Science.gov

Sample records for resuscitation induced lung

  1. Pharmacologic Resuscitation Decreases Circulating CINC-1 Levels and Attenuates hemorrhage-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fukudome, Eugene Y.; Li, Yongqing; Kochanek, Ashley R.; Lu, Jennifer; Smith, Eleanor J.; Liu, Baoling; Kim, Kyuseok; Velmahos, George C.; deMoya, Marc A.; Alam, Hasan B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a complication of hemorrhagic shock (HS). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI) such as valproic acid (VPA) can improve survival following HS, however, their effects on late organ injury are unknown. Here, we have investigated the effects of HS and VPA treatment on ALI as well as circulating cytokines that may serve as biomarkers for the development of organ injury. Materials and Methods Anesthetized Wistar-Kyoto rats (250-300g) underwent 40% blood volume hemorrhage over 10 minutes followed by 30 minutes of un-resuscitated shock and were treated with 1) VPA 300mg/kg or 2) vehicle control. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, following shock, and prior to sacrifice (1h, 4h, and 20h; n=3-4/timepoint/group). Serum samples were screened for possible biomarkers using a multiplex electrochemiluminescence detection assay, and results were confirmed using ELISA. Additionally, lung tissue lysate was examined for chemokine and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels as a marker for neutrophil infiltration and ALI. Additionally, lung CINC-1 (a chemokine belonging to the IL-8 family that promotes neutrophil chemotaxis) mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR. Results Serum screening revealed that hemorrhage rapidly altered levels of circulating CINC-1. ELISA confirmed that CINC-1 protein was significantly elevated in the serum as early as 4h, and in the lung at 20h following hemorrhage, without any significant changes in the CINC-1 mRNA expression. Lung MPO levels were also elevated 4h and 20h after hemorrhage. VPA treatment attenuated these changes Conclusions Hemorrhage resulted in development of ALI, which was prevented with VPA treatment. Circulating CINC-1 levels rose rapidly after hemorrhage, and serum CINC-1 levels correlated with lung CINC-1 and MPO levels. This suggests that circulating CINC-1 could be used as an early marker for the subsequent development of organ inflammation and injury. PMID:22657731

  2. Sodium hydrosulfide alleviates lung inflammation and cell apoptosis following resuscitated hemorrhagic shock in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dun-quan; Gao, Cao; Niu, Wen; Li, Yan; Wang, Yan-xia; Gao, Chang-jun; Ding, Qian; Yao, Li-nong; Chai, Wei; Li, Zhi-chao

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) against inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in a rat model of resuscitated hemorrhagic shock. Methods: Hemorrhagic shock was induced in adult male SD rats by drawing blood from the femoral artery for 10 min. The mean arterial pressure was maintained at 35–40 mmHg for 1.5 h. After resuscitation the animals were observed for 200 min, and then killed. The lungs were harvested and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was prepared. The levels of relevant proteins were examined using Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses. NaHS (28 μmol/kg, ip) was injected before the resuscitation. Results: Resuscitated hemorrhagic shock induced lung inflammatory responses and significantly increased the levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and HMGB1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, resuscitated hemorrhagic shock caused marked oxidative stress in lung tissue as shown by significant increases in the production of reactive oxygen species H2O2 and ·OH, the translocation of Nrf2, an important regulator of antioxidant expression, into nucleus, and the decrease of thioredoxin 1 expression. Moreover, resuscitated hemorrhagic shock markedly increased the expression of death receptor Fas and Fas-ligand and the number apoptotic cells in lung tissue, as well as the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins FADD, active-caspase 3, active-caspase 8, Bax, and decreased the expression of Bcl-2. Injection with NaHS significantly attenuated these pathophysiological abnormalities induced by the resuscitated hemorrhagic shock. Conclusion: NaHS administration protects rat lungs against inflammatory responses induced by resuscitated hemorrhagic shock via suppressing oxidative stress and the Fas/FasL apoptotic signaling pathway. PMID:24122010

  3. Development of a fluid resuscitation protocol using inferior vena cava and lung ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher W C; Kory, Pierre D; Arntfield, Robert T

    2016-02-01

    Appropriate fluid resuscitation has been a major focus of critical care medicine since its inception. Currently, the most accurate method to guide fluid administration decisions uses "dynamic" measures that estimate the change in cardiac output that would occur in response to a fluid bolus. Unfortunately, their use remains limited due to required technical expertise, costly equipment, or applicability in only a subset of patients. Alternatively, point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become widely used as a tool to help clinicians prescribe fluid therapy. Common POCUS applications that serve as guides to fluid administration rely on assessments of the inferior vena cava to estimate preload and lung ultrasound to identify the early presence of extravascular lung water and avoid fluid overresuscitation. Although application of these POCUS measures has multiple limitations that are commonly misunderstood, current evidence suggests that they can be used in combination to sort patients among 3 fluid management categories: (1) fluid resuscitate, (2) fluid test, and (3) fluid restrict. This article reviews the pertinent literature describing the use of inferior vena cava and lung ultrasound for fluid responsiveness and presents an evidence-informed algorithm using these measures to guide fluid resuscitation decisions in the critically ill. PMID:26475100

  4. Induced Hypothermia During Resuscitation From Hemorrhagic Shock Attenuates Microvascular Inflammation In The Rat Mesenteric Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Coyan, Garrett N.; Moncure, Michael; Thomas, James H.; Wood, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Microvascular inflammation occurs during resuscitation following hemorrhagic shock, causing multiple organ dysfunction and mortality. Pre-clinical evidence suggests that hypothermia may have some benefit in selected patients by decreasing this inflammation, but this effect has not been extensively studied. Methods Intravital microscopy was used to visualize mesenteric venules of anesthetized rats in real time to evaluate leukocyte adherence and mast cell degranulation. Animals were randomly allocated to normotensive or hypotensive groups, and further subdivided into hypothermic and normothermic resuscitation (N=6 per group). Animals in the shock groups underwent mean arterial blood pressure reduction to 40-45 mmHg for 1 hour via blood withdrawal. During the first two hours following resuscitation by infusion of shed blood plus double that volume of normal saline, rectal temperature of the hypothermic groups were maintained at 32-34°C, while the normothermic groups were maintained between 36-38°C. The hypothermic group was then rewarmed for the final two hours of resuscitation. Results Leukocyte adherence was significantly lower after 2 hours of hypothermic resuscitation compared with normothermic resuscitation: (2.8±0.8 vs 8.3±1.3 adherent leukocytes, p=0.004). Following rewarming, leukocyte adherence remained significantly different between hypothermic and normothermic shock groups: (4.7±1.2 vs 9.5±1.6 adherent leukocytes, p=0.038). Mast cell degranulation index (MDI) was significantly decreased in the hypothermic (1.02±0.04 MDI) vs normothermic (1.22±0.07 MDI) shock groups (p=0.038) after the experiment. Conclusions Induced hypothermia during resuscitation following hemorrhagic shock attenuates microvascular inflammation in rat mesentery. Furthermore, this decrease in inflammation is carried over after rewarming takes place. PMID:25046540

  5. Effect of a pharmacologically induced decrease in core temperature in rats resuscitated from cardiac arrest

    EPA Science Inventory

    Targeted temperature management is recommended to reduce brain damage after resuscitation from cardiac arrest in humans although the optimal target temperature remains controversial. 1 4 The American Heart Association (AHA) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation...

  6. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. PMID:27600123

  7. Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that mechanical ventilation can injure the lung, producing an entity known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). There are various forms of VILI, including volutrauma (i.e., injury caused by overdistending the lung), atelectrauma (injury due to repeated opening/closing of lung units), and biotrauma (release of mediators that can induce lung injury or aggravate pre-existing injury, potentially leading to multiple organ failure). Experimental data in the pediatric context are in accord with the importance of VILI, and appear to show age-related susceptibility to VILI, although a conclusive link between use of large Vts and mortality has not been demonstrated in this population. The relevance of VILI in the pediatric intensive care unit population is thus unclear. Given the physiological and biological differences in the respiratory systems of infants, children, and adults, it is difficult to directly extrapolate clinical practice from adults to children. This Critical Care Perspective analyzes the relevance of VILI to the pediatric population, and addresses why pediatric patients might be less susceptible than adults to VILI. PMID:25003705

  8. Do Sustained Lung Inflations during Neonatal Resuscitation Affect Cerebral Blood Volume in Preterm Infants? A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwaberger, Bernhard; Pichler, Gerhard; Avian, Alexander; Binder-Heschl, Corinna; Baik, Nariae; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2015-01-01

    Background Sustained lung inflations (SLI) during neonatal resuscitation may promote alveolar recruitment in preterm infants. While most of the studies focus on respiratory outcome, the impact of SLI on the brain hasn’t been investigated yet. Objective Do SLI affect cerebral blood volume (CBV) in preterm infants? Methods Preterm infants of gestation 28 weeks 0 days to 33 weeks 6 days with requirement for respiratory support (RS) were included in this randomized controlled pilot trial. Within the first 15 minutes after birth near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements using ‘NIRO-200-NX’ (Hamamatsu, Japan) were performed to evaluate changes in CBV and cerebral tissue oxygenation. Two groups were compared based on RS: In SLI group RS was given by applying 1–3 SLI (30 cmH2O for 15 s) continued by respiratory standard care. Control group received respiratory standard care only. Results 40 infants (20 in each group) with mean gestational age of 32 weeks one day (±2 days) and birth weight of 1707 (±470) g were included. In the control group ΔCBV was significantly decreasing, whereas in SLI group ΔCBV showed similar values during the whole period of 15 minutes. Comparing both groups within the first 15 minutes ΔCBV showed a tendency toward different overall courses (p = 0.051). Conclusion This is the first study demonstrating an impact of SLI on CBV. Further studies are warranted including reconfirmation of the present findings in infants with lower gestational age. Future investigations on SLI should not only focus on respiratory outcome but also on the consequences on the developing brain. Trial Registration German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00005161 https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/setLocale_EN.do PMID:26406467

  9. Hemorrhagic Shock and Resuscitation-Mediated Tissue Water Distribution is Normalized by Adjunctive Peritoneal Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, El Rasheid; Matheson, Paul J; Flessner, Michael F; Garrison, R Neal

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adjunctive direct peritoneal resuscitation (DPR) from hemorrhagic shock (HS) improves intestinal blood flow and abrogates postresuscitation edema. HS causes water shifts as a result of sodium redistribution and changes in transcapillary Starling forces. Conventional resuscitation (CR) with crystalloid aggravates water sequestration. We examined the compartment pattern of organ tissue water after HS and CR, and modulation of tissue edema by adjunctive DPR. STUDY DESIGN Rats were hemorrhaged (40% mean arterial pressure for 60 minutes) and assigned to four groups (n = 7): sham, no HS; HS no resuscitation; HS+CR (shed blood plus 2 volumes Ringer’s lactate); and HS+CR+DPR (20 mL clinical intraperitoneal (IP) dialysis fluid). Isotopic markers determined equilibrium distribution volumes [VD] in gut, liver, lung, and muscle by quantitative autoradiography (2-hour postresuscitation). Total tissue water (TTW) was determined by wet-dry weights. Extracellular water was measured from 14C-mannitol VD, and intravascular volume (IVV) from 131I-labeled IgG VD. Cellular and interstitial water volumes were calculated. RESULTS HS alone decreased IVV in all tissues and TTW in gut, lung, and muscle, but not liver, compared with shams. IVV remained decreased with all resuscitations despite restoration of central hemodynamics. CR caused interstitial edema in gut, liver, and muscle, and cellular edema in lung. DPR reduced (liver, muscle) or prevented (gut, lung) these volume shifts. CONCLUSIONS HS decreases IVV. HS-induced water shifts are organ-specific and prominent in gut, lung, and muscle. CR restores central hemodynamics, does not restore IVV, and alters organ-specific TTW distribution. Adjunctive DPR with IP dialysis fluid normalizes TTW and water compartment distribution and prevents edema. Combined effect of DPR and intravascular fluid replacement appears to prevent global tissue edema and improve outcomes from HS. PMID:18471737

  10. Ubiquinol decreases hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation-induced microvascular inflammation in rat mesenteric microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiuhua; Holloway, Naomi; Thimmesch, Amanda; Wood, John G; Clancy, Richard L; Pierce, Janet D

    2014-11-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is a leading cause of death in traumatic injury. Ischemia and hypoxia in HS and fluid resuscitation (FR) creates a condition that facilitates excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This is a major factor causing increased leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions and inflammation in the microcirculation resulting in reperfusion tissue injury. The aim of this study was to determine if ubiquinol (coenzyme Q10) decreases microvascular inflammation following HS and FR. Intravital microscopy was used to measure leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions in the rat mesentery following 1-h of HS and 2-h post FR with or without ubiquinol. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by removing ~ 40% of anesthetized Sprague Dawley rats' blood volume to maintain a mean arterial blood pressure <50 mmHg for 1 h. Ubiquinol (1 mg/100 g body weight) was infused intravascularly in the ubiquinol group immediately after 1-h HS. The FR protocol included replacement of the shed blood and Lactate Ringer's in both the control and ubiquinol groups. We found that leukocyte adherence (2.3 ± 2.0), mast cell degranulation (1.02 ± 0.01), and ROS levels (159 ± 35%) in the ubiquinol group were significantly reduced compared to the control group (10.8 ± 2.3, 1.36 ± 0.03, and 343 ± 47%, respectively). In addition, vascular permeability in the control group (0.54 ± 0.11) was significantly greater than the ubiquinol group (0.34 ± 0.04). In conclusion, ubiquinol attenuates HS and FR-induced microvascular inflammation. These results suggest that ubiquinol provides protection to mesenteric microcirculation through its antioxidant properties. PMID:25413319

  11. Myeloid Knockout of HIF-1α Does Not Markedly Affect Hemorrhage/Resuscitation-Induced Inflammation and Hepatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, G.; Relja, B.; Klarner, A.; Henrich, D.; Dehne, N.; Brühne, B.; Lehnert, M.; Marzi, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and NF-κB play important roles in the inflammatory response after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (H/R). Here, the role of myeloid HIF-1α in liver hypoxia, injury, and inflammation after H/R with special regard to NF-κB activation was studied. Methods. Mice with a conditional HIF-1α knockout (KO) in myeloid cell-line and wild-type (WT) controls were hemorrhaged for 90 min (30 ± 2 mm Hg) and resuscitated. Controls underwent only surgical procedures. Results. After six hours, H/R enhanced the expression of HIF-1α-induced genes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and adrenomedullin (ADM). In KO mice, this was not observed. H/R-induced liver injury in HIF-1α KO was comparable to WT. Elevated plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels after H/R were not reduced by HIF-1α KO. Local hepatic hypoxia was not significantly reduced in HIF-1α KO compared to controls after H/R. H/R-induced NF-κB phosphorylation in liver did not significantly differ between WT and KO. Conclusions. Here, deleting HIF-1α in myeloid cells and thereby in Kupffer cells was not protective after H/R. This data indicates that other factors, such as NF-κB, due to its upregulated phosphorylation in WT and KO mice, contrary to HIF-1α, are rather key modulators of inflammation after H/R in our model. PMID:24991092

  12. Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor-1α ameliorates lung injury induced by trauma and hemorrhagic shock in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Huang, Yan; Xu, Hui; Hu, Rong; Li, Qi-fang

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Ischemia/reperfusion is an initial triggering event that leads to gut-induced acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, we investigated whether hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) played a role in the pathogenesis of lung injury induced by trauma and hemorrhagic shock (T/HS). Methods: Male Wistar rats underwent laparotomy and hemorrhagic shock for 60 min. Sham-shock animals underwent laparotomy but without hemorrhagic shock. After resuscitation for 3 hr, the rats were sacrificed. Morphologic changes of the lungs and intestines were examined. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected. Lung water content, pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitrite/nitrate, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the lungs were measured. The gene expression of pulmonary HIF-1α and iNOS, and HIF-1α transcriptional activity in the lungs were also assessed. The apoptosis in the lungs was determined using TUNEL assay and cleaved caspase-3 expression. Results: Lung and intestinal injuries induced by T/HS were characterized by histological damages and a significant increase in lung water content. Compared to the sham-shock group, the BALF cell counts, the pulmonary MPO activity and the MDA, nitrite/nitrate, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels in the T/HS group were significantly increased. Acute lung injury was associated with a higher degree of pulmonary HIF-1α and iNOS expression as well as apoptosis in the lungs. Intratracheal delivery of HIF-1α inhibitor YC-1 (1 mg/kg) significantly attenuated lung injury, and reduced pulmonary HIF-1α and iNOS expression and HIF-1α transcriptional activity in the T/HS group. Conclusion: Local inhibition of HIF-1α by YC-1 alleviates the lung injury induced by T/HS. Our results provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of T/HS-induced ALI and a potential therapeutic application. PMID:22465950

  13. Geriatric Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Perera, Thomas; Cortijo-Brown, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    The geriatric population makes up a large portion of the emergency patient population. Geriatric patients have less reserve and more comorbid diseases. They are frequently on multiple medications and are more likely to require aggressive treatment during acute illness. Although it may not be obvious, it is important to recognize the signs of shock as early as possible. Special care and monitoring should be used when resuscitating the elderly. The use of bedside ultrasound and monitoring for coagulopathies are discussed. Clinicians should be constantly vigilant and reassess throughout diagnosis and treatment. Ethical considerations in this population need to be considered on an individual basis. PMID:27475009

  14. Damage control resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pohlman, Timothy H; Walsh, Mark; Aversa, John; Hutchison, Emily M; Olsen, Kristen P; Lawrence Reed, R

    2015-07-01

    The early recognition and management of hemorrhage shock are among the most difficult tasks challenging the clinician during primary assessment of the acutely bleeding patient. Often with little time, within a chaotic setting, and without sufficient clinical data, a decision must be reached to begin transfusion of blood components in massive amounts. The practice of massive transfusion has advanced considerably and is now a more complete and, arguably, more effective process. This new therapeutic paradigm, referred to as damage control resuscitation (DCR), differs considerably in many important respects from previous management strategies for catastrophic blood loss. We review several important elements of DCR including immediate correction of specific coagulopathies induced by hemorrhage and management of several extreme homeostatic imbalances that may appear in the aftermath of resuscitation. We also emphasize that the foremost objective in managing exsanguinating hemorrhage is always expedient and definitive control of the source of bleeding. PMID:25631636

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene expression at different stages of hypoxia-induced dormancy and upon resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Iona, Elisabetta; Pardini, Manuela; Mustazzolu, Alessandro; Piccaro, Giovanni; Nisini, Roberto; Fattorini, Lanfranco; Giannoni, Federico

    2016-08-01

    The physiology of dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis was studied in detail by examining the gene expression of 51 genes using quantitative Reverse-Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction. A forty-day period of dormancy in the Wayne culture model depicted four major transcription patterns. Some sigma factors and many metabolic genes were constant, whereas genes belonging to the dormancy regulon were activated on day 9. In particular, alpha-crystallin mRNA showed more than a 1,000-fold increase compared to replicating bacilli. Genes belonging to the enduring hypoxic response were up-regulated at day 16, notably, transcription factors sigma B and E. Early genes typical of log-phase bacilli, esat-6 and fbpB, were uniformly down-regulated during dormancy. Late stages of dormancy showed a drop in gene expression likely due to a lack of substrates in anaerobic respiration as demonstrated by the transcriptional activation observed following nitrates addition. Among genes involved in nitrate metabolism, narG was strongly up-regulated by nitrates addition. Dormant bacilli responded very rapidly when exposed to oxygen and fresh medium, showing a transcriptional activation of many genes, including resuscitation-promoting factors, within one hour. Our observations extend the current knowledge on dormant M. tuberculosis gene expression and its response to nutrients and to aerobic and anaerobic respiration. PMID:27480637

  16. Metformin attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic patients may develop acute lung injury less often than non-diabetics; a fact that could be partially ascribed to the usage of antidiabetic drugs, including metformin. Metformin exhibits pleiotropic properties which make it potentially beneficial against lung injury. We hypothesized that pretreatment with metformin preserves alveolar capillary permeability and, thus, prevents ventilator-induced lung injury. Methods Twenty-four rabbits were randomly assigned to pretreatment with metformin (250 mg/Kg body weight/day per os) or no medication for two days. Explanted lungs were perfused at constant flow rate (300 mL/min) and ventilated with injurious (peak airway pressure 23 cmH2O, tidal volume ≈17 mL/Kg) or protective (peak airway pressure 11 cmH2O, tidal volume ≈7 mL/Kg) settings for 1 hour. Alveolar capillary permeability was assessed by ultrafiltration coefficient, total protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity in BALF. Results High-pressure ventilation of the ex-vivo lung preparation resulted in increased microvascular permeability, edema formation and microhemorrhage compared to protective ventilation. Compared to no medication, pretreatment with metformin was associated with a 2.9-fold reduction in ultrafiltration coefficient, a 2.5-fold reduction in pulmonary edema formation, lower protein concentration in BALF, lower ACE activity in BALF, and fewer histological lesions upon challenge of the lung preparation with injurious ventilation. In contrast, no differences regarding pulmonary artery pressure and BALF total cell number were noted. Administration of metformin did not impact on outcomes of lungs subjected to protective ventilation. Conclusions Pretreatment with metformin preserves alveolar capillary permeability and, thus, decreases the severity of ventilator-induced lung injury in this model. PMID:22827994

  17. Timolol-induced interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hetain; Wilches, Lina Vanessa; Guerrero, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Timolol maleate is a non-selective beta-adrenergic receptor blocking agent with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of open-angle glaucoma. A 76 year old female who presented with productive cough, progressive dyspnea and hypoxia after starting timolol maleate opthalamic drops following glaucoma surgery. The patient was diagnosed with interstitial lung disease secondary to timolol treatment and after cessation of the offending agent along with corticosteroid treatment, symptoms improved drastically. Elimination of other possible causes of disease along with evolution of radiological and functional signs left us with a diagnosis of timolol-induced interstitial lung disease. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of timolol-induced interstitial lung disease. PMID:26236595

  18. In Vivo Evaluation of the Ameliorating Effects of Small-Volume Resuscitation with Four Different Fluids on Endotoxemia-Induced Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-ling; Chen, Jing-hui; Zhu, Qiong-fang; Yu, Gao-feng; Luo, Chen-fang; Luo, Gang-jian; Li, Shang-rong; Hei, Zi-qing

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury associated with renal hypoperfusion is a frequent and severe complication during sepsis. Fluid resuscitation is the main therapy. However, heart failure is usually lethal for those patients receiving large volumes of fluids. We compared the effects of small-volume resuscitation using four different treatment regimens, involving saline, hypertonic saline (HTS), hydroxyethyl starch (HES), or hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch (HSH), on the kidneys of rats treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce endotoxemia. LPS injection caused reduced and progressively deteriorated systemic (arterial blood pressure) and renal hemodynamics (renal blood flow and renal vascular resistance index) over time. This deterioration was accompanied by marked renal functional and pathological injury, as well as an oxidative and inflammatory response, manifesting as increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide, and malondialdehyde and decreased activity of superoxide dismutase. Small-volume perfusion with saline failed to improve renal and systemic circulation. However, small-volume perfusion with HES and HSH greatly improved the above parameters, while HTS only transiently improved systemic and renal hemodynamics with obvious renal injury. Therefore, single small-volume resuscitation with HES and HSH could be valid therapeutic approaches to ameliorate kidney injury induced by endotoxemia, while HTS transiently delays injury and saline shows no protective effects. PMID:26273142

  19. In Vivo Evaluation of the Ameliorating Effects of Small-Volume Resuscitation with Four Different Fluids on Endotoxemia-Induced Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-ling; Chen, Jing-hui; Zhu, Qiong-fang; Yu, Gao-feng; Luo, Chen-fang; Luo, Gang-jian; Li, Shang-rong; Hei, Zi-qing

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury associated with renal hypoperfusion is a frequent and severe complication during sepsis. Fluid resuscitation is the main therapy. However, heart failure is usually lethal for those patients receiving large volumes of fluids. We compared the effects of small-volume resuscitation using four different treatment regimens, involving saline, hypertonic saline (HTS), hydroxyethyl starch (HES), or hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch (HSH), on the kidneys of rats treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce endotoxemia. LPS injection caused reduced and progressively deteriorated systemic (arterial blood pressure) and renal hemodynamics (renal blood flow and renal vascular resistance index) over time. This deterioration was accompanied by marked renal functional and pathological injury, as well as an oxidative and inflammatory response, manifesting as increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide, and malondialdehyde and decreased activity of superoxide dismutase. Small-volume perfusion with saline failed to improve renal and systemic circulation. However, small-volume perfusion with HES and HSH greatly improved the above parameters, while HTS only transiently improved systemic and renal hemodynamics with obvious renal injury. Therefore, single small-volume resuscitation with HES and HSH could be valid therapeutic approaches to ameliorate kidney injury induced by endotoxemia, while HTS transiently delays injury and saline shows no protective effects. PMID:26273142

  20. Miniature oxygen resuscitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G.; Teegen, J. T.; Waddell, H.

    1969-01-01

    Miniature, portable resuscitation system is used during evacuation of patients to medical facilities. A carrying case contains a modified resuscitator head, cylinder of oxygen, two-stage oxygen regulator, low pressure tube, and a mask for mouth and nose.

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation update.

    PubMed

    Lipley, Nick

    2014-11-01

    THE ROYAL College of Nursing (RCN), Resuscitation Council (UK) and British Medical Association (BMA) have issued a new edition of their guidance on when to attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). PMID:25369953

  2. Neonatal resuscitation: Current issues

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Indu A

    2010-01-01

    The following guidelines are intended for practitioners responsible for resuscitating neonates. They apply primarily to neonates undergoing transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. The updated guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation have assimilated the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the old guidelines and recommendations for daily practice are provided. Current controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed and argued in the context of the ILCOR 2005 consensus. PMID:21189881

  3. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  4. Complicated Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David T

    2016-10-01

    More than 4 decades after the creation of the Brooke and Parkland formulas, burn practitioners still argue about which formula is the best. So it is no surprise that there is no consensus about how to resuscitate a thermally injured patient with a significant comorbidity such as heart failure or cirrhosis or how to resuscitate a patient after an electrical or inhalation injury or a patient whose resuscitation is complicated by renal failure. All of these scenarios share a common theme in that the standard rule book does not apply. All will require highly individualized resuscitations. PMID:27600129

  5. Tobacco smoke-induced lung fibrosis and emphysema.

    PubMed

    Morse, Danielle; Rosas, Ivan O

    2014-01-01

    Despite public health campaigns discouraging smoking, 1,000 American children every day become smokers, ensuring that tobacco-related health complications will be with us for decades to come. Smoking is the greatest risk factor for both chronic obstructive lung disease and interstitial lung disease. The facts that not every smoker develops chronic lung disease and that lung pathology differs markedly among smokers indicate that individual susceptibility must be a central determinant of lung injury responses to cigarette smoke. Comparative examination of pathogenic mechanisms of smoke-induced lung disease can shed light on the homeostatic pathways critical to maintaining lung health. In this review, we explore common and divergent biological forces tilting the lung homeostatic balance away from health and toward emphysema or pulmonary fibrosis. We emphasize recent insights that highlight the greatest contrasts or similarities in the pathogenesis of these two chronic lung disease phenotypes. PMID:24274738

  6. Attenuation of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Lung Vascular Stiffening by Lipoxin Reduces Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyong; Mambetsariev, Isa; Tian, Yufeng; Beckham, Yvonne; Meliton, Angelo; Leff, Alan; Gardel, Margaret L.; Allen, Michael J.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible changes in lung microstructure accompany lung inflammation, although alterations in tissue micromechanics and their impact on inflammation remain unknown. This study investigated changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and tissue stiffness in a model of LPS-induced inflammation and examined the role of lipoxin analog 15-epi-lipoxin A4 (eLXA4) in the reduction of stiffness-dependent exacerbation of the inflammatory process. Atomic force microscopy measurements of live lung slices were used to directly measure local tissue stiffness changes induced by intratracheal injection of LPS. Effects of LPS on ECM properties and inflammatory response were evaluated in an animal model of LPS-induced lung injury, live lung tissue slices, and pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) culture. In vivo, LPS increased perivascular stiffness in lung slices monitored by atomic force microscopy and stimulated expression of ECM proteins fibronectin, collagen I, and ECM crosslinker enzyme, lysyl oxidase. Increased stiffness and ECM remodeling escalated LPS-induced VCAM1 and ICAM1 expression and IL-8 production by lung ECs. Stiffness-dependent exacerbation of inflammatory signaling was confirmed in pulmonary ECs grown on substrates with high and low stiffness. eLXA4 inhibited LPS-increased stiffness in lung cross sections, attenuated stiffness-dependent enhancement of EC inflammatory activation, and restored lung compliance in vivo. This study shows that increased local vascular stiffness exacerbates lung inflammation. Attenuation of local stiffening of lung vasculature represents a novel mechanism of lipoxin antiinflammatory action. PMID:24992633

  7. Pretreatment with perfluorohexane vapor attenuates fMLP-induced lung injury in isolated perfused rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Bleyl, Jörg U; Heller, Axel R; Fehrenbach, Antonia; Heintz, Manuel; Fehrenbach, Heinz; Klenz, Gesa; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Hübler, Matthias; Spieth, Peter M; Koch, Thea

    2010-08-01

    The authors investigated the protective effects and dose dependency of perfluorohexane (PFH) vapor on leukocyte-mediated lung injury in isolated, perfused, and ventilated rabbit lungs. Lungs received either 18 vol.% (n = 7), 9 vol.% (n = 7), or 4.5 vol.% (n = 7) PFH. Fifteen minutes after beginning of PFH application, lung injury was induced with formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP). Control lungs (n = 7) received fMLP only. In addition 5 lungs (PFH-sham) remained uninjured receiving 18 vol.% PFH only. Pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), peak inspiratory pressure (P(max)), and lung weight were monitored for 90 minutes. Perfusate samples were taken at regular intervals for analysis and representative lungs were fixed for histological analysis. In the control, fMLP application led to a significant increase of mPAP, P(max), lung weight, and lipid mediators. Pretreatment with PFH attenuated the rise in these parameters. This was accompanied by preservation of the structural integrity of the alveolar architecture and air-blood barrier. In uninjured lungs, mPAP, P(max), lung weight, and lipid mediator formation remained uneffected in the presence of PFH. The authors concluded that pretreatment with PFH vapor leads to an attenuation of leukocyte-mediated lung injury. Vaporization of perfluorocarbons (PFCs) offers new therapeutic options, making use of their protective and anti-inflammatory properties in prophylaxis or in early treatment of acute lung injury. PMID:20653469

  8. Intrapartum fetal resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cowan, D B

    1980-08-30

    Fetal distress is defined. The pathophysiology of fetal distress is discussed and tretment is recommended. The principles of intrapartum fetal resuscitation are proposed, with particular reference to the inhibition of uterine activity. PMID:7404260

  9. Animal models of beryllium-induced lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, G.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Hahn, F.F.

