized. Representative EVA/IVA task scenarios were defined based on an evaluation of missions and payloads. Analysis of the scenarios resulted in a total of 788 EVA/IVA's in the 1979-1990 time frame, for an average of 1.3 per shuttle flight. Duration was estimated to be under 4 hours on 98% of the EVA/IVA's, and distance from the airlock was determined to be 70 feet or less 96% of the time. Payload water vapor sensitivity was estimated to be significant on 9%-17% of the flights. Further analysis of the scenarios was carried out to determine specific equipment characteristics, such as suit cycle and mobility requirements.

  5. Fractionation Trends Among IVA Iron Meteorites: Contrasts with IIIAB Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, J. T.; Richardson, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    A neutron-activation study of 49 group-IVA irons shows much lower negative slopes on Ir-Au and Ir-As diagrams than observed in the larger magmatic group IIIAB. This difference seems to reflect the tendency of D(sub Ir), D(sub Au), and D(sub As) to increase with increasing S content. Contents of S and other volatiles are much lower in IVA irons than IIIAB irons. We show that both groups can be fit with Dx values that depend quadratically on S, with initial IVA S contents about 6X lower than those in IIIAB. The IVA scatter fields show a spread in Au or As at constant Ir that appears to reflect variations in the fraction of trapped melt between 0% and 30%. Copper shows an S-shaped trend that may reflect moderate positive and negative changes in D(sub Cu) as the magma evolved or, less likely, sampling variations in a broad band reflecting fractionation and trapping of melt. Gibeon, the largest IVA iron with a mass greater than 30 tons, shows an appreciable range in compositions consistent either with differences in the degree of magma crystallization or with differences in the content of trapped melt. A striking difference between IVA and IIIAB is observed in the Ir/Au ratios in the most Ir-rich irons in the groups; that in IVA is 40% lower than the IIIAB ratio, and lower than those in other iron-meteorite groups, The IVA Ir/Au ratio is about half the ratios in the chondrite groups. We examined three possible explanations of this anomaly: (1) the high-Ir irons contain large amounts of trapped melt: or (2) half of the IVA core (i.e., the first 50% to crystallize) is missing from the terrestrial set of IVA irons; or (3) the IVA magma formed by incomplete melting of the metal in the chondritic precursor material, with the metal that remained in the mantle having high Ir and low Au contents. Plausibility arguments favor the third possibility. The third scenario is the most plausible, but the second cannot be ruled out. We review recent evidence regarding the cooling rates

  6. Phase 2 microwave concrete decontamination results

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Foster, D. Jr.; Wilson, C.T.; Schaich, C.R.

    1995-04-01

    The authors report on the results of the second phase of a four-phase program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop a system to decontaminate concrete using microwave energy. The microwave energy is directed at the concrete surface through the use of an optimized wave guide antenna, or applicator, and this energy rapidly heats the free water present in the interstitial spaces of the concrete matrix. The resulting steam pressure causes the surface to burst in much the same way popcorn pops in a home microwave oven. Each steam explosion removes several square centimeters of concrete surface that are collected by a highly integrated wave guide and vacuum system. The authors call this process the microwave concrete decontamination, or MCD, process. In the first phase of the program the principle of microwaves concrete removal concrete surfaces was demonstrated. In these experiments, concrete slabs were placed on a translator and moved beneath a stationary microwave system. The second phase demonstrated the ability to mobilize the technology to remove the surfaces from concrete floors. Area and volume concrete removal rates of 10.4 cm{sup 2}/s and 4.9 cm{sup 3}/S, respectively, at 18 GHz were demonstrated. These rates are more than double those obtained in Phase 1 of the program. Deeper contamination can be removed by using a longer residence time under the applicator to create multiple explosions in the same area or by taking multiple passes over previously removed areas. Both techniques have been successfully demonstrated. Small test sections of painted and oil-soaked concrete have also been removed in a single pass. Concrete with embedded metal anchors on the surface has also been removed, although with some increased variability of removal depth. Microwave leakage should not pose any operational hazard to personnel, since the observed leakage was much less than the regulatory standard.

  7. Use MACES IVA Suit for EVA Mobility Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of an Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) suit for a spacewalk or Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) was evaluated for mobility and usability in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) environment. The Space Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) has been modified (MACES) to integrate with the Orion spacecraft. The first several missions of the Orion MPCV spacecraft will not have mass available to carry an EVA specific suit so any EVA required will have to be performed by the MACES. Since the MACES was not designed with EVA in mind, it was unknown what mobility the suit would be able to provide for an EVA or if a person could perform useful tasks for an extended time inside the pressurized suit. The suit was evaluated in multiple NBL runs by a variety of subjects including crewmembers with significant EVA experience. Various functional mobility tasks performed included: translation, body positioning, carrying tools, body stabilization, equipment handling, and use of tools. Hardware configurations included with and without TMG, suit with IVA gloves and suit with EVA gloves. Most tasks were completed on ISS mockups with existing EVA tools. Some limited tasks were completed with prototype tools on a simulated rocky surface. Major findings include: demonstration of the ability to weigh-out the suit, understanding the need to have subjects perform multiple runs prior to getting feedback, determination of critical sizing factors, and need for adjustment of suit work envelop. The early testing has demonstrated the feasibility of EVA's limited duration and limited scope. Further testing is required with more flight like tasking and constraints to validate these early results. If the suit is used for EVA, it will require mission specific modifications for umbilical management or PLSS integration, safety tether attachment, and tool interfaces. These evaluations are continuing through calendar year 2014.

  8. Study of space shuttle EVA/IVA support requirements. Volume 2: EVA/IVA tasks, guidelines, and constraints definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B. W.; Copeland, R. J.; Wood, P. W., Jr.; Cox, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The guidelines for EVA and IVA tasks to be performed on the space shuttle are defined. In deriving tasks, guidelines, and constraints, payloads were first identified from the mission model. Payload requirements, together with man and manipulator capabilities, vehicle characteristics and operation, and safety considerations led to a definition of candidate tasks. Guidelines and constraints were also established from these considerations. Scenarios were established, and screening criteria, such as commonality of EVA and IVA activities, were applied to derive representative planned and unplanned tasks. The whole spectrum of credible contingency situations with a potential requirement for EVA/IVA was analyzed.

  9. Pilot Overmyer completes hygiene activities / demostrates IVA foot restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    On middeck, Pilot Overmyer, drying his face with a towel from forward single tray personal item stowage locker, completes personal hygiene activities (shaving) and demostrates use of intravehicular activity (IVA) foot restraint on floor.

  10. Silica and Pyroxene in IVA Irons; Possible Formation of the IVA Magma by Impact Melting and Reduction of L-LL-Chondrite Materials Followed by Crystallization and Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, John T.; Matsunami, Yoshiyuki; Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    Group IVA is a large magmatic group of iron meteorites. The mean DELTA O-17 (= delta O-17 - 0.52(raised dot) delta O-18) of the silicates is approx. plus or minus 1.2%o, similar to the highest values in L chondrites and the lowest values in LL chondrites; delta O-18 values are also in the L/LL range. This strongly suggests that IVA irons formed by melting L-LL parental material, but the mean Ni content of IVA irons (83 mg/g) is much lower than that of a presumed L-LL parent (approx. 170 mg/g) and the low-Ca pyroxene present in two IVA meteorites is Fs13, much lower than the Fs20-29 values in L and LL chondrites. Thus, formation from L-LL precursors requires extensive addition of metallic Fe, probably produced by reduction of FeS and FeO. Group IVA also has S/Ni, Ga/Ni, and Ge/Ni ratios that are much lower than those in L-LL chondrites or any chondrite group that preserves nebular compositions, implying loss of these volatile elements during asteroidal processing. We suggest that these reduction and loss processes occurred near the surface of the asteroid during impact heating, and resulted partly from reduction by C, and partly from the thermal dissociation of FeS and FeO with loss of O and S. The hot (approx. 1770 K) low-viscosity melt quickly moved through channels in the porous asteroid to form a core. Two members of the IVA group, Sao Joao Nepomuceno (hereafter, SJN) and Steinbach, contain moderate amounts of orthopyroxene and silica, and minor amounts of low-Ca clinopyroxene. Even though SJN formed after approx. 26% crystallization and Steinbach formed after approx. 77% Crystallization of the IVA core, both could have originated within several tens of meters of the core-mantle interface if 99% of the crystallization occurred from the center outwards. Two other members of the group (Gibeon and Bishop Canyon) contain tabular tridymite, which we infer to have initially formed as veins deposited from a cooling SiO-rich vapor. The silicates were clearly introduced

  11. Silica and pyroxene in IVA irons; possible formation of the IVA magma by impact melting and reduction of L-LL-chondrite materials followed by crystallization and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.; Matsunami, Yoshiyuki; Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-06-01

    Group IVA is a large magmatic group of iron meteorites. The mean Δ 17O (=δ 17O - 0.52·δ 18O) of the silicates is ˜+1.2‰, similar to the highest values in L chondrites and the lowest values in LL chondrites; δ 18O values are also in the L/LL range. This strongly suggests that IVA irons formed by melting L-LL parental material, but the mean Ni content of IVA irons (83 mg/g) is much lower than that of a presumed L-LL parent (˜170 mg/g) and the low-Ca pyroxene present in two IVA meteorites is Fs13, much lower than the Fs20-29 values in L and LL chondrites. Thus, formation from L-LL precursors requires extensive addition of metallic Fe, probably produced by reduction of FeS and FeO. Group IVA also has S/Ni, Ga/Ni, and Ge/Ni ratios that are much lower than those in L-LL chondrites or any chondrite group that preserves nebular compositions, implying loss of these volatile elements during asteroidal processing. We suggest that these reduction and loss processes occurred near the surface of the asteroid during impact heating, and resulted partly from reduction by C, and partly from the thermal dissociation of FeS and FeO with loss of O and S. The hot (˜1770 K) low-viscosity melt quickly moved through channels in the porous asteroid to form a core. Two members of the IVA group, São João Nepomuceno (hereafter, SJN) and Steinbach, contain moderate amounts of orthopyroxene and silica, and minor amounts of low-Ca clinopyroxene. Even though SJN formed after ˜26% crystallization and Steinbach formed after ˜77% crystallization of the IVA core, both could have originated within several tens of meters of the core-mantle interface if 99% of the crystallization occurred from the center outwards. Two other members of the group (Gibeon and Bishop Canyon) contain tabular tridymite, which we infer to have initially formed as veins deposited from a cooling SiO-rich vapor. The silicates were clearly introduced into IVA irons after the initial magma crystallized. Because the

  12. Cytomegalovirus vaccine: phase II clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Rieder, F; Steininger, C

    2014-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of the most significant viral pathogens during pregnancy and in immunocompromised patients. Antiviral prophylactic strategies are limited by toxicities, drug-drug interactions and development of antiviral resistance. A safe and protective vaccine against CMV is highly desirable in view of the potential positive impact on CMV-associated morbidity and mortality as well as healthcare costs. Unfortunately, this demand could not be met in the past four decades although development of a CMV vaccine has been ranked at the highest priority by the US Institute of Medicine. Multiple different vaccine candidates have been developed and evaluated in phase I clinical trials and few succeeded to phase II trials. Nevertheless, two different vaccines showed recently promising results in trials that studied healthy adults and immunocompromised solid-organ and bone-marrow transplant recipients, respectively. The gB/MF59 vaccine exhibited a vaccine efficacy of 50% in healthy, postpartum females. In transplant patients, gB/MF59 and the DNA vaccine TransVax both limited the periods of viraemia and consequently the need for antiviral treatment. The success of these trials is encouraging and will probably give new impetus to the development of an effective CMV vaccine. Sterilizing immunity may not be attainable in the near future and may not be necessary for a CMV vaccine to have a significant impact on health care as discussed in the present review. PMID:24283990

  13. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA: Common double deletion in the N-Acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase gene (GALNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Toshinori; Tomatsu, Shunji; Fukuda, Seiji

    1995-04-10

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS). We found two separate deletions of nearly 8.0 and 6.0 kb in the GALNS gene, including some exons. There are Alu repetitive elements near the breakpoints of the 8.0-kb deletion, and this deletion resulted from an Alu-Alu recombination. The other 6.0-kb deletion involved illegitimate recombinational events between incomplete short direct repeats of 8 bp at deletion breakpoints. The same rearrangement has been observed in a heteroallelic state in four unrelated patients. This is the first documentation of a common double deletion a gene that is not a member of a gene cluster. 39 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Long-term therapeutic efficacy of allogenic bone marrow transplantation in a patient with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA

    PubMed Central

    Chinen, Yasutsugu; Higa, Takeshi; Tomatsu, Shunji; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Tadao; Hyakuna, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is one of the lysosomal storage diseases. It is caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to accumulation of the specific glycosaminoglycans keratan sulfate and chondroitin-6-sulfate. This accumulation has a direct impact on cartilage and bone development, resulting in systemic skeletal dysplasia. There is no curative therapy for this skeletal dysplasia. This report describes long-term therapeutic efficacy in a 15-year-old boy with a severe form of MPS IVA who received successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from his HLA-identical carrier sister. The level of the GALNS enzyme in the recipient’s lymphocytes reached almost half of normal level within two years after BMT. For the successive 9+ years post-BMT, GALNS activity in his lymphocytes maintained the same level as the donor’s, and the level of urinary uronic acid was reduced. Lumbar bone mineral density increased around 50% one year later post-BMT and was kept consistent. Radiographs showed that the figures of trochanter major and minor appeared, while the epiphyseal dysplasia in the femoral cap was almost unchanged. Loud snoring and apnea disappeared. Vital capacity increased to around 20% for the first two years and was maintained. Activity of daily life (ADL) was improved in work/study efficacy, respiratory status, sleep, joint pain, and frequency of infection. In conclusion, the long-term study of hematopoetic stem cell transplantation has shown clinical improvements in respiratory function, radiograph findings, ADL, and biochemical findings, suggesting that it is a potential therapeutic option for patients with MPS IVA. PMID:25593792

  15. Natural history and clinical assessment of Taiwanese patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase deficiency, which catalyzes a step in the catabolism of glycosaminoglycans, keratan sulfate and chondroitin-6-sulfate. This disease has a variable age of onset and rate of progression. Methods A retrospective analysis of medical records of 24 patients with MPS IVA (11 males, 13 females; current mean age ± SD, 12.6 ± 6.6 years; age range, 1.4-29.4 years) seen at 6 medical centers in Taiwan from January 1996 through June 2013 was performed. Results Mean ages of onset of symptoms and confirmed diagnosis were 2.0 ± 1.6 and 5.7 ± 4.5 years, respectively. The most prevalent clinical manifestations were kyphosis (100%), pectus carinatum (96%), abnormal gait (93%), striking short trunk dwarfism (92%), genu valgum (92%), and valvular heart disease (91%). Eight patients (33%) experienced at least one surgical procedure with the most common being ear tube insertion (25%), adenoidectomy (17%), tonsillectomy (13%), supraglottoplasty (13%), spinal decompression (13%), and spinal fusion (13%). The most prevalent cardiac valve abnormalities were aortic stenosis (45%) and mitral regurgitation (45%). At the time of the study, 8 out of 24 patients (33%) have died at the mean age of 17.2 ± 7.7 years. Conclusions An understanding of the natural history involved in MPS IVA may allow early diagnosis of the disease. All affected Taiwanese patients experienced significant functional limitations. Adequate evaluations and timely management may improve clinical outcomes and quality of life. PMID:24513086

  16. PHASE I SINGLE CELL ELECTROLYZER TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J; Timothy Steeper, T

    2008-08-05

    This document reports the results of Phase I Single Cell testing of an SO{sub 2}-Depolarized Water Electrolyzer. Testing was performed primarily during the first quarter of FY 2008 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using an electrolyzer cell designed and built at SRNL. Other facility hardware were also designed and built at SRNL. This test further advances this technology for which work began at SRNL in 2005. This research is valuable in achieving the ultimate goal of an economical hydrogen production process based on the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Cycle. The focus of this work was to conduct single cell electrolyzer tests to further develop the technology of SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis as part of the HyS Cycle. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by water-splitting. Like all other sulfur-based cycles, HyS utilizes the high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both thermodynamic efficiency and hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. The anode and cathode are formed by spraying platinum containing catalyst on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). In most testing the material of the PEM was NafionR. The electrolyzer cell active area can be as large as 54.8 cm{sup 2}. Feed to the anode of the electrolyzer is a sulfuric acid solution containing sulfur dioxide. The partial pressure of sulfur dioxide could be varied in the

  17. Vapor-liquid phase separator permeability results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1981-01-01

    Continued studies are described in the area of vapor-liquid phase separator work with emphasis on permeabilities of porous sintered plugs (stainless steel, nominal pore size 2 micrometer). The temperature dependence of the permeability has been evaluated in classical fluid using He-4 gas at atmospheric pressure and in He-2 on the basis of a modified, thermosmotic permeability of the normal fluid.

  18. Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration - Phase I Results

    SciTech Connect

    William L. Osborn, Susan Petty, Trenton T. Cladouhos, Joe Iovenitti, Laura Nofziger, Owen Callahan, Douglas S. Perry and Paul L. Stern

    2011-10-23

    Phase I of the Newberry Volcano Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration included permitting, community outreach, seismic hazards analysis, initial microseismic array deployment and calibration, final MSA design, site characterization, and stimulation planning. The multi-disciplinary Phase I site characterization supports stimulation planning and regulatory permitting, as well as addressing public concerns including water usage and induced seismicity. A review of the project'™s water usage plan by an independent hydrology consultant found no expected impacts to local stakeholders, and recommended additional monitoring procedures. The IEA Protocol for Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems was applied to assess site conditions, properly inform stakeholders, and develop a comprehensive mitigation plan. Analysis of precision LiDAR elevation maps has concluded that there is no evidence of recent faulting near the target well. A borehole televiewer image log of the well bore revealed over three hundred fractures and predicted stress orientations. No natural, background seismicity has been identified in a review of historic data, or in more than seven months of seismic data recorded on an array of seven seismometers operating around the target well. A seismic hazards and induced seismicity risk assessment by an independent consultant concluded that the Demonstration would contribute no additional risk to residents of the nearest town of La Pine, Oregon. In Phase II of the demonstration, an existing deep hot well, NWG 55-29, will be stimulated using hydroshearing techniques to create an EGS reservoir. The Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration is allowing geothermal industry and academic experts to develop, validate and enhance geoscience and engineering techniques, and other procedures essential to the expansion of EGS throughout the country. Successful development will demonstrate to the American public that EGS can play a

  19. Interplay of the Serine/Threonine-Kinase StkP and the Paralogs DivIVA and GpsB in Pneumococcal Cell Elongation and Division

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Nathalie; Cluzel, Caroline; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Freton, Céline; Combet, Christophe; Guiral, Sébastien; Soufi, Boumediene; Macek, Boris; Kuru, Erkin; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Brun, Yves V.; Di Guilmi, Anne-Marie; Claverys, Jean-Pierre; Galinier, Anne; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Despite years of intensive research, much remains to be discovered to understand the regulatory networks coordinating bacterial cell growth and division. The mechanisms by which Streptococcus pneumoniae achieves its characteristic ellipsoid-cell shape remain largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed the interplay of the cell division paralogs DivIVA and GpsB with the ser/thr kinase StkP. We observed that the deletion of divIVA hindered cell elongation and resulted in cell shortening and rounding. By contrast, the absence of GpsB resulted in hampered cell division and triggered cell elongation. Remarkably, ΔgpsB elongated cells exhibited a helical FtsZ pattern instead of a Z-ring, accompanied by helical patterns for DivIVA and peptidoglycan synthesis. Strikingly, divIVA deletion suppressed the elongated phenotype of ΔgpsB cells. These data suggest that DivIVA promotes cell elongation and that GpsB counteracts it. Analysis of protein-protein interactions revealed that GpsB and DivIVA do not interact with FtsZ but with the cell division protein EzrA, which itself interacts with FtsZ. In addition, GpsB interacts directly with DivIVA. These results are consistent with DivIVA and GpsB acting as a molecular switch to orchestrate peripheral and septal PG synthesis and connecting them with the Z-ring via EzrA. The cellular co-localization of the transpeptidases PBP2x and PBP2b as well as the lipid-flippases FtsW and RodA in ΔgpsB cells further suggest the existence of a single large PG assembly complex. Finally, we show that GpsB is required for septal localization and kinase activity of StkP, and therefore for StkP-dependent phosphorylation of DivIVA. Altogether, we propose that the StkP/DivIVA/GpsB triad finely tunes the two modes of peptidoglycan (peripheral and septal) synthesis responsible for the pneumococcal ellipsoid cell shape. PMID:24722178

  20. The TGV II Experiment (Phase I Results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneš, P.; Briançon, Ch.; Brudanin, V. B.; Čermák, P.; Egorov, V. G.; Gusev, K. N.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalik, A.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Šimkovic, F.; Štekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.

    2007-10-01

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of 106Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of Cd-106 enriched to 75% (total mass about 10 g). In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture (g.s.→g.s.) in 106Cd as 2.0×1020 years. This limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published.

  1. The TGV II Experiment (Phase I Results)

    SciTech Connect

    Benes, P.; Cermak, P.; Stekl, I.; Brudanin, V. B.; Egorov, V. G.; Gusev, K. N.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Kovalik, A.; Simkovic, F.

    2007-10-12

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of {sup 106}Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of Cd-106 enriched to 75% (total mass about 10 g). In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture (g.s.{yields}g.s.) in {sup 106}Cd as 2.0x10{sup 20} years. This limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published.

  2. Linkage of PRA models. Phase 1, Results

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.L.; Knudsen, J.K.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of the Phase I work of the ``Linkage of PRA Models`` project was to postulate methods of providing guidance for US Nuclear Regulator Commission (NRC) personnel on the selection and usage of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models that are best suited to the analysis they are performing. In particular, methods and associated features are provided for (a) the selection of an appropriate PRA model for a particular analysis, (b) complementary evaluation tools for the analysis, and (c) a PRA model cross-referencing method. As part of this work, three areas adjoining ``linking`` analyses to PRA models were investigated: (a) the PRA models that are currently available, (b) the various types of analyses that are performed within the NRC, and (c) the difficulty in trying to provide a ``generic`` classification scheme to groups plants based upon a particular plant attribute.

  3. Novel missense mutation in the GALNS gene in an affected patient with severe form of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA.

    PubMed

    Seyedhassani, Seyed Mohammad; Hashemi-Gorji, Feyzollah; Yavari, Mahdieh; Mirfakhraie, Reza

    2015-10-23

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA), also known as Morquio A, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), which causes major skeletal and connective tissue abnormalities and affects multiple organ systems. In this study, one MPS IVA patient with a severe form from consanguine large Iranian family has been investigated. To find a mutation, all of the 14 exons and intron-exon junctions of GALNS gene were sequenced. Sequencing results were analyzed using bioinformatic analysis in order to predict probable pathogenic effect of the variant. One novel homozygous missense mutation in exon 5, c.542A>G (p.Y181C), was found in the proband. That was predicted as being probably pathogenic by bioinformatics analysis. Segregation and familial study confirmed this pathogenic mutation. In conclusion, we have identified the novel mutation responsible for MPS IVA in an Iranian patient to assist in the diagnosis, genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of the affected families. PMID:26276046

  4. Long-term results of a randomized phase III trial of TPF induction chemotherapy followed by surgery and radiation in locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lai-ping; Zhang, Chen-ping; Ren, Guo-xin; Guo, Wei; William, William N; Hong, Christopher S; Sun, Jian; Zhu, Han-guang; Tu, Wen-yong; Li, Jiang; Cai, Yi-li; Yin, Qiu-ming; Wang, Li-zhen; Wang, Zhong-he; Hu, Yong-jie; Ji, Tong; Yang, Wen-jun; Ye, Wei-min; Li, Jun; He, Yue; Wang, Yan-an; Xu, Li-qun; Zhuang, Zhengping; Lee, J Jack; Myers, Jeffrey N; Zhang, Zhi-yuan

    2015-07-30

    Previously, we conducted a randomized phase III trial of TPF (docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil) induction chemotherapy in surgically managed locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and found no improvement in overall survival. This study reports long-term follow-up results from our initial trial. All patients had clinical stage III or IVA locally advanced OSCC. In the experimental group, patients received two cycles of TPF induction chemotherapy (75mg/m2 docetaxel d1, 75mg/m2 cisplatin d1, and 750mg/m2/day 5-fluorouracil d1-5) followed by radical surgery and post-operative radiotherapy; in the control group, patients received upfront radical surgery and post-operative radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Among 256 enrolled patients with a median follow-up of 70 months, estimated 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 61.1%, 52.7%, 55.2%, and 60.4%, respectively. There were no significant differences in survival rates between experimental and control groups. However, patients with favorable pathologic responses had improved outcomes compared to those with unfavorable pathologic responses and to those in the control group. Although TPF induction chemotherapy did not improve long-term survival compared to surgery upfront in patients with stage III and IVA OSCC, a favorable pathologic response after induction chemotherapy may be used as a major endpoint and prognosticator in future studies. Furthermore, the negative results observed in this trial may be represent type II error from an underpowered study. Future larger scale phase III trials are warranted to investigate whether a significant benefit exists for TPF induction chemotherapy in surgically managed OSCC. PMID:26124084

  5. Phase Transition Signature Results from PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.e.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2009-06-08

    The PHENIX experiment has conducted searches for the QCD critical point with measurements of multiplicity fluctuations, transverse momentum fluctuations, event-by-event kaon-to-pion ratios, elliptic flow, and correlations. Measurements have been made in several collision systems as a function of centrality and transverse momentum. The results do not show significant evidence of critical behavior in the collision systems and energies studied, although several interesting features are discussed.

  6. Antidiabetic Effects of Aqueous Infusions of Artemisia herba-alba and Ajuga iva in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Boudjelal, Amel; Siracusa, Laura; Henchiri, Cherifa; Sarri, Madani; Abderrahim, Benkhaled; Baali, Faiza; Ruberto, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    The aqueous infusions of the aerial parts of Artemisia herba-alba Asso and Ajuga iva Schreber, prepared in accordance with the traditional procedure used in the local folk medicine, have been analysed for their composition and content of phytochemical constituents and examined for their antidiabetic effectiveness in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of A. herba-alba and A. iva infusions was studied in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats, which were randomly divided into nine groups, each group consisting of six animals. The drug preparations (100, 200, and 300 mg/kg b. w.) of each plant were given orally to the rats of each group twice daily for 15 days. Compositional analysis of the aqueous infusions revealed the presence of several polyphenols as main components. A. herba-alba infusion was characterised by mono- and di-cinnamoylquinic acids, with 5-caffeoylquinic (chlorogenic) acid being the main compound, followed by 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid. Vicenin-2 (apigenin 6,8-di-C-glucoside) appeared to be the most abundant among flavonoids. On the other hand, A. iva showed the exclusive presence of flavonoids, with the flavanone naringin present in relatively high levels together with several apigenin (flavone) derivatives. Oral administration of 300 mg/kg b. w. of the aqueous infusions of A. herba-alba and A. iva exhibited a significant reduction in blood glucose content, showing a much more efficient antidiabetic activity compared to glibenclamide, the oral hypoglycaemic agent used as a positive control in this study. These results suggest that A. herba-alba and A. iva possess significant antidiabetic activity, as they were able to improve the biochemical damage in alloxan-induced diabetes in rats. PMID:26018915

  7. Final Technical Report: Results of Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, David, J.; Hambrick, Joshua; Srinivasan, Devarajan; Ayyannar, Raja; O'Brien, Kathleen

    2011-09-28

    Arizona Public Service Company (APS) expects that by 2027, renewable energy will account for 6,590 GWh in energy consumption by its customers. While much of this future energy will come from large centrally-located power plants, distributed renewable energy, sited at the point of end-use will also play an important role in meeting the needs of APS’ customers and is expected to provide 1,734 GWh. With increasing penetration of residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems at the point of end-use, PV power generation not only offsets the load, but could also cause significant shifts in power flow patterns through the distribution system, and could possibly cause reversal of flow through some branches of a distribution circuit. Significant changes to power flow introduced into existing distribution systems due to the increased amount of PV systems may cause operational issues, including over-voltage on the distribution feeder (loss of voltage regulation) and incorrect operation of control equipment, which may lead to an increase in the number of operations and related equipment wear that could affect equipment reliability and customer power quality. Additionally, connecting generation resources to a distribution feeder can introduce additional sources of short-circuit current to the distribution system. This could potentially result in increased short-circuit currents, potentially reaching damaging levels, causing protection desensitization and a potential loss of protection coordination. These effects may be further compounded by variability of PV production due to shading by clouds. The effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications are not well understood, and there is a great need to characterize this variability. This project will contribute to understanding the effects of high-penetration solar electricity on the design and operation of distribution systems by demonstrating how a high penetration of PV systems affects grid operations

  8. Final Technical Report: Results of Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, David, J.; Hambrick, Joshua; Srinivasan, Devarajan; Ayyannar, Raja; O'Brien, Kathleen; Bebic, Jovan; Schelenz, Owen

    2011-09-28

    Arizona Public Service Company (APS) expects that by 2027, renewable energy will account for 6,590 GWh in energy consumption by its customers. While much of this future energy will come from large centrally-located power plants, distributed renewable energy, sited at the point of end-use will also play an important role in meeting the needs of APS customers and is expected to provide 1,734 GWh. With increasing penetration of residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems at the point of end-use, PV power generation not only offsets the load, but could also cause significant shifts in power flow patterns through the distribution system, and could possibly cause reversal of flow through some branches of a distribution circuit. Significant changes to power flow introduced into existing distribution systems due to the increased amount of PV systems may cause operational issues, including over-voltage on the distribution feeder (loss of voltage regulation) and incorrect operation of control equipment, which may lead to an increase in the number of operations and related equipment wear that could affect equipment reliability and customer power quality. Additionally, connecting generation resources to a distribution feeder can introduce additional sources of short-circuit current to the distribution system. This could potentially result in increased short-circuit currents, potentially reaching damaging levels, causing protection desensitization and a potential loss of protection coordination. These effects may be further compounded by variability of PV production due to shading by clouds. The effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications are not well understood, and there is a great need to characterize this variability. This project will contribute to understanding the effects of high-penetration solar electricity on the design and operation of distribution systems by demonstrating how a high penetration of PV systems affects grid operations of a

  9. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  10. Recent development work on PIM : a Blumlein driven IVA machine.

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Martin J.; Sinclair, Mark A.; Williamson, Mark C.; Clough, Stephen G.; Thomas, Kenneth J.; Smith, Ian Douglas; Bailey, Vernon Leslie; Johnson, David Lee; Corcoran, Patrick Allen; Kishi, Hiroshi J.; Maenchen, John Eric

    2003-08-01

    An IVA (inductive voltage adder) research programme at AWE began with the construction of a small scale IVA test bed named LINX and progressed to building PIM (Prototype IVA Module). The work on PIM is geared towards furnishing AWE with a range of machines operating at 1 to 4 MV that may eventually supersede, with an upgrade in performance, existing machines operating in that voltage range. PIM has a water dielectric Blumlein of 10 ohms charged by a Marx generator. This has been used to drive either one or two 1.5 MV inductive cavities and fitting a third cavity may be attempted in the future. The latest two cavity configuration is shown which requires a split oil coax to connect the two cavities in parallel. It also has a laser triggering system for initiating the Blumlein and the prepulse reduction system fitted to the output of the Blumlein. A short MITL (magnetically insulated transmission line) connects the cavities, via a vacuum pumping section, to a chamber containing an e-beam diode test load.

  11. Retrospective Analysis of the Survival Benefit of Induction Chemotherapy in Stage IVa-b Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yao; Tang, Jie; OuYang, Pu-Yun; Su, Zhen; Xie, Fang-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The value of adding induction chemotherapy to chemoradiotherapy in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LA-NPC) remains controversial, yet high-risk patients with LA-NPC have poor outcomes after chemoradiotherapy. We aimed to assess the survival benefits of induction chemotherapy in stage IVa-b NPC. Patients and Methods A total of 602 patients with stage IVa-b NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy with or without induction chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Overall survival (OS), locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test and Cox regression analysis. Results In univariate analysis, 5-year OS was 83.2% for induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy and 74.8% for concurrent chemotherapy alone, corresponding to an absolute risk reduction of 8.4% (P = 0.022). Compared to concurrent chemotherapy alone, addition of induction chemotherapy improved 5-year DMFS (83.2% vs. 74.4%, P = 0.018) but not 5-year LRFS (83.7% vs. 83.0%, P = 0.848) or PFS (71.9% vs. 66.0%, P = 0.12). Age, T category, N category, chemotherapy strategy and clinical stage were associated with 5-year OS (P = 0.017, P = 0.031, P = 0.007, P = 0.022, P = 0.001, respectively). In multivariate analysis, induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy was an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.43–0.90, P = 0.012) and DMFS (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.38–0.83, P = 0.004). In subgroup analysis, induction chemotherapy significantly improved 5-year DMFS in stage IVa (86.8% vs. 77.3%, P = 0.008), but provided no significant benefit in stage IVb. Conclusions In patients with stage IVa-b NPC treated with IMRT, addition of induction chemotherapy to concurrent chemotherapy significantly improved 5-year OS and 5-year DMFS. This study provides a basis for selection of

  12. Aminoglycoside binding and catalysis specificity of aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa: A thermodynamic, structural and kinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Elise; Guichou, Jean-François; Chaloin, Laurent; Kunzelmann, Simone; Leban, Nadia; Serpersu, Engin H.; Lionne, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background Aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases make up a large class of bacterial enzymes that is widely distributed among pathogens and confer a high resistance to several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa, APH(2″)-IVa, is an important member of this class, but there is little information on the thermodynamics of aminoglycoside binding and on the nature of its rate-limiting step. Methods We used isothermal titration calorimetry, electrostatic potential calculations, molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystallography to study the interactions between the enzyme and different aminoglycosides. We determined the rate-limiting step of the reaction by the means of transient kinetic measurements. Results For the first time, Kd values were determined directly for APH(2″)-IVa and different aminoglycosides. The affinity of the enzyme seems to anti-correlate with the molecular weight of the ligand, suggesting a limited degree of freedom in the binding site. The main interactions are electrostatic bonds between the positively charged amino groups of aminoglycosides and Glu or Asp residues of APH. In spite of the significantly different ratio Kd/Km, there is no large difference in the transient kinetics obtained with the different aminoglycosides. We show that a product release step is rate-limiting for the overall reaction. Conclusions APH(2″)-IVa has a higher affinity for aminoglycosides carrying an amino group in 2′ and 6′, but tighter bindings do not correlate with higher catalytic efficiencies. As with APH(3′)-IIIa, an intermediate containing product is preponderant during the steady state. General significance This intermediate may constitute a good target for future drug design. PMID:26802312

  13. Integrated thermal treatment system sudy: Phase 2, Results

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study, the results of which have been published as an interim report, examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 2 systems. The assumptions and methods were the same as for the Phase 1 study. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in he Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr).

  14. 45 CFR 302.33 - Services to individuals not receiving title IV-A assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... application under this section; or (ii) Is a non-IV-A Medicaid recipient; or (iii) Has been receiving IV-D services and is no longer eligible for assistance under the title IV-A, IV-E foster care, and Medicaid... IV-A, IV-E foster care, and Medicaid programs, the IV-D agency must notify the family, within...

  15. Multimodal treatment for stage IVA thymoma: a proposable strategy.

    PubMed

    Rena, Ottavio; Mineo, Tommaso Claudio; Casadio, Caterina

    2012-04-01

    A retrospective review of a series of consecutive patients was carried out to evaluate the feasibility and the efficacy of a multimodal treatment in the management of stage IVA thymoma at first diagnosis. From 1998 to 2008, 18 patients affected by stage IVA thymoma underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery and subsequent mediastinal radiation therapy. There were 10 males and 8 females, mean age 54.5 years (range 29-68). Not specific symptoms were present in 12 cases and thymus-related syndromes were reported in 4. Histological subtypes were 1 AB, 2 B1, 4 B2, 7 B3, 1 mixed B1-B2, 1 mixed B1-B3 and 2 mixed B2-B3 thymomas. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (4 courses of cisplatin-based chemotherapy) was well tolerated in all cases. Those patients demonstrating clinical response at restaging (16/18) received surgical resection: "en-bloc" thymoma, residual thymic tissue and tumour involved organs resection was carried out together with the pleural implants removal. Complete macroscopic resection was achieved 10/16 patients (64%). Postoperative mortality and morbidity were null and 24%, respectively. Adjuvant radiation therapy consisted of 45-54 Gy administered by a 6 MV linear accelerator to the whole mediastinum and previous tumour bed. Mean follow-up was 82±33 months (range 31-143); overall survival was 85% and 53% at 5- and 10-years. Disease-related survival of the entire cohort was 100% and 58% at 5- and 10-years, whereas freedom from relapse survival for patients submitted to complete resection was 58% and 42% at 5- and 10-years. Disease-related survival when complete and not complete resection were considered were 100% and 52% and 72% and 0% at 5- and 10-years respectively (p=0.048). Multimodal management based on induction chemotherapy, subsequent surgery and postoperative mediastinal radiation allows a good complete resection rate and it is demonstrated to be a safe and effective treatment to warrant a good long-term survival in stage IVA thymoma patients. PMID

  16. Development of metallographic preparation techniques for group IVA and VA elements

    SciTech Connect

    Bingert, S. A.; Abeln, T. G.; Thoma, D. J.; Cooley, J. C.; Hults, W. L.; Kelly, A. M.

    2001-01-01

    Existing metallographic preparation techniques for Group IVA/VA (e.g. V, Ti, Ta, Hf, Nb, Zr) materials do not reveal all microstructural features inherent to the process history. As a result, new techniques have been developed and compared to existing procedures. For example, in pure tantalum, the new procedure exposes a substructure that is not evident using previously published techniques. In niobium, better grain boundary delineation is possible with the new process. Similar results are evident for titanium, zirconium, vanadium, and hafnium. The new preparation stage includes a chemical polish and etchant. The chemical polish was found to eliminate problems associated with the mechanical polish. Specifically, the chemical polish removes the worked surface and eliminates smearing. The etching stage serves to delineate the grain boundaries, and in some cases allows bright field as well as polarized or differential interference contrast (DIC) for optical examination. Finally, optical lighting conditions to enhance the observations available with the optimized procedure will be discussed.

  17. Inductive voltage adder (IVA) for submillimeter radius electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Maenchen, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have already demonstrated the utility of inductive voltage adder accelerators for production of small-size electron beams. In this approach, the inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed foilless diode to produce high-energy (10--20 MeV), high-brightness pencil electron beams. This concept was first demonstrated with the successful experiments which converted the linear induction accelerator RADLAC II into an IVA fitted with a small 1-cm radius cathode magnetically immersed foilless diode (RADLAC II/SMILE). They present here first validations of extending this idea to mm-scale electron beams using the SABRE and HERMES-III inductive voltage adders as test beds. The SABRE experiments are already completed and have produced 30-kA, 9-MeV electron beams with envelope diameter of 1.5-mm FWHM. The HERMES-III experiments are currently underway.

  18. Blood flow analysis for the secondary impeller of an IVAS heart pump.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Ding, W; Smith, W A; Golding, L A

    1997-01-01

    The rotodynamic heart pump (IVAS), designed by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, includes a secondary flow path along the journal bearing, through a secondary impeller, and over the rotor outer surface. The flow behaviors of the blood through the journal bearing and the secondary impeller are investigated by a computational fluid dynamics method that solves the 3-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations using a new solution algorithm. Results of the analyses include: 1) the blood flow patterns within the journal bearing, 2) the effect of the non-uniform bearing clearance on the flow patterns of the impeller cavity, 3) the flow patterns around a secondary impeller blade that include effects of tip clearance and the gap between the blade and the inner or outer side wall, 4) effects of the blade angles on the secondary impeller performance, and 5) the shear stress distribution. PMID:9360151

  19. AB108. The appliance of Bio-Plex immunoassay using dried blood spots for mucopolysaccharidosis IVA newborn screening in Taiwan—a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Wang, Tuen-Jen; Tsai, Chia-Chen; Lin, Shuan-Pei

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IVA is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) resulting in excessive lysosomal storage of keratan sulfate. This excessive storage causes a systemic skeletal dysplasia, short stature, and joint abnormalities. Treatments for MPS IVA are available. Better outcomes are associated with early treatment, which highlights a need for newborn screening for MPS IVA. Methods We have conducted a newborn screening pilot program for MPS IVA since December 1, 2013. Screening involved measuring the quantity of GALNS in dried blood spots on filter paper (DBFP) from newborns using a Bio-Plex immunoassay. The amounts of fluorescence sorting detected by YAG laser with wavelengths of 532 (exciting) and 580 nm (emission) is proportional to the quantity of GALNS protein. Results More than 5,657 neonates have been analyzed, in those, 132 newborns had GALNS quantification less than the cut-off value (48.64 ρg/mL) at the first screening test. Most of them (n=124) were exclusive and only eight had been recalled for a second DBFP collection and GALNS quantity rechecked. The reference values were 48.64-552.4 ρg/mL. For the confirmed MPS IV patients without enzyme replacement therapy (n=11), the GALNS quantities were far less than 5% of the normal population, and ranged from 0.00 to 4.02 ρg/mL. The GALNS quantities of the carriers (n=2) were significantly reduced comparing with those of the normal values. Conclusions The Bio-Plex immunoassay has the potential to be adopted for newborn screening of MPS IVA. This method is reliable, sensitive, validated, simple, and cost-effective in measuring GALNS enzyme in DBFP.

  20. Np Behavior in Synthesized Uranyl Phases: Results of Initial Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Judah I.; Douglas, Matthew; McNamara, Bruce K.; Clark, Sue B.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2004-09-28

    Initial tests were completed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for developing a potential mechanism to retard the mobility of neptunium at the Yucca Mountain repository. Neptunium is of concern because of its mobility in the environment and long half life, contributing a large percentage of the potential dose over extended times at the perimeter of the site. The mobility of neptunium could be retarded by associating with uranium mineral phases. The following four uranium mineral phases were examined and are potential secondary phases expected to form as a result of interactions of spent nuclear fuel with the local environment: meta-schoepite, studtite, uranophane, and sodium boltwoodite. The fate of the neptunium was examined in these synthetic experiments.

  1. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST). Phase I test results

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, W S; Alamgir, M; Sutherland, W A

    1984-09-01

    A new full height BWR system simulator has been built under the Full-Integral-Simulation-Test (FIST) program to investigate the system responses to various transients. The test program consists of two test phases. This report provides a summary, discussions, highlights and conclusions of the FIST Phase I tests. Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests have investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. Results and governing phenomena of each test have been evaluated and discussed in detail in this report. One of the FIST program objectives is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two pretest predictions made with TRACB02 are presented and compared with test data in this report.

  2. Chikusetsusaponin IVa Butyl Ester (CS-IVa-Be), a Novel IL6R Antagonist, Inhibits IL6/STAT3 Signaling Pathway and Induces Cancer Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Qian, Shihui; Cai, Xueting; Lu, Wuguang; Hu, Chunping; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yang; Yu, Qiang; Gao, S Paul; Cao, Peng

    2016-06-01

    The activation of IL6/STAT3 signaling is associated with the pathogenesis of many cancers. Agents that suppress IL6/STAT3 signaling have cancer-therapeutic potential. In this study, we found that chikusetsusaponin IVa butyl ester (CS-IVa-Be), a triterpenoid saponin extracted from Acanthopanas gracilistylus W.W.Smith, induced cancer cell apoptosis. CS-IVa-Be inhibited constitutive and IL6-induced STAT3 activation, repressed STAT3 DNA-binding activity, STAT3 nuclear translocation, IL6-induced STAT3 luciferase reporter activity, IL6-induced STAT3-regulated antiapoptosis gene expression in MDA-MB-231 cells, and IL6-induced TF-1 cell proliferation. Surprisingly, CS-IVa-Be inhibited IL6 family cytokines rather than other cytokines induced STAT3 activation. Further studies indicated that CS-IVa-Be is an antagonist of IL6 receptor via directly binding to the IL6Rα with a Kd of 663 ± 74 nmol/L and the GP130 (IL6Rβ) with a Kd of 1,660 ± 243 nmol/L, interfering with the binding of IL6 to IL6R (IL6Rα and GP130) in vitro and in cancer cells. The inhibitory effect of CS-IVa-Be on the IL6-IL6Rα-GP130 interaction was relatively specific as CS-IVa-Be showed higher affinity to IL6Rα than to LIFR (Kd: 4,910 ± 1,240 nmol/L) and LeptinR (Kd: 4,990 ± 915 nmol/L). We next demonstrated that CS-IVa-Be not only directly induced cancer cell apoptosis but also sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via upregulating DR5. Our findings suggest that CS-IVa-Be as a novel IL6R antagonist inhibits IL6/STAT3 signaling pathway and sensitizes the MDA-MB-231 cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1190-200. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26929249

  3. First Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Girard, T. A.; Marques, J. G.; Ramos, A. R.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Sudre, C.; Poupeney, J.; Payne, R. F.; Miley, H. S.; Puibasset, J.

    2010-11-01

    We report results of a 14.1kgd measurement with 15 superheated droplet detectors of total active mass 0.208 kg, comprising the first stage of a 30kgd Phase II experiment. In combination with the results of the neutron-spin sensitive XENON10 experiment, these results yield a limit of |ap|<0.32 for MW=50GeV/c2 on the spin-dependent sector of weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interactions with a 50% reduction in the previously allowed region of the phase space, formerly defined by XENON, KIMS, and PICASSO. In the spin-independent sector, a limit of 2.3×10-5pb at MW=45GeV/c2 is obtained.

  4. First Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Felizardo, M.; Morlat, T.; Girard, T. A.; Fernandes, A. C.; Marques, J. G.; Ramos, A. R.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Sudre, C.; Poupeney, J.; Payne, R. F.; Miley, H. S.; Puibasset, J.

    2010-11-19

    We report results of a 14.1 kg d measurement with 15 superheated droplet detectors of total active mass 0.208 kg, comprising the first stage of a 30 kg d Phase II experiment. In combination with the results of the neutron-spin sensitive XENON10 experiment, these results yield a limit of |a{sub p}|<0.32 for M{sub W}=50 GeV/c{sup 2} on the spin-dependent sector of weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interactions with a 50% reduction in the previously allowed region of the phase space, formerly defined by XENON, KIMS, and PICASSO. In the spin-independent sector, a limit of 2.3x10{sup -5} pb at M{sub W}=45 GeV/c{sup 2} is obtained.

  5. The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: Results from Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Oreopoulos, L.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Delamere, Jennifer; Shippert, Timothy R.; Cole, Jason; Fomin, Boris; Iacono, Michael J.; Jin, Zhonghai; Li, Jiangning; Manners, James; Raisanen, Petri; Rose, Fred; Zhang, Yuanchong; Wilson, Michael J.; Rossow, William B.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from Phase I of the Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes (CIRC), intended as an evolving and regularly updated reference source for evaluation of radiative transfer (RT) codes used in Global Climate Models. CIRC differs from previous intercomparisons in that it relies on an observationally validated catalogue of cases. The seven CIRC Phase I baseline cases, five cloud-free, and two with overcast liquid clouds, are built around observations by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program that satisfy the goals of Phase I, namely to examine radiative transfer (RT) model performance in realistic, yet not overly complex, atmospheric conditions. In addition to the seven baseline cases, additional idealized "subcases" are also examined to facilitate intrepretation of the causes of model errors. In addition to summarizing individual model performance with respect to reference line-by-line calculations and inter-model differences, we also highlight RT model behavior for conditions of doubled CO2, aspects of utilizing a spectral specification of surface albedo, and the impact of the inclusion of scattering in the thermal infrared. Our analysis suggests that RT models should work towards improving their calculation of diffuse shortwave flux, shortwave absorption, treatment of spectral surface albedo, and shortwave CO2 forcing. On the other hand, LW calculations appear to be significantly closer to the reference results. By enhancing the range of conditions under which participating codes are tested, future CIRC phases will hopefully allow even more rigorous examination of RT code performance.

  6. Phase quality map based on local multi-unwrapped results for two-dimensional phase unwrapping.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Heping; Tang, Jinsong; Zhang, Sen

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of a phase unwrapping algorithm and the reliability of the corresponding unwrapped result are two key problems in reconstructing the digital elevation model of a scene from its interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) or interferometric synthetic aperture sonar (InSAS) data. In this paper, a new phase quality map is designed and implemented in a graphic processing unit (GPU) environment, which greatly accelerates the unwrapping process of the quality-guided algorithm and enhances the correctness of the unwrapped result. In a local wrapped phase window, the center point is selected as the reference point, and then two unwrapped results are computed by integrating in two different simple ways. After the two local unwrapped results are computed, the total difference of the two unwrapped results is regarded as the phase quality value of the center point. In order to accelerate the computing process of the new proposed quality map, we have implemented it in a GPU environment. The wrapped phase data are first uploaded to the memory of a device, and then the kernel function is called in the device to compute the phase quality in parallel by blocks of threads. Unwrapping tests performed on the simulated and real InSAS data confirm the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:25967782

  7. Discrimination of Spore-Forming Bacilli Using spoIVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; LaDuc, Myron; Stuecker, Tara

    2009-01-01

    A method of discriminating between spore-forming and non-spore-forming bacteria is based on a combination of simultaneous sporulation-specific and non-sporulation-specific quantitative polymerase chain reactions (Q-PCRs). The method was invented partly in response to the observation that for the purposes of preventing or reducing biological contamination affecting many human endeavors, ultimately, only the spore-forming portions of bacterial populations are the ones that are problematic (or, at least, more problematic than are the non-spore-forming portions). In some environments, spore-forming bacteria constitute small fractions of the total bacterial populations. The use of sporulation-specific primers in Q-PCR affords the ability to assess the spore-forming fraction of a bacterial population present in an environment of interest. This assessment can provide a more thorough and accurate understanding of the bacterial contamination in the environment, thereby making it possible to focus contamination- testing, contamination-prevention, sterilization, and decontamination resources more economically and efficiently. The method includes the use of sporulation-specific primers in the form of designed, optimized deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) oligonucleotides specific for the bacterial spoIVA gene (see table). [In "spoIVA," "IV" signifies Roman numeral four and the entire quoted name refers to gene A for the fourth stage of sporulation.] These primers are mixed into a PCR cocktail with a given sample of bacterial cells. A control PCR cocktail into which are mixed universal 16S rRNA primers is also prepared. ["16S rRNA" denotes a ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence that is common to all organisms.] Following several cycles of heating and cooling according to the PCR protocol to amplify amounts of DNA molecules, the amplification products can be analyzed to determine the types of bacterial cells present within the samples. If the amplification product is strong

  8. Interferometric SAR phase difference calibration: Methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Bickel, D.L.; Hensley, W.H.

    1993-12-31

    This paper addresses the steps necessary to determine and maintain the phase calibration of a two-channel interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR). The method, setup, and accuracy of four different calibration techniques are compared. The most novel technique involves pointing the interferometric baseline at nadir and imaging a lake surface. The other techniques include measuring various flat surfaces in traditional side-looking IFSAR maps, in-flight closed-loop calibration path measurements, and static laboratory measurements. Initial results indicate that, using combinations of these measurements, it is possible to maintain the interferometric phase calibration of Sandia National Laboratories` K{sub U} Band IFSAR to better than 3 degrees. The time variability of various parts of the calibration and requirements for recalibration are also discussed.

  9. Experiment TGV II—results of Phases I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briançon, Ch.; Brudanin, V. B.; Čermák, P.; Egorov, V. G.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalík, A.; Mamedov, F.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Sandukovski, V. G.; Shitov, Yu. A.; Šimkovic, F.; Stekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Zinatulina, D. R.

    2009-11-01

    Currently, the TGV collaboration is investigating the two-neutrino double electron capture (2vEC/EC) of 106Cd at the Modane underground laboratory. The study is performed with low-background multi-HPGe detector TGV II, which has been constructed for measurements of the rare processes. The half-life limits of T1/2>2.6×1020 years (for Phase I, 8687 hours) and T1/2>3.6×1020 years (for Phase II, 9003 hours) were obtained for the ground state to ground state 2vEC/EC of 106Cd. The results already allow to rule out some of the previous nuclear structure calculations.

  10. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester induces cell cycle arrest by the inhibition of nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yun, Ji Ho; Lee, Dong Hwa; Park, Young Gyun; Son, Kun Ho; Nho, Chu Won; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2015-04-17

    We demonstrate that chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (CME), a triterpenoid saponin from the root of Achyranthes japonica, has an anticancer activity. We investigate its molecular mechanism in depth in HCT116 cells. CME reduces the amount of β-catenin in nucleus and inhibits the binding of β-catenin to specific DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) in target gene promoters. Thus, CME appears to decrease the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Cyclin D1, as a representative target for β-catenin, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. As a result of the decrease of the cell cycle regulatory proteins, CME inhibits cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, we suggest that CME as a novel Wnt/β-catenin inhibitor can be a putative agent for the treatment of colorectal cancers. - Highlights: • CME inhibits cell proliferation in HCT116 cells. • CME increases cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis. • CME attenuates cyclin D1 and regulates cell cycle regulatory proteins. • CME inhibits β-catenin translocation to nucleus.

  11. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio A disease): clinical review and current treatment.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, S; Montaño, A M; Oikawa, H; Smith, M; Barrera, L; Chinen, Y; Thacker, M M; Mackenzie, W G; Suzuki, Y; Orii, T

    2011-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA), also known as Morquio A, is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme N-acetylgalatosamine-6-sulfate-sulfatase (GALNS), which catalyzes a step in the catabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), keratan sulfate (KS) and chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S). It leads to accumulation of the KS and C6S, mainly in bone and cornea, causing a systemic skeletal chondrodysplasia. MPS IVA has a variable age of onset and variable rate of progression. Common presenting features include elevation of urinary and blood KS, marked short stature, hypoplasia of the odontoid process, pectus carinatum, kyphoscoliosis, genu valgum, laxity of joints and corneal clouding; however there is no central nervous system impairment. Generally, MPS IVA patients with a severe form do not survive beyond the third decade of life whereas those patients with an attenuated form may survive over 70 years. There has been no effective therapy for MPS IVA, and care has been palliative. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) have emerged as a treatment for mucopolysaccharidoses disorders, including Morquio A disease. This review provides an overview of the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and symptomatic management of patients with MPS IVA and describes potential perspectives of ERT and HSCT. The issue of treating very young patients is also discussed. PMID:21506915

  12. DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 results and perspectives of the phase2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; d'Angelo, A.; d'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; He, H. L.; Incicchitti, A.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, X. H.; Montecchia, F.; Sheng, X. D.; Wang, R. G.; Ye, Z. P.

    2016-07-01

    The DAMA/LIBRA experiment (˜ 250 kg of highly radio-pure NaI(Tl)) is running deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the I.N.F.N. Here we briefly recall the results obtained in its first phase of measurements (DAMA/LIBRA-phase1; total exposure: 1.04 ton × yr). DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI (cumulative exposure: 1.33 ton × yr) give evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo by exploiting the model-independent DM annual modulation signature. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade. At present DAMA/LIBRA-phase2 is running with increased sensitivity.

  13. Analysis of SBIR phase I and phase II review results at the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Vener, K J; Calkins, B M

    1991-09-01

    A cohort of phase I and phase II summary statements for the SBIR grant applications was evaluated to determine the strengths and weaknesses in approved and disapproved applications. An analysis of outcome variables (disapproval or unfunded status) was examined with respect to exposure variables (strengths or shortcomings). Logistic regression models were developed for comparisons to measure the predictive value of shortcomings and strengths to the outcomes. Disapproved phase I results were compared with an earlier 1985 study. Although the magnitude of the frequencies of shortcomings was greater in the present study, the relative rankings within shortcoming class were more alike than different. Also, the frequencies of shortcomings were, with one exception, not significantly different in the two studies. Differences in the summary statement review may have accounted for some differences observed between the 1985 data and results of the present study. Comparisons of Approved/Disapproved and Approved-Unfunded/Funded yielded the following observations. For phase I applicants, a lack of a clearly stated, testable hypothesis, a poorly qualified or described investigative team, and inadequate methodological approaches contributed significantly (in that order) to a rating of disapproval. A critical flaw for phase II proposals was failure to accomplish objectives of the phase I study. Methodological issues also dominate the distinctions in both comparison groups. A clear result of the data presented here and that published previously is that SBIR applicants need continuing assistance to improve the chances of their success. These results should serve as a guide to assist NIH staff as they provide information to prospective applicants focusing on key elements of the application. A continuing review of the SBIR program would be helpful to evaluate the quality of the submitted science. PMID:1916087

  14. Intelligent controller for optimized sootblowing. Phase 2 results

    SciTech Connect

    Bangham, M.; Patton, J.; Abeledo, H.; Liberatore, I.

