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Sample records for ret g691s polymorphism

  1. Association of RET codon 691 polymorphism in radiation-induced human thyroid tumours with C-cell hyperplasia in peritumoural tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bounacer, A; Du Villard, J A; Wicker, R; Caillou, B; Schlumberger, M; Sarasin, A; Suárez, H G

    2002-01-01

    The RET proto-oncogene encodes a protein structurally related to transmembrane receptors with an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. In human thyroid gland, the RET proto-oncogene is normally expressed in parafollicular C-cells. Thyroid C-cell hyperplasia is associated with inherited medullary thyroid carcinomas and is considered as a pre-neoplastic stage of C-cells disease. It has also been observed in thyroid tissues adjacent to follicular and papillary carcinomas. In order to study the relationship between a misfunctioning of the RET proto-oncogene and the presence of C-cell hyperplasia, we compared a series of thyroid glands presenting sporadic or radiation-associated tumours, as well as samples of unrelated normal thyroid tissues, for alteration in exons 10 and 11 of the gene and for the presence or absence of C-cell hyperplasia. Here we report a significantly higher frequency of C-cell hyperplasia present in peritumoural thyroid tissues of radiation-induced epithelial thyroid tumours, than in peritumoural of sporadic thyroid tumours or in control normal thyroid tissues (P=0.001). A G691S RET polymorphism was present with a higher frequency in radiation-induced epithelial thyroid tumours (55%) than in sporadic tumours (20%) and in control normal thyroid tissues (15%). Interestingly, this polymorphism was associated in the majority (88%) of radiation-induced tumours with a C-cell hyperplasia in the peritumoural tissues. Several explanations for this association are discussed. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1929–1936. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600371 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12085189

  2. Traditional and targeted exome sequencing reveals common, rare and novel functional deleterious variants in RET signaling complex in a cohort of living US patients with urinary tract malformations

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Rajshekhar; Ramos, Enrique; Hoffman, Mary; VanWinkle, Jessica; Martin, Daniel R; Davis, Thomas K; Hoshi, Masato; Hmiel, Stanley P; Beck, Anne; Hruska, Keith; Coplen, Doug; Liapis, Helen; Mitra, Robi; Druley, Todd; Austin, Paul; Jain, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Signaling by the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-RET receptor tyrosine kinase and SPRY1, a RET repressor, is essential for early urinary tract development. Individual or a combination of GDNF, RET and SPRY1 mutant alleles in mice cause renal malformations reminiscent of congenital anomalies of the kidney or urinary tract (CAKUT) in humans and distinct from renal agenesis phenotype in complete GDNF or RET null mice. We sequenced GDNF, SPRY1 and RET in 122 unrelated living CAKUT patients to discover deleterious mutations that cause CAKUT. Novel or rare deleterious mutations in GDNF or RET were found in 6 unrelated patients. A family with duplicated collecting system had a novel mutation, RETR831Q, which showed markedly decreased GDNF dependent MAPK activity. Two patients with RET-G691S polymorphism harbored additional rare non-synonymous variants GDNF-R93W and RET-R982C. The patient with double RET-G691S/R982C genotype had multiple defects including renal dysplasia, megaureters and cryptorchidism. Presence of both mutations were necessary to affect RET activity. Targeted whole exome and next-generation sequencing revealed a novel deleterious mutation G443D in GFRα1, the co-receptor for RET, in this patient. Pedigree analysis indicated that the GFRα1 mutation was inherited from the unaffected mother and the RET mutations from the unaffected father. Our studies indicate that 5% of living CAKUT patients harbor deleterious rare variants or novel mutations in GDNF-GFRα1-RET pathway. We provide evidence for the coexistence of deleterious rare and common variants in genes in the same pathway as a cause of CAKUT and discovered novel phenotypes associated with the RET pathway. PMID:22729463

  3. Molecular Basis of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: The Role of RET Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Ceolin, Lucieli; Siqueira, Débora R.; Romitti, Mírian; Ferreira, Carla V.; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2012-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor originating in parafollicular C cells. It accounts for 5 to 8% of all thyroid cancers. MTC develops in either sporadic (75%) or hereditary form (25%). Genetic and molecular studies have demonstrated the involvement of the RET proto-oncogene in hereditary MTC and, less often, in its sporadic form. Although a strong genotype-phenotype correlation has been described, wide clinical heterogeneity is observed among families with the same RET mutation or even in carriers of the same kindred. In recent years, several single nucleotide polymorphisms of the RET gene have been described in the general population as well as in patients with MTC. Some studies have reported associations between the presence of polymorphisms and development or progression of MTC. Nonetheless, other studies failed to demonstrate any effect of the RET variants. Differences in the genetic background of distinct populations or methodological approaches have been suggested as potential reasons for the conflicting results. Here, we review current knowledge concerning the molecular pathogenesis of sporadic and hereditary MTC. In particular, we analyze the role of RET polymorphisms in the clinical presentation and prognosis of MTC based on the current literature. PMID:22312249

  4. Genotyping analysis of 3 RET polymorphisms demonstrates low somatic mutation rate in Chinese Hirschsprung disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Qian; Li, Qi; Cheng, Wei; Qiao, Guoliang; Xiao, Ping; Gan, Liang; Su, Lin; Miao, Chunyue; Li, Long

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genetic mosaicism has been reported for both coding and non-coding sequences in the RET gene in Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) patients. This study aimed to investigate somatic mutation rate in Chinese population by comparing both homozygous genotype percentage and risk allele frequency of 3 RET single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among blood and colon samples. Methods: DNA was extracted from 59 HSCR blood samples, 59 control blood samples and 76 fresh frozen colon tissue samples (grouped into ganglionic, transitional and aganglionic level). Genotype status of rs2435357 and rs2506030 was examined by competitive allele specific hydrolysis probes (Taqman) PCR technology, and rs2506004 was examined by Sanger sequencing. Homozygous genotype percentage and risk allele frequency were calculated for each type of sample and compared by chi-square test. P<0.05 was regarded as being statistically significant. Results: Colon tissue DNA samples showed similar frequency of SNPs as that of the blood DNA samples in HSCR patients, both of which are significantly higher than the control blood group (rs2435357 TT genotype: 71.2%, 74.7% versus 22.0% in HSCR blood, HSCR colon and control blood DNA respectively, P=0.000; rs2506004 AA genotype: 72.4%, 83.1% versus 25.5%, P=0.000; rs2506030 GG genotype: 79.7%, 77.2% versus 54.2%, P=0.000 and 0.004). With respect to DNA extracted from ganglionic, transitional and aganglionic levels, no statistically significant difference was demonstrated in those 3 regions (rs2435357: P=0.897; rs2506004: P=0.740; rs2506030: P=0.901). Conclusion: Our data does not support the notion that high frequency of somatic changes as an underlying etiology of Chinese HSCR population. PMID:26191260

  5. In silico and in vitro analysis of rare germline allelic variants of RET oncogene associated with medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Cosci, B; Vivaldi, A; Romei, C; Gemignani, F; Landi, S; Ciampi, R; Tacito, A; Molinaro, E; Agate, L; Bottici, V; Cappagli, V; Viola, D; Piaggi, P; Vitti, P; Pinchera, A; Elisei, R

    2011-10-01

    Germline and somatic RET oncogene mutations are found in 98% hereditary and 40% sporadic medullary thyroid carcinomas. Our aim was to analyse by in silico and in vitro assays the transforming activity of six rare RET mutations (T338I, V648I, M918V, A883T, S904F and M848T). Six known RET mutations were used as controls. The in silico analysis showed the highest score value (i.e. 65) for S904F, M848T, M918T and C634R, whereas L790F, G691S, T338I and V648I had 0 score. Intermediate score values were obtained by A883T (score=55), M918V, V804M and Y791F (score=15). The in vitro focus formation assay showed that cells transfected with S904F, M918T, M848T or C634R generated the largest number of focus formation units (FFU). Intermediate numbers of FFU were observed in cells transfected with M918V, V804M, Y791F or A883T, while cells transfected with L790F, G691S, T338I or V648I showed a number of FFU similar to control cells. A positive correlation between the in silico score and in vitro FFU was found (P=0.0005). Only cells transfected with M918T or C634R grew faster and generated higher number of colonies in soft agar than control cells. However, the cells that were transfected with V804M produced an intermediate number of colonies. In conclusion, two of the six rare RET mutations, S904F and M848T possessed a relatively high transforming activity but a low aggressiveness; the other four mutations T338I, V648I, M918V and A883T were low or non-transforming, and their ability to induce tumoural transformation might be related to particular genetic conditions. PMID:21810974

  6. Effect of retS gene on antibiotics production in Pseudomonas fluorescens FD6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingxia; Xiao, Qi; Xu, Jingyou; Tong, Yunhui; Wen, Jia; Chen, Xijun; Wei, Lihui

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid sensor kinase termed RetS (regulator of exopolysaccharide and Type III secretion) controls expression of numerous genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To investigate the function of RetS in P. fluorescens FD6, the retS gene was disrupted. Genetic inactivation of retS resulted in enhanced production of 2, 4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin, and pyoluteorin. The retS mutant also exhibited significant increase in phlA-lacZ, prnA-lacZ, and pltA-lacZ transcription levels, influencing expression levels of the small regulatory RNAs RsmX and RsmZ. In the gacSretS double mutant, all the phenotypic changes caused by the retS deletion were reversed to the level of gacS single mutant. Furthermore, the retS mutation drastically elevated biofilm formation and improved the colonization ability of strain FD6 on wheat rhizospheres. Based on these results, we proposed that RetS negatively controlled the production of antibiotics through the Gac/Rsm pathway in P. fluorescens FD6. PMID:26505308

  7. Retort to Religious Critics of RET.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardi, Thomas J.

    This paper is concerned with people who contact clergymen for counseling who could benefit from the short-term directive therapeutic approach of Rational Emotive Therapy (RET) and the reluctance of clergymen to use RET. The integration of the precepts of Christianity and the concepts of RET is considered. This paper is specifically a response to…

  8. RET mutation screening in MEN2 patients and discovery of a novel mutation in a sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jhiang, S M; Fithian, L; Weghorst, C M; Clark, O H; Falko, J M; O'Dorisio, T M; Mazzaferri, E L

    1996-04-01

    RET germline mutations were found to predispose to the development of three variants of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, MEN2A, MEN2B, and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). We have screened for RET mutations at exons 10, 11, 13, and 16 in leukocyte DNA extracted from 37 individuals, and have identified RET germline mutations in 12 affected individuals from 9 unrelated families. No RET germline mutation was found in 19 individuals with apparent sporadic diseases. We have also screened for RET mutations at exons 10, 11, and 16 in tumor DNA extracted from 13 freshly frozen medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC). RET mutation was detected in every tumor, either inherited or sporadic, indicating that RET plays an important role in the development of both inherited and sporadic MTC. We initially screened for RET mutations by direct DNA sequencing of the genomic PCR products amplified from patients' leukocyte or tumor DNA. Recently, we utilized the "Cold SSCP" method, nonradioactive single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, to screen for RET mutations and have identified a novel mutation, a 6-bp deletion preceding the cysteine-634, in a sporadic MTC. PMID:8733882

  9. Effect of 3′UTR RET Variants on RET mRNA Secondary Structure and Disease Presentation in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ceolin, Lucieli; Romitti, Mirian; Rodrigues Siqueira, Débora; Vaz Ferreira, Carla; Oliboni Scapineli, Jessica; Assis-Brazil, Beatriz; Vieira Maximiano, Rodolfo; Dias Amarante, Tauanne; de Souza Nunes, Miriam Celi; Weber, Gerald; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2016-01-01

    Background The RET S836S variant has been associated with early onset and increased risk for metastatic disease in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). However, the mechanism by which this variant modulates MTC pathogenesis is still open to discuss. Of interest, strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between RET S836S and 3'UTR variants has been reported in Hirschsprung's disease patients. Objective To evaluate the frequency of the RET 3’UTR variants (rs76759170 and rs3026785) in MTC patients and to determine whether these variants are in LD with S836S polymorphism. Methods Our sample comprised 152 patients with sporadic MTC. The RET S836S and 3’UTR (rs76759170 and rs3026785) variants were genotyped using Custom TaqMan Genotyping Assays. Haplotypes were inferred using the phase 2.1 program. RET mRNA structure was assessed by Vienna Package. Results The mean age of MTC diagnosis was 48.5±15.5 years and 57.9% were women. The minor allele frequencies of RET polymorphisms were as follows: S836S, 5.6%; rs76759170, 5.6%; rs3026785, 6.2%. We observed a strong LD among S836S and 3’UTR variants (|D’| = -1, r2 = 1 and |D’| = -1, r2 = 0,967). Patients harboring the S836S/3’UTR variants presented a higher percentage of lymph node and distant metastasis (P = 0.013 and P<0.001, respectively). Accordingly, RNA folding analyses demonstrated different RNA secondary structure predictions for WT(TCCGT), S836S(TTCGT) or 3’UTR(GTCAC) haplotypes. The S836S/3’UTR haplotype presented a greater number of double helices sections and lower levels of minimal free energy when compared to the wild-type haplotype, suggesting that these variants provides the most thermodynamically stable mRNA structure, which may have functional consequences on the rate of mRNA degradation. Conclusion The RET S836S polymorphism is in LD with 3’UTR variants. In silico analysis indicate that the 3’UTR variants may affect the secondary structure of RET mRNA, suggesting that these variants might play a

  10. Mutation detection in autosomal dominant Hirschsprung disease: SSCP analysis of the RET proto-oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Angrist, M.; Bolk, S.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or congenital aganglionic megacolon, is the most common cause of congenital bowel obstruction, with an incidence of 1 in 5000. Recently, linkage of an incompletely penetrant, dominant form of HSCR to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10 was reported, followed by identification of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR patients. RET mutations have also been reported in both sporadic and familial forms of three neuroendrocrine tumor syndromes. Unlike the clustered RET mutations observed in these syndromes, the 18 reported HSCR mutations are distributed throughout the extracellular and tryosine kinase domains of RET. In an effort to determine the frequency of RET mutations in HSCR and correlate genotype with phenotype, we have begun to screen for mutations among 80 HSCR probands representing a wide range of phenotypes and pedigree structures. Non-isotopic single strand conformation of polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was carried out using the Pharmacia PhastSystem{trademark}. Initial screening of exons 2 through 6 detected variants in 11 patients not seen in 24 controls. One additional band shift in exon 6 has been observed in both patients and controls. Preliminary sequence analysis has revealed two putative familial mutations in exon 2: a single base pair deletion (49Pro del C 296) and a point mutation that leads to a conservative amino acid substitution (93Gly{r_arrow}Ser). These results suggest that HSCR may be associated with a range of alterations in the coding sequence of the RET extracellular domain. Additional mutations will be described.

  11. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: Mutation analysis of the receptor tyrosine kinase RET

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Angrist, M.; Schwartz, S.; Chakravarti, A.

    1996-06-28

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) usually occurs as an isolated phenotype. However, 16% of the index cases are also affected with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Complex segregation analysis suggests that CCHS is familial and has the same inheritance pattern with or without HSCR. We postulate that alteration of normal function of the receptor tyrosine kinase, RET, may contribute to CCHS based on RET`s expression pattern and the identification of RET mutations in HSCR patients. To further explore the nature of the inheritance of CCHS, we have undertaken two main routes of investigation: cytogenetic analysis and mutation detection. Cytogenetic analysis of metaphase chromosomes showed normal karyotypes in 13 of the 14 evaluated index cases; one index case carried a familial pericentric inversion on chromosome 2. Mutation analysis showed no sequence changes unique to index cases, as compared to control individuals, and as studied by single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding region of RET. We conclude that point mutations in the RET coding region cannot account for a substantial fraction of CCHS in this patient population, and that other candidate genes involved in neural crest cell differentiation and development must be considered. 54 refs.

  12. Exon Skipping in the RET Gene Encodes Novel Isoforms That Differentially Regulate RET Protein Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Gabreski, Nicole A; Vaghasia, Janki K; Novakova, Silvia S; McDonald, Neil Q; Pierchala, Brian A

    2016-07-29

    Rearranged during transfection (RET), a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family ligands (GFLs), plays a crucial role in the development and function of the nervous system and additionally is required for kidney development and spermatogenesis. RET encodes a transmembrane receptor that is 20 exons long and produces two known protein isoforms differing in C-terminal amino acid composition, referred to as RET9 and RET51. Studies of human pheochromocytomas identified two additional novel transcripts involving the skipping of exon 3 or exons 3, 4, and 5 and are referred to as RET(Δ) (E3) and RET(Δ) (E345), respectively. Here we report the presence of Ret(Δ) (E3) and Ret(Δ) (E345) in zebrafish, mice, and rats and show that these transcripts are dynamically expressed throughout development of the CNS, peripheral nervous system, and kidneys. We further explore the biochemical properties of these isoforms, demonstrating that, like full-length RET, RET(ΔE3) and RET(ΔE345) are trafficked to the cell surface, interact with all four GFRα co-receptors, and have the ability to heterodimerize with full-length RET. Signaling experiments indicate that RET(ΔE3) is phosphorylated in a similar manner to full-length RET. RET(ΔE345), in contrast, displays higher baseline autophosphorylation, specifically on the catalytic tyrosine, Tyr(905), and also on one of the most important signaling residues, Tyr(1062) These data provide the first evidence for a physiologic role of these isoforms in RET pathway function. PMID:27226544

  13. Crystal Structure and Oligomeric State of the RetS Signaling Kinase Sensory Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, X.; Jaw, J; Robinson, H; Schubot, F

    2010-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause both acute and chronic-persistent infections in predisposed individuals. Acute infections require the presence of a functional type III secretion system (T3SS), whereas chronic P. aeruginosa infections are characterized by the formation of drug-resistant biofilms. The T3SS and biofilm formation are reciprocally regulated by the signaling kinases LadS, RetS, and GacS. RetS downregulates biofilm formation and upregulates expression of the T3SS through a unique mechanism. RetS forms a heterodimeric complex with GacS and thus prevents GacS autophosphorylation and downstream signaling. The signals that regulate RetS are not known but RetS possesses a distinctive periplasmic sensor domain that is believed to serve as receptor for the regulatory ligand. We have determined the crystal structure of the RetS sensory domain at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. The structure closely resembles those of carbohydrate binding modules of other proteins, suggesting that the elusive ligands are likely carbohydrate moieties. In addition to the conserved beta-sandwich structure, the sensory domain features two alpha helices which create a unique surface topology. Protein-protein crosslinking and fluorescence energy transfer experiments also revealed that the sensory domain dimerizes with a dissociation constant of K{sub d} = 580 {+-} 50 nM, a result with interesting implications for our understanding of the underlying signaling mechanism.

  14. Drosophila Cancer Models Identify Functional Differences between Ret Fusions.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Sarah; Cagan, Ross L

    2016-09-13

    We generated and compared Drosophila models of RET fusions CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET. Both RET fusions directed cells to migrate, delaminate, and undergo EMT, and both resulted in lethality when broadly expressed. In all phenotypes examined, NCOA4-RET was more severe than CCDC6-RET, mirroring their effects on patients. A functional screen against the Drosophila kinome and a library of cancer drugs found that CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET acted through different signaling networks and displayed distinct drug sensitivities. Combining data from the kinome and drug screens identified the WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 plus the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib as a synergistic drug combination that is specific for NCOA4-RET. Our work emphasizes the importance of identifying and tailoring a patient's treatment to their specific RET fusion isoform and identifies a multi-targeted therapy that may prove effective against tumors containing the NCOA4-RET fusion. PMID:27626672

  15. Bacteria Responsible for the Retting of Brazilian Flax

    PubMed Central

    Rosemberg, J. A.

    1965-01-01

    Twenty-two species of bacteria were isolated from Linum usitatissimum stored for retting. Achromobacter parvulus, Clostridium beijerinckii, C. saprogenes, C. saccharoacetoperbutylicum, C. perenne, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its achromogenic variety are retting agents. The last species mentioned performs the retting in only 72 hr. This is the first time A. parvulus has been shown to be a retting agent. PMID:5866046

  16. RET mutations in MEN 2 associated diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstra, R.M.W.; Stelwagen, T.; Stulp, R.P.

    1994-09-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) comprises three clinically distinct dominantly inherited cancer syndromes namely MEN 2A, MEN 2B and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). Germline (point) mutations of the RET proto-oncogene have been reported to occur in all these syndromes. In MEN 2A and FMTC patients the mutations occurred within codons specifying cysteine residues in the transition of the RET extracellular and transmembrane domains, while in MEN 2B patients we could detect a single RET mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain in all patients. Also in patients suffering from Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR), mutations in the RET gene have been found. These mutations are spread all over the gene. Several families have been described in which MEN 2 and HSCR are associated. MEN 2A is also found associated with cutaneous lichen amyloidosis (CLA). It might be that specific RET mutations correlate with these disease associations. We therefore scanned DNA from patients from a family with MEN 2A and HSCR, MEN 2A and CLA and CLA only for RET mutations. Results obtained thus far do not support the existence of specific correlations.

  17. Alternative splicing results in RET isoforms with distinct trafficking properties

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Douglas S.; Rodrigues, David M.; Hyndman, Brandy D.; Crupi, Mathieu J. F.; Nicolescu, Adrian C.; Mulligan, Lois M.

    2012-01-01

    RET encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase that is essential for spermatogenesis, development of the sensory, sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric nervous systems and the kidneys, as well as for maintenance of adult midbrain dopaminergic neurons. RET is alternatively spliced to encode multiple isoforms that differ in their C-terminal amino acids. The RET9 and RET51 isoforms display unique levels of autophosphorylation and have differential interactions with adaptor proteins. They induce distinct gene expression patterns, promote different levels of cell differentiation and transformation, and play unique roles in development. Here we present a comprehensive study of the subcellular localization and trafficking of RET isoforms. We show that immature RET9 accumulates intracellularly in the Golgi, whereas RET51 is efficiently matured and present in relatively higher amounts on the plasma membrane. RET51 is internalized faster after ligand binding and undergoes recycling back to the plasma membrane. This differential trafficking of RET isoforms produces a more rapid and longer duration of signaling through the extracellular-signal regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway downstream of RET51 relative to RET9. Together these differences in trafficking properties contribute to some of the functional differences previously observed between RET9 and RET51 and establish the important role of intracellular trafficking in modulating and maintaining RET signaling. PMID:22875993

  18. Mutational dichotomy in desmoplastic malignant melanoma corroborated by multigene panel analysis.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Stephan W; Kashofer, Karl; Halbwedl, Iris; Winter, Gerlinde; El-Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila; Mentzel, Thomas; Hoefler, Gerald; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette

    2015-07-01

    Desmoplastic malignant melanoma is a distinct melanoma entity histologically subtyped into mixed and pure forms due to significantly reduced lymph node metastases in the pure form. Recent reports investigating common actionable driver mutations have demonstrated a lack of BRAF, NRAS, and KIT mutation in pure desmoplastic melanoma. In search for alternative driver mutations next generation amplicon sequencing for hotspot mutations in 50 genes cardinal to tumorigenesis was performed and in addition the RET G691S polymorphism was investigated. Data from 21 desmoplastic melanomas (12 pure and 9 mixed) were retrieved. Pure desmoplastic melanomas were either devoid of mutations (50%) or displayed mutations in tumor suppressor genes (TP53, CDKN2A, and SMAD4) singularly or in combination with the exception of a PIK3CA double-mutation lacking established biological relevance. Mixed desmoplastic melanomas on the contrary were frequently mutated (89%), and 67% exhibited activating mutations similar to common-type cutaneous malignant melanomas (BRAF, NRAS, FGFR2, and ERBB2). Separate analysis of morphologically heterogeneous tumor areas in four mixed desmoplastic malignant melanomas displayed no difference in mutation status and RET G691 status. GNAQ and GNA11, two oncogenes in BRAF and NRAS wild-type uveal melanomas, were not mutated in our cohort. The RET G691S polymorphism was found in 25% of pure and 38% of mixed desmoplastic melanomas. Apart from RET G691S our findings demonstrate absence of activating driver mutations in pure desmoplastic melanoma beyond previously investigated oncogenes (BRAF, NRAS, and KIT). The findings underline the therapeutic dichotomy of mixed versus pure desmoplastic melanoma with regard to activating mutations primarily of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. PMID:25769001

  19. The RET oncogene in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Jason D; Zeiger, Martha A

    2015-07-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common form of thyroid cancer, accounting for greater than 80% of cases. Surgical resection, with or without postoperative radioiodine therapy, remains the standard of care for patients with PTC, and the prognosis is generally excellent with appropriate treatment. Despite this, significant numbers of patients will not respond to maximal surgical and medical therapy and ultimately will die from the disease. This mortality reflects an incomplete understanding of the oncogenic mechanisms that initiate, drive, and promote PTC. Nonetheless, significant insights into the pathologic subcellular events underlying PTC have been discovered over the last 2 decades, and this remains an area of significant research interest. Chromosomal rearrangements resulting in the expression of fusion proteins that involve the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene were the first oncogenic events to be identified in PTC. Members of this fusion protein family (the RET/PTC family) appear to play an oncogenic role in approximately 20% of PTCs. Herein, the authors review the current understanding of the clinicopathologic role of RET/PTC fusion proteins in PTC development and progression and the molecular mechanisms by which RET/PTCs exert their oncogenic effects on the thyroid epithelium. PMID:25731779

  20. Microbial diversity observed during hemp retting.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alexandra; Pochart, Philippe; Day, Arnaud; Mennuni, Sarah; Bono, Pierre; Baret, Jean-Luc; Spadoni, Jean-Louis; Mangin, Irène

    2015-05-01

    Historically used in textile and paper industry, hemp fibres have started to find new applications in composite materials with important economic and ecological advantages. However, their applications are limited since manufacturers have some difficulties to standardise fabrication processes. This study is a first step before selection and isolation of strains that could later be used to optimise microbial retting efficiency and hence fibre quality. We studied six samples harvested on different ground types, at different dates and with different retting durations on field to obtain an exhaustive representation of the process. After DNA extraction, total bacteria and fungi associated with stems during retting were specifically quantified using real-time PCR. Then, using sequence analysis of randomly cloned 16S and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, a phylogenetic characterisation of the dominant microorganisms was carried out. Quantitatively, we showed that there were 8.1-9.5 log₁₀ 16S rRNA gene copies per gram of hemp straw for bacteria and 8.6-9.6 log₁₀ 18S rRNA gene copies per gram for fungi. Qualitatively, we noticed a higher bacterial diversity in comparison to fungi. This work showed that in the different samples, the same species were present but in significantly different proportions according to ground type, harvest dates and retting durations on field. The most frequent bacterial sequences were affiliated to species Escherichia coli, Pantoea agglomerans, Pseudomonas rhizosphaerae, Rhodobacter sp., Pseudomonas fulva, Rhizobium huautlense and Massilia timonae, whereas fungal sequences were principally related to the genera Cladosporium and Cryptococcus. PMID:25575888

  1. Identification and characterization of RET fusions in advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Christopher R.; Seery, Tara; Sanford, Eric M.; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Stephens, Philip J.; Miller, Vincent A.; Ali, Siraj M.; Chiu, Vi K.

    2015-01-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for molecularly directed therapies available for metastatic colorectal cancer. Comprehensive genomic profiling has the potential to identify actionable genomic alterations in colorectal cancer. Through comprehensive genomic profiling we prospectively identified 6 RET fusion kinases, including two novel fusions of CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET, in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. RET fusion kinases represent a novel class of oncogenic driver in CRC and occurred at a 0.2% frequency without concurrent driver mutations, including KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA or other fusion tyrosine kinases. Multiple RET kinase inhibitors were cytotoxic to RET fusion kinase positive cancer cells and not RET fusion kinase negative CRC cells. The presence of a RET fusion kinase may identify a subset of metastatic CRC patients with a high response rate to RET kinase inhibition. This is the first characterization of RET fusions in CRC patients and highlights the therapeutic significance of prospective comprehensive genomic profiling in advanced CRC. PMID:26078337

  2. Identification and characterization of RET fusions in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Klempner, Samuel J; Garrett, Christopher R; Seery, Tara; Sanford, Eric M; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Ross, Jeffrey S; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Chiu, Vi K

    2015-10-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for molecularly directed therapies available for metastatic colorectal cancer. Comprehensive genomic profiling has the potential to identify actionable genomic alterations in colorectal cancer. Through comprehensive genomic profiling we prospectively identified 6 RET fusion kinases, including two novel fusions of CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET, in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. RET fusion kinases represent a novel class of oncogenic driver in CRC and occurred at a 0.2% frequency without concurrent driver mutations, including KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA or other fusion tyrosine kinases. Multiple RET kinase inhibitors were cytotoxic to RET fusion kinase positive cancer cells and not RET fusion kinase negative CRC cells. The presence of a RET fusion kinase may identify a subset of metastatic CRC patients with a high response rate to RET kinase inhibition. This is the first characterization of RET fusions in CRC patients and highlights the therapeutic significance of prospective comprehensive genomic profiling in advanced CRC. PMID:26078337

  3. Ventilatory impairment from pre-harvest retted flax.

    PubMed

    Jamison, J P; Langlands, J H; Lowry, R C

    1986-12-01

    A new method of retting flax recently developed to suit the United Kingdom climate has allowed the reintroduction of flax growing to this country. The weed killer glyphosate is sprayed on the crop which then rets before harvesting six weeks later. The acute bronchoconstrictor responses of 11 normal subjects to dust from dew retted and from pre-harvest retted flaxes were compared in a double blind crossover fashion. There were no significant differences in the dust levels nor in the size of the dust particles in the experimental dust room. The decreases in pulmonary function after six hours of dust inhalation were significantly larger after pre-harvest retted flax dust than after dew retted flax dust (delta FEV1, -0.21 and -0.40 1; delta MEF50, -0.72 and -1.211/s; delta sGaw (specific airway conductance), -0.17 and -0.65 kPa/s for dew retted and pre-harvest retted respectively). The subjects also reported more symptoms after inhaling pre-harvest retted flax dust. It is concluded that the acute bronchoconstrictor response to flax dust is increased by pre-harvest retting, suggesting an increased risk of byssinosis. PMID:3801332

  4. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the ‘DFG-out’ inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the ‘gatekeeper’ V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET. PMID:26046350

  5. INTERACTION BETWEEN A CHROMOSOME 10 RET ENHANCER AND CHROMOSOME 21 IN THE DOWN SYNDROME-HIRSCHSPRUNG DISEASE ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Stacey; Pelet, Anna; Amiel, Jeanne; Borrego, Salud; Hofstra, Robert; Tam, Paul; Ceccherini, Isabella; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Sherman, Stephanie; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) display a 40-fold greater risk of Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) than the general population of newborns implicating chromosome 21 in HSCR etiology. Here we demonstrate that the RET enhancer polymorphism RET+9.7 (rs2435357:C>T) at chromosome 10q11.2 is associated with HSCR in DS individuals both by transmission disequilibrium (P=0.0015) and case-control (P=0.0115) analysis of matched cases. Interestingly, the RET+9.7 T allele frequency is significantly different between individuals with DS alone (0.26±0.04), HSCR alone (0.61±0.04), and those with HSCR and DS (0.41±0.04), demonstrating an association and interaction between RET and chromosome 21 gene dosage. This is the first report of a genetic interaction between a common functional variant (rs2435357) and a not infrequent copy number error (chromosome 21 dosage) in two human developmental disorders. PMID:19306335

  6. RET fusion gene: translation to personalized lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Takashi; Tsuta, Koji; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Nakaoku, Takashi; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Goto, Koichi

    2013-11-01

    Development of lung adenocarcinoma (LADC), the most frequent histological type of lung cancer, depends in many cases on the activation of "driver" oncogenes such as KRAS, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Inhibitors that target the EGFR and ALK tyrosine kinases show therapeutic effects against LADCs containing EGFR gene mutations and ALK gene fusions, respectively. Recently, we and others identified the RET fusion gene as a new targetable driver gene in LADC. The RET fusions occur in 1-2% of LADCs. Existing US Food and Drug Administration-approved inhibitors of RET tyrosine kinase show promising therapeutic effects both in vitro and in vivo, as well as in a few patients. Clinical trials are underway to investigate the therapeutic effects of RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vandetanib (ZD6474) and cabozantinib (XL184), in patients with RET fusion-positive non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:23991695

  7. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-05-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ.

  8. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ. PMID:25944708

  9. Bacterial population structure of the jute-retting environment.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Tulika K; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2008-08-01

    Jute is one of the most versatile bast fibers obtained through the process of retting, which is a result of decomposition of stalks by the indigenous microflora. However, bacterial communities associated with the retting of jute are not well characterized. To investigate the presence of microorganisms during the process of jute retting, full-cycle rRNA approach was followed, and two 16S rRNA gene libraries, from jute-retting locations of Krishnanagar and Barrackpore, were constructed. Phylotypes affiliating to seven bacterial divisions were identified in both libraries. The bulk of clones came from Proteobacteria ( approximately 37, 41%) and a comparatively smaller proportion of clones from the divisions-Firmicutes ( approximately 11, 12%), Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroidetes group (CFB; approximately 9, 7%), Verrucomicrobia ( approximately 6, 5%), Acidobacteria ( approximately 4, 5%), Chlorobiales ( approximately 5, 5%), and Actinobacteria ( approximately 4, 2%) were identified. Percent coverage value and diversity estimations of phylotype richness, Shannon-Weiner index, and evenness confirmed the diverse nature of both the libraries. Evaluation of the retting waters by whole cell rRNA-targeted flourescent in situ hybridization, as detected by domain- and group-specific probes, we observed a considerable dominance of the beta-Proteobacteria (25.9%) along with the CFB group (24.4%). In addition, 32 bacterial species were isolated on culture media from the two retting environments and identified by 16S rDNA analysis, confirming the presence of phyla, Proteobacteria ( approximately 47%), Firmicutes ( approximately 22%), CFB group ( approximately 19%), and Actinobacteria ( approximately 13%) in the retting niche. Thus, our study presents the first quantification of the dominant and diverse bacterial phylotypes in the retting ponds, which will further help in improving the retting efficiency, and hence the fiber quality. PMID:18097714

  10. Modification of cell wall polysaccharides during retting of cassava roots.

    PubMed

    Ngolong Ngea, Guillaume Legrand; Guillon, Fabienne; Essia Ngang, Jean Justin; Bonnin, Estelle; Bouchet, Brigitte; Saulnier, Luc

    2016-12-15

    Retting is an important step in traditional cassava processing that involves tissue softening of the roots to transform the cassava into flour and various food products. The tissue softening that occurs during retting was attributed to the degradation of cell wall pectins through the action of pectin-methylesterase and pectate-lyase that possibly originated from a microbial source or the cassava plant itself. Changes in cell wall composition were investigated during retting using chemical analysis, specific glycanase degradation and immuno-labelling of cell wall polysaccharides. Pectic 1,4-β-d-galactan was the main cell wall polysaccharide affected during the retting of cassava roots. This result suggested that better control of pectic galactan degradation and a better understanding of the degradation mechanism by endogenous endo-galactanase and/or exogenous microbial enzymes might contribute to improve the texture properties of cassava products. PMID:27451197

  11. Distinct Temporal Regulation of RET Isoform Internalization: Roles of Clathrin and AP2.

    PubMed

    Crupi, Mathieu J F; Yoganathan, Piriya; Bone, Leslie N; Lian, Eric; Fetz, Andrew; Antonescu, Costin N; Mulligan, Lois M

    2015-11-01

    The RET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) contributes to kidney and nervous system development, and is implicated in a number of human cancers. RET is expressed as two protein isoforms, RET9 and RET51, with distinct interactions and signaling properties that contribute to these processes. RET isoforms are internalized from the cell surface into endosomal compartments in response to glial cell line-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) ligand stimulation but the specific mechanisms of RET trafficking remain to be elucidated. Here, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to demonstrate that RET internalization occurs primarily through clathrin coated pits (CCPs). Activated RET receptors colocalize with clathrin, but not caveolin. The RET51 isoform is rapidly and robustly recruited to CCPs upon GDNF stimulation, while RET9 recruitment occurs more slowly and is less pronounced. We showed that the clathrin-associated adaptor protein complex 2 (AP2) interacts directly with each RET isoform through its AP2 μ subunit, and is important for RET internalization. Our data establish that interactions with the AP2 complex promote RET receptor internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis but that RET9 and RET51 have distinct internalization kinetics that may contribute to differences in their biological functions. PMID:26304132

  12. Type III secretion-dependent modulation of innate immunity as one of multiple factors regulated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa RetS.

    PubMed

    Zolfaghar, Irandokht; Evans, David J; Ronaghi, Reza; Fleiszig, Suzanne M J

    2006-07-01

    Mutation of retS (rtsM) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA103 reduces its virulence in both ocular and respiratory murine models of infection. In vitro, retS mutants exhibit loss of the ExsA-regulated type III secretion system (TTSS), reduced twitching motility, and a decrease in association with, invasion of, and survival within corneal epithelial cells. In addition, transcription of multiple other virulence genes is positively and negatively affected by retS mutation. Since our published data show that ExoU and ExoT, the two TTSS effectors encoded by strain PA103, each confer virulence in this corneal model, we hypothesized that loss of virulence of retS mutants follows loss of type III secretion. Corneal pathology, bacterial colonization, and phagocyte infiltration were compared for wild-type PA103, retS mutants, and various TTSS mutants after infection with approximately 10(6) CFU bacteria. Results showed that either a retS or an exsA (TTSS) mutation delayed disease progression, as illustrated by reduced severity scores and colonization levels during the first 48 h postinfection. Surprisingly, retS mutant infections then became more severe than those involving exsA mutants. By day 7, colonization levels of retS mutants even surpassed those of wild-type bacteria (more than twofold, P = 0.028). Although retS mutants caused more severe opacification of central corneas than both the wild type and the exsA mutants, neither mutant caused the peripheral ring opacity commonly associated with wild-type infection, suggesting that the TTSS was involved. Histological experiments with retS and various TTSS mutants showed that ring opacification required ExoU but not ExoT and that it consisted of dense polymorphonuclear phagocyte infiltration at the corneal periphery and the absence of any cell type in the central cornea. These data suggest that these P. aeruginosa TTSS effectors have different effects on innate immunity and that RetS influences virulence beyond its effects

  13. Identification of a lung adenocarcinoma cell line with CCDC6-RET fusion gene and the effect of RET inhibitors in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makito; Makinoshima, Hideki; Matsumoto, Shingo; Suzuki, Ayako; Mimaki, Sachiyo; Matsushima, Koutatsu; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Goto, Koichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Ishii, Genichiro; Ochiai, Atsushi; Tsuta, Koji; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Kohno, Takashi; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Tsuchihara, Katsuya

    2013-07-01

    Rearrangements of the proto-oncogene RET are newly identified potential driver mutations in lung adenocarcinoma (LAD). However, the absence of cell lines harboring RET fusion genes has hampered the investigation of the biological relevance of RET and the development of RET-targeted therapy. Thus, we aimed to identify a RET fusion positive LAD cell line. Eleven LAD cell lines were screened for RET fusion transcripts by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The biological relevance of the CCDC6-RET gene products was assessed by cell growth, survival and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT with or without the suppression of RET expression using RNA interference. The efficacy of RET inhibitors was evaluated in vitro using a culture system and in an in vivo xenograft model. Expression of the CCDC6-RET fusion gene in LC-2/ad cells was demonstrated by the mRNA and protein levels, and the genomic break-point was confirmed by genomic DNA sequencing. Mutations in KRAS and EGFR were not observed in the LC-2/ad cells. CCDC6-RET was constitutively active, and the introduction of a siRNA targeting the RET 3' region decreased cell proliferation by downregulating RET and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, treatment with RET-inhibitors, including vandetanib, reduced cell viability, which was accompanied by the downregulation of the AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Vandetanib exhibited anti-tumor effects in the xenograft model. Endogenously expressing CCDC6-RET contributed to cell growth. The inhibition of kinase activity could be an effective treatment strategy for LAD. LC-2/ad is a useful model for developing fusion RET-targeted therapy. PMID:23578175

  14. Chromosome 10 and RET gene copy number alterations in hereditary and sporadic Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, Raffaele; Romei, Cristina; Cosci, Barbara; Vivaldi, Agnese; Bottici, Valeria; Renzini, Giulia; Ugolini, Clara; Tacito, Alessia; Basolo, Fulvio; Pinchera, Aldo; Elisei, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    About 30% of hereditary Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma (MTC) have been demonstrated to harbour imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET alleles. We studied the RET copy number alterations (RET CNA) in 65 MTC and their correlation with RET mutation and patients' outcome. Fluorescence in situ Hybridization and Real-time PCR revealed RET CNA in 27.7% MTC but only in a variable percentage of cells. In sporadic MTC, RET CNA were represented by chromosome 10 aneuploidy while in hereditary MTC by RET amplification. A significant higher prevalence of RET CNA was observed in RET mutated MTC (P=0.003). RET CNA was also associated to a poorer outcome (P=0.005). However, the multivariate analysis revealed that only RET mutation and advanced clinical stage correlated with the worst outcome. In conclusion, 30% MTC harbour RET CNA in variable percentage of cells suggesting cell heterogeneity. RET CNA can be considered a poor prognostic factor potentiating the poor prognostic role of RET mutation. PMID:21867742

  15. RET-rearranged non-small-cell lung carcinoma: a clinicopathological and molecular analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsuta, K; Kohno, T; Yoshida, A; Shimada, Y; Asamura, H; Furuta, K; Kushima, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: To elucidate clinicopathological characteristics of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cases carrying RET rearrangements causing oncogenic fusions to identify responders to therapy with RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Methods: We investigated 1874 patients with carcinomas, including 1620 adenocarcinomas (ADCs), 203 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), 8 large cell carcinomas, and 43 sarcomatoid carcinomas (SACs). Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and/or reverse transcription–PCR (RT–PCR) were performed to detect RET gene rearrangement. Results: In all, 22 cases (1.2%) showed RET rearrangements; all cases were of ADC histology. Of the 22 patients, 19 possessed KIF5B–RET fusion genes, whereas 3 possessed CCDC6–RET fusion genes. The RET-rearranged tumours were significantly more common in younger patients (P=0.038) and tended to occur in patients with no history of smoking (P=0.051). In addition, RET rearrangements were not associated with gender, occupational history (particularly radioactive exposure), tumour size, lymph node status, tumour stage, or patient survival. The predominant growth pattern in RET-rearranged ADCs was lepidic in 6 cases, papillary in 9 cases, acinar in 2 cases, micropapillary in 1 case, and solid in 4 cases. Cells with cytoplasmic mucin production were at least focally present in 12 of the 22 (54.5%) RET-rearranged ADC cases. Among the 21 analysed RET-rearranged tumours, RET immunopositivity was observed in 15 cases (71.4%), and was significantly associated with RET rearrangement (P<0.001). Conclusions: The RET rearrangements were observed in 1.2% of NSCLCs. All cases of RET rearrangement were ADCs. The RET rearrangements were more likely to be observed in younger patients. Although cytoplasmic mucin production was at least focally present in 54.5% of RET-rearranged ADCs, specific histological features were not detected. PMID:24504365

  16. Influence of pectinolytic enzymes on retting effectiveness and resultant fiber properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzymes have the potential to provide an improved method to ret flax for textile fibers. New commercial pectinase products were evaluated both with and without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for retting efficiency. The Fried Test identified the most efficient enzymes and best retting condit...

  17. Dancing Around My Technology Classroom Box (My Second RET Lab)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Terry

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory the author had been assigned for his RET (Research Experience for Teachers) at Vanderbilt University is new and different from the one he had previously experienced. This summer he was assigned to the Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-chip laboratory to help research dielectrophoresis. As this is an emerging technology, there was not a lot…

  18. RET [Rational Emotive Therapy] Abolishes Most of the Human Ego.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    Rational-emotive therapy (RET) holds that much of what we call the human "ego" has little or no legitimacy and, when conceived of and given a global rating (e.g., the individual gets rated as "worthwhile" or "worthless"), interferes with survival and happiness. Certain aspects of "ego" do have a verifiable existence and lead to beneficial results:…

  19. miRNA Profiling Reveals Dysregulation of RET and RET-Regulating Pathways in Hirschsprung's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangshuang; Wang, Shiqi; Guo, Zhenhua; Wu, Huan; Jin, Xianqing; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiaoqing; Liang, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR), the most common congenital malformation of the gut, is regulated by multiple signal transduction pathways. Several components of these pathways are important targets for microRNAs (miRNAs). Multiple miRNAs have been associated with the pathophysiology of HSCR, and serum miRNAs profiles of HSCR patients have been reported, but miRNA expression in HSCR colon tissue is almost completely unexplored. Using microarray technology, we screened colon tissue to detect miRNAs whose expression profiles were altered in HSCR and identify targets of differentially expressed miRNAs. Following filtering of low-intensity signals, data normalization, and volcano plot filtering, we identified 168 differentially expressed miRNAs (104 up-regulated and 64 down-regulated). Fifty of these mRNAs represent major targets of dysegulated miRNAs and may thus important roles in the pathophysiology of HSCR. Pathway analysis revealed that 7 of the miRNA targets encode proteins involved in regulation of cell proliferation and migration via RET and related signaling pathways (MAPK and PI3K/AKT). Our results identify miRNAs that play key roles in the pathophysiology of the complex multi-factorial disease HSCR. PMID:26933947

  20. miRNA Profiling Reveals Dysregulation of RET and RET-Regulating Pathways in Hirschsprung's Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangshuang; Wang, Shiqi; Guo, Zhenhua; Wu, Huan; Jin, Xianqing; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiaoqing; Liang, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR), the most common congenital malformation of the gut, is regulated by multiple signal transduction pathways. Several components of these pathways are important targets for microRNAs (miRNAs). Multiple miRNAs have been associated with the pathophysiology of HSCR, and serum miRNAs profiles of HSCR patients have been reported, but miRNA expression in HSCR colon tissue is almost completely unexplored. Using microarray technology, we screened colon tissue to detect miRNAs whose expression profiles were altered in HSCR and identify targets of differentially expressed miRNAs. Following filtering of low-intensity signals, data normalization, and volcano plot filtering, we identified 168 differentially expressed miRNAs (104 up-regulated and 64 down-regulated). Fifty of these mRNAs represent major targets of dysegulated miRNAs and may thus important roles in the pathophysiology of HSCR. Pathway analysis revealed that 7 of the miRNA targets encode proteins involved in regulation of cell proliferation and migration via RET and related signaling pathways (MAPK and PI3K/AKT). Our results identify miRNAs that play key roles in the pathophysiology of the complex multi-factorial disease HSCR. PMID:26933947

  1. RET-targeting molecular stratified non-small-cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in lung cancer genomics have successfully characterized therapeutic targets of lung cancer. RET fusion gene products are among the newest target molecules for lung adenocarcinoma. Preclinical findings and preliminary reports regarding potential tumor control by RET-targeting multi-kinase inhibitors encourage further clinical trials. The infrequent prevalence of RET fusion gene-positive cases may be a major obstacle hindering the development of RET-targeted therapy. Thus, it is necessary to recruit appropriate participants for trials to develop an efficient RET fusion gene detection system to achieve targeted therapy for lung adenocarcinomas stratified by this molecular target. PMID:25806272

  2. Molecular and biochemical analysis of RET/PTC4, a novel oncogenic rearrangement between RET and ELE1 genes, in a post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Fugazzola, L; Pierotti, M A; Vigano, E; Pacini, F; Vorontsova, T V; Bongarzone, I

    1996-09-01

    A post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid cancer, displaying a novel ELE1/RET oncogenic rearrangement with an anomalous fusion transcript, was molecularly characterized. In spite of the presence of a normal breakpoint in exon 5 of the activating ELE1 gene, the sequence of the rearranged genomic DNA showed a previously unreported intra-exonic breakpoint in the RET protooncogene. As a consequence, a cDNA sequence 93 nucleotides larger than the regular one, and with the exon 5 of ELE1 joined to exon 11 instead of exon 12 of RET, is formed. To characterize the product of this new oncogenic ELE1/RET rearrangement, here designated as RET/PTC4, we performed an immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis on cell extracts from NIH3T3 transfectants. The results showed the presence of two isoforms of the chimeric protein, displaying a constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation. As expected, the molecular weight of this protein was higher than that of RET/ PTC3 protein (p80 and p85, instead of p76 and p81). Previous reports, from our and other laboratories, showed that post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid carcinomas are characterized by a high frequency (about 60%) of RET oncogenic rearrangements (Fugazzola et al., 1995; Klugbauer et al., 1995; Ito et al., 1994). These events predominantly involve ELE1 activating sequence, thus producing RET/PTC3 oncogene (Fugazzola et al., 1995; Klugbauer et al., 1995). Hence, this elevated frequency of RET rearrangements could increase the probability of selecting unusual events as that here described. Alternatively, targeted radiation effects could be responsible for the atypical RET rearrangement producing RET/PTC4 oncogene. PMID:8806699

  3. RET/PTC Translocations and Clinico-Pathological Features in Human Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Romei, Cristina; Elisei, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most frequent endocrine cancer accounting for 5–10% of thyroid nodules. Papillary histotype (PTC) is the most prevalent form accounting for 80% of all thyroid carcinoma. Although much is known about its epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical, and biological behavior, the only documented risk factor for PTC is the ionizing radiation exposure. Rearrangements of the Rearranged during Transfection (RET) proto-oncogene are found in PTC and have been shown to play a pathogenic role. The first RET rearrangement, named RET/PTC, was discovered in 1987. This rearrangement constitutively activates the transcription of the RET tyrosine-kinase domain in follicular cell, thus triggering the signaling along the MAPK pathway and an uncontrolled proliferation. Up to now, 13 different types of RET/PTC rearrangements have been reported but the two most common are RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3. Ionizing radiations are responsible for the generation of RET/PTC rearrangements, as supported by in vitro studies and by the evidence that RET/PTC, and particularly RET/PTC3, are highly prevalent in radiation induced PTC. However, many thyroid tumors without any history of radiation exposure harbor similar RET rearrangements. The overall prevalence of RET/PTC rearrangements varies from 20 to 70% of PTCs and they are more frequent in childhood than in adulthood thyroid cancer. Controversial data have been reported on the relationship between RET/PTC rearrangements and the PTC prognosis. RET/PTC3 is usually associated with a more aggressive phenotype and in particular with a greater tumor size, the solid variant, and a more advanced stage at diagnosis which are all poor prognostic factors. In contrast, RET/PTC1 rearrangement does not correlate with any clinical–pathological characteristics of PTC. Moreover, the RET protein and mRNA expression level did not show any correlation with the outcome of patients with PTC and no correlation between RET/PTC rearrangements and the

  4. Somatic RET mutation in a patient with pigmented adrenal pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Maison, Nicole; Korpershoek, Esther; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Robledo, Mercedes; de Krijger, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pheochromocytomas (PCC) and paraganglioma (PGL) are rare neuroendocrine tumors arising from chromaffin cells of the neural crest. Mutations in the RET-proto-oncogene are associated with sporadic pheochromocytoma, familial or sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2. In the past, only few cases of pigmented PCCs, PGLs, and one case of pigmented MTC have been reported in the literature. Herein, we present the case of a 77-year old woman with a history of Tako-tsubo-cardiomyopathy and laboratory, as well as radiological, high suspicion of pheochromocytoma, who underwent left-sided adrenalectomy. The 3 cm tumor, which was located on the upper pole of the left adrenal, appeared highly pigmented with dark red to black color. Histologic examinations revealed highly pleomorphic cells with bizarre, huge hyperchromatic nuclei, that immunohistochemically were positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin, focally positive for HMB45 and negative for melan A. These clinical and pathological features led to the diagnosis of the rare variant of a melanotic ‘black’ pheochromocytoma. In our case a somatic RET mutation in exon 16 (RET c.2753T>C, p.Met918Thy) was detected by targeted next generation sequencing. In summary, this case represents a rare variant of catecholamine-producing tumor with distinct histological features. A potential relationship between the phenotype, the cellular origin and the genetic alterations is discussed. Learning points Pheochromocytoma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor. Pigmentation is seen in several types of tumors arising from the neural crest. The macroscopic black aspect can mislead to the diagnosis of a metastasis deriving from a malignant melanoma. RET mutation are seen in catecholamine and non-catecholamine producing tumors of the same cellular origin. PMID:26843961

  5. Destabilizing RET in targeted treatment of thyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gild, M L; Bullock, M; Pon, C K; Robinson, B G; Clifton-Bligh, R J

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC) are resistant to traditional chemotherapy. Kinase inhibitors have shown promise in patients with progressive DTC, but dose-limiting toxicity is commonplace. HSP90 regulates protein degradation of several growth-mediating kinases such as RET, and we hypothesized that HSP90 inhibitor (AUY922) could inhibit RET-mediated medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) as well as papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cell growth and also radioactive iodine uptake by PTC cells. Studies utilized MTC cell lines TT (C634W) and MZ-CRC-1 (M918T) and the PTC cell line TPC-1 (RET/PTC1). Cell viability was assessed with MTS assays and apoptosis by flow cytometry. Signaling target expression was determined by western blot and radioiodine uptake measured with a gamma counter. Prolonged treatment of both MTC cell lines with AUY922 simultaneously inhibited both MAPK and mTOR pathways and significantly induced apoptosis (58.7 and 78.7% reduction in MZ-CRC-1 and TT live cells respectively, following 1 μM AUY922; P<0.02). Similarly in the PTC cell line, growth and signaling targets were inhibited, and also a 2.84-fold increase in radioiodine uptake was observed following AUY922 administration (P=0.015). AUY922 demonstrates in vitro activity against MTC and PTC cell lines. We observed a potent dose-dependent increase in apoptosis in MTC cell lines following drug administration confirming its anti-tumorigenic effects. Western blots confirm inhibition of pro-survival proteins including AKT suggesting this as the mechanism of cell death. In a functional study, we observed an increase in radioiodine uptake in the PTC cell line following AUY922 treatment. We believe HSP90 inhibition could be a viable alternative for treatment of RET-driven chemo-resistant thyroid cancers. PMID:26574568

  6. Prognostic and Predictive Values of Subcellular Localisation of RET in Renal Clear-Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yu; Fan, Yang; Chen, Luyao; Liu, Kan; Meng, Qingyu; Zhao, Chaofei; Ma, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) presents a poor prognosis and an unpredictable course. To date, no validated biomarkers can predict the outcome of RCC. Ongoing efforts are conducted to identify the molecular markers of RCC progression, as well as the targets for novel therapeutic approaches. RET is a tyrosine kinase receptor which has been investigated as a possible target in other cancers because it is involved in oncogenic activation. To evaluate the predictive and prognostic functions of RET in ccRCC, a tissue microarray study was conducted on 273 ccRCC patients. Results showed that both RET cytoplasmic and nuclear expression were independently associated with PFS and OS, and the combined RET cytoplasmic and nuclear statuses demonstrated that the ratio of high nuclear RET and cytoplasmic RET was the strongest predictor of both PFS and OS. The high cytoplasmic RET expression retained its independent poor prognostic value in targeted drug treated patients. The RET nuclear expression was associated with distant metastasis. Moreover, the RET nuclear expression was an independent predictor of ccRCC postoperative metastasis. In conclusion, RET may be useful in prognostication and can be used at initial diagnosis to identify patients with high potential to develop metastasis. PMID:27092013

  7. Parkin cooperates with GDNF/RET signaling to prevent dopaminergic neuron degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Meka, Durga Praveen; Müller-Rischart, Anne Kathrin; Nidadavolu, Prakash; Mohammadi, Behnam; Motori, Elisa; Ponna, Srinivas Kumar; Aboutalebi, Helia; Bassal, Mahmoud; Annamneedi, Anil; Finckh, Barbara; Miesbauer, Margit; Rotermund, Natalie; Lohr, Christian; Tatzelt, Jörg; Winklhofer, Konstanze F.; Kramer, Edgar R.

    2015-01-01

    Parkin and the glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) receptor RET have both been independently linked to the dopaminergic neuron degeneration that underlies Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study, we demonstrate that there is genetic crosstalk between parkin and the receptor tyrosine kinase RET in two different mouse models of PD. Mice lacking both parkin and RET exhibited accelerated dopaminergic cell and axonal loss compared with parkin-deficient animals, which showed none, and RET-deficient mice, in which we found moderate degeneration. Transgenic expression of parkin protected the dopaminergic systems of aged RET-deficient mice. Downregulation of either parkin or RET in neuronal cells impaired mitochondrial function and morphology. Parkin expression restored mitochondrial function in GDNF/RET-deficient cells, while GDNF stimulation rescued mitochondrial defects in parkin-deficient cells. In both cases, improved mitochondrial function was the result of activation of the prosurvival NF-κB pathway, which was mediated by RET through the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. Taken together, these observations indicate that parkin and the RET signaling cascade converge to control mitochondrial integrity and thereby properly maintain substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons and their innervation in the striatum. The demonstration of crosstalk between parkin and RET highlights the interplay in the protein network that is altered in PD and suggests potential therapeutic targets and strategies to treat PD. PMID:25822020

  8. RET/GFRα Signals Are Dispensable for Thymic T Cell Development In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Afonso Rocha Martins; Arroz-Madeira, Sílvia; Fonseca-Pereira, Diogo; Ribeiro, Hélder; Lasrado, Reena; Pachnis, Vassilis; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2012-01-01

    Identification of thymocyte regulators is a central issue in T cell biology. Interestingly, growing evidence indicates that common key molecules control neuronal and immune cell functions. The neurotrophic factor receptor RET mediates critical functions in foetal hematopoietic subsets, thus raising the possibility that RET-related molecules may also control T cell development. We show that Ret, Gfra1 and Gfra2 are abundantly expressed by foetal and adult immature DN thymocytes. Despite the developmentally regulated expression of these genes, analysis of foetal thymi from Gfra1, Gfra2 or Ret deficient embryos revealed that these molecules are dispensable for foetal T cell development. Furthermore, analysis of RET gain of function and Ret conditional knockout mice showed that RET is also unnecessary for adult thymopoiesis. Finally, competitive thymic reconstitution assays indicated that Ret deficient thymocytes maintained their differentiation fitness even in stringent developmental conditions. Thus, our data demonstrate that RET/GFRα signals are dispensable for thymic T cell development in vivo, indicating that pharmacological targeting of RET signalling in tumours is not likely to result in T cell production failure. PMID:23300832

  9. Full-flow RET creation, comparison, and selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferty, Neal; He, Yuan; Silakov, Mikhail; Endo, Toshi; Adam, Kostas

    2014-10-01

    Patterning scaling trends are expected to continue until at least the 5 nm node. With the introduction of EUV now delayed until at least the 7 nm node, 193i patterning will continue mainstream use for the foreseeable future. This scaling increases reliance on optimized OPC and illumination and imposes strict requirements on RET solutions, which we define here as source, optics, and mask synthesis (including SRAF). Along with the patterning requirements, any solution must be calculated efficiently. To meet these requirements, a new RET Selection flow has been built using the Calibre platform. This flow includes SMO, Mask synthesis to further tune the output mask, Verification, and Analysis. The entire flow is session based, allowing runs to be cloned, queued, and compared. The flow is built on a robust GUI framework featuring persistent database integration. The central component of the flow is a new SMO algorithm that offers improved scalability using parallel implementation, and improved accuracy using thick mask modeling and resist models. Lithography-aware mask manufacturability limit enforcement is possible using an integrated inverse lithography tool. This also allows large area patterns to be included for RET benchmarking purposes. Finally, the analysis and visualization stages of the flow allow a particular solution to be compared against other candidates using any image metric desired. Comparison metrics can be customized for layer and customer requirements. In this paper, we will summarize the key points of our flow, and demonstrate it using several experiments.