    1996-10-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is conducting research to improve the understanding of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) and beryllium-induced lung cancer. Initial animal studies examined beagle dogs that inhaled BeO calcined at either 500 or 1000{degrees}C. At similar lung burdens, the 500{degrees}C BeO induced more severe and extensive granulomatous pneumonia, lymphocytic infiltration into the lung, and positive Be-specific lymphocyte proliferative responses in vitro than the 1000{degrees}C BeO. However, the progressive nature of human CBD was not duplicated. More recently, Strains A/J and C3H/HeJ mice were exposed to Be metal by inhalation. This produced a marked granulomatous pneumonia, diffuse infiltrates, and multifocal aggregates of interstitial lymphocytes with a pronounced T helper component and pulmonary in situ lymphocyte proliferation. With respect to lung cancer, at a mean lung burden as low as 17 pg Be/g lung, inhaled Be metal induced benign and/or malignant lung tumors in over 50% of male and female F344 rats surviving {ge}1 year on study. Substantial tumor multiplicity was found, but K-ras and p53 gene mutations were virtually absent. In mice, however, a lung burden of approximately 60 {mu}g ({approximately}300 {mu}g Be/g lung) caused only a slight increase in crude lung tumor incidence and multiplicity over controls in strain A/J mice and no elevated incidence in strain C3H mice. Taken together, this research program constitutes a coordinated effort to understand beryllium-induced lung disease in experimental animal models. 47 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Cold ischemia-induced autophagy in rat lung tissue

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XU; WU, JING-XIANG; YOU, XING-JI; ZHU, HONG-WEI; WEI, JIONG-LIN; XU, MEI-YING

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved pathway that permits recycling of nutrients within the cell and is rapidly upregulated during starvation or cell stress. Autophagy has been implicated in the pathophysiological process of warm ischemia-reperfusion injury in the rat lung. Cold ischemia (CI) preservation for lung transplantation also exhibits cell stress and nutrient deprivation, however, little is known with regard to the involvement of autophagy in this process. In the present study, CI preservation-induced autophagy and apoptosis was investigated in the lungs of Sprague Dawley rats. Sprague Dawley rat lungs were flushed and preserved at 4°C (i.e. CI) for various durations (0, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h). The levels of autophagy, autophagic cell death and apoptosis were measured at each time point following CI. The results revealed that autophagy was induced by CI preservation, which was initiated at 3 h, peaked at 6 h after CI and declined thereafter. Additionally, a coexistence of autophagic cell death and apoptosis was observed in rat lung tissues following prolonged CI. These findings demonstrate that autophagy is involved in the pathophysiological process of lung CI. Furthermore, autophagic cell death in addition to necrosis and apoptosis occurs following CI in the lung. CI preservation may therefore be a potential mechanism of lung injury during organ preservation prior to lung transplantation. PMID:25435100

  11. Respiratory failure due to infliximab induced interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kakavas, Sotiris; Balis, Evangelos; Lazarou, Vasiliki; Kouvela, Marousa; Tatsis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Although poorly understood, interstitial lung disease has been reported as a possible complication of tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors. We report a case of interstitial lung disease in a 64-year-old man with psoriasis 3 weeks after the initiation of infliximab treatment. The patient had received two fortnightly infusions of infliximab following a short course of methotrexate. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral ground glass and interstitial infiltrates, while the results of microbiology and immunologic workup were negative. Likewise, bronchoalveolar lavage detected neither typical nor atypical pathogens. Infliximab-induced interstitial lung injury was suspected and corticosteroid therapy was administered which resulted in rapid clinical and radiological improvement. This is one of the few reported cases of interstitial lung disease due to infliximab in the psoriasis population. The patient had no pre-existing lung pathology, while his previous exposure to methotrexate was minimal and was not temporally associated with the induction of interstitial lung disease. PMID:23969008

  12. NNK-Induced Lung Tumors: A Review of Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hua-Chuan; Takano, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of lung adenocarcinoma has been remarkably increasing in recent years due to the introduction of filter cigarettes and secondary-hand smoking because the people are more exposed to higher amounts of nitrogen oxides, especially 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone(NNK), which is widely applied in animal model of lung tumors. In NNK-induced lung tumors, genetic mutation, chromosome instability, gene methylation, and activation of oncogenes have been found so as to disrupt the expression profiles of some proteins or enzymes in various cellular signal pathways. Transgenic animal with specific alteration of lung cancer-related molecules have also been introduced to clarify the molecular mechanisms of NNK in the pathogenesis and development of lung tumors. Based on these animal models, many antioxidant ingredients and antitumor chemotherapeutic agents have been proved to suppress the NNK-induced lung carcinogenesis. In the future, it is necessary to delineate the most potent biomarkers of NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis, and to develop efficient methods to fight against NNK-associated lung cancer using animal models. PMID:21559252

  13. Corilagin Attenuates Aerosol Bleomycin-Induced Experimental Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Guo, Qiong-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Ju; Li, Xiao; Li, Wen-Ting; Ma, Xi-Tao; Ma, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressing lethal disease with few clinically effective therapies. Corilagin is a tannin derivative which shows anti-inflammatory and antifibrotics properties and is potentiated in treating IPF. Here, we investigated the effect of corilagin on lung injury following bleomycin exposure in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis. Corilagin abrogated bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis as assessed by H&E; Masson’s trichrome staining and lung hydroxyproline content in lung tissue. Corilagin reduced the number of apoptotic lung cells and prevented lung epithelial cells from membrane breakdown, effluence of lamellar bodies and thickening of the respiratory membrane. Bleomycin exposure induced expression of MDA, IKKα, phosphorylated IKKα (p-IKKα), NF-κB P65, TNF-α and IL-1β, and reduced I-κB expression in mice lung tissue or in BALF. These changes were reversed by high-dose corilagin (100 mg/kg i.p) more dramatically than by low dose (10 mg/kg i.p). Last, corilagin inhibits TGF-β1 production and α-SMA expression in lung tissue samples. Taken together, these findings confirmed that corilagin attenuates bleomycin-induced epithelial injury and fibrosis via inactivation of oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokine release and NF-κB and TGF-β1 signaling. Corilagin may serve as a promising therapeutic agent for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24886817

  14. NOS-2 Inhibition in Phosgene-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Filipczak, Piotr T.; Senft, Albert P.; Seagrave, JeanClare; Weber, Waylon; Kuehl, Philip J.; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; McDonald, Jacob D.; Baron, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Phosgene exposure via an industrial or warfare release produces severe acute lung injury (ALI) with high mortality, characterized by massive pulmonary edema, disruption of epithelial tight junctions, surfactant dysfunction, and oxidative stress. There are no targeted treatments for phosgene-induced ALI. Previous studies demonstrated that nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS-2) is upregulated in the lungs after phosgene exposure; however, the role of NOS-2 in the pathogenesis of phosgene-induced ALI remains unknown. We previously demonstrated that NOS-2 expression in lung epithelium exacerbates inhaled endotoxin-induced ALI in mice, mediated partially through downregulation of surfactant protein B (SP-B) expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that a selective NOS-2 inhibitor delivered to the lung epithelium by inhalation would mitigate phosgene-induced ALI. Inhaled phosgene produced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein, histologic lung injury, and lung NOS-2 expression at 24 h. Administration of the selective NOS-2 inhibitor 1400 W via inhalation, but not via systemic delivery, significantly attenuated phosgene-induced ALI and preserved epithelial barrier integrity. Furthermore, aerosolized 1400 W augmented expression of SP-B and prevented downregulation of tight junction protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), both critical for maintenance of normal lung physiology and barrier integrity. We also demonstrate for the first time that NOS-2-derived nitric oxide downregulates the ZO-1 expression at the transcriptional level in human lung epithelial cells, providing a novel target for ameliorating vascular leak in ALI. Our data demonstrate that lung NOS-2 plays a critical role in the development of phosgene-induced ALI and suggest that aerosolized NOS-2 inhibitors offer a novel therapeutic strategy for its treatment. PMID:25870319

  15. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Koichi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Rikimaru; Obata, Toru

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  16. Molecular features in arsenic-induced lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a well-known human carcinogen, which potentially affects ~160 million people worldwide via exposure to unsafe levels in drinking water. Lungs are one of the main target organs for arsenic-related carcinogenesis. These tumors exhibit particular features, such as squamous cell-type specificity and high incidence among never smokers. Arsenic-induced malignant transformation is mainly related to the biotransformation process intended for the metabolic clearing of the carcinogen, which results in specific genetic and epigenetic alterations that ultimately affect key pathways in lung carcinogenesis. Based on this, lung tumors induced by arsenic exposure could be considered an additional subtype of lung cancer, especially in the case of never-smokers, where arsenic is a known etiological agent. In this article, we review the current knowledge on the various mechanisms of arsenic carcinogenicity and the specific roles of this metalloid in signaling pathways leading to lung cancer. PMID:23510327

  17. Magnolol reduces bleomycin-induced rodent lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Huang, Han; Chang, Huijuan; Jin, Xiuhong

    2015-01-01

    Magnolol, a compound extracted from the Chinese medicinal herb Magnolia officinalis, has been proved to exert multiple pharmacological effects, including anti-oxidant and anti-inflammation activities. In this study, how it influenced bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis of rats was investigated. A single intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (5 mg/Kg, sacrificed 7 and 28 days post bleomycin instillation) caused body weight decrease and lung indices increase. Hodroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) levels increased in the rat lung tissues after bleomycin administration, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity decreased in the rat lung tissues. Collagen were excessively deposited in rat lung tissues after bleomycin treatment. However, oral administration of magnolol (10 mg/Kg, 20 mg/Kg, 30 mg/Kg) apparently and significantly inhibited the fibrotic process. It partly reversed the bleomycin-induced increase of hydroxyproline content, MPO activity, TNF-α and TGF-β levels in the lung tissues, significantly inhibited the bleomycin-induced decrease of SOD activity, Excessive collagen deposition was also inhibited by magnolol administration. In summary, our results suggested that magnolol might be a potent anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic agent against bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. PMID:26629034

  18. Crocin attenuates lipopolysacchride-induced acute lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Kuai, Jianke; Luo, Zhonghua; Wang, Wuping; Wang, Lei; Ke, Changkang; Li, Xiaofei; Ni, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Crocin, a representative of carotenoid compounds, exerts a spectrum of activities including radical scavenger, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties. To investigate the protective effect of crocin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS (1 mg/kg). The mice received intragastric injection of crocin (50 mg/kg) 1 h before LPS administration. Pulmonary histological changes were evaluated by hematoxylineosin stain and lung wet/dry weight ratios were observed. Concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and nitric oxide (NO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were measured by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung tissues was determined by Western blot analysis. Crocin pretreatment significantly alleviated the severity of lung injury and inhibited the production of TNF-α and IL-1β in mice with ALI. After LPS administration, the lung wet/dry weight ratios, as an index of lung edema, and MPO activity were also markedly reduced by crocin pretreatment. Crocin pretreatment also reduced the concentrations of NO in lung tissues. Furthermore, the expression of iNOS was significantly suppressed by crocin pretreatment. Croncin potently protected against LPS-induced ALI and the protective effects of crocin may attribute partly to the suppression of iNOS expression. PMID:26191176

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Adopt Lung Cell Phenotype in Normal and Radiation-induced Lung Injury Conditions.

    PubMed

    Maria, Ola M; Maria, Ahmed M; Ybarra, Norma; Jeyaseelan, Krishinima; Lee, Sangkyu; Perez, Jessica; Shalaby, Mostafa Y; Lehnert, Shirley; Faria, Sergio; Serban, Monica; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-04-01

    Lung tissue exposure to ionizing irradiation can invariably occur during the treatment of a variety of cancers leading to increased risk of radiation-induced lung disease (RILD). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess the potential to differentiate into epithelial cells. However, cell culture methods of primary type II pneumocytes are slow and cannot provide a sufficient number of cells to regenerate damaged lungs. Moreover, effects of ablative radiation doses on the ability of MSCs to differentiate in vitro into lung cells have not been investigated yet. Therefore, an in vitro coculture system was used, where MSCs were physically separated from dissociated lung tissue obtained from either healthy or high ablative doses of 16 or 20 Gy whole thorax irradiated rats. Around 10±5% and 20±3% of cocultured MSCs demonstrated a change into lung-specific Clara and type II pneumocyte cells when MSCs were cocultured with healthy lung tissue. Interestingly, in cocultures with irradiated lung biopsies, the percentage of MSCs changed into Clara and type II pneumocytes cells increased to 40±7% and 50±6% at 16 Gy irradiation dose and 30±5% and 40±8% at 20 Gy irradiation dose, respectively. These data suggest that MSCs to lung cell differentiation is possible without cell fusion. In addition, 16 and 20 Gy whole thorax irradiation doses that can cause varying levels of RILD, induced different percentages of MSCs to adopt lung cell phenotype compared with healthy lung tissue, providing encouraging outlook for RILD therapeutic intervention for ablative radiotherapy prescriptions. PMID:26200842

  20. Association Between RT-Induced Changes in Lung Tissue Density and Global Lung Function

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jinli; Zhang Junan; Zhou Sumin; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Foltz, Rodney J.; Hollis, Donna R.; Light, Kim L.; Wong, Terence Z.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between radiotherapy (RT)-induced changes in computed tomography (CT)-defined lung tissue density and pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods and Materials: Patients undergoing incidental partial lung RT were prospectively assessed for global (PFTs) and regional (CT and single photon emission CT [SPECT]) lung function before and, serially, after RT. The percent reductions in the PFT and the average changes in lung density were compared (Pearson correlations) in the overall group and subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Comparisons were also made between the CT- and SPECT-based computations using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Between 1991 and 2004, 343 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 111 patients had a total of 203 concurrent post-RT evaluations of changes in lung density and PFTs available for the analyses, and 81 patients had a total of 141 concurrent post-RT SPECT images. The average increases in lung density were related to the percent reductions in the PFTs, albeit with modest correlation coefficients (range, 0.20-0.43). The analyses also indicated that the association between lung density and PFT changes is essentially equivalent to the corresponding association with SPECT-defined lung perfusion. Conclusion: We found a weak quantitative association between the degree of increase in lung density as defined by CT and the percent reduction in the PFTs.

  1. [Resuscitation of newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Kalmbach, Kilian; Leonhardt, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    Successful resuscitation of newborn infants depends on adequate preparation, exact evaluation and prompt initiation of support according to the recently updated recommendations by trained personnel. The key step in postnatal adaptation is the initiation of breathing with a subsequent increase in pulmonary blood flow and pulmonary gas exchange. Therefore, in compromised newborn infants, adequate ventilation is the most important step in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Ventilation should be initiated with room air in term infants and with low concentrations of supplemental oxygen in preterm infants. Subsequently, oxygen supplementation should always be guided by pulse oximetry. Chest compressions are only effective if adequate ventilation has been ensured. The compression ventilation ratio remains 3:1. The prevention of heat loss and maintaining a normal body temperature by adequate measures is an essential part of the care for healthy as well as asphyxiated infants. Therapeutic hypothermia should only be initiated after successful resuscitation and consultation with the regional neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:21815119

  2. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Zoltan; Donic, Viliam; Benacka, Roman; Jakus, Jan; Gresova, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath - sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant - autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation and

  3. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath – sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant – autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation

  4. Brain resuscitation. Ethical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Omery, A; Caswell, D

    1989-03-01

    Brain resuscitation is the newest in a long line of treatment protocols that is designed to aid us in sustaining not just life, but quality life in the critical care setting. Like other, previously established protocols, it is not value free. Its implementation brings ethical considerations that must be addressed. If the issues are not addressed, there is the real danger that the resulting moral dilemmas will overwhelm the nurse. In brain resuscitation, there are at least three ethical issues that must be recognized. These are the role of resuscitation in the life process, allocation of scarce resources, and participation in research. To address these issues, nurses will have to be aware of the ethical principle and/or perspectives involved. For some of these issues, the solutions will have to come from nursing's national organizations, such as the American Association of Critical Care Nurses. Other solutions presented will require the nurse to come to an individual decision regarding the ethics of brain resuscitation. The journey to the conclusion of this discussion will end with disappointment for those who sought an algorhythm or decision tree with which to make definitive decisions in regard to ethical decisions about brain resuscitation. To have assumed that such an absolute discussion in regard to the ethical perspectives related to brain resuscitation is possible or even desirable would have been to deny the moral/ethical responsibilities of the nurse who practices in a critical care setting. While these ethical responsibilities can be overwhelmingly burdensome, they can also be opportunities. They can be positive opportunities for our health care colleagues, our patients, and ourselves. PMID:2803694

  5. Endpoints of resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cestero, Ramon F; Dent, Daniel L

    2015-04-01

    Despite the multiple causes of the shock state, all causes possess the common abnormality of oxygen supply not meeting tissue metabolic demands. Compensatory mechanisms may mask the severity of hypoxemia and hypoperfusion, since catecholamines and extracellular fluid shifts initially compensate for the physiologic derangements associated with patients in shock. Despite the achievement of normal physiologic parameters after resuscitation, significant metabolic acidosis may continue to be present in the tissues, as evidenced by increased lactate levels and metabolic acidosis. This review discusses the major endpoints of resuscitation in clinical use. PMID:25814109

  6. Computational Models of Ventilator Induced Lung Injury and Surfactant Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Jason H.T.; Smith, Bradford J.; Allen, Gilman B.

    2014-01-01

    Managing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) invariably involves the administration of mechanical ventilation, the challenge being to avoid the iatrogenic sequellum known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Devising individualized ventilation strategies in ARDS requires that patient-specific lung physiology be taken into account, and this is greatly aided by the use of computational models of lung mechanical function that can be matched to physiological measurements made in a given patient. In this review, we discuss recent models that have the potential to serve as the basis for devising minimally injurious modes of mechanical ventilation in ARDS patients. PMID:26904138

  7. Ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Gutierrez; Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato Soibelmann

    2013-01-01

    In preterm infants, the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation is associated with ventilator-induced lung injuries and subsequent bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of the present review was to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of injury that involve cytokine-mediated inflammation to contribute to the development of new preventive strategies. Relevant articles were retrieved from the PubMed database using the search terms "ventilator-induced lung injury preterm", "continuous positive airway pressure", "preterm", and "bronchopulmonary dysplasia". The resulting data and other relevant information were divided into several topics to ensure a thorough, critical view of ventilation-induced lung injury and its consequences in preterm infants. The role of pro-inflammatory cytokines (particularly interleukins 6 and 8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) as mediators of lung injury was assessed. Evidence from studies conducted with animals and human newborns is described. This evidence shows that brief periods of mechanical ventilation is sufficient to induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Other forms of mechanical and non-invasive ventilation were also analyzed as protective alternatives to conventional mechanical ventilation. It was concluded that non-invasive ventilation, intubation followed by early surfactant administration and quick extubation for nasal continuous positive airway pressure, and strategies that regulate tidal volume and avoid volutrauma (such as volume guarantee ventilation) protect against ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants. PMID:24553514

  8. [Mechanical resuscitation assist devices].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Breil, M; Ihli, M; Messelken, M; Rauch, S; Schewe, J-C

    2014-03-01

    In Germany 100,000-160,000 people suffer from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) annually. The incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after OHCA varies between emergency ambulance services but is in the range of 30-90 CPR attempts per 100,000 inhabitants per year. Basic life support (BLS) involving chest compressions and ventilation is the key measure of resuscitation. Rapid initiation and quality of BLS are the most critical factors for CPR success. Even healthcare professionals are not always able to ensure the quality of CPR measures. Consequently in recent years mechanical resuscitation devices have been developed to optimize chest compression and the resulting circulation. In this article the mechanical resuscitation devices currently available in Germany are discussed and evaluated scientifically in context with available literature. The ANIMAX CPR device should not be used outside controlled trials as no clinical results have so far been published. The same applies to the new device Corpuls CPR which will be available on the market in early 2014. Based on the current published data a general recommendation for the routine use of LUCAS™ and AutoPulse® CPR cannot be given. The preliminary data of the CIRC trial and the published data of the LINC trial revealed that mechanical CPR is apparently equivalent to good manual CPR. For the final assessment further publications of large randomized studies must be analyzed (e.g. the CIRC and PaRAMeDIC trials). However, case control studies, case series and small studies have already shown that in special situations and in some cases patients will benefit from the automatic mechanical resuscitation devices (LUCAS™, AutoPulse®). This applies especially to emergency services where standard CPR quality is far below average and for patients who require prolonged CPR under difficult circumstances. This might be true in cases of resuscitation due to hypothermia, intoxication and pulmonary embolism as well as

  9. [Resuscitation - Adult advanced life support].

    PubMed

    Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Bein, Berthold

    2016-03-01

    Enhanced measures for resuscitation of adults are based on basic measures of resuscitation. The central elements are highly effective chest compressions and avoidance of disruptions that are associated with poor patient outcomes that occur within seconds. The universal algorithm distinguishes the therapy for ventricular fibrillation from the therapy in asystole or pulseless electrical activity (PEA) by the need of defibrillation, and amiodarone administration in the former. Defibrillation is biphasic. In all other aspects, there are no differences in therapy. In each episode of cardiac arrest, reversible causes should be excluded or treated. For the diagnosis during resuscitation, sonography can be helpful. What is new in the 2015 ERC recommendations is the use of capnography, which can be used for the assessment of ROSC (return of spontaneous circulation), ventilation, resuscitation and intubation quality. Mechanical resuscitation devices can be used in selected situations. Successful primary resuscitation should be directly followed by measures of the post-resuscitation care. PMID:27022698

  10. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Matthew M; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S; Mains, Charles W; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  11. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Matthew M.; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S.; Mains, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  12. Witnessed resuscitation: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Wendy Marina

    2006-03-01

    The science and practice of resuscitation is recognised and endorsed on an international level, yet for more than a decade it has appeared in the literature alongside words such as witnessing or witnessed to signify the practice of family presence during a resuscitation attempt. This paper explores the meaning of witnessed resuscitation using the process for concept analysis proposed by Rodgers. The term resuscitation is explored, followed by identification of relevant uses of the concept of witnessed resuscitation. The reader is introduced to conceptual variations that challenge the way in which the concept has become associated with family or relatives presence in the resuscitation room of an accident and emergency department. Conceptual clarity is further enhanced through the identification of references, antecedents and consequences of witnessed resuscitation and by providing a model case of the concept that includes its defining attributes. PMID:16043184

  13. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: risks and benefits of ventilation].

    PubMed

    Cordioli, Ricardo Luiz; Garelli, Valentina; Lyazidi, Aissam; Suppan, Laurent; Savary, Dominique; Brochard, Laurent; Richard, Jean-Christophe M

    2013-12-11

    Knowledge of the physiological mechanisms that govern cardiopulmonary interactions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) allows to better assess risks and benefits of ventilation. Ventilation is required to maintain gas exchange, particularly when CPR is prolonged. Nevertheless, conventional ventilation (bag mask or mechanical ventilation) may be harmful when excessive or when chest compressions are interrupted. In fact large tidal volume and/or rapid respiratory rate may adversely compromise hemodynamic effects of chest compressions. In this regard, international recommendations that give the priority to chest compressions, are meaningful. Continuous flow insufflation with oxygen that generates a moderate positive airway pressure avoids any interruption of chest compressions and prevents the risk of lung injury associated with prolonged resuscitation. PMID:24416979

  14. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model. Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells. PMID:26396176

  15. Partial liquid ventilation improves lung function in ventilation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Vazquez de Anda, G F; Lachmann, R A; Verbrugge, S J; Gommers, D; Haitsma, J J; Lachmann, B

    2001-07-01

    Disturbances in lung function and lung mechanics are present after ventilation with high peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) and low levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Therefore, the authors investigated whether partial liquid ventilation can re-establish lung function after ventilation-induced lung injury. Adult rats were exposed to high PIP without PEEP for 20 min. Thereafter, the animals were randomly divided into five groups. The first group was killed immediately after randomization and used as an untreated control. The second group received only sham treatment and ventilation, and three groups received treatment with perfluorocarbon (10 mL x kg(-1), 20 mL x kg(-1), and 20 ml x kg(-1) plus an additional 5 mL x kg(-1) after 1 h). The four groups were maintained on mechanical ventilation for a further 2-h observation period. Blood gases, lung mechanics, total protein concentration, minimal surface tension, and small/large surfactant aggregates ratio were determined. The results show that in ventilation-induced lung injury, partial liquid ventilation with different amounts of perflubron improves gas exchange and pulmonary function, when compared to a group of animals treated with standard respiratory care. These effects have been observed despite the presence of a high intra-alveolar protein concentration, especially in those groups treated with 10 and 20 mL of perflubron. The data suggest that replacement of perfluorocarbon, lost over time, is crucial to maintain the constant effects of partial liquid ventilation. PMID:11510811

  16. Metallothionein-induced zinc partitioning exacerbates hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Min; McLaughlin, Joseph N.; Frederick, Daniel R.; Zhu, Lin; Thambiayya, Kalidasan; Wasserloos, Karla J.; Kaminski, Iris; Pearce, Linda L.; Peterson, Jim; Li, Jin; Latoche, Joseph D.; Peck Palmer, Octavia M.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Fattman, Cheryl L.; Alcorn, John F.; Oury, Tim D.; Angus, Derek C.; Pitt, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Hypozincemia, with hepatic zinc accumulation at the expense of other organs, occurs in infection, inflammation, and aseptic lung injury. Mechanisms underlying zinc partitioning or its impact on extrahepatic organs are unclear. Here we show that the major zinc-binding protein, metallothionein (MT), is critical for zinc transmigration from lung to liver during hyperoxia and preservation of intrapulmonary zinc during hyperoxia is associated with an injury-resistant phenotype in MT-null mice. Particularly, lung-to-liver zinc ratios decreased in wild-type (WT) and increased significantly in MT-null mice breathing 95% oxygen for 72 h. Compared with female adult WT mice, MT-null mice were significantly protected against hyperoxic lung injury indicated by reduced inflammation and interstitial edema, fewer necrotic changes to distal airway epithelium, and sustained lung function at 72 h hyperoxia. Lungs of MT-null mice showed decreased levels of immunoreactive LC3, an autophagy marker, compared with WT mice. Analysis of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the lungs revealed similar levels of manganese-SOD activity between strains under normoxia and hyperoxia. Lung extracellular SOD activity decreased significantly in both strains at 72 h of hyperoxia, although there was no difference between strains. Copper-zinc-SOD activity was ∼4× higher under normoxic conditions in MT-null compared with WT mice but was not affected in either group by hyperoxia. Collectively the data suggest that genetic deletion of MT-I/II in mice is associated with compensatory increase in copper-zinc-SOD activity, prevention of hyperoxia-induced zinc transmigration from lung to liver, and hyperoxia-resistant phenotype strongly associated with differences in zinc homeostasis during hyperoxic acute lung injury. PMID:23275622

  17. Lung-derived soluble mediators are pathogenic in ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jaecklin, Thomas; Engelberts, Doreen; Otulakowski, Gail; O'Brodovich, Hugh; Post, Martin; Kavanagh, Brian P

    2011-04-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) due to high tidal volume (V(T)) is associated with increased levels of circulating factors that may contribute to, or be markers of, injury. This study investigated if exclusively lung-derived circulating factors produced during high V(T) ventilation can cause or worsen VILI. In isolated perfused mouse lungs, recirculation of perfusate worsened injury (compliance impairment, microvascular permeability, edema) induced by high V(T). Perfusate collected from lungs ventilated with high V(T) and used to perfuse lungs ventilated with low V(T) caused similar compliance impairment and permeability and caused a dose-dependent decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) across rat distal lung epithelial monolayers. Circulating soluble factors derived from the isolated lung thus contributed to VILI and had deleterious effects on the lung epithelial barrier. These data demonstrate transferability of an injury initially caused exclusively by mechanical ventilation and provides novel evidence for the biotrauma hypothesis in VILI. Mediators of the TER decrease were heat-sensitive, transferable via Folch extraction, and (following ultrafiltration, 3 kDa) comprised both smaller and larger molecules. Although several classes of candidate mediators, including protein cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, macrophage inflammation protein-1α) and lipids (e.g., eicosanoids, ceramides, sphingolipids), have been implicated in VILI, only prostanoids accumulated in the perfusate in a pattern consistent with a pathogenic role, yet cyclooxygenase inhibition did not protect against injury. Although no single class of factor appears solely responsible for the decrease in barrier function, the current data implicate lipid-soluble protein-bound molecules as not just markers but pathogenic mediators in VILI. PMID:21239530

  18. Haemodynamic changes in adrenaline-induced acute massive lung oedema.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C P

    1975-01-01

    During the production of adrenaline-induced acute massive lung oedema in the dog, plumonary arterial, pulmonary venous, systemic arterial, and bronchial arterial blood pressures all increase markedly. Pulmonary arterial and venous blood flows fall steeply after initial transient rises. Systemic arterial blood flow also declines, with or without an initial transient increase. The bronchial arterial blood flow shows an initial fall followed by a rise of late onset. The main determinant for the pathogenesis of adrenaline-induced lung oedema is apparently the enormously increased hydrostatic pressure in the pulmonary vascular bed. PMID:123482

  19. Nilotinib ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nilotinib on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given nilotinib (10 mg/kg) by oral gavage twice daily for 1 week prior to exposure to aerosolized LPS. At 24 h after LPS exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples and lung tissue were collected. The lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio, protein level and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF were determined. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities as well as nitrite/nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -}) levels were measured in lung tissues. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were determined in lung tissues. Treatment with nilotinib prior to LPS exposure significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pulmonary edema, as it significantly decreased lung W/D ratio, protein concentration and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the BALF. This was supported by the histopathological examination which revealed marked attenuation of LPS-induced ALI in nilotinib treated rats. In addition, nilotinib significantly increased SOD and GSH activities with significant decrease in MDA content in the lung. Nilotinib also reduced LPS mediated overproduction of pulmonary NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -} levels. Importantly, nilotinib caused down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and iNOS levels in the lung. Taken together, these results demonstrate the protective effects of nilotinib against the LPS-induced ALI. This effect can be attributed to nilotinib ability to counteract the inflammatory cells

  20. A biomechanical model of pendelluft induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Alzahrany, Mohammed; Banerjee, Arindam

    2015-07-16

    Lung ventilation using high frequency oscillatory techniques have been documented to attain adequate gas exchange through various gas transport mechanisms. Among them, the pendelluft flow is considered one of the most crucial mechanisms. In this work, we computationally investigate the induction of abnormal mechanical stresses and a regionally trapped volume of gas due to pendelluft flow. Large eddy simulation was used to model the turbulence in an upper tracheobronchial lung geometry that was derived from CT scans. The pendelluft flow was captured by modeling physiological boundary conditions at the truncated level of the lung model that is sensitive to the coupled resistance and compliance of individual patients. The flow-volume and volume-pressure loops are characterized by irregular shapes and suggest abnormal regional lung ventilation. Incomplete loops were observed indicating gas trapping in these regions signifying a potential for local injury due to incomplete ventilation from a residual volume build-up at the end of the expiration phase. In addition, the gas exchange between units was observed to create a velocity gradient causing a region of high wall shear stress surrounding the carina ridges. The recurrence of the pendelluft flow could cause a rupture to the lung epithelium layer. The trapped gas and wall shear stress were observed to amplify with increasing compliance asymmetry and ventilator operating frequency. In general, despite the significant contribution of the pendelluft flow to the gas exchange augmentation there exists significant risks of localized lung injury, phenomena we describe as pendelluft induced lung injury or PILI. PMID:25997727

  1. IL-17 induces EMT via Stat3 in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qi; Han, Jieli; Fan, Jinshuo; Duan, Limin; Guo, Mengfei; Lv, Zhilei; Hu, Guorong; Chen, Lian; Wu, Feng; Tao, Xiaonan; Xu, Juanjuan; Jin, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a vital role in lung inflammatory diseases, including lung cancer. However, the role and mechanism of action of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 in EMT in lung adenocarcinoma remain unresolved. In our study, we discovered that the expression of N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail1, Snail2, and Twist1 was positively correlated with IL-17 expression, while E-cadherin expression was negatively correlated with IL-17 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma tissues. Moreover, we confirmed that IL-17 promoted EMT in A549 and Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells in vitro by upregulating N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail1, Snail2, and Twist1 expression and downregulating E-cadherin expression. Stat3 was activated in IL-17-treated A549 and LLC cells, and Stat3 inhibition or siRNA knockdown notably reduced IL-17-induced EMT in A549 and LLC cells. Thus, IL-17 promotes EMT in lung adenocarcinoma via Stat3 signaling; these observations suggest that targeting IL-17 and EMT are potential novel therapeutic strategies for lung cancer. PMID:27186414

  2. Apigenin protects against bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, LING; ZHAO, WEI

    2016-01-01

    Apigenin is a non-toxic and non-mutagenic flavone that exists abundantly in numerous herbs and vegetables. Apigenin exerts anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats. A single intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (5 mg/kg) was administered and rats were sacrificed on 7 and 28 days post bleomycin instillation. The instillation of bleomycin resulted in decreased body weight and an increase in the lung index. In addition, bleomycin administration increased the hydroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels and decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the rat lung tissues. Excessive collagen deposits were detected in the lung tissues in bleomycin-treated rats compared with normal control rats. Notably, the oral administration of apigenin (10, 15 and 20 mg/kg/day) appeared to prevent the fibrotic process. The treatment suppressed the increases in hydroxyproline content, MPO activity, TNF-α and TGF-β levels and attenuated the reduction of SOD activity that were induced by bleomycin. Furthermore, excessive collagen deposition was inhibited by the apigenin treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that apigenin may function as a potent anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic agent against bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. PMID:26889245

  3. Stanniocalcin-1 inhibits thrombin-induced signaling and protects from bleomycin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Luping; Zhang, Lin; Ju, Huiming; Li, Qingtian; Pan, Jenny Szu-Chin; Al-Lawati, Zahraa; Sheikh-Hamad, David

    2015-01-01

    Thrombin-induced and proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated signaling increases ROS production, activates ERK, and promotes inflammation and fibroblast proliferation in bleomycin-induced lung injury. Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) activates anti-oxidant pathways, inhibits inflammation and provides cytoprotection; hence, we hypothesized that STC1 will inhibit thrombin/PAR1 signaling and protect from bleomycin-induced pneumonitis. We determined thrombin level and activity, thrombin-induced PAR-1-mediated signaling, superoxide generation and lung pathology after intra-tracheal administration of bleomycin to WT and STC1 Tg mice. Lungs of bleomycin-treated WT mice display: severe pneumonitis; increased generation of superoxide; vascular leak; increased thrombin protein abundance and activity; activation of ERK; greater cytokine/chemokine release and infiltration with T-cells and macrophages. Lungs of STC1 Tg mice displayed none of the above changes. Mechanistic analysis in cultured pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) suggests that STC1 inhibits thrombin-induced and PAR1-mediated ERK activation through suppression of superoxide. In conclusion, STC1 blunts bleomycin-induced rise in thrombin protein and activity, diminishes thrombin-induced signaling through PAR1 to ERK, and inhibits bleomycin-induced pneumonitis. Moreover, our study identifies a new set of cytokines/chemokines, which play a role in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced lung injury. These findings broaden the array of potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of lung diseases characterized by thrombin activation, oxidant stress and inflammation. PMID:26640170

  4. Pleurotus eryngii Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Lung Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Tsugunobu; Ouchi, Kenji; Inatomi, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Pleurotus eryngii (P. eryngii) is consumed as a fresh cultivated mushroom worldwide and demonstrated to have multiple beneficial effects. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of P. eryngii in mice with acute lung injury (ALI). Intranasal instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 μg/site/mouse) induced marked lung inflammation (increase in the number of inflammatory cells, protein leakage, and production of nitric oxide in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) as well as histopathological damage in the lung, 6 h after treatment. Mice administered heat-treated P. eryngii (0.3–1 g/kg, p.o. (HTPE)) 1 h before LPS challenge showed decreased pulmonary inflammation and ameliorated histopathological damage. These results suggest that HTPE has anti-inflammatory effects against ALI. Thus, P. eryngii itself may also have anti-inflammatory effects and could be a beneficial food for the prevention of ALI induced by bacterial infection. PMID:24799939

  5. [Automaton resuscitation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lévy, E; Tollet, M; Cosnes, J

    1979-05-19

    The aim of the Automaton Resuscitation is execution, watching and maintenance of a programme of intricate resuscitation tying for the first time the therapeutic to extemporaneous outflow of biological spoliation. This apparatus executes permanently and automatically the taking of biological fluid, estimates its outflow, amounts its total and realizes or the reinstillation of the fluid in the digestive tract or the order of intravenous perfusion tied to fluid spoliation according to an adjustable connection. A first self acting regulator for the juice intestinal reinstillation has been made in 1974. The second one with 4 units of continuous aspiration, data integration, reinstillation and perfusion tied with security had waked for 6 months. Moreover it allows with fiability the reinstillation of the gastric, duodenal, bilious, pancreatic or intestinal juice, on the other hand an intravenous perfusion tied to spontaneous spoliation (digestive) or instigated spoliation (provocated diuresis) and in a fundamental way simplifies the work of the physicians and the nurses. PMID:471743

  6. Lung mechanics are both dose and tidal volume dependant in LPS-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Dani-Louise; De Smet, Hilde R; Bersten, Andrew D

    2009-07-31

    Endotoxin stimulus plays a significant role in various forms of acute lung injury (ALI) which may be exacerbated by mechanical ventilation. Here, we identify the temporal pathophysiologic sequence following inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and subsequently examine both LPS dose and V(T) relationships. Rats received intratracheal LPS (3, 9 or 15 mg/kg) prior to mechanical ventilation (V(T)=6, 9 or 12 ml/kg) and measurement of forced impedance mechanics for up to 4h. LPS-induced lung injury was achieved within the 15 min of LPS instillation with a 78% decrease in PaO(2) promptly followed by approximately 30% deterioration in tissue elastance. Despite a 41% increase in total surfactant, the active disaturated phospholipid fraction decreased 3-7% with decreasing PaO(2) and tissue mechanics and with increases in total lung lavage protein (150%) and wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (10%). V(T)=12 ml/kg resulted in an additional deterioration in tissue resistance (130%) and elastance (63%). These results suggest that LPS-induced lung injury is both LPS dose and V(T) sensitive, supporting a 'two hit' model of ALI. PMID:19539791

  7. Novel Approaches to Neonatal Resuscitation and the Impact on Birth Asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Te Pas, Arjan B; Sobotka, Kristina; Hooper, Stuart B