    1998-07-01

    This paper summarizes results generated during Phase 2 of a Small-business Technology Transfer (STTR) project entitled Intelligent Controller for Optimized Sootblowing (ICOS), funded by the US Department of Energy. The project was conducted by DHR Technologies, a Division of OAO Technologies Solutions, Inc. (DHR) and the Operations Research Department at the George Washington University (GWU), with support from Baltimore Gas and Electric Company's Brandon Shores Station Unit No. 1 (BSU1). The objective of the project is to advance the state-of-the-art in automated sootblowing control for large coal-fired utility boilers. The results of the Phase 2 study suggest that the maximum possible efficiency improvement, which could potentially be gained at a large coal-fired unit using an optimized sootblowing controller, is on the order of about 60--80 Btu/kWh, depending on load. An improvement of this magnitude, which translates into yearly fuel savings of about $700,000 for a large unit, could potentially be attained at a poorly operated unit. At a well-run unit, such as BGE's Brandon Shores Unit No. 1, the potential savings are more modest, about 10 Btu/kWh. For BSU1, this potential improvement equates to fuel savings of about $60,000 per year.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2009-11-09

    This study is the third phase in a series of experiments designed to reduce conservatism in the model that predicts the formation of nepheline, a crystalline phase that can reduce the durability of high level waste glass. A Phase I study developed a series of glass compositions that were very durable while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62, where nepheline is predicted to crystallize upon slow cooling. A Phase II study selected glass compositions to identify any linear effects of composition on nepheline crystallization and that were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. However, it was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results of the Phase II study alone were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator. It was recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where the only constraint limiting processing is the current nepheline discriminator. Two methods were used in selecting glasses for this Phase III nepheline study. The first was based on the relationship of the current nepheline discriminator model to the other DWPF PCCS models, and the second was based on theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. A series of 29 test glass compositions was selected for this study using a combination of the two approaches. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. After reviewing the data, the study glasses generally met the target compositions with little issue. Product Consistency Test results correlated well with the crystallization analyses in

  16. Results from phase I of the GERDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wester, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array Gerda at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of the INFN in Italy is an experiment dedicated to the search for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay in 76Ge. The experiment employs high purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge inside a 64 m3 cryostat filled with liquid argon. Gerda was planned in two phases of data taking with the goal to reach a half-life sensitivity in the order of 1026 yr. Phase I of Gerda was running from November 2011 until May 2013. With about 18 kg total detector mass, data with an exposure of 21.6 kg.yr was collected and a background index of 0.01 cts/(keV.kg.yr) was achieved in the region of interest. No signal was found for the 0νββ decay and a new limit of T1/2 > 2.1 . 1025 yr (90% C.L.) was obtained, strongly disfavoring the previous claim of observation. Furthermore, the 2νββ decay half-life of 76Ge was measured with unprecedented precision. Other results include new half-life limits of the order of 1023 yr for Majoron emitting double beta decay modes with spectral indices n = 1, 2, 3, 7 and new limits in the order of 1023 yr for 2νββ decays to the first 3 excited states of 76Se. In Phase II, currently in preparation, the detector mass will be doubled while reducing the background index by a factor of 10.

  17. Results from phase I of the GERDA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, Thomas

    2015-10-28

    The GERmanium Detector Array Gerda at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of the INFN in Italy is an experiment dedicated to the search for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay in {sup 76}Ge. The experiment employs high purity germanium detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge inside a 64 m{sup 3} cryostat filled with liquid argon. Gerda was planned in two phases of data taking with the goal to reach a half-life sensitivity in the order of 10{sup 26} yr. Phase I of Gerda was running from November 2011 until May 2013. With about 18 kg total detector mass, data with an exposure of 21.6 kg·yr was collected and a background index of 0.01 cts/(keV·kg·yr) was achieved in the region of interest. No signal was found for the 0νββ decay and a new limit of T{sub 1/2} > 2.1 · 10{sup 25} yr (90% C.L.) was obtained, strongly disfavoring the previous claim of observation. Furthermore, the 2νββ decay half-life of {sup 76}Ge was measured with unprecedented precision. Other results include new half-life limits of the order of 10{sup 23} yr for Majoron emitting double beta decay modes with spectral indices n = 1, 2, 3, 7 and new limits in the order of 10{sup 23} yr for 2νββ decays to the first 3 excited states of {sup 76}Se. In Phase II, currently in preparation, the detector mass will be doubled while reducing the background index by a factor of 10.

  18. Cryogenic Two-Phase Flight Experiment: Results overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, T.; Buchko, M.; Brennan, P.; Bello, M.; Stoyanof, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper focuses on the flight results of the Cryogenic Two-Phase Flight Experiment (CRYOTP), which was a Hitchhiker based experiment that flew on the space shuttle Columbia in March of 1994 (STS-62). CRYOTP tested two new technologies for advanced cryogenic thermal control; the Space Heat Pipe (SHP), which was a constant conductance cryogenic heat pipe, and the Brilliant Eyes Thermal Storage Unit (BETSU), which was a cryogenic phase-change thermal storage device. These two devices were tested independently during the mission. Analysis of the flight data indicated that the SHP was unable to start in either of two attempts, for reasons related to the fluid charge, parasitic heat leaks, and cryocooler capacity. The BETSU test article was successfully operated with more than 250 hours of on-orbit testing including several cooldown cycles and 56 freeze/thaw cycles. Some degradation was observed with the five tactical cryocoolers used as thermal sinks, and one of the cryocoolers failed completely after 331 hours of operation. Post-flight analysis indicated that this problem was most likely due to failure of an electrical controller internal to the unit.

  19. Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study. Results from Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Phil Patterson, Phil; Singh, Margaret; Plotkin, Steve; Moore, Jim

    2007-03-09

    Presentation reporting Phase 1 results, 3/9/2007. Projecting the future role of advanced drivetrains and fuels in the light vehicle market is inherently difficult, given the uncertainty (and likely volatility) of future oil prices, inadequate understanding of likely consumer response to new technologies, the relative infancy of several important new technologies with inevitable future changes in their performance and costs, and the importance — and uncertainty — of future government marketplace interventions (e.g., new regulatory standards or vehicle purchase incentives). The Multi-Path Transportation Futures (MP) Study has attempted to improve our understanding of this future role by examining several scenarios of vehicle costs, fuel prices, government subsidies, and other key factors. These are projections, not forecasts, in that they try to answer a series of “what if” questions without assigning probabilities to most of the basic assumptions.

  20. The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: Results from Phase I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Mlawer, Eli; Delamere, Jennifer; Shippert, Timothy; Cole, Jason; Iacono, Michael; Jin, Zhonghai; Li, Jiangnan; Manners, James; Raisanen, Petri; Rose, Fred; Zhang, Yuanchong; Wilson Michael J.; Rossow, William

    2011-01-01

    The computer codes that calculate the energy budget of solar and thermal radiation in Global Climate Models (GCMs), our most advanced tools for predicting climate change, have to be computationally efficient in order to not impose undue computational burden to climate simulations. By using approximations to gain execution speed, these codes sacrifice accuracy compared to more accurate, but also much slower, alternatives. International efforts to evaluate the approximate schemes have taken place in the past, but they have suffered from the drawback that the accurate standards were not validated themselves for performance. The manuscript summarizes the main results of the first phase of an effort called "Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes" (CIRC) where the cases chosen to evaluate the approximate models are based on observations and where we have ensured that the accurate models perform well when compared to solar and thermal radiation measurements. The effort is endorsed by international organizations such as the GEWEX Radiation Panel and the International Radiation Commission and has a dedicated website (i.e., http://circ.gsfc.nasa.gov) where interested scientists can freely download data and obtain more information about the effort's modus operandi and objectives. In a paper published in the March 2010 issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society only a brief overview of CIRC was provided with some sample results. In this paper the analysis of submissions of 11 solar and 13 thermal infrared codes relative to accurate reference calculations obtained by so-called "line-by-line" radiation codes is much more detailed. We demonstrate that, while performance of the approximate codes continues to improve, significant issues still remain to be addressed for satisfactory performance within GCMs. We hope that by identifying and quantifying shortcomings, the paper will help establish performance standards to objectively assess radiation code quality

  1. ECAS Phase I fuel cell results. [Energy Conservation Alternatives Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper summarizes and discusses the fuel cell system results of Phase I of the Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS). Ten advanced electric powerplant systems for central-station baseload generation using coal were studied by NASA in ECAS. Three types of low-temperature fuel cells (solid polymer electrolyte, SPE, aqueous alkaline, and phosphoric acid) and two types of high-temperature fuel cells (molten carbonate, MC, and zirconia solid electrolyte, SE) were studied. The results indicate that (1) overall efficiency increases with fuel cell temperature, and (2) scale-up in powerplant size can produce a significant reduction in cost of electricity (COE) only when it is accompanied by utilization of waste fuel cell heat through a steam bottoming cycle and/or integration with a gasifier. For low-temperature fuel cell systems, the use of hydrogen results in the highest efficiency and lowest COE. In spite of higher efficiencies, because of higher fuel cell replacement costs integrated SE systems have higher projected COEs than do integrated MC systems. Present data indicate that life can be projected to over 30,000 hr for MC fuel cells, but data are not yet sufficient for similarly projecting SE fuel cell life expectancy.

  2. Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

    1996-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

  3. Clinical-pathologic study of stage IIB, III, and IVA carcinoma of the cervix: extended diagnostic evaluation for paraaortic node metastasis--a Gynecologic Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Heller, P B; Maletano, J H; Bundy, B N; Barnhill, D R; Okagaki, T

    1990-09-01

    Three hundred twenty patients were entered into GOG Protocol 63, a clinical-pathologic study of stage IIB, III, and IVA cervical carcinoma. Following the completion of FIGO staging prerequisites, patients had computerized tomography (CT), a lymph-angiogram (LAG), and an ultrasound (US) of the aortic area. If any study was positive, a cytologic or histologic evaluation by fine-needle aspiration or selective paraaortic lymphadenectomy was performed. Paraaortic node dissection was mandated for patients with negative extended staging studies. Results of extended staging evaluations were compared with histologic or cytologic results. Two hundred sixty-four patients were eligible and evaluable. One hundred sixty-seven patients (63%) were stage IIB, 89 (34%) were stage III, and 8 (3%) were stage IVA. Positive paraaortic nodes occurred in 21% of stage IIB, 31% of stage III, and 13% of stage IVA. LAG sensitivity was 79% with a specificity of 73%. Sensitivity of CT and US was 34 and 19%, respectively, with specificities of 96 and 99%, respectively. The frequency of false-negative results with LAG for patients with stage IIB disease was 6%. This decrease is consistent with a stable sensitivity and specificity. These findings suggest that a negative LAG may be adequate to eliminate surgical staging in subgroups with low risk of metastasis to the aortic nodes. Until new noninvasive testing methods are developed, LAG appears to be the most reliable noninvasive examination to evaluate spread of cervical cancer to aortic nodes. PMID:2227556

  4. Status and first results of the NEMO Phase-2 tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarusi, T.; Aiello, S.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Bouhadef, B.; Bozza, C.; Cacopardo, G.; Calamai, M.; Calì, C.; Capone, A.; Caruso, F.; Ceres, A.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Costa, M.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amato, V.; D'Amico, A.; DeBonis, G.; De Luca, V.; Deniskina, N.; De Rosa, G.; Distefano, C.; Fermani, P.; Flaminio, V.; Fusco, L. A.; Garufi, F.; Giordano, V.; Giovanetti, G.; Gmerk, A.; Grasso, R.; Grella, G.; Hugon, C.; Imbesi, M.; Kulikovsky, V.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Leonora, E.; Litrico, P.; Lonardo, A.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Maccioni, E.; Margiotta, A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Papaleo, R.; Pellegrino, C.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pugliatti, C.; Pulvirenti, S.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Spurio, M.; Speziale, F.; Spitaleri, A.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Trasatti, L.; Trovato, A.; Ventura, C.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.

    2014-03-01

    In March 2013, the NEMO Phase 2 tower has been successfully installed in the Capo Passero site, at a depth of 3500 m and 80 km off from the southern coast of Sicily. The unfurled tower is 450 m high; it is composed of 8 mechanical floors, for a total amount of 32 PMTs and various instruments for environmental measurements. The tower positioning is achieved by an acoustic system. The tower is continuously acquiring and transmitting all the measured signals to shore. Data reduction is completely performed in the Portopalo shore station by a dedicated computing facility connected to the persistent storage system at LNS, in Catania. Results from the last 9 months of acquisition will be presented. In particular, the analyzed optical rates, showing stable and low baseline values, are compatible with the contribution mainly of 40K light emission, with a small percentage of light bursts due to bioluminescence. These features reveal the optimal nature of the Capo Passero abyssal site to host a km3-sized Neutrino Telescope.

  5. Multi-path transportation futures study: Results from Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Phil; Singh, Margaret; Plotkin, Steve; Moore, Jim

    2007-03-09

    This PowerPoint briefing provides documentation and details for Phase 1 of the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study, which compares alternative ways to make significant reductions in oil use and carbon emissions from U.S. light vehicles to 2050. Phase I, completed in 2006, was a scoping study, aimed at identifying key analytic issues and constructing a study design. The Phase 1 analysis included an evaluation of several pathways and scenarios; however, these analyses were limited in number and scope and were designed to be preliminary.

  6. IVA the robot: Design guidelines and lessons learned from the first space station laboratory manipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konkel, Carl R.; Powers, Allen K.; Dewitt, J. Russell

    1991-01-01

    The first interactive Space Station Freedom (SSF) lab robot exhibit was installed at the Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL, and has been running daily since. IntraVehicular Activity (IVA) the robot is mounted in a full scale U.S. Lab (USL) mockup to educate the public on possible automation and robotic applications aboard the SSF. Responding to audio and video instructions at the Command Console, exhibit patrons may prompt IVA to perform a housekeeping task or give a speaking tour of the module. Other exemplary space station tasks are simulated and the public can even challenge IVA to a game of tic tac toe. In anticipation of such a system being built for the Space Station, a discussion is provided of the approach taken, along with suggestions for applicability to the Space Station Environment.

  7. The impact of an IVA robot on the Space Station microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Phillip E.; Rohn, Douglas A.

    1989-01-01

    In order to maintain a microgravity environment during Space Station operations, it will be necessary to minimize reaction forces. These mechanical forces will typically occur during reboost, docking, equipment operation, intravehicular activities (IVA) robot operation, or crew activity. This paper focuses on those disturbances created by an IVA robot and its impact on the Space Station microgravity environment. The robot dynamic analysis that was used to generate the forcing function as the input into a finite element model of the U.S. Laboratory will be shown. Acceleration levels were determined through analysis and have shown that a robotic system can sustain reaction forces into the station below 0.0001 g. A comparison between IVA robot effects and crew motion effects on the low-g environment is also described. It is concluded that robot trajectory shaping and motor accelerations feedback can minimize reaction forces.

  8. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  9. Integrated thermal treatment system study -- Phase 2 results. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 1 systems. The alternatives evaluated were: rotary kiln, slagging kiln, plasma furnace, plasma gasification, molten salt oxidation, molten metal waste destruction, steam gasification, Joule-heated vitrification, thermal desorption and mediated electrochemical oxidation, and thermal desorption and supercritical water oxidation. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in the Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr). 28 refs., 88 figs., 41 tabs.

  10. Results of the Gallium-Clad Phase 3 and Phase 4 tasks (canceled prior to completion)

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.N.

    1998-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Gallium-Clad interactions Phase 3 and 4 tasks. Both tasks were to involve examining the out-of-pile stability of residual gallium in short fuel rods with an imposed thermal gradient. The thermal environment was to be created by an electrical heater in the center of the fuel rod and coolant flow on the rod outer cladding. Both tasks were canceled due to difficulties with fuel pellet fabrication, delays in the preparation of the test apparatus, and changes in the Fissile Materials Disposition program budget.

  11. Critical role for cytosolic group IVA phospholipase A2 in early adipocyte differentiation and obesity.

    PubMed

    Peña, Lucía; Meana, Clara; Astudillo, Alma M; Lordén, Gema; Valdearcos, Martín; Sato, Hiroyasu; Murakami, Makoto; Balsinde, Jesús; Balboa, María A

    2016-09-01

    Adipogenesis is the process of differentiation of immature mesenchymal stem cells into adipocytes. Elucidation of the mechanisms that regulate adipocyte differentiation is key for the development of novel therapies for the control of obesity and related comorbidities. Cytosolic group IVA phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α) is the pivotal enzyme in receptor-mediated arachidonic acid (AA) mobilization and attendant eicosanoid production. Using primary multipotent cells and cell lines predetermined to become adipocytes, we show here that cPLA2α displays a proadipogenic function that occurs very early in the adipogenic process. Interestingly, cPLA2α levels decrease during adipogenesis, but cPLA2α-deficient preadipocytes exhibit a reduced capacity to differentiate into adipocytes, which affects early and terminal adipogenic transcription factors. Additionally, the absence of the phospholipase alters proliferation and cell-cycle progression that takes place during adipogenesis. Preconditioning of preadipocytes with AA increases the adipogenic capacity of these cells. Moreover, animals deficient in cPLA2α show resistance to obesity when fed a high fat diet that parallels changes in the expression of adipogenic transcription factors of the adipose tissue. Collectively, these results show that preadipocyte cPLA2α activation is a hitherto unrecognized factor for adipogenesis in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27317983

  12. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Cold Pour Phase 2 Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2001-02-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) at the Savannah River site (SRS) as part of a two-track approach for dispositioning weapons-usable plutonium. The Department of Energy is funding the development and testing effort for the PIP being conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory. PIP is developing the ''Can-in Canister'' (CIC) technology that immobilizes plutonium by encapsulating it in ceramic forms (or pucks) and ultimately surrounding the forms with high-level waste glass to provide a deterrent to recovery. A cold (non-radioactive) test program was conducted to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. Tests were conducted in two phases. Phase 1 Cold Pour Tests, conducted in 1999, were scoping tests. This paper describes the Phase 2 tests conducted in 2000 that verified the adequacy of the baseline and demonstrated compliance with repository requirements.

  13. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Cold Pour Phase 2 Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2001-01-10

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop technology for dispositioning excess weapons grade plutonium. This program introduces the ''Can-in-Canister'' (CIC) technology that immobilizes the plutonium by encapsulating it in ceramic forms (or pucks) and ultimately surrounding it with high-level waste glass to provide a deterrent to recovery. A cold (non-radioactive) test program was conducted to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. Tests were conducted in two phases. Phase 1 Cold Pour Tests, conducted in 1999, were scoping tests. This paper describes the Phase 2 tests conducted in 2000 which verified the adequacy of the baseline CIC design and assured that the system would meet repository quality assurance requirements.

  14. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Cold Pour Phase 2 Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2001-01-05

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop technology for dispositioning excess weapons grade plutonium. This program introduces the ''Can-in-Canister'' (CIC) technology that immobilizes the plutonium by encapsulating it in ceramic forms (or pucks) and ultimately surrounding it with high-level waste glass to provide a deterrent to recovery. A cold (non-radioactive) test program was conducted to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. Tests were conducted in two phases. Phase 1 Cold Pour Tests, conducted in 1999, were scoping tests. This paper describes the Phase 2 tests conducted in 2000 which verified the adequacy of the baseline CIC design and assured that the system would meet repository quality assurance requirements.

  15. Phase II Study of Consolidation Chemotherapy After Concurrent Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joong; Kim, Woo Young; Nam, Hee Rim; Kim, Byoung-Gie . E-mail: huna0@naver.com; Huh, Seung Jae; Lee, Je-Ho; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to determine the efficacy of consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) using high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with cervical carcinoma (FIGO stage IB2-IVA) were treated with external beam radiation therapy to the whole pelvis (50.4 Gy) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (24 Gy to point A). Cisplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} (Day 1) and 5-fluorouracil 1000 mg/m{sup 2} (Days 1-5) were given every 3 weeks starting concurrently with the radiation and followed by 3 more cycles of consolidation for a total of 6 cycles. Results: Thirty patients (94%) received 3 more cycles of post-CCRT consolidation chemotherapy and were evaluable for the toxicity and efficacy of consolidation. The most common toxicities of Grade 2 or higher were nausea or vomiting (47%) and anemia (33%). Late complications of the rectum and bladder occurred in 13% and 6% of the patients, respectively. The clinical complete response rate was 87% (95% CI, 75%-99%). During a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6-58 months), 5 patients (17%) had recurrence; the sites of failure were 3 (10%) inside the radiation field and 2 (7%) outside the radiation field. The estimated 3-year progression-free survival rate was 83% (95% CI, 67%-99%) and overall survival rate was 91% (95% CI, 79%-100%). Conclusions: Consolidation chemotherapy after CCRT is well tolerated and effective in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. A prospective randomized trial to compare this treatment strategy with standard CCRT seems to be worthwhile.

  16. Final Technical Report. Results of Phases 2-5

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, David; Ayyanar, Raja; Gemin, Paul; Baggu, Murali; Srinivasan, Devarajan

    2015-02-27

    APS’s renewable energy portfolio, driven in part by Arizona’s Renewable Energy Standard (RES) currently includes more than 1100 MW of installed capacity, equating to roughly 3000 GWh of annual production. Overall renewable production is expected to grow to 6000 GWh by 2025. It is expected that distributed photovoltaics, driven primarily by lower cost, will contribute to much of this growth and that by 2025, distributed installations will account for half of all renewable production (3000GHW). As solar penetration increases, additional analysis may be required for routine utility processes to ensure continued safe and reliable operation of the electric distribution network. Such processes include residential or commercial interconnection requests and load shifting during normal feeder operations. Circuits with existing high solar penetration will also have to be studied and results will need to be evaluated for adherence to utility practices or strategy. Increased distributed PV penetration may offer benefits such as load offsetting, but it also has the potential to adversely impact distribution system operation. These effects may be exacerbated by the rapid variability of PV production. Detailed effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications continue to be studied. Comprehensive, high-resolution electrical models of the distribution system were developed to analyze the impacts of PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including coordination and anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/VAr control schemes. Modeling methods were refined by validating against field measurements. To augment the field measurements, methods were developed to synthesize high resolution load and PV generation data to facilitate quasi-static time series simulations. The models were then extended to explore boundary conditions for PV hosting capability of the feeder and to simulate common utility practices such as feeder

  17. The Adenovirus L4 33-Kilodalton Protein Binds to Intragenic Sequences of the Major Late Promoter Required for Late Phase-Specific Stimulation of Transcription▿

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Humayra; LeRoy, Gary; Bridge, Gemma; Flint, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    The adenovirus late IVa2 protein is required for maximally efficient transcription from the viral major late (ML) promoter, and hence, the synthesis of the majority of viral late proteins. This protein is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that also promotes the assembly of progeny virus particles. Previous studies have established that a IVa2 protein dimer (DEF-B) binds specifically to an intragenic ML promoter sequence necessary for late phase-specific stimulation of ML transcription. However, activation of transcription from the ML promoter correlates with binding of at least one additional infected-cell-specific protein, termed DEF-A, to the promoter. Using an assay for the DNA-binding activity of DEF-A, we identified the unknown protein by using conventional purification methods, purification of FLAG-tagged IVa2-protein-containing complexes, and transient synthesis of viral late proteins. The results of these experiments established that the viral L4 33-kDa protein is the only component of DEF-A: the IVa2 and L4 33-kDa proteins are necessary and sufficient for formation of all previously described complexes in the intragenic control region of the ML promoter. Furthermore, the L4 33-kDa protein binds to the promoter with the specificity characteristic of DEF-A and stimulates transcription from the ML promoter in transient-expression assays. PMID:17093188

  18. Test results of the Phase 1 Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, B.E.

    1995-03-01

    Radioactive waste materials in underground high level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the Hanford Site evolve gaseous mixtures at varying rates. In order to verify the flammability of these gases and the mechanisms by which they are produced, it is necessary to sample material from these tanks in such a way as to preserve the gas phase of the material for analysis. Careful laboratory studies could then be performed on these samples which would allow judgement to be made of the hazard level of the storage tank. The Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) system is such a sampling method. A multidisciplinary team developed and issued a plan to obtain waste tank core samples for gas phase analysis. This plan contained the basic idea and function of the RGS system. Different organizations assumed responsibility of various aspects of the RGS program which they were most qualified to develop.

  19. Asymmetric Division and Differential Gene Expression during a Bacterial Developmental Program Requires DivIVA

    PubMed Central

    Eswaramoorthy, Prahathees; Winter, Peter W.; Wawrzusin, Peter; York, Andrew G.; Shroff, Hari; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S.

    2014-01-01

    Sporulation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a developmental program in which a progenitor cell differentiates into two different cell types, the smaller of which eventually becomes a dormant cell called a spore. The process begins with an asymmetric cell division event, followed by the activation of a transcription factor, σF, specifically in the smaller cell. Here, we show that the structural protein DivIVA localizes to the polar septum during sporulation and is required for asymmetric division and the compartment-specific activation of σF. Both events are known to require a protein called SpoIIE, which also localizes to the polar septum. We show that DivIVA copurifies with SpoIIE and that DivIVA may anchor SpoIIE briefly to the assembling polar septum before SpoIIE is subsequently released into the forespore membrane and recaptured at the polar septum. Finally, using super-resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that DivIVA and SpoIIE ultimately display a biased localization on the side of the polar septum that faces the smaller compartment in which σF is activated. PMID:25101664

  20. Space shuttle EVA/IVA support equipment requirements study. Volume 1: Final summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the support equipment requirements for space shuttle intravehicular and extravehicular activities. The subjects investigated are; (1) EVA/IVA task identification and analysis,. (2) primary life support system, (3) emergency life support system, (4) pressure suit assembly, (5) restraints, (6) work site provision, (7) emergency internal vehicular emergencies, and (8) vehicular interfaces.

  1. GROWTH OF THE MARSH ELDER IVA FRUTESCENS IN RELATION TO DURATION OF TIDAL FLOODING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iva frutescens is a common shrub at the upland fringe of salt marshes throughout the East and Gulf coasts of North America. Its position and relative size are governed largely by the degree of flooding by seawater. Cross sections of older stems (living and standing dead) from sa...

  2. Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy Using Carboplatin, Tegafur-Uracil and Leucovorin for Stage III and IV Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of GORTEC Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fesneau, Melanie; Pointreau, Yoann; Chapet, Sophie; Martin, Laurent; Pommier, Pascal; Alfonsi, Marc; Laguerre, Brigitte; Feham, Nasreddine; Berger, Christine; Garaud, Pascal; Calais, Gilles

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment of locally advanced, nonresectable, head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, the optimal chemotherapy regimen is still controversial. The objective of this Phase II study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a concomitant treatment using tegafur-uracil, leucovorin, carboplatin, and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 77 patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma Stage III and IVA were enrolled between October 2003 and July 2005. Of the 77 patients, 72 were eligible. They were treated with tegafur-uracil (300 mg/m{sup 2}/d) and leucovorin (75 mg/d) from Days 1 to 19 and from Days 29 to 47 and carboplatin (70 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously for 4 consecutive days), in three cycles every 21 days. Conventional radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Results: With a mean follow-up of 22.8 months, the 3-year locoregional control, overall survival and disease-free survival actuarial rate was 33.1%, 41.9%, and 27.2%, respectively. The compliance of the treatment was correct. The main acute toxicity was mucositis, with 62% Grade 3-4. Three patients (4.2%) died of acute toxicity. The incidence and severity of late toxicity was acceptable, with 32% Grade 3 and no Grade 4 toxicity. Conclusion: The protocol of concomitant chemoradiotherapy using tegafur-uracil, leucovorin, and carboplatin for locally advanced unresectable head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma is feasible. The compliance was correct. The incidence and severity of the acute and late toxicities were acceptable, but not improved. The efficacy of this regimen seems equivalent to the main protocols of concurrent chemoradiotherapy. It represents a possible alternative for patients without an intravenous catheter.

  3. Isotopic signatures and origin of nitrogen in IIE and IVA iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, K. J.; Palma, R. L.; Marti, K.; Lavielle, B.

    2000-02-01

    Nitrogen concentrations and isotopic signatures have been determined in groups IIE and IVA iron meteorites. Contrary to assumptions made in the literature, the present data show that spallation components significantly modify the N signatures of the metal. All 15N data are corrected for cosmic-ray produced spallation components using 21Ne concentrations measured in aliquots. A production-rate ratio 21Ne/ 15N = 0.80 is obtained, which can reliably be used for this correction, since it is not sensitive to shielding differences. The trapped N signatures in group IVA irons fall into two subgroups IVA (-26) with δ 15N = -26 ± 2 ‰ and IVA (-6) with δ 15N = -6 ± 1.4‰, respectively. Only the latter is close to values reported for metal of L-chondrites. Group IIE irons also define two distinct subgroups IIE (Y) with δ 15N = -7.5 ± 1.5‰ and IIE (O) with δ 15N = -2.3 ± 1‰. Therefore, the earlier proposed subdivision of IIE irons into "young" and "old" subgroups is substantiated by the different trapped N signatures. With regard to a possible relationship with H-chondrites as suggested by oxygen isotopes, only the young IIE subgroup overlaps the range of signatures reported in H-chondrite metal. Seymchan has a distinctly lighter signature (δ 15N = -54‰), consistent with its reclassification as an ungrouped iron. We observe no correlation of either nitrogen concentrations or isotopic signatures with abundances of Ga, Ge, Ir or Ni. The distinct N components in the so-called magmatic group IVA constrain the thermal history of the parent body, as these signatures need to be reconciled with the magmatic history. Implications for the origin of nitrogen components are discussed. Some of the spread in N isotopic data in the literature apparently is due to inclusions.

  4. Enzyme replacement therapy in newborn mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mice: early treatment rescues bone lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Montaño, Adriana M.; Oikawa, Hirotaka; Dung, Vu Chi; Hashimoto, Amiko; Oguma, Toshihiro; Takahashi, Tatsuo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Orii, Tadao; Sly, William S.

    2014-01-01

    We treated mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) mice to assess the effects of long-term enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) initiated at birth, since adult mice treated by ERT showed little improvement in bone pathology (1). To conduct ERT in newborn mice, we used recombinant human N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) produced in a CHO cell line. First, to observe the tissue distribution pattern, a dose of 250 units/g body weight was administered intravenously in MPS IVA mice at day 2 or 3. The infused enzyme was primarily recovered in liver and spleen, with detectable activity in bone and brain. Second, newborn ERT was conducted after tissue distribution study. The first injection of newborn ERT was performed intravenously, the second to fourth weekly injections were intraperitoneal, and the remaining injections from 5th to 14th week were intravenous into the tail vein. MPS IVA mice treated with GALNS showed clearance of lysosomal storage in liver, spleen, and sinus lining cells in bone marrow. The column structure of the growth plate was organized better than adult mice treated with ERT; however, hyaline and fibrous cartilage cells in femur, spine, ligaments, discs, synovium, and periosteum still had storage materials to some extent. Heart valves were refractory to the treatment. Levels of serum keratan sulfate were kept normal in newborn ERT mice. In conclusion, the enzyme, which enters the cartilage before the cartilage cell layer becomes mature, prevents disorganization of column structure. Early treatment from birth leads to partial remission of bone pathology in MPS IVA mouse. PMID:24953405

  5. Silica Waste Utilisation Phase II - Preliminary Laboratory Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.; Boyd, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    A second phase of laboratory testing is being performed on waste silica from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field in Mexico. The main objective is to produce mixes of various combinations of hydrated lime, portland cement, and plastic fibers with the waste silica from disposal ponds to determine their suitability for use as insulating bricks in low cost housing. Silica-cement mixtures appear to have the highest flexural strength and resistance to weathering. Silica-lime mixtures appear to have the best insulating properties (lowest thermal conductivity). The addition of plastic fibers to the silica-lime mixture appears to improve both strength and weather resistance. Work is still in progress and will be completed in 1996 with the construction of various test walls in the Mexicali, Mexico area.

  6. Phase 1 results from the Stirling-powered vehicle project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Technology Utilization (TU) Office is sponsoring a multiyear, multiphase demonstration program to assess the technology developed under the DOE/NASA automotive Stirling engine (ASE) program with engines installed in various Air Force vehicles while being evaluated by independent third parties under realistic conditions. This paper reviews the operational history of Phase 1 with a Mod 1 Stirling engine installed in an Air Force multistop van in a variety of missions. Ten months of operation were with Air Force personnel at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia, where over 1100 hr and 4000 mi were logged on the Langley flight line. The Stirling-powered van operated on unleaded gasoline, JP-4 aircraft fuel, and diesel fuel at Langley Air Force Base. Two months of operation were completed with Deere and Company personnel in the Moline, Illinois area where over 175 hr and 2650 mi were logged on a Deere mail delivery route.

  7. Phase separated membrane bioreactor - Results from model system studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Seshan, P. K.; Dunlop, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    The operation and evaluation of a bioreactor designed for high intensity oxygen transfer in a microgravity environment is described. The reactor itself consists of a zero headspace liquid phase separated from the air supply by a long length of silicone rubber tubing through which the oxygen diffuses in and the carbon dioxide diffuses out. Mass transfer studies show that the oxygen is film diffusion controlled both externally and internally to the tubing and not by diffusion across the tube walls. Methods of upgrading the design to eliminate these resistances are proposed. Cell growth was obtained in the fermenter using Saccharomyces cerevisiae showing that this concept is capable of sustaining cell growth in the terrestrial simulation.

  8. [Morquio disease (Mucopolysaccharidosis type IV-A): clinical aspects, diagnosis and new treatment with enzyme replacement therapy].

    PubMed

    Politei, Juan; Schenone, Andrea B; Guelbert, Norberto; Fainboim, Alejandro; Szlago, Marina

    2015-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IV-A (Morquio A disease) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase, that results in impaired catabolism of two glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin-6-sulfate and keratan sulfate. Clinical presentations reflect a spectrum of progression from a severe phenotype to an attenuated expression. Accumulation of substrate manifests predominantly as short stature and skeletal dysplasia, including atlantoaxial instability and cervical cord compression. Other abnormalities in the visual, auditory, cardiovascular and respiratory systems can also affect individuals with Morquio disease. Elosulfase alfa showed in clinical trials in children and adults a significant and sustained improvement in endurance and urinary levels of keratan sulfate. Data from the ongoing observational, multinational Morquio A Registry Study will provide valuable information on the long-term efficacy and safety of elosulfase alfa in patients, as well as on the natural history of this very rare disease. PMID:26172013

  9. HESTIA Phase I Test Results: The Air Revitalization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Sarah E.; Hansen, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    In any human spaceflight mission, a number of Environmental Control & Life Support System (ECLSS) technologies work together to provide the conditions astronauts need to live healthily, productively, and comfortably in space. In a long-duration mission, many of these ECLSS technologies may use materials supplied by In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), introducing more interactions between systems. The Human Exploration Spacecraft Test-bed for Integration & Advancement (HESTIA) Project aims to create a test-bed to evaluate ECLSS and ISRU technologies and how they interact in a high-fidelity, closed-loop, human-rated analog habitat. Air purity and conditioning are essential components within any ECLSS and for HESTIA's first test they were achieved with the Air Revitalization System (ARS) described below. The ARS provided four essential functions to the test-bed chamber: cooling the air, removing humidity from the air, removing trace contaminants, and scrubbing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air. In this case, the oxygen supply function was provided by ISRU. In the current configuration, the ARS is a collection of different subsystems. A fan circulates the air, while a condensing heat exchanger (CHX) pulls humidity out of the air. A Trace Contaminant Removal System (TCRS) filters the air of potentially harmful contaminants. Lastly, a Reactive Plastic Lithium Hydroxide (RP-LiOH) unit removes CO2 from the breathing air. During the HESTIA Phase I test in September 2015, the ARS and its individual components each functioned as expected, although further analysis is underway. During the Phase I testing and in prior bench-top tests, the energy balance of heat removed by the CHX was not equal to the cooling it received. This indicated possible instrument error and therefore recalibration of the instruments and follow-up testing is planned in 2016 to address the issue. The ARS was tested in conjunction with two other systems: the Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS) and the

  10. CryoSat-2 commissioning phase results summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, R.

    2010-12-01

    CryoSat-2 was launched on 8th April 2010 and following a 3 day LEOP entered its 6 month commissioning phase. The primary payload of the platform consists of the Synthetic Interferometric Radar Altimeter (SIRAL-2) with support for its data processing coming from data acquired from on-board DORIS DGXX and star trackers. We present a description of the payload and provide post-launch performance summaries in terms of SIRAL internal/external calibration in combination with an assessment of global data acquisition achievement in each of the three science modes: Low resolution pulse-width limited mode (LRM) over interior land-ice and ocean to support POD, Synthetic aperture radar mode (SARM) for sea-ice and SAR interferometric mode (SARInM) for higher surface slope land-ice sheet margin acquisitions. Commissioning activities are summarised with examples and we provide conclusions on the experiences gained with the data during this period. Specific issues are highlighted and that Users of the data products should consider taking into account with their analyses. Finally, present performances of the three science modes over transponders and open ocean calibration zones are provided in addition to specific cases over land and sea ice. Preliminary performances of DORIS and star trackers will be provided in the context of overall SIRAL performance.

  11. Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration, Phase I Flight-Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.; Allen, Michael J.; Nabaa, Nassib

    2007-01-01

    The first phase of the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration (AARD) project was completed on August 30, 2006. The goal of this 15-month effort was to develop and flight-test a system to demonstrate an autonomous refueling engagement using the Navy style hose-and-drogue air-to-air refueling method. The prime contractor for this Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored program was Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC), Sparks, Nevada. The responsible flight-test organization was the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), Edwards, California, which also provided the F/A-18 receiver airplane (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The B-707-300 tanker airplane (The Boeing Company) was contracted through Omega Aerial Refueling Services, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia, and the optical tracking system was contracted through OCTEC Ltd., Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom. Nine research flights were flown, testing the functionality and performance of the system in a stepwise manner, culminating in the plug attempts on the final flight. Relative position keeping was found to be very stable and accurate. The receiver aircraft was capable of following the tanker aircraft through turns while maintaining its relative position. During the last flight, six capture attempts were made, two of which were successful. The four misses demonstrated excellent characteristics, the receiver retreating from the drogue in a controlled, safe, and predictable manner that precluded contact between the drogue and the receiver aircraft. The position of the receiver aircraft when engaged and in position for refueling was found to be 5.5 to 8.5 ft low of the ideal position. The controller inputs to the F/A-18 were found to be extremely small

  12. Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration: Phase I Flight-Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.; Allen, Michael J.; Nabaa, Nassib

    2007-01-01

    The first phase of the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration (AARD) project was completed on August 30, 2006. The goal of this 15-month effort was to develop and flight-test a system to demonstrate an autonomous refueling engagement using the Navy style hose-and-drogue air-to-air refueling method. The prime contractor for this Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored program was Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC), Sparks, Nevada. The responsible flight-test organization was the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), Edwards, California, which also provided the F/A-18 receiver airplane (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The B-707-300 tanker airplane (The Boeing Company) was contracted through Omega Aerial Refueling Services, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia, and the optical tracking system was contracted through OCTEC Ltd., Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom. Nine research flights were flown, testing the functionality and performance of the system in a stepwise manner, culminating in the plug attempts on the final flight. Relative position keeping was found to be very stable and accurate. The receiver aircraft was capable of following the tanker aircraft through turns while maintaining its relative position. During the last flight, six capture attempts were made, two of which were successful. The four misses demonstrated excellent characteristics, the receiver retreating from the drogue in a controlled, safe, and predictable manner that precluded contact between the drogue and the receiver aircraft. The position of the receiver aircraft when engaged and in position for refueling was found to be 5.5 to 8.5 ft low of the ideal position. The controller inputs to the F/A-18 were found to be extremely small.

  13. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: Integrating Results From the Primary Science Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, R. W.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) recently completed its one-Mars-year Primary Science Phase, observing the Martian atmosphere, surface and subsurface with 7 science investigations using 6 science instruments and tracking of the spacecraft as it orbited Mars. In addition, an eighth investigation made use of the onboard accelerometers during a 5-month period of MRO aerobraking to characterize upper atmospheric structure. Hallmarks-and challenges-of the MRO science mission have been: 1) unprecedented spatial resolution at all wavelengths used when observing from orbit; 2) coordinated imaging of local areas; and 3) the balancing of mapping, regional survey, and targeted observation of selected locales, frequently including repeat observations for stereo or for change detection. This talk will give an overview of the data return, including coverage in various observing modes, and will review how the various data sets have combined to provide new perspectives in our attempts to understand Mars, its present climate and its past evolution. Examples include the combination of surface compositional and morphologic information--on scales comparable to those examined by a terrestrial field geologist-to understand modification of the surface, revelations of the interior structure of the polar ice caps and of ice-rich deposits elsewhere which illuminate climate changes in recent geologic time, and monitoring of modern day variations, particularly as they reveal seasonal and inter-annual redistribution of dust and water, but also as they characterize ongoing mass wasting and cratering of the surface. Together, these all point to a complex history of change on Mars, with alternating episodes of significant water activity early in the planet's history, but with some water activity occurring in later geologic times, including the modern era.

  14. Multi-modal data fusion using source separation: Two effective models based on ICA and IVA and their properties

    PubMed Central

    Adali, Tülay; Levin-Schwartz, Yuri; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of information from multiple sets of data in order to extract a set of features that are most useful and relevant for the given task is inherent to many problems we deal with today. Since, usually, very little is known about the actual interaction among the datasets, it is highly desirable to minimize the underlying assumptions. This has been the main reason for the growing importance of data-driven methods, and in particular of independent component analysis (ICA) as it provides useful decompositions with a simple generative model and using only the assumption of statistical independence. A recent extension of ICA, independent vector analysis (IVA) generalizes ICA to multiple datasets by exploiting the statistical dependence across the datasets, and hence, as we discuss in this paper, provides an attractive solution to fusion of data from multiple datasets along with ICA. In this paper, we focus on two multivariate solutions for multi-modal data fusion that let multiple modalities fully interact for the estimation of underlying features that jointly report on all modalities. One solution is the Joint ICA model that has found wide application in medical imaging, and the second one is the the Transposed IVA model introduced here as a generalization of an approach based on multi-set canonical correlation analysis. In the discussion, we emphasize the role of diversity in the decompositions achieved by these two models, present their properties and implementation details to enable the user make informed decisions on the selection of a model along with its associated parameters. Discussions are supported by simulation results to help highlight the main issues in the implementation of these methods. PMID:26525830

  15. Mechanical Abrasion as a Low Cost Technique for Contamination-Free Sample Acquisition from a Category IVA Clean Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, B.; Yarbrough, C.; Carson, J.; Troy, R.

    2000-01-01

    The proposed Mars Sample Transfer Chain Architecture provides Planetary Protection Officers with clean samples that are required for the eventual release from confinement of the returned Martian samples. At the same time, absolute cleanliness and sterility requirement is not placed of any part of the Lander (including the deep drill), Mars Assent Vehicle (MAV), any part of the Orbiting Sample container (OS), Rover mobility platform, any part of the Minicorer, Robotic arm (including instrument sensors), and most of the caching equipment on the Rover. The removal of the strict requirements in excess of the Category IVa cleanliness (Pathfinder clean) is expected to lead to significant cost savings. The proposed architecture assumes that crosscontamination renders all surfaces in the vicinity of the rover(s) and the lander(s) contaminated. Thus, no accessible surface of Martian rocks and soil is Earth contamination free. As a result of the latter, only subsurface samples (either rock or soil) can be and will be collected for eventual return to Earth. Uncontaminated samples can be collected from a Category IVa clean platform. Both subsurface soil and rock samples can be maintained clean if they are collected by devices that are self-contained and clean and sterile inside only. The top layer of the sample is removed in a manner that does not contaminate the collection tools. Biobarrier (e.g., aluminum foil) covering the moving parts of these devices may be used as the only self removing bio-blanket that is required. The samples never leave the collection tools. The lids are placed on these tools inside the collection device. These single use tools with the lid and the sample inside are brought to Earth in the OS. The lids have to be designed impenetrable to the Earth organisms. The latter is a well established art.

  16. High-Temperature Phase Transition in Enstatite : Raman Spectroscopic Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, B.; Bass, J.

    2003-12-01

    (Mg,Fe)SiO3 enstatite has various polymorphs of which orthoenstatite with space group Pbca is the most common in natural rocks. The existence of a high temperature form has been suggested from various experiments but its symmetry remains unknown. Recent high-temperature Brillouin measurements on nearly pure MgSiO3 show that this transition is first order with a strong hysteresis (Tc at about 1200-1250° C with increasing temperature, Tc around 1000° C with decreasing temperature; Jackson et al, 2003). It is accompanied by strong pretransitional softening of some elastic constants and has some important consequences in the understanding of upper mantle seismic properties especially in hot regions. In order to more fully understand the nature of this transition and possibly the structural changes associated with it, we have performed in situ Raman spectroscopy on pure enstatite up to the transition temperature. The transition is observed in the same temperature range with increasing temperature, and is characterized by a decrease of the number of Raman modes, which can be interpreted as the transition to a space group with reduced Wigner-Seitz cell. Pretransitional effects are observed especially on a low frequency mode at 80 cm-1, which displays pronounced anharmonic behaviour. Possible space groups are Pbcn (protoenstatite), C2/c (high-clinoenstatite) or a previously unreported Cmca structure. The latter is a supergroup of Pbca and could account for the pretransitional softening. On decreasing temperature, backtransformation to orthoenstatite is marked by the appearance of cracks along simple crystallographic directions, which eventually leads to the breaking of the submillimeter-sized single crystals used as starting materials. Areas of untransformed high-temperature phase can be preserved down to about 750° C. This large hysteresis is strongly controlled by crystal shape and size as well as thermal history. In a parallel experiments, needle shaped thin (5x50

  17. Corrections of diverse forms of lower limb deformities in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Kenis, Vladimir; Melchenko, Eugeniy; Ghachem, Maher Ben; Csepan, Robert; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thoracolumbar kyphosis has been considered as the first presenting deformity and is often a key diagnostic clue noted in children with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IV (Morquio's syndrome). However, we observed that the progressive irregularities of the epiphyses of the long bones were the most prominent skeletal pathology, causing effectively the development of diverse forms of lower limbs deformities with extreme variation in age of onset. Materials and Methods: Ten patients (seven children and three adults) with an average age of 15 years have been enrolled in this study. Age of diagnosis of MPS IVA has a variable age of onset and a MISLEADING rate of severity. Hip dislocations, genu valgum, protrusio acetabuli and osteoarthritis were the most common lower limbs deformities in these patients. Clinical and radiographic phenotypes were the baseline tools of documentation. Urinary screening and genotypic characterizations have been applied accordingly. Results: Combined pelvic and femoral procedures for hip dislocation, epiphysiodeses and supracondylar osteotomy for genu valgum and hip arthroplasty for protrusio acetabuli have been performed. All patients manifested insufficient activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulphate sulphatase, an enzyme that degrades keratin sulphate and chondroitin-6 sulphate. Conclusion: The extensive clinical heterogeneity contributed significantly in the delay in establishing the diagnosis particularly in adult patients with MPS IV. The epiphyseal irregularities of the long bones and the progressive flattening pathology of MPS IV A were the reason to falsely diagnose some patients as spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenital and/or tarda. Proximal femoral osteotomy, realignment osteotomy and total hip arthroplasty have been performed for coxa vara, genu valgum and protrusio acetabuli, respectively, in children and adult group of patients. The importance of early diagnosis on MPS IV A is to receive enzyme replacement therapy

  18. Transmission and phase balancing of alternating phase-shifting masks (5x): theoretical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesinger, Uwe A.; Pforr, Rainer; Knobloch, Juergen; Friedrich, Christoph M.

    1999-12-01

    Dual trench alternating phase shifting masks with an optimized value of the so-called shallow trench depth represents an interesting approach to overcome aerial image imbalances. In order to get a better understanding of the possibilities and limits of this approach, especially for 5X reduction, theoretical and experimental investigations were accomplished. In this paper experimental data obtained from 5X dual trench type alternating PSMs, using DUV-lithography are introduced and compared with 3D-mask simulations. The masks were fabricated with different etch depths and contain parts of typical DRAM patterns. Besides the transmission balancing also the phase balancing has an important influence on the effective process window of an alternating PSM. The effective phase error can be measured with an AIMS-system (MSM100). The comparison with simulated data allows the determination of the phase error. In a second step the influence of different balancing methods on phase and transmission were investigated with the TEMPEST mask simulator for unpolarized light. The optimization of the balancing with respect to the CD-bias, undercut and etch depth will be shown and a first approach of a sensitivity analysis will be presented.

  19. Orbit transfer vehicle engine study. Phase A: Continuation (study results)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Studies included: selection of boost pump designs for low NPSH operation and generation of associated programmatic data; evaluation of OTV engine operation at intermediate thrust levels and impact on programmatics; and assessments of OTV engine operation at idle-mode thrusts under conditions experienced during aerobraking maneuvers of the ABOTV. As a result of the studies, it was recommended that the original OTV boost pump designs be used without change for low NPSH operation. Intermediate thrust operation is feasible for both the expander cycle and staged combustion cycles.

  20. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  1. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  2. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  3. Shock-thermal history of Kavarpura IVA iron: Evidences from microtextures and nickel profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Ghosh, S.; Murty, S. V. S.

    2015-11-01

    We classify Kavarpura iron (fell in August, 2006, in Rajasthan, India), an inclusion-free member of high-Ni IVA group. Widmanstätten pattern and finger-cellular plessites textures characteristic of IVA group are present in Kavarpura. Symmetric and asymmetric textural zoning within the cloudy taenite and plessite refer to long term martensitisation process with mean metallographic cooling rate of 200 °C/Ma. Imprints of variable shock pressure domains (Neumann bands and shock hatched ε kamacite) suggest alteration by up to 600 kb shock pressure. Degeneration of cellular plessites, bending of finger plessites and plastic flowage of taenites bear textural evidences corresponding to post-shock annealing which is further confirmed by Ni profiles across the cloudy taenites and plessites under high shock pressure domains. Based on microtextural evidences and Ni profiling, we suggest Kavarpura had cooled at steady state and subsequently suffered multiple impacts.

  4. Molecular Testing of 163 Patients with Morquio A (Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA) Identifies 39 Novel GALNS Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Morrone, A; Tylee, K.L.; Al-Sayed, M; Brusius-Facchin, A.C.; Caciotti, A.; Church, H.J.; Coll, M.J.; Davidson, K.; Fietz, M.J.; Gort, L.; Hegde, M.; Kubaski, F.; Lacerda, L.; Laranjeira, F.; Leistner-Segal, S.; Mooney, S.; Pajares, S.; Pollard, L.; Riberio, I.; Wang, R.Y.; Miller, N.

    2014-01-01

    Morquio A (Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA; MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by partial or total deficiency of the enzyme galactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS; also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase) encoded by the GALNS gene. Patients who inherit two mutated GALNS gene alleles produce protein with decreased ability to degrade the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) keratan sulfate and chondroitin 6-sulfate, thereby causing GAG accumulation within lysosomes and consequently pleiotropic disease. GALNS mutations occur throughout the gene and many mutations are identified only in single patients or families, causing difficulties both in mutation detection and interpretation. In this study, molecular analysis of 163 patients with Morquio A identified 99 unique mutations in the GALNS gene believed to negatively impact GALNS protein function, of which 39 are previously unpublished, together with 26 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Recommendations for the molecular testing of patients, clear reporting of sequence findings, and interpretation of sequencing data are provided. PMID:24726177

  5. Triapine With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With IB2-IVA Cervical or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Vulvar Adenocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  6. Structure of the Type IVa Major Pilin from the Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Patrick N.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2013-10-11

    Several species of bacteria are capable of reducing insoluble metal oxides as well as other extracellular electron acceptors. These bacteria play a critical role in the cycling of minerals in subsurface environments, sediments, and groundwater. In some species of bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, the transport of electrons is facilitated by filamentous fibers that are referred to as bacterial nanowires. These nanowires belong to the type IVa family of pilin proteins and are mainly comprised of one subunit protein, PilA. Here, we report the high resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the PilA protein from G. sulfurreducens determined in detergent micelles. The protein is over 85% α-helical and exhibits similar architecture to the N-terminal regions of other non-conductive type IVa pilins. The detergent micelle interacts with the first 21 amino acids of the protein, indicating that this region likely associates with the bacterial inner membrane prior to fiber formation. A model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus fiber is proposed based on docking of this structure into the fiber model of the type IVa pilin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This model provides insight into the organization of aromatic amino acids that are important for electrical conduction.

  7. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly

    PubMed Central

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F.; Greger, Ingo H.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community. PMID:27264908

  8. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly.

    PubMed

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F; Greger, Ingo H

    2016-01-01

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community. PMID:27264908

  9. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Has a Larger Analytical Range than Fluorescence Assays of Lysosomal Enzymes: Application to Newborn Screening and Diagnosis of Mucopolysaccharidoses Types II, IVA, and VI

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun Babu; Masi, Sophia; Ghomashchi, Farideh; Chennamaneni, Naveen Kumar; Ito, Makoto; Scott, C. Ronald; Turecek, Frantisek; Gelb, Michael H.; Spacil, Zdenek

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is interest in newborn screening and diagnosis of lysosomal storage diseases because of the development of treatment options that improve clinical outcome. Assays of lysosomal enzymes with high analytical range (ratio of assay response from the enzymatic reaction divided by the assay response due to nonenzymatic processes) are desirable because they are predicted to lead to a lower rate of false positives in population screening and to more accurate diagnoses. METHODS We designed new tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) assays that give the largest analytical ranges reported to date for the use of dried blood spots (DBS) for detection of mucopolysaccharidoses type II (MPS-II), MPS-IVA, and MPS-VI. For comparison, we carried out fluorometric assays of 6 lysosomal enzymes using 4-methylumbelliferyl (4MU)-substrate conjugates. RESULTS The MS/MS assays for MPS-II, -IVA, and -VI displayed analytical ranges that are 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than those for the corresponding fluorometric assays. The relatively small analytical ranges of the 4MU assays are due to the intrinsic fluorescence of the 4MU substrates, which cause high background in the assay response. CONCLUSIONS These highly reproducible MS/MS assays for MPS-II, -IVA, and -VI can support multiplex newborn screening of these lysosomal storage diseases. MS/MS assays of lysosomal enzymes outperform 4MU fluorometric assays in terms of analytical range. Ongoing pilot studies will allow us to gauge the impact of the increased analytical range on newborn screening performance. PMID:26369786

  10. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233.145 Public Welfare... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.145 Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X..., enacted July 30, 1965, no payment may be made to any State under title I, IV-A, X, XIV or XVI of...

  11. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233.145 Public Welfare... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.145 Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X..., enacted July 30, 1965, no payment may be made to any State under title I, IV-A, X, XIV or XVI of...

  12. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233.145 Public Welfare... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.145 Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X..., enacted July 30, 1965, no payment may be made to any State under title I, IV-A, X, XIV or XVI of...

  13. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233.145 Public Welfare... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.145 Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X..., enacted July 30, 1965, no payment may be made to any State under title I, IV-A, X, XIV or XVI of...

  14. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Gambacorta, Antonietta; Gallotta, Valerio; Smaniotto, Daniela; Fagotti, Anna; Tagliaferri, Luca; Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco; Autorino, Rosa; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6 Gy (1.8 cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8 Gy administered with CBs (0.9 cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300 mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2 weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8 weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if >45 pCR were registered (α error = 0.05; β error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36 months (range: 7-85 months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or 2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very

  15. Appendix to the report from the low-residue soldering task force: Phase 2 results

    SciTech Connect

    Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J.; Huffman, D.D.

    1995-12-01

    The LRSTF report for Phase I of its evaluation of low-residue soldering was issued in June 1995. This Appendix summarizes the results of follow-on testing performed in Phase II and compares electrical test results for both phases. Deliberate decisions were made by the LRSTF in Phase I to challenge the design guideline limits in MILSTD-275, Printed Wiring for Electronic Equipment The LRSTF considered this approach to produce a ``worst case`` design and provide useful information about the robustness of LR soldering processes. As such, good design practices were sometimes deliberately violated in designing the LRSTF board. This approach created some anomalies for both LR boards and RMA/cleaned controls. Phase II testing verified that problems that affected both RMA/cleaned and LR boards in Phase I were design related.

  16. Performance results of a 300-degree linear phase modulator for spaceborne communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Mueller, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    A phase modulator capable of large linear phase deviation, low loss, and wide band operation with good thermal stability was developed for deep space spacecraft transponder (DST) applications at X-band (8.415 GHz) and Ka-band (32 GHz) downlinks. The design uses a two-stage circulator-coupled reflection phase shifter with constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit to obtain a phase deviation of +/-2.5 rad with better than 8 percent linearity. The measured insertion loss is 6.6 dB +/- 0.35 dB at 8415 MHz. Measured carrier and relative sideband amplitudes resulting from phase modulation by sine wave and square modulating functions agree well with the predicted results.

  17. The group I pilin glycan affects type IVa pilus hydrophobicity and twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Tara M.; Conrad, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The group I pilin category is the most common type of type IVa pilus produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The lateral surfaces of these pili are characterized by the presence of closely spaced, covalently attached O-antigen repeating units. The current work was conducted to investigate the pilin glycan's effect on pilus solubility and function. Culture supernatant fluids containing fully, partially and non-glycosylated P. aeruginosa group I pili were tested for solubility in the presence of ammonium sulfate. These results showed that while pili expressing three or four sugars were highly soluble under all conditions, those with fewer than three were insoluble under the lowest salt concentrations tested. A representative of the P. aeruginosa group II pili also showed low solubility when assayed under these same conditions. Reduced solubility suggested an increased pilus surface hydrophobicity, which was supported by protein modelling. While having no effect on the WT strain, an ionic strength found at many host infection sites inhibited surface and subsurface twitching motility of strain 1244G7, an isogenic mutant unable to glycosylate pilin. This effect was reversed by mutant complementation. Twitching motility of P. aeruginosa strain PA103, which produces group II pili, was also inhibited by ionic strengths which influenced the mutant 1244 strain. We suggest that the group I pilin glycan may, therefore, be beneficial to this organism specifically for optimal pilus functioning at the many host disease sites with ionic strengths comparable to those tested here. PMID:26297472

  18. Results of phase 2 of the APRICOT program. Final report. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    APRICOT (Analysis of Primary Containment Transients) is a cooperative activity for comparison and benchmarking of computational methods used to analyze LMFBR (Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor) structural response to pressure loads from HCDA's (Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents). Independent experts review the calculations for the purpose of comparing computational results and methods of solution. Phase 2 involved a series of more complex calculations based on the simulation of scaled-down containment experiments. These calculations, as those of Phase 1, were performed by participants from Europe, Japan and the United States. The calculations were all in reasonable agreement with experimental determinations of hydrodynamic loads; however, the calculated plastic strains differed significantly from the experimental results. The unresolved issues from the Phase 2 calculations are currently being studied with the calculations for Phase 3.