  10. RET/PTC activation in papillary thyroid carcinoma: European Journal of Endocrinology Prize Lecture.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Massimo; Melillo, Rosa Marina; Fusco, Alfredo

    2006-11-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is frequently associated with RET gene rearrangements that generate the so-called RET/PTC oncogenes. In this review, we examine the data about the mechanisms of thyroid cell transformation, activation of downstream signal transduction pathways and modulation of gene expression induced by RET/PTC. These findings have advanced our understanding of the processes underlying PTC formation and provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches to this disease. PMID:17062879

  11. An evaluation and recommendation of the optimal methodologies to detect RET gene rearrangements in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianwei; Lu, Yachao; Ye, Qingqing; Zhang, Meizhuo; Zheng, Li; Yin, Xiaolu; Gavine, Paul; Sun, Zhongsheng; Ji, Qunsheng; Zhu, Guanshan; Su, Xinying

    2015-03-01

    To recommend a reliable and clinically realistic RET/PTC rearrangement detection assay for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), we compared multiplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and immunohistochemistry (IHC). RET/PTC rearrangement was detected using either RET break-apart FISH followed by multicolor FISH to confirm CCDC6/RET or NCOA4/RET fusions, or by multiplex qPCR to detect 14 RET/PTC subtypes with simultaneous RET mRNA expression. RET protein expression was detected by IHC. The specificity and sensitivity of multiplex qPCR and IHC were calculated using break-apart FISH as a reference. Among 73 PTC patients with sufficient tissue available for FISH and multiplex qPCR, 10 cases were defined as RET/PTC positive by both assays, including eight CCDC6/RET and two NCOA4/RET fusions with relatively high RET mRNA. In addition, multiplex qPCR identified another two CCDC6/RET fusion positive cases, but with low RET mRNA expression. IHC staining identified 11 RET positive cases among 39 patients with available samples. In comparison to FISH, multiplex qPCR displayed 100% sensitivity and 97% specificity to detect RET/PTC fusions, while IHC was neither sensitive nor specific. Our data reveal that both multiplex qPCR and FISH assays are equally applicable for detection of RET/PTC rearrangements. Break-apart FISH methodology is highly recommended for the wider screening of RET rearrangements (regardless of partner genes), while multiplex qPCR is preferred to identify all known fusion types using one assay, provided mRNA expression is also measured. IHC analysis could potentially provide an additional method of fusion detection dependent on further optimization of assay conditions and scoring cutoffs. PMID:25407564

  12. Targeting mTOR in RET mutant medullary and differentiated thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gild, Matti L; Landa, Iñigo; Ryder, Mabel; Ghossein, Ronald A; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Fagin, James A

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of RET, a tyrosine kinase receptor encoded by a gene that is frequently mutated in medullary thyroid cancer, have emerged as promising novel therapies for the disease. Rapalogs and other mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are effective agents in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, which share lineage properties with medullary thyroid carcinomas. The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of mTOR activity to RET-induced signaling and cell growth and to establish whether growth suppression is enhanced by co-targeting RET and mTOR kinase activities. Treatment of the RET mutant cell lines TT, TPC-1, and MZ-CRC-1 with AST487, a RET kinase inhibitor, suppressed growth and showed profound and sustained inhibition of mTOR signaling, which was recapitulated by siRNA-mediated RET knockdown. Inhibition of mTOR with INK128, a dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 kinase inhibitor, also resulted in marked growth suppression to levels similar to those seen with RET blockade. Moreover, combined treatment with AST487 and INK128 at low concentrations suppressed growth and induced apoptosis. These data establish mTOR as a key mediator of RET-mediated cell growth in thyroid cancer cells and provide a rationale for combinatorial treatments in thyroid cancers with oncogenic RET mutations. PMID:23828865

  13. RET mutation and increased angiogenesis in medullary thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Verrienti, Antonella; Tallini, Giovanni; Colato, Chiara; Boichard, Amélie; Checquolo, Saula; Pecce, Valeria; Sponziello, Marialuisa; Rosignolo, Francesca; de Biase, Dario; Rhoden, Kerry; Casadei, Gian Piero; Russo, Diego; Visani, Michela; Acquaviva, Giorgia; Ferdeghini, Marco; Filetti, Sebastiano; Durante, Cosimo

    2016-08-01

    Advanced medullary thyroid cancers (MTCs) are now being treated with drugs that inhibit receptor tyrosine kinases, many of which involved in angiogenesis. Response rates vary widely, and toxic effects are common, so treatment should be reserved for MTCs likely to be responsive to these drugs. RET mutations are common in MTCs, but it is unclear how they influence the microvascularization of these tumors. We examined 45 MTCs with germ-line or somatic RET mutations (RETmut group) and 34 with wild-type RET (RETwt). Taqman Low-Density Arrays were used to assess proangiogenic gene expression. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess intratumoral, peritumoral and nontumoral expression levels of VEGFR1, R2, R3, PDGFRa, PDGFB and NOTCH3. We also assessed microvessel density (MVD) and lymphatic vessel density (LVD) based on CD31-positive and podoplanin-positive vessel counts, respectively, and vascular pericyte density based on staining for a-smooth muscle actin (a-SMA), a pericyte marker. Compared with RETwt tumors, RETmut tumors exhibited upregulated expression of proangiogenic genes (mRNA and protein), especially VEGFR1, PDGFB and NOTCH3. MVDs and LVDs were similar in the two groups. However, microvessels in RETmut tumors were more likely to be a-SMA positive, indicating enhanced coverage by pericytes, which play key roles in vessel sprouting, maturation and stabilization. These data suggest that angiogenesis in RETmut MTCs may be more intense and complete than that found in RETwt tumors, a feature that might increase their susceptibility to antiangiogenic therapy. Given their increased vascular pericyte density, RETmut MTCs might also benefit from combined or preliminary treatment with PDGF inhibitors. PMID:27402614

  14. RET masks for the final frontier of optical lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. F.; van den Broeke, Douglas; Hsu, Stephen; Hsu, Michael C. W.; Laidig, Tom; Shi, Xuelong; Chen, Ting; Socha, Robert J.; Hollerbach, Uwe; Wampler, Kurt E.; Park, Jungchul; Park, Sangbong; Gronlund, Keith

    2005-06-01

    With immersion and hyper numerical aperture (NA>1) optics apply to the ITRS 2003/4 roadmap scenario (Figure 1); it is very clear that the IC manufacturing has already stepped into the final frontier of optical lithography. Today"s advanced lithography for DRAM/Flash is operating at k1 close to 0.3. The manufacturing for leading edge logic devices does not follow too far behind. Patterning at near theoretical lithography imaging limit (k1=0.25) even with hyper NA optics, the attainable aerial image contrast is marginal at best for the critical feature. Thus, one of the key objectives for low k1 lithography is to ensure the printing performance of critical features for manufacturing. Resolution enhancement technology (RET) mask in combination with hyper NA and illumination optimization is one primary candidate to enable lithography manufacturing at very low k1 factor. The use of rule-based Scattering Bars (SB) for all types of phase-shifting masks has become the de facto OPC standard since 180nm node. Model-based SB OPC method derives from interference mapping lithography (IML) has shown impressive printing result for both clear (gate) and dark field (contact and via) mask types. There are four basic types of RET mask candidates for 65nm node, namely, alternating phase-shifting mask (altPSM), attenuated PSM (attPSM), chromeless phase lithography (CPL) PSM, and double dipole lithography (DDL) using binary chrome mask. The wafer printing performances from CPL and DDL have proven both are strong candidates for 45nm nodes. One concern for using RET masks to target 45 nm nodes is likely to be the scaling for SB dimension for 4X mask. To assist imaging effectively with high NA, SB cannot be too small in width. However, for SB to be larger than sub-resolution, they can easily cause unwanted SB printing. The other major concern is the unwanted side lobe printing. This may occur for semi-dense pitch ranges under high NA and strong off-axis-illumination (OAI). Looking ahead

  15. AZD1480 blocks growth and tumorigenesis of RET- activated thyroid cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Couto, Joana P; Almeida, Ana; Daly, Laura; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Bromberg, Jacqueline F; Soares, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Persistent RET activation is a frequent event in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). In these cancers, RET activates the ERK/MAPK, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and the JAK/STAT3 pathways. Here, we tested the efficacy of a JAK1/2- inhibitor, AZD1480, in the in vitro and in vivo growth of thyroid cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic RET. Thyroid cancer cell lines harboring RET/PTC1 (TPC-1), RET M918T (MZ-CRC1) and RET C634W (TT) alterations, as well as TPC-1 xenografts, were treated with JAK inhibitor, AZD1480. This inhibitor led to growth inhibition and/or apoptosis of the thyroid cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as to tumor regression of TPC-1 xenografts, where it efficiently blocked STAT3 activation in tumor and stromal cells. This inhibition was associated with decreased proliferation, decreased blood vessel density, coupled with increased necrosis. However, AZD1480 repressed the growth of STAT3- deficient TPC-1 cells in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating that its effects in this cell line were independent of STAT3 in the tumor cells. In all cell lines, the JAK inhibitor reduced phospho-Y1062 RET levels, and mTOR effector phospho-S6, while JAK1/2 downregulation by siRNA did not affect cell growth nor RET and S6 activation. In conclusion, AZD1480 effectively blocks proliferation and tumor growth of activated RET- thyroid cancer cell lines, likely through direct RET inhibition in cancer cells as well as by modulation of the microenvironment (e.g. via JAK/phospho-STAT3 inhibition in endothelial cells). Thus, AZD1480 should be considered as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of RET- activated thyroid cancers. PMID:23056499

  16. Molecular genetics of childhood papillary thyroid carcinomas after irradiation: high prevalence of RET rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Rabes, H M; Klugbauer, S

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed a connection between thyroid carcinogenesis and a history of radiation. The molecular mechanisms involved are not well understood. It has been claimed that RAS, p53 or GSP mutations and RET or TRK rearrangements might play a role in adult thyroid tumors. In childhood, the thyroid gland is particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation. The reactor accident in Chernobyl provided a unique chance to study molecular genetic aberrations in a cohort of children who developed papillary thyroid carcinomas after a short latency time after exposure to high doses of radioactive iodine isotopes. According to the concepts of molecular genetic epidemiology, exposure to a specific type of irradiation might result in a typical molecular lesion. Childhood papillary thyroid tumors after Chernobyl exhibit a high prevalence of RET rearrangement as almost the only molecular alteration. The majority showed RET/PTC3 (i.e., ELE/RET rearrangements), including several subtypes. Less frequently, RET/PTC1 (i.e., H4/RET rearrangements), and a novel type (RET/PTC5, i.e., RFG5/RET) were observed. Proof of reciprocal transcripts suggests that a balanced intrachromosomal inversion leads to this rearrangement. Breakpoint analyses revealed short homologous nucleotide stretches at the fusion points. In all types of rearrangement, the RET tyrosine kinase domain becomes controlled by 5' fused regulatory sequences of ubiquitously expressed genes that display coiled-coil regions with dimerization potential. Oncogenic activation of RET is apparently due to ligand-independent constitutive ectopic RET tyrosine kinase activity. The analysis of this cohort of children with radiation-induced thyroid tumors after Chernobyl provides insights into typical molecular aberrations in relation to a specific mode of environmental exposure and may serve as a paradigm for molecular genetic epidemiology. PMID:10027005

  17. Impact of RET Teacher-Developed Curriculum Units on Classroom Experiences for Teachers and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein-Gardner, Stacy S.; Johnston, Megan E.; Benson, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the impact of Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) teacher-developed curriculum on teaching styles and strategies at two RET sites with common Legacy Cycle training. The study was conducted to assess and document program-specific and National Science Foundation (NSF) goals related to classroom practices and…

  18. The Influence of RET's on Elementary and Secondary Grade Teachers' Views of Scientific Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahbah, Sibel; Golden, Barry W.; Roseler, Katrina; Elderle, Patrick; Saka, Yavuz; Shoutherland, Sherry A.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores in-service elementary and secondary science teachers' conceptions of the Nature of Scientific Inquiry and the influence of participation in two different Research Experience for Teacher (RET) programs had on these conceptions. Participant teachers attended one of two six week RET programs in which they worked with scientists to…

  19. 7-dehydrocholesterol efficiently supports Ret signaling in a mouse model of Smith-Opitz-Lemli syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gou-Fàbregas, Myriam; Macià, Anna; Anerillas, Carlos; Vaquero, Marta; Jové, Mariona; Jain, Sanjay; Ribera, Joan; Encinas, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a rare disorder of cholesterol synthesis. Affected individuals exhibit growth failure, intellectual disability and a broad spectrum of developmental malformations. Among them, renal agenesis or hypoplasia, decreased innervation of the gut, and ptosis are consistent with impaired Ret signaling. Ret is a receptor tyrosine kinase that achieves full activity when recruited to lipid rafts. Mice mutant for Ret are born with no kidneys and enteric neurons, and display sympathetic nervous system defects causing ptosis. Since cholesterol is a critical component of lipid rafts, here we tested the hypothesis of whether the cause of the above malformations found in SLOS is defective Ret signaling owing to improper lipid raft composition or function. No defects consistent with decreased Ret signaling were found in newborn Dhcr7−/− mice, or in Dhcr7−/− mice lacking one copy of Ret. Although kidneys from Dhcr7−/− mice showed a mild branching defect in vitro, GDNF was able to support survival and downstream signaling of sympathetic neurons. Consistently, GFRα1 correctly partitioned to lipid rafts in brain tissue. Finally, replacement experiments demonstrated that 7-DHC efficiently supports Ret signaling in vitro. Taken together, our findings do not support a role of Ret signaling in the pathogenesis of SLOS. PMID:27334845

  20. Linen Most Useful: Perspectives on Structure, Chemistry, and Enzymes for Retting Flax

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Danny E.

    2013-01-01

    The components of flax (Linum usitatissimum) stems are described and illustrated, with reference to the anatomy and chemical makeup and to applications in processing and products. Bast fiber, which is a major economic product of flax along with linseed and linseed oil, is described with particular reference to its application in textiles, composites, and specialty papers. A short history of retting methods, which is the separation of bast fiber from nonfiber components, is presented with emphasis on water retting, field retting (dew retting), and experimental methods. Past research on enzyme retting, particularly by the use of pectinases as a potential replacement for the current commercial practice of field retting, is reviewed. The importance and mechanism of Ca2+ chelators with pectinases in retting are described. Protocols are provided for retting of both fiber-type and linseed-type flax stems with different types of pectinases. Current and future applications are listed for use of a wide array of enzymes to improve processed fibers and blended yarns. Finally, potential lipid and aromatic coproducts derived from the dust and shive waste streams of fiber processing are indicated. PMID:25969769

  1. Crosstalk between VEGF-A/VEGFR2 and GDNF/RET signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tufro, Alda . E-mail: atufro@aecom.yu.edu; Teichman, Jason; Banu, Nazifa; Villegas, Guillermo

    2007-06-29

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) plays multiple roles in kidney development: stimulates cell proliferation, survival, tubulogenesis, and branching morphogenesis. However, the mechanism that mediates VEGF-A induced ureteric bud branching is unclear. Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) signaling through tyrosine kinase c-RET is the major regulator of ureteric bud branching. Here we examined whether VEGF-A regulates RET signaling. We determined that ureteric bud-derived cells express the main VEGF-A signaling receptor, VEGFR2 and RET, by RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunocytochemistry. We show that the VEGF-A isoform VEGF{sub 165} induces RET-tyr{sup 1062} phosphorylation in addition to VEGFR2 autophosphorylation, that VEGF{sub 165} and GDNF have additive effects on RET-tyr{sup 1062} phosphorylation, and that VEGFR2 and RET co-immunoprecipitate. Functionally, VEGF{sub 165} induces ureteric bud cell proliferation and branching morphogenesis. Similarly, in embryonic kidney explants VEGF{sub 165} induces RET-tyr{sup 1062} phosphorylation and upregulates GDNF. These findings provide evidence for a novel cooperative interaction between VEGFR2 and RET that mediates VEGF-A functions in ureteric bud cells.

  2. Alectinib in RET-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer—Another progress in precision medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Filipits, Martin

    2015-01-01

    RET fusions have been recognized as potential therapeutic targets in advanced non-small cell lung cancer. RET fusion proteins are detected in about 2% of lung adenocarcinomas. Alectinib, a second generation ALK inhibitor, was shown to block growth of cells with RET fusions. Thus alectinib should be further evaluated within clinical trials in patients with RET fusion-positive adenocarcinomas of the lung. PMID:26798590

  3. To Bud or not to Bud: The RET perspective in CAKUT

    PubMed Central

    Davis, T. Keefe; Hoshi, Masato; Jain, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidneys or lower urinary tract (CAKUT) encompass a spectrum of anomalies that result from aberrations in spatio-temporal regulation of genetic, epigenetic, environmental and molecular signals at key stages of urinary tract development. The Rearranged in Transfection (RET) tyrosine kinase signaling system is a major pathway required for normal development of the kidneys, ureters, peripheral and enteric nervous systems. In the kidneys, RET is activated by interaction with the ligand glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and coreceptor GFRα1. This activated complex regulates a number of downstream signaling cascades (PLCγ, MAPK and PI3K) that control proliferation, migration, renewal and apoptosis. Disruption of these events is thought to underlie diseases arising from aberrant RET signaling. RET mutations are found in 5–30% of CAKUT patients and a number of Ret mouse mutants show a spectrum of kidney and lower urinary tract defects reminiscent of CAKUT in humans. The remarkable similarities between mouse and human kidney development and in defects due to RET mutations has led to using RET signaling as a paradigm to determine the fundamental principles in patterning of the upper and lower urinary tract and to understand CAKUT pathogenesis. In this review we provide an overview of studies in vivo that delineate expression and the functional importance of RET signaling complex during different stages of development of the upper and lower urinary tracts. We discuss how RET signaling balances activating and inhibitory signals emanating from its docking tyrosines and its interaction with upstream and downstream regulators to precisely modulate different aspects of Wolffian duct patterning and branching morphogenesis. We outline the diversity of cellular mechanisms regulated by RET, disruption of which causes malformations ranging from renal agenesis to multicystic dysplastic kidneys in the upper tract and vesicoureteral reflux

  4. A novel RET/PTC variant detected in a pediatric patient with papillary thyroid cancer without ionization history.

    PubMed

    Halkova, Tereza; Dvorakova, Sarka; Vaclavikova, Eliska; Sykorova, Vlasta; Vcelak, Josef; Sykorova, Pavla; Vlcek, Petr; Reboun, Martin; Katra, Rami; Kodetova, Daniela; Schrumpf, Melanie; van Wezel, Tom; Morreau, Hans; Bendlova, Bela

    2015-12-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most frequent type of thyroid cancer. Its development is often caused by the formation of RET/PTC fused genes. RET/PTC1 is the most prevalent form, where exon 1 of CCDC6 gene is fused with the intracellular portion of RET protooncogene starting with exon 12. We have discovered a novel RET/PTC1 variant which we have named RET/PTC1ex9 in metastatic PTC of 8-year-old boy. RET/PTC1ex9 detection was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction with melting curve analysis and subsequent Sanger and next-generation sequencing. A fusion of exon 1 of CCDC6 with exon 9 of extracellular domain of RET followed by exon 12 of RET was revealed. This is the first RET/PTC variant among PTC cases that contain the extracellular part of RET. This observation could be probably explained by incorrect splicing of RET due to the somatic 32-bp deletion in exon-intron 11 boundary of RET. PMID:26472164

  5. AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy in the Guanylate Cyclase (RetGC1/RetGC2) Double Knockout Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Boye, Sanford L.; Peshenko, Igor V.; Huang, Wei Chieh; Min, Seok Hong; McDoom, Issam; Kay, Christine N.; Liu, Xuan; Dyka, Frank M.; Foster, Thomas C.; Umino, Yumiko; Karan, Sukanya; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Dizhoor, Alexander; Hauswirth, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in GUCY2D are associated with recessive Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1). GUCY2D encodes photoreceptor-specific, retinal guanylate cyclase-1 (RetGC1). Reports of retinal degeneration in LCA1 are conflicting; some describe no obvious degeneration and others report loss of both rods and cones. Proof of concept studies in models representing the spectrum of phenotypes is warranted. We have previously demonstrated adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated RetGC1 is therapeutic in GC1ko mice, a model exhibiting loss of cones only. The purpose of this study was to characterize AAV-mediated gene therapy in the RetGC1/RetGC2 double knockout (GCdko) mouse, a model lacking rod and cone function and exhibiting progressive loss of both photoreceptor subclasses. Use of this model also allowed for the evaluation of the functional efficiency of transgenic RetGC1 isozyme. Subretinal delivery of AAV8(Y733F) vector containing the human rhodopsin kinase (hGRK1) promoter driving murine Gucy2e was performed in GCdko mice at various postnatal time points. Treatment resulted in restoration of rod and cone function at all treatment ages and preservation of retinal structure in GCdko mice treated as late as 7 weeks of age. Functional gains and structural preservation were stable for at least 1 year. Treatment also conferred cortical- and subcortical-based visually-guided behavior. Functional efficiency of transgenic RetGC1 was indistinguishable from that of endogenous isozyme in congenic wild-type (WT) mice. This study clearly demonstrates AAV-mediated RetGC1 expression restores function to and preserves structure of rod and cone photoreceptors in a degenerative model of retinal guanylate cyclase deficiency, further supporting development of an AAV-based vector for treatment of LCA1. PMID:23210611

  6. Sporadic Hirschsprung`s disease due to a novel nonsense mutation in the RET protooncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.M.; Donis-Keller, H.; Langer, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR, aganglionic megacolon) is characterized by a lack of ganglion cells along variable lengths of the hindgut. This is most likely due to a failure of the progenitor cells (that are destined to become the ganglion cells of the submucosal and myenteric plexuses) to complete their distal migration in the colon. Recently, mutations in the RET protoocogene have been reported in association with HSCR. We report a novel nonsense mutation resulting in a severely truncated protein. Germline DNA from a panel of 6 HSCR patients was analyzed by SSCP for 20 exons of RET. Eight exons were also directly sequenced. We identified a novel mutation within RET exon 2. The mutation (TAC{sub 36}{yields}TAG{sub 36}), which occurs at nucleotide position 108, involves the replacement of tyrosine with a stop codon and results in a truncated 35 amino acid protein. This mutation is the most 5{prime} nonsense mutation reported thus far. Interestingly, the patient has no prior family history of HSCR and was also diagnosed with multiple developmental anomalies including dysplastic kidney. Recent gene targeting studies with mouse models have shown that RET is essential for normal renal development. However, a parallel phenotype has not been seen in other reported HSCR patients with RET mutations. The observations reported here provide evidence that RET plays a role in human renal development. Ongoing studies will determine the extent of RET involvement in sporadic cases of HSCR.

  7. Spectrum of mutations of the ret proto-oncogene in Hirschsprung`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lyonnet, S.; Attie, T.; Pelet, A.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR) is a frequent congenital malformation (1 in 5,000 live births) ascribed to the absence of autonomic ganglia cells in the terminal hindgut. HSCR is a neurocristopathie resulting in intestinal obstruction in neonates and in milder phenotypes in adults. Recently, we have mapped a dominant gene for familial HSCR to chromosome 10q11.2 and identified mutations of the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR families. Studying a large number of HSCR patients by DGGE analysis of the RET coding sequence we observed: (a) various RET mutations in our series of 30 HSCR families, (b) de novo mutations in several sporadic HSCR cases, (c) the variable clinical expression of RET mutations in HSCR families and the absence of genotype/phenotype correlations at the RET locus, (d) the low penetrance of RET mutations in HSCR families supporting the role of one or several modifier genes, and (e) the existence of syndromic HSCR families unlinked to the RET locus.

  8. A mouse model of KIF5B-RET fusion-dependent lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Motonobu; Ishigame, Teruhide; Tsuta, Koji; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Imai, Toshio; Kohno, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Oncogenic fusion of the RET (rearranged during transfection) gene was recently identified as a novel driver gene aberration not only for the development of thyroid carcinoma but also of lung adenocarcinoma, the most frequent histological type of lung cancer. This study constructed and analyzed transgenic mice expressing KIF5B-RET, the predominant form of RET fusion gene specific for lung adenocarcinoma, under the control of the SPC (surfactant protein C) gene promoter. The mice expressed the KIF5B-RET fusion gene specifically in lung alveolar epithelial cells, and developed multiple tumors in the lungs. Treatment of the transgenic mice with vandetanib, which is a RET tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of thyroid carcinoma, for 8 or 20 weeks led to a marked reduction in the number of lung tumors (3.3 versus 0 and 6.5 versus 0.2 per tissue section, respectively; P < 0.01, t-test). The results suggest that the RET fusion functions as a driver for the development of lung tumors, whose growth is inhibited by RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:25064355

  9. Ret rescues mitochondrial morphology and muscle degeneration of Drosophila Pink1 mutants

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Pontus; Müller-Rischart, Anne Kathrin; Motori, Elisa; Schönbauer, Cornelia; Schnorrer, Frank; Winklhofer, Konstanze F; Klein, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated Pink1 and Parkin proteins are believed to function in a common pathway controlling mitochondrial clearance and trafficking. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its signaling receptor Ret are neuroprotective in toxin-based animal models of PD. However, the mechanism by which GDNF/Ret protects cells from degenerating remains unclear. We investigated whether the Drosophila homolog of Ret can rescue Pink1 and park mutant phenotypes. We report that a signaling active version of Ret (RetMEN2B) rescues muscle degeneration, disintegration of mitochondria and ATP content of Pink1 mutants. Interestingly, corresponding phenotypes of park mutants were not rescued, suggesting that the phenotypes of Pink1 and park mutants have partially different origins. In human neuroblastoma cells, GDNF treatment rescues morphological defects of PINK1 knockdown, without inducing mitophagy or Parkin recruitment. GDNF also rescues bioenergetic deficits of PINK knockdown cells. Furthermore, overexpression of RetMEN2B significantly improves electron transport chain complex I function in Pink1 mutant Drosophila. These results provide a novel mechanism underlying Ret-mediated cell protection in a situation relevant for human PD. PMID:24473149

  10. Identification of two novel RET kinase inhibitors through MCR-based drug discovery: Design, synthesis and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Frett, Brendan; Moccia, Marialuisa; Carlomagno, Francesca; Santoro, Massimo; Li, Hong-yu

    2015-01-01

    From an MCR fragment library, two novel chemical series have been developed as inhibitors of RET, which is a kinase involved in the pathology of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Structure activity relationship studies (SAR) identified two sub-micromolar tractable leads, 6g and 13g. 6g was confirmed to be a Type-II RET inhibitor. 13g and 6g inhibited RET in cells transformed by RET/C634. A RET DFG-out homology model was established and utilized to predict Type-II inhibitor binding modes. PMID:25232968

  11. Ret-Y a measure of reticulocyte size: a sensitive indicator of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Kickler, T S; Borowitz, M J; Thompson, R E; Charintranont, N; Law, R

    2004-12-01

    In this study the size of reticulocytes was measured, reticulocyte-Y (Ret-Y), to distinguish iron deficiency anemia from the anemia of chronic disease using a Sysmex XE2100 cell counter. We evaluated this parameter prospectively in 100 patients seen for the evaluation of anemia. A clinical diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia or anemia of chronic disease was made on the basis of a complete blood count, examination of the peripheral smear, and serum ferritin along with a history and physical examination. We analyzed the sensitivity and specificity of the Ret-Y in relationship to the clinical diagnosis. We also measured serum transferrin receptor levels to use as the gold standard laboratory test for iron deficiency against which we compared the Ret-Y. In 40 normal individuals with normal serum ferritin and transferrin receptor levels the mean Ret-Y was 1874 +/- 178 (1 SD). The mean Ret-Y in the anemia of chronic disease group (n=62) was 1722 +/- 162, not significantly different from normal. The mean Ret-Y value among iron-deficient patients (n=38), was 1407 +/- 136 (P <0.01 vs. the anemia of chronic disease group's Ret-Y value). Receiver operator curves showed that Ret-Y correlated closely to the serum transferrin receptor and was superior to the mean corpuscular volume, and ferritin level, in differentiating the type of anemia. The Ret-Y parameter has the highest overall sensitivity and specificity of the panel of tests routinely used in differentiating iron deficiency anemia from anemia of chronic disease. PMID:15596002

  12. From 120 to 32 nm CMOS technology: development of OPC and RET to rescue optical lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouiller, Yorick

    2006-10-01

    Starting from the 120 nm CMOS technology node down to the 32 nm node, we have entered into a new lithographic regime. The wavelength has not changed (only 193 nm), and we move closer and closer to the theoretical optical resolution limit. Therefore, Resolution Enhancement Techniques (RET) have been developed in order to print all shapes properly and close the resolution gap. The primary RET developed are off-axis illumination, sub-resolution assist features and a phase shift mask. Moreover, working closer to the resolution limit implies bigger image distortion between the mask and the silicon. For this purpose OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) has been widely used by making mask pre-compensation of all non linear effects, optical diffraction and interference effects, resist and etch. RET and OPC are also fundamentally linked. RET such as off-axis illumination generates more distortion, and therefore justifies the need of more aggressive OPC, and RET techniques like Alt PSM and sub-resolution assist features are generated through the OPC infrastructure. From its first industrial utilization for 120 nm node to 32 nm prospectively, many evolutions have been seen for OPC. These include the generalisation to all lithographic layers, moving to pixel based simulation, usage of full chip simulation and verification, the incorporation of process window effects like Energy Latitude or Depth of Focus into the OPC algorithm, and inverse lithography approach. For RET, we have seen huge differentiation depending on the type of application, such as logic or memory. In conclusion, we need to consider design as a third party that is playing a key role in this RET-OPC synergy. To use more aggressive RET and reduce the cycle time of OPC recipe development, more regular designs are considered as a key enabler for the future: they will allow logic makers to consider RET options that are pushed as far as those used by memory makers. To cite this article: Y. Trouiller, C. R. Physique 7

  13. The RET proto-oncogene: a potential target for molecular cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pützer, Brigitte M; Drosten, Matthias

    2004-07-01

    The inhibition of activated receptor tyrosine kinases has defined a new era of selective cancer therapy. The value of these approaches has been demonstrated for a growing number of tyrosine kinases. Gain-of-function alterations within the RET proto-oncogene are responsible for the development of medullary, as well as papillary, thyroid carcinoma and make it a candidate for the design of targeted therapies. Recently, various strategies have been used to block the activity of RET in pre-clinical models, providing evidence that RET is a potential target for a selective cancer-therapy approach, especially when considering that the inhibition of RET activity is sufficient to revert neoplastic characteristics. Although the ideal clinically useful therapeutic option has yet to be developed, successes with other selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors encourages further effort. PMID:15242684

  14. Multiple endocrine neoplasias type 2B and RET proto-oncogene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B) is an autosomal dominant complex oncologic neurocristopathy including medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, gastrointestinal disorders, marphanoid face, and mucosal multiple ganglioneuromas. Medullary thyroid carcinoma is the major cause of mortality in MEN 2B syndrome, and it often appears during the first years of life. RET proto-oncogene germline activating mutations are causative for MEN 2B. The 95% of MEN 2B patients are associated with a point mutation in exon 16 (M918/T). A second point mutation at codon 883 has been found in 2%-3% of MEN 2B cases. RET proto-oncogene is also involved in different neoplastic and not neoplastic neurocristopathies. Other RET mutations cause MEN 2A syndrome, familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, or Hirschsprung's disease. RET gene expression is also involved in Neuroblastoma. The main diagnosis standards are the acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa and the molecular analysis of RET. In our protocol the rectal biopsy is, therefore, the first approach. RET mutation detection offers the possibility to diagnose MEN 2B predisposition at a pre-clinical stage in familial cases, and to perform an early total prophylactic thyroidectomy. The surgical treatment of MEN 2B is total thyroidectomy with cervical limphadenectomy of the central compartment of the neck. When possible, this intervention should be performed with prophylactic aim before 1 year of age in patients with molecular genetic diagnosis. Recent advances into the mechanisms of RET proto-oncogene signaling and pathways of RET signal transduction in the development of MEN 2 and MTC will allow new treatment possibilities. PMID:22429913

  15. The discovery of 2-substituted phenol quinazolines as potent RET kinase inhibitors with improved KDR selectivity.

    PubMed

    Newton, Rebecca; Bowler, Katherine A; Burns, Emily M; Chapman, Philip J; Fairweather, Emma E; Fritzl, Samantha J R; Goldberg, Kristin M; Hamilton, Niall M; Holt, Sarah V; Hopkins, Gemma V; Jones, Stuart D; Jordan, Allan M; Lyons, Amanda J; Nikki March, H; McDonald, Neil Q; Maguire, Laura A; Mould, Daniel P; Purkiss, Andrew G; Small, Helen F; Stowell, Alexandra I J; Thomson, Graeme J; Waddell, Ian D; Waszkowycz, Bohdan; Watson, Amanda J; Ogilvie, Donald J

    2016-04-13

    Deregulation of the receptor tyrosine kinase RET has been implicated in medullary thyroid cancer, a small percentage of lung adenocarcinomas, endocrine-resistant breast cancer and pancreatic cancer. There are several clinically approved multi-kinase inhibitors that target RET as a secondary pharmacology but additional activities, most notably inhibition of KDR, lead to dose-limiting toxicities. There is, therefore, a clinical need for more specific RET kinase inhibitors. Herein we report our efforts towards identifying a potent and selective RET inhibitor using vandetanib 1 as the starting point for structure-based drug design. Phenolic anilinoquinazolines exemplified by 6 showed improved affinities towards RET but, unsurprisingly, suffered from high metabolic clearance. Efforts to mitigate the metabolic liability of the phenol led to the discovery that a flanking substituent not only improved the hepatocyte stability, but could also impart a significant gain in selectivity. This culminated in the identification of 36; a potent RET inhibitor with much improved selectivity against KDR. PMID:26874741

  16. Bacterial succession and metabolite changes during flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) retting with Bacillus cereus HDYM-02

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dan; Liu, Pengfei; Pan, Chao; Du, Renpeng; Ping, Wenxiang; Ge, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing and GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) were jointly used to reveal the bacterial succession and metabolite changes during flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) retting. The inoculation of Bacillus cereus HDYM-02 decreased bacterial richness and diversity. This inoculum led to the replacement of Enterobacteriaceae by Bacillaceae. The level of aerobic Pseudomonadaceae (mainly Azotobacter) and anaerobic Clostridiaceae_1 gradually increased and decreased, respectively. Following the addition of B. cereus HDYM-02, the dominant groups were all degumming enzyme producers or have been proven to be involved in microbial retting throughout the entire retting period. These results could be verified by the metabolite changes, either degumming enzymes or their catalytic products galacturonic acid and reducing sugars. The GC-MS data showed a clear separation between flax retting with and without B. cereus HDYM-02, particularly within the first 72 h. These findings reveal the important bacterial groups that are involved in fiber retting and will facilitate improvements in the retting process. PMID:27585559

  17. Bacterial succession and metabolite changes during flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) retting with Bacillus cereus HDYM-02.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Liu, Pengfei; Pan, Chao; Du, Renpeng; Ping, Wenxiang; Ge, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing and GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) were jointly used to reveal the bacterial succession and metabolite changes during flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) retting. The inoculation of Bacillus cereus HDYM-02 decreased bacterial richness and diversity. This inoculum led to the replacement of Enterobacteriaceae by Bacillaceae. The level of aerobic Pseudomonadaceae (mainly Azotobacter) and anaerobic Clostridiaceae_1 gradually increased and decreased, respectively. Following the addition of B. cereus HDYM-02, the dominant groups were all degumming enzyme producers or have been proven to be involved in microbial retting throughout the entire retting period. These results could be verified by the metabolite changes, either degumming enzymes or their catalytic products galacturonic acid and reducing sugars. The GC-MS data showed a clear separation between flax retting with and without B. cereus HDYM-02, particularly within the first 72 h. These findings reveal the important bacterial groups that are involved in fiber retting and will facilitate improvements in the retting process. PMID:27585559

  18. Characterization of interactions and pharmacophore development for DFG-out inhibitors to RET tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunxia; Grøtli, Morten; Eriksson, Leif A

    2015-07-01

    RET (rearranged during transfection) tyrosine kinase is a promising target for several human cancers. Abt-348, Birb-796, Motesanib and Sorafenib are DFG-out multi-kinase inhibitors that have been reported to inhibit RET activity with good IC50 values. Although the DFG-out conformation has attracted great interest in the design of type II inhibitors, the structural requirements for binding to the RET DFG-out conformation remains unclear. Herein, the DFG-out conformation of RET was determined by homology modelling, the four inhibitors were docked, and the binding modes investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Binding free energies were calculated using the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Bolzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method. The trends in predicted binding free affinities correlated well with experimental data and were used to explain the activity difference of the studied inhibitors. Per-residue energy decomposition analyses provided further information on specific interaction properties. Finally, we also conducted a detailed e-pharmacophore modelling of the different RET-inhibitor complexes, explaining the common and specific pharmacophore features of the different complexes. The results reported herein will be useful in future rational design of novel DFG-out RET inhibitors. PMID:26044359

  19. An Effective Distributed Architecture for OPC & RET Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugg, Robert M.; Boman, Mathias; Burdorf, James; Rieger, Michael L.

    2002-12-01

    The computational power needed to generate mask layouts for OPC and resolution enhancement techniques increases exponentially with process node. Rapidly growing design complexity is compounded with the more aggressive methods now required for smaller feature sizes. Layers once considered non-critical now routinely receive correction. While some improvement in code efficiency can be expected, algorithms are maturing to the point where improvements will likely not keep pace with the computational need. To maintain required processing cycle times massively parallel processing methods must be employed. In this paper we discuss loosely-coupled distributed computing architectures applied to OPC/RET layout synthesis. The degree to which an application is scalable depends on how well the problem can be divided into independent sets of data. Furthermore, data must also be partitioned into reasonably sized blocks so that memory requirements per processor can be bounded. Communication overhead, I/O overhead and serial processeses all degrade scalability, and may increase overall storage requirements. In this paper we analyze behavior of distributed processing architectures with large numbers of processors, and we present performance data on an existing massively parallel system.

  20. Intracellular Signal Transduction and Modification of the Tumor Microenvironment Induced by RET/PTCs in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Menicali, Elisa; Moretti, Sonia; Voce, Pasquale; Romagnoli, Serena; Avenia, Nicola; Puxeddu, Efisio

    2012-01-01

    RET gene rearrangements (RET/PTCs) represent together with BRAF point mutations the two major groups of mutations involved in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) initiation and progression. In this review, we will examine the mechanisms involved in RET/PTC-induced thyroid cell transformation. In detail, we will summarize the data on the molecular mechanisms involved in RET/PTC formation and in its function as a dominant oncogene, on the activated signal transduction pathways and on the induced gene expression modifications. Moreover, we will report on the effects of RET/PTCs on the tumor microenvironment. Finally, a short review of the literature on RET/PTC prognostic significance will be presented. PMID:22661970

  1. RET and EDNRB mutation screening in patients with Hirschsprung disease: Functional studies and its implications for genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Widowati, Titis; Melhem, Shamiram; Patria, Suryono Y; de Graaf, Bianca M; Sinke, Richard J; Viel, Martijn; Dijkhuis, Jos; Sadewa, Ahmad H; Purwohardjono, Rochadi; Soenarto, Yati; Hofstra, Robert Mw; Sribudiani, Yunia

    2016-06-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a major cause of chronic constipation in children. HSCR can be caused by germline mutations in RET and EDNRB. Defining causality of the mutations identified is difficult and almost exclusively based on in silico predictions. Therefore, the reported frequency of pathogenic mutations might be overestimated. We combined mutation analysis with functional assays to determine the frequencies of proven pathogenic RET and EDNRB mutations in HSCR. We sequenced RET and EDNRB in 57 HSCR patients. The identified RET-coding variants were introduced into RET constructs and these were transfected into HEK293 cells to determine RET phosphorylation and activation via ERK. An exon trap experiment was performed to check a possible splice-site mutation. We identified eight rare RET-coding variants, one possible splice-site variant, but no rare EDNRB variants. Western blotting showed that three coding variants p.(Pr270Leu), p.(Ala756Val) and p.(Tyr1062Cys) resulted in lower activation of RET. Moreover, only two RET variants (p.(Ala756Val) and p.(Tyr1062Cys)) resulted in reduced ERK activation. Splice-site assays on c.1880-11A>G could not confirm its pathogenicity. Our data suggest that indeed almost half of the identified rare variants are proven pathogenic and that, hence, functional studies are essential for proper genetic counseling. PMID:26395553

  2. KIF5B/RET fusion gene in surgically-treated adenocarcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Keisuke; Sasaki, Hidefumi; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Shimizu, Shigeki; Shitara, Masayuki; Hikosaka, Yu; Moriyama, Satoru; Yano, Motoki; Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2012-10-01

    Recently, a novel fusion gene resulting from a linkage between the kinesin family member 5B gene (KIF5B; 10p11.22) and the rearranged during transfection gene (RET; 10q11.21) was identified in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the correlation between the KIF5B/RET fusion gene status and the clinicopathological features of surgically-treated lung cancer has not been well characterized. In this study, we have independently investigated the KIF5B/RET fusion gene status in 371 surgically-treated NSCLCs (270 were adenocarcinomas and 101 were squamous cell carcinomas), 60 breast cancers, 11 metastatic lung cancers from colon cancers and thyroid papillary adenocarcinoma cases at the Nagoya City University Hospital. The fusion gene status was analyzed by an RT-PCR-based assay and by using direct sequencing. We detected 3 of 270 cases of KIF5B/RET fusion genes in adenocarcinomas (1.1%) consisting of female and never smokers with mixed subtype adenocarcinomas. The fusion genes were detected exclusively with other mutations, such as EGFR, Kras, Braf, erbB2 mutations, and EML4/ALK fusion. KIF5B/RET fusion was not detected in the cases with squamous cell carcinoma or other types of cancers. From the 3 cases, 2 were KIF5B (exon 15); RET (exon 12) fusions with papillary dominant and 1 case was KIF5B (exon 22); RET (exon 12) fusion with solid dominant adenocarcinoma. The matched normal lung tissues did not display translocation. We reported KIF5B/RET fusion genes as a driver somatic mutation of lung adenocarcinomas. The cinicopathological backgrounds of the KIF5B/RET fusion-positive patients were similar with those of the EML4/ALK fusion-positive patients. The chimeric oncogene may be a promising molecular target for the personalized diagnosis and treatment of NSCLC. PMID:22797671

  3. Ret and Etv4 Promote Directed Movements of Progenitor Cells during Renal Branching Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Paul; Cebrian, Cristina; Zong, Hui; Hippenmeyer, Simon; Costantini, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Branching morphogenesis of the epithelial ureteric bud forms the renal collecting duct system and is critical for normal nephron number, while low nephron number is implicated in hypertension and renal disease. Ureteric bud growth and branching requires GDNF signaling from the surrounding mesenchyme to cells at the ureteric bud tips, via the Ret receptor tyrosine kinase and coreceptor Gfrα1; Ret signaling up-regulates transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5, which are also critical for branching. Despite extensive knowledge of the genetic control of these events, it is not understood, at the cellular level, how renal branching morphogenesis is achieved or how Ret signaling influences epithelial cell behaviors to promote this process. Analysis of chimeric embryos previously suggested a role for Ret signaling in promoting cell rearrangements in the nephric duct, but this method was unsuited to study individual cell behaviors during ureteric bud branching. Here, we use Mosaic Analysis with Double Markers (MADM), combined with organ culture and time-lapse imaging, to trace the movements and divisions of individual ureteric bud tip cells. We first examine wild-type clones and then Ret or Etv4 mutant/wild-type clones in which the mutant and wild-type sister cells are differentially and heritably marked by green and red fluorescent proteins. We find that, in normal kidneys, most individual tip cells behave as self-renewing progenitors, some of whose progeny remain at the tips while others populate the growing UB trunks. In Ret or Etv4 MADM clones, the wild-type cells generated at a UB tip are much more likely to remain at, or move to, the new tips during branching and elongation, while their Ret-/- or Etv4-/- sister cells tend to lag behind and contribute only to the trunks. By tracking successive mitoses in a cell lineage, we find that Ret signaling has little effect on proliferation, in contrast to its effects on cell movement. Our results show that Ret/Etv4 signaling

  4. Mutations in exon 10 of the RET proto-oncogene in Hirschsprung`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Attie, T.; Eng, C.; Mulligan, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR) is a frequent congenital malformation ascribed to the absence of autonomic ganglion cells in the terminal hindgut. Recently, we have identified mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR families. Mutations of the RET gene have also been reported in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). While RET mutations in HSCR are scattered on the whole coding sequence, MEN 2A and FMTC mutations are clustered in 5 cystein codons of exons 10 and 11. Here, we report on HSCR families carrying mutations in exon 10 of the RET gene, one of them involving a cystein codon. Germ-line mutations in exon 10 of the RET gene may contribute to either an early development defect (HSCR) or inherited predisposition to cancer (MEN 2A and FMTC), probable depending on the nature and location of the mutation. These data also suggest that HSCR patients with mutations in exon 10 might subsequently prove to be at risk for MEN 2A or FMTC since several MEN 2A/HSCR associations have been reported.

  5. Ecotoxicological effects of jute retting on the survival of two freshwater fish and two invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Debjit Kumar; Kaviraj, Anilava

    2008-04-01

    Severe deterioration of water quality occurs during jute retting in ponds, canals, floodplain lakes, and other inland water bodies in the rural areas of West Bengal in India. Attempts were made to evaluate changes in the physicochemical parameters of water caused by jute retting, and their impact on the survival of two species of freshwater fish (Labeo rohita and Hypophthalmicthys molitrix) and two species of freshwater invertebrate (Daphnia magna, a Cladocera, and Branchiura sowerbyi, an Oligochaeta). Results showed that jute retting in a pond for 30 days resulted in a sharp increase in the BOD (>1,000 times) and COD (>25 times) of the water, along with a sharp decrease in dissolved oxygen (DO). Free CO(2), total ammonia, and nitrate nitrogen also increased (three to five times) in water as a result of jute retting. Ninety-six-hour static bioassays performed in the laboratory with different dilutions of jute-retting water (JRW) revealed that D. magna and B. sowerbyi were not susceptible to even the raw JRW whereas fingerlings of both species of fish were highly susceptible, L. rohita being more sensitive (96 h LC(50) 37.55% JRW) than H. molitrix (96 h LC(50) 57.54% JRW). Mortality of fish was significantly correlated with the percentage of JRW. PMID:18157635

  6. The Ret receptor regulates sensory neuron dendrite growth and integrin mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Soba, Peter; Han, Chun; Zheng, Yi; Perea, Daniel; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2015-01-01

    Neurons develop highly stereotyped receptive fields by coordinated growth of their dendrites. Although cell surface cues play a major role in this process, few dendrite specific signals have been identified to date. We conducted an in vivo RNAi screen in Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization (C4da) neurons and identified the conserved Ret receptor, known to play a role in axon guidance, as an important regulator of dendrite development. The loss of Ret results in severe dendrite defects due to loss of extracellular matrix adhesion, thus impairing growth within a 2D plane. We provide evidence that Ret interacts with integrins to regulate dendrite adhesion via rac1. In addition, Ret is required for dendrite stability and normal F-actin distribution suggesting it has an essential role in dendrite maintenance. We propose novel functions for Ret as a regulator in dendrite patterning and adhesion distinct from its role in axon guidance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05491.001 PMID:25764303

  7. Ret is essential to mediate GDNF's neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effect in a Parkinson disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Drinkut, Anja; Tillack, Karsten; Meka, Durga P; Schulz, Jorg B; Kügler, Sebastian; Kramer, Edgar R

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent survival and regeneration-promoting factor for dopaminergic neurons in cell and animal models of Parkinson disease (PD). GDNF is currently tested in clinical trials on PD patients with so far inconclusive results. The receptor tyrosine kinase Ret is the canonical GDNF receptor, but several alternative GDNF receptors have been proposed, raising the question of which signaling receptor mediates here the beneficial GDNF effects. To address this question we overexpressed GDNF in the striatum of mice deficient for Ret in dopaminergic neurons and subsequently challenged these mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Strikingly, in this established PD mouse model, the absence of Ret completely abolished GDNF's neuroprotective and regenerative effect on the midbrain dopaminergic system. This establishes Ret signaling as absolutely required for GDNF's effects to prevent and compensate dopaminergic system degeneration and suggests Ret activation as the primary target of GDNF therapy in PD. PMID:27607574

  8. A novel RET gene mutation in a patient with apparently sporadic pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Scollo, Claudia; Russo, Marco; De Gregorio, Laura; Terranova, Rosa; Mangione, Erika; Castoro, Carlotta; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Pellegriti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma (Pheo) is a chromaffin tumor arising from the adrenal medulla. The recent discovery of new germline mutations in RET, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, VHL, NF1, TMEM127, MAX genes, increased the rate of genetic disease from 10% to 28% in patients with apparently sporadic tumor. RET germline mutations cause multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 syndrome (MEN 2A) characterized by complete penetrance of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and lower prevalence of Pheo and hyperparathyroidism. We describe the genetic etiology of an apparently sporadic case of monolateral Pheo in a 42-year-old male patient. A new (not previously reported) MEN 2A-associated germline RET mutation located in exon 11 (Glu632Gly, caused by an A>G point mutation at position 1895 of the RET cDNA) was found in the patient but not in his living first-degree relatives. This observation increases the number of possible germline RET mutations. Genotype-phenotype correlation of this new genetic alteration is unknown, but this rare mutation is probably associated with a low risk for MTC (usually the first tumor diagnosed in MEN 2A syndrome) and with the development of Pheo before the onset of MTC. Since we expect MTC to occur in our patient, strict follow-up is mandatory. Our findings emphasize the relevance of genetic testing in patients with Pheo, especially when the clinical presentation (family history, young age at diagnosis, multiple locations, malignant lesions, and bilateralism) is suggestive. PMID:26497911

  9. The Oncogenic Activity of RET Point Mutants for Follicular Thyroid Cells May Account for the Occurrence of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Patients Affected by Familial Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Rosa Marina; Cirafici, Anna Maria; De Falco, Valentina; Bellantoni, Marie; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo; Carlomagno, Francesca; Picascia, Antonella; Tramontano, Donatella; Tallini, Giovanni; Santoro, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    Activating germ-line point mutations in the RET receptor are responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2-associated medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), whereas somatic RET rearrangements are prevalent in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). Some rare kindreds, carrying point mutations in RET, are affected by both cancer types, suggesting that, under specific circumstances, point mutations in RET can drive the generation of PTC. Here we describe a family whose siblings, affected by both PTC and MTC, carried a germ-line point mutation in the RET extracellular domain, converting cysteine 634 into serine. We tested on thyroid follicular cells the transforming activity of RET(C634S), RET(K603Q), another mutant identified in a kindred with both PTC and MTC, RET(C634R) a commonly isolated allele in MEN2A, RET(M918T) responsible for MEN2B and also identified in kindreds with both PTC and MTC, and RET/PTC1 the rearranged oncogene that characterizes bona fide PTC in patients without MTC. We show that the various RET point mutants, but not wild-type RET, scored constitutive kinase activity and exerted mitogenic effects for thyroid PC Cl 3 cells, albeit at significantly lower levels compared to RET/PTC1. The low mitogenic activity of RET point mutants paralleled their reduced kinase activity compared to RET/PTC. Furthermore, RET point mutants maintained a protein domain, the intracellular juxtamembrane domain, that exerted negative effects on the mitogenic activity. In conclusion, RET point mutants can behave as dominant oncogenes for thyroid follicular cells. Their transforming activity, however, is rather modest, providing a possible explanation for the rare association of MTC with PTC. PMID:15277225

  10. Exclusion of linkage between RET and Neuronal Intestinal Dysplasia type B

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, V.; Yin Luo; Brancolini, V.; Romeo, G.; Weber, D.; Brancolini, V.; Devoto, M.

    1996-03-15

    Neuronal Intestinal Dysplasia type B (NID B) is a complex alteration of the enteric nervous system belonging to the group of intestinal dysganglionoses which may involve rectum, colon, and small intestine. Second only to Hirschsprung diseases (HSCR), NID B is one of the most frequent causes of chronic constipation and pseudo-obstructive intestinal dysmotility. Since NID B is often associated with HSCR and point mutations in the RET proto-oncogene have been identified in HSCR patients, we analyzed two NID B pedigrees to investigate if RET mutations might cause also the NID B phenotype. Linkage analysis demonstrated that the NID B locus is not linked to RET in the pedigrees analysed. Further genetic analyses will possibility improve the understanding of the cause and facilitate diagnostic procedures in NID B. 20 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. GDNF-Ret signaling in midbrain dopaminergic neurons and its implication for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Edgar R; Liss, Birgit

    2015-12-21

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its canonical receptor Ret can signal together or independently to fulfill many important functions in the midbrain dopaminergic (DA) system. While Ret signaling clearly impacts on the development, maintenance and regeneration of the mesostriatal DA system, the physiological functions of GDNF for the DA system are still unclear. Nevertheless, GDNF is still considered to be an excellent candidate to protect and/or regenerate the mesostriatal DA system in Parkinson disease (PD). Clinical trials with GDNF on PD patients are, however, so far inconclusive. Here, we review the current knowledge of GDNF and Ret signaling and function in the midbrain DA system, and their crosstalk with proteins and signaling pathways associated with PD. PMID:26555190

  12. Ret and Etv4 Promote Directed Movements of Progenitor Cells during Renal Branching Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Paul; Cebrian, Cristina; Zong, Hui; Hippenmeyer, Simon; Costantini, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Branching morphogenesis of the epithelial ureteric bud forms the renal collecting duct system and is critical for normal nephron number, while low nephron number is implicated in hypertension and renal disease. Ureteric bud growth and branching requires GDNF signaling from the surrounding mesenchyme to cells at the ureteric bud tips, via the Ret receptor tyrosine kinase and coreceptor Gfrα1; Ret signaling up-regulates transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5, which are also critical for branching. Despite extensive knowledge of the genetic control of these events, it is not understood, at the cellular level, how renal branching morphogenesis is achieved or how Ret signaling influences epithelial cell behaviors to promote this process. Analysis of chimeric embryos previously suggested a role for Ret signaling in promoting cell rearrangements in the nephric duct, but this method was unsuited to study individual cell behaviors during ureteric bud branching. Here, we use Mosaic Analysis with Double Markers (MADM), combined with organ culture and time-lapse imaging, to trace the movements and divisions of individual ureteric bud tip cells. We first examine wild-type clones and then Ret or Etv4 mutant/wild-type clones in which the mutant and wild-type sister cells are differentially and heritably marked by green and red fluorescent proteins. We find that, in normal kidneys, most individual tip cells behave as self-renewing progenitors, some of whose progeny remain at the tips while others populate the growing UB trunks. In Ret or Etv4 MADM clones, the wild-type cells generated at a UB tip are much more likely to remain at, or move to, the new tips during branching and elongation, while their Ret−/− or Etv4−/− sister cells tend to lag behind and contribute only to the trunks. By tracking successive mitoses in a cell lineage, we find that Ret signaling has little effect on proliferation, in contrast to its effects on cell movement. Our results show that Ret/Etv4

  13. Influence of design shrinks and proximity influence distance on flattening of optical hierarchy during RET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistler, John L.; Duckworth, Koby

    2006-10-01

    As geometries shrink faster than the actual wavelength used for exposure, the Proximity influence distance, or PID of nearest neighbor features starts to impact not only the overall RET of unit cells in the design library but also the flattening of the hierarchy of the electronic design increasing the overall database size, computational times and respective memory requirements per computational node. In this paper we explore the impact of different PID values in relation to the overall flattening of hierarchy, time to market and the impact on RET complexity as dimensions are shrunk in overall design.

  14. Germline ESR2 mutation predisposes to medullary thyroid carcinoma and causes up-regulation of RET expression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joel; Read, Martin L; Hoffman, Jon; Brown, Rachel; Bradshaw, Beth; Campbell, Christopher; Cole, Trevor; Navas, Johanna Dieguez; Eatock, Fiona; Gundara, Justin S; Lian, Eric; Mcmullan, Dom; Morgan, Neil V; Mulligan, Lois; Morrison, Patrick J; Robledo, Mercedes; Simpson, Michael A; Smith, Vicki E; Stewart, Sue; Trembath, Richard C; Sidhu, Stan; Togneri, Fiona S; Wake, Naomi C; Wallis, Yvonne; Watkinson, John C; Maher, Eamonn R; McCabe, Christopher J; Woodward, Emma R

    2016-05-01

    Familial medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and its precursor, C cell hyperplasia (CCH), is associated with germline RET mutations causing multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2. However, some rare families with apparent MTC/CCH predisposition do not have a detectable RET mutation. To identify novel MTC/CCH predisposition genes we undertook exome resequencing studies in a family with apparent predisposition to MTC/CCH and no identifiable RET mutation. We identified a novel ESR2 frameshift mutation, c.948delT, which segregated with histological diagnosis following thyroid surgery in family members and demonstrated loss of ESR2-encoded ERβ expression in the MTC tumour. ERα and ERβ form heterodimers binding DNA at specific oestrogen-responsive elements (EREs) to regulate gene transcription. ERβ represses ERα-mediated activation of the ERE and the RET promoter contains three EREs. In vitro, we showed that ESR2 c.948delT results in unopposed ERα mediated increased cellular proliferation, activation of the ERE and increased RET expression. In vivo, immunostaining of CCH and MTC using an anti-RET antibody demonstrated increased RET expression. Together these findings identify germline ESR2 mutation as a novel cause of familial MTC/CCH and provide important insights into a novel mechanism causing increased RET expression in tumourigenesis. PMID:26945007

  15. Radiation exposure, young age, and female gender are associated with high prevalence of RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 in papillary thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xuan; Li, Zhaoqu; He, Caiyun; Chen, Weichao; Fu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Ankui

    2016-01-01

    Background RET/PTC rearrangements have been identified as a specific genetic event in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). We conducted this meta-analysis to identify an enriched population who were more likely to occur RET/PTC fusion genes. Methods All relevant studies in the PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase databases were searched up to June 2015. The studies found were screened according to our inclusion and exclusion criteria. All analyses were performed using STATA software. Results Eventually, 38 eligible studies comprising 2395 participants were included. Overall analysis indicated that radiation exposure contributed to increased RET/PTC risk (OR = 2.82; 95%CI: 1.38–5.78, P = 0.005). Stratified analysis according to RET/PTC subtype and geographical area showed that this association was restricted to the RET/PTC3 subtype (OR = 8.30, 95%CI: 4.32–15.96, P < 0.001) in the Western population. In addition, age < 18 years, i.e., young age, was associated with higher prevalence of RET/PTC3 (OR = 2.03, 95%CI: 1.14–3.62, P = 0.017), especially in the radiation-exposure subpopulation (OR = 2.35, 95%CI: 1.01–5.49, P = 0.048). The association between female gender and RET/PTC1 risk was more significant in the PTC patients without radiation exposure (OR = 1.69, 95%CI: 1.04–2.74, P = 0.034). Conclusion Both radiation exposure and young age are associated with increased risk of RET/PTC3 and that female gender is associated with higher prevalence of RET/PTC1 in the subpopulation without radiation exposure. The RET/PTC status in combination with radiation exposure, age, and sex should be considered in the differential diagnosis of suspicious PTC. PMID:26918339

  16. The β-catenin Axis Integrates Multiple Signals Downstream From RET/PTC and Leads to Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Castellone, Maria Domenica; De Falco, Valentina; Rao, Deva Magendra; Bellelli, Roberto; Muthu, Magesh; Basolo, Fulvio; Fusco, Alfredo; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Santoro, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    RET/PTC (RET/papillary thyroid carcinoma) oncoproteins result from the in-frame fusion of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase domain with protein dimerization motifs encoded by heterologous genes. Here we show that RET/PTC stimulates the β-catenin pathway. By stimulating PI3K/AKT and Ras/ERK, RET/PTC promotes GSK3β phosphorylation, thereby reducing GSK3β-mediated N-terminal β-catenin (Ser33/Ser37/Thr41) phosphorylation. In addition, RET/PTC physically interacts with β-catenin, and increases its phosphotyrosine content. The increased free pool of S/T(nonphospho)/Y(phospho)β-catenin is stabilized as a result of the reduced binding affinity for the Axin/GSK3β complex and activates the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factor. Moreover, through the ERK pathway, RET/PTC stimulates cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and promotes the formation of a β-catenin-CREB-CBP/p300 transcriptional complex. Transcriptional complexes containing β-catenin are recruited to the cyclin D1 promoter and a cyclin D1 gene promoter reporter is active in RET/PTC expressing cells. Silencing of β-catenin by siRNA inhibits proliferation of RET/PTC transformed PC thyrocytes, whereas a constitutively active form of β-catenin stimulates autonomous proliferation of thyroid cells. Thus, multiple signaling events downstream from RET/PTC converge on β-catenin to stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:19223551

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Orbits of β Ret and ν Oct (Ramm+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramm, D. J.; Pourbaix, D.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Komonjinda, S.

    2010-10-01

    The echelle spectra of beta Ret and nu Oct that formed the basis of this work were obtained at Mt John University Observatory (MJUO), Lake Tekapo, New Zealand, between 2001 July and 2007 February. The observations used the 1-m McLellan telescope and the fibre-fed High Efficiency and Resolution Canterbury University Large Echelle Spectrograph (HERCULES). (2 data files).

  18. Probes for biomolecules detection based on RET-enhanced fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dahai; Wang, Jun; Wang, Bin; You, Zheng

    2016-05-15

    Fluorescent probes based on the principle of resonance energy transfer (RET) or the principle of fluorescence polarization (FP) are already used to detect biomolecules independently. However, there were no in-depth studies about the impact of RET on FP. Also, very few studies gave a comprehensive analysis on how to effectively design such a fluorescent probe. Based on the principle of resonance energy transfer (RET), we constructed fluorescent probes (SA-488-sub-nanogold) using streptavidin labeled Alexa488 (SA-488), nanogold and biotinylated substrate peptide (biotin-subpeptide). The influence of the structure and the ingredients of the substrate peptide were discussed. After SA-488 was combined with the biotin-subpeptide and the nanogold, its fluorescence intensity (FI) would be suppressed due to the energy transfer, leading to an increase in its volume and mass. The suppression of the FI led to a decrease in SA-488's effective concentration, and the increase in the volume or mass prolonged the SA-488's rotational relaxation time. Both changes increased SA-488's polarization in the solution. Therefore, the FP performance of the probe is enhanced by the RET. Using the probe, trypsin and biotin were detected by the change in both fluorescence intensity and fluorescence polarization, showing higher reliability, higher sensitivity, and a lower detection limit. PMID:26774994

  19. Dynamic mechanical analysis, surface chemistry and morphology of alkali and enzymatic retted kenaf fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bast fibers grow in the bark layer of many plants, and have been used for textiles and cordage for over 6000 years. Bast fibers of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) are retted by three methods and a comparative assessment of available reactive groups on the fiber surface and mechanical properties are ...

  20. Hox Proteins Coordinate Motor Neuron Differentiation and Connectivity Programs through Ret/Gfrα Genes.

    PubMed

    Catela, Catarina; Shin, Maggie M; Lee, David H; Liu, Jeh-Ping; Dasen, Jeremy S

    2016-03-01

    The accuracy of neural circuit assembly relies on the precise spatial and temporal control of synaptic specificity determinants during development. Hox transcription factors govern key aspects of motor neuron (MN) differentiation; however, the terminal effectors of their actions are largely unknown. We show that Hox/Hox cofactor interactions coordinate MN subtype diversification and connectivity through Ret/Gfrα receptor genes. Hox and Meis proteins determine the levels of Ret in MNs and define the intrasegmental profiles of Gfrα1 and Gfrα3 expression. Loss of Ret or Gfrα3 leads to MN specification and innervation defects similar to those observed in Hox mutants, while expression of Ret and Gfrα1 can bypass the requirement for Hox genes during MN pool differentiation. These studies indicate that Hox proteins contribute to neuronal fate and muscle connectivity through controlling the levels and pattern of cell surface receptor expression, consequently gating the ability of MNs to respond to limb-derived instructive cues. PMID:26904955

  1. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a child harboring a founder Hirschsprung RET mutation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Valentina; Mosconi, Manuela; Nozza, Paolo; Murgia, Daniele; Mattioli, Girolamo; Ceccherini, Isabella; Pini Prato, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo obstruction (CIPO) is a rare clinical entity characterized by symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction without either recognizable anatomical abnormalities or intestinal aganglionosis. A Chinese female infant presented to our institution with a clinical diagnosis of CIPO. Aganglionosis was ruled out by full thickness colonic and ileal biopsies and by rectal suction biopsies. Unexpectedly, direct sequencing and PCR amplification of RET proto-oncogene from peripheral blood extracted DNA identified a RET R114H mutation. This mutation has already been reported as strongly associated with Asian patients affected by Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) and is considered a founder mutation in Asia. The same mutation has never been reported in patients with CIPO, so far. These findings support the role of RET in the development of the enteric nervous system but underline the importance of other genetic or environmental factors contributing to the gastrointestinal phenotype of the disease. Somehow, this RET R114H mutation proved to have a role in the etiology of both CIPO and HSCR and could contribute to a more diffuse imbalance of gut dysmotility. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27273837

  2. Beyond ALK-RET, ROS1 and other oncogene fusions in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Takashi; Nakaoku, Takashi; Tsuta, Koji; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Goto, Koichi

    2015-04-01

    Fusions of the RET and ROS1 protein tyrosine kinase oncogenes with several partner genes were recently identified as new targetable genetic aberrations in cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lacking activating EGFR, KRAS, ALK, BRAF, or HER2 oncogene aberrations. RET and ROS1 fusion-positive tumors are mainly observed in young, female, and/or never smoking patients. Studies based on in vitro and in vivo (i.e., mouse) models and studies of several fusion-positive patients indicate that inhibiting the kinase activity of the RET and ROS1 fusion proteins is a promising therapeutic strategy. Accordingly, there are several ongoing clinical trials aimed at examining the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) against RET and ROS1 proteins in patients with fusion-positive lung cancer. Other gene fusions (NTRK1, NRG1, and FGFR1/2/3) that are targetable by existing TKIs have also been identified in NSCLCs. Options for personalized lung cancer therapy will be increased with the help of multiplex diagnosis systems able to detect multiple druggable gene fusions. PMID:25870798

  3. Examining the Influence of RETs on Science Teacher Beliefs and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enderle, Patrick; Dentzau, Michael; Roseler, Katrina; Southerland, Sherry; Granger, Ellen; Hughes, Roxanne; Golden, Barry; Saka, Yavuz

    2014-01-01

    Following the argument that an explicit focus on teacher thinking is an important outcome for professional development (Capps, Crawford, & Costas, 2012; Desimone, 2009), the research presented here examines the impact of one form of professional development, Research Experiences for Teachers (RETs), has in shaping teachers' beliefs and…

  4. Beyond ALK-RET, ROS1 and other oncogene fusions in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakaoku, Takashi; Tsuta, Koji; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Goto, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Fusions of the RET and ROS1 protein tyrosine kinase oncogenes with several partner genes were recently identified as new targetable genetic aberrations in cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lacking activating EGFR, KRAS, ALK, BRAF, or HER2 oncogene aberrations. RET and ROS1 fusion-positive tumors are mainly observed in young, female, and/or never smoking patients. Studies based on in vitro and in vivo (i.e., mouse) models and studies of several fusion-positive patients indicate that inhibiting the kinase activity of the RET and ROS1 fusion proteins is a promising therapeutic strategy. Accordingly, there are several ongoing clinical trials aimed at examining the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) against RET and ROS1 proteins in patients with fusion-positive lung cancer. Other gene fusions (NTRK1, NRG1, and FGFR1/2/3) that are targetable by existing TKIs have also been identified in NSCLCs. Options for personalized lung cancer therapy will be increased with the help of multiplex diagnosis systems able to detect multiple druggable gene fusions. PMID:25870798

  5. Control of Aβ release from human neurons by differentiation status and RET signaling.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Diana; Chernyshova, Yana; Leist, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have compared the processing of endogenous human amyloid precursor protein (APP) in younger and older neurons. Here, we characterized LUHMES cells as a human model to study Alzheimer's disease-related processes during neuronal maturation and aging. Differentiated LUHMES expressed and spontaneously processed APP via the secretase pathways, and they secreted amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. This was inhibited by cholesterol depletion or secretase inhibition, but not by block of tau phosphorylation. In vitro aged cells increased Aβ secretion without upregulation of APP or secretases. We identified the medium constituent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) as responsible for this effect. GDNF-triggered Aβ release was associated with rapid upregulation of the GDNF coreceptor "rearranged during transfection" (RET). Other direct (neurturin) or indirect (nerve growth factor) RET activators also increased Aβ, whereas different neurotrophins were ineffective. Downstream of RET, we found activation of protein kinase B (AKT) to be involved. Accordingly, inhibitors of the AKT regulator phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase completely blocked GDNF-triggered AKT phosphorylation and Aβ increase. This suggests that RET signaling affects Aβ release from aging neurons. PMID:22534065

  6. A novel RET rearrangement (ACBD5/RET) by pericentric inversion, inv(10)(p12.1;q11.2), in papillary thyroid cancer from an atomic bomb survivor exposed to high-dose radiation.