    2016-09-01

    Historically, recommendations for neonatal resuscitation were largely based on dogma, but there is renewed interest in performing resuscitation studies at birth. The emphasis for resuscitation following birth asphyxia is administering effective ventilation, as adequate lung aeration leads not only to an increase in oxygenation but also increased pulmonary blood flow and heart rate. To aerate the lung, an initial sustained inflation can increase heart rate, oxygenation, and blood pressure recovery much faster when compared with standard ventilation. Hyperoxia should be avoided, and extra oxygen given to restore cardiac function and spontaneous breathing should be titrated based on oxygen saturations. PMID:27524447

  8. Hypervolemia induces and potentiates lung damage after recruitment maneuver in a model of sepsis-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Recruitment maneuvers (RMs) seem to be more effective in extrapulmonary acute lung injury (ALI), caused mainly by sepsis, than in pulmonary ALI. Nevertheless, the maintenance of adequate volemic status is particularly challenging in sepsis. Since the interaction between volemic status and RMs is not well established, we investigated the effects of RMs on lung and distal organs in the presence of hypovolemia, normovolemia, and hypervolemia in a model of extrapulmonary lung injury induced by sepsis. Methods ALI was induced by cecal ligation and puncture surgery in 66 Wistar rats. After 48 h, animals were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and randomly assigned to 3 volemic status (n = 22/group): 1) hypovolemia induced by blood drainage at mean arterial pressure (MAP)≈70 mmHg; 2) normovolemia (MAP≈100 mmHg), and 3) hypervolemia with colloid administration to achieve a MAP≈130 mmHg. In each group, animals were further randomized to be recruited (CPAP = 40 cm H2O for 40 s) or not (NR) (n = 11/group), followed by 1 h of protective mechanical ventilation. Echocardiography, arterial blood gases, static lung elastance (Est,L), histology (light and electron microscopy), lung wet-to-dry (W/D) ratio, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, caspase-3, type III procollagen (PCIII), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA expressions in lung tissue, as well as lung and distal organ epithelial cell apoptosis were analyzed. Results We observed that: 1) hypervolemia increased lung W/D ratio with impairment of oxygenation and Est,L, and was associated with alveolar and endothelial cell damage and increased IL-6, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 mRNA expressions; and 2) RM reduced alveolar collapse independent of volemic status. In hypervolemic animals, RM improved oxygenation above the levels observed with the use of positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP), but increased lung injury and led to higher inflammatory and fibrogenetic

  9. [Lazarus phenomenon: spontaneous resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Casielles García, J L; González Latorre, M V; Fernández Amigo, N; Guerra Vélz, A; Cotta Galán, M; Bravo Capaz, E; de las Mulas Béjar, M

    2004-01-01

    A 94-year-old woman undergoing surgery for simple repair of a duodenal perforation experienced a sudden massive hemorrhage (1500 mL) when the duodenum was separated from adjacent structures. Hemodynamic stability was re-established when fluids were replaced. After the abdominal wall was closed, increased amplitude of the QRS wave was observed and heart rate slowed until there was no pulse. Electromechanical dissociation (EMD) was diagnosed and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started. When EMD persisted after 40 minutes, resuscitative measures were stopped and the ventilator was disconnected, though orotracheal intubation and arterial and electrocardiographic monitoring were maintained. After 2 or 3 minutes, heart rhythm restarted spontaneously and arterial pressure waves reappeared on the monitor. The patient progressed well for 72 hours, after which she developed septic shock and multiorgan failure, dying 18 days later. The Lazarus phenomenon may be more common than the medical literature would indicate, possibly because a large gap in our understanding of the pathophysiology of the phenomenon underlies anecdotes about "miracles". As we wait for adequate international consensus on a protocol for monitoring the withdrawal of resuscitative measures, we should act prudently before definitively certifying death. The case we report occurred during a surgical intervention in which the patient had received general anesthesia. We believe that the causes that might explain the Lazarus phenomenon are quite different in that context than they would be in a nonsurgical setting, such that it would be useful to create a national database to keep a record of such intraoperative events. PMID:15495638

  10. Alterations of lung microbiota in a mouse model of LPS-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Afonyushkin, Taras; Ulanov, Alexander; Semenyuk, Ekaterina; Latif, Omar; Tesic, Vera; Birukova, Anna A.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome are common responses to a variety of infectious and noninfectious insults. We used a mouse model of ALI induced by intratracheal administration of sterile bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to investigate the changes in innate lung microbiota and study microbial community reaction to lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction induced by endotoxin insult. One group of C57BL/6J mice received LPS via intratracheal injection (n = 6), and another received sterile water (n = 7). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed at 72 h after treatment. Bacterial DNA was extracted and used for qPCR and 16S rRNA gene-tag (V3–V4) sequencing (Illumina). The bacterial load in BAL from ALI mice was increased fivefold (P = 0.03). The community complexity remained unchanged (Simpson index, P = 0.7); the Shannon diversity index indicated the increase of community evenness in response to ALI (P = 0.07). Principal coordinate analysis and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) test (P = 0.005) revealed a significant difference between microbiota of control and ALI groups. Bacteria from families Xanthomonadaceae and Brucellaceae increased their abundance in the ALI group as determined by Metastats test (P < 0.02). In concordance with the 16s-tag data, Stenotrohomonas maltophilia (Xanthomonadaceae) and Ochrobactrum anthropi (Brucellaceae) were isolated from lungs of mice from both groups. Metabolic profiling of BAL detected the presence of bacterial substrates suitable for both isolates. Additionally, microbiota from LPS-treated mice intensified IL-6-induced lung inflammation in naive mice. We conclude that the morbid transformation of ALI microbiota was attributed to the set of inborn opportunistic pathogens thriving in the environment of inflamed lung, rather than the external infectious agents. PMID:25957290

  11. Role of heme in bromine-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lam, Adam; Vetal, Nilam; Matalon, Sadis; Aggarwal, Saurabh

    2016-06-01

    Bromine (Br2 ) gas inhalation poses an environmental and occupational hazard resulting in high morbidity and mortality. In this review, we underline the acute lung pathology (within 24 h of exposure) and potential therapeutic interventions that may be utilized to mitigate Br2 -induced human toxicity. We discuss our latest published data, which suggest that an increase in heme-dependent tissue injury underlies the pathogenesis of Br2 toxicity. Our study was based on previous findings that demonstrated that Br2 upregulates the heme-degrading enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which converts toxic heme into bilverdin. Interestingly, following Br2 inhalation, heme levels were indeed elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, plasma, and whole lung tissue in C57BL/6 mice. High heme levels correlated with increased lung oxidative stress, lung inflammation, respiratory acidosis, lung edema, higher airway resistance, and mortality. However, therapeutic reduction of heme levels, by either scavenging with hemopexin or degradation by HO-1, improved lung function and survival. Therefore, heme attenuation may prove a useful adjuvant therapy to treat patients after Br2 exposure. PMID:27244263

  12. [Imaging features of drug-induced lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Mellot, F; Scherrer, A

    2005-05-01

    Drug-induced lung diseases are an increasingly frequent cause of morbidity. Over 350 drugs are now recognized as being implicated in drug-induced lung diseases. Early diagnosis is critical. Discontinuing the drug may result in regression of the adverse effect. Diagnosis is based on a history of drug exposure with a temporal relationship between the introduction of the drug and the onset of symptoms, histologic evidence of lung damage and exclusion of other causes of lung injury. Unfortunately there is no specific test available. Histologic and radiologic findings are often non specific and diagnosis can be difficult. Drugs can cause a constellation of distinct patterns of respiratory involvement and all anatomic compartments of the lungs may be involved. The most common patterns are: non specific interstitial pneumonia and fibrosis, pulmonary eosinophilia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, pulmonary edema with or without diffuse alveolar damage, bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, pulmonary hemorrhage and vasculitis. It is important to be familiar with their common radiologic appearances. PMID:16106793

  13. Mechanical stretch induces lung α-epithelial Na(+) channel expression.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Shamimunisa B; Isaac, John; Seidner, Steven R; Dixon, Patricia S; Henson, Barbara M; DiGeronimo, Robert J

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT During fetal development physiological stretching helps drive lung growth and maturation. At birth, the α-subunit of the alveolar epithelial sodium channel (α-ENaC) is a critical factor in helping to facilitate clearance of lung fluid during the perinatal period. The effects of stretch, however, on α-ENaC expression in the fetal lung have yet to be elucidated. In an effort to explore this question, we used both an in vitro cell culture model that exposes cells to repetitive cyclic stretch (CS) as well as an in vivo preterm animal model of mechanical ventilation (MV). We found that murine lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells exposed to repetitive CS showed a significant rise in α-ENaC mRNA expression. Total and cell-surface protein abundance of α-ENaC were also elevated after 24 h of CS. Stretch-induced increases in α-ENaC expression were suppressed in the presence of either actinomycin D or cycloheximide. Pharmacological inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) did not attenuate stretch-induced increases in α-ENaC protein, whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK or c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) did. In 29-day preterm rabbits, alveolar stretching secondary to postnatal MV markedly elevated fetal lung α-ENaC expression compared to spontaneously breathing counterparts. In summary, our findings indicate that mechanical stretch promotes α-ENaC expression. PMID:25058750

  14. Resuscitation in the dental practice.

    PubMed

    Jevon, P

    2016-03-11

    The Resuscitation Council (UK) published new resuscitation guidelines in October 2015. The aim of this article is to understand these new guidelines and how dental practices should implement them. A 'resuscitation in the dental practice poster' has been designed which incorporates the new Resuscitation Council (UK) adult basic life support algorithm. This poster, endorsed by the British Dental Association, is included with this issue of the British Dental Journal. Further copies can be downloaded from: https://www.walsallhealthcare.nhs.uk/Data/Sites/1/media/documents/health-and-safety/resus.pdf. PMID:26964602

  15. Protocolized Resuscitation of Burn Patients.

    PubMed

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Salinas, Jose; Kramer, George C

    2016-10-01

    Fluid resuscitation of burn patients is commonly initiated using modified Brooke or Parkland formula. The fluid infusion rate is titrated up or down hourly to maintain adequate urine output and other endpoints. Over-resuscitation leads to morbid complications. Adherence to paper-based protocols, flow sheets, and clinical practice guidelines is associated with decreased fluid resuscitation volumes and complications. Computerized tools assist providers. Although completely autonomous closed-loop control of resuscitation has been demonstrated in animal models of burn shock, the major advantages of open-loop and decision-support systems are identifying trends, enhancing situational awareness, and encouraging burn team communication. PMID:27600131

  16. Amiodarone-Induced Lung Injury With Bilateral Lung Pneumonitis and Peripheral Eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Alqaid, Ammar; Baskaran, Gautam; Dougherty, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone is a widely used antiarrhythmic that is used in the management of a variety of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Amiodarone-induced lung injury is an adverse effect in 5% of patients taking amiodarone, usually within 12 months of commencing therapy. Different mechanisms of injury and histopathological changes have been proposed and described. Eosinophilic pneumonia is one uncommon presentation of amiodarone-induced lung injury. The following is a case report of a 62-year-old woman who, after taking 400 mg of amiodarone twice daily for 8 months, developed bilateral interstitial pneumonitis with peripheral eosinophilia. After cessation of amiodarone, she had significant improvement in terms of her clinical symptoms and partial regression of pulmonary infiltrates on radiological imaging. The case underlies the importance of vigilance monitoring patients who are taking potentially pneumotoxic drugs as well as describing a classic example of drug-induced pneumonitis. PMID:25882273

  17. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  18. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  19. Resuscitation therapy for traumatic brain injury-induced coma in rats: mechanisms of median nerve electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhen; Zhong, Ying-jun; Wang, Liang; Wei, Tian-qi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, rats were put into traumatic brain injury-induced coma and treated with median nerve electrical stimulation. We explored the wake-promoting effect, and possible mechanisms, of median nerve electrical stimulation. Electrical stimulation upregulated the expression levels of orexin-A and its receptor OX1R in the rat prefrontal cortex. Orexin-A expression gradually increased with increasing stimulation, while OX1R expression reached a peak at 12 hours and then decreased. In addition, after the OX1R antagonist, SB334867, was injected into the brain of rats after traumatic brain injury, fewer rats were restored to consciousness, and orexin-A and OXIR expression in the prefrontal cortex was downregulated. Our findings indicate that median nerve electrical stimulation induced an up-regulation of orexin-A and OX1R expression in the prefrontal cortex of traumatic brain injury-induced coma rats, which may be a potential mechanism involved in the wake-promoting effects of median nerve electrical stimulation. PMID:26170820

  20. Successful alectinib treatment after crizotinib-induced interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Fujiuchi, Satoru; Fujita, Yuka; Sasaki, Takaaki; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu

    2016-05-01

    A 70-year-old woman with lung adenocarcinoma, harbouring anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangement, was treated with crizotinib as third-line chemotherapy. After 2 months, crizotinib was discontinued because of the development of crizotinib-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD). Steroid treatment was then introduced and tapered off. Following complete resolution of the interstitial shadow, cytotoxic chemotherapy was initiated, and continued for over 2 years, until new intrapulmonary lesions developed. Although there was a risk of drug-induced interstitial pneumonia, alectinib was initiated as the fifth-line therapy, without steroid supplementation, as there was no alternative treatment. No recurrence of ILD was noted at 10 months. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful alectinib treatment after the development of crizotinib-induced ILD without the use of prednisolone. PMID:27516885

  1. Successful alectinib treatment after crizotinib‐induced interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yuka; Sasaki, Takaaki; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A 70‐year‐old woman with lung adenocarcinoma, harbouring anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangement, was treated with crizotinib as third‐line chemotherapy. After 2 months, crizotinib was discontinued because of the development of crizotinib‐induced interstitial lung disease (ILD). Steroid treatment was then introduced and tapered off. Following complete resolution of the interstitial shadow, cytotoxic chemotherapy was initiated, and continued for over 2 years, until new intrapulmonary lesions developed. Although there was a risk of drug‐induced interstitial pneumonia, alectinib was initiated as the fifth‐line therapy, without steroid supplementation, as there was no alternative treatment. No recurrence of ILD was noted at 10 months. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful alectinib treatment after the development of crizotinib‐induced ILD without the use of prednisolone. PMID:27516885

  2. Predicting ventilator-induced lung injury using a lung injury cost function.

    PubMed

    Hamlington, Katharine L; Smith, Bradford J; Allen, Gilman B; Bates, Jason H T

    2016-07-01

    Managing patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requires mechanical ventilation that balances the competing goals of sustaining life while avoiding ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). In particular, it is reasonable to suppose that for any given ARDS patient, there must exist an optimum pair of values for tidal volume (VT) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) that together minimize the risk for VILI. To find these optimum values, and thus develop a personalized approach to mechanical ventilation in ARDS, we need to be able to predict how injurious a given ventilation regimen will be in any given patient so that the minimally injurious regimen for that patient can be determined. Our goal in the present study was therefore to develop a simple computational model of the mechanical behavior of the injured lung in order to calculate potential injury cost functions to serve as predictors of VILI. We set the model parameters to represent normal, mildly injured, and severely injured lungs and estimated the amount of volutrauma and atelectrauma caused by ventilating these lungs with a range of VT and PEEP. We estimated total VILI in two ways: 1) as the sum of the contributions from volutrauma and atelectrauma and 2) as the product of their contributions. We found the product provided estimates of VILI that are more in line with our previous experimental findings. This model may thus serve as the basis for the objective choice of mechanical ventilation parameters for the injured lung. PMID:27174922

  3. Inducible Innate Resistance of Lung Epithelium to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Scott E.; Xu, Yi; Tuvim, Michael J.; Dickey, Burton F.

    2015-01-01

    Most studies of innate immunity have focused on leukocytes such as neutrophils, macrophages and natural killer cells. However, epithelial cells play key roles in innate defenses that include providing a mechanical barrier to microbial entry, signaling to leukocytes, and directly killing pathogens. Importantly, all of these defenses are highly inducible in response to the sensing of microbial and host products. In healthy lungs, the level of innate immune epithelial function is low at baseline, as indicated by low levels of spontaneous microbial killing and cytokine release, reflecting low constitutive stimulation in the nearly sterile lower respiratory tract when mucociliary clearance mechanisms are functioning effectively. This contrasts with the colon, where bacteria are continuously present and epithelial cells are constitutively activated. While the surface area of the lungs presents a large target for microbial invasion, activated lung epithelial cells that are closely apposed to deposited pathogens are ideally positioned for microbial killing. PMID:20148683

  4. Small Molecular TRAIL Inducer ONC201 Induces Death in Lung Cancer Cells: A Preclinical Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Zhou, Jihong; Li, Zhanhua; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively targets cancer cells. The present preclinical study investigated the anti-cancer efficiency of ONC201, a first-in-class small molecule TRAIL inducer, in lung cancer cells. We showed that ONC201 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative in both established (A549 and H460 lines) and primary human lung cancer cells. It was yet non-cytotoxic to normal lung epithelial cells. Further, ONC201 induced exogenous apoptosis activation in lung cancer cells, which was evidenced by TRAIL/death receptor-5 (DR5) induction and caspase-8 activation. The caspase-8 inhibitor or TRAIL/DR5 siRNA knockdown alleviated ONC201's cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells. Molecularly, ONC201 in-activated Akt-S6K1 and Erk signalings in lung cancer cells, causing Foxo3a nuclear translocation. For the in vivo studies, intraperitoneal injection of ONC201 at well-tolerated doses significantly inhibited xenografted A549 tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Further, ONC201 administration induced TRAIL/DR5 expression, yet inactivated Akt-S6K1 and Erk in tumor tissues. These results of the study demonstrates the potent anti-lung cancer activity by ONC201. PMID:27626799

  5. Zinc modulates cytokine-induced lung epithelial cell barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Bao, Shenying; Knoell, Daren L

    2006-12-01

    Apoptosis plays a causative role in acute lung injury in part due to epithelial cell loss. We recently reported that zinc protects the lung epithelium during inflammatory stress whereas depletion of intracellular zinc enhances extrinsic apoptosis. In this investigation, we evaluated the relationship between zinc, caspase-3, and cell-to-cell contact via proteins that form the adherens junction complex. Cell adhesion proteins are directly responsible for formation of the mechanical barrier of the lung epithelium. We hypothesized that exposure to inflammatory cytokines, in conjunction with zinc deprivation, would induce caspase-3, leading to degradation of junction proteins, loss of cell-to-cell contact, and compromised barrier function. Primary human upper airway and type I/II alveolar epithelial cultures were obtained from multiple donors and exposed to inflammatory stimuli that provoke extrinsic apoptosis in addition to depletion of intracellular zinc. We observed that zinc deprivation combined with tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma, and Fas receptor ligation accelerates caspase-3 activation, proteolysis of E-cadherin and beta-catenin, and cellular apoptosis, leading to increased paracellular leak across monolayers of both upper airway and alveolar lung epithelial cultures. Zinc supplementation inhibited apoptosis and paracellular leak, whereas caspase inhibition was less effective. We conclude that zinc is a vital factor in the lung epithelium that protects against death receptor-mediated apoptosis and barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, our findings suggest that although caspase-3 inhibition reduces lung epithelial apoptosis it does not prevent mechanical dysfunction. These findings facilitate future studies aimed at developing therapeutic strategies to prevent acute lung injury. PMID:16844947

  6. Interstitial lung disease induced by alectinib (CH5424802/RO5424802).

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Arita, Machiko; Sakai, Takahiro; Sone, Naoyuki; Nishiyama, Akihiro; Niwa, Takashi; Hotta, Machiko; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Ishida, Tadashi

    2015-02-01

    A 75-year-old woman with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged Stage IV lung adenocarcinoma was administered the selective anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, alectinib, as a third-line treatment in a Phase 1-2 study. On the 102nd day, chest computed tomography showed diffuse ground glass opacities. Laboratory data revealed high serum levels of KL-6, SP-D and lactate dehydrogenase without any clinical symptoms. There was no evidence of infection. Marked lymphocytosis was seen in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis, and transbronchial lung biopsy showed mild thickening of alveolar septa and lymphocyte infiltration. Interstitial lung disease was judged to be related to alectinib based on improvements in imaging findings and serum biomarkers after discontinuation of alectinib. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of alectinib-induced interstitial lung disease. Alectinib is a promising drug for ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer. Clinical trials of this selective anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor will facilitate the meticulous elucidation of its long-term safety profile. PMID:25398579

  7. Hyperventilation induces release of cytokines from perfused mouse lung.

    PubMed

    von Bethmann, A N; Brasch, F; Nüsing, R; Vogt, K; Volk, H D; Müller, K M; Wendel, A; Uhlig, S

    1998-01-01

    Artificial mechanical ventilation represents a major cause of iatrogenic lung damage in intensive care. It is largely unknown which mediators, if any, contribute to the onset of such complications. We investigated whether stress caused by artificial mechanical ventilation leads to induction, synthesis, and release of cytokines or eicosanoids from lung tissue. We used the isolated perfused and ventilated mouse lung where frequent perfusate sampling allows determination of mediator release into the perfusate. Hyperventilation was executed with either negative (NPV) or positive pressure ventilation (PPV) at a transpulmonary pressure that was increased 2.5-fold above normal. Both modes of hyperventilation resulted in an approximately 1.75-fold increased expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA, but not of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA. After switching to hyperventilation, prostacyclin release into the perfusate increased almost instantaneously from 19 +/- 17 pg/min to 230 +/- 160 pg/min (PPV) or 115 +/- 87 pg/min (NPV). The enhancement in TNFalpha and IL-6 production developed more slowly. In control lungs after 150 min of perfusion and ventilation, TNFalpha and IL-6 production was 23 +/- 20 pg/min and 330 +/- 210 pg/min, respectively. In lungs hyperventilated for 150 min, TNFalpha and IL-6 production were increased to 287 +/- 180 pg/min and more than 1,000 pg/min, respectively. We conclude that artificial ventilation might cause pulmonary and systemic adverse reactions by inducing the release of mediators into the circulation. PMID:9445308

  8. Pancreatitis-induced acute lung injury. An ARDS model.

    PubMed Central

    Guice, K S; Oldham, K T; Johnson, K J; Kunkel, R G; Morganroth, M L; Ward, P A

    1988-01-01

    Cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats is associated with acute lung injury characterized by increased pulmonary microvascular permeability, increased wet lung weights, and histologic features of alveolar capillary endothelial cell and pulmonary parenchymal injury. The alveolar capillary permeability index is increased 1.8-fold after a 3-hour injury (0.30 to 0.54, p less than 0.05). Gravimetric analysis shows a similar 1.5-fold increase in wet lung weights at 3 hours (0.35% vs. 0.51% of total body weight, p less than 0.05). Histologic features assessed by quantitative morphometric analysis include significant intra-alveolar hemorrhage (0.57 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.12 +/- 0.02 RBC/alveolus at 6 hours, p less than 0.001); endothelial cell disruption (28.11% vs. 4.3%, p less than 0.001); and marked, early neutrophil infiltration (7.45 +/- 0.53 vs. 0.83 +/- 0.18 PMN/hpf at 3 hours, p less than 0.001). The cerulein peptide itself, a cholecystokinin (CCK) analog, is naturally occurring and is not toxic and in several in vitro settings including exposure to pulmonary artery endothelial cells, Type II epithelial cells, and an ex vivo perfused lung preparation. The occurrence of this ARDS-like acute lung injury with acute pancreatitis provides an excellent experimental model to investigate mechanisms and mediators involved in the pathogenesis of ARDS. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3389946

  9. Molecular Mechanisms and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Nian-Hua; Li, Jian Jian; Sun, Lun-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF) is a severe side effect of radiotherapy in lung cancer patients that presents as a progressive pulmonary injury combined with chronic inflammation and exaggerated organ repair. RILF is a major barrier to improving the cure rate and well-being of lung cancer patients because it limits the radiation dose that is required to effectively kill tumor cells and diminishes normal lung function. Although the exact mechanism is unclear, accumulating evidence suggests that various cells, cytokines and regulatory molecules are involved in the tissue reorganization and immune response modulation that occur in RILF. In this review, we will summarize the general symptoms, diagnostics, and current understanding of the cells and molecular factors that are linked to the signaling networks implicated in RILF. Potential approaches for the treatment of RILF will also be discussed. Elucidating the key molecular mediators that initiate and control the extent of RILF in response to therapeutic radiation may reveal additional targets for RILF treatment to significantly improve the efficacy of radiotherapy for lung cancer patients.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Nian-Hua; Li, Jian Jian; Sun, Lun-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF) is a severe side effect of radiotherapy in lung cancer patients that presents as a progressive pulmonary injury combined with chronic inflammation and exaggerated organ repair. RILF is a major barrier to improving the cure rate and well-being of lung cancer patients because it limits the radiation dose that is required to effectively kill tumor cells and diminishes normal lung function. Although the exact mechanism is unclear, accumulating evidence suggests that various cells, cytokines and regulatory molecules are involved in the tissue reorganization and immune response modulation that occur in RILF. In this review, we will summarize the general symptoms, diagnostics, and current understanding of the cells and molecular factors that are linked to the signaling networks implicated in RILF. Potential approaches for the treatment of RILF will also be discussed. Elucidating the key molecular mediators that initiate and control the extent of RILF in response to therapeutic radiation may reveal additional targets for RILF treatment to significantly improve the efficacy of radiotherapy for lung cancer patients. PMID:23909719

  11. Histamine action in paraquat-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lindenschmidt, R C; Selig, W M; Patterson, C E; Verburg, K M; Henry, D P; Forney, R B; Rhoades, R A

    1986-02-01

    We investigated direct histamine release and its effects in edema formation following paraquat (PQ) injury in a blood-free, perfused rat lung preparation. Under control conditions, perfusate histamine levels from the lung averaged 9.5 +/- 1.4 ng/ml. Lungs perfused with paraquat (1 mM) showed marked increases in pulmonary arterial pressure (133%), airway pressure (74%), alveolarcapillary protein flux (200%), and lung weight (38%). Prior to any detectable lung weight or pressure changes, PQ caused a 300% increase in perfusate histamine. Diphenhydramine (1.0 X 10(-5) M), a specific H1-histamine receptor antagonist, blocked the increased protein flux that followed PQ administration and significantly delayed edema. Furthermore, diphenhydramine attenuated the rise in PGF2 alpha. Conversely, histamine release was partially attenuated by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, ibuprofen, at 2.4 X 10(-5) M, the same level that we had previously shown to block an early rise in PGF2 alpha and the onset of edema after PQ. These data show that the increased alveolar-capillary protein flux that occurred with PQ injury was attenuated by an H1-receptor antagonist and suggest that histamine is a primary mediator in paraquat-induced injury and that histamine subsequently stimulates prostaglandin release. PMID:3456218

  12. Pancreatitis-induced acute lung injury. An ARDS model.

    PubMed

    Guice, K S; Oldham, K T; Johnson, K J; Kunkel, R G; Morganroth, M L; Ward, P A

    1988-07-01

    Cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats is associated with acute lung injury characterized by increased pulmonary microvascular permeability, increased wet lung weights, and histologic features of alveolar capillary endothelial cell and pulmonary parenchymal injury. The alveolar capillary permeability index is increased 1.8-fold after a 3-hour injury (0.30 to 0.54, p less than 0.05). Gravimetric analysis shows a similar 1.5-fold increase in wet lung weights at 3 hours (0.35% vs. 0.51% of total body weight, p less than 0.05). Histologic features assessed by quantitative morphometric analysis include significant intra-alveolar hemorrhage (0.57 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.12 +/- 0.02 RBC/alveolus at 6 hours, p less than 0.001); endothelial cell disruption (28.11% vs. 4.3%, p less than 0.001); and marked, early neutrophil infiltration (7.45 +/- 0.53 vs. 0.83 +/- 0.18 PMN/hpf at 3 hours, p less than 0.001). The cerulein peptide itself, a cholecystokinin (CCK) analog, is naturally occurring and is not toxic and in several in vitro settings including exposure to pulmonary artery endothelial cells, Type II epithelial cells, and an ex vivo perfused lung preparation. The occurrence of this ARDS-like acute lung injury with acute pancreatitis provides an excellent experimental model to investigate mechanisms and mediators involved in the pathogenesis of ARDS. PMID:3389946

  13. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: new concept.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwangha

    2012-05-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a series of life-saving actions that improve the chances of survival, following cardiac arrest. Successful resuscitation, following cardiac arrest, requires an integrated set of coordinated actions represented by the links in the Chain of Survival. The links include the following: immediate recognition of cardiac arrest and activation of the emergency response system, early CPR with an emphasis on chest compressions, rapid defibrillation, effective advanced life support, and integrated post-cardiac arrest care. The newest development in the CPR guideline is a change in the basic life support sequence of steps from "A-B-C" (Airway, Breathing, Chest compressions) to "C-A-B" (Chest compressions, Airway, Breathing) for adults. Also, "Hands-Only (compression only) CPR" is emphasized for the untrained lay rescuer. On the basis of the strength of the available evidence, there was unanimous support for continuous emphasis on high-quality CPR with compressions of adequate rate and depth, which allows for complete chest recoil, minimizing interruptions in chest compressions and avoiding excessive ventilation. High-quality CPR is the cornerstone of a system of care that can optimize outcomes beyond return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). There is an increased emphasis on physiologic monitoring to optimize CPR quality, and to detect ROSC. A comprehensive, structured, integrated, multidisciplinary system of care should be implemented in a consistent manner for the treatment of post-cardiac arrest care patients. The return to a prior quality and functional state of health is the ultimate goal of a resuscitation system of care. PMID:23101004

  14. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: current guidelines.

    PubMed

    Green, Bart N; Clark, Tammi

    2005-01-01

    It is critical for health care providers to have the skills and composure required to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) when necessary. Unfortunately, it is easy to postpone updating one's CPR certification when confronted with the demands of leading a practice. New guidelines for CPR have been in effect since 2000. This clinical update provides a brief overview of the new guidelines, some suggestions for incorporating CPR training into the clinician's practice, and clarification for some common legal misconceptions that doctors may have pertaining to administering CPR. PMID:19674653

  15. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25008149

  16. Bradykinin-induced contraction of guinea pig lung in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lach, E; Trifilieff, A; Mousli, M; Landry, Y; Gies, J P

    1994-08-01

    We have investigated the contractile effect of bradykinin (BK) in guinea pig lung in vitro. BK induces a dose-related contraction of lung parenchymal strips which is increased significantly in the presence of 10(-5) M captopril (an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor) or 10(-5) M DL-thiorphan (a neutral endopeptidase inhibitor). The kininase I inhibitor, DL-2-mercaptomethyl-3-guanidino-ethylthiopropionic acid (MGTPA), has no effect on the BK-induced contraction. BK is more potent in contracting parenchymal lung strips than other contractile agents (histamine, carbachol and substance P), however the BK-induced maximal contraction is lower than those obtained with histamine and carbachol. The B1 agonist, des-Arg9-BK, does not contract lung parenchymal strips. The new BK B2 receptor antagonists (Hoe 140, NPC 17731 and NPC 17761), which possess binding affinities in the nanomolar range, inhibit the BK-induced contractile response in a dose-dependent manner. The BK-induced contraction was unaffected by propranolol, atropine, tetrodotoxin, capsaicin pre-treatment, triprolidine, methysergide, Ro 19-3704 and N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME), excluding the involvement of nervous pathways, preformed mast cell mediators, platelet-activating factor and nitric oxide. However, indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, AA-861, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, and furegrelate, a thromboxane A2 synthase inhibitor, decreased the contractile response to BK, suggesting that both cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase products are involved in this contraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7990978

  17. Maraviroc-Mediated Lung Protection following Trauma-Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Chao; Zheng, Chih-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) pathway exerts anti-inflammatory effects in response to injury. Maraviroc has been shown to have potent anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PPARγ plays an important role in maraviroc-mediated lung protection following trauma-hemorrhage. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent trauma-hemorrhage (mean blood pressure maintained at approximately 35–40 mmHg for 90 minutes), followed by fluid resuscitation. During resuscitation, a single dose of maraviroc (3 mg/kg, intravenously) with and without a PPARγ inhibitor GW9662 (1 mg/kg, intravenously), GW9662, or vehicle was administered. Lung water content, tissue histology, and other various parameters were measured (n = 8 rats/group) 24 hours after resuscitation. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's testing were used for statistical analysis. Results. Trauma-hemorrhage significantly increased lung water content, myeloperoxidase activity, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β levels. These parameters significantly improved in the maraviroc-treated rats subjected to trauma-hemorrhage. Maraviroc treatment also decreased lung tissue damage as compared to the vehicle-treated trauma-hemorrhaged rats. Coadministration of GW9662 with maraviroc abolished the maraviroc-induced beneficial effects on these parameters and lung injury. Conclusion. These results suggest that PPARγ might play a key role in maraviroc-mediated lung protection following trauma-hemorrhage. PMID:27556035

  18. Acanthoic acid ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Qiushi, Wang; Guanghua, Li; Guangquan, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Acanthoic acid, a pimaradiene diterpene isolated from Acanthopanax koreanum, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of acanthoic acid on LPS-induced acute lung injury have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of acanthoic acid on LPS-induced ALI and to clarify the possible anti-inflammatory mechanisms. In vivo, an LPS-induced ALI model in mice was used to assess the protective effects of acanthoic acid on ALI. Meanwhile, mouse alveolar macrophages MH-S were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of acanthoic acid. The expressions of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were measured by ELISA. LXRα and NF-κB expression were detected by Western blot analysis. The results showed that acanthoic acid downregulated LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production in BALF. MPO activity and lung wet-to-dry ratio were also inhibited by acanthoic acid. In addition, acanthoic acid attenuated lung histopathologic changes. In vitro, acanthoic acid inhibited inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production and NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages. Acanthoic acid was found to up-regulated the expression of LXRα. The inhibition of acanthoic acid on LPS-induced cytokines and NF-κB activation can be abolished by LXRα siRNA. In conclusion, our results suggested that the protective effect of acanthoic acid on LPS-induced ALI was due to its ability to activate LXRα, thereby inhibiting LPS-induced inflammatory response. PMID:25620130

  19. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces lung growth in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Drager, Luciano F.; Myers, Allen C.; Wise, Robert A.; Schwartz, Alan R.; Mitzner, Wayne; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, which have been attributed to intermittent hypoxia (IH). The effects of IH on lung structure and function are unknown. We used a mouse model of chronic IH, which mimics the O2 profile in patients with OSA. We exposed adult C57BL/6J mice to 3 mo of IH with a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) nadir of 5% 60 times/h during the 12-h light phase. Control mice were exposed to room air. Lung volumes were measured by quasistatic pressure-volume (PV) curves under anesthesia and by water displacement postmortem. Lungs were processed for morphometry, and the mean airspace chord length (Lm) and alveolar surface area were determined. Lung tissue was stained for markers of proliferation (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling), and type II alveolar epithelial cells (surfactant protein C). Gene microarrays were performed, and results were validated by real-time PCR. IH increased lung volumes by both PV curves (air vs. IH, 1.16 vs. 1.44 ml, P < 0.0001) and water displacement (P < 0.01) without changes in Lm, suggesting that IH increased the alveolar surface area. IH induced a 60% increase in cellular proliferation, but the number of proliferating type II alveolocytes tripled. There was no increase in apoptosis. IH upregulated pathways of cellular movement and cellular growth and development, including key developmental genes vascular endothelial growth factor A and platelet-derived growth factor B. We conclude that IH increases alveolar surface area by stimulating lung growth in adult mice. PMID:21131398