  19. Phase III Simplified Integrated Test (SIT) results - Space Station ECLSS testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Dubiel, Melissa Y.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Perry, Jay L.; Whitley, Ken M.

    1990-01-01

    During 1989, phase III testing of Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) began at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with the Simplified Integrated Test. This test, conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), was the first time the four baseline air revitalization subsystems were integrated together. This paper details the results and lessons learned from the phase III SIT. Future plans for testing at the MSFC CMIF are also discussed.

  20. Cr-Bearing Inclusions in IVA Irons: Implication for Cr and Volatile Behaviors in the Metallic Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, J.; McKeegan, K. D.; Wasson, J. T.

    2015-07-01

    We found inclusions that contribute to bulk Cr concentrations and found fO2 or fS2 changes during crystallization. O-isotope compositions of chromite are mass-dependently lighter than other IVA oxides. Also, we discovered a new mineral MnCr2S4.

  1. Critical behavior of two-dimensional models with spatially modulated phases: Analytic results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruján, P.

    1981-12-01

    The two-dimensional Elliott [or axial next-nearest-neighbor Ising (ANNNI)] model is mapped into an eight-vertex model with direct and staggered fields. With the use of the transfer-matrix approach it is shown that the dual of the ANNNI model belongs to the universality class of the one-dimensional quantum XY model in a staggered field at T=0. The phase structure is investigated by high- and low-temperature expansions of the correlation length and by spin-wave-like approximations valid in first order at low and high temperatures, respectively. The fact that the phase diagram obtained at low temperatures agrees qualitatively with recent results by Villain and Bak and by Coppersmith et al. shows that the paramagnetic phase extends until T=0. The role of the umklapp scattering in determining the critical wave vector in the modulated phase and in stabilizing the <2> antiphase is pointed out. In the eight-vertex representation the critical indices are identified in the floating, massless phase. The dislocations destabilizing this incommensurate phase correspond to the energy operator of the eight-vertex model. Finally, it is argued that the apparent contradiction between the low-temperature results on one hand, and the Monte Carlo simulations and high-temperature-expansion results on the other hand, is probably due to the strong oscillatory behavior of spin-spin correlation functions in the massive paramagnetic region.

  2. Experimental results from a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Velroyen, Astrid; Meiser, Jan; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-01-01

    To explore the future clinical potential of improved soft-tissue visibility with grating-based X-ray phase contrast (PC), we have developed a first preclinical computed tomography (CT) scanner featuring a rotating gantry. The main challenge in the transition from previous bench-top systems to a preclinical scanner are phase artifacts that are caused by minimal changes in the grating alignment during gantry rotation. In this paper, we present the first experimental results from the system together with an adaptive phase recovery method that corrects for these phase artifacts. Using this method, we show that the scanner can recover quantitatively accurate Hounsfield units in attenuation and phase. Moreover, we present a first tomography scan of biological tissue with complementary information in attenuation and phase contrast. The present study hence demonstrates the feasibility of grating-based phase contrast with a rotating gantry for the first time and paves the way for future in vivo studies on small animal disease models (in the mid-term future) and human diagnostics applications (in the long-term future). PMID:23019354

  3. Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. In the Ivaí Indigenous Land, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Letícia; Bergamasco, Rosângela; Toledo, Max Jean de Ornelas; Falavigna, Dina Lúcia Morais; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Mota, Lúcio Tadeu; Falavigna-Guilherme, Ana Lúcia

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of cysts of Giardia spp. and oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. in waters of the Ivaí Indigenous Land, Brazil. Samples of river and spring water and of treated water were filtered and analyzed by direct immunofluorescence (Merifluor kit, Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, Ohio). Of 21 samples, 7 from each locality, 3 (3/7, 42.8%) from a river were positive for Giardia (mean concentration 2.57 cysts/L), and 1 (1/7, 14.3%) was positive for Cryptosporidium (6 oocysts/L). From springs, 1 sample (1/7, 14.3%) was positive for Cryptosporidium (6 oocysts/L). One sample (1/7, 14.3%) from treated water was positive for both, with 4 oocysts/L and 2 cysts/L. Giardia was the more frequent protozoan present. PMID:18945186

  4. Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise: Results from the second phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinty, B.; Widlowski, J.-L.; Taberner, M.; Gobron, N.; Verstraete, M. M.; Disney, M.; Gascon, F.; Gastellu, J.-P.; Jiang, L.; Kuusk, A.; Lewis, P.; Li, X.; Ni-Meister, W.; Nilson, T.; North, P.; Qin, W.; Su, L.; Tang, S.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Yan, G.; Zang, H.

    2004-03-01

    The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) initiative is a community-driven exercise to benchmark the models of radiation transfer (RT) used to represent the reflectance of terrestrial surfaces. Systematic model intercomparisons started in 1999 as a self-organized, open-access, voluntary activity of the RT modeling community. The results of the first phase were published by [2001]. The present paper describes the benchmarking protocol and the results achieved during the second phase, which took place during 2002. This second phase included two major components: The first one included a rerun of all direct-mode tests proposed during the first phase, to accommodate the evaluation of models that have been upgraded since, and the participation of new models into the entire exercise. The second component was designed to probe the performance of three-dimensional models in complex heterogeneous environments, which closely mimic the observations of actual space instruments operating at various spatial resolutions over forest canopy systems. Phases 1 and 2 of RAMI both confirm not only that a majority of the radiation transfer models participating in RAMI are in good agreement between themselves for relatively simple radiation transfer problems but also that these models exhibit significant discrepancies when considering more complex but nevertheless realistic geophysical scenarios. Specific recommendations are provided to guide the future of this benchmarking program (Phase 3 and beyond).

  5. Experiment of Injecting Phase Cal Ahead of the Feed: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, Dmitrij; Maslenikov, Anatolij; Vytnov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    For developing the Russian VLBI network of new generation, a few experiments of injecting the phase calibration signal ahead of the feed were carried out. In the experiments an external broadband phase calibration signal was emitted through a special feed to a receiver horn directly. Prototypes of the feed for a frequency range of 2-18 GHz were created. The first experiments on injection phase cal ahead of the feed were carried out at Svetloe Observatory of the QUASAR VLBI network. The phase cal signal was emitted by the broadband feed installed on the roof of a mirror cabin, reflected by the sub-reflector, and received by the horn of the receiving system. The results of these experiments are considered.

  6. A synopsis of test results and knowledge gained from the Phase-0 CSI evolutionary model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Elliott, Kenny B.; Horta, Lucas G.

    1993-01-01

    The Phase-0 CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) is a testbed for the study of space platform global line-of-sight (LOS) pointing. Now that the tests have been completed, a summary of hardware and closed-loop test experiences is necessary to insure a timely dissemination of the knowledge gained. The testbed is described and modeling experiences are presented followed by a summary of the research performed by various investigators. Some early lessons on implementing the closed-loop controllers are described with particular emphasis on real-time computing requirements. A summary of closed-loop studies and a synopsis of test results are presented. Plans for evolving the CEM from phase 0 to phases 1 and 2 are also described. Subsequently, a summary of knowledge gained from the design and testing of the Phase-0 CEM is made.

  7. MRI morphometric characterisation of the paediatric cervical spine and spinal cord in children with MPS IVA (Morquio-Brailsford syndrome).

    PubMed

    Solanki, Guirish A; Lo, William B; Hendriksz, Christian J

    2013-03-01

    Nearly all children with MPS IVA develop skeletal deformities affecting the spine. At the atlanto-axial spine, odontoid hypoplasia occurs. GAG deposition around the dens, leads to peri-odontoid infiltration. Transverse/alar ligament incompetence causes instability. Atlanto-axial instability is associated with cord compression and myelopathy, leading to major morbidity and mortality. Intervention is often required. Does the presence of widened bullet shaped vertebra in platyspondily encroach on the spinal canal and cause spinal stenosis in MPS IVA? So far, there have been no standardised morphometric measurements of the paediatric MPS IVA cervical spine to evaluate whether there is pre-existing spinal stenosis predisposing to compressive myelopathy or whether this is purely an acquired process secondary to instability and compression. This study provides the first radiological quantitative analysis of the cervical spine and spinal cord in a series of affected children. MRI morphometry indicates that the MPS IVA spine is narrower at C1-2 level giving an inverted funnel shape. There is no evidence of a reduction in the Torg ratio (canal-body ratio) in the cervical spine. The spinal canal does not exceed 11 mm at any level, significantly smaller than normal historical cohorts (14 mm). The sagittal diameter and axial surface area of both spinal canal and cord are reduced. C1-2 level cord compression was evident in the canal-cord ratio but the Torg ratio was not predictive of cord compression. In MPS IVA the reduction in the space available for the cord (SAC) is multifactorial rather than due to congenital spinal stenosis. PMID:23404316

  8. An Update on Phased Array Results Obtained on the GE Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Horvath, Csaba; Envia, Edmane

    2013-01-01

    Beamform maps have been generated from 1) simulated data generated by the LINPROP code and 2) actual experimental phased array data obtained on the GE Counter-rotating open rotor model. The beamform maps show that many of the tones in the experimental data come from their corresponding Mach radius. If the phased array points to the Mach radius associated with a tone then it is likely that the tone is a result of the loading and thickness noise on the blades. In this case, the phased array correctly points to where the noise is coming from and indicates the axial location of the loudest source in the image but not necessarily the correct vertical location. If the phased array does not point to the Mach radius associated with a tone then some mechanism other than loading and thickness noise may control the amplitude of the tone. In this case, the phased array may or may not point to the actual source. If the source is not rotating it is likely that the phased array points to the source. If the source is rotating it is likely that the phased array indicates the axial location of the loudest source but not necessarily the correct vertical location. These results indicate that you have to be careful in how you interpret phased array data obtained on an open rotor since they may show the tones coming from a location other than the source location. With a subsonic tip speed open rotor the tones can come form locations outboard of the blade tips. This has implications regarding noise shielding.

  9. MSFC Sortie Laboratory Environmental Control System (ECS) phase B design study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatonis, A. J.; Mitchell, K. L.

    1974-01-01

    Phase B effort of the Sortie Lab program has concluded. Results of that effort are presented which pertain to the definitions of the environmental control system (ECS). Numerous design studies were performed in Phase B to investigate system feasibility, complexity, weight, and cost. The results and methods employed for these design studies are included. An autonomous Sortie Lab ECS was developed which utilizes a deployed space radiator. Total system weight was projected to be 1814.4 kg including the radiator and fluids. ECS power requirements were estimated at 950 watts.

  10. Chikusetsu saponin IVa confers cardioprotection via SIRT1/ERK1/2 and Homer1a pathway.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jialin; Yin, Ying; Wei, Guo; Cui, Jia; Zhang, Enhu; Guan, Yue; Yan, Jiajia; Guo, Chao; Zhu, Yanrong; Mu, Fei; Weng, Yan; Wang, Yanhua; Wu, Xiaoxiao; Xi, Miaomiao; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Ca(2+) overload contribute to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. In this study, we aimed to study the protective effects of Chikusetsu saponin IVa (CHS) from Aralia taibaiensis against hyperglycemia-induced myocardial injuries. Treatment of H9c2 cells with high glucose (HG) for 24 h resulted in a loss of cell viability and increase of ROS, LDH and Ca(2+) levels, and also induced cell apoptosis, and those changes were all markedly reversed by the administration of CHS. In further studies, CHS dose-dependently increased the expression of Homer1a, ERK1/2 and SIRT1 in both H9c2 cells and rat primary cardiomyocytes. However, transfection of Homer1a-specific siRNA abolished the ability of CHS in controlling the ROS and Ca(2+) homeostasis. Moreover, specific SIRT1 inhibitors or siRNA significantly suppressed the enhanced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and expression of Homer1a induced by CHS as well as its cytoprotective effect. CHS induced Homer1a expression was also suppressed by siERK1/2. Additionally, results in diabetic mice also showed that CHS protected myocardium from I/R-introduced apoptosis by activating the SIRT1/ERK1/2/Homer1a pathway. These results demonstrated that CHS protected against hyperglycemia-induced myocardial injury through SIRT1/ERK1/2 and Homer1a pathway in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26648253

  11. Chikusetsu saponin IVa confers cardioprotection via SIRT1/ERK1/2 and Homer1a pathway

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jialin; Yin, Ying; Wei, Guo; Cui, Jia; Zhang, Enhu; Guan, Yue; Yan, Jiajia; Guo, Chao; Zhu, Yanrong; Mu, Fei; Weng, Yan; Wang, Yanhua; Wu, Xiaoxiao; Xi, Miaomiao; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Ca2+ overload contribute to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. In this study, we aimed to study the protective effects of Chikusetsu saponin IVa (CHS) from Aralia taibaiensis against hyperglycemia-induced myocardial injuries. Treatment of H9c2 cells with high glucose (HG) for 24 h resulted in a loss of cell viability and increase of ROS, LDH and Ca2+ levels, and also induced cell apoptosis, and those changes were all markedly reversed by the administration of CHS. In further studies, CHS dose-dependently increased the expression of Homer1a, ERK1/2 and SIRT1 in both H9c2 cells and rat primary cardiomyocytes. However, transfection of Homer1a-specific siRNA abolished the ability of CHS in controlling the ROS and Ca2+ homeostasis. Moreover, specific SIRT1 inhibitors or siRNA significantly suppressed the enhanced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and expression of Homer1a induced by CHS as well as its cytoprotective effect. CHS induced Homer1a expression was also suppressed by siERK1/2. Additionally, results in diabetic mice also showed that CHS protected myocardium from I/R-introduced apoptosis by activating the SIRT1/ERK1/2/Homer1a pathway. These results demonstrated that CHS protected against hyperglycemia-induced myocardial injury through SIRT1/ERK1/2 and Homer1a pathway in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26648253

  12. [3-phase scintigraphy in the Sudeck syndrome. Comparison with the results of roentgenologic and clinical studies].

    PubMed

    Koppers, B

    1982-11-01

    37 patients with clinically and radiologically proved reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome were scintigraphed by 99mTc-MDP (three-phase-scintigraphy). In 87% of the examinations (all three-phases) an increased tracer accumulation in the region of the affected limb could be seen scintigraphically. The majority of the positive results (92% resp. 87%) were found in the interval phase (phase II) and the late phase (phase III) of the scintigraphic examinations.--We recommend a staging of the increase of the tracer accumulation when examining the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome. This staging doesn't significantly correlate with the familiar clinical and radiological stagings. However it may be useful when assessing the course of the syndrome.--Increased tracer accumulations could be observed in the case of clinically, radiologically and scintigraphically manifest reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome in the region of the foot, frequently in the ipsilateral knee region, rarely in the ipsilateral hip joint region, although clinically the syndrome could not be observed in these regions. PMID:6184293

  13. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  14. A compilation of results pertaining to the behavior of phase locked loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleicher, N.

    1971-01-01

    State-of-the art on phase locked loops PLL is reported by summarizing some specific results. Following a statement of the overall analysis and design objectives, results are presented in a format identifying working terminology, inherent assumptions, and references for each result. The use of PLL in tracking, synchronization, and demodulation is reemphasized, as well as the mathematical challenge involved in solving nonlinear stochastic differential equations.

  15. A uniqueness result for propagation-based phase contrast imaging from a single measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maretzke, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Phase contrast imaging seeks to reconstruct the complex refractive index of an unknown sample from scattering intensities, measured for example under illumination with coherent x-rays. By incorporating refraction, this method yields improved contrast compared to purely absorption-based radiography but involves a phase retrieval problem which, in general, allows for ambiguous reconstructions. In this paper, we show uniqueness of propagation-based phase contrast imaging for compactly supported objects in the near-field regime, based on a description by the projection- and paraxial approximations. In this setting, propagation is governed by the Fresnel propagator and the unscattered part of the illumination function provides a known reference wave at the detector which facilitates phase reconstruction. The uniqueness theorem is derived using the theory of entire functions. Unlike previous results based on exact solution formulae, it is valid for arbitrary complex objects and requires intensity measurements only at a single detector distance and illumination wavelength. We also deduce a uniqueness criterion for phase contrast tomography, which may be applied to resolve the three-dimensional structure of micro- and nano-scale samples. Moreover, our results may have some significance to electronic imaging methods due to the equivalence of paraxial wave propagation and Schrödinger’s equation.

  16. Igneous Evolution of the Core and Mantle in the Parent Body of Group IVA Iron and Stony-Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; McCoy, T. J.; Haack, H.; Taylor, G. J.

    1992-07-01

    Group IVA is comprised of 52 irons lacking silicates, two with trace amounts of silica (Gibeon and Bishop Canyon) and two stony irons (Steinbach and Sao Joao Nepomuceno), which have high but varied proportions of a pyroxene-tridymite intergrowth (Prinz et al., 1984). Despite their remarkable composition, these stony irons are not geological freaks lacking cosmochemical significance but important clues to the complexity of asteroidal processes. Metal: Our crystallization models for Fe-Ni-S magmas using distribution coefficients from Jones and Malvin (1990) with minor modifications from Haack and Scott (1992) show that the IVA irons formed by fractional crystallization of a melt with about 1-3 wt% S. Unlike previous authors we are able to model the Ir, Au, Ga, Ge, and P vs Ni trends in IVA concurrently. We include the formation of a second S-rich immiscible liquid during crystallization and find that our models can match IVA trends as well as those of group IIIAB, which has a higher S content. Siderophile concentrations in Steinbach and Sao Joao metal are, surprisingly, entirely appropriate for IVA irons with 9.1 and 8.0% Ni, showing that they formed in two separate places in the IVA body by mixing of silicates with metal that was fractionally crystallizing. Silicates: Steinbach and Sao Joao contain 10-60 vol% of SiO2 and ortho- and clinobronzite. In the sponge-like silicate- metal intergrowths, typical pore sizes are 2-6 mm though metal crystals are larger. Textures suggest co-crystallization of silicates from a liquid. Slight compositional differences between the two pyroxenes exist in both meteorites, with Steinbach pyroxenes being more FeO-rich. Formation of all the pyroxene by reaction between olivine and SiO2 (Prinz et al., 1984) fails to account for the minor elemental abundances in pyroxene, e.g. 0.25 wt% Al2O3. But the occurrence of SiO2 without pyroxene suggests that the SiO2-pyroxene intergrowths did not form entirely from SiO2-pyroxene eutectic or

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of imatinib mesylate in patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia: results of a phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Schmidli, H; Peng, B; Riviere, G-J; Capdeville, R; Hensley, M; Gathmann, I; Bolton, A E; Racine-Poon, A

    2005-01-01

    Aims This study was designed to investigate the biochemical and physiological covariates or comedications that affect the pharmacokinetics of imatinib mesylate in patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia (CP CML). Methods Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed in 371 patients receiving 400 mg imatinib once daily during a phase III trial of imatinib vs interferon-alfa plus cytarabine for the treatment of newly diagnosed CP CML. Covariates included age, weight, sex, ethnicity, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration, white blood cell (WBC) count, liver function, and creatinine concentration. Blood samples for imatinib analysis were taken on treatment days 1 and 29. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling was used for the population pharmacokinetic analysis. Results Population mean estimates (95% confidence interval) at day 1 for apparent clearance (CL) and apparent volume of distribution (V) of imatinib were 14 (13–15) l h−1 and 252 (237–267) l, respectively. Modelling suggested that CL decreased by 4 (3-5) l h−1 from day 1 to day 29, whereas V remained unchanged. Interindividual variability in CL and V was 32% and 31%, respectively. Weight, Hb, and WBC count demonstrated small effects on CL and V. Doubling body weight or Hb or halving the WBC count was associated with a 12%, 86% and 8% increase in CL, respectively, and a 32%, 60% and 5% increase in V, respectively. Comedications showed no clear effects on imatinib CL. Conclusions Population covariates and coadministered drugs minimally affected imatinib pharmacokinetics in newly diagnosed CP CML patients. PMID:15963092

  18. PilN Binding Modulates the Structure and Binding Partners of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IVa Pilus Protein PilM.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Matthew; Tammam, Stephanie; Little, Dustin J; Robinson, Howard; Koo, Jason; Shah, Megha; Calmettes, Charles; Moraes, Trevor F; Burrows, Lori L; Howell, P Lynne

    2016-05-20

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that expresses type IVa pili. The pilus assembly system, which promotes surface-associated twitching motility and virulence, is composed of inner and outer membrane subcomplexes, connected by an alignment subcomplex composed of PilMNOP. PilM binds to the N terminus of PilN, and we hypothesize that this interaction causes functionally significant structural changes in PilM. To characterize this interaction, we determined the crystal structures of PilM and a PilM chimera where PilM was fused to the first 12 residues of PilN (PilM·PilN(1-12)). Structural analysis, multiangle light scattering coupled with size exclusion chromatography, and bacterial two-hybrid data revealed that PilM forms dimers mediated by the binding of a novel conserved motif in the N terminus of PilM, and binding PilN abrogates this binding interface, resulting in PilM monomerization. Structural comparison of PilM with PilM·PilN(1-12) revealed that upon PilN binding, there is a large domain closure in PilM that alters its ATP binding site. Using biolayer interferometry, we found that the association rate of PilN with PilM is higher in the presence of ATP compared with ADP. Bacterial two-hybrid data suggested the connectivity of the cytoplasmic and inner membrane components of the type IVa pilus machinery in P. aeruginosa, with PilM binding to PilB, PilT, and PilC in addition to PilN. Pull-down experiments demonstrated direct interactions of PilM with PilB and PilT. We propose a working model in which dynamic binding of PilN facilitates functionally relevant structural changes in PilM. PMID:27022027

  19. The NASA broad-specification fuels combustion technology program: An assessment of phase 1 test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fear, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is made of the results of Phase 1 screening testing of current and advanced combustion system concepts using several broadened-properties fuels. The severity of each of several fuels-properties effects on combustor performance or liner life is discussed, as well as design techniques with the potential to offset these adverse effects. The selection of concepts to be pursued in Phase 2 refinement testing is described. This selection takes into account the relative costs and complexities of the concepts, the current outlook on pollutant emissions control, and practical operational problems.

  20. Overview of results from phase I of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The first phase of the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was successfully completed during the years 2010, 2011 and 2014, with Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energies (√sNN) of 7.7, 11.5, 14.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV. The BES has three distinct goals: search for the turning off of the signatures of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), search for the first-order phase transition, and search for the critical point. We report several interesting results that address each of these goals of the BES program.

  1. Joint research effort on vibrations of twisted plates, phase 1: Final results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielb, R. E.; Leissa, A. W.; Macbain, J. C.; Carney, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    The complete theoretical and experimental results of the first phase of a joint government/industry/university research study on the vibration characteristics of twisted cantilever plates are given. The study is conducted to generate an experimental data base and to compare many different theoretical methods with each other and with the experimental results. Plates with aspect ratios, thickness ratios, and twist angles representative of current gas turbine engine blading are investigated. The theoretical results are generated by numerous finite element, shell, and beam analysis methods. The experimental results are obtained by precision matching a set of twisted plates and testing them at two laboratories. The second and final phase of the study will concern the effects of rotation.

  2. Results of the Boeing/DOE DECC Phase 1 stirling engine project

    SciTech Connect

    STONE,KENNETH W.; CLARK,TERRY; NELVING,HANS; DIVER JR.,RICHARD B.

    2000-03-02

    Phase I of Boeing Company/DOE Dish Engine Critical Component (DECC) Project started in April of 1998 and was completed in 1999. The Phase I objectives, schedule, and test results are presented in this paper. These data shows the power, energy, and mirror performance are comparable to that when the hardware was first manufactured 15 years ago. During the Phase I and initial Phase II test period the on-sun system accumulated over 3,800 hours of solar-powered operating time, accumulated over 4,500 hours of concentrator solar tracking time, and generated over 50,000 kWh of grid-compatible electrical energy. The data also shows that the system was available 95 {percent} of the time when the sun's insolation level was above approximately 300 w/m{sup 2}, and achieved a daily energy efficiency between 20{percent} and 26{percent}. A second concentrator was refurbished during Phase I and accumulated over 2,200 hours of solar track time. A second Stirling engine operated 24 hours a day in a test cell in Sweden and accumulated over 6,000 test hours. Discussion of daily operation shows no major problems encountered during the testing that would prevent commercialization of the technology. Further analysis of the test data shows that system servicing with hydrogen, coolant and lubricating oil should not be a major O and M cost.

  3. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio testing:phase 1 summary and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, Manuel Gilbert; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Lange, F. , Germany); Nolte, O. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Koch, W. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Dickey, Roy R.; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire , France); Young, F. I.; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und reaktorsicherheit , Germany)

    2005-10-01

    This multinational test program is quantifying the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device (HEDD) impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. The experimental work, performed in four consecutive test phases, has been in progress for several years. The overall program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation for nuclear security related evaluations. The spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC), and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes the preliminary, Phase 1 work performed in 2001 and 2002 at Sandia National Laboratories and the Fraunhofer Institute, Germany, and documents the experimental results obtained, observations, and preliminary interpretations. Phase 1 testing included: performance quantifications of the HEDD devices; characterization of the HEDD or conical shaped charge (CSC) jet properties with multiple tests; refinement of the aerosol particle collection apparatus being used; and, CSC jet-aerosol tests using leaded glass plates and glass pellets, serving as representative brittle materials. Phase 1 testing was quite important for the design and performance of the following Phase 2 test program and test apparatus.

  4. Impact of the volume of gaseous phase in closed reactors on ANC results and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drapeau, Clémentine; Delolme, Cécile; Lassabatere, Laurent; Blanc, Denise

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of the geochemical behavior of polluted solid materials is often challenging and requires huge expenses of time and money. Nevertheless, given the increasing amounts of polluted solid materials and related risks for the environment, it is more and more crucial to understand the leaching of majors and trace metals elements from these matrices. In the designs of methods to quantify pollutant solubilization, the combination of experimental procedures with modeling approaches has recently gained attention. Among usual methods, some rely on the association of ANC and geochemical modeling. ANC experiments - Acid Neutralization Capacity - consists in adding known quantities of acid or base to a mixture of water and contaminated solid materials at a given liquid / solid ratio in closed reactors. Reactors are agitated for 48h and then pH, conductivity, redox potential, carbon, majors and heavy metal solubilized are quantified. However, in most cases, the amounts of matrix and water do not reach the total volume of reactors, leaving some space for air (gaseous phase). Despite this fact, no clear indication is given in standard procedures about the effect of this gaseous phase. Even worse, the gaseous phase is never accounted for when exploiting or modeling ANC data. The gaseous phase may exchange CO2 with the solution, which may, in turn, impact both pH and element release. This study lies within the most general framework for the use of geochemical modeling for the prediction of ANC results for the case of pure phases to real phase assemblages. In this study, we focus on the effect of the gaseous phase on ANC experiments on different mineral phases through geochemical modeling. To do so, we use PHREEQC code to model the evolution of pH and element release (including majors and heavy metals) when several matrices are put in contact with acid or base. We model the following scenarios for the gaseous phase: no gas, contact with the atmosphere (open system

  5. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in alkaline media - Phase 2 results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, N. R.; Rance, A. P.; Fennell, P. A. H.; Kursten, B.

    2013-07-01

    In the Belgian Supercontainer concept a carbon steel overpack will surround high-level waste and spent fuel containers and be encased in a cementitious buffer material. A programme of research was carried out to investigate and measure the rate of anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in an artificial alkaline porewater that simulates the aqueous phase in the cementitious buffer material. The corrosion rates were measured by monitoring hydrogen evolution using a manometric gas cell technique and by applying electrochemical methods. Phase 2 of the programme has repeated and extended previous Phase 1 measurements of the effects of radiation, temperature and chloride concentration of the anaerobic corrosion rate. This paper provides an update on the results from Phase 2 of the programme. The results confirm previous conclusions that the long-term corrosion rate of carbon steel in alkaline simulated porewater is determined by the formation of a thin barrier layer and a thicker outer layer composed of magnetite. Anaerobic corrosion of steel in cement requires an external supply of water.

  6. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III results

  7. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  8. Results on decay with emission of two neutrinos or Majorons in Ge from GERDA Phase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Barros, N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Budjáš, D.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; di Vacri, A.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Fedorova, O.; Freund, K.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Csáthy, J. Janicskó; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Klimenko, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schulz, O.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stepaniuk, M.; Ur, C. A.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Walter, M.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wilsenach, H.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zavarise, P.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-09-01

    A search for neutrinoless decay processes accompanied with Majoron emission has been performed using data collected during Phase I of the GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN (Italy). Processes with spectral indices were searched for. No signals were found and lower limits of the order of 10 yr on their half-lives were derived, yielding substantially improved results compared to previous experiments with Ge. A new result for the half-life of the neutrino-accompanied decay of Ge with significantly reduced uncertainties is also given, resulting in yr.

  9. Use of the Remote Access Virtual Environment Network (RAVEN) for coordinated IVA-EVA astronaut training and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cater, J P; Huffman, S D

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a unique virtual reality training and assessment tool developed under a NASA grant, "Research in Human Factors Aspects of Enhanced Virtual Environments for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Training and Simulation." The Remote Access Virtual Environment Network (RAVEN) was created to train and evaluate the verbal, mental and physical coordination required between the intravehicular (IVA) astronaut operating the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm and the EVA astronaut standing in foot restraints on the end of the RMS. The RAVEN system currently allows the EVA astronaut to approach the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) under control of the IVA astronaut and grasp, remove, and replace the Wide Field Planetary Camera drawer from its location in the HST. Two viewpoints, one stereoscopic and one monoscopic, were created all linked by Ethernet, that provided the two trainees with the appropriate training environments. PMID:11539288

  10. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A major phase of the wind energy program is the development of reliable wind turbines for supplying cost-competitive electrical energy. This paper discusses the preliminary results of two projects in this phase of the program. First an experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are reviewed. Also discussed are the results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs. These studies show wind energy costs of 7 to 1.5 c/kWH for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 a year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  11. Heteroallelic missense mutations of the galactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) gene in a mild form of Morquio disease (MPS IVA)

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.E.C.; Gordon, B.A.; Rupar, C.A.

    1996-06-28

    Morquio disease (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) activity. Patients commonly present in early infancy with growth failure, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, corneal opacification, and keratan sulfaturia, but milder forms have been described. We report on a patient who grew normally until age 5 years. Her keratan sulfaturia was not detected until adolescence, and she now has changes restricted largely to the axial skeleton. She has experienced only mildly impaired vision. At age 22, thin-layer chromatography of purified glycosaminoglycans showed some keratan sulfaturia. GALNS activity in fibroblast homogenate supernatants was 20 {plus_minus} 5% of controls (as compared to 5 {plus_minus} 3% of controls in severe MPS IVA, P <.003). Kinetic analysis of residual fibroblast GALNS activity in patient and parents revealed decreased K{sub m} and increased V{sub max} in the mother and daughter, but not in the father, compatible with compound heterozygosity. GALNS exons were amplified from patient genomic DNA and screened by SSCP. Two missense mutations, a C to T transition at position 335 (predicting R94C) and a T to G transversion at position 344 (predicting F97V), were found on sequencing an abnormally migrating exon 3 amplicon. Digestion of the amplicon with FokI and AccI restriction enzymes (specific for the R94C and F97V mutations, respectively) confirmed heterozygosity. In fibroblast transfection experiments, heterozygous R94C and F97V mutants independently expressed as severe and mile GALNS deficiency, respectively. We interpret these findings to indicate that our patient bears heteroallelic GALNS missense mutations, leading to GALNS deficiency and mild MPS IVA. Our findings expand the clinical and biochemical phenotype of MPS IVA, but full delineation of the genotype-phenotype relationship requires further study of native and transfected mutant cell lines. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Re-187-Os-187, Pt-190-Os-186 Isotopic and Highly Siderophile Element Systematics of Group IVA Irons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; McCoy, T. J.; Schulte, R. F.; McDonough, W. F.; Ash, R. D.

    2005-01-01

    We have recently completed Re-187-Os-187 and Pt-190-Os-186 isotopic and elemental studies of the two largest magmatic iron meteorite groups, IIAB and IIIAB [1]. These studies revealed closed-system behavior of both isotopic systems, but complex trace element behavior for Re, Pt and Os in group IIIAB. Here we examine isotopic and trace elemental systematics of group IVA irons. The IVA irons are not as extensively fractionated as IIAB and IIIAB and their apparently less complex crystallization history may make for more robust interpretation of the relative partitioning behavior of Re, Pt and Os, as well as the other highly siderophile elements (HSE) measured here; Pd, Ru and Ir [e.g. 2]. An additional goal of our continuing research plan for iron meteorites is to assess the possibility of relating certain ungrouped irons with major groups via trace element modeling. Here, the isotopic and trace element systematics of the ungrouped irons Nedagolla and EET 83230 are compared with the IVA irons.

  13. Crystal structure of soluble MD-1 and its interaction with lipid IVa

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-il; Hong, Minsun; Han, Gye Won; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-07-22

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria is a common pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) that induces potent innate immune responses. The host immune response against LPS is triggered by myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) in association with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on the cell surface. The MD-2/TLR4-mediated LPS response is regulated by the evolutionarily related complex of MD-1 and Toll-like receptor homolog RP105. Here, we report crystallographic and biophysical data that demonstrate a previously unidentified direct interaction of MD-1 with LPS. The crystal structure of chicken MD-1 (cMD-1) at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution exhibits a {beta}-cup-like fold, similar to MD-2, that encloses a hydrophobic cavity between the two {beta}-sheets. A lipid-like moiety was observed inside the cavity, suggesting the possibility of a direct MD-1/LPS interaction. LPS was subsequently identified as an MD-1 ligand by native gel electrophoresis and gel filtration analyses. The crystal structure of cMD-1 with lipid IVa, an LPS precursor, at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution revealed that the lipid inserts into the deep hydrophobic cavity of the {beta}-cup-like structure, but with some important differences compared with MD-2. These findings suggest that soluble MD-1 alone, in addition to its complex with RP105, can regulate host LPS sensitivity.

  14. Influence of temperature on viral hemorrhagic septicemia (Genogroup IVa) in Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii Valenciennes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Purcell, M.K.; Hart, L.M.; Gregg, J.L.; Thompson, R.L.; Garver, K.A.; Winton, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    An inverse relationship between water temperature and susceptibility of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) to viral hemorrhagic septicemia, genogroup IVa (VHS) was indicated by controlled exposure studies where cumulative mortalities, viral shedding rates, and viral persistence in survivors were greatest at the coolest exposure temperatures. Among groups of specific pathogen-free (SPF) Pacific herring maintained at 8, 11, and 15 °C, cumulative mortalities after waterborne exposure to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) were 78%, 40%, and 13%, respectively. The prevalence of survivors with VHSV-positive tissues 25 d post-exposure was 64%, 16%, and 0% (at 8, 11 and 15 °C, respectively) with viral prevalence typically higher in brain tissues than in kidney/spleen tissue pools at each temperature. Similarly, geometric mean viral titers in brain tissues and kidney/spleen tissue pools decreased at higher temperatures, and kidney/spleen titers were generally 10-fold lower than those in brain tissues at each temperature. This inverse relationship between temperature and VHS severity was likely mediated by an enhanced immune response at the warmer temperatures, where a robust type I interferon response was indicated by rapid and significant upregulation of the herring Mx gene. The effect of relatively small temperature differences on the susceptibility of a natural host to VHS provides insights into conditions that preface periodic VHSV epizootics in wild populations throughout the NE Pacific.

  15. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, T.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary results of two projects in the development phase of reliable wind turbines designed to supply cost-competitive electrical energy were discussed. An experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are first reviewed. The results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs are also discussed. These studies predict wind energy costs of 1.5 to 7 cents per kW-h for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 per year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  16. A three-phase series-parallel resonant converter -- analysis, design, simulation and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, A.K.S.; Zheng, L.

    1995-12-31

    A three-phase dc-to-dc series-parallel resonant converter is proposed and its operating modes for 180{degree} wide gating pulse scheme are explained. A detailed analysis of the converter using constant current model and Fourier series approach is presented. Based on the analysis, design curves are obtained and a design example of 1 kW converter is given. SPICE simulation results for the designed converter and experimental results for a 500 W converter are presented to verify the performance of the proposed converter for varying load conditions. The converter operates in lagging PF mode for the entire load range and requires a narrow variation in switching frequency.

  17. Thermal and impact histories of reheated group IVA, IVB, and ungrouped iron meteorites and their parent asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Goldstein, J. I.; Scott, E. R. D.; Michael, J. R.; Kotula, P. G.; Pham, T.; McCoy, T. J.

    2011-09-01

    Abstract- The microstructures of six reheated iron meteorites—two IVA irons, Maria Elena (1935), Fuzzy Creek; one IVB iron, Ternera; and three ungrouped irons, Hammond, Babb’s Mill (Blake’s Iron), and Babb’s Mill (Troost’s Iron)—were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron-probe microanalysis, and electron backscatter diffraction techniques to determine their thermal and shock history and that of their parent asteroids. Maria Elena and Hammond were heated below approximately 700-750 °C, so that kamacite was recrystallized and taenite was exsolved in kamacite and was spheroidized in plessite. Both meteorites retained a record of the original Widmanstätten pattern. The other four, which show no trace of their original microstructure, were heated above 600-700 °C and recrystallized to form 10-20 μm wide homogeneous taenite grains. On cooling, kamacite formed on taenite grain boundaries with their close-packed planes aligned. Formation of homogeneous 20 μm wide taenite grains with diverse orientations would have required as long as approximately 800 yr at 600 °C or approximately 1 h at 1300 °C. All six irons contain approximately 5-10 μm wide taenite grains with internal microprecipitates of kamacite and nanometer-scale M-shaped Ni profiles that reach approximately 40% Ni indicating cooling over 100-10,000 yr. Un-decomposed high-Ni martensite (α2) in taenite—the first occurrence in irons—appears to be a characteristic of strongly reheated irons. From our studies and published work, we identified four progressive stages of shock and reheating in IVA irons using these criteria: cloudy taenite, M-shaped Ni profiles in taenite, Neumann twin lamellae, martensite, shock-hatched kamacite, recrystallization, microprecipitates of taenite, and shock-melted troilite. Maria Elena and Fuzzy Creek represent stages 3 and 4, respectively. Although not all reheated irons contain evidence for shock, it was probably the main

  18. Moving formal methods into practice. Verifying the FTPP Scoreboard: Results, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivas, Mandayam; Bickford, Mark

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the Phase 1 results of an effort aimed at formally verifying a key hardware component, called Scoreboard, of a Fault-Tolerant Parallel Processor (FTPP) being built at Charles Stark Draper Laboratory (CSDL). The Scoreboard is part of the FTPP virtual bus that guarantees reliable communication between processors in the presence of Byzantine faults in the system. The Scoreboard implements a piece of control logic that approves and validates a message before it can be transmitted. The goal of Phase 1 was to lay the foundation of the Scoreboard verification. A formal specification of the functional requirements and a high-level hardware design for the Scoreboard were developed. The hardware design was based on a preliminary Scoreboard design developed at CSDL. A main correctness theorem, from which the functional requirements can be established as corollaries, was proved for the Scoreboard design. The goal of Phase 2 is to verify the final detailed design of Scoreboard. This task is being conducted as part of a NASA-sponsored effort to explore integration of formal methods in the development cycle of current fault-tolerant architectures being built in the aerospace industry.

  19. High Rate User Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caroglanian, Armen; Perko, Kenneth; Seufert, Steve; Dod, Tom; Warshowsky, Jay; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The High Rate User Phased Array Antenna (HRUPAA) is a Ka-Band planar phased array designed by the Harris Corporation for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The HRUPAA permits a satellite to downlink data either to a ground station or through the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The HRUPAA is scanned electronically by ground station / user satellite command over a 120 degree cone angle. The phased array has the advantage of not imparting attitude disturbances to the user spacecraft. The 288-element transmit-only array has distributed RF amplifiers integrated behind each of the printed patch antenna elements. The array has 33 dBW EIRP and is left-hand circularly polarized. An engineering model of a partially populated array has been developed and delivered to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This report deals with the testing of the engineering model at the Goddard Antenna Range near-field and compact range facilities. The antenna specifications are described first, followed by the test plan and test results.

  20. Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine With Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer: Phase I Trial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Czito, Brian G. . E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu; Bendell, Johanna C.; Willett, Christopher G.; Morse, Michael A.; Blobe, Gerard C.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Thomas, John; Ludwig, Kirk A.; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Ashton, Jill; Yu Daohai; Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is associated with poor outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Bevacizumab, a VEGF inhibitor, enhances the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on tumor cytotoxicity in preclinical models, including colorectal cancer. A Phase I trial was undertaken to evaluate the combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum were eligible. Pretreatment staging included computerized tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical evaluation. Patients received 50.4 Gy of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the tumor in 28 fractions. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab were administered concurrently with radiation therapy. After EBRT completion, patients were restaged and evaluated for surgery. Primary endpoints included the determination of dose-limiting toxicity and a recommended Phase II dose, non dose-limiting toxicity, and preliminary radiographic and pathologic response rates. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled. All were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Dose level 2 was associated with unacceptable toxicity (primarily diarrhea). Dose level 1 had an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended Phase II dose in our study was bevacizumab 15 mg/kg Day 1 + 10 mg/kg Days 8 and 22, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly, and capecitabine 625 mg/m{sup 2} bid during radiation days. Six patients had clinical responses. Two patients had a pathologic complete response, and 3 had microscopic disease only. One patient experienced a postoperative abscess, one a syncopal episode during adjuvant chemotherapy, and one a subclinical myocardial infarction during adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions: The combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in rectal cancer was tolerable, with encouraging response rates. Further

  1. OECD/NEA burnup credit calculational criticality benchmark Phase I-B results

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.; Brady, M.C.

    1996-06-01

    In most countries, criticality analysis of LWR fuel stored in racks and casks has assumed that the fuel is fresh with the maximum allowable initial enrichment. This assumption has led to the design of widely spaced and/or highly poisoned storage and transport arrays. If credit is assumed for fuel burnup, initial enrichment limitations can be raised in existing systems, and more compact and economical arrays can be designed. Such reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control is referred to as burnup credit. The Burnup Credit Working Group, formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods agree to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods agree within 11% about the average for all fission products studied. Most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are Sm 149, Sm 151, and Gd 155.

  2. OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Calculational Criticality Benchmark Phase I-B Results

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Burnup credit is an ongoing technical concern for many countries that operate commercial nuclear power reactors. In a multinational cooperative effort to resolve burnup credit issues, a Burnup Credit Working Group has been formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. This working group has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide, and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods are in agreement to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods are within 11% agreement about the average for all fission products studied. Furthermore, most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are {sup 149}Sm, {sup 151}Sm, and {sup 155}Gd.

  3. Bases, Assumptions, and Results of the Flowsheet Calculations for the Decision Phase Salt Disposition Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dimenna, R.A.; Jacobs, R.A.; Taylor, G.A.; Durate, O.E.; Paul, P.K.; Elder, H.H.; Pike, J.A.; Fowler, J.R.; Rutland, P.L.; Gregory, M.V.; Smith III, F.G.; Hang, T.; Subosits, S.G.; Campbell, S.G.

    2001-03-26

    The High Level Waste (HLW) Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team was formed on March 13, 1998, and chartered to identify options, evaluate alternatives, and recommend a selected alternative(s) for processing HLW salt to a permitted wasteform. This requirement arises because the existing In-Tank Precipitation process at the Savannah River Site, as currently configured, cannot simultaneously meet the HLW production and Authorization Basis safety requirements. This engineering study was performed in four phases. This document provides the technical bases, assumptions, and results of this engineering study.

  4. Investor Outlook: Significance of the Positive LCA2 Gene Therapy Phase III Results.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Spark Therapeutics recently reported positive phase III results for SPK-RPE65 targeting the treatment of visual impairment caused by RPE65 gene mutations (often referred to as Leber congenital amaurosis type 2, or LCA2, but may include other retinal disorders), marking an important inflection point for the field of gene therapy. The results highlight the ability to successfully design and execute a randomized trial of a gene therapy and also reinforce the potentially predictive nature of early preclinical and clinical data. The results are expected to pave the way for the first approved gene therapy product in the United States and should sustain investor interest and confidence in gene therapy for many approaches, including retina targeting and beyond. PMID:26684444

  5. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect that a planar surface located near a jet flow has on the noise radiated to the far-field. Two different configurations were tested: 1) a shielding configuration in which the surface was located between the jet and the far-field microphones, and 2) a reflecting configuration in which the surface was mounted on the opposite side of the jet, and thus the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Both conventional far-field microphone and phased array noise source localization measurements were obtained. This paper discusses phased array results, while a companion paper discusses far-field results. The phased array data show that the axial distribution of noise sources in a jet can vary greatly depending on the jet operating condition and suggests that it would first be necessary to know or be able to predict this distribution in order to be able to predict the amount of noise reduction to expect from a given shielding configuration. The data obtained on both subsonic and supersonic jets show that the noise sources associated with a given frequency of noise tend to move downstream, and therefore, would become more difficult to shield, as jet Mach number increases. The noise source localization data obtained on cold, shock-containing jets suggests that the constructive interference of sound waves that produces noise at a given frequency within a broadband shock noise hump comes primarily from a small number of shocks, rather than from all the shocks at the same time. The reflecting configuration data illustrates that the law of reflection must be satisfied in order for jet noise to reflect off of a surface to an observer, and depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface, and the observer, only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement.

  6. Recent Results from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission and Plans for the Extended Science Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vondrak, Richard; Keller, John W.; Chin, Gordon; Petro, Noah; Garvin, James B.; Rice, James W.

    2012-01-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft (LRO), launched on June 18, 2009, began with the goal of seeking safe landing sites for future robotic missions or the return of humans to the Moon as part of NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD). In addition, LRO's objectives included the search for surface resources and to investigate the Lunar radiation environment. After spacecraft commissioning, the ESMD phase of the mission began on September 15, 2009 and completed on September 15, 2010 when operational responsibility for LRO was transferred to NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD). The SMD mission was scheduled for 2 years and completed in September, 2012. The LRO mission has been extended for two years under SMD. The extended mission focuses on a new set of goals related to understanding the geologic history of the Moon, its current state, and what it can tell us about the evolution Of the Solar System. Here we will review the major results from the LRO mission for both exploration and science and discuss plans and objectives going forward including plans for the extended science phase out to 2014. Results from the LRO mission include but are not limited to the development of comprehensive high resolution maps and digital terrain models of the lunar surface; discoveries on the nature of hydrogen distribution, and by extension water, at the lunar poles; measurement of the day and night time temperature of the lunar surface including temperature down below 30 K in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs); direct measurement of Hg, H2, and CO deposits in the PSRs, evidence for recent tectonic activity on the Moon, and high resolution maps of the illumination conditions as the poles. The objectives for the second and extended science phases of the mission under SMD include: 1) understanding the bombardment history of the Moon, 2) interpreting Lunar geologic processes, 3) mapping the global Lunar regolith, 4) identifying volatiles on the Moon, and 5

  7. Self-contained self-rescuer long term field evaluation: combined eighth and ninth phase results

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-15

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory (NPPTL) and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) conduct a Long Term Field Evaluation (LTFE) program to evaluate deployed self-contained self rescuers (SCSRs). The objective of the program is to evaluate how well SCSRs endure the underground coal mining environment with regard to both physical damage and aging when they are deployed in accordance with Federal regulations (30 CFR 75.1714). This report presents findings of the combined eighth and ninth phases of the LTFE. For these phases, over four hundred SCSRs were evaluated. The units tested include the CSE SR-100, Draeger Oxy K-Plus, MSA Life-saver 60, and the OCENCO EBA 6.5. The OCENCO 20 was evaluated only in Phase 9. Testing was performed between December 2000 and April 2004. Results of the evaluation indicate that all SCSRs experience some performance degradation due to the mining environment. Observed degradation varies from elevated levels of carbon dioxide, high breathing resistance, and reduced capacity. Mechanical degradation to the SCSR components included breathing hoses, chemical beds, outer cases and seals. The LTFE tests discussed in this report are different from tests performed for SCSR certification to the requirements of 42 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 84 (42 CFR, Part 84). LTFE tests reported here are conducted to an end point, oxygen depletion, to enable comparison of the duration of new and deployed SCSRs. The method for obtaining deployed SCSRs for this evaluation was not a random selection from the deployed population of SCSRs. Although the results of these tests are useful for observing performance of the tested SCSRs, they are not representative of all deployed SCSRs. 9 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs., 3 apps.

  8. Switching From Oral Donepezil to Rivastigmine Transdermal Patch in Alzheimer's Disease: 20-Week Extension Phase Results

    PubMed Central

    Dengiz, Alan; Meng, Xiangyi; Olin, Jason T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the long-term safety, tolerability, and efficacy of 2 strategies for switching from donepezil to rivastigmine transdermal patches in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. Method: This was a prospective, 25-week, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study to evaluate an immediate or delayed switch (7-day withdrawal) from donepezil (5 to 10 mg/d) to rivastigmine transdermal patches (4.6 mg/24 h). Participants included male and female patients, aged ≥ 50 years, with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer's type, defined as a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 10–24, inclusive. Patients were enrolled between February 2007 and February 2008. The study was split into a 5-week core phase and a 20-week extension phase. Safety and efficacy results from the extension phase are presented. Results: Both switching strategies were well tolerated. Rates of discontinuation for any reason were similar between the groups. Discontinuations due to adverse events were also similar, and the incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events was low. Apart from Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study–Activities of Daily Living Scale scores, at the end of the study, there was no statistically significant change from baseline in cognitive, behavioral, or global outcomes. Over half of the patients preferred rivastigmine transdermal patches to a tablet. Conclusions: This study suggests that the majority of patients receiving donepezil tablets can be safely switched to rivastigmine transdermal patches without significant deterioration in cognition, behavior, and global functioning. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00305903 PMID:21274364

  9. Phase-space analysis and experimental results for secondary focusing at X-ray beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Rong; Meron, Mati; Kujala, Naresh; Barrea, Raul A.

    2011-11-17

    Micro-focusing optical devices at synchrotron beamlines usually have a limited acceptance, but more flux can be intercepted if such optics are used to focus secondary sources created by the primary optics. Flux throughput can be maximized by placing the secondary focusing optics close to or exactly at the secondary source position. However, standard methods of beamline optics analysis, such as the lens equation or matching the mirror surface to an ellipse, work poorly when the source-to-optics distance is very short. In this paper the general characteristics of the focusing of beams with Gaussian profiles by a 'thin lens' are analysed under the paraxial approximation in phase space, concluding that the focusing of a beam with a short source-to-optics distance is distinct from imaging the source; slope errors are successfully included in all the formulas so that they can be used to calculate beamline focusing with good accuracy. A method is also introduced to use the thin-lens result to analyse the micro-focusing produced by an elliptically bent trapezoid-shaped Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror. The results of this analysis are in good agreement with ray-tracing simulations and are confirmed by the experimental results of the secondary focusing at the 18-ID Bio-CAT beamline (at the APS). The result of secondary focusing carried out at 18-ID using a single-bounce capillary can also be explained using this phase-space analysis. A discussion of the secondary focusing results is presented at the end of this paper.

  10. Results on Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay from Gerda Phase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macolino, Carla

    2014-12-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, is designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge and it is installed in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN, Italy. In this review, the detection principle and detector setup of GERDA are described. Also, the main physics results by GERDA Phase I, are discussed. They include the measurement of the half-life of 2νββ decay, the background decomposition of the energy spectrum and the techniques for the discrimination of the background, based on the pulse shape of the signal. In the last part of this review, the estimation of a limit on the half-life of 0νββ (T0ν 1/2>2.1ḑot 1025 yr at 90% C.L.) and the comparison with previous results are discussed. GERDA data from Phase I strongly disfavor the recent claim of 0νββ discovery, based on data from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment.

  11. Smagglce: Surface Modeling and Grid Generation for Iced Airfoils: Phase 1 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Choo, Yung K.; Braun, Donald C.; Baez, Marivell; Gnepp, Steven

    1999-01-01

    SmaggIce (Surface Modeling and Grid Generation for Iced Airfoils) is a software toolkit used in the process of aerodynamic performance prediction of iced airfoils with grid-based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). It includes tools for data probing, boundary smoothing, domain decomposition, and structured grid generation and refinement. SmaggIce provides the underlying computations to perform these functions, a GUI (Graphical User Interface) to control and interact with those functions, and graphical displays of results, it is being developed at NASA Glenn Research Center. This paper discusses the overall design of SmaggIce as well as what has been implemented in Phase 1. Phase 1 results provide two types of software tools: interactive ice shape probing and interactive ice shape control. The ice shape probing tools will provide aircraft icing engineers and scientists with an interactive means to measure the physical characteristics of ice shapes. On the other hand, the ice shape control features of SmaggIce will allow engineers to examine input geometry data, correct or modify any deficiencies in the geometry, and perform controlled systematic smoothing to a level that will make the CFD process manageable.

  12. The Langley Research Center CSI phase-0 evolutionary model testbed-design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.; Horta, Lucas G.; Elliott, K. B.

    1991-01-01

    A testbed for the development of Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) technology is described. The design philosophy, capabilities, and early experimental results are presented to introduce some of the ongoing CSI research at NASA-Langley. The testbed, referred to as the Phase 0 version of the CSI Evolutionary model (CEM), is the first stage of model complexity designed to show the benefits of CSI technology and to identify weaknesses in current capabilities. Early closed loop test results have shown non-model based controllers can provide an order of magnitude increase in damping in the first few flexible vibration modes. Model based controllers for higher performance will need to be robust to model uncertainty as verified by System ID tests. Data are presented that show finite element model predictions of frequency differ from those obtained from tests. Plans are also presented for evolution of the CEM to study integrated controller and structure design as well as multiple payload dynamics.

  13. A three-phase series-parallel resonant converter -- analysis, design, simulation, and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, A.K.S.; Zheng, R.L.

    1996-07-01

    A three-phase dc-to-dc series-parallel resonant converter is proposed /and its operating modes for a 180{degree} wide gating pulse scheme are explained. A detailed analysis of the converter using a constant current model and the Fourier series approach is presented. Based on the analysis, design curves are obtained and a design example of a 1-kW converter is given. SPICE simulation results for the designed converter and experimental results for a 500-W converter are presented to verify the performance of the proposed converter for varying load conditions. The converter operates in lagging power factor (PF) mode for the entire load range and requires a narrow variation in switching frequency, to adequately regulate the output power.

  14. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 1 and 2: Testing and Modeling Results; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; LaCava, W.; Link, H.; McNiff, B.

    2012-05-01

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) investigates root causes of wind turbine gearbox premature failures and validates design assumptions that affect gearbox reliability using a combined testing and modeling approach. Knowledge gained from the testing and modeling of the GRC gearboxes builds an understanding of how the selected loads and events translate into internal responses of three-point mounted gearboxes. This paper presents some testing and modeling results of the GRC research during Phase 1 and 2. Non-torque loads from the rotor including shaft bending and thrust, traditionally assumed to be uncoupled with gearbox, affect gear and bearing loads and resulting gearbox responses. Bearing clearance increases bearing loads and causes cyclic loading, which could contribute to a reduced bearing life. Including flexibilities of key drivetrain subcomponents is important in order to reproduce the measured gearbox response during the tests using modeling approaches.

  15. Final report of the APRICOT Program and results of Phase 3. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    APRICOT (Analysis of PRImary COntainment Transients) was a cooperative activity for comparison and benchmarking of computational methods used to analyze LMFBR (Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor) structural response to pressure loads from HCDA's (Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents). The participants were LMFBR project groups from Europe, Japan and the United States. Independent experts reviewed the calculations for the purpose of comparing computational results and methods of solution. Phase 3 involved a series of simple calculations of structural response and fluid-structure interactions under elastic and elastic-plastic conditions. The results were generally in reasonable agreement although there were a few anomalies. The APRICOT program has provided significant code validation data to enhance confidence in numerical simulations of HCDA's. It has also demonstrated the value of this type of benchmark activity.

  16. CANARY phase B: on-sky open-loop tomographic LGS AO results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Tim; Gendron, Eric; Basden, Alastair; Martin, Olivier; Osborn, James; Henry, David; Hubert, Zoltan; Sivo, Gaetano; Gratadour, Damien; Chemla, Fanny; Sevin, Arnaud; Cohen, Matthieu; Younger, Eddy; Vidal, Fabrice; Wilson, Richard; Butterley, Tim; Bitenc, Urban; Reeves, Andrew; Bharmal, Nazim; Raynaud, Henri-François; Kulcsar, Caroline; Conan, Jean-Marc; Huet, Jean-Michel; Perret, Denis; Dickson, Colin; Atkinson, David; Bailie, Tom; Longmore, Andy; Todd, Stephen; Talbot, Gordon; Morris, Simon; Rousset, Gérard; Myers, Richard

    2014-07-01

    CANARY is an on-sky Laser Guide Star (LGS) tomographic AO demonstrator that has been in operation at the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma since 2010. In 2013, CANARY was upgraded from its initial configuration that used three off-axis Natural Guide Stars (NGS) through the inclusion of four off-axis Rayleigh LGS and associated wavefront sensing system. Here we present the system and analysis of the on-sky results obtained at the WHT between May and September 2014. Finally we present results from the final `Phase C' CANARY system that aims to recreate the tomographic configuration to emulate the expected tomographic AO configuration of both the AOF at the VLT and E-ELT.