    PubMed

    Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Koyama, Kazuaki; Mukai, Mayumi; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2014-11-01

    During analysis of RET/PTC rearrangements in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) among atomic bomb survivors, a cDNA fragment of a novel type of RET rearrangement was identified in a PTC patient exposed to a high radiation dose using the improved 5' RACE method. This gene resulted from the fusion of the 3' portion of RET containing tyrosine kinase domain to the 5' portion of the acyl-coenzyme A binding domain containing 5 (ACBD5) gene, by pericentric inversion inv(10)(p12.1;q11.2); expression of the fusion gene was confirmed by RT-PCR. ACBD5 gene is ubiquitously expressed in various human normal tissues including thyroid. Full-length cDNA of the ACBD5-RET gene was constructed and then examined for tumorigenicity. Enhanced phosphorylation of ERK proteins in the MAPK pathway was observed in NIH3T3 cells transfected with expression vector encoding the full-length ACBD5/RET cDNA, while this was not observed in the cells transfected with empty expression vector. Stable NIH3T3 transfectants with ACBD5-RET cDNA induced tumor formation after their injection into nude mice. These findings suggest that the ACBD5-RET rearrangement is causatively involved in the development of PTC. PMID:25175022

  7. The Establishment of a Formal Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (M-RETS) Organization

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Redmond; Chela Bordas O'Connor

    2010-06-30

    The objectives identified in requesting and utilizing this funding has been met. The goal was to establish a formal, multi-jurisdictional organization to: (1) ensure the policy objectives of the participating jurisdictions are addressed through increased tradability of the Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) from M-RETS and to eliminate the possibility that a single jurisdiction will be the sole arbiter of the operation of the system; (2) facilitate the establishment of REC standards including the attributes related to, the creation, trading, and interaction with other trading and tracking systems; and (3) have a centralized and established organization that will be responsible for the contracting and governance responsibilities of a multi-jurisdictional tracking system. The M-RETS Inc. Board ensures that the system remains policy neutral; that the attributes of generation are tracked in a way that allows the system users to easily identify and trade relevant RECs; that the system can add jurisdictions as needed or desired; and that the tracking system operate in such a way to allow for the greatest access possible for those participating in other tracking or trading systems by allowing those systems to negotiate with a single M-RETS entity for the import and export of RECs. M-RETS as an organizational body participates and often leads the discussions related to the standardization of RECs and increasing the tradability of M-RETS RECs. M-RETS is a founding member of the Environmental Trading Network of North America (ETNNA) and continues to take a leadership role in the development of processes to facilitate trading among tracking systems and to standardize REC definitions. The Board of Directors of M-RETS, Inc., the non-profit corporation, continues to hold telephone/internet Board meetings. Legal counsel continues working with the board and APX management on a new agreement with APX. The board expects to have an agreement and corresponding fee structure in place by

  8. Mutation and deletion analysis of GFRα-1, encoding the co-receptor for the GDNF/RET complex, in human brain tumours

    PubMed Central

    Gimm, O; Gössling, A; Marsh, D J; Dahia, P L M; Mulligan, L M; Deimling, A von; Eng, C

    1999-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) plays a key role in the control of vertebrate neuron survival and differentiation in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. GDNF preferentially binds to GFRα-1 which then interacts with the receptor tyrosine kinase RET. We investigated a panel of 36 independent cases of mainly advanced sporadic brain tumours for the presence of mutations in GDNF and GFRα-1. No mutations were found in the coding region of GDNF. We identified six previously described GFRα-1 polymorphisms, two of which lead to an amino acid change. In 15 of 36 brain tumours, all polymorphic variants appeared to be homozygous. Of these 15 tumours, one also had a rare, apparently homozygous, sequence variant at codon 361. Because of the rarity of the combination of homozygous sequence variants, analysis for hemizygous deletion was pursued in the 15 samples and loss of heterozygosity was found in 11 tumours. Our data suggest that intragenic point mutations of GDNF or GFRα-1 are not a common aetiologic event in brain tumours. However, either deletion of GFRα-1 and/or nearby genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of these tumours. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408842

  9. 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangements in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hongyang; Xu, Haimiao; Xie, Fajun; Qin, Jing; Han, Na; Fan, Yun; Mao, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is poor despite reports suggesting modest improvement in survival. To date, chemotherapy remains the cornerstone treatment for SCLC patients, and many studies have focused on identifying the molecular characteristics of SCLC, which serve as the basis for precision treatments that improve the prognosis of SCLC. For instance, the therapeutic effect of temozolomide, recommended for patients with relapsed SCLC, is linked to 1p/19q codeletion in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. A subpopulation of SCLC patients may derive benefit from tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting RET. In order to identify 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangement in SCLC patients, 32 SCLC resected specimens were retrospectively collected between 2008 and 2014 from the Zhejiang Cancer Hospital in People’s Republic of China. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to detect 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangement in the specimens. A 1p single deletion was detected in eight specimens, 19q single deletion was detected in three specimens, and only three specimens had a 1p/19q codeletion. None of the specimens had a RET rearrangement. The three patients whose specimens had a 1p/19q codeletion were alive after 58, 50, and 30 months of follow-up care. There was a trend toward prolonged overall survival for the patients with codeletion compared to no codeletion, 1p single deletion, 19q single deletion, and without 1p and 19q deletion (P=0.113, 0.168, 0.116, and 0.122, respectively). Our data showed that RET rearrangement may be not an ideal molecular target for SCLC therapies in People’s Republic of China. Instead, 1p/19q codeletion is a promising marker for a good prognosis and treatment with temozolomide in SCLC. PMID:27366094

  10. [RET/PTC Gene Rearrangements in the Sporadic and Radiogenic Thyroid Tumors: Molecular Genetics, Radiobiology and Molecular Epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ushenkova, L N; Koterov, A N; Biryukov, A P

    2015-01-01

    A review of molecular genetic, radiobiological and molecular epidemiological studies of gene (chromosome) rearrangements RET/PTC in the cells of the thyroid gland as well as the laws in relation to radiation exposure in vitro, in vivo and human populations identified with them are submitted. The data on the c-RET gene and its chimeric constructs with the gene-donors (RET/PTC rearrangements) are considered. The information about the history of the RET/PTC discovery, their types, carcinogenic potential and specificity both to tumor and non-tumor thyroid disease especially for papillary thyroid carcinoma are provided. The data (seven studies) on the induction of RET/PTC after irradiation of tumor and normal thyroid cells in vitro and mice are reviewed. The mechanisms of RET/PTC induction may be associated with DNA double strand breaks and oxidative stress. Some information (three publications) about the possibility of RET/PTC induction by low doses of radiation with low LET (to 0.1 Gy) is given and it is concluded that their potential evidentiary is generally weak. The achievements in the molecular epidemiology of RET/PTC frequency for exposed and unexposed cohorts are stated. At the same time it is noted that, despite the vast array. of data accumulated from 30 countries of the world and more than 20 years of research, the formed provisions are weakly confirmed statistically and have no base corresponding to the canons of evidence-based medicine. The possibility of use of the RET/PTC presence or their frequencies as markers of the papillary thyroid carcinomas and, specifically, their radiogenic forms, is considered. In the first case the answer may be positive, while in the second, the situation is characterized by uncertainty. Based to the above mentioned we came to a conclusion about the need of a pooled or meta-analysis of the totality of the published data. PMID:26310016

  11. Spectroscopic characterization of enzymatic flax retting: Factor analysis of FT-IR and FT-Raman data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, D. D.; Henrikssen, G.; Akin, D. E.; Barton, F. E.

    1998-06-01

    Flax retting is a chemical, microbial or enzymatic process which releases the bast fibers from the stem matrix so they can be suitable for mechanical processing before spinning into linen yarn. This study aims to determine the vibrational spectral features and sampling methods which can be used to evaluate the retting process. Flax stems were retted on a small scale using an enzyme mixture known to yield good retted flax. Processed stems were harvested at various time points in the process and the retting was evaluated by conventional methods including weight loss, color difference and Fried's test, a visual ranking of how the stems disintegrate in hot water. Spectroscopic measurements were performed on either whole stems or powders of the fibers that were mechanically extracted from the stems. Selected regions of spectra were baseline and amplitude corrected using a variant of the multiplicative signal correction method. Principal component regression and partial least-squares regression with full cross-validation were used to determine the spectral features and rate of spectral transformation by regressing the spectra against the retting time in hours. FT-Raman of fiber powders and FT-IR reflectance of whole stems were the simplest and most precise methods for monitoring the retting transformation. Raman tracks the retting by measuring the decrease in aromatic signal and subtle changes in the C-H stretching vibrations. The IR method uses complex spectral features in the fingerprint and carbonyl region, many of which are due to polysaccharide components. Both spectral techniques monitor the retting process with greater precision than the reference method.

  12. Polymorphic light eruption

    MedlinePlus

    ... outdoors. Wear a sun hat. Wear sunglasses with UV protection. Use a lip balm with sunscreen. Alternative Names Polymorphic light eruption; Photodermatosis; PMLE Images Polymorphic light eruption on ...

  13. Building block style recipes for productivity improvement in OPC, RET and ILT flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linghui; Kwa, Denny; Wan, Jinyin; Wang, Tom; St. John, Matt; Deeth, Steven; Chen, Xiaohui; Cecil, Tom; Meng, Xiaodong; Lucas, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Traditional model-based Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) and rule-based Resolution Enhancement Technology (RET) methods have been the workhorse mask synthesis methods in volume production for logic and memory devices for more than 15 years. Rule-based OPC methods have been in standard use for over 20 years now. With continuous technical enhancements, these methods have proven themselves robust, flexible and fast enough to meet many of the technical needs of even the most advanced nodes. Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) methods are well known to have strong benefits in finding flexible mask pattern solutions to improve process window for the most advanced design locations where traditional methods are not sufficient. However, OPC/RET requirements at each node have changed radically in the last 20 years beyond just technical requirements. The volume of engineering work to be done has also skyrocketed. The number of device layers which need OPC/RET can be 10X higher than in earlier nodes. Additionally, the number of mask layers per device layer is often 2X or more times higher with multiple patterning. Finally, the number of features to correct per mask increases ~2X with each node. These factors led to a large increase in the number of OPC engineers needed to develop the complex new OPC/RET recipes for advanced nodes. In this paper, we describe new developments which significantly improve the productivity of OPC engineers to deploy Rule Based OPC (RBOPC), Model Based OPC (MBOPC), AF, and ILT recipes in modern manufacturing flows. In addition to technical improvements such as novel multiple segment hotspot fixing solvers and ILT hot-spot fixing necessary to support correction needs, we have re-architected the entire flow based on how OPC engineers now develop and maintain OPC/RET recipes. The re-architecture of the flow takes advantages of more recent developments in modular and structured programming methods which are known to benefit ease engineering software

  14. The RET/PTC-RAS-BRAF linear signaling cascade mediates the motile and mitogenic phenotype of thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Rosa Marina; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Guarino, Valentina; De Falco, Valentina; Cirafici, Anna Maria; Salvatore, Giuliana; Caiazzo, Fiorina; Basolo, Fulvio; Giannini, Riccardo; Kruhoffer, Mogens; Orntoft, Torben; Fusco, Alfredo; Santoro, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    In papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs), rearrangements of the RET receptor (RET/PTC) and activating mutations in the BRAF or RAS oncogenes are mutually exclusive. Here we show that the 3 proteins function along a linear oncogenic signaling cascade in which RET/PTC induces RAS-dependent BRAF activation and RAS- and BRAF-dependent ERK activation. Adoptive activation of the RET/PTC-RAS-BRAF axis induced cell proliferation and Matrigel invasion of thyroid follicular cells. Gene expression profiling revealed that the 3 oncogenes activate a common transcriptional program in thyroid cells that includes upregulation of the CXCL1 and CXCL10 chemokines, which in turn stimulate proliferation and invasion. Thus, motile and mitogenic properties are intrinsic to transformed thyroid cells and are governed by an epistatic oncogenic signaling cascade. PMID:15761501

  15. A Caged Ret Kinase Inhibitor and its Effect on Motoneuron Development in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Bliman, David; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Kettunen, Petronella; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase receptor RET is implicated in the development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Attaching activity-compromising photocleavable groups (caging) to inhibitors could allow for external spatiotemporally controlled inhibition using light, potentially providing novel information on how these kinase receptors are involved in cellular processes. Here, caged RET inhibitors were obtained from 3-substituted pyrazolopyrimidine-based compounds by attaching photolabile groups to the exocyclic amino function. The most promising compound displayed excellent inhibitory effect in cell-free, as well as live-cell assays upon decaging. Furthermore, inhibition could be efficiently activated with light in vivo in zebrafish embryos and was shown to effect motoneuron development. PMID:26300345

  16. Identification of a Vav2-dependent mechanism for GDNF/Ret control of mesolimbic DAT trafficking.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuyong; Zhao, Chengjiang; Wu, Yingying; Yang, Qiaoqiao; Shao, Aiyun; Wang, Tiepeng; Wu, Jianfu; Yin, Yanqing; Li, Yandong; Hou, Jincan; Zhang, Xinhua; Zhou, Guomin; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Xiaomin; Bustelo, Xosé R; Zhou, Jiawei

    2015-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) homeostasis is essential for a variety of brain activities. Dopamine transporter (DAT)-mediated DA reuptake is one of the most critical mechanisms for normal DA homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of DAT activity in the brain remain poorly understood. Here we show that the Rho-family guanine nucleotide exchange factor protein Vav2 is required for DAT cell surface expression and transporter activity modulated by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its cognate receptor Ret. Mice deficient in either Vav2 or Ret displayed elevated DAT activity, which was accompanied by an increase in intracellular DA selectively in the nucleus accumbens. Vav2(-/-) mice exposed to cocaine showed reduced DAT activity and diminished behavioral cocaine response. Our data demonstrate that Vav2 is a determinant of DAT trafficking in vivo and contributes to the maintenance of DA homeostasis in limbic DA neuron terminals. PMID:26147533

  17. Comprehensive assessment of the disputed RET Y791F variant shows no association with medullary thyroid carcinoma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Rodrigo A; Hatakana, Roxanne; Lourenço, Delmar M; Lindsey, Susan C; Camacho, Cleber P; Almeida, Marcio; Lima, José V; Sekiya, Tomoko; Garralda, Elena; Naslavsky, Michel S; Yamamoto, Guilherme L; Lazar, Monize; Meirelles, Osorio; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Lebrao, Maria Lucia; Duarte, Yeda A O; Blangero, John; Zatz, Mayana; Cerutti, Janete M; Maciel, Rui M B; Toledo, Sergio P A

    2015-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of germline mutations of the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene is vital for the proper recommendation of preventive thyroidectomy in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC)-prone carriers. To gain information regarding the most disputed variant of RET, ATA-A Y791F, we sequenced blood DNA samples from a cohort of 2904 cancer-free elderly individuals (1261 via Sanger sequencing and 1643 via whole-exome/genome sequencing). We also accessed the exome sequences of an additional 8069 individuals from non-cancer-related laboratories and public databanks as well as genetic results from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) project. The mean allelic frequency observed in the controls was 0.0031, with higher occurrences in Central European populations (0.006/0.008). The prevalence of RET Y791F in the control databases was extremely high compared with the 40 known RET pathogenic mutations (P=0.00003), while no somatic occurrence has been reported in tumours. In this study, we report new, unrelated Brazilian individuals with germline RET Y791F-only: two tumour-free elderly controls; two individuals with sporadic MTC whose Y791F-carrying relatives did not show any evidence of tumours; and a 74-year-old phaeochromocytoma patient without MTC. Furthermore, we showed that the co-occurrence of Y791F with the strong RET C634Y mutation explains the aggressive MTC phenotypes observed in a large affected family that was initially reported as Y791F-only. Our literature review revealed that limited analyses have led to the misclassification of RET Y791F as a probable pathogenic variant and, consequently, to the occurrence of unnecessary thyroidectomies. The current study will have a substantial clinical influence, as it reveals, in a comprehensive manner, that RET Y791F only shows no association with MTC susceptibility. PMID:25425582

  18. Promoter CpG island methylation of RET predicts poor prognosis in stage II colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Draht, Muriel X G; Smits, Kim M; Tournier, Benjamin; Jooste, Valerie; Chapusot, Caroline; Carvalho, Beatriz; Cleven, Arjen H G; Derks, Sarah; Wouters, Kim A D; Belt, Eric J T; Stockmann, Hein B A C; Bril, Herman; Weijenberg, Matty P; van den Brandt, Piet A; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Herman, James G; Meijer, Gerrit A; Piard, Françoise; Melotte, Veerle; van Engeland, Manon

    2014-05-01

    Improved prognostic stratification of patients with TNM stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) is desired, since 20-30% of high-risk stage II patients may die within five years of diagnosis. This study was conducted to investigate REarranged during Transfection (RET) gene promoter CpG island methylation as a possible prognostic marker for TNM stage II CRC patients. The utility of RET promoter CpG island methylation in tumors of stage II CRC patients as a prognostic biomarker for CRC related death was studied in three independent series (including 233, 231, and 294 TNM stage II patients, respectively) by using MSP and pyrosequencing. The prognostic value of RET promoter CpG island methylation was analyzed by using Cox regression analysis. In the first series, analyzed by MSP, CRC stage II patients (n = 233) with RET methylated tumors had a significantly worse overall survival as compared to those with unmethylated tumors (HRmultivariable = 2.51, 95%-CI: 1.42-4.43). Despite a significant prognostic effect of RET methylation in stage III patients of a second series, analyzed by MSP, the prognostic effect in stage II patients (n = 231) was not statistically significant (HRmultivariable = 1.16, 95%-CI 0.71-1.92). The third series (n = 294), analyzed by pyrosequencing, confirmed a statistically significant association between RET methylation and poor overall survival in stage II patients (HRmultivariable = 1.91, 95%-CI: 1.04-3.53). Our results show that RET promoter CpG island methylation, analyzed by two different techniques, is associated with a poor prognosis in stage II CRC in two independent series and a poor prognosis in stage III CRC in one series. RET methylation may serve as a useful and robust tool for clinical practice to identify high-risk stage II CRC patients with a poor prognosis. This merits further investigation. PMID:24560444

  19. A Founding Locus within the RET Proto-Oncogene May Account for a Large Proportion of Apparently Sporadic Hirschsprung Disease and a Subset of Cases of Sporadic Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Borrego, Salud; Wright, Fred A.; Fernández, Raquel M.; Williams, Nita; López-Alonso, Manuel; Davuluri, Ramana; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Eng, Charis

    2003-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a common congenital disorder characterized by aganglionosis of the gut. The seemingly unrelated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), pheochromocytoma, and hyperparathyroidism. Yet, germline mutations in the RET proto-oncogene are associated with both MEN 2 and HSCR. In the former, gain-of-function mutations in a limited set of codons is found, whereas, in the latter, loss-of-function mutations are found. However, germline RET mutation is associated with only 3% of a population-based series of isolated HSCR, and little is known about susceptibility to sporadic MTC. We have found previously that specific haplotypes comprising RET coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) comprising exon 2 SNP A45A were strongly associated with HSCR, whereas haplotypes associated with exon 14 SNP S836S were associated with MTC. In this study, we describe three novel intron 1 SNPs, and, together with the coding SNP haplotypes, the data suggest the presence of distinct ancestral haplotypes for HSCR and sporadic MTC in linkage disequilibrium with a putative founding susceptibility locus/loci. The data are consistent with the presence of a very ancient, low-penetrance founder locus ∼20–30 kb upstream of SNP A45A, but the failure of the SNPs to span the locus presents challenges in modeling mode of transmission or ancestry. We postulate that this founding locus is germane to both isolated HSCR and MTC but also that different mutations in this locus would predispose to one or the other. PMID:12474140

  20. Anilinoquinazoline inhibitors of the RET kinase domain-Elaboration of the 7-position.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Allan M; Begum, Habiba; Fairweather, Emma; Fritzl, Samantha; Goldberg, Kristin; Hopkins, Gemma V; Hamilton, Niall M; Lyons, Amanda J; March, H Nikki; Newton, Rebecca; Small, Helen F; Vishwanath, Swamy; Waddell, Ian D; Waszkowycz, Bohdan; Watson, Amanda J; Ogilvie, Donald J

    2016-06-01

    We have previously reported a series of anilinoquinazoline derivatives as potent and selective biochemical inhibitors of the RET kinase domain. However, these derivatives displayed diminished cellular potency. Herein we describe further optimisation of the series through modification of their physicochemical properties, delivering improvements in cell potency. However, whilst cellular selectivity against key targets could be maintained, combining cell potency and acceptable pharmacokinetics proved challenging. PMID:27086121

  1. Identification of selective inhibitors of RET and comparison with current clinical candidates through development and validation of a robust screening cascade

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Amanda J.; Hopkins, Gemma V.; Hitchin, Samantha; Begum, Habiba; Jones, Stuart; Jordan, Allan; Holt, Sarah; March, H. Nikki; Newton, Rebecca; Small, Helen; Stowell, Alex; Waddell, Ian D.; Waszkowycz, Bohdan; Ogilvie, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    RET (REarranged during Transfection) is a receptor tyrosine kinase, which plays pivotal roles in regulating cell survival, differentiation, proliferation, migration and chemotaxis. Activation of RET is a mechanism of oncogenesis in medullary thyroid carcinomas where both germline and sporadic activating somatic mutations are prevalent. At present, there are no known specific RET inhibitors in clinical development, although many potent inhibitors of RET have been opportunistically identified through selectivity profiling of compounds initially designed to target other tyrosine kinases. Vandetanib and cabozantinib, both multi-kinase inhibitors with RET activity, are approved for use in medullary thyroid carcinoma, but additional pharmacological activities, most notably inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor - VEGFR2 (KDR), lead to dose-limiting toxicity. The recent identification of RET fusions present in ~1% of lung adenocarcinoma patients has renewed interest in the identification and development of more selective RET inhibitors lacking the toxicities associated with the current treatments. In an earlier publication [Newton et al, 2016; 1] we reported the discovery of a series of 2-substituted phenol quinazolines as potent and selective RET kinase inhibitors. Here we describe the development of the robust screening cascade which allowed the identification and advancement of this chemical series.  Furthermore we have profiled a panel of RET-active clinical compounds both to validate the cascade and to confirm that none display a RET-selective target profile. PMID:27429741

  2. Assessment of changes in community level physiological profile and molecular diversity of bacterial communities in different stages of jute retting.

    PubMed

    Das, Biswapriya; Chakrabarti, Kalyan; Ghosh, Sagarmoy; Chakraborty, Ashis; Saha, Manabendra Nath

    2013-12-01

    Retting of jute is essentially microbiological and biochemical in nature. Community Level Physiological Profiles (CLPP) as well as genomic diversity of bacterial communities were assessed in water samples collected during pre-retting, after 1st and 2nd charges of retting. The water samples were collected from two widely cultivated jute growing locations, Sonatikari (22 degrees 41'27"N; 88 degrees 35'44"E) and Baduria (22 degrees 44'24"N; 88 degrees 47'24"E), West Bengal, India. The CLPP, expressed as net area under substrate utilization curve, was studied by carbon source utilization patterns in BIOLOG Ecoplates. Molecular diversity was studied by polymerase chain reaction followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) of total DNA from water samples. Both between locations and stages of retting, substrate utilizations pattern were carbohydrates > carboxylic acids > polymers > amino acids > amines/amides > phenolic compounds. Differential substrate utilization pattern as well as variation in banding pattern in DGGE profiles was observed between the two locations and at different stages of retting. The variations in CLPP in different stages of retting were due to the change in bacterial communities. PMID:24506039

  3. A subpopulation of itch-sensing neurons marked by Ret and somatostatin expression.

    PubMed

    Stantcheva, Kalina K; Iovino, Loredana; Dhandapani, Rahul; Martinez, Concepcion; Castaldi, Laura; Nocchi, Linda; Perlas, Emerald; Portulano, Carla; Pesaresi, Martina; Shirlekar, Kalyanee S; de Castro Reis, Fernanda; Paparountas, Triantafillos; Bilbao, Daniel; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2016-04-01

    Itch, the unpleasant sensation that elicits a desire to scratch, is mediated by specific subtypes of cutaneous sensory neuron. Here, we identify a subpopulation of itch-sensing neurons based on their expression of the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. We apply flow cytometry to isolate Ret-positive neurons from dorsal root ganglia and detected a distinct population marked by low levels of Ret and absence of isolectin B4 binding. We determine the transcriptional profile of these neurons and demonstrate that they express neuropeptides such as somatostatin (Sst), the NGF receptor TrkA, and multiple transcripts associated with itch. We validate the selective expression of Sst using an Sst-Cre driver line and ablated these neurons by generating mice in which the diphtheria toxin receptor is conditionally expressed from the sensory neuron-specific Avil locus. Sst-Cre::Avil(iDTR) mice display normal nociceptive responses to thermal and mechanical stimuli. However, scratching behavior evoked by interleukin-31 (IL-31) or agonist at the 5HT1F receptor is significantly reduced. Our data provide a molecular signature for a subpopulation of neurons activated by multiple pruritogens. PMID:26929027

  4. Characterization of bacterial pectinolytic strains involved in the water retting process.

    PubMed

    Tamburini, Elena; León, Alicia Gordillo; Perito, Brunella; Mastromei, Giorgio

    2003-09-01

    Pectinolytic microorganisms involved in the water retting process were characterized. Cultivable mesophilic anaerobic and aerobic bacteria were isolated from unretted and water-retted material. A total of 104 anaerobic and 23 aerobic pectinolytic strains were identified. Polygalacturonase activity was measured in the supernatant of cell cultures; 24 anaerobic and nine aerobic isolates showed an enzymatic activity higher than the reference strains Clostridium felsineum and Bacillus subtilis respectively. We performed the first genotypic characterization of the retting microflora by a 16S amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). Anaerobic isolates were divided into five different groups, and the aerobic isolates were clustered into three groups. 84.6% of the anaerobic and 82.6% of the aerobic isolates consisted of two main haplotypes. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined for 12 strains, representative of each haplotype. All anaerobic strains were assigned to the Clostridium genus, whereas the aerobic isolates were assigned to either the Bacillus or the Paenibacillus genus. Anaerobic isolates with high polygalacturonase (PG) activity belong to two clearly distinct phylogenetic clusters related to C. acetobutylicum-C. felsineum and C. saccharobutylicum species. Aerobic isolates with high PG activity belong to two clearly distinct phylogenetic clusters related to B. subtilisT and B. pumilusT. PMID:12919408

  5. The histone code reader SPIN1 controls RET signaling in liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Henriette; Greschik, Holger; Willmann, Dominica; Ozretić, Luka; Jilg, Cordula Annette; Wardelmann, Eva; Jung, Manfred; Buettner, Reinhard; Schüle, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The histone code reader Spindlin1 (SPIN1) has been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor growth, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we show that reducing SPIN1 levels strongly impairs proliferation and increases apoptosis of liposarcoma cells in vitro and in xenograft mouse models. Combining signaling pathway, genome-wide chromatin binding, and transcriptome analyses, we found that SPIN1 directly enhances expression of GDNF, an activator of the RET signaling pathway, in cooperation with the transcription factor MAZ. Accordingly, knockdown of SPIN1 or MAZ results in reduced levels of GDNF and activated RET explaining diminished liposarcoma cell proliferation and survival. In line with these observations, levels of SPIN1, GDNF, activated RET, and MAZ are increased in human liposarcoma compared to normal adipose tissue or lipoma. Importantly, a mutation of SPIN1 within the reader domain interfering with chromatin binding reduces liposarcoma cell proliferation and survival. Together, our data describe a molecular mechanism for SPIN1 function in liposarcoma and suggest that targeting SPIN1 chromatin association with small molecule inhibitors may represent a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:25749382

  6. Using the Hemoglobin Content of Reticulocytes (RET-He) to Evaluate Anemia in Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peerschke, Ellinor I. B.; Pessin, Melissa S.; Maslak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evaluation of anemia, particularly iron deficiency, in patients with cancer is difficult. This study examined using the hemoglobin content of reticulocytes (RET-He) to rule out iron deficiency, as defined by serum iron studies (transferrin saturation <20%, serum iron <40 µg/ dL, and ferritin <100 ng/mL), in an unselected cancer patient population. Methods Patients were entered into the study based on the existence of concurrent laboratory test requests for CBC and serum iron studies. Results Using a threshold of 32 pg/cell, RET-He ruled out iron deficiency with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 98.5% and 100%, respectively, in the study population (n = 209) and in a subpopulation of patients with low reticulocyte counts (n = 19). In comparison, the NPV of traditional CBC parameters (hemoglobin, <11 g/dL; mean corpuscular volume, <80 fL) was only 88.5%. Conclusions These results support the use of RET-He in the evaluation of iron deficiency in a cancer care setting. PMID:25239418

  7. Yap and Taz are required for Ret-dependent urinary tract morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Reginensi, Antoine; Hoshi, Masato; Boualia, Sami Kamel; Bouchard, Maxime; Jain, Sanjay; McNeill, Helen

    2015-08-01

    Despite the high occurrence of congenital abnormalities of the lower urinary tract in humans, the molecular, cellular and morphological aspects of their development are still poorly understood. Here, we use a conditional knockout approach to inactivate within the nephric duct (ND) lineage the two effectors of the Hippo pathway, Yap and Taz. Deletion of Yap leads to hydronephrotic kidneys with blind-ending megaureters at birth. In Yap mutants, the ND successfully migrates towards, and contacts, the cloaca. However, close analysis reveals that the tip of the Yap(-/-) ND forms an aberrant connection with the cloaca and does not properly insert into the cloaca, leading to later detachment of the ND from the cloaca. Taz deletion from the ND does not cause any defect, but analysis of Yap(-/-);Taz(-/-) NDs indicates that both genes play partially redundant roles in ureterovesical junction formation. Aspects of the Yap(-/-) phenotype resemble hypersensitivity to RET signaling, including excess budding of the ND, increased phospho-ERK and increased expression of Crlf1, Sprouty1, Etv4 and Etv5. Importantly, the Yap(ND) (-/-) ND phenotype can be largely rescued by reducing Ret gene dosage. Taken together, these results suggest that disrupting Yap/Taz activities enhances Ret pathway activity and contributes to pathogenesis of lower urinary tract defects in human infants. PMID:26243870

  8. Distribution of RET Mutations and Evaluation of Treatment Approaches in Hereditary Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğan, Berna İmge; Yüksel, Bağdagül; Tuna, Mazhar Müslüm; Navdar Başaran, Mehtap; Akkurt Kocaeli, Ayşen; Ertörer, Melek Eda; Aydın, Kadriye; Güldiken, Sibel; Şimşek, Yasin; Cihan Karaca, Züleyha; Yılmaz, Merve; Aktürk, Müjde; Anaforoğlu, İnan; Kebapçı, Nur; Duran, Cevdet; Taşlıpınar, Abdullah; Kulaksızoğlu, Mustafa; Gürsoy, Alptekin; Dağdelen, Selçuk; Erdoğan, Murat Faik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This retrospective multicenter study, centrally conducted and supported by the Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism of Turkey, aimed to evaluate the impact of free RET proto-oncogene testing in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) patients. Surgical timing, adequacy of the treatment, and frequency of prophylactic thyroidectomy (PTx) in mutation carriers were also assessed. Methods: Genetic testing for MTC and pheochromocytoma was conducted between July 2008 and January 2012 in 512 patients. Application forms and RET mutation analyses of these patients whose blood samples were sent from various centers around Turkey were assessed retrospectively. An evaluation form was sent to the physicians of the eligible 319 patients who had confirmed sporadic MTC, familial MTC (FMTC), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), or who were mutation carriers. Physicians were asked to give information about the surgical history, latest calcitonin levels, morbidity, mortality, genetic screening, and PTx among family members. Twenty-five centers responded by filling in the forms of 192 patients. Results: Among the 319 patients, RET mutation was detected in 71 (22.3%). Cys634Arg mutation was the most prevalent mutation (43.7%), followed by Val804Met in 18 patients (25.4%), and Cys634Tyr in 6 patients (8.5%). Among 192 MTC patients, the diagnosis was sporadic MTC in 146 (76.4%), FMTC in 14 (7.3%), MEN2A in 15 patients (7.9%), and MEN2B in one patient. The number of mutation carriers among 154 apparently sporadic MTC patients was 8 (5.2%). Ten patients were submitted to PTx out of twenty-four mutation carriers at a mean age of 35±19 years. Conclusion: Turkish people have a similar RET proto-oncogene mutation distribution when compared to other Mediterranean countries. Despite free RET gene testing, the number of the PTx in Turkey is limited and relatively late in the life span of the carriers. This is mainly due to patient and family incompliance and incomplete family

  9. Diversity of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene and its oncogenic mechanism in medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Mehdi; Zarif Yeganeh, Marjan; Sheikholeslami, Sara; Afsari, Farinaz

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and accounts for nearly 1% of all of human cancer. Thyroid cancer has four main histological types: papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. Papillary, follicular, and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas are derived from follicular thyroid cells, whereas medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates from the neural crest parafollicular cells or C-cells of the thyroid gland. MTC represents a neuroendocrine tumor and differs considerably from differentiated thyroid carcinoma. MTC is one of the aggressive types of thyroid cancer, which represents 3-10% of all thyroid cancers. It occurs in hereditary (25%) and sporadic (75%) forms. The hereditary form of MTC has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. According to the present classification, hereditary MTC is classified as a multiple endocrine neoplasi type 2 A & B (MEN2A & MEN2B) and familial MTC (FMTC). The RET proto-oncogene is located on chromosome 10q11.21. It is composed of 21 exons and encodes a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase. RET regulates a complex network of signal transduction pathways during development, survival, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of the enteric nervous system progenitor cells. Gain of function mutations in RET have been well demonstrated in MTC development. Variants of MTC result from different RET mutations, and they have a good genotype-phenotype correlation. Various MTC related mutations have been reported in different exons of the RET gene. We proposed that RET genetic mutations may be different in distinct populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find a geographical pattern of RET mutations in different populations. PMID:26678667

  10. RET/PTC rearrangements preferentially occurred in papillary thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors exposed to high radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Ito, Reiko; Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Taga, Masataka; Imai, Kazue; Cologne, John; Soda, Midori; Arihiro, Koji; Fujihara, Megumu; Abe, Kuniko; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Sekine, Ichiro; Yasui, Wataru; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei

    2008-09-01

    A major early event in papillary thyroid carcinogenesis is constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway caused by alterations of a single gene, typically rearrangements of the RET and NTRK1 genes or point mutations in the BRAF and RAS genes. In childhood papillary thyroid cancer, regardless of history of radiation exposure, RET/PTC rearrangements are a major event. Conversely, in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer among the general population, the most common molecular event is BRAF(V600E) point mutation, not RET/PTC rearrangements. To clarify which gene alteration, chromosome aberration, or point mutation preferentially occurs in radiation-associated adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer, we have performed molecular analyses on RET/PTC rearrangements and BRAF(V600E) mutation in 71 papillary thyroid cancer cases among atomic bomb survivors (including 21 cases not exposed to atomic bomb radiation), in relation to radiation dose as well as time elapsed since atomic bomb radiation exposure. RET/PTC rearrangements showed significantly increased frequency with increased radiation dose (P(trend) = 0.002). In contrast, BRAF(V600E) mutation was less frequent in cases exposed to higher radiation dose (P(trend) < 0.001). Papillary thyroid cancer subjects harboring RET/PTC rearrangements developed this cancer earlier than did cases with BRAF(V600E) mutation (P = 0.03). These findings were confirmed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. These results suggest that RET/PTC rearrangements play an important role in radiation-associated thyroid carcinogenesis. PMID:18757433

  11. A Pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amine Derivative Containing an Isoxazole Moiety Is a Selective and Potent Inhibitor of RET Gatekeeper Mutants.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hojong; Kwak, Yeonui; Choi, Seunghye; Cho, Hanna; Kim, Nam Doo; Sim, Taebo

    2016-01-14

    Aberrant RET kinase signaling plays critical roles in several human cancers such as thyroid carcinoma. The gatekeeper mutants (V804L or V804M) of RET are resistant to currently approved RET inhibitors such as cabozantinib and vandetanib. We, for the first time, report a highly selective and extremely potent RET inhibitor, 6i rationally designed. Compound 6i inhibits strongly RET gatekeeper mutants and other clinically relevant RET mutants as well as wt-RET. This substance also significantly suppresses growth of thyroid cancer-derived TT cell lines and Ba/F3 cells transformed with various RET mutants. Docking studies reveal that the isoxazole moiety in 6i is responsible for binding affinity improvement by providing additional site for H-bonding with Lys758. Also, 6i not only substantially blocks cellular RET autophosphorylation and its downstream pathway, it markedly induces apoptosis and anchorage-independent growth inhibition in TT cell lines while having no effect on normal thyroid Nthy ori-3-1 cells. PMID:26652860

  12. Association between BRAF and RAS mutations, and RET rearrangements and the clinical features of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Jie; Liu, Zeming; Zeng, Wen; Maimaiti, Yusufu; Guo, Yawen; Nie, Xiu; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Xiangwang; Shi, Lan; Liu, Chunping; Huang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the significance of BRAF V600E and Ras mutations, and RET rearrangements in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) in the South central region of China. Methods: We included patients from Union hospital’s pathology archive diagnosed with PTC and meeting the criteria for BRAF mutation, RAS mutation, and RET rearrangement testing. Medical records were analyzed for BRAF and RAS mutation status, RET rearrangements (positive or negative), and a list of standardized clinicopathologic features. Results: Positive BRAF mutation was found to be significantly associated with age and extrathyroidal extension (P=0.011 and P=0.013, respectively). However, there was no significant association between BRAF mutation and sex, tumor size, histological subtype, multifocality, or accompanying nodular goiter and Hashimoto’s. On the other hand, none of these characteristics of PTC were been found to be associated with RAS mutation. Additionally, the frequency of RET rearrangements was higher in patients ≤45 years old than that in patients >45 years old. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the BRAF V600E mutation slightly correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics of PTC in the Han population. Furthermore, neither RAS mutation nor RET rearrangements were found to be associated with the clinicopathological characteristics of PTCs. Our work provides useful information on somatic mutations to predict the risk of PTC in different ethnic groups. PMID:26823860

  13. A novel RET inhibitor with potent efficacy against medullary thyroid cancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Abbas K.; Mukerji, Ridhwi; Shah, Anuj; Timmermann, Barbara N.; Cohen, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Most medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC) recur or progress despite optimal surgical resection. Current targeted-therapies show promise but lack durable efficacy and tolerability. The purpose of this study was to build upon previous in vitro work and evaluate Withaferin A (WA), a novel RET inhibitor, in a metastatic murine model of MTC. Methods 5 million DRO-81-1 human MTC-cells injected in the left posterior neck of Nu/Nu mice uniformly generated metastases to the liver, spleen, and/or lungs. Treatment with WA (8mg/kg/day i.p.×21 days) was started for tumors >100 mm3. Endpoints were survival, tumor>1500 mm3, decreased bodyweight, or body score (all measured thrice weekly). Results All controls (saline; n=5) died or deteriorated from metastatic disease by 7 weeks post injection. All treated animals were alive,(WA; n=5), having tumor regression and growth-delay without toxicity or weight-loss at 6 wks post treatment; p<0.01. Tumor cells treated with WA demonstrated inhibition of total and phospho-RET levels by Western-Blot analysis in a dose-dependent manner (almost complete inhibition with 5uM WA treatment) as well as potent inhibition of phospho-ERK and phospho-AKT levels. Conclusions Withaferin A is a novel natural-product RET-inhibitor with efficacy in a metastatic murine model of MTC. Further long-term efficacy/toxicity studies are warranted to evaluate this compound for clinical translation. PMID:21134556

  14. Retting of jute grown in arsenic contaminated area and consequent arsenic pollution in surface water bodies.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Aparajita; Bairagya, M D; Basu, B; Gupta, P C; Sarkar, S

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity of ground water in Bengal delta is a major environmental catastrophe. Cultivation of jute, a non edible crop after summer rice usually reduces arsenic load of the soil. However, during retting of jute As is present in the crop and thus increase its amount in surface water bodies. To test this hypothesis, a study was carried out in ten farmers' field located in As affected areas of West Bengal, India. As content of soil and variou the jute plant were recorded on 35 and 70 days after sowing (DAS) as well as on harvest date (110 DAS). During the study period, due to the influence of rainfall, As content of surface (0-150 mm) soil fluctuates in a narrow range. As content of jute root was in the range of 1.13 to 9.36 mg kg(-1). As content of both root and leaf attained highest concentration on 35 DAS and continuously decreased with the increase in crop age. However, in case of shoot, the As content initially decreased by 16 to 50% during 35 to 70 DAS and on 110 DAS the value slightly increased over 70 DAS. Retting of jute in pond water increased the water As content by 0.2 to 2.0 mg L(-1). The increment was 1.1 to 4 times higher over the WHO safe limit (0.05 mg L(-1)) for India and Bangladesh. Microbiological assessment in this study reveals the total bacterial population of pre and post retting pond water. Bacterial strains capable in transforming more toxic As-III to less toxic AS-V were screened and six of them were selected based on their As tolerance capacity. Importantly, identified bacterial strain Bacterium C-TJ19 (HQ834294) has As transforming ability as well as pectinolytic activity, which improves fibre quality of jute. PMID:23178784

  15. Systemic and CNS activity of the RET inhibitor vandetanib combined with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in KIF5B-RET re-arranged non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Vivek; Berry, Jenny; Roxas, Michael; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Subbiah, Ishwaria Mohan; Ali, Siraj M; McMahon, Caitlin; Miller, Vincent; Cascone, Tina; Pai, Shobha; Tang, Zhenya; Heymach, John V

    2015-07-01

    In-frame fusion KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene)-RET transcripts have been characterized in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancers and are known oncogenic drivers. The RET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, suppresses fusion-induced, anchorage-independent growth activity. In vitro studies have shown that vandetanib is a high-affinity substrate of breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) but is not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), limiting its blood-brain barrier penetration. A co-administration strategy to enhance the brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-gp/Abcb1- and Bcrp1/Abcg2-mediated efflux with mTOR inhibitors, specifically everolimus, was shown to increase the blood-brain barrier penetration. We report the first bench-to-bedside evidence that RET inhibitor combined with an mTOR inhibitor is active against brain-metastatic RET-rearranged lung cancer and the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration. A 74-year-old female with progressive adenocarcinoma of the lung (wild-type EGFR and no ALK rearrangement) presented for therapy options. A deletion of 5'RET was revealed by FISH assay, indicating RET-gene rearrangement. Because of progressive disease in the brain, she was enrolled in a clinical trial with vandetanib and everolimus (NCT01582191). Comprehensive genomic profiling revealed fusion of KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene) and RET, in addition to AKT2 gene amplification. After two cycles of therapy a repeat MRI brain showed a decrease in the intracranial disease burden and PET/CT showed systemic response as well. Interestingly, AKT2 amplification seen is a critical component of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, alterations of which has been associated with both de novo and acquired resistance to targeted therapy. The addition of everolimus may have both overcome the AKT2 amplification to produce a response in addition to its direct effects on the RET gene. Our case report forms the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration by

  16. Systemic and CNS activity of the RET inhibitor vandetanib combined with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in KIF5B-RET re-arranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Vivek; Berry, Jenny; Roxas, Michael; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Subbiah, Ishwaria Mohan; Ali, Siraj M.; McMahon, Caitlin; Miller, Vincent; Cascone, Tina; Pai, Shobha; Tang, Zhenya; Heymach, John V.

    2016-01-01

    In-frame fusion KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene)-RET transcripts have been characterized in 1–2% of non-small cell lung cancers and are known oncogenic drivers. The RET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, suppresses fusion-induced, anchorage-independent growth activity. In vitro studies have shown that vandetanib is a high-affinity substrate of breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) but is not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), limiting its blood-brain barrier penetration. A co-administration strategy to enhance the brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-gp/Abcb1- and Bcrp1/Abcg2-mediated efflux with mTOR inhibitors, specifically everolimus, was shown to increase the blood-brain barrier penetration. We report the first bench to bed-side evidence that RET inhibitor combined with an mTOR inhibitor is active against brain-metastatic RET-rearranged lung cancer and the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration. A 74 year old female with progressive adenocarcinoma of the lung (wild-type EGFR and no ALK rearrangement) presented for therapy options. A deletion of 5’RET was revealed by FISH assay, indicating RET-gene rearrangement. Because of progressive disease in the brain, she was enrolled in a clinical trial with vandetanib and everolimus (NCT01582191). Comprehensive genomic profiling revealed fusion of KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene) and RET, in addition to AKT2 gene amplification. After 2 cycles of therapy a repeat MRI brain showed a decrease in the intracranial disease burden and PET /CT showed systemic response as well. Interestingly, AKT2 amplification seen is a critical component of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, alterations of which has been associated with both de novo and acquired resistance to targeted therapy. The addition of everolimus may have both overcome the AKT2 amplification to produce a response in addition to its direct effects on the RET gene. Our case report forms the first evidence of blood

  17. Exclusion of the RET proto-oncogene as candidate for total colonic aganglionsis in the spotting lethal (sl) rat strain

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccherini, I.; Matera, I.; Devoto, M.

    1994-09-01

    Causative germline mutations and deletions of the RET proto-oncogene have been demonstrated in a number of Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) patients showing either short- or long-segment intestinal aganglionosis, including both sporadic and familial cases with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The spotting lethal (sl) rats show autosomal recessive recurrence of total colonic aganglionosis which resembles the long-segment HSCR type in humans with 100% mortality of the homozygotes at 4-5 weeks of age. Heterozygotes were backcrossed with DA rats and the F2 offspring was used to test the possible cosegregation of the aganglionosis and the RET proto-oncogene. A genomic DNA fragment of the rat RET gene was amplified using degenerated oligonucleotides, subcloned and sequenced. The coding portion of this DNA fragment (300bp) shares 93% and 81% of its amino acids with the murine and human RET proto-oncogene, respectively. An A{yields}G transition in the third nucleotide of the alanine codon corresponding to amino acid Glu90 of the human RET gene was identified in the sl but not in the wild type DA strain. This mutation creates a Bsp 1286I restriction site. Restriction analysis performed on 57 affected rats (mutated homozygotes) of the F2 generation revealed independent segregation between the rat colonic aganglionosis gene and RET, thus allowing the exclusion of the latter proto-oncogene as candidate for the mutation present in the sl rat strain. Several different candidate rat chromosomal regions are being analyzed in order to proceed with the mapping of the genetic defect in the sl rats.

  18. Interleukin 24 is induced by the RET/PTC3 oncoprotein and is an autocrine growth factor for epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Shogo; Rothstein, Jay L

    2004-09-30

    Thyroid cancers, like hematological malignancies, are commonly associated with chromosomal translocations leading to the formation of fusion proteins. Through altered signaling by fusion proteins, cell death and survival pathways are disrupted and the physiological balance of cell-cell communication may be lost. A consequence of this disruption is the release of factors by stressed cells that alert the host. One type of host response is leukocytic infiltration that may develop into chronic inflammation or autoimmune disease. Although inflammation can be associated with neoplastic tissue, the mechanism driving this process is largely unknown. Therefore, to address the mechanism of cancer inflammation we investigated the effects of an oncogene in a murine model system. A comprehensive genetic analysis revealed several soluble factors that were induced by RET/papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC)3 gene expression including several proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines and immunologically relevant costimulatory molecules. Following a large genetic screen using RP3-expressing thyroid cells, we identified a highly abundant transcript and later identified it as interleukin 24 (Il24), a cytokine with diverse tumor suppressor and inflammatory activities. We show that RET/PTC3 induces Il24 expression in rat thyrocytes and that this expression is dependent on the signaling properties of its tyrosine kinase. Likewise, RET/PTC3 induces large amounts of Il24 following expression in murine thyrocytes, but its expression is dramatically reduced in poorly differentiated carcinomas, a finding that parallels the loss of RET/PTC3 expression. Consistent with its behavior as a tumor suppressor, the loss of Il24 coincided with the loss of RET/PTC3 in poorly differentiated mouse tumors. A functional role of Il24 in the autocrine growth/survival of RET/PTC3-expressing thyroid cells was identified helping to support its role in cellular transformation. These data suggest that the induction of

  19. Natural Fiber Composite Retting, Preform Manufacture and Molding (Project 18988/Agreement 16313)

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Howe, Daniel T.; Laddha, Sachin; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2009-12-31

    Plant-based natural fibers can be used in place of glass in fiber reinforced automotive composites to reduce weight, cost and provide environmental benefits. Current automotive applications use natural fibers in injection molded thermoplastics for interior, non-structural applications. Compression molded natural fiber reinforced thermosets have the opportunity to extend natural fiber composite applications to structural and semi-structural parts and exterior parts realizing further vehicle weight savings. The development of low cost molding and fiber processing techniques for large volumes of natural fibers has helped in understanding the barriers of non-aqueous retting. The retting process has a significant effect on the fiber quality and its processing ability that is related to the natural fiber composite mechanical properties. PNNL has developed a compression molded fiber reinforced composite system of which is the basis for future preforming activities and fiber treatment. We are using this process to develop preforming techniques and to validate fiber treatment methods relative to OEM provided application specifications. It is anticipated for next fiscal year that demonstration of larger quantities of SMC materials and molding of larger, more complex components with a more complete testing regimen in coordination with Tier suppliers under OEM guidance.

  20. NSF RET in Southern Africa: community and research experiences in soil science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenov, N.; Pollard, A.; Wellbeloved-Stone, R.; Riffel, H.; Chavarro, D.; D'Odorico, P.

    2010-12-01

    Collaborative research on belowground carbon storage in the Kalahari Desert has provided opportunities for international research experience for US middle and high school teachers, funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Program. This presentation will highlight the field research experiences, international high school visit, relationships fostered with Botswana high school teachers, and new soil science curricula developed by three US environmental science teachers. New lesson plans and activities on carbon sequestration, fine and coarse root mapping, and soil organic carbon cycling and other learning tools have been incorporated into the existing Underground Safari webpage (instaar.colorado.edu/undergroundsafari) (Figure 1). An interactive blog, undergroundsafari.edublogs.org, has been developed to allow dynamic discourse between students, teachers and researchers on this project. Lessons learned from classroom trials of curriculum and use of other RET experience-motivated activities in the classroom will be discussed. Figure 1. Screen capture of the "Videos" page from the Underground Safari website for NSF DEB project, "Collaborative Research: Distribution and dynamics of belowground carbon in savannas."

  1. HSP90 inhibition blocks ERBB3 and RET phosphorylation in myxoid/round cell liposarcoma and causes massive cell death in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Setareh; Järnum, Sofia; Vannas, Christoffer; Udhane, Sameer; Jonasson, Emma; Tomic, Tajana Tesan; Grundevik, Pernilla; Fagman, Henrik; Hansson, Magnus; Kalender, Zeynep; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Dolatabadi, Soheila; Stratford, Eva Wessel; Myklebost, Ola; Eriksson, Mikael; Stenman, Göran; Stock, Regine Schneider; Ståhlberg, Anders; Åman, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Myxoid sarcoma (MLS) is one of the most common types of malignant soft tissue tumors. MLS is characterized by the FUS-DDIT3 or EWSR1-DDIT3 fusion oncogenes that encode abnormal transcription factors. The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) encoding RET was previously identified as a putative downstream target gene to FUS-DDIT3 and here we show that cultured MLS cells expressed phosphorylated RET together with its ligand Persephin. Treatment with RET specific kinase inhibitor Vandetanib failed to reduce RET phosphorylation and inhibit cell growth, suggesting that other RTKs may phosphorylate RET. A screening pointed out EGFR and ERBB3 as the strongest expressed phosphorylated RTKs in MLS cells. We show that ERBB3 formed nuclear and cytoplasmic complexes with RET and both RTKs were previously reported to form complexes with EGFR. The formation of RTK hetero complexes could explain the observed Vandetanib resistence in MLS. EGFR and ERBB3 are clients of HSP90 that help complex formation and RTK activation. Treatment of cultured MLS cells with HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG, caused loss of RET and ERBB3 phosphorylation and lead to rapid cell death. Treatment of MLS xenograft carrying Nude mice resulted in massive necrosis, rupture of capillaries and hemorrhages in tumor tissues. We conclude that complex formation between RET and other RTKs may cause RTK inhibitor resistance. HSP90 inhibitors can overcome this resistance and are thus promising drugs for treatment of MLS/RCLS. PMID:26595521

  2. Comprehensive analysis of RET common and rare variants in a series of Spanish Hirschsprung patients confirms a synergistic effect of both kinds of events

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background RET is the major gene associated to Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) with differential contributions of its rare and common, coding and noncoding mutations to the multifactorial nature of this pathology. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive study of our HSCR series evaluating the involvement of both RET rare variants (RVs) and common variants (CVs) in the context of the disease. Methods RET mutational screening was performed by dHPLC and direct sequencing for the identification of RVs. In addition Taqman technology was applied for the genotyping of 3 RET CVs previously associated to HSCR, including a variant lying in an enhancer domain within RET intron 1 (rs2435357). Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS v.17.0 to analyze the distribution of the variants. Results Our results confirm the strongest association to HSCR for the "enhancer" variant, and demonstrate a significantly higher impact of it in male versus female patients. Integration of the RET RVs and CVs analysis showed that in 91.66% of cases with both kinds of mutational events, the enhancer allele is in trans with the allele bearing the RET RV. Conclusions A gender effect exists on both the transmission and distribution of rare coding and common HSCR causing mutations. In addition, these RET CVs and RVs seem to act in a synergistic way leading to HSCR phenotype. PMID:21995290

  3. Investigation of the bacterial retting community of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) under different conditions using next-generation semiconductor sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of the natural fibers requires the development of cost-efficient processing of fibers with consistent, uniform properties. The microbial communities associated with kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) plant fibers during retting were determined in an effort to identify possible means of accelerating...

  4. Microbiological and Biochemical Characterization of Cassava Retting, a Traditional Lactic Acid Fermentation for Foo-Foo (Cassava Flour) Production

    PubMed Central

    Brauman, A.; Keleke, S.; Malonga, M.; Miambi, E.; Ampe, F.

    1996-01-01

    The overall kinetics of retting, a spontaneous fermentation of cassava roots performed in central Africa, was investigated in terms of microbial-population evolution and biochemical and physicochemical parameters. During the traditional process, endogenous cyanogens were almost totally degraded, plant cell walls were lysed by the simultaneous action of pectin methylesterase and pectate lyase, and organic acids (C(inf2) to C(inf4)) were produced. Most microorganisms identified were found to be facultative anaerobes which used the sugars (sucrose, glucose, and fructose) present in the roots as carbon sources. After 24 h of retting, the fermentation reached an equilibrium that was reproducible in all the spontaneous fermentations studied. Lactic acid bacteria were largely predominant (over 99% of the total flora after 48 h) and governed the fermentation. The epiphytic flora was first replaced by Lactococcus lactis, then by Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and finally, at the end of the process, by Lactobacillus plantarum. These organisms produced ethanol and high concentrations of lactate, which strongly acidified the retting juice. In addition, the rapid decrease in partial oxygen pressure rendered the process anaerobic. Strict anaerobes, such as Clostridium spp., developed and produced the volatile fatty acids (mainly butyrate) responsible, together with lactate, for the typical flavor of retted cassava. Yeasts (mostly Candida spp.) did not seem to play a significant role in the process, but their increasing numbers in the last stage of the process might influence the flavor and the preservation of the end products. PMID:16535378

  5. Microbiological and biochemical characterization of cassava retting, a traditional lactic Acid fermentation for foo-foo (cassava flour) production.

    PubMed

    Brauman, A; Keleke, S; Malonga, M; Miambi, E; Ampe, F

    1996-08-01

    The overall kinetics of retting, a spontaneous fermentation of cassava roots performed in central Africa, was investigated in terms of microbial-population evolution and biochemical and physicochemical parameters. During the traditional process, endogenous cyanogens were almost totally degraded, plant cell walls were lysed by the simultaneous action of pectin methylesterase and pectate lyase, and organic acids (C(inf2) to C(inf4)) were produced. Most microorganisms identified were found to be facultative anaerobes which used the sugars (sucrose, glucose, and fructose) present in the roots as carbon sources. After 24 h of retting, the fermentation reached an equilibrium that was reproducible in all the spontaneous fermentations studied. Lactic acid bacteria were largely predominant (over 99% of the total flora after 48 h) and governed the fermentation. The epiphytic flora was first replaced by Lactococcus lactis, then by Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and finally, at the end of the process, by Lactobacillus plantarum. These organisms produced ethanol and high concentrations of lactate, which strongly acidified the retting juice. In addition, the rapid decrease in partial oxygen pressure rendered the process anaerobic. Strict anaerobes, such as Clostridium spp., developed and produced the volatile fatty acids (mainly butyrate) responsible, together with lactate, for the typical flavor of retted cassava. Yeasts (mostly Candida spp.) did not seem to play a significant role in the process, but their increasing numbers in the last stage of the process might influence the flavor and the preservation of the end products. PMID:16535378

  6. Effect of ret/PTC 1 rearrangement on transcription and post-transcriptional regulation in a papillary thyroid carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Susanne; Smyth, Paul; Finn, Stephen P; Denning, Karen; Flavin, Richard; O'Regan, Esther M; Li, Jinghuan; Potratz, Astrid; Guenther, Simone M; Henfrey, Richard; O'Leary, John J; Sheils, Orla

    2006-01-01

    Background microRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of non-coding single stranded RNAs measuring approximately 22 nt in length that have been found to control cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. miRNAs negatively regulate their target genes and recently have been implicated in tumourigenesis. Furthermore, miRNA expression profiling correlates with various cancers, with these genes thought to act as both tumour suppressors and oncogenes. ret/PTC 1 is an oncogene with constitutive kinase activity implicated in the development of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). This rearrangement leads to aberrant MAPK activation that is implicated in PTC tumourigenesis. Aim The aim of this study was to identify the effect that ret/PTC 1 has on transcription and post-transcriptional regulation in PTC by using DNA microarray and microRNA analysis. Results DNA microarray analysis revealed a group of genes differentially expressed between normal thyroid cell lines and those harbouring a ret/PTC 1 rearrangement. Furthermore, a unique miRNA expression signature differentiated between PTC cell lines with ret/PTC 1 and a normal thyroid cell line. 21 miRNAs showed significant overexpression and 14 miRNAs showed underexpression in these cell lines when compared to normal thyroid. Several of these up/down regulated miRNAs may be involved in PTC pathogenesis. PMID:17156473

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of the kenaf fiber microbial retting community by semiconductor sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kenaf, hemp, and jute have been used for cordage and fiber production since prehistory. To obtain the fibers, harvested plants are soaked in ponds where indigenous microflora digests pectins and other heteropolysaccharides, releasing fibers in a process called retting. Renewed interest in “green” ...

  8. GFRA2 Identifies Cardiac Progenitors and Mediates Cardiomyocyte Differentiation in a RET-Independent Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Kokkinopoulos, Ioannis; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Nowotschin, Sonja; Shiraishi, Manabu; Ruchaya, Prashant; Miller, Duncan; Harmer, Stephen; Poliandri, Ariel; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Sakata, Yasushi; Dunkel, Leo; Tinker, Andrew; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Sawa, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Ozono, Keiichi; Suzuki, Ken; Yashiro, Kenta

    2016-07-26

    A surface marker that distinctly identifies cardiac progenitors (CPs) is essential for the robust isolation of these cells, circumventing the necessity of genetic modification. Here, we demonstrate that a Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor containing neurotrophic factor receptor, Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha 2 (Gfra2), specifically marks CPs. GFRA2 expression facilitates the isolation of CPs by fluorescence activated cell sorting from differentiating mouse and human pluripotent stem cells. Gfra2 mutants reveal an important role for GFRA2 in cardiomyocyte differentiation and development both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, the cardiac GFRA2 signaling pathway is distinct from the canonical pathway dependent on the RET tyrosine kinase and its established ligands. Collectively, our findings establish a platform for investigating the biology of CPs as a foundation for future development of CP transplantation for treating heart failure. PMID:27396331

  9. Microbial populations associated with the retting of melon pods (Colocynthis citrullus L.) during seed recovery.

    PubMed

    Offonry, S U; Achi, O K

    1998-01-01

    The traditional process for the retting of melon pulp and microbiological characteristics in the recovery of melon seeds (Colocynthis citrullus L.) were investigated. Melon pods were sliced open and exposed for seven days. The pulp underwent a natural fermentation that was characterized by the growth of microorganisms to 10(8)-10(10) cfu/g. The pH fluctuated between 4.8 and 5.1 with a lactic acid content of 0.72%. Bacillus subtilis, B. polymyxa, Lactobacillus fermentum, L. brevis and Streptococcusfaecalis were the predominant microorganisms but, significant contributions were made by Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterobacter cloacae. Penicillium, Aspergillus and Rhizopus species including the yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida krusei and Deboromyces hansenii were isolated from the fermentation. Growth of microorganisms was completely inhibited in antibiotic-treated samples indicating that the melon pods were the main source of microorganisms for the fermentation. PMID:9839833

  10. Decoding Tumor Phenotypes for ALK, ROS1, and RET Fusions in Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Radiomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Insuk; Cho, Jong Ho; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Yoon-La; Kim, Hyeseung; Lee, Genehee; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jhingook

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quantitative imaging using radiomics can capture distinct phenotypic differences between tumors and may have predictive power for certain phenotypes according to specific genetic mutations. We aimed to identify the clinicoradiologic predictors of tumors with ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), ROS1 (c-ros oncogene 1), or RET (rearranged during transfection) fusions in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 539 pathologically confirmed lung adenocarcinomas were included in this retrospective study. The baseline clinicopathologic characteristics were retrieved from the patients’ medical records and the ALK/ROS1/RET fusion status was reviewed. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography imaging characteristics were evaluated using a radiomics approach. Significant features for the fusion-positive tumor prediction model were extracted from all of the clinicoradiologic features, and were used to calculate diagnostic performance for predicting 3 fusions’ positivity. The clinicoradiologic features were compared between ALK versus ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors to identify the clinicoradiologic similarity between the 2 groups. The fusion-positive tumor prediction model was a combination of younger age, advanced tumor stage, solid tumor on CT, higher values for SUVmax and tumor mass, lower values for kurtosis and inverse variance on 3-voxel distance than those of fusion-negative tumors (sensitivity and specificity, 0.73 and 0.70, respectively). ALK fusion-positive tumors were significantly different in tumor stage, central location, SUVmax, homogeneity on 1-, 2-, and 3-voxel distances, and sum mean on 2-voxel distance compared with ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors. ALK/ROS1/RET fusion-positive lung adenocarcinomas possess certain clinical and imaging features that enable good discrimination of fusion-positive from fusion-negative lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:26469915

  11. Low dose irradiation of thyroid cells reveals a unique transcriptomic and epigenetic signature in RET/PTC-positive cells.

    PubMed

    Abou-El-Ardat, Khalil; Monsieurs, Pieter; Anastasov, Nataša; Atkinson, Mike; Derradji, Hanane; De Meyer, Tim; Bekaert, Sofie; Van Criekinge, Wim; Baatout, Sarah

    2012-03-01

    The high doses of radiation received in the wake of the Chernobyl incident and the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been linked to the increased appearance of thyroid cancer in the children living in the vicinity of the site. However, the data gathered on the effect of low doses of radiation on the thyroid remain limited. We have examined the genome wide transcriptional response of a culture of TPC-1 human cell line of papillary thyroid carcinoma origin with a RET/PTC1 translocation to various doses (0.0625, 0.5, and 4Gy) of X-rays and compared it to response of thyroids with a RET/PTC3 translocation and against wild-type mouse thyroids irradiated with the same doses using Affymetrix microarrays. We have found considerable overlap at a high dose of 4Gy in both RET/PTC-positive systems but no common genes at 62.5mGy. In addition, the response of RET/PTC-positive system at all doses was distinct from the response of wild-type thyroids with both systems signaling down different pathways. Analysis of the response of microRNAs in TPC-1 cells revealed a radiation-responsive signature of microRNAs in addition to dose-responsive microRNAs. Our results point to the fact that a low dose of X-rays seems to have a significant proliferative effect on normal thyroids. This observation should be studied further as opposed to its effect on RET/PTC-positive thyroids which was subtle, anti-proliferative and system-dependent. PMID:22027090

  12. Polymorphous computing fabric

    DOEpatents

    Wolinski, Christophe Czeslaw; Gokhale, Maya B.; McCabe, Kevin Peter

    2011-01-18

    Fabric-based computing systems and methods are disclosed. A fabric-based computing system can include a polymorphous computing fabric that can be customized on a per application basis and a host processor in communication with said polymorphous computing fabric. The polymorphous computing fabric includes a cellular architecture that can be highly parameterized to enable a customized synthesis of fabric instances for a variety of enhanced application performances thereof. A global memory concept can also be included that provides the host processor random access to all variables and instructions associated with the polymorphous computing fabric.

  13. Effects of siRNA on RET/PTC3 Junction Oncogene in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: From Molecular and Cellular Studies to Preclinical Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Hafiz Muhammad; Urbinati, Giorgia; Chapuis, Hubert; DesmaEle, Didier; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Couvreur, Patrick; Massaad-Massade, Liliane

    2014-01-01

    RET/PTC3 junction oncogene is typical of radiation-induced childhood papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) with a short latency period. Since, RET/PTC3 is only present in the tumour cells, thus represents an interesting target for specific therapy by small interfering RNA (siRNA). Our aim is to demonstrate in vitro and in vivo molecular and cellular effects of siRNA on RET/PTC3 knockdown for therapeutic application.First, we established a novel cell line stably expressing RET/PTC3 junction oncogene, named RP3 which was found tumorigenic in nude mice compared to NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Among four siRNAs and five concentrations tested against RET/PTC3, an efficient siRNA RET/PTC3 and an appropriate dose (50 nM) were selected which showed significant inhibition (p<0.001) of gene (RT-qPCR) and protein (Western blot) expressions. This siRNA was found efficient in RP3 cells (harbouring RET/PTC3) but non-efficient in BHP10-3 SCmice cell line (harbouring RET/PTC1) showing that a specific siRNA against fusion sequence is required to target the junction oncogene. In vitro siRNA RET/PTC3 showed significant (p<0.001) inhibitory effects on RP3 cell viability (MTT assay) and on invasion/migration (IncuCyte scratch test) with blockage of cell cycle at G0/G1 phase (flow cytometry) and induced apoptosis by caspase-3 and PARP1 cleavage (WB). After intravenous injection in nude mice, respective squalene (SQ) nanoparticles (NPs) of siRNA RET/PTC3 significantly (p<0.001) reduced RP3 tumour growth, oncogene and oncoprotein expressions, induced apoptosis and partially restored differentiation (decrease in Ki67). Hence, our findings highly support the use of siRNA RET/PTC3-SQ NPs as a new promising treatment for patients affected by PTC expressing RET/PTC3. PMID:24759995

  14. RET/PTC rearrangements in thyroid nodules: studies in irradiated and not irradiated, malignant and benign thyroid lesions in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Elisei, R; Romei, C; Vorontsova, T; Cosci, B; Veremeychik, V; Kuchinskaya, E; Basolo, F; Demidchik, E P; Miccoli, P; Pinchera, A; Pacini, F

    2001-07-01

    Rearrangements of the RET proto-oncogene may occur in both naturally occurring and radiation-induced papillary thyroid carcinomas. Conflicting results on the frequency and type of RET/PTC rearrangements have been reported in relation to age, radiation exposure, and histological tumor variant. We designed the present study to evaluate in a single laboratory, using the same methodologies, the pattern of RET/PTC activation in thyroid tumors from different groups of patients (exposed or not exposed to radiation, children or adults, with benign or malignant tumors) in relationship to the above mentioned variables. We studied 154 patients with benign nodules (n = 65) or papillary thyroid cancer (n = 89). In the last group, 25 were Belarus children exposed to the post-Chernobyl radioactive fallout, 17 were Italian adults exposed to external radiotherapy for benign diseases, and 47 were Italian subjects (25 children and 22 adults) with no history of radiation exposure. Among patients with benign thyroid nodules, 21 were Belarus subjects (18 children and 3 adults) exposed to the post-Chernobyl radioactive fallout, 8 were Italian adults exposed to external radiation on the head and neck, and 36 were Italian adults with naturally occurring benign nodules. The overall frequency of RET/PTC rearrangements in papillary thyroid cancer was 55%. The highest frequency was found in post-Chernobyl children and was significantly higher (P = 0.02) than that found in Italian children not exposed to radiation, but not significantly higher than that found in adults exposed to external radiation. No difference of RET/PTC rearrangements was found between samples from irradiated (external x-ray) or not irradiated adult patients, as well as between children and adults with naturally occurring, not irradiated, thyroid cancer. When analyzing the type of RET/PTC rearrangement (RET/PTC1 or RET/PTC3), no major difference was apparent. In addition, eight cases with an unknown RET/PTC rearrangement

  15. [Dose-Response Dependences for Frequency of RET/PTC Gene Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma after Irradiation. Simple Pooling Analysis of Molecular Epidemiological Data].