  20. Escin attenuates acute lung injury induced by endotoxin in mice.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wenyu; Zhang, Leiming; Fan, Huaying; Jiang, Na; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2011-01-18

    Endotoxin causes multiple organ dysfunctions, including acute lung injury (ALI). The current therapeutic strategies for endotoxemia are designed to neutralize one or more of the inflammatory mediators. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that escin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-edematous effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of escin on ALI induced by endotoxin in mice. ALI was induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intravenously. The mice were given dexamethasone or escin before injection of LPS. The mortality rate was recorded. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and nitric oxide (NO) were measured. Pulmonary superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were also determined. The expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) level was detected by Western blotting. Pretreatment with escin could decrease the mortality rate, attenuate lung injury resulted from LPS, down-regulate the level of the inflammation mediators, including NO, TNF-α, and IL-1β, enhance the endogenous antioxidant capacity, and up-regulating the GR expression in lung. The results suggest that escin may have potent protective effect on the LPS-induced ALI by inhibiting of the inflammatory response, and its mechanism involves in up-regulating the GR and enhancing the endogenous antioxidant capacity. PMID:21040784

  1. Pressure Controlled Ventilation to Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koeppen, Michael; Eckle, Tobias; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2011-01-01

    Murine models are extensively used to investigate acute injuries of different organs systems (1-34). Acute lung injury (ALI), which occurs with prolonged mechanical ventilation, contributes to morbidity and mortality of critical illness, and studies on novel genetic or pharmacological targets are areas of intense investigation (1-3, 5, 8, 26, 30, 33-36). ALI is defined by the acute onset of the disease, which leads to non-cardiac pulmonary edema and subsequent impairment of pulmonary gas exchange (36). We have developed a murine model of ALI by using a pressure-controlled ventilation to induce ventilator-induced lung injury (2). For this purpose, C57BL/6 mice are anesthetized and a tracheotomy is performed followed by induction of ALI via mechanical ventilation. Mice are ventilated in a pressure-controlled setting with an inspiratory peak pressure of 45 mbar over 1 - 3 hours. As outcome parameters, pulmonary edema (wet-to-dry ratio), bronchoalveolar fluid albumin content, bronchoalveolar fluid and pulmonary tissue myeloperoxidase content and pulmonary gas exchange are assessed (2). Using this technique we could show that it sufficiently induces acute lung inflammation and can distinguish between different treatment groups or genotypes (1-3, 5). Therefore this technique may be helpful for researchers who pursue molecular mechanisms involved in ALI using a genetic approach in mice with gene-targeted deletion. PMID:21587159

  2. Lessons Learned for the Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The lessons learned regarding the resuscitation of traumatic hemorrhagic shock are numerous and come from a better understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and experience in this population over 10-plus years of combat operations. We have now come to better understand that the greatest benefit in survival can come from improved treatment of hemorrhage in the prehospital phase of care. We have learned that there is an endogenous coagulopathy that occurs with severe traumatic injury secondary to oxygen debt and that classic resuscitation strategies for severe bleeding based on crystalloid or colloid solutions exacerbate coagulopathy and shock for those with life-threatening hemorrhage. We have relearned that a whole blood-based resuscitation strategy, or one that at least recapitulates the functionality of whole blood, may reduce death from hemorrhage and reduce the risks of excessive crystalloid administration which include acute lung injury, abdominal compartment syndrome, cerebral edema, and anasarca. Appreciation of the importance of shock and coagulopathy management underlies the emphasis on early hemostatic resuscitation. Most importantly, we have learned that there is still much more to understand regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the resuscitation strategies required to improve outcomes for casualties with hemorrhagic shock. PMID:27215864

  3. Inhaled Carbon Monoxide Protects against the Development of Shock and Mitochondrial Injury following Hemorrhage and Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Hernando; Kautza, Benjamin; Escobar, Daniel; Nassour, Ibrahim; Luciano, Jason; Botero, Ana Maria; Gordon, Lisa; Martinez, Silvia; Holder, Andre; Ogundele, Olufunmilayo; Loughran, Patricia; Rosengart, Matthew R.; Pinsky, Michael; Shiva, Sruti; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Currently, there is no effective resuscitative adjunct to fluid and blood products to limit tissue injury for traumatic hemorrhagic shock. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) to limit inflammation and tissue injury, and specifically mitochondrial damage, in experimental models of hemorrhage and resuscitation. Results Inhaled CO (250 ppm for 30 minutes) protected against mortality in severe murine hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HS/R) (20% vs. 80%; P<0.01). Additionally, CO limited the development of shock as determined by arterial blood pH (7.25±0.06 vs. 7.05±0.05; P<0.05), lactate levels (7.2±5.1 vs 13.3±6.0; P<0.05), and base deficit (13±3.0 vs 24±3.1; P<0.05). A dose response of CO (25–500 ppm) demonstrated protection against HS/R lung and liver injury as determined by MPO activity and serum ALT, respectively. CO limited HS/R-induced increases in serum tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 levels as determined by ELISA (P<0.05 for doses of 100–500ppm). Furthermore, inhaled CO limited HS/R induced oxidative stress as determined by hepatic oxidized glutathione:reduced glutathione levels and lipid peroxidation. In porcine HS/R, CO did not influence hemodynamics. However, CO limited HS/R-induced skeletal muscle and platelet mitochondrial injury as determined by respiratory control ratio (muscle) and ATP-linked respiration and mitochondrial reserve capacity (platelets). Conclusion These preclinical studies suggest that inhaled CO can be a protective therapy in HS/R; however, further clinical studies are warranted. PMID:26366865

  4. How to Recognize a Failed Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Brownson, Elisha G; Pham, Tam N; Chung, Kevin K

    2016-10-01

    Failed burn resuscitation can occur at various points. Early failed resuscitation will be largely caused by prehospital factors. During resuscitation, failure will present as a patient's nonresponse to adjunctive therapy. Late failure will occur in the setting of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Burn care providers must be vigilant during the resuscitation to identify a threatened resuscitation so that adjunctive therapies or rescue maneuvers can be used to convert to a successful resuscitation. However, when a patient's resuscitative course becomes unsalvageable, transition to comfort care should be taken to avoid prolongation of suffering. PMID:27600128

  5. Wogonoside ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Ren, Yi; Yang, Chengliang; Guo, Yue; Zhang, Xiaojing; Hou, Gang; Guo, Xinjin; Sun, Nan; Liu, Yongyu

    2014-12-01

    Wogonoside has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we evaluated the effect of wogonoside on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Male BALB/c mice with ALI, induced by intranasal instillation of LPS, were treated with wogonoside 1 h prior to LPS exposure. Mice treated with LPS alone showed significantly increased TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). When pretreated with wogonoside, the TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β levels were significantly decreased. Meanwhile, wogonoside significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases in the macrophage and neutrophil infiltration of lung tissues and markedly attenuated myeloperoxidase activity. Furthermore, wogonoside inhibited the TLR4 expression and the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, and IκB induced by LPS. In conclusion, our results indicate that wogonoside exhibits a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI via suppression of TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:24854163

  6. CYR61 (CCN1) overexpression induces lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Grazioli, Serge; Gil, Sucheol; An, Dowon; Kajikawa, Osamu; Farnand, Alex W; Hanson, Josiah F; Birkland, Timothy; Chen, Peter; Duffield, Jeremy; Schnapp, Lynn M; Altemeier, William A; Matute-Bello, Gustavo

    2015-04-15

    Cysteine-rich protein-61 (CYR61), also known as connective tissue growth factor, CYR61, and nephroblastoma overexpressed gene 1 (CCN1), is a heparin-binding protein member of the CCN family of matricellular proteins. Gene expression profiles showed that Cyr61 is upregulated in human acute lung injury (ALI), but its functional role is unclear. We hypothesized that CYR61 contributes to ALI in mice. First, we demonstrated that CYR61 expression increases after bleomycin-induced lung injury. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to determine whether CYR61 overexpression in the lungs was sufficient to cause ALI. Mice instilled with CYR61 adenovirus showed greater weight loss, increased bronchoalveolar lavage total neutrophil counts, increased protein concentrations, and increased mortality compared with mice instilled with empty-vector adenovirus. Immunohistochemical studies in lungs from humans with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis revealed CYR61 expression on the luminal membrane of alveolar epithelial cells in areas of injury. We conclude that CYR61 is upregulated in ALI and that CYR61 overexpression exacerbates ALI in mice. PMID:25713320

  7. CYR61 (CCN1) overexpression induces lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Grazioli, Serge; Gil, Sucheol; An, Dowon; Kajikawa, Osamu; Farnand, Alex W.; Hanson, Josiah F.; Birkland, Timothy; Chen, Peter; Duffield, Jeremy; Schnapp, Lynn M.; Altemeier, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine-rich protein-61 (CYR61), also known as connective tissue growth factor, CYR61, and nephroblastoma overexpressed gene 1 (CCN1), is a heparin-binding protein member of the CCN family of matricellular proteins. Gene expression profiles showed that Cyr61 is upregulated in human acute lung injury (ALI), but its functional role is unclear. We hypothesized that CYR61 contributes to ALI in mice. First, we demonstrated that CYR61 expression increases after bleomycin-induced lung injury. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to determine whether CYR61 overexpression in the lungs was sufficient to cause ALI. Mice instilled with CYR61 adenovirus showed greater weight loss, increased bronchoalveolar lavage total neutrophil counts, increased protein concentrations, and increased mortality compared with mice instilled with empty-vector adenovirus. Immunohistochemical studies in lungs from humans with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis revealed CYR61 expression on the luminal membrane of alveolar epithelial cells in areas of injury. We conclude that CYR61 is upregulated in ALI and that CYR61 overexpression exacerbates ALI in mice. PMID:25713320

  8. The physical basis of ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Plataki, Maria; Hubmayr, Rolf D

    2010-01-01

    Although mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), it can aggravate or cause lung injury, known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). The biophysical characteristics of heterogeneously injured ARDS lungs increase the parenchymal stress associated with breathing, which is further aggravated by MV. Cells, in particular those lining the capillaries, airways and alveoli, transform this strain into chemical signals (mechanotransduction). The interaction of reparative and injurious mechanotransductive pathways leads to VILI. Several attempts have been made to identify clinical surrogate measures of lung stress/strain (e.g., density changes in chest computed tomography, lower and upper inflection points of the pressure–volume curve, plateau pressure and inflammatory cytokine levels) that could be used to titrate MV. However, uncertainty about the topographical distribution of stress relative to that of the susceptibility of the cells and tissues to injury makes the existence of a single ‘global’ stress/strain injury threshold doubtful. PMID:20524920

  9. Future Therapies in Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Hodgman, Erica I; Subramanian, Madhu; Arnoldo, Brett D; Phelan, Herb A; Wolf, Steven E

    2016-10-01

    Since the 1940s, the resuscitation of burn patients has evolved with dramatic improvements in mortality. The most significant achievement remains the creation and adoption of formulae to calculate estimated fluid requirements to guide resuscitation. Modalities to attenuate the hypermetabolic phase of injury include pharmacologic agents, early enteral nutrition, and the aggressive approach of early excision of large injuries. Recent investigations into the genomic response to severe burns and the application of computer-based decision support tools will likely guide future resuscitation, with the goal of further reducing mortality and morbidity, and improving functional and quality of life outcomes. PMID:27600132

  10. Resuscitation of subdiaphragmatic exsanguination.

    PubMed

    Ross, S E; Schwab, C W

    1988-04-01

    Subdiaphragmatic exsanguination is a major cause of death in civilian trauma. In a 1-year review of 867 consecutive admissions to a Level I Trauma Center, a 4.3 per cent incidence (37 patients) of infradiaphragmatic exsanguination was found. Eleven per cent of all abdominal injuries and 35 per cent of pelvic fractures sustained massive hemorrhage. A treatment protocol incorporating immediate airway control, MAST device, super-large bore venous access, warming rapid infusors, immediate type O blood transfusion, emergency department thoracotomy, and emergent operation as required, produced an overall mortality of 54 per cent. Mortality was higher for pelvic fracture (59%) than abdominal injury (43%). No patient survived ED thoracotomy. Continued developments in resuscitation techniques, as well as prehospital, and operative care are required to reduce mortality from exsanguinating hemorrhage. PMID:3355017

  11. A case of miriplatin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kumasawa, Fumio; Miura, Takao; Takahashi, Toshimi; Endo, Daisuke; Ohki, Takashi; Nakagawara, Hiroshi; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Tsujino, Ichiro; Masahiro, Ogawa; Gon, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Noriaki; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Hashimoto, Shu

    2016-07-01

    A 69-year-old man with an 8-year history of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was hospitalized for treatment of recurrent tumour. In 2010, the first transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) using miriplatin with agents (Lipiodol Ultra-Fluid) was performed and did not occur any adverse events. In 2014, since his HCC recurred, the TACE using miriplatin with agents was performed. Following this therapy, pyrexia occurred on day 3, followed by respiratory failure with cough and dyspnea on day 5. Chest radiography revealed scattered infiltration in the right upper lung fields, and chest computed tomography revealed ground grass attenuations, indicating fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia. These findings progressively deteriorated, and a diagnosis of miriplatin-induced lung injury was made. His respiratory failure also progressively deteriorated. Treatment with pulse methylprednisolone therapy resulted in a dramatic improvement in both patient symptoms and radiological abnormalities. PMID:26867794

  12. Do-not-resuscitate order

    MedlinePlus

    ... order; DNR; DNR order; Advance care directive - DNR; Health care agent - DNR; Health care proxy - DNR; End-of-life - DNR; Living ... medical order written by a doctor. It instructs health care providers not to do cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) ...

  13. Do-not-resuscitate order

    MedlinePlus

    ... It instructs health care providers not to do cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if a patient's breathing stops or if the ... you to choose whether or not you want CPR before an emergency occurs. It is specific about ...

  14. Lung deformations and radiation-induced regional lung collapse in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Quentin Kavanagh, Brian; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed; Garg, Kavita

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To differentiate radiation-induced fibrosis from regional lung collapse outside of the high dose region in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods: Lung deformation maps were computed from pre-treatment and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) scans using a point-to-point translation method. Fifty anatomical landmarks inside the lung (vessel or airway branches) were matched on planning and follow-up scans for the computation process. Two methods using the deformation maps were developed to differentiate regional lung collapse from fibrosis: vector field and Jacobian methods. A total of 40 planning and follow-ups CT scans were analyzed for 20 lung SBRT patients. Results: Regional lung collapse was detected in 15 patients (75%) using the vector field method, in ten patients (50%) using the Jacobian method, and in 12 patients (60%) by radiologists. In terms of sensitivity and specificity the Jacobian method performed better. Only weak correlations were observed between the dose to the proximal airways and the occurrence of regional lung collapse. Conclusions: The authors presented and evaluated two novel methods using anatomical lung deformations to investigate lung collapse and fibrosis caused by SBRT treatment. Differentiation of these distinct physiological mechanisms beyond what is usually labeled “fibrosis” is necessary for accurate modeling of lung SBRT-induced injuries. With the help of better models, it becomes possible to expand the therapeutic benefits of SBRT to a larger population of lung patients with large or centrally located tumors that were previously considered ineligible.

  15. Formaldehyde induces lung inflammation by an oxidant and antioxidant enzymes mediated mechanism in the lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso dos Santos; de Oliveira, Ana Paula Ligeiro; Breithaupt-Faloppa, Ana Cristina; Bertoni, Jônatas de Almeida; Oliveira-Filho, Ricardo Martins; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Marcourakis, Tânia; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan

    2011-12-15

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an indoor and outdoor pollutant widely used by many industries, and its exposure is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in the airways. Our previous studies have demonstrated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in lung inflammation induced by FA inhalation but did not identify source of the ROS. In the present study, we investigate the effects of FA on the activities and gene expression of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1 and 2, catalase (CAT), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and 2. The hypothesized link between NADPH-oxidase, nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase, the lung inflammation after FA inhalation was also investigated. For experiments, male Wistar rats were submitted to FA inhalation (1%, 90 min daily) for 3 consecutive days. The treatments with apocynin and indomethacin before the FA exposure reduced the number of neutrophils recruited into the lung. Moreover, the treatments with apocynin and indomethacin blunted the effect of FA on the generation of IL-1β, while the treatments with L-NAME and apocynin reduced the generation of IL-6 by lung explants when compared to the untreated group. FA inhalation increased the levels of NO and hydrogen peroxide by BAL cells cultured and the treatments with apocynin and l-NAME reduced these generations. FA inhalation did not modify the activities of GPX, GR, GST and CAT but reduced the activity of SOD when compared to the naïve group. Significant increases in SOD-1 and -2, CAT, iNOS, cNOS and COX-1 expression were observed in the FA group compared to the naïve group. The treatments with apocynin, indomethacin and L-NAME reduced the gene expression of antioxidant and oxidant enzymes. In conclusion, our results indicate that FA causes a disruption of the physiological balance between oxidant and antioxidant enzymes in lung tissue, most likely favoring the

  16. [Forensic medicine aspects of resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Bauer, G

    1987-12-15

    Nowadays, in almost all cases of clinical death, there is at least a remote chance of resuscitation, of restoring breathing and circulation by means of modern methods of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Statistically, there are more cases of cardiocirculatory arrest due to an internal cause than to a traumatic cause. Just as medical activity in general, resuscitation is increasingly discussed in its legal and ethical aspects. The duty to exercise due care and proper qualification require a very specific approach in the case of resuscitation, as the chain of persons potentially involved in life saving stretches from the medical layman to the specialist trained to deal with emergency situations. As opposed to conditions in other countries, in Austria the duty to render aid and assistance as statutory provision of the penal code can be of great importance in such cases. Criteria and definition, especially in the ad hoc establishment of death, assume a special significance in resuscitation. Over the past years, resuscitation measures within the complex of the procurement of death have repeatedly been put up for discussion. Examples from US judicature may help to define the problem more clearly and also to offer solutions for similar cases. Such decisions should essentially be guided by the consideration of the presumed will of the patient who no longer is in a position to exercise the right of self-determination. PMID:3326291

  17. Lung Transcriptomics during Protective Ventilatory Support in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Herrera, Marialbert; Lorenzo-Diaz, Fabian; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Corrales, Almudena; Valladares, Francisco; Klassert, Tilman E.; Valladares, Basilio; Slevogt, Hortense; Ma, Shwu-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe inflammatory process of the lung. The only proven life-saving support is mechanical ventilation (MV) using low tidal volumes (LVT) plus moderate to high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, it is currently unknown how they exert the protective effects. To identify the molecular mechanisms modulated by protective MV, this study reports transcriptomic analyses based on microarray and microRNA sequencing in lung tissues from a clinically relevant animal model of sepsis-induced ALI. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. At 24 hours post-CLP, septic animals were randomized to three ventilatory strategies: spontaneous breathing, LVT (6 ml/kg) plus 10 cmH2O PEEP and high tidal volume (HVT, 20 ml/kg) plus 2 cmH2O PEEP. Healthy, non-septic, non-ventilated animals served as controls. After 4 hours of ventilation, lung samples were obtained for histological examination and gene expression analysis using microarray and microRNA sequencing. Validations were assessed using parallel analyses on existing publicly available genome-wide association study findings and transcriptomic human data. The catalogue of deregulated processes differed among experimental groups. The ‘response to microorganisms’ was the most prominent biological process in septic, non-ventilated and in HVT animals. Unexpectedly, the ‘neuron projection morphogenesis’ process was one of the most significantly deregulated in LVT. Further support for the key role of the latter process was obtained by microRNA studies, as four species targeting many of its genes (Mir-27a, Mir-103, Mir-17-5p and Mir-130a) were found deregulated. Additional analyses revealed 'VEGF signaling' as a central underlying response mechanism to all the septic groups (spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated). Based on this data, we conclude that a co-deregulation of 'VEGF signaling' along with 'neuron projection

  18. Dual Oxidase 2 in Lung Epithelia Is Essential for Hyperoxia-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ji; Ryu, Jae-Chan; Kwon, Younghee; Lee, Suhee; Bae, Yun Soo; Yoon, Joo-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Acute lung injury (ALI) induced by excessive hyperoxia has been employed as a model of oxidative stress imitating acute respiratory distress syndrome. Under hyperoxic conditions, overloading quantities of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated in both lung epithelial and endothelial cells, leading to ALI. Some NADPH oxidase (NOX) family enzymes are responsible for hyperoxia-induced ROS generation in lung epithelial and endothelial cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of ROS production in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and ALI induced by hyperoxia are poorly understood. Results: In this study, we show that dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) is a key NOX enzyme that affects hyperoxia-induced ROS production, particularly in type II AECs, leading to lung injury. In DUOX2 mutant mice (DUOX2thyd/thyd) or mice in which DUOX2 expression is knocked down in the lungs, hyperoxia-induced ALI was significantly lower than in wild-type (WT) mice. DUOX2 was mainly expressed in type II AECs, but not endothelial cells, and hyperoxia-induced ROS production was markedly reduced in primary type II AECs isolated from DUOX2thyd/thyd mice. Furthermore, DUOX2-generated ROS are responsible for caspase-mediated cell death, inducing ERK and JNK phophorylation in type II AECs. Innovation: To date, no role for DUOX2 has been defined in hyperoxia-mediated ALI despite it being a NOX homologue and major ROS source in lung epithelium. Conclusion: Here, we present the novel finding that DUOX2-generated ROS induce AEC death, leading to hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1803–1818. PMID:24766345

  19. Molecular Basis of Asbestos-Induced Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Cheresh, Paul; Kamp, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos causes asbestosis and malignancies by molecular mechanisms that are not fully understood. The modes of action underlying asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma appear to differ depending on the fiber type, lung clearance, and genetics. After reviewing the key pathologic changes following asbestos exposure, we examine recently identified pathogenic pathways, with a focus on oxidative stress. Alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis, which is an important early event in asbestosis, is mediated by mitochondria- and p53-regulated death pathways and may be modulated by the endoplasmic reticulum. We review mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-damage and -repair mechanisms, focusing on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, as well as cross talk between reactive oxygen species production, mtDNA damage, p53, OGG1, and mitochondrial aconitase. These new insights into the molecular basis of asbestos-induced lung diseases may foster the development of novel therapeutic targets for managing degenerative diseases (e.g., asbestosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), tumors, and aging, for which effective management is lacking. PMID:23347351

  20. The role of pro- and anti-inflammatory responses in silica-induced lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Barbarin, Virginie; Nihoul, Aurélie; Misson, Pierre; Arras, Mohammed; Delos, Monique; Leclercq, Isabelle; Lison, Dominique; Huaux, Francois

    2005-01-01

    Background It has been generally well accepted that chronic inflammation is a necessary component of lung fibrosis but this concept has recently been challenged. Methods Using biochemical, histological, immunohistochemistry, and cellular analyses, we compared the lung responses (inflammation and fibrosis) to fibrogenic silica particles (2.5 and 25 mg/g lung) in Sprague-Dawley rats and NMRI mice. Results Rats treated with silica particles developed chronic and progressive inflammation accompanied by an overproduction of TNF-α as well as an intense lung fibrosis. Dexamethasone or pioglitazone limited the amplitude of the lung fibrotic reaction to silica in rats, supporting the paradigm that inflammation drives lung fibrosis. In striking contrast, in mice, silica induced only a limited and transient inflammation without TNF-α overproduction. However, mice developed lung fibrosis of a similar intensity than rats. The fibrotic response in mice was accompanied by a high expression of the anti-inflammatory and fibrotic cytokine IL-10 by silica-activated lung macrophages. In mice, IL-10 was induced only by fibrotic particles and significantly expressed in the lung of silica-sensitive but not silica-resistant strains of mice. Anti-inflammatory treatments did not control lung fibrosis in mice. Conclusion These results indicate that, beside chronic lung inflammation, a pronounced anti-inflammatory reaction may also contribute to the extension of silica-induced lung fibrosis and represents an alternative pathway leading to lung fibrosis. PMID:16212659

  1. Exercise-induced haemoptysis as a rare presentation of a rare lung disease.

    PubMed

    Mihalek, Andrew D; Haney, Carissa; Merino, Maria; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Moss, Joel; Olivier, Kenneth N

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid primarily affecting the lungs is a seldom seen clinical entity. This case discusses the work-up of a patient presenting with exercise-induced haemoptysis and diffuse cystic lung disease on radiographic imaging. The common clinical and radiographic findings of diffuse cystic lung diseases as well as a brief overview of pulmonary amyloid are presented. PMID:27272655

  2. Radiation-induced lung damage: dose-time-fractionation considerations.

    PubMed

    Van Dyk, J; Mah, K; Keane, T J

    1989-01-01

    The comparison of different dose-time-fractionation schedules requires the use of an isoeffect formula. In recent years, the NSD isoeffect formula has been heavily criticized. In this report, we consider an isoeffect formula which is specifically developed for radiation-induced lung damage. The formula is based on the linear-quadratic model and includes a factor for overall treatment time. The proposed procedures allow for the simultaneous derivation of an alpha/beta ratio and a gamma/beta time factor. From animal data in the literature, the derived alpha/beta and gamma/beta ratios for acute lung damage are 5.0 +/- 1.0 Gy and 2.7 +/- 1.4 Gy2/day respectively, while for late damage the suggested values are 2.0 Gy and 0.0 Gy2/day. Data from two clinical studies, one prospective and the other retrospective, were also analysed and corresponding alpha/beta and gamma/beta ratios were determined. For the prospective clinical study, with a limited range of doses per fraction, the resultant alpha/beta and gamma/beta ratios were 0.9 +/- 2.6 Gy and 2.6 +/- 2.5 Gy2/day. The combination of the retrospective and prospective data yielded alpha/beta and gamma/beta ratios of 3.3 +/- 1.5 Gy and 2.4 +/- 1.5 Gy2/day, respectively. One potential advantage of this isoeffect formalism is that it might possibly be applied to both acute and late lung damage. The results of this formulation for acute lung damage indicate that time-dependent effects such as slow repair or proliferation might be more important in determining isoeffect doses than previously predicted by the estimated single dose (ED) formula. Although we present this as an alternative approach, we would caution against its clinical use until its applicability has been confirmed by additional clinical data. PMID:2928557

  3. The HMGB1-RAGE axis mediates traumatic brain injury-induced pulmonary dysfunction in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniel J; Gracon, Adam S A; Ripsch, Matthew S; Fisher, Amanda J; Cheon, Bo M; Pandya, Pankita H; Vittal, Ragini; Capitano, Maegan L; Kim, Youngsong; Allette, Yohance M; Riley, Amanda A; McCarthy, Brian P; Territo, Paul R; Hutchins, Gary D; Broxmeyer, Hal E; Sandusky, George E; White, Fletcher A; Wilkes, David S

    2014-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in systemic inflammatory responses that affect the lung. This is especially critical in the setting of lung transplantation, where more than half of donor allografts are obtained postmortem from individuals with TBI. The mechanism by which TBI causes pulmonary dysfunction remains unclear but may involve the interaction of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). To investigate the role of HMGB1 and RAGE in TBI-induced lung dysfunction, RAGE-sufficient (wild-type) or RAGE-deficient (RAGE(-/-)) C57BL/6 mice were subjected to TBI through controlled cortical impact and studied for cardiopulmonary injury. Compared to control animals, TBI induced systemic hypoxia, acute lung injury, pulmonary neutrophilia, and decreased compliance (a measure of the lungs' ability to expand), all of which were attenuated in RAGE(-/-) mice. Neutralizing systemic HMGB1 induced by TBI reversed hypoxia and improved lung compliance. Compared to wild-type donors, lungs from RAGE(-/-) TBI donors did not develop acute lung injury after transplantation. In a study of clinical transplantation, elevated systemic HMGB1 in donors correlated with impaired systemic oxygenation of the donor lung before transplantation and predicted impaired oxygenation after transplantation. These data suggest that the HMGB1-RAGE axis plays a role in the mechanism by which TBI induces lung dysfunction and that targeting this pathway before transplant may improve recipient outcomes after lung transplantation. PMID:25186179

  4. Attenuation of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats by mesna.

    PubMed

    El-Medany, Azza; Hagar, Hanan H; Moursi, Mahmoud; At Muhammed, Raeesa; El-Rakhawy, Fatma I; El-Medany, Gamila

    2005-02-10

    Lung fibrosis is a common side effect of the chemotherapeutic agent, bleomycin. Current evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species may play a key role in the development of lung fibrosis. The present study examined the effect of mesna on bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Animals were divided into three groups: (1) saline control group; (2) Bleomycin group in which rats were injected with bleomycin (15 mg/kg, i.p.) three times a week for four weeks; (3) Bleomycin and mesna group, in which mesna was given to rats (180 mg/kg/day, i.p.) a week prior to bleomycin and daily during bleomycin injections for 4 weeks until the end of the treatment. Bleomycin treatment resulted in a pronounced fall in the average body weight of animals. Bleomycin-induced pulmonary injury and lung fibrosis was indicated by increased lung hydroxyproline content, and elevated nitric oxide synthase, myeoloperoxidase, platelet activating factor, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in lung tissues. On the other hand, bleomycin induced a reduction in reduced glutathione concentration and angiotensin converting enzyme activity in lung tissues. Moreover, bleomycin-induced severe histological changes in lung tissues revealed as lymphocytes and neutrophils infiltration, increased collagen deposition and fibrosis. Co-administration of bleomycin and mesna reduced bleomycin-induced weight loss and attenuated lung injury as evaluated by the significant reduction in hydroxyproline content, nitric oxide synthase activity, and concentrations of myeoloperoxidase, platelet activating factor, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in lung tissues. Furthermore, mesna ameliorated bleomycin-induced reduction in reduced glutathione concentration and angiotensin activity in lung tissues. Finally, histological evidence supported the ability of mesna to attenuate bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis and consolidation. Thus, the findings of the present study provide evidence that mesna may serve as a novel target for

  5. Inhaled nitric oxide exacerbated phorbol-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hen I; Chu, Shi Jye; Hsu, Kang; Wang, David

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we determined the effect of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) on the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in isolated rat lung. Typical acute lung injury was induced successfully by PMA during 60 min of observation. PMA (2 microg/kg) elicited a significant increase in microvascular permeability, (measured using the capillary filtration coefficient Kfc), lung weight gain, lung weight/body weight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Pretreatment with inhaled NO (30 ppm) significantly exacerbated acute lung injury. All of the parameters reflective of lung injury increased significantly except PAP (P<0.05). Coadministration of Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (5 mM) attenuated the detrimental effect of inhaled NO in PMA-induced lung injury, except for PAP. In addition, L-NAME (5 mM) significantly attenuated PMA-induced acute lung injury except for PAP. These experimental data suggest that inhaled NO significantly exacerbated acute lung injury induced by PMA in rats. L-NAME attenuated the detrimental effect of inhaled NO. PMID:14643171

  6. Sustained adenosine exposure causes lung endothelial apoptosis: a possible contributor to cigarette smoke-induced endothelial apoptosis and lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Sakhatskyy, Pavlo; Newton, Julie; Shamirian, Paul; Hsiao, Vivian; Curren, Sean; Gabino Miranda, Gustavo Andres; Pedroza, Mesias; Blackburn, Michael R.; Rounds, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of emphysema. Cigarette smoke (CS) causes lung EC apoptosis and emphysema. In this study, we show that CS exposure increased lung tissue adenosine levels in mice, an effect associated with increased lung EC apoptosis and the development of emphysema. Adenosine has a protective effect against apoptosis via adenosine receptor-mediated signaling. However, sustained elevated adenosine increases alveolar cell apoptosis in adenosine deaminase-deficient mice. We established an in vitro model of sustained adenosine exposure by incubating lung EC with adenosine in the presence of an adenosine deaminase inhibitor, deoxycoformicin. We demonstrated that sustained adenosine exposure caused lung EC apoptosis via nucleoside transporter-facilitated intracellular adenosine uptake, subsequent activation of p38 and JNK in mitochondria, and ultimately mitochondrial defects and activation of the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Our results suggest that sustained elevated adenosine may contribute to CS-induced lung EC apoptosis and emphysema. Our data also reconcile the paradoxical effects of adenosine on apoptosis, demonstrating that prolonged exposure causes apoptosis via nucleoside transporter-mediated intracellular adenosine signaling, whereas acute exposure protects against apoptosis via activation of adenosine receptors. Inhibition of adenosine uptake may become a new therapeutic target in treatment of CS-induced lung diseases. PMID:23316066

  7. Effect of Fenoterol on PAF-induced lung edema in isolated and perfused rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Pesce, L; Tristano, S; Friedman, E; Comellas, A; Marcano, H; Sanchez de León, R

    1998-11-01

    We have studied the effects of fenoterol on PAF-induced response in pulmonary circulation. We used 28 isolated and perfused rabbit lungs preparations: eight control preparations (CP), four vehicles preparations (VP), eight PAF preparations (PP) with two doses of PAF, one called low dose (LD = 0.5 microg/kg of weight) and the other high dose (HD = 1 microg/kg of weight) and eight Fenoterol preparations (FP) which we administered 0.05 mg of Fenoterol for 15 min, followed by a LD and HD of PAF. FP prevented elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) as compared to PP, at LD of PAF: 12.615 (CI 95%: 8.57-20.885) versus 83.705 (CI 95%: 50.55-114.3) cm of water; and at HD of PAF: 19.38 (CI 95%: 11.235-28.94) versus 205.1 (CI 95%: 141.3-271) cm of water respectively. FP prevented the increase in fluid filtration rate (FFR) observed in PP at both doses of PAF LD: 0.765 (CI 95%: 0.07-3.385) versus 0.01 (CI 95%: -0.05-0.005) g/min; HD: 5.515 (CI 95%: 2.425-8.865) versus 0.03 (CI 95%: 0-0.33) g/min. Our results suggest that PAF has a vasoconstrictor effect that produces lung edema and this effect is inhibited by fenoterol. PMID:9865589

  8. Regional deposition of particles in human lung after induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Svartengren, M; Philipson, K; Linnman, L; Camner, P

    1986-01-01

    The percentage 24-hr lung retention (Ret24), a measure of penetration to the aveoli, of 4 micron monodispersed Teflon particles, aerodynamic diameter 6 micron, was studied in 8 healthy nonsmokers. The particles were inhaled at 0.2 1/sec with maximally deep breaths. Bronchoconstriction was induced by inhalation of a methacholinebromide aerosol for one exposure before and for one exposure after inhalation of the Teflon particles. Airway resistance (Raw) was measured using a whole body pletysmograph before and after the induction of bronchoconstriction and increased on an average by a factor 2-3. Ret24 was significantly lower when the Teflon particles were inhaled during bronchoconstriction than when bronchoconstriction was induced after inhalation of the Teflon particles, 26 +/- 12% and 48 +/- 6% (mean +/- SD), respectively. These experimental data agree fairly well with data on deposition due to impaction and sedimentation using a lung model where the diameters of the airways were varied so that an increase in airway resistance occurs similar to that produced in our experimental subjects. However, the experimental data tended to be lower than the theoretical ones when the particles were inhaled during the induced bronchoconstriction. In this study, where the mucociliary transport system was stimulated by methacholinebromide, the percentage 3-hr retention (Ret3) was highly correlated with Ret24, r = 0.97, i.e., Ret3 can be used instead of the Ret24. This implies that radionuclides with shorter half-lives which give lower radiation doses, can be used, and that subjects can be studied within shorter periods of time. PMID:3516667

  9. Treatment of sulfur mustard (HD)-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D R; Byers, S L; Vesely, K R

    2000-12-01

    An in vivo sulfur mustard (HD) vapor exposure model followed by bronchoalveolar lavage was developed previously in this laboratory to study biochemical indicators of HD-induced lung injury. This model was used to test two treatment compounds--niacinamide (NIA) and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC)--for their ability to ameliorate HD-induced biochemical changes. Anesthetized rats were intratracheally intubated and exposed to 0.35 mg of HD in 0.1 ml of ethanol or ethanol alone for 50 min. At the beginning of the exposure (t = 0), the rats were treated with either NIA (750 mg kg(-1)) or NAC (816 mg kg(-1)), i.p. At 24 h post-exposure, rats were euthanized and the lungs were lavaged with saline (three 5-ml washes). One milliliter of the recovered lavage fluid was analyzed for cellular components. The remaining fluid was centrifuged (10 min at 300 g) and the supernatant was assayed on a Cobas FARA clinical analyzer for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), albumin (ALB), total protein (TP) and glutathione peroxidase (GP). The HD alone and HD+NIA treatment caused significant increases in all of the biochemical parameters compared with control levels. The NAC treatment yielded LDH, ALB and TP values that, although elevated, were not significantly different from the control. The GP levels were significantly higher than the control but significantly lower than the HD alone levels, indicating some protection compared with the HD alone group. The GGT levels were unaffected by NAC compared with HD alone. Cytological analysis of lavage fluid showed that the percentages of neutrophils were 5.3 +/- 1.0 (mean +/- SEM) for control, 46.6 +/- 4.5 for HD, 31.4 +/- 4.7 for HD + NIA and 21.6 +/- 4.7 for HD + NAC, respectively. The neutrophil counts were significantly higher for the three HD-exposed groups vs controls; however, the NAC-treated group had neutrophil counts lower than HD alone, indicating decreased inflammatory response. These results show that NAC may be

  10. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide induced acute inflammation in lung by chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinshan; Xue, Jinling; Xu, Bi; Xie, Jiani; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-02-13

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, also called endotoxin) is a pro-inflammatory constituent of gram negative bacteria and cyanobacteria, which causes a potential health risk in the process of routine urban application of reclaimed water, such as car wash, irrigation, scenic water refilling, etc. Previous studies indicated that the common disinfection treatment, chlorination, has little effect on endotoxin activity removal measured by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. However, in this study, significant decrease of acute inflammatory effects was observed in mouse lung, while LAL assay still presented a moderate increase of endotoxin activity. To explore the possible mechanisms, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results showed the chlorination happened in alkyl chain of LPS molecules, which could affect the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein. Also the size of LPS aggregates was found to drop significantly after treatment, which could be another results of chlorination caused polarity change. In conclusion, our observation demonstrated that chlorination is effective to reduce the LPS induced inflammation in lung, and it is recommended to use health effect-based methods to assess risk removal of water treatment technologies. PMID:26530889

  11. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Gate, Laurent . E-mail: laurent.gate@inrs.fr; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Herve; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stephane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 {sup o}C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  12. Oxidative Stress Mediates Radiation Lung Injury by Inducing Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yu; Zhang Xiuwu; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Apoptosis in irradiated normal lung tissue has been observed several weeks after radiation. However, the signaling pathway propagating cell death after radiation remains unknown. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 15 Gy to the whole thorax. Pro-apoptotic signaling was evaluated 6 weeks after radiation with or without administration of AEOL10150, a potent catalytic scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Results: Apoptosis was observed primarily in type I and type II pneumocytes and endothelium. Apoptosis correlated with increased PTEN expression, inhibition of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling, and increased p53 and Bax protein levels. Transforming growth factor-{beta}1, Nox4, and oxidative stress were also increased 6 weeks after radiation. Therapeutic administration of AEOL10150 suppressed pro-apoptotic signaling and dramatically reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Increased PTEN signaling after radiation results in apoptosis of lung parenchymal cells. We hypothesize that upregulation of PTEN is influenced by Nox4-derived oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight the role of PTEN in radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity.