  17. Controls-structures interaction guest investigator program: Overview and phase 1 experimental results and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith-Taylor, Rudeen; Tanner, Sharon E.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator program is described in terms of its support of the development of CSI technologies. The program is based on the introduction of CSI researchers from industry and academia to available test facilities for experimental validation of technologies and methods. Phase 1 experimental results are reviewed with attention given to their use of the Mini-MAST test facility and the facility for the Advance Control Evaluation of Structures. Experiments were conducted regarding the following topics: collocated/noncollocated controllers, nonlinear math modeling, controller design, passive/active suspension systems design, and system identification and fault isolation. The results demonstrate that significantly enhanced performance from the control techniques can be achieved by integrating knowledge of the structural dynamics under consideration into the approaches.

  18. Phase Transition-like Behavior of Magnetospheric Substorms: Global MHD Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Sitnov, M.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Guzdar, P. N.; Goodrich, C. C.; Milikh, G. M.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J. G.

    2001-12-01

    Because of their relevance to massive global energy loading and unloading, lots of observations and studies have been made for magnetic substorm events. Using nonlinear dynamical techniques, we investigate whether the simulated substorms from global MHD models have the non-equilibrium phase transition-like features revealed by \\markcite{Sitnov et al. [2000]}. We simulated 6 intervals of total duration of 240 hours from the same data set used in Sitnov et al. [2000]. We analyzed the input-output (vBs--pseudo-AL index) system obtained from the global MHD model and compared the results to those in \\markcite{Sitnov et al. [2000, 2001]}. The analysis of the coupled vBs--pseudo-AL index system shows the first-order phase transition map, which is consistent with the map obtained for the vBs--observed-AL index system from Sitnov et al. [2000]. The explanation lies in the cusp catastrophe model proposed by Lewis [1991]. Although, the comparison between observation and individual global MHD simulations may vary, the overall global transition pattern during the substorm cycle revealed by Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) is consistent between simulations and observations. This is an important validation of the global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. The coupled vBs--pseudo-AL index system shows multi-scale behavior (scale-invarianet power-law dependence) in singular power spectrum. We found critical exponents of the non-equilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere, which reflect the multi-scale aspect of the substorm activity, different from power-law frequency of autonomous systems. The exponents relate input and output parameters of the magnetosphere and distinguish the second order phase transition model from the self-organized criticality model. We also discuss the limitations of the global MHD model in reproducing the multi-scale behavior when compared to the real system.

  19. Final results of Borexino Phase-I on low-energy solar neutrino spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Pena-Garay, C.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Wurm, M.; Xu, J.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.; Borexino Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Borexino has been running since May 2007 at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy with the primary goal of detecting solar neutrinos. The detector, a large, unsegmented liquid scintillator calorimeter characterized by unprecedented low levels of intrinsic radioactivity, is optimized for the study of the lower energy part of the spectrum. During Phase-I (2007-2010), Borexino first detected and then precisely measured the flux of the Be7 solar neutrinos, ruled out any significant day-night asymmetry of their interaction rate, made the first direct observation of the pep neutrinos, and set the tightest upper limit on the flux of solar neutrinos produced in the CNO cycle (carbon, nitrogen, oxigen) where carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen serve as catalysts in the fusion process. In this paper we discuss the signal signature and provide a comprehensive description of the backgrounds, quantify their event rates, describe the methods for their identification, selection, or subtraction, and describe data analysis. Key features are an extensive in situ calibration program using radioactive sources, the detailed modeling of the detector response, the ability to define an innermost fiducial volume with extremely low background via software cuts, and the excellent pulse-shape discrimination capability of the scintillator that allows particle identification. We report a measurement of the annual modulation of the Be7 neutrino interaction rate. The period, the amplitude, and the phase of the observed modulation are consistent with the solar origin of these events, and the absence of their annual modulation is rejected with higher than 99% C.L. The physics implications of Phase-I results in the context of the neutrino oscillation physics and solar models are presented.

  20. Simbol-X Hard X-ray Focusing Mirrors: Results Obtained During the Phase A Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliaferri, G.; Basso, S.; Borghi, G.; Burkert, W.; Citterio, O.; Civitani, M.; Conconi, P.; Cotroneo, V.; Freyberg, M.; Garoli, D.; Gorenstein, P.; Hartner, G.; Mattarello, V.; Orlandi, A.; Pareschi, G.; Romaine, S.; Spiga, D.; Valsecchi, G.; Vernani, D.

    2009-05-01

    Simbol-X will push grazing incidence imaging up to 80 keV, providing a strong improvement both in sensitivity and angular resolution compared to all instruments that have operated so far above 10 keV. The superb hard X-ray imaging capability will be guaranteed by a mirror module of 100 electroformed Nickel shells with a multilayer reflecting coating. Here we will describe the technogical development and solutions adopted for the fabrication of the mirror module, that must guarantee an Half Energy Width (HEW) better than 20 arcsec from 0.5 up to 30 keV and a goal of 40 arcsec at 60 keV. During the phase A, terminated at the end of 2008, we have developed three engineering models with two, two and three shells, respectively. The most critical aspects in the development of the Simbol-X mirrors are i) the production of the 100 mandrels with very good surface quality within the timeline of the mission, ii) the replication of shells that must be very thin (a factor of 2 thinner than those of XMM-Newton) and still have very good image quality up to 80 keV, iii) the development of an integration process that allows us to integrate these very thin mirrors maintaining their intrinsic good image quality. The Phase A study has shown that we can fabricate the mandrels with the needed quality and that we have developed a valid integration process. The shells that we have produced so far have a quite good image quality, e.g. HEW <~30 arcsec at 30 keV, and effective area. However, we still need to make some improvements to reach the requirements. We will briefly present these results and discuss the possible improvements that we will investigate during phase B.

  1. Phase transition-like behavior of magnetospheric substorms: Global MHD simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Sitnov, M. I.; Sharma, S. A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Goodrich, C. C.; Guzdar, P. N.; Milikh, G. M.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    Using nonlinear dynamical techniques, we statistically investigate whether the simulated substorms from global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models have a combination of global and multiscale features, revealed in substorm dynamics by [2000] and featured the phase transition-like behavior. We simulate seven intervals of total duration of 280 hours from the data set used in the above works [, 1985]. We analyze the input-output (vBs-pseudo AL index) system obtained from the global MHD model and compare the results to those inferred from the original set (vBs-observed AL index). The analysis of the coupled vBs-pseudo AL index system shows the first-order phase transition map, which is consistent with the map obtained for the vBs-observed AL index system. Although the comparison between observations and global MHD simulations for individual events may vary, the overall global transition pattern during the substorm cycle revealed by singular spectrum analysis (SSA) is statistically consistent between simulations and observations. The coupled vBs-pseudo AL index system also shows multiscale behavior (scale-invariant power law dependence) in SSA power spectrum. Besides, we find the critical exponent of the nonequilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere, which reflects the multiscale aspect of the substorm activity, different from power law frequency of autonomous systems. The exponent relates input and output parameters of the magnetosphere. We also discuss the limitations of the global MHD model in reproducing the multiscale behavior when compared to the real system.

  2. Summary of test results for the cryogenic two-phase flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Theodore D.; Buchko, Matthew T.; Bello, Mel; Brennan, Patrick; Stoyanof, Marco M.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a brief summary of the flight results for the Cryogenic Two-Phase Flight Experiment (CRYOTP). This experiment was a Hitchhiker-based payload that flew on the space shuttle Columbia in March of 1994 (STS-62). CRYOTP tested two new technologies for advanced cryogenic thermal control; the Space Heat Pipe (SHP), which was a constant conductance cryogenic heat pipe, and the Brilliant Eyes Thermal Storage Unit (BETSU), which was a cryogenic phase-change thermal storage device. Both devices were tested independently during the mission. Analysis of the flight data indicated that the SHP was unable to start in either of two attempts, due to a supercritical startup limit related to the wall material thermal conductivity, parasitic heat leaks, and cryocooler capacity. The BETSU test article was successfully operated with more than 250 hours of on-orbit testing including several cooldown cycles and 56 freeze/thaw cycles. Some degradation was observed with the five tactical cryocoolers used as thermal sinks, and one of the cryocoolers failed completely after 331 hours of operation. Post-flight analysis indicated that this problem was most likely due to failure of an electrical controller internal to the unit.

  3. Results and Lessons Learned from Phase 1 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A summary of the key findings from the model evaluation studies performed for the Phase 1 annual 2006 North American and European simulations, as well as reflections on experiences gained during Phase 1 that will be important for guiding the implementation of Phase 2 of the Air Q...

  4. Detection and genetic characterization of PVL-positive ST8-MRSA-IVa and exfoliative toxin D-positive European CA-MRSA-Like ST1931 (CC80) MRSA-IVa strains in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Ghosh, Souvik; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Urushibara, Noriko; Hossain, Mohammad Akram; Ahmed, Salma; Mahmud, Chand; Jilani, Md Shariful Alam; Haq, Jalaluddin Ashraful; Ahmed, Abdullah Akhtar; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2014-08-01

    Severe skin lesions caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection are associated with production from bacterial cells of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a typical virulence factor of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA), as well as other toxins represented by exfoliative toxins. Through a retrospective study of 26 S. aureus strains isolated from skin lesions of diabetic patients admitted to a hospital in Bangladesh, 2 PVL-gene-positive MRSA-IVa strains and 8 PVL-negative, exfoliative toxin D (ETD) gene (etd)-positive MRSA-IVa strains were isolated. A PVL-positive MRSA-IVa strain had a type I arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), belonged to ST8/agr-type I/spa-type t121 (a variant of t008), and harbored blaZ, tet(K), msrA, and aph(3')-IIIa, which are mostly typical characteristics found in USA300, a predominant CA-MRSA clone in the United States. Another PVL-positive MRSA strain, belonging to ST1929 (CC88)/agr-type III/spa-type t3341, was negative for ACME, but possessed blaZ and tet(K). The etd-positive MRSA-IVa strains possessed the epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor B (EDIN-B)-encoding gene (edinB) and belonged to ST1931 (CC80)/agr-type III/spa-type t11023 (a variant of t044), which was genetic trait similar to that of the European CA-MRSA ST80 clone. However, unlike the European ST80 strains, the etd-positive MRSA strains detected in the present study harbored seb, sek, and seq, while they were negative for tet(K), aph(3')-IIIa, and fusB, showing susceptibility to fusidic acid. These findings suggested that etd-positive ST1931 MRSA strains belong to the same lineage as the European ST80 MRSA clone, evolving from a common ancestral clone via acquisition of a different pathogenicity island. This is the first report of a USA300-like MRSA-IV strain, PVL-positive ST1929 (CC88) MRSA-IV, and European ST80 CA-MRSA-like etd-positive ST1931 (CC80) MRSA-IV strains isolated in Bangladesh. PMID:24552553

  5. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect that a planar surface located near a jet flow has on the noise radiated to the far-field. Two different configurations were tested: 1) a shielding configuration in which the surface was located between the jet and the far-field microphones, and 2) a reflecting configuration in which the surface was mounted on the opposite side of the jet, and thus the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Both conventional far-field microphone and phased array noise source localization measurements were obtained. This paper discusses phased array results, while a companion paper (Brown, C.A., "Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Far-Field Noise Results," ASME paper GT2012-69639, June 2012.) discusses far-field results. The phased array data show that the axial distribution of noise sources in a jet can vary greatly depending on the jet operating condition and suggests that it would first be necessary to know or be able to predict this distribution in order to be able to predict the amount of noise reduction to expect from a given shielding configuration. The data obtained on both subsonic and supersonic jets show that the noise sources associated with a given frequency of noise tend to move downstream, and therefore, would become more difficult to shield, as jet Mach number increases. The noise source localization data obtained on cold, shock-containing jets suggests that the constructive interference of sound waves that produces noise at a given frequency within a broadband shock noise hump comes primarily from a small number of shocks, rather than from all the shocks at the same time. The reflecting configuration data illustrates that the law of reflection must be satisfied in order for jet noise to reflect off of a surface to an observer, and depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface, and the observer, only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement.

  6. Solid-liquid phase boundaries of lens protein solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Berland, C R; Thurston, G M; Kondo, M; Broide, M L; Pande, J; Ogun, O; Benedek, G B

    1992-01-01

    We report measurement of the solid-liquid phase boundary, or liquidus line, for aqueous solutions of three pure calf gamma-crystallin proteins: gamma II, gamma IIIa, and gamma IIIb. We also studied the liquidus line for solutions of native gamma IV-crystallin calf lens protein, which consists of 85% gamma IVa/15% gamma IVb. In all four proteins the liquidus phase boundaries lie higher in temperature than the previously determined liquid-liquid coexistence curves. Thus, over the range of concentration and temperature for which liquid-liquid phase separation occurs, the coexistence of a protein crystal phase with a protein liquid solution phase is thermodynamically stable relative to the metastable separated liquid phases. The location of the liquidus lines clearly divides these four crystallin proteins into two groups: those in which liquidus lines flatten at temperatures greater than 70 degrees C: gamma IIIa and gamma IV, and those in which liquidus lines flatten at temperatures less than 50 degrees C: gamma II and gamma IIIb. We have analyzed the form of the liquidus lines by using specific choices for the structures of the Gibbs free energy in solution and solid phases. By applying the thermodynamic conditions for equilibrium between the two phases to the resulting chemical potentials, we can estimate the temperature-dependent free energy change upon binding of protein and water into the solid phase. PMID:1741375

  7. RESULTS FROM BETATRON PHASE MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC DURING THE SEXTANT TEST.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC, D.

    1998-06-26

    The Sextant Test of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was an important step towards its completion. One sixth of the two RHIC accelerators was fully commissioned. Gold ion beam was injected and transported through one sextant of one of the two rings. The betatron phase advance per cell was measured by recording differences in the horizontal and vertical positions of the beam at the end of the sextant due to a sequence of correction dipole kicks along the beam line. Measurement results show excellent agreement with predicted values, confirming that production measurements of the integral functions of the quadrupoles were very accurate, and that the polarity of all elements (correction dipoles, quadrupoles, dipoles etc.) was correct.

  8. Results from betatron phase measurements in RHIC during the sextant test

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Connolly, R.; Fischer, W.

    1998-08-01

    The Sextant Test of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was an important step towards its completion. One sixth of the two RHIC accelerators was fully commissioned. gold ion beam was injected and transported through one sextant of one of the two rings. The betatron phase advance per cell was measured by recording differences in the horizontal and vertical positions of the beam at the end of the sextant due to a sequence of correction dipole kicks along the beam line. Measurement results show excellent agreement with predicted values, confirming that production measurements of the integral functions of the quadrupoles were very accurate, and that the polarity of all elements (correction dipoles, quadrupoles, dipoles etc.) was correct.

  9. NASA Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program - Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Phase I results and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Fear, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with increases in the cost of fuels and the reduced availability of high quality petroleum crude, a modification of fuel specifications has been considered to allow acceptance of poorer quality fuels. To obtain the information upon which a selection of appropriate fuels for aircraft can be based, the Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program was formulated by NASA. A description is presented of program-related investigations conducted by an American aerospace company. The specific objective of Phase I of this program has been to evaluate the impact of the use of broadened properties fuels on combustor design through comprehensive combustor rig testing. Attention is given to combustor concepts, experimental evaluation, results obtained with single stage combustors, the stage combustor concept, and the capability of a variable geometry combustor.

  10. Artemis common lunar lander. Phase 2: Study results for external review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the Artemis Program is to gather vital reconnaissance data by conducting robotic exploration missions to the lunar surface both prior to and concurrent with human exploration missions. The Artemis Program includes rapid, near-term development of a variety of small experimental and operational payloads, provides a low-cost capability to deliver these payloads to any location on the lunar surface, and supports the analysis of the data returned. The Artemis Program will improve the understanding of lunar geosciences, demonstrate the Moon's unique capability as an astronomical platform to study the universe, and to conduct scientific and technology development experiments, and will prepare for, enhance, and complement human mission The Artemis Common Lunar Lander Phase 2 Study results for external review are included.

  11. Population Heterogeneity of Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Resulting from Phase Variation of the lpf Operon In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Robert A.; Weening, Eric H.; Keestra, A. Marijke; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2002-01-01

    The lpf fimbrial operon oscillates between phase ON and phase OFF expression states, thereby generating heterogeneity within S. enterica serotype Typhimurium populations with regard to expression of long polar fimbrial antigens. To determine whether the proportion of lpf phase variants changes with growth conditions, the lpf phase ON content of cultures was determined after in vitro and in vivo passage. After passage in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth for 120 generations, 96% of cells in a serotype Typhimurium culture carried the lpf operon in the phase ON expression state, regardless of the phase ON/OFF ratio in the inoculum. In contrast, a culture passaged on LB agar plates for 500 generations contained approximately 2% lpf phase ON cells. Differences in the lpf phase ON content of cultures passaged in broth and on plates were not caused by an outgrowth of lpf phase ON or lpf phase OFF cells, since deletion of lpf biosynthesis genes did not alter the phase ON/OFF ratio attained after passage. Instead, growth in LB broth resulted in a eightfold increase in the phase OFF-to-ON transition frequency and a decrease of the lpf phase ON-to-OFF transition frequency by a factor of 150 compared to growth on LB agar plates. After infection of naïve CBA/J mice with an lpf phase ON culture of serotype Typhimurium, the proportion of lpf phase ON cells continuously decreased over time, regardless of whether the strain carried intact fimbrial biosynthesis genes. These data suggest that elaboration of fimbriae does not have a major influence on the population heterogeneity produced by phase variation of the lpf operon in naïve mice. PMID:11948147

  12. Population heterogeneity of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium resulting from phase variation of the lpf operon in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Robert A; Weening, Eric H; Keestra, A Marijke; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2002-05-01

    The lpf fimbrial operon oscillates between phase ON and phase OFF expression states, thereby generating heterogeneity within S. enterica serotype Typhimurium populations with regard to expression of long polar fimbrial antigens. To determine whether the proportion of lpf phase variants changes with growth conditions, the lpf phase ON content of cultures was determined after in vitro and in vivo passage. After passage in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth for 120 generations, 96% of cells in a serotype Typhimurium culture carried the lpf operon in the phase ON expression state, regardless of the phase ON/OFF ratio in the inoculum. In contrast, a culture passaged on LB agar plates for 500 generations contained approximately 2% lpf phase ON cells. Differences in the lpf phase ON content of cultures passaged in broth and on plates were not caused by an outgrowth of lpf phase ON or lpf phase OFF cells, since deletion of lpf biosynthesis genes did not alter the phase ON/OFF ratio attained after passage. Instead, growth in LB broth resulted in a eightfold increase in the phase OFF-to-ON transition frequency and a decrease of the lpf phase ON-to-OFF transition frequency by a factor of 150 compared to growth on LB agar plates. After infection of naïve CBA/J mice with an lpf phase ON culture of serotype Typhimurium, the proportion of lpf phase ON cells continuously decreased over time, regardless of whether the strain carried intact fimbrial biosynthesis genes. These data suggest that elaboration of fimbriae does not have a major influence on the population heterogeneity produced by phase variation of the lpf operon in naïve mice. PMID:11948147

  13. Late-phase melt progression experiment: MP-2. Results and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gasser, R.D.; Gauntt, R.O.; Bourcier, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    In-pile experiments addressing late-phase processes in Light Water Reactors (LWRs) were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. Melt Progression (MP) experiments were designed to provide information to develop and verify computer models for analysis of LWR core damage in severe accidents. Experiments examine the formation and motion of ceramic molten pools in disrupted reactor core regions. The MP-2 experiment assembly consisted of: (1) a rubble bed of enriched UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} simulating severely disrupted reactor core regions, (2) a ceramic/metallic crust representing blockage formed by early phase melting, relocation, and refreezing of core components, and (3) an intact rod stub region that remained in place below the blockage region. The test assembly was fission heated in the central cavity of the ACRR at an average rate of about 0.2 KA, reaching a peak molten pool temperature around 3400 K. Melting of the debris bed ceramic components was initiated near the center of the bed. The molten material relocated downward, refreezing to form a ceramic crust near the bottom of the rubble bed. As power levels were increased, the crust gradually remelted and reformed at progressively lower positions in the bed until late in the experiment when it penetrated into and attacked the ceramic/metallic blockage. The metallic components of the blockage region melted and relocated to the bottom of the intact rod stub region before the ceramic melt penetrated the blockage region from above. The ceramic pool penetrated halfway into the blockage region by the end of the experiment. Measurements of thermal response and material relocation are compared to the results of the computer simulations. Postexperiment examination of the assembly with the associated material interactions and metallurgy are also discussed in detail with the analyses and interpretation of results. 16 refs., 206 figs., 24 tabs.

  14. Assessing the results: phase 1 hyperlipidemia outcomes in 27 health plans.

    PubMed

    Latts, L M

    2001-04-16

    In phase 1 of this hyperlipidemia outcomes management program, characteristics of 7,619 patients treated with statins at 27 US managed care plans were determined. Nearly 40% (3,018 patients) had documented coronary heart disease (CHD). Most (65%) had at least two CHD risk factors. Hyperlipidemia treatment included simvastatin (39%), atorvastatin (25%), fluvastatin (14%), pravastatin (12%), and lovastatin (2%). On-treatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were available for 79% of patients; however, only 46% had both baseline and follow-up levels recorded in their charts. Of patients for whom follow-up data were available, 3,779 (63%) achieved their target LDL-C levels as recommended by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). Target LDL-C levels were reached by 1,381 (87%) of the patients with a goal of 160 mg/dL, 1,326 (65%) of those with a goal of 130 mg/dL, and 1,072 (44%) of those with a goal of 100 mg/dL. Overall, 66% of patients who met their treatment goal and 24% of those who did not required no more than a 25% reduction in LDL-C. In contrast, 8% of patients who achieved goals and 36% of patients who did not required >40% reduction in LDL-C. Phase 1 results did not suggest any substantial difference among statins for achievement of NCEP goals or decrease in LDL-C. These results show that therapy with statins is effective for achievement of NCEP targets in most patients and that there is potential for improvement in the quality and cost-effectiveness of statin therapy with carefully planned interventions. PMID:11311193

  15. Nivolumab for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results of a Randomized Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Motzer, Robert J.; Rini, Brian I.; McDermott, David F.; Redman, Bruce G.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Harrison, Michael R.; Vaishampayan, Ulka N.; Drabkin, Harry A.; George, Saby; Logan, Theodore F.; Margolin, Kim A.; Plimack, Elizabeth R.; Lambert, Alexandre M.; Waxman, Ian M.; Hammers, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nivolumab is a fully human immunoglobulin G4 programmed death–1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody that restores T-cell immune activity. This phase II trial assessed the antitumor activity, dose-response relationship, and safety of nivolumab in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Patients and Methods Patients with clear-cell mRCC previously treated with agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway were randomly assigned (blinded ratio of 1:1:1) to nivolumab 0.3, 2, or 10 mg/kg intravenously once every 3 weeks. The primary objective was to evaluate the dose-response relationship as measured by progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and safety. Results A total of 168 patients were randomly assigned to the nivolumab 0.3- (n = 60), 2- (n = 54), and 10-mg/kg (n = 54) cohorts. One hundred eighteen patients (70%) had received more than one prior systemic regimen. Median PFS was 2.7, 4.0, and 4.2 months, respectively (P = .9). Respective ORRs were 20%, 22%, and 20%. Median OS was 18.2 months (80% CI, 16.2 to 24.0 months), 25.5 months (80% CI, 19.8 to 28.8 months), and 24.7 months (80% CI, 15.3 to 26.0 months), respectively. The most common treatment-related adverse event (AE) was fatigue (24%, 22%, and 35%, respectively). Nineteen patients (11%) experienced grade 3 to 4 treatment-related AEs. Conclusion Nivolumab demonstrated antitumor activity with a manageable safety profile across the three doses studied in mRCC. No dose-response relationship was detected as measured by PFS. These efficacy and safety results in mRCC support study in the phase III setting. PMID:25452452

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus casseliflavus aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei; Smith, Clyde A.

    2010-01-01

    The deactivation of aminoglycoside antibiotics by chemical modification is one of the major sources of bacterial resistance to this family of therapeutic compounds, which includes the clinically relevant drugs streptomycin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) form one such family of enzymes responsible for this resistance. The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa [APH(2′′)-IVa] from Enterococcus casseliflavus, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 306 amino-acid residues) has been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The enzyme was crystallized in three substrate-free forms. Two of the crystal forms belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121 with similar unit-cell parameters, although one of the crystal forms had a unit-cell volume that was approximately 13% smaller than the other and a very low solvent content of around 38%. The third crystal form belonged to the monoclinic space group P21 and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The orthorhombic crystal forms of apo APH(2′′)-IVa both diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and the monoclinic crystal form diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution; synchrotron diffraction data were collected from these crystals at SSRL (Stanford, California, USA). Structure determination by molecular replacement using the structure of the related enzyme APH(2′′)-IIa is proceeding. PMID:20057078

  17. Virulence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotypes Ia, IVa, IVb, and IVc in five fish species.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Moon, Chang Hoon; Hershberger, Paul K.; Kurath, Gael

    2013-01-01

    The susceptibility of yellow perch Perca flavescens, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, koi Cyprinus carpio koi, and Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to 4 strains of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was assessed. Fish were challenged via intraperitoneal injection with high (1 × 106 plaque-forming units, PFU) and low (1 × 103 PFU) doses of a European strain (genotype Ia), and North American strains from the West coast (genotype IVa), Great Lakes (genotype IVb), and the East coast (genotype IVc). Pacific herring were exposed to the same VHSV strains, but at a single dose of 5 × 103 PFU ml-1 by immersion in static seawater. Overall, yellow perch were the most susceptible, with cumulative percent mortality (CPM) ranging from 84 to 100%, and 30 to 93% in fish injected with high or low doses of virus, respectively. Rainbow trout and Chinook salmon experienced higher mortalities (47 to 98% CPM) after exposure to strain Ia than to the other virus genotypes. Pacific herring were most susceptible to strain IVa with an average CPM of 80% and moderately susceptible (42 to 52% CPM) to the other genotypes. Koi had very low susceptibility (≤5.0% CPM) to all 4 VHSV strains. Fish tested at 7 d post challenge were positive for all virus strains, with yellow perch having the highest prevalence and concentrations of virus, and koi the lowest. While genotype Ia had higher virulence in salmonid species, there was little difference in virulence or host-specificity between isolates from subtypes IVa, IVb, and IVc.  

  18. Assessing Impacts of Child Care Policies on Welfare Recipients in Michigan. Research Study Results. Phase II Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sponseller, Doris Bergen

    This report describes the results of the second phase of a study of child care policy conducted for the Michigan League for Human Services (MLHS). (The report on the first phase of the study described the results of a mailed survey sent to parents receiving public assistance and to practitioners who provided and/or monitored publicly supported…

  19. Results for Phase I of the IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Strydom, Gerhard; Bostelmann, Friederike; Yoon, Su Jong

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of uncertainties in design and safety analysis of reactors is today not only broadly accepted, but in many cases became the preferred way to replace traditional conservative analysis for safety and licensing analysis. The use of a more fundamental methodology is also consistent with the reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes available today. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR) has its own peculiarities, coated particle design, large graphite quantities, different materials and high temperatures that also require other simulation requirements. The IAEA has therefore launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) in 2013 to study uncertainty propagation specifically in the HTGR analysis chain. Two benchmark problems are defined, with the prismatic design represented by the General Atomics (GA) MHTGR-350 and a 250 MW modular pebble bed design similar to the HTR-PM (INET, China). This report summarizes the contributions of the HTGR Methods Simulation group at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) up to this point of the CRP. The activities at INL have been focused so far on creating the problem specifications for the prismatic design, as well as providing reference solutions for the exercises defined for Phase I. An overview is provided of the HTGR UAM objectives and scope, and the detailed specifications for Exercises I-1, I-2, I-3 and I-4 are also included here for completeness. The main focus of the report is the compilation and discussion of reference results for Phase I (i.e. for input parameters at their nominal or best-estimate values), which is defined as the first step of the uncertainty quantification process. These reference results can be used by other CRP participants for comparison with other codes or their own reference

  20. Oscillatory phase modulates the timing of neuronal activations and resulting behavior.

    PubMed

    Coon, W G; Gunduz, A; Brunner, P; Ritaccio, A L; Pesaran, B; Schalk, G

    2016-06-01

    Human behavioral response timing is highly variable from trial to trial. While it is generally understood that behavioral variability must be due to trial-by-trial variations in brain function, it is still largely unknown which physiological mechanisms govern the timing of neural activity as it travels through networks of neuronal populations, and how variations in the timing of neural activity relate to variations in the timing of behavior. In our study, we submitted recordings from the cortical surface to novel analytic techniques to chart the trajectory of neuronal population activity across the human cortex in single trials, and found joint modulation of the timing of this activity and of consequent behavior by neuronal oscillations in the alpha band (8-12Hz). Specifically, we established that the onset of population activity tends to occur during the trough of oscillatory activity, and that deviations from this preferred relationship are related to changes in the timing of population activity and the speed of the resulting behavioral response. These results indicate that neuronal activity incurs variable delays as it propagates across neuronal populations, and that the duration of each delay is a function of the instantaneous phase of oscillatory activity. We conclude that the results presented in this paper are supportive of a general model for variability in the effective speed of information transmission in the human brain and for variability in the timing of human behavior. PMID:26975551

  1. A neon-E rich phase in Orgueil - Results obtained on density separates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, P.; Jungck, M. H. A.; Meier, F. O.; Niederer, F. R.

    1981-09-01

    A stepwise heating technique was used on eight density separates from the neon-E rich phase G4j of the carbonaceous chondrite Orgueil to measure He, Ne and Ar. The density separation technique was found to further enrich the Ne-E carrier phases, allowing the Ne-E to be identified as virtually pure Ne-22. At least two separable carrier phases exist: (1) the l-carrier phase, which releases its Ne-E at temperatures below 900 C and is heavily enriched in the low-density separate; and (2) the h-carrier phase. The h-carrier is found to be highly retentive, with release temperatures above 900 C, and is associated with higher-density material. It is concluded that Ne-E and its carrier phases are probably of presolar origin.

  2. The PICASSO project: MT Investigation in Southern Spain and Morocco - Results of phase I and outlook on phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyan, D.; Schmoldt, J.; Jones, A. G.; Hogg, C.; Rosell, O.

    2009-12-01

    PICASSO (Project to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) is an international, multi-disciplinary project that aims to improve knowledge of the internal structure and plate-tectonic processes in the highly complex three-dimensional region formed by the collision of the African and European plate under the effect of the Mediterranean plate motion. The first phase of the DIAS magnetotelluric (MT) component of the PICASSO project was carried out in Southern Spain from Sept.-Nov., 2007 focused on the investigation of the internal structure of the Betic Mountain Chain and the Iberian Basement. Two different types of magnetotelluric (MT) equipment - broadband (BBMT) and long period (LMT) MT - were used along a profile from the outskirts of Madrid to the Mediterranean Sea through the Betic Mountain Chain. The modified acquisition design of one of the equipment types (the LVIV LEMI long period system), with separate recording of each telluric channel, allowed for advanced investigation of the acquired dataset. The data were processed using four different robust algorithms, and the different responses have been compared. A distinct separation can be made between the Betics region of Alpine orogeny in the south and the Variscan Iberian Massif beneath the north of the profile in terms of their inherent electric conductivity characteristics. Models derived by two-dimensional inversions of regional responses, after removing distortion effects, from this first phase show a remarkably complex subsurface structure beneath the region of the External Betic Chain. Strike direction varies along the profile and with depth due to the intricate morphology, and its choice has significant impact on the responses to be modelled and thereby provides a challenging framework for MT data interpretation. The second phase of PICASSO aims to shed light onto the origin of the Atlas Mountain Chain and test hypotheses for its missing mantle root derived from heat flow, gravity, geoid

  3. [Clinical aspects of obsessive-compulsive syndromes: results of phase 2 of a large French survey].

    PubMed

    Hantouche, E G; Bourgeois, M; Bouhassira, M; Lancrenon, S

    1996-01-01

    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) had received a new interest from fundamental research (psychopharmacology, neurobiology and brain imagery...). Although more investigation of OCD clinical aspects are needed, especially in large cohorts of patients, not seen nor investigated only in high specialized psychiatric units. A large french survey "Screening-Understanding-Treating OCD" was conducted in 1994 with the participation of 240 psychiatrists. The survey had included 4,363 new consecutive patients consulting in out-patient psychiatry. The phase 1 had shown a point prevalence rates of 9.2% for OCD (full criteria of DSM III-R) and 17% for OCS (Obsessive-Compulsive Syndromes). From 731 patients, the phrase 2 was conducted on a cohort of 646 patients with OCD or OCS and had explored in details in the clinical aspects of the OC illness (typology, symptomatic categories, comorbidity, OCD spectrum, psychiatric family history and treatment history...). The results of the french survey phase 2 had confirmed a variety of classical and current literature data, especially: the ICD 10 proposal for diagnostic sub-typology according to symptomatic predominance (obsessions, compulsions or both); the symptomatic clustering of obsessions and compulsions into three major categories, suggested by a recent study from the Boston University; the high rate of comorbidity with anxiety and depressive disorders and with disorders related to the large OCD spectrum (somatoform disorders, eating disorders, impulse-control disorders, compulsive buying...); the impact of clinical parameters (as slowness, avoidance, lack of insight) on clinical global OCD and OCS severity; the high rate of intrafamilial psychiatric morbidity (OCD, depression, anxiety disorders). PMID:9035981

  4. Promising short-term clinical results of the cementless Oxford phase III medial unicondylar knee prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan JM; Bruijn, Daniël J; Driessen, Marcel JM

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the short-term clinical results of the Oxford phase III cementless medial unicondylar knee prosthesis (UKP) compared to the cemented medial UKP. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a tertairy orthopedic centre between the period of May 2010 and September 2012. We included 99 medial UKP in 97 patients and of these UKP, 53 were cemented and 46 were cementless. Clinical outcome was measured using a questionnaire, containing a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, Oxford Knee score, Kujala score and SF-12 score. Knee function was tested using the American Knee Society score. Complications, reoperations and revisions were recorded. Statistical significance was defined as a P value < 0.05. RESULTS: In a mean follow-up time of 19.5 mo, three cemented medial UKP were revised to a total knee prosthesis. Reasons for revision were malrotation of the tibial component, aseptic loosening of the tibial component and progression of osteoarthritis in the lateral- and patellofemoral compartment. In five patients a successful reoperation was performed, because of impingement or (sub)luxation of the polyethylene bearing. Patients with a reoperation were significant younger than patients in the primary group (56.7 vs 64.0, P = 0.01) and were more likely to be male (85.7% vs 38.8%, P = 0.015). Overall the cementless medial UKP seems to perform better, but the differences in clinical outcome are not significant; a VAS pain score of 7.4 vs 11.7 (P = 0.22), an Oxford Knee score of 43.3 vs 41.7 (P = 0.27) and a Kujala score of 79.6 vs 78.0 (P = 0.63). The American Knee Society scores were slightly better in the cementless group with 94.5 vs 90.2 (P = 0.055) for the objective score and 91.2 vs 87.8 (P = 0.25) for the subjective score. CONCLUSION: The cementless Oxford phase III medial UKP shows good short-term clinical results, when used in a specialist clinic by an experienced surgeon. PMID:27114932

  5. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-01-01

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms. PMID:27323085

  6. DARPA/AFRL Smart Wing Phase 2 wind tunnel test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Lewis B.; Martin, C. A.; Sanders, Brian P.; West, Mark N.; Pinkerton-Florance, Jennifer L.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2002-07-01

    Northrop Grumman Corporation built and twice tested a 30 percent scale wind tunnel model of a proposed uninhabited combat air vehicle under the DARPA/AFRL Smart Materials and Structures Development - Smart Wing Phase 2 program to demonstrate the applicability of smart control surfaces on advanced aircraft configurations. The model constructed was a full span, sting mounted model with smart leading and trailing edge control surfaces on the right wing and conventional, hinged trailing edge control surfaces on the left wing. Among the performance benefits that were quantified were increased pitching moment, increased rolling moment and improved pressure distribution of the smart wing over the conventional wing. This paper present an overview of the result from the wind tunnel test performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamic Tunnel in March 2000 and May 2001. Successful results included: (1) improved aileron effectiveness at high dynamic pressures, (2) demonstrated improvements in lateral and longitudinal effectiveness with smooth contoured smart trailing edge over conventional hinged control surfaces, (3) chordwise and spanwise shape control of the smart trailing edge control surface, and (4) smart trailing edge control surface deflection rates over 80 deg/sec.

  7. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, John D.; Woodson, James C.; Hershberger, Paul K.; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L.; Purcell, Maureen K.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, −UAA.001, and −PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  8. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of the Montpellier Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David; Gourgon-Bourgade, Sophie; Gutowski, Marian; Rouanet, Phillippe; Saint-Aubert, Bernard; Ailleres, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Dubois, Jean-Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We recently presented the intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a reliable alternative to conventional boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery. The low crude numbers of recurrence in elderly patients led us to investigate the feasibility and the efficacy of this procedure as a sole treatment. Methods and Materials: We included 94 patients older than 65 years in this phase II trial. Among them, 42 patients presented with all the inclusion criteria, i.e., stages pT0 to pT1 and pN0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, and tumor-free margin of >2 mm. IORT was delivered using a dedicated linear accelerator. One 21-Gy fraction was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose, using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. The primary endpoint was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, and specific and overall rates of survival. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (range, 12-49 months), and median age was 72 years (range, 66-80 years). The median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Endpoints for all but one patient corresponded to acceptable quality index criteria. Pretreatment quality-of-life scores were maximal, and no significant decrease was observed during follow-up. Cosmesis was good to excellent at 6 months. Two patients experienced recurrence but underwent salvage mastectomy. Conclusion: Our results confirm that exclusive partial-breast IORT is feasible for treating early-stage breast cancer in the elderly. IORT may be considered an alternative treatment for a selected population and offers a safe one-step treatment.

  9. Evaluation of fine-particle catalysts: Activity testing results and phase identification using Mossbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.; Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine- particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Coal Liquefaction program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Previously reported results have described the standard test procedure that was developed at Sandia to evaluate fine-particle size iron catalysts being developed in DOE/PETC`s AR Coal Liquefaction Program. This test uses DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design that enables evaluation of a catalyst over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt% on a dmmf coal basis). Testing has been performed on Pacific Northwest Laboratories` (PNL) 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst. Results showed that this catalyst is more active than the University of Pittsburgh`s sulfated iron oxide catalyst that was evaluated previously. PNL has also produced two additional batches of catalyst in an effort to optimize their preparation procedures for larger batches. Sandia has observed significant differences in activities among these three catalysts; these differences might be due to particle size effects, the type of drying procedure, or the amount of moisture present. Mossbauer characterization of the iron phases in the coal, catalyst precursors, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) insoluble material from liquefaction reactions has been performed on the University of Pittsburgh`s catalyst and the first PNL catalyst that was tested at Sandia. The Mossbauer results were obtained at the University of Kentucky and will be presented. Future work will include testing additional catalysts being developed in the AR Coal Liquefaction Program, developing procedures to characterize reaction products, and determining the kinetics of the reactions.

  10. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation: Phase II Results of a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.

    2013-11-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. The Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3), which operated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23, was established to verify the accuracy of these simulation tools [1]. This work was then extended under the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project under IEA Wind Task 30 [2]. Both of these projects sought to verify the accuracy of offshore wind turbine dynamics simulation tools (or codes) through code-to-code comparison of simulated responses of various offshore structures. This paper describes the latest findings from Phase II of the OC4 project, which involved the analysis of a 5-MW turbine supported by a floating semisubmersible. Twenty-two different organizations from 11 different countries submitted results using 24 different simulation tools. The variety of organizations contributing to the project brought together expertise from both the offshore structure and wind energy communities. Twenty-one different load cases were examined, encompassing varying levels of model complexity and a variety of metocean conditions. Differences in the results demonstrate the importance and accuracy of the various modeling approaches used. Significant findings include the importance of mooring dynamics to the mooring loads, the role nonlinear hydrodynamic terms play in calculating drift forces for the platform motions, and the difference between global (at the platform level) and local (at the member level) modeling of viscous drag. The results from this project will help guide development and improvement efforts for these tools to ensure that they are providing the accurate information needed to support the design and

  11. Robonaut 2 - IVA Experiments On-Board ISS and Development Towards EVA Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, Myron; Hulse, Aaron; Badger, Julia; Thackston, Allison; Rogers, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Robonaut 2 (R2) has completed its fixed base activities on-board the ISS and is scheduled to receive its climbing legs in early 2014. In its continuing line of firsts, the R2 torso finished up its on-orbit activities on its stanchion with the manipulation of space blanket materials and performed multiple tasks under teleoperation control by IVA astronauts. The successful completion of these two IVA experiments is a key step in Robonaut's progression towards an EVA capability. Integration with the legs and climbing inside the ISS will provide another important part of the experience that R2 will need prior to performing tasks on the outside of ISS. In support of these on-orbit activities, R2 has been traversing across handrails in simulated zero-g environments and working with EVA tools and equipment on the ground to determine manipulation strategies for an EVA Robonaut. R2 made significant advances in robotic manipulation of deformable materials in space while working with its softgoods task panel. This panel features quarter turn latches that secure a space blanket to the task panel structure. The space blanket covers two cloth cubes that are attached with Velcro to the structure. R2 was able to open and close the latches, pull back the blanket, and remove the cube underneath. R2 simulated cleaning up an EVA worksite as well, by replacing the cube and reattaching the blanket. In order to interact with the softgoods panel, R2 has both autonomously and with a human in the loop identified and localized these deformable objects. Using stereo color cameras, R2 identified characteristic elements on the softgoods panel then extracted the location and orientation of the object in its field of view using stereo disparity and kinematic transforms. R2 used both vision processing and supervisory control to successfully accomplish this important task. Teleoperation is a key capability for Robonaut's effectiveness as an EVA system. To build proficiency, crewmembers have

  12. Hepatopancreatoduodenectomy for local recurrence of cholangiocarcinoma after excision of a type IV-A congenital choledochal cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mihoko; Ebata, Tomoki; Sugawara, Gen; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Takashi; Shingu, Yuji; Nagino, Masato

    2016-12-01

    Surgical resection is the only curative treatment for biliary tract cancer (BTC); however, the recurrence rate remains high even after curative resection. There are limited data regarding the effectiveness of surgical resection for recurrent BTC. We report the favorable survival outcome of a patient who underwent a hepatopancreatoduodenectomy for local recurrence of cholangiocarcinoma after excision of a type IV-A congenital choledochal cyst. The patient, a 25-year-old woman, had undergone excision of a type IV-A congenital choledochal cyst with hepaticojejunostomy. The resected specimen revealed an early cholangiocarcinoma. The local recurrence at the site of anastomosis was detected 4 years and 4 months after surgery. We performed a left trisectionectomy with caudate lobectomy combined with hepatic artery and portal vein resections and a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histological examination revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and the final diagnosis was recurrence of cholangiocarcinoma. There are a few reports of extensive resection for recurrence of BTC; however, aggressive surgery is possible and may offer favorable survival in selected patients. PMID:26943695

  13. NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project: Results of the August 1999 Aerosol Measurement Intercomparison Workshop, Laboratory Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. Randy, III; Anderson, Bruce E.; Connors, V. S.; Wey, C. C.; Sanders, T.; Twohy, C.; Brock, C. A.; Winstead, E. L.; Pui, D.; Chen, Da-Ren

    2001-01-01

    During August 1-14, 1999, NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) convened a workshop at the NASA Langley Research Center to try to determine why such a wide variation in aerosol emissions indices and chemical and physical properties have been reported by various independent AEAP-supported research teams trying to characterize the exhaust emissions of subsonic commercial aircraft. This workshop was divided into two phases, a laboratory phase and a field phase. The laboratory phase consisted of supplying known particle number densities (concentrations) and particle size distributions to a common manifold for the participating research teams to sample and analyze. The field phase was conducted on an aircraft run-up pad. Participating teams actually sampled aircraft exhaust generated by a Langley T-38 Talon aircraft at 1 and 9 m behind the engine at engine powers ranging from 48 to 100 percent. Results from the laboratory phase of this intercomparison workshop are reported in this paper.

  14. Oral citrulline as arginine precursor may be beneficial in sickle cell disease: early phase two results.

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, W. H.; Daeschner, C. W.; Files, B. A.; McConnell, M. E.; Strandjord, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    L-Arginine may be a conditionally essential amino acid in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease, particularly as required substrate in the arginine-nitric oxide pathway for endogenous nitrovasodilation and vasoprotection. Vasoprotection by arginine is mediated partly by nitric oxide-induced inhibition of endothelial damage and inhibition of adhesion and activation of leukocytes. Activated leukocytes may trigger many of the complications, including vasoocclusive events and intimal hyperplasias. High blood leukocyte counts during steady states in the absence of infection are significant laboratory risk factors for adverse complications. L-Citrulline as precursor amino acid was given orally twice daily in daily doses of approximately 0.1 g/kg in a pilot Phase II clinical trial during steady states in four homozygous sickle cell disease subjects and one sickle cell-hemoglobin C disease patient (ages 10-18). There soon resulted dramatic improvements in symptoms of well-being, raised plasma arginine levels, and reductions in high total leukocyte and high segmented neutrophil counts toward or to within normal limits. Continued L-citrulline supplementation in compliant subjects continued to lessen symptomatology, to maintain plasma arginine concentrations greater than control levels, and to maintain nearly normal total leukocyte and neutrophil counts. Side effects or toxicity from citrulline were not experienced. Oral L-citrulline may portend very useful for palliative therapy in sickle cell disease. Placebo-controlled, long-term trials are now indicated. PMID:11688916

  15. Phase Retrieval to Monitor HST Focus: II. Results Post-Servicing Mission 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami-Matias Niemi, Sami-Matias; Lallo, Matthew

    2010-12-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) focus has been monitored throughout the Observatory's life primarily using high-resolution imaging cameras. The preferred method to determine the focus position is a Phase Retrieval technique. It solves for certain Zernike polynomials such as focus, coma and astigmatism, by fitting a model Point Spread Function interactively adjusting the aberration parameters to observed data. In this report, we discuss results of the monthly focus monitoring program since the latest mirror move in July 2009. Since the primary purpose for this monitoring is to support accurate focus maintenance, we present a picture of the current focus state of the HST. We discuss focus measurements done with both the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and draw conclusions about their confocality. We also predict when the Observatory is going to be in the best focus. The spread in these predictions is large and arises from uncertainties, such as orbital thermal variations (breathing) and long-term trends, which are difficult to model. Our best estimate, based on the long-term historical focus trend, implies that ACS (and all science instruments confocal to it) is close to the best focus at the time of writing. There is tentative evidence that the best focus of WFC3 UVIS is ˜ 0.5 ± 0.2 μm below that of ACS.

  16. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage : aerosol ratio test program and Phase 2 test results.

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III; Thompson, N. Slater; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Hibbs, R.S.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno; Young, F. I.; Koch, Wolfgang; Brochard, Didier; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Lange, Florentin

    2004-05-01

    A multinational test program is in progress to quantify the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device, HEDD, impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments; the program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the spent fuel ratio, SFR, the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are crucial for predicting radiological impacts. This document includes a thorough description of the test program, including the current, detailed test plan, concept and design, plus a description of all test components, and requirements for future components and related nuclear facility needs. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2003. All available test results, observations, and analyses - primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. This spent fuel sabotage - aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC, and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  17. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6). Simulation Design and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Robock, Alan; Tilmes, S.; Boucher, Olivier; English, J.; Irvine, Peter; Jones, Andrew; Lawrence, M. G.; Maccracken, Michael C.; Muri, Helene O.; Moore, John; Niemeier, Ulrike; Phipps, Steven; Sillmann, Jana; Storelvmo, Trude; Wang, Hailong; Watanabe, Shingo

    2015-10-27

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP project simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more longwave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. This is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  18. Bubble Generation in a Flowing Liquid Medium and Resulting Two-Phase Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pais, S. C.; Kamotani, Y.; Bhunia, A.; Ostrach, S.

    1999-01-01

    forming bubble decreases, as the superficial liquid velocity is in-creased. Furthermore, it is shown that the void fraction of the resulting two-phase flow increases with volumetric gas flow rate Q(sub d), pipe diameter and gas injection nozzle diameter, while they decrease with surrounding liquid flow. The important role played by flowing liquid in detaching bubbles in a reduced gravity environment is thus emphasized. We observe that the void fraction can be accurately controlled by using single nozzle gas injection, rather than by employing multiple port injection, since the later system gives rise to unpredictable coalescence of adjacent bubbles. It is of interest to note that empirical bubble size and corresponding void fraction are somewhat smaller for the co-flow geometry than the cross-flow configuration at similar flow conditions with similar pipe and nozzle diameters. In order to supplement the empirical data, a theoretical model is employed to study single bubble generation in the dynamic (Q(sub d) = 1 - 1000 cu cm/s) and bubbly flow regime within the framework of the co-flow configuration. This theoretical model is based on an overall force balance acting on the bubble during the two stages of generation, namely the expansion and the detachment stage. Two sets of forces, one aiding and the other inhibiting bubble detachment are identified. Under conditions of reduced gravity, gas momentum flux enhances, while the surface tension force at the air injection nozzle tip inhibits bubble detachment. In parallel, liquid drag and inertia can act as both attaching and detaching forces, depending on the relative velocity of the bubble with respect to the surrounding liquid. Predictions of the theoretical model compare well with our experimental results. However, at higher superficial liquid velocities, as the bubble loses its spherical form, empirical bubble size no longer matches the theoretical predictions. In summary, we have developed a combined experimental and

  19. Euclid near infrared spectrophotometer instrument concept and first test results at the end of phase B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciaszek, Thierry; Ealet, Anne; Jahnke, Knud; Prieto, Eric; Barbier, Rémi; Mellier, Yannick; Costille, Anne; Ducret, Franck; Fabron, Christophe; Gimenez, Jean-Luc; Grange, Robert; Martin, Laurent; Rossin, Christelle; Pamplona, Tony; Vola, Pascal; Clémens, Jean Claude; Smadja, Gérard; Amiaux, Jérome; Barrière, Jean Christophe; Berthe, Michel; De Rosa, Adriano; Franceschi, Enrico; Morgante, Gianluca; Trifoglio, Massimo; Valenziano, Luca; Bonoli, Carlotta; Bortoletto, Favio; D'Alessandro, Maurizio; Corcione, Leonardo; Ligori, Sebastiano; Garilli, Bianca; Riva, Marco; Grupp, Frank; Vogel, Carolin; Hormuth, Felix; Seidel, Gregor; Wachter, Stefanie; Diaz, Jose Javier; Grañena, Ferran; Padilla, Cristobal; Toledo, Rafael; Lilje, Per B.; Solheim, Bjarte G. B.; Toulouse-Aastrup, Corinne; Andersen, Michael; Holmes, Warren; Israelsson, Ulf; Seiffert, Michael; Weber, Carissa; Waczynski, Augustyn; Laureijs, René J.; Racca, Giuseppe; Salvignol, Jean-Christophe; Strada, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    The Euclid mission objective is to understand why the expansion of the Universe is accelerating by mapping the geometry of the dark Universe by investigating the distance-redshift relationship and tracing the evolution of cosmic structures. The Euclid project is part of ESA's Cosmic Vision program with its launch planned for 2020. The NISP (Near Infrared Spectro-Photometer) is one of the two Euclid instruments and is operating in the near-IR spectral region (0.9-2μm) as a photometer and spectrometer. The instrument is composed of: - a cold (135K) optomechanical subsystem consisting of a SiC structure, an optical assembly (corrector and camera lens), a filter wheel mechanism, a grism wheel mechanism, a calibration unit and a thermal control system - a detection subsystem based on a mosaic of 16 Teledyne HAWAII2RG cooled to 95K with their front-end readout electronic cooled to 140K, integrated on a mechanical focal plane structure made with Molybdenum and Aluminum. The detection subsystem is mounted on the optomechanical subsystem structure - a warm electronic subsystem (280K) composed of a data processing / detector control unit and of an instrument control unit that interfaces with the spacecraft via a 1553 bus for command and control and via Spacewire links for science data This presentation describes the architecture of the instrument at the end of the phase B (Preliminary Design Review), the expected performance, the technological key challenges and preliminary test results obtained on a detection system demonstration model.

  20. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6): simulation design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, B.; Robock, A.; Tilmes, S.; Boucher, O.; English, J. M.; Irvine, P. J.; Jones, A.; Lawrence, M. G.; MacCracken, M.; Muri, H.; Moore, J. C.; Niemeier, U.; Phipps, S. J.; Sillmann, J.; Storelvmo, T.; Wang, H.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more longwave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. This is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  1. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6): simulation design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, B.; Robock, A.; Tilmes, S.; Boucher, O.; English, J. M.; Irvine, P. J.; Jones, A.; Lawrence, M. G.; MacCracken, M.; Muri, H.; Moore, J. C.; Niemeier, U.; Phipps, S. J.; Sillmann, J.; Storelvmo, T.; Wang, H.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP project simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more longwave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. This is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  2. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    SciTech Connect

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Juergen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  3. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-01

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  4. A neon-E rich phase in Orgueil - Results of stepwise heating experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, P.

    1978-01-01

    A Ne-E rich phase was separated from the Orgeuil carbonaceous chondrite. He and Ne were analyzed in this phase and in an Orgueil residual bulk silicate sample using the stepwise heating technique. Ne-E was found to be released from the Ne-E rich phase at temperatures as low as 500 C; however, gas richest in Ne-E is observed at the highest temperatures (1230 C). The following limits for the isotopic composition of Ne-E were obtained: Ne-20/Ne-22 less than 1.52; Ne-21/Ne-22 less than 0.0244.

  5. Sodium oxybate therapy provides multidimensional improvement in fibromyalgia: results of an international phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Spaeth, Michael; Bennett, Robert M; Benson, Beverly A; Wang, Y Grace; Lai, Chinglin; Choy, Ernest H

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is characterised by chronic musculoskeletal pain and multiple symptoms including fatigue, multidimensional function impairment, sleep disturbance and tenderness. Along with pain and fatigue, non-restorative sleep is a core symptom of fibromyalgia. Sodium oxybate (SXB) is thought to reduce non-restorative sleep abnormalities. This study evaluated effects of SXB on fibromyalgia-related pain and other symptoms. Methods 573 patients with fibromyalgia according to 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria were enrolled at 108 centres in eight countries. Subjects were randomly assigned to placebo, SXB 4.5 g/night or SXB 6 g/night. The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of subjects with ≥30% reduction in pain visual analogue scale from baseline to treatment end. Other efficacy assessments included function, sleep quality, effect of sleep on function, fatigue, tenderness, health-related quality of life and subject's impression of change in overall wellbeing. Results Significant improvements in pain, sleep and other symptoms associated with fibromyalgia were seen in SXB treated subjects compared with placebo. The proportion of subjects with ≥30% pain reduction was 42.0% for SXB4.5 g/night (p=0.002) and 51.4% for SXB6 g/night (p<0.001) versus 26.8% for placebo. Quality of sleep (Jenkins sleep scale) improved by 20% for SXB4.5 g/night (p≤0.001) and 25% for SXB6 g/night (p≤0.001) versus 0.5% for placebo. Adverse events with an incidence ≥5% and twice placebo were nausea, dizziness, vomiting, insomnia, anxiety, somnolence, fatigue, muscle spasms and peripheral oedema. Conclusion These results, combined with findings from previous phase 2 and 3 studies, provide supportive evidence that SXB therapy affordsimportant benefits across multiple symptoms in subjects with fibromyalgia. PMID:22294641

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Interim Results of a Prospective Phase II Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Pawlicki, Todd; Cotrutz, Cristian; Presti, Joseph C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-one low-risk prostate cancer patients with 6 months' minimum follow-up received 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy with image-guided SBRT alone using the CyberKnife. The early (<3 months) and late (>6 months) urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using validated quality of life questionnaires (International Prostate Symptom Score, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response are analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months. There were no RTOG Grade 4 acute or late rectal/urinary complications. There were 2 patients with RTOG Grade 3 late urinary toxicity and none with RTOG Grade 3 rectal complications. A reduced rate of severe rectal toxicities was observed with every-other-day vs. 5 consecutive days treatment regimen (0% vs. 38%, p = 0.0035). A benign PSA bounce (median, 0.4 ng/mL) was observed in 12 patients (29%) occurring at 18 months (median) after treatment. At last follow-up, no patient has had a PSA failure regardless of biochemical failure definition. Of 32 patients with 12 months minimum follow-up, 25 patients (78%) achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.4 ng/mL. A PSA decline to progressively lower nadirs up to 3 years after treatment was observed. Conclusions: The early and late toxicity profile and PSA response for prostate SBRT are highly encouraging. Continued accrual and follow-up will be necessary to confirm durable biochemical control rates and low toxicity profiles.

  7. New Results in Two-Phase Pressure Drop Calculations at Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braisted, Jon; Kurwitz, Cable; Best, Frederick

    2004-02-01

    The mass, power, and volume energy savings of two-phase systems for future spacecraft creates many advantages over current single-phase systems. Current models of two-phase phenomena such as pressure drop, void fraction, and flow regime prediction are still not well defined for space applications. Commercially available two-phase modeling software has been developed for a large range of acceleration fields including reduced-gravity conditions. Recently, a two-phase experiment has been flown to expand the two-phase database. A model of the experiment was created in the software to determine how well the software could predict the pressure drop observed in the experiment. Of the simulations conducted, the computer model shows good agreement of the pressure drop in the experiment to within 30%. However, the software does begin to over-predict pressure drop in certain regions of a flow regime map indicating that some models used in the software package for reduced-gravity modeling need improvement.