    PubMed

    Koterov, A N; Ushenkova, L N; Biryukov, A P

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of all possible publications on the theme included in the previously formed base of sources on molecular epidemiology of RET/PTC rearrangements in thyroid papillary carcinoma a pooled analysis ("simple pooling data") on determination of the dose-effect dependences for RET/PTC frequency in radiogenic carcinomas of various irradiated groups was performed. (They are groups subjected to radiotherapeutic exposure, residents near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (CNPP) and victims of nuclear bombing). The tendency to Pearson linear correlation (r = 0.746; p = 0.148) between the frequency of RET/PTC and the estimated dose on thyroid in the regions affected by the CNPP accident was revealed. But this tendency was recognized to be random owing to abnormally low values of the indicator for the most contaminated Gomel region. The method tentatively called "case-control" showed reliable differences in thyroid dose values for carcinomas with RET/PTC and without those. The versatility of changes was found: the lack of RET/PTC for radiotherapeutic impacts was associated with higher doses, whereas in case of the CNPP accident and for nuclear bombing victims it was the opposite. Probably, in the first case the "cellular cleaning" phenomenon after exposure to very high doses took place. Search of direct Pearson correlations between average/median thyroid doses on groups and RET/PTC frequency in carcinomas of these groups showed a high reliability for the dose-effect dependences- at the continuous dose scale (for RET/PTC in total and RET/PTC1 respectively: r = 0.830; p = 0.002 and r = 0.906; p = 0.0003); while there was no significant correlation received for RET/PTC3. When using the weighting least square regression analysis (proceeding from the number of carcinomas in samples), the specified regularities remained. Attempts to influence the strength of correlation by exception ofthe data of all the samples connected with the accident on the CNPP did not significantly

  16. An orally available tyrosine kinase ALK and RET dual inhibitor bearing the tetracyclic benzo[b]carbazolone core.

    PubMed

    Song, Zilan; Xia, Zongjun; Ji, Yinchun; Xing, Li; Gao, Yinglei; Ai, Jing; Geng, Meiyu; Zhang, Ao

    2016-08-01

    Our early structure-activity relationship study has identified benzo[b]carbazolone 6 as a high potency orally bioavailable ALK inhibitor. Further lead profiling disclosed that 6 is active against both ALK resistant and hot spot-activating mutants, and is also highly potent against RET kinase. Tumor stasis and partial tumor regression were achieved with 6 in both NIH/3T3-EML4-ALK and NIH/3T3-EML4-ALK L1196M xenograft models. Based on the optimal in vitro and in vivo antitumor efficacy, compound 6 is now being profiled further in our preclinical settings as a new orally available ALK/RET dual inhibitor. PMID:27131066

  17. KIF26A is an unconventional kinesin and regulates GDNF-Ret signaling in enteric neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruyun; Niwa, Shinsuke; Homma, Noriko; Takei, Yosuke; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2009-11-13

    The kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are motor proteins that transport organelles and protein complexes in a microtubule- and ATP-dependent manner. We identified KIF26A as a new member of the murine KIFs. KIF26A is a rather atypical member as it lacks ATPase activity. Mice with a homozygous deletion of Kif26a developed a megacolon with enteric nerve hyperplasia. Kif26a-/- enteric neurons showed hypersensitivity for GDNF-Ret signaling, and we find that KIF26A suppressed GDNF-Ret signaling by direct binding and inhibition of Grb2, an essential component of GDNF/Akt/ERK signaling. We therefore propose that the unconventional kinesin KIF26A plays a key role in enteric nervous system development by repressing a cell growth signaling pathway. PMID:19914172

  18. Role of H2O2 in RET/PTC1 chromosomal rearrangement produced by ionizing radiation in human thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Ameziane-El-Hassani, Rabii; Boufraqech, Myriem; Lagente-Chevallier, Odile; Weyemi, Urbain; Talbot, Monique; Métivier, Didier; Courtin, Françoise; Bidart, Jean-Michel; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Schlumberger, Martin; Dupuy, Corinne

    2010-05-15

    During childhood, the thyroid gland is one of the most sensitive organs to the carcinogenetic effects of ionizing radiation that may lead to papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) associated with RET/PTC oncogene rearrangement. Exposure to ionizing radiation induces a transient "oxidative burst" through radiolysis of water, which can cause DNA damage and mediates part of the radiation effects. H(2)O(2) is a potent DNA-damaging agent that induces DNA double-strand breaks, and consequently, chromosomal aberrations. Irradiation by 5 Gy X-ray increased extracellular H(2)O(2). Therefore, we investigated the implication of H(2)O(2) in the generation of RET/PTC1 rearrangement after X-ray exposure. We developed a highly specific and sensitive nested reverse transcription-PCR method. By using the human thyroid cell line HTori-3, previously found to produce RET/PTC1 after gamma-irradiation, we showed that H(2)O(2), generated during a 5 Gy X-ray irradiation, causes DNA double-strand breaks and contributes to RET/PTC1 formation. Pretreatment of cells with catalase, a scavenger of H(2)O(2), significantly decreased RET/PTC1 rearrangement formation. Finally, RET/PTC chromosomal rearrangement was detected in HTori-3.1 cells after exposure of cells to H(2)O(2) (25 micromol/L), at a dose that did not affect the cell viability. This study shows for the first time that H(2)O(2) is able to cause RET/PTC1 rearrangement in thyroid cells and consequently highlights that oxidative stress could be responsible for the occurrence of RET/PTC1 rearrangement found in thyroid lesions even in the absence of radiation exposure. PMID:20424115

  19. RET mutation p.S891A in a Chinese family with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma and associated cutaneous amyloidosis binding OSMR variant p.G513D

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiao-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Zhen-Guang; Cao, Jin-Lin; Du, Juan; Liu, Nai-Fang; Li, Feng; Sheng, Mao; Fu, Er; Guo, Jian; Jia, Hong; Zhang, Yi-Ming; Ma, Ju-Ming

    2015-01-01

    There are no reports on the relationship between familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) associated with cutaneous amyloidosis (CA) and RET or OSMR/IL31RA gene mutations. In this study, we investigated a Chinese family with FMTC/CA and found a recurrent RET c.2671T>G (p.S891A) mutation in six of 17 family members. Three of the six p.S891A mutation carriers presented with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Of them, three (two with and one without MTC) were diagnosed as having combined lichen/macular biphasic CA. We also identified a novel RET variant, c.1573C>T (p.R525W) in five members. Of them, three carriers had no evidence of thyroid/skin or basal serum/stimulated calcitonin abnormalities. In vitro cell proliferation assay indicated that oncogenic activity of RET p.S891A was slightly enhanced by p.R525W, whereas p.R525W alone had no effect on cell proliferation. Meanwhile, we identified a novel OSMR variant, c.1538G>A (p.G513D) in seven members. We noticed that three OSMR p.G513D carriers presenting with CA also had the RET p.S891A mutation. Our investigation indicated that the RET p.S891A mutation combined with OSMR p.G513D may underlie a novel phenotype manifesting as FMTC and CA. PMID:26356818

  20. RET mutation p.S891A in a Chinese family with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma and associated cutaneous amyloidosis binding OSMR variant p.G513D.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiao-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Zhen-Guang; Cao, Jin-Lin; Du, Juan; Liu, Nai-Fang; Li, Feng; Sheng, Mao; Fu, Er; Guo, Jian; Jia, Hong; Zhang, Yi-Ming; Ma, Ju-Ming

    2015-10-20

    There are no reports on the relationship between familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) associated with cutaneous amyloidosis (CA) and RET or OSMR/IL31RA gene mutations. In this study, we investigated a Chinese family with FMTC/CA and found a recurrent RET c.2671T>G (p.S891A) mutation in six of 17 family members. Three of the six p.S891A mutation carriers presented with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Of them, three (two with and one without MTC) were diagnosed as having combined lichen/macular biphasic CA. We also identified a novel RET variant, c.1573C>T (p.R525W) in five members. Of them, three carriers had no evidence of thyroid/skin or basal serum/stimulated calcitonin abnormalities. In vitro cell proliferation assay indicated that oncogenic activity of RET p.S891A was slightly enhanced by p.R525W, whereas p.R525W alone had no effect on cell proliferation. Meanwhile, we identified a novel OSMR variant, c.1538G>A (p.G513D) in seven members. We noticed that three OSMR p.G513D carriers presenting with CA also had the RET p.S891A mutation. Our investigation indicated that the RET p.S891A mutation combined with OSMR p.G513D may underlie a novel phenotype manifesting as FMTC and CA. PMID:26356818

  1. Activated Alk triggers prolonged neurogenesis and Ret upregulation providing a therapeutic target in ALK-mutated neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cazes, Alex; Lopez-Delisle, Lucille; Tsarovina, Konstantina; Pierre-Eugène, Cécile; De Preter, Katleen; Peuchmaur, Michel; Nicolas, André; Provost, Claire; Louis-Brennetot, Caroline; Daveau, Romain; Kumps, Candy; Cascone, Ilaria; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Prignon, Aurélie; Speleman, Frank; Rohrer, Hermann; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of the ALK (Anaplastic lymphoma Kinase) gene have been identified in sporadic and familial cases of neuroblastoma, a cancer of early childhood arising from the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). To decipher ALK function in neuroblastoma predisposition and oncogenesis, we have characterized knock-in (KI) mice bearing the two most frequent mutations observed in neuroblastoma patients. A dramatic enlargement of sympathetic ganglia is observed in AlkF1178L mice from embryonic to adult stages associated with an increased proliferation of sympathetic neuroblasts from E14.5 to birth. In a MYCN transgenic context, the F1178L mutation displays a higher oncogenic potential than the R1279Q mutation as evident from a shorter latency of tumor onset. We show that tumors expressing the R1279Q mutation are sensitive to ALK inhibition upon crizotinib treatment. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that activated ALK triggers RET upregulation in mouse sympathetic ganglia at birth as well as in murine and human neuroblastoma. Using vandetanib, we show that RET inhibition strongly impairs tumor growth in vivo in both MYCN/KI AlkR1279Q and MYCN/KI AlkF1178L mice. Altogether, our findings demonstrate the critical role of activated ALK in SNS development and pathogenesis and identify RET as a therapeutic target in ALK mutated neuroblastoma. PMID:24811913

  2. Cosegregation of Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR) and a RET mutation in a French Canadian family with MEN 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Chretien, P.; Blanchard, L.; Gaboury, L.

    1994-09-01

    We have previously reported the occurrence of HSCR in a French Canadian family with MEN 2A. This B family includes 23 cases of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and 13 cases of HSCR of which 5 died at young age of intestinal obstruction; cases of HSCR are clustered in branches of the family in which MTC is segregating and each case of HSCR has a parent with MTC. HSCR cases with or without MTC harbors cosegregation of the MEN 2A haplotypes markers. A mutation of Cys 620 to Arg in exon 10 of RET identified in family members with MTC (without HSCR) was also present in the cases of HSCR who have not developed MTC yet. Three of the eight live HSCR cases have developed MTC and the other five are 19, 15, 18, 3 and 1 y.o. and have normal or high calcitonin levels. The data from this family suggest that HSCR cosegregated with MEN 2A mutation in this kindred. MEN 2A and recently described HSCR-associated RET mutations were proposed to actiate or repress RET proto-oncogene. The mutation responsible for HSCR in this kindred has not been identified yet; however, the anticipated HSCR mutation does not prevent the occurrence of MTC formation in MEN 2A mutation carriers.

  3. Testing for Depéret's Rule (Body Size Increase) in Mammals using Combined Extinct and Extant Data

    PubMed Central

    Bokma, Folmer; Godinot, Marc; Maridet, Olivier; Ladevèze, Sandrine; Costeur, Loïc; Solé, Floréal; Gheerbrant, Emmanuel; Peigné, Stéphane; Jacques, Florian; Laurin, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Whether or not evolutionary lineages in general show a tendency to increase in body size has often been discussed. This tendency has been dubbed “Cope's rule” but because Cope never hypothesized it, we suggest renaming it after Depéret, who formulated it clearly in 1907. Depéret's rule has traditionally been studied using fossil data, but more recently a number of studies have used present-day species. While several paleontological studies of Cenozoic placental mammals have found support for increasing body size, most studies of extant placentals have failed to detect such a trend. Here, we present a method to combine information from present-day species with fossil data in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework. We apply the method to body mass estimates of a large number of extant and extinct mammal species, and find strong support for Depéret's rule. The tendency for size increase appears to be driven not by evolution toward larger size in established species, but by processes related to the emergence of new species. Our analysis shows that complementary data from extant and extinct species can greatly improve inference of macroevolutionary processes. PMID:26508768

  4. Testing for Depéret's Rule (Body Size Increase) in Mammals using Combined Extinct and Extant Data.

    PubMed

    Bokma, Folmer; Godinot, Marc; Maridet, Olivier; Ladevèze, Sandrine; Costeur, Loïc; Solé, Floréal; Gheerbrant, Emmanuel; Peigné, Stéphane; Jacques, Florian; Laurin, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Whether or not evolutionary lineages in general show a tendency to increase in body size has often been discussed. This tendency has been dubbed "Cope's rule" but because Cope never hypothesized it, we suggest renaming it after Depéret, who formulated it clearly in 1907. Depéret's rule has traditionally been studied using fossil data, but more recently a number of studies have used present-day species. While several paleontological studies of Cenozoic placental mammals have found support for increasing body size, most studies of extant placentals have failed to detect such a trend. Here, we present a method to combine information from present-day species with fossil data in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework. We apply the method to body mass estimates of a large number of extant and extinct mammal species, and find strong support for Depéret's rule. The tendency for size increase appears to be driven not by evolution toward larger size in established species, but by processes related to the emergence of new species. Our analysis shows that complementary data from extant and extinct species can greatly improve inference of macroevolutionary processes. PMID:26508768

  5. SorLA controls neurotrophic activity by sorting of GDNF and its receptors GFRα1 and RET.

    PubMed

    Glerup, Simon; Lume, Maria; Olsen, Ditte; Nyengaard, Jens R; Vaegter, Christian B; Gustafsen, Camilla; Christensen, Erik I; Kjolby, Mads; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Bender, Dirk; Madsen, Peder; Saarma, Mart; Nykjaer, Anders; Petersen, Claus M

    2013-01-31

    Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that has reached clinical trials for Parkinson's disease. GDNF binds to its coreceptor GFRα1 and signals through the transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase RET, or RET independently through NCAM or syndecan-3. Whereas the GDNF signaling cascades are well described, cellular turnover and trafficking of GDNF and its receptors remain poorly characterized. Here, we find that SorLA acts as sorting receptor for the GDNF/GFRα1 complex, directing it from the cell surface to endosomes. Through this mechanism, GDNF is targeted to lysosomes and degraded while GFRα1 recycles, creating an efficient GDNF clearance pathway. The SorLA/GFRα1 complex further targets RET for endocytosis but not for degradation, affecting GDNF-induced neurotrophic activities. SorLA-deficient mice display elevated GDNF levels, altered dopaminergic function, marked hyperactivity, and reduced anxiety, all of which are phenotypes related to abnormal GDNF activity. Taken together, these findings establish SorLA as a critical regulator of GDNF activity in the CNS. PMID:23333276

  6. Experimental implantation of epiretinal retina implants (EPI-RET) with an IOL-type receiver unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerding, H.; Benner, F. P.; Taneri, S.

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the surgical feasibility of implantation and long-term structural outcome of retina implant devices with an anterior IOL receiver, a connecting microcable and posterior segment epiretinal microcontacts. Implantation of epiretinal retina (EPI-RET) implants was performed as a one-step surgical procedure including phacoemulsification and pars plana vitrectomy in two adult rabbits. Implants were mechanically stabilized in an anterior position by the lens capsule and in the posterior segment by microtacks with a soft contact collar. Follow-up (6 and 9 months) included regular clinical examination, anterior and posterior segment photography and finally pathohistological evaluation. Implantation was uneventful in case 1 and complicated by vitreous space haemorrhage in case 2. At the end of follow-up, the retina was partially detached in animal 1 and subtotally detached in animal 2. Common features of tissue reaction in both cases were the formation of cyclitic membranes extending around and posterior to the anterior IOL receiver. In addition to that severe proliferations developed around microcables, microcontacts and microtacks forming a tissue capsule around posterior segment foreign materials. Retinal areas in contact to implant devices presented a severe structural damage and disorganization. Results of this preliminary trial suggest that the application of epiretinal prostheses with large diameter IOL receivers may be a critical issue and can give rise to an unfavourable outcome. Further systematic investigation ought to be performed involving a larger number of animals, modified implants and perhaps other species.

  7. Clinical significance of RET mutation screening in a pedigree of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A.

    PubMed

    Ying, Rongbiao; Feng, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The clinical characteristics and RET proto-oncogene (RET‑PO) mutation status of a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A pedigree (MEN2A) was analyzed with the aim of preliminarily exploring the molecular mechanisms and clinical significance of the disease. Clinical characteristics of a single MEN2A patient were analyzed. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of the proband and 10 family members. The 21 exons of RET‑PO were PCR amplified and the amplified products were sequenced. Of the family members, 5 exhibited a C634Y (TGC→TAC) missense mutation in exon 11 of RET‑PO, among which 2 family members were screened as mutation carriers, while the others did not exhibit clinical symptoms of the mutation. The screening and analysis of RET‑PO mutations for the MEN2A proband and the family members suggests potential clinical phenotypes and enables assessment of the risk of disease development, thus providing useful information for determining the surgical timing of preventive thyroid gland removal. PMID:27277749

  8. Polymorphism of triphenyl phosphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, J.; Davydova, N. A.; Drozd, M.

    2014-03-01

    The glass-forming liquid triphenyl phosphite (TPP) has recently attracted much attention due to the possible existence of a polyamorphism, i.e., the existence of two or more amorphous phases. In the present work we provide experimental evidence of the existence of a polymorphism in TPP. In addition to the already known conventional crystalline phase, which melts at 299.1 K, it has been found that TPP can crystallize in another polymorphic phase. The new polymorph can be obtained from the liquid phase due to direct cooling from the room temperature up to 245 K where it is held for 15 min and then heated up to 270 K. At 270 K crystallization of the new polymorph occurs, which melts at 291.6 K.

  9. The RET fusion gene and its correlation with demographic and clinicopathological features of non-small cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Wang, Shanshan; Xie, Weiwei; Chang, Jianhua; Gan, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The RET fusion gene is a novel oncogene observed in a subset of NSCLC in recent years. Nevertheless, the results of epidemiological studies concerning the gene remain unclear. Thus, a meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the correlation of RET fusion gene with demographic and clinicopathological features of NSCLC. Methods. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched to identify eligible studies. The association of RET fusion gene occurrence with gender, age, smoking status, histology type and tumor stage were analyzed in meta-analysis. Subgroup analysis according to patients' location (Asian and non-Asian) was also conducted. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated to assess the correlation. Results. Nine studies with a total of 6,899 NSCLC patients met the inclusion criteria. A total of 84 patients with RET fusion gene were detected. The RET fusion gene was identified at significantly higher frequencies in female (OR = 0.55, 95%CI = 0.35–0.85) than male patients and in young (<60 ) patients (OR = 0.43, 95%CI = 0.19–0.99) than old patients (≤60 ), particularly in patients from Asian. A significant higher frequency was also identified in non-smokers (OR = 0.28, 95% CI = 0.16–0.49), and in patients with lung adenocarcinomas (OR = 3.59, 95%CI = 1.50–8.56). Additionally, no association between RET fusion gene and the TNM stage of tumor was observed. Conclusion. RET fusion gene occurred predominantly in Asian females with younger age, in non-smokers, and in lung adenocarcinomas patients. This subset of NSCLC patients might be good candidates for personalized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25975578

  10. Functional Loss of Semaphorin 3C and/or Semaphorin 3D and Their Epistatic Interaction with Ret Are Critical to Hirschsprung Disease Liability

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qian; Arnold, Stacey; Heanue, Tiffany; Kilambi, Krishna Praneeth; Doan, Betty; Kapoor, Ashish; Ling, Albee Yun; Sosa, Maria X.; Guy, Moltu; Jiang, Qingguang; Burzynski, Grzegorz; West, Kristen; Bessling, Seneca; Griseri, Paola; Amiel, Jeanne; Fernandez, Raquel M.; Verheij, Joke B.G.M.; Hofstra, Robert M.W.; Borrego, Salud; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Ceccherini, Isabella; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Pachnis, Vassilis; McCallion, Andrew S.; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2015-01-01

    Innervation of the gut is segmentally lost in Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), a consequence of cell-autonomous and non-autonomous defects in enteric neuronal cell differentiation, proliferation, migration, or survival. Rare, high-penetrance coding variants and common, low-penetrance non-coding variants in 13 genes are known to underlie HSCR risk, with the most frequent variants in the ret proto-oncogene (RET). We used a genome-wide association (220 trios) and replication (429 trios) study to reveal a second non-coding variant distal to RET and a non-coding allele on chromosome 7 within the class 3 Semaphorin gene cluster. Analysis in Ret wild-type and Ret-null mice demonstrates specific expression of Sema3a, Sema3c, and Sema3d in the enteric nervous system (ENS). In zebrafish embryos, sema3 knockdowns show reduction of migratory ENS precursors with complete ablation under conjoint ret loss of function. Seven candidate receptors of Sema3 proteins are also expressed within the mouse ENS and their expression is also lost in the ENS of Ret-null embryos. Sequencing of SEMA3A, SEMA3C, and SEMA3D in 254 HSCR-affected subjects followed by in silico protein structure modeling and functional analyses identified five disease-associated alleles with loss-of-function defects in semaphorin dimerization and binding to their cognate neuropilin and plexin receptors. Thus, semaphorin 3C/3D signaling is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of ENS development whose dys-regulation is a cause of enteric aganglionosis. PMID:25839327

  11. Ret finger protein mediates Pax7-induced ubiquitination of MyoD in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Joung, Hosouk; Eom, Gwang Hyeon; Choe, Nakwon; Lee, Hye Mi; Ko, Jeong-Hyeon; Kwon, Duk-Hwa; Nam, Yoon Seok; Min, Hyunki; Shin, Sera; Kook, Jeewon; Cho, Young Kuk; Kim, Jeong Chul; Seo, Sang Beom; Baik, Yung Hong; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kook, Hyun

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy results from the net loss of muscular proteins and organelles and is caused by pathologic conditions such as nerve injury, immobilization, cancer, and other metabolic diseases. Recently, ubiquitination-mediated degradation of skeletal-muscle-specific transcription factors was shown to be involved in muscle atrophy, although the mechanisms have yet to be defined. Here we report that ret finger protein (RFP), also known as TRIM27, works as an E3 ligase in Pax7-induced degradation of MyoD. Muscle injury induced by sciatic nerve transection up-regulated RFP and RFP physically interacted with both Pax7 and MyoD. RFP and Pax7 synergistically reduced the protein amounts of MyoD but not the mRNA. RFP-induced reduction of MyoD protein was blocked by proteasome inhibitors. The Pax7-induced reduction MyoD was attenuated by RFP siRNA and by MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. RFPΔR, an RFP construct that lacks the RING domain, failed to reduce MyoD amounts. RFP ubiquitinated MyoD, but RFPΔR failed to do so. Forced expression of RFP, but not RFPΔR, enhanced Pax7-induced ubiquitination of MyoD, whereas RFP siRNA blocked the ubiquitination. Sciatic nerve injury-induced muscle atrophy as well the reduction in MyoD was attenuated in RFP knockout mice. Taken together, our results show that RFP works as a novel E3 ligase in the Pax7-mediated degradation of MyoD in response to skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:25025573

  12. mRNA-based dendritic cell immunization improves survival in ret transgenic mouse melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Sharbi-Yunger, Adi; Grees, Mareike; Tzehoval, Esther; Utikal, Jochen; Umansky, Viktor; Eisenbach, Lea

    2016-06-01

    Malignant melanoma is characterized by a rapid progression, metastasis to distant organs and resistance to chemo and radiotherapy. Although melanoma is capable of eliciting an immune response, the disease progresses and the overall results of immunotherapeutic clinical studies are not satisfactory. Recently, we have developed a novel genetic platform for improving an induction of peptide-specific CD8(+) T cells by dendritic cell (DC) based on membrane-anchored β2-microglobulin (β2m) linked to a selected antigenic peptide at the N-terminus and to the cytosolic domain of TLR4 at the C-terminus. In vitro transcribed mRNA transfection of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) resulted in an efficient coupling of peptide presentation and cell activation. In this research, we utilize the chimeric platform to induce an immune response in ret transgenic mice that spontaneously develop malignant skin melanoma and to examine its effect on the overall survival of tumor-bearing mice. Following immunization with chimeric construct system, we observe a significantly prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice as compared to the control group. Moreover, we see elevations in the frequency of CD62L(hi)CD44(hi) central and CD62L(lo)CD44(hi) effector memory CD8(+) T-cell subsets. Importantly, we do not observe any changes in frequencies of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the vaccinated groups. Our data suggest that this novel vaccination approach could be efficiently applied for the immunotherapy of malignant melanoma. PMID:27471629

  13. Enabling the 14nm node contact patterning using advanced RET solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeggaoui, N.; Landie, G.; Villaret, A.; Farys, V.; Yesilada, E.; Tritchkov, A.; Word, J.

    2015-09-01

    The 14nm node designs is getting more sophisticated, and printability issues become more critical which need more advanced techniques to fix. One of the most critical processes is the contact patterning due to the very aggressive design rules and the process window which becomes quickly limited. Despite the large number of RET applied, some hotspot configurations remain challenging. It becomes increasingly challenging to achieve sufficient process windows around the hot spots just using conventional process such as OPC and rule-based SRAF insertion. Although, it might be desirable to apply Inverse Lithography Technique (ILT) on all hot spots to guarantee ideal mask quality. However, because of the high number of hot spots to repair in the design, that solution might be much time consuming in term of OPC and mask processing. In this paper we present a hybrid OPC solution based on local ILT usage around hot spots. It is named as Local Printability Enhancement (LPE) flow. First, conventional OPC and SRAF placement is applied on the whole design. Then, we apply LPE solution only on the remaining problematic hot spots of the design. The LPE flow also takes into account the mask rules so that it maintains the mask rule check (MRC) compliance through the borders of the repaired hot spot's areas. We will demonstrate that the LPE flow enlarges the process window around hot spots and gives better lithography quality than baseline. The simulation results are confirmed on silicon wafer where all the hot spots are printed. We will demonstrate that LPE flow enlarges the depth of focus of the most challenging hot spot by 30nm compared to POR conventional solution. Because the proposed flow applies ILT solution on very local hot spot areas, the total OPC run time remains acceptable from manufacturing side.

  14. Thrombophilic polymorphisms in Israel.

    PubMed

    Zoossmann-Diskin, Avshalom; Gazit, Ephraim; Peleg, Leah; Shohat, Mordechai; Turner, David

    2008-01-01

    Three thrombophilic polymorphisms, FV G1691A, FII G20210A and MTHFR C677T were investigated in Israeli populations by FRET, (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) real-time PCR. We observe extensive variability in the frequencies of each of the polymorphisms, as has been observed in the study of other polymorphisms in these populations. Very high allele frequencies for FV G1691A (the highest 0.087 in Turkish and Greek Jews) and FII G20210A (the highest 0.061 in Georgian Jews) in some of the Israeli populations justify a clinical investigation to assess their risk for venous thrombosis. Principal Coordinates Analysis demonstrates that the Jewish populations are interspersed among the non-Jewish populations. The resemblance of some Jewish populations to certain non-Jewish populations coincides with findings based on classical markers. PMID:18583164

  15. Topographic gravitational potential up to second-order derivatives: an examination of approximation errors caused by rock-equivalent topography (RET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Michael; Hirt, Christian

    2016-05-01

    In gravity forward modelling, the concept of Rock-Equivalent Topography (RET) is often used to simplify the computation of gravity implied by rock, water, ice and other topographic masses. In the RET concept, topographic masses are compressed (approximated) into equivalent rock, allowing the use of a single constant mass-density value. Many studies acknowledge the approximate character of the RET, but few have attempted yet to quantify and analyse the approximation errors in detail for various gravity field functionals and heights of computation points. Here, we provide an in-depth examination of approximation errors associated with the RET compression for the topographic gravitational potential and its first- and second-order derivatives. Using the Earth2014 layered topography suite we apply Newtonian integration in the spatial domain in the variants (a) rigorous forward modelling of all mass bodies, (b) approximative modelling using RET. The differences among both variants, which reflect the RET approximation error, are formed and studied for an ensemble of 10 different gravity field functionals at three levels of altitude (on and 3 km above the Earth's surface and at 250 km satellite height). The approximation errors are found to be largest at the Earth's surface over RET compression areas (oceans, ice shields) and to increase for the first- and second-order derivatives. Relative errors, computed here as ratio between the range of differences between both variants relative to the range in signal, are at the level of 0.06-0.08 % for the potential, ˜ 3-7 % for the first-order derivatives at the Earth's surface (˜ 0.1 % at satellite altitude). For the second-order derivatives, relative errors are below 1 % at satellite altitude, at the 10-20 % level at 3 km and reach maximum values as large as ˜ 20 to 110 % near the surface. As such, the RET approximation errors may be acceptable for functionals computed far away from the Earth's surface or studies focussing on

  16. Decreased expression levels of cell cycle regulators and matrix metalloproteinases in melanoma from RET-transgenic mice by single irradiation of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Machiko; Omata, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Chihiro; Yajima, Ichiro; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kato, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Since effective therapies for melanoma with BRAFV600E mutation are being developed, interest has been shown in the development of therapies for melanoma without BRAFV600E mutation. Recently, interest has also been shown in medical application of non-nequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas (NEAPPs). We previously suggested that repeated NEAPP irradiation to spontaneously developed benign melanocytic tumors in RFP-RET-transgenic mice (RET-mice) not only suppresses tumor growth but also prevents malignant transformation. In this study, we first confirmed that transcript expression levels of tumor growth regulators (CyclinD1, D2, E1, E2, G2 and PCNA but not CyclinG1) and tumor invasion regulators [Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -9 and -14 and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM)] in melanomas were significantly higher than those in benign melanocytic tumors in RET-mice. We then showed that transcript expression levels of CyclinE1, G1 and G2 and MMP-2 and -9 in melanomas from RET-mice were significantly decreased by single NEAPP irradiation, whereas transcript expression levels of CyclinD1, D2, E2, PCNA, MCAM and MMP-14 were comparable in untreated and NEAPP-treated melanomas. Since no BrafV600E mutation melanomas have been found in RET-mice, our results suggest that single NEAPP irradiation is a potential therapeutic tool for melanoma without BRAFV600E mutation through modulation of the expression levels of tumor growth and invasion regulators. PMID:26464684

  17. Nephric duct insertion is a crucial step in urinary tract maturation that is regulated by a Gata3-Raldh2-Ret molecular network in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Ian; Grote, David; Marcotte, Michael; Batourina, Ekaterina; Mendelsohn, Cathy; Bouchard, Maxime

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract development depends on a complex series of events in which the ureter moves from its initial branch point on the nephric duct (ND) to its final insertion site in the cloaca (the primitive bladder and urethra). Defects in this maturation process can result in malpositioned ureters and hydronephrosis, a common cause of renal disease in children. Here, we report that insertion of the ND into the cloaca is an unrecognized but crucial step that is required for proper positioning of the ureter and that depends on Ret signaling. Analysis of Ret mutant mice at birth reveals hydronephrosis and defective ureter maturation, abnormalities that our results suggest are caused, at least in part, by delayed insertion of the ND. We find a similar set of malformations in mutants lacking either Gata3 or Raldh2. We show that these factors act in parallel to regulate ND insertion via Ret. Morphological analysis of ND extension in wild-type embryos reveals elaborate cellular protrusions at ND tips that are not detected in Ret, Gata3 or Raldh2 mutant embryos, suggesting that these protrusions may normally be important for fusion with the cloaca. Together, our studies reveal a novel Ret-dependent event, ND insertion, that, when abnormal, can cause obstruction and hydronephrosis at birth; whether ND defects underlie similar types of urinary tract abnormalities in humans is an interesting possibility. PMID:21521737

  18. Disappearing Polymorphs Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bučar, Dejan-Krešimir; Lancaster, Robert W; Bernstein, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Nearly twenty years ago, Dunitz and Bernstein described a selection of intriguing cases of polymorphs that disappear. The inability to obtain a crystal form that has previously been prepared is indeed a frustrating and potentially serious problem for solid-state scientists. This Review discusses recent occurrences and examples of disappearing polymorphs (as well as the emergence of elusive crystal forms) to demonstrate the enduring relevance of this troublesome, but always captivating, phenomenon in solid-state research. A number of these instances have been central issues in patent litigations. This Review, therefore, also highlights the complex relationship between crystal chemistry and the law. PMID:26031248

  19. ζ2 Reticuli, its debris disk, and its lonely stellar companion ζ1 Ret. Different Tc trends for different spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibekyan, V.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Figueira, P.; Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Faria, J. P.; González Hernández, J. I.; Israelian, G.; Harutyunyan, G.; Suárez-Andrés, L.; Hakobyan, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Several studies have reported a correlation between the chemical abundances of stars and condensation temperature (known as Tc trend). Very recently, a strong Tc trend was reported for the ζ Reticuli binary system, which consists of two solar analogs. The observed trend in ζ2 Ret relative to its companion was explained by the presence of a debris disk around ζ2 Ret. Aims: Our goal is to re-evaluate the presence and variability of the Tc trend in the ζ Reticuli system and to understand the impact of the presence of the debris disk on a star. Methods: We used very high-quality spectra of the two stars retrieved from the HARPS archive to derive very precise stellar parameters and chemical abundances. We derived the stellar parameters with the classical (nondifferential) method, while we applied a differential line-by-line analysis to achieve the highest possible precision in abundances, which are fundamental to explore for very tiny differences in the abundances between the stars. Results: We confirm that the abundance difference between ζ2 Ret and ζ1 Ret shows a significant (~2σ) correlation with Tc. However, we also find that the Tc trends depend on the individual spectrum used (even if always of very high quality). In particular, we find significant but varying differences in the abundances of the same star from different individual high-quality spectra. Conclusions: Our results for the ζ Reticuli system show, for example, that nonphysical factors, such as the quality of spectra employed and errors that are not accounted for, can be at the root of the Tc trends for the case of individual spectra. Based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility under request number vadibekyan204818, vadibekyan204820, and vadibekyan185979.The tables with EWs of the lines and chemical abundances are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A34

  20. Enzyme polymorphisms in Canarium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifty-two accessions of Canarium involving seven species, C. ovatum, C. album, C. megalanthum, C. harveyi, C. indicum, C. mehenbethene, and C. odontophyllum were studied for isozyme polymorphisms. Starch gel electrophoresis with a histidine-citrate buffer system (pH 6.5) was employed to assay six en...

  1. Polymorphous Perversity in Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Eilola, Johndan

    2012-01-01

    Here's the tricky part: If we teach ourselves and our students that texts are made to be broken apart, remixed, remade, do we lose the polymorphous perversity that brought us pleasure in the first place? Does the pleasure of transgression evaporate when the borders are opened?

  2. Investigation of Uranium Polymorphs

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Lucas E.; Henager, Charles H.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Meier, David E.; Peper, Shane M.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2011-08-01

    The UO3-water system is complex and has not been fully characterized, even though these species are common throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. As an example, most production schemes for UO3 result in a mixture of up to six or more different polymorphic phases, and small differences in these conditions will affect phase genesis that ultimately result in measureable changes to the end product. As a result, this feature of the UO3-water system may be useful as a means for determining process history. This research effort attempts to better characterize the UO3-water system with a variety of optical techniques for the purpose of developing some predictive capability for estimating process history in polymorphic phases of unknown origin. Three commercially relevant preparation methods for the production of UO3 were explored. Previously unreported low temperature routes to β- and γ-UO3 were discovered. Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic libraries were established for pure and mixed polymorphic forms of UO3 in addition to the common hydrolysis products of UO3. An advantage of the sensitivity of optical fluorescence microscopy over XRD has been demonstrated. Preliminary aging studies of the α and γ forms of UO3 have been conducted. In addition, development of a 3-D phase field model used to predict phase genesis of the system was initiated. Thermodynamic and structural constants that will feed the model have been gathered from the literature for most of the UO3 polymorphic phases.

  3. Modulation of the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret/glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) signaling: a new player in reproduction induced anterior pituitary plasticity?

    PubMed

    Guillou, Anne; Romanò, Nicola; Bonnefont, Xavier; Le Tissier, Paul; Mollard, Patrice; Martin, Agnès O

    2011-02-01

    During gestation, parturition, and lactation, the endocrine axis of the dam must continually adapt to ensure the continual and healthy development of offspring. The anterior pituitary gland, which serves as the endocrine interface between the brain and periphery, undergoes adaptations that contribute to regulation of the reproductive axis. Growth factors and their receptors are potential candidates for intrapituitary and paracrine factors to participate in the functional and anatomical plasticity of the gland. We examined the involvement of the growth factor glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its receptor tyrosine kinase rearranged during transfection (Ret) in the physiological functional and anatomical plasticity of the anterior pituitary gland. We found that variations in both expression and subcellular localization of Ret during gestation and lactation are temporally correlated with changes in pituitary gland function. We showed that Ret/GDNF signaling could endorse two different functional roles depending on the physiological status. At the end of lactation and after weaning, Ret was colocalized with markers of apoptosis. We found that Ret could therefore act as a physiological dependence receptor capable of inducing apoptosis in the absence of GDNF. In addition, we identified the follicullostellate cell as a probable source for intrapituitary GDNF and proposed GDNF as a potential physiological modulator of endocrine cell function. During all stages studied, we showed that acute application of GDNF to pituitary slices was able to modulate both positively and negatively intracellular calcium activity. Altogether our results implicate Ret/GDNF as a potent pleiotropic factor able to influence pituitary physiology during a period of high plasticity. PMID:21239429

  4. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung’s disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = −0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression. PMID:27409604

  5. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression. PMID:27409604

  6. Preparation of 3-substituted-1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amines as RET kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dinér, Peter; Alao, John P; Söderlund, Johan; Sunnerhagen, Per; Grøtli, Morten

    2012-05-24

    A series of 3-substituted-1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amines have been designed, synthesized, and evaluated as RET protein kinase inhibitors. On the basis of docking results, a small library of pyrazolopyrimidine compounds with an extended hydrophobic side arm was synthesized. The most promising of the compounds (7a) displayed efficient inhibition in vitro and good selectivity when tested on a panel of kinases. Furthermore, 7a inhibited GDNF-induced RET phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells at concentrations as low as 100 nM. PMID:22559926

  7. Polymorphism of phosphoric oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, W.L.; Faust, G.T.; Hendricks, S.B.

    1943-01-01

    The melting points and monotropic relationship of three crystalline forms of phosphoric oxide were determined by the method of quenching. Previous vapor pressure data are discussed and interpreted to establish a pressure-temperature diagram (70 to 600??) for the one-component system. The system involves three triple points, at which solid, liquid and vapor (P4O10) coexist in equilibrium, namely: 420?? and 360 cm., 562?? and 43.7 cm. and 580?? and 55.5 cm., corresponding to the hexagonal, orthorhombic and stable polymorphs, respectively, and at least two distinct liquids, one a stable polymer of the other, which are identified with the melting of the stable form and the hexagonal modification, respectively. Indices of refraction of the polymorphs and glasses were determined. The density and the thermal, hygroscopic and structural properties of the several phases are discussed.

  8. Facts and fictions about polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Reutzel-Edens, Susan M; Bernstein, Joel

    2015-12-01

    We present new facts about polymorphism based on (i) crystallographic data from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD, a database built over 50 years of community effort), (ii) 229 solid form screens conducted at Hoffmann-La Roche and Eli Lilly and Company over the course of 8+ and 15+ years respectively and (iii) a dataset of 446 polymorphic crystals with energies and properties computed with modern DFT-d methods. We found that molecular flexibility or size has no correlation with the ability of a compound to be polymorphic. Chiral molecules, however, were found to be less prone to polymorphism than their achiral counterparts and compounds able to hydrogen bond exhibit only a slightly higher propensity to polymorphism than those which do not. Whilst the energy difference between polymorphs is usually less than 1 kcal mol(-1), conformational polymorphs are capable of differing by larger values (up to 2.5 kcal mol(-1) in our dataset). As overall statistics, we found that one in three compounds in the CSD are polymorphic whilst at least one in two compounds from the Roche and Lilly set display polymorphism with a higher estimate of up to three in four when compounds are screened intensively. Whilst the statistics provide some guidance of expectations, each compound constitutes a new challenge and prediction and realization of targeted polymorphism still remains a holy grail of materials sciences. PMID:26400501

  9. [Polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulfate].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Huang, Hai-Wei; Wu, Jian-Min; Shi, Ya-Qin; Yang, La-Hu

    2013-08-01

    This paper is to report the polymorphism of raw materials of clopidogrel bisulfate at home and abroad. By the analysis of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD), samples are roughly classified into two groups, except one patent material. And the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) examination showed more detailed information for these materials. The results of the study could provide comprehensive basis for the quality evaluation of clopidogrel bisulfate. PMID:24187849

  10. Optimizing detection of RET and PPARg rearrangements in thyroid neoplastic cells using a home-brew tetracolor probe

    PubMed Central

    Caria, Paola; Frau, Daniela V; Dettori, Tinuccia; Boi, Francesco; Lai, Maria L; Mariotti, Stefano; Vanni, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to identify specific DNA target sequences in the nuclei of nondividing cells of numerous solid neoplasms has contributed to the introduction of molecular cytogenetics as a useful adjunct to cytology, leading recently to the “marriage” of the 2 disciplines. Numerous cancer molecular markers can now be investigated using different technical approaches, at both the gene and expression levels, in biopsies of various suspected cancers, including differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The limited amount of bioptic material is often insufficient to carry out multiple tests, and optimizing handling of the biopsy is desirable. METHODS We have developed a home-brew tetracolor break-apart probe able to simultaneously identify the 2 most common genetic alterations in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: RET/PTC variants in papillary thyroid carcinoma and PAX8/PPARg fusion and variants in follicular thyroid carcinoma. RESULTS The probe had 100% specificity, 99.5% sensitivity, and ≥3% cutoff. The probe was tested on RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARg RT-PCR positive controls, and feasibility was assessed in 368 thyroid nodule fine-needle aspirations (FNA). In the latter analysis, 24 FNAs had split RET signal, and 9 had split PPARg signal. FISH analysis of available surgically removed nodules confirmed the sensitivity of FISH in detecting abnormal clones and oligoclones. CONCLUSIONS The home-brew tetracolor probe showed high feasibility, optimizing the use of the biological material in relation to the available molecular tests and maximizing the FISH experimental and slide-scoring times. This probe may be considered an alternative to RT-PCR when recovery and quality of RNA amplification from FNA are insufficient. Cancer (Cancer Cytopathol) 2014;122:377–385. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Cytopathology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative

  11. Changes in Teachers' Beliefs and Classroom Practices Concerning Inquiry-Based Instruction Following a Year-Long RET-PLC Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Rommel J.; Damico, Julie B.

    2015-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examines how engaging science teachers in a summer Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) followed by an academic-year Professional Learning Community (PLC) focused on translating teacher research experiences to inquiry-based classroom lessons might facilitate changes in their beliefs and classroom practices regarding…

  12. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and the Thyroid: C-Cell Effects in Mice Are Mediated via the GLP-1 Receptor and not Associated with RET Activation

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Gotfredsen, Carsten; Pilling, Andrew; Sjögren, Ingrid; Andersen, Søren; Andersen, Lene; Sietske de Boer, Anne; Manova, Katia; Barlas, Afsar; Vundavalli, Sushil; Nyborg, Niels C. Berg; Bjerre Knudsen, Lotte; Moelck, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Liraglutide and exenatide are glucagon-like peptide receptor (GLP-1R) agonists used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Both molecules have been associated with the development of thyroid C-cell tumors after lifetime exposure in rodents. Previously, it has been reported that these tumors are preceded by increased plasma calcitonin and C-cell hyperplasia. We can now document that the murine C-cell effects are mediated via GLP-1R. Thus, 13 wk of continuous exposure to GLP-1R agonists was associated with marked increases in plasma calcitonin and in the incidence of C-cell hyperplasia in wild-type mice. In contrast, similar effects were not seen in GLP-1R knockout mice. Human C-cell cancer is often caused by activating mutations in the rearranged-during-transfection (RET) protooncogene. We developed an immunohistochemical method to assess RET activation in tissues. Liraglutide dosing to mice was not found to activate RET. Further evaluation of the signaling pathways demonstrated that liraglutide increased ribosomal S6, but not MAPK kinase, phosphorylation. These observations are consistent with effects of GLP-1R agonists on rodent C cells being mediated via mammalian target of rapamycin activation in a RET- and MAPK-independent manner. PMID:22234463

  13. Who Are the Science Teachers That Seek Professional Development in Research Experience for Teachers (RET's)? Implications for Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saka, Yavuz

    2013-01-01

    To address the need to better prepare teachers to enact science education reforms, the National Science Foundation has supported a Research Experience for Teachers (RET's) format for teacher professional development. In these experiences, teachers work closely with practicing scientists to engage in authentic scientific inquiry. Although…

  14. Computational Modeling of Structurally Conserved Cancer Mutations in the RET and MET Kinases: The Impact on Protein Structure, Dynamics, and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Anshuman; Torkamani, Ali; Schork, Nicholas J.; Verkhivker, Gennady

    2009-01-01

    Structural and biochemical characterization of protein kinases that confer oncogene addiction and harbor a large number of disease-associated mutations, including RET and MET kinases, have provided insights into molecular mechanisms associated with the protein kinase activation in human cancer. In this article, structural modeling, molecular dynamics, and free energy simulations of a structurally conserved mutational hotspot, shared by M918T in RET and M1250T in MET kinases, are undertaken to quantify the molecular mechanism of activation and the functional role of cancer mutations in altering protein kinase structure, dynamics, and stability. The mechanistic basis of the activating RET and MET cancer mutations may be driven by an appreciable free energy destabilization of the inactive kinase state in the mutational forms. According to our results, the locally enhanced mobility of the cancer mutants and a higher conformational entropy are counterbalanced by a larger enthalpy loss and result in the decreased thermodynamic stability. The computed protein stability differences between the wild-type and cancer kinase mutants are consistent with circular dichroism spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry experiments. These results support the molecular mechanism of activation, which causes a detrimental imbalance in the dynamic equilibrium shifted toward the active form of the enzyme. Furthermore, computer simulations of the inhibitor binding with the oncogenic and drug-resistant RET mutations have also provided a plausible molecular rationale for the observed differences in the inhibition profiles, which is consistent with the experimental data. Finally, structural mapping of RET and MET cancer mutations and the computed protein stability changes suggest a similar mechanism of activation, whereby the cancer mutations which display the higher oncogenic activity tend to have the greatest destabilization effect on the inactive kinase structure. PMID:19186126

  15. High Affinity Pharmacological Profiling of Dual Inhibitors Targeting RET and VEGFR2 in Inhibition of Kinase and Angiogeneis Events in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dunna, Nageswara Rao; Kandula, Venkatesh; Girdhar, Amandeep; Pudutha, Amareshwari; Hussain, Tajamul; Bandaru, Srinivas; Nayarisseri, Anuraj

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence shows that dual inhibition of kinases as well angiogenesis provides ideal therapeutic option in the treatment of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) than inhibiting either of these with the events separately. Although treatment with dual inhibitors has shown good clinical responses in patients with MTC, it has been associated with serious side effects. Some inhibitors are active agents for both angiogenesis or kinase activity. Owing to narrow therapeutic window of established inhibitors, the present study aims to identify high affinity dual inhibitors targeting RET and VEGFR2 respectively for kinase and angiogenesis activity. Established inhibitors like Vandetanib, Cabozantinib, Motesanib, PP121, RAF265 and Sunitinib served as query parent compounds for identification of structurally similar compounds by Tanimoto-based similarity searching with a threshold of 95% against the PubChem database. All the parent inhibitors and respective similar compounds were docked against RET and VEGFR2 in order to retrieve high affinity compounds with these two proteins. AGN-PC-0CUK9P PubCID: 59320403 a compound related to PPI21 showed almost equal affinity for RET and VEGFR2 and unlike other screened compounds with no apparent bias for either of the receptors. Further, AGN- PC-0CUK9P demonstrated appreciable interaction with both RET and VEGFR2 and superior kinase activity in addition to showed optimal ADMET properties and pharmacophore features. From our in silico investigation we suggest AGN-PC-0CUK9P as a superior dual inhibitor targeting RET and VEGFR2 with high efficacy which should be proposed for pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies for improved treatment of MTC. PMID:26514495

  16. Development of medullary thyroid carcinoma in transgenic mice expressing the RET protooncogene altered by a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A mutation

    PubMed Central

    Michiels, Francine-Marie; Chappuis, Sophie; Caillou, Bernard; Pasini, Andrea; Talbot, Monique; Monier, Roger; Lenoir, Gilbert M.; Feunteun, Jean; Billaud, Marc

    1997-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) is a dominantly inherited cancer syndrome that comprises three clinical subtypes: MEN type 2A (MEN-2A), MEN type 2B (MEN-2B), and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), a malignant tumor arising from calcitonin-secreting thyroid C cells, is the cardinal disease feature of this syndrome, and mortality in affected MEN-2 patients is mainly caused by this malignancy. Germ-line mutations of the RET protooncogene, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, are responsible for these three neoplastic-prone disorders. MEN2 mutations convert the RET protooncogene in a dominantly acting oncogene as a consequence of the ligand-independent activation of the tyrosine kinase. The majority of MEN2A and FMTC mutations are located in the extracellular domain and cause the replacement of one of five juxtamembrane cysteines by a different amino acid. To examine whether expression of a MEN2A allele of RET results in transformation of C cells, we have used the transgenic approach. Expression of the RET gene altered by a MEN2A mutation was targeted in C cells by placing the transgene under the control of the calcitonin gene-related peptide/calcitonin promoter. Animals of three independent transgenic mouse lines, which expressed the transgene in the thyroid, displayed overt bilateral C cell hyperplasia as early as 3 weeks of age and subsequently developed multifocal and bilateral MTC. Moreover, these tumors were morphologically and biologically similar to human MTC which afflicts MEN- 2 individuals. These findings provide evidence that the MEN2A mutant form of RET is oncogenic in parafollicular C cells and suggest that these transgenic mice should prove a valuable animal model for hereditary MTC. PMID:9096393

  17. Molecular Characterization of Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumors with Frequent ALK and ROS1 Fusions and Rare Novel RET Gene Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Antonescu, Cristina R; Suurmeijer, Albert JH; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Jungbluth, Achim A; Travis, William D; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Fletcher, Christopher DM; Alaggio, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 50% of conventional IMTs harbor ALK gene rearrangement and overexpress ALK. Recently gene fusions involving other kinases have been implicated in the pathogenesis of IMT, including ROS1 and in one patient PDGFRB. However, it remains uncertain if the emerging genotypes correlate with clinicopathologic characteristics of IMT. In this study we expand the molecular investigation of IMT in a large cohort of different clinical presentations and analyze for potential genotype-phenotype associations. Criteria for inclusion in the study were typical morphology and tissue availability for molecular studies. The lack of ALK immunoreactivity was not an excluding factor. As overlapping gene fusions involving actionable kinases are emerging in both IMT and lung cancer, we set out to evaluate abnormalities in ALK, ROS1, PDGFRB, NTRK1 and RET by FISH. Additionally, next generation paired-end RNA sequencing and FusionSeq algorithm was applied in 4 cases, which identified EML4-ALK fusions in 2 cases. Of the 62 IMTs (25 children and 37 adults), 35 (56%) showed ALK gene rearrangement. Of note, EML4-ALK inversion was noted in 7 (20%) cases, seen mainly in the lung and soft tissue of young children including 2 lesions from newborns. There were 6 (10%) ROS1 rearranged IMTs, all except one presenting in children, mainly in the lung and intra-abdominal and showed a distinctive fascicular growth of spindle cells with long cell processes, often positive for ROS1 IHC. Two of the cases showed TFG-ROS1 fusions. Interestingly, one adult IMT revealed a RET gene rearrangement, a previously unreported finding. Our results show that 42/62 (68%) of IMTs are characterized by kinase fusions, offering a rationale for targeted therapeutic strategies. Interestingly 90% of fusion negative IMT were seen in adults, while >90% of pediatric IMT showed gene rearrangements.EML4-ALK inversion and ROS1 fusions emerge as common fusion abnormalities in IMT, closely recapitulating the pattern seen in

  18. Polymorphic Electronic Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoica, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    Polymorphic electronics is a nascent technological discipline that involves, among other things, designing the same circuit to perform different analog and/or digital functions under different conditions. For example, a circuit can be designed to function as an OR gate or an AND gate, depending on the temperature (see figure). Polymorphic electronics can also be considered a subset of polytronics, which is a broader technological discipline in which optical and possibly other information- processing systems could also be designed to perform multiple functions. Polytronics is an outgrowth of evolvable hardware (EHW). The basic concepts and some specific implementations of EHW were described in a number of previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. To recapitulate: The essence of EHW is to design, construct, and test a sequence of populations of circuits that function as incrementally better solutions of a given design problem through the selective, repetitive connection and/or disconnection of capacitors, transistors, amplifiers, inverters, and/or other circuit building blocks. The evolution is guided by a search-and-optimization algorithm (in particular, a genetic algorithm) that operates in the space of possible circuits to find a circuit that exhibits an acceptably close approximation of the desired functionality. The evolved circuits can be tested by computational simulation (in which case the evolution is said to be extrinsic), tested in real hardware (in which case the evolution is said to be intrinsic), or tested in random sequences of computational simulation and real hardware (in which case the evolution is said to be mixtrinsic).

  19. Polymorphic Evolutionary Games.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, I present an analytical framework for polymorphic evolutionary games suitable for explicitly modeling evolutionary processes in diploid populations with sexual reproduction. The principal aspect of the proposed approach is adding diploid genetics cum sexual recombination to a traditional evolutionary game, and switching from phenotypes to haplotypes as the new game׳s pure strategies. Here, the relevant pure strategy׳s payoffs derived by summing the payoffs of all the phenotypes capable of producing gametes containing that particular haplotype weighted by the pertinent probabilities. The resulting game is structurally identical to the familiar Evolutionary Games with non-linear pure strategy payoffs (Hofbauer and Sigmund, 1998. Cambridge University Press), and can be analyzed in terms of an established analytical framework for such games. And these results can be translated into the terms of genotypic, and whence, phenotypic evolutionary stability pertinent to the original game. PMID:27016340

  20. SLIT2/ROBO1-miR-218-1-RET/PLAG1: a new disease pathway involved in Hirschsprung's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weibing; Tang, Junwei; He, Jun; Zhou, Zhigang; Qin, Yufeng; Qin, Jingjing; Li, Bo; Xu, Xiaoqun; Geng, Qiming; Jiang, Weiwei; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) is a rare congenital disease caused by impaired proliferation and migration of neural crest cells. We investigated changes in expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) and the genes they regulate in tissues of patients with HSCR. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses were used to measure levels of miRNA, mRNAs, and proteins in colon tissues from 69 patients with HSCR and 49 individuals without HSCR (controls). Direct interactions between miRNAs and specific mRNAs were indentified in vitro, while the function role of miR-218-1 was investigated by using miR-218 transgenic mice. An increased level of miR-218-1 correlated with increased levels of SLIT2 and decreased levels of RET and PLAG1mRNA and protein. The reductions in RET and PLAG1 by miR-218-1 reduced proliferation and migration of SH-SY5Y cells. Overexpression of the secreted form of SLIT2 inhibited cell migration via binding to its receptor ROBO1. Bowel tissues from miR-218-1 transgenic mice had nerve fibre hyperplasia and reduced numbers of gangliocytes, compared with wild-type mice. Altered miR-218-1 regulation of SLIT2, RET and PLAG1 might be involved in the pathogenesis of HSCR. PMID:25786906

  1. SLIT2/ROBO1-miR-218-1-RET/PLAG1: a new disease pathway involved in Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weibing; Tang, Junwei; He, Jun; Zhou, Zhigang; Qin, Yufeng; Qin, Jingjing; Li, Bo; Xu, Xiaoqun; Geng, Qiming; Jiang, Weiwei; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2015-06-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) is a rare congenital disease caused by impaired proliferation and migration of neural crest cells. We investigated changes in expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) and the genes they regulate in tissues of patients with HSCR. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses were used to measure levels of miRNA, mRNAs, and proteins in colon tissues from 69 patients with HSCR and 49 individuals without HSCR (controls). Direct interactions between miRNAs and specific mRNAs were indentified in vitro, while the function role of miR-218-1 was investigated by using miR-218 transgenic mice. An increased level of miR-218-1 correlated with increased levels of SLIT2 and decreased levels of RET and PLAG1 mRNA and protein. The reductions in RET and PLAG1 by miR-218-1 reduced proliferation and migration of SH-SY5Y cells. Overexpression of the secreted form of SLIT2 inhibited cell migration via binding to its receptor ROBO1. Bowel tissues from miR-218-1 transgenic mice had nerve fibre hyperplasia and reduced numbers of gangliocytes, compared with wild-type mice. Altered miR-218-1 regulation of SLIT2, RET and PLAG1 might be involved in the pathogenesis of HSCR. PMID:25786906

  2. Diagnostic correlation between RET proto-oncogene mutation, imaging techniques, biochemical markers and morphological examination in MEN2A syndrome: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sovrea, Alina Simona; Dronca, Eleonora; Galatâr, Mihaela; Radian, Serban; Vornicescu, Corina; Georgescu, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) is a rare autosomal dominant monogenic disorder caused mostly by missense mutations in the RET (REarranged during Transfection) proto-oncogene on chromosome 10q11.2. MEN2A represents more than 50% of all MEN2 cases, having a regular pattern with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) incidence of 90-100%, bilateral pheochromocytoma (PCC) incidence of 40-50% and primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) incidence of 10-25%. Until recently, the diagnosis of MTC was most frequently based on fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules, after an ultrasound examination and endocrine evaluation of serum calcitonin levels. Nowadays, RET gene screening (starting with exons 10 and 11) is a mandatory test used for identification of both symptomatic and non-symptomatic MTC carriers or for exclusion of healthy individuals from subsequent periodical clinical/biochemical screening. In this context, and in the idea of PCC preceding MTC, the early detection of germline RET mutations are highly suggestive for hereditary disease. PCC diagnosis is established in classical manner by abdominal ultrasound imaging or computed tomography confirming the presence of adrenal gland masses, elevated plasma metanephrines and normetanephrines values and histopathological examination. Additional HPT diagnosis is acknowledged by serum ionized calcium and parathormone levels. Here we report a hereditary case of MEN2A in a two-generation Romanian family, along with data presenting the importance of correlative plurifactorial diagnostic scheme in this syndrome and a short literature review. PMID:24969991

  3. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  4. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  5. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  6. Purification and biochemical characterization of an alkaline pectin lyase from Fusarium decemcellulare MTCC 2079 suitable for Crotalaria juncea fiber retting.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sangeeta; Dubey, Amit Kumar; Anand, Gautam; Kumar, Reetesh; Yadav, Dinesh

    2014-07-01

    An extracellular pectin lyase secreted by Fusarium decemcellulare MTCC 2079 under solid state fermentation condition has been purified to electrophoretic homogeniety by using ammonium sulfate fractionation, carboxymethyl cellulose and gel filtration (Sephadex G-100) column chromatographies. The purified enzyme showed single protein band corresponding to molecular mass 45 ± 01 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme had maximum activity at pH 9.0 and showed maximum stability in the pH range of 9.0-12.0. The optimum temperature of the purified enzyme was 50 °C and it showed maximum stability upto 40 °C. The energy of activation for the thermal denaturation (Ea ) was 59.06 kJ mol(-1)  K(-1). The Km and kcat values using citrus pectin as the substrate were 0.125 mg ml(-1) and 72.9 s(-1) in 100 mM sodium carbonate buffer pH 9.0 at 50 °C. The biophysical studies on pectin lyase showed that its secondary structure belongs to α + β class of protein with comparatively less of β-sheets. Purified pectin lyase showed efficient retting of Crotolaria juncea fibers. PMID:25088294

  7. Nucleation of polymorphic amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Auer, Stefan

    2015-03-10

    One and the same protein can self-assemble into amyloid fibrils with different morphologies. The phenomenon of fibril polymorphism is relevant biologically because different fibril polymorphs can have different toxicity, but there is no tool for predicting which polymorph forms and under what conditions. Here, we consider the nucleation of polymorphic amyloid fibrils occurring by direct polymerization of monomeric proteins into fibrils. We treat this process within the framework of our newly developed nonstandard nucleation theory, which allows prediction of the concentration dependence of the nucleation rate for different fibril polymorphs. The results highlight that the concentration dependence of the nucleation rate is closely linked with the protein solubility and a threshold monomer concentration below which fibril formation becomes biologically irrelevant. The relation between the nucleation rate, the fibril solubility, the threshold concentration, and the binding energies of the fibril building blocks within fibrils might prove a valuable tool for designing new experiments to control the formation of particular fibril polymorphs. PMID:25762329

  8. New polymorphous computing fabric.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolinski, C.; Gokhale, M.; McCabe, K. P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper introduces a new polymorphous computing Fabric well suited to DSP and Image Processing and describes its implementation on a Configurable System on a Chip (CSOC). The architecture is highly parameterized and enables customization of the synthesized Fabric to achieve high performance for a specific class of application. For this reason it can be considered to be a generic model for hardware accelerator synthesis from a high level specification. Another important innovation is the Fabric uses a global memory concept, which gives the host processor random access to all the variables and instructions on the Fabric. The Fabric supports different computing models including MIMD, SPMD and systolic flow and permits dynamic reconfiguration. We present a specific implementation of a bank of FIR filters on a Fabric composed of 52 cells on the Altera Excalibur ARM running at 33 MHz. The theoretical performance of this Fabric is 1.8 GMACh. For the FIR application we obtain 1.6 GMAC/s real performance. Some automatic tools have been developed like the tool to provide a host access utility and assembler.

  9. Detection of PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC Rearrangements Is Feasible in Routine Air-Dried Fine Needle Aspiration Smears

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz, Carolina; Rehfeld, Christian; Krogdahl, Annelise; Precht Jensen, Eva Magrethe; Bösenberg, Eileen; Narz, Frank; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Eszlinger, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Background The diagnostic limitations of fine needle aspiration (FNA), like the indeterminate category, can be partially overcome by molecular analysis. As PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC rearrangements have been detected in follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs) and papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs), their detection in FNA smears could improve the FNA diagnosis. To date, these rearrangements have never been analyzed in routine air-dried FNA smears, but only in frozen tissue, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue, and in fresh FNA material. Fixed routine air-dried FNA samples have hitherto been judged as generally not suitable for testing these rearrangements in a clinical setting. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of extracting RNA from routine air-dried FNA smears for the detection of these rearrangements with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Methods A new method for RNA extraction from routine air-dried FNA smears was established, which allowed analysis for the presence of four variants of PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC 1 and RET/PTC 3, which were analyzed in 106 routine FNA smears and the corresponding surgically obtained FFPE tissues using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). To assess RNA quality, an intron-spanning PAX8 cDNA was amplified. Results Acceptable RNA quality was obtained from 95% of the FNA samples and 92% of the FFPE samples. PAX8/PPARG was detected in 4 of 96 FFPEs and in 6 of 96 FNAs. PAX8/PPARG was present in 4 of 10 FTCs and in 3 of 42 follicular adenomas (FAs). Similarly, RET/PTC was found in 3 of 96 FFPEs and in 4 of 96 FNAs. Two of 21 PTC samples and 3 of 42 FA samples carried this rearrangement. Conclusion These data are the first to show the feasibility of extracting RNA from routine air-dried FNA smears for the detection of PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC rearrangements with RT-qPCR. These promising methodological advances, if confirmed in larger series of FNA and FFPE samples, may lead to

  10. Microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 is induced by conditional expression of RET/PTC in thyroid PCCL3 cells through the activation of the MEK-ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Puxeddu, Efisio; Mitsutake, Norisato; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Moretti, Sonia; Kim, Hei W; Seta, Karen A; Brockman, Diane; Myatt, Leslie; Millhorn, David E; Fagin, James A

    2003-12-26

    RET/PTC rearrangements are believed to be tumor-initiating events in papillary thyroid carcinomas. We identified microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1) as a RET/PTC-inducible gene through subtraction hybridization cloning and expression profiling with custom microarrays. The inducible prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) biosynthetic enzymes cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and mPGES-1 are up-regulated in many cancers. COX-2 is overexpressed in thyroid malignancies compared with benign nodules and normal thyroid tissues. Eicosanoids may promote tumorigenesis through effects on tumor cell growth, immune surveillance, and angiogenesis. Conditional RET/PTC1 or RET/PTC3 expression in PCCL3 thyroid cells markedly induced mPGES-1 and COX-2. PGE2 was the principal prostanoid and up-regulated (by approximately 60-fold), whereas hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid metabolites were decreased, consistent with shunting of prostanoid biosynthesis toward PGE2 by coactivation of the two enzymes. RET/PTC activated mPGES-1 gene transcription. Based on experiments with kinase inhibitors, with PCCL3 cell lines with doxycycline-inducible expression of RET/PTC mutants with substitutions of critical tyrosine residues in the kinase domain, and lines with inducible expression of activated mutants of H-RAS and MEK1, RET/PTC was found to regulate mPGES-1 through Shc-RAS-MEK-ERK. These data show a direct relationship between activation of a tyrosine kinase receptor oncogene and regulation of PGE2 biosynthesis. As enzymes involved in prostanoid biosynthesis can be targeted with pharmacological inhibitors, these findings may have therapeutic implications. PMID:14555660

  11. Coding polymorphism for phylogeny reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kornet, D J; Turner, H

    1999-06-01

    The methodology of coding polymorphic taxa has received limited attention to date. A search of the taxonomic literature revealed seven types of coding methods. Apart from ignoring polymorphic characters (sometimes called the fixed-only method), two main categories can be distinguished: methods that identify the start of a new character state with the origin of an evolutionary novelty, and methods that identify the new state with the fixation of a novelty. The methods of the first category introduce soft reversals, yielding signals that support cladograms incompatible with true phylogenies. We conclude that coding the plesiomorphy is the method to be preferred, unless the ancestral state is unknown, in which case coding as ambiguous is recommended. This holds for coding polymorphism in species as well as in supraspecific taxa. In this light we remark on methods proposed by previous authors. PMID:12066713

  12. Adaptive dynamics of saturated polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kisdi, Éva; Geritz, Stefan A H

    2016-03-01

    We study the joint adaptive dynamics of n scalar-valued strategies in ecosystems where n is the maximum number of coexisting strategies permitted by the (generalized) competitive exclusion principle. The adaptive dynamics of such saturated systems exhibits special characteristics, which we first demonstrate in a simple example of a host-pathogen-predator model. The main part of the paper characterizes the adaptive dynamics of saturated polymorphisms in general. In order to investigate convergence stability, we give a new sufficient condition for absolute stability of an arbitrary (not necessarily saturated) polymorphic singularity and show that saturated evolutionarily stable polymorphisms satisfy it. For the case [Formula: see text], we also introduce a method to construct different pairwise invasibility plots of the monomorphic population without changing the selection gradients of the saturated dimorphism. PMID:26676357

  13. Genetics Home Reference: catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

    MedlinePlus

    ... for This Page Cerrone M, Napolitano C, Priori SG. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia: A paradigm to understand ... on PubMed Central Liu N, Ruan Y, Priori SG. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2008 ...