  13. Vitamin C in Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Julie A; Rowan, Matthew P; Driscoll, Ian R; Chung, Kevin K; Friedman, Bruce C

    2016-10-01

    The inflammatory state after burn injury is characterized by an increase in capillary permeability that results in protein and fluid leakage into the interstitial space, increasing resuscitative requirements. Although the mechanisms underlying increased capillary permeability are complex, damage from reactive oxygen species plays a major role and has been successfully attenuated with antioxidant therapy in several disease processes. However, the utility of antioxidants in burn treatment remains unclear. Vitamin C is a promising antioxidant candidate that has been examined in burn resuscitation studies and shows efficacy in reducing the fluid requirements in the acute phase after burn injury. PMID:27600125

  14. [Resuscitation 2015-the new guidelines].

    PubMed

    Wetsch, W A; Böttiger, B W

    2016-06-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is amongst the major causes of death in industrialized countries. The patient's prognosis however is still very serious. Because diagnosis and therapy in medicine constantly undergo further development, guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation are updated und published frequently, to ensure that every patient receives the best state of the art medical therapy and consequently has the best chances to survive. On October 15, 2015, the new guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation were published. This article gives a short summary of the most important changes. PMID:27160260

  15. Ventilation-induced lung injury is not exacerbated by growth restriction in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Allison, Beth J; Hooper, Stuart B; Coia, Elise; Zahra, Valerie A; Jenkin, Graham; Malhotra, Atul; Sehgal, Arvind; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; Sozo, Foula; Miller, Suzanne L; Polglase, Graeme R

    2016-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and preterm birth are frequent comorbidities and, combined, increase the risk of adverse respiratory outcomes compared with that in appropriately grown (AG) infants. Potential underlying reasons for this increased respiratory morbidity in IUGR infants compared with AG infants include altered fetal lung development, fetal lung inflammation, increased respiratory requirements, and/or increased ventilation-induced lung injury. IUGR was surgically induced in preterm fetal sheep (0.7 gestation) by ligation of a single umbilical artery. Four weeks later, preterm lambs were euthanized at delivery or delivered and ventilated for 2 h before euthanasia. Ventilator requirements, lung inflammation, early markers of lung injury, and morphological changes in lung parenchymal and vascular structure and surfactant composition were analyzed. IUGR preterm lambs weighed 30% less than AG preterm lambs, with increased brain-to-body weight ratio, indicating brain sparing. IUGR did not induce lung inflammation or injury or alter lung parenchymal and vascular structure compared with AG fetuses. IUGR and AG lambs had similar oxygenation and respiratory requirements after birth and had significant, but similar, increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression, lung injury markers, gene expression, and surfactant phosphatidylcholine species compared with unventilated controls. IUGR does not induce pulmonary structural changes in our model. Furthermore, IUGR and AG preterm lambs have similar ventilator requirements in the immediate postnatal period. This study suggests that increased morbidity and mortality in IUGR infants is not due to altered lung tissue or vascular structure, or to an altered response to early ventilation. PMID:26608532

  16. Ischemia and reperfusion of the lung tissues induced increase of lung permeability and lung edema is attenuated by dimethylthiourea (PP69).

    PubMed

    Chen, K H; Chao, D; Liu, C F; Chen, C F; Wang, D

    2010-04-01

    This study sought to determine whether oxygen radical scavengers of dimethylthiourea (DMTU), superoxide dismutase (SOD), or catalase (CAT) pretreatment attenuated ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced lung injury. After isolation from a Sprague-Dawley rat, the lungs were perfused through the pulmonary artery cannula with rat whole blood diluted 1:1 with a physiological salt solution. An acute lung injury was induced by 10 minutes of hypoxia with 5% CO2-95% N2 followed by 65 minutes of ischemia and then 65 minutes of reperfusion. I/R significantly increased microvascular permeability as measured by the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), lung weight-to-body weight ratio (LW/BW), and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (PCBAL). DMTU pretreatment significantly attenuated the acute lung injury. The capillary filtration coefficient (P<.01), LW/BW (P<.01) and PCBAL (P<.05) were significantly lower among the DMTU-treated rats than hosts pretreated with SOD or CAT. The possible mechanisms of the protective effect of DMTU in I/R-induced lung injury may relate to the permeability of the agent allowing it to scavenge intracellular hydroxyl radicals. However, whether superoxide dismutase or catalase antioxidants showed protective effects possibly due to their impermeability of the cell membrane not allowing scavenging of intracellular oxygen radicals. PMID:20430163

  17. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 stimulates postnatal lung development but does not prevent O2-induced alveolar injury.

    PubMed

    Tibboel, Jeroen; Groenman, Freek A; Selvaratnam, Johanna; Wang, Jinxia; Tseu, Irene; Huang, Zhen; Caniggia, Isabella; Luo, Daochun; van Tuyl, Minke; Ackerley, Cameron; de Jongste, Johan C; Tibboel, Dick; Post, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated whether hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 influences postnatal vascularization and alveologenesis in mice and whether stable (constitutive-active) HIF could prevent hyperoxia-induced lung injury. We assessed postnatal vessel and alveolar formation in transgenic mice, expressing a stable, constitutive-active, HIF1α-subunit (HIF-1αΔODD) in the distal lung epithelium. In addition, we compared lung function, histology, and morphometry of neonatal transgenic and wild-type mice subjected to hyperoxia. We found that postnatal lungs of HIF-1αΔODD mice had a greater peripheral vessel density and displayed advanced alveolarization compared with control lungs. Stable HIF-1α expression was associated with increased postnatal expression of angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoietins 1 and 2, Tie2, and Ephrin B2 and B4. Hyperoxia-exposed neonatal HIF-1αΔODD mice exhibited worse lung function but had similar histological and surfactant abnormalities compared with hyperoxia-exposed wild-type controls. In conclusion, expression of constitutive-active HIF-1α in the lung epithelium was associated with increased postnatal vessel growth via up-regulation of angiogenic factors. The increase in postnatal vasculature was accompanied by enhanced alveolar formation. However, stable HIF-1α expression in the distal lung did not prevent hyperoxia-induced lung injury in neonates but instead worsened lung function. PMID:25180700

  18. Artesunate Protects Against Sepsis-Induced Lung Injury Via Heme Oxygenase-1 Modulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tian-Hui; Jin, Song-Gen; Fei, Dong-Sheng; Kang, Kai; Jiang, Lei; Lian, Zhi-Yuan; Pan, Shang-Ha; Zhao, Ming-Ran; Zhao, Ming-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Artesunate, a derivative of artemisinin, has anti-inflammatory properties and exerts protective roles in sepsis. Heme oxygense-1 (HO-1) inhibits the inflammatory response through reduction of proinflammatory cytokines and leukocyte influx into tissues. The present study investigated the effects of artesunate on HO-1 and septic lung injury. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was employed to induce septic lung injury. Mice pretreated with artesunate (AS) (15 mg/kg) exhibited decreased sepsis-induced mortality and lung injury and alleviated lung pathological changes and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, AS lowered the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoform (iNOS) expression and NF-κB activation in lung tissue. In addition, AS enhanced NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) activation and HO-1 expression and enzymatic activity in lung tissue. However, the protective effects of AS on sepsis-induced lung injury were eliminated by ZnPP IX, an HO-1 competitive inhibitor. Therefore, AS plays protective roles in septic lung injury related to the upregulation of HO-1. These findings suggest an effective and applicable treatment to sepsis-induced lung injury and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms and actions of AS. PMID:26627481

  19. Burn Resuscitation in the Austere Environment.

    PubMed

    Peck, Michael; Jeng, James; Moghazy, Amr

    2016-10-01

    Intravenous (IV) cannulation and sterile IV salt solutions may not be options in resource-limited settings (RLSs). This article presents recipes for fluid resuscitation in the aftermath of burns occurring in RLSs. Burns of 20% total body surface area (TBSA) can be resuscitated, and burns up to 40% TBSA can most likely be resuscitated, using oral resuscitation solutions (ORSs) with salt supplementation. Without IV therapy, fluid resuscitation for larger burns may only be possible with ORSs. Published global experience is limited, and the magnitude of burn injuries that successfully respond to World Health Organization ORSs is not well-described. PMID:27600127

  20. AKT1E17K Is Oncogenic in Mouse Lung and Cooperates with Chemical Carcinogens in Inducing Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malanga, Donatella; Belmonte, Stefania; Colelli, Fabiana; Scarfò, Marzia; De Marco, Carmela; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Mirante, Teresa; Camastra, Caterina; Gagliardi, Monica; Rizzuto, Antonia; Mignogna, Chiara; Paciello, Orlando; Papparella, Serenella; Fagman, Henrik; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The hotspot AKT1E17K mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of AKT1 occurs in approximately 0.6–2% of human lung cancers. Recently, we have demonstrated that AKT1E17K transforms immortalized human bronchial cells. Here by use of a transgenic Cre-inducible murine strain in the wild type Rosa26 (R26) locus (R26-AKT1E17K mice) we demonstrate that AKT1E17K is a bona-fide oncogene and plays a role in the development of lung cancer in vivo. In fact, we report that mutant AKT1E17K induces bronchial and/or bronchiolar hyperplastic lesions in murine lung epithelium, which progress to frank carcinoma at very low frequency, and accelerates tumor formation induced by chemical carcinogens. In conclusion, AKT1E17K induces hyperplasia of mouse lung epithelium in vivo and cooperates with urethane to induce the fully malignant phenotype. PMID:26859676

  1. Fluid resuscitation strategies in the Israeli army.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Michael M

    2003-05-01

    temporarily stopped because of hypotension, vasoconstriction, and thrombus formation, aggressive fluid resuscitation with lactated Ringer's solution to achieve normal hemodynamic parameters is prohibited, because it may induce internal rebleeding and hemodynamic decompensation. When evacuation time exceeds 60 minutes, the use of crystalloids and colloids is indicated. If brain injury is suspected, fluid resuscitation should be aimed toward normalization of hemodynamic parameters. PMID:12768101

  2. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  3. Loss of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2 Alpha in the Lung Alveolar Epithelium of Mice Leads to Enhanced Eosinophilic Inflammation in Cobalt-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Proper, Steven P.; Saini, Yogesh; LaPres, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Hard metal lung disease (HMLD) is an occupational lung disease specific to inhalation of cobalt-containing particles whose mechanism is largely unknown. Cobalt is a known hypoxia mimic and stabilizer of the alpha subunits of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Previous work revealed that though HIF1α contrib utes to cobalt toxicity in vitro, loss of HIF1α in the alveolar epithelial cells does not provide in vivo protection from cobalt-induced lung inflammation. HIF1α and HIF2α show unique tissue expression profiles, and HIF2α is known to be the predominant HIF mRNA isoform in the adult lung. Thus, if HIF2α activation by cobalt contributes to pathophysiology of HMLD, we hypothesized that loss of HIF2α in lung epithelium would provide protection from cobalt-induced inflammation. Mice with HIF2α-deficiency in Club and alveolar type II epithelial cells (ATIIs) (HIF2αΔ/Δ) were exposed to cobalt (60 µg/day) or saline using a subacute occupational exposure model. Bronchoalveolar lavage cellularity, cytokines, qRT-PCR, and histopathology were analyzed. Results show that loss of HIF2α leads to enhanced eosinophilic inflammation and increased goblet cell metaplasia. Additionally, control mice demonstrated a mild recovery from cobalt-induced lung injury compared with HIF2αΔ/Δ mice, suggesting a role for epithelial HIF2α in repair mechanisms. The expression of important cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10, displayed significant differences following cobalt exposure when HIF2αΔ/Δ and control mice were compared. In summary, our data suggest that although loss of HIF2α does not afford protection from cobalt-induced lung inflammation, epithelial HIF2α signaling does play an important role in modulating the inflammatory and repair response in the lung. PMID:24218148

  4. Loss of hypoxia-inducible factor 2 alpha in the lung alveolar epithelium of mice leads to enhanced eosinophilic inflammation in cobalt-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Proper, Steven P; Saini, Yogesh; Greenwood, Krista K; Bramble, Lori A; Downing, Nathaniel J; Harkema, Jack R; Lapres, John J

    2014-02-01

    Hard metal lung disease (HMLD) is an occupational lung disease specific to inhalation of cobalt-containing particles whose mechanism is largely unknown. Cobalt is a known hypoxia mimic and stabilizer of the alpha subunits of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Previous work revealed that though HIF1α contrib utes to cobalt toxicity in vitro, loss of HIF1α in the alveolar epithelial cells does not provide in vivo protection from cobalt-induced lung inflammation. HIF1α and HIF2α show unique tissue expression profiles, and HIF2α is known to be the predominant HIF mRNA isoform in the adult lung. Thus, if HIF2α activation by cobalt contributes to pathophysiology of HMLD, we hypothesized that loss of HIF2α in lung epithelium would provide protection from cobalt-induced inflammation. Mice with HIF2α-deficiency in Club and alveolar type II epithelial cells (ATIIs) (HIF2α(Δ/Δ)) were exposed to cobalt (60 µg/day) or saline using a subacute occupational exposure model. Bronchoalveolar lavage cellularity, cytokines, qRT-PCR, and histopathology were analyzed. Results show that loss of HIF2α leads to enhanced eosinophilic inflammation and increased goblet cell metaplasia. Additionally, control mice demonstrated a mild recovery from cobalt-induced lung injury compared with HIF2α(Δ/Δ) mice, suggesting a role for epithelial HIF2α in repair mechanisms. The expression of important cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10, displayed significant differences following cobalt exposure when HIF2α(Δ/Δ) and control mice were compared. In summary, our data suggest that although loss of HIF2α does not afford protection from cobalt-induced lung inflammation, epithelial HIF2α signaling does play an important role in modulating the inflammatory and repair response in the lung. PMID:24218148

  5. Statins for post resuscitation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Silfvast, Tom; Tenhunen, Jyrki

    2009-07-01

    After sudden cardiac arrest, successful resuscitation and return of spontaneous circulation, a multi-faceted ischaemia/reperfusion related disorder develops. This condition now known as post resuscitation syndrome is characterised by marked increases in the inflammatory response and changes in coagulation profile and vascular reactivity. Additionally, the production of reactive oxygen species and activation of cytotoxic cascades of metabolism add to these injury mechanisms resulting in multiorgan perfusion deficits and dysfunction. Especially in the cerebrum these injuries may be the cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence has shown that statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) exert numerous beneficial effects in cardiovascular diseases irrespective of the lipid status. Remarkably, these pleiotropic effects seem to extended beyond cardiovascular diseases such as immunomodulative and antioxidative properties. We hypothesised that administration of statins early in the post resuscitation phase would prove beneficial in the resuscitated patient via several pleiotropic effects. These include inhibition of excessive coagulation and inflammatory response, suppression of oxygen radical production and improved vascular reactivity. The discussed effects are mediated via multiple pathways activated in the cardiac arrest victim, to which statins have been shown to have a beneficial modulating effect in experimental settings and non-cardiac arrest patients. To test this hypothesis in clinical practice, a randomized, controlled trial with sufficient power and standardised post resuscitation treatment would be necessary. The generally good tolerance of statin therapy with minimal adverse effects would support this experiment, although a parenteral form of the drug to ensure adequate dosage might be a prerequisite. PMID:19254829

  6. Mustard vesicant-induced lung injury: Advances in therapy.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Barry; Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-08-15

    Most mortality and morbidity following exposure to vesicants such as sulfur mustard is due to pulmonary toxicity. Acute injury is characterized by epithelial detachment and necrosis in the pharynx, trachea and bronchioles, while long-term consequences include fibrosis and, in some instances, cancer. Current therapies to treat mustard poisoning are primarily palliative and do not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. New knowledge about vesicant-induced pulmonary disease pathogenesis has led to the identification of potentially efficacious strategies to reduce injury by targeting inflammatory cells and mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, proteases and proinflammatory/cytotoxic cytokines. Therapeutics under investigation include corticosteroids, N-acetyl cysteine, which has both mucolytic and antioxidant properties, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, liposomes containing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and/or tocopherols, protease inhibitors, and cytokine antagonists such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody and pentoxifylline. Antifibrotic and fibrinolytic treatments may also prove beneficial in ameliorating airway obstruction and lung remodeling. More speculative approaches include inhibitors of transient receptor potential channels, which regulate pulmonary epithelial cell membrane permeability, non-coding RNAs and mesenchymal stem cells. As mustards represent high priority chemical threat agents, identification of effective therapeutics for mitigating toxicity is highly significant. PMID:27212445

  7. Pyrrolidine Dithiocarbamate Attenuates Paraquat-Induced Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiuli; Shao, Chunfeng; Wu, Qing; Wu, Qiangen; Huang, Min; Zhou, Zhijun

    2009-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ) has been demonstrated that the main target organ for the toxicity is the lung. This study aimed to investigate the potential protective effect of PDTC on the PQ-induced pulmonary damage. Fifty-four rats were divided into control, PQ-treated and PQ+PDTC-treated groups. Rats in the PQ group were administrated 40 mg/kg PQ by gastric gavage, and PDTC group with 40 mg/kg PQ followed by injection of 120 mg/kg PDTC (IP). On the days 3, 7, 14 and 21 after treatments, the activities of GSH-Px, SOD, MDA level and the content of HYP were measured. TGF-β1 mRNA and protein were assayed by RT-PCR and ELISA. MDA level in plasma and BALF was increased and the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were decreased significantly in the PQ-treated groups (P < .05) compared with control group. While the activities of GSH-Px and SOD in the PQ+PDTC-treated groups was markedly higher than that of PQ-treated groups (P < .05), and in contrast, MDA level was lower. TGF-β1 mRNA and protein were significantly lower in the PQ+PDTC-treated groups than that of PQ-treated groups (P < .05). The histopathological changes in the PQ+PDTC-treated groups were milder than those of PQ groups. Our results suggested that PDTC treatment significantly attenuated paraquat-induced pulmonary damage. PMID:19639047

  8. Paeonol attenuates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting ROS-sensitive inflammatory signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng-Han; Lin, An-Hsuan; Lee, Hung-Fu; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Kou, Yu Ru

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes persistent lung inflammation that is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive pathways. We have previously reported that cigarette smoke (CS) activates reactive oxygen species- (ROS-) sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling leading to induction of lung inflammation. Paeonol, the main phenolic compound present in the Chinese herb Paeonia suffruticosa, has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether paeonol has similar beneficial effects against CS-induced lung inflammation remains unclear. Using a murine model, we showed that chronic CS exposure for 4 weeks caused pulmonary inflammatory infiltration, increased lung vascular permeability, elevated lung levels of chemokines, cytokines, and 4-hydroxynonenal (an oxidative stress biomarker), and induced lung inflammation; all of these CS-induced events were suppressed by chronic treatment with paeonol. Using human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs), we demonstrated that cigarette smoke extract (CSE) sequentially increased extracellular and intracellular levels of ROS, activated the MAPKs/NF-κB signaling, and induced interleukin-8 (IL-8); all these CSE-induced events were inhibited by paeonol pretreatment. Our findings suggest a novel role for paeonol in alleviating the oxidative stress and lung inflammation induced by chronic CS exposure in vivo and in suppressing CSE-induced IL-8 in vitro via its antioxidant function and an inhibition of the MAPKs/NF-κB signaling. PMID:25165413

  9. Measurement of ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Ornato, J P; Bryson, B L; Donovan, P J; Farquharson, R R; Jaeger, C

    1983-02-01

    Determining adequacy of mechanical ventilation is as important during CPR as in a more stable situation (such as, a patient on a ventilator in an ICU). Yet, such assessment during CPR usually only means listening for breath sounds, checking chest excursion, and blood gases. Exhaled tidal volume (VT) was measured on 45 intubated adult patients during resuscitation using a Wright's spirometer attached to a T-valve above the endotracheal tube. Ten patients had aspiration prior to intubation; 15 received advanced cardiac life support in the field, including esophageal airway insertion. CPR was performed in all cases with a mechanical compression device (Thumper). The pressure ventilator on this device was calibrated (peak inspiratory pressure, VT vs compliance) using a Dixie Test Lung, allowing indirect assessment of pulmonary compliance during CPR. Our findings suggest that lung compliance is markedly reduced within a short time after cardiac arrest. Fifty-five % of patients in this series could not be adequately oxygenated (PaO2 less than 50 torr) despite an FIO2 of 0.8 and adequate ventilation. Due to the reduced cardiac output during CPR causing venoarterial shunting, it is speculated that pulmonary edema is the most plausible explanation for this observation. PMID:6822084

  10. A Rat Model of Ventricular Fibrillation and Resuscitation by Conventional Closed-chest Technique.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Lorissa; Radhakrishnan, Jeejabai; Gazmuri, Raúl J

    2015-01-01

    A rat model of electrically-induced ventricular fibrillation followed by cardiac resuscitation using a closed chest technique that incorporates the basic components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in humans is herein described. The model was developed in 1988 and has been used in approximately 70 peer-reviewed publications examining a myriad of resuscitation aspects including its physiology and pathophysiology, determinants of resuscitability, pharmacologic interventions, and even the effects of cell therapies. The model featured in this presentation includes: (1) vascular catheterization to measure aortic and right atrial pressures, to measure cardiac output by thermodilution, and to electrically induce ventricular fibrillation; and (2) tracheal intubation for positive pressure ventilation with oxygen enriched gas and assessment of the end-tidal CO2. A typical sequence of intervention entails: (1) electrical induction of ventricular fibrillation, (2) chest compression using a mechanical piston device concomitantly with positive pressure ventilation delivering oxygen-enriched gas, (3) electrical shocks to terminate ventricular fibrillation and reestablish cardiac activity, (4) assessment of post-resuscitation hemodynamic and metabolic function, and (5) assessment of survival and recovery of organ function. A robust inventory of measurements is available that includes - but is not limited to - hemodynamic, metabolic, and tissue measurements. The model has been highly effective in developing new resuscitation concepts and examining novel therapeutic interventions before their testing in larger and translationally more relevant animal models of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:25938619

  11. Relevance of particle-induced rat lung tumors for assessing lung carcinogenic hazard and human lung cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1997-01-01

    Rats and other rodents are exposed by inhalation to identify agents that might present hazards for lung cancer in humans exposed by inhalation. In some cases, the results are used in attempts to develop quantitative estimates of human lung cancer risk. This report reviews evidence for the usefulness of the rat for evaluation of lung cancer hazards from inhaled particles. With the exception of nickel sulfate, particulate agents thought to be human lung carcinogens cause lung tumors in rats exposed by inhalation. The rat is more sensitive to carcinogenesis from nonfibrous particles than mice or Syrian hamsters, which have both produced false negatives. However, rats differ from mice and nonhuman primates in both the pattern of particle retention in the lung and alveolar epithelial hyperplastic responses to chronic particle exposure. Present evidence warrants caution in extrapolation from the lung tumor response of rats to inhaled particles to human lung cancer hazard, and there is considerable uncertainty in estimating unit risks for humans from rat data. It seems appropriate to continue using rats in inhalation carcinogenesis assays of inhaled particles, but the upper limit of exposure concentrations must be set carefully to avoid false-positive results. A positive finding in both rats and mice would give greater confidence that an agent presents a carcinogenic hazard to man, and both rats and mice should be used if the agent is a gas or vapor. There is little justification for including Syrian hamsters in assays of the intrapulmonary carcinogenicity of inhaled agents. PMID:9400748

  12. Febuxostat protects rats against lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Alaa N A; Shehatou, George S G; Shebl, Abdelhadi M; Salem, Hatem A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate possible protective effects of febuxostat, a highly potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor, against acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups, as follows: (i) vehicle control group; (ii) and (iii) febuxostat 10 and febuxostat 15 groups, drug-treated controls; (iv) LPS group, receiving an intraperitoneal injection of LPS (7.5 mg/kg); (v) and (vi) febuxostat 10-LPS and febuxostat 15-LPS groups, receiving oral treatment of febuxostat (10 and 15 mg/kg/day, respectively) for 7 days before LPS. After 18 h administration of LPS, blood was collected for C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was examined for leukocyte infiltration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, protein content, and total nitrate/nitrite. Lung weight gain was determined, and lung tissue homogenate was prepared and evaluated for oxidative stress. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was assessed in BALF and lung homogenate. Moreover, histological changes of lung tissues were evaluated. LPS elicited lung injury characterized by increased lung water content (by 1.2 fold), leukocyte infiltration (by 13 fold), inflammation and oxidative stress (indicated by increased malondialdehyde (MDA), by 3.4 fold), and reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity (by 34 %). Febuxostat dose-dependently decreased LPS-induced lung edema and elevations in BALF protein content, infiltration of leukocytes, and LDH activity. Moreover, the elevated levels of TNF-α in BALF and lung tissue of LPS-treated rats were attenuated by febuxostat pretreatment. Febuxostat also displayed a potent antioxidant activity by decreasing lung tissue levels of MDA and enhancing SOD activity. Histological analysis of lung tissue further demonstrated that febuxostat dose-dependently reversed LPS-induced histopathological changes. These findings demonstrate a significant dose

  13. Inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition attenuates physical stress-induced lung hyper-responsiveness and oxidative stress in animals with lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Marques, Ricardo Henrique; Reis, Fabiana G; Starling, Claudia M; Cabido, Claudia; de Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Dohlnikoff, Marisa; Prado, Carla M; Leick, Edna A; Martins, Mílton A; Tibério, Iolanda F L C

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in stress-induced asthmatic alterations have been poorly characterised. We assessed whether inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibition modulates the stress-amplified lung parenchyma responsiveness, oxidative stress and extracellular matrix remodelling that was previously increased by chronic lung inflammation. Guinea pigs were subjected to 7 exposures to ovalbumin (1-5 mg/ml) or saline (OVA and SAL groups) over 4 weeks. To induce behavioural stress, animals were subjected to a forced swimming protocol (5 times/week, over 2 weeks; SAL-Stress and OVA-Stress groups) 24 h after the 4th inhalation. 1400W (iNOS-specific inhibitor) was administered intraperitoneally in the last 4 days of the protocol (SAL-1400W, OVA-1400W, SAL-Stress+1400W and OVA-Stress+1400W groups). Seventy-two hours after the last inhalation, animals were anaesthetised and exsanguinated, and adrenal glands were removed. Lung tissue resistance and elastance were evaluated by oscillatory mechanics and submitted for histopathological evaluation. Stressed animals had higher adrenal weights compared to non-stressed groups, which were reduced by 1400W treatment. Behavioural stress in sensitised animals amplified the resistance and elastance responses after antigen challenge, numbers of eosinophils and iNOS+ cells, actin content and 8-iso-PGF2α density in the distal lung compared to the OVA group. 1400W treatment in ovalbumin-exposed and stressed animals reduced lung mechanics, iNOS+ cell numbers and 8-iso-PGF2α density compared to sensitised and stressed animals that received vehicle treatment. We concluded that stress amplifies the distal lung constriction, eosinophilic inflammation, iNOS expression, actin content and oxidative stress previously induced by chronic lung inflammation. iNOS-derived NO contributes to stress-augmented lung tissue functional alterations in this animal model and is at least partially due to activation of the oxidative stress pathway. PMID:22262048

  14. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia: a rare histopathological variant of chemotherapy-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arjun; Sen, Shiraj; Naina, Harris

    2016-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury is the most common chemotherapy-associated lung disease, and is linked with several histopathological patterns. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia (AFOP) is a relatively new and rare histological pattern of diffuse lung injury. We report the first known case of bleomycin-induced AFOP. A 36-year-old man with metastatic testicular cancer received three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin, before being transitioned to paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin. He subsequently presented with exertional dyspnoea, cough and pleuritic chest pain. CT of the chest demonstrated bilateral ground glass opacities with peribronchovascular distribution and pulmonary function tests demonstrated a restrictive pattern of lung disease with impaired diffusion. Transbronchial biopsy revealed intra-alveolar fibrin deposits with organising pneumonia, consisting of intraluminal loose connective tissue consistent with AFOP. The patient received high-dose corticosteroids with symptomatic and radiographic improvement. AFOP should be recognised as a histopathological variant of bleomycin-induced lung injury. PMID:27053543

  15. Protective effect of sodium aescinate on lung injury induced by methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuan; Wang, Tian; Jiang, Na; Ren, Ru-Tong; Zhao, De-Lu; Li, Chong; Fu, Feng-Hua

    2011-10-01

    Methyl parathion (MP) is a high venenosus insecticide. It has been used in pest control of agriculture for several years. The present study is performed to investigate the protective effect of sodium aescinate (SA) on lung injury induced by MP. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats are randomly divided into five groups, with 8 animals in each group: control group, MP administration group, MP plus SA at doses of 0.45 mg/kg, 0.9 mg/kg and 1.8 mg/kg groups. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and nitric oxide (NO) level in plasma, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, NO level, and antioxidative parameters in lung tissue are assayed. Histopathological examination of lung is also performed. The results show that SA has no effect on AChE. Treatment with SA decreases the activity of MPO in lung and the level of NO in plasma and lung. The level of malondialdehyde in lung is decreased after SA treatments. SA increases the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and the content of glutathione in lung. SA administration also ameliorates lung injury induced by MP. The findings indicate that SA could protect lung injury induced by MP and the mechanism of action is related to the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effect of SA. PMID:21177729