  8. Preliminary Results of a Phase II Trial of Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ladra, Matthew M.; Szymonifka, Jackie D.; Mahajan, Anita; Friedmann, Alison M.; Yong Yeap, Beow; Goebel, Claire P.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Grosshans, David R.; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Marcus, Karen J.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This prospective phase II study was designed to assess disease control and to describe acute and late adverse effects of treatment with proton radiotherapy in children with rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Patients and Methods Fifty-seven patients with localized RMS (age 21 years or younger) or metastatic embryonal RMS (age 2 to 10 years) were enrolled between February 2005 and August 2012. All patients were treated with chemotherapy based on either vincristine, actinomycin, and cyclophosphamide or vincristine, actinomycin, and ifosfamide–based chemotherapy and proton radiation. Surgical resection was based on tumor site and accessibility. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0, was used to assess and grade adverse effects of treatment. Concurrent enrollment onto Children's Oncology Group or European Pediatric Sarcoma Study Group protocols was allowed. All pathology and imaging were reviewed at the treating institution. Results Median follow-up was 47 months (range, 14 to 102 months) for survivors. Five-year event-free survival (EFS), overall survival (OS), and local control (LC) were 69%, 78%, and 81%, respectively, for the entire cohort. The 5-year LC by risk group was 93% for low-risk and 77% for intermediate-risk disease. There were 13 patients with grade 3 acute toxicity and three patients with grade 3 late toxicity. There were no acute or late toxicities higher than grade 3. Conclusion Five-year LC, EFS, and OS rates were similar to those observed in comparable trials that used photon radiation. Acute and late toxicity rates were favorable. Proton radiation appears to represent a safe and effective radiation modality for pediatric RMS. PMID:25332253

  9. Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

    2005-10-31

    Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

  10. Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Properties from AERI Lidar Observations: Algorithm and Results from SHEBA

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David D.

    2005-04-01

    A new approach to retrieve microphysical properties from mixed-phase Arctic clouds is presented. This mixed-phase cloud property retrieval algorithm (MIXCRA) retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective radius of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance and lidar cloud boundary observations. The theoretical basis for this technique is that the absorption coefficient of ice is greater than that of liquid water from 10 to 13 μm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16 to 25 μm. MIXCRA retrievals are only valid for optically thin (τvisible < 6) single-layer clouds when the precipitable water vapor is less than 1 cm. MIXCRA was applied to the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data that were collected during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment from November 1997 to May 1998, where 63% of all of the cloudy scenes above the SHEBA site met this specification. The retrieval determined that approximately 48% of these clouds were mixed phase and that a significant number of clouds (during all 7 months) contained liquid water, even for cloud temperatures as low as 240 K. The retrieved distributions of effective radii for water and ice particles in single-phase clouds are shown to be different than the effective radii in mixed-phase clouds.

  11. Optimized tracking of RF carriers with phase noise, including Pioneer 10 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Hurd, W. J.; Brown, D. H.

    1987-01-01

    The ability to track very weak signals from distant spacecraft is limited by the phase instabilities of the received signal and of the local oscillator employed by the receiver. These instabilities ultimately limit the minimum loop bandwidth that can be used in a phase-coherent receiver, and hence limit the ratio of received carrier power to noise spectral density which can be tracked phase coherently. A method is presented for near real time estimation of the received carrier phase and additive noise spectrum, and optimization of the phase locked loop bandwidth. The method was used with the breadboard Deep Space Network (DSN) Advanced Receiver to optimize tracking of very weak signals from the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, which is now more distant that the edge of the solar system. Tracking with bandwidths of 0.1 Hz to 1.0 Hz reduces tracking signal threshold and increases carrier loop signal to noise ratio (SNR) by 5 dB to 15 dB compared to the 3 Hz bandwidth of the receivers now used operationally in the DSN. This will enable the DSN to track Pioneer 10 until its power sources fails near the end of the century.

  12. Safety with Ocrelizumab in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from the Ocrelizumab Phase III Program

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Paul; Rigby, William; Tak, Paul P.; Dörner, Thomas; Olech, Ewa; Martin, Carmen; Millar, Laurie; Travers, Helen; Fisheleva, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective was to determine the safety of ocrelizumab (OCR) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods This was an analysis of the double-blind, placebo-controlled periods and long-term follow-up of 4 OCR phase III trials in RA (SCRIPT, STAGE, FILM and FEATURE). Safety data per study and the results of a meta-analysis of serious infectious events (SIEs) are presented. Results Overall, 868 patients received placebo, 1064 patients OCR 200 mg×2 (or 400 mg×1) (OCR200), and 827 patients OCR 500 mg×2 (OCR500) plus background methotrexate (MTX) at baseline and 24 weeks. During the double-blind, placebo-controlled periods, the incidence of adverse events and serious adverse events was comparable between the OCR+MTX and placebo +MTX groups. Infusion-related reactions were more common with OCR+MTX and decreased in frequency with subsequent infusions. Serious infusion-related reactions were rare (0.1%). Serious infections occurred more frequently with OCR500+MTX. In the meta-analysis, a statistically significant difference from placebo +MTX in incidence of SIEs per 100 patient-years of 2.4 (95% CI, 0.3–4.5) was observed with OCR500+MTX, but not with OCR200+MTX (0.6; 95% CI, −1.3 to 2.4). Patients recruited in Asia exhibited a higher risk of serious infections (hazard ratio, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.03–3.06). The incidence of human anti-human antibodies was <5%. Long-term follow-up indicated no differences in malignancy rates between the treatment groups. There was no apparent difference in time to B-cell repletion between the OCR dose groups. Conclusions In placebo-controlled clinical trials of RA, OCR500+MTX was associated with a higher risk of serious infections compared with placebo +MTX. The safety profile of OCR 200+MTX was comparable with placebo+MTX. Trial Registration STAGE Clinical Trials.gov NCT00406419 SCRIPT Clinical Trials.gov NCT00476996 FILM Clinical Trials.gov NCT00485589 FEATURE Clinical Trials.gov NCT00673920 PMID:24498318

  13. Unconventional Cooper pairing results in a pseudogap-like phase in s-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, Daniel; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2015-10-01

    The impact of disorder on the superconducting (SC) pairing mechanism is the centre of much debate. Some evidence suggests a loss of phase coherence of pairs while others point towards the formation of a competing phase. In our work we show that the two perspectives may be different sides of the same coin. Using an extension of the perturbative renormalization group approach we compare the impact of different disorder-induced interactions on a SC ground state. We find that in the strongly disordered regime an interaction between paired fermions and their respective disordered environment replaces conventional Cooper pairing. For these unconventional Cooper pairs the phase coherence condition, required for the formation of a SC condensate, is not satisfied.

  14. Phase stability in austenitic stainless steels -- New approaches, results, and their relation to properties

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years, the phase stability of austenitic stainless steels, and its effect on the mechanical properties of stainless steels, have been the subject of much interest. With the availability of new experimental techniques, new theoretical methods, and new computational procedures, significant advances have been made in understanding, and being able to predict, phase stability and mechanical properties of stainless steel welds. This paper reviews some of these developments, with an emphasis on recent work that has been done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  15. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE C-400 INTERIM REMEDIAL PROJECT PHASE I RESULTS, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart,L.; Richards, W.

    2010-10-29

    The groundwater and soil in the vicinity of the C-400 Building at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), is contaminated with substantial quantities of industrial solvents, primarily trichoroethene (TCE). This solvent 'source' is recognized as a significant challenge and an important remediation target in the overall environmental cleanup strategy for PGDP. Thus, the cleanup of the C-400 TCE Source is a principal focus for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and for PGDP regulators and stakeholders. Using a formal investigation, feasibility study and decision process, Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) was selected for the treatment of the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of C-400. ERH was selected as an interim action to remove 'a significant portion of the contaminant mass of TCE at the C-400 Cleaning Building area through treatment' with the longer term goal of reducing 'the period the TCE concentration in groundwater remains above its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).' ERH is a thermal treatment that enhances the removal of TCE and related solvents from soil and groundwater. The heterogeneous conditions at PGDP, particularly the high permeability regional gravel aquifer (RGA), are challenging to ERH. Thus, a phased approach is being followed to implement this relatively expensive and complex remediation technology. Conceptually, the phased approach encourages safety and efficiency by providing a 'lessons learned' process and allowing appropriate adjustments to be identified and implemented prior to follow-on phase(s) of treatment. More specifically, early deployment targeted portions of the challenging RGA treatment zone with relatively little contamination reducing the risk of adverse collateral impacts from underperformance in terms of heating and capture. Because of the importance and scope of the C-400 TCE source remediation activities, DOE chartered an Independent Technical Review (ITR) in 2007 to assess the C-400 ERH plans prior

  16. The Two-Phase Flow Separator Experiment Breadboard Model: Reduced Gravity Aircraft Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, E; Sharp, L. M.; Chahine, G.; Kamotani, Y.; Gotti, D.; Owens, J.; Gilkey, K.; Pham, N.

    2015-01-01

    Life support systems in space depend on the ability to effectively separate gas from liquid. Passive cyclonic phase separators use the centripetal acceleration of a rotating gas-liquid mixture to carry out phase separation. The gas migrates to the center, while gas-free liquid may be withdrawn from one of the end plates. We have designed, constructed and tested a breadboard that accommodates the test sections of two independent principal investigators and satisfies their respective requirements, including flow rates, pressure and video diagnostics. The breadboard was flown in the NASA low-gravity airplane in order to test the system performance and design under reduced gravity conditions.

  17. REFINEMENT OF THE NEPHELINE DISCRIMINATOR: RESULTS OF A PHASE I STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K; James Newell, J; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

    2008-02-13

    The performance of a glass used for immobilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) is generally quantified by its resistance to chemical degradation, or durability. The durability of a HLW glass is dependent on its composition. If crystalline phases form within a glass during cooling, the composition of the residual glass network is altered, therefore affecting the durability of the glass. Crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}) has been shown to adversely impact the durability of HLW glasses since it removes glass forming species (in this case, Al and Si) from the glass network. The propensity for nepheline crystallization in a HLW glass increases with increasing concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O in the glass. Nepheline crystallization is therefore of concern for processing of HLW at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since the sludge waste streams at the Savannah River Site (SRS) can contain high concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O. Currently, a 'nepheline discriminator' is included as a process control constraint at the DWPF. The nepheline discriminator relates the concentrations of SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (as weight percentages in glass) to a critical value of 0.62. The discriminator defines a boundary line on the SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary diagram above which (or toward the SiO{sub 2} corner of the ternary) nepheline is not predicted to crystallize in the glass upon quenching or slow cooling. The current equation uses only the concentrations of the SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} components in the glass in predicting whether or not nepheline is likely to crystallize. However, several other components have been shown to impact the propensity for nepheline crystallization, including B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO among others. Therefore, the potential exists to further refine the nepheline discriminator to include these components. In addition, recently studied HLW

  18. Income Verification Pilot Project (Phase II): Results of Quality Assurance Evaluation, 1982-83 School Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    Presented in this report are selected findings of the Income Verification Pilot Project (IVPP), an investigation examining misreporting of applicant income and family size on applications for government-sponsored school meal benefits. As reported here, Phase II of the project provided for a comprehensive assessment of specific quality assurance…

  19. Aquitard contaminant storage and flux resulting from dense nonaqueous phase liquid source zone dissolution and remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A one-dimensional diffusion model was used to investigate the effects of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone dissolution and remediation on the storage and release of contaminants from aquitards. Source zone dissolution was represented by a power-law source depleti...

  20. Dual phase transformation and resultant magnetic properties in Fe{sub 3}Pt thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, S. N.; Lee, H. Y.; Chen, S. K.; Liu, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    Fifty-nm-thick Fe{sub 75}Pt{sub 25} thin films have been made on glass substrates by rf magnetron sputtering at room temperature, and subsequently annealed at 300 -700 deg. C (T{sub a}) for 1 h. The as-deposited Fe{sub 3}Pt film exhibits high magnetization of 1530 emu/cm{sup 3} and a disordered bcc structure, confirmed by high-resolution synchrotron radiation x-ray diffractometry. First-phase transformation from the bcc to disorder fcc structure occurs for samples annealed at 300 deg. C. With increasing of T{sub a} up to 375 deg. C, the film displays a nearly disordered fcc phase with low magnetization of 1083 emu/cm{sup 3}. The fcc phase changes to ordered L1{sub 2} structure for samples with T{sub a} {>=} 400 deg. C. The highly ordered L1{sub 2} phase with magnetization of 1270 emu/cm{sup 3} and coercivity of 66 Oe was obtained in Fe{sub 3}Pt film at 700 deg. C-annealing.

  1. Negative results in phase III trials of complex interventions: cause for concern or just good science?

    PubMed

    Crawford, Mike J; Barnicot, Kirsten; Patterson, Sue; Gold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Not all interventions that show promise in exploratory trials will be supported in phase III studies. But the high failure rate in recent trials of complex mental health interventions is a concern. Proper consideration of trial processes and greater use of adaptive trial designs could ensure better use of available resources. PMID:27369475

  2. REFINEMENT OF THE NEPHELINE DISCRIMINATOR: RESULTS OF A PHASE II STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T

    2008-11-21

    Twenty five glass compositions were selected for a Phase II study to assess the potential for reducing the conservatism in the nepheline discriminator. The glass compositions were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the liquidus temperature model was used to restrict the glass compositions so that they could all be melted at the same temperature. The nepheline discriminator was used to force the glass compositions into regions where nepheline formation was predicted to occur. The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized for crystallization and chemical durability after both quenching and slow cooling. Chemical analysis showed that the fabricated glasses met the target compositions. Nepheline was identified in one of the quenched glasses and several of the CCC glasses. There was no clear relationship between the types of crystallization that occurred in a particular glass and its location on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} ternary diagram. A partitioning algorithm was used to identify trends in crystallization behavior based on glass composition. Generally, for the CCC glasses MnO influenced the crystallization of spinels and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} influenced the crystallization of nepheline. Measured durability responses varied from acceptable to unacceptable depending on the glass composition and type and extent of crystallization that occurred. It was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator at this time. It is recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where acceptable glasses are predicted to be

  3. Long-Term Results From the Contura Multilumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Phase 4 Registry Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttino, Laurie W.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Vicini, Frank; Julian, Thomas; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the long-term outcomes from a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred forty-two evaluable patients were enrolled by 23 institutions between January 2008 and February 2011. All patients received 34 Gy in 10 fractions, delivered twice daily. Rigorous target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints were observed. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 1-54 months). For the entire patient cohort of 342 patients, 10 patients experienced an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Eight of these IBTR were classified as true recurrences/marginal miss (TRMM), and 2 were elsewhere failures (EF). Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. For the entire cohort, 88% of patients had good to excellent overall cosmesis. The overall incidence of infection was 8.5%. Symptomatic seroma was reported in only 4.4% of patients. A separate analysis was performed to determine whether improved outcomes would be observed for patients treated at high-volume centers with extensive brachytherapy experience. Three IBTR were observed in this cohort, only 1 of which was classified as a TRMM. Local recurrence-free survival at high-volume centers was 98.1% at 3 years. Overall cosmetic outcome and toxicity were superior in patients treated at high-volume centers. In these patients, 95% had good to excellent overall cosmesis. Infection was observed in only 2.9% of patients, and symptomatic seroma was reported in only 1.9%. Conclusion: Use of the CMLB for APBI delivery is associated with acceptable long-term local control and toxicity. Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. Significant (grade 3) toxicity was uncommon, and no grade 4 toxicity was observed. Treatment at high-volume centers was associated

  4. Specific N-glycans of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Surface and the Abnormal Increase of Core-α-1, 6-fucosylated Triantennary Glycan via N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases-IVa Regulation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Huan; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Yubao; Li, Tingting; Zhan, Chao; Huo, Wenjuan; He, Anshun; Yao, Yuanfei; Jin, Yu; Qu, Youpeng; Sun, Xue-Long; Li, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation alterations of cell surface proteins are often observed during the progression of malignancies. The specific cell surface N-glycans were profiled in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with clinical tissues (88 tumor and adjacent normal tissues) and the corresponding serum samples of HCC patients. The level of core-α-1,6-fucosylated triantennary glycan (NA3Fb) increased both on the cell surface and in the serum samples of HCC patients (p < 0.01). Additionally, the change of NA3Fb was not influenced by Hepatitis B virus (HBV)and cirrhosis. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa (GnT-IVa), which was related to the synthesis of the NA3Fb, was substantially increased in HCC tissues. Knockdown of GnT-IVa leads to a decreased level of NA3Fb and decreased ability of invasion and migration in HCC cells. NA3Fb can be regarded as a specific cell surface N-glycan of HCC. The high expression of GnT-IVa is the cause of the abnormal increase of NA3Fb on the HCC cell surface, which regulates cell migration. This study demonstrated the specific N-glycans of the cell surface and the mechanisms of altered glycoform related with HCC. These findings lead to better understanding of the function of glycan and glycosyltransferase in the tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis of HCC. PMID:26537865

  5. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer

  6. A Description of Room Arrangement, Design, and Appearance in Title IV-A Day Care Centers in Philadelphia, 1974-1975. Report No. 7733.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silber, Theodore J.

    This report describes the room arrangement, design, and appearance of 152 Title IV-A Day Care centers in Philadelphia. A series of 27 items on a section of the Daily Care, In-Room Observation Guide was used to provide an overall description of rooms in day care and to identify differences in features for different types of programs. Data were…

  7. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233.145 Public Welfare..., XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. (a) Under the provisions of section 121(b) of Pub. L. 89-97... Social Security Act for aid or assistance in the form of medical or any other type of remedial care...

  8. Alirocumab for hyperlipidemia: ODYSSEY Phase III clinical trial results and US FDA approval indications.

    PubMed

    Roth, Eli M

    2016-03-01

    A new class of lipid-lowering drugs, inhibitors of PCSK9 has been generating impressive clinical trial data over the last several years, and alirocumab (Praluent) has become the first to be approved by the US FDA. Alirocumab has been shown to lower low density lipoprotein cholesterol by 45-62% with a safety profile generally comparable to placebo. Alirocumab is a monoclonal antibody to PCSK9 administered subcutaneously and has been evaluated in 16 Phase III clinical trials, the majority of which have been enrolled or completed. This article will be a review of the available Phase III safety and efficacy data of the ODYSSEY studies including a brief description of each of the 16 studies. PMID:26785741

  9. NEPHELINE FORMATION STUDY FOR SLUDGE BATCH 4: PHASE 3 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K

    2006-05-01

    This Phase 3 study was undertaken to complement the previous phases of the nepheline formation studies1, 2 by continuing the investigation into the ability of the nepheline discriminator to predict the occurrence of nepheline crystallization in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) glasses and into the impact of such phases on the durability of the SB4 glasses. The Phase 3 study had two primary objectives. The first was to continue to demonstrate the ability of the discriminator value to adequately predict the nepheline formation potential for specific glass systems of interest. The second was to generate additional data that have a high probability of supporting the SB4 variability study. To support these two objectives, sixteen glasses were selected based on the most recent SB4 compositional projection, Case 15C Blend 1.3 Four different frits were included, based on previous assessments of projected operating windows and melt rate,4, 5 with four WLs selected for each frit. Eight of these frit-sludge combinations covered WLs which tightly bound the nepheline discriminator value of 0.62, with the intent of refining this value to a level of confidence where it can be incorporated into offline administrative controls and/or the Process Composition Control System (PCCS) to support Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability decisions. The remaining eight frit-sludge combinations targeted lower WLs (35 and 40%) and were prepared and analyzed to contribute needed data to the ComPro database6 to support a potential variability study for SB4.

  10. Oral clofarabine for relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphomas: Results of a phase 1 study

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, J.S.; Takvorian, R.W.; Fisher, D.C.; Feng, Y.; Jacobsen, E.D.; Brown, J.R.; Barnes, J.A.; Neuberg, D.S.; Hochberg, E.P.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a phase 1 trial evaluating the oral nucleoside analogue clofarabine in patients with relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients were treated once daily on days 1 through 21 of a 28 day cycle for a maximum of 6 cycles. The study was conducted with a 3+3 design with ten additional patients treated at the recommended phase 2 dose. Thirty patients were enrolled including indolent B-cell lymphomas (21), mantle cell (6), and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (3). The primary toxicities were hematologic including grade 3–4 neutropenia (53%) and thrombocytopenia (27%). Three mg was determined to be the recommended phase 2 dose. Tumor volume was reduced in 70% of patients, and the overall response rate was 47% including 27% complete remissions. Responses were seen in indolent B-cell lymphomas and mantle cell lymphoma. At a median follow-up of 17 months, 68% of responding patients remain in ongoing remission. Oral clofarabine was well tolerated with encouraging efficacy in indolent B-cell lymphomas and mantle cell lymphomas, warranting further investigation. PMID:23289359

  11. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Phase II test results and TRAC-BWR model qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, W A; Alamgir, M; Findlay, J A; Hwang, W S

    1985-10-01

    Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. There are nine tests in Phase II of the FIST program. They include the following LOCA tests: BWR/6 LPCI line break, BWR/6 intermediate size recirculation break, and a BWR/4 large break. Steady state natural circulation tests with feedwater makeup performed at high and low pressure, and at high pressure with HPCS makeup, are included. Simulation of a transient without rod insertion, and with controlled depressurization, was performed. Also included is a simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip test. The final two tests simulated a failure to maintain water level during a postulated accident. A FIST program objective is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two post-test predictions made with TRACB04 are compared with Phase II test data in this report. These are for the BWR/6 LPCI line break LOCA, and the Peach Bottom turbine trip test simulation.

  12. Crystal growth of pure substances: Phase-field simulations in comparison with analytical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, B.; Danilov, D.; Galenko, P.

    2005-07-01

    A phase-field model for non-isothermal solidification in multicomponent systems [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 64 (3) (2004) 775-799] consistent with the formalism of classic irreversible thermodynamics is used for numerical simulations of crystal growth in a pure material. The relation of this approach to the phase-field model by Bragard et al. [Interface Science 10 (2-3) (2002) 121-136] is discussed. 2D and 3D simulations of dendritic structures are compared with the analytical predictions of the Brener theory [Journal of Crystal Growth 99 (1990) 165-170] and with recent experimental measurements of solidification in pure nickel [Proceedings of the TMS Annual Meeting, March 14-18, 2004, pp. 277-288; European Physical Journal B, submitted for publication]. 3D morphology transitions are obtained for variations in surface energy and kinetic anisotropies at different undercoolings. In computations, we investigate the convergence behaviour of a standard phase-field model and of its thin interface extension at different undercoolings and at different ratios between the diffuse interface thickness and the atomistic capillary length. The influence of the grid anisotropy is accurately analyzed for a finite difference method and for an adaptive finite element method in comparison.

  13. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  14. Distortion of self-induced-transparency solitons as a result of self-phase modulation in ion-doped fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Victor V.; Fradkin, Évald E.

    1995-11-01

    The temporal envelope profile and the phase of a steady-state pulse propagating through a resonant medium in the presence of nonresonant nonlinearity are derived. The formation of solitonlike pulses takes place as a result of the balance of the self-phase modulation generated by nonresonant nonlinearity and the nonlinear resonant group-velocity dispersion induced by the self-induced-transparency effect in a resonant medium. Self-phase-modulation action leads to distortion of the pulse when its power and inverse duration exceed the critical values Pcr and tau -1cr . We show the destructive role of self-phase modulation in the case of self-induced-transparency pulse generation in a laser with erbium-doped fiber as an intracavity coherent absorber.

  15. Simultaneous phase and amplitude retrieval with COFFEE: from theory to laboratory results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Baptiste; Sauvage, Jean-François; Mugnier, Laurent M.; Dohlen, Kjetil; Fusco, Thierry; Ferrari, Marc

    2014-07-01

    The final performance of current and future instruments dedicated to exoplanet detection and characterization (such as SPHERE on the VLT, GPI on Gemini North or future instruments on the ELTs) is limited by intensity residuals in the scientific image plane, which originate in uncorrected optical aberrations. After correction of the atmospheric turbulence, the main contribution to these residuals comes from the quasi-static aberrations introduced upstream of the coronagraph which create long-lived speckles in the detector plane that can easily be mistaken for a planet. In order to reach very high contrast such as the ones required to image earth-like planets, these aberrations needs to be compensated for. We have recently proposed a dedicated focal-plane wave-font sensor called COFFEE (for COronagraphic Focal-plane wave-Front Estimation for Exoplanet detection), which consists in an extension of conventional phase diversity to a coronagraphic system: aberrations both upstream and downstream of the coronagraph are estimated using two coronagraphic focal-plane images, recorded from the scientific camera itself, without any differential aberration. Such a system has been successfully validated on the SPHERE instrument, where COFFEEs estimation has been used to compensate for the phase aberration upstream of the coronagraph, leading to a contrast optimization in the whole focal plane area controlled by the AO loop. If compensating for phase aberrations only was acceptable to reach levels of contrast of 10-6, it will no longer be the case for instruments that aim at imaging earth-like planets. Such targets, which would be the ones of a planet-finder instrument integrated on an ELT, require a level of contrast better than 10-9. To reach this level, neglecting amplitude aberrations (inhomogeneous intensity in the pupil, Fresnel propagation effect) is no longer possible. In this communication, we present an extension of COFFEE able to perform a simultaneous estimation of

  16. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT – CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger; Freshley, Mark D.; Dixon, Paul; Hubbard, Susan S.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Flach, Gregory P.; Faybishenko, Boris; Gorton, Ian; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Moulton, John D.; Steefel, Carl I.; Marble, Justin

    2013-06-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  17. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  18. NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment phase 3 test objectives and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, D.A.; Fingersh, L.J.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1995-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are conducting research to improve a wind turbine technology. One program, the Combined Experiment, has focused on making measurements needed to understand aerodynamic and structural responses of horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT). A new phase of this program, the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment, will focus on quantifying unsteady aerodynamic phenomena prevalent install controlled HAWTs. Optimally twisted blades and innovative data acquisition systems will be used in these tests. data can now be acquired and viewed interactively during turbine operations. This paper describes the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment and highlights planned future research activities.

  19. Investor Outlook: Focus on Upcoming LCA2 Gene Therapy Phase III Results.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Investor interest in gene therapy has increased substantially over the past few years, and the next major catalyst for the field is likely to be Spark Therapeutics's phase III trial for the treatment of visual impairment caused by RPE65 gene mutations (often referred to as Leber congenital amaurosis type 2, or LCA2, but may include other retinal disorders). Analysis of the approach from the basic genetics, underlying visual mechanisms, clinical data, and commercialization considerations helps frame investor expectations and the potential implications for the broader field. PMID:26390089

  20. Results on neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge from GERDA Phase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios; GERDA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment is searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge by operating bare germanium diodes in liquid argon. GERDA is located at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) in Italy. During Phase I, a total exposure of 21.6 kg yrand a background index of 0.01 cts/(keVkg yr) were reached. No signal was observed and a lower limit of T0ν1/2 > 2.1 · 1025 yr(90% C.L.) is derived for the half life of the 0νββ decay of 76Ge.

  1. Phase I Field Test Results of an Innovative DNAPL Remediation Technology: The Hydrophobic Lance

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-01-28

    An innovative technology for recovery of pure phase DNAPL was deployed in the subsurface near the M-Area Settling Basin, continuing the support of the A/M Area Ground Water Corrective Action Program (per Part B requirements). This technology, the Hydrophobic Lance, operates by placing a neutral/hydrophobic surface (Teflon) in contact with the DNAPL. This changes the in situ conditions experienced by the DNAPL, allowing it to selectively drain into a sump from which it can be pumped. Collection of even small amounts of DNAPL can save years of pump-and-treat operation because of the generally low solubility of DNAPL components.

  2. Analysis, design, and experimental results for lightweight space heat receiver canisters, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Michael G.; Brege, Mark A.; Heidenreich, Gary R.

    1991-01-01

    Critical technology experiments have been performed on thermal energy storage modules in support of the Brayton Advanced Heat Receiver program. The modules are wedge-shaped canisters designed to minimize the mechanical stresses that occur during the phase change of the lithium fluoride phase change material. Nickel foam inserts were used in some of the canisters to provide thermal conductivity enhancement and to distribute the void volume. Two canisters, one with a nickel foam insert, and one without, were thermally cycled in various orientations in a fluidized bed furnace. The only measurable impact of the nickel foam was seen when the back and short sides of the canister were insulated to simulate operation in the advanced receiver design. In tests with insulation, the furnace to back side delta T was larger in the canister with the nickel foam insert, probably due to the radiant absorptivity of the nickel. However, the differences in the temperature profiles of the two canisters were small, and in many cases the profiles matched fairly well. Computed Tomography (CT) was successfully used to nondestructively demarcate void locations in the canisters. Finally, canister dimensional stability, which was measured throughout the thermal cycling test program with an inspection fixture was satisfactory with a maximum change of 0.635 mm (0.025 in.).

  3. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Subsonic jets are relatively simple. The peak noise source location gradually moves upstream toward the nozzle as frequency increases. 2) Supersonic jets are more complicated. The peak noise source location moves downstream as frequency increases through a BBSN hump. 3) In both subsonic and supersonic jets the peak noise source location corresponding to a given frequency of noise moves downstream as jet Mach number increases. 4) The noise generated at a given frequency in a BBSN hump is generated by a small number of shocks, not from all the shocks at the same time. 5) Single microphone spectrum levels decrease when the noise source locations measured with the phased array are blocked by a shielding surface. This consistency validates the phased array data and the stationary monopole source model used to process it. 6) Reflecting surface data illustrate that the law of reflection must be satisfied for noise to reflect off a surface toward an observer. Depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface and the observer only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement. 7) The low frequency noise created when a jet flow impinges on a surface comes primarily from the trailing edge regardless of the axial extent impacted by the flow.

  4. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management - Current Status and Phase II Demonstration Results - 13161

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger R.; Flach, Greg; Freshley, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky; Gorton, Ian; Dixon, Paul; Moulton, J. David; Hubbard, Susan S.; Faybishenko, Boris; Steefel, Carl I.; Finsterle, Stefan; Marble, Justin

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial tool-sets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  5. Orbit transfer vehicle engine study, phase A extension. Volume 2A: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Engine trade studies and systems analyses leading to a baseline engine selection for advanced expander cycle engine are discussed with emphasis on: (1) performance optimization of advanced expander cycle engines in the 10 to 20K pound thrust range; (2) selection of a recommended advanced expander engine configuration based on maximized performance and minimized mission risk, and definition of the components for this configuration; (3) characterization of the low thrust adaptation requirements and performance for the staged combustion engine; (4) generation of a suggested safety and reliability approach for OTV engines independent of engine cycle; (5) definition of program risk relationships between expander and staged combustion cycle engines; and (6) development of schedules and costs for the DDT&E, production, and operation phases of the 10K pound thrust expander engine program.

  6. NASA/General Electric broad-specification fuels combustion technology program - Phase I results and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.; Bahr, D. W.; Fear, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop the technology required to utilize fuels with broadened properties in aircraft gas turbine engines. The first phase of this program consisted of the experimental evaluation of three different combustor concepts to determine their potential for meeting several specific emissions and performance goals, when operated on broadened property fuels. The three concepts were a single annular combustor; a double annular combustor; and a short single annular combustor with variable geometry. All of these concepts were sized for the General Electric CF6-80 engine. A total of 24 different configurations of these concepts were evaluated in a high pressure test facility, using four test fuels having hydrogen contents between 11.8 and 14%. Fuel effects on combustor performance, durability and emissions, and combustor design features to offset these effects were demonstrated.

  7. The HRSC Experiment on Mars Express: First Imaging Results from the Commissioning Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, J.; Neukum, G.; Hoffmann, H.; Jaumann, R.; Hauber, E.; Albertz, J.; McCord, T. B.; Markiewicz, W. J.

    2004-12-01

    The ESA Mars Express spacecraft was launched from Baikonur on June 2, 2003, entered Mars orbit on December 25, 2003, and reached the nominal mapping orbit on January 28, 2004. Observing conditions were favorable early on for the HRSC (High Resolution Stereo Camera), designed for the mapping of the Martian surface in 3-D. The HRSC is a pushbroom scanner with 9 CCD line detectors mounted in parallel and perpendicular to the direction of flight on the focal plane. The camera can obtain images at high resolution (10 m/pix), in triple stereo (20 m/pix), in four colors, and at five different phase angles near-simultaneously. An additional Super-Resolution Channel (SRC) yields nested-in images at 2.3 m/pix for detailed photogeologic studies. Even for nominal spacecraft trajectory and camera pointing data from the commissioning phase, solid stereo image reconstructions are feasible. More yet, the three-line stereo data allow us to identify and correct errors in navigation data. We find that > 99% of the stereo rays intersect within a sphere of radius < 20m after orbit and pointing data correction. From the HRSC images we have produced Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) with pixel sizes of 200 m, some of them better. HRSC stereo models and data obtained by the MOLA (Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter) show good qualitative agreement. Differences in absolute elevations are within 50 m, but may reach several 100 m in lateral positioning (mostly in the spacecraft along-track direction). After correction of these offsets, the HRSC topographic data conveniently fill the gaps between the MOLA tracks and reveal hitherto unrecognized morphologic detail. At the time of writing, the HRSC has covered approx. 22.5 million square kilometers of the Martian surface. In addition, data from 5 Phobos flybys from May through August 2004 were obtained. The HRSC is beginning to make major contributions to geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry, and cartography of Mars (papers submitted to Nature).

  8. DARPA counter-sniper program: Phase 1 Acoustic Systems Demonstration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapezza, Edward M.; Law, David B.; Csanadi, Christina J.

    1997-02-01

    During October 1995 through May 1996, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency sponsored the development of prototype systems that exploit acoustic muzzle blast and ballistic shock wave signatures to accurately predict the location of gunfire events and associated shooter locations using either single or multiple volumetric arrays. The output of these acoustic systems is an estimate of the shooter location and a classification estimate of the caliber of the shooter's weapon. A portable display and control unit provides both graphical and alphanumeric shooter location related information integrated on a two- dimensional digital map of the defended area. The final Phase I Acoustic Systems Demonstration field tests were completed in May. These these tests were held at USMC Base Camp Pendleton Military Operations Urban Training (MOUT) facility. These tests were structured to provide challenging gunfire related scenarios with significant reverberation and multi-path conditions. Special shot geometries and false alarms were included in these tests to probe potential system vulnerabilities and to determine the performance and robustness of the systems. Five prototypes developed by U.S. companies and one Israeli developed prototype were tested. This analysis quantifies the spatial resolution estimation capability (azimuth, elevation and range) of these prototypes and describes their ability to accurately classify the type of bullet fired in a challenging urban- like setting.

  9. Results of the phase II study of photodynamic therapy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konaka, Chimori; Kato, Harubumi; Okunaka, Tetsuya; Hayata, Yoshihiro

    1994-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) utilizing Photofrin has proven to be an effective modality used in the treatment of solid tumors. In particular, it can be applied via endoscopy to lesions developing in luminal organs. A phase II study was conducted for submission to the Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare. In this protocol an excimer dye laser was used to deliver 630 nm light via a quartz fiber passed through an endoscopic working channel two days subsequent to i.v. injection of photosensitizer. In this study, 98 patients with superficial cancer of various organs were treated. Of these, 88 patients could be evaluated, including 33 with roentgenographically occult lung cancer, 10 with esophageal cancer, 24 with gastric cancer, 18 with cervical cancer and three with bladder cancer. Complete remission as evaluated endoscopically, pathologically, and cytologically was obtained in 83 out of 98 (84.7). There was no serious complication except mild skin photosensitivity, which was seen in four patients. It was concluded that PDT can be efficacious in the treatment of superficial cancers and that complete remission can be achieved when suitable photoradiation conditions are met.

  10. Cladribine and cytarabine in refractory multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis: results of an international phase 2 study

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Frederic; van Noesel, Max; Barkaoui, Mohamed; Bardet, Odile; Mura, Rosella; Arico, Maurizio; Piguet, Christophe; Gandemer, Virginie; Armari Alla, Corinne; Clausen, Niels; Jeziorski, Eric; Lambilliote, Anne; Weitzman, Sheila; Henter, Jan Inge; Van Den Bos, Cor

    2015-01-01

    An international phase 2 study combining cladribine and cytarabine (Ara-C) was initiated for patients with refractory, risk-organ–positive Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in 2005. The protocol, comprising at least two 5-day courses of Ara-C (1 g/m2 per day) plus cladribine (9 mg/m2 per day) followed by maintenance therapy, was administered to 27 patients (median age at diagnosis, 0.7 years; median follow-up, 5.3 years). At inclusion, all patients were refractory after at least 1 course of vinblastine (VBL) plus corticosteroid, all had liver and spleen involvement, and 25 patients had hematologic cytopenia. After 2 courses, disease status was nonactive (n = 2), better (n = 23), or stable (n = 2), with an overall response rate of 92%. Median disease activity scores decreased from 12 at the start of therapy to 3 after 2 courses (P < .0001). During maintenance therapy, 4 patients experienced reactivation in risk organs. There were 4 deaths; 2 were related to therapy toxicity and 2 were related to reactivation. All patients experienced severe toxicity, with World Health Organization grade 4 hematologic toxicity and 6 documented severe infections. The overall 5-year survival rate was 85% (95% confidence interval, 65.2%-94.2%). Thus, the combination of cladribine/Ara-C is effective therapy for refractory multisystem LCH but is associated with high toxicity. PMID:26194764

  11. Recombinant leukocyte A interferon in advanced breast cancer. Results of a phase II efficacy trial.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, S A; Mayer, D; Ochs, J J; Abrams, P G; Knost, J A; Foon, K A; Fein, S; Oldham, R K

    1983-05-01

    Nineteen patients with advanced refractory metastatic breast cancer no longer responsive to chemotherapy were treated in the first phase II efficacy trial of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (IFL-rA), a highly purified single molecular species of alpha interferon prepared by recombinant DNA methods. Patients received a previously determined maximum tolerated dose for this agent (50 X 10(6) U/m2 body surface area) by intramuscular injection three times weekly for up to 3 months. The symptoms of toxicity observed in this trial resemble those previously reported for alpha interferons and include fever, chills, fatigue, anorexia, and leukopenia. All patients required dose reductions, most often for reasons of severe fatigue. Of the 17 patients evaluable for tumor response, one patient had stable disease and 16 had evidence of tumor progression. We conclude that IFL-rA is not an active agent in the treatment of advanced, refractory breast cancer when used at a maximum tolerated dose on this treatment schedule. PMID:6342490

  12. Arsenic pilot plant operation and results - Socorro Springs, New Mexico - phase 1.

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Holub, William E. Jr; Wright, Jeremy B.; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2007-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative water treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The first pilot tests have been conducted in New Mexico where over 90 sites that exceed the new MCL have been identified by the New Mexico Environment Department. The pilot test described in this report was conducted in Socorro New Mexico between January 2005 and July 2005. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The Sandia National Laboratories pilot demonstration at the Socorro Springs site obtained arsenic removal performance data for five different adsorptive media under constant ambient flow conditions. Well water at Socorro Springs has approximately 42 ppb arsenic in the oxidized (arsenate-As(V)) redox state with moderate amounts of silica, low concentrations of iron and manganese and a slightly alkaline pH (8). The study provides estimates of the capacity (bed volumes until breakthrough at 10 ppb arsenic) of adsorptive media in the same chlorinated water. Near the end of the test the feedwater pH was lowered to assess the affect on bed capacity and as a prelude to a controlled pH study (Socorro Springs Phase 2).

  13. Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

    2012-01-01

    rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition (¼” lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and ¼” lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

  14. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--VOCS IN BLOOD ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) in 145 blood samples. These samples were collected to examine the relationships between personal exposure measurements, environmental measurements, and body burden. Venous blood sample...

  15. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--METALS IN BLOOD ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 165 blood samples. These samples were collected to examine the relationships between personal exposure measurements, environmental measurements, and body burden. Venous blood samples were collected by venipun...

  16. Orbit transfer vehicle engine study, phase A, extension 1: Volume 2: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Because of the advantage of the Advanced Expander Cycle Engine brought out in initial studies, further design optimization and comparative analyses were undertaken. The major results and conclusion derived are summarized. The primary areas covered are (1) thrust chamber geometry optimization, (2) expander cycle optimization, (3) alternate low thrust capability, (4) safety and reliability, (5) development risk comparison, and (6) cost comparisons. All of the results obtained were used to baseline the initial design concept for the OTV Advanced Expander Cycle Engine Point Design Study.

  17. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--PESTICIDES IN WATER ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Water data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 10 pesticides in 388 water samples over 80 households. One-liter samples of tap water were collected after a two-minute flush from the tap identified by the resident as that most commonly used...

  18. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--PAHS IN DUST ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PAHs in Dust data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 126 dust samples over 50 households. Samples were obtained by collecting dust samples from the indoor floor areas in the main activity room using a modi...

  19. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--PESTICIDES IN DUST ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Dust data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 9 pesticides in 126 dust samples over 50 households. Samples were obtained by collecting dust samples from the indoor floor areas in the main activity room using a modified vacuum cleaner devic...

  20. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--PESTICIDES IN DUST ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Dust data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 3 pesticides in 437 dust samples over 278 households. Samples were taken by collecting dust from the indoor floor areas in the main room and in the bedroom of the primary resident. The primary...

  1. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN BLANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 205 blank samples and for particles in 64 blank samples. Measurements were made for up to 12 metals in blank samples of air, dust, soil, water, food and beverages, blood, hair, and urine. Blank samples were u...

  2. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--PESTICIDES IN SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Soil data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 9 pesticides in 60 soil samples over 41 households. Composite samples were obtained from up to 24 locations around the outside of the specific residence and combined into a single sample. Only...

  3. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--PESTICIDES IN FOOD--DUPLICATE DIET ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Food data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 4 pesticides in 351 food and beverage samples over 177 households. Each sample was collected as a duplicate of the food consumed by the primary respondent during a single 24-hour period during ...

  4. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--PAHS IN SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PAHs in Soil data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 60 soil samples over 41 households. Composite samples were obtained from up to 24 locations around the outside of the specific residence and combined in...

  5. Bilingual Education Instructional and Training Materials. Field Test Results and Final Phase II Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahone, Alicia

    The report describes a federally funded project for the development of an innovative approach to bilingual curriculum and instruction and inservice teacher training. A needs assessment and research process resulted in development and field testing of a set of bilingual Spanish-English instructional materials for limited-English-speaking urban…

  6. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--PESTICIDES IN BLOOD ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Blood Serum data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 17 pesticides in 358 blood samples over 79 households. Each sample was collected via a venous sample from the primary respondent within each household by a phlebotomist. Samples were ge...

  7. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--PAHS IN DERMAL WIPES ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PAHs in Dermal Wipe Samples data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 PAHs in 40 dermal wipe samples over 40 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household. The sampling period occurred on the last day of each...

  8. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR PESTICIDE METABOLITES IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticide Metabolites in Spike Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 4 pesticide metabolites in 3 control samples (spikes) from 3 households. Measurements were made in spiked samples of urine. Spiked samples were used to assess recovery o...

  9. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--PESTICIDES IN AIR ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Air data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 9 pesticides in 127 air samples over 51 households. Samples were taken by pumping standardized air volumes through URG impactors with a 10 um cutpoint and polyurethane foam (PUF) filters at indo...

  10. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--PAHS IN AIR ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PAHs in Air data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 PAHs in 127 air samples over 51 households. Twenty-four-hour samples were taken over a one-week period using a continuous pump and solenoid apparatus pumping a standardized air volume through an UR...

  11. Analytical Round Robin for Elastic-Plastic Analysis of Surface Cracked Plates: Phase I Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, D. N.; Allen, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical round robin for the elastic-plastic analysis of surface cracks in flat plates was conducted with 15 participants. Experimental results from a surface crack tension test in 2219-T8 aluminum plate provided the basis for the inter-laboratory study (ILS). The study proceeded in a blind fashion given that the analysis methodology was not specified to the participants, and key experimental results were withheld. This approach allowed the ILS to serve as a current measure of the state of the art for elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis. The analytical results and the associated methodologies were collected for comparison, and sources of variability were studied and isolated. The results of the study revealed that the J-integral analysis methodology using the domain integral method is robust, providing reliable J-integral values without being overly sensitive to modeling details. General modeling choices such as analysis code, model size (mesh density), crack tip meshing, or boundary conditions, were not found to be sources of significant variability. For analyses controlled only by far-field boundary conditions, the greatest source of variability in the J-integral assessment is introduced through the constitutive model. This variability can be substantially reduced by using crack mouth opening displacements to anchor the assessment. Conclusions provide recommendations for analysis standardization.

  12. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN REPLICATE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Replicates data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 11 metals in 88 replicate (duplicate) samples from 52 households. Measurements were made in samples of indoor and outdoor air, drinking water, food, and beverages. Duplicate samples for a...

  13. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--METALS IN DERMAL WIPES ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Dermal Wipe Samples data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 4 metals in 343 dermal wipe samples over 80 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household. The sampling period occurred on the first day of...

  14. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--METALS IN DUST ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Dust data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 4 metals in 282 dust samples over 80 households. Samples were obtained by collecting dust samples from the indoor floor areas in the main activity room using a modified vacuum cleaner device that c...

  15. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Spikes data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 4 metals in 71 control samples (spikes) from 47 households. Measurements were made in samples of indoor and outdoor air, blood, and urine. Controls were used to assess recovery of target anal...

  16. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--METALS IN SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Soil data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 4 metals in 277 soil samples over 75 households. Composite samples were obtained from up to 24 locations around the outside of the specific residence and combined into a single sample. The primary...

  17. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN BLANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Blanks data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 11 metals in 115 blank samples from 58 households. Measurements were made in blank samples of indoor and outdoor air, drinking water, beverages, urine, and blood. Blank samples were used to a...

  18. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--METALS IN AIR ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Air data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 metals in 369 air samples over 175 households. Samples were taken by pumping standardized air volumes through filters at indoor and outdoor sites around each household being sampled. The primary...

  19. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Spike Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 11 metals in 38 control samples (spikes) from 18 households. Measurements were made in spiked samples of dust, food, beverages, blood, urine, and dermal wipe residue. Spiked samples we...

  20. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN BLANK SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Blank Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 27 metals in 82 blank samples from 26 households. Measurements were made in blank samples of dust, indoor and outdoor air, personal air, food, beverages, blood, urine, and dermal wipe r...

  1. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN REPLICATE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Replicate Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 27 metals in 133 replicate (duplicate) samples from 62 households. Measurements were made in samples of soil, blood, tap water, and drinking water. Duplicate samples for a small pe...

  2. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--PESTICIDES IN DERMAL WIPES ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Dermal Wipes data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 3 pesticides in 177 dermal wipe samples over 177 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household during Stage III of the NHEXAS study. The Derma...

  3. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--METALS IN SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Soil data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 metals in 551 soil samples over 392 households. Samples were taken by collecting surface soil in the yard and next to the foundation from each residence. The primary metals of interest include ...

  4. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--METALS IN DERMAL WIPES ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Dermal Wipes data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 metals in 179 dermal wipe samples over 179 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household during Stage III of the NHEXAS study. The sampling per...

  5. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--METALS IN DUST ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Dust data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 metals in 562 dust samples over 388 households. Samples were taken by collecting dust samples from the indoor floor areas in the main room and in the bedroom of the primary resident. In additio...

  6. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--METALS IN FOOD ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 1,250 food samples. Dietary samples were collected by study participants who agreed to collect these on four consecutive days using a duplicate diet methodology. This method involves preparing or obtaining du...

  7. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--METALS IN WATER ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 905 water samples. Standing tap water, collected from the kitchen tap after water in the home plumbing was undisturbed for 4 hours, was analyzed to assess the contribution of home plumbing to exposure to meta...

  8. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR PESTICIDES IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Spike Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 4 pesticides in 26 control samples (spikes) from 19 households. Measurements were made in spiked samples of indoor air, food, beverages, and dermal wipe residue. Spiked samples wer...

  9. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--METALS IN BLOOD ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Blood data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 2 metals in 374 blood samples over 80 households. Each sample was collected via a venous sample from the primary respondent within each household by a phlebotomist. Samples were generally drawn o...

  10. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--METALS IN WATER ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Water data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 metals in 400 water samples over 80 households. One-liter samples of tap water were collected after a two minute flush from the tap identified by the resident as that most commonly used for dri...

  11. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--VOCS IN WATER ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in 247 drinking water samples. Samples were collected from the primary drinking water source, whether flushed tap water or other source such as bottled water, to assess the contributio...

  12. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--PESTICIDES IN AIR ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Air data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 3 pesticides in 225 air samples over 162 households. Samples were collected at indoor and outdoor sites around each household being sampled. Filters with a 10-um cutpoint were used to collect p...

  13. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--METALS IN URINE ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Urine data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 6 metals in 176 urine samples over 176 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household during Stage III of the NHEXAS study. The sample consists of the fir...

  14. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--METALS IN DUST ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 1,906 dust samples. Dust samples were collected to assess potential residential sources of dermal and inhalation exposures and to examine relationships between analyte levels in dust and in personal and bioma...

  15. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--PESTICIDE METABOLITES IN URINE ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticide Metabolites in Urine data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 4 pesticide metabolites in 176 urine samples over 176 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household during Stage III of the NHEXAS study. ...

  16. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--METALS IN FOOD ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Duplicate Diet Food data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 metals in 773 food samples over 80 households. Each sample was collected as a duplicate of the food consumed by the primary respondent during a four-day period commencing with the...

  17. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--PESTICIDES IN FOOD ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Duplicate Diet Food data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 10 pesticides in 682 food samples over 80 households. Each sample was collected as a duplicate of the food consumed by the primary respondent during a four-day period commencing ...

  18. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--METALS IN AIR ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Air data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 4 metals in 458 air samples over 79 households. Twenty-four-hour samples were taken over a one-week period using a continuous pump and solenoid apparatus by pumping a standardized air volume through...

  19. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--METALS IN AIR ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 534 air samples. Samples of personal air, indoor air, and outdoor air were collected using a pump and interval timer over a period of approximately 144 hours to measure inhalation exposure to metals. Most of ...

  20. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--PARTICLES IN AIR ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of particles (aerosol mass) in 538 air samples. Samples of personal air, indoor air, and outdoor air were collected using a pump and interval timer over a period of approximately 144 hours to measure inhalation exposure t...

  1. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--VOCS IN AIR ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) in 998 air samples. Samples of personal air, indoor air, and outdoor air were collected using two-stage passive badges (3-M, 3520, Minneapolis, MN) over a period of approximately 144 h...

  2. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--METALS IN URINE ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 600 urine samples. For some chemicals, particularly arsenic, urine provides the best information about the relationship between exposure and body burden. Two samples were collected from each participant on da...

  3. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN REPLICATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 490 duplicate (replicate) samples and for particles in 130 duplicate samples. Measurements were made for up to 11 metals in samples of air, dust, water, blood, and urine. Duplicate samples (samples collected ...

  4. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--METALS-XRF IN DUST ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals-XRF in Dust data set contains X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analytical results for measurements of up to 27 metals in 384 dust samples over 384 households. Samples were taken by collecting dust from the indoor floor areas in the main room and in the bedroom of the primary ...

  5. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--METALS-XRF IN AIR ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals-XRF in Air data set contains X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analytical results for measurements of up to 27 metals in 432 air samples over 236 households. Samples were taken by pumping standardized air volumes through filters at indoor and outdoor sites around each househol...

  6. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--METALS-XRF IN SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals-XRF in Soil data set contains X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analytical results for measurements of up to 27 metals in 551 soil samples over 392 households. Samples were taken by collecting soil from the yard and next to the foundation from each residence. The primary meta...

  7. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--METALS IN HAIR ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 182 hair samples. Hair samples were collected due to their potential use for assessing body burden. The cutting surfaces of a stainless-steel scissors were cleaned with an alcohol wipe before being used to cu...

  8. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN SPIKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 49 field control samples (spikes). Measurements were made for up to 11 metals in samples of water, blood, and urine. Field controls were used to assess recovery of target analytes from a sample media during s...

  9. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR VOCS IN SPIKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of VOCs in 53 field control samples (spikes). Measurements were made for up to 23 VOCs in samples of air and water. Field controls were used to assess recovery of target analytes from sample media during storage, shipment...

  10. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--METALS IN SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes analytical results for measurements of metals in 128 soil samples. These samples were collected at a subset of homes to examine the source relationship between analyte levels in soil and those measured in personal, indoor, and biomarker samples. Samples of ...

  11. REVIEW OF RESULTS FOR THE OECD/NEA PHASE VII BENCHMARK: STUDY OF SPENT FUEL COMPOSITIONS FOR LONG TERM DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Wagner, John C

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the problem specification and compares participants results for the OECD/NEA/WPNCS Expert Group on Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety Phase VII Benchmark Study of Spent Fuel Compositions for Long-Term Disposal. The Phase VII benchmark was developed to study the ability of relevant computer codes and associated nuclear data to predict spent fuel isotopic compositions and corresponding keff values in a cask configuration over the time duration relevant to spent nuclear fuel (SNF) disposal. The benchmark was divided into two sets of calculations: (1) decay calculations out to 1,000,000 years for provided pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) UO2 discharged fuel compositions and (2) burnup credit criticality calculations for a representative cask model at selected time steps. Contributions from 15 organizations and companies in 10 countries were submitted to the Phase VII benchmark exercise. This paper provides a description of the Phase VII benchmark and detailed comparisons of the participants isotopic compositions and keff values that were calculated with a diversity of computer codes and nuclear data sets. Differences observed in the calculated time-dependent nuclide densities are attributed to different decay data or code-specific numerical approximations. The variability of the keff results is consistent with the evaluated uncertainty associated with cross-section data.

  12. New calorimetric system and some results of water phase transition research in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Bakradze, N; Kiziria, E; Sokhadze, V; Gogichaishvili, Sh; Vardidze, E

    2007-01-01

    The principle of operation and main parameters of the recently created scanning differential reverse microcalorimeter of the new generation are presented. The microcalorimeter is destined for studying water crystallization and ice melting processes in heterogeneous systems, including plant and animal cells and tissues in the temperature range of 20 to -55 degrees C. In order to obtain maximum information from the experimental results respective algorithms and applied software package were developed. The results of studies of water crystallization and ice melting processes in different parts of common plantain (Plantago major L.) root, as a certain model system, can give us information on the peculiarities of the studied processes in complex, heterogeneous systems. PMID:17522730

  13. Plasma Spray Deposition of Lanthanum Phosphate and Phase Structure of the Resultant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pragatheeswaran, A.; Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Bhandari, Subhankar; Ramachandran, K.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma-sprayed lanthanum phosphate coatings were prepared on stainless steel substrates at different input powers from 16 to 24 kW. Coatings were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that the as-sprayed coatings consist of lanthanum ortho (LaPO4), poly(La2P4O13), and oxy(La3PO7) phosphates. Subsequent heat treatment of the coatings resulted in the recombination of the La-polyphosphate and La-oxyphosphate to form LaPO4. SEM images of microstructure of the coatings and coating-substrate interface showed micro-cracks, voids, and porosity that were found to decrease with deposition power.

  14. The Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Public Outdoor Lighting Inventory: Phase I: Survey Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Smalley, Edward; Haefer, R.

    2014-09-30

    This document presents the results of a voluntary web-based inventory survey of public street and area lighting across the U.S. undertaken during the latter half of 2013.This survey attempts to access information about the national inventory in a “bottoms-up” manner, going directly to owners and operators. Adding to previous “top down” estimates, it is intended to improve understanding of the role of public outdoor lighting in national energy use.

  15. Phase transitions in cooperative coinfections: Simulation results for networks and lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, Peter; Chen, Li; Ghanbarnejad, Fakhteh; Cai, Weiran

    2016-04-01

    We study the spreading of two mutually cooperative diseases on different network topologies, and with two microscopic realizations, both of which are stochastic versions of a susceptible-infected-removed type model studied by us recently in mean field approximation. There it had been found that cooperativity can lead to first order transitions from spreading to extinction. However, due to the rapid mixing implied by the mean field assumption, first order transitions required nonzero initial densities of sick individuals. For the stochastic model studied here the results depend strongly on the underlying network. First order transitions are found when there are few short but many long loops: (i) No first order transitions exist on trees and on 2-d lattices with local contacts. (ii) They do exist on Erdős-Rényi (ER) networks, on d -dimensional lattices with d ≥4 , and on 2-d lattices with sufficiently long-ranged contacts. (iii) On 3-d lattices with local contacts the results depend on the microscopic details of the implementation. (iv) While single infected seeds can always lead to infinite epidemics on regular lattices, on ER networks one sometimes needs finite initial densities of infected nodes. (v) In all cases the first order transitions are actually "hybrid"; i.e., they display also power law scaling usually associated with second order transitions. On regular lattices, our model can also be interpreted as the growth of an interface due to cooperative attachment of two species of particles. Critically pinned interfaces in this model seem to be in different universality classes than standard critically pinned interfaces in models with forbidden overhangs. Finally, the detailed results mentioned above hold only when both diseases propagate along the same network of links. If they use different links, results can be rather different in detail, but are similar overall.