  14. Crystal Polymorphs of Barbital: News about a Classic Polymorphic System

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Barbital is a hypnotic agent that has been intensely studied for many decades. The aim of this work was to establish a clear and comprehensible picture of its polymorphic system. Four of the six known solid forms of barbital (denoted I0, III, IV, and V) were characterized by various analytical techniques, and the thermodynamic relationships between the polymorph phases were established. The obtained data permitted the construction of the first semischematic energy/temperature diagram for the barbital system. The modifications I0, III, and V are enantiotropically related to one another. Polymorph IV is enantiotropically related to V and monotropically related to the other two forms. The transition points for the pairs I0/III, I0/V, and III/IV lie below 20 °C, and the transition point for IV/V is above 20 °C. At room temperature, the order of thermodynamic stability is I0 > III > V > IV. The metastable modification III is present in commercial samples and has a high kinetic stability. The solid-state NMR spectra provide information on aspects of crystallography (viz., the asymmetric units and the nature of hydrogen bonding). The known correlation between specific N–H···O=C hydrogen bonding motifs of barbiturates and certain IR characteristics was used to predict the H-bonded pattern of polymorph IV. PMID:24283960

  15. Amplified fragment length polymorphism and virulence polymorphism in Puccinia hordei

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Puccinia hordei is the causal agent of barley leaf rust. To study the genetic diversity in P. hordei, 45 isolates with diverse virulence patterns and geographical origins were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers. Two pathotypes of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici and one is...

  16. A protein tyrosine kinase receptor, c-RET signaling pathway contributes to the enteric neurogenesis induced by a 5-HT4 receptor agonist at an anastomosis after transection of the gut in rodents.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kei; Kawahara, Isao; Kuniyasu, Hiroki; Takaki, Miyako

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported that a serotonin 4 (5-HT4) receptor agonist, mosapride citrate (MOS), increased the number of c-RET-positive cells and levels of c-RET mRNA in gel sponge implanted in the necks of rats. The 5-HT4 receptor is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) coupled to G protein Gs-cAMP cascades. We investigated the possibility that 5-HT4 receptor activation induced c-RET activation and/or PKA activation by elevating cAMP levels. Rodents were orally administered MOS by adding it to drinking water for 2 weeks after enteric nerve circuit insult via gut transection and anastomosis, together with the RET inhibitors withaferin A (WA) and RPI-1 or the PKA inhibitor H89. We then examined PGP9.5-positive cells in the newly formed granulation tissue at the anastomotic site. MOS significantly increased the number of new neurons, but not when co-administered with WA or RPI-1. Co-administration of H89 failed to alter MOS-induced increases in neurogenesis. In conclusion, the c-RET signaling pathway contributes to enteric neurogenesis facilitated by MOS, though the contribution of PKA activation seems unlikely. PMID:25850922

  17. Polymorphism in pleistocene land snails.

    PubMed

    Owen, D F

    1966-04-01

    Under suitable conditions the colors and patterns of the shells of land snails may be preserved for thousands of years. In a late Pleistocene population of Limicolaria martensiana all the major color forms that occur in modern living snails may be distinguished, and the basic polymorphism is at least 8,000 to 10,000 year old. PMID:17830234

  18. Neutral behavior of shared polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew G.

    1997-01-01

    Several cases have been described in the literature where genetic polymorphism appears to be shared between a pair of species. Here we examine the distribution of times to random loss of shared polymorphism in the context of the neutral Wright–Fisher model. Order statistics are used to obtain the distribution of times to loss of a shared polymorphism based on Kimura’s solution to the diffusion approximation of the Wright–Fisher model. In a single species, the expected absorption time for a neutral allele having an initial allele frequency of ½ is 2.77 N generations. If two species initially share a polymorphism, that shared polymorphism is lost as soon as either of two species undergoes fixation. The loss of a shared polymorphism thus occurs sooner than loss of polymorphism in a single species and has an expected time of 1.7 N generations. Molecular sequences of genes with shared polymorphism may be characterized by the count of the number of sites that segregate in both species for the same nucleotides (or amino acids). The distribution of the expected numbers of these shared polymorphic sites also is obtained. Shared polymorphism appears to be more likely at genetic loci that have an unusually large number of segregating alleles, and the neutral coalescent proves to be very useful in determining the probability of shared allelic lineages expected by chance. These results are related to examples of shared polymorphism in the literature. PMID:9223256

  19. Analysis of Ret knockin mice reveals a critical role for IKKs, but not PI 3-K, in neurotrophic factor-induced survival of sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Encinas, Mario; Rozen, Esteban J.; Dolcet, Xavier; Jain, Sanjay; Comella, Joan X.; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Johnson, Eugene M.

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed the survival responses and downstream signaling elicited by GDNF on sympathetic neurons from different Ret knockin mice. Lack of tyrosine 1062, a multidocking site in Ret, completely prevented GDNF-mediated survival. Importantly lack of tyrosine 981, although abrogating Akt phosphorylation, had no effect on neuronal survival, indicating that the PI 3-K/Akt pathway is not necessary for survival of sympathetic neurons. In contrast, silencing of B-Raf completely prevented not only GDNF-mediated but also NGF-mediated cell survival, independently of MEK-1/2. We identified IKKs as the main effectors of the protective effects of B-Raf. First, B-Raf interacted with and activated IKKs. Second, knockdown of IKKs reversed the protection afforded by a constitutively active form of B-Raf. Third, knockdown of IKKs prevented both NGF- and GDNF-mediated survival. In conclusion, our data delineate a novel survival pathway for sympathetic neurons linking B-Raf to IKKs, independently of both PI 3-K and MEK-1/2 pathways. PMID:18497757

  20. Changes in Teachers' Beliefs about Reformed Science Teaching and Learning, and Their Inquiry-Based Instructional Practices Following a Year-Long RET-PLC Professional Development Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, R.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the extent to which teachers' beliefs and classroom practices concerning inquiry-based instruction change following participation in a large mid-Atlantic university's year-long Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) - Professional Learning Community (PLC) professional development program. Mixed methods were used to explore this study's research questions. Supported with NASA funding, twelve secondary science teachers participated in the study. Study findings suggest that RET programs that incorporate a PLC component can help to shift teachers' beliefs and classroom practices concerning inquiry-based instruction, and help them to increase the level of inquiry in their science lessons. An implication of this research is that teacher professional development models need to be developed to help teachers effectively plan more time for students to conduct inquiry-based activities, to communicate findings based on evidence, and to develop questions to investigate themselves. Moreover, the findings of this study can help to inform science teacher education and professional development programs in creating more fruitful experiences for these professionals, and help them to align their beliefs and practice more toward the constructivist visions of current reform efforts.

  1. Cold DUst around NEarby Stars (DUNES). First results. A resolved exo-Kuiper belt around the solar-like star ζ2 Ret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiroa, C.; Fedele, D.; Maldonado, J.; González-García, B. M.; Rodmann, J.; Heras, A. M.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Augereau, J.-Ch.; Mora, A.; Montesinos, B.; Ardila, D.; Bryden, G.; Liseau, R.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Launhardt, R.; Solano, E.; Bayo, A.; Absil, O.; Arévalo, M.; Barrado, D.; Beichmann, C.; Danchi, W.; Del Burgo, C.; Ertel, S.; Fridlund, M.; Fukagawa, M.; Gutiérrez, R.; Grün, E.; Kamp, I.; Krivov, A.; Lebreton, J.; Löhne, T.; Lorente, R.; Marshall, J.; Martínez-Arnáiz, R.; Meeus, G.; Montes, D.; Morbidelli, A.; Müller, S.; Mutschke, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Olofsson, G.; Ribas, I.; Roberge, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Thébault, P.; Walker, H.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2010-07-01

    We present the first far-IR observations of the solar-type stars δ Pav, HR 8501, 51 Peg and ζ2 Ret, taken within the context of the DUNES Herschel open time key programme (OTKP). This project uses the PACS and SPIRE instruments with the objective of studying infrared excesses due to exo-Kuiper belts around nearby solar-type stars. The observed 100 μm fluxes from δ Pav, HR 8501, and 51 Peg agree with the predicted photospheric fluxes, excluding debris disks brighter than Ldust/Lstar 5 × 10-7 (1σ level) around those stars. A flattened, disk-like structure with a semi-major axis of 100 AU in size is detected around ζ2 Ret. The resolved structure suggests the presence of an eccentric dust ring, which we interpret as an exo-Kuiper belt with Ldust/Lstar ≈ 10-5. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  2. IPD: the Immuno Polymorphism Database.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James; Marsh, Steven G E

    2007-01-01

    The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD) (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/) is a set of specialist databases related to the study of polymorphic genes in the immune system. IPD currently consists of four databases: IPD-KIR, contains the allelic sequences of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs); IPD-MHC, a database of sequences of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of different species; IPD-HPA, alloantigens expressed only on platelets; and IPD-ESTAB, which provides access to the European Searchable Tumour Cell Line Database, a cell bank of immunologically characterized melanoma cell lines. The IPD project works with specialist groups or nomenclature committees who provide and curate individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. The IPD project stores all the data in a set of related databases. Those sections with similar data, such as IPD-KIR and IPD-MHC, share the same database structure. PMID:18449992

  3. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  4. Parasitic polymorphism of Coccidioides spp

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Coccidioides spp. is the ethiological agent of coccidioidomycosis, an infection that can be fatal. Its diagnosis is complicated, due to that it shares clinical and histopathological characteristics with other pulmonary mycoses. Coccidioides spp. is a dimorphic fungus and, in its saprobic phase, grows as a mycelium, forming a large amount of arthroconidia. In susceptible persons, arthroconidia induce dimorphic changes into spherules/endospores, a typical parasitic form of Coccidioides spp. In addition, the diversity of mycelial parasitic forms has been observed in clinical specimens; they are scarcely known and produce errors in diagnosis. Methods We presented a retrospective study of images from specimens of smears with 15% potassium hydroxide, cytology, and tissue biopsies of a histopathologic collection from patients with coccidioidomycosis seen at a tertiary-care hospital in Mexico City. Results The parasitic polymorphism of Coccidioides spp. observed in the clinical specimens was as follows: i) spherules/endospores in different maturation stages; ii) pleomorphic cells (septate hyphae, hyphae composed of ovoid and spherical cells, and arthroconidia), and iii) fungal ball formation (mycelia with septate hyphae and arthroconidia). Conclusions The parasitic polymorphism of Coccidioides spp. includes the following: spherules/endospores, arthroconidia, and different forms of mycelia. This knowledge is important for the accurate diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis. In earlier studies, we proposed the integration of this diversity of forms in the Coccidioides spp. parasitic cycle. The microhabitat surrounding the fungus into the host would favor the parasitic polymorphism of this fungus, and this environment may assist in the evolution toward parasitism of Coccidioides spp. PMID:24750998

  5. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 3: Papers by Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.)

    SciTech Connect

    Rinne, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process-and how-would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and discussion panels. Volume 2 contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. This volume contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.).

  6. Evaluation of expression and function of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, platelet derived growth factor receptors-alpha and -beta, KIT, and RET in canine apocrine gland anal sac adenocarcinoma and thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Toceranib phosphate (Palladia) has a reported objective response rate of 25% in both canine apocrine gland anal sac adenocarcinoma (AGASACA) and thyroid carcinoma (TC), with stable disease occurring in an additional 50-60% of dogs. The basis for the observed responses to toceranib is not known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate AGASACA and TC samples for the expression and activation of VEGFR2, PDGFRα, PDGFRβ, KIT and RET to assess whether dysregulation of these receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) may contribute to the biologic activity of toceranib. Results mRNA for VEGFR2, PDGFRα/β, KIT and RET was detected in all AGASACA samples. mRNA for VEGFR2, PDGFRα/β, and KIT was detected in all TC samples, while mRNA for RET was amplified in 10/15 samples. No phosphorylation of VEGFR2, PDGFRα/β, or KIT was observed on the arrays. However, phosphorylation of RET was detected in 54% of the primary AGASACA and 20% of TC. VEGFR2 was expressed in 19/24 primary and 6/10 metastatic AGASACA and 6/15 TC samples. KIT was present in 8/24 primary and 3/10 metastatic AGASACA and 9/15 TC samples. PDGFRα expression was noted in all tumor samples. In contrast PDGFRβ expression was found in only a few tumor samples but was evident in the stroma of all tumor specimens. Conclusions Known targets of toceranib are expressed in both AGASAC and TC. Given the observed expression of VEGFR and PDGFRα/β and phosphorylation of RET, these RTKs merit investigation as to their roles in the biology of AGSACA and TC and their contribution to toceranib’s activity. PMID:22630170

  7. Polymorphic transporters and platinum pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sprowl, Jason A.; Ness, Rachel A.; Sparreboom, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Summary Several solute carriers and ATP-binding cassette transporters have been implicated in the influx or efflux of platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin. Given that many of these proteins are highly polymorphic, the genetic status of these proteins could be an important contributor to the extensive interindividual pharmacokinetic variability associated with the clinical use of these agents. In this review article, we provide an updated overview of the various transporters that have shown promise in animal models or patient populations in facilitating the movement of platinum-based agents across cell membranes, and how their function is associated with drug disposition or pharmacodynamic effects. PMID:22986709

  8. Germline RET 634 mutation positive MEN 2A-related C-cell hyperplasias have genetic features consistent with intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Cano, S J; de Miguel, M; Blanes, A; Tashjian, R; Wolfe, H J

    2001-08-01

    C-cell hyperplasias are normally multifocal in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A. We compared clonality, microsatellite pattern of tumor suppressor genes, and cellular kinetics of C-cell hyperplasia foci in each thyroid lobe. We selected 11 females from multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A kindred treated with thyroidectomy due to hypercalcitoninemia. C-cell hyperplasia foci were microdissected for DNA extraction to analyze the methylation pattern of androgen receptor alleles and microsatellite regions (TP53, RB1, WT1, and NF1). Consecutive sections were selected for MIB-1, pRB1, p53, Mdm-2, and p21WAF1 immunostaining, DNA content analysis, and in situ end labeling. Appropriate tissue controls were run. Only two patients had medullary thyroid carcinoma foci. Nine informative C-cell hyperplasia patients showed germline point mutation in RET, eight of them with the same androgen receptor allele preferentially methylated in both lobes. C-cell hyperplasia foci showed heterogeneous DNA deletions revealed by loss of heterozygosity of TP53 (12 of 20), RB1 (6 of 14), and WT1 (4 of 20) and hypodiploid G0/G1 cells (14 of 20), low cellular turnover (MIB-1 index 4.5%, in situ end labeling index 0.03%), and significantly high nuclear area to DNA index ratio. MEN 2A (germline point mutation in RET codon 634) C-cell hyperplasias are monoclonal and genetically heterogeneous and show down-regulated apoptosis, findings consistent with an intraepithelial neoplasia. Concordant X-chromosome inactivation and interstitial gene deletions suggest clone expansions of precursors occurring at a point in embryonic development before divergence of each thyroid lobe and may represent a paradigm for other germline mutations. PMID:11502837

  9. Pharmacogenetics and human genetic polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K

    2010-08-01

    The term pharmacogenetics was first used in the late 1950s and can be defined as the study of genetic factors affecting drug response. Prior to formal use of this term, there was already clinical data available in relation to variable patient responses to the drugs isoniazid, primaquine and succinylcholine. The subject area developed rapidly, particularly with regard to genetic factors affecting drug disposition. There is now comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis for variable drug metabolism by the cytochromes P450 and also for variable glucuronidation, acetylation and methylation of certain drugs. Some of this knowledge has already been translated to the clinic. The molecular basis of variation in drug targets, such as receptors and enzymes, is generally less well understood, although there is consistent evidence that polymorphisms in the genes encoding the beta-adrenergic receptors and the enzyme vitamin K epoxide reductase is of clinical importance. The genetic basis of rare idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions had also been examined. Susceptibility to reactions affecting skin and liver appears to be determined in part by the HLA (human leucocyte antigen) genotype, whereas reactions affecting the heart and muscle may be determined by polymorphisms in genes encoding ion channels and transporters respectively. Genome-wide association studies are increasingly being used to study drug response and susceptibility to adverse drug reactions, resulting in identification of some novel pharmacogenetic associations. PMID:20626352

  10. Polymorphism and Structure of Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhaès, P.; Issi, J. P.; Bonnamy, S.; Launois, P.

    In this chapter, our purpose is to introduce carbon materials, situating the nanotubes inside this polymorphic zoo. We aim at giving the reader the basic notions on carbon materials structural and physical properties, necessary for the understanding of the following chapters. The introductory section gives a historical background about the peculiar carbon element and the numerous carbon materials which have been identified up to now. Then in a second part a classical thermodynamic approach is presented to describe the crystalline and non-crystalline forms of carbon, up to fullerenes and nanotubes. It is shown that the choice of the processing ways, including the crucial role played by the temperature, is fundamental to control the final type of material. In particular the different processes to prepare non-crystalline graphitic carbons are described in Sect. 1.3. Based on the texture symmetries different types of classical carbon materials are presented in relation with their numerous industrial applications. Then a general introduction is given concerning mainly the transport properties of the crystalline forms, including the intercalation compounds, but also their `avatars' as pregraphitic carbons. In a final part, this panorama, which is going from the classical forms to the more molecular ones including nanotubes, is completed by the presentation of similar compounds. Starting from neighboring elements in the periodic classification we show that doped carbons and parent compounds present a similar polymorphism which enlarges this general introduction.

  11. Spinning up the polymorphs of calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Boulos, Ramiz A.; Zhang, Fei; Tjandra, Edwin S.; Martin, Adam D.; Spagnoli, Dino; Raston, Colin L.

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the growth of the polymorphs of calcium carbonate is important in understanding the changing environmental conditions in the oceans. Aragonite is the main polymorph in the inner shells of marine organisms, and can be readily converted to calcite, which is the most stable polymorph of calcium carbonate. Both of these polymorphs are significantly more stable than vaterite, which is the other naturally occurring polymorph of calcium carbonate, and this is reflected in its limited distribution in nature. We have investigated the effect of high shear forces on the phase behaviour of calcium carbonate using a vortex fluidic device (VFD), with experimental parameters varied to explore calcium carbonate mineralisation. Variation of tilt angle, rotation speed and temperature allow for control over the size, shape and phase of the resulting calcium carbonate. PMID:24448077

  12. Polymorphs and Versatile Solvates of 7-Hydroxyisoflavone.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ningbo; Zhang, Guoshun; Jin, Guimin; Du, Guanhua; Lu, Yang

    2016-04-01

    7-hydroxyisoflavone has been crystallized, identified, and characterized as 2 solvent-free conformational polymorphs and 5 solvates, which differ from each other in the mode of packing and in molecular conformation. All the 7 crystal structures were previously unreported. The conformational polymorphs and solvates were compared by Hirshfeld surface and fingerprint plot analysis and were spectroscopically characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermal gravimetric analysis. Hydrogen bond played an important role in the formation of polymorphs. From this study, we can predict that more solvates could be cultivated in other polarity solvents such as isopropanol or 2-butanol at appropriate conditions. PMID:26935882

  13. [Relationship of MTHFR gene polymorphisms with infertility].

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai-min; Tian, Run-hui; Wang, Hong-liang

    2016-02-01

    The folate metabolic pathway plays important roles in cellular physiology by participating in nucleotide synthesis, DNA repair and methylation, and maintenance and stability of the genome. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key regulatory enzyme involved in folate metabolism. Polymorphisms of MTHFR may change the level of homocysteine and affect DNA synthesis and methylation, leading to an increased oxidative stress and disturbed methylation reactions and consequently affecting reproductive function. This article presents an overview on MTHFR gene polymorphisms, proposing that multicentered, large-sample and long-term prospective studies are needed to reveal the relationship between MTHFR gene polymorphisms and infertility. PMID:26939404

  14. Vibrational study of tamoxifen citrate polymorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamberini, M. C.; Baraldi, C.; Tinti, A.; Palazzoli, F.; Ferioli, V.

    2007-09-01

    The trans isomer of ( Z)-2-[ p-(1,2-diphenyl-butenyl)phenoxy]- N, N-dimethyletylamine (tamoxifen) is well known for its endocrine activity as an antiestrogenic agent. Its citrate salt, a widely used pharmaceutical agent, appears in three main polymorphic forms, two of which are well known (I and II) and another form not yet well evidenced. A vibrational study has been conducted for identifying the two known polymorphic forms of tamoxifen citrate (I and II) and for characterising the other form (form III) examined in this study. Other techniques for the characterization of the different polymorphs, such as XRDP, have been used.

  15. Rivastigmine hydrogen tartrate polymorphs: Solid-state characterisation of transition and polymorphic conversion via milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, Maria Inês; Simon, Alice; Cabral, Lúcio Mendes; de Sousa, Valéria Pereira; Healy, Anne Marie

    2015-11-01

    Rivastigmine (RHT) is an active pharmaceutical ingredient that is used for the treatment of mild to moderately severe dementia in Alzheimer's disease, and is known to present two polymorphic forms and to amorphise upon granulation. To date there is no information in the scientific or patent literature on polymorphic transition and stability. Hence, the aim of the current study was to gain a fundamental understanding of the polymorphic forms by (1) evaluating RHT thermodynamic stability (monotropy or enantiotropy) and (2) investigating the potential for polymorphic transformation upon milling. The two polymorphic and amorphous forms were characterised using X-ray powder diffractometry, thermal analyses, infra-red spectroscopy and water sorption analysis. The polymorphic transition was found to be spontaneous (ΔG0 < 0) and exothermic (ΔH0 < 0), indicative of a monotropic polymorph pair. The kinetic studies showed a fast initial polymorphic transition characterised by a heterogeneous nucleation, followed by a slow crystal growth. Ball milling can be used to promote the polymorphic transition and for the production of RHT amorphous form.

  16. Kinetic Trapping of Metastable Amino Acid Polymorphs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy measurements indicate that inkjet-printed racemic solutions of amino acids can produce nanocrystals trapped in metastable polymorph forms upon rapid solvent evaporation. Polymorphism impacts the composition, distribution, and physico-kinetic properties of organic solids, with energetic arguments favoring the most stable polymorph. In this study, unfavored noncentrosymmetric crystal forms were observed by SHG microscopy. Polarization-dependent SHG measurement and synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction analysis of individual printed drops are consistent with formation of homochiral crystal production. Fundamentally, these results provide evidence supporting the ubiquity of Ostwald’s Rule of Stages, describing the hypothesized transitioning of crystals between metastable polymorphic forms in the early stages of crystal formation. Practically, the presence of homochiral metastable forms has implications on chiral resolution and on solid form preparations relying on rapid solvent evaporation. PMID:24451055

  17. Simple sequence repeat polymorphisms in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic mapping, forward genetic analyses, and marker-assisted selection (MAS) have been intractable in intraspecific populations of cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea), primarily because domestication and breeding bottlenecks have narrowed genetic diversity and depleted DNA polymorphisms. The DNA...

  18. Kinetic trapping of metastable amino acid polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Azhad U; Dettmar, Christopher M; Sullivan, Shane Z; Zhang, Shijie; Jacobs, Kevin T; Kissick, David J; Maltais, Thora; Hedderich, Hartmut G; Bishop, Patricia A; Simpson, Garth J

    2014-02-12

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy measurements indicate that inkjet-printed racemic solutions of amino acids can produce nanocrystals trapped in metastable polymorph forms upon rapid solvent evaporation. Polymorphism impacts the composition, distribution, and physico-kinetic properties of organic solids, with energetic arguments favoring the most stable polymorph. In this study, unfavored noncentrosymmetric crystal forms were observed by SHG microscopy. Polarization-dependent SHG measurement and synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction analysis of individual printed drops are consistent with formation of homochiral crystal production. Fundamentally, these results provide evidence supporting the ubiquity of Ostwald's Rule of Stages, describing the hypothesized transitioning of crystals between metastable polymorphic forms in the early stages of crystal formation. Practically, the presence of homochiral metastable forms has implications on chiral resolution and on solid form preparations relying on rapid solvent evaporation. PMID:24451055

  19. Persistent hydrogen bonding in polymorphic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Galek, Peter T A; Fábián, László; Allen, Frank H

    2009-02-01

    The significance of hydrogen bonding and its variability in polymorphic crystal structures is explored using new automated structural analysis methods. The concept of a chemically equivalent hydrogen bond is defined, which may be identified in pairs of structures, revealing those types of bonds that may persist, or not, in moving from one polymorphic form to another. Their frequency and nature are investigated in 882 polymorphic structures from the Cambridge Structural Database. A new method to compare conformations of equivalent molecules is introduced and applied to derive distinct subsets of conformational and packing polymorphs. The roles of chemical functionality and hydrogen-bond geometry in persistent interactions are systematically explored. Detailed structural comparisons reveal a large majority of persistent hydrogen bonds that are energetically crucial to structural stability. PMID:19155561

  20. Purification of polymorphic components of complex genomes

    DOEpatents

    Stodolsky, Marvin

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for processing related subject and reference macromolecule populations composed of complementary strands into their respective subject and reference populations of representative fragments and effectuating purification of unique polymorphic subject fragments.

  1. Purification of polymorphic components of complex genomes

    DOEpatents

    Stodolsky, M.

    1988-01-21

    A method for processing related subject and reference macromolecule composed of complementary strand into their respective subject and reference populations of representative fragments and effectuating purification of unique polymorphic subject fragments. 1 fig.

  2. Purification of polymorphic components of complex genomes

    DOEpatents

    Stodolsky, M.

    1991-07-16

    A method is disclosed for processing related subject and reference macromolecule populations composed of complementary strands into their respective subject and reference populations of representative fragments and effectuating purification of unique polymorphic subject fragments. 1 figure.

  3. Gene polymorphisms and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaodan; Yuan, Bowei; López, Elena; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    The genetic component was suggested to contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a major and growing public health burden. The present review aims to characterize the evidence that gene polymorphisms contribute to the aetiology of COPD and related traits, and explore the potential relationship between certain gene polymorphisms and COPD susceptibility, severity, lung function, phenotypes, or drug effects, even though limited results from related studies lacked consistency. Most of these studies were association studies, rather than confirmatory studies. More large-sized and strictly controlled studies are needed to prove the relationship between gene polymorphisms and the reviewed traits. More importantly, prospective confirmatory studies beyond initial association studies will be necessary to evaluate true relationships between gene polymorphisms and COPD and help individualized treatment for patients with COPD. PMID:24256364

  4. Next generation sequencing analysis of platinum refractory advanced germ cell tumor sensitive to Sunitinib (Sutent®) a VEGFR2/PDGFRβ/c-kit/ FLT3/RET/CSF1R inhibitor in a phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Germ cell tumors (GCT) are the most common solid tumors in adolescent and young adult males (age 15 and 35 years) and remain one of the most curable of all solid malignancies. However a subset of patients will have tumors that are refractory to standard chemotherapy agents. The management of this refractory population remains challenging and approximately 400 patients continue to die every year of this refractory disease in the United States. Methods Given the preclinical evidence implicating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in the biology of germ cell tumors, we hypothesized that the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor sunitinib (Sutent) may possess important clinical activity in the treatment of this refractory disease. We proposed a Phase II efficacy study of sunitinib in seminomatous and non-seminomatous metastatic GCT’s refractory to first line chemotherapy treatment (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00912912). Next generation targeted exome sequencing using HiSeq 2000 (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) was performed on the tumor sample of the unusual responder. Results Five patients are enrolled into this Phase II study. Among them we report here the clinical course of a patient (Patient # 5) who had an exceptional response to sunitinib. Next generation sequencing to understand this patient’s response to sunitinib revealed RET amplification, EGFR and KRAS amplification as relevant aberrations. Oncoscan MIP array were employed to validate the copy number analysis that confirmed RET gene amplification. Conclusion Sunitinib conferred clinical benefit to this heavily pre-treated patient. Next generation sequencing of this ‘exceptional responder’ identified the first reported case of a RET amplification as a potential basis of sensitivity to sunitinib (VEGFR2/PDGFRβ/c-kit/ FLT3/RET/CSF1R inhibitor) in a patient with refractory germ cell tumor. Further characterization of GCT patients using

  5. Impact polymorphs of quartz: experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, M. C.; Dutta, R.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    We have used the light gas gun at the University of Kent to perform a series of impact experiments firing quartz projectiles onto metal, quartz and sapphire targets. The aim is to quantify the amount of any high pressure quartz polymorphs produced, and use these data to develop our hydrocode modelling to enable the predict ion of the quantity of polymorphs produced during a planetary scale impact.

  6. DNA polymorphism identity determination using flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott; Cai, Hong

    2001-01-01

    DNA polymorphism identity determination using flow cytometry. Primers designed to be immobilized on microspheres are allowed to anneal to the DNA strand under investigation, and are extended by either DNA polymerase using fluorescent dideoxynucleotides or ligated by DNA ligase to fluorescent reporter oligonucleotides. The fluorescence of either the dideoxynucleotide or the reporter oligonucleotide attached to the immobilized primer is measured by flow cytometry, thereby identifying the nucleotide polymorphism on the DNA strand.

  7. Glycidamide genotoxicity modulated by Caspases genes polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    de Lima, João Pereira; Silva, Susana N; Rueff, José; Pingarilho, Marta

    2016-08-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is amongst acknowledged carcinogenic dietary factors. Its DNA-reactive metabolite is glycidamide (GA). The present study intended to correlate the role of key polymorphic genes of apoptosis (CASP7, CASP8, CASP9, CASP10, LTA and TNFRSF1B) with biomarkers of effect of DNA damage, namely the sister chromatid exchange assay (SCE) and the comet assay in whole blood cells exposed to GA. The aim was to assess as a proof of concept the role that pro-apoptotic effector proteins might have in the yields of genotoxic effects when those effector proteins are coded by polymorphic genes. Whole blood from a small group of volunteers was exposed to GA to assess DNA damage and the volunteers were genotyped for polymorphic genes related to apoptosis pathways. A relation between the induction of SCE and several variants of the polymorphism CASP8 rs1035142 G>T was observed. Also, a relation between the % tail DNA and the CASP10 I522L polymorphism was found. Furthermore, associations between % tail DNA and several SNP-SNP interactions of CASP8 and CASP10 were found. A possible correlation between DNA damage and the genetic susceptibility, bestowed by polymorphic genes in the apoptosis inducing pathways was verified. PMID:27062911

  8. RET and anisotropy measurements establish the proximity of the conserved Trp17 to Ile98 and Phe99 of tear lipocalin.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Yusifov, Taleh N; Glasgow, Ben J

    2002-07-16

    Previous studies suggest that the conserved Trp17 on strand A of TL has a role in lipocalin stability and interacts, directly or indirectly, with Ile98 and Phe99 on strand G to influence ligand binding. Here, we determined the proximity of Trp17 to Ile98 and Phe99. Time-resolved fluorescence experiments showed resonance energy transfer between tryptophans at positions 17 and 98. In addition, an exciton effect was discovered in CD experiments resulting from interactions of the excited states of these tryptophans. Fluorescence anisotropy values of mutants containing two tryptophans (positions 99/17 and 98/17) were lower than expected in the absence of RET, confirming that these residues are proximate in tear lipocalin. The data support a model of tear lipocalin in which Trp17 and Phe99 are close together deep in the cavity and participate in an internal hydrophobic cluster. Ile98 is proximate to Trp17 but faces toward the outside of the cavity and in the model is part of an external hydrophobic patch. Comparison with beta-lactoglobulin suggests that these motifs may have an important influence on protein stability and ligand binding in other members of the lipocalin family. PMID:12102626

  9. Loss of CCDC6, the First Identified RET Partner Gene, Affects pH2AX S139 Levels and Accelerates Mitotic Entry upon DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Mark T.; Pacelli, Roberto; Fusco, Alfredo; Celetti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    CCDC6 was originally identified in chimeric genes caused by chromosomal translocation involving the RET proto-oncogene in some thryoid tumors mostly upon ionizing radiation exposure. Recognised as a pro-apoptotic phosphoprotein that negatively regulates CREB1-dependent transcription, CCDC6 is an ATM substrate that is responsive to genotoxic stress. Here we report that following genotoxic stress, loss or inactivation of CCDC6 in cancers that carry the CCDC6 fusion, accelerates the dephosphorylation of pH2AX S139, resulting in defective G2 arrest and premature mitotic entry. Moreover, we show that CCDC6 depleted cells appear to repair DNA damaged in a shorter time compared to controls, based on reporter assays in cells. High-troughput proteomic screening predicted the interaction between the CCDC6 gene product and the catalytic subunit of Serin–Threonin Protein Phosphatase 4 (PP4c) recently identified as the evolutionarily conserved pH2AX S139 phosphatase that is activated upon DNA Damage. We describe the interaction between CCDC6 and PP4c and we report the modulation of PP4c enzymatic activity in CCDC6 depleted cells. We discuss the functional significance of CCDC6-PP4c interactions and hypothesize that CCDC6 may act in the DNA Damage Response by negatively modulating PP4c activity. Overall, our data suggest that in primary tumours the loss of CCDC6 function could influence genome stability and thereby contribute to carcinogenesis. PMID:22655027

  10. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2a and germ line C634G RET mutation diagnosed in an 80-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Sanz, C; Vezzosi, D; Pigny, P; Bennet, A; Caron, P

    2009-04-01

    An 80-year-old man presented with progressive fatigue. Blood tests showed that serum calcium was increased (2.93 mmol/l, normal range 2.20-2.55 mmol/l) and serum concentration of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) inappropriately high (198 pg/ml, normal range 15-85 pg/ml). Neck ultrasonography and Tc-MIBI scintigraphy revealed a right parathyroid adenoma and a multinodular goiter. Serum calcitonin was significantly increased (220 pg/ml, normal range<10 pg/ml). Concomitantly, a chest-abdominal computed tomography was performed and revealed a 22 mm right adrenal incidentaloma. The urinary catecholamines and metabolites were two-fold above the upper limit of normal. After right adrenalectomy which confirmed the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma, the patient underwent total thyroidectomy with dissection of the central lymph node compartment and right parathyroidectomy. On histopathologic examination, both thyroid lobes presented 13 foci of MTC without lymph node metastasis and the parathyroid gland presented a benign adenoma without hyperplasia. The patient underwent screening and genetic testing revealing a germ line C634 G RET mutation. The diagnosis of Men2a at the age of 80 years and the absence of lymph node metastasis of the multiple MTC in a carrier of C634G mutation were unusual and argued for the possible role of genetic modifier(s) in this MEN 2a patient. PMID:19201392

  11. A PCR-mutagenesis strategy for rapid detection of mutations in codon 634 of the ret proto-oncogene related to MEN 2A.

    PubMed Central

    Roqué, María; Pusiol, Eduardo; Perinetti, Héctor; Godoy, Clara Pott; Mayorga, Luis S

    2002-01-01

    Background Multiple endocrine neoplasias type 2A (MEN 2A) is a dominantly inherited cancer syndrome. Missence mutations in the codon encoding cysteine 634 of the ret proto-oncogene have been found in 85% of the MEN 2A families. The main tumour type always present in MEN 2A is medullar thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Only 25% of all MTC are hereditary, and generally they are identified by a careful family history. However, some familial MTCs are not easily detected by this means and underdiagnosis of MEN 2A is suspected. Methods DNA samples from MEN 2A patients were amplified by PCR. The products were incubated with the restriction enzyme Bst ApI or Bgl I. The samples were loaded in non-denaturing 10% Polyacrilamyde Gel and run at 120 volts for 40 min. The gels were stained with 10 μg/ml ethidium bromide, and the bands were visualized under a UV lamp. Results We developed a PCR-mutagenic method to check the integrity of the three bases of the cysteine 634 codon. Conclusion The method can be used to detect inherited mutations in MTC patients without a clear family history. The method is relatively simple to use as a routine test in these patients to decrease the underdiagnosis of MEN 2A. In addition, the assay can be used to screen affected families with any mutation in cysteine 634. PMID:12033991

  12. New polymorphs of an old drug: conformational and synthon polymorphism of 5-nitrofurazone.

    PubMed

    Pogoda, Dorota; Janczak, Jan; Videnova-Adrabinska, Veneta

    2016-04-01

    Two new polymorphic forms of 5-nitrofurazone (5-nitro-2-furaldehyde semicarbazone) have been synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction methods, vibrational spectroscopy (FT-IR and temperature Raman), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Hirshfeld surface analysis. The compound crystallizes in three different polymorphic forms P21/a (polymorph α), P21 (polymorph β) and P21/c (polymorph γ), the crystal structures of two of which (polymorphs β and γ) represent new structure determinations. The solid-state molecular organization in the three crystal forms is analyzed and discussed in terms of molecular conformation, crystal packing and hydrogen-bonded networks. All three crystals are formed from trans geometrical isomers, but the molecular conformation of the α-polymorph is syn-anti-anti-anti, while that of β- and γ-polymorphs is syn-anti-syn-syn. As a consequence of this the hydrogen-bond donor and acceptor sites of the molecules are oriented differently, which in turn results in different hydrogen-bond connectivity and packing patterns. PMID:27048728

  13. An overview of famotidine polymorphs: solid-state characteristics, thermodynamics, polymorphic transformation and quality control.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Yang

    2014-07-01

    Crystal polymorphism of pharmaceuticals has well-known profound effects on the physical, chemical, and pharmaceutical properties of drugs, which can result in changes in the solubility, stability, dissolution, bioavailability, and efficacy of drugs. In this review article, famotidine (FAM), which has a well-known trade name of Pepcid®, was selected as a model drug. Although FAM has three polymorphs (forms A, B and C), forms A and B have been commonly discussed. The active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in the commercial version of FAM is the metastable form B. FAM has been a concern of FDA because of the physical properties, solubilities, bioavailabilities, or bioequivalencies of the different polymorphic forms. In addition, a patent infringement suit of FAM polymorph had been made sound legal arguments in the pharmaceutical market. We review the solid-state characteristics, thermodynamics, polymorphic transformation, and quality control of FAM in drug products. In particular, pharmaceutical processes, such as grinding, compression, and heating temperature have a significant effect on the polymorphic transformation of FAM. Moreover, environmental humidity and residual water content should be well controlled to prevent polymorphic transformation of FAM during pharmaceutical processing. Several thermal and spectroscopic analytical techniques used for qualitative and quantitative determinations of polymorphic transformation of FAM after different treatments or quality control of FAM in the commercial tablets before and after the expiration dates have been discussed. PMID:24577998

  14. Polymorphism of SARS-CoV genomes.

    PubMed

    Shang, Lei; Qi, Yan; Bao, Qi-Yu; Tian, Wei; Xu, Jian-Cheng; Feng, Ming-Guang; Yang, Huan-Ming

    2006-04-01

    In this work, severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) genome BJ202 (AY864806) was completely sequenced. The genome was directly accessed from the stool sample of a patient in Beijing. Comparative genomics methods were used to analyze the sequence variations of 116 SARS-CoV genomes (including BJ202) available in the NCBI GenBank. With the genome sequence of GZ02 as the reference, there were 41 polymorphic sites identified in BJ202 and a total of 278 polymorphic sites present in at least two of the 116 genomes. The distribution of the polymorphic sites was biased over the whole genome. Nearly half of the variations (50.4%, 140/278) clustered in the one third of the whole genome at the 3' end (19.0 kb-29.7 kb). Regions encoding Orf10-11, Orf3/4, E, M and S protein had the highest mutation rates. A total of 15 PCR products (about 6.0 kb of the genome) including 11 fragments containing 12 known polymorphic sites and 4 fragments without identified polymorphic sites were cloned and sequenced. Results showed that 3 unique polymorphic sites of BJ202 (positions 13 804, 15 031 and 20 792) along with 3 other polymorphic sites (26 428, 26 477 and 27 243) all contained 2 kinds of nucleotides. It is interesting to find that position 18379 which has not been identified to be polymorphic in any of the other 115 published SARS-CoV genomes is actually a polymorphic site. The nucleotide composition of this site is A (8) to G (6). Among 116 SARS-CoV genomes, 18 types of deletions and 2 insertions were identified. Most of them were related to a 300 bp region (27,700-28,000) which encodes parts of the putative ORF9 and ORF10-11. A phylogenetic tree illustrating the divergence of whole BJ202 genome from 115 other completely sequenced SARS-CoVs was also constructed. BJ202 was phylogeneticly closer to BJ01 and LLJ-2004. PMID:16625834

  15. Angiotensinogen polymorphism and ischemic stroke risk

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Huan; Hao, Jun-Jie; Yang, Yu-Mei; Xu, Xia-Hong; Wang, Yue; Zuo, Lian; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Si-Yi; Wang, Xuan; Li, Ying; Li, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The angiotensinogen M235T polymorphism was associated with ischemic stroke risk. However, the results were controversial. Thus, a meta-analysis was conducted. NCBI, Medline, Web of Science and Embase databases were systematically searched. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using random-effects models. There was a significant association between angiotensinogen M235T polymorphism and ischemic stroke risk (OR = 1.69; 95% CI, 1.35-2.11; P < 0.001). In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, we found that this polymorphism was significantly associated with ischemic stroke in Asian (OR = 1.85; 95% CI, 1.45-2.35; P < 0.001). In the age subgroup, we found that angiotensinogen M235T polymorphism could increase both early-onset ischemic stroke risk (OR = 1.88; 95% CI, 1.33-2.43; P < 0.001) and late-onset ischemic stroke risk (OR = 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.39; P = 0.04). This meta-analysis suggested that angiotensinogen M235T polymorphism was associated with ischemic stroke. PMID:26550208

  16. The Basques according to polymorphic Alu insertions.

    PubMed

    de Pancorbo, M M; López-Martínez, M; Martínez-Bouzas, C; Castro, A; Fernández-Fernández, I; de Mayolo, G A; de Mayolo, A A; de Mayolo, P A; Rowold, D J; Herrera, R J

    2001-08-01

    Polymorphic Alu insertions provide a set of DNA markers of interest in human population genetics. Approximately 1000-2000 of these insertions have not reached fixation within the human genome. Each one of these polymorphic loci most probably resulted from a unique insertional event, and therefore all individuals possessing the insertion are related by descent not just state. In addition, the direction of mutational change is toward the gain of the Alu element at a particular locus. Therefore, the improved knowledge of both the ancestral state and the direction of mutational change greatly facilitates the analysis of population relationships. As a result, Alu insertion polymorphisms represent a significant tool for population genetic studies. In this study, polymorphic Alu insertions have been employed to ascertain phylogenetic relationships among Basque groups and worldwide populations. The Basques are considered to be a geographic isolate with a unique language and customs. They may be direct descendants of Cro-Magnon enclaves from the upper Paleolithic (38,000 to 10,000 years). The Basques are distributed among narrow valleys in northeastern Spain with little migration between them until recently. This characteristic may have had an effect on allelic frequency distributions. With the aim of studying this possible effect, we have analyzed six autosomal polymorphic Alu loci from four different sites within the Spanish Basque region in order to ascertain any genetic heterogeneity among the Basques. The results are consistent with a lack of homogeneity among these four autochthonous Basque groups. PMID:11511929

  17. Hapsembler: An Assembler for Highly Polymorphic Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Nilgun; Brudno, Michael

    As whole genome sequencing has become a routine biological experiment, algorithms for assembly of whole genome shotgun data has become a topic of extensive research, with a plethora of off-the-shelf methods that can reconstruct the genomes of many organisms. Simultaneously, several recently sequenced genomes exhibit very high polymorphism rates. For these organisms genome assembly remains a challenge as most assemblers are unable to handle highly divergent haplotypes in a single individual. In this paper we describe Hapsembler, an assembler for highly polymorphic genomes, which makes use of paired reads. Our experiments show that Hapsembler produces accurate and contiguous assemblies of highly polymorphic genomes, while performing on par with the leading tools on haploid genomes. Hapsembler is available for download at http://compbio.cs.toronto.edu/hapsembler.

  18. Polymorphism of Amyloid Fibrils In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Karthikeyan; Gührs, Karl-Heinz; Koehler, Rolf; Schmidt, Matthias; Michel, Henri; Loos, Cornelia; Gaffney, Patricia M; Sigurdson, Christina J; Hegenbart, Ute; Schönland, Stefan; Fändrich, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphism is a wide-spread feature of amyloid-like fibrils formed in vitro, but it has so far remained unclear whether the fibrils formed within a patient are also affected by this phenomenon. In this study we show that the amyloid fibrils within a diseased individual can vary considerably in their three-dimensional architecture. We demonstrate this heterogeneity with amyloid fibrils deposited within different organs, formed from sequentially non-homologous polypeptide chains and affecting human or animals. Irrespective of amyloid type or source, we found in vivo fibrils to be polymorphic. These data imply that the chemical principles of fibril assembly that lead to such polymorphism are fundamentally conserved in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26954430

  19. Crystal Polymorphism in a Carbamazepine Derivative: Oxcarbazepine

    PubMed Central

    LUTKER, KATIE M.; MATZGER, ADAM J.

    2011-01-01

    Although crystal polymorphism of carbamazepine (CBZ), an anticonvulsant used to treat epilepsy, has been known for decades, the phenomenon has only recently been noted for its keto-derivative oxcarbazepine (OCB). Here it is demonstrated that OCB possesses at least three anhydrous polymorphs. Although all forms are morphologically similar, making differentiation between crystal modifications by optical microscopy difficult, powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and thermomicroscopy show distinctive differences. These techniques provide an efficient method of distinguishing between the three polymorphs. The crystal structure of form II of OCB is reported for the first time and the structure of form I has been redetermined at low temperature. Remarkably, both the molecular conformation and crystal packing of form II are in excellent agreement with the blind prediction made in 2007. PMID:19603503

  20. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Liang, Yuting; Li, Hong; Li, Haibo; He, Quanze; Xue, Ying; Shen, Cong; Zhang, Chunhua; Xiang, Jingjing; Ding, Jie; Qiao, Longwei; Zheng, Qiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disorder characterized by degenerative articular cartilage and is largely attributed to genetic risk factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are common DNA variants that have shown promising and efficiency, compared with positional cloning, to map candidate genes of complex diseases, including OA. In this study, we aim to provide an overview of multiple SNPs from a number of genes that have recently been linked to OA susceptibility. We also performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to evaluate the association of SNP rs7639618 of double von Willebrand factor A domains (DVWA) gene with OA susceptibility. A systematic search of studies on the association of SNPs with susceptibility to OA was conducted in PubMed and Google scholar. Studies subjected to meta-analysis include human and case-control studies that met the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium model and provide sufficient data to calculate an odds ratio (OR). A total of 9500 OA cases and 9365 controls in 7 case-control studies relating to SNP rs7639618 were included in this study and the ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Over 50 SNPs from different genes have been shown to be associated with either hip (23), or knee (20), or both (13) OA. The ORs of these SNPs for OA and the subtypes are not consistent. As to SNP rs7639618 of DVWA, increased knee OA risk was observed in all genetic models analyzed. Specifically, people from Asian with G-allele showed significantly increased risk of knee OA (A versus G: OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.13–1.46; AA versus GG: OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.25–2.05; GA versus GG: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.18–1.44; AA versus GA+GG: OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.12–1.61; AA+GA versus GG: OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.19–1.64), but not in Caucasians or with hip OA. Our results suggest that multiple SNPs play different roles in the pathogenesis of OA and its subtypes; SNP rs7639618 of DVWA gene is associated with a significantly increased

  1. Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gandini, Sara; Gnagnarella, Patrizia; Serrano, Davide; Pasquali, Elena; Raimondi, Sara

    2014-01-01

    It was suggested that vitamin D levels influence cancer development. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a crucial mediator for the cellular effects of vitamin D. In fact It has been hypothesized that polymorphisms in the VDR gene affect cancer risk and the relevance of VDR gene restriction fragment length polymorphisms for various types of cancer has been investigated by a great number of studies. However, results from previous studies on the association of VDR polymorphisms with different cancer types are somewhat contradictory, and the role of VDR in the etiology of cancer is still equivocal. We have performed a systematic review of the literature to analyze the relevance of more VDR polymorphisms (Fok1, Bsm1, Taq1, Apa1, and Cdx2) for individual malignancies, including cancer of the skin (melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer), ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma, bladder cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia, thyroid carcinoma, esophageal adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, sarcoma, head and neck and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Up to June 2012, we identified 79 independent studies for a total of 52427 cases and 62225 controls. Significant associations with VDR polymorphisms have been reported for prostate (Fok1, Bsm1, Taq1), breast (Fok1, Bsm1, Apa1), colon-rectum (Fok1, Bsm1, Taq1) and skin cancer (Fok1, Bsm1, Taq1). Very few studies reported risk estimates for the other cancer sites. Conflicting data have been reported for most malignancies and at present it is still not possible to make any definitive statements about the importance of the VDR genotype for cancer risk. It seems probable that interactions with other factors such as calcium and vitamin D intake, 25(OH)D plasma levels and UV radiation exposure play a decisive role in cancer risk. To conclude, there is some indication that VDR polymorphisms may modulate the risk of some cancer sites and in future studies VDR genetic variation should be integrated also with prediagnostic indicator of

  2. Retting and degumming of natural fibers by pectinolytic enzymes produced from Bacillus tequilensis SV11-UV37 using solid state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chiliveri, Swarupa Rani; Koti, Sravanthi; Linga, Venkateswar Rao

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the simultaneous production and optimization of pectinolytic enzymes (pectate lyase and polygalacturonase) under SSF from Bacillus tequilensis SV11-UV37 using wheat bran as a substrate, which is commercially viable and cost-effective. Optimization by one variable-at-a-time-approach showed a maximum yield of pectate lyase (1371.25 U/gds) and polygalacturonase (85.45 U/gds) with wheat bran using 80 % (v/w) moisture, 0.7 mm particle size, 20 % (v/w) inoculum, 1 % (w/w) pectin at 37 °C, pH 6 and 72 h of incubation. In addition, optimization using central composite design achieved 1.6-fold improvement in both pectate lyase (1828.13 U/gds) and polygalacturonase (105.55 U/gds) yield at optimum levels of pectin (3 %, w/w), inoculum size (20 %, v/w) and moisture level (80 %, v/w). Further, Retting studies concluded that the enzyme mixture was efficient in separating the whole fiber from kenaf and part (>75 %) from sunn hemp. In degumming of sunn hemp fibers, amount of galacturonic acid released and percentage weight loss was higher in successive alkali and enzymatic treatment than their independent treatments. The scanning electron microscopic analysis also confirmed that alkali followed by enzymatic treatment effectively removed non-cellulosic gummy material from the fiber; hence, this enzyme mixture may find feasible applications in the fiber and textile industry. PMID:27218009

  3. Community development in a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program: Teacher growth and translation of the experience back to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Carol Suzanne Chism

    This qualitative study explores how a scientific research experience helped seven secondary science teachers to grow professionally. The design of this Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program emphasized having teachers become members of university scientific research communities---participating in experimental design, data collection, analysis, and presenting of findings---in order to have a better understanding of research science. I conducted individual interviews with teacher and scientist participants, visited the teachers in their laboratories, videotaped classroom visits, and videotaped group meetings during the summers to learn what teachers brought back to their classrooms about the processes of science. I examined the teachers' views of research science, views shaped by their exposure to research science under the mentorship of a scientist participant. The teachers observed the collaborative efforts of research scientists and experienced doing scientific research, using technology and various experimental methods. Throughout their two-year experience, the teachers continually refined their images of scientists. I also examined how teachers in this program built a professional community as they developed curricula. Further, I investigated what the teachers brought from their experiences back to the classroom, deciding on a theme of "Communicating Science" as a way to convey aspects of scientific inquiry to students. Teacher growth as a result of this two-year program included developing more empathy for student learning and renewing their enthusiasm for both learning and teaching science. Teacher growth also included developing curricula to involve students in behaving as scientists. The teachers identified a few discrete communication practices of scientists that they deemed appropriate for students to adopt to increase their communication skills. Increased community building in classes to model scientific communities was seen as a way to motivate

  4. Regulatory polymorphisms underlying complex disease traits.

    PubMed

    Knight, Julian C

    2005-02-01

    There is growing evidence that genetic variation plays an important role in the determination of individual susceptibility to complex disease traits. In contrast to coding sequence polymorphisms, where the consequences of non-synonymous variation may be resolved at the level of the protein phenotype, defining specific functional regulatory polymorphisms has proved problematic. This has arisen for a number of reasons, including difficulties with fine mapping due to linkage disequilibrium, together with a paucity of experimental tools to resolve the effects of non-coding sequence variation on gene expression. Recent studies have shown that variation in gene expression is heritable and can be mapped as a quantitative trait. Allele-specific effects on gene expression appear relatively common, typically of modest magnitude and context specific. The role of regulatory polymorphisms in determining susceptibility to a number of complex disease traits is discussed, including variation at the VNTR of INS, encoding insulin, in type 1 diabetes and polymorphism of CTLA4, encoding cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen, in autoimmune disease. Examples where regulatory polymorphisms have been found to play a role in mongenic traits such as factor VII deficiency are discussed, and contrasted with those polymorphisms associated with ischaemic heart disease at the same gene locus. Molecular mechanisms operating in an allele-specific manner at the level of transcription are illustrated, with examples including the role of Duffy binding protein in malaria. The difficulty of resolving specific functional regulatory variants arising from linkage disequilibrium is demonstrated using a number of examples including polymorphism of CCR5, encoding CC chemokine receptor 5, and HIV-1 infection. The importance of understanding haplotypic structure to the design and interpretation of functional assays of putative regulatory variation is highlighted, together with discussion of the strategic use of

  5. Polymorphs calcium carbonate on temperature reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Kai-Yin; Chia, Chin-Hua; Zakaria, Sarani

    2014-09-03

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) has three different crystal polymorphs, which are calcite, aragonite and vaterite. In this study, effect of reaction temperature on polymorphs and crystallite structure of CaCO{sub 3} was investigated. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM) were used to characterize the obtained CaCO{sub 3} particles. The obtained results showed that CaCO{sub 3} with different crystal and particle structures can be formed by controlling the temperature during the synthesis process.

  6. [Polymorphic loci and polymorphism analysis of short tandem repeats within XNP gene].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi-Ji; Gong, Yao-Qin; Guo, Chen-Hong; Chen, Bing-Xi; Li, Jiang-Xia; Guo, Yi-Shou

    2002-01-01

    To select polymorphic short tandem repeat markers within X-linked nuclear protein (XNP) gene, genomic clones which contain XNP gene were recognized by homologous analysis with XNP cDNA. By comparing the cDNA with genomic DNA, non-exonic sequences were identified, and short tandem repeats were selected from non-exonic sequences by using BCM search Launcher. Polymorphisms of the short tandem repeats in Chinese population were evaluated by PCR amplification and PAGE. Five short tandem repeats were identified from XNP gene, two of which were polymorphic. Four and 11 alleles were observed in Chinese population for XNPSTR1 and XNPSTR4, respectively. Heterozygosities were 47% for XNPSTR1 and 70% for XNPSTR4. XNPSTR1 and XNPSTR4 localized within 3' end and intron 10, respectively. Two polymorphic short tandem repeats have been identified within XNP gene and will be useful for linkage analysis and gene diagnosis of XNP gene. PMID:12182071

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To enhance capabilities for genetic analyses in rainbow trout, a large suite of polymorphic markers that are amenable to high-throughput genotyping protocols must be developed. However, the evolutionarily recent whole genome duplication event complicates the use of standard approaches in the discove...

  8. Idealized powder diffraction patterns for cellulose polymorphs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose samples are routinely analyzed by X-ray diffraction to determine their crystal type (polymorph) and crystallinity. However, the connection is seldom made between those efforts and the crystal structures of cellulose that have been determined with synchrotron X-radiation and neutron diffrac...

  9. Difficulties in Learning Inheritance and Polymorphism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberman, Neomi; Beeri, Catriel; Kolikant, Yifat Ben-David

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on difficulties related to the concepts of inheritance and polymorphism, expressed by a group of 22 in-service CS teachers with an experience with the procedural paradigm, as they coped with a course on OOP. Our findings are based on the analysis of tests, questionnaires that the teachers completed in the course, as well as on…

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in caprine calpastatin gene.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Maitra, A; Pandey, A K; Singh, L V; Mishra, B P

    2013-04-01

    The calpains and calpastatin (CAST) make up a major cytosolic proteolytic system, the calpain-calpastatin system, found in mammalian tissues. The relative levels of the components of the calpain-calpastatin system determine the extent of meat tenderization during postmortem storage. Calpastatin (CAST) is a protein inhibitor of the ubiquitous calcium-dependent proteases-micro-calpain and m-calpain. Polymorphisms in the bovine, ovine and pig CAST gene have been associated with meat tenderness but little is known about how caprine CAST gene may affect goat meat quality traits. In this study we selected different parts of the CAST gene: 1) that have been previously reported to be polymorphic, intron 5 and 12 and 3'UTR; 2) first time explored (exon 3, 7 and 8 and part of intron 7 and 8) to investigate polymorphic status of caprine CAST gene. Using comparative sequencing ten novel SN Ps located in exon 3 and intron 5, 7 and 8 were identified. Previously reported SNPs in intron 5, 3'UTR and intron 12 were absent. Sequence analysis revealed a non synonymous amino acid variation in exon 3, which would result in Lys/Arg substitution in the corresponding protein sequence. Considerable variation was detected in intronic regions. Twenty-four InDel were also recognized in intronic regions (15) and 3'UTR (9). All the sequences shared high homology with published bovine and ovine sequences. Three PCR-RFLP loci have been established for further analyzing genetic polymorphism in indigenous goats. PMID:23866627

  11. Raman phonon spectra of pentacene polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brillante, A.; Della Valle, R. G.; Farina, L.; Girlando, A.; Masino, M.; Venuti, E.

    2002-05-01

    We report for the first time lattice phonon Raman spectra of pentacene measured by means of a Raman microprobe technique. We experimentally prove the existence of two polymorphs, as expected from recent structural studies. A comparison with Quasi Harmonic Lattice Dynamics calculations, previously performed starting from the available X-ray data, help us in identifying the phase to which each crystal belongs.

  12. Characterization of Polymorphic Forms of Rifaximin.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, Ana Carolina; Antonio, Selma Gutierrez; Salgado, Hérida Regina Nunes

    2016-07-01

    Rifaximin is a gut-selective oral antimicrobial that has no systemic adverse effects compared with placebo. It is used for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy, traveler's diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, Clostridium difficile infection, ulcerative colitis, and acute diarrhea. The crystalline form present in rifaximin, α, has minimal systemic absorption compared to the amorphous form. The objective of this study was to obtain polymorphic forms of rifaximin using recrystallization processes. The forms were characterized and studied by thermal analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and solubility testing. Six polymorphic forms of rifaximin, designated I-VI, were obtained by the crystallization process by evaporation of the solvent. Some polymorphic forms obtained in this work may not have the same excellent tolerability as the reference medicine; therefore, studies such as these are extremely important and point to the need for greater requirements by the regulatory agencies overseeing polymorph analysis of the raw materials used in the manufacture of medicines marketed globally. These analyses are not required in the majority of official compendia. Partnerships among industries, research centers, and universities would be a viable way to consolidate research in this area and contribute to improving the quality of solid drugs. PMID:27455934

  13. Saitohin polymorphism and executive dysfunction in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bosia, Marta; Buonocore, Mariachiara; Guglielmino, Carmelo; Pirovano, Adele; Lorenzi, Cristina; Marcone, Alessandra; Bramanti, Placido; Cappa, Stefano F; Aguglia, Eugenio; Smeraldi, Enrico; Cavallaro, Roberto

    2012-10-01

    Saitohin (STH) is an intronless gene nested within the human tau gene, which contains a single nucleotide polymorphism (A/G), suggested to be involved in the physiopathology and clinical course of several neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. Recently, an association between this polymorphism and frontal hypoperfusion and clinical prognosis in frontotemporal dementia was reported. The present study sought to evaluate the possible role of the STH polymorphism as a concurring factor of cognitive decline in schizophrenia, a disease sharing both early psychotic manifestations, a core deficit of executive functions and hypofrontality with frontotemporal lobe dementia. 220 clinically stabilized patients with schizophrenia were assessed with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) for evaluation of executive functions and compared for STH allele frequency with 48 patients affected by frontotemporal dementia and 47 healthy subjects. There was no significant difference in allelic distribution between the healthy controls and all other groups, while we observed a significantly greater frequency of G allele among both patients with frontotemporal dementia (p = 0.037) and schizophrenia patients with poor performances of WCST (p = 0.044), compared to schizophrenia patients with best WCST performances. Among the patients with schizophrenia, stratified for age and gender, the STH polymorphism resulted in a significant predictor of WCST performance (p = 0.007). These results suggest a possible contribution of STH gene products on the heterogeneity of core frontal executive functions deterioration, probably through complex interactions with mechanism involved in neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration. PMID:22187337

  14. Four new polymorphic forms of suplatast tosilate.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Keiko; Ushio, Takanori; Miura, Hidenori; Nakamura, Takashi; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    We found four new polymorphic forms (γ-, ε-, ζ-, and η-forms) of suplatast tosilate (ST) by recrystallization and seeding with ST-analogous compounds; three polymorphic forms (α-, β-, and δ-forms) of ST have been previously reported. The physicochemical properties of these new forms were investigated using infrared (IR) spectroscopy, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and powder X-ray diffractometry. The presence of hydrogen bonds in the new forms was assessed from the IR and solid-state NMR spectra. The crystal structures of the ε- and η-forms were determined from their powder X-ray diffraction data using the direct space approach and the Monte Carlo method, followed by Rietveld refinement. The structures determined for the ε- and η-forms supported the presence of hydrogen bonds between the ST molecules, as the IR and solid-state NMR spectra indicated. The thermodynamic characteristics of the seven polymorphic forms were evaluated by determining the solubility of each form. The α-form was the most insoluble in 2-propanol at 35°C, and was thus concluded to be the most stable form. The ε-form was the most soluble, and a polymorphic transition from the ε- to the α-form was observed during solubility testing. PMID:24211359

  15. Molecular basis for amyloid-[beta] polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Laganowsky, Arthur; Landau, Meytal; Zhao, Minglei; Soriaga, Angela B.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Flot, David; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberga, David

    2011-10-19

    Amyloid-beta (A{beta}) aggregates are the main constituent of senile plaques, the histological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. A{beta} molecules form {beta}-sheet containing structures that assemble into a variety of polymorphic oligomers, protofibers, and fibers that exhibit a range of lifetimes and cellular toxicities. This polymorphic nature of A{beta} has frustrated its biophysical characterization, its structural determination, and our understanding of its pathological mechanism. To elucidate A{beta} polymorphism in atomic detail, we determined eight new microcrystal structures of fiber-forming segments of A{beta}. These structures, all of short, self-complementing pairs of {beta}-sheets termed steric zippers, reveal a variety of modes of self-association of A{beta}. Combining these atomic structures with previous NMR studies allows us to propose several fiber models, offering molecular models for some of the repertoire of polydisperse structures accessible to A{beta}. These structures and molecular models contribute fundamental information for understanding A{beta} polymorphic nature and pathogenesis.

  16. Rapid dissemination of RET-transgene-driven melanoma in the presence of non-obese diabetic alleles: Critical roles of Dectin-1 and Nitric-oxide synthase type 2.