  16. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells from EGFP Transgenic Mice Attenuate Hyperoxia-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Cheng-Wei; Yen, Chih-Ching; Lee, Kun-Hsiung; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of oxygen aggravate the severity of lung injury in patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Although mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to effectively attenuate various injured tissues, there is limited information regarding a role for amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs) in treating acute lung injury. We hypothesized that intravenous delivery of AFSCs would attenuate lung injury in an experimental model of hyperoxia-induced lung injury. AFSCs were isolated from EGFP transgenic mice. The in vitro differentiation, surface markers, and migration of the AFSCs were assessed by specific staining, flow cytometry, and a co-culture system, respectively. The in vivo therapeutic potential of AFSCs was evaluated in a model of acute hyperoxia-induced lung injury in mice. The administration of AFSCs significantly reduced the hyperoxia-induced pulmonary inflammation, as reflected by significant reductions in lung wet/dry ratio, neutrophil counts, and the level of apoptosis, as well as reducing the levels of inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and early-stage fibrosis in lung tissues. Moreover, EGFP-expressing AFSCs were detected and engrafted into a peripheral lung epithelial cell lineage by fluorescence microscopy and DAPI stain. Intravenous administration of AFSCs may offer a new therapeutic strategy for acute lung injury (ALI), for which efficient treatments are currently unavailable. PMID:24040409

  17. Ginsenoside Rg3 attenuated omethoate-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Yu, X F; Zhao, J J; Shi, S M; Fu, L; Sui, D Y

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphorus exposure affects different organs such as the lung, gastrointestinal tract, liver, and brain. The present experiment aimed to evaluate the effect of ginsenoside Rg3 on lung injury induced by acute omethoate poisoning. Rats were administered with omethoate subcutaneously at a single dose of 60 mg/kg, followed by ginsenoside Rg3 (5, 10, or 20 mg/kg) treatment. Histopathological examination of the lung was performed at 24 h after the omethoate exposure. The antioxidative parameters in the lung were also assayed. Moreover, the activities of acetylcholinesterase, myeloperoxidase, and the content of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in the lung were determined. The results showed that ginsenoside Rg3 attenuated omethoate-induced lung injury. Ginsenoside Rg3 increased the level of glutathione in the lung (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). The altered activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in the lung were also ameliorated by ginsenoside Rg3 treatment (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). Ginsenoside Rg3 caused significant reductions in the contents of malondialdehyde, TNF-α, and the activity of myeloperoxidase (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). The present study demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg3 had a protective effect against omethoate-induced lung injury in rats, and the mechanisms were related to its antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:26240163

  18. Recovery from silver-nanoparticle-exposure-induced lung inflammation and lung function changes in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyung Seuk; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Ji, Jun Ho; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jong Seong; Ryu, Hyeon Ryol; Lee, Jin Kyu; Chung, Yong Hyun; Park, Hyun Min; Shin, Beom Soo; Chang, Hee Kyung; Kelman, Bruce; Yu, Il Je

    2013-03-01

    In a previous study, the lung function, as indicated by the tidal volume, minute volume, and peak inspiration flow, decreased during 90 days of exposure to silver nanoparticles and was accompanied by inflammatory lesions in the lung morphology. Therefore, this study investigated the recovery from such lung function changes in rats following the cessation of 12 weeks of nanoparticle exposure. Male and female rats were exposed to silver nanoparticles (14-15 nm diameter) at concentrations of 0.66 × 10(6) particles/cm(3) (49 μg/m(3), low dose), 1.41 × 10(6) particles/cm(3) (117 μg/m(3), middle dose), and 3.24 × 10(6) particles/cm(3) (381 μg/m(3), high dose) for 6 h/day in an inhalation chamber for 12 weeks. The rats were then allowed to recover. The lung function was measured every week during the exposure period and after the cessation of exposure, plus animals were sacrificed after the 12-week exposure period, and 4 weeks and 12 weeks after the exposure cessation. An exposure-related lung function decrease was measured in the male rats after the 12-week exposure period and 12 weeks after the exposure cessation. In contrast, the female rats did not show a consistent lung function decrease either during the exposure period or following the exposure cessation. The histopathology showed a gradual recovery from the lung inflammation in the female rats, whereas the male rats in the high-dose group exhibited persistent inflammation throughout the 12-week recovery period. Therefore, the present results suggest a potential persistence of lung function changes and inflammation induced by silver nanoparticle exposure above the no observed adverse effect level. PMID:22264098

  19. CXCR4 Blockade Attenuates Hyperoxia Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Shelley; Ramachandran, Shalini; Torres, Eneida; Huang, Jian; Hehre, Dorothy; Suguihara, Cleide; Young, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung inflammation is a key factor in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its receptor chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) modulate the inflammatory response. Whether antagonism of CXCR4 will alleviate lung inflammation in neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury is unknown. Objective To determine whether CXCR4 antagonism would attenuate lung injury in rodents with experimental BPD by decreasing pulmonary inflammation. Methods Newborn rats exposed to normoxia (RA) or hyperoxia (FiO2=0.9) from postnatal day 2 (P2)-P16 were randomized to receive the CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 or placebo (PL) from P5 to P15. Lung alveolarization, angiogenesis, and inflammation were evaluated at P16. Results As compared to RA, hyperoxic-PL pups had a decrease in alveolarization, reduced lung vascular density and increased lung inflammation. In contrast, AMD3100-treated hyperoxic pups had improved alveolarization and increased angiogenesis. This improvement in lung structure was accompanied by a decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid macrophage and neutrophil count and reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Conclusion CXCR4 antagonism decreases lung inflammation and improves alveolar as well as vascular structure in neonatal rats with experimental BPD. These findings suggest a novel therapeutic strategy to alleviate lung injury in preterm infants with BPD. PMID:25825119

  20. Chemically-induced mouse lung tumors: applications to human health assessments [Poster 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to discuss issues related to the use of mouse lung tumor data in human health assessments. Naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbenzene were chosen for the anal...

  1. Chemically-induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Applications to Human Health Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to better understand the mouse lung tumor data’s role in human health assessments. Three environmental chemicals - naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbe...

  2. Cerium-144-induced lung gumors in two strains of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    A major problem in the extrapolation of radiation cancer risk factors from one species or population to another is the choice of the risk model to use, either absolute or relative. The purpose of this study was to compare absolute and relative risk models in predicting the lung-tumor risks between a low lung-tumor incidence strain of mice and a high-incidence strain of mice. The conclusion from this study is that absolute risk is more accurate than relative risk for predicting lung tumor risk from high to low lung-tumor incidence strains of mice.

  3. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Samir A.; Omar, Hany A.; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A.; AlSaeed, Mohammed S.; EL-Tarras, Adel E.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  4. Magnetite induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Vani; Ravichandran, Prabakaran; Copeland, Clinton L; Gopikrishnan, Ramya; Biradar, Santhoshkumar; Goornavar, Virupaxi; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Hall, Joseph C

    2012-04-01

    There is an ongoing concern regarding the biocompatibility of nanoparticles with sizes less than 100 nm as compared to larger particles of the same nominal substance. In this study, we investigated the toxic properties of magnetite stabilized with polyacrylate sodium. The magnetite was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis, and the mean particle diameter was calculated using the Scherrer formula and was found to be 9.3 nm. In this study, we treated lung epithelial cells with different concentrations of magnetite and investigated their effects on oxidative stress and cell proliferation. Our data showed an inhibition of cell proliferation in magnetite-treated cells with a significant dose-dependent activation and induction of reactive oxygen species. Also, we observed a depletion of antioxidants, glutathione, and superoxide dismutase, respectively, as compared with control cells. In addition, apoptotic-related protease/enzyme such as caspase-3 and -8 activities, were increased in a dose-dependent manner with corresponding increased levels of DNA fragmentation in magnetite-treated cells compared to than control cells. Together, the present study reveals that magnetite exposure induces oxidative stress and depletes antioxidant levels in the cells to stimulate apoptotic pathway for cell death. PMID:22147200

  5. Acid aspiration-induced lung injury in rabbits is mediated by interleukin-8-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Folkesson, H G; Matthay, M A; Hébert, C A; Broaddus, V C

    1995-01-01

    Acid aspiration lung injury may be mediated primarily by neutrophils recruited to the lung by acid-induced cytokines. We hypothesized that a major acid-induced cytokine was IL-8 and that a neutralizing anti-rabbit-IL-8 monoclonal antibody (ARIL8.2) would attenuate acid-induced lung injury in rabbits. Hydrochloric acid (pH = 1.5 in 1/3 normal saline) or 1/3 normal saline (4 ml/kg) was instilled into the lungs of ventilated, anesthetized rabbits. The rabbits were studied for 6 or 24 h. In acid-instilled rabbits without the anti-IL-8 monoclonal antibody, severe lung injury developed in the first 6 h; in the long-term experiments, all rabbits died with lung injury between 12 and 14 h. In acid-instilled rabbits given the anti-IL-8 monoclonal antibody (2 mg/kg, intravenously) either as pretreatment (5 min before the acid) or as treatment (1 h after the acid), acid-induced abnormalities in oxygenation and extravascular lung water were prevented and extravascular protein accumulation was reduced by 70%; in the long-term experiments, anti-IL-8 treatment similarly protected lung function throughout the 24-h period. The anti-IL-8 monoclonal antibody also significantly reduced air space neutrophil counts and IL-8 concentrations. This study establishes IL-8 as a critical cytokine for the development of acid-induced lung injury. Neutralization of IL-8 may provide the first useful therapy for this clinically important form of acute lung injury. Images PMID:7615779

  6. Proopiomelanocortin but not vasopressin or renin-angiotensin system induces resuscitative effects of central 5-HT1A activation in haemorrhagic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Sowa, P; Adamczyk-Sowa, M; Zwirska-Korczala, K; Pierzchala, K; Adamczyk, D; Paluch, Z; Misiolek, M

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectory mechanisms: vasopressin, renin-angiotensin system and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides (POMC), partaking in the effects of serotonin through central serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A) receptors in haemorrhagic shock in rats. The study was conducted on male Wistar rats. All experimental procedures were carried out under full anaesthesia. The principal experiment included a 2 hour observation period in haemorrhagic shock. Drugs used - a selective 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT (5 μg/5 μl); V1a receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β, β-cyclo-pentamethylenepropionyl(1),O-me-Tyr(2),Arg(8)]AVP (10 μg/kg); angiotensin type I receptor antagonist (AT1) ZD7155 (0.5 mg/kg, i.v.); angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor captopril (30 mg/kg, i.v.); melanocortin type 4 (MC4) receptor antagonist HS014 (5 μg, i.c.v.). There was no influence of ZD715, captopril or blocking of the V1a receptors on changes in the heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), peripheral blood flow or resistance caused by the central stimulation of 5-HT1A receptors (P≥0.05). However, selective blocking of central MC4 receptors caused a slight, but significant decrease in HR and MAP (P<0.05). POMC derivatives acting via the central MC4 receptor participate in the resuscitative effects of 8-OH-DPAT. The angiotensin and vasopressin systems do not participate in these actions. PMID:25371525

  7. TGFβ signaling in lung epithelium regulates bleomycin-induced alveolar injury and fibroblast recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Degryse, Amber L.; Tanjore, Harikrishna; Xu, Xiaochuan C.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Jones, Brittany R.; Boomershine, Chad S.; Ortiz, Camila; Sherrill, Taylor P.; McMahon, Frank B.; Gleaves, Linda A.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    The response of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) to lung injury plays a central role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, but the mechanisms by which AECs regulate fibrotic processes are not well defined. We aimed to elucidate how transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signaling in lung epithelium impacts lung fibrosis in the intratracheal bleomycin model. Mice with selective deficiency of TGFβ receptor 2 (TGFβR2) in lung epithelium were generated and crossed to cell fate reporter mice that express β-galactosidase (β-gal) in cells of lung epithelial lineage. Mice were given intratracheal bleomycin (0.08 U), and the following parameters were assessed: AEC death by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-mediated nick-end labeling assay, inflammation by total and differential cell counts from bronchoalveolar lavage, fibrosis by scoring of trichrome-stained lung sections, and total lung collagen content. Mice with lung epithelial deficiency of TGFβR2 had improved AEC survival, despite greater lung inflammation, after bleomycin administration. At 3 wk after bleomycin administration, mice with epithelial TGFβR2 deficiency showed a significantly attenuated fibrotic response in the lungs, as determined by semiquantitatve scoring and total collagen content. The reduction in lung fibrosis in these mice was associated with a marked decrease in the lung fibroblast population, both total lung fibroblasts and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-derived (S100A4+/β-gal+) fibroblasts. Attenuation of TGFβ signaling in lung epithelium provides protection from bleomycin-induced fibrosis, indicating a critical role for the epithelium in transducing the profibrotic effects of this cytokine. PMID:21441353

  8. TGFβ signaling in lung epithelium regulates bleomycin-induced alveolar injury and fibroblast recruitment.

    PubMed

    Degryse, Amber L; Tanjore, Harikrishna; Xu, Xiaochuan C; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Jones, Brittany R; Boomershine, Chad S; Ortiz, Camila; Sherrill, Taylor P; McMahon, Frank B; Gleaves, Linda A; Blackwell, Timothy S; Lawson, William E

    2011-06-01

    The response of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) to lung injury plays a central role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, but the mechanisms by which AECs regulate fibrotic processes are not well defined. We aimed to elucidate how transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signaling in lung epithelium impacts lung fibrosis in the intratracheal bleomycin model. Mice with selective deficiency of TGFβ receptor 2 (TGFβR2) in lung epithelium were generated and crossed to cell fate reporter mice that express β-galactosidase (β-gal) in cells of lung epithelial lineage. Mice were given intratracheal bleomycin (0.08 U), and the following parameters were assessed: AEC death by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-mediated nick-end labeling assay, inflammation by total and differential cell counts from bronchoalveolar lavage, fibrosis by scoring of trichrome-stained lung sections, and total lung collagen content. Mice with lung epithelial deficiency of TGFβR2 had improved AEC survival, despite greater lung inflammation, after bleomycin administration. At 3 wk after bleomycin administration, mice with epithelial TGFβR2 deficiency showed a significantly attenuated fibrotic response in the lungs, as determined by semiquantitatve scoring and total collagen content. The reduction in lung fibrosis in these mice was associated with a marked decrease in the lung fibroblast population, both total lung fibroblasts and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-derived (S100A4(+)/β-gal(+)) fibroblasts. Attenuation of TGFβ signaling in lung epithelium provides protection from bleomycin-induced fibrosis, indicating a critical role for the epithelium in transducing the profibrotic effects of this cytokine. PMID:21441353

  9. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 inhibits lung injury induced by respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hongjing; Xie, Zhengde; Li, Tieling; Zhang, Shaogeng; Lai, Chengcai; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Keyu; Han, Lina; Duan, Yueqiang; Zhao, Zhongpeng; Yang, Xiaolan; Xing, Li; Zhang, Peirui; Wang, Zhouhai; Li, Ruisheng; Yu, Jane J.; Wang, Xiliang; Yang, Penghui

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a major cause of severe lower respiratory illness in infants and young children, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for viral pathogenesis have not been fully elucidated. To date, no drugs or vaccines have been employed to improve clinical outcomes for RSV-infected patients. In this paper, we report that angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) protected against severe lung injury induced by RSV infection in an experimental mouse model and in pediatric patients. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency aggravated RSV-associated disease pathogenesis, mainly by its action on the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). Furthermore, administration of a recombinant ACE2 protein alleviated the severity of RSV-induced lung injury. These findings demonstrate that ACE2 plays a critical role in preventing RSV-induced lung injury, and suggest that ACE2 is a promising potential therapeutic target in the management of RSV-induced lung disease. PMID:26813885

  10. K-ras mutations in beryllium-induced mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Belinsky, S.A.; Mitchell, C.E.

    1994-11-01

    Previous studies at ITRI have shown that single, nose-only exposure of F344/N rats to beryllium metal (Be) produced a 64% incidence of lung tumors over the lifetime of the rat. Long tumors induced by Be metal were subsequently analyzed for alterations in the K-ras and p53 genes. Mutation of the K-ras gene was both a rare (2 of 24 tumors) and late event in Be-induced carcinogenesis. In addition, no mutations were detected in exons 5 - 8 of the p53 gene. These results indicated that the mechanisms underlying the development of Be-induced lung cancer in rats did not involve gene dysfunction commonly associated with human non-small-cell lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the prevalence and specificity for mutation of the K-ras gene in lung tumors induced in the A/J mouse by Be to mutations in spontaneous tumors.

  11. Farmer's Lung: Causes and Symptoms of Mold and Dust Induced Respiratory Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Resources Farmer's Lung: Causes and Symptoms of Mold and Dust Induced Respiratory Illness ID 442-602 ( ... noninfectious allergic disease that is caused by inhaling mold spores in the dust from moldy hay, straw, ...

  12. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1) the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2) the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner. PMID:27493815

  13. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia.

    PubMed

    Menticoglou, Savas; Schneider, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1) the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2) the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner. PMID:27493815

  14. Resuscitation and quantification of stressed Escherichia coli K12 NCTC8797 in water samples.

    PubMed

    Ozkanca, R; Saribiyik, F; Isik, K; Sahin, N; Kariptas, E; Flint, K P

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact on numbers of using different media for the enumeration of Escherichia coli subjected to stress, and to evaluate the use of different resuscitation methods on bacterial numbers. E. coli was subjected to heat stress by exposure to 55 degrees C for 1h or to light-induced oxidative stress by exposure to artificial light for up to 8h in the presence of methylene blue. In both cases, the bacterial counts on selective media were below the limits of detection whereas on non-selective media colonies were still produced. After resuscitation in non-selective media, using a multi-well MPN resuscitation method or resuscitation on membrane filters, the bacterial counts on selective media matched those on non-selective media. Heat and light stress can affect the ability of E. coli to grow on selective media essential for the enumeration as indicator bacteria. A resuscitation method is essential for the recovery of these stressed bacteria in order to avoid underestimation of indicator bacteria numbers in water. There was no difference in resuscitation efficiency using the membrane filter and multi-well MPN methods. This study emphasises the need to use a resuscitation method if the numbers of indicator bacteria in water samples are not to be underestimated. False-negative results in the analysis of drinking water or natural bathing waters could have profound health effects. PMID:17418553

  15. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production. PMID:26690120

  16. Deletion of Src family kinase Lyn aggravates endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rong; Ma, Zhongsen; Ma, Mengshi; Yu, Jinyan; Chen, Jiao; Li, Zhenyu; Shetty, Sreerama; Fu, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Overwhelming acute inflammation often leads to tissue damage during endotoxemia. In the present study, we investigated the role of Lyn, a member of the Src family tyrosine kinases, in modulating inflammatory responses in a murine model of endotoxemia. We examined lung inflammatory signaling in Lyn knockout (Lyn(-/-)) mice and wild-type littermates (Lyn(+/+)) during endotoxemia. Our data indicate that Lyn deletion aggravates endotoxin-induced pulmonary inflammation and proinflammatory signaling. We found increased activation of proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB in the lung tissues of Lyn(-/-) mice after endotoxin challenge. Furthermore, during endotoxemia, the lung tissues of Lyn(-/-) mice showed increased inflammasome activation indicated by augmented caspase-1 and IL-1β cleavage and activation. The aggravated lung inflammatory signaling in Lyn(-/-) mice was associated with increased production of proinflammatory mediators and elevated matrix metallopeptidase 9 and reduced VE-cadherin levels. Our results suggest that Lyn kinase modulates inhibitory signaling to suppress endotoxin-induced lung inflammation. PMID:26453518

  17. Monitoring End Points of Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Daniel M; Matthews, Marc R

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses commonly used methods of monitoring and determining the end points of resuscitation. Each end point of resuscitation is examined as it relates to use in critically ill burn patients. Published medical literature, clinical trials, consensus trials, and expert opinion regarding end points of resuscitation were gathered and reviewed. Specific goals were a detailed examination of each method in the critical care population and how this methodology can be used in the burn patient. Although burn resuscitation is monitored and administered using the methodology as seen in medical/surgical intensive care settings, special consideration for excessive edema formation, metabolic derangements, and frequent operative interventions must be considered. PMID:27600124

  18. An alternative approach to advancing resuscitation science.

    PubMed

    Kern, Karl B; Valenzuela, Terence D; Clark, Lani L; Berg, Robert A; Hilwig, Ronald W; Berg, Marc D; Otto, Charles W; Newburn, Daniel; Ewy, Gordon A

    2005-03-01

    Stagnant survival rates in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remain a great impetus for advancing resuscitation science. International resuscitation guidelines, with all their advantages for standardizing resuscitation therapeutic protocols, can be difficult to change. A formalized evidence-based process has been adopted by the International Liason Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) in formulating such guidelines. Currently, randomized clinical trials are considered optimal evidence, and very few major changes in the Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care are made without such. An alternative approach is to allow externally controlled clinical trials more weight in Guideline formulation and resuscitation protocol adoption. In Tucson, Arizona (USA), the Fire Department cardiac arrest database has revealed a number of resuscitation issues. These include a poor bystander CPR rate, a lack of response to initial defibrillation after prolonged ventricular fibrillation, and substantial time without chest compressions during the resuscitation effort. A local change in our previous resuscitation protocols had been instituted based upon this historical database information. PMID:15733752

  19. Neonatal Resuscitation in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Berkelhamer, Sara K; Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Niermeyer, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Almost one quarter of newborn deaths are attributed to birth asphyxia. Systematic implementation of newborn resuscitation programs has the potential to avert many of these deaths as basic resuscitative measures alone can reduce neonatal mortality. Simplified resuscitation training provided through Helping Babies Breathe decreases early neonatal mortality and stillbirth. However, challenges remain in providing every newborn the needed care at birth. Barriers include ineffective educational systems and programming; inadequate equipment, personnel and data monitoring; and limited political and social support to improve care. Further progress calls for renewed commitments to closing gaps in the quality of newborn resuscitative care. PMID:27524455

  20. Inflammasome, IL-1 and inflammation in ozone-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Michaudel, Chloé; Couturier-Maillard, Aurélie; Chenuet, Pauline; Maillet, Isabelle; Mura, Catherine; Couillin, Isabelle; Gombault, Aurélie; Quesniaux, Valérie F; Huaux, François; Ryffel, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ambient ozone causes airway hyperreactivity and lung inflammation, which represent an important health concern in humans. Recent clinical and experimental studies contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms of epithelial injury, inflammation and airway hyperreactivity, which is reviewed here. The present data suggest that ozone induced oxidative stress causes inflammasome activation with the release of IL-1, other cytokines and proteases driving lung inflammation leading to the destruction of alveolar epithelia with emphysema and respiratory failure. Insights in the pathogenic pathway may allow to identify novel biomarkers of ozone-induced lung disease and therapeutic targets. PMID:27168953

  1. Experimental studies on lung carcinogenesis and their relationship to future research on radiation-induced lung cancer in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-03-01

    The usefulness of experimental systems for studying human lung carcinogenesis lies in the ease of studying components of a total problem. As an example, the main thrust of attack on possible synergistic interactions between radiation, cigarette smoke, and other irritants must be by means of research on animals. Because animals can be serially sacrificed, a systematic search can be made for progressive lung changes, thereby improving our understanding of carcinogenesis. The mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis have not yet been delineated, but modern concepts of molecular and cellular biology and of radiation dosimetry are being increasingly applied to both in vivo and in vitro exposure to determine the mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, to elucidate human data, and to aid in extrapolating experimental animal data to human exposures. In addition, biologically based mathematical models of carcinogenesis are being developed to describe the nature of the events leading to malignancy; they are also an essential part of a rational approach to quantitative cancer risk assessment. This paper summarizes recent experimental and modeling data on radon-induced lung cancer and includes the confounding effects of cigarette-smoke exposures. The applicability of these data to understanding human exposures is emphasized, and areas of future research on human radiation-induced carcinogenesis are discussed. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. TRPM2 channels in alveolar epithelial cells mediate bleomycin-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Ryo; Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Takenaka, Miki; Kage, Yukiko; Negoro, Takaharu; Toda, Takahiro; Ohbayashi, Masayuki; Numata, Tomohiro; Nakano, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Mori, Yasuo; Ishii, Masakazu; Shimizu, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Lung inflammation is a major adverse effect of therapy with the antitumor drug bleomycin (BLM). Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a Ca(2+)-permeable channel that is activated by oxidative stress through the production of ADP-ribose. We herein investigated whether TRPM2 channels contributed to BLM-induced lung inflammation. The intratracheal instillation of BLM into wild-type (WT) mice increased the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and inflammatory cytokine levels in the lung. Increases in inflammatory markers in WT mice were markedly reduced in trpm2 knockout (KO) mice, which demonstrated that the activation of TRPM2 channels was involved in BLM-induced lung inflammation. The expression of TRPM2 mRNA was observed in alveolar macrophages, alveolar epithelial cells, and lung fibroblasts. Actually, TRPM2 protein was expressed in lung tissues. Of these, TRPM2 channels in epithelial cells were activated by the addition of H2O2 following a BLM pretreatment, resulting in the secretion of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The H2O2-induced activation of TRPM2 by the BLM pretreatment was blocked by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors PJ34 and 3-aminobenzamide. The accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) in the nucleus, a marker for ADP-ribose production, was strongly induced by H2O2 following the BLM pretreatment. Furthermore, administration of PRAP inhibitors into WT mice markedly reduced recruitment of inflammatory cells and MIP-2 secretion induced by BLM instillation. These results suggest that the induction of MIP-2 secretion through the activation of TRPM2 channels in alveolar epithelial cells is an important mechanism in BLM-induced lung inflammation, and the TRPM2 activation is likely to be mediated by ADP-ribose production via PARP pathway. TRPM2 channels may be new therapeutic target for BLM-induced lung inflammation. PMID:26600069

  3. Lasting glycolytic stress governs susceptibility to urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaofang; Deng, Jiaxiu; Cao, Ning; Guo, Zhenzhen; Zheng, Yaqiu; Geng, Shengnan; Meng, Mingjing; Lin, Haihong; Duan, Yongjian; Du, Gangjun

    2016-01-01

    Urethane is a recognized genotoxic carcinogen in fermented foods and beverages. This study is to compare susceptibility of ICR mice, BALB/c mice and C57BL/6 mice to urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis. The mice were injected intraperitoneally with 600 mg/kg of urethane for three times or ten times at 7-day intervals. At week 26, lung carcinogenic incidence was found in 40% ICR mice, 20% BALB/c mice and 10% C57BL/6 mice of the 3× injection group, respectively, whereas 100% lung tumor incidence took place in three mouse strains of the 10× injection group. In the 10× injection group, urethane induced lasting glycolytic stress of lung with an increase in lactate, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT-1), reactive oxygen species(ROS) and 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-29-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and a decrease in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and cytochrome C oxidase (COX). In the 3× injection group, urethane also promoted lung glycolytic stress at the end of urethane injection but it lasted no more than 7 days besides in lung tumor-bearing mice. Metformin as a glycolytic enhancer promoted urethane carcinogenic efficacy in the 3× injection group, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose (2-DG) as a glycolytic inhibitor decreased urethane carcinogenic efficacy in the 10× injection group. Further, urethane promoted tumor survival in A549 cells by inducing cancer stem-like cellular state. These data suggest that lasting glycolytic stress is sufficient for urethane-induced lung tumorigenesis, and that urethane 10× injection-induced lung cancer can serve as a valuable model for lung tumor biology and tumor prevention. PMID:26524634

  4. Intraperitoneal Resuscitation Improves Intestinal Blood Flow Following Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, El Rasheid; Garrison, R. Neal; Spain, David A.; Matheson, Paul J.; Harris, Patrick D.; Richardson, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of peritoneal resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. Summary Background Data Methods for conventional resuscitation (CR) from hemorrhagic shock (HS) often fail to restore adequate intestinal blood flow, and intestinal ischemia has been implicated in the activation of the inflammatory response. There is clinical evidence that intestinal hypoperfusion is a major factor in progressive organ failure following HS. This study presents a novel technique of peritoneal resuscitation (PR) that improves visceral perfusion. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were bled to 50% of baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP) and resuscitated with shed blood plus 2 equal volumes of saline (CR). Groups were 1) sham, 2) HS + CR, and 3) HS + CR + PR with a hyperosmolar dextrose-based solution (Delflex 2.5%). Groups 1 and 2 had normal saline PR. In vivo videomicroscopy and Doppler velocimetry were used to assess terminal ileal microvascular blood flow. Endothelial cell function was assessed by the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine. Results Despite restored heart rate and MAP to baseline values, CR animals developed a progressive intestinal vasoconstriction and tissue hypoperfusion compared to baseline flow. PR induced an immediate and sustained vasodilation compared to baseline and a marked increase in average intestinal blood flow during the entire 2-hour post-resuscitation period. Endothelial-dependent dilator function was preserved with PR. Conclusions Despite the restoration of MAP with blood and saline infusions, progressive vasoconstriction and compromised intestinal blood flow occurs following HS/CR. Hyperosmolar PR during CR maintains intestinal blood flow and endothelial function. This is thought to be a direct effect of hyperosmolar solutions on the visceral microvessels. The addition of PR to a CR protocol prevents the splanchnic ischemia that initiates systemic inflammation. PMID:12724637

  5. Role of reactive nitrogen species generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase in vesicant-induced lung injury, inflammation and altered lung functioning

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Shen, Jianliang; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-05-15

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by sulfur mustard and related vesicants is associated with oxidative stress. In the present studies we analyzed the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung injury and inflammation induced by vesicants using 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) as a model. C57Bl/6 (WT) and iNOS −/− mice were sacrificed 3 days or 14 days following intratracheal administration of CEES (6 mg/kg) or control. CEES intoxication resulted in transient (3 days) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and protein content in WT, but not iNOS −/− mice. This correlated with expression of Ym1, a marker of oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. In contrast, in iNOS −/− mice, Ym1 was only observed 14 days post-exposure in enlarged alveolar macrophages, suggesting that they are alternatively activated. This is supported by findings that lung tumor necrosis factor and lipocalin Lcn2 expression, mediators involved in tissue repair were also upregulated at this time in iNOS −/− mice. Conversely, CEES-induced increases in the proinflammatory genes, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, were abrogated in iNOS −/− mice. In WT mice, CEES treatment also resulted in increases in total lung resistance and decreases in compliance in response to methacholine, effects blunted by loss of iNOS. These data demonstrate that RNS, generated via iNOS play a role in the pathogenic responses to CEES, augmenting oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressing tissue repair. Elucidating inflammatory mechanisms mediating vesicant-induced lung injury is key to the development of therapeutics to treat mustard poisoning. -- Highlights: ► Lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress are induced by the model vesicant CEES ► RNS generated via iNOS are important in the CEES-induced pulmonary toxicity ► iNOS −/− mice are protected from CEES-induced lung toxicity and

  6. Capsaicin provokes apoptosis and restricts benzo(a)pyrene induced lung tumorigenesis in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Anandakumar, P; Kamaraj, S; Jagan, S; Ramakrishnan, G; Devaki, T

    2013-10-01

    Capsaicin (CAP), a constituent of red chilli and red pepper is exposed to exert compelling anticarcinogenic effects. In the present study, we examined the anti-tumorigenic potential of CAP on benzo(a)pyrene-induced mice lung tumorigenesis by analyzing the markers of apoptosis. Intraperitoneal administration of CAP (10mg/kg body weight) to Swiss albino mice suppressed the development of lung carcinoma by amending the protein expressions of apoptotic regulators p53, Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3. The apoptotic-inducing nature of CAP was further confirmed by DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopic study and ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining. The results obtained from the present study show that CAP inhibits the development of mice lung carcinogenesis through its ability to induce apoptosis. Our present findings provide the basis for further clinical exploration of CAP as an anti-carcinogenic compound against lung carcinogenesis. PMID:23747734

  7. Murine Lung Cancer Induces Generalized T Cell Exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rohit; Chen, Ching-Wen; Lyons, John D; Margoles, Lindsay M; Liang, Zhe; Coopersmith, Craig M; Ford, Mandy L

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer is known to modulate tumor-specific immune responses by establishing a micro-environment that leads to the upregulation of T cell inhibitory receptors, resulting in the progressive loss of function and eventual death of tumor-specific T cells. However, the ability of cancer to impact the functionality of the immune system on a systemic level is much less well characterized. Because cancer is known to predispose patients to infectious complications including sepsis, we hypothesized that the presence of cancer alters pathogen-directed immune responses on a systemic level. Materials and Methods We assessed systemic T cell coinhibitory receptor expression, cytokine production, and apoptosis in mice with established subcutaneous lung cancer tumors and in unmanipulated mice without cancer. Results Results indicated that the frequencies of PD-1+, BTLA+, and 2B4+ cells in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments were increased in mice with localized cancer relative to non-cancer controls, and the frequencies of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing multiple different inhibitory receptors was increased in cancer animals relative to non-cancer controls. Additionally, 2B4+CD8+ T cells in cancer mice exhibited reduced IL-2 and IFN-γ, while BTLA+CD8+ T cells in cancer mice exhibited reduced IL-2 and TNF. Conversely, CD4+ T cells in cancer animals demonstrated an increase in the frequency of Annexin V+ apoptotic cells. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that the presence of cancer induces systemic T cell exhaustion and generalized immune suppression. PMID:25748104

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury in mice. I. Concomitant evaluation of inflammatory cells and haemorrhagic lung damage.