  16. ASB14780, an Orally Active Inhibitor of Group IVA Phospholipase A2, Is a Pharmacotherapeutic Candidate for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Shiho; Ishihara, Keiichi; Kawashita, Eri; Tomoo, Toshiyuki; Nagahira, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Akiba, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    We have previously shown that high-fat cholesterol diet (HFCD)-induced fatty liver and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic fibrosis are reduced in mice deficient in group IVA phospholipase A2 (IVA-PLA2), which plays a role in inflammation. We herein demonstrate the beneficial effects of ASB14780 (3-[1-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-3-(2-phenylethyl)-1H-indol-5-yl]propanoic acid 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol salt), an orally active IVA-PLA2 inhibitor, on the development of fatty liver and hepatic fibrosis in mice. The daily coadministration of ASB14780 markedly ameliorated liver injury and hepatic fibrosis following 6 weeks of treatment with CCl4. ASB14780 markedly attenuated the CCl4-induced expression of smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) protein and the mRNA expression of collagen 1a2, α-SMA, and transforming growth factor-β1 in the liver, and inhibited the expression of monocyte/macrophage markers, CD11b and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, while preventing the recruitment of monocytes/macrophages to the liver. Importantly, ASB14780 also reduced the development of fibrosis even in matured hepatic fibrosis. Additionally, ASB14780 also reduced HFCD-induced lipid deposition not only in the liver, but also in already established fatty liver. Furthermore, treatment with ASB14780 suppressed the HFCD-induced expression of lipogenic mRNAs. The present findings suggest that an IVA-PLA2 inhibitor, such as ASB14780, could be useful for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases, including fatty liver and hepatic fibrosis. PMID:26699145

  17. ADEOS-II/GLI ocean-color atmospheric correction: early phase result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Hajime; Toratani, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Akihiko; Chen, Wen-Zhong; Murakami, Hiroshi; Frouin, Robert J.; Mitchell, B. G.; Kahru, Mati

    2003-11-01

    The paper presents initial results of atmospherically corrected ocean color data from the Global Imager (GLI), a moderate resolution spectrometer launched in December 2002 aboard ADEOS-II satellite. The standard GLI atmospheric correction algorithm, which includes an iterative procedure based on in-water optical modeling is first described, followed by brief description of standard in-water algorithms for output geophysical parameters. Ship/buoy-observed and satellite-derived marine reflectances, or normalized water-leaving radiance, are then compared, under vicarious calibration correction factors based on global GLI-SeaWiFS data comparison. The results, over 15 water-leaving radiance match-up data collected mostly off California and off Baja California, show standard errors in GLI estimate of 0.1 to 0.36 μW/cm2/nm/sr for 412, 443, 490, and 565 nm bands, with improved standard errors of 0.09 to 0.14 μW/cm2/nm/sr if in situ data set is limited to those obtained by in-water radiance measurement. Under provisional de-striping procedure, satellite-derived chlorophyll a estimates compares well with 35 ship-measured data collected off California within one day difference from the satellite observation, showing standard error factor of 1.73 (+73% or -43% error).

  18. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer: Long-term results of a phase I trial

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, Abdelkarim S. . E-mail: abdelkarim.allal@hcuge.ch; Zwahlen, Daniel; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Peyer, Raymond de; Morel, Philippe; Huber, Olivier; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term results of radiation therapy (RT) when added preoperatively to systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients presenting with T3-4 or N+ gastric cancer received two cycles of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} d1, 5FU 800 mg/m{sup 2} d1-4, and Leucovorin 60 mg twice daily d1-4; one cycle before and one concomitantly with hyperfractionated RT (median dose, 38.4; range, 31.2-45.6 Gy). All patients underwent a total or subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node resection. Results: Nineteen patients were accrued and 18 completed the neoadjuvant therapeutic program. All patients were subsequently operated and no fatality occurred. At a mean follow-up of 8 years for the surviving patients, no severe late toxicity was observed. The 5-year locoregional control, disease-free, and overall survival were of 85%, 41%, and 35%, respectively. The peritoneum was the most frequent site of relapse. Among long terms survivors, no severe (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3-4) late complication was reported. Conclusions: The present neoadjuvant treatment does not seem to increase the operative risk, nor the late side effects. The encouraging locoregional control rate suggests that the neoadjuvant approach should be considered for future trials in locally advanced gastric cancer. Also, the frequency of peritoneal recurrence stresses the need for a more efficient systemic or intraperitoneal treatment.

  19. Polymer networks with bicontinuous gradient morphologies resulting from the competition between phase separation and photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Atsuko; Shimada, Keisuke; Hayashi, Chie; Nakanishi, Hideyuki; Norisuye, Tomohisa; Tran-Cong-Miyata, Qui

    2016-02-14

    Poly(ethyl acrylate)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PEA/PMMA) polymer networks (IPNs) with spatially graded bicontinuous morphology were designed and controlled by taking advantage of the spinodal decomposition process induced by photopolymerization of the MMA monomer. Spatial gradients of the quench depth, induced by the gradients of light intensity, were generated along the path of the excitation light travelling through the mixture. Bicontinuous structures with uniaxial gradient of characteristic length scales were obtained by two different methods: simply irradiating the mixture with strong light intensity along the Z-direction and using the so-called computer-assisted irradiation (CAI) method with moderate intensity to generate the light intensity gradient exclusively in the XY plane. These experimental results suggest that the combination of these two irradiation methods could provide polymer materials with biaxially co-continuous gradient morphology. An analysis method using the concept of spatial correlation function was developed to analyze the time-evolution of these graded structures. The experimental results obtained in this study suggest a promising method to design gradient polymers in the bulk state (3D) as well as on the surface (2D) by taking advantage of photopolymerization. PMID:26738621

  20. The Eurosdr Project "RADIOMETRIC Aspects of Digital Photogrammetric IMAGES" - Results of the Empirical Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkavaara, E.; Arbiol, R.; Markelin, L.; Martínez, L.; Bovet, S.; Bredif, M.; Chandelier, L.; Heikkinen, V.; Korpela, I.; Lelegard, L.; Pérez, F.; Schläpfer, D.; Tokola, T.

    2011-09-01

    This article presents the empirical research carried out in the context of the multi-site EuroSDR project "Radiometric aspects of digital photogrammetric images" and provides highlights of the results. The investigations have considered the vicarious radiometric and spatial resolution validation and calibration of the sensor system, radiometric processing of the image blocks either by performing relative radiometric block equalization or into absolutely reflectance calibrated products, and finally aspects of practical applications on NDVI layer generation and tree species classification. The data sets were provided by Leica Geosystems ADS40 and Intergraph DMC and the participants represented stakeholders in National Mapping Authorities, software development and research. The investigations proved the stability and quality of evaluated imaging systems with respect to radiometry and optical system. The first new-generation methods for reflectance calibration and equalization of photogrammetric image block data provided promising accuracy and were also functional from the productivity and usability points of view. The reflectance calibration methods provided up to 5% accuracy without any ground reference. Application oriented results indicated that automatic interpretation methods will benefit from the optimal use of radiometrically accurate multi-view photogrammetric imagery.

  1. Take heart: results from the initial phase of a work-site wellness program.

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, R E; Terborg, J R; Hollis, J F; Severson, H H; Boles, S M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term effects of a low-intensity work-site heart disease risk reduction program using a matched pair design with work site as the unit of analysis. METHODS. Twenty-six heterogeneous work sites with between 125 and 750 employees were matched on key organization characteristics and then randomly assigned to early or delayed intervention conditions. Early intervention consisted of an 18-month multifaceted program that featured an employee steering committee and a menu approach to conducting key intervention activities tailored to each site. RESULTS. Cross-sectional and cohort analyses produced consistent results. At the conclusion of the intervention, early and delayed intervention conditions did not differ on changes in smoking rates, dietary intake, or cholesterol levels. There was considerable variability in outcomes among work sites within each condition. CONCLUSIONS. Despite documented implementation of key intervention activities and organization-level changes in terms of perceived support for health promotion, this intervention did not produce short-term improvements beyond secular trends observed in control work sites. Research is needed to understand determinants of variability between work sites. PMID:7856780

  2. Hypersonic research engine project. Phase 2: Some combustor test results of NASA aerothermodynamic integration model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Y. H.; Gaede, A. E.; Sainio, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Combustor test results of the NASA Aerothermodynamic Integration Model are presented of a ramjet engine developed for operation between Mach 3 and 8. Ground-based and flight experiments which provide the data required to advance the technology of hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems as well as to evaluate facility and testing techniques are described. The engine was tested with synthetic air at Mach 5, 6, and 7. The hydrogen fuel was heated to 1500 R prior to injection to simulate a regeneratively cooled system. Combustor efficiencies up to 95 percent at Mach 6 were achieved. Combustor process in terms of effectiveness, pressure integral factor, total pressure recovery and Crocco's pressure-area relationship are presented and discussed. Interactions between inlet-combustor, combustor stages, combustor-nozzle, and the effects of altitude, combustor step, and struts are observed and analyzed.

  3. [Citalopram in depression (results of an open multicenter study in phase IV of the clinical trial)].

    PubMed

    Vinar, O; Svestka, J; Koníková, M

    1993-12-01

    249 depressed patients were treated by 35 psychiatrists in an open multicenter trial during 6 weeks with citalopram. The protocol enabled that naturalistic treatment conditions could be kept. The results were rated with the help of the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale. The treatment was successful in 77% of the patients. 5 patients dropped out because of adverse effects, 8 patients did not finish the trial due to insufficient efficacy. In 160 patients (64.2%) no adverse effects were registered. Transient mild headaches in 8.4% and nausea in 4% were the most frequent adverse events. The best effects were observed in patients who were rated as moderately ill (82.8% ameliorated) at pretreatment. Nevertheless, also 66.7% of those rated as severely ill before the treatment improved substantially. In patients treated with higher doses than 20 mg/day, the improvement rate was not higher than in those treated with 20 mg daily. PMID:8124734

  4. Results of Phase 2 postburn drilling, coring, and logging: Rocky Mountain 1 Underground Coal Gasification Test, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, R.L.; Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.

    1991-02-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) site consisted of two different module configurations: the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) and elongated linked well (ELW) configurations. The postburn coring of the RM1 UCG site was designed in two phases to fulfill seven objectives outlined in Western Research Institute`s Annual Project Plan for 1989 (Western Research Institute 1989). The seven objectives were to (1) delineate the areal extent of the cavities, (2) identify the extent of roof collapse, (3) obtain samples of all major cavity rock types, (4) characterize outflow channels and cavity stratigraphy, (5) characterize the area near CRIP points and ignition points, (6) further define the structural geology of the site, and (7) identify the vertical positioning of the horizontal process wells within the coal seam. Phase 1 of the coring was completed during the summer of 1989 and served to partially accomplish all seven objectives. A detailed description of Phase 1 results was presented in a separate report (Lindblom et al. 1990). Phase 2, completed during the summer of 1990, was designed to complete the seven objectives; more specifically, to further define the areal extent and location of the cavities, to evaluate the outflow channels for both modules, and to further characterize the structural geology in the ELW module area.

  5. Results of Phase 2 postburn drilling, coring, and logging: Rocky Mountain 1 Underground Coal Gasification Test, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, R.L.; Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.

    1991-02-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) site consisted of two different module configurations: the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) and elongated linked well (ELW) configurations. The postburn coring of the RM1 UCG site was designed in two phases to fulfill seven objectives outlined in Western Research Institute's Annual Project Plan for 1989 (Western Research Institute 1989). The seven objectives were to (1) delineate the areal extent of the cavities, (2) identify the extent of roof collapse, (3) obtain samples of all major cavity rock types, (4) characterize outflow channels and cavity stratigraphy, (5) characterize the area near CRIP points and ignition points, (6) further define the structural geology of the site, and (7) identify the vertical positioning of the horizontal process wells within the coal seam. Phase 1 of the coring was completed during the summer of 1989 and served to partially accomplish all seven objectives. A detailed description of Phase 1 results was presented in a separate report (Lindblom et al. 1990). Phase 2, completed during the summer of 1990, was designed to complete the seven objectives; more specifically, to further define the areal extent and location of the cavities, to evaluate the outflow channels for both modules, and to further characterize the structural geology in the ELW module area.

  6. Valinomycin sensitivity proves that light-induced thylakoid voltages result in millisecond phase of chlorophyll fluorescence transients.

    PubMed

    Pospísil, Pavel; Dau, Holger

    2002-04-22

    Upon sudden exposure of plants to an actinic light of saturating intensity, the yield of chlorophyll fluorescence increases typically by 200-400% of the initial O-level. At least three distinct phases of these O-J-I-P transients can be resolved: O-J (0.05-5 ms), J-I (5-50 ms), and I-P (50-1000 ms). In thylakoid membranes, the J-I increase accounts for approximately 30% of the total fluorescence increase; in Photosystem II membranes, the J-I phase is always lacking. In the presence of the ionophore valinomycin, which is known to inhibit specifically the formation of membrane voltages, the magnitude of the J-I phase is clearly diminished; in the presence of valinomycin supplemented by potassium, the J-I phase is fully suppressed. We conclude that the light-driven formation of the thylakoid-membrane voltage results in an increase of the chlorophyll excited-state lifetime, a phenomenon explainable by the electric-field-induced shift of the free-energy level of the primary radical pair [Dau and Sauer, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1102 (1992) 91]. The assignment of the J-I increase in the fluorescence yield enhances the potential of using O-J-I-P fluorescence transients for investigations on photosynthesis in intact organisms. A putative role of thylakoid voltages in protection of PSII against photoinhibitory damage is discussed. PMID:12034474

  7. Desynchronization of Theta-Phase Gamma-Amplitude Coupling during a Mental Arithmetic Task in Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Lee, Jaewon; Na, Chul; Kee, Baik Seok; Min, Kyung Joon; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Johanna Inhyang; Lee, Young Sik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Theta-phase gamma-amplitude coupling (TGC) measurement has recently received attention as a feasible method of assessing brain functions such as neuronal interactions. The purpose of this electroencephalographic (EEG) study is to understand the mechanisms underlying the deficits in attentional control in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) by comparing the power spectra and TGC at rest and during a mental arithmetic task. Methods Nineteen-channel EEGs were recorded from 97 volunteers (including 53 subjects with ADHD) from a camp for hyperactive children under two conditions (rest and task performance). The EEG power spectra and the TGC data were analyzed. Correlation analyses between the Intermediate Visual and Auditory (IVA) continuous performance test (CPT) scores and EEG parameters were performed. Results No significant difference in the power spectra was detected between the groups at rest and during task performance. However, TGC was reduced during the arithmetic task in the ADHD group compared with the normal group (F = 16.70, p < 0.001). The TGC values positively correlated with the IVA CPT scores but negatively correlated with theta power. Conclusions Our findings suggest that desynchronization of TGC occurred during the arithmetic task in ADHD children. TGC in ADHD children is expected to serve as a promising neurophysiological marker of network deactivation during attention-demanding tasks. PMID:26930194

  8. RELAP5-3D Results for Phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom

    2012-06-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2.

  9. RELAP5-3D results for phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Strydom, G.; Epiney, A. S.

    2012-07-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2. (authors)

  10. Application of Phase Smoothing Pseudo Range PPP/INS Tightly Coupled Technique in Improving the Results of Low Precision MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.

    2015-12-01

    In land surveying and engineering surveying, we need to obtain high precision navigation results. However, due to the inertial device costs less than a introduction, commonly used low precision inertial navigation equipment with tightly coupled GPS / INS integrated to get high precision navigation results. Many studies have improved the accuracy of error by using the UKF and CKF filtering algorithm, but it is still using the traditional pseudo code directly, the improvement effect is not obvious, and the disturbance is large. In this study, the PPP /INSmodel is improved by using the carrier phase smoothing pseudo range algorithm. Experimental results show that based on phase smoothing pseudo range PPP/INS tight coupled method, the position precision and the velocity precision for of the measured data of higher accuracy of MEMS and GPS receiver can get to a decimeter level and centimeter level. This coupling method has higher accuracy, stronger anti disturbance and Have a better convergence than the traditional C/A code. Based on different phase smoothing epoch number combination the accuracy and smoothing effect is also different, the larger smooth epoch number is, the better treatment effect it has and The higher precision it has. For high precision measurement, the equipment cost is saved. It has a practical significance meaning in the measurement of outdoor ground.

  11. [Socio-political aspects of toxoplasmosis epidemic in Santa Isabel do Ivaí, Paraná State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Márcio José; de Oliveira, Luzia Helena Herrmann; Freire, Roberta Lemos; Navarro, Italmar Teodorico

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, due to a toxoplasmosis epidemic Santa Isabel do Ivaí, Paraná State, was the focus of sanitary investigations. Four hundred and twenty six individuals had serology suggestive of acute T. gondii infection (IgM reactor), considered the largest outbreak of toxoplasmosis ever reported in the world. This research was meant to identify actions carried out by the sanitation and health services sector at that time, highlighting the political conflicts that took place during the process and identifying the measures taken by the sanitary authorities during and after the epidemic period. This is an interdisciplinary study aimed at understanding major problems of public health like this one. The investigation was based on the contents of documents--press and institutional--and interviews. According to official data, the epidemic was caused by the contamination of one of the water reservoirs that supply the city. This research showed that political and social factors, as the party instability and the level of political dependence of local society, were largely responsible for the occurrence of the epidemic and for the difficulties faced by the health agents during such crisis. PMID:21503487

  12. Hypofractionated Versus Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Final Results of Phase III Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric E.; Botten, Rochelle J.; Butters, Julie; Di Matteo, Addolorata C.; Holloway, Richard H.; Fowler, Jack

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated (55 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks) vs. a conventionally fractionated (64 Gy in 32 fractions within 6.5 weeks) dose schedule for radiotherapy (RT) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: A total of 217 patients were randomized to either the hypofractionated (n = 108) or the conventional (n = 109) dose schedule. Most patients (n = 156) underwent RT planning and RT using a two-dimensional computed tomography method. Efficacy using the clinical, radiologic, and prostate-specific antigen data in each patient was evaluated before RT and at predetermined intervals after RT until death. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity using the modified Late Effect in Normal Tissue - Subjective Objective Management Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scales was also evaluated before and at intervals after RT to 60 months. Results: The whole group has now been followed for a median of 90 months (range, 3-138). Of the 217 patients, 85 developed biochemical relapse (nadir prostate-specific antigen level + 2 {mu}g/L), 36 in the hypofractionated and 49 in the conventional group. The biochemical relapse-free, but not overall, survival at 90 months was significantly better with the hypofractionated (53%) than with the conventional (34%) schedule. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity persisted 60 months after RT and did not differ between the two dose schedules. Multivariate analyses revealed that the conventional schedule was of independent prognostic significance, not only for biochemical failure, but also for an increased risk of worse genitourinary symptoms at 4 years. Conclusions: A therapeutic advantage of the hypofractionated compared with the conventional dose schedule for RT of prostate cancer was evident at 90 months in the present study.

  13. Review of the WECC EDT phase 2 EIM benefits analysis and results report.

    SciTech Connect

    Veselka, T.D.; Poch, L.A.; Botterud, A.

    2012-04-05

    A region-wide Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) was recently proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In order for the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to make more informed decisions regarding its involvement in the EIM, Western asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to review the EIM benefits study (the October 2011 revision) performed by Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc. (E3). Key components of the E3 analysis made use of results from a study conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); therefore, we also reviewed the NREL work. This report examines E3 and NREL methods and models used in the EIM study. Estimating EIM benefits is very challenging because of the complex nature of the Western Interconnection (WI), the variability and uncertainty of renewable energy resources, and the complex decisions and potentially strategic bidding of market participants. Furthermore, methodologies used for some of the more challenging aspects of the EIM have not yet matured. This review is complimentary of several components of the EIM study. Analysts and modelers clearly took great care when conducting detailed simulations of the WI using well-established industry tools under stringent time and budget constraints. However, it is our opinion that the following aspects of the study and the interpretation of model results could be improved upon in future analyses. The hurdle rate methodology used to estimate current market inefficiencies does not directly model the underlying causes of sub-optimal dispatch and power flows. It assumes that differences between historical flows and modeled flows can be attributed solely to market inefficiencies. However, flow differences between model results and historical data can be attributed to numerous simplifying assumptions used in the model and in the input data. We suggest that alternative approaches be explored in order to better estimate the benefits of introducing market

  14. Phase III Trial of Chemoradiotherapy for Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma: Long-Term Results of RTOG 9402

    PubMed Central

    Cairncross, Gregory; Wang, Meihua; Shaw, Edward; Jenkins, Robert; Brachman, David; Buckner, Jan; Fink, Karen; Souhami, Luis; Laperriere, Normand; Curran, Walter; Mehta, Minesh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, pure (AO) and mixed (anaplastic oligoastrocytoma [AOA]), are chemosensitive, especially if codeleted for 1p/19q, but whether patients live longer after chemoradiotherapy is unknown. Patients and Methods Eligible patients with AO/AOA were randomly assigned to procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) plus radiotherapy (RT) versus RT alone. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Results Two hundred ninety-one eligible patients were randomly assigned: 148 to PCV plus RT and 143 to RT. For the entire cohort, there was no difference in median survival by treatment (4.6 years for PCV plus RT v 4.7 years for RT; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.79; 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.04; P = .1). Patients with codeleted tumors lived longer than those with noncodeleted tumors (PCV plus RT: 14.7 v 2.6 years, HR = 0.36, 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.57, P < .001; RT: 7.3 v 2.7 years, HR = 0.40, 95% CI, 0.27 to 0.60, P < .001), and the median survival of those with codeleted tumors treated with PCV plus RT was twice that of patients receiving RT (14.7 v 7.3 years; HR = 0.59; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.95; P = .03). For those with noncodeleted tumors, there was no difference in median survival by treatment arm (2.6 v 2.7 years; HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.58 to 1.23; P = .39). In Cox models that included codeletion status, the adjusted OS for all patients was prolonged by PCV plus RT (HR = 0.67; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.91; P = .01). Conclusion For the subset of patients with 1p/19q codeleted AO/AOA, PCV plus RT may be an especially effective treatment, although this observation was derived from an unplanned analysis. PMID:23071247

  15. Early-Phase Clinical Trials In The Community: Results From the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program Early-Phase Working Group Baseline Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Zaren, Howard A.; Nair, Suresh; Go, Ronald S.; Enos, Rebecca A.; Lanier, Keith S.; Thompson, Michael A.; Zhao, Jinxiu; Fleming, Deborah L.; Leighton, John C.; Gribbin, Thomas E.; Bryant, Donna M.; Carrigan, Angela; Corpening, Jennifer C.; Csapo, Kimberly A.; Dimond, Eileen P.; Ellison, Christie; Gonzalez, Maria M.; Harr, Jodi L.; Wilkinson, Kathy; Denicoff, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) formed an Early-Phase Working Group to facilitate site participation in early-phase (EP) trials. The Working Group conducted a baseline assessment (BA) to describe the sites' EP trial infrastructure and its association with accrual. Methods: EP accrual and infrastructure data for the sites were obtained for July 2010-June 2011 and 2010, respectively. Sites with EP accrual rates at or above the median were considered high-accruing sites. Analyses were performed to identify site characteristics associated with higher accrual onto EP trials. Results: Twenty-seven of the 30 NCCCP sites participated. The median number of EP trials open per site over the course of July 2010-June 2011 was 19. Median EP accrual per site was 14 patients in 1 year. Approximately half of the EP trials were Cooperative Group; most were phase II. Except for having a higher number of EP trials open (P = .04), high-accruing sites (n = 14) did not differ significantly from low-accruing sites (n = 13) in terms of any single site characteristic. High-accruing sites did have shorter institutional review board (IRB) turnaround time by 20 days, and were almost three times as likely to be a lead Community Clinical Oncology Program site (small sample size may have prevented statistical significance). Most sites had at least basic EP trial infrastructure. Conclusion: Community cancer centers are capable of conducting EP trials. Infrastructure and collaborations are critical components of success. This assessment provides useful information for implementing EP trials in the community. PMID:23814525

  16. The IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis: Phase I Status and Initial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Strydom, Gerhard; Bostelmann, Friederike; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2014-10-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. One way to address the uncertainties in the HTGR analysis tools is to assess the sensitivity of critical parameters (such as the calculated maximum fuel temperature during loss of coolant accidents) to a few important input uncertainties. The input parameters were identified by engineering judgement in the past but are today typically based on a Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT) process. The input parameters can also be derived from sensitivity studies and are then varied in the analysis to find a spread in the parameter of importance. However, there is often no easy way to compensate for these uncertainties. In engineering system design, a common approach for addressing performance uncertainties is to add compensating margins to the system, but with passive properties credited it is not so clear how to apply it in the case of modular HTGR heat removal path. Other more sophisticated uncertainty modelling approaches, including Monte Carlo analysis, have also been proposed and applied. Ideally one wishes to apply a more fundamental approach to determine the predictive capability and accuracies of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations used for reactor design and safety assessment. Today there is a broader acceptance of the use of uncertainty analysis even in safety studies, and it has been accepted by regulators in some cases to replace the traditional conservative analysis. Therefore some safety analysis calculations may use a mixture of these approaches for different parameters depending upon the particular requirements of the analysis problem involved. Sensitivity analysis can for example be used to provide information as part of an uncertainty analysis to determine best estimate plus uncertainty results to the

  17. Drugs, Women and Violence in the Americas: U.S. Results of a Multi-Centric Pilot Project (Phase 1).

    PubMed

    González-Guarda, Rosa María; Peragallo, Nilda; Lynch, Ami; Nemes, Susanna

    2010-09-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the collective and individual experiences that Latin American females in the U. S. have with substance abuse, violence and risky sexual behaviors. METHODS: This study was conducted in two phases that were carried out from July 2006 to June 2007 in south Florida. This paper covers Phase 1. In Phase 1, focus groups were conducted among 93 women in English, Spanish and Portuguese. Through content analyses of the focus group transcriptions, major themes were identified. RESULTS: Participants identified substance abuse, violence and risky sexual behaviors as closely related problems of great concern in Latina women in the U.S. Three important themes emerged from the focus groups. These included "Living in the US and the Devaluing of Latino Culture," the "Vicious Cycle of Abuse" and "Breaking the Silence". CONCLUSIONS: The results from this study suggest that substance abuse, violence and HIV should be addressed in an integrative and comprehensive manner. Recommendations for the development of policies, programs and services addressing substance abuse, violence and risk for HIV among Latinos are provided. PMID:21593995

  18. New results on the robust stability of PID controllers with gain and phase margins for UFOPTD processes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Q B; Liu, Q; Huang, B

    2016-03-01

    This paper considers the problem of determining all the robust PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controllers in terms of the gain and phase margins (GPM) for open-loop unstable first order plus time delay (UFOPTD) processes. It is the first time that the feasible ranges of the GPM specifications provided by a PID controller are given for UFOPTD processes. A gain and phase margin tester is used to modify the original model, and the ranges of the margin specifications are derived such that the modified model can be stabilized by a stabilizing PID controller based on Hermite-Biehlers Theorem. Furthermore, we obtain all the controllers satisfying a given margin specification. Simulation studies show how to use the results to design a robust PID controller. PMID:26708658

  19. Saturation of impurity-rich phases in a cerium-substituted pyrochlore-rich titanate ceramic: part 1 experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F J; Ebbinghaus, B; Kirkorian, O; VanKonynenburg, R

    2000-05-25

    The saturation of impurity-rich accessory phases in a Ce-analog baseline ceramic formulation for the immobilization of excess plutonium has been tested by synthesizing an impurity-rich baseline compositions at 1300 C, 1350 C, and 1400 C in air. Impurity oxides are added at the 10 wt% level. The resulting phases assemblages are typically rich in pyrochlore, Hf-zirconolite (hafnolite), brannerite and rutile, but in many instances also contain an accessory mineral enriched in the impurity oxide. The concentration of that oxide in coexisting pyrochlore sets the saturation limit for solid solution of the component in question. In most cases, the accessory phase does not contain significant amounts of Ce, Gd or U. Exceptions are the stabilization of a Ca-lanthanide phosphate and a phosphate glass when P{sub 2}O{sub 5} is added to the formulation. P{sub 2}O{sub 5} addition is also very effective in reducing the modal amount of pyrochlore in the form relative to brannerite. Addition of the sodium-aluminosilicate, NaAlSiO{sub 4}, also results in the formation of a grain boundary melt at run conditions, but the fate of this phase on cooling is not well determined. At temperatures above 1300 C, addition of 10 wt% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} also leads to melting. Substitution of cations of different valences can also be associated with model-dependent changes in the oxidation state of uranium via charge transfer reactions. A set of simple components is suggested for the description of pyrochlores in both impurity-free and impurity-rich formulations.

  20. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain H. . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair ({kappa} = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis.

  1. Final results of a multicenter phase 1 study of lenalidomide in patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wendtner, Clemens-Martin; Hillmen, Peter; Mahadevan, Daruka; Bühler, Andreas; Uharek, Lutz; Coutré, Steven; Frankfurt, Olga; Bloor, Adrian; Bosch, Francesc; Furman, Richard R; Kimby, Eva; Gribben, John G; Gobbi, Marco; Dreisbach, Luke; Hurd, David D; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Shah, Sheetal; Zhang, Jennie; Moutouh-de Parseval, Laure; Hallek, Michael; Heerema, Nyla A; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Chanan-Khan, Asher A

    2012-03-01

    Based on clinical activity in phase 2 studies, lenalidomide was evaluated in a phase 2/3 study in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Following tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) complications, the protocol was amended to a phase 1 study to identify the maximum tolerated dose-escalation level (MTDEL). Fifty-two heavily pretreated patients, 69% with bulky disease and 48% with high-risk genomic abnormalities, initiated lenalidomide at 2.5 mg/day, with dose escalation until the MTDEL or the maximum assigned dose was attained. Lenalidomide was safely titrated to 20 mg/day; the MTDEL was not reached. Most common grade 3-4 adverse events were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia; TLS was mild and rare. The low starting dose and conservative dose escalation strategy resulted in six partial responders and 30 patients obtaining stable disease. In summary, lenalidomide 2.5 mg/day is a safe starting dose that can be titrated up to 20 mg/day in patients with CLL. PMID:21879809

  2. Twenty-Seven Years of Phase III Trials for Patients with Extensive Disease Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Disappointing Results

    PubMed Central

    Oze, Isao; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Ochi, Nobuaki; Takigawa, Nagio; Fujiwara, Yoshiro; Tabata, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2009-01-01

    Background Few studies have formally assessed whether treatment outcomes have improved substantially over the years for patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer (ED-SCLC) enrolled in phase III trials. The objective of the current investigation was to determine the time trends in outcomes for the patients in those trials. Methods and Findings We searched for trials that were reported between January 1981 and August 2008. Phase III randomized controlled trials were eligible if they compared first-line, systemic chemotherapy for ED-SCLC. Data were evaluated by using a linear regression analysis. Results: In total, 52 trials were identified that had been initiated between 1980 and 2006; these studies involved 10,262 patients with 110 chemotherapy arms. The number of randomized patients and the proportion of patients with good performance status (PS) increased over time. Cisplatin-based regimens, especially cisplatin and etoposide (PE) regimen, have increasingly been studied, whereas cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine–based regimens have been less investigated. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant improvement in survival over the years. Additionally, the use of a PE regimen did not affect survival, whereas the proportion of patients with good PS and the trial design of assigning prophylactic cranial irradiation were significantly associated with favorable outcome. Conclusions and Significance The survival of patients with ED-SCLC enrolled in phase III trials did not improve significantly over the years, suggesting the need for further development of novel targets, newer agents, and comprehensive patient care. PMID:19915681

  3. Bosutinib Versus Imatinib in Newly Diagnosed Chronic-Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Results From the BELA Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Jorge E.; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Dyagil, Irina; Griskevicius, Laimonas; Malhotra, Hemant; Powell, Christine; Gogat, Karïn; Countouriotis, Athena M.; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Bosutinib is an oral Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The phase III Bosutinib Efficacy and Safety in Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (BELA) trial compared bosutinib with imatinib in newly diagnosed, chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Patients and Methods A total of 502 patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to bosutinib 500 mg per day or imatinib 400 mg per day. Results The complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) rate at 12 months was not different for bosutinib (70%; 95% CI, 64% to 76%) versus imatinib (68%; 95% CI, 62% to 74%; two-sided P = .601); therefore, the study did not achieve its primary end point. The major molecular response (MMR) rate at 12 months was higher with bosutinib (41%; 95% CI, 35% to 47%) compared with imatinib (27%; 95% CI, 22% to 33%; two-sided P < .001). Time to CCyR and MMR was faster with bosutinib compared with imatinib (two-sided P < .001 for both). On-treatment transformation to accelerated/blast phase occurred in four patients (2%) on bosutinib compared with 10 patients (4%) on imatinib. A total of three CML-related deaths occurred on the bosutinib arm compared with eight on the imatinib arm. The safety profiles of bosutinib and imatinib were distinct; GI and liver-related events were more frequent with bosutinib, whereas neutropenia, musculoskeletal disorders, and edema were more frequent with imatinib. Conclusion This ongoing trial did not meet its primary end point of CCyR at 12 months, despite the observed higher MMR rate at 12 months, faster times to CCyR and MMR, fewer on-treatment transformations to accelerated/blast phase, and fewer CML-related deaths with bosutinib compared with imatinib. Each drug had a distinct safety profile. PMID:22949154

  4. Disruption of group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury partly through inhibition of TNF-α-mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yukio; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Fujioka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Obata, Jun-ei; Kawabata, Kenichi; Watanabe, Yosuke; Mishina, Hideto; Tamaru, Shun; Kita, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Takao

    2012-01-01

    Group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α), which preferentially cleaves arachidonic acid from phospholipids, plays a role in apoptosis and tissue injury. Downstream signals in response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a mediator of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, involve cPLA2α activation. This study examined the potential role of cPLA2α and its mechanistic link with TNF-α in myocardial I/R injury using cPLA2α knockout (cPLA2α−/−) mice. Myocardial I/R was created with 10-wk-old male mice by 1 h ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery, followed by 24 h of reperfusion. As a result, compared with wild-type (cPLA2α+/+) mice, cPLA2α−/− mice had a 47% decrease in myocardial infarct size, preservation of echocardiographic left ventricle (LV) function (%fractional shortening: 14 vs. 21%, respectively), and lower content of leukotriene B4 and thromboxane B2 (62 and 50% lower, respectively) in the ischemic myocardium after I/R. Treatment with the TNF-α inhibitor (soluble TNF receptor II/IgG1 Fc fusion protein, sTNFR:Fc) decreased myocardial I/R injury and LV dysfunction in cPLA2α+/+ mice but not cPLA2α−/− mice. sTNFR:Fc also suppressed cPLA2α phosphorylation in the ischemic myocardium after I/R of cPLA2α+/+ mice. Similarly, sTNFR:Fc exerted protective effects against hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R)-induced injury in the cultured cardiomyocytes from cPLA2α+/+ mice but not cPLA2α−/− cardiomyocytes. H/R and TNF-α induced cPLA2α phosphorylation in cPLA2α+/+ cardiomyocytes, which was reversible by sTNFR:Fc. In cPLA2α−/− cardiomyocytes, TNF-α induced apoptosis and release of arachidonic acid to a lesser extent than in cPLA2α+/+ cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, disruption of cPLA2α attenuates myocardial I/R injury partly through inhibition of TNF-α-mediated pathways. PMID:22427514

  5. Study of the suit inflation effect on crew safety during landing using a full-pressure IVA suit for new-generation reentry space vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wataru, Suzuki

    Recently, manned space capsules have been recognized as beneficial and reasonable human space vehicles again. The Dragon capsule already achieved several significant successes. The Orion capsule is going to be sent to a high-apogee orbit without crews for experimental purposes in September 2014. For such human-rated space capsules, the study of acceleration impacts against the human body during splashdown is essential to ensure the safety of crews. Moreover, it is also known that wearing a full pressure rescue suit significantly increases safety of a crew, compared to wearing a partial pressure suit. This is mainly because it enables the use of a personal life support system independently in addition to that which installed in the space vehicle. However, it is unclear how the inflation of the full pressure suit due to pressurization affects the crew safety during splashdown, especially in the case of the new generation manned space vehicles. Therefore, the purpose of this work is to investigate the effect of the suit inflation on crew safety against acceleration impact during splashdown. For this objective, the displacements of the safety harness in relation with the suit, a human surrogate, and the crew seats during pressurizing the suit in order to determine if the safety and survivability of a crew can be improved by wearing a full pressure suit. For these tests, the DL/H-1 full pressure IVA suit, developed by Pablo de Leon and Gary L. Harris, will be used. These tests use image analysis techniques to determine the displacements. It is expected, as a result of these tests, that wearing a full pressure suit will help to mitigate the impacts and will increase the safety and survivability of a crew during landing since it works as a buffer to mitigate impact forces during splashdown. This work also proposes a future plan for sled test experiments using a sled facility such as the one in use by the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) for experimental validation

  6. OECD/NEA expert group on uncertainty analysis for criticality safety assessment: Results of benchmark on sensitivity calculation (phase III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, T.; Laville, C.; Dyrda, J.; Mennerdahl, D.; Golovko, Y.; Raskach, K.; Tsiboulia, A.; Lee, G. S.; Woo, S. W.; Bidaud, A.; Sabouri, P.; Bledsoe, K.; Rearden, B.; Gulliford, J.; Michel-Sendis, F.

    2012-07-01

    The sensitivities of the k{sub eff} eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods. (authors)

  7. The Controls-Structures Interaction Guest Investigator Program - An overview and phase I experimental results. [for flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith-Taylor, Rudeen; Tanner, Sharon E.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator program is described in terms of its support of the development of CSI technologies. The program is based on the introduction of CSI researchers from industry and academia to available test facilities for experimental validation of technologies and methods. Phase I experimental results are reviewed with attention given to their use of the Mini-MAST test facility and the facility for the Advance Control Evaluation of Structures. Experiments were conducted regarding: collocated/noncollocated controllers, nonlinear math modeling, controller design, passive/active suspension systems design, and system identification and fault isolation. The results demonstrate that significantly enhanced performance from the control techniques can be achieved by integrating knowledge of the structural dynamics under consideration into the approaches.

  8. Gas phase dicyanoacetylene (C4N2) on Titan: New experimental and theoretical spectroscopy results applied to Cassini CIRS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, A.; Cottini, V.; Fayt, A.; Manceron, L.; Kwabia-Tchana, F.; Benilan, Y.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Nixon, C.; Irwin, P.

    2015-03-01

    Dicyanoacetylene has not been observed so far in the gas phase in Titan's atmosphere but this molecule is still on the list of the detected species, on the basis of the correspondence between a solid phase feature measured at 478 cm-1 in the laboratory and a spectral feature observed by Voyager. In this work, the infrared spectrum of gaseous C4N2 has been investigated to improve our knowledge of the band intensities and the line parameters for this molecule. Results of previously investigated bands have been revised and the intensity of the ν9 band at 107 cm-1, measured for the first time, was found to be the strongest absorption in the whole infrared domain. We have also improved the analysis of the complex rotational and hot band structure of C4N2 in order to obtain the first line lists for both bending modes ν8 and ν9. Using our radiative transfer code including the new line list of the strong ν9 band, we have searched for the signature of C4N2 at 107 cm-1 in the atmosphere of Titan utilizing Titan CIRS far infrared spectra. Despite averaging a large number of CIRS spectra at northern latitudes during the very favorable Titan winter, no gaseous C4N2 could be detected. At the 1-σ level we obtain an abundance upper limit of 5.3 × 10-10 for the limb average which is lower than or comparable to previously inferred values. As a consequence, the absence or very low amount of gaseous C4N2 makes quite puzzling its presence in the solid phase with an abundance compatible with the observed spectral feature at 478 cm-1.

  9. Frontline nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase: results from the European ENEST1st study.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, A; Rosti, G; Cross, N C P; Steegmann, J L; le Coutre, P; Ossenkoppele, G; Petrov, L; Masszi, T; Hellmann, A; Griskevicius, L; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Rea, D; Coriu, D; Brümmendorf, T H; Porkka, K; Saglio, G; Gastl, G; Müller, M C; Schuld, P; Di Matteo, P; Pellegrino, A; Dezzani, L; Mahon, F-X; Baccarani, M; Giles, F J

    2016-01-01

    The Evaluating Nilotinib Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Trials as First-Line Treatment (ENEST1st) study included 1089 patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. The rate of deep molecular response (MR(4) (BCR-ABL1⩽0.01% on the International Scale or undetectable BCR-ABL1 with ⩾10,000 ABL1 transcripts)) at 18 months was evaluated as the primary end point, with molecular responses monitored by the European Treatment and Outcome Study network of standardized laboratories. This analysis was conducted after all patients had completed 24 months of study treatment (80.9% of patients) or discontinued early. In patients with typical BCR-ABL1 transcripts and ⩽3 months of prior imatinib therapy, 38.4% (404/1052) achieved MR(4) at 18 months. Six patients (0.6%) developed accelerated or blastic phase, and 13 (1.2%) died. The safety profile of nilotinib was consistent with that of previous studies, although the frequencies of some nilotinib-associated adverse events were lower (for example, rash, 21.4%). Ischemic cardiovascular events occurred in 6.0% of patients. Routine monitoring of lipid and glucose levels was not mandated in the protocol. These results support the use of frontline nilotinib, particularly when achievement of a deep molecular response (a prerequisite for attempting treatment-free remission in clinical trials) is a treatment goal. PMID:26437782

  10. Frontline nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase: results from the European ENEST1st study

    PubMed Central

    Hochhaus, A; Rosti, G; Cross, N C P; Steegmann, J L; le Coutre, P; Ossenkoppele, G; Petrov, L; Masszi, T; Hellmann, A; Griskevicius, L; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Rea, D; Coriu, D; Brümmendorf, T H; Porkka, K; Saglio, G; Gastl, G; Müller, M C; Schuld, P; Di Matteo, P; Pellegrino, A; Dezzani, L; Mahon, F-X; Baccarani, M; Giles, F J

    2016-01-01

    The Evaluating Nilotinib Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Trials as First-Line Treatment (ENEST1st) study included 1089 patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. The rate of deep molecular response (MR4 (BCR-ABL1⩽0.01% on the International Scale or undetectable BCR-ABL1 with ⩾10 000 ABL1 transcripts)) at 18 months was evaluated as the primary end point, with molecular responses monitored by the European Treatment and Outcome Study network of standardized laboratories. This analysis was conducted after all patients had completed 24 months of study treatment (80.9% of patients) or discontinued early. In patients with typical BCR-ABL1 transcripts and ⩽3 months of prior imatinib therapy, 38.4% (404/1052) achieved MR4 at 18 months. Six patients (0.6%) developed accelerated or blastic phase, and 13 (1.2%) died. The safety profile of nilotinib was consistent with that of previous studies, although the frequencies of some nilotinib-associated adverse events were lower (for example, rash, 21.4%). Ischemic cardiovascular events occurred in 6.0% of patients. Routine monitoring of lipid and glucose levels was not mandated in the protocol. These results support the use of frontline nilotinib, particularly when achievement of a deep molecular response (a prerequisite for attempting treatment-free remission in clinical trials) is a treatment goal. PMID:26437782

  11. Evaluating results from the multiple myeloma patient subset treated with denosumab or zoledronic acid in a randomized phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Raje, N; Vadhan-Raj, S; Willenbacher, W; Terpos, E; Hungria, V; Spencer, A; Alexeeva, Y; Facon, T; Stewart, A K; Feng, A; Braun, A; Balakumaran, A; Roodman, G D

    2016-01-01

    In a phase 3 trial of denosumab vs zoledronic acid in patients (n=1776) with bone metastases and solid tumors or multiple myeloma, denosumab was superior to zoledronic acid for the primary end point of prevention of skeletal-related events. There was no difference in overall survival between the two groups; however, an ad hoc overall survival analysis in the multiple myeloma subset of patients (n=180) favored zoledronic acid (hazard ratio (HR) 2.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13–4.50; P=0.014). In the present analysis, we found imbalances between the groups with respect to baseline risk characteristics. HRs with two-sided 95% CIs were estimated using the Cox model. After adjustment in a covariate analysis, the CI crossed unity (HR 1.86; 95% CI 0.90–3.84; P=0.0954). Furthermore, we found a higher rate of early withdrawals for the reasons of lost to follow-up and withdrawal of consent in the zoledronic acid group; after accounting for these, the HR was 1.31 (95% CI 0.80–2.15; P=0.278). In conclusion, the survival results in multiple myeloma patients in this trial were confounded and will eventually be resolved by an ongoing phase 3 trial. PMID:26745852

  12. First Results from the RPC Magnetometer Experiment during the Approach Phase to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, I.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Koenders, C.; Carr, C.; Cupido, E.; Vallat, C.; Motschmann, U. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Volwerk, M.

    2014-12-01

    The European Space Agency's spacecraft ROSETTA has reached its final destination, the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The ROSETTA orbiter is equipped with a complete plasma package named RPC (ROSETTA Plasma Consortium). Included is the magnetometer system RPC-MAG which consists of 2 triaxial Fluxgate magnetometers located on a 1.5 m long boom outside the spacecraft. During the approach phase to the comet magnetic field measurements have been performed since May 2014. We will report on these measurements showing the evolution of the magnetic field from the solar wind dominated to a cometary influenced plasma. A detailed discussion of the observed signatures will be presented in order to separate spacecraft generated disturbances from real cometary signals. The very first results of the magnetic field measurements will be compared with theoretically expected structures.

  13. Summary Report on Phase I Results from the 3D Printing in Zero G Technology Demonstration Mission, Volume I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, T. J.; Bean, Q. A.; Beshears, R. D.; Rolin, T. D.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Ordonez, E. A.; Ryan, R. M.; Ledbetter, F. E., III

    2016-01-01

    Human space exploration to date has been confined to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a unique opportunity for researchers to prove out the technologies that will enable humans to safely live and work in space for longer periods of time and venture beyond the Earth/Moon system. The ability to manufacture parts in-space rather than launch them from Earth represents a fundamental shift in the current risk and logistics paradigm for human spaceflight. In September 2014, NASA, in partnership with Made In Space, Inc., launched the 3D Printing in Zero-G technology demonstration mission to explore the potential of additive manufacturing for in-space applications and demonstrate the capability to manufacture parts and tools on orbit using fused deposition modeling. This Technical Publication summarizes the results of testing to date of the ground control and flight prints from the first phase of this ISS payload.

  14. Research on an expert system for database operation of simulation-emulation math models. Volume 1, Phase 1: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, K.; Beale, G. O.; Schaffer, J. D.; Hsieh, B. J.; Padalkar, S.; Rodriguez-Moscoso, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the first phase of Research on an Expert System for Database Operation of Simulation/Emulation Math Models, is described. Techniques from artificial intelligence (AI) were to bear on task domains of interest to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. One such domain is simulation of spacecraft attitude control systems. Two related software systems were developed to and delivered to NASA. One was a generic simulation model for spacecraft attitude control, written in FORTRAN. The second was an expert system which understands the usage of a class of spacecraft attitude control simulation software and can assist the user in running the software. This NASA Expert Simulation System (NESS), written in LISP, contains general knowledge about digital simulation, specific knowledge about the simulation software, and self knowledge.

  15. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Low-Risk Endometrial Cancers: Final Results of a Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Macchia, Gabriella; Cilla, Savino M.P.; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Deodato, Francesco; Digesu, Cinzia; Caravatta, Luciana; Picardi, Vincenzo; Corrado, Giacomo; Piermattei, Angelo; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Scambia, Giovanni; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose of short-course radiotherapy (intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique) to the upper two thirds of the vagina in endometrial cancers with low risk of local recurrence. Patients and Methods: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had low-risk resected primary endometrial adenocarcinomas. Radiotherapy was delivered in 5 fractions over 1 week. The planning target volume was the clinical target volume plus 5 mm. The clinical target volume was defined as the upper two thirds of the vagina as evidenced at CT simulation by a vaginal radio-opaque device. The planning target volume was irradiated by a seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique, planned by the Plato Sunrise inverse planning system. A first cohort of 6 patients received 25 Gy (5-Gy fractions), and a subsequent cohort received 30 Gy (6-Gy fractions). The Common Toxicity Criteria scale, version 3.0, was used to score toxicity. Results: Twelve patients with endometrial cancer were enrolled. Median age was 58 years (range, 49-74 years). Pathologic stage was IB (83.3%) and IC (16.7%). Median tumor size was 30 mm (range, 15-50 mm). All patients completed the prescribed radiotherapy. No patient experienced a dose-limiting toxicity at the first level, and the radiotherapy dose was escalated from 25 to 30 Gy. No patients at the second dose level experienced dose-limiting toxicity. The most common Grade 2 toxicity was gastrointestinal, which was tolerable and manageable. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose of short-course radiotherapy was 30 Gy at 6 Gy per fraction. On the basis of this result, we are conducting a Phase II study with radiotherapy delivered at 30 Gy.

  16. Design and code validation of the Jupiter inductive voltage adder (IVA) PRS driver

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Mendel, C.W.

    1995-07-01

    The proposed Jupiter accelerator is a {approximately} 10-MV, 500-TW system capable of delivering 15-MJ kinetic energy to an imploding plasma radiation source (PRS). The accelerator is based on Hermes-III technology and contains 30 identical inductive voltage adder modules connected in parallel. The modules drive a common circular convolute electrode system in the center of which is located an imploding foil. The relatively high voltage of 8--10 MV is required to compensate for the voltage differential generated across the load due primarily to the fast increase in current (L di/dt) and to lesser extent to the increasing inductance(I dL/dt) and resistive component of the imploding foil. Here we examine the power flow through the device and, in particular, through the voltage adder and long MITL. Analytical models, such as pressure balance and parapotential flow, as well as circuit and PIC codes, were utilized. A new version of the TWOQUICK PIC code, which includes an imploding, cylindrical foil as load, was utilized to compare the power flow calculations done with SCREAMER and TRIFL. The agreement is very satisfactory and adds confidence to the Jupiter design. In addition, an experimental validation of the design is under way this year (FY95) with Hermes III. Long extension MITLs are connected at the end of the voltage adder with inductive and diode loads to benchmark the above design codes. In this paper we outline the accelerator`s conceptual design with emphasis on the power flow and coupling to the inductive load and include preliminary results of Hermes-III experimental design validation.

  17. Electrons for intraoperative radiotherapy in selected breast-cancer patients: late results of the Montpellier phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Montpellier cancer institute phase II trial started in 2004 and evaluated the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a sole radiation treatment for patients with an excellent prognostic and very low recurrence risk. Methods Forty-two patients were included between 2004 and 2007. Inclusion criteria were patients ≥ 65 years old, T0-T1, N0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, free-margin > 2 mm. IORT was delivered using dedicated linear accelerator. One fraction of 21 Gy was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. Primary end-point was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, specific and overall survival. Results At inclusion, median age was 72 years (range, 66–80). Median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Late cosmetic results were good at 5 years despite the poor agreement of accuracy assessment between patients and physicians. Four patients (9.5%) experienced a local failure and underwent salvage mastectomy. The 5 year-disease free survival is 92.7% (range 79.1−97.6). All patients are still alive with a median follow-up of 72 months (range 66–74). Conclusion Our results confirm with a long-term follow-up that exclusive partial breast IORT is feasible for early-breast cancer in selected patients. IORT provides good late cosmetics results and should be considered as a safe and very comfortable “one-step” treatment procedure. Nevertheless, patient assessments are essential for long-term quality results. PMID:23902825

  18. Phase 1 results of safety and tolerability in a rush oral immunotherapy protocol to multiple foods using Omalizumab

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Up to 30% of patients with food allergies have clinical reactivity to more than one food allergen. Although there is currently no cure, oral immunotherapy (OIT) is under investigation. Pilot data have shown that omalizumab may hasten the ability to tolerate over 4 g of food allergen protein. Objective To evaluate the safety and dose tolerability of a Phase 1 Single Site OIT protocol using omalizumab to allow for a faster and safe desensitization to multiple foods simultaneously. Methods Participants with multiple food allergies received OIT for up to 5 allergens simultaneously with omalizumab (rush mOIT). Omalizumab was administered for 8 weeks prior to and 8 weeks following the initiation of a rush mOIT schedule. Home reactions were recorded with diaries. Results Twenty-five (25) participants were enrolled in the protocol (median age 7 years). For each included food, participants had failed an initial double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge at a protein dose of 100 mg or less. After pre-treatment with omalizumab, 19 participants tolerated all 6 steps of the initial escalation day (up to 1250 mg of combined food proteins), requiring minimal or no rescue therapy. The remaining 6 were started on their highest tolerated dose as their initial daily home doses. Participants reported 401 reactions per 7,530 home doses (5.3%) with a median of 3.2 reactions per 100 doses. Ninety-four percent (94%) of reactions were mild. There was one severe reaction. Participants reached their maintenance dose of 4,000 mg protein per allergen at a median of 18 weeks. Conclusion These phase 1 data demonstrate that rush OIT to multiple foods with 16 weeks of treatment with omalizumab could allow for a fast desensitization in subjects with multiple food allergies. Phase 2 randomized controlled trials are needed to better define safety and efficacy parameters of multi OIT experimental treatments with and without omalizumab. PMID:24576338

  19. Phase IIB/III Trial of Tenecteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Results of a Prematurely Terminated Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haley, E. Clarke; Thompson, John L.P.; Grotta, James C.; Lyden, Patrick D.; Hemmen, Thomas G.; Brown, Devin L.; Fanale, Christopher; Libman, Richard; Kwiatkowski, Thomas G.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Levine, Steven R.; Johnston, Karen C.; Buchsbaum, Richard; Levy, Gilberto; Levin, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Background: Intravenous alteplase (rt-PA) remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use remains limited. In a previous pilot dose-escalation study, intravenous tenecteplase showed promise as a potentially safer alternative. Therefore, a Phase IIB clinical trial was begun to a) choose a best dose of tenecteplase to carry forward, and b) to provide evidence for either promise or futility of further testing of tenecteplase versus rt-PA. If promise was established, then the trial would continue as a Phase III efficacy trial comparing the selected tenecteplase dose to standard rt-PA. Methods: The trial began as a small, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial comparing 0.1, 0.25, and 0.4 mg/kg tenecteplase with standard 0.9 mg/kg rt-PA in patients with acute stroke within 3 hours of onset. An adaptive sequential design used an early (24 hour) assessment of major neurological improvement balanced against occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) to choose a “best” dose of tenecteplase to carry forward. Once a “best” dose was established, the trial was to continue until at least 100 pairs of the selected tenecteplase dose versus standard rt-PA could be compared by 3 month outcome using the modified Rankin Scale in an interim analysis. Decision rules were devised to yield a clear recommendation to either stop for futility or to continue into Phase III. Results: The trial was prematurely terminated for slow enrollment after only 112 patients had been randomized at 8 clinical centers between 2006 and 2008. The 0.4 mg/kg dose was discarded as inferior after only 73 patients were randomized, but the selection procedure was still unable to distinguish between 0.1 mg/kg and 0.25 mg/kg as a propitious dose at the time the trial was stopped. There were no statistically persuasive differences in 3 month outcomes between the remaining tenecteplase groups and rt-PA. Symptomatic ICH rates were highest in the

  20. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Judith M. Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide.

  1. Intravitreal Sirolimus for the Treatment of Geographic Atrophy: Results of a Phase I/II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Philip A.; Cunningham, Denise; Shimel, Katherine; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Cukras, Catherine A.; Ferris, Frederick L.; Chew, Emily Y.; Wong, Wai T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the safety and effects of intravitreal sirolimus for the potential treatment of geographic atrophy (GA). Methods. The study was a single-center, open-label, phase I/II trial enrolling six participants with bilateral GA treated with intravitreal sirolimus in only one randomly assigned eye, with the fellow eye as control. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in total GA area from baseline on color fundus photography (CFP); secondary outcomes included changes in GA area on fundus autofluorescence (FAF), visual acuity, central retinal thickness (CRT), and macular sensitivity from baseline. Results. Although no systemic adverse events were attributed to treatment, two of six participants had ocular adverse events that were possibly associated. The treated eye of one participant developed abnormal paralesional changes on FAF that were associated with accelerated retinal thinning. This accelerated retinal thinning was also seen in the treated eye of a second participant. Because of concern that these events were associated with treatment, treatment was suspended. Comparisons of treated and fellow eyes for change in visual acuity, change in GA area, and change in CRT showed no evidence of treatment benefit and generally favored the untreated fellow eye. Conclusions. While paralesional FAF changes and rapid retinal thinning observed are potentially part of the natural course of GA, they may possibly be related to treatment. No general evidence of anatomical or functional benefit was detected in treated eyes. Further data on intravitreal sirolimus for GA treatment will be available from a larger phase II trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01445548.) PMID:25525171

  2. Results on neutrinoless double-β decay of 76Ge from phase I of the GERDA experiment.

    PubMed

    Agostini, M; Allardt, M; Andreotti, E; Bakalyarov, A M; Balata, M; Barabanov, I; Barnabé Heider, M; Barros, N; Baudis, L; Bauer, C; Becerici-Schmidt, N; Bellotti, E; Belogurov, S; Belyaev, S T; Benato, G; Bettini, A; Bezrukov, L; Bode, T; Brudanin, V; Brugnera, R; Budjáš, D; Caldwell, A; Cattadori, C; Chernogorov, A; Cossavella, F; Demidova, E V; Domula, A; Egorov, V; Falkenstein, R; Ferella, A; Freund, K; Frodyma, N; Gangapshev, A; Garfagnini, A; Gotti, C; Grabmayr, P; Gurentsov, V; Gusev, K; Guthikonda, K K; Hampel, W; Hegai, A; Heisel, M; Hemmer, S; Heusser, G; Hofmann, W; Hult, M; Inzhechik, L V; Ioannucci, L; Janicskó Csáthy, J; Jochum, J; Junker, M; Kihm, T; Kirpichnikov, I V; Kirsch, A; Klimenko, A; Knöpfle, K T; Kochetov, O; Kornoukhov, V N; Kuzminov, V V; Laubenstein, M; Lazzaro, A; Lebedev, V I; Lehnert, B; Liao, H Y; Lindner, M; Lippi, I; Liu, X; Lubashevskiy, A; Lubsandorzhiev, B; Lutter, G; Macolino, C; Machado, A A; Majorovits, B; Maneschg, W; Misiaszek, M; Nemchenok, I; Nisi, S; O'Shaughnessy, C; Pandola, L; Pelczar, K; Pessina, G; Pullia, A; Riboldi, S; Rumyantseva, N; Sada, C; Salathe, M; Schmitt, C; Schreiner, J; Schulz, O; Schwingenheuer, B; Schönert, S; Shevchik, E; Shirchenko, M; Simgen, H; Smolnikov, A; Stanco, L; Strecker, H; Tarka, M; Ur, C A; Vasenko, A A; Volynets, O; von Sturm, K; Wagner, V; Walter, M; Wegmann, A; Wester, T; Wojcik, M; Yanovich, E; Zavarise, P; Zhitnikov, I; Zhukov, S V; Zinatulina, D; Zuber, K; Zuzel, G

    2013-09-20

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a process that violates lepton number conservation. It is predicted to occur in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. This Letter reports the results from phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment at the Gran Sasso Laboratory (Italy) searching for neutrinoless double beta decay of the isotope (76)Ge. Data considered in the present analysis have been collected between November 2011 and May 2013 with a total exposure of 21.6 kg yr. A blind analysis is performed. The background index is about 1 × 10(-2) counts/(keV kg yr) after pulse shape discrimination. No signal is observed and a lower limit is derived for the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay of (76)Ge, T(1/2)(0ν) >2.1 × 10(25) yr (90% C.L.). The combination with the results from the previous experiments with (76)Ge yields T(1/2)(0ν)>3.0 × 10(25) yr (90% C.L.). PMID:24093254

  3. Results on Neutrinoless Double-β Decay of Ge76 from Phase I of the GERDA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Andreotti, E.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Barnabé Heider, M.; Barros, N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Budjáš, D.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; Cossavella, F.; Demidova, E. V.; Domula, A.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Ferella, A.; Freund, K.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Guthikonda, K. K.; Hampel, W.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Ioannucci, L.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Klimenko, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Liu, X.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Machado, A. A.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Misiaszek, M.; Nemchenok, I.; Nisi, S.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pessina, G.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Schönert, S.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Strecker, H.; Tarka, M.; Ur, C. A.; Vasenko, A. A.; Volynets, O.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Walter, M.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zavarise, P.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2013-09-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a process that violates lepton number conservation. It is predicted to occur in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. This Letter reports the results from phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment at the Gran Sasso Laboratory (Italy) searching for neutrinoless double beta decay of the isotope Ge76. Data considered in the present analysis have been collected between November 2011 and May 2013 with a total exposure of 21.6 kg yr. A blind analysis is performed. The background index is about 1×10-2counts/(keVkgyr) after pulse shape discrimination. No signal is observed and a lower limit is derived for the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge76, T1/20ν>2.1×1025yr (90% C.L.). The combination with the results from the previous experiments with Ge76 yields T1/20ν>3.0×1025yr (90% C.L.).