    PubMed

    Dabbeche-Bouricha, Emna; Araujo, Luiza M; Kato, Masashi; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle; Garchon, Henri-Jean

    2016-05-01

    Mice transgenic for the RET oncogene provide a remarkable model for investigating the mechanisms underlying the promotion and the development of melanoma. This model was established on the C57BL/6 genetic background. In the present study, we investigated an effect of the strongly proinflammatory and autoimmune genetic makeup of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) strain. We bred (NODxB6)F1 mice and backcrossed them with NOD mice. F1 mice and mice at subsequent generations of backcrossing showed marked acceleration of tumor development, in particular with a more frequent and earlier extension of the primary uveal melanoma. In close relation with this severe evolution, we observed a profound drop in Dectin-1 expression on CD11b(+)Ly6G(+) granulocytic myeloid cells correlating with an expansion of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T regulatory cell and of interferon(IFN)γ-producing CD8(+) T cell subsets in tumors. IFNγ is a major inducer of the type 2 nitric-oxide synthase (Nos2) gene whose products are known to be tumorigenic. Germline inactivation of the Nos2 gene was associated with a dramatically improved tumor prognosis and a restoration of Dectin-1 expression on myeloid cells. Moreover, in vivo treatment of (NODxB6)F1.RET(+) mice with curdlan, a glucose polymer that binds Dectin-1, prevented tumor extension and was associated with marked reduction of the CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cell subset. These observations highlight the (NODxB6)F1.RET(+) mice as a new model to investigate the role of the immune system in the host-tumor relationship and point to Dectin-1 and Nos2 as potentially promising therapeutic targets. PMID:27467912

  17. Polymorphism Control in Nanostructured Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Shantanu

    Polymorphic phase transformations are common to all nanocrystalline binary metal oxides. The polymorphic nature of such metal oxides makes available a large number of phases with differing crystal structures, each stable under certain conditions of temperature, pressure, and/or particle size. These different crystal structures translate to unique physical and chemical properties for each structural class of polymorphs. Thus predicting when polymorphic phase transitions are likely to occur becomes important to the synthesis of stable functional materials with desired properties. Theoretical calculations using a heuristic approach have resulted in an accurate estimation of the critical particle size predicting metastable to stable phase transitions. This formula is applied to different case studies: for anatase to rutile titania; gamma-Alumina to alpha-Alumina; and tetragonal to monoclinic zirconia. The theoretical values calculated have been seen to be very close to the experimental results from the literature. Manifestation of the effect of phase transitions in nanostructured metal oxides was provided in the study of metastable to stable phase transitions in WO3. Nanowires of tungsten trioxide have been synthesized in-situ inside an electron microscope. Such structure of tungsten trioxide result due to a metastable to stable phase transformation, from the cubic to the monoclinic phase. The transformation is massive and complete. The structures formed are unique one-dimensional nanowires. Such a method can be scaled inside any equipment equipped with an electron gun, for example lithography systems either using STEM or E-beam lithography. Another study on nanowire formation in binary metal oxides involved the synthesis of stable orthorhombic MoO3 by means of blend electrospinning. Both a traditional single jet electrospinning set up and a novel high-throughput process to get high aspect ratio nanowires. The latter is a jet-controlled and flow controlled

  18. Human Diallelic Insertion/Deletion Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Weber, James L.; David, Donna; Heil, Jeremy; Fan, Ying; Zhao, Chengfeng; Marth, Gabor

    2002-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of 2,000 human diallelic insertion/deletion polymorphisms (indels) distributed throughout the human genome. Candidate indels were identified by comparison of overlapping genomic or cDNA sequences. Average confirmation rate for indels with a ⩾2-nt allele-length difference was 58%, but the confirmation rate for indels with a 1-nt length difference was only 14%. The vast majority of the human diallelic indels were monomorphic in chimpanzees and gorillas. The ratio of deletion:insertion mutations was 4.1. Allele frequencies for the indels were measured in Europeans, Africans, Japanese, and Native Americans. New alleles were generally lower in frequency than old alleles. This tendency was most pronounced for the Africans, who are likely to be closest among the four groups to the original modern human population. Diallelic indels comprise ∼8% of all human polymorphisms. Their abundance and ease of analysis make them useful for many applications. PMID:12205564

  19. Hyphenated spectroscopy as a polymorph screening tool.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, Jaakko; Strachan, Clare J; Pöllänen, Kati; Yliruusi, Jouko; Rantanen, Jukka

    2007-06-28

    Polymorph screening of a model compound (nitrofurantoin) was performed. Nitrofurantoin was crystallized from acetone-water mixtures with varying process parameters. Two anhydrate forms (alpha and beta) and one monohydrate form (II) were crystallized in the polymorph screen. The solid forms were analyzed with three complementary spectroscopic techniques: near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and terahertz pulsed spectroscopy (TPS), and the results of the solid phase analysis were verified with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). NIR and Raman spectroscopy were coupled to achieve a rapid and comprehensive method of solid phase analysis. The hyphenated NIR/Raman spectroscopic data were analyzed with a multivariate method, principal component analysis (PCA). The combination was found effective in screening solid forms due to the complementary characteristics of the methods. NIR spectroscopy is powerful in differentiating between anhydrate and hydrate forms and intermolecular features, whereas Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to intramolecular alterations in the molecular backbone. PMID:17367979

  20. Adiponectin gene polymorphisms: Association with childhood obesity

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Vanêssa Gomes; Gomes, Karina Braga

    2014-01-01

    The current childhood obesity epidemic represents a particular challenge for public health. Understanding of the etiological mechanisms of obesity remains integral in treating this complex disorder. In recent years, studies have elucidated the influence of hormones secreted by adipose tissue named adipokines. Adiponectin is a adipokine that exhibits important anti-inflammatory, insulin-sensitizing and anti-atherogenic properties and it is strongly associated to obesity development. It is well known that adiponectin levels decrease with obesity. Furthermore, studies show that some single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding adiponectin, ADIPOQ, may influence the expression of this protein. The objective of this paper is to provide an up-to-date review of ADIPOQ polymorphisms in the context of childhood obesity.

  1. Kinetics versus Thermodynamics in Virus Capsid Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Moerman, Pepijn; van der Schoot, Paul; Kegel, Willem

    2016-07-01

    Virus coat proteins spontaneously self-assemble into empty shells in aqueous solution under the appropriate physicochemical conditions, driven by an interaction free energy per bond on the order of 2-5 times the thermal energy kBT. For this seemingly modest interaction strength, each protein building block nonetheless gains a very large binding free energy, between 10 and 20 kBT. Because of this, there is debate about whether the assembly process is reversible or irreversible. Here we discuss capsid polymorphism observed in in vitro experiments from the perspective of nucleation theory and of the thermodynamics of mass action. We specifically consider the potential contribution of a curvature free energy term to the effective interaction potential between the proteins. From these models, we propose experiments that may conclusively reveal whether virus capsid assembly into a mixture of polymorphs is a reversible or an irreversible process. PMID:27027925

  2. Androgen receptor gene polymorphism in zebra species

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hideyuki; Langenhorst, Tanya; Ogden, Rob; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor genes (AR) have been found to have associations with reproductive development, behavioral traits, and disorders in humans. However, the influence of similar genetic effects on the behavior of other animals is scarce. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ) in 44 Grevy's zebras, 23 plains zebras, and three mountain zebras, and compared them with those of domesticated horses. We observed polymorphism among zebra species and between zebra and horse. As androgens such as testosterone influence aggressiveness, AR polymorphism among equid species may be associated with differences in levels of aggression and tameness. Our findings indicate that it would be useful to conduct further studies focusing on the potential association between AR and personality traits, and to understand domestication of equid species. PMID:26236645

  3. IPD—the Immuno Polymorphism Database

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James; Mistry, Kavita; McWilliam, Hamish; Lopez, Rodrigo; Marsh, Steven G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD) (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/) is a set of specialist databases related to the study of polymorphic genes in the immune system. The IPD project works with specialist groups or nomenclature committees who provide and curate individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. The IPD project stores all the data in a set of related databases. IPD currently consists of four databases: IPD-KIR, contains the allelic sequences of Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors, IPD-MHC, is a database of sequences of the Major Histocompatibility Complex of different species; IPD-human platelet antigens, alloantigens expressed only on platelets and IPD-ESTDAB, which provides access to the European Searchable Tumour cell-line database, a cell bank of immunologically characterised melanoma cell lines. The data is currently available online from the website and ftp directory. PMID:19875415

  4. IPD--the Immuno Polymorphism Database.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James; Mistry, Kavita; McWilliam, Hamish; Lopez, Rodrigo; Marsh, Steven G E

    2010-01-01

    The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD) (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/) is a set of specialist databases related to the study of polymorphic genes in the immune system. The IPD project works with specialist groups or nomenclature committees who provide and curate individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. The IPD project stores all the data in a set of related databases. IPD currently consists of four databases: IPD-KIR, contains the allelic sequences of Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors, IPD-MHC, is a database of sequences of the Major Histocompatibility Complex of different species; IPD-human platelet antigens, alloantigens expressed only on platelets and IPD-ESTDAB, which provides access to the European Searchable Tumour cell-line database, a cell bank of immunologically characterised melanoma cell lines. The data is currently available online from the website and ftp directory. PMID:19875415

  5. Genetic polymorphisms and idiopathic generalized epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Lucarini, Nazzareno; Verrotti, Alberto; Napolioni, Valerio; Bosco, Guido; Curatolo, Paolo

    2007-09-01

    In recent years, progress in understanding the genetic basis of idiopathic generalized epilepsies has proven challenging because of their complex inheritance patterns and genetic heterogeneity. Genetic polymorphisms offer a convenient avenue for a better understanding of the genetic basis of idiopathic generalized epilepsy by providing evidence for the involvement of a given gene in these disorders, and by clarifying its pathogenetic mechanisms. Many of these genes encode for some important central nervous system ion channels (KCNJ10, KCNJ3, KCNQ2/KCNQ3, CLCN2, GABRG2, GABRA1, SCN1B, and SCN1A), while many others encode for ubiquitary enzymes that play crucial roles in various metabolic pathways (HP, ACP1, ME2, LGI4, OPRM1, GRIK1, BRD2, EFHC1, and EFHC2). We review the main genetic polymorphisms reported in idiopathic generalized epilepsy, and discusses their possible functional significance in the pathogenesis of seizures. PMID:17765802

  6. New polymorphic variants of human blood clotting factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Surin, V.L.; Luk`yanenko, A.V.; Tagiev, A.F.; Smirnova, O.V.; Plutalov, O.V.; Berlin, Yu.A.

    1995-04-01

    The polymorphism of Alu-repeats, which are located in the introns of the human factor IX gene (copies 1-3), was studied. To identify polymorphic variants, direct sequencing of PCR products that contained appropriate repeats was used. In each case, 20 unrelated X chromosomes were studied. A polymorphic Dra I site was found near the 3{prime}-end of Alu copy 3 within the region of the polyA tract. A PCR-based testing system with internal control of restriction hydrolysis was suggested. Testing 81 unrelated X chromosomes revealed that the frequency of the polymorphic Dra I site is 0.23. Taq I polymorphism, which was revealed in Alu copy 4 of factor IX gene in our previous work, was found to be closely linked to Dra I polymorphism. Studies in linkage between different types of polymorphisms of the factor IX gene revealed the presence of a rare polymorphism in intron a that was located within the same minisatellite region as the known polymorphic insertion 50 bp/Dde I. However, the size of the insertion in our case was 26 bp. Only one polymorphic variant was found among over 150 unrelated X chromosomes derived from humans from Moscow and its vicinity. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Calorimetric determinations and theoretical calculations of polymorphs of thalidomide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Ochoa, F.; Pérez, G. Espinosa; Mijangos-Santiago, F.

    2007-09-01

    The analysis of the thermograms of thalidomide obtained for the two reported polymorphs α and β by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) shows some inconsistencies that are discussed in the present work. The conception of a new polymorph form, named β ∗, allowed us to explain the observed thermal behavior more satisfactorily. This new polymorph shows enantiotropy with both α and β polymorphs, reflected in the unique endotherm obtained in the DSC-thermograms, when a heating rate of 10 °C/min is applied. Several additional experiments, such as re-melting of both polymorph forms, showed that there is indeed a new polymorph with an endotherm located between the endotherms of α and β. IR, Raman, and powder X-ray permit us to characterize the isolated compound, resulting from the re-melting of both polymorph forms. Mechanical calculations were performed to elucidate the conformations of each polymorph, and ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed to determine the energy of the more stable conformers and the spatial cell energy for both polymorphs α and β. These results suggested a possible conformation for the newly discovered polymorph β ∗.

  8. Preparation and Crystallographic Analysis of Gliclazide Polymorphs

    PubMed Central

    Rajamma, A. J.; Sateesha, S. B.; Narode, M. K.; Prashanth, V. R. S. S.; Karthik, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of gliclazide in the pharmaceutical industry, a large number of research groups have been engaged in various investigations aiming to enhance its biomedical application. But, very limited efforts have been made to study polymorphism of gliclazide. Therefore, this study focuses on solvent-induced polymorphism of gliclazide and its characterization by thermal methods. Three polymorphs namely, Form-I, II and III and an amorphous powder were produced from different solvents and solvent mixtures. Crystals were analyzed using infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction and single crystal x-ray diffraction. Polymorph Form-I is found to exist in centro-symmetric triclinic P-1 space group and has endothermic peak at 162.93°. Form-II has endothermic peak from 171.2° to 172.35° and exists in centro-symmetric monoclinic P21/a space group while Form-III has endothermic peak from 168.93° to 169.86° and exists in centro-symmetric monoclinic P21/n space group. The equilibrium solubility values of Form-I, II, III and the amorphous form were 0.4825±0.025, 0.2341±0.042, 0.2581±0.038 and 0.5213±0.072 mg/ml, respectively. The Form-I has relatively higher solubility and similar to that of amorphous gliclazide. Form-II and Form-III are relatively most stable and least soluble. However, there was no remarkable difference in their aqueous solubility under the conditions in which study was conducted. PMID:25767316

  9. Preparation and crystallographic analysis of gliclazide polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Rajamma, A J; Sateesha, S B; Narode, M K; Prashanth, V R S S; Karthik, A M

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of gliclazide in the pharmaceutical industry, a large number of research groups have been engaged in various investigations aiming to enhance its biomedical application. But, very limited efforts have been made to study polymorphism of gliclazide. Therefore, this study focuses on solvent-induced polymorphism of gliclazide and its characterization by thermal methods. Three polymorphs namely, Form-I, II and III and an amorphous powder were produced from different solvents and solvent mixtures. Crystals were analyzed using infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction and single crystal x-ray diffraction. Polymorph Form-I is found to exist in centro-symmetric triclinic P-1 space group and has endothermic peak at 162.93°. Form-II has endothermic peak from 171.2° to 172.35° and exists in centro-symmetric monoclinic P21/a space group while Form-III has endothermic peak from 168.93° to 169.86° and exists in centro-symmetric monoclinic P21/n space group. The equilibrium solubility values of Form-I, II, III and the amorphous form were 0.4825±0.025, 0.2341±0.042, 0.2581±0.038 and 0.5213±0.072 mg/ml, respectively. The Form-I has relatively higher solubility and similar to that of amorphous gliclazide. Form-II and Form-III are relatively most stable and least soluble. However, there was no remarkable difference in their aqueous solubility under the conditions in which study was conducted. PMID:25767316

  10. Distinct germline polymorphisms underlie glioma morphologic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Robert B.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Johnson, Derek; Fridley, Brooke L.; Decker, Paul A.; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Rynearson, Amanda L.; Fink, Stephanie; Rice, Terri; McCoy, Lucie S.; Halder, Chandralekha; Kosel, Matthew L.; Giannini, Caterina; Tihan, Tarik; O’Neill, Brian P.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Yang, Ping; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K.

    2010-01-01

    Two recent genome-wide association studies reported that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in (or near) TERT (5p15), CCDC26 (8q24), CDKN2A/B (9p21), PHLDB1 (11q23), and RTEL1 (20q13) are associated with infiltrating glioma. From these reports it was not clear if the SNP associations predispose to glioma in general or whether they are specific to certain glioma grades or morphologic subtypes. To identify hypothesized associations between susceptibility loci and tumor subtype, we genotyped two case/control groups composed of the spectrum of infiltrating glioma subtypes, and stratified the analyses by type. We report that specific germline polymorphisms are associated with different glioma subtypes. CCDC26 (8q24) region polymorphisms are strongly associated with oligodendroglial tumor risk (rs4295627, OR=2.05, p=8.3*10−11), but not glioblastoma risk. The opposite is true of RTEL (20q13) region polymorphisms which are significantly associated with glioblastoma (rs2297440, OR = 0.56, p= 4.6*10−10) but not oligodendroglial tumor. The SNPs in or near CCDC26 (8q24) are associated with oligodendroglial tumors regardless of combined 1p and 19q deletion status; however, the association is greatest for those with combined deletion (rs4295627, OR=2.77, p=2.6*10-9). These observations generate hypotheses concerning the possible mechanisms by which specific SNPs (or alterations in linkage disequilibrium with such SNPs) are associated with glioma development. PMID:21356187

  11. IL-10 gene polymorphism and herpesvirus infections.

    PubMed

    Hurme, M; Haanpää, M; Nurmikko, T; Wang, X-Y; Virta, M; Pessi, T; Kilpinen, S; Hulkkonen, J; Helminen, M

    2003-01-01

    Genetics has an important role in resistance to various infections and it also may modify the clinical picture of an infectious disease. Here, we briefly review our recent data demonstrating that the polymorphism of the IL-10 gene is associated with resistance to some common herpesviruses and, additionally, that this same gene is involved in the regulation of the severity of the infection and in the reactivation process. PMID:12627487

  12. Androgen receptor polymorphism (CAG repeats) and androgenicity.

    PubMed

    Canale, D; Caglieresi, C; Moschini, C; Liberati, C D; Macchia, E; Pinchera, A; Martino, E

    2005-09-01

    Objective Polymorphism of the androgen receptor (AR) has been related to various pathophysiological conditions, such as osteoporosis and infertility. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency of distribution in a normal Italian population and to assess CAG repeats (CAGr) in other conditions, such as hypoandrogenism, potentially influenced by AR polymorphism. Patients and measurements CAGr polymorphism was determined in a group of 91 healthy normoandrogenized subjects, 29 hypoandrogenized patients (hypoplasia of prostate and seminal vesicles, reduced beard or body hair, etc.) and 29 infertile patients by direct sequencing. Results The mean (+/- SD) number of CAG repeats [(CAGr)n] was 21.5 (+/- 1.7) in the control group, 21.4 (+/- 2.0) in the infertile patients and 24.0 (+/- 2.9) in the hypoandrogenic males. The difference was statistically significant between this last group and the other two (P < 0.0001), while there was no difference between normal controls and infertile patients. The frequency distribution showed a shift towards higher CAG length in hypoandrogenized patients compared to controls and infertile patients. If we used a cut-off point of 24.9 (2 SD above the mean), the percentage of patients with 25 or more CAGr repeats was 38% among hypoandrogenized patients, 7% among infertile patients and 5% among the control group. In hypoandrogenized subjects (CAGr)n correlated slightly with testis and prostate volume. The number of CAG repeats was not associated with any of the hormonal parameters, including testosterone, evaluated in the three groups. Conclusions Our normal population, representing subjects from Central Italy, is superimposable on other European populations with regard to (CAGr)n distribution. Hypoandrogenic males have a shift in the frequency distribution towards longer (CAGr)n. Infertile patients are not statistically different from the control group. These findings suggest that, given the same amount of circulating

  13. Innate Immune Gene Polymorphisms in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sadee, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause worldwide of human mortality attributable to a single infectious agent. Recent studies targeting candidate genes and “case-control” association have revealed numerous polymorphisms implicated in host susceptibility to TB. Here, we review current progress in the understanding of causative polymorphisms in host innate immune genes associated with TB pathogenesis. We discuss genes encoding several types of proteins: macrophage receptors, such as the mannose receptor (MR, CD206), dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN, CD209), Dectin-1, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18), nucleotide oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) and NOD2, CD14, P2X7, and the vitamin D nuclear receptor (VDR); soluble C-type lectins, such as surfactant protein-A (SP-A), SP-D, and mannose-binding lectin (MBL); phagocyte cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-18; chemokines, such as IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), RANTES, and CXCL10; and other important innate immune molecules, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and solute carrier protein 11A1 (SLC11A1). Polymorphisms in these genes have been variably associated with susceptibility to TB among different populations. This apparent variability is probably accounted for by evolutionary selection pressure as a result of long-term host-pathogen interactions in certain regions or populations and, in part, by lack of proper study design and limited knowledge of molecular and functional effects of the implicated genetic variants. Finally, we discuss genomic technologies that hold promise for resolving questions regarding the evolutionary paths of the human genome, functional effects of polymorphisms, and corollary impacts of adaptation on human health, ultimately leading to novel approaches to controlling TB. PMID:22825450

  14. Polymorphic microsatellites and Wilson disease (WD)

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, E. A.; White, A.; Tomfohrde, J.; Osborne-Lawrence, S.; Prestridge, L.; Bonne-Tamir, B.; Scheinberg, I. H.; George-Hyslop, P. St; Giagheddu, M.; Kim, J.-W.; Seo, J. K.; Lo, W. H.-y.; Ivanova-Smolenskaya, I. A.; Limborska, S. A.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. L.; Farrer, L. A.; Bowcock, A. M.

    1993-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD), an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism, has been previously mapped to chromosome 13q. Highly informative PCR-based polymorphic microsatellites closely linked to the WD locus (WND) at 13q14.3, as well as sequence-tagged sites for closely linked loci, are described. Two polymorphic microsatellite markers at D13S118 and D13S119 lie within 3 cM of WND. Two others (D13S227 and D13S228) were derived from a yeast artificial chromosome containing D13S31. These were placed on a genetic linkage map of chromosome 13 and were typed in 74 multiplex WD families from a variety of geographic origins (166 affected members). Multipoint analysis provides very high odds that the location of WND is between D13S31/D13S227/D13S228 and D13S59. Previous odds with RFLP-based markers were only 7:1 more likely than any other location. Current odds are 5,000:1. Preclinical testing of three cases of WD by using the highly informative polymorphic microsatellite markers is described. The markers described here ensure that 95% of predictive tests using DNA from both parents and from at least one affected sib will have an accuracy >99%. PMID:8213814

  15. Introgressive hybridization in a trophically polymorphic cichlid

    PubMed Central

    Hulsey, C Darrin; García-de-León, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Trophically polymorphic species could represent lineages that are rapidly diverging along an ecological axis or could phenotypically mark the collapse of species through introgressive hybridization. We investigated patterns of introgression between the trophically polymorphic cichlid fish Herichthys minckleyi and its relative H. cyanoguttatus using a combination of population genetics and species tree analyses. We first examined the distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes within the alternative H. minckleyi pharyngeal jaw morphotypes that are endemic to the small desert valley of Cuatro Ciénegas. We recovered two clusters of mitochondrial haplotypes. The first contained a number of slightly differentiated cytochrome b (cytb) haplotypes that showed some phylogeographic signal and were present in both jaw morphotypes. The other haplotype was monomorphic, highly differentiated from the other cluster, present in equal frequencies in the morphotypes, and identical to H. cyanoguttatus haplotypes found outside Cuatro Ciénegas. Then, we investigated whether H. minckleyi individuals with the H. cyanoguttatus cytb were more evolutionarily similar to H. cyanoguttatus or other H. minckleyi using a species tree analysis of 84 nuclear loci. Both H. minckleyi pharyngeal morphotypes, regardless of their cytb haplotype, were quite distinct from H. cyanoguttatus. However, hybridization could be blurring subdivision within H. minckleyi as the alternative jaw morphotypes were not genetically distinct from one another. Accounting for introgression from H. cyanoguttatus will be essential to understand the evolution of the trophically polymorphic cichlid H. minckleyi. PMID:24340193

  16. Introgressive hybridization in a trophically polymorphic cichlid.

    PubMed

    Hulsey, C Darrin; García-de-León, Francisco J

    2013-11-01

    Trophically polymorphic species could represent lineages that are rapidly diverging along an ecological axis or could phenotypically mark the collapse of species through introgressive hybridization. We investigated patterns of introgression between the trophically polymorphic cichlid fish Herichthys minckleyi and its relative H. cyanoguttatus using a combination of population genetics and species tree analyses. We first examined the distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes within the alternative H. minckleyi pharyngeal jaw morphotypes that are endemic to the small desert valley of Cuatro Ciénegas. We recovered two clusters of mitochondrial haplotypes. The first contained a number of slightly differentiated cytochrome b (cytb) haplotypes that showed some phylogeographic signal and were present in both jaw morphotypes. The other haplotype was monomorphic, highly differentiated from the other cluster, present in equal frequencies in the morphotypes, and identical to H. cyanoguttatus haplotypes found outside Cuatro Ciénegas. Then, we investigated whether H. minckleyi individuals with the H. cyanoguttatus cytb were more evolutionarily similar to H. cyanoguttatus or other H. minckleyi using a species tree analysis of 84 nuclear loci. Both H. minckleyi pharyngeal morphotypes, regardless of their cytb haplotype, were quite distinct from H. cyanoguttatus. However, hybridization could be blurring subdivision within H. minckleyi as the alternative jaw morphotypes were not genetically distinct from one another. Accounting for introgression from H. cyanoguttatus will be essential to understand the evolution of the trophically polymorphic cichlid H. minckleyi. PMID:24340193

  17. Genotyping for cytochrome P450 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K; King, Barry P; Leathart, Julian B S

    2006-01-01

    Protocols for the extraction of DNA from human blood and for genotyping for a number of common cytochrome P450 polymorphisms using either polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis are described. Rapid high-throughput techniques are also available for analyses of this type, but they require access to specialized equipment and are not considered here. General guidelines for performing amplification using PCR are described together with electrophoresis protocols for analysis of restriction digests of PCR products with agarose and polyacrylamide gels including the use of polyacrylamide-based gels for SSCP analysis. Protocols for the following specific isoforms and alleles are also provided: CYP1A1 (*2B and *4 alleles), CYP2C8 (*3 and *4 alleles), CYP2C9 (*2, *3, and *11 alleles), CYP2C19 (*2 and *3 alleles), CYP2D6 (*3, *4, *5, and *6 alleles), CYP2E1 (*5A, *5B, and *6 alleles), and CYP3A5 (*3 allele). PMID:16719392

  18. Chromosome-length polymorphism in fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Zolan, M E

    1995-01-01

    The examination of fungal chromosomes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has revealed that length polymorphism is widespread in both sexual and asexual species. This review summarizes characteristics of fungal chromosome-length polymorphism and possible mitotic and meiotic mechanisms of chromosome length change. Most fungal chromosome-length polymorphisms are currently uncharacterized with respect to content and origin. However, it is clear that long tandem repeats, such as tracts of rRNA genes, are frequently variable in length and that other chromosomal rearrangements are suppressed during normal mitotic growth. Dispensable chromosomes and dispensable chromosome regions, which have been well documented for some fungi, also contribute to the variability of the fungal karyotype. For sexual species, meiotic recombination increases the overall karyotypic variability in a population while suppressing genetic translocations. The range of karyotypes observed in fungi indicates that many karyotypic changes may be genetically neutral, at least under some conditions. In addition, new linkage combinations of genes may also be advantageous in allowing adaptation of fungi to new environments. PMID:8531892

  19. Glucosyltransferase gene polymorphism among Streptococcus mutans strains.

    PubMed Central

    Chia, J S; Hsu, T Y; Teng, L J; Chen, J Y; Hahn, L J; Yang, C S

    1991-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases were detected among Streptococcus mutans serotype c strains by Southern blot analysis with DNA probes located within the gtfB gene (H. Aoki, T. Shiroza, M. Hayakawa, S. Sato, and H. K. Kuramitsu, Infect. Immun. 53:587-594, 1986). Restriction endonucleases were used to examine genomic DNAs isolated from serotype a to h strains. The variations were readily detected among 33 strains of serotype c by EcoRI and PstI restriction enzyme digestions. Serotypes e and f, which are genetically similar to serotype c, also had comparable polymorphism; however, serotypes a, b, d, g, and h did not hybridize to the same DNA probes in parallel experiments. Further analysis of enzymatic activities for glucan synthesis and sucrose-dependent adherence revealed no significant differences among the serotype c strains. Our results suggested that genetic polymorphisms existing in S. mutans serotype c strains may reflect a complexity in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases, which are produced ubiquitously in members of the S. mutans group. Images PMID:1826894

  20. Inflammasome polymorphisms in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Pontillo, Alessandra; Reis, Edione C; Liphaus, Bernadete L; Silva, Clovis A; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasome is the cytoplasmic complex responsible for pro-IL1 β cleavage and secretion of IL-1β. Recently our group reported the first association between polymorphisms in the inflammasome receptor NLRP1 and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) "di per se" and especially in SLE-associated renal disease, suggesting the involvement of NLRP1-inflammasome in the immune dysregulation characteristic of SLE patients. Considering that juvenile-onset SLE (JSLE) is more severe than adult SLE, and that the genetic background plays a major role in the early development of autoimmune diseases, we analysed selected polymorphisms in inflammasome genes (NLRP1, NLRP3, CARD8, IL1B, TNFAIP3) of children and adolescents with JSLE (n = 90) and in healthy controls (n = 144). A single polymorphism in IL1B, and not NLRP1, gene resulted in association with JSLE, suggesting that IL-1 β is involved in the pathogenesis of SLE, but different genes could play specific role in adult- or early-onset disease. PMID:26182076

  1. Interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms and toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Paula R.; Costa, Germano C.; Dutra, Walderez O.; Oréfice, Fernando; Teixeira, Antônio L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose It has been proposed that cytokine gene polymorphisms can predispose individuals to disease by enhancing inflammatory processes. Considering the relevance of interleukin-1 (IL-1) in the pathogenesis of toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis (TR), we investigated whether IL1A −889 C/T and IL1B +3954C/T promoter polymorphisms are associated with TR in humans. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study that involved 100 Brazilian TR patients and 100 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Genomic DNA was obtained from oral swabs of all participants and amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers flanking the locus −889 of IL1A and +3954 of IL1B. PCR products were submitted to digestion and analyzed by PAGE to distinguish C and T alleles. Results There was no significant difference in the genotype or allele distributions of the IL1A −889 C/T and IL1B +3954C/T polymorphisms in patients with TR when compared with controls. However, in a subgroup analysis, the frequency of genotype and allele distributions of IL1A −889 C/T differed significantly between TR patients with and without recurrent episodes. Conclusion This study suggests that the genotypes related with a high production of IL-1a may be associated with the recurrence of TR. PMID:18941541

  2. Genetic polymorphisms linked to susceptibility to malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The influence of host genetics on susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum malaria has been extensively studied over the past twenty years. It is now clear that malaria parasites have imposed strong selective forces on the human genome in endemic regions. Different genes have been identified that are associated with different malaria related phenotypes. Factors that promote severity of malaria include parasitaemia, parasite induced inflammation, anaemia and sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes in brain microvasculature. Recent advances in human genome research technologies such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and fine genotyping tools have enabled the discovery of several genetic polymorphisms and biomarkers that warrant further study in host-parasite interactions. This review describes and discusses human gene polymorphisms identified thus far that have been shown to be associated with susceptibility or resistance to P. falciparum malaria. Although some polymorphisms play significant roles in susceptibility to malaria, several findings are inconclusive and contradictory and must be considered with caution. The discovery of genetic markers associated with different malaria phenotypes will help elucidate the pathophysiology of malaria and enable development of interventions or cures. Diversity in human populations as well as environmental effects can influence the clinical heterogeneity of malaria, thus warranting further investigations with a goal of developing new interventions, therapies and better management against malaria. PMID:21929748

  3. Colour Polymorphism Protects Prey Individuals and Populations Against Predation

    PubMed Central

    Karpestam, Einat; Merilaita, Sami; Forsman, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Colour pattern polymorphism in animals can influence and be influenced by interactions between predators and prey. However, few studies have examined whether polymorphism is adaptive, and there is no evidence that the co-occurrence of two or more natural prey colour variants can increase survival of populations. Here we show that visual predators that exploit polymorphic prey suffer from reduced performance, and further provide rare evidence in support of the hypothesis that prey colour polymorphism may afford protection against predators for both individuals and populations. This protective effect provides a probable explanation for the longstanding, evolutionary puzzle of the existence of colour polymorphisms. We also propose that this protective effect can provide an adaptive explanation for search image formation in predators rather than search image formation explaining polymorphism. PMID:26902799

  4. A quantitative study of eosinophil polymorphs in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Fuggle, W J; Crocker, J; Smith, P J

    1984-03-01

    Eosinophil polymorphonuclear leucocytes (polymorphs) were counted in 45 specimens from patients with Hodgkin's disease and five specimens from patients with reactive follicular hyperplasia. The use of chlorazol fast pink BK, a little known stain for eosinophil polymorphs, combined with image analysis facilitated rapid and reliable counting. Significant differences were found between the mean percentages of eosinophil polymorphs in the Rye subtypes of Hodgkin's disease. The numbers of eosinophil polymorphs in specimens from patients with reactive follicular hyperplasia were very low and could not be counted. PMID:6699190

  5. Impact of Candidate Genetic Polymorphisms in Prostate Cancer: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Salvi, S; Conteduca, V; Gurioli, G; Calistri, D; Casadio, V; De Giorgi, U

    2016-02-01

    In the last few years, the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been investigated in many tumors as predictor of disease aggressiveness and clinical outcome. We searched for relevant articles from 1998 to 2015 about the impact of SNPs in prostate cancer. Particularly, in this article, we review the pathogenetic, prognostic and predictive significance of gene polymorphisms in prostate tumor, providing a brief overview of studies in which the possible role of genetic variants was investigated in clinical settings. Because conflicting results often emerge about the impact of gene polymorphisms in prostate cancer, further larger studies are warranted in order to introduce gene polymorphism into clinical practice as biomarkers. PMID:26518421

  6. Detecting high-resolution polymorphisms in human coding loci by combining PCR and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis.

    PubMed

    Poduslo, S E; Dean, M; Kolch, U; O'Brien, S J

    1991-07-01

    A strategy is described that allows the development of polymorphic genetic markers to be characterized in individual genes. Segments of the 3' untranslated regions are amplified, and polymorphisms are detected by digestion with frequently cutting enzymes and with the detection of single-stranded conformation polymorphisms. This allows these genes, or DNA segments, to be placed on the linkage maps of human chromosomes. Polymorphisms in two genes have been identified using this approach. A HaeIII polymorphism was detected in the KIT proto-oncogene, physically assigned to chromosome 4q11-12. This polymorphism is linked to other chromosome 4p markers and is in linkage disequilibrium with a HindIII polymorphism previously described at this locus. We have also identified in the insulin-like growth factor1 receptor gene (IGF1R) a 2-bp deletion that is present at a frequency of .25 in the Caucasian population. Pedigree analysis with this insertion/deletion polymorphism placed the IGF1R gene at the end of the current linkage map of chromosome 15q, consistent with the physical assignment of 15q2526. Thus, polymorphisms in specific genes can be used to related the physical, genetic, and comparative maps of mammalian genomes and to simplify the testing of candidate genes for human diseases. PMID:1676559

  7. Polymorphism in phenobarbital: discovery of a new polymorph and crystal structure of elusive form V.

    PubMed

    Roy, Saikat; Goud, N Rajesh; Matzger, Adam J

    2016-03-10

    This report highlights the discovery of a new polymorph of the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB) using polymer-induced heteronucleation (PIHn) and unravelling the crystal structure of the elusive form V. Both forms are characterized by structural, thermal and VT-Raman spectroscopy methods to elucidate phase transformation behavior and shed light on stability relationships. PMID:26926048

  8. Genetic polymorphisms associated with exertional rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Deuster, Patricia A; Contreras-Sesvold, Carmen L; O'Connor, Francis G; Campbell, William W; Kenney, Kimbra; Capacchione, John F; Landau, Mark E; Muldoon, Sheila M; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Heled, Yuval

    2013-08-01

    Exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) occurs in young, otherwise healthy, individuals principally during strenuous exercise, athletic, and military training. Although many risk factors have been offered, it is unclear why some individuals develop ER when participating in comparable levels of physical exertion under identical environmental conditions and others do not. This study investigated possible genetic polymorphisms that might help explain ER. DNA samples derived from a laboratory-based study of persons who had never experienced an episode of ER (controls) and clinical ER cases referred for testing over the past several years were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes. These included angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), α-actinin-3 (ACTN3), creatine kinase muscle isoform (CKMM), heat shock protein A1B (HSPA1B), interleukin 6 (IL6), myosin light chain kinase (MYLK), adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1 (AMPD1), and sickle cell trait (HbS). Population included 134 controls and 47 ER cases. The majority of ER cases were men (n = 42/47, 89.4 %); the five women with ER were Caucasian. Eighteen African Americans (56.3 %) were ER cases. Three SNPs were associated with ER: CKMM Ncol, ACTN3 R577X, and MYLK C37885A. ER cases were 3.1 times more likely to have the GG genotype of CKMM (odds ratio/OR = 3.1, confidence interval/CI 1.33-7.10), 3.0 times for the XX genotype of ACTN3 SNP (OR = 2.97, CI 1.30-3.37), and 5.7 times for an A allele of MYLK (OR = 21.35, CI 2.60-12.30). All persons with HbS were also ER cases. Three distinct polymorphisms were associated with ER. Further work will be required to replicate these findings and determine the mechanism(s) whereby these variants might confer susceptibility. PMID:23543093

  9. The extensive polymorphism of KIR genes

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Derek; Gonzelez, Faviel

    2010-01-01

    The functions of human natural killer (NK) cells are controlled by diverse families of antigen receptors. Prominent among these are the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), a family of genes clustered in one of the most variable regions of the human genome. Within this review we discuss the vast polymorphism of the KIR gene complex which rivals that of the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) complex. There are several aspects to this polymorphism. Initially there is presence/absence of individual KIR genes, with four of these genes, termed framework genes, being present in all individuals tested to date, except on those very occasional instances when the gene has been deleted. Within each gene, alleles are present at different frequencies. We provide details of a new website that enables convenient searching for data on KIR gene, allele and genotype frequencies in different populations and show how these frequencies vary in different worldwide populations and the high probability of individuals differing in their KIR repertoire when both gene and allele polymorphism is considered. The KIR genes present in an individual may be classified into A and/or B haplotypes, which respectively have a more inhibitory role or a more activating role on the function of the NK cell. Family studies have been used to ascertain the make-up of these haplotypes, inclusion of allele typing enabling determination of whether one or two copies of a particular gene is present. In addition to genetic diversification the KIR gene complex shows differences at the functional level with different alleles having different protein expression levels and different avidity with their HLA ligand. PMID:20028428

  10. MMP-3 gene polymorphisms and Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Adiguzel, Mustafa; Horozoglu, Cem; Kilicoglu, Onder; Ozger, Harzem; Acar, Leyla; Ergen, Arzu

    2016-03-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common adolescence cancer among all primary bone tumors next only to multiplemyeloma. It has a substantially worse prognosis and ability to metastasize to lung. MMPs (matrix metalloproteinases) are among the major proteases that take part in regulation of ECM (extracellular matrix). MMPs play an active role in the formation of the osteoid tissue, rich in collagens and other ECM proteoglycans. They also take part in pro-osteoclast, osteoclast, osteoblast, and osteoid formation. Many members of the MMP gene family have been linked to human cancers. It has been shown that MMPs particularly play a role in the tumor's acquisition of an invasive and metastatic character. In our study, the E45K and T102T polymorphisms of MMP-3 were studied using the PCR-RFLP method in 135 Turkish subjects (54 subjects with osteosarcoma and 81 healthy controls). We found that frequencies of E45K G allele (p:0,010, χ²:6,710, OR:1,429, 95% Cl: 1,019-1,858) and AG genotype (p:0,001, χ²:14,753, OR:2,32, 95% Cl: 1,491-3,626) were elevated in patients compared to controls. Besides, there was a significant difference in.E45K AA genotype between study groups (p:0,004, χ²:8,182, OR: 2,929, 95% Cl: 1,38-6,19). There were no significant differences between any genotypes or allele in the control and patient groups for MMP-3 T102T polymorphism. Our findings indicate that the G allele and AG genotype of MMP-3 E45K polymorphism is associated with increased risk of osteosarcoma in adolescent population of Turkey. PMID:27145630

  11. Nucleosomes Shape DNA Polymorphism and Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Sasha A.; Karpen, Gary H.; Langley, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 80% of genomic DNA in eukaryotes is packaged as nucleosomes, which, together with the remaining interstitial linker regions, generate higher order chromatin structures [1]. Nucleosome sequences isolated from diverse organisms exhibit ∼10 bp periodic variations in AA, TT and GC dinucleotide frequencies. These sequence elements generate intrinsically curved DNA and help establish the histone-DNA interface. We investigated an important unanswered question concerning the interplay between chromatin organization and genome evolution: do the DNA sequence preferences inherent to the highly conserved histone core exert detectable natural selection on genomic divergence and polymorphism? To address this hypothesis, we isolated nucleosomal DNA sequences from Drosophila melanogaster embryos and examined the underlying genomic variation within and between species. We found that divergence along the D. melanogaster lineage is periodic across nucleosome regions with base changes following preferred nucleotides, providing new evidence for systematic evolutionary forces in the generation and maintenance of nucleosome-associated dinucleotide periodicities. Further, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) frequency spectra show striking periodicities across nucleosomal regions, paralleling divergence patterns. Preferred alleles occur at higher frequencies in natural populations, consistent with a central role for natural selection. These patterns are stronger for nucleosomes in introns than in intergenic regions, suggesting selection is stronger in transcribed regions where nucleosomes undergo more displacement, remodeling and functional modification. In addition, we observe a large-scale (∼180 bp) periodic enrichment of AA/TT dinucleotides associated with nucleosome occupancy, while GC dinucleotide frequency peaks in linker regions. Divergence and polymorphism data also support a role for natural selection in the generation and maintenance of these super

  12. Trophic radiation through polymorphism in cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Sage, R D; Selander, R K

    1975-11-01

    Several morphologically defined species of cichlid fishes (Cichlasoma) endemic to the Cuatro Cienegas basin of Mexico and differing in tooth structure, body shape, and diet are allelically identical at 27 gene loci. The presence of only one Mendelian population in each of three drainage systems studied and the occurrence of two of the morphotypes in the same broods indicate that the supposed species are morphs. That trophic radiation in the Cuatro Cienegas cichlids has been achieved through ecological polymorphism rather than speciation raises questions regarding the genetic basis for the extensive intralacustrine radiation of cichlids in Africa and elsewhere. PMID:16592286

  13. Trophic radiation through polymorphism in cichlid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Richard D.; Selander, Robert K.

    1975-01-01

    Several morphologically defined species of cichlid fishes (Cichlasoma) endemic to the Cuatro Cienegas basin of Mexico and differing in tooth structure, body shape, and diet are allelically identical at 27 gene loci. The presence of only one Mendelian population in each of three drainage systems studied and the occurrence of two of the morphotypes in the same broods indicate that the supposed species are morphs. That trophic radiation in the Cuatro Cienegas cichlids has been achieved through ecological polymorphism rather than speciation raises questions regarding the genetic basis for the extensive intralacustrine radiation of cichlids in Africa and elsewhere. Images PMID:16592286

  14. What Determines the Ice Polymorph in Clouds?

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2016-07-20

    Ice crystals in the atmosphere nucleate from supercooled liquid water and grow by vapor uptake. The structure of the ice polymorph grown has strong impact on the morphology and light scattering of the ice crystals, modulates the amount of water vapor in ice clouds, and can impact the molecular uptake and reactivity of atmospheric aerosols. Experiments and molecular simulations indicate that ice nucleated and grown from deeply supercooled liquid water is metastable stacking disordered ice. The ice polymorph grown from vapor has not yet been determined. Here we use large-scale molecular simulations to determine the structure of ice that grows as a result of uptake of water vapor in the temperature range relevant to cirrus and mixed-phase clouds, elucidate the molecular mechanism of the formation of ice at the vapor interface, and compute the free energy difference between cubic and hexagonal ice interfaces with vapor. We find that vapor deposition results in growth of stacking disordered ice only under conditions of extreme supersaturation, for which a nonequilibrium liquid layer completely wets the surface of ice. Such extreme conditions have been used to produce stacking disordered frost ice in experiments and may be plausible in the summer polar mesosphere. Growth of ice from vapor at moderate supersaturations in the temperature range relevant to cirrus and mixed-phase clouds, from 200 to 260 K, produces exclusively the stable hexagonal ice polymorph. Cubic ice is disfavored with respect to hexagonal ice not only by a small penalty in the bulk free energy (3.6 ± 1.5 J mol(-1) at 260 K) but also by a large free energy penalty at the ice-vapor interface (89.7 ± 12.8 J mol(-1) at 260 K). The latter originates in higher vibrational entropy of the hexagonal-terminated ice-vapor interface. We predict that the free energy penalty against the cubic ice interface should decrease strongly with temperature, resulting in some degree of stacking disorder in ice grown from

  15. Human lymphocyte polymorphisms detected by quantitative two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.; Merril, C.R.

    1983-09-01

    A survey of 186 soluble lymphocyte proteins for genetic polymorphism was carried out utilizing two-dimensional electrophoresis of /sup 14/C-labeled phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human lymphocyte proteins. Nineteen of these proteins exhibited positional variation consistent with independent genetic polymorphism in a primary sample of 28 individuals. Each of these polymorphisms was characterized by quantitative gene-dosage dependence insofar as the heterozygous phenotype expressed approximately 50% of each allelic gene product as was seen in homozygotes. Patterns observed were also identical in monozygotic twins, replicate samples, and replicate gels. The three expected phenotypes (two homozygotes and a heterozygote) were observed in each of 10 of these polymorphisms while the remaining nine had one of the homozygous classes absent. The presence of the three phenotypes, the demonstration of gene-dosage dependence, and our own and previous pedigree analysis of certain of these polymorphisms supports the genetic basis of these variants. Based on this data, the frequency of polymorphic loci for man is: P . 19/186 . .102, and the average heterozygosity is .024. This estimate is approximately 1/3 to 1/2 the rate of polymorphism previously estimated for man in other studies using one-dimensional electrophoresis of isozyme loci. The newly described polymorphisms and others which should be detectable in larger protein surveys with two-dimensional electrophoresis hold promise as genetic markers of the human genome for use in gene mapping and pedigree analyses.

  16. Association between Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 Gene Polymorphism and Completed Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fudalej, Sylwia; Ilgen, Mark; Fudalej, Marcin; Kostrzewa, Grazyna; Barry, Kristen; Wojnar, Marcin; Krajewski, Pawel; Blow, Frederic; Ploski, Rafal

    2010-01-01

    The association between suicide and a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs1386483) was examined in the recently identified tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) gene. Blood samples of 143 suicide victims and 162 age- and sex-matched controls were examined. The frequency of the TT genotype in the TPH2 polymorphism was higher in suicide victims than in…

  17. Association Between NAT2 Polymorphisms and Lung Cancer Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Cui, Wei; Cong, Lin; Wang, Li; Ruan, Xinjian; Jia, Jia; Liu, Yanfang; Jia, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xia

    2015-12-01

    To further investigate the association between NAT2 polymorphisms and lung cancer susceptibility.In terms of phenotypes, we investigated the acetylator status of NAT2 polymorphisms associated with lung cancer risk. Additionally, in view of genotypes, we mainly analyzed 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NAT2 gene, namely C282T, A803G, C481T, G590A, and G857A. Twenty-six eligible studies were included in our meta-analysis by searching PubMed, Embase, and CNKI databases. We used odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the susceptibility to lung cancer associated with NAT2 polymorphisms.Overall, based on phenotypes, the pooled ORs showed no significant association between NAT2 polymorphisms and lung cancer susceptibility. In the subgroup analyses by ethnicity and source of control, there was still no significant association. In terms of genotypes, overall, no obvious relationship was observed between NAT2 polymorphisms and lung cancer risk. But increased risk of lung cancer was found in association with NAT2 C282T polymorphism (TT vs. CC + TC: OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.11-2.25).Our meta-analysis demonstrates that TT genotype in NAT2 C282T polymorphism may be a risk factor for lung cancer susceptibility. Additionally, the acetylator status of 5 SNPs in NAT2 gene may not be associated with lung cancer risk. PMID:26656326

  18. Polymorphisms in Autophagy Genes and Susceptibility to Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Alisjahbana, Bachti; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Parwati, Ida; Oosting, Marije; Plantinga, Theo S.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Netea, Mihai G.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; van de Vosse, Esther; van Crevel, Reinout

    2012-01-01

    Recent data suggest that autophagy is important for intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and polymorphisms in the autophagy gene IRGM have been linked with susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) among African-Americans, and with TB caused by particular M. tuberculosis genotypes in Ghana. We compared 22 polymorphisms of 14 autophagy genes between 1022 Indonesian TB patients and 952 matched controls, and between patients infected with different M. tuberculosis genotypes, as determined by spoligotyping. The same autophagy polymorphisms were studied in correlation with ex-vivo production of TNF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-17 in healthy volunteers. No association was found between TB and polymorphisms in the genes ATG10, ATG16L2, ATG2B, ATG5, ATG9B, IRGM, LAMP1, LAMP3, P2RX7, WIPI1, MTOR and ATG4C. Associations were found between polymorphisms in LAMP1 (p = 0.02) and MTOR (p = 0.02) and infection with the successful M. tuberculosis Beijing genotype. The polymorphisms examined were not associated with M. tuberculosis induced cytokines, except for a polymorphism in ATG10, which was linked with IL-8 production (p = 0.04). All associations found lost statistical significance after correction for multiple testing. This first examination of a broad set of polymorphisms in autophagy genes fails to show a clear association with TB, with M. tuberculosis Beijing genotype infection or with ex-vivo pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:22879892

  19. Effects of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms on HIV-1 susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    White, Tommy E.; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Knowlton, Caitlin; Kim, Baek; Sawyer, Sara L.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2014-07-15

    SAMHD1 is a human restriction factor that prevents efficient infection of macrophages, dendritic cells and resting CD4+ T cells by HIV-1. Here we explored the antiviral activity and biochemical properties of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms. Our studies focused on human SAMHD1 polymorphisms that were previously identified as evolving under positive selection for rapid amino acid replacement during primate speciation. The different human SAMHD1 polymorphisms were tested for their ability to block HIV-1, HIV-2 and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). All studied SAMHD1 variants block HIV-1, HIV-2 and EIAV infection when compared to wild type. We found that these variants did not lose their ability to oligomerize or to bind RNA. Furthermore, all tested variants were susceptible to degradation by Vpx, and localized to the nuclear compartment. We tested the ability of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms to decrease the dNTP cellular levels. In agreement, none of the different SAMHD1 variants lost their ability to reduce cellular levels of dNTPs. Finally, we found that none of the tested human SAMHD1 polymorphisms affected the ability of the protein to block LINE-1 retrotransposition. - Highlights: • Human SAMHD1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms block HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection. • SAMHD1 polymorphisms do not affect its ability to block LINE-1 retrotransposition. • SAMHD1 polymorphisms decrease the cellular levels of dNTPs.

  20. TPMT Polymorphism: When Shield Becomes Weakness.

    PubMed

    Katara, Pramod; Kuntal, Himani

    2016-06-01

    Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) is a cytoplasmic transmethylase present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In humans, it shows its presence in almost all of the tissues, predominantly in liver and kidney. TPMT is one of the important metabolic enzymes of phase II metabolic pathway and catalyzes methylation of thiopurine drugs such as azathioprine, 6-thioguanine and 6-mercaptopurine, which are used to treat patients with neoplasia and autoimmune disease as well as transplant recipients. In this sense, TPMT acts as shield against toxic effect of these drugs. Pharmacogenomic studies revealed that genetic polymorphism in TPMT is responsible for variable and, in some cases, adverse drug reaction. Those human groups who carry variants of TPMT (i.e., [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]) are at high risk, because they are unable to metabolize thiopurine drugs thus becoming a weakness of patients against these drugs. Keeping in the mind the importance of TPMT, this review discusses the existence and distribution of various TPMT variants throughout different ethnic groups and risk of adverse drug reactions to them, and how they can avoid this risk of side effects. The review also highlighted factors responsible for variable reactions of TPMT, how this TPMT polymorphism can be considered in drug designing process to avoid toxic effects, designing precautions against them and more importantly designing personalized medicine. PMID:26297310

  1. From Single Nucleotide Polymorphism to Transcriptional Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Sebastian; Nair, Viji; Patel, Sanjeevkumar R.; Eichinger, Felix; Nelson, Robert G.; Weil, E. Jennifer; Pezzolesi, Marcus G.; Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Randolph, Ann; Keller, Benjamin J.; Werner, Thomas; Kretzler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have proven to be highly effective at defining relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and clinical phenotypes in complex diseases. Establishing a mechanistic link between a noncoding SNP and the clinical outcome is a significant hurdle in translating associations into biological insight. We demonstrate an approach to assess the functional context of a diabetic nephropathy (DN)-associated SNP located in the promoter region of the gene FRMD3. The approach integrates pathway analyses with transcriptional regulatory pattern-based promoter modeling and allows the identification of a transcriptional framework affected by the DN-associated SNP in the FRMD3 promoter. This framework provides a testable hypothesis for mechanisms of genomic variation and transcriptional regulation in the context of DN. Our model proposes a possible transcriptional link through which the polymorphism in the FRMD3 promoter could influence transcriptional regulation within the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-signaling pathway. These findings provide the rationale to interrogate the biological link between FRMD3 and the BMP pathway and serve as an example of functional genomics-based hypothesis generation. PMID:23434934

  2. Intronic polymorphisms of cytochromes P450

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 enzymes active in drug metabolism are highly polymorphic. Most allelic variants have been described for enzymes encoded by the cytochrome P450 family 2 (CYP2) gene family, which has 252 different alleles. The intronic polymorphisms in the cytochrome P450 genes account for only a small number of the important variant alleles; however, the most important ones are CYP2D6*4 and CYP2D6*41, which cause abolished and reduced CYP2D6 activity, respectively, and CYP3A5*3 and CYP3A5*5, common in Caucasian populations, which cause almost null activity. Their discoveries have been based on phenotypic alterations within individuals in a population, and their identification has, in several cases, been difficult and taken a long time. In light of the next-generation sequencing projects, it is anticipated that further alleles with intronic mutations will be identified that can explain the hitherto unidentified genetic basis of inter-individual differences in cytochrome P450-mediated drug and steroid metabolism. PMID:20846929

  3. Polymorphic collaboration in the global grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuay, William K.

    2006-05-01

    Next generation collaborative systems must be able to represent the same information in different forms on a broad spectrum of devices and resources from low end personal digital assistants (PDA) to high performance computers (HPC). Users might be on a desktop then switch to a laptop and then to a PDA while accessing the global grid. The user preference profile for a collaboration session should be capable of moving with them as well as be automatically adjusted for the device type. Collaborative systems must be capable of representing the same information in many forms for different domains and on many devices and thus be polymorphic. Polymorphic collaboration will provide an ability for multiple heterogeneous resources (human to human, human to machine and machine to machine) to share information and activities, as well as the ability to regulate collaborative sessions based on client characteristics and needs; reuse user profiles, tool category choices, and settings in future collaboration session by same or different users; use intelligent agents to assist collaborative systems in learning user/resource preferences and behaviors, and autonomously derive optimal information to provide to users and decision makers. This paper discusses ongoing research in next generation collaborative environments with the goal of making electronic collaboration as easy to use as the telephone - collaboration at the touch of the screen.

  4. Counterintuitive compaction behavior of clopidogrel bisulfate polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Khomane, Kailas S; More, Parth K; Bansal, Arvind K

    2012-07-01

    Being a density violator, clopidogrel bisulfate (CLP) polymorphic system (forms I and II) allows us to study individually the impact of molecular packing (true density) and thermodynamic properties such as heat of fusion on the compaction behavior. These two polymorphs of CLP were investigated for in-die and out-of-die compaction behavior using CTC profile, Heckel, and Walker equations. Compaction studies were performed on a fully instrumented rotary tabletting machine. Detailed examinations of the molecular packing of each form revealed that arrangement of the sulfate anion differs significantly in both crystal forms, thus conferring different compaction behavior to two forms. Close cluster packing of molecules in form I offers a rigid structure, which has poor compressibility and hence resists deformation under compaction pressure. This results into lower densification, higher yield strength, and mean yield pressure, as compared with form II at a given pressure. However, by virtue of higher bonding strength, form I showed superior tabletability, despite its poor compressibility and deformation behavior. Form I, having higher true density and lower heat of fusion showed higher bonding strength. Hence, true density and not heat of fusion can be considered predictor of bonding strength of the pharmaceutical powders. PMID:22488254

  5. Dynamically Alterable Arrays of Polymorphic Data Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    An application library package was developed that represents data packets for Deep Space Network (DSN) message packets as dynamically alterable arrays composed of arbitrary polymorphic data types. The software was to address a limitation of the present state of the practice for having an array directly composed of a single monomorphic data type. This is a severe limitation when one is dealing with science data in that the types of objects one is dealing with are typically not known in advance and, therefore, are dynamic in nature. The unique feature of this approach is that it enables one to define at run-time the dynamic shape of the matrix with the ability to store polymorphic data types in each of its indices. Existing languages such as C and C++ have the restriction that the shape of the array must be known in advance and each of its elements be a monomorphic data type that is strictly defined at compile-time. This program can be executed on a variety of platforms. It can be distributed in either source code or binary code form. It must be run in conjunction with any one of a number of Lisp compilers that are available commercially or as shareware.

  6. IPD—the Immuno Polymorphism Database

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James; Waller, Matthew J.; Stoehr, Peter; Marsh, Steven G. E.

    2005-01-01

    The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD) (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/) is a set of specialist databases related to the study of polymorphic genes in the immune system. IPD currently consists of four databases: IPD-KIR, contains the allelic sequences of Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors; IPD-MHC, a database of sequences of the Major Histocompatibility Complex of different species; IPD-HPA, alloantigens expressed only on platelets; and IPD-ESTAB, which provides access to the European Searchable Tumour Cell-Line Database, a cell bank of immunologically characterized melanoma cell lines. The IPD project works with specialist groups or nomenclature committees who provide and curate individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. The IPD project stores all the data in a set of related databases. Those sections with similar data, such as IPD-KIR and IPD-MHC share the same database structure. The sharing of a common database structure makes it easier to implement common tools for data submission and retrieval. The data are currently available online from the website and ftp directory; files will also be made available in different formats to download from the website and ftp server. The data will also be included in SRS, BLAST and FASTA search engines at the European Bioinformatics Institute. PMID:15608253

  7. IPD--the Immuno Polymorphism Database.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James; Waller, Matthew J; Stoehr, Peter; Marsh, Steven G E

    2005-01-01

    The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD) (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/) is a set of specialist databases related to the study of polymorphic genes in the immune system. IPD currently consists of four databases: IPD-KIR, contains the allelic sequences of Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors; IPD-MHC, a database of sequences of the Major Histocompatibility Complex of different species; IPD-HPA, alloantigens expressed only on platelets; and IPD-ESTAB, which provides access to the European Searchable Tumour Cell-Line Database, a cell bank of immunologically characterized melanoma cell lines. The IPD project works with specialist groups or nomenclature committees who provide and curate individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. The IPD project stores all the data in a set of related databases. Those sections with similar data, such as IPD-KIR and IPD-MHC share the same database structure. The sharing of a common database structure makes it easier to implement common tools for data submission and retrieval. The data are currently available online from the website and ftp directory; files will also be made available in different formats to download from the website and ftp server. The data will also be included in SRS, BLAST and FASTA search engines at the European Bioinformatics Institute. PMID:15608253

  8. IPD—the Immuno Polymorphism Database

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James; Halliwell, Jason A.; McWilliam, Hamish; Lopez, Rodrigo; Marsh, Steven G. E.

    2013-01-01

    The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD), http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/ is a set of specialist databases related to the study of polymorphic genes in the immune system. The IPD project works with specialist groups or nomenclature committees who provide and curate individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. The IPD project stores all the data in a set of related databases. IPD currently consists of four databases: IPD-KIR, contains the allelic sequences of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors, IPD-MHC, a database of sequences of the major histocompatibility complex of different species; IPD-HPA, alloantigens expressed only on platelets; and IPD-ESTDAB, which provides access to the European Searchable Tumour Cell-Line Database, a cell bank of immunologically characterized melanoma cell lines. The data is currently available online from the website and FTP directory. This article describes the latest updates and additional tools added to the IPD project. PMID:23180793

  9. IPD--the Immuno Polymorphism Database.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James; Halliwell, Jason A; McWilliam, Hamish; Lopez, Rodrigo; Marsh, Steven G E

    2013-01-01

    The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD), http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/ is a set of specialist databases related to the study of polymorphic genes in the immune system. The IPD project works with specialist groups or nomenclature committees who provide and curate individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. The IPD project stores all the data in a set of related databases. IPD currently consists of four databases: IPD-KIR, contains the allelic sequences of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors, IPD-MHC, a database of sequences of the major histocompatibility complex of different species; IPD-HPA, alloantigens expressed only on platelets; and IPD-ESTDAB, which provides access to the European Searchable Tumour Cell-Line Database, a cell bank of immunologically characterized melanoma cell lines. The data is currently available online from the website and FTP directory. This article describes the latest updates and additional tools added to the IPD project. PMID:23180793

  10. Bitter Taste Receptor Polymorphisms and Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Carrai, Maura; Crocco, Paolina; Montesanto, Alberto; Canzian, Federico; Rose, Giuseppina; Rizzato, Cosmeri

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that genetic factors account for 25% of the variation in human life span. On the basis of published molecular, genetic and epidemiological data, we hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms of taste receptors, which modulate food preferences but are also expressed in a number of organs and regulate food absorption processing and metabolism, could modulate the aging process. Using a tagging approach, we investigated the possible associations between longevity and the common genetic variation at the three bitter taste receptor gene clusters on chromosomes 5, 7 and 12 in a population of 941 individuals ranging in age from 20 to 106 years from the South of Italy. We found that one polymorphism, rs978739, situated 212 bp upstream of the TAS2R16 gene, shows a statistically significant association (p = 0.001) with longevity. In particular, the frequency of A/A homozygotes increases gradually from 35% in subjects aged 20 to 70 up to 55% in centenarians. These data provide suggestive evidence on the possible correlation between human longevity and taste genetics. PMID:23133589

  11. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences. PMID:26416087

  12. Investigation of transferrin polymorphism in Garole sheep.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Devesh K; Taraphder, Subhash; Sahoo, Ajit K; Dhara, K C

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the genetics of polymorph systems of Transferrin in Garole sheep breed. The present study was conducted on 95 adult Garole sheep comprising 52 ewes and 43 rams, maintained at Sheep and Goat Breeding Farm of West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, West Bengal, during the period from April-September, 2009. The polymorphism of transferrin was determined through SDS-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis technique. It was found that the transferrin type was controlled by five codominant alleles (TfA, TfB, TfC TfD and TfE) in Garole sheep. These five alleles, because of co-dominant nature of inheritance, determined the occurrence of nine transferrin genotypes in the analyzed flock. Four (TfAA, TfBB, TfCC and TfDD) of these were homozygous and the remaining five (TfAD, TfBC, TfBD, TfCD and TfDE) heterozygous. It was found that the TfDD genotype (0.263) was predominant while TfDE genotype (0.042) was least common in the analyzed flock. Frequencies of other genotypes were as: TfCD(0.242), TfBD(0.126), TfCC(0.084), TfBB(0.074), TfAA(0.063), TfAD and TfBC (0.053 for each genotype ) in whole population. From the result it was found that in whole population combined, the heterozygotic genotypic frequency (0.516) was more than that of homozygotic genotypic frequency (0.484). Considerable variations were recognized in the frequencies of transferrin alleles. In the whole population frequencies of transferrin alleles were found to be TfA = 0.089, TfB = 0.163, TfC = 0.232, TfD = 0.495 and TfE = 0.021. Transferrin system has shown an absence of genetic equilibrium among the analyzed herd (chi2 value = 51.31). In conclusion, there were polymorphism in Transferrin types and the presence of differences among the frequencies of the five alleles by categories could be a source of genetic variation in Garole sheep. PMID:20349135

  13. Gene Polymorphisms and Pharmacogenetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rego-Pérez, Ignacio; Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Blanco, Francisco J

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, chronic and inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with genetic predisposition. The advent of new biological agents, as well as the more traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, has resulted in highly efficient therapies for reducing the symptoms and signs of RA; however, not all patients show the same level of response in disease progression to these therapies. These variations suggest that RA patients may have different genetic regulatory mechanisms. The extensive polymorphisms revealed in non-coding gene-regulatory regions in the immune system, as well as genetic variations in drug-metabolizing enzymes, suggest that this type of variation is of functional and evolutionary importance and may provide clues for developing new therapeutic strategies. Pharmacogenetics is a rapidly advancing area of research that holds the promise that therapies will soon be tailored to an individual patient’s genetic profile. PMID:19506728

  14. AMPD1 polymorphism and response to regadenoson

    PubMed Central

    Saab, Rayan; Zouk, Aline N; Mastouri, Ronald; Skaar, Todd C; Philips, Santosh; Kreutz, Rolf P

    2016-01-01

    Aims AMPD1 c.34C>T (rs17602729) polymorphism results in AMPD1 deficiency. We examined the association of AMPD1 deficiency and variability of hemodynamic response to regadenoson. Subjects & methods Genotyping for c.34C>T was performed in 267 patients undergoing regadenoson cardiac stress testing. Results Carriers of c.34C >T variant exhibited higher relative changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) compared with wild-type subjects ([%] SBP change to peak: 12 ± 25 vs 5 ± 13%; p = 0.01) ([%] SBP change to nadir: −3 ± 15 vs −7 ± 11%; p = 0.04). Change in heart rate was similar between groups, but side effects were more common in carriers of the variant (+LR = 4.2; p = 0.04). Conclusion AMPD1 deficiency may be involved in the modulation of regadenoson’s systemic effects. PMID:26554440

  15. Amyloid Fibrils: Formation, Polymorphism, and Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Härd, Torleif

    2014-02-01

    Amyloid fibrils with cross-β spine basic architectures are prevalent and stable forms of peptides and proteins. Recent research has provided significant contributions to our understanding of the mechanisms of fibril formation and to the surprising diversity and persistence of structural polymorphism in amyloid fibrils. There have also been successful demonstrations of how molecules can be engineered to inhibit unwanted amyloid formation by different mechanisms. Future research in these areas will include investigations of mechanisms for primary nucleation and the structure of oligomeric intermediates, the general role of secondary nucleation events (autocatalysis), elucidation of the mechanisms and implications of preservation of structural morphology in amyloid propagation, and research into the largely unexplored phenomenon of cross-seeding, by which amyloid fibrils of one species induce the formation of amyloid by another species. PMID:26276617

  16. Diosgenone: a second P21 polymorph

    PubMed Central

    Hernández Linares, María-Guadalupe; Guerrero-Luna, Gabriel; Bernès, Sylvain; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; Fernández-Herrera, María A.