    PubMed

    Asti, C; Ruggieri, V; Porzio, S; Chiusaroli, R; Melillo, G; Caselli, G F

    2000-01-01

    Intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces an inflammatory response characterized by infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) into the extracellular matrix and by the release of mediators that play a fundamental role in lung damage. In the present study, we developed a mouse model which allows correlation of the inflammatory response and haemorrhagic tissue injury in the same animal. In particular, the different steps of the inflammatory response and tissue damage were evaluated by the analysis of three parameters: myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the parenchyma, reflecting PMNs accumulation into the lung, inflammatory cells count in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), reflecting their extravasation, and total haemoglobin estimation in BALF, a marker of haemorrhagic tissue damage consequent to PMNs degranulation. In our experimental conditions, intra-tracheal administration of 10 microg/mouse of LPS evoked an increase of MPO activity in the lung at 4 h (131%) and 6 h (147%) from endotoxin challenge. A significant increase of PMNs in the BALF was noticed at these times with a plateau between the 12nd and 24th h. PMN accumulation produced a time-dependent haemorrhagic lung damage until 24 h after LPS injection (4 h: +38%; 6 h: +23%; 12 h: +44%; 24 h: +129% increase of haemoglobin concentration in the BALF vs. control). Lung injury was also assessed histopathologically. Twenty-four hours after the challenge, diffuse alveolar haemorrhage, as well as PMN recruitment in the interstitium and alveolus were observed in the LPS group. This model was pharmacologically characterized by pretreatment of LPS-treated mice with antiinflammatory drugs acting on different steps of the . We demonstrated that: a) betamethasone (1, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg p.o.) reduced in a dose-dependent manner the MPO activity, the number of inflammatory cells and, at the same time, lung injury; b) pentoxifylline, a TNFalpha production inhibitor (200

  9. Hypertonic saline dextran resuscitation of thermal injury.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, J W; White, D J; Baxter, C R

    1990-01-01

    Burn treatment requires large volumes of crystalloid, which may exacerbate burn-induced cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Small-volume hypertonic saline dextran (HSD) resuscitation has been used for effective treatment of several types of shock. In this study isolated coronary perfused guinea pig hearts were used to determine if HSD improved left ventricular contractile response to burn injuries. Parameters measured included left ventricular pressure (LVP) and maximal rate of LVP rise (+dP/dt max) and fall (-dP/dt max) at a constant preload. Third-degree scald burns comprising 45% of total body surface area (burn groups, N = 75), or 0% for controls (group 1, N = 25) were produced using a template device. In group 2, 25 burned guinea pigs were not fluid resuscitated and served as untreated burns; 20 burns were resuscitated with 4 mL lactated Ringer's (LR) solution/kg/% burn for 24 hours (group 3); additional burn groups were treated with an initial bolus of HSD (4 mL/kg, 2400 mOsm, sodium chloride, 6% dextran 70) followed by either 1, 2, or 4 mL LR/kg/% burn over 24 hours (groups 4, 5, and 6, respectively). Untreated burn injury significantly impaired cardiac function, as indicated by a fall in LVP (from 88 +/- 3 to 68 +/- 4 mmHg; p = 0.01) and +/- dP/dt max (from 1352 +/- 50 to 1261 +/- 90 and from 1150 +/- 35 to 993 +/- 59; p = 0.01, respectively) and a downward shift of LV function curves from those obtained from control hearts. Compared to untreated burns, hearts from burned animals treated with LR alone showed no significant improvement in cardiac function. However hearts from burned animals treated with HSD + 1 mL LR/kg/% burn had significantly higher LVP (79 +/- 4 vs. 68 +/- 4 mmHg, p = 0.01) and +/- dP/dt max (+dP/dt: 1387 +/- 60 vs. 1261 +/- 90 mmHg/sc, p = 0.01; -dP/dt: 1079 +/- 50 vs. 993 +/- 59 mmHg/sc, p = 0.01) than hearts from untreated burned animals and generated left ventricular function curves comparable to those calculated for hearts from control

  10. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2015-11-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  11. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation. PMID:26617279

  12. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  13. Low Level Laser Therapy Reduces the Development of Lung Inflammation Induced by Formaldehyde Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Miranda da Silva, Cristiane; Peres Leal, Mayara; Brochetti, Robson Alexandre; Braga, Tárcio; Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; Saraiva Câmara, Niels Olsen; Damazo, Amílcar Sabino; Ligeiro-de-Oliveira, Ana Paula; Chavantes, Maria Cristina; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Lung diseases constitute an important public health problem and its growing level of concern has led to efforts for the development of new therapies, particularly for the control of lung inflammation. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) has been highlighted as a non-invasive therapy with few side effects, but its mechanisms need to be better understood and explored. Considering that pollution causes several harmful effects on human health, including lung inflammation, in this study, we have used formaldehyde (FA), an environmental and occupational pollutant, for the induction of neutrophilic lung inflammation. Our objective was to investigate the local and systemic effects of LLLT after FA exposure. Male Wistar rats were exposed to FA (1%) or vehicle (distillated water) during 3 consecutive days and treated or not with LLLT (1 and 5 hours after each FA exposure). Non-manipulated rats were used as control. 24 h after the last FA exposure, we analyzed the local and systemic effects of LLLT. The treatment with LLLT reduced the development of neutrophilic lung inflammation induced by FA, as observed by the reduced number of leukocytes, mast cells degranulated, and a decreased myeloperoxidase activity in the lung. Moreover, LLLT also reduced the microvascular lung permeability in the parenchyma and the intrapulmonary bronchi. Alterations on the profile of inflammatory cytokines were evidenced by the reduced levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and the elevated levels of IL-10 in the lung. Together, our results showed that LLLT abolishes FA-induced neutrophilic lung inflammation by a reduction of the inflammatory cytokines and mast cell degranulation. This study may provide important information about the mechanisms of LLLT in lung inflammation induced by a pollutant. PMID:26569396

  14. Intermedin Stabilized Endothelial Barrier Function and Attenuated Ventilator-induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Redetzky, Holger Christian; Kummer, Wolfgang; Pfeil, Uwe; Hellwig, Katharina; Will, Daniel; Paddenberg, Renate; Tabeling, Christoph; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Even protective ventilation may aggravate or induce lung failure, particularly in preinjured lungs. Thus, new adjuvant pharmacologic strategies are needed to minimize ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Intermedin/Adrenomedullin-2 (IMD) stabilized pulmonary endothelial barrier function in vitro. We hypothesized that IMD may attenuate VILI-associated lung permeability in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) monolayers were incubated with IMD, and transcellular electrical resistance was measured to quantify endothelial barrier function. Expression and localization of endogenous pulmonary IMD, and its receptor complexes composed of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1–3 were analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence in non ventilated mouse lungs and in lungs ventilated for 6 h. In untreated and IMD treated mice, lung permeability, pulmonary leukocyte recruitment and cytokine levels were assessed after mechanical ventilation. Further, the impact of IMD on pulmonary vasoconstriction was investigated in precision cut lung slices (PCLS) and in isolated perfused and ventilated mouse lungs. IMD stabilized endothelial barrier function in HPMVECs. Mechanical ventilation reduced the expression of RAMP3, but not of IMD, CRLR, and RAMP1 and 2. Mechanical ventilation induced lung hyperpermeability, which was ameliorated by IMD treatment. Oxygenation was not improved by IMD, which may be attributed to impaired hypoxic vasoconstriction due to IMD treatment. IMD had minor impact on pulmonary leukocyte recruitment and did not reduce cytokine levels in VILI. Conclusions/Significance IMD may possibly provide a new approach to attenuate VILI. PMID:22563471

  15. Potentiation of chemically induced lung fibrosis by thorax irradiation. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Haschek, W.M.; Meyer, K.R.; Ullrich, R.L.; Witschi, H.P.

    1980-04-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) causes epithelial cell death, followed 2 to 4 days later by extensive proliferation of type II alveolar cells in mouse lung. Five to 8 days after BHT, most dividing cells are capillary endothelial cells or interstitial cells. In animials that were exposed to 200 rad thorax irradiation immediately or 1 day after BHT, lung hydroxyproline was increased 2 weeks later. The response was dose dependent, and the interaction between BHT and thorax irradiation was synergistic. Light microscopy showed abnormal accumulation of collagen in the alveolar septa. Lung hydroxyproline was not increased in animals that were irradiated 6 days after BHT, compared to animals treated with BHT alone. We concluded that fibrosis develops if lung is damaged by a blood-borne agent and radiation to the thorax occurs at a time when it may compromise alveolar reepithelialization. Exposure to x-rays during proliferation of capillary endothelial cells or interstitial cells does not enhance development of fibrosis.

  16. CD11b(+) Mononuclear Cells Mitigate Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Eldredge, Laurie C; Treuting, Piper M; Manicone, Anne M; Ziegler, Steven F; Parks, William C; McGuire, John K

    2016-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common consequence of life-saving interventions for infants born with immature lungs. Resident tissue myeloid cells regulate lung pathology, but their role in BPD is poorly understood. To determine the role of lung interstitial myeloid cells in neonatal responses to lung injury, we exposed newborn mice to hyperoxia, a neonatal mouse lung injury model with features of human BPD. In newborn mice raised in normoxia, we identified a CD45(+) F4/80(+) CD11b(+), Ly6G(lo-int) CD71(+) population of cells in lungs of neonatal mice present in significantly greater percentages than in adult mice. In response to hyperoxia, surface marker and gene expression in whole lung macrophages/monocytes was biased to an alternatively activated phenotype. Partial depletion of these CD11b(+) mononuclear cells using CD11b-diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor transgenic mice resulted in 60% mortality by 40 hours of hyperoxia exposure with more severe lung injury, perivascular edema, and alveolar hemorrhage compared with DT-treated CD11b-DT receptor-negative controls, which displayed no mortality. These results identify an antiinflammatory population of CD11b(+) mononuclear cells that are protective in hyperoxia-induced neonatal lung injury in mice, and suggest that enhancing their beneficial functions may be a treatment strategy in infants at risk for BPD. PMID:26192732

  17. Emphysema and Mechanical Stress-Induced Lung Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Susumu; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Szabari, Margit V.; Takahashi, Ayuko; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet

    2013-01-01

    Transpulmonary pressure and the mechanical stresses of breathing modulate many essential cell functions in the lung via mechanotransduction. We review how mechanical factors could influence the pathogenesis of emphysema. Although the progression of emphysema has been linked to mechanical rupture, little is known about how these stresses alter lung remodeling. We present possible new directions and an integrated multiscale view that may prove useful in finding solutions for this disease. PMID:24186935

  18. Sox9 mediates Notch1-induced mesenchymal features in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Capaccione, Kathleen M.; Hong, Xuehui; Morgan, Katherine M.; Liu, Wenyu; Bishop, Michael J.; Liu, LianXin; Markert, Elke; Deen, Malik; Minerowicz, Christine; Bertino, Joseph R.; Allen, Thaddeus; Pine, Sharon R.

    2014-01-01

    Sox9 has gained increasing importance both functionally and as a prognostic factor in cancer. We demonstrate a functional role for Sox9 in inducing a mesenchymal phenotype in lung ADC. We show that Sox9 mRNA and protein are overexpressed in lung ADC, particularly those with KRAS mutations. Sox9 expression correlated with the Notch target gene Hes1, and numerous other Notch pathway components. We observed that Sox9 is a potent inducer of lung cancer cell motility and invasion, and a negative regulator of E-cadherin, a key protein that is lost during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, we show that Notch1 signaling directly regulates Sox9 expression through a SOX9 promoter binding site, independently of the TGF-β pathway, and that Sox9 participates in Notch-1 induced cell motility, cell invasion, and loss of E-cadherin expression. Together, the results identify a new functional role for a Notch1-Sox9 signaling axis in lung ADC that may explain the correlation of Sox9 with tumor progression, higher tumor grade, and poor lung cancer survival. In addition to Notch and TGF-β, Sox9 also acts downstream of NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Thus, Sox9 could potentially act as a hub to mediate cross-talk among key oncogenic pathways in lung ADC. Targeting Sox9 expression or transcriptional activity could potentially reduce resistance to targeted therapy for lung ADC caused by pathway redundancy. PMID:25004243

  19. Time-dependent changes of autophagy and apoptosis in lipopolysaccharide-induced rat acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Lijun; Yu, Liangzhu; Han, Lu; Ji, Wanli; Shen, Hui; Hu, Zhenwu

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Abnormal lung cell death including autophagy and apoptosis is the central feature in acute lung injury (ALI). To identify the cellular mechanisms and the chronology by which different types of lung cell death are activated during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI, we decided to evaluate autophagy (by LC3-II and autophagosome) and apoptosis (by caspase-3) at different time points after LPS treatment in a rat model of LPS-induced ALI. Materials and Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: control group and LPS group. ALI was induced by LPS intraperitoneal injection (3 mg/kg). The lung tissues were collected to measure lung injury score by histopathological evaluation, the protein expression of LC3-II and caspase-3 by Western blot, and microstructural changes by electron microscopy analysis. Results: During ALI, lung cell death exhibited modifications in the death process at different stages of ALI. At early stages (1 hr and 2 hr) of ALI, the mode of lung cell death started with autophagy in LPS group and reached a peak at 2 hr. As ALI process progressed, apoptosis was gradually increased in the lung tissues and reached its maximal level at later stages (6 hr), while autophagy was time-dependently decreased. Conclusion: These findings suggest that activated autophagy and apoptosis might play distinct roles at different stages of LPS-induced ALI. This information may enhance the understanding of lung pathophysiology at the cellular level during ALI and pulmonary infection, and thus help optimize the timing of innovating therapeutic approaches in future experiments with this model. PMID:27482344

  20. Brain Resuscitation in the Drowning Victim

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Bierens, Joost J. L. M.; Branche, Christine M.; Clark, Robert S.; Friberg, Hans; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W. E.; Holzer, Michael; Katz, Laurence M.; Knape, Johannes T. A.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Nadkarni, Vinay; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.

    2013-01-01

    Drowning is a leading cause of accidental death. Survivors may sustain severe neurologic morbidity. There is negligible research specific to brain injury in drowning making current clinical management non-specific to this disorder. This review represents an evidence-based consensus effort to provide recommendations for management and investigation of the drowning victim. Epidemiology, brain-oriented prehospital and intensive care, therapeutic hypothermia, neuroimaging/monitoring, biomarkers, and neuroresuscitative pharmacology are addressed. When cardiac arrest is present, chest compressions with rescue breathing are recommended due to the asphyxial insult. In the comatose patient with restoration of spontaneous circulation, hypoxemia and hyperoxemia should be avoided, hyperthermia treated, and induced hypothermia (32–34 °C) considered. Arterial hypotension/hypertension should be recognized and treated. Prevent hypoglycemia and treat hyperglycemia. Treat clinical seizures and consider treating non-convulsive status epilepticus. Serial neurologic examinations should be provided. Brain imaging and serial biomarker measurement may aid prognostication. Continuous electroencephalography and N20 somatosensory evoked potential monitoring may be considered. Serial biomarker measurement (e.g., neuron specific enolase) may aid prognostication. There is insufficient evidence to recommend use of any specific brain-oriented neuroresuscitative pharmacologic therapy other than that required to restore and maintain normal physiology. Following initial stabilization, victims should be transferred to centers with expertise in age-specific post-resuscitation neurocritical care. Care should be documented, reviewed, and quality improvement assessment performed. Preclinical research should focus on models of asphyxial cardiac arrest. Clinical research should focus on improved cardiopulmonary resuscitation, re-oxygenation/reperfusion strategies, therapeutic hypothermia

  1. Differential expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α in non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karetsi, Eleni; Ioannou, Maria G.; Kerenidi, Theodora; Minas, Markos; Molyvdas, Paschalis A.; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I.; Paraskeva, Efrosyni

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and vascular endothelial growth factor in small cell lung cancer and subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer and examine their relationships with clinicopathologic factors, response to treatment and survival. METHODS: We examined samples obtained by bronchial endoscopic biopsy from 55 patients with inoperable lung cancer (16 with adenocarcinoma, 17 with squamous cell carcinoma, and 22 with small cell lung cancer). Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and vascular endothelial growth factor were detected using immunohistochemistry. The diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients were conducted according to the standard practice. RESULTS: A significant difference (p = 0.022) in hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expression was observed between non-small cell lung cancer (75.8% positive) and small cell lung cancer (45.5% positive). The frequency of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α nuclear expression was 88.2% in squamous cell carcinoma, 62.5% in adenocarcinoma, and 45.5% in small cell lung cancer. A significant correlation was observed between hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and vascular endothelial growth factor expression (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.001) when all types of lung cancer were examined, either collectively or separately. CONCLUSIONS: The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α differs significantly between subtypes of lung cancer. These findings could help elucidate the biology of the different types of non-operable lung carcinomas and have implications for the design of new therapeutic approaches for lung cancer. PMID:23295589

  2. Membrane translocation of IL-33 receptor in ventilator induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Hsing; Lin, Jau-Chen; Wu, Shu-Yu; Huang, Kun-Lun; Jung, Fang; Ma, Ming-Chieh; Wang Hsu, Guoo-Shyng; Jow, Guey-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury is associated with inflammatory mechanism and causes high mortality. The objective of this study was to discover the role of IL-33 and its ST2 receptor in acute lung injury induced by mechanical ventilator (ventilator-induced lung injury; VILI). Male Wistar rats were intubated after tracheostomy and received ventilation at 10 cm H2O of inspiratory pressure (PC10) by a G5 ventilator for 4 hours. The hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were collected and analyzed. The morphological changes of lung injury were also assessed by histological H&E stain. The dynamic changes of lung injury markers such as TNF-α and IL-1β were measured in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung tissue homogenization by ELISA assay. During VILI, the IL-33 profile change was detected in BALF, peripheral serum, and lung tissue by ELISA analysis. The Il-33 and ST2 expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry staining and western blot analysis. The consequence of VILI by H&E stain showed inducing lung congestion and increasing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β in the lung tissue homogenization, serum, and BALF, respectively. In addition, rats with VILI also exhibited high expression of IL-33 in lung tissues. Interestingly, the data showed that ST2L (membrane form) was highly accumulated in the membrane fraction of lung tissue in the PC10 group, but the ST2L in cytosol was dramatically decreased in the PC10 group. Conversely, the sST2 (soluble form) was slightly decreased both in the membrane and cytosol fractions in the PC10 group compared to the control group. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that ST2L translocation from the cytosol to the cell membranes of lung tissue and the down-expression of sST2 in both fractions can function as new biomarkers of VILI. Moreover, IL-33/ST2 signaling activated by mechanically responsive lung injury may potentially serve as a new therapy target. PMID:25815839

  3. FLUID RESUSCITATION: PAST, PRESENT, AND THE FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Santry, Heena P.; Alam, Hasan B.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhage remains a major cause of preventable death following both civilian and military trauma. The goals of resuscitation in the face of hemorrhagic shock are restoring end-organ perfusion and maintaining tissue oxygenation while attempting definitive control of bleeding. However, if not performed properly, resuscitation can actually exacerbate cellular injury caused by hemorrhagic shock, and the type of fluid used for resuscitation plays an important role in this injury pattern. This article reviews the historical development and scientific underpinnings of modern resuscitation techniques. We summarized data from a number of studies to illustrate the differential effects of commonly used resuscitation fluids, including isotonic crystalloids, natural and artificial colloids, hypertonic and hyperoncotic solutions, and artificial oxygen carriers, on cellular injury and how these relate to clinical practice. The data reveal that a uniformly safe, effective, and practical resuscitation fluid when blood products are unavailable and direct hemorrhage control is delayed has been elusive. Yet, it is logical to prevent this cellular injury through wiser resuscitation strategies than attempting immunomodulation after the damage has already occurred. Thus, we describe how some novel resuscitation strategies aimed at preventing or ameliorating cellular injury may become clinically available in the future. PMID:20160609

  4. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  5. Resuscitative thoracotomy in penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Lindsay M; Hsee, Li; Civil, Ian D

    2015-06-01

    The resuscitative thoracotomy (RT) is an important procedure in the management of penetrating trauma. As it is performed only in patients with peri-arrest physiology or overt cardiac arrest, survival is low. Experience is also quite variable depending on volume of penetrating trauma in a particular region. Survival ranges from 0% to as high as 89% depending on patient selection, available resources, and location of RT (operating or emergency rooms). In this article, published guidelines are reviewed as well as outcomes. Technical considerations of RT and well as proper training, personnel, and location are also discussed. PMID:25342073

  6. Blocking HMGB1 signal pathway protects early radiation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Baozhong; Wang, Guifu; Xu, Junlong

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that HMGB1 participated in various types of lung injury. In this study, we explored whether blocking HMGB1 has a preventive effect on the early radiation-induced lung injury and investigate the mechanism. Mice model of radiation-induced lung injury were accomplished by a single dose irradiation (15 Gy) to the whole thorax. Irradiated mice were treated with HMGB1-neutralizing antibody intraperitoneally dosed 10 μg, 50 μg, 100 μg/mouse respectively and were sacrificed after one week post-irradiation. Lung tissue slices were stained by H&E, and alveolitis was quantified by Szapiel scoring system. The level of cytokines TNF-γ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was detected by ELISA method. And p65NF-κB, p50NF-κB protein expression in mice lung tissues was detected by Western blot analysis. The results showed that blocking HMGB1 inhibited the inflammatory response, and thereby decreased the degree of alveolitis of irradiated lung tissue. In addition, HMGB1 antagonist can restrain the expression of type Th2 or Th17 derived inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17A, promote the expression of Th1 type cytokines INF-γ, and inhibit p65 NF-κB but promote p50 NF-κB activation, which promoted the resolution of the radiation-induced inflammatory response. In conclusion, blocking HMGB1 can reduce the degree of early radiation-induced lung injury, and its mechanism may be related to the promotion of p50NF-κB activation and its downstream molecules expression. Inhibiting HMGB1 may be a new target to deal with early radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:26191172

  7. Blocking HMGB1 signal pathway protects early radiation-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liping; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Baozhong; Wang, Guifu; Xu, Junlong

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that HMGB1 participated in various types of lung injury. In this study, we explored whether blocking HMGB1 has a preventive effect on the early radiation-induced lung injury and investigate the mechanism. Mice model of radiation-induced lung injury were accomplished by a single dose irradiation (15 Gy) to the whole thorax. Irradiated mice were treated with HMGB1-neutralizing antibody intraperitoneally dosed 10 μg, 50 μg, 100 μg/mouse respectively and were sacrificed after one week post-irradiation. Lung tissue slices were stained by H&E, and alveolitis was quantified by Szapiel scoring system. The level of cytokines TNF-γ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was detected by ELISA method. And p65NF-κB, p50NF-κB protein expression in mice lung tissues was detected by Western blot analysis. The results showed that blocking HMGB1 inhibited the inflammatory response, and thereby decreased the degree of alveolitis of irradiated lung tissue. In addition, HMGB1 antagonist can restrain the expression of type Th2 or Th17 derived inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17A, promote the expression of Th1 type cytokines INF-γ, and inhibit p65 NF-κB but promote p50 NF-κB activation, which promoted the resolution of the radiation-induced inflammatory response. In conclusion, blocking HMGB1 can reduce the degree of early radiation-induced lung injury, and its mechanism may be related to the promotion of p50NF-κB activation and its downstream molecules expression. Inhibiting HMGB1 may be a new target to deal with early radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:26191172

  8. Neonatal resuscitation 1: a model to measure inspired and expired tidal volumes and assess leakage at the face mask

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, C; Kamlin, C; Davis, P; Morley, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Neonatal resuscitation is a common and important intervention, and adequate ventilation is the key to success. In the delivery room, positive pressure ventilation is given with manual ventilation devices using face masks. Mannequins are widely used to teach and practise this technique. During both simulated and real neonatal resuscitation, chest excursion is used to assess tidal volume delivery, and leakage from the mask is not measured. Objective: To describe a system that allows measurement of mask leakage and estimation of tidal volume delivery. Methods: Respiratory function monitors, a modified resuscitation mannequin, and a computer were used to measure leakage from the mask and to assess tidal volume delivery in a model of neonatal resuscitation. Results: The volume of gas passing through a flow sensor was measured at the face mask. This was a good estimate of the tidal volume entering and leaving the lung in this model. Gas leakage between the mask and mannequin was also measured. This occurred principally during inflation, although gas leakage during deflation was seen when the total leakage was large. A volume of gas that distended the mask but did not enter the lung was also measured. Conclusion: This system can be used to assess the effectiveness of positive pressure ventilation given using a face mask during simulated neonatal resuscitation. It could be useful for teaching neonatal resuscitation and assessing ventilation through a face mask. PMID:15871990

  9. Extracellular Adenosine Production by ecto-5'-Nucleotidase (CD73) Enhances Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wirsdörfer, Florian; de Leve, Simone; Cappuccini, Federica; Eldh, Therese; Meyer, Alina V; Gau, Eva; Thompson, Linda F; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Fischer, Ute; Kasper, Michael; Klein, Diana; Ritchey, Jerry W; Blackburn, Michael R; Westendorf, Astrid M; Stuschke, Martin; Jendrossek, Verena

    2016-05-15

    Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis is a severe side effect of thoracic irradiation, but its pathogenesis remains poorly understood and no effective treatment is available. In this study, we investigated the role of the extracellular adenosine as generated by the ecto-5'-nucleotidase CD73 in fibrosis development after thoracic irradiation. Exposure of wild-type C57BL/6 mice to a single dose (15 Gray) of whole thorax irradiation triggered a progressive increase in CD73 activity in the lung between 3 and 30 weeks postirradiation. In parallel, adenosine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were increased by approximately 3-fold. Histologic evidence of lung fibrosis was observed by 25 weeks after irradiation. Conversely, CD73-deficient mice failed to accumulate adenosine in BALF and exhibited significantly less radiation-induced lung fibrosis (P < 0.010). Furthermore, treatment of wild-type mice with pegylated adenosine deaminase or CD73 antibodies also significantly reduced radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CD73 potentiates radiation-induced lung fibrosis, suggesting that existing pharmacologic strategies for modulating adenosine may be effective in limiting lung toxicities associated with the treatment of thoracic malignancies. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3045-56. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26921334

  10. Environmental exposure and HPV infection may act synergistically to induce lung tumorigenesis in nonsmokers

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ya-Wen; Lin, Frank Cheau-Feng; Chen, Chih-Yi; Hsu, Nan-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of lung tumorigenesis have focused on smokers rather than nonsmokers. In this study, we used human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative lung cancer cells to test the hypothesis that HPV infection synergistically increases DNA damage induced by exposure to the carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and contributes to lung tumorigenesis in nonsmokers. DNA adduct levels induced by B[a]P in HPV-positive cells were significantly higher than in HPV-negative cells. The DNA adduct formation was dependent on HPV E6 oncoprotein expression. Gene and protein expression of two DNA repair genes, XRCC3 and XRCC5, were lower in B[a]P-treated E6-positive cells than in E6-negative lung cancer cells. The reduced expression was also detected immunohistochemically and was caused by increased promoter hypermethylation. Moreover, mutations of p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) genes in lung cancer patients were associated with XRCC5 inactivation. In sum, our study indicates that HPV E6-induced promoter hypermethylation of the XRCC3 and XRCC5 DNA repair genes and the resultant decrease in their expression increases B[a]P-induced DNA adducts and contributes to lung tumorigenesis in nonsmokers. PMID:26918347

  11. Titanium oxide nanoparticle instillation induces inflammation and inhibits lung development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Stanishevsky, Andrei; Bulger, Arlene; Halloran, Brian; Steele, Chad; Vohra, Yogesh; Matalon, Sadis

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles are used in an increasing number of biomedical, industrial, and food applications, but their safety profiles in developing organisms, including the human fetus and infant, have not been evaluated. Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanoparticles, which are commonly used in cosmetics, sunscreens, paints, and food, have been shown to induce emphysema and lung inflammation in adult mice. We hypothesized that exposure of newborn mice to TiO2 would induce lung inflammation and inhibit lung development. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to TiO2 (anatase; 8–10 nm) nanoparticles by intranasal instillation as a single dose on postnatal day 4 (P4) or as three doses on postnatal days 4, 7, and 10 (each dose = 1 μg/g body wt). Measurements of lung function (compliance and resistance), development (morphometry), inflammation (histology; multiplex analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid for cytokines; PCR array and multiplex analysis of lung homogenates for cytokines) was performed on postnatal day 14. It was observed that a single dose of TiO2 nanoparticles led to inflammatory cell influx, and multiple doses led to increased inflammation and inhibition of lung development without significant effects on lung function. Macrophages were noted to take up the TiO2 nanoparticles, followed by polymorphonuclear infiltrate. Multiple cytokines and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were increased in lung homogenates, and VEGF was reduced. These results suggest that exposure of the developing lung to nanoparticles may lead to ineffective clearance by macrophages and persistent inflammation with resulting effects on lung development and may possibly impact the risk of respiratory disorders in later life. PMID:23220372

  12. Role of MMP2 and MMP9 in TRPV4-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Villalta, Patricia C; Rocic, Petra; Townsley, Mary I

    2014-10-15

    Ca(2+) entry through transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) results in swelling, blebbing, and detachment of the epithelium and capillary endothelium in the intact lung. Subsequently, increased permeability of the septal barrier and alveolar flooding ensue. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that TRPV4 activation provides a Ca(2+) source necessary for proteolytic disruption of cell-cell or cell-matrix adhesion by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9, thus increasing septal barrier permeability. In our study, C57BL/6 or TRPV4(-/-) mouse lungs were perfused with varying doses of the TRPV4 agonist GSK-1016790A (Sigma) and then prepared for Western blot. Lung injury, assessed by increases in lung wet-to-dry weight ratios and total protein levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, was increased in a dose-dependent fashion in TRPV4(+/+) but not TRPV4(-/-) lungs. In concert with lung injury, we detected increased active MMP2 and MMP9 isoforms, suggesting that TRPV4 can provide the Ca(2+) source necessary for increased MMP2/9 activation. Furthermore, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) 2 levels in the TRPV4-injured lungs were decreased, suggesting that TRPV4 activation increases the availability of these active MMPs. We then determined whether MMP2 and MMP9 mediate TRPV4-induced lung injury. Pharmacological blockade (SB-3CT, 1 μM; Sigma) of MMP2 and MMP9 resulted in protection against TRPV4-induced lung injury. We conclude that TRPV4 activation and the subsequent Ca(2+) transient initiates a rapid cascade of events leading to release and activation of the gelatinase MMPs, which then contribute to lung injury. PMID:25150065

  13. Role of MMP2 and MMP9 in TRPV4-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Villalta, Patricia C.; Rocic, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+ entry through transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) results in swelling, blebbing, and detachment of the epithelium and capillary endothelium in the intact lung. Subsequently, increased permeability of the septal barrier and alveolar flooding ensue. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that TRPV4 activation provides a Ca2+ source necessary for proteolytic disruption of cell-cell or cell-matrix adhesion by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9, thus increasing septal barrier permeability. In our study, C57BL/6 or TRPV4−/− mouse lungs were perfused with varying doses of the TRPV4 agonist GSK-1016790A (Sigma) and then prepared for Western blot. Lung injury, assessed by increases in lung wet-to-dry weight ratios and total protein levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, was increased in a dose-dependent fashion in TRPV4+/+ but not TRPV4−/− lungs. In concert with lung injury, we detected increased active MMP2 and MMP9 isoforms, suggesting that TRPV4 can provide the Ca2+ source necessary for increased MMP2/9 activation. Furthermore, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) 2 levels in the TRPV4-injured lungs were decreased, suggesting that TRPV4 activation increases the availability of these active MMPs. We then determined whether MMP2 and MMP9 mediate TRPV4-induced lung injury. Pharmacological blockade (SB-3CT, 1 μM; Sigma) of MMP2 and MMP9 resulted in protection against TRPV4-induced lung injury. We conclude that TRPV4 activation and the subsequent Ca2+ transient initiates a rapid cascade of events leading to release and activation of the gelatinase MMPs, which then contribute to lung injury. PMID:25150065

  14. Lipopolysaccharide induces expression of collagen VI in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Sayuri; Unuma, Kana; Yamada, Atsushi; Aki, Toshihiko; Uemura, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of the lung during the septic systemic inflammatory response elicited by administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected i.p. with 15 mg/kg LPS. After 24 h, the lungs were excised to evaluate the cellular responses to LPS. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis revealed that type VI collagen (ColVI) was extremely upregulated during sepsis in the rat lung within the first 24 h of LPS administration. Upregulation of ColVI protein and its mRNA was demonstrated by Western blot analysis, real time PCR, and immunohistochemistry. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the activation of ColVI in the rat lung at the early stage of systemic inflammation. Activation of ColVI might be involved in sepsis-mediated lung fibrosis at an early stage. PMID:26023260

  15. Development and assessment of countermeasure formulations for treatment of lung injury induced by chlorine inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Gary W; Chen, Jing; Schlueter, Connie F; Mo, Yiqun; Humphrey, David M; Rawson, Greg; Niño, Joe A; Carson, Kenneth H

    2016-05-01

    Chlorine is a commonly used, reactive compound to which humans can be exposed via accidental or intentional release resulting in acute lung injury. Formulations of rolipram (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor), triptolide (a natural plant product with anti-inflammatory properties), and budesonide (a corticosteroid), either neat or in conjunction with poly(lactic:glycolic acid) (PLGA), were developed for treatment of chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection. Formulations were produced by spray-drying, which generated generally spherical microparticles that were suitable for intramuscular injection. Multiple parameters were varied to produce formulations with a wide range of in vitro release kinetics. Testing of selected formulations in chlorine-exposed mice demonstrated efficacy against key aspects of acute lung injury. The results show the feasibility of developing microencapsulated formulations that could be used to treat chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection, which represents a preferred route of administration in a mass casualty situation. PMID:26952014

  16. Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management.

    PubMed

    Mulshine, James L; Avila, Rick; Yankelevitz, David; Baer, Thomas M; Estépar, Raul San Jose; Ambrose, Laurie Fenton; Aldigé, Carolyn R

    2015-05-01

    The Prevent Cancer Foundation Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management was held in New York, NY on May 16 and 17, 2014. The two goals of the Workshop were to define strategies to drive innovation in precompetitive quantitative research on the use of imaging to assess new therapies for management of early lung cancer and to discuss a process to implement a national program to provide high quality computed tomography imaging for lung cancer and other tobacco-induced disease. With the central importance of computed tomography imaging for both early detection and volumetric lung cancer assessment, strategic issues around the development of imaging and ensuring its quality are critical to ensure continued progress against this most lethal cancer. PMID:25898957

  17. Eicosapentaenoic acid attenuates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting ROS-sensitive inflammatory signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-Han; Lin, An-Hsuan; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Peng, Ruo-Yun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Kou, Yu Ru

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes chronic lung inflammation that is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive pathways. Our previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke (CS) activates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling resulting in induction of lung inflammation. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a major type of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is present in significant amounts in marine-based fish and fish oil. EPA has been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo. However, whether EPA has similar beneficial effects against CS-induced lung inflammation remains unclear. Using a murine model, we show that subchronic CS exposure for 4 weeks caused pulmonary inflammatory infiltration (total cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), 11.0-fold increase), increased lung vascular permeability (protein level in BALF, 3.1-fold increase), elevated levels of chemokines (11.4–38.2-fold increase) and malondialdehyde (an oxidative stress biomarker; 2.0-fold increase) in the lungs, as well as lung inflammation; all of these CS-induced events were suppressed by daily supplementation with EPA. Using human bronchial epithelial cells, we further show that CS extract (CSE) sequentially activated NADPH oxidase (NADPH oxidase activity, 1.9-fold increase), increased intracellular levels of ROS (3.0-fold increase), activated both MAPKs and NF-κB, and induced interleukin-8 (IL-8; 8.2-fold increase); all these CSE-induced events were inhibited by pretreatment with EPA. Our findings suggest a novel role for EPA in alleviating the oxidative stress and lung inflammation induced by subchronic CS exposure in vivo and in suppressing the CSE-induced IL-8 in vitro via its antioxidant function and by inhibiting MAPKs/NF-κB signaling. PMID:25452730

  18. Beta-carotene promotes the development of NNK-induced small airway-derived lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wadei, Hussein A. N.; Schuller, Hildegard M.