  4. First results of a large-area cryogenic gaseous photomultiplier coupled to a dual-phase liquid xenon TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazi, L.; Coimbra, A. E. C.; Erdal, E.; Israelashvili, I.; Rappaport, M. L.; Shchemelinin, S.; Vartsky, D.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Breskin, A.

    2015-10-01

    We discuss recent advances in the development of cryogenic gaseous photomultipliers (GPM), for possible use in dark matter and other rare-event searches using noble-liquid targets. We present results from a 10 cm diameter GPM coupled to a dual-phase liquid xenon (LXe) TPC, demonstrating—for the first time—the feasibility of recording both primary (``S1'') and secondary (``S2'') scintillation signals. The detector comprised a triple Thick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM) structure with cesium iodide photocathode on the first element; it was shown to operate stably at 180 K with gains above 105, providing high single-photon detection efficiency even in the presence of large α particle-induced S2 signals comprising thousands of photoelectrons. S1 scintillation signals were recorded with a time resolution of 1.2 ns (RMS). The energy resolution (σ/E) for S2 electroluminescence of 5.5 MeV α particles was ~ 9%, which is comparable to that obtained in the XENON100 TPC with PMTs. The results are discussed within the context of potential GPM deployment in future multi-ton noble-liquid detectors.

  5. Comprehensive assessment of long-term effects of reducing intake of energy phase 2 (CALERIE Phase 2) screening and recruitment: Methods and results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Comprehensive Assessment of the Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy Phase 2 (CALERIE) study is a systematic investigation of sustained 25% calorie restriction (CR) in non-obese humans. CALERIE is a multicenter (3 clinical sites, one coordinating center), parallel group, randomized con...

  6. The InterFrost benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology - first inter-comparison phase results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Christophe; Rühaak, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    are essentially theoretical but include the full complexity of the coupled non-linear set of equations (heat transfer with conduction, advection, phase change and Darcian flow). The complete set of inter-comparison results shows that the participating codes all produce simulations which are quantitatively similar and correspond to physical intuition. From a quantitative perspective, they agree well over the whole set of performance measures. The differences among the simulation results will be discussed in more depth throughout the test cases especially for the identification of the threshold times for each system as these exhibited the least agreement. However, the results suggest that in spite of the difficulties associated with the resolution of the set of TH equations (coupled and non-linear structure with phase change providing steep slopes), the developed codes provide robust results with a qualitatively reasonable representation of the processes and offer a quantitatively realistic basis. Further perspectives of the exercise will also be presented.

  7. Psychosocial Results from a Phase I Trial of a Nonsurgical Circumcision Device for Adult Men in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Kasprzyk, Danuta; Montaño, Daniel E; Hamilton, Deven T; Down, Kayla L; Marrett, Karl D; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Xaba, Sinokuthemba; Mugurungi, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Male circumcision (MC), an effective HIV prevention tool, has been added to Zimbabwe's Ministry of Health and Child Care HIV/AIDS Prevention Program. A Phase I safety trial of a nonsurgical male circumcision device was conducted and extensive psychosocial variables were assessed. Fifty-three men (18 and older) were recruited for the device procedure; 13 follow-up clinical visits were completed. Interviews conducted three times (before the procedure, at 2 weeks and 90 days post-procedure) assessed: Satisfaction; expectations; actual experience; activities of daily living; sexual behavior; and HIV risk perception. Using the Integrated Behavioral Model, attitudes towards MC, sex, and condoms, and sources of social influence and support were also assessed. Men (mean age 32.5, range 18-50; mean years of education = 13.6; 55% employed) were satisfied with device circumcision results. Men understand that MC is only partially protective against HIV acquisition. Most (94.7%) agreed that they will continue to use condoms to protect themselves from HIV. Pain ratings were surprisingly negative for a procedure billed as painless. Men talked to many social networks members about their MC experience; post-procedure (mean of 14 individuals). Minimal impact on activities of daily living and absenteeism indicate possible cost savings of device circumcisions. Spontaneous erections occurred frequently post-procedure. The results had important implications for changes in the pre-procedure clinical counseling protocol. Clear-cut counseling to manage pain and erection expectations should result in improved psychosocial outcomes in future roll-out of device circumcisions. Men's expectations must be managed through evidence-based counseling, as they share their experiences broadly among their social networks. PMID:26745142

  8. Amyloid-β 11C-PiB-PET imaging results from 2 randomized bapineuzumab phase 3 AD trials

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Mark E.; Margolin, Richard; Sperling, Reisa; Koeppe, Robert; Mason, Neale S.; Klunk, William E.; Mathis, Chester A.; Salloway, Stephen; Fox, Nick C.; Hill, Derek L.; Les, Andrea S.; Collins, Peter; Gregg, Keith M.; Di, Jianing; Lu, Yuan; Tudor, I. Cristina; Wyman, Bradley T.; Booth, Kevin; Broome, Stephanie; Yuen, Eric; Grundman, Michael; Brashear, H. Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of bapineuzumab on brain β-amyloid (Aβ) burden using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB)-PET. Methods: Two phase 3 clinical trials, 1 each in apolipoprotein APOE ε4 carriers and noncarriers, were conducted in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease dementia. Bapineuzumab, an anti-Aβ monoclonal antibody, or placebo, was administered by IV infusion every 13 weeks for 78 weeks. PET substudies assessed change in brain fibrillar Aβ over 71 weeks using an 11C-PiB-PET standardized uptake value ratio (SUVr) global cortical average (GCA) comprising the average SUVr from 5 cortical regions of interest with cerebellar gray matter as the reference region. Results: A total of 115 carriers and 39 noncarriers were analyzed. The difference (δ) in mean baseline to 71 week change in 11C-PiB-PET GCA between bapineuzumab and placebo was significant in carriers (0.5 mg/kg vs placebo δ = −0.101; p = 0.004) and in pooled analyses of both carriers and noncarriers (0.5 mg/kg vs placebo δ = −0.068; p = 0.027; 1.0 mg/kg vs placebo δ = −0.133; p = 0.028) but not in the noncarrier trial separately. Analyses by individual region of interest and in mild disease yielded findings similar to the main trial results. Conclusions: The 11C-PiB-PET imaging results demonstrated reduction of fibrillar Aβ accumulation in patients with Alzheimer disease treated with bapineuzumab; however, as no clinical benefit was observed, the findings are consistent with the hypotheses that bapineuzumab may not have been initiated early enough in the disease course, the doses were insufficient, or the most critical Aβ species were inadequately targeted. PMID:26208959

  9. Effect of the application of an electric field on the performance of a two-phase loop device: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creatini, F.; Di Marco, P.; Filippeschi, S.; Fioriti, D.; Mameli, M.

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade, the continuous development of electronics has pointed out the need for a change in mind with regard to thermal management. In the present scenario, Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs) are novel promising two-phase passive heat transport devices that seem to meet all present and future thermal requirements. Nevertheless, PHPs governing phenomena are quite unique and not completely understood. In particular, single closed loop PHPs manifest several drawbacks, mostly related to the reduction of device thermal performance and reliability, i.e. the occurrence of multiple operational quasi-steady states. The present research work proposes the application of an electric field as a technique to promote the circulation of the working fluid in a preferential direction and stabilize the device operation. The tested single closed loop PHP is made of a copper tube with an inner tube diameter equal to 2.00 mm and filled with pure ethanol (60% filling ratio). The electric field is generated by a couple of wire-shaped electrodes powered with DC voltage up to 20 kV and laid parallel to the longitudinal axis of the glass tube constituting the adiabatic section. Although the electric field intensity in the working fluid region is weakened both by the polarization phenomenon of the working fluid and by the interposition of the glass tube, the experimental results highlight the influence of the electric field on the device thermal performance and encourage the continuation of the research in this direction.

  10. Extended Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Analyses at the Shuttle Landing Facility: Phase II Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the AMU's Short-Range Statistical Forecasting task for peak winds at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The peak wind speeds are an important forecast element for the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle programs. The 45th Weather Squadron and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group indicate that peak winds are challenging to forecast. The Applied Meteorology Unit was tasked to develop tools that aid in short-range forecasts of peak winds at tower sites of operational interest. A seven year record of wind tower data was used in the analysis. Hourly and directional climatologies by tower and month were developed to determine the seasonal behavior of the average and peak winds. Probability density functions (PDF) of peak wind speed were calculated to determine the distribution of peak speed with average speed. These provide forecasters with a means of determining the probability of meeting or exceeding a certain peak wind given an observed or forecast average speed. A PC-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) tool was created to display the data quickly.

  11. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation within IEA Wind Task 30: Phase II Results Regarding a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.; Qvist, J.; Froyd, L.; Chen, X.; Azcona, J.; Uzungoglu, E.; Guedes Soares, C.; Luan, C.; Yutong, H.; Pengcheng, F.; Yde, A.; Larsen, T.; Nichols, J.; Buils, R.; Lei, L.; Anders Nygard, T.; et al.

    2014-03-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools (or codes) that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project, which operates under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 30. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of simulation codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating semisubmersible in 200 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants? codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  12. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

    2010-04-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  13. Design and Initial Results of a Multi-Phase Randomized Trial of Ceftriaxone in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, James D.; Shefner, Jeremy M.; Conwit, Robin; Schoenfeld, David; Keroack, Myles; Felsenstein, Donna; Krivickas, Lisa; David, William S.; Vriesendorp, Francine; Pestronk, Alan; Caress, James B.; Katz, Jonathan; Simpson, Ericka; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Pascuzzi, Robert; Glass, Jonathan; Rezania, Kourosh; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Greenblatt, David J.; Cudkowicz, Merit E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ceftriaxone increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter, EAAT2, which might protect from glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity. A trial using a novel three stage nonstop design, incorporating Phases I-III, tested ceftriaxone in ALS. Stage 1 determined the cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone in subjects with ALS. Stage 2 evaluated safety and tolerability for 20-weeks. Analysis of the pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and safety was used to determine the ceftriaxone dosage for Stage 3 efficacy testing. Methods In Stage 1, 66 subjects at ten clinical sites were enrolled and randomized equally into three study groups receiving intravenous placebo, ceftriaxone 2 grams daily or ceftriaxone 4 grams daily divided BID. Participants provided serum and cerebrospinal fluid for pharmacokinetic analysis on study day 7. Participants continued their assigned treatment in Stage 2. The Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) reviewed the data after the last participants completed 20 weeks on study drug. Results Stage 1 analysis revealed linear pharmacokinetics, and CSF trough levels for both dosage levels exceeding the pre-specified target trough level of 1 µM (0.55 µg/mL). Tolerability (Stages 1 and 2) results showed that ceftriaxone at dosages up to 4 grams/day was well tolerated at 20 weeks. Biliary adverse events were more common with ceftriaxone but not dose-dependent and improved with ursodeoxycholic (ursodiol) therapy. Conclusions The goals of Stages 1 and 2 of the ceftriaxone trial were successfully achieved. Based on the pre-specified decision rules, the DSMB recommended the use of ceftriaxone 4 g/d (divided BID) for Stage 3, which recently closed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00349622. PMID:23613806

  14. Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift (CAPS) Method for Airborne Aerosol Light Extinction Measurement: Instrument Validation and First Results from Field Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, A.; Perim de Faria, J.; Berg, M.; Bundke, U.; Freedman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring the direct impact of aerosol particles on climate requires the continuous measurement of aerosol optical parameters like the aerosol extinction coefficient on a regular basis. Remote sensing and ground-based networks are well in place (e.g., AERONET, ACTRIS), whereas the regular in situ measurement of vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosol optical properties remains still an important challenge in quantifying climate change. The European Research Infrastructure IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System; www.iagos.org) responds to the increasing requests for long-term, routine in situ observational data by using commercial passenger aircraft as measurement platform. However, scientific instrumentation for the measurement of atmospheric constituents requires major modifications before being deployable aboard in-service passenger aircraft. Recently, a compact and robust family of optical instruments based on the cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) technique has become available for measuring aerosol light extinction. While this technique was successfully deployed for ground-based atmospheric measurements under various conditions, its suitability for operation aboard aircraft in the free and upper free troposphere still has to be demonstrated. In this work, the modifications of a CAPS PMex instrument for measuring aerosol light extinction on aircraft, the results from subsequent laboratory tests for evaluating the modified instrument prototype, and first results from a field deployment aboard a research aircraft will be covered. In laboratory studies, the instrument showed excellent agreement (deviation < 5%) with theoretical values calculated from Rayleigh scattering cross-sections, when operated on pressurized air and CO2 at ambient and low pressure (~200 hPa). For monodisperse and polydisperse aerosols, reference aerosol extinction coefficients were calculated from measured size distributions and agreed with the CAPS PMex instrument

  15. Results of the Phase 1 Trial of RG7112, a Small-molecule MDM2 Antagonist in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Andreeff, Michael; Kelly, Kevin R.; Yee, Karen; Assouline, Sarit; Strair, Roger; Popplewell, Leslie; Bowen, David; Martinelli, Giovanni; Drummond, Mark W.; Vyas, Paresh; Kirschbaum, Mark; Iyer, Swaminathan Padmanabhan; Ruvolo, Vivian; Nogueras González, Graciela M.; Huang, Xuelin; Chen, Gong; Graves, Bradford; Blotner, Steven; Bridge, Peter; Jukofsky, Lori; Middleton, Steve; Reckner, Monica; Rueger, Ruediger; Zhi, Jianguo; Nichols, Gwen; Kojima, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose RG7112 is a small-molecule MDM2 antagonist. MDM2 is a negative regulator of the tumor suppressor p53 and frequently overexpressed in leukemias. Thus, a Phase I study of RG7112 in patients with hematologic malignancies was conducted. Experimental Design Primary study objectives included determination of the dose and safety profile of RG7112. Secondary objectives included evaluation of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, such as TP53-mutation status and MDM2 expression, and preliminary clinical activity. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts: Stratum A (relapsed/refractory AML (except APL), ALL, and CML) and Stratum B (relapsed/refractory CLL/sCLL). Some Stratum A patients were treated at the MTD to assess clinical activity. Results RG7112 was administered to 116 patients (96 patients in Stratum A and 20 patients in Stratum B). All patients experienced at least 1 adverse event, and 3 DLTs were reported. PK analysis indicated that twice-daily dosing enhanced daily exposure. Anti-leukemia activity was observed in the 30 patients with AML assessed at the MTD included 5 patients who met IWG criteria for response. Exploratory analysis revealed TP53 mutations in 14% of Stratum A patients and in 40% of Stratum B patients. Two patients with TP53 mutations exhibited clinical activity. p53 target genes were induced only in TP53 wild-type leukemic cells. Baseline expression levels of MDM2 correlated positively with clinical response. Conclusions RG7112 demonstrated clinical activity against relapsed/refractory AML and CLL/sCLL. MDM2 inhibition resulted in p53 stabilization and transcriptional activation of p53-target genes. We provide proof-of-concept that MDM2 inhibition restores p53 function and generates clinical responses in hematologic malignancies. PMID:26459177

  16. Safety of celecoxib and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results of the phase 4 registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess long-term safety and developmental data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients treated in routine clinical practice with celecoxib or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs). Methods Children aged ≥2 to <18 years with rheumatoid-factor–positive or –negative polyarthritis, persistent or extended oligoarthritis, or systemic arthritis were enrolled into this prospective, observational, multicenter standard-of-care registry. Eligible patients were newly or recently prescribed (≤6 months) an nsNSAID or celecoxib. Enrolled patients were followed to the end of the study, whether they remained on the original NSAID, switched, or discontinued therapy altogether. All adverse events (AEs) regardless of severity were captured in the database. Results A total of 274 patients (nsNSAID, n = 219; celecoxib, n = 55) were observed for 410 patient-years of observation. Naproxen, meloxicam, and nabumetone were the most frequently used nsNSAIDs. At baseline, the celecoxib group was older, had a numerically longer median time since diagnosis, and a numerically higher proportion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal-related NSAID intolerance. AEs reported were those frequently observed with NSAID treatment and were similar across groups (nsNSAIDs: 52.0%; celecoxib: 52.9%). Twelve unique patients experienced a total of 18 serious AEs; the most frequent were infections, and none was attributed to NSAID use. Conclusions The safety profile of celecoxib and nsNSAIDs appears similar overall. The results from this registry, ongoing pharmacovigilance, and the phase 3 trial that led to the approval of celecoxib for children with JIA provide evidence that the benefit-risk for celecoxib treatment in JIA remains positive. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00688545. PMID:25057265

  17. Results from a phase 1 study of nusinersen (ISIS-SMNRx) in children with spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Darras, Basil T.; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Montes, Jacqueline; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Norris, Daniel A.; Bennett, C. Frank; Bishop, Kathie M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary clinical efficacy of intrathecal nusinersen (previously ISIS-SMNRx), an antisense oligonucleotide designed to alter splicing of SMN2 mRNA, in patients with childhood spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Methods: Nusinersen was delivered by intrathecal injection to medically stable patients with type 2 and type 3 SMA aged 2–14 years in an open-label phase 1 study and its long-term extension. Four ascending single-dose levels (1, 3, 6, and 9 mg) were examined in cohorts of 6–10 participants. Participants were monitored for safety and tolerability, and CSF and plasma pharmacokinetics were measured. Exploratory efficacy endpoints included the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Expanded (HFMSE) and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Results: A total of 28 participants enrolled in the study (n = 6 in first 3 dose cohorts; n = 10 in the 9-mg cohort). Intrathecal nusinersen was well-tolerated with no safety/tolerability concerns identified. Plasma and CSF drug levels were dose-dependent, consistent with preclinical data. Extended pharmacokinetics indicated a prolonged CSF drug half-life of 4–6 months after initial clearance. A significant increase in HFMSE scores was observed at the 9-mg dose at 3 months postdose (3.1 points; p = 0.016), which was further increased 9–14 months postdose (5.8 points; p = 0.008) during the extension study. Conclusions: Results from this study support continued development of nusinersen for treatment of SMA. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that in children with SMA, intrathecal nusinersen is not associated with safety or tolerability concerns. PMID:26865511

  18. Results of the Lasagna{trademark} Phase IIa field demonstration for the remediation of TCE in clay soils

    SciTech Connect

    Athmer, C.J.; Ho, S.V.; Hughes, B.M.; Clausen, J.L.; Johnstone, F.; Hines, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    The Lasagna{trademark} technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electrokinetics is utilized to move the contaminants through those zones until the treatment is completed. The Phase IIa demonstration was the second field demonstration at a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site in Paducah, Ky. The first demonstration, Phase I, proved that TCE could be mobilized and captured using Lasagna{trademark}. This second demonstration measured 30 feet by 21 feet by 45 feet deep and showed for the first time TCE, including pure phase residual TCE, could be mobilized in tight soils using electrokinetics and degraded in-situ using iron filings. Over 95% removal of TCE was observed in areas of the demonstration site including pure phase residual TCE regions.

  19. CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT RESULTING FROM MULTICOMPONENT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID POOL DISSOLUTION IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL SUBSURFACE FORMATIONS (R823579)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semi-analytical method for simulating transient contaminant transport originating from the dissolution of multicomponent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) pools in three-dimensional, saturated, homogeneous porous media is presented. Each dissolved component may undergo first-order...

  20. Safety and clinical activity of elosulfase alfa in pediatric patients with Morquio A syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IVA) less than 5 y

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Simon A.; Bialer, Martin; Parini, Rossella; Martin, Ken; Wang, Hui; Yang, Ke; Shaywitz, Adam J.; Harmatz, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that elosulfase alfa has a favorable efficacy/safety profile in Morquio A patients aged ≥5 y. This study evaluated safety and impact on urine keratan sulfate (uKS) levels and growth velocity in younger patients. Methods: Fifteen Morquio A patients aged <5 y received elosulfase alfa 2.0 mg/kg/week for 52 wk during the primary treatment phase of a phase II, open-label, multinational study. Primary endpoint was safety and tolerability; secondary endpoints were change in uKS and growth velocity over 52 wk. Results: All 15 patients completed the primary treatment phase. Six of 743 infusions (0.8%) administered led to adverse events (AEs) requiring infusion interruption and medical intervention. Eleven patients (73.3%) had ≥1 study drug-related AE, mostly infusion-associated reactions. Mean z-score growth rate per year numerically improved from −0.6 at baseline to −0.4 at week 52. Comparison to untreated subjects of similar age in the Morquio A Clinical Assessment Program study showed a smaller decrease in height z-scores for treated than for untreated patients. Mean percent change from baseline in uKS was −30.2% at 2 wk and −43.5% at 52 wk. Conclusion: Early intervention with elosulfase alfa is well-tolerated and produces a decrease in uKS and a trend toward improvement in growth. PMID:26331768

  1. Shallow fractionation signature of phase chemistry in Taburiente lavas, La Palma, Canary Islands: Results of MELTS modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guetschow, H. A.; Nelson, B. K.

    2002-12-01

    Depth of crystal fractionation influences the chemical evolution of ocean island basalts and has significant implications for the physical structures of these volcanoes. In contrast to dominantly shallow systems such as Hawaii, a range of fractionation depths have been reported for Canary Islands lavas. Magmas erupted on La Palma preserve fluid- and melt-inclusion evidence for high-pressure (> 10 kbar) crystallization (Klügel et al., 1998; Hansteen et al., 1998; Nikogosian et al., 2002). If high-pressure fractional crystallization were an early and dominant process, it would generate specific patterns in rock and phase chemistry of eruptive sequences. Alkalic basalts from Taburiente volcano display coherent major element trends consistent with evolution dominated by fractional crystallization while their phenocryst compositions, trace elements, and isotopic trends require mixing between multiple sources. The current model confirms the importance of both fractionation and mixing to achieve the full range of lavas observed. A low-pressure (1 kbar) thermodynamic fractional crystallization model performed with the MELTS (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995) software closely reproduces major element trends from two stratigraphic sequences. This model also predicts the observed sequence of groundmass clinopyroxene compositions and phenocryst zoning reversals. In all low pressure simulations, olivine remains a modally significant liquidus phase during the first 20% and last 30% of the crystallization sequence, resulting in a negative correlation between the CaO and Fo content of olivine. These results are consistent with the presence of olivine phenocrysts that bear petrographic evidence of early crystallization, as well as observed compositional trends of groundmass olivine and clinopyroxene in Taburiente lavas. MELTS models that include an initial period of high pressure (12 kbar) clinopyroxene fractionation produce major element trends comparable to the low pressure model, but

  2. Tolerance and Acceptance Results of a Palladium-103 Permanent Breast Seed Implant Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe Rakovitch, Eileen; Keller, Brian M.; Sankreacha, Raxa; Chartier, Carole

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To test, in a prospective Phase I/II trial, a partial breast irradiation technique using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) realized in a single 1-h procedure under sedation and local freezing. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had infiltrating ductal carcinoma {<=}3 cm in diameter, surgical margin {>=}2 mm, no extensive intraductal component, no lymphovascular invasion, and negative lymph nodes. Patients received a permanent seed implant, and a minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the clinical target volume, with a margin of 1.5 cm. Results: From May 2004 to April 2007, 67 patients received the PBSI treatment. The procedure was well tolerated, with 17% of patients having significant pain after the procedure. Only 1 patient (1.5%) had an acute skin reaction (Grade 3 according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria). The rates of acute moist desquamation, erythema, and indurations were 10.4%, 42%, and 27%, respectively. At 1 year the rate of Grade 1 telangiectasia was 14%. The rate of skin reaction decreased from 65% to 28% when skin received less than the 85% isodose. According to a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group questionnaire, 80-90% of patients were very satisfied with their treatment, and the remainder were satisfied. One patient (1.5%) developed an abscess, which resolved after the use of antibiotics. There was no recurrence after a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 11-49 months). Conclusions: The feasibility, safety, and tolerability of PBSI compares favorably with that of external beam and other partial breast irradiation techniques.

  3. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume III. Model predictions and results

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the third of a seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. This volume deals with parametric studies carried out using the FBC model. A comparison with available pilot plant data is included where such data are available. This volume in essence documents model performance; describing predictions on bubble growth, combustion characteristics, sulfur capture, heat transfer and related parameters. The model has approximately forty input variables which are at the disposal of the user. The user has the option to change a few or all of these input variables. In the parametric studies reported here, a large number of input variables whose variation is less critical to the predicted results, were maintained constant at the default values. On the other hand, those parameters whose selection is very important in design and operation of the FBC's were varied in suitable operating regions. The chief among such parameters are: bed temperature, coal feed size distribution (2 parameters), average bed-sorbent size, calcium to sulfur molar ratio, superficial velocity, excess air fraction, and bed weight (or bed height). The computations for obtaining the parametric relationships are based upon selection of a geometrical design for the combustor. Bed cross-section is 6' x 6', bed height is 4', and the freeboard height is 16'. The heat transfer tubes have 2'' OD, a pitch of 10'', and are located on an equilateral triangle pattern. The air distributor is a perforated plate with 0.1'' diameter holes on a rectangular grid with 0.75'' center-to-center spacing.

  4. Late radiation toxicity after intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for breast cancer: results from the randomized phase III trial TARGIT A.

    PubMed

    Sperk, Elena; Welzel, Grit; Keller, Anke; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Gerhardt, Axel; Sütterlin, Marc; Wenz, Frederik

    2012-08-01

    The randomized phase III trial TARGIT A showed non-inferiority regarding local control after intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT 20 Gy which was followed by whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) in patients with risk factors only) in comparison to standard WBRT (50-56 Gy) after breast-conserving surgery in selected patients. This is the first analysis of long-term toxicities in the setting of TARGIT. Between 02/2002 and 12/2008, 305 patients were treated within TARGIT A (Arm A: n = 34 IORT, n = 20 IORT + WBRT for risk factors; Arm B WBRT: n = 55) or received IORT as a planned boost (control group: n = 196) at a single center. Toxicity was assessed according to the LENT SOMA scales. No significant differences were seen between Arm A and Arm B regarding fibrosis, breast edema, retraction, ulceration, lymphedema, hyperpigmentation, and pain. Arm A had significantly less telangiectases compared to Arm B (p = 0.049). In the subanalysis (Arm A IORT vs. Arm A IORT + WBRT vs. Arm B), fibrosis had a cumulative rate of 5.9 versus 37.5 versus 18.4 %, respectively (38.2 % IORT boost control group), at 3 years. No telangiectases were seen after IORT alone (0 % Arm A IORT vs. 17.5 % Arm A IORT + WBRT vs. 17.7 % Arm B). The hazard ratio of higher grade toxicity as first event was 0.46 (95 % CI, 0.26-0.83) for Arm A IORT as compared to Arm B (p = 0.010). No recurrences were seen after a median follow-up of 40 months (Arm A) and 42 months (Arm B). With its very low chronic skin toxicity rates and outstanding long-term results regarding toxicity and local control, IORT with 50 kV X-rays is a safe and effective method for treatment of selected breast cancer patients. PMID:22842984

  5. Chemoprevention of Head and Neck Cancer with Celecoxib and Erlotinib: Results of a Phase Ib and Pharmacokinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Nabil F.; Hurwitz, Selwyn J.; Kono, Scott A.; Yang, Chung S.; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Zhengjia; Sica, Gabe; Müller, Susan; Moreno-Williams, Rachel; Lewis, Melinda; Grist, William; Chen, Amy Y.; Moore, Charles E; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Ramalingam, Suresh; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Nannapaneni, Sreenivas; Shin, Hyung Ju C.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Shin, Dong M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors synergistically inhibit head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumorigenesis in preclinical studies. We conducted a phase I and pharmacokinetic study with the erlotinib and celecoxib combination in patients with advanced premalignant lesions. Patients and Methods 36 subjects with oral leukoplakia, mild, moderate, or severe dysplasia, or carcinoma in situ were screened for study participation; 12 consented and received therapy for a median of 5.38 months. Erlotinib was escalated following a standard 3+3 design at 50, 75, and 100mg orally daily and celecoxib was fixed at 400mg twice daily for 6 months. Biopsy of lesions and cytobrush of normal mucosa were performed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Erlotinib pharmacokinetics were analyzed in 10 subjects. Results The maximum tolerated dose of erlotinib with celecoxib 400mg BID was 50mg per day with skin rash being the main observed toxicity. Overall histologic response rate was 63% (complete response 43%, partial response 14%, stable disease 29%, disease progression 14%). With median follow-up of 36 months, mean time to progression to higher-grade dysplasia or carcinoma was 25.4 months. Downregulation of EGFR and p-ERK in follow-up biopsies correlated with response to treatment. Larger average erlotinib V/F (∼308L) and CL/F (8.3L/hr) compared to previous studies may be related to relatively large average bodyweights. Average erlotinib t1/2 was 25.6hr. Conclusion Encouraging responses to the celecoxib and erlotinib combination correlated with EGFR pathway inhibition. Although erlotinib-related rash was the main limitation to dose escalation, the intervention was well tolerated. PMID:24085777

  6. ERCC1 is a prognostic biomarker in locally advanced head and neck cancer: results from a randomised, phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, J E; Austin, M C; Schmidt, R; Kurland, B F; Vaezi, A; Hayes, D N; Mendez, E; Parvathaneni, U; Chai, X; Sampath, S; Martins, R G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin-radiotherapy is a preferred standard for locally advanced, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, the cisplatin-attributable survival benefit is small and toxicity substantial. A biomarker of cisplatin resistance could guide treatment selection and spare morbidity. The ERCC1-XPF nuclease is critical to DNA repair pathways resolving cisplatin-induced lesions. Methods: In a phase II trial, patients with untreated Stage III-IVb HNSCC were randomised to cisplatin-radiotherapy with/without erlotinib. Archived primary tumours were available from 90 of 204 patients for this planned substudy. Semi-quantitative ERCC1 protein expression (H-score) was determined using the FL297, 4F9, and 8F1 antibodies. The primary analysis evaluated the relationship between continuous ERCC1 protein expression and progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary analyses included two pre-specified ERCC1 cutpoints and performance in HPV-associated disease. Results: Higher ERCC1 expression was associated with inferior PFS, as measured by the specific antibodies FL297 (HR=2.5, 95% CI=1.1–5.9, P=0.03) and 4F9 (HR=3.0, 95% CI=1.2–7.8, P=0.02). Patients with increased vs decreased/normal ERCC1 expression experienced inferior PFS (HR=4.8 for FL297, P=0.003; HR=5.5 for 4F9, P=0.007). This threshold remained prognostic in HPV-associated disease. Conclusion: ERCC1-XPF protein expression by the specific FL297 and 4F9 antibodies is prognostic in patients undergoing definitive cisplatin-radiotherapy for HNSCC, irrespective of HPV status. PMID:24064970

  7. Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes: Results of iPILPS Phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W. J.; Schmidt, G. A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

    2006-05-01

    Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ( 1H 218O and 1H 2H 16O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are offline, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here, we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions, but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the isotope transfer function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

  8. NGlycolylGM3/VSSP Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Results of Phase I/IIa Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Ana; Hernandez, Julio; Ortiz, Ramón; Cepeda, Meylán; Perez, Kirenia; Car, Adriana; Viada, Carmen; Toledo, Darién; Guerra, Pedro Pablo; García, Elena; Arboláez, Migdacelys; Fernandez, Luis E

    2012-01-01

    Patients treated with vaccines based on NGlycolil gangliosides have showed benefit in progression free survival and overall survival. These molecules, which have been observed in breast cancer cells, are minimally or not expressed in normal human tissue and have been considered as antigen tumor-specific. For this reason they are very attractive to immunotherapy. A phase I/II clinical trial was carried out in metastatic breast cancer patients with the NGlycolylGM3/VSSP vaccine administered by subcutaneous route. Selecting the optimal biological doses of the vaccine in these patients was the principal objective based on the immunogenicity, efficacy and safety results. Six levels of doses of vaccine were studied. Treatment schedule consisted of five doses every two weeks and then monthly until reaching a fifteenth doses. Doses levels studied were 150, 300, 600, 900, 1200 and 1500 μg. Five patients in each level were included except at the 900 μg dose, in which ten patients were included. Immunogenicity was determined by levels of antibodies generated in patients after vaccination. The response criteria of evaluation in solid tumors (RECIST) was used to evaluate antitumoral effect. Safety was evaluated by Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Event (CTCAE). The vaccine administration was safe and immunogenic in all does levels. Most frequent adverse events related to vaccination were mild or moderate and were related to injection site reactions and "flu-like" symptoms. Vaccination induced specific anti-NeuGcGM3 IgM and IgG antibodies responses in all patients. Disease control (objective response or stable disease) was obtained in 72.7% of evaluated patients. Median overall survival was 15.9 months. Two patients of two different dose levels achieved overall survival values of about six years. The dose of 900 μg was selected as biological optimal dose in which overall survival was 28.5 months. PMID:23055739

  9. NGlycolylGM3/VSSP Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Results of Phase I/IIa Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Ana; Hernandez, Julio; Ortiz, Ramón; Cepeda, Meylán; Perez, Kirenia; Car, Adriana; Viada, Carmen; Toledo, Darién; Guerra, Pedro Pablo; García, Elena; Arboláez, Migdacelys; Fernandez, Luis E

    2012-01-01

    Patients treated with vaccines based on NGlycolil gangliosides have showed benefit in progression free survival and overall survival. These molecules, which have been observed in breast cancer cells, are minimally or not expressed in normal human tissue and have been considered as antigen tumor-specific. For this reason they are very attractive to immunotherapy. A phase I/II clinical trial was carried out in metastatic breast cancer patients with the NGlycolylGM3/VSSP vaccine administered by subcutaneous route. Selecting the optimal biological doses of the vaccine in these patients was the principal objective based on the immunogenicity, efficacy and safety results. Six levels of doses of vaccine were studied. Treatment schedule consisted of five doses every two weeks and then monthly until reaching a fifteenth doses. Doses levels studied were 150, 300, 600, 900, 1200 and 1500 μg. Five patients in each level were included except at the 900 μg dose, in which ten patients were included. Immunogenicity was determined by levels of antibodies generated in patients after vaccination. The response criteria of evaluation in solid tumors (RECIST) was used to evaluate antitumoral effect. Safety was evaluated by Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Event (CTCAE). The vaccine administration was safe and immunogenic in all does levels. Most frequent adverse events related to vaccination were mild or moderate and were related to injection site reactions and “flu-like” symptoms. Vaccination induced specific anti-NeuGcGM3 IgM and IgG antibodies responses in all patients. Disease control (objective response or stable disease) was obtained in 72.7% of evaluated patients. Median overall survival was 15.9 months. Two patients of two different dose levels achieved overall survival values of about six years. The dose of 900 μg was selected as biological optimal dose in which overall survival was 28.5 months. PMID:23055739

  10. 30 CFR 203.40 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? 203.40 Section 203.40 Mineral... eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? Your lease... lease has not produced gas or oil from a well with a perforated interval the top of which is 18,000...

  11. 30 CFR 203.40 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? 203.40 Section 203.40 Mineral... a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? Your lease may receive an RSV under... a well with a perforated interval the top of which is 18,000 feet TVD SS or deeper that...

  12. 30 CFR 203.40 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? 203.40 Section 203.40 Mineral... leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well.... (b) The lease has not produced gas or oil from a well with a perforated interval the top of which...

  13. 30 CFR 203.40 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? 203.40 Section 203.40 Mineral... eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? Your lease... lease has not produced gas or oil from a well with a perforated interval the top of which is 18,000...

  14. Liquid/liquid metal extraction: Phase diagram topology resulting from molecular interactions between extractant, ion, oil and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, C.; Bauduin, P.; Dufrêche, J. F.; Zemb, T.; Diat, O.

    2012-11-01

    We consider the class of surfactants called "extractants" since they specifically interact with some cations and are used in liquid-liquid separation processes. We review here features of water-poor reverse micelles in water/oil/ extractant systems as determined by combined structural studies including small angle scattering techniques on absolute scale. Origins of instabilities, liquid-liquid separation as well as emulsification failure are detected. Phase diagrams contain the same multi-phase domains as classical microemulsions, but special unusual features appear due to the high spontaneous curvature directed towards the polar cores of aggregates as well as rigidity of the film made by extracting molecules.

  15. Involved-Node Proton Therapy in Combined Modality Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Results of a Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella; Zaiden, Robert; Slayton, William; Sandler, Eric; Dang, Nam H.; Lynch, James W.; Li, Zuofeng; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: This study describes the early clinical outcomes of a prospective phase 2 study of consolidative involved-node proton therapy (INPT) as a component of combined-mode therapy in patients with stages I to III Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) with mediastinal involvement. Methods and Materials: Between September 2009 and June 2013, 15 patients with newly diagnosed HL received INPT after completing chemotherapy in an institutional review board-approved protocol comparing the dosimetric impact of PT with those of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated RT. Based on {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) response, 5 children received 15 to 25.5 cobalt Gy equivalent (CGE) of INPT after receiving 4 cycles of Adriamycin, Bleomycin, Vincristine, Etoposide, Prednisone, Cyclophosphamide or Vincristine, adriamycin, methotrexate, Prednisone chemotherapy, and 10 adults received 30.6 to 39.6 CGE of INPT after 3 to 6 cycles of Adriamycin, Bleomycine, Vinblastine, Dacarbazine. Patients were routinely evaluated for toxicity during and after treatment, using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, and for relapse by physical examination and routine imaging. Relapse-free survival (RFS) and event-free survival (EFS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method from the time of diagnosis. Results: The median follow-up was 37 months (range, 26-55). Two events occurred during follow-up: 1 relapse (inside and outside the targeted field) and 1 transformation into a primary mediastinal large B cell lymphoma. The 3-year RFS rate was 93%, and the 3-year EFS rate was 87%. No acute or late grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Although decades of follow-up will be needed to realize the likely benefit of PT in reducing the risk of radiation-induced late effects, PT following chemotherapy in patients with HL is well-tolerated, and disease outcomes

  16. Efficacy and Safety of Cariprazine in Acute Exacerbation of Schizophrenia: Results From an International, Phase III Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kane, John M; Zukin, Stephen; Wang, Yao; Lu, Kaifeng; Ruth, Adam; Nagy, Krisztián; Laszlovszky, István; Durgam, Suresh

    2015-08-01

    This phase III study evaluated the efficacy and safety of cariprazine, a dopamine D3 and D2 receptor partial agonist with preferential binding to D3 receptors, in patients with acute exacerbation of schizophrenia. Patients were randomized to 6-week double-blind treatment with placebo, cariprazine 3 to 6 mg/d, or cariprazine 6 to 9 mg/d. Primary and secondary efficacy: change from baseline to week 6 in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity scores, respectively, analyzed using a mixed-effects model for repeated measures adjusting for multiple comparisons. Safety included treatment-emergent adverse events, clinical laboratory values, vital signs, electrocardiograms, ophthalmologic examination, Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale, and extrapyramidal symptom scales. In the Safety Population (placebo, n = 147; cariprazine 3-6 mg/d, n = 151; cariprazine 6-9 mg/d, n = 148), 60.5% of patients completed the study. At week 6, statistically significant least squares mean differences in favor of cariprazine versus placebo were observed for Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score (3-6 mg/d: -6.8, P = 0.003; 6-9 mg/d: -9.9, P < 0.001) and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (3-6 mg/d: -0.3, P = 0.012; 6-9 mg/d: -0.5, P < 0.001). Common treatment-emergent adverse events (≥5% and twice the rate of placebo) in both cariprazine groups were akathisia, extrapyramidal disorder, and tremor; most were mild to moderate in severity. Mean changes in metabolic parameters were generally small and similar between groups. Prolactin levels decreased in all groups. In conclusion, cariprazine 3 to 6 and 6 to 9 mg/d versus placebo demonstrated significant improvement on primary and secondary efficacy parameters. Cariprazine was generally well tolerated. These results suggest that cariprazine may be a new and effective treatment for schizophrenia. PMID:26075487

  17. Evaluation of Flygt Mixers for Application in Savannah River Site Tank 19 Test Results from Phase B: Mid-Scale Testing at PNNL

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Combs, W.H.; Farmer, J.R.; Gladki, H.; Hatchell, B.K.; Johnson, M.A.; Poirier, M.R.; Rodwell, P.O.

    1999-03-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed mixer tests using 3-kW (4-hp) Flygt mixers in 1.8- and 5.7-m-diameter tanks at the 336 building facility in Richland, Washington to evaluate candidate scaling relationships for Flygt mixers used for sludge mobilization and particle suspension. These tests constituted the second phase of a three-phase test program involving representatives from ITT Flygt Corporation, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and PNNL. The results of the first phase of tests, which were conducted at ITT Flygt's facility in a 0.45-m-diameter tank, are documented in Powell et al. (1999). Although some of the Phase B tests were geometrically similar to selected Phase A tests (0.45-m tank), none of the Phase B tests were geometrically, cinematically, and/or dynamically similar to the planned Tank 19 mixing system. Therefore, the mixing observed during the Phase B tests is not directly indicative of the mixing expected in Tank 19 and some extrapolation of the data is required to make predictions for Tank 19 mixing. Of particular concern is the size of the mixer propellers used for the 5.7-m tank tests. These propellers were more than three times larger than required by geometric scaling of the Tank 19 mixers. The implications of the lack of geometric similarity, as well as other factors that complicate interpretation of the test results, are discussed in Section 5.4.

  18. One where the kid actually is "all right": the queering of Iva in Marilyn Hacker's Love, Death, and the Changing of the Seasons.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jax Lee

    2013-01-01

    This article explores Marilyn Hacker's 1986 sonnet sequence, Love, Death, and the Changing of the Seasons, for its depiction of lesbian parenting. Hacker moves beyond the simply erotic to focus on a truly subversive act present within the queer community, namely that of child-rearing. Lesbian parenting is a private world, one not subject to the male gaze in the ways that other seemingly private worlds (like sex) are still commodified. The daughter character of Iva exemplifies the construction of self in a queer environment. Children of queer parents have the unique subject position of being "queered" themselves regardless of their ultimate sexual orientation. While this queering would seem to primarily affect their understandings of gender and sexuality, this article argues that such early "othering" serves to deconstruct one's understanding of binaries and social conformity on a large scale, thereby encouraging qualities of acceptance and compassion and increasing the intimate family bond. PMID:23514212

  19. An investigation of wing buffeting response at subsonic and transonic speeds. Phase 2: F-111A flight data analysis. Volume 1: Summary of technical approach, results and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benepe, D. B.; Cunningham, A. M., Jr.; Traylor, S., Jr.; Dunmyer, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the flight buffeting response of the F-111A was performed in two phases. In Phase 1 stochastic analysis techniques were applied to wing and fuselage responses for maneuvers flown at subsonic speeds and wing leading edge sweep of 26 degrees. Power spectra and rms values were obtained. This report gives results of Phase 2 where the analyses were extended to include maneuvers flown at wing leading edge sweep values of 50 and 75.5 degrees at subsonic and supersonic speeds and the responses examined were expanded to include vertical shear, bending moment, and hingeline torque of the left and right horizontal tails. Power spectra, response time histories, variations of rms response with angle of attack and effects of wing sweep and Mach number are presented and discussed. Some Phase 1 results are given for comparison purposes.

  20. Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

  1. The IAEA coordinated research programme on HTGR uncertainty analysis: Phase I status and Ex. I-1 prismatic reference results

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bostelmann, Friederike; Strydom, Gerhard; Reitsma, Frederik; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2016-01-11

    The quantification of uncertainties in design and safety analysis of reactors is today not only broadly accepted, but in many cases became the preferred way to replace traditional conservative analysis for safety and licensing analysis. The use of a more fundamental methodology is also consistent with the reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes available today. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied, in contrast to the historical approach where sensitivity analysis were performed and uncertainties then determined by a simplified statistical combination of a few important inputmore » parameters. New methodologies are currently under development in the OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modelling (UAM) benchmark activity. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) designs require specific treatment of the double heterogeneous fuel design and large graphite quantities at high temperatures. The IAEA has therefore launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM) in 2013 to study uncertainty propagation specifically in the HTGR analysis chain. Two benchmark problems are defined, with the prismatic design represented by the General Atomics (GA) MHTGR-350 and a 250 MW modular pebble bed design similar to the Chinese HTR-PM. Work has started on the first phase and the current CRP status is reported in the paper. A comparison of the Serpent and SCALE/KENO-VI reference Monte Carlo results for Ex. I-1 of the MHTGR-350 design is also included. It was observed that the SCALE/KENO-VI Continuous Energy (CE) k∞ values were 395 pcm (Ex. I-1a) to 803 pcm (Ex. I-1b) higher than the respective Serpent lattice calculations, and that within the set of the SCALE results, the KENO-VI 238 Multi-Group (MG) k∞ values were up to 800 pcm lower than the KENO-VI CE values. The use of the

  2. The group IV-A cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, CNGC19 and CNGC20, localize to the vacuole membrane in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Christen C. Y.; Christopher, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) are implicated in the uptake of both essential and toxic cations, Ca2+ signalling, and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. The 20 CNGC paralogues of Arabidopsis are divided into five evolutionary groups. Group IV-A is highly isolated and consists only of two closely spaced genes, CNGC19 and CNGC20. Prior studies have shown that both genes are induced by salinity and biotic stress. A unique feature of CNGC19 and CNGC20 is their long hydrophilic N-termini. To determine the subcellular locations of CNGC19 and CNGC20, partial and full-length fusions to GFP(S65T) were generated. Translational fusions of the N-termini of CNGC19 (residues 1–171) and CNGC20 (residues 1–200) to GFP(S65T) were targeted to punctate structures when transiently expressed in leaf protoplasts. In the case of CNGC20, but not CNGC19, the punctate structures were co-labelled with a marker for the Golgi. The full-length CNGC19-GFP fusion co-localized with markers for the vacuole membrane (αTIP- and γTIP-mCherry). Vacuole membrane labelling by the full-length CNGC20-GFP fusion was also observed, but the signal was weak and accompanied by numerous punctate signals that did not co-localize with αTIP- or γTIP-mCherry. These punctate structures diminished, and localization of full-length CNGC20-GFP to the vacuole increased, when it was co-expressed with the full-length CNGC19-mCherry. Vacuole membrane labelling was also detected in planta via immunoelectron microscopy using a CNGC20-antiserum on cryopreserved ultrathin sections of roots. We hypothesize that the role of group IV-A CNGCs is to mediate the movement of cations between the central vacuole and the cytosol in response to certain types of abiotic and biotic stress.

  3. Efficacy and safety of nedaplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy for FIGO Stage IB2–IVA cervical cancer and its clinical prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Masateru; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Mabuchi, Seiji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Sumida, Iori; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is a standard treatment for cervical cancer, but nedaplatin-based CCRT is not routinely administered. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nedaplatin-based CCRT (35 mg/m2 weekly) and analyzed prognostic factors for survival among 52 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage IB2–IVA cervical cancer treated from 1999 to 2009. Patients were treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy of 40–56 Gy (in 20–28 fractions) and 13.6–28.8 Gy (in 2–4 fractions) of high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy or 18 Gy (in 3 fractions) of HDR interstitial brachytherapy. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analysis. Acute and late toxicities were evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. The median follow-up period was 52 months. The median patient age was 63 years. The 5-year OS, PFS and LC rates were 78%, 57% and 73%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that histologic type, maximum tumor diameter, and pretreatment hemoglobin level were independent risk factors for PFS. Regarding adverse effects, 24 patients (46%) had acute Grade 3–4 leukopenia and 5 (10%) had late Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicities. No patient experienced renal toxicity. Nedaplatin-based CCRT for FIGO Stage IB2–IVA cervical cancer was efficacious and safe, with no renal toxicity. Histologic type, maximum tumor diameter, and pretreatment hemoglobin level were statistically significant prognostic factors for PFS. PMID:25428244

  4. Phase compensation of MARSIS subsurface sounding data and estimation of ionospheric properties: New insights from SHARAD results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Bruce A.; Watters, Thomas R.

    2016-02-01

    Subsurface radar sounding observations by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) and Shallow Radar (SHARAD) instruments are affected by ionospheric phase distortions that lead to image blurring and delay offsets. Based on experience with SHARAD image correction, we propose that ionospheric blurring in MARSIS radargrams may be compensated with a model of smoothly varying quadratic phase errors along the track. This method yields well-focused radargrams for geologic interpretation and allows analysis of the validity range for models used to derive total electron content (TEC) from phase distortion terms in previous MARSIS studies. The quadratic term appears to be a good proxy for TEC at solar zenith angles >65° for MARSIS Band 4 (5 MHz) and >75° for Band 3 (4 MHz). Comparison of MARSIS- and SHARAD-derived TEC values from 2007 to 2014 reveals correlations in seasonal behavior and in the characterization of ionospheric activity due to coronal mass ejections. We also present SHARAD and MARSIS evidence for a persistent region of anomalous radar scattering south of Arsia Mons. These echoes have been previously suggested to arise from refraction of the radar signal by electron density variations. There are no strong signatures, however, in the quadratic image compensation term correlated with the anomalous scattering, suggesting either that electron density variations responsible for refracted signal paths occur primarily in regions offset from the spacecraft track or that these density changes have a minimal impact on the integrated phase distortion of the subspacecraft footprint. We suggest observations and analyses to better constrain the mechanism and timing of such echoes.

  5. Feed system design and experimental results in the uhf model study for the proposed Urbana phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loane, J. T.; Bowhill, S. A.; Mayes, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of atmospheric turbulence and the basis for the coherent scatter radar techniques are discussed. The reasons are given for upgrading the Radar system to a larger steerable array. Phase array theory pertinent to the system design is reviewed, along with approximations for maximum directive gain and blind angles due to mutual coupling. The methods and construction techniques employed in the UHF model study are explained. The antenna range is described, with a block diagram for the mode of operation used.

  6. Formation of gas-phase peroxides in a rural atmosphere: An interpretation of the recent SOS/SERON field results

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Tang, I.N.; Weinstein-Lloyd, J.B.

    1993-09-01

    Hydrogen perioxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and certain organic peroxides such as hydroxymethyl-hydroperoxide (HMHP), are gas-phase oxidants present in the atmosphere at ppbv concentration levels. These oxidants play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. In addition, precipitation containing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is toxic to trees, and it has also been suggested that organic peroxides formed presumably by ozone reactions with biogenic alkenes are responsible for leaf disorders. Recently, we have developed a nonenzymatic method or aqueous-phase H{sub 2}O{sub 2} measurement, using Fenton reagent and fluorescent hydroxy- benzoic acid. The new method, in conjunction with the well-known method of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and horseradish peroxidase for total peroxides, and together with an improved gas scrubber to mitigate sampling line problems, has been successfully deployed in recent SOS/SERON field measurements in rural Georgia. For the first time, continuously measured and speciated gas-phase peroxide data have become available, making it possible to examine some aspects of the ozone chemistry leading to the formation of these oxidants. It is observed that daily H{sub 2}O{sub 2} maximum frequently occurs at a different time than does HMHP, and that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, but not HMHP, tends to correlate with solar fluxes measured at the same location. These findings seem to indicate that the formation mechanisms for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and organic peroxides are basically different. It is likely that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is formed from radical-radical recombination, while HMHP is formed by ozone-alkene reactions. Since the gas-phase ozone-alkene reactions are usually too slow to account for the diurnal concentration variations observed for HMHP, heterogeneous processes involving ozone and alkenes are also a possibility.

  7. Effect of standard phase differences between gas and liquid and the resulting experimental bias in the analysis of gaseous volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2012-02-10

    Liquid- or gas-phase standards can be used for the analysis of VOCs in air. Once the accuracy is secured in the standard preparation stage, the use of gas-phase standard should be more reliable with the least matrix effect. However, it is not difficult to find that the liquid-phase standard is used more preferably in many laboratories for several reasons (e.g., low expense, easy handling, etc.). As such, one needs to accurately evaluate any possible bias stemming from the use of different standard phases. To this end, standards for 8 VOCs consisting of 4 aromatic compounds (benzene (B), toluene (T), styrene (S) and p-xylene (p-X)) and 4 others (methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), butyl acetate (BuAc), and isobutyl alcohol (i-BuAl)) were prepared in both liquid and gas phases. Each standard was analyzed by the initial collection on the adsorption tube and by the combined application of thermal-desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS). The results indicated that experimental bias between the two phases, if expressed in terms of percent difference (PD), was very low in many target VOCs (B (1.09%), T (2.41%), p-X (3.64%), MEK (6.76%), and MIBK (0.17%)), while it was not in some targets (e.g., >10%: e.g., S, i-BuAl, and BuAc). In an ancillary experiment, biases were evaluated further by (1) calibrating gaseous samples against liquid phase standard and via (2) comparison between two different types of gas phase standards. In conclusion, treatment of different standards (e.g., between the same or different phases) will inevitably induce biases in most VOCs, although certain volatiles (e.g., benzene, MIBK, etc.) are virtually unaffected by such variables in a practical sense. PMID:22244142

  8. New results from the analyses of the solid phase of the NASA Ames Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen T.; Beauchamp, Jesse L.; Salama, Farid

    2015-11-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, a complex chemistry occurs at low temperature between N2 and CH4 that leads to the production of heavy organic molecules and subsequently solid aerosols. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment was developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC facility to study Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma (~200K). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier molecules, in order to monitor the evolution of the chemical growth.Following a recent in situ mass spectrometry study of the gas phase that demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature (Sciamma-O’Brien et al., Icarus, 243, 325 (2014)), we have performed a complementary study of the solid phase. The findings are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. Grains and aggregates form in the gas phase and can be jet deposited onto various substrates for ex situ analyses. Scanning Electron Microscopy images show that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates, and that different growth mechanisms seem to occur depending on the gas mixture. They also allow the determination of the size distribution of the THS solid grains. A Direct Analysis in Real Time mass spectrometry analysis coupled with Collision Induced Dissociation has detected the presence of aminoacetonitrile, a precursor of glycine, in the THS aerosols. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements also show the presence of imine and nitrile functional groups, showing evidence of nitrogen chemistry. Infrared and µIR spectra of samples deposited on KBr and Si substrates show the

  9. Results of Phase 1 postburn drilling and coring, Rocky Mountain 1 Underground Coal Gasification Site, Hanna Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.; Oliver, R.L.