    2012-01-01

    Diosgenone [(20S,22R,25R)-spirost-4-en-3-one, C27H40O3] has been proposed as a new therapeutic alternative for the treatment of malaria. The first X-ray structure report for diosgenone was by Piro et al. [(2002). Z. Naturforsch. Teil C, 57, 947–950] in the space group P21 (Z′ = 2). We now report a new polymorph in the same space group, with two mol­ecules in the asymmetric unit. Both mol­ecules have similar conformations, characterized by a skewed envelope A ring, which contains the C=C bond conjugated with the ketone functionality at C3. The dimorphism results from a modification of the relative orientation of the mol­ecules in the asymmetric unit: two independent mol­ecules were arranged anti­parallel in the Piro report, while they are parallel in the present determination. PMID:22904824

  17. Clinical Challenges in Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Jacopo F; Underwood, Katherine; Mazzanti, Andrea; Priori, Silvia G

    2016-08-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an inheritable cardiac disorder associated with exercise- and stress-induced sudden death in young individuals. Although important steps forward have been made in the comprehension and treatment of this disease, several aspects remain unclear. Firstly, from an epidemiological standpoint the actual prevalence of CPVT is still unknown and possibly underestimated. In addition, the diagnostic process remains very challenging and can be supported by genetic analysis in only about half of the cases. Finally, up to one third of CPVT patients continue to present complex arrhythmias despite beta blocker treatment; the role of newer therapeutic options, such as flecainide and left cardiac sympathetic denervation, needs to be further elucidated. All these points constitute challenges for the cardiologist in the management of CPVT patients and fuel research into new diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:26948768

  18. New source of genetic polymorphisms in Lepidoptera?

    PubMed

    Hundsdoerfer, Anna K; Wink, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The variability level of the ISSR (inter-simple sequences repeat) primer (GACA)4 was examined in the three Lepidoptera families Pyralidae, Sphingidae and Pieridae. Our study shows that the tetra-repeat (GACA)n is evidently present in sufficient numbers in these butterflies to provide informative DNA fingerprints. The variability is mostly rather high, but within a comparable range to other ISSR studies. Although less polymorphisms may be encountered in some butterfly families, this study indicates that high variability of this marker may be a common characteristic of Lepidoptera genomes. An appeal for a minimal level of standardization of ISSR-PCR data analysis is formulated to enable an exact comparison between the groups of organisms studied with this fingerprint technique. PMID:16163839

  19. Amyloid Polymorphism: Structural Basis and Neurobiological Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Our understanding of the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases, of mechanisms by which disease-associated peptides and proteins aggregate into fibrils, and of structural properties of aggregation intermediates has advanced considerably in recent years. Detailed molecular structural models for certain fibrils and aggregation intermediates are now available. It is now well established that amyloid fibrils are generally polymorphic at the molecular level, with a given peptide or protein being capable of forming a variety of distinct, self-propagating fibril structures. Recent results from structural studies and from studies involving cell cultures, transgenic animals, and human tissue provide initial evidence that molecular structural variations in amyloid fibrils and related aggregates may correlate with or even produce variations in disease development. This article reviews our current knowledge of the structural and mechanistic aspects of amyloid formation, as well as current evidence for the biological relevance of structural variations. PMID:25950632

  20. Does colour polymorphism enhance survival of prey populations?

    PubMed

    Wennersten, Lena; Forsman, Anders

    2009-06-22

    That colour polymorphism may protect prey populations from predation is an old but rarely tested hypothesis. We examine whether colour polymorphic populations of prey exposed to avian predators in an ecologically valid visual context were exposed to increased extinction risk compared with monomorphic populations. We made 2976 artificial pastry prey, resembling Lepidoptera larvae, in four different colours and presented them in 124 monomorphic and 124 tetramorphic populations on tree trunks and branches such that they would be exposed to predation by free-living birds, and monitored their 'survival'. Among monomorphic populations, there was a significant effect of prey coloration on survival, confirming that coloration influenced susceptibility to visually oriented predators. Survival of polymorphic populations was inferior to that of monomorphic green populations, but did not differ significantly from monomorphic brown, yellow or red populations. Differences in survival within polymorphic populations paralleled those seen among monomorphic populations; the red morph most frequently went extinct first and the green morph most frequently survived the longest. Our findings do not support the traditional protective polymorphism hypothesis and are in conflict with those of earlier studies. As a possible explanation to our findings, we offer a competing 'giveaway cue' hypothesis: that polymorphic populations may include one morph that attracts the attention of predators and that polymorphic populations therefore may suffer increased predation compared with some monomorphic populations. PMID:19324729

  1. A model of ecological and evolutionary consequences of color polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Forsman, Anders; Ahnesjö, Jonas; Caesar, Sofia; Karlsson, Magnus

    2008-01-01

    We summarize direct and indirect effects on fitness components of animal color pattern and present a synthesis of theories concerning the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of chromatic multiple niche polymorphisms. Previous endeavors have aimed primarily at identifying conditions that promote the evolution and maintenance of polymorphisms. We consider in a conceptual model also the reciprocal influence of color polymorphism on population processes and propose that polymorphism entails selective advantages that may promote the ecological success of polymorphic species. The model begins with an evolutionary branching event from mono- to polymorphic condition that, under the influence of correlational selection, is predicted to promote the evolution of physical integration of coloration and other traits (cf. multi-trait coevolution and complex phenotypes). We propose that the coexistence within a population of alternative ecomorphs with coadapted gene complexes promotes utilization of diverse environmental resources, population stability and persistence, colonization success, and range expansions, and enhances the evolutionary potential and speciation. Conversely, we predict polymorphic populations to be less vulnerable to environmental change and at lower risk of range contractions and extinctions compared with monomorphic populations. We offer brief suggestions as to how these falsifiable predictions may be tested. PMID:18376544

  2. Identification of polymorphism in ethylone hydrochloride: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Chad R; Alarcon, Idralyn Q; Copeland, Catherine R; Cameron, T Stanley; Linden, Anthony; Grossert, J Stuart

    2016-08-01

    Ethylone, a synthetic cathinone with psychoactive properties, is a designer drug which has appeared on the recreational drug market in recent years. Since 2012, illicit shipments of ethylone hydrochloride have been intercepted with increasing frequency at the Canadian border. Analysis has revealed that ethylone hydrochloride exists as two distinct polymorphs. In addition, several minor impurities were detected in some seized exhibits. In this study, the two conformational polymorphs of ethylone hydrochloride have been synthesized and fully characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman, powder XRD, GC-MS, ESI-MS/MS and NMR ((13) C CPMAS, (1) H, (13) C). The two polymorphs can be distinguished by vibrational spectroscopy, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The FTIR data are applied to the identification of both polymorphs of ethylone hydrochloride (mixed with methylone hydrochloride) in a laboratory submission labelled as 'Ocean Snow Ultra'. The data presented in this study will assist forensic scientists in the differentiation of the two ethylone hydrochloride polymorphs. This report, alongside our recent article on the single crystal X-ray structure of a second polymorph of this synthetic cathinone, is the first to confirm polymorphism in ethylone hydrochloride. © 2015 Canada Border Services Agency. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 Canada Border Services Agency. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26344849

  3. The human serum paraoxonase/arylesterase polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Eckerson, H W; Wyte, C M; La Du, B N

    1983-01-01

    The heterozygous human serum paraoxonase phenotype can be clearly distinguished from both homozygous phenotypes on the basis of its distinctive ratio of paraoxonase to arylesterase activities. A trimodal distribution of the ratio values was found with 348 individual serum samples, measuring the ratio of paraoxonase activity (with 1 M NaCl in the assay) to arylesterase activity, using phenylacetate. The three modes corresponded to the three paraoxonase phenotypes, A, AB, and B (individual genotypes), and the expected Mendelian segregation of the trait was observed within families. The paraoxonase/arylesterase activity ratio showed codominant inheritance. We have defined the genetic locus determining the aromatic esterase (arylesterase) responsible for the polymorphic paraoxonase activity as esterase-A (ESA) and have designated the two common alleles at this locus by the symbols ESA*A and ESA*B. The frequency of the ESA*A allele was estimated to be .685, and that of the ESA*B allele, 0.315, in a sample population of unrelated Caucasians from the United States. We postulate that a single serum enzyme, with both paraoxonase and arylesterase activity, exists in two different isozymic forms with qualitatively different properties, and that paraoxon is a "discriminating" substrate (having a polymorphic distribution of activity) and phenylacetate is a "nondiscriminating" substrate for the two isozymes. Biochemical evidence for this interpretation includes the cosegregation of the degree of stimulation of paraoxonase activity by salt and paraoxonase/arylesterase activity ratio characteristics; the very high correlation between both the basal (non-salt stimulated) and salt-stimulated paraoxonase activities with arylesterase activity; and the finding that phenylacetate is an inhibitor for paraoxonase activities in both A and B types of enzyme. PMID:6316781

  4. Mitochondrial Mutations and Polymorphisms in Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Adolfo; Martin, Maureen V.; Rollins, Brandi; Moon, Emily A.; Bunney, William E.; Macciardi, Fabio; Lupoli, Sara; Smith, Erin N.; Kelsoe, John; Magnan, Christophe N.; van Oven, Mannis; Baldi, Pierre; Wallace, Douglas C.; Vawter, Marquis P.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial deficiencies with unknown causes have been observed in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) in imaging and postmortem studies. Polymorphisms and somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were investigated as potential causes with next generation sequencing of mtDNA (mtDNA-Seq) and genotyping arrays in subjects with SZ, BD, major depressive disorder (MDD), and controls. The common deletion of 4,977 bp in mtDNA was compared between SZ and controls in 11 different vulnerable brain regions and in blood samples, and in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of BD, SZ, and controls. In a separate analysis, association of mitochondria SNPs (mtSNPs) with SZ and BD in European ancestry individuals (n = 6,040) was tested using Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN) and Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 (WTCCC2) datasets. The common deletion levels were highly variable across brain regions, with a 40-fold increase in some regions (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus and amygdala), increased with age, and showed little change in blood samples from the same subjects. The common deletion levels were increased in the DLPFC for BD compared to controls, but not in SZ. Full mtDNA genome resequencing of 23 subjects, showed seven novel homoplasmic mutations, five were novel synonymous coding mutations. By logistic regression analysis there were no significant mtSNPs associated with BD or SZ after genome wide correction. However, nominal association of mtSNPs (p < 0.05) to SZ and BD were found in the hypervariable region of mtDNA to T195C and T16519C. The results confirm prior reports that certain brain regions accumulate somatic mutations at higher levels than blood. The study in mtDNA of common polymorphisms, somatic mutations, and rare mutations in larger populations may lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. PMID:22723804

  5. Consequences of POR mutations and polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Miller, Walter L; Agrawal, Vishal; Sandee, Duanpen; Tee, Meng Kian; Huang, Ningwu; Choi, Ji Ha; Morrissey, Kari; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2011-04-10

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) transports electrons from NADPH to all microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, including steroidogenic P450c17, P450c21 and P450aro. Severe POR mutations A287P (in Europeans) and R457H (in Japanese) cause the Antley-Bixler skeletal malformation syndrome (ABS) plus impaired steroidogenesis (causing genital anomalies), but the basis of ABS is unclear. We have characterized the activities of ∼40 POR variants, showing that assays based on P450c17 activities, but not cytochrome c assays, correlate with the clinical phenotype. The human POR gene is highly polymorphic: the A503V sequence variant, which decreases P450c17 activities to ∼60%, is found on ∼28% of human alleles. A promoter polymorphism (∼8% of Asians and ∼13% of Caucasians) at -152 reduces transcriptional activity by half. Screening of 35 POR variants showed that most mutants lacking activity with P450c17 or cytochrome c also lacked activity to support CYP1A2 and CYP2C19 metabolism of EOMCC (a fluorogenic non-drug substrate), although there were some remarkable differences: Q153R causes ABS and has ∼30% of wild-type activity with P450c17 but had 144% of WT activity with CYP1A2 and 284% with CYP2C19. The effects of POR variants on CYP3A4, which metabolizes nearly 50% of clinically used drugs, was examined with multiple, clinically relevant drug substrates, showing that A287P and R457H dramatically reduce drug metabolism, and that A503V variably impairs drug metabolism. The degree of activity can vary with the drug substrate assayed, as the drugs can influence the conformation of the P450. POR is probably an important contributor to genetic variation in both steroidogenesis and drug metabolism. PMID:21070833

  6. Consequences of POR mutations and polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Walter L.; Agrawal, Vishal; Sandee, Duanpen; Tee, Meng Kian; Huang, Ningwu; Choi, Ji Ha; Morrissey, Kari; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) transports electrons from NADPH to all microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, including steroidogenic P450c17, P450c21 and P450aro. Severe POR mutations A287P (in Europeans) and R457H (in Japanese) cause the Antley-Bixler skeletal malformation syndrome (ABS) plus impaired steroidogenesis (causing genital anomalies), but the basis of ABS is unclear. We have characterized the activities of ~40 POR variants, showing that assays based on P450c17 activities, but not cytochrome c assays, correlate with the clinical phenotype. The human POR gene is highly polymorphic: the A503V sequence variant, which decreases P450c17 activities to ~60%, is found on ~28% of human alleles. A promoter polymorphism (~8% of Asians and ~13% of Caucasians) at −152 reduces transcriptional activity by half. Screening of 35 POR variants showed that most mutants lacking activity with P450c17 or cytochrome c also lacked activity to support CYP1A2 and CYP2C19 metabolism of EOMCC (a fluorogenic non-drug substrate), although there were some remarkable differences: Q153R causes ABS and has ~30% of wild-type activity with P450c17 but had 144% of WT activity with CYP1A2 and 284% with CYP2C19. The effects of POR variants on CYP3A4, which metabolizes nearly 50% of clinically used drugs, was examined with multiple, clinically-relevant drug substrates, showing that A287P and R457H dramatically reduce drug metabolism, and that A503V variably impairs drug metabolism. The degree of activity can vary with the drug substrate assayed, as the drugs can influence the conformation of the P450. POR is probably an important contributor to genetic variation in both steroidogenesis and drug metabolism. PMID:21070833

  7. Emergence of stable polymorphisms driven by evolutionary games between mutants

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weini; Haubold, Bernhard; Hauert, Christoph; Traulsen, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Under neutrality, polymorphisms are maintained through the balance between mutation and drift. Under selection, a variety of mechanisms may be involved in the maintenance of polymorphisms, for example, sexual selection or host-parasite coevolution on the population level or heterozygote advantage in diploid individuals. Here we address the emergence of polymorphisms in a population of interacting haploid individuals. In our model, each mutation generates a new evolutionary game characterized by a payoff matrix with an additional row and an additional column. Hence, in general, the fitness of new mutations is frequency-dependent rather than constant. This dynamical process is distinct from the sequential fixation of advantageous traits and naturally leads to the emergence of polymorphisms under selection. It causes substantially higher diversity than observed under the established models of neutral or frequency-independent selection. Our framework allows for the coexistence of an arbitrary number of types, but predicts an intermediate average diversity. PMID:22735447

  8. Prioritizing sequence polymorphisms for potential association with phenotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The millions of SNP, insertions and deletions revealed by next generation sequencing (NGS), are certain to include polymorphisms responsible for phenotypic variation. Distinguishing causal from benign variants may allow genomic predictions that are robust across populations. While variants underly...

  9. Chromosome Polymorphism in Microtus (Alexandromys) mujanensis (Arvicolinae, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Lemskaya, Natalya A; Kartavtseva, Irina V; Rubtsova, Nadezhda V; Golenishchev, Fedor N; Sheremetyeva, Irina N; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    The Muya Valley vole (Microtus mujanensis) has a constant diploid chromosome number of 2n = 38, but an unstable karyotype with polymorphic chromosome pairs. Here, we describe 4 karyotypic variants involving 2 polymorphic chromosome pairs, MMUJ8 and MMUJ14, in 6 animals from Buryatia using a combination of GTG-banding and chromosome painting with M. agrestis probes. We suggest that the polymorphic pairs MMUJ8 and MMUJ14 were formed through pericentric inversions that played a major role during karyotype evolution of the species. We also propose that the stable diploid number with some ongoing polymorphism in the number of chromosome arms indicates that this evolutionarily young endemic species of Russian Far East is on the way to karyotype and likely species stabilization. PMID:26314555

  10. Complement Factor H Polymorphism in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Robert J.; Zeiss, Caroline; Chew, Emily Y.; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Sackler, Richard S.; Haynes, Chad; Henning, Alice K.; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Mane, Shrikant M.; Mayne, Susan T.; Bracken, Michael B.; Ferris, Frederick L.; Ott, Jurg; Barnstable, Colin; Hoh., Josephine

    2006-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in the elderly. We report a genome-wide screen of 96 cases and 50 controls for polymorphisms associated with AMD. Among 116,204 single-nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped, an intronic and common variant in the complement factor H gene (CFH) is strongly associated with AMD (nominal P value <10−7). In individuals homozygous for the risk allele, the likelihood of AMD is increased by a factor of 7.4 (95% confidence interval 2.9 to 19). Resequencing revealed a polymorphism in linkage disequilibrium with the risk allele representing a tyrosine-histidine change at amino acid 402. This polymorphism is in a region of CFH that binds heparin and C-reactive protein. The CFH gene is located on chromosome 1 in a region repeatedly linked to AMD in family-based studies. PMID:15761122

  11. Polymorphisms of Chicken TLR3 and 7 in Different Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Wenke; An, Jian; Wu, Yanhua

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) mediate immune responses via the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), thus playing important roles in host defense. Among the chicken (Ch) TLR family, ChTLR3 and 7 have been shown to recognize viral RNA. In our earlier studies, we have reported polymorphisms of TLR1, 2, 4, 5, 15 and 21. In the present study, we amplified TLR3 and 7 genes from different chicken breeds and analyzed their sequences. We identified 7 amino acid polymorphism sites in ChTLR3 with 6 outer part sites and 1 inner part site, and 4 amino acid polymorphism sites in ChTLR7 with 3 outer part sites and 1 inner part site. These results demonstrate that ChTLR genes are polymorphic among different chicken breeds, suggesting a varied resistance across numerous chicken breeds. This information might help improve chicken health by breeding and vaccination. PMID:25781886

  12. Physical and structural basis for polymorphism in amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    As our understanding of the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils has matured over the past 15 years, it has become clear that, while amyloid fibrils do have well-defined molecular structures, their molecular structures are not uniquely determined by the amino acid sequences of their constituent peptides and proteins. Self-propagating molecular-level polymorphism is a common phenomenon. This article reviews current information about amyloid fibril structures, variations in molecular structures that underlie amyloid polymorphism, and physical considerations that explain the development and persistence of amyloid polymorphism. Much of this information has been obtained through solid state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The biological significance of amyloid polymorphism is also discussed briefly. Although this article focuses primarily on studies of fibrils formed by amyloid-β peptides, the same principles apply to many amyloid-forming peptides and proteins. PMID:25179159

  13. [Study of Chloroplast DNA Polymorphism in the Sunflower (Helianthus L.)].

    PubMed

    Markina, N V; Usatov, A V; Logacheva, M D; Azarin, K V; Gorbachenko, C F; Kornienko, I V; Gavrilova, V A; Tihobaeva, V E

    2015-08-01

    The polymorphism of microsatellite loci of chloroplast genome in six Helianthus species and 46 lines of cultivated sunflower H. annuus (17 CMS lines and 29 Rf-lines) were studied. The differences between species are confined to four SSR loci. Within cultivated forms of the sunflower H. annuus, the polymorphism is absent. A comparative analysis was performed on sequences of the cpDNA inbred line 3629, line 398941 of the wild sunflower, and the American line HA383 H. annuus. As a result, 52 polymorphic loci represented by 27 SSR and 25 SNP were found; they can be used for genotyping of H. annuus samples, including cultural varieties: twelve polymorphic positions, of which eight are SSR and four are SNP. PMID:26601486

  14. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms for Pig Identification and Parentage Exclusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms have become an important type of marker for commercial diagnostic and parentage genotyping applications as automated genotyping systems have been developed that yield accurate genotypes. Unfortunately, a large number of highly informative public SNP markers tested in ...

  15. Unsolvated ruthenium(II) benzene dichloride: The beta polymorph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Simona; Giacobbe, Carlotta; Tabacaru, Aurel; Xhaferaj, Nertil; Pettinari, Claudio

    2014-06-01

    A novel polymorph of the unsolvated species [Ru2(benzene)2Cl4] (β form in the following) was serendipitously isolated as a polycrystalline powder. Its molecular and crystal structure was unraveled by means of state-of-the-art X-ray powder diffraction structure determination methods applied to laboratory data, and was compared to those of both the α polymorph and the CHCl3 solvate, throwing light on some discrepant results recently appeared in the literature. The thermal behavior of the α and β polymorphs was investigated by coupling thermogravimetric analyses to variable-temperature X-ray powder diffraction experiments. No temperature-stimulated phase transformation could be detected between the two polymorphs, each preserving its structural features up to decomposition, suggesting that kinetic, more than thermodynamic, factors regulate their isolation.

  16. Structural features of two polymorphs of ammonium uranyl crotonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenkov, A. V.; Peresypkina, E. V.; Pushkin, D. V.; Virovets, A. V.; Serezhkina, L. B.; Serezhkin, V. N.

    2014-09-01

    X-ray crystallography, FTIR spectroscopy and thermal analysis were conducted for crystals of two polymorphs of NH4UO2(C3H5COO)3, which are the first examples of uranyl tricarboxylate complexes with ions of unsaturated aliphatic monocarboxylic acid. The main structural units of both polymorphs are anionic complexes [UO2(C3H5COO)3]-. Uranium atoms adopt hexagonal bipyramidal coordination polyhedron, and crotonate ions realize bidentate cyclic type of coordination. Due to different packing of ammonium ions and [UO2(C3H5COO)3]- complexes triclinic crystals of α-polymorph have layer structure and cubic crystals of β-polymorph have three dimensional structure. Features of three dimensional packing of R+ ions and [UO2L3]- complexes in structures of 25 known R[UO2L3] compounds are discussed.

  17. Discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms and mutations by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2002-01-01

    Comparative genomics, analyzing variation among individual genomes, is an area of intense investigation. DNA sequencing is usually employed to look for polymorphisms and mutations. Pyrosequencing, a real-time DNA sequencing method, is emerging as a popular platform for comparative genomics. Here we review the use of this technology for mutation scanning, polymorphism discovery and chemical haplotyping. We describe the methodology and accuracy of this technique and discuss how to reduce the cost for large-scale analysis. PMID:18628881

  18. Melanoma risk is associated with vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Zeljic, Katarina; Kandolf-Sekulovic, Lidija; Supic, Gordana; Pejovic, Janko; Novakovic, Marijan; Mijuskovic, Zeljko; Magic, Zvonko

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have reported that vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms are associated with the occurrence of various cancers, including melanoma. The aim of the current study was to investigate the association of VDR gene polymorphisms with melanoma risk, clinicopathological characteristics, and vitamin D levels. The study group included 117 patients (84 patients with superficial spreading melanoma and 33 patients with nodular melanoma). The control group included 122 sex-matched and age-matched healthy-blood donors of the same ethnicity. VDR gene polymorphisms FokI, EcoRV, TaqI, and ApaI were genotyped by real-time PCR. In 60 patients, the total 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were evaluated in serum samples by direct chemiluminescence. Associations among parameters were considered to be significant if the P value was less than 0.05. Significant differences in the frequencies of VDR genotypes were observed between cases and the control group for FokI and TaqI polymorphisms (P<0.0001; P=0.005, respectively). Heterozygous Ff as well as mutant FF genotypes of the FokI polymorphism were associated with increased melanoma risk compared with the wild-type form [odds ratio (OR)=3.035, P=0.003; OR=9.276, P<0.0001, respectively]. A significantly increased melanoma risk was observed for the heterozygous Tt (OR=2.302, P=0.011) and the mutated variant tt (OR=3.697, P=0.003) of the TaqI polymorphism in comparison with the wild-type genotype. None of the polymorphisms studied was associated with clinicopathological characteristics and vitamin D serum level. Our results suggest that FokI and TaqI polymorphisms in the VDR gene may be considered as potential biomarkers for melanoma susceptibility. Low vitamin D levels in melanoma patients indicate the need for vitamin D supplementation. PMID:24638155

  19. Genetic Polymorphisms Influence Cognition in Patients Undergoing Carotid Interventions.

    PubMed

    Hitchner, Elizabeth; Morrison, Doug; Liao, Phoebe; Rosen, Allyson; Zhou, Wei

    2016-09-01

    While carotid interventions help decrease the risk of stroke, nearly 40% of patients experience cognitive deterioration. Genetic polymorphism in apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been implicated in cognitive impairment; however, it is unclear whether they may influence cognitive changes in patients undergoing carotid intervention. In this study, we seek to assess the role of genetic polymorphisms in carotid intervention-related cognitive change. Polymorphisms related to cognitive function were chosen for this preliminary analysis. Over 2 years, patients undergoing carotid interventions were prospectively recruited. Patients underwent neuropsychological testing 2 weeks prior to and at 1 month following their procedure. Saliva samples were collected for genetic analysis. Logistic regressions were used to identify associations between polymorphisms and cognitive measures. A total of 91 patients were included; all were male with an average age of 70 years. The majority of patients exhibited hypertension (95%) and a history of smoking (81%). Presence of ApoE 4 allele was associated with depression (p= 0.047). After correcting for age and genetic polymorphisms in BDNF and serotonin transporter (5-HTT), ApoE 4 allele was associated with depression (p= 0.044) and showed a trend with baseline cognitive impairment (p= 0.10). Age ≥ 70 years was associated with baseline cognitive impairment after adjusting for the three genetic polymorphisms (p= 0.03). Patients with ApoE 4 and BDNF A polymorphisms performed less well on the visual and verbal memory measures, respectively. Polymorphisms in ApoE and BDNF may provide insight on cognition in patients undergoing carotid interventions; however, the mechanism of this relationship remains unclear. PMID:27574384

  20. [BCL1 POLYMORPHISM OF GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR GENE AND RESPIRATORY DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Prystupa, L N; Garbuzova, V Yu; Kmyta, V V

    2015-01-01

    The article analyses the results of investigating the connection between BCL1-polymorphism of glucocorticoid receptor gene and respiratory diseases. Its role in increasing sensitivity to glucocorticoids is proved here. The authors investigated the association of Bcl1 polymorphism with predisposition to bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, with the nicotine addiction degree and with progressing disorders of pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26118026

  1. Relationship of MTHFR gene polymorphisms with renal and cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Ragusa, Angela; Martines, G Fabio; Pirri, Clara; Buccheri, Maria Antonietta; Di Nora, Concetta; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of different methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T gene polymorphism and hyperhomocysteinemia for the development of renal failure and cardiovascular events, which are controversial. METHODS: We challenged the relationship, if any, of MTHFR 677C>T and MTHFR 1298A>C polymorphisms with renal and heart function. The present article is a reappraisal of these concepts, investigating within a larger population, and including a subgroup of dialysis patients, if the two most common MTHFR polymorphisms, C677T and A1298C, as homozygous, heterozygous or with a compound heterozygous state, show different association with chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis. MTHFR polymorphism could be a favorable evolutionary factor, i.e., a protective factor for many ominous conditions, like cancer and renal failure. A similar finding was reported in fatty liver disease in which it is suggested that MTHFR polymorphisms could have maintained and maintain their persistence by an heterozygosis advantage mechanism. We studied a total of 630 Italian Caucasian subject aged 54.60 ± 16.35 years, addressing to the increased hazard of hemodialysis, if any, according to the studied MTHFR genetic polymorphisms. RESULTS: A favorable association with normal renal function of MTHFR polymorphisms, and notably of MTHFR C677T is present independently of the negative effects of left ventricular hypertrophy, increased Intra-Renal arterial Resistance and hyperparathyroidism. CONCLUSION: MTHFR gene polymorphisms could have a protective role on renal function as suggested by their lower frequency among our dialysis patients in end-stage renal failure; differently, the association with left ventricular hypertrophy and reduced left ventricular relaxation suggest some type of indirect, or concurrent mechanism. PMID:25664255

  2. Epitaxial stabilization and phase instability of VO2 polymorphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Keum, Jong K.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-01-20

    The VO2 polymorphs, i.e., VO2(A), VO2(B), VO2(M1) and VO2(R), have a wide spectrum of functionalities useful for many potential applications in information and energy technologies. However, synthesis of phase pure materials, especially in thin film forms, has been a challenging task due to the fact that the VO2 polymorphs are closely related to each other in a thermodynamic framework. Here, we report epitaxial stabilization of the VO2 polymorphs to synthesize high quality single crystalline thin films and study the phase stability of these metastable materials. We selectively deposit all the phases on various perovskite substrates with different crystallographic orientations. Bymore » investigating the phase instability, phonon modes and transport behaviours, not only do we find distinctively contrasting physical properties of the VO2 polymorphs, but that the polymorphs can be on the verge of phase transitions when heated as low as ~400 °C. In conclusion, our successful epitaxy of both VO2(A) and VO2(B) phases, which are rarely studied due to the lack of phase pure materials, will open the door to the fundamental studies of VO2 polymorphs for potential applications in advanced electronic and energy devices.« less

  3. Computational Approach for Epitaxial Polymorph Stabilization through Substrate Selection.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Dwaraknath, Shyam S; Garten, Lauren; Ndione, Paul; Ginley, David; Persson, Kristin A

    2016-05-25

    With the ultimate goal of finding new polymorphs through targeted synthesis conditions and techniques, we outline a computational framework to select optimal substrates for epitaxial growth using first principle calculations of formation energies, elastic strain energy, and topological information. To demonstrate the approach, we study the stabilization of metastable VO2 compounds which provides a rich chemical and structural polymorph space. We find that common polymorph statistics, lattice matching, and energy above hull considerations recommends homostructural growth on TiO2 substrates, where the VO2 brookite phase would be preferentially grown on the a-c TiO2 brookite plane while the columbite and anatase structures favor the a-b plane on the respective TiO2 phases. Overall, we find that a model which incorporates a geometric unit cell area matching between the substrate and the target film as well as the resulting strain energy density of the film provide qualitative agreement with experimental observations for the heterostructural growth of known VO2 polymorphs: rutile, A and B phases. The minimal interfacial geometry matching and estimated strain energy criteria provide several suggestions for substrates and substrate-film orientations for the heterostructural growth of the hitherto hypothetical anatase, brookite, and columbite polymorphs. These criteria serve as a preliminary guidance for the experimental efforts stabilizing new materials and/or polymorphs through epitaxy. The current screening algorithm is being integrated within the Materials Project online framework and data and hence publicly available. PMID:27145398

  4. Identification of conserved and polymorphic STRs for personal genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Short tandem repeats (STRs) are abundant in human genomes. Numerous STRs have been shown to be associated with genetic diseases and gene regulatory functions, and have been selected as genetic markers for evolutionary and forensic analyses. High-throughput next generation sequencers have fostered new cutting-edge computing techniques for genome-scale analyses, and cross-genome comparisons have facilitated the efficient identification of polymorphic STR markers for various applications. Results An automated and efficient system for detecting human polymorphic STRs at the genome scale is proposed in this study. Assembled contigs from next generation sequencing data were aligned and calibrated according to selected reference sequences. To verify identified polymorphic STRs, human genomes from the 1000 Genomes Project were employed for comprehensive analyses, and STR markers from the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) and disease-related STR motifs were also applied as cases for evaluation. In addition, we analyzed STR variations for highly conserved homologous genes and human-unique genes. In total 477 polymorphic STRs were identified from 492 human-unique genes, among which 26 STRs were retrieved and clustered into three different groups for efficient comparison. Conclusions We have developed an online system that efficiently identifies polymorphic STRs and provides novel distinguishable STR biomarkers for different levels of specificity. Candidate polymorphic STRs within a personal genome could be easily retrieved and compared to the constructed STR profile through query keywords, gene names, or assembled contigs. PMID:25560225

  5. Color polymorphism in an aphid is maintained by attending ants

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Saori; Murakami, Taiga; Yoshimura, Jin; Hasegawa, Eisuke

    2016-01-01

    The study of polymorphisms is particularly informative for enhancing our understanding of phenotypic and genetic diversity. The persistence of polymorphism in a population is generally explained by balancing selection. Color polymorphisms that are often found in many insects and arthropods are prime examples of the maintenance of polymorphisms via balancing selection. In some aphids, color morphs are maintained through frequency-dependent predation by two predatory insects. However, the presence of color polymorphism in ant-attended aphids cannot be explained by traditional balancing selection because these aphids are free from predation. We examined the selective advantages of the existence of two color (red and green) morphs in the ant-attended aphid, Macrosiphoniella yomogicola, in fields. We measured the degree of ant attendance on aphid colonies with different proportions of color morphs. The results show that the ants strongly favor aphid colonies with intermediate proportions of the two color morphs. The relationship between the degree of ant attendance and the proportion of color morphs in the field is convex when aphid colony size and ant colony size are controlled. This function has a peak of approximately 65% of green morphs in a colony. This system represents the first case of a balancing polymorphism that is not maintained by opposing factors but by a symbiotic relationship. PMID:27617289

  6. Epitaxial stabilization and phase instability of VO2 polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Keum, Jong K.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-01-01

    The VO2 polymorphs, i.e., VO2(A), VO2(B), VO2(M1) and VO2(R), have a wide spectrum of functionalities useful for many potential applications in information and energy technologies. However, synthesis of phase pure materials, especially in thin film forms, has been a challenging task due to the fact that the VO2 polymorphs are closely related to each other in a thermodynamic framework. Here, we report epitaxial stabilization of the VO2 polymorphs to synthesize high quality single crystalline thin films and study the phase stability of these metastable materials. We selectively deposit all the phases on various perovskite substrates with different crystallographic orientations. By investigating the phase instability, phonon modes and transport behaviours, not only do we find distinctively contrasting physical properties of the VO2 polymorphs, but that the polymorphs can be on the verge of phase transitions when heated as low as ~400 °C. Our successful epitaxy of both VO2(A) and VO2(B) phases, which are rarely studied due to the lack of phase pure materials, will open the door to the fundamental studies of VO2 polymorphs for potential applications in advanced electronic and energy devices.

  7. Epitaxial stabilization and phase instability of VO2 polymorphs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Keum, Jong K.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-01-01

    The VO2 polymorphs, i.e., VO2(A), VO2(B), VO2(M1) and VO2(R), have a wide spectrum of functionalities useful for many potential applications in information and energy technologies. However, synthesis of phase pure materials, especially in thin film forms, has been a challenging task due to the fact that the VO2 polymorphs are closely related to each other in a thermodynamic framework. Here, we report epitaxial stabilization of the VO2 polymorphs to synthesize high quality single crystalline thin films and study the phase stability of these metastable materials. We selectively deposit all the phases on various perovskite substrates with different crystallographic orientations. By investigating the phase instability, phonon modes and transport behaviours, not only do we find distinctively contrasting physical properties of the VO2 polymorphs, but that the polymorphs can be on the verge of phase transitions when heated as low as ~400 °C. Our successful epitaxy of both VO2(A) and VO2(B) phases, which are rarely studied due to the lack of phase pure materials, will open the door to the fundamental studies of VO2 polymorphs for potential applications in advanced electronic and energy devices. PMID:26787259

  8. Epitaxial stabilization and phase instability of VO2 polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Ivanov, Ilia N; Keum, Jong K; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-01-01

    The VO2 polymorphs, i.e., VO2(A), VO2(B), VO2(M1) and VO2(R), have a wide spectrum of functionalities useful for many potential applications in information and energy technologies. However, synthesis of phase pure materials, especially in thin film forms, has been a challenging task due to the fact that the VO2 polymorphs are closely related to each other in a thermodynamic framework. Here, we report epitaxial stabilization of the VO2 polymorphs to synthesize high quality single crystalline thin films and study the phase stability of these metastable materials. We selectively deposit all the phases on various perovskite substrates with different crystallographic orientations. By investigating the phase instability, phonon modes and transport behaviours, not only do we find distinctively contrasting physical properties of the VO2 polymorphs, but that the polymorphs can be on the verge of phase transitions when heated as low as ~400 °C. Our successful epitaxy of both VO2(A) and VO2(B) phases, which are rarely studied due to the lack of phase pure materials, will open the door to the fundamental studies of VO2 polymorphs for potential applications in advanced electronic and energy devices. PMID:26787259

  9. Color polymorphism in an aphid is maintained by attending ants.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Saori; Murakami, Taiga; Yoshimura, Jin; Hasegawa, Eisuke

    2016-09-01

    The study of polymorphisms is particularly informative for enhancing our understanding of phenotypic and genetic diversity. The persistence of polymorphism in a population is generally explained by balancing selection. Color polymorphisms that are often found in many insects and arthropods are prime examples of the maintenance of polymorphisms via balancing selection. In some aphids, color morphs are maintained through frequency-dependent predation by two predatory insects. However, the presence of color polymorphism in ant-attended aphids cannot be explained by traditional balancing selection because these aphids are free from predation. We examined the selective advantages of the existence of two color (red and green) morphs in the ant-attended aphid, Macrosiphoniella yomogicola, in fields. We measured the degree of ant attendance on aphid colonies with different proportions of color morphs. The results show that the ants strongly favor aphid colonies with intermediate proportions of the two color morphs. The relationship between the degree of ant attendance and the proportion of color morphs in the field is convex when aphid colony size and ant colony size are controlled. This function has a peak of approximately 65% of green morphs in a colony. This system represents the first case of a balancing polymorphism that is not maintained by opposing factors but by a symbiotic relationship. PMID:27617289

  10. Surveying expression level polymorphism and single-feature polymorphism in near-isogenic wheat lines differing for the Yr5 stripe rust resistance locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA polymorphisms are valuable for several applications including genotyping, molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection. The Affymetrix Wheat GeneChip was used to survey expression level polymorphisms (ELPs) and single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) between two near-isogenic wheat genotypes (BC7...

  11. Surveying expression level polymorphism and single-feature polymorphism in near-isogenic wheat lines differing for the Yr5 stripe rust resistance locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA polymorphisms are valuable for several applications including genotyping, molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection. The Affymetrix Wheat GeneChip was used to survey expression level polymorphisms (ELPs) and single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) between two near-isogenic wheat genotypes (BC...

  12. Gene Polymorphism Studies in a Teaching Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, Jeffry

    2009-02-01

    I present a laboratory procedure for illustrating transcription, post-transcriptional modification, gene conservation, and comparative genetics for use in undergraduate biology education. Students are individually assigned genes in a targeted biochemical pathway, for which they design and test polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. In this example, students used genes annotated for the steroid biosynthesis pathway in soybean. The authoritative Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) interactive database and other online resources were used to design primers based first on soybean expressed sequence tags (ESTs), then on ESTs from an alternate organism if soybean sequence was unavailable. Students designed a total of 50 gene-based primer pairs (37 soybean, 13 alternative) and tested these for polymorphism state and similarity between two soybean and two pea lines. Student assessment was based on acquisition of laboratory skills and successful project completion. This simple procedure illustrates conservation of genes and is not limited to soybean or pea. Cost per student estimates are included, along with a detailed protocol and flow diagram of the procedure.

  13. Insertional Polymorphisms of Endogenous Feline Leukemia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Alfred L.; Nash, William G.; Menninger, Joan C.; Murphy, William J.; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    The number, chromosomal distribution, and insertional polymorphisms of endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) were determined in four domestic cats (Burmese, Egyptian Mau, Persian, and nonbreed) using fluorescent in situ hybridization and radiation hybrid mapping. Twenty-nine distinct enFeLV loci were detected across 12 of the 18 autosomes. Each cat carried enFeLV at only 9 to 16 of the loci, and many loci were heterozygous for presence of the provirus. Thus, an average of 19 autosomal copies of enFeLV were present per cat diploid genome. Only five of the autosomal enFeLV sites were present in all four cats, and at only one autosomal locus, B4q15, was enFeLV present in both homologues of all four cats. A single enFeLV occurred in the X chromosome of the Burmese cat, while three to five enFeLV proviruses occurred in each Y chromosome. The X chromosome and nine autosomal enFeLV loci were telomeric, suggesting that ectopic recombination between nonhomologous subtelomeres may contribute to enFeLV distribution. Since endogenous FeLVs may affect the infectiousness or pathogenicity of exogenous FeLVs, genomic variation in enFeLVs represents a candidate for genetic influences on FeLV leukemogenesis in cats. PMID:15767400

  14. Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism in Tuberculosis Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naserpour Farivar, Taghi; Sharifi Moud, Batool; Sargazi, Mansur; Moeenrezakhanlou, Alireza

    In this study, we aimed to determine the significance of association between Tuberculosis and apolipoprotein E polymorphism. The apolipoprotein E genotypes were assayed in 250 tuberculosis patients by polymerase chain reaction followed by enzymatic digestion with Hha I. The results were compared with the results of the same experiments on 250 sex and age matched control peoples. Present results showed that in studied populations, prevalence of E4 genotype was lower in controls than in patients (8 v. 13.2%; OR = 1.75, p<0.05) and prevalence of E3 genotype was high in controls than in patients (86 v.51%; OR = 0.17, p<0.05). Statistically significant difference was found between patients and controls with respect to ɛ2 allele frequencies, while ɛ2 allele frequency was found to be much less prevalent in controls (6%) than in patients (35.8%; OR = 8.72, p<0.05). Also, our study revealed that there is an association between apolipoprotein E genotypes and amplitude to tuberculosis in studied populations. However, large population-based studies are needed to understand the exact role played by the locus in causing the condition.

  15. Serum protein polymorphism in Bali (Indonesia).

    PubMed

    Constans, J; Gouaillard, C; Breguet, G

    1986-01-01

    Serum samples from Bali, obtained in three different ethnic groups and in one isolated village were tested by isoelectric focusing electrophoresis for Gc, Pi, Tf and Hp subtyping. In addition to the three common alleles Gc1F, Gc1S and Gc2, two variants Gc1A1 and Gc1A8 were observed. In the Pi system, five alleles were present: PiM1, PiM2, PiM3, PiM4 and PiX. The Tf variability was exceptional with the presence of eight alleles: TfB1, TfC1, TfC2, TfC3, TfC4, TfC8, TfD1 and TfDchi. For Hp, there were two common alleles Hp1S and Hp1FS and two rare ones: Hp1F and Hp2SS. As expected, the genetic polymorphism is reduced in the isolated community. The anthropological significance of these genetic data is discussed. PMID:3493727

  16. Polymorphic Admixture Typing in Human Ethnic Populations

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Michael; Stephens, J. Claiborne; Winkler, Cheryl; Lomb, Deborah A.; Ramsburg, Mark; Boaze, Raleigh; Stewart, Claudia; Charbonneau, Lauren; Goldman, David; Albaugh, Bernard J.; Goedert, James J.; Beasley, R. Palmer; Hwang, Lu-Yu; Buchbinder, Susan; Weedon, Michael; Johnson, Patricia A.; Eichelberger, Mary; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    A panel of 257 RFLP loci was selected on the basis of high heterozygosity in Caucasian DNA surveys and equivalent spacing throughout the human genome. Probes from each locus were used in a Southern blot survey of allele frequency distribution for four human ethnic groups: Caucasian, African American, Asian (Chinese), and American Indian (Cheyenne). Nearly all RFLP loci were polymorphic in each group, albeit with a broad range of differing allele frequencies (δ). The distribution of frequency differences (δ values) was used for three purposes: (1) to provide estimates for genetic distance (differentiation) among these ethnic groups, (2) to revisit with a large data set the proportion of human genetic variation attributable to differentiation within ethnic groups, and (3) to identify loci with high δ values between recently admixed populations of use in mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium (MALD). Although most markers display significant allele frequency differences between ethnic groups, the overall genetic distances between ethnic groups were small (.066–.098), and <10% of the measured overall molecular genetic diversity in these human samples can be attributed to “racial” differentiation. The median δ values for pairwise comparisons between groups fell between .15 and .20, permitting identification of highly informative RFLP loci for MALD disease association studies. PMID:7942857

  17. Dispersal Polymorphisms in Invasive Fire Ants.

    PubMed

    Helms, Jackson A; Godfrey, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    In the Found or Fly (FoF) hypothesis ant queens experience reproduction-dispersal tradeoffs such that queens with heavier abdomens are better at founding colonies but are worse flyers. We tested predictions of FoF in two globally invasive fire ants, Solenopsis geminata (Fabricius, 1804) and S. invicta (Buren, 1972). Colonies of these species may produce two different monogyne queen types-claustral queens with heavy abdomens that found colonies independently, and parasitic queens with small abdomens that enter conspecific nests. Claustral and parasitic queens were similarly sized, but the abdomens of claustral queens weighed twice as much as those of their parasitic counterparts. Their heavier abdomens adversely impacted morphological predictors of flight ability, resulting in 32-38% lower flight muscle ratios, 55-63% higher wing loading, and 32-33% higher abdomen drag. In lab experiments maximum flight durations in claustral S. invicta queens decreased by about 18 minutes for every milligram of abdomen mass. Combining our results into a simple fitness tradeoff model, we calculated that an average parasitic S. invicta queen could produce only 1/3 as many worker offspring as a claustral queen, but could fly 4 times as long and have a 17- to 36-fold larger potential colonization area. Investigations of dispersal polymorphisms and their associated tradeoffs promises to shed light on range expansions in invasive species, the evolution of alternative reproductive strategies, and the selective forces driving the recurrent evolution of parasitism in ants. PMID:27082115

  18. Genetic polymorphisms and esophageal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Toru; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Tanaka, Shinji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2007-10-15

    The aim of this paper is to review and evaluate, in a comprehensive manner, the published data regarding the contribution of genetic polymorphisms to risk of esophageal cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma, in humans. All relevant studies available in MEDLINE and published before February 2007 were identified. Studies carried out in humans and that compared esophageal cancer patients with at least 1 standard control group were considered for analysis. One-hundred studies and 3 meta-analyses were identified. Eighty (80%) studies were conducted in Asian countries, particularly China including Taiwan (60 (60%) studies). The most intensively examined genes were those encoding carcinogen metabolic enzymes. The most widely studied gene was GSTM1 (15 studies), followed by ALDH2 (11 studies). ALDH2, MTHFR C677T, CYP1A1 Ile/Val, CYP1A1MspI, CYP2E1, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 were examined by meta-analyses and significant relations were found between ALDH2*1*2 and the CYP1A1 Val allele and increased risk of esophageal cancer. In addition, increased risk of esophageal SCC was consistently associated with the ADH2*1*2 and the p53 codon 72 Pro/Pro genotypes. Cohort studies that simultaneously consider multiple genetic and environmental factors possibly involved in esophageal carcinogenesis are needed to ascertain not only the relative contribution of these factors to tumor development but also the contributions of their putative interactions. PMID:17674367

  19. Epitaxial Retrieval of a Disappearing Polymorph

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recrystallization of [PdCl2([9]aneS2O)] ([9]aneS2O = 1-oxa-4,7-dithiacyclononane), 1, and [PtCl2([9]aneS2O)], 2, by diffusion of Et2O vapor into solutions of the complexes in MeNO2 yielded three phases of 1 and two phases of 2. The known phase of 1, herein designated α-1, was obtained under ambient conditions. A second phase, designated β-1, was initially also obtained by this method; however, following the advent of a third phase, γ-1, all subsequent efforts over a period of a year to crystallize β-1 yielded either γ-1, obtained by carrying out the recrystallization at elevated temperature, or α-1, commonly found throughout the study. This persistent absence of a phase which could initially be crystallized with ease led us to the conclusion that β-1 was an example of a “disappearing polymorph”. The first phase obtained of 2, designated α-2, was obtained by recrystallization under ambient conditions and is isomorphous and isostructural with α-1. The second phase β-2 was obtained by slight elevation of the recrystallization temperature and was found to be isomorphous and isostructural with β-1. Subsequently, β-2 was used to seed the growth of the disappearing polymorph β-1. No third phase of 2 (γ-2) has been isolated thus far. PMID:25598741

  20. Evaluation of the compaction of sulfathiazole polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Picker-Freyer, Katharina Maria; Liao, Xiangmin; Zhang, Guifang; Wiedmann, Timothy Scott

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to relate the tableting performance assessed by an instrumented tableting machine to the mechanical properties measured by nanoindentation. Three different polymorphic forms of sulfathiazole were prepared by recrystallization, and the density and X-ray powder diffraction patterns were measured and compared with theoretical density and simulated powder patterns, respectively. Tablets were prepared using a series of applied pressures, and the results were subjected to energy analysis, three dimensional (3D) modeling, and the traditional Heckel analysis. With these approaches, form I was found to be consistently the most brittle material, but the subtle differences between forms II and III were only revealed by 3D modeling. The rank order of the crushing force was found to be I is congruent to II < III. From nanoindentation, form III was found to be much harder than forms I and II, and III also had a much higher Young's modulus. The energy calculations of the nanoindentation curves showed that form III was distinct from forms I and II, which is consistent with the presence of slip planes that are only present in form III. However, in this system, there was little correspondence between the macroscopic and microscopic measurements, and thus particle-particle interactions may to be of paramount importance. PMID:17565752

  1. Long, polymorphic microsatellites in simple organisms.

    PubMed

    Field, D; Wills, C

    1996-02-22

    We have examined the phylogenetic distribution of the longest, perfect microsatellites in GenBank. Despite the large contributions of model higher-eukaryotic organisms to GenBank, the selective cloning of long microsatellites from these organisms as genetic markers, and the relative lack of concentration on the microsatellites in lower eukaryotes and prokaryotes, we found that simple organisms, defined here as slime molds, fungi, protists, prokaryotes, viruses, organelles and plasmids, contributed 78 of the 375 examined sequences. These 78 simple-organism microsatellites are characterized predominantly by trinucleotide repeats, nearly half of which lie in exons, and in general show a bias towards A+T rich motifs. Simple-organism microsatellites represented more than once in GenBank displayed length polymorphisms when independent clones were compared. These facts collectively raise speculation as to the role of these 'junk' sequences in such highly economical genomes, especially when precise changes in long microsatellites are known to regulate critical virulence factors in several prokaryotes. Regardless of their biological significance, simple-organism microsatellites may provide a general source of molecular markers to track disease outbreaks and the evolution of microorganisms in unprecedented detail. PMID:8728984

  2. Lactotransferrin Gene Polymorphism Associated with Caries Experience.

    PubMed

    Doetzer, Andrea D; Brancher, João A; Pecharki, Giovana D; Schlipf, Nina; Werneck, Renata; Mira, Marcelo T; Riess, Olaf; Bauer, Peter; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a common multifactorial disease, resulting from the interaction of biofilm, cariogenic diet and host response over time. Lactotransferrin (LTF) is a main salivary glycoprotein, which modulates the host immune-inflammatory and antibacterial response. Although a genetic component for caries outcome has been identified, little is known over the genetic aspects underlying its susceptibility. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between LTF polymorphisms and caries susceptibility. Six hundred seventy seven 12-year-old students were selected: 346 with (DMFT ≥ 1) and 331 without caries experience (DMFT = 0). Also, individuals concentrating higher levels of disease (polarization group, DMFT ≥ 2, n = 253) were tested against those with DMFT ≤ 1 (n = 424). Along with clinical parameters, three representative LTF tag SNPs (rs6441989, rs2073495, rs11716497) were genotyped and the results were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Allele A for tag SNP rs6441989 was found to be significantly less frequent in the polarization group, conferring a protective effect against caries experience [AA + AG × GG (OR: 0.710, 95% CI: 0.514-0.980, p = 0.045)], and remained significantly associated with caries protection in the presence of gingivitis (p = 0.020) and plaque (p = 0.035). These results might contribute to the understanding of the genetic control of caries susceptibility in humans. PMID:25998152

  3. [Genomic medicine. Polymorphisms and microarray applications].

    PubMed

    Spalvieri, Mónica P; Rotenberg, Rosa G

    2004-01-01

    This update shows new concepts related to the significance of DNA variations among individuals, as well as to their detection by using a new technology. The sequencing of the human genome is only the beginning of what will enable us to understand genetic diversity. The unit of DNA variability is the polymorphism of a single nucleotide (SNP). At present, studies on SNPs are restricted to basic research but the large number of papers on this subject makes feasible their entrance into clinical practice. We illustrate here the use of SNPs as molecular markers in ethnical genotyping, gene expression in some diseases and as potential targets in pharmacological response, and also introduce the technology of arrays. Microarrays experiments allow the quantification and comparison of gene expression on a large scale, at the same time, by using special chips and array designs. Conventional methods provide data from up to 20 genes, while a single microarray may provide information about thousands of them simultaneously, leading to a more rapid and accurate genotyping. Biotechnology improvements will facilitate our knowledge of each gene sequence, the frequency and exact location of SNPs and their influence on cellular behavior. Although experimental efficiency and validity of results from microarrays are still controversial, the knowledge and characterization of a patient's genetic profile will lead, undoubtedly, to advances in prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of human diseases. PMID:15637833

  4. Dispersal Polymorphisms in Invasive Fire Ants

    PubMed Central

    Helms, Jackson A.; Godfrey, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    In the Found or Fly (FoF) hypothesis ant queens experience reproduction-dispersal tradeoffs such that queens with heavier abdomens are better at founding colonies but are worse flyers. We tested predictions of FoF in two globally invasive fire ants, Solenopsis geminata (Fabricius, 1804) and S. invicta (Buren, 1972). Colonies of these species may produce two different monogyne queen types—claustral queens with heavy abdomens that found colonies independently, and parasitic queens with small abdomens that enter conspecific nests. Claustral and parasitic queens were similarly sized, but the abdomens of claustral queens weighed twice as much as those of their parasitic counterparts. Their heavier abdomens adversely impacted morphological predictors of flight ability, resulting in 32–38% lower flight muscle ratios, 55–63% higher wing loading, and 32–33% higher abdomen drag. In lab experiments maximum flight durations in claustral S. invicta queens decreased by about 18 minutes for every milligram of abdomen mass. Combining our results into a simple fitness tradeoff model, we calculated that an average parasitic S. invicta queen could produce only 1/3 as many worker offspring as a claustral queen, but could fly 4 times as long and have a 17- to 36-fold larger potential colonization area. Investigations of dispersal polymorphisms and their associated tradeoffs promises to shed light on range expansions in invasive species, the evolution of alternative reproductive strategies, and the selective forces driving the recurrent evolution of parasitism in ants. PMID:27082115

  5. MTHFR genetic polymorphism increases the risk of preterm delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yanrong; Li, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to investigate the association between the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and premature delivery susceptibility. Methods: With matched age and gender, 108 premature delivery pregnant women as cases and 108 healthy pregnant women as controls were recruited in this case-control study. The cases and controls had same gestational weeks. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was adopted to analyze C677T and A1298C polymorphisms of the participants. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype analysis were conducted by Haploview software. The differences for frequencies of gene type, allele and haplotypes in cases and controls were tested by chi-square test. The relevant risk of premature delivery was represented by odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results: TT gene type frequency of C677T polymorphsim was higher in cases than the controls (P=0.004, OR=3.077, 95% CI=1.469-6.447), so was allele T (P=0.002, OR=1.853, 95% CI=1.265-2.716). Whereas, CC gene type of A1298C polymorphism had a lower distribution in cases than the controls (P=0.008, OR=0.095, 95% CI=0.012-0.775), so was allele C (P=0.047, OR=0.610, 95% CI=0.384-0.970). Haplotype analysis and linkage disequilibrium test conducted on the alleles of two polymorphisms in MTHFR gene, we discovered that haplotype T-A had a higher distribution in cases, which indicated that susceptible haplotype T-A was the candidate factor for premature delivery. Conclusions: Gene type TT of MTHFR C677T polymorphism might make premature delivery risk rise while gene type CC of A1298C polymorphism might have protective influence on premature delivery. PMID:26261642

  6. Association between HRH4 polymorphisms and ankylosing spondylitis susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Bo; Wang, Yongcheng; Zhang, Yonggang; Mao, Keya; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Target: The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between the histamine H4 receptor (HRH4) polymorphisms and the susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was used to analyze the HRH4 rs8088140 and rs657132 polymorphisms. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analyses were conducted with Haploview software. The genotypes distributions of HRH4 polymorphisms in the control group were tested by Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies between the cases and control groups were compared by χ2 test. The controls were matched with cases by age and gender. The relative risk of AS with HRH4 polymorphisms was represented by odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) calculated by χ2 test. Results: The genotypes distributions of HRH4 rs8088140, rs657132 polymorphisms in controls conformed to HWE. The frequency of rs657132 AA genotype in the case group was obviously higher than that in the control group (P=0.040), and so was the A allele (OR=2.572, 95% CI=1.475-4.486, P=0.022). The frequency differences of A-A haplotype between two groups had statistical significance (P=0.011, OR=2.071, 95% CI=1.172-3.660) through haplotype analysis, indicating A-A might be the susceptible haplotype to AS. Conclusion: The AA genotypes of HRH4 rs657132 polymorphism may be the susceptible factors for AS, and rs657132 plays a role in generation of AS. In addition, A-A haplotype in rs8088140-rs657132 is also increased the risk of AS. PMID:26823878

  7. Polymorphism of human cytochrome P-450.

    PubMed

    Guengerich, F P; Umbenhauer, D R; Churchill, P F; Beaune, P H; Böcker, R; Knodell, R G; Martin, M V; Lloyd, R S

    1987-03-01

    The cytochrome P-450 forms involved in debrisoquine 4-hydroxylation (P-450DB), phenacetin O-deethylation (P-450PA), S-mephenytoin 4-hydroxylation (P-450MP), and nifedipine 1,4-oxidation (P-450NF) have been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from human liver microsomes. All of these reactions show in vivo polymorphism in humans. Evidence for the roles of the purified proteins in these processes comes from in vitro reconstitution and immunoinhibition studies. The rat orthologs of these enzymes are as follows--P-450DB: P-450UT-H; P-450PA: P-450ISF-G; P-450MP: P-450UT-I; P-450NF: P-450PCN-E. Only in the case of P-450UT-H is the primary rat ortholog the same cytochrome P-450 which catalyses the catalytic reaction under consideration. Reconstitution and immunochemical studies establish that the following reactions are catalysed by the individual P-450s--P-450DB: debrisoquine 4-hydroxylation, sparteine delta 5-oxidation, bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation, encainide O-demethylation, and propanolol 4-hydroxylation; P-450PA: phenacetin O-deethylation; P-450MP: S-mephenytoin 4-hydroxylation and tolbutamide methyl hydroxylation; P-450NF: oxidation of nifedipine and 16 other substituted dihydropyridines, estradiol 2- and 4-hydroxylation, aldrin epoxidation, benzphetamine N-demethylation and 6 beta-hydroxylation of testosterone, androstenedione and cortisol. A cDNA clone has been isolated that corresponds to rat P-450UT-H, as shown by a number of criteria. Studies with this probe establish that the sex and strain variation in debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase and related activities is related to differences in the levels of a 2.0 kb length mRNA present.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3577206

  8. Human enamel thickness and ENAM polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Daubert, Diane M; Kelley, Joanna L; Udod, Yuriy G; Habor, Carolina; Kleist, Chris G; Furman, Ilona K; Tikonov, Igor N; Swanson, Willie J; Roberts, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    The tooth enamel development gene, enamelin (ENAM), showed evidence of positive selection during a genome-wide scan of human and primate DNA for signs of adaptive evolution. The current study examined the hypothesis that a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) C14625T (rs7671281) in the ENAM gene identified in the genome-wide scan is associated with a change in enamel phenotype. African Americans were selected as the target population, as they have been reported to have a target SNP frequency of approximately 50%, whereas non-Africans are predicted to have a 96% SNP frequency. Digital radiographs and DNA samples from 244 teeth in 133 subjects were analysed, and enamel thickness was assessed in relation to SNP status, controlling for age, sex, tooth number and crown length. Crown length was found to increase with molar number, and females were found to have thicker enamel. Teeth with larger crowns also had thicker enamel, and older subjects had thinner enamel. Linear regression and generalized estimating equations were used to investigate the relationship between enamel thickness of the mandibular molars and ENAM SNP status; enamel in subjects with the derived allele was significantly thinner (P=0.040) when the results were controlled for sex, age, tooth number and crown length. The derived allele demonstrated a recessive effect on the phenotype. The data indicate that thinner dental enamel is associated with the derived ENAM genotype. This is the first direct evidence of a dental gene implicated in human adaptive evolution as having a phenotypic effect on an oral structure. PMID:27357321

  9. Polymorphisms of the chicken antiviral MX gene.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T

    2007-01-01

    The Mx gene was originally found in laboratory mice in an infection experiment using influenza virus (Lindermann, 1962). Almost all of the mouse strains in that experiment died from the infection, and only the A2G strain had resistance to the virus. This resistant character was shown to be inherited as a single autosomal dominant trait (Lindermann et al., 1963; Lindermann, 1964; Haller et al., 1979). A congenic mouse strain was established by introducing the Mx+ allele of the A2G resistant strain into the Mx- sensitive inbred strain BALB/c (Staeheli et al., 1984). By immunizing parental BALB/c mice with extracts of interferon (IFN)-treated cultured cells from congenic BALB/c-Mx+ mice, a specific antibody against Mx protein was obtained (Horisberger et al., 1983; Staeheli et al., 1985). The Mx protein was detected in the nucleus of IFN-alpha/beta-treated mouse cells by immunofluorescence using the anti-Mx antibody (Dreiding et al., 1985). Thereafter, by using the antibody as an indicator, cDNA encoding the Mx protein was cloned from a cDNA library constructed from IFN-treated cells of congenic BALB/c-Mx+ mice (Staeheli et al., 1986a). IFN-treated Mx+ mouse cells contained a 3.5-kb Mx mRNA in the Northern blot, while Mx- cells failed to express the transcript. The functional Mx+ gene from an A2G mouse was found to contain 14 exons and encode 631 amino acids. The Mx- allelic mouse strains were found to be missing sequence of exons 9 through 11 or to contain a point mutation that converts lysine at position 389 to a stop codon (Staeheli et al., 1988). If these polymorphisms of the Mx gene could be detected in domestic animals, it would be possible to produce breeds that show resistance to infectious diseases. PMID:17675880

  10. The polymorphisms of the chromatin fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulé, Jean-Baptiste; Mozziconacci, Julien; Lavelle, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the genome is packed into chromosomes, each consisting of large polymeric fibers made of DNA bound with proteins (mainly histones) and RNA molecules. The nature and precise 3D organization of this fiber has been a matter of intense speculations and debates. In the emerging picture, the local chromatin state plays a critical role in all fundamental DNA transactions, such as transcriptional control, DNA replication or repair. However, the molecular and structural mechanisms involved remain elusive. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the tremendous efforts that have been made for almost 40 years to build physiologically relevant models of chromatin structure. The motivation behind building such models was to shift our representation and understanding of DNA transactions from a too simplistic ‘naked DNA’ view to a more realistic ‘coated DNA’ view, as a step towards a better framework in which to interpret mechanistically the control of genetic expression and other DNA metabolic processes. The field has evolved from a speculative point of view towards in vitro biochemistry and in silico modeling, but is still longing for experimental in vivo validations of the proposed structures or even proof of concept experiments demonstrating a clear role of a given structure in a metabolic transaction. The mere existence of a chromatin fiber as a relevant biological entity in vivo has been put into serious questioning. Current research is suggesting a possible reconciliation between theoretical studies and experiments, pointing towards a view where the polymorphic and dynamic nature of the chromatin fiber is essential to support its function in genome metabolism.