    2009-01-01

    Aim Beta-carotene has shown cancer preventive effects in preclinical studies while increasing lung cancer mortality in clinical trials. We have shown that β-carotene stimulates cAMP signaling in vitro. Here, we have tested the hypothesis that beta-carotene promotes the development of pulmonary adenocarcinoma (PAC) in vivo via cAMP signaling. Methods: PAC was induced in hamsters with the carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) followed by β-carotene for 1.5 years. Incidence, multiplicity and size of lung tumors were recorded and phosphorylated CREB and ERK1/2 in tumour cells determined by Western blots. Cyclic AMP in blood cells was analysed by immunoassays, retinoids in serum and lungs by HPLC. Results: beta-carotene increased lung tumor multiplicity, lung tumour size, blood cell cAMP, serum and lung levels of retinoids and induced p-CREB and p-ERK1/2 in lung tumours. Conclusions:Our data suggest that beta-carotene promotes the development of PAC via increased cAMP signaling. PMID:19254833

  19. Twist1 Suppresses Senescence Programs and Thereby Accelerates and Maintains Mutant Kras-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajan, Saravanan; Das, Sandhya T.; Zabuawala, Tahera; Chen, Joy; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Luong, Richard; Tamayo, Pablo; Salih, Tarek; Aziz, Khaled; Adam, Stacey J.; Vicent, Silvestre; Nielsen, Carsten H.; Withofs, Nadia; Sweet-Cordero, Alejandro; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Rudin, Charles M.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2012-01-01

    KRAS mutant lung cancers are generally refractory to chemotherapy as well targeted agents. To date, the identification of drugs to therapeutically inhibit K-RAS have been unsuccessful, suggesting that other approaches are required. We demonstrate in both a novel transgenic mutant Kras lung cancer mouse model and in human lung tumors that the inhibition of Twist1 restores a senescence program inducing the loss of a neoplastic phenotype. The Twist1 gene encodes for a transcription factor that is essential during embryogenesis. Twist1 has been suggested to play an important role during tumor progression. However, there is no in vivo evidence that Twist1 plays a role in autochthonous tumorigenesis. Through two novel transgenic mouse models, we show that Twist1 cooperates with KrasG12D to markedly accelerate lung tumorigenesis by abrogating cellular senescence programs and promoting the progression from benign adenomas to adenocarcinomas. Moreover, the suppression of Twist1 to physiological levels is sufficient to cause Kras mutant lung tumors to undergo senescence and lose their neoplastic features. Finally, we analyzed more than 500 human tumors to demonstrate that TWIST1 is frequently overexpressed in primary human lung tumors. The suppression of TWIST1 in human lung cancer cells also induced cellular senescence. Hence, TWIST1 is a critical regulator of cellular senescence programs, and the suppression of TWIST1 in human tumors may be an effective example of pro-senescence therapy. PMID:22654667

  20. Benzo(a)pyrene induced lung cancer: Role of dietary phytochemicals in chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Barua, Chandana C; Sriram, Chandra Shekhar; Gogoi, Ranadeep

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the major cause of overall cancer deaths, and chemoprevention is a promising strategy to control this disease. Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is one among the principal constituents of tobacco smoke that plays a key role in lung carcinogenesis. The B(a)P induced lung cancer in mice offers a relevant model to study the effect of natural products and has been widely used by many researchers and found considerable success in ameliorating the pathophysiological changes of lung cancer. Currently available synthetic drugs that constitute the pharmacological armamentarium are themselves effective in managing the condition but not without setbacks. These hunches have accelerated the requisite for natural products, which may be used as dietary supplement to prevent the progress of lung cancer. Besides, these agents also supplement the conventional treatment and offer better management of the condition with less side effects. In the context of soaring interest toward dietary phytochemicals as newer pharmacological interventions for lung cancer, in the present review, we are attempting to give a silhouette of mechanisms of B(a)P induced lung carcinogenesis and the role of dietary phytochemicals in chemoprevention. PMID:26398396

  1. Role of activated neutrophils in chest trauma-induced septic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Perl, Mario; Hohmann, Christoph; Denk, Stephanie; Kellermann, Philipp; Lu, Dapeng; Braumüller, Sonja; Bachem, Max G; Thomas, Jörg; Knöferl, Markus W; Ayala, Alfred; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus S

    2012-07-01

    More than 50% of severely injured patients have chest trauma. Second insults frequently result in acute lung injury (ALI), with sepsis being the main underlying condition. We aimed to develop a standardized, reproducible, and clinically relevant double-hit mouse model of ALI induced by chest trauma and polymicrobial sepsis and to investigate the pathophysiologic role of activated neutrophils. Lung contusion was applied to C57Bl/6 mice via a focused blast wave. Twenty-four hours later, sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. For polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) depletion, animals received intravenous injections of PMN-depleting antibody. In response to blunt chest trauma followed by sepsis as well as after sepsis alone, a significant local and systemic inflammatory response with increased cytokine/chemokine levels in lung and plasma was observed. In contrast, lung apoptosis was markedly elevated only after a double hit. Intra-alveolar neutrophils and total bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentrations were markedly increased following isolated chest trauma or the combined insult, but not after sepsis alone. Lung myeloperoxidase activity was enhanced only in response to the double hit accompanied by histological disruption of the alveolar architecture, lung congestion, and marked cellular infiltrates. Neutrophil depletion significantly diminished lung interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 concentrations and reduced the degree of septic ALI. Here we have established a novel and highly reproducible mouse model of chest trauma-induced septic ALI characterizing a clinical relevant double-hit scenario. In particular, the depletion of neutrophils substantially mitigated the extent of lung injury, indicating a pathomechanistic role for neutrophils in chest trauma-induced septic ALI. PMID:22552016

  2. Stimulation of alveolar macrophages by BCG vaccine enhances the process of lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Chyczewska, E; Chyczewski, L; Bańkowski, E; Sułkowski, S; Nikliński, J

    1993-01-01

    It was found that the BCG vaccine injected subcutaneously to the rats enhances the process of lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin. Pretreatment of rats with this vaccine results in accumulation of activated macrophages in lung interstitium and in the bronchoalveolar spaces. It may be suggested that the activated macrophages release various cytokines which may stimulate the proliferation of fibroblasts and biosynthesis of extracellular matrix components. PMID:7505240

  3. Signaling through the A2B Adenosine Receptor Dampens Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schingnitz, Ulrich; Hartman, Katherine; MacManus, Christopher F.; Eckle, Tobias; Zug, Stephanie; Colgan, Sean P.; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis and septic acute lung injury are among the leading causes for morbidity and mortality of critical illness. Extracellular adenosine is a signaling molecule implicated in the cellular adaptation to hypoxia, ischemia or inflammation. Therefore, we pursued the role of the A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR) as potential therapeutic target in endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. We gained initial insight from in vitro studies of cultured endothelia or epithelia exposed to inflammatory mediators showing time-dependent induction of the A2BAR (up to 12.9±3.4-fold, p<0.05). Similarly, murine studies of endotoxin-induced lung injury identified an almost 4.6-fold induction of A2BAR transcript and corresponding protein induction with LPS-exposure. Studies utilizing A2BAR promoter constructs and RNA-protection assays indicated that A2BAR induction involved mRNA stability. Functional studies of LPS-induced lung injury revealed that pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of the A2BAR was associated with dramatic increases in lung inflammation and histologic tissue injury. Studies of A2BAR-bone marrow chimeric mice suggested pulmonary A2BAR signaling in lung protection. Finally, studies with a specific A2BAR agonist (BAY 60-6583) demonstrated attenuation of lung inflammation and pulmonary edema in wild-type but not in gene-targeted mice for the A2BAR. These studies suggest the A2BAR as potential therapeutic target in the treatment of endotoxin-induced forms of acute lung injury. PMID:20348420

  4. Platelet-activating factor induces selective pulmonary arterial hyperreactivity in isolated perfused rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Ohar, J A; Waller, K S; Dahms, T E

    1993-07-01

    The role of vasoreactivity in PAF-induced pulmonary hypertension (PHT) was assessed in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs. We evaluated the steady-state pulmonary vascular response to five vasoconstrictors: PGF2 alpha, norepinephrine, angiotensin II, PAF, and KCl. Pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) were significantly greater in lungs of rabbits treated with PAF for 28 days than in control rabbits in response to PGF2 alpha and norepinephrine. When resistance was partitioned by the vascular occlusion method, at baseline the vascular resistance was equally distributed between arterial and venous segments in both experimental groups. Arterial resistance accounted for approximately 76% of PVR during norepinephrine injection and 60% of PVR during PGF2 alpha injection in PAF-treated lungs. Whereas arterial resistance accounted for approximately 63% of PVR during norepinephrine injection and 52% of PVR during PGF2 alpha injection in control lungs, there was no significant difference in the response to angiotensin II, acute PAF, and KCl in lungs from chronic PAF-treated rabbits compared with responses in control rabbit lungs, though the pressor response to acute PAF tended to be blunted in PAF-treated lungs. Chronic PAF treatment results in enhanced pulmonary arterial reactivity to selected autacoids in isolated perfused lungs. PMID:8317792

  5. Targeting the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α to alleviate cardiopulmonary bypass-induced lung injury (review).

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingxin; Xie, Baodong; Gu, Chengxiong; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Fan; Yu, Yang

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary dysfunction is one of the most frequent complications associated with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Multiple factors, including the contact of blood with the artificial surface of the CPB circuit, ischemia‑reperfusion and lung ventilator arrest elicit inflammatory reactions, consequently resulting in CPB‑induced lung injury. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α) has been demonstrated to have a critical role in mediating CPB‑induced pulmonary inflammation. The present review evaluated previous studies and summarized the effects of CPB on TNF‑α level in the serum and lung tissue of patients and animal models of CPB, the underlying mechanism of TNF‑α‑mediated lung injury and the therapeutic strategies for the inhibition of TNF‑α activity and production to attenuate CPB‑induced lung injury. TNF‑α level in the serum and lung tissue is significantly increased during and following CPB. TNF‑α mediates CPB‑induced lung damage by directly inducing apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells and lung endothelial cells and by indirectly modulating the function of immune cells, including monocytes and macrophages. A functional neutralizing antibody to TNF‑α can reduce pulmonary TNF‑α production and attenuate CPB‑induced lung injury in a rabbit model of CPB. Inhibition of TNF‑α function and production using a neutralizing antibody to TNF‑α appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy to alleviate CPB‑induced lung injury. PMID:25483004

  6. Chronic Exposure to Particulate Chromate Induces Premature Centrosome Separation and Centriole Disengagement in Human Lung Cells.

    PubMed

    Martino, Julieta; Holmes, Amie L; Xie, Hong; Wise, Sandra S; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-10-01

    Particulate hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a well-established human lung carcinogen. Lung tumors are characterized by structural and numerical chromosome instability. Centrosome amplification is a phenotype commonly found in solid tumors, including lung tumors, which strongly correlates with chromosome instability. Human lung cells exposed to Cr(VI) exhibit centrosome amplification but the underlying phenotypes and mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we further characterize the phenotypes of Cr(VI)-induced centrosome abnormalities. We show that Cr(VI)-induced centrosome amplification correlates with numerical chromosome instability. We also show chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) induces centrosomes with supernumerary centrioles and acentriolar centrosomes in human lung cells. Moreover, chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) affects the timing of important centriolar events. Specifically, chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) causes premature centriole disengagement in S and G2 phase cells. It also induces premature centrosome separation in interphase. Altogether, our data suggest that chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) targets the protein linkers that hold centrioles together. These centriolar linkers are important for key events of the centrosome cycle and their premature disruption might underlie Cr(VI)-induced centrosome amplification. PMID:26293554

  7. Protective effect of catalpol on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kai; Piao, Taikui; Wang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Jiuyang; Wang, Xuefeng; Liu, Hongyu

    2014-12-01

    Catalpol, an iridiod glucoside isolated from Rehmannia glutinosa, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. Although anti-inflammatory activity of catalpol already reported, its involvement in lung protection has not been reported. Thus, we investigated the role of catalpol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in this study. Mice acute lung injury model was induced by intranasal instillation of LPS. Catalpol was administrated 1h prior to or after LPS exposure. The severity of pulmonary injury was evaluated 12h after LPS administration. The results showed that catalpol inhibited lung W/D ratio, myeloperoxidase activity of lung samples, the amounts of inflammatory cells and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4 and IL-1β in BALF induced by LPS. The production of IL-10 in BALF was up-regulated by catalpol. In vitro, catalpol inhibited TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4 and IL-1β production and up-regulated IL-10 expression in LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that the activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways was inhibited by catalpol. Furthermore, catalpol was found to inhibit TLR4 expression induced by LPS. In conclusion, catalpol potently protected against LPS-induced ALI. The protective effect may attribute to the inhibition of TLR4-mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:25063711

  8. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jung Ar; Chung, Jin Sil; Cho, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Young Do

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  9. Carbon nanoparticles induce ceramide- and lipid raft-dependent signalling in lung epithelial cells: a target for a preventive strategy against environmentally-induced lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Particulate air pollution in lung epithelial cells induces pathogenic endpoints like proliferation, apoptosis, and pro-inflammatory reactions. The activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a key event responsible for signalling events involving mitogen activated protein kinases specific for these endpoints. The molecular events leading to receptor activation however are not well understood. These events are relevant for the toxicological evaluation of inhalable particles as well as for potential preventive strategies in situations when particulate air pollution cannot be avoided. The current study therefore had the objective to elucidate membrane-coupled events leading to EGFR activation and the subsequent signalling cascade in lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, we aimed to identify the molecular target of ectoine, a biophysical active substance which we described to prevent carbon nanoparticle-induced lung inflammation. Methods Membrane signalling events were investigated in isolated lipid rafts from lung epithelial cells with regard to lipid and protein content of the signalling platforms. Using positive and negative intervention approaches, lipid raft changes, subsequent signalling events, and lung inflammation were investigated in vitro in lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN) and in vivo in exposed animals. Results Carbon nanoparticle treatment specifically led to an accumulation of ceramides in lipid rafts. Detailed analyses demonstrated a causal link of ceramides and subsequent EGFR activation coupled with a loss of the receptor in the lipid raft fractions. In vitro and in vivo investigations demonstrate the relevance of these events for carbon nanoparticle-induced lung inflammation. Moreover, the compatible solute ectoine was able to prevent ceramide-mediated EGFR phosphorylation and subsequent signalling as well as lung inflammation in vivo. Conclusion The data identify a so far unknown event in pro-inflammatory signalling and

  10. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk. PMID:27345200

  11. Natural Antioxidant Betanin Protects Rats from Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further. PMID:25861636

  12. Marked Recovery From Paraquat-Induced Lung Injury During Long-Term Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwon-Hyun; Kim, Young-Tong; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Paraquat-induced lung injury has been considered a progressive and irreversible disease. The purpose of this study was to report the long-term evolution of lung lesions in eight survivors with significant paraquat-induced lung injuries who could be followed-up for longer than 6 months. Methods We retrospectively examined high-resolution computed tomography and pulmonary function test of eight survivors with significant paraquat-induced lung injurys. Results High-resolution computed tomography revealed a predominant pattern of irregularly shaped consolidation with traction bronchiectasis at 1-2 months after paraquat poisoning, a mixed pattern of irregularly shaped consolidation and ground-glass opacity at 3-12 months, and a mixed pattern of consolidation, ground-glass opacity, and honeycombing at 1-2 years. At 3-12 months after paraquat ingestion, the areas of consolidation had markedly decreased and the decreased lung volume had returned to normal. At 1-2 years after paraquat poisoning, the cystic changes had disappeared. At 2-3 years after paraquat poisoning, the decrease in forced vital capacity had greatly improved to the normal range. Conclusions Recovery of nearly normal pulmonary structure and function may occur over several years following paraquat poisoning. Pulmonary function (both forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) evolved toward normal in the long-term survivors of paraquat poisoning with initial prominent lung injuries. PMID:19543486

  13. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  14. Piperine Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury via Modulating NF-κB Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jingyao; Li, Hongyan; Gu, Lina

    2016-02-01

    Piperine, one of the active components of black pepper, has been reported to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of piperine on lipolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) have not been reported. Thus, the protective effects of piperine against LPS-induced ALI were investigated in this study. LPS-induced lung injury was assessed by histological study, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and inflammatory cytokine production. Our results demonstrated that piperine attenuated LPS-induced MPO activity, lung edema, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production. Histological studies showed that piperine obviously attenuated LPS-induced lung injury. In addition, piperine significantly inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that piperine had a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of piperine is through inhibition of NF-κB activation. Piperine may be a potential therapeutic agent for ALI. PMID:26410851

  15. Protection from Cigarette Smoke-Induced Lung Dysfunction and Damage by H2 Relaxin (Serelaxin).

    PubMed

    Pini, Alessandro; Boccalini, Giulia; Lucarini, Laura; Catarinicchia, Stefano; Guasti, Daniele; Masini, Emanuela; Bani, Daniele; Nistri, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is the major etiologic factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is characterized by airway remodeling, lung inflammation and fibrosis, emphysema, and respiratory failure. The current therapies can improve COPD management but cannot arrest its progression and reduce mortality. Hence, there is a major interest in identifying molecules susceptible of development into new drugs to prevent or reduce CS-induced lung injury. Serelaxin (RLX), or recombinant human relaxin-2, is a promising candidate because of its anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic properties highlighted in lung disease models. Here, we used a guinea pig model of CS-induced lung inflammation, and remodeling reproducing some of the hallmarks of COPD. Animals exposed chronically to CS (8 weeks) were treated with vehicle or RLX, delivered by osmotic pumps (1 or 10 μg/day) or aerosol (10 μg/ml/day) during CS treatment. Controls were nonsmoking animals. RLX maintained airway compliance to a control-like pattern, likely because of its capability to counteract lung inflammation and bronchial remodeling. In fact, treatment of CS-exposed animals with RLX reduced the inflammatory recruitment of leukocytes, accompanied by a significant reduction of the release of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β). Moreover, RLX was able to counteract the adverse bronchial remodeling and emphysema induced by CS exposure by reducing goblet cell hyperplasia, smooth muscle thickening, and fibrosis. Of note, RLX delivered by aerosol has shown a comparable efficacy to systemic administration in reducing CS-induced lung dysfunction and damage. In conclusion, RLX emerges as a new molecule to counteract CS-induced inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27048661

  16. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes intratracheally instilled into the rat lung induce development of pleural malignant mesothelioma and lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Suzui, Masumi; Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Fukamachi, Katsumi; Numano, Takamasa; Abdelgied, Mohamed; Takahashi, Satoru; Ohnishi, Makoto; Omori, Toyonori; Tsuruoka, Shuji; Hirose, Akihiko; Kanno, Jun; Sakamoto, Yoshimitsu; Alexander, David B; Alexander, William T; Jiegou, Xu; Tsuda, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have a fibrous structure and physical properties similar to asbestos and have been shown to induce malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum after injection into the scrotum or peritoneal cavity in rats and mice. For human cancer risk assessment, however, data after administration of MWCNT via the airway, the exposure route that is most relevant to humans, is required. The present study was undertaken to investigate the carcinogenicity of MWCNT-N (NIKKISO) after administration to the rat lung. MWCNT-N was fractionated by passing it through a sieve with a pore size of 25 μm. The average lengths of the MWCNT were 4.2 μm before filtration and 2.6 μm in the flow-through fraction; the length of the retained MWCNT could not be determined. For the present study, 10-week-old F344/Crj male rats were divided into five groups: no treatment, vehicle control, MWCNT-N before filtration, MWCNT-N flow-through and MWCNT-N retained groups. Administration was by the trans-tracheal intrapulmonary spraying (TIPS) method. Rats were administered a total of 1 mg/rat during the initial 2 weeks of the experiment and then observed up to 109 weeks. The incidences of malignant mesothelioma and lung tumors (bronchiolo-alveolar adenomas and carcinomas) were 6/38 and 14/38, respectively, in the three groups administered MWCNT and 0/28 and 0/28, respectively, in the control groups. All malignant mesotheliomas were localized in the pericardial pleural cavity. The sieve fractions did not have a significant effect on tumor incidence. In conclusion, administration of MWCNT to the lung in the rat induces malignant mesothelioma and lung tumors. PMID:27098557

  17. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms of dust-induced lung fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, R.J.; Curtis, C.G.

    1984-04-01

    The sequence of cellular and biochemical events in response to the deposition of dust particles in lung tissue is described. Primary reactions at the lung surface include changes in the free cell population, the alveolar surface protein and in the quantity of pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein-rich material secreted by Type II cells. The relationship between these changes and lung fibrogenesis is discussed. It is suggested that such primary changes are protective mechanisms which may assist in the prevention of fibrogenesis rather than lead to an increase in collagen formation and deposition. If these primary defenses are overcome, then the interstitial fibroblastlike cell may have a prominent role in fibrogenesis. Therefore detailed observations of the interaction between lung fibroblasts and mineral dusts in vitro are described. As fibrogenesis may be arrested in vivo, or possibly reversed, and does not always progress to fibrosis, final consideration is given to the step from fibrogenesis to fibrosis. It is suggested that this step may involve other tissue proteins apart from collagen and that the irreversible nature of fibrosis can be explained by the formation of strong intermolecular crosslinks between different proteins. The types of crosslinks that may be involved are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the role of calcium-dependent transglutaminases in fibrosis, as these enzymes have hitherto received little attention. 90 references, 25 figures, 11 tables.

  18. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms of dust-induced lung fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R J; Curtis, C G

    1984-01-01

    The sequence of cellular and biochemical events in response to the deposition of dust particles in lung tissue is described. Primary reactions at the lung surface include changes in the free cell population, the alveolar surface protein and in the quantity of pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein-rich material secreted by Type II cells. The relationship between these changes and lung fibrogenesis is discussed. It is suggested that such primary changes are protective mechanisms which may assist in the prevention of fibrogenesis rather than lead to an increase in collagen formation and deposition. If these primary defenses are overcome, then the interstitial fibroblastlike cell may have a prominent role in fibrogenesis. Therefore detailed observations of the interaction between lung fibroblasts and mineral dusts in vitro are described. As fibrogenesis may be arrested in vivo, or possibly reversed, and does not always progress to fibrosis, final consideration is given to the step from fibrogenesis to fibrosis. It is suggested that this step may involve other tissue proteins apart from collagen and that the irreversible nature of fibrosis can be explained by the formation of strong intermolecular crosslinks between different proteins. The types of crosslinks that may be involved are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the role of calcium-dependent transglutaminases in fibrosis, as these enzymes have hitherto received little attention. Images FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 20. FIGURE 21. FIGURE 22. FIGURE 23. PMID:6376109

  19. Risk assessment methodologies for passive smoking-induced lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Repace, J.L.; Lowrey, A.H. )

    1990-03-01

    Risk assessment methodologies have been successfully applied to control societal risk from outdoor air pollutants. They are now being applied to indoor air pollutants such as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and radon. Nonsmokers' exposures to ETS have been assessed based on dosimetry of nicotine, its metabolite, continine, and on exposure to the particulate phase of ETS. Lung cancer responses have been based on both the epidemiology of active and of passive smoking. Nine risk assessments of nonsmokers' lung cancer risk from exposure to ETS have been performed. Some have estimated risks for lifelong nonsmokers only; others have included ex-smokers; still others have estimated total deaths from all causes. To facilitate interstudy comparison, in some cases lung cancers had to be interpolated from a total, or the authors' original estimate had to be adjusted to include ex-smokers. Further, all estimates were adjusted to 1988. Excluding one study whose estimate differs from the mean of the others by two orders of magnitude, the remaining risk assessments are in remarkable agreement. The mean estimate is approximately 5000 +/- 2400 nonsmokers' lung cancer deaths (LCDSs) per year. This is a 25% greater risk to nonsmokers than is indoor radon, and is about 57 times greater than the combined estimated cancer risk from all the hazardous outdoor air pollutants currently regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency: airborne radionuclides, asbestos, arsenic, benzene, coke oven emissions, and vinyl chloride. 48 references.

  20. Diltiazem restores cardiac output and improves renal function after hemorrhagic shock and crystalloid resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Ba, Z F; Meldrum, D R; Chaudry, I H

    1992-05-01

    Although calcium antagonists produce salutary effects after shock and ischemia, it is unknown whether such agents restore the depressed cardiac output (CO) and renal function in a nonheparinized model of trauma-hemorrhage and resuscitation. To study this, rats underwent a midline laparotomy (i.e., trauma induced) and were bled to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 40 mmHg until 40% of the maximum bleedout was returned in the form of Ringer lactate (RL). They were then resuscitated with four times the volume of shed blood with RL over 60 min. Diltiazem (400 micrograms/kg body wt) or an equal volume of saline was infused intravenously over 95 min. This infusion was started during the last 15 min of resuscitation. CO was determined by indocyanine green dilution. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was assessed with [3H]inulin clearance, and cortical microcirculation was examined by laser Doppler flowmetry. Results indicate that crystalloid resuscitation alone transiently restored but did not maintain CO after hemorrhage. Diltiazem infusion in conjunction with crystalloid resuscitation, however, restored and maintained CO and cortical microcirculation. Although GFR decreased in both groups, the values in diltiazem-treated animals were significantly higher than those in the sham-operated animals. Furthermore, diltiazem markedly decreased tissue water content. Thus diltiazem appears to be a promising adjunct in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock even in the absence of blood resuscitation. PMID:1590448

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation using electrically driven devices: a review

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, Stefan; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Lange, Ruediger; Krane, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) immediate resuscitation with chest compressions and ventilation is crucial for survival. As manual resuscitation is associated with several drawbacks, mechanical resuscitation devices have been developed to support resuscitation teams. These devices are able to achieve better perfusion of heart and brain in laboratory settings, but real world experience showed no significant improved survival in comparison to manual resuscitation. This review will focus on two mechanical resuscitation devices, the Lund University Cardiac Assist System (LUCAS) and AutoPulse devices and the actual literature available. In conclusion, the general use of mechanical resuscitation devices cannot be recommended at the moment. PMID:26623121

  2. Important Role of Platelets in Modulating Endotoxin-Induced Lung Inflammation in CFTR-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Caiqi; Su, Emily M.; Yang, Xi; Gao, Zhaowei; Li, Ling; Wu, Haiya; Jiang, Yiyi; Su, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Mutation of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) leads to cystic fibrosis (CF). Patients with CF develop abnormalities of blood platelets and recurrent lung inflammation. However, whether CFTR-mutated platelets play a role in the development of lung inflammation is elusive. Therefore, we intratracheally challenged wildtype and F508del (a common type of CFTR mutation) mice with LPS to observe changes of F508del platelets in the peripheral blood and indexes of lung inflammation (BAL neutrophils and protein levels). Furthermore, we investigated whether or not and how F508del platelets modulate the LPS-induced acute lung inflammation by targeting anti-platelet aggregation, depletion of neutrophils, reconstitution of bone marrow or neutrophils, blockade of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), platelet activating factor (PAF), and correction of mutated CFTR trafficking. We found that LPS-challenged F508del mice developed severe thrombocytopenia and had higher levels of plasma TXB2 coincided with neutrophilic lung inflammation relative to wildtype control. Inhibition of F508del platelet aggregation or depletion of F508del neutrophils diminished the LPS-induced lung inflammation in the F508del mice. Moreover, wildtype mice reconstituted with either F508del bone marrow or neutrophils developed worse thrombocytopenia. Blocking PSGL-1, platelet activating factor (PAF), or rectifying trafficking of mutated CFTR in F508del mice diminished and alveolar neutrophil transmigration in the LPS-challenged F508del mice. These findings suggest that F508del platelets and their interaction with neutrophils are requisite for the development of LPS-induced lung inflammation and injury. As such, targeting platelets might be an emerging strategy for dampening recurrent lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:24367540

  3. Bevacizumab‐induced chronic interstitial pneumonia during maintenance therapy in non‐small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sekimoto, Yasuhito; Shukuya, Takehiko; Koyama, Ryo; Nagaoka, Tetsutaro; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and a key drug for advanced non‐small cell lung cancer. There are few reports describing bevacizumab‐induced chronic interstitial pneumonia. A 62‐year‐old man with advanced non‐small cell lung cancer was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea. He previously received four courses of carboplatin plus paclitaxel with bevacizumab combination therapy and thereafter received four courses of maintenance bevacizumab monotherapy. A chest‐computed tomography scan on admission revealed diffuse ground glass opacity. He had not received any other drugs and did not have pneumonia. Thus, he was diagnosed with bevacizumab‐induced chronic interstitial pneumonia and was treated with a high dose of corticosteroids. After steroid treatment, his dyspnea and radiological findings improved. This case report is the first description of bevacizumab‐induced chronic interstitial pneumonia during maintenance therapy in a patient with non‐small cell lung cancer. PMID:27081491

  4. Cyclin D expression in plutonium-induced lung tumors in F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.F.; Kelly, G.

    1995-12-01

    The genetic mechanisms responsible for {alpha}-radiation-induced lung cancer in rats following inhalation of {sup 239}Pu is an ongoing area of research in our laboratory. Previous studies have examined the status of the p53 gene by immunohistochemistry. Only two tumors (2/26 squamous cell carcinomas) exhibited detectable levels of p53 products. Both were the result of mutations in codons 280 and 283. More recent studies of X-ray-induced lung tumors in rats showed a similar lack of involvement of p53. In conclusion, we found that {alpha}-radiation-induced rat lung tumors have a high incidence (31 of 39) of cyclin D{sub 1} overexpression.

  5. Protective effect of U74500A on phorbol myristate acetate-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shi-Jye; Chang, Deh-Ming; Wang, David; Lin, Hen-I; Lin, Shih-Hua; Hsu, Kang

    2004-08-01

    1. The present study was designed to determine whether U74500A could ameliorate acute lung injury (ALI) induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in our rat isolated lung model compared with any amelioration induced by dimethylthiourea (DMTU), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. 2. Acute lung injury was induced successfully by PMA during 60 min of observation. At 2 microg/kg, PMA elicited a significant increase in microvascular permeability (measured using the capillary filtration coefficient Kfc), lung weight gain, the lung weight/bodyweight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure and protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. 3. Pretreatment with 1.5 mg/kg U74500A significantly attenuated ALI; there was no significant increase in any parameters measured, except for pulmonary arterial pressure. The protective effect of U74500A was approximately the same as that of 600 mg/kg DMTU. However, 6000 U/kg SOD, 50,000 U/kg catalase and 6000 U/kg SOD + 50,000 U/kg catalase had no protective effect. 4. These experimental data suggest that U74500A significantly ameliorates ALI induced by PMA in rats. PMID:15298545

  6. Lung epithelial cells are essential effectors of inducible resistance to pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cleaver, J O; You, D; Michaud, D R; Pruneda, F A Guzmán; Juarez, M M Leiva; Zhang, J; Weill, P M; Adachi, R; Gong, L; Moghaddam, S J; Poynter, M E; Tuvim, M J; Evans, S E

    2014-01-01

    Infectious pneumonias are the leading cause of death worldwide, particularly among immunocompromised patients. Therapeutic stimulation of the lungs' intrinsic defenses with a unique combination of inhaled Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists broadly protects mice against otherwise lethal pneumonias. As the survival benefit persists despite cytotoxic chemotherapy-related neutropenia, the cells required for protection were investigated. The inducibility of resistance was tested in mice with deficiencies of leukocyte lineages due to genetic deletions and in wild-type mice with leukocyte populations significantly reduced by antibodies or toxins. Surprisingly, these serial reductions in leukocyte lineages did not appreciably impair inducible resistance, but targeted disruption of TLR signaling in the lung epithelium resulted in complete abrogation of the protective effect. Isolated lung epithelial cells were also induced to kill pathogens in the absence of leukocytes. Proteomic and gene expression analyses of isolated epithelial cells and whole lungs revealed highly congruent antimicrobial responses. Taken together, these data indicate that lung epithelial cells are necessary and sufficient effectors of inducible resistance. These findings challenge conventional paradigms about the role of epithelia in antimicrobial defense and offer a novel potential intervention to protect patients with impaired leukocyte-mediated immunity from fatal pneumonias. PMID:23632328

  7. Pendrin, an anion exchanger on lung epithelial cells, could be a novel target for lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chun-E; Jiang, Dingyuan; Dai, Huaping; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of pendrin in acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and to explore whether pendrin expression existing on alveolar cells. Methods: ALI C57BL/6 mice model induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was established. The expression of pendrin in lung was analyzed by RT-PCR and western blotting methods, the changes of lung inflammatory parameters and pathology were observed, the cellular distribution of pendrin in the lung was determined using immunofluorescence. Statistical comparisons between groups were made by two-tailed Student’s t-test. Results: Enhanced expression of the slc26a4 gene and production of pendrin in lungs of LPS-induced ALI mice were confirmed. In comparison with vehicle-control mice, methazolamide treatment mitigated lung inflammatory parameters and pathology. IL-6 and MCP-1 in lung tissues and BALF in methazolamide-treated mice were statistically decreased. Methazolamide treatment had significant effect on the total protein concentration in the BALF and the ratio of lung wet/dry weight. The percentage of macrophages in the BALF was increased. There was a low expression of pendrin in ATII. Conclusions: Pendrin may be involved in pathological process of LPS-induced ALI. Inhibition of the pendrin function could be used to treat ALI. Airway epithelial cell may be a valuable therapeutic target for discovering and developing new drugs and/or new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALI/ARDS. PMID:27158384

  8. Video recording of emergency department trauma resuscitations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Debra M

    2003-01-01

    Although hospitals are faced with the challenges of appropriately informing the public regarding health care and protecting the privacy of patients, a comprehensive policy concerning videotaping of trauma resuscitations can be developed to comply with regulatory bodies. Video recording of trauma team resuscitations can be utilized as an effective quality improvement tool to evaluate trauma team performance, psychomotor skills and techniques, and to identify educational needs related to specific trauma populations. Video recording of Trauma resuscitations is an effective tool for improving trauma team performance by educating clinical staff regarding roles and responsibilities. PMID:16265920

  9. Fluid Resuscitation in Sepsis: Reexamining the Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Tirupakuzhi Vijayaraghavan, Bharath Kumar; Cove, Matthew Edward

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis results in widespread inflammatory responses altering homeostasis. Associated circulatory abnormalities (peripheral vasodilation, intravascular volume depletion, increased cellular metabolism, and myocardial depression) lead to an imbalance between oxygen delivery and demand, triggering end organ injury and failure. Fluid resuscitation is a key part of treatment, but there is little agreement on choice, amount, and end points for fluid resuscitation. Over the past few years, the safety of some fluid preparations has been questioned. Our paper highlights current concerns, reviews the science behind current practices, and aims to clarify some of the controversies surrounding fluid resuscitation in sepsis. PMID:25180196

  10. Sepsis Resuscitation: Fluid Choice and Dose.

    PubMed

    Semler, Matthew W; Rice, Todd W

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is a common and life-threatening inflammatory response to severe infection treated with antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Despite the central role of intravenous fluid in sepsis management, fundamental questions regarding which fluid and in what amount remain unanswered. Recent advances in understanding the physiologic response to fluid administration, and large clinical studies examining resuscitation strategies, fluid balance after resuscitation, colloid versus crystalloid solutions, and high- versus low-chloride crystalloids, inform the current approach to sepsis fluid management and suggest areas for future research. PMID:27229641