    1990-09-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) test consisted of two different module configurations: the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) and elongated linked well (ELW) configurations. The postburn coring of the RM1 UCG site was designed in two phases to fulfill seven objectives outlined in the Western Research Institute's (WRI) annual project plan for 1988--1989. The seven objectives were to (1) delineate the areal extent of the cavities, (2) identify the extent of roof collapse, (3) obtain samples of all major cavity rock types, (4) characterize outflow channels and cavity stratigraphy, (5) characterize the area near CRIP points and ignition points, (6) further define the structural geology of the site, and (7) identify the vertical positioning of the horizontal process wells within the coal seam. Phase 1 of the coring was completed in the summer of 1989 and served to partially accomplish all seven objectives. In relation to the seven objectives, WRI determined that (1) the ELW cavity extends farther to the west and the CRIP cavity was located 5--10 feet farther to the south than anticipated; (2) roof collapse was contained within unit A in both modules; (3) samples of all major rock types were recovered; (4) insufficient data were obtained to characterize the outflow channels, but cavity stratigraphy was well defined; (5) bore holes near the CRIP points and ignition point did not exhibit characteristics significantly different from other bore holes in the cavities; (6) a fault zone was detected between VIW=1 and VIW-2 that stepped down to the east; and (7) PW-1 was only 7--12 feet below the top of the coal seam in the eastern part of the ELW module area; and CIW-1 was located 18--20 feet below the top of the coal seam in the CRIP module area. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. High-solids black liquor firing in pulp and paper industry kraft recovery boilers: Phase 1 -- Final report. Volume 2: Project technical results

    SciTech Connect

    Southards, W.T.; Clement, J.L.; McIlroy, R.A.; Tharp, M.R.; Verrill, C.L.; Wessell, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    This project is a multiple-phase effort to develop technologies to improve high-solids black liquor firing in pulp mill recovery boilers. The principal means to this end is to construct and operate a pilot-scale recovery furnace simulator (RFS) in which these technologies can be tested. The Phase 1 objectives are to prepare a preliminary design for the RFS, delineate a project concept for evaluating candidate technologies, establish industrial partners, and report the results. Phase 1 addressed the objectives with seven tasks: Develop a preliminary design of the RFS; estimate the detailed design and construction costs of the RFS and the balance of the project; identify interested parties in the paper industry and key suppliers; plan the Phase 2 and Phase 3 tests to characterize the RFS; evaluate the economic justification for high-solids firing deployment in the industry; evaluate high-solids black liquor property data to support the RFS design; manage the project and reporting results, which included planning the future program direction.

  11. First-in-class, first-in-human phase I results of targeted agents: highlights of the 2008 American society of clinical oncology meeting.

    PubMed

    Molckovsky, Andrea; Siu, Lillian L

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes phase I trial results of 11 drugs presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting held in Chicago IL from May 30 to June 3rd 2008: BMS-663513, CT-322, CVX-045, GDC-0449, GRN163L, LY2181308, PF-00562271, RAV12, RTA 402, XL765, and the survivin vaccine. PMID:18959794

  12. 30 CFR 203.40 - Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Which leases are eligible for royalty relief as a result of drilling a deep well or a phase 1 ultra-deep well? 203.40 Section 203.40 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT RELIEF OR REDUCTION IN ROYALTY RATES...

  13. Far infrared spectra of amorphous and crystalline water ice and changes in these phases as the result of proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.

    1992-01-01

    Far infrared spectra from 20 microns (500 cm(sup -1)) to 100 microns (100 cm(sup -1)) of water ice were measured. Amorphous ice deposited at 13 K has one absorption band at 45 microns (220 cm(sup -1)). Amorphous ice evolves into a crystalline form with absorptions at 44 microns (229 cm(sup -1)) and 62 microns (162 cm(sup -1)) as the temperature is increased to 155 K. Spectra documenting this phase change are presented as well as spectra of crystalline ice at temperatures between 13 K and 155 K. Far infrared spectra of amorphous and crystalline water ice before and after proton irradiation are also presented. Changes in these two forms are discussed in relation to ices in comets, grains, and planetary satellites in various radiation environments. Observations of non-terrestrial clathrate hydrates are still lacking despite the fact that clathrates first were suggested to exist in cometary and interstellar ices over forty years ago. Spectroscopy, the most direct method of astronomical detection, has been hampered by the similarity of clathrate hydrate spectra to those of unenclathrated guest molecules and solid H2O. A methanol (CH3OH) clathrate hydrate, using a recently published procedure, was prepared and its far-IR spectrum investigated. The spectrum is quite differenct from that of either unenclathrated CH3OH or solid H2O and so should be of value in astronomical searches for this clathrate.

  14. Deferasirox in patients with iron overload secondary to hereditary hemochromatosis: results of a 1-yr Phase 2 study.

    PubMed

    Cançado, Rodolfo; Melo, Murilo R; de Moraes Bastos, Roberto; Santos, Paulo C J L; Guerra-Shinohara, Elivira M; Chiattone, Carlos; Ballas, Samir K

    2015-12-01

    This open-label, prospective, phase 2 study evaluated the safety and efficacy of deferasirox (10 ± 5 mg/kg/d) in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) and iron overload refractory to or intolerant of phlebotomy. Ten patients were enrolled and all completed the 12-month treatment period. There were significant decreases from baseline to end of study (i.e., 12 months) in median serum ferritin (P < 0.001), mean transferrin saturation (P < 0.05), median liver iron concentration (P < 0.001), and mean alanine aminotransferase (P < 0.05). The median time to achieve serum ferritin reduction ≥50% compared to baseline was 7.53 months. The most common adverse events were mild, transient diarrhea (n = 5) and nausea (n = 2). No patient experienced an increase in serum creatinine that exceeded the upper limit of normal. These data confirm that deferasirox was well tolerated and effective in reducing iron burden in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis and could be a safe alternative to phlebotomy in selected patients. PMID:25684349

  15. Distribution of organic carbon, selected stable elements and artificial radionuclides among dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases in the Rhône River (France): preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Eyrolle, F; Charmasson, S

    2001-01-01

    The behaviour of radionuclides discharged from nuclear facilities in the Rhône River depends on their distribution among the dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases. A large water sample was fractionated using sequential ultrafiltration. Size distributions of organic carbon, Fe, Al, Si, Ca, Mg, Cu, Zn, 137Cs, 60Co and 106Ru were obtained. Our results show that organic colloids account for 11% of the total organic carbon content. Approximately 20% of the dissolved (< 450 nm) Fe and Al are in colloidal classes. 137Cs is not significantly transferred by the colloidal phase while 25% of 60Co or 106Ru is associated with organic and inorganic colloids. PMID:11398374

  16. Neoadjuvant capecitabine, bevacizumab and radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer: results of a single-institute Phase I study

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Yoshitaka; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Hosono, Masako; Nagahara, Hisashi; Hirakawa, Kosei; Shimatani, Yasuhiko; Tsutsumi, Shinichi; Miki, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this Phase I clinical trial was to assess the feasibility and safety of capecitabine-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) combined with bevacizumab and to determine the optimal capecitabine dose for Japanese patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients with cT3/T4 rectal cancer were eligible. Bevacizumab was administered at 5 mg/kg intravenously on Days 1, 15 and 29. Capecitabine was administered on weekdays concurrently with pelvic radiotherapy at a daily dose of 1.8 Gy, totally to 50.4 Gy. Capecitabine was initiated at 825 mg/m2 twice daily at Dose Level 1, with a planned escalation to 900 mg/m2 twice daily at Dose Level 2. Within 6.1–10.3 (median, 9.4) weeks after the completion of the CRT, surgery was performed. Three patients were enrolled at each dose level. Regarding the CRT-related acute toxicities, all of the adverse events were limited to Grade 1. There was no Grade 2 or greater toxicity. No patient needed attenuation or interruption of bevacizumab, capecitabine or radiation. All of the patients received the scheduled dose of CRT. All of the patients underwent R0 resection. Two (33.3%) of the six patients had a pathological complete response, and five (83.3%) patients experienced downstaging. In total, three patients (50%) developed postoperative complications. One patient developed an intrapelvic abscess and healed with incisional drainage. The other two patients healed following conservative treatment. This regimen was safely performed as preoperative CRT for Japanese patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. The recommended capecitabine dose is 900 mg/m2 twice daily. PMID:25129557

  17. Results of a Randomized Phase I Gene Therapy Clinical Trial of Nononcolytic Fowlpox Viruses Encoding T Cell Costimulatory Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Won; Kim-Schulze, Seunghee; DeRaffele, Gail; Jagoda, Michael C.; Broucek, Joseph R.; Zloza, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Oncolytic viruses have shown promise as gene delivery vehicles in the treatment of cancer; however, their efficacy may be inhibited by the induction of anti-viral antibody titers. Fowlpox virus is a nonreplicating and nononcolytic vector that has been associated with lesser humoral but greater cell-mediated immunity in animal tumor models. To test whether fowlpox virus gene therapy is safe and can elicit immune responses in patients with cancer, we conducted a randomized phase I clinical trial of two recombinant fowlpox viruses encoding human B7.1 or a triad of costimulatory molecules (B7.1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3; TRICOM). Twelve patients (10 with melanoma and 2 with colon adenocarcinoma) enrolled in the trial and were randomized to rF-B7.1 or rF-TRICOM administered in a dose escalation manner (∼3.7×107 or ∼3.7×108 plaque-forming units) by intralesional injection every 4 weeks. The therapy was well tolerated, with only four patients experiencing grade 1 fever or injection site pain, and there were no serious adverse events. All patients developed anti-viral antibody titers after vector delivery, and posttreatment anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody titers were detected in the two patients with colon cancer. All patients developed CD8+ T cell responses against fowlpox virus, but few responses against defined tumor-associated antigens were observed. This is the first clinical trial of direct (intratumoral) gene therapy with a nononcolytic fowlpox virus. Treatment was well tolerated in patients with metastatic cancer; all subjects exhibited anti-viral antibody responses, but limited tumor-specific T cell responses were detected. Nononcolytic fowlpox viruses are safe and induce limited T cell responses in patients with cancer. Further development may include prime–boost strategies using oncolytic viruses for initial priming. PMID:24484178

  18. Three-dimensional mixed-wet random pore-scale network modeling of two- and three-phase flow in porous media. II. Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piri, Mohammad; Blunt, Martin J.

    2005-02-01

    We use the model described in Piri and Blunt [Phys. Rev. E 71, 026301 (2005)] to predict two- and three-phase relative permeabilities of Berea sandstone using a random network to represent the pore space. We predict measured relative permeabilities for two-phase flow in a water-wet system. We then successfully predict the steady-state oil, water, and gas three-phase relative permeabilities measured by Oak (Proceedings of the SPE/DOE Seventh Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery, Tulsa, OK, 1990). We also study secondary and tertiary gas injection into media of different wettability and initial oil saturation and interpret the results in terms of pore-scale displacement processes.

  19. Three-dimensional mixed-wet random pore-scale network modeling of two- and three-phase flow in porous media. II. Results.

    PubMed

    Piri, Mohammad; Blunt, Martin J

    2005-02-01

    We use the model described in Piri and Blunt [Phys. Rev. E 71, 026301 (2005)] to predict two- and three-phase relative permeabilities of Berea sandstone using a random network to represent the pore space. We predict measured relative permeabilities for two-phase flow in a water-wet system. We then successfully predict the steady-state oil, water, and gas three-phase relative permeabilities measured by Oak (Proceedings of the SPE/DOE Seventh Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery, Tulsa, OK, 1990). We also study secondary and tertiary gas injection into media of different wettability and initial oil saturation and interpret the results in terms of pore-scale displacement processes. PMID:15783414

  20. Efficacy of pazopanib in progressive, radioiodine-refractory, metastatic differentiated thyroid cancers: results of a phase 2 consortium study

    PubMed Central

    Bible, Keith C; Suman, Vera J; Molina, Julian R; Smallridge, Robert C; Maples, William J; Menefee, Michael E; Rubin, Joseph; Sideras, Kostandinos; Morris, John C; McIver, Bryan; Burton, Jill K; Webster, Kevin P; Bieber, Carolyn; Traynor, Anne M; Flynn, Patrick J; Goh, Boon Cher; Tang, Hui; Ivy, Susan Percy; Erlichman, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Chemotherapy has historically proven ineffective in advanced differentiated thyroid cancers, but the realisation that various tyrosine kinases are activated in the disease suggested a potential therapeutic role for tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. We investigated the safety and efficacy of pazopanib. Methods This phase 2 trial was done from Feb 22, 2008, to Jan 31, 2009, in patients with metastatic, rapidly progressive, radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancers. Each patient received 800 mg continuous pazopanib daily in 4-week cycles until disease progression, drug intolerance, or both occurred. Up to two previous therapies were allowed, and measurable disease with radiographic progression in the 6-month period before enrolment was a requirement for inclusion. The primary endpoint was any tumour response, according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00625846. Findings 39 patients were enrolled. One patient had received no previous radioiodine therapy and another withdrew consent before treatment. Clinical outcomes could, therefore, be assessed in 37 patients (19 [51%] men, median age 63 years). The study is closed to accrual of new patients, but several enrolled patients are still being treated. Patients received a median of 12 cycles (range 1 to >23, total >383). Confirmed partial responses were recorded in 18 patients (response rate 49%, 95% CI 35–68), with likelihood of response lasting longer than 1 year calculated to be 66%. Maximum concentration of pazopanib in plasma during cycle one was significantly correlated with radiographic response (r=−0·40, p=0·021). 16 (43%) patients required dose reductions owing to adverse events, the most frequent of which (any grade) were fatigue (29 patients), skin and hair hypopigmentation (28), diarrhoea (27), and nausea (27). Two patients who died during treatment had pre-existing contributory disorders

  1. Hypofractionated Helical Tomotherapy for Older Aged Patients With Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Results of a Phase I-II Trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Xia; Du, Lei; Yu, Wei; Cai, Bo-Ning; Xu, Shou-Ping; Xie, Chuan-Bin; Ma, Lin

    2016-08-01

    In our center, the feasibility and related acute toxicities of hypofractionated helical tomotherapy have been evaluated in older aged patients with prostate cancer . Between February 2009 and February 2014, 67 patients (older than 65 years) were enrolled in a prospective phase I-II study (registered number, ChiCTR-ONC-13004037). Patients in cohort 1 (n = 33) and cohort 2 (n = 34) received 76 Gy in 34 fractions (2.25 Gy/F) and 71.6 Gy in 28 fractions (2.65 Gy/F), respectively, to the prostate and seminal vesicles, while 25 patients in cohort 2 also received integrated elective lymph node irradiation (50.4 Gy). All patients were treated with helical tomotherapy, and daily image guidance was performed before each treatment. Acute toxicities were assessed with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria. No significant difference was detected between the 2 cohorts in the incidence of acute toxicities. In cohort 1, the incidences of grade 1 and 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 45.5% and 45.4%, respectively, and without grade 3 and 4 toxicities. In cohort 2, the incidences of acute grade 1 and 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 47.1% and 55.9%, respectively, and grade 3 genitourinary toxicity (hematuria) was noted only in 1 patient. No significant difference was detected in the incidence of acute toxicities between the patients receiving integrated elective lymph node irradiation and those receiving irradiation to prostate and seminal vesicle in cohort 2. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed with clinical parameters. Only the baseline weight was found negatively correlated with genitourinary toxicities at a weak level (relative risk = 0.946, 95% confidence interval 0.896-0.998], P = .043). This study shows that 2 hypofractionation regimens (76 Gy/34F and 71.6 Gy/28F) delivered with HT are well tolerated in older aged patients having prostate cancer

  2. A combined Eulerian-Lagrangian two-phase flow analysis of SSME HPOTP nozzle plug trajectories. II - Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, P. K.; Garcia, R.; Dejong, F. J.; Sabnis, J. S.; Pribik, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of Space Shuttle Main Engine high-pressure oxygen turbopump nozzle plug trajectories has been performed, using a Lagrangian method to track nozzle plug particles expelled from a turbine through a high Reynolds number flow in a turnaround duct with turning vanes. Axisymmetric and parametric analyses reveal that if nozzle plugs exited the turbine they would probably impact the LOX heat exchanger with impact velocities which are significantly less than the penetration velocity. The finding that only slight to moderate damage will result from nozzle plug failure in flight is supported by the results of a hot-fire engine test with induced nozzle plug failures.

  3. Modeling of Developing Inhomogeneities in the Ferrite Microstructure and Resulting Mechanical Properties Induced by Deformation in the Two-Phase Region

    SciTech Connect

    Majta, J; Zurek, A.K.; Pietrzyk, M.

    1999-07-13

    The differences in microstructure development of hot deformed steels in the austenite and two-phase region have been effectively described using an integrated computer modeling process. In general, the complete model presented here takes into account kinetics of recrystallization, precipitation, phase transformation, recrystallized austenite grain size, ferrite grain size, and the resulting mechanical properties. The transformation submodel of niobium-microalloyed steels is based on the nucleation and grain growth theory and additivity rule. The thermomechanical part of the modeling process was effectively carried out using the finite element method. Results were obtained in different temperatures, strain rates, and range of deformation. The thermomechanical treatments are different for two grades of niobium-steels to make possible analysis of the resulting structure and properties for different histories of deformation and chemical composition.

  4. Comparison of phase velocities from array measurements of Rayleigh waves associated with microtremor and results calculated from borehole shear-wave velocity profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Hsi-Ping; Boore, David M.; Joyner, William B.; Oppenheimer, David H.; Warrick, Richard E.; Zhang, Wenbo; Hamilton, John C.; Brown, Leo T.

    2000-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities (VS) are widely used for earthquake ground-motion site characterization. VS data are now largely obtained using borehole methods. Drilling holes, however, is expensive. Nonintrusive surface methods are inexpensive for obtaining VS information, but not many comparisons with direct borehole measurements have been published. Because different assumptions are used in data interpretation of each surface method and public safety is involved in site characterization for engineering structures, it is important to validate the surface methods by additional comparisons with borehole measurements. We compare results obtained from a particular surface method (array measurement of surface waves associated with microtremor) with results obtained from borehole methods. Using a 10-element nested-triangular array of 100-m aperture, we measured surface-wave phase velocities at two California sites, Garner Valley near Hemet and Hollister Municipal Airport. The Garner Valley site is located at an ancient lake bed where water-saturated sediment overlies decomposed granite on top of granite bedrock. Our array was deployed at a location where seismic velocities had been determined to a depth of 500 m by borehole methods. At Hollister, where the near-surface sediment consists of clay, sand, and gravel, we determined phase velocities using an array located close to a 60-m deep borehole where downhole velocity logs already exist. Because we want to assess the measurements uncomplicated by uncertainties introduced by the inversion process, we compare our phase-velocity results with the borehole VS depth profile by calculating fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave phase velocities from an earth model constructed from the borehole data. For wavelengths less than ~2 times of the array aperture at Garner Valley, phase-velocity results from array measurements agree with the calculated Rayleigh-wave velocities to better than 11%. Measurement errors become larger for wavelengths 2

  5. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR LAB RESULTS DATA ENTRY AND PREPARATION (D03)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe how lab results are organized and processed into the official database known as the Complete Dataset (CDS); to describe the structure and creation of the Analysis-ready Dataset (ADS); and to describe the structure and process of creating the...

  6. Study for identification of beneficial uses of space, phase 1. Volume 2, book 1: Technical report, introduction, methodology, results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the beneficial uses of space and to identify the products, processes, or services that will be best developed or produced in the unique environment offered by spacecraft. The subjects discussed are: (1) review of study background, (2) specific users and uses, (3) methodology, and (4) basic data generated and significant results.

  7. Water- and Air-Quality Monitoring of Sweetwater Reservoir Watershed, San Diego County, California - Phase One Results Continued, 2001-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, Gregory O.; Foreman, William T.; Morita, Andrew; Majewski, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    In 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Sweetwater Authority, began a study to monitor water, air, and sediment at the Sweetwater and Loveland Reservoirs in San Diego County, California. The study includes regular sampling of water and air at Sweetwater Reservoir for chemical constituents, including volatile organic compounds (VOC), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), pesticides, and major and trace elements. The purpose of this study is to monitor changes in contaminant composition and concentration during the construction and operation of State Route 125. To accomplish this, the study was divided into two phases. Phase One sampling (water years 1998-2004) determined baseline conditions for the detection frequency and the concentrations of target compounds in air and water. Phase Two sampling (starting water year 2005) continues at selected monitoring sites during and after construction of State Route 125 to assess the chemical impact this roadway alignment may have on water quality in the reservoir. Water samples were collected for VOCs and pesticides at Loveland Reservoir during Phase One and will be collected during Phase Two for comparison purposes. Air samples collected to monitor changes in VOCs, PAHs, and pesticides were analyzed by adapting methods used to analyze water samples. Bed-sediment samples have been and will be collected three times during the study; at the beginning of Phase One, at the start of Phase Two, and near the end of the study. In addition to the ongoing data collection, several special studies were initiated to assess the occurrence of specific chemicals of concern, such as trace metals, anthropogenic indicator compounds, and pharmaceuticals. This report describes the study design, and the sampling and analytical methods, and presents data from water and air samples collected during the fourth and fifth years of Phase One of the study (October 2001 to September 2003). Data collected during the first three

  8. Raising the bar for enthusiasm when looking at results of randomized phase II trials-the case of sunitinib in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Massimo; Bironzo, Paolo; Scagliotti, Giorgio Vittorio

    2016-02-01

    With the advent of targeted agents, randomized phase II trials designed with explicit comparative intent, to allow a better interpretation of the results obtained with experimental treatment, have become a common approach for anti-cancer drug development. In the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30504 randomized phase II trial, patients with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), without progression after four to six cycles of standard chemotherapy with cisplatin or carboplatin plus etoposide, were randomized to sunitinib or placebo, until disease progression. Primary endpoint of the study was progression-free survival (PFS), and the results were formally positive [hazard ratio (HR) 0.62; one-sided P=0.02]. However, the prognosis of patients with extensive-stage SCLC is particularly bad, and even a relevant relative benefit (i.e., an encouraging HR) will likely correspond to a debatable absolute benefit: the difference in median PFS between patients treated with sunitinib and patients assigned to control arm was slightly higher than 1.5 months. Is this difference in median PFS big enough to predict a clinically relevant benefit in overall survival? Unfortunately, we do not know. From a "clinical" point of view, is this small absolute improvement in PFS relevant enough to further invest in the strategy? Probably not, also considering the absence of known predictive factors. If the results of the phase II trial had been really promising, the subsequent phase III study should have been promptly conducted, but this was not the case. It seems that, this time, the bar for enthusiasm was already raised in the phase II setting. PMID:26958498

  9. Isotopic evolution of Mauna Kea volcano: Results from the initial phase of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lassiter, J.C.; DePaolo, D.J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of Mauna Kea lavas recovered by the first drilling phase of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project. These lavas, which range in age from ???200 to 400 ka, provide a detailed record of chemical and isotopic changes in basalt composition during the shied/postshield transition and extend our record of Mauna Kea volcanism to a late-shield period roughly equivalent to the last ???100 ka of Mauna Loa activity. Stratigraphic variations in isotopic composition reveal a gradual shift over time toward a more depleted source composition (e.g., higher 143Nd/144Nd, lower 87Sr/86Sr, and lower 3He/4He). This gradual evolution is in sharp contrast with the abrupt appearance of alkalic lavas at ???240 ka recorded by the upper 50 m of Mauna Kea lavas from the core. Intercalated tholeiitic and alkalic lavas from the uppermost Mauna Kea section are isotopically indistinguishable. Combined with major element evidence (e.g., decreasing SiO2 and increasing FeO) that the depth of melt segregation increased during the transition from tholeiitic to alkalic volcanism, the isotopic similarity of tholeiitic and alkalic lavas argues against significant lithosphere involvement during melt generation. Instead, the depleted isotopic signatures found in late shield-stage lavas are best explained by increasing the proportion of melt generated from a depleted upper mantle component entrained and heated by the rising central plume. Direct comparison of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa lavas erupted at equivalent stages in these volcanoes' life cycles reveals persistent chemical and isotopic differences independent of the temporal evolution of each volcano. The oldest lavas recovered from the drillcore are similar to modern Kilauea lavas, but are distinct from Mauna Loa lavas. Mauna Kea lavas have higher 143Nd/144Nd and 206Pb/204Pb and lower 87Sr/86Sr. Higher concentrations of incompatible trace elements in primary magmas, lower SiO2, and higher FeO also

  10. Crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds. Phase 2: Results of duplex-type experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Sixth Irradiation Series is to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest toughness data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288{degrees}C to an average fluence of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). This is the second report giving the results of the tests on irradiated duplex-type crack-arrest specimens. A previous report gave results of tests on irradiated weld-embrittled-type specimens. Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimens irradiated in the same capsules as the crack-arrest specimens were also tested, and a 41-J transition temperature shift was determined from these specimens. {open_quotes}Mean{close_quote} curves of the same form as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) K{sub la} curve were fit to the data with only the {open_quotes}reference temperature{close_quotes} as a parameter. The shift between the mean curves agrees well with the 41-J transition temperature shift obtained from the CVN specimen tests. Moreover, the four data points resulting from tests on the duplex crack-arrest specimens of the present study did not make a significant change to mean curve fits to either the previously obtained data or all the data combined.

  11. Systemic Inhibition of Canonical Notch Signaling Results in Sustained Callus Inflammation and Alters Multiple Phases of Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Dishowitz, Michael I.; Mutyaba, Patricia L.; Takacs, Joel D.; Barr, Andrew M.; Engiles, Julie B.; Ahn, Jaimo; Hankenson, Kurt D.

    2013-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is an important regulator of embryological bone development, and many aspects of development are recapitulated during bone repair. We have previously reported that Notch signaling components are upregulated during bone fracture healing. However, the significance of the Notch pathway in bone regeneration has not been described. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the importance of Notch signaling in regulating bone fracture healing by using a temporally controlled inducible transgenic mouse model (Mx1-Cre;dnMAMLf/-) to impair RBPjκ-mediated canonical Notch signaling. The Mx1 promoter was synthetically activated resulting in temporally regulated systemic dnMAML expression just prior to creation of bilateral tibial fractures. This allowed for mice to undergo unaltered embryological and post-natal skeletal development. Results showed that systemic Notch inhibition prolonged expression of inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil cell inflammation, and reduced the proportion of cartilage formation within the callus at 10 days-post-fracture (dpf) Notch inhibition did not affect early bone formation at 10dpf, but significantly altered bone maturation and remodeling at 20dpf. Increased bone volume fraction in dnMAML fractures, which was due to a moderate decrease in callus size with no change in bone mass, coincided with increased trabecular thickness but decreased connectivity density, indicating that patterning of bone was altered. Notch inhibition decreased total osteogenic cell density, which was comprised of more osteocytes rather than osteoblasts. dnMAML also decreased osteoclast density, suggesting that osteoclast activity may also be important for altered fracture healing. It is likely that systemic Notch inhibition had both direct effects within cell types as well as indirect effects initiated by temporally upstream events in the fracture healing cascade. Surprisingly, Notch inhibition did not alter cell proliferation

  12. Clinical Results of an Automated Artificial Pancreas Using Technosphere Inhaled Insulin to Mimic First-Phase Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Zisser, Howard; Dassau, Eyal; Lee, Justin J.; Harvey, Rebecca A.; Bevier, Wendy; Doyle, Francis J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not adding a fixed preprandial dose of inhaled insulin to a fully automated closed loop artificial pancreas would improve the postprandial glucose control without adding an increased risk of hypoglycemia. Research Design and Methods: Nine subjects with T1DM were recruited for the study. The patients were on closed-loop control for 24 hours starting around 4:30 pm. Mixed meals (~50 g CHO) were given at 6:30 pm and 7:00 am the following day. For the treatment group each meal was preceded by the inhalation of one 10 U dose of Technosphere Insulin (TI). Subcutaneous insulin delivery was controlled by a zone model predictive control algorithm (zone-MPC). At 11:00 am, the patient exercised for 30 ± 5 minutes at 50% of predicted heart rate reserve. Results: The use of TI resulted in increasing the median percentage time in range (70-180 mg/dl, BG) during the 5-hour postprandial period by 21.6% (81.6% and 60% in the with/without TI cases, respectively, P = .06) and reducing the median postprandial glucose peak by 33 mg/dl (172 mg/dl and 205 mg/dl in the with and without TI cases, respectively, P = .004). The median percentage time in range 80-140 mg/dl during the entire study period was 67.5% as compared to percentage time in range without the use of TI of 55.2% (P = .03). Conclusions: Adding preprandial TI (See video supplement) to an automated closed-loop AP system resulted in superior postprandial control as demonstrated by lower postprandial glucose exposure without addition hypoglycemia. PMID:25901023

  13. Phase III Integrated Water Recovery Testing at MSFC - Closed hygiene and potable loop test results and lesson learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holder, Donald W., Jr.; Bagdigian, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    A series of tests has been conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to evaluate the performance of a Space Station Freedom (SSF) pre-development water recovery system. Potable, hygiene, and urine reclamation subsystems were integrated with end-use equipment items and successfully operated for a total of 35 days, including 23 days in closed-loop mode with man-in-the-loop. Although several significant subsystem physical anomalies were encountered, reclaimed potable and hygiene water routinely met current SSF water quality specifications. This paper summarizes the test objectives, system design, test activities/protocols, significant results/anomalies, and major lessons learned.

  14. Results of research to develop cost effective biomonitoring at oil shale lease tracts. Phase I. Fall sampling report

    SciTech Connect

    Skalski, J.R.; Fitzner, R.E.; Gano, K.A.

    1982-05-01

    This report presents the results of censuses conducted during October 1981 to estimate the fall abundance of small mammals and avifauna on replicate plots in the vicinity of Federal Tract C-a (Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company). The objectives of the fall censuses were to evaluate alternative census techniques, test assumptions vital to the use of indices and abundance estimators, determine cost-functions associated with monitoring efforts, and estimate variance components needed to devise optimal monitoring designs. Analyses of the fall census data on small mammal abundance were performed.

  15. Meteosat Second Generation: the MSG-1 imaging radiometer performance results at the end of the commissioning phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminou, Donny M. A.; Ottenbacher, Andreas; Hanson, Christopher G.; Pili, Paolo; Muller, Johannes; Blancke, Bernard; Jacquet, Bernard; Bianchi, Stephane; Coste, Pierre; Pasternak, Frederick; Faure, Francois

    2003-11-01

    Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) is a series of 3 (possibly 4) geostationary satellites developed and procured by the European Space Agency (ESA) on behalf of the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT). The first satellite (MSG-1) was launched on 29th August, 2002 by an Ariane 5 rocket. After the LEOP and the drift to the commissioning longitude, the satellite was positioned above the Atlantic Ocean at 10.5° W (longitude) with a 1.9° orbital inclination. The prime contractor of MSG satellite series is Alcatel Space Industries (France; the Imaging Radiometer SEVIRI is procured under the responsibility of Astrium SAS, France). The MSG-1 satellite commissioning is performed by EUMETSAT with the support of ESA and industry. MSG-1 commissioning started on 25th September 2002. This paper addresses the results of the SEVIRI functionality tests performed as part of the MSG-1 commissioning and describes the radiometric and imaging performances of the main optical payload SEVIRI, including the image quality after its rectification and calibration. The performance results presented here are based on an offline analysis of a limited subset of the large amount of SEVIRI data obtained during the MSG-1 commissioning tests.

  16. Experimental results for a photonic time reversal processor for the adaptive control of an ultra wideband phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmuda, Henry; Fanto, Michael; McEwen, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a new concept for a photonic implementation of a time reversed RF antenna array beamforming system. The process does not require analog to digital conversion to implement and is therefore particularly suited for high bandwidth applications. Significantly, propagation distortion due to atmospheric effects, clutter, etc. is automatically accounted for with the time reversal process. The approach utilizes the reflection of an initial interrogation signal from off an extended target to precisely time match the radiating elements of the array so as to re-radiate signals precisely back to the target's location. The backscattered signal(s) from the desired location is captured by each antenna and used to modulate a pulsed laser. An electrooptic switch acts as a time gate to eliminate any unwanted signals such as those reflected from other targets whose range is different from that of the desired location resulting in a spatial null at that location. A chromatic dispersion processor is used to extract the exact array parameters of the received signal location. Hence, other than an approximate knowledge of the steering direction needed only to approximately establish the time gating, no knowledge of the target position is required, and hence no knowledge of the array element time delay is required. Target motion and/or array element jitter is automatically accounted for. Presented here are experimental results that demonstrate the ability of a photonic processor to perform the time-reversal operation on ultra-short electronic pulses.

  17. Group IVA Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Regulates the G2-to-M Transition by Modulating the Activity of Tumor Suppressor SIRT2

    PubMed Central

    Movahedi Naini, Said; Sheridan, Alice M.; Force, Thomas; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2015-01-01

    The G2-to-M transition (or prophase) checkpoint of the cell cycle is a critical regulator of mitotic entry. SIRT2, a tumor suppressor gene, contributes to the control of this checkpoint by blocking mitotic entry under cellular stress. However, the mechanism underlying both SIRT2 activation and regulation of the G2-to-M transition remains largely unknown. Here, we report the formation of a multiprotein complex at the G2-to-M transition in vitro and in vivo. Group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α) acts as a bridge in this complex to promote binding of SIRT2 to cyclin A-Cdk2. Cyclin A-Cdk2 then phosphorylates SIRT2 at Ser331. This phosphorylation reduces SIRT2 catalytic activity and its binding affinity to centrosomes and mitotic spindles, promoting G2-to-M transition. We show that the inhibitory effect of cPLA2α on SIRT2 activity impacts various cellular processes, including cellular levels of histone H4 acetylated at K16 (Ac-H4K16) and Ac-α-tubulin. This regulatory effect of cPLA2α on SIRT2 defines a novel function of cPLA2α independent of its phospholipase activity and may have implications for the impact of SIRT2-related effects on tumorigenesis and age-related diseases. PMID:26303530

  18. Identification of the emerging skin pathogen Corynebacterium amycolatum using PCR-amplification of the essential divIVA gene as a target.

    PubMed

    Letek, M; Ordóñez, E; Fernández-Natal, I; Gil, J A; Mateos, L M

    2006-12-01

    The actinomycete Corynebacterium amycolatum is a saprophytic bacterium usually associated with the human skin, but it is at present considered an emergent pathogen as it is isolated from nosocomial settings from samples of immunosuppressed patients. The conventional method to distinguish C. amycolatum from closely related species is mainly based on phenotypic or chemotaxonomic studies. We developed a molecular method to identify rapidly C. amycolatum based on the use of different primers for amplification of the cell division divIVA gene using conventional or real-time PCR. This technique was used for the first time to distinguish C. amycolatum from the closely related Corynebacterium striatum, Corynebacterium minutissimum and Corynebacterium xerosis, without the requirement of further molecular analysis. The suitability of the identification method was tested on 51 clinical isolates belonging to the nonlipophilic fermentative group of corynebacteria (cluster C. striatum/C. amycolatum), which were accurately characterized by sequencing a 0.8 kb fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. PMID:17147766

  19. Formal design and verification of a reliable computing platform for real-time control. Phase 1: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divito, Ben L.; Butler, Ricky W.; Caldwell, James L.

    1990-01-01

    A high-level design is presented for a reliable computing platform for real-time control applications. Design tradeoffs and analyses related to the development of the fault-tolerant computing platform are discussed. The architecture is formalized and shown to satisfy a key correctness property. The reliable computing platform uses replicated processors and majority voting to achieve fault tolerance. Under the assumption of a majority of processors working in each frame, it is shown that the replicated system computes the same results as a single processor system not subject to failures. Sufficient conditions are obtained to establish that the replicated system recovers from transient faults within a bounded amount of time. Three different voting schemes are examined and proved to satisfy the bounded recovery time conditions.

  20. Phase III integrated water recovery testing at MSFC - Partially closed hygiene loop and open potable loop results and lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, R. M.; Traweek, M. S.; Griffith, G. K.; Griffin, M. R.

    1991-01-01

    A series of tests has been conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to evaluate the performance of a predevelopment water recovery system. Potable, hygiene, and urine reclamation subsystems were integrated with end-use equipment items and successfully operated in open and partially closed-loop modes, with man-in-the-loop, for a total of 28 days. Several significant subsystem physical anomalies were encountered during testing. Reclaimed potable and hygiene water generally met the current Space Station Freedom (SSF) water quality specifications for inorganic and microbiological constituents, but exceeded the maximum allowable concentrations for Total Organic Carbon (TOC). This paper summarizes the test objectives, system design, test activities/protocols, significant results/anomalies, and major lessons learned.

  1. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy for nondisseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-wook . E-mail: lsw@amc.seoul.kr; Back, Geum Mun; Yi, Byong Yong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Shin, Seong Soo; Kim, Jung-hun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Bong-Jae; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seung-Bae; Park, Jin-hong; Lee, Kang Kyoo; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To present preliminary results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients who underwent IMRT for nondisseminated NPC at the Asan Medical Center between September 2001 and December 2003 were prospectively evaluated. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was delivered with the 'step and shoot' SMART technique at prescribed doses of 72 Gy (2.4 Gy/day) to the gross tumor volume, 60 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinical target volume and metastatic nodal station, and 46 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinically negative neck region. Eighteen patients also received cisplatin once per week. Results: The median follow-up period was 27 months. Nineteen patients completed the treatment without interruption; the remaining patient interrupted treatment for 2 weeks owing to severe pharyngitis and malnutrition. Five patients (25%) had Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 mucositis, whereas 9 (45%) had Grade 3 pharyngitis. Seven patients (35%) lost more than 10% of their pretreatment weight, whereas 11 (55%) required intravenous fluids and/or tube feeding. There was no Grade 3 or 4 xerostomia. All patients showed complete response. Two patients had distant metastases and locoregional recurrence, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with the SMART boost technique allows parotid sparing, as shown clinically and by dosimetry, and might also be more effective biologically. A larger population of patients and a longer follow-up period are needed to evaluate ultimate tumor control and late toxicity.

  2. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project, UAS Control and Non-Payload Communication System Phase-1 Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James H.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's UAS Integration in the NAS project, has partnered with Rockwell Collins to develop a concept Control and Non-Payload Communication (CNPC) system prototype radio, operating on recently allocated UAS frequency spectrum bands. This prototype radio is being used to validate initial proposed performance requirements for UAS control communications. This presentation will give an overview of the current status of the prototype radio development, and results from phase 1 flight tests conducted during 2013.

  3. Results of gas-fired flash-smelting tests. Phase 1-3. Topical technical report, November 1987-April 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Pusateri, J.F.

    1990-06-01

    A natural gas-fired burner for the HRD FLAME REACTOR Process was designed and successfully tested on over 450 tons of Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) dust, and over a wide range of operating conditions. The coal/coke-fired FLAME REACTOR Process has already been demonstrated as an efficient and economic means of recovering zinc from EAF dust as a salable oxide product, and a salable nonhazardous, iron-rich slag product. The results of the work indicate that the natural gas-fired process has a higher zinc capacity for a given reactor size, with zinc recoveries 5-10 percentage points higher than coal/coke processing at high throughputs. Gas-fired capital costs are about 15% less than coal for a 20,000 STPY EAF dust plant. Smaller plants show even higher break-even costs. Net processing costs are about $100/ton of EAF dust, which is extremely competitive with land-filling and other recycling options.

  4. Auto-adjusting positive airway pressure in children with sickle cell anemia: results of a phase I randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Melanie J; Bucks, Romola S; Hogan, Alexandra M; Hambleton, Ian R; Height, Susan E; Dick, Moira C; Kirkham, Fenella J; Rees, David C

    2009-07-01

    Low nocturnal oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) is implicated in complications of Sickle Cell Anemia (SCA). Twenty-four children with SCA were randomized to receive overnight auto-adjusting continuous positive airway pressure (auto-CPAP) with supplemental oxygen, if required, to maintain SpO(2) >or=94% or as controls. We assessed adherence, safety, sleep parameters, cognition and pain. Twelve participants randomized to auto-CPAP (3 with oxygen) showed improvement in Apnea/Hypopnea Index (p<0.001), average desaturation events >3%/hour (p=0.02), mean nocturnal SpO(2) (p=0.02) and cognition. Primary efficacy endpoint (Processing Speed Index) showed no group differences (p=0.67), but a second measure of processing speed and attention (Cancellation) improved in those receiving treatment (p=0.01). No bone marrow suppression, rebound pain or serious adverse event resulting from auto-CPAP use was observed. Six weeks of auto-CPAP therapy is feasible and safe in children with SCA, significantly improving sleep-related breathing disorders and at least one aspect of cognition. PMID:19570752

  5. Cliffs Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 6 series: Gallia County. Phase II report. Preliminary laboratory results

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    The US Department of Energy is funding a research and development program entitled the Eastern Gas Shales Project designed to increase commercial production of natural gas in the eastern United States from Middle and Upper Devonian Shales. On September 28, 1978 the Department of Energy entered into a cooperative agreement with Mitchell Energy Corporation to explore Devonian shale gas potential in Gallia County, Ohio. Objectives of the cost-sharing contract were the following: (1) to select locations for a series of five wells to be drilled around the periphery of a possible gas reservoir in Gallia County, Ohio; (2) to drill, core, log, case, fracture, clean up, and test each well, and to monitor production from the wells for a five-year period. This report summarizes the procedures and results of core characterization work performed at the Eastern Gas Shales Project Core Laboratory on core retrieved from the Gallia County EGSP wells, designated OH No. 6/1, OH No. 6/2, OH No. 6/3, OH No. 6/4, and OH No. 6/5. Characterization work performed includes photographic logs, fracture logs, measurements of core color variation, and stratigraphic interpretation of the cored intervals. In addition the following tests were performed by Michigan Technological University to obtain the following data: directional ultrasonic velocity; directional tensile strength, strength in point load; trends of microfractures; and hydraulic fracturing characteristics.

  6. Wind estimates from cloud motions: Preliminary results from phases 1, 2, and 3 of an in situ aircraft verification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Shenk, W. E.; Skillman, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Low level aircraft equipped with Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) were used to define the vertical extent and horizontal motion of a cloud and to measure the ambient wind field. A high level aircraft, also equipped with an INS, took photographs to describe the horizontal extent of the cloud field and to measure cloud motion. The aerial photographs were also used to make a positive identification in a satellite picture of the cloud observed by the low level aircraft. The experiment was conducted over the tropical oceans in the vicinity of Florida, Puerto Rico, Panama and in the Western Gulf of Mexico. Results for tropical cumulus clouds indicate excellent agreement between the cloud motion and the wind at the cloud base. The magnitude of the vector difference between the cloud motion and the cloud base wind is less than 1.3 m/sec for 67% of the cases with track lengths of 1 hour or longer. The cirrus cloud motions agreed best with the mean wind in the cloud layer with a vector difference of about 1.6 m/sec.

  7. Preliminary evaluation of the second hot dry rock geothermal energy reservoir: results of phase 1, run segment 4

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, H.D.; Aamodt, R.L.; Albright, J.N.

    1980-05-01

    Results of the preliminary assessment of the second hot dry rock reservoir at the Fenton Hill field site are presented. This second reservoir was created by fracturing a deeper interval of granite rock located at a depth of 2.93 km (9620 ft) in the same wellbore pair used in the creation of the first reservoir; no additional redrilling was required. The new fracture system has a vertical extent of at least 320 m (1050 ft), suggesting that the combined heat-transfer area of the old and new fracture systems is 11 times that of the old system. The virgin rock temperature at the bottom of the deeper interval was 197/sup 0/C (386/sup 0/F). Water at a flow rate of 6 l/s (100 gpm) was circulated through the reservoir for a period of 23 days. Downhole measurements of the water temperature at the reservoir outlet, as well as temperatures inferred from geothermometry, showed that the thermal drawdown of the reservoir was negligible and preliminary estimates indicate that the minimum effective heat-transfer area of the new reservoir is 45,000 m/sup 2/ (480,000 ft/sup 2/), which is six times larger than the first reservoir. The following are presented: operational plan, reservoir geometry and flow paths, flow impedance, geochemistry, heat extraction, dye tracer flow distribution studies, and seismicity. (MHR)

  8. Outcome of alloanergized haploidentical bone marrow transplantation after ex vivo costimulatory blockade: results of 2 phase 1 studies

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jeff K.; Gribben, John G.; Brennan, Lisa L.; Yuk, Dongin; Nadler, Lee M.

    2008-01-01

    We report the outcomes of 24 patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies or bone marrow failure (BMF) who received haploidentical bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after ex vivo induction of alloantigen-specific anergy in donor T cells by allostimulation in the presence of costimulatory blockade. Ninety-five percent of evaluable patients engrafted and achieved full donor chimerism. Despite receiving a median T-cell dose of 29 ×106/kg, only 5 of 21 evaluable patients developed grade C (n = 4) or D (n = 1) acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), with only one attributable death. Twelve patients died from treatment-related mortality (TRM). Patients reconstituted T-cell subsets and immunoglobulin levels rapidly with evidence of in vivo expansion of pathogen-specific T cells in the early posttransplantation period. Five patients reactivated cytomegalovirus (CMV), only one of whom required extended antiviral treatment. No deaths were attributable to CMV or other viral infections. Only 1 of 12 evaluable patients developed chronic GVHD. Eight patients survive disease-free with normal performance scores (median follow-up, 7 years). Thus, despite significant early TRM, ex vivo alloanergization can support administration of large numbers of haploidentical donor T cells, resulting in rapid immune reconstitution with very few viral infections. Surviving patients have excellent performance status and a low rate of chronic GVHD. PMID:18617635

  9. Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate for Adults with Moderate to Severe Binge Eating Disorder: Results of Two Pivotal Phase 3 Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Susan L; Hudson, James; Ferreira-Cornwell, M Celeste; Radewonuk, Jana; Whitaker, Timothy; Gasior, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) vs placebo in binge eating disorder (BED) was evaluated in two multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Adults (study 1, n=383; study 2, n=390) meeting DSM-IV-TR BED criteria were randomized (1:1) to placebo or LDX (50 or 70 mg/day) dose titration; optimized doses were maintained to the end of double-blind treatment (week 12/early termination). Change from baseline in binge eating days/week at weeks 11−12 (primary efficacy endpoint) was assessed with mixed-effects models for repeated measures. Secondary endpoints related to binge eating and medical parameters, safety, and treatment compliance were also assessed. Least squares mean (95% CI) treatment differences for change from baseline binge eating days/week at weeks 11–12 significantly favored LDX (study 1: –1.35 [–1.70, –1.01] study 2: –1.66 [–2.04, –1.28] both P<0.001). In both studies, treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) reported by ⩾10% of LDX participants were dry mouth, insomnia, and headache. Serious TEAEs occurred in two (1.1%) placebo participants in each study and in three (1.6%) and one (0.6%) LDX participants in study 1 and study 2, respectively. Across studies, mean increases from baseline at week 12/early termination with LDX for pulse and systolic and diastolic blood pressure ranged from 4.41–6.31 b.p.m. and 0.2–1.45 and 1.06–1.83 mm Hg, respectively. LDX (50 and 70 mg/day) was superior to placebo in decreasing binge eating days/week from baseline and improving binge eating–related key secondary endpoints. Safety results appear consistent with the known safety profile of LDX. PMID:26346638

  10. Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate for Adults with Moderate to Severe Binge Eating Disorder: Results of Two Pivotal Phase 3 Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Susan L; Hudson, James; Ferreira-Cornwell, M Celeste; Radewonuk, Jana; Whitaker, Timothy; Gasior, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) vs placebo in binge eating disorder (BED) was evaluated in two multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Adults (study 1, n=383; study 2, n=390) meeting DSM-IV-TR BED criteria were randomized (1:1) to placebo or LDX (50 or 70 mg/day) dose titration; optimized doses were maintained to the end of double-blind treatment (week 12/early termination). Change from baseline in binge eating days/week at weeks 11-12 (primary efficacy endpoint) was assessed with mixed-effects models for repeated measures. Secondary endpoints related to binge eating and medical parameters, safety, and treatment compliance were also assessed. Least squares mean (95% CI) treatment differences for change from baseline binge eating days/week at weeks 11-12 significantly favored LDX (study 1: -1.35 [-1.70, -1.01]; study 2: -1.66 [-2.04, -1.28]; both P<0.001). In both studies, treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) reported by ⩾10% of LDX participants were dry mouth, insomnia, and headache. Serious TEAEs occurred in two (1.1%) placebo participants in each study and in three (1.6%) and one (0.6%) LDX participants in study 1 and study 2, respectively. Across studies, mean increases from baseline at week 12/early termination with LDX for pulse and systolic and diastolic blood pressure ranged from 4.41-6.31 b.p.m. and 0.2-1.45 and 1.06-1.83 mm Hg, respectively. LDX (50 and 70 mg/day) was superior to placebo in decreasing binge eating days/week from baseline and improving binge eating-related key secondary endpoints. Safety results appear consistent with the known safety profile of LDX. PMID:26346638

  11. Androgen suppression adjuvant to definitive radiotherapy in prostate carcinoma-long-term results of phase III RTOG 85-31

    SciTech Connect

    Pilepich, Miljenko V. . E-mail: mpilepich@mednet.ucla.edu; Winter, Kathryn; Lawton, Colleen A.; Krisch, Robert E.; Wolkov, Harvey B.; Movsas, Benjamin; Hug, Eugen B.; Asbell, Sucha O.; Grignon, David

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 85-31 was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of adjuvant androgen suppression, using goserelin, in unfavorable prognosis carcinoma of the prostate treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were those with palpable primary tumor extending beyond the prostate (clinical Stage T3) or those with regional lymphatic involvement. Patients who had undergone prostatectomy were eligible if penetration through the prostatic capsule to the margin of resection and/or seminal vesicle involvement was documented histologically. Stratification was based on histologic differentiation, nodal status, acid phosphatase status, and prior prostatectomy. The patients were randomized to either RT and adjuvant goserelin (Arm I) or RT alone followed by observation and application of goserelin at relapse (Arm II). In Arm I, the drug was to be started during the last week of RT and was to be continued indefinitely or until signs of progression. Results: Between 1987 and 1992, when the study was closed, 977 patients were entered: 488 to Arm I and 489 to Arm II. As of July 2003, the median follow-up for all patients was 7.6 years and for living patients was 11 years. At 10 years, the absolute survival rate was significantly greater for the adjuvant arm than for the control arm: 49% vs. 39%, respectively (p = 0.002). The 10-year local failure rate for the adjuvant arm was 23% vs. 38% for the control arm (p <0.0001). The corresponding 10-year rates for the incidence of distant metastases and disease-specific mortality was 24% vs. 39% (p <0.001) and 16% vs. 22% (p = 0.0052), respectively, both in favor of the adjuvant arm. Conclusion: In a population of patients with unfavorable prognosis carcinoma of the prostate, androgen suppression applied as an adjuvant after definitive RT was associated not only with a reduction in disease progression but in a statistically significant improvement in absolute

  12. Accelerated versus conventional fractionated postoperative radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer: Results of a multicenter Phase III study

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe . E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Richetti, Antonella; Bignardi, Mario; Corvo, Renzo; Gabriele, Pietro; Sormani, Maria Pia; Antognoni, Paolo

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether, in the postoperative setting, accelerated fractionation (AF) radiotherapy (RT) yields a superior locoregional control rate compared with conventional fractionation (CF) RT in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx. Methods and materials: Patients from four institutions with one or more high-risk features (pT4, positive resection margins, pN >1, perineural/lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular extension, subglottic extension) after surgery were randomly assigned to either RT with one daily session of 2 Gy up to 60 Gy in 6 weeks or AF. Accelerated fractionation consisted of a 'biphasic concomitant boost' schedule, with the boost delivered during the first and last weeks of treatment, to deliver 64 Gy in 5 weeks. Informed consent was obtained. The primary endpoint of the study was locoregional control. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Results: From March 1994 to August 2000, 226 patients were randomized. At a median follow-up of 30.6 months (range, 0-110 months), 2-year locoregional control estimates were 80% {+-} 4% for CF and 78% {+-} 5% for AF (p = 0.52), and 2-year overall survival estimates were 67% {+-} 5% for CF and 64% {+-} 5% for AF (p = 0.84). The lack of difference in outcome between the two treatment arms was confirmed by multivariate analysis. However, interaction analysis with median values as cut-offs showed a trend for improved locoregional control for those patients who had a delay in starting RT and who were treated with AF compared with those with a similar delay but who were treated with CF (hazard ratio = 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.1). Fifty percent of patients treated with AF developed confluent mucositis, compared with only 27% of those treated with CF (p = 0.006). However, mucositis duration was not different between arms. Although preliminary, actuarial Grade 3+ late toxicity estimates at 2 years were 18% {+-} 4% and 27% {+-} 6% for CF

  13. Intra-Erythrocyte Infusion of Dexamethasone Reduces Neurological Symptoms in Ataxia Teleangiectasia Patients: Results of a Phase 2 Trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ataxia Teleangiectasia [AT] is a rare neurodegenerative disease characterized by early onset ataxia, oculocutaneous teleangiectasias, immunodeficiency, recurrent infections, radiosensitivity and proneness to cancer. No therapies are available for this devastating disease. Recent observational studies in few patients showed beneficial effects of short term treatment with betamethasone. To avoid the characteristic side effects of long-term administration of steroids we developed a method for encapsulation of dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) into autologous erythrocytes (EryDex) allowing slow release of dexamethasone for up to one month after dosing. Aims of the study were: the assessment of the effect of EryDex in improving neurological symptoms and adaptive behaviour of AT patients; the safety and tolerability of the therapy. Methods Twenty two patients (F:M = 1; mean age 11.2 ± 3.5) with a confirmed diagnosis of AT and a preserved or partially supported gait were enrolled for the study. The subjects underwent for six months a monthly infusion of EryDex. Ataxia was assessed by the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) and the adaptive behavior by Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS). Clinical evaluations were performed at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months. Results An improvement in ICARS (reduction of the score) was detected in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population (n = 22; p = 0.02) as well as in patients completing the study (per protocol PP) (n = 18; p = 0.01), with a mean reduction of 4 points (ITT) or 5.2 points (PP). When compared to baseline, a significant improvement were also found in VABS (increase of the score) (p < 0.0001, ITT, RMANOVA), with statistically significant increases at 3 and 6 months (p < 0.0001). A large inter-patient variability in the incorporation of DSP into erythrocytes was observed, with an evident positive effect of higher infusion dose on ICARS score decline

  14. Layered Na‐Ion Cathodes with Outstanding Performance Resulting from the Synergetic Effect of Mixed P‐ and O‐Type Phases

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Marlou

    2015-01-01

    Herein, the synthesis of new quaternary layered Na‐based oxides of the type NaxMnyNizFe0.1Mg0.1O2 (0.67≤ x ≤ 1.0; 0.5≤ y ≤ 0.7; 0.1≤ z ≤ 0.3) is described. The synthesis can be tuned to obtain P2‐ and O3‐type as well as mixed P‐/O‐type phases as demonstrated by structural, morphological, and electrochemical properties characterization. Although all materials show good electrochemical performance, the simultaneous presence of the P‐ and O‐type phases is found to have a synergetic effect resulting in outstanding performance of the mixed phase material as a sodium‐ion cathode. The mixed P3/P2/O3‐type material, having an average elemental composition of Na0.76Mn0.5Ni0.3Fe0.1Mg0.1O2, overcomes the specific drawbacks associated with the P2‐ and O3‐type materials, allowing the outstanding electrochemical performance. In detail, the mixed phase material is able to deliver specific discharge capacities of up to 155 mAh g−1 (18 mA g−1) in the potential range of 2.0–4.3 V. In the narrower potential range of 2.5–4.3 V the material exhibits high average discharge potential (3.4 V versus Na/Na+), exceptional average coulombic efficiencies (>99.9%), and extraordinary capacity retention (90.2% after 601 cycles). The unexplored class of P‐/O‐type mixed phases introduces new perspectives for the development of layered positive electrode materials and powerful Na‐ion batteries. PMID:27134617

  15. Water- and Air-Quality Monitoring of the Sweetwater Reservoir Watershed, San Diego County, California-Phase One Results, Continued, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, Gregory O.; Foreman, William T.; Sidhu, Jagdeep S.; Majewski, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    In 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Sweetwater Authority, began a study to assess the overall health of the Sweetwater watershed with respect to chemical contamination. The study included regular sampling of air and water at Sweetwater Reservoir for chemical contaminants, including volatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, and major and trace elements. Background water samples were collected at Loveland Reservoir for volatile organic compounds and pesticides. The purpose of this study was to monitor changes in contaminant composition and concentration in the air and water resulting from the construction and operation of State Route 125 near Sweetwater Reservoir. To accomplish this, the study was divided into two phases. Phase One sampling was designed to establish baseline conditions for target compounds in terms of detection frequency and concentration in air and water. Phase Two sampling is planned to continue at the established monitoring sites during and after construction of State Route 125 to assess the chemical impact this roadway alignment project may have on the water quality in the reservoir. In addition to the ongoing data collection, several special studies were initiated to assess the occurrence of specific chemicals of concern, such as low-use pesticides, trace metals, and wastewater compounds. This report describes the study design, and the sampling and analytical methods, and presents the results for the second and third years of the study (October 1999 to September 2001). Data collected during the first year of sampling (October 1998 to September 1999) were published in 2002.

  16. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevâg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Åyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The ability of 11 models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model intercomparison initiative (AeroCom II), is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded data set of aerosol extinction profiles built for this purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 subcontinental regions show that five models improved, whereas three degraded in reproducing the interregional variability in Zα0-6 km, the mean extinction height diagnostic, as computed from the CALIOP aerosol profiles over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models' performance remains highly variable, the simulation of the timing of the Zα0-6 km peak season has also improved for all but two models from AeroCom Phase I to Phase II. The biases in Zα0-6 km are smaller in all regions except Central Atlantic, East Asia, and North and South Africa. Most of the models now underestimate Zα0-6 km over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the performance and evolution of the individual models and for the intermodel diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties contributing to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  17. Nilotinib as frontline therapy for patients with newly diagnosed Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase: results from the Japanese subgroup of ENESTnd.

    PubMed

    Nakamae, Hirohisa; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Kurokawa, Mineo; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Nagai, Tadashi; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Akira; Amagasaki, Taro; Yanada, Masamitsu

    2011-05-01

    Recent results from the phase 3 ENESTnd (Evaluating Nilotinib Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Trials-Newly Diagnosed Patients) study have demonstrated superiority of nilotinib over imatinib for the treatment of newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase (CML-CP). Here, we report results from the Japanese subset of patients in ENESTnd, and assess whether results in this subpopulation are consistent with the overall study population. Seventy-nine Japanese patients with CML-CP were randomized to receive nilotinib 300 mg twice daily (BID) (n = 30), nilotinib 400 mg BID (n = 24) or imatinib 400 mg once daily (QD) (n = 25). Major molecular response r