  11. Human enamel thickness and ENAM polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Daubert, Diane M; Kelley, Joanna L; Udod, Yuriy G; Habor, Carolina; Kleist, Chris G; Furman, Ilona K; Tikonov, Igor N; Swanson, Willie J; Roberts, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    The tooth enamel development gene, enamelin (ENAM), showed evidence of positive selection during a genome-wide scan of human and primate DNA for signs of adaptive evolution. The current study examined the hypothesis that a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) C14625T (rs7671281) in the ENAM gene identified in the genome-wide scan is associated with a change in enamel phenotype. African Americans were selected as the target population, as they have been reported to have a target SNP frequency of approximately 50%, whereas non-Africans are predicted to have a 96% SNP frequency. Digital radiographs and DNA samples from 244 teeth in 133 subjects were analysed, and enamel thickness was assessed in relation to SNP status, controlling for age, sex, tooth number and crown length. Crown length was found to increase with molar number, and females were found to have thicker enamel. Teeth with larger crowns also had thicker enamel, and older subjects had thinner enamel. Linear regression and generalized estimating equations were used to investigate the relationship between enamel thickness of the mandibular molars and ENAM SNP status; enamel in subjects with the derived allele was significantly thinner (P=0.040) when the results were controlled for sex, age, tooth number and crown length. The derived allele demonstrated a recessive effect on the phenotype. The data indicate that thinner dental enamel is associated with the derived ENAM genotype. This is the first direct evidence of a dental gene implicated in human adaptive evolution as having a phenotypic effect on an oral structure. PMID:27357321

  12. Chromosomal Polymorphisms Involved in Reproductive Failure in the Romanian Population

    PubMed Central

    Mierla, D; Stoian, V

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetic heteromorphisms are described as variations at specific chromosomal regions with no impact on phenotype. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of these chromosomal polymorphisms involved in reproductive failure in the Romanian population. One thousand eight hundred and nine infertile patients, who were referred to Life Memorial Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, between January 2008 and April 2011, were investigated in this retrospective study. The frequency of chromosomal polymorphic variations was calculated for these patients. The control group is represented by 1116 fetuses investigated by amniocentesis between January 2009 and April 2011. In this study 122 (6.74%) infertile patients and 63 fetuses (5.65%) showed chromosomal polymorphic variations. The differences between the two groups was not statistically significant (p <0.242) but there was statistical significance for some specific chromosomal polymorphisms [inv(9),1qh+, 9qh+, fra(17)]. Some chromosomal polymorphic variations appear to be associated with reproductive failure. The statistically significantly higher incidence of heterochromatic variations found in infertile individuals emphasizes the need to assess their role in infertility and subfertility. PMID:24052728

  13. Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Demin; Jing, Lei; Zhang, Suzhan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective was to perform a meta-analysis to summarize the available evidence from prospective nested case-control studies on the association of vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphism and the risk of breast cancer. We searched PubMed, ISI web of science, EMBASE, and reference lists for included articles. Study specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled by using fixed-effect or random-effects models. Eight studies were included in the meta-analysis. There were no association between Fok1 gene allele contrast f versus F (OR: 0.859; 95%CI: 0.685–1.079), ff versus FF (OR: 0.893; 95%CI: 0.763–1.045), recessive models ff versus FF+Ff (OR: 0.932; 95%CI: 0.796–1.092), and dominant models ff+Ff versus FF (OR: 0.899; 95%CI: 0.780–1.037). The estimated VDR polymorphism showed no significant association between Bsm1, Taq1, Apa1 polymorphism, and breast cancer risk. In the Caucasian ethnic subgroup, no association was found between allele contrast, recessive models, and dominant models on Fok1, Bsm1 polymorphism, and breast cancer risk. VDR polymorphism (Fok1, Bsm1, Taq1, and Apa1) were not associated with the risk of breast cancer in the general population as well as Caucasian population. PMID:27149457

  14. Turner syndrome and genetic polymorphism: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    de Marqui, Alessandra Bernadete Trovó

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present the main results of the literature on genetic polymorphisms in Turner syndrome and their association with the clinical signs and the etiology of this chromosomal disorder. Data sources: The review was conducted in the PubMed database without any time limit, using the terms Turner syndrome and genetic polymorphism. A total of 116 articles were found, and based on the established inclusion and exclusion criteria 17 were selected for the review. Data synthesis: The polymorphisms investigated in patients with Turner syndrome were associated with growth deficit, causing short stature, low bone mineral density, autoimmunity and cardiac abnormalities, which are frequently found in patients with Turner syndrome. The role of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the etiology of Turner syndrome, i.e., in chromosomal nondisjunction, was also confirmed. Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms appear to be associated with Turner syndrome. However, in view of the small number of published studies and their contradictory findings, further studies in different populations are needed in order to clarify the role of genetic variants in the clinical signs and etiology of the Turner syndrome. PMID:25765448

  15. Association of TNF, MBL, and VDR Polymorphisms with Leprosy Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Bishwa R.; Macdonald, Murdo; Berrington, William R.; Misch, E. Ann; Ranjit, Chaman; Siddiqui, M. Ruby; Kaplan, Gilla; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although genetic variants in tumor necrosis factor (TNF), mannose binding lectin (MBL), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) have been associated with leprosy clinical outcomes these findings have not been extensively validated. Methods We used a case-control study design with 933 patients in Nepal, which included 240 patients with type I reversal reaction (RR), and 124 patients with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) reactions. We compared genotype frequencies in 933 cases and 101 controls of 7 polymorphisms, including a promoter region variant in TNF (G−308A), three polymorphisms in MBL (C154T, G161A and G170A), and three variants in VDR (FokI, BsmI, and TaqI). Results We observed an association between TNF −308A and protection from leprosy with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.52 (95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.29 to 0.95, P = 0.016). MBL polymorphism G161A was associated with protection from lepromatous leprosy (OR (95% CI) = 0.33 (0.12–0.85), P = 0.010). VDR polymorphisms were not associated with leprosy phenotypes. Conclusion These results confirm previous findings of an association of TNF −308A with protection from leprosy and MBL polymorphisms with protection from lepromatous leprosy. The statistical significance was modest and will require further study for conclusive validation. PMID:20650301

  16. Excess polymorphism at the Adh locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, M E; Aguadé, M

    1986-09-01

    The evolutionary history of a region of DNA encompassing the Adh locus is studied by comparing patterns of variation in Drosophila melanogaster and its sibling species, D. simulans. An unexpectedly high level of silent polymorphism in the Adh coding region relative to the 5' and 3' flanking regions in D. melanogaster is revealed by a populational survey of restriction polymorphism using a four-cutter filter hybridization technique as well as by direct sequence comparisons. In both of these studies, a region of the Adh gene encompassing the three coding exons exhibits a frequency of polymorphism equal to that of a 4-kb 5' flanking region. In contrast, an interspecific sequence comparison shows a two-fold higher level of divergence in the 5' flanking sequence compared to the structural locus. Analysis of the patterns of variation suggest an excess of polymorphism within the D. melanogaster Adh locus, rather than lack of polymorphism in the 5' flanking region. An approach is outlined for testing neutral theory predictions about patterns of variation within and between species. This approach indicates that the observed patterns of variation are incompatible with an infinite site neutral model. PMID:3021568

  17. Association of TNF, MBL, and VDR polymorphisms with leprosy phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Bishwa R; Macdonald, Murdo; Berrington, William R; Misch, E Ann; Ranjit, Chaman; Siddiqui, M Ruby; Kaplan, Gilla; Hawn, Thomas R

    2010-10-01

    Although genetic variants in tumor necrosis factor (TNF), mannose binding lectin (MBL), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) have been associated with leprosy clinical outcomes, these findings have not been extensively validated. We used a case-control study design with 933 patients in Nepal, which included 240 patients with type I reversal reaction (RR), and 124 patients with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) reactions. We compared genotype frequencies in 933 cases and 101 controls of seven polymorphisms, including a promoter region variant in TNF (G -308A), three polymorphisms in MBL (C154T, G161A and G170A), and three variants in VDR (FokI, BsmI, and TaqI). We observed an association between TNF -308A and protection from leprosy with an odds ratio of 0.52 (95% confidence interval = 0.29-0.95, p = 0.016). MBL polymorphism G161A was associated with protection from lepromatous leprosy (odds ratio = 0.33, 95% confidence interval = 0.12-0.85, p = 0.010). VDR polymorphisms were not associated with leprosy phenotypes. These results confirm previous findings of an association of TNF -308A with protection from leprosy and MBL polymorphisms with protection from lepromatous leprosy. The statistical significance was modest and will require further study for conclusive validation. PMID:20650301

  18. Development of novel polymorphic microsatellite markers in Siganus fuscescens.

    PubMed

    Mao, X Q; Li, Z B; Ning, Y F; Shangguan, J B; Yuan, Y; Huang, Y S; Li, B B

    2016-01-01

    Rabbitfish, Siganus fuscescens, is widely distributed in the Indo-Pacific regions and eastern Mediterranean. Its dwelling place includes reef flats, coral reef regions, and seagrass meadows in tropical area and reef areas or shallow waters in locations at high latitudes. In the present study, 10 new polymorphic microsatellite markers were screened from 30 wild S. fuscescens individuals, using a method of fast isolation protocol and amplified fragment length polymorphism of sequences containing repeats. The number of polymorphic alleles per locus was 3 to 5 with a mean of 4.3, while the value of polymorphic information content ranged from 0.283 to 0.680. The values of the observed and expected heterozygosities were in the range 0.3333-0.8462 and 0.3011-0.7424, respectively. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was not observed in this study. These polymorphic loci are expected to be effective in evaluating the genetic diversity, population structure, and gene flow and in determining the paternity in S. fuscescens, as well as for conservation management. PMID:27525874

  19. Quasiparticle bands and spectra of Ga2O3 polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furthmüller, J.; Bechstedt, F.

    2016-03-01

    Within the framework of density functional theory and Hedin's G W approximation for single-particle excitations, we present quasiparticle band structures and densities of states for two gallium oxide polymorphs: rhombohedral α -Ga2O3 and monoclinic β -Ga2O3 . The gap problem is attacked. In addition, their electron effective mass tensors are given. Solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation we also calculate excitonic optical spectra of the two polymorphs. The treatment of excitonic effects allows for a trustable prediction of optical properties from the band gap to the ultraviolet region. In addition, for few other polymorphs we also discuss the frequency-dependent dielectric tensor within the independent-particle approximation (random phase approximation) and densities of states on density functional level. We demonstrate that apart from subtle details, the overall densities of states and optical spectra, in particular the isotropically averaged spectra, are rather similar for all polymorphs, while the electronic dielectric constants vary with the structure. For all polymorphs, complete sets of elastic constants are given.

  20. Polymorphic behavior of isonicotinamide in cooling crystallization from various solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Thomas B.; Taris, Alessandra; Rong, Ben-Guang; Grosso, Massimiliano; Qu, Haiyan

    2016-09-01

    In this work the nucleation of different polymorphs of isonicotinamide (INA) from different solvents has been studied. The metastable zone width of INA in cooling crystallization from five different solvents has been investigated and attempts have been made to reveal the link between the INA molecular self-association to the polymorphism of the nucleated crystals using ATR FT-IR (Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared) and Raman spectroscopy. Raman and IR spectra of INA dissolved in different solvents have demonstrated that the INA molecules might associate in different configurations, whereas, the link between the structure of the molecular self-association and the structure of the nucleated polymorph is complicated by the influence of INA concentration. This is consistent with our previous study with piroxicam. The cooling crystallization of INA from five different solvents resulted in two different polymorphs depending on the initial concentration of the solution. The results obtained in the present work showed that information about self-association of an API (Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient) in a given solvent is not sufficient to predict the polymorphic behavior in all scenarios.

  1. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect. PMID:27323105

  2. Genetic polymorphisms in Pakistani women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liaqat, Irfana; Jahan, Nusrat; Krikun, Graciela; Taylor, Hugh S

    2015-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the major cause of anovulatory infertility. Although the genetic basis of PCOS is not well understood, it is a common metabolic and endocrine disorder. This study investigates the possible genomic variants associated with PCOS in Pakistani women from the Punjab region. DNA samples from 96 patients with genetically unrelated PCOS and 96 controls were analyzed by direct sequencing to determine the polymorphisms of different loci on follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (fshr), follicle-stimulating hormone β (fshrβ), luteinizing hormone chorionic gonadotropin (lhcgr), luteinizing hormone β (lhβ), estrogen receptor α (esr1), and estrogen receptor β (esr2) genes. Significant associations were observed within the genotype frequencies, allele frequencies, and multi-single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype analysis of most polymorphisms studied. This study identified new SNPs at positions 605+52 Del/T in lhcgr genes occurring in this particular subpopulation. The strong r (2) value suggests that polymorphisms in the fshr and esr1 genes were in linkage disequilibrium. Our study provides evidence of statistically significant associations between susceptibility to PCOS in Pakistani women and the gene polymorphisms mentioned earlier. This suggests that the susceptible loci for PCOS lie within or very close to the chromosomal regions spanning these genes. PMID:25100445

  3. Geographic variation in animal colour polymorphisms and its role in speciation.

    PubMed

    McLean, Claire A; Stuart-Fox, Devi

    2014-11-01

    Polymorphic species, in which multiple variants coexist within a population, are often used as model systems in evolutionary biology. Recent research has been dominated by the hypothesis that polymorphism can be a precursor to speciation. To date, the majority of research regarding polymorphism and speciation has focused on whether polymorphism is maintained within a population or whether morphs within populations may diverge to form separate species (sympatric speciation); however, the geographical context of speciation in polymorphic systems is likely to be both diverse and complex. In this review, we draw attention to the geographic variation in morph composition and frequencies that characterises many, if not most polymorphic species. Recent theoretical and empirical developments suggest that such variation in the number, type and frequency of morphs present among populations can increase the probability of speciation. Thus, the geographical context of a polymorphism requires a greater research focus. Here, we review the prevalence, causes and evolutionary consequences of geographic variation in polymorphism in colour-polymorphic animal species. The prevalence and nature of geographic variation in polymorphism suggests that polymorphism may be a precursor to and facilitate speciation more commonly than appreciated previously. We argue that a better understanding of the processes generating geographic variation in polymorphism is vital to understanding how polymorphism can promote speciation. PMID:24528520

  4. Typing classical polymorphisms by real-time PCR: analysis of the GPT and ALAD protein polymorphisms in the Jewish populations.

    PubMed

    Zoossmann-Diskin, Avshalom; Swinburne, Sarah; Shohat, Mordechai; Peleg, Leah; Gazit, Ephraim; Turner, David

    2008-01-01

    Expanding the already extensive data array on classical polymorphisms in new populations is beneficial to full characterization of the intricate relationships between human populations. This can be done in a short time on a large-scale by using real-time PCR. The red-cell enzymes Delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) have each two alleles that can be separated by protein electrophoresis. They were previously characterized by protein electrophoresis in some of the Jewish populations. We designed primers and probes for fluorescence resonance energy transfer detection of the ALAD and GPT alleles to type Jewish populations including some in which these polymorphisms have not been studied in the past. The methods described here allow fast and efficient determination of these common classical polymorphisms. When used in large-scale population studies, these methods are not only faster, but also cheaper than amplification followed by restriction enzyme digestion and gel electrophoresis. The frequency of ALAD*1 among Jews ranges from 0.781 to 0.960 and that of GPT*1 from 0.412 to 0.773. A maximum likelihood tree based on the ALAD and GPT polymorphisms and five other red-cells enzymes polymorphisms depicts quite accurately the known historic, anthropological, and geographic relations between the Jewish populations. PMID:18432999

  5. The Y Alu polymorphism in southern African populations and its relationship to other Y-specific polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Spurdle, A.B.; Jenkins, T. ); Hammer, M.F. )

    1994-02-01

    Y-linked polymorphisms were studied in a number of African populations. The frequency of the alleles of a Y-specific Alu insertion polymorphism, termed the [open quotes]Y Alu polymorphism,[close quotes] was determined in 889 individuals from 23 different African population groups. A trend in frequency was observed, with the insert largely absent in Caucasoid populations, at intermediate frequency in the Khoisan, and at high frequency in Negroids. The insert predates diversification of Homo sapiens, since it occurs in all groups. The Alu insertion is believed to result from a unique mutation event, and comparisons between this and several other Y-linked polymorphisms were carried out in an attempt to validate their usefulness in population and evolutionary studies. The p21A1/Taql and pDP31/EcoRI polymorphisms and 49a/TaqI alleles were all shown to have arisen on more than one occasion, and evidence exists for a preraciation crossover event between the Y-linked pseudoautosomal XY275 locus and the Y chromosome pseudoautosomal boundary. 33 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Reverse random amplified microsatellite polymorphism reveals enhanced polymorphisms in the 3' end of simple sequence repeats in the pepper genome.

    PubMed

    Min, Woong-Ki; Han, Jung-Heon; Kang, Won-Hee; Lee, Heung-Ryul; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2008-09-30

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) are widely distributed in eukaryotic genomes and are informative genetic markers. Despite many advantages of SSR markers such as a high degree of allelic polymorphisms, co-dominant inheritance, multi-allelism, and genome-wide coverage in various plant species, they also have shortcomings such as low polymorphic rates between genetically close lines, especially in Capsicum annuum. We developed an alternative technique to SSR by normalizing and alternating anchored primers in random amplified microsatellite polymorphisms (RAMP). This technique, designated reverse random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (rRAMP), allows the detection of nucleotide variation in the 3' region flanking an SSR using normalized anchored and random primer combinations. The reproducibility and frequency of polymorphic loci in rRAMP was vigorously enhanced by translocation of the 5' anchor of repeat sequences to the 3' end position and selective use of moderate arbitrary primers. In our study, the PCR banding pattern of rRAMP was highly dependent on the frequency of repeat motifs and primer combinations with random primers. Linkage analysis showed that rRAMP markers were well scattered on an intra-specific pepper map. Based on these results, we suggest that this technique is useful for studying genetic diversity, molecular fingerprinting, and rapidly constructing molecular maps for diverse plant species. PMID:18483466

  7. Investigation of the Polymorphs and Hydrolysis of Uranium Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Lucas E.; Blake, Thomas A.; Henager, Charles H.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Meier, David E.; Peper, Shane M.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-04-01

    This work focuses on progress in gaining a better understanding of the polymorphic nature of the UO3-water system, one of several important materials associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. The UO3-water system is complex and has not been fully characterized, even though these species are common throughout the fuel cycle. Powder x-ray diffraction, Raman and fluorescence characterization was performed on polymorphic forms of UO3 and UO3 hydrolysis products for the purpose of developing some predictive capability of estimating process history and utility, e.g. for polymorphic phases of unknown origin. Specifically, we have investigated three industrially relevant production pathways of UO3 and discovered a previously unknown low temperature route to β-UO3. Pure phases of UO3, hydrolysis products and starting materials were used to establish optical spectroscopic signatures for these compounds.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region 1 polymorphism in Singapore Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shee, Cheng-Yap; Chong, Michelle S M; Ng, Irene; Chia, Tet-Fatt

    2005-03-01

    Sequence polymorphisms of hypervariable region 1 were analyzed in 100 unrelated Singaporean Chinese. Ninety-five different haplotypes resulting from 113 variable sites were found between nucleotide positions 16045 and 16364. Single nucleotide polymorphism at nucleotide positions 16223, 16045, 16129, 16362 and 16189 was amongst the five highest frequencies observed in the sequences, whilst the most frequent haplotype was 16045-16223. Based on polymorphic sites observed at HV1, haplogroups A, F1a, M7b1, B5a and D4b were the most commonly observed clusters. The haplotype, nucleotide diversity and the average number of nucleotide differences were found to be 0.999, 0.028 and 9.082, respectively. The cytosine-stretch region located around nucleotide position 16189 was observed in 22% of this population sample. Transitions were found to be more predominant than transversions. PMID:15708338

  9. Mu opioid receptor polymorphism, early social adversity, and social traits.

    PubMed

    Carver, Charles S; Johnson, Sheri L; Kim, Youngmee

    2016-10-01

    A polymorphism in the mu opioid receptor gene OPRM1 (rs1799971) has been investigated for its role in sensitivity to social contexts. Evidence suggests that the G allele of this polymorphism is associated with higher levels of sensitivity. This study tested for main effects of the polymorphism and its interaction with a self-report measure of childhood adversity as an index of negative environment. Outcomes were several personality measures relevant to social connection. Significant interactions were obtained, such that the negative impact of childhood adversity on personality was greater among G carriers than among A homozygotes on measures of agreeableness, interdependence, anger proneness, hostility, authentic pride, life engagement, and an index of (mostly negative) feelings coloring one's world view. Findings support the role of OPRM1 in sensitivity to negative environments. Limitations are noted, including the lack of a measure of advantageous social environment to assess sensitivity to positive social contexts. PMID:26527429

  10. Computation of the Gibbs free energy difference between polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkovits, Daniel W.; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2015-03-01

    Semi-crystalline polymers commonly crystallize into several different polymorphs; for example, the alpha and beta phases of isotactic polypropylene. While it is possible to favor particular polymorphs by kinetic means, such as with varying degrees of supercooling or through the use of different solvents in solution casting, we focus on the question of thermodynamic stability; that is, which polymorph possesses the lowest Gibbs free energy for a given temperature and pressure. We implement a version of the Bennett Acceptance Ratio method and find phase diagrams for several polymers. We also demonstrate agreement with phonon analysis in the quasi-harmonic approximation. The advantages and drawbacks of these methods will be discussed. Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI).

  11. DNA Polymorphisms in Lentinula edodes, the Shiitake Mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Rajiv K.

    1991-01-01

    DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were examined in Lentinula edodes strains. Genomic DNA from strain 70 was cloned in plasmid vector pUC19, and 18 random clones containing low-copy DNA sequences were used to probe seven strains in Southern DNA-DNA hybridizations. Each cloned fragment revealed DNA polymorphism. An RFLP genotype was determined for each strain and the genetic relatedness was assessed. The coefficients of genetic similarity among the seven strains ranged from 0.43 to 0.90. The inheritance of RFLP markers was examined in single spore isolates. Homokaryons displayed a loss of polymorphic bands compared with the parent dikaryon. Hybrids constructed by crossing compatible homokaryons displayed the inheritance of RFLP markers from each parent homokaryon. Images PMID:16348509

  12. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-08-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  13. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  14. Modeling Polymorphic Molecular Crystals with Electronic Structure Theory.

    PubMed

    Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-05-11

    Interest in molecular crystals has grown thanks to their relevance to pharmaceuticals, organic semiconductor materials, foods, and many other applications. Electronic structure methods have become an increasingly important tool for modeling molecular crystals and polymorphism. This article reviews electronic structure techniques used to model molecular crystals, including periodic density functional theory, periodic second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, fragment-based electronic structure methods, and diffusion Monte Carlo. It also discusses the use of these models for predicting a variety of crystal properties that are relevant to the study of polymorphism, including lattice energies, structures, crystal structure prediction, polymorphism, phase diagrams, vibrational spectroscopies, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Finally, tools for analyzing crystal structures and intermolecular interactions are briefly discussed. PMID:27008426

  15. High-pressure polymorphism of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin): Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Ethan L.; Dreger, Zbigniew A.; Gupta, Yogendra M.

    2015-02-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to elucidate the high-pressure polymorphic behavior of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), an important pharmaceutical compound known as aspirin. Using a diamond anvil cell (DAC), single crystals of the two polymorphic phases of aspirin existing at ambient conditions (ASA-I and ASA-II) were compressed to 10 GPa. We found that ASA-I does not transform to ASA-II, but instead transforms to a new phase (ASA-III) above ∼2 GPa. It is demonstrated that this transformation primarily introduces structural changes in the bonding and arrangement of the acetyl groups and is reversible upon the release of pressure. In contrast, a less dense ASA-II shows no transition in the pressure range studied, though it appears to exhibit a disordered structure above 7 GPa. Our results suggest that ASA-III is the most stable polymorph of aspirin at high pressures.

  16. Sampling Polymorphs of Ionic Solids using Random Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevanović, Vladan

    2016-02-01

    Polymorphism offers rich and virtually unexplored space for discovering novel functional materials. To harness this potential approaches capable of both exploring the space of polymorphs and assessing their realizability are needed. One such approach devised for partially ionic solids is presented. The structure prediction part is carried out by performing local density functional theory relaxations on a large set of random supperlattices (RSLs) with atoms distributed randomly over different planes in a way that favors cation-anion coordination. Applying the RSL sampling on MgO, ZnO, and SnO2 reveals that the resulting probability of occurrence of a given structure offers a measure of its realizability explaining fully the experimentally observed, metastable polymorphs in these three systems.

  17. Polymorphic phases of sp3-hybridized carbon under cold compression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rulong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2012-05-01

    It is well established that graphite can be transformed into superhard carbons under cold compression (Mao et al. Science 2003, 302, 425). However, structure of the superhard carbon is yet to be determined experimentally. We have performed an extensive structural search for the high-pressure crystalline phases of carbon using the evolutionary algorithm. Nine low-energy polymorphic structures of sp(3)-hybridized carbon result from the unbiased search. These new polymorphic carbon structures together with previously reported low-energy sp(3)-hybridized carbon structures (e.g., M-carbon, W-carbon, and Cco-C(8) or Z-carbon) can be classified into three groups on the basis of different ways of stacking two (or more) out of five (A-E) types of buckled graphene layers. Such a classification scheme points out a simple way to construct a variety of sp(3)-hybridized carbon allotropes via stacking buckled graphene layers in different combinations of the A-E types by design. Density-functional theory calculations indicate that, among the nine low-energy crystalline structures, seven are energetically more favorable than the previously reported most stable crystalline structure (i.e., Cco-C(8) or Z-carbon) in the pressure range 0-25 GPa. Moreover, several newly predicted polymorphic sp(3)-hybridized carbon structures possess elastic moduli and hardness close to those of the cubic diamond. In particular, Z-carbon-4 possesses the highest hardness (93.4) among all the low-energy sp(3)-hybridized carbon structures predicted today. The calculated electronic structures suggest that most polymorphic carbon structures are optically transparent. The simulated X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of a few polymorphic structures are in good agreement with the experimental spectrum, suggesting that samples from the cold-compressed graphite experiments may consist of multiple polymorphic phases of sp(3)-hybridized carbon. PMID:22490007

  18. African origin of human-specific polymorphic Alu insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M. ); Stoneking, M. ); Bazan, H.; Kass, D.H.; Shaikh, T.H.; Scheer, W.D. ); Novick, G.E.; Herrera, R.J. ); Ioannou, P.A. )

    1994-12-06

    Alu elements are a family of interspersed repeats that have mobilized throughout primate genomes by retroposition from a few [open quotes]master[close quotes] genes. Among the 500,000 Alu elements in the human genome are members of the human-specific subfamily that are not fixed in the human species. Four such polymorphic human-specific Alu insertions were analyzed by a rapid, PCR-based assay. These four polymorphic Alu insertions were shown to be absent from the genomes of a number of nonhuman primates, consistent with their arising as human genetic polymorphisms sometime after the human/African ape divergence. Analysis of 664 unrelated individuals from 16 population groups from around the world revealed substantial levels of variation within population groups and significant genetic differentiation among groups. No significant associations were found among the four loci, consistent with their location on different chromosomes. A maximum-likelihood tree of population relationships showed four major groupings consisting of Africa, Europe, Asia/Americas, and Australia/New Guinea, which is concordant with similar trees based on other loci. A particularly useful feature of the polymorphic Alu insertions is that the ancestral state is known to be the absence of the Alu element, and the presence of the Alu element at a particular chromosomal site reflects a single, unique event in human evolution. A hypothetical ancestral group can then be included in the tree analysis, with the frequency of each insertion set to zero. The ancestral group connected to the maximum-likelihood tree within the African branch, which suggests an African origin of these polymorphic Alu insertions. These data are concordant with other diverse data sets, which lends further support to the recent African origin hypothesis for modern humans. Polymorphic Alu insertions represent a source of genetic variation for studying human population structure and evolution. 45 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Associations between vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; He, Qi; Shao, Yu-Guo; Ji, Min; Bao, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Many epidemiologic studies have investigated the association between vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and breast cancer risk, but the results were inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis of 31 studies on VDR polymorphisms, including FokI, BsmI, TaqI, and ApaI, and breast cancer risk published before May 2013. For FokI, the allele of f was found to be associated with increased risk of breast cancer compared with F (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.03-1.36). Patients with ff genotype were at significantly higher risk of breast cancer compared with those with FF genotype (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.66-2.29). In subgroup analysis by race, Fok1 polymorphism was significantly associated with breast cancer risk for Caucasian population (f vs. F: OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.14-1.59; ff vs. FF: OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.86-2.54; ff vs. FF + Ff: OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.03-1.30). For ApaI, aa genotype was associated with increased breast cancer risk in Asian population based on four studies (aa vs. Aa + AA, OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.12-1.98). No significant association was found between breast cancer risk and ApaI and TaqI polymorphism in different models and populations. Our updated meta-analysis showed that Fok1 polymorphism is associated with breast cancer risk both in general population and in Caucasian population. ApaI polymorphism might be associated with breast cancer risk in Asian population. Large well-designed epidemiological studies are necessary to clarify the risk identified in the current meta-analysis. PMID:23900677

  20. Association Between IL-10 Gene Polymorphism and Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongtao; Li, Qiuming; Wang, Menghua; Wan, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic and environmental factors both play important roles in the occurrence and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR). IL-10 592 gene polymorphism is associated with diabetes pathogenesis. This study analyzed the relationship between IL-10 gene promoter-592 loci polymorphism (SNP) in a diabetic model rats with DR. Material/Methods Streptozotocin (STZ) was injected through the tail vein to establish a diabetic rat model. The rats were randomly divided into 2 groups for 3 months’ feeding, including 100 rats in the diabetes-positive control group and 100 rats only injected with citric acid buffer as the blank control group. Fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) was used to observe retinal vascular changes. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment polymorphisms assay (PCR-RFLP) was used to detect IL-10 gene promoter-592 loci polymorphism in DNA samples. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to test serum IL-10 concentration. Results Serum IL-10 level in DR rats was 33.18±5.0 pg/mL and in the control rats it was 53.33±4.16 pg/mL in (P<0.01). Diabetes susceptibility with IL-10-592 genotype frequency and gene frequency analysis showed that IL-10-592 genotype frequency and allele frequency were significantly different in the DR group compared with the control group (P<0.01). Conclusions IL-10 592 polymorphism was associated with DR susceptibility, suggesting that the gene polymorphism might be a risk factor for DR. PMID:26492380

  1. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Sobierajczyk, Katarzyna; Izdebska, Justyna; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER). Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease. PMID:25356504

  2. Polymorphisms of human N-acetyltransferases and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Agúndez, José A G

    2008-07-01

    Human arylamine N-acetyltransferases (CoASAc; NAT, EC 2.3.1.5) NAT1 and NAT2 play a key role in the metabolism of drugs and environmental chemicals and in the metabolic activation and detoxification of procarcinogens. Phenotyping analyses have revealed an association between NAT enzyme activities and the risk of developing several forms of cancer. As genotyping procedures have become available for NAT1 and NAT2 gene variations, hundreds of association studies on NAT polymorphisms and cancer risk have been conducted. Here we review the findings obtained from these studies. Evidence for a putative association of NAT1 polymorphism and myeloma, lung and bladder cancer, as well as association of NAT2 polymorphisms with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, liver, colorectal and bladder cancer have been reported. In contrast, no consistent evidence for a relevant association of NAT polymorphisms with brain, head & neck, breast, gastric, pancreatic or prostate cancer have been described. Although preliminary data are available, further well-powered studies are required to fully elucidate the role of NAT1 in most human cancers, and that of NAT2 in astrocytoma, meningioma, esophageal, renal, cervical and testicular cancers, as well as in leukaemia and myeloma. This review discusses controversial findings on cancer risk and putative causes of heterogeneity in the proposed associations, and it identifies topics that require further investigation, particularly mechanisms underlying association of NAT polymorphisms and risk for subsets of cancer patients with specific exposures, putative epistatic contribution of polymorphism for other xenobiotic-metabolising enzymes such as glutathione S-transferases of Cytochrome P450 enzymes, and genetic plus environmental interaction. PMID:18680472

  3. The association between IGF-1 polymorphisms and high myopia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Xingtao; Qu, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    Background: The potential association between IGF-1 polymorphisms and high myopia has been investigated in previous studies, but the actual relationship remains controversial. Accordingly, we conducted a meta-analysisincludingcase-control and cohort studies to assess the existing relationship between high myopia and IGF-1 polymorphisms. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and OVID. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in the studies obtained from the retrospective database search. Analyses of heterogeneity, sensitivity, and publication bias were also conducted. The findings from this meta-analysis were based on approximately 2,187 high myopia cases and 1,183 controls, and were used to assess the association between three IGF-1 genetic polymorphisms (rs6214, rs12423791, and rs5742632) and high myopia risks. We investigated the association of the IGF-1 gene SNP rs6214, but no statistical association was observed in the resulting odds ratios (OR) in the allelic (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.89-1.25), dominant (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 0.90-1.27), or recessive models (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.89-1.26), or in the homozygote (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.91-1.38) and heterozygote comparisons (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.88-1.27). Simultaneously, two other selected SNPs, rs12423791 and rs5742632, were also studied, but similarly, no statistical association existed between these polymorphisms and the risk of high myopia. In conclusions, no statistical association between IGF-1 polymorphisms (rs6214, rs12423791, and rs5742632) and the risk of high myopia was observed following the reported meta-analysis. PMID:26309715

  4. Emergence of Polymorphic Mating Strategies in Robot Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Elfwing, Stefan; Doya, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphism has fascinated evolutionary biologists since the time of Darwin. Biologists have observed discrete alternative mating strategies in many different species. In this study, we demonstrate that polymorphic mating strategies can emerge in a colony of hermaphrodite robots. We used a survival and reproduction task where the robots maintained their energy levels by capturing energy sources and physically exchanged genotypes for the reproduction of offspring. The reproductive success was dependent on the individuals' energy levels, which created a natural trade-off between the time invested in maintaining a high energy level and the time invested in attracting mating partners. We performed experiments in environments with different density of energy sources and observed a variety in the mating behavior when a robot could see both an energy source and a potential mating partner. The individuals could be classified into two phenotypes: 1) forager, who always chooses to capture energy sources, and 2) tracker, who keeps track of potential mating partners if its energy level is above a threshold. In four out of the seven highest fitness populations in different environments, we found subpopulations with distinct differences in genotype and in behavioral phenotype. We analyzed the fitnesses of the foragers and the trackers by sampling them from each subpopulation and mixing with different ratios in a population. The fitness curves for the two subpopulations crossed at about 25% of foragers in the population, showing the evolutionary stability of the polymorphism. In one of those polymorphic populations, the trackers were further split into two subpopulations: (strong trackers) and (weak trackers). Our analyses show that the population consisting of three phenotypes also constituted several stable polymorphic evolutionarily stable states. To our knowledge, our study is the first to demonstrate the emergence of polymorphic evolutionarily stable strategies within a

  5. A two-stage model for Cepaea polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Cook, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    The history of the study of snails in the genus Cepaea is briefly outlined. Cepaea nemoralis and C. hortensis are polymorphic for genetically controlled shell colour and banding, which has been the main interest of the work covered. Random drift, selective predation and climatic selection, both at a macro- and micro-scale, all affect gene frequency. The usual approach to understanding maintenance of the polymorphism, has been to look for centripetal effects on frequency. Possible processes include balance of mutation pressure and drift, heterozygote advantage, relational balance heterosis, frequency-dependent predation, multi-niche selective balance, or some combination of these. Mutational balance is overlaid by more substantial forces. There is some evidence for heterosis. Predation by birds may protect the polymorphism, and act apostatically to favour distinct morphs. Although not substantiated for Cepaea, many studies show that predators behave in the appropriate manner, while shell colour polymorphisms in molluscs occur most commonly in species exposed to visually searching predators. It is not known whether different thermal properties of the shells help to generate equilibria. Migration between colonies is probably greater than originally thought. The present geographical range has been occupied for less than 5000 generations. Climatic and human modification alter snail habitats relatively rapidly, which in turn changes selection pressures. A simple simulation shows that migration coupled with selection which fluctuates but is not centripetal, may retain polymorphism for sufficiently long to account for the patterns we see today. There may therefore be a two-stage basis to the polymorphism, comprising long-term but weak balancing forces coupled with fluctuating selection which does not necessarily balance but results in very slow elimination. Persistence of genetic variants in this way may provide the conditions for evolution of a balanced genome.

  6. Asymmetric Dispersal Can Maintain Larval Polymorphism: A Model Motivated by Streblospio benedicti

    PubMed Central

    Zakas, Christina; Hall, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphism in traits affecting dispersal occurs in a diverse variety of taxa. Typically, the maintenance of a dispersal polymorphism is attributed to environmental heterogeneity where parental bet-hedging can be favored. There are, however, examples of dispersal polymorphisms that occur across similar environments. For example, the estuarine polychaete Streblospio benedicti has a highly heritable offspring dimorphism that affects larval dispersal potential. We use analytical models of dispersal to determine the conditions necessary for a stable dispersal polymorphism to exist. We show that in asexual haploids, sexual haploids, and in sexual diploids in the absence of overdominance, asymmetric dispersal is required in order to maintain a dispersal polymorphism when patches do not vary in intrinsic quality. Our study adds an additional factor, dispersal asymmetry, to the short list of mechanisms that can maintain polymorphism in nature. The region of the parameter space in which polymorphism is possible is limited, suggesting why dispersal polymorphisms within species are rare. PMID:22576818

  7. Genomic and genotyping characterization of haplotype-based polymorphic microsatellites in Prunus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficient utilization of microsatellites in genetic studies remains impeded largely due to the unknown status of their primer reliability, chromosomal location, and allele polymorphism. Discovery and characterization of microsatellite polymorphisms in a taxon will disclose the unknowns and gain new ...

  8. Combined crystal structure prediction and high-pressure crystallization in rational pharmaceutical polymorph screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, M. A.; van de Streek, J.; Fabbiani, F. P. A.; Hidber, P.; Grassmann, O.

    2015-07-01

    Organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and pigments, frequently form several crystal polymorphs with different physicochemical properties. Finding polymorphs has long been a purely experimental game of trial-and-error. Here we utilize in silico polymorph screening in combination with rationally planned crystallization experiments to study the polymorphism of the pharmaceutical compound Dalcetrapib, with 10 torsional degrees of freedom one of the most flexible molecules ever studied computationally. The experimental crystal polymorphs are found at the bottom of the calculated lattice energy landscape, and two predicted structures are identified as candidates for a missing, thermodynamically more stable polymorph. Pressure-dependent stability calculations suggested high pressure as a means to bring these polymorphs into existence. Subsequently, one of them could indeed be crystallized in the 0.02 to 0.50 GPa pressure range and was found to be metastable at ambient pressure, effectively derisking the appearance of a more stable polymorph during late-stage development of Dalcetrapib.

  9. Investigation of a Privileged Polymorphic Motif: a Dimeric ROY Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Lutker, Katie M.; Tolstyka, Zachary P.; Matzger, Adam J.

    2009-01-01

    Bis(5-methyl-2-[(2-nitrophenyl)amino]-3-thiophenecarbonitrilyl)acetylene, a derivative of the highly polymorphic compound 5-methyl-2-[(2-nitrophenyl)amino]-3-thiophenecarbonitrile (ROY) that possesses two chromophores electronically coupled through a triple bond, was found to be trimorphic. Structural data for two of these forms indicates that symmetry is maintained in one structure and broken in the other leading to spontaneous differentiation of the methyl-thiophenecarbonitrile units. This study contributes to the mounting evidence that ROY and its derivatives are particularly prone to polymorphism. PMID:19367341

  10. Kappa-casein polymorphisms among cattle breeds and bison herds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, M.A.; Cockett, N.

    1993-01-01

    We identified the HindIII restriction site polymorphism Of kappa-casein in cattle reported by Pinder et al. (Animal Genetics 22, 11, 1991) and found an additonal polymorphism (RsaI) in cattle and bison. The Hin dIII and Rsa I restriction sites were mapped and three haplotypes (alleles) were identified. Preliminary screening of 39 cattle and 71 bison revealed one allele restricted to cattle, one restricted to bison, and one shared by the species. No fixed allelic differences were observed among cattle breeds or among bison herds or subspecies.

  11. Novel polymorphs of the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drug benznidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honorato, Sara Braga; Mendonça, Jorge Souza; Boechat, Nubia; Oliveira, Alcemira Conceição; Mendes Filho, Josué; Ellena, Javier; Ayala, Alejandro Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Benznidazole (N-benzyl-2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)acetamide), is a nitro-heterocyclic drug used in the treatment of Chagas disease. Despite the fact that this drug was released more than 30 years ago, little information about its solid state properties is available in the literature. In this study, it was verified that this drug exhibits three polymorphs, which were characterized in situ by X-ray powder diffraction, thermal analysis, hot stage microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The thermodynamic relationships among these polymorphs were also discussed.

  12. An orthorhombic polymorph of 10,11-dihydrocarbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Harrison, William T A; Yathirajan, H S; Anilkumar, H G

    2006-05-01

    The title compound (systematic name: 10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine-5-carboxamide), C15H14N2O, is shown to crystallize as an orthorhombic polymorph to complement the known monoclinic form. The molecular conformations of both forms are very similar, involving a bent conformation for the seven-membered azepine ring and an overall ;butterfly' shape. The molecules assemble into chains by way of N-H...O bonds and N-H...pi interactions in both crystal modifications. The two polymorphs appear to form due to different van der Waals interactions between the layer-like sheets of molecules. PMID:16679591

  13. The Pressure-Induced Polymorphic Transformations in Fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Gorkovenko, Ekaterina A; Kichanov, Sergey E; Kozlenko, Denis P; Belushkin, Alexandr V; Wąsicki, Jan; Nawrocik, Wojciech; Mielcarek, Jadwiga; Dubrovinsky, Leonid S; Lathe, Christian; Savenko, Boris N

    2015-12-01

    The structural properties and Raman spectra of fluconazole have been studied by means of X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy at pressures up to 2.5 and 5.5 GPa, respectively. At a pressure of 0.8 GPa, a polymorphic phase transition from the initial form I to a new triclinic form VIII has been observed. At higher pressure of P = 3.2 GPa, possible transformation into another new polymorphic form IX has been detected. The unit cell parameters and volumes, and vibration modes as functions of pressure have been obtained for the different forms of fluconazole. PMID:26367523

  14. Polymorphisms and genes associated with puberty in heifers.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Marina R S; Nguyen, Loan To; Porto Neto, Laercio R; Reverter, Antonio; Moore, Stephen S; Lehnert, Sigrid A; Thomas, Milton G

    2016-07-01

    Puberty onset is a multifactorial process influenced by genetic determinants and environmental conditions, especially nutritional status. Genes, genetic variations, and regulatory networks compose the molecular basis of achieving puberty. In this article, we reviewed the discovery of multiple polymorphisms and genes associated with heifer puberty phenotypes and discuss the opportunities to use this evolving knowledge of genetic determinants for breeding early pubertal Bos indicus-influenced cattle. The discovery of polymorphisms and genes was mainly achieved through candidate gene studies, quantitative trait loci analyses, genome-wide association studies, and recently, global gene expression studies (transcriptome). These studies are recapitulated and summarized in the current review. PMID:27238439

  15. Applications of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) in molecular ecology.

    PubMed

    Hadrys, H; Balick, M; Schierwater, B

    1992-05-01

    Molecular genetic markers have been developed into powerful tools to analyse genetic relationships and genetic diversity. As an extension to the variety of existing techniques using polymorphic DNA markers, the Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique may be used in molecular ecology to determine taxonomic identity, assess kinship relationships, analyse mixed genome samples, and create specific probes. Main advantages of the RAPD technology include (i) suitability for work on anonymous genomes, (ii) applicability to problems where only limited quantities of DNA are available, (iii) efficiency and low expense. PMID:1344984

  16. Molecular docking study of conformational polymorph: building block of crystal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Rashmi; Tewari, Ashish Kumar; Singh, Ved Prakash; Singh, Praveen; Dangi, Jawahar Singh; Puerta, Carmen; Valerga, Pedro; Kant, Rajni

    2013-01-01

    Two conformational polymorphs of novel 2-[2-(3-cyano-4,6-dimethyl-2-oxo-2H-pyridin-1-yl)-ethoxy]-4,6-dimethyl nicotinonitrile have been developed. The crystal structure of both polymorphs (1a and 1b) seems to be stabilized by weak interactions. A difference was observed in the packing of both polymorphs. Polymorph 1b has a better binding affinity with the cyclooxygenase (COX-2) receptor than the standard (Nimesulide). PMID:24250264

  17. Effect of Interferon-γ on the Basal and the TNFα-Stimulated Secretion of CXCL8 in Thyroid Cancer Cell Lines Bearing Either the RET/PTC Rearrangement Or the BRAF V600e Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Rotondi, Mario; Coperchini, Francesca; Awwad, Oriana; Di Buduo, Christian A.; Abbonante, Vittorio; Magri, Flavia; Balduini, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    CXCL8 displays several tumor-promoting effects. Targeting and/or lowering CXCL8 concentrations within the tumor microenvironment would produce a therapeutic benefit. Aim of this study was to test the effect of IFNγ on the basal and TNFα-stimulated secretion of CXCL8 in TCP-1 and BCPAP thyroid cancer cell lines (harboring RET/PTC rearrangement and BRAF V600e mutation, resp.). Cells were incubated with IFNγ (1, 10, 100, and 1000 U/mL) alone or in combination with TNF-α (10 ng/mL) for 24 hours. CXCL8 and CXCL10 concentrations were measured in the cell supernatants. IFNγ inhibited in a dose-dependent and significant manner both the basal (ANOVA F: 22.759; p < 0.00001) and the TNFα-stimulated (ANOVA F: 15.309; p < 0.00001) CXCL8 secretions in BCPAP but not in TPC-1 cells (NS). On the other hand, IFNγ and IFNγ + TNF-α induced a significant secretion of CXCL10 in both BCPAP (p < 0.05) and TPC-1 (p < 0.05) cells. Transwell migration assay showed that (i) CXCL8 increased cell migration in both TPC-1 and BCPAP cells; (ii) IFNγ significantly reduced the migration only of BCPAP cells; and (iii) CXCL8 reverted the effect of IFNγ. These results constitute the first demonstration that IFNγ inhibits CXCL8 secretion and in turn the migration of a BRAF V600e mutated thyroid cell line. PMID:27555670

  18. Effect of Interferon-γ on the Basal and the TNFα-Stimulated Secretion of CXCL8 in Thyroid Cancer Cell Lines Bearing Either the RET/PTC Rearrangement Or the BRAF V600e Mutation.

    PubMed

    Rotondi, Mario; Coperchini, Francesca; Awwad, Oriana; Pignatti, Patrizia; Di Buduo, Christian A; Abbonante, Vittorio; Magri, Flavia; Balduini, Alessandra; Chiovato, Luca

    2016-01-01

    CXCL8 displays several tumor-promoting effects. Targeting and/or lowering CXCL8 concentrations within the tumor microenvironment would produce a therapeutic benefit. Aim of this study was to test the effect of IFNγ on the basal and TNFα-stimulated secretion of CXCL8 in TCP-1 and BCPAP thyroid cancer cell lines (harboring RET/PTC rearrangement and BRAF V600e mutation, resp.). Cells were incubated with IFNγ (1, 10, 100, and 1000 U/mL) alone or in combination with TNF-α (10 ng/mL) for 24 hours. CXCL8 and CXCL10 concentrations were measured in the cell supernatants. IFNγ inhibited in a dose-dependent and significant manner both the basal (ANOVA F: 22.759; p < 0.00001) and the TNFα-stimulated (ANOVA F: 15.309; p < 0.00001) CXCL8 secretions in BCPAP but not in TPC-1 cells (NS). On the other hand, IFNγ and IFNγ + TNF-α induced a significant secretion of CXCL10 in both BCPAP (p < 0.05) and TPC-1 (p < 0.05) cells. Transwell migration assay showed that (i) CXCL8 increased cell migration in both TPC-1 and BCPAP cells; (ii) IFNγ significantly reduced the migration only of BCPAP cells; and (iii) CXCL8 reverted the effect of IFNγ. These results constitute the first demonstration that IFNγ inhibits CXCL8 secretion and in turn the migration of a BRAF V600e mutated thyroid cell line. PMID:27555670

  19. Large number of replacement polymorphisms in rapidly evolving genes of Drosophila. Implications for genome-wide surveys of DNA polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, K J; Nigro, L; Aquadro, C F; Tautz, D

    1999-01-01

    We present a survey of nucleotide polymorphism of three novel, rapidly evolving genes in populations of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Levels of silent polymorphism are comparable to other loci, but the number of replacement polymorphisms is higher than that in most other genes surveyed in D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Tests of neutrality fail to reject neutral evolution with one exception. This concerns a gene located in a region of high recombination rate in D. simulans and in a region of low recombination rate in D. melanogaster, due to an inversion. In the latter case it shows a very low number of polymorphisms, presumably due to selective sweeps in the region. Patterns of nucleotide polymorphism suggest that most substitutions are neutral or nearly neutral and that weak (positive and purifying) selection plays a significant role in the evolution of these genes. At all three loci, purifying selection of slightly deleterious replacement mutations appears to be more efficient in D. simulans than in D. melanogaster, presumably due to different effective population sizes. Our analysis suggests that current knowledge about genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism is far from complete with respect to the types and range of nucleotide substitutions and that further analysis of differences between local populations will be required to understand the forces more completely. We note that rapidly diverging and nearly neutrally evolving genes cannot be expected only in the genome of Drosophila, but are likely to occur in large numbers also in other organisms and that their function and evolution are little understood so far. PMID:10581279

  20. Polymorphism in 3-acetyl-4-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one.

    PubMed

    Ghouili, Afef; Brahmia, Ameni; Ben Hassen, Rached

    2015-10-01

    A new polymorph (denoted polymorph II) of 3-acetyl-4-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one, C11H8O4, was obtained unexpectedly during an attempt to recrystallize the compound from salt-melted ice, and the structure is compared with that of the original polymorph (denoted polymorph I) [Lyssenko & Antipin (2001). Russ. Chem. Bull. 50, 418-431]. Strong intramolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds are observed equally in the two polymorphs [O...O = 2.4263 (13) Å in polymorph II and 2.442 (1) Å in polymorph I], with a slight delocalization of the hydroxy H atom towards the ketonic O atom in polymorph II [H...O = 1.32 (2) Å in polymorph II and 1.45 (3) Å in polymorph I]. In both crystal structures, the packing of the molecules is dominated and stabilized by weak intermolecular C-H...O hydrogen bonds. Additional π-π stacking interactions between the keto-enol hydrogen-bonded rings stabilize polymorph I [the centres are separated by 3.28 (1) Å], while polymorph II is stabilized by interactions between α-pyrone rings, which are parallel to one another and separated by 3.670 (5) Å. PMID:26422214

  1. Searching the Cambridge Structural Database for the 'best' representative of each unique polymorph.

    PubMed

    van de Streek, Jacco

    2006-08-01

    A computer program has been written that removes suspicious crystal structures from the Cambridge Structural Database and clusters the remaining crystal structures as polymorphs or redeterminations. For every set of redeterminations, one crystal structure is selected to be the best representative of that polymorph. The results, 243,355 well determined crystal structures grouped by unique polymorph, are presented and analysed. PMID:16840806

  2. Genetic study of eight AKT1 gene polymorphisms and their interaction with DRD2 gene polymorphisms in tardive dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Zai, Clement C; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Hwang, Rudi; Zai, Gwyneth C; Deluca, Vincenzo; Müller, Daniel J; King, Nicole; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Meltzer, Herbert Y; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Potkin, Steven G; Remington, Gary; Kennedy, James L

    2008-12-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a motor adverse effect of chronic antipsychotic medication. It has been suggested to involve dopamine neurotransmission system changes. AKT1 acts downstream of the D(2) receptor that is blocked by all antipsychotics to some degree. The AKT1 gene has not been investigated in TD. We examined eight polymorphisms spanning the AKT1 gene and their association with TD in our schizophrenia sample of 193 Caucasians, 76 of which with TD. AKT1 polymorphisms and haplotypes were not significantly associated with TD. However, we detected a significant interaction between rs6275 of DRD2 and rs3730358 of AKT1 (p<1 x 10(-5)). PMID:18838251

  3. Nestling polymorphism in a cuckoo-host system.

    PubMed

    Sato, Nozomu J; Tanaka, Keita D; Okahisa, Yuji; Yamamichi, Masato; Kuehn, Ralph; Gula, Roman; Ueda, Keisuke; Theuerkauf, Jörn

    2015-12-21

    Virulence of avian brood parasites can trigger a coevolutionary arms race, which favours rejection of parasitic eggs or chicks by host parents, and in turn leads to mimicry in parasite eggs or chicks [1-7]. The appearance of host offspring is critical to enable host parents to detect parasites. Thus, increasing accuracy of parasites' mimicry can favour a newly emerged host morph to escape parasites' mimicry. If parasites catch up with the hosts with a newly acquired mimetic morph, host polymorphism should be maintained through apostatic (negative frequency-dependent) selection, which favours hosts rarer morphs [1-3,7]. Among population-wide polymorphism, uniformity of respective host morphs in single host nests stochastically prevents parasites from targeting any specific morph of hosts and thus helps parents detect parasitism. Polymorphism in such a state is well-known in egg appearances of hosts of brood parasitic birds [2,3,7], which might also occur in chick appearances when arms races escalate. Here, we present evidence of polymorphism in chick skin coloration in a cuckoo-host system: the fan-tailed gerygone Gerygone flavolateralis and its specialist brood parasite, the shining bronze-cuckoo Chalcites lucidus in New Caledonia (Figure 1A-C). PMID:26702649

  4. PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism reduces enzymatic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaogan; Wang Zhaoqi; Tong Weimin . E-mail: tong@iarc.fr; Shen Yan

    2007-03-02

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) modifies a variety of nuclear proteins by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, and plays diverse roles in molecular and cellular processes. A common PARP1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at codon 762, resulting in the substitution of alanine (Ala) for valine (Val) in the catalytic domain has been implicated in susceptibility to cancer. To characterize the functional effect of this polymorphism on PARP1, we performed in vitro enzymatic analysis on PARP1-Ala762 and PARP1-Val762. We found that PARP1-Ala762 displayed 57.2% of the activity of PARP1-Val762 for auto-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and 61.9% of the activity of PARP1-Val762 for trans-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of histone H1. The kinetic characterization revealed that the K {sub m} of PARP1-Ala762 was increased to a 1.2-fold of the K {sub m} of PARP1-Val762 for trans-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Thus, the PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism reduces the enzymatic activity of PARP1 by increasing K {sub m}. This finding suggests that different levels of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by PARP1 might aid in understanding Cancer risk of carriers of the PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism.

  5. Genome-Wide Patterns of Nucleotide Polymorphism in Domesticated Rice

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ryan D; Boyko, Adam; Fledel-Alon, Adi; York, Thomas L; Polato, Nicholas R; Olsen, Kenneth M; Nielsen, Rasmus; McCouch, Susan R; Bustamante, Carlos D; Purugganan, Michael D

    2007-01-01

    Domesticated Asian rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the oldest domesticated crop species in the world, having fed more people than any other plant in human history. We report the patterns of DNA sequence variation in rice and its wild ancestor, O. rufipogon, across 111 randomly chosen gene fragments, and use these to infer the evolutionary dynamics that led to the origins of rice. There is a genome-wide excess of high-frequency derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in O. sativa varieties, a pattern that has not been reported for other crop species. We developed several alternative models to explain contemporary patterns of polymorphisms in rice, including a (i) selectively neutral population bottleneck model, (ii) bottleneck plus migration model, (iii) multiple selective sweeps model, and (iv) bottleneck plus selective sweeps model. We find that a simple bottleneck model, which has been the dominant demographic model for domesticated species, cannot explain the derived nucleotide polymorphism site frequency spectrum in rice. Instead, a bottleneck model that incorporates selective sweeps, or a more complex demographic model that includes subdivision and gene flow, are more plausible explanations for patterns of variation in domesticated rice varieties. If selective sweeps are indeed the explanation for the observed nucleotide data of domesticated rice, it suggests that strong selection can leave its imprint on genome-wide polymorphism patterns, contrary to expectations that selection results only in a local signature of variation. PMID:17907810

  6. Polymorphic copper iodide clusters: insights into the mechanochromic luminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Benito, Quentin; Le Goff, Xavier F; Maron, Sébastien; Fargues, Alexandre; Garcia, Alain; Martineau, Charlotte; Taulelle, Francis; Kahlal, Samia; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre; Perruchas, Sandrine

    2014-08-13

    An in-depth study of mechanochromic and thermochromic luminescent copper iodide clusters exhibiting structural polymorphism is reported and gives new insights into the origin of the mechanochromic luminescence properties. The two different crystalline polymorphs exhibit distinct luminescence properties with one being green emissive and the other one being yellow emissive. Upon mechanical grinding, only one of the polymorphs exhibits great modification of its emission from green to yellow. Interestingly, the photophysical properties of the resulting partially amorphous crushed compound are closed to those of the other yellow polymorph. Comparative structural and optical analyses of the different phases including a solution of clusters permit us to establish a correlation between the Cu-Cu bond distances and the luminescence properties. In addition, the local structure of the [Cu4I4P4] cluster cores has been probed by (31)P and (65)Cu solid-state NMR analysis, which readily indicates that the grinding process modifies the phosphorus and copper atoms environments. The mechanochromic phenomenon is thus explained by the disruption of the crystal packing within intermolecular interactions inducing shortening of the Cu-Cu bond distances in the [Cu4I4] cluster core and eventually modification of the emissive state. These results definitely establish the role of cuprophilic interactions in the mechanochromism of copper iodide clusters. More generally, this study constitutes a step further into the understanding of the mechanism involved in the mechanochromic luminescent properties of metal-based compounds. PMID:25076411

  7. Prediction of polymorphic transformations of paracetamol in solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Maniruzzaman, Mohammed; Islam, Muhammad T; Moradiya, Hiren G; Halsey, Sheelagh A; Slipper, Ian J; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Snowden, Martin J; Douroumis, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    A novel approach employing variable-temperature X-ray powder diffraction (VTXRPD) was used to exploit its suitability as an off-line predictive tool to study the polymorphic transformations of paracetamol (PMOL) in melt-extruded hydrophilic polymer matrices. Physical mixtures (PMs) and extruded formulations of PMOL with either polyvinyl caprolactam graft copolymer (Soluplus®) or vinylpyrrolidone-vinyl acetate copolymer (Kollidon®) in the solid state were characterized by using differential scanning calorimetry, hot-stage microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental findings from VTXRPD showed that the stable Form I (monoclinic) of PMOL transformed to the metastable polymorph Form II (orthorhombic) at temperatures varying from 112°C to 120°C, in both the PMs and extrudates suggesting an effect of both temperature and identity of the polymers. The findings obtained from VTXRD analysis for both the PMs and the extruded formulations were confirmed by in-line near-infrared (NIR) monitoring during the extrusion processing. In the NIR study, PMOL underwent the same pattern of polymorphic transformations as those detected using VTXPRD. The results of this study suggest that VTXRPD can be used to predict the polymorphic transformation of drugs in polymer matrices during extrusion processing and provides a better understanding of extrusion processing parameters. PMID:24788533

  8. [Intraspecific genetic polymorphism of Russian sturgeon Acipencer gueldenstaedtii].

    PubMed

    Timoshkina, N N; Barmintseva, A E; Usatov, A V; Miuge, N S

    2009-09-01

    Three populations (Azov, Caspian, and Black Sea) of Russian sturgeon Acipenser queldenstaedtii were tested for polymorphism at nuclear (RAPD and microsatellites) and mitochondrial (PCR identification of two mito-types) markers. In addition, morphometric analysis of he representatives of Azov population was carried out. According to the morphological characters, the Black Sea population occupied an intermediate position between the Caspian and Azov populations, reflecting the phylogeography of this species. In agreement with the morphometric data, genetic distances (the data of STR analysis) also placed the Black Sea population between the Caspian and Azov populations (FST = 0.058 and 0.043). The genetic distance between the Azov and Caspian population was somewhat higher (FST = 0.070). The highest allelic polymorphism at four microsatellite loci was found observed in Caspian population, while the lowest polymorphism was in the Sea of Azov. RAPD analysis distinguished high polymorphism within the populations, although it was not feasible for interpopulation analysis. Using the method differentiating the "baerii-like" and typical "gueldenstaedtii" mitotypes, the absence of the "baerii-like" marker in the Black Sea population was demonstrated. The frequency of this marker in Caspian and Azov populations constituted 31.1 and 1.8%, respectively. Possible evolutionary reasons for the interpopulation differences observed are discussed. PMID:19824546

  9. Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers from Coilia ectenes.

    PubMed

    Rong, X J; Xu, Y J; Wang, Q Y; Liao, M J; Liu, X Z; Pan, C Y; Zhang, Z; Wang, Y G

    2013-01-01

    Coilia ectenes (Jordan and Seale 1905) is an important anadromous species that is an important resource at risk of extinction because of over-fishing, pollution, and coastal construction. To evaluate the genetic diversity of C. ectenes for use in breeding programs, elite microsatellite-enriched libraries were constructed and novel microsatellite markers were developed, and applied to genetically detect wild populations. Out of 92 randomly selected and sequenced clones, 89 contained a CA or GA repeat motif. Twenty-two pairs of primers were designed to investigate the polymorphism and genetic structure of a wild population collected from the Yellow River estuary, China. It was found that 2 loci were monomorphic and 20 loci were polymorphic. The number of alleles per polymorphic loci ranged from 3 to 13, with an average of 7.9. The expected heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.05 to 0.89, with an average of 0.68. The isolated polymorphic markers are expected to be of use in future genetic breeding programs for C. ectenes, and in the assessment of genetic variation within this species. PMID:24338395

  10. The Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase Polymorphisms in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jason J; Stanfill, Ansley; Pourmotabbed, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains the fifth leading cause of mortality in the United States with an annual rate of over 128,000 deaths per year. Differences in incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcome have long been noted when comparing ischemic stroke among different ethnicities. The observation that racial disparities exist in clinical outcomes after stroke has resulted in genetic studies focusing on specific polymorphisms. Some studies have focused on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMPs are a ubiquitous group of proteins with extensive roles that include extracellular matrix remodeling and blood-brain barrier disruption. MMPs play an important role in ischemic stroke pathophysiology and clinical outcome. This review will evaluate the evidence for associations between polymorphisms in MMP-1, 2, 3, 9, and 12 with ischemic stroke incidence, pathophysiology, and clinical outcome. The role of polymorphisms in MMP genes may influence the presentation of ischemic stroke and be influenced by racial and ethnic background. However, contradictory evidence for the role of MMP polymorphisms does exist in the literature, and further studies will be necessary to consolidate our understanding of these multi-faceted proteins. PMID:27529234

  11. MicroRNA polymorphisms: a giant leap towards personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prasun J

    2010-01-01

    “An individual’s genetic inheritance of microRNA polymorphisms associated with disease progression, prognosis and treatment holds the key to create safer and more personalized drugs and can be a giant leap towards personalized medicine.” PMID:20428464

  12. Polymorphism in Core-Chlorinated Naphthalene Tetracarboxylic Diimide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdum, Geoffrey; May, Falk; Yao, Nan; Weitz, Thomas; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Polymorphism within organic semiconductors can play a critical role in device performance, as some packing motifs may be more favorable to charge transport than others. As-evaporated polycrystalline thin-films of core-chlorinated naphthalene tetracarboxylic diimides (NTCDI-1) adopt a triclinic polymorph that is not different from those of single crystals grown via physical-vapor transport. Exposing these thin-films to saturated vapors of select organic solvents, such as those of acetone and chloroform, induces structural transformation; thermally evaporated films convert from the triclinic polymorph to a monoclinic polymorph that was reported for solution-grown single crystals. Isothermal transformations are well described by second-order Avrami kinetics; molecular dynamic simulations give us insight into how solvents induce different kinds of favorable molecule-molecule interactions. Interestingly, the surface energy of the underlying substrate also plays a role in determining the rate of transformation; the rate of transformation is 2x and 4x faster on hexamethyldisilazane modified-Si/SiO2 compared to on Si/SiO2 and octadecyltrichlorosilane modified-Si/SiO2, respectively.

  13. Impact of ESR1 Gene Polymorphisms on Migraine Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Liu, Ruozhuo; Dong, Zhao; Wang, Xiaolin; Yu, Shengyuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An increasing number of studies have explored genetic associations between the functionally important polymorphisms in estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) gene and migraine susceptibility. The previously reported associations have nevertheless been inconsistent. The present work incorporating the published data derived from 8 publications was performed to assess the impact of these polymorphisms on incident migraine. Strength of the genetic risk was estimated by means of an odds ratio along with the 95% confidence interval (OR and 95% CI). From the results, we found individuals who harbored the 325-GG genotype, compared with those harboring the CC genotype or CG and CC combined genotypes, had almost 50% greater risk of migraine. The same genetic models showed notable associations in subgroups of Caucasians and migraine with aura (MA). For 594G>A, a moderately increased risk of migraine was seen under AG versus GG. The AA + AG versus GG model, however, showed a borderline association with migraine. Subgroup analyses according to ethnicity and subtype of migraine provided statistical evidence of significantly increased risk of migraine in Caucasians and of a marginal association with MA, respectively. Both 325C>G and 594G>A polymorphisms showed no major effects either in males or in females. Based on the statistical data, we conclude some of the ESR1 gene polymorphisms may have major contributions to the pathogenesis of migraine in Caucasian populations. PMID:26334887

  14. Permanent tooth calcification in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): patterns and polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, K L; Conroy, G C

    1996-01-01

    Tooth calcification is an important developmental marker for use in constructing models for early hominid life history, particularly for its application to the fossil record. As chimpanzees are commonly utilized in interspecific comparisons in such research, this study aims to improve available baseline data for tooth calcification patterns in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and to quantify basic patterns and polymorphisms. We present an analysis of developmental patterns for the left mandibular dentition (I1-M3) based on intraoral radiographs obtained from a cross-sectional sample of chimpanzees (58 males, 60 females) housed at LEMSIP (NYU Medical Center) and Yerkes (Emory University). No significant differences with previous descriptions of the basic sequences of tooth calcification in chimpanzees were found, but variation in such patterns was documented for the first time. In the overall sequence, polymorphisms between the canine and the group (M2 P4 P3) reached significant levels. This is due to the relative delay in canine crown formation compared to other teeth. Differences in the basic sequence between males and females were recorded, but are due to minor shifts in the percentages of occurrence for polymorphic sequences which are common to both genders. Perhaps our most important findings are that a) different polymorphic sequences occur in tooth calcification and tooth emergence in chimpanzees, and b) developmental relationships among teeth fluctuate throughout tooth calcification. Thus, characterizations of dental developmental patterns based on particular stages of development cannot necessarily be extrapolated to other stages without supporting data. PMID:8928717

  15. Interferon-gamma Genetic Polymorphism and Expression in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Lu, Hsing-Fang; Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Yu, Hong-Ren; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Huang, Fu-Chen; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Kuo, Ho-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. IFNG gene encoding interferon (IFN)-γ, produced by natural killer cells and T cells, has been suggested to play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of Kawasaki disease. The aim of this study was to examin the correlation of gene polymorphisms of the IFNG gene and plasma levels of IFN-γ in KD patients and their outcomes. A total of 950 subjects (381 KD and 569 controls) were recruited. Three tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs2069718, rs1861493, rs2069705) were selected for TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Clinical phenotypes, coronary artery lesions (CAL), coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment outcomes were collected for analysis. Plasma IFN-γ levels were also measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Polymorphisms of the IFNG gene were significantly different between the normal controls and KD patients. The G allele of rs1861493 conferred a better response to IVIG treatment in KD patients. AA allele frequencies of rs1861493 were also associated with a significantly higher risk of CAA in KD patients. Furthermore, the plasma IFN-γ level was lower in the AA allele than in the GG allele of rs1861493 both before and after IVIG treatment in KD patients. This study provides the first evidence supporting an association between IFNG gene polymorphisms, susceptibility of KD, IVIG responsiveness, and plasma IFN-γ levels in KD patients. PMID:27124053

  16. Computational Assembly of Polymorphic Amyloid Fibrils Reveals Stable Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Smaoui, Mohamed Raef; Poitevin, Frédéric; Delarue, Marc; Koehl, Patrice; Orland, Henri; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid proteins aggregate into polymorphic fibrils that damage tissues of the brain, nerves, and heart. Experimental and computational studies have examined the structural basis and the nucleation of short fibrils, but the ability to predict and precisely quantify the stability of larger aggregates has remained elusive. We established a complete classification of fibril shapes and developed a tool called CreateFibril to build such complex, polymorphic, modular structures automatically. We applied stability landscapes, a technique we developed to reveal reliable fibril structural parameters, to assess fibril stability. CreateFibril constructed HET-s, Aβ, and amylin fibrils up to 17 nm in length, and utilized a novel dipolar solvent model that captured the effect of dipole-dipole interactions between water and very large molecular systems to assess their aqueous stability. Our results validate experimental data for HET-s and Aβ, and suggest novel (to our knowledge) findings for amylin. In particular, we predicted the correct structural parameters (rotation angles, packing distances, hydrogen bond lengths, and helical pitches) for the one and three predominant HET-s protofilaments. We reveal and structurally characterize all known Aβ polymorphic fibrils, including structures recently classified as wrapped fibrils. Finally, we elucidate the predominant amylin fibrils and assert that native amylin is more stable than its amyloid form. CreateFibril and a database of all stable polymorphic fibril models we tested, along with their structural energy landscapes, are available at http://amyloid.cs.mcgill.ca. PMID:23442919

  17. Structural and electrical properties of polymorphic pentacene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadlober, Barbara; Satzinger, Valentin; Maresch, Hannes; Somitsch, Dieter; Haase, Anja; Pichler, Heinz; Rom, Werner; Jakopic, Georg

    2003-11-01

    Due to its outstanding carrier transport capabilities the aromatic hydrocarbon pentacene is still one of the most promising out of all organic semiconducting materials investigated so far. Pentacene appears in several polymorphic structures that significantly differ with respect to the d(001) spacing. It is shown, that precise control of the epitaxial growth process of thin films enables not only to adjust the formation of the polymorphic phases, but also to influence grain size and shape. The relative volume fraction of the pentacene polymorphs is determined by several parameters which are substrate material, deposition rate, film thickness and substrate temperature. A comparison of X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements reveals that the phase with the smaller layer-by-layer spacing grows on top of the other]. Moreover, there is a strict correlation between evaporation rate and maximum grain size. In addition to structural we also investigated the electrical properties of pentacene thin films focussing on polymorphism and its influence on the transport properties. Apart from the fact that the charge carrier mobility is strongly influenced by the grain size it turned out that the bulk phase is related to a lower intrinisic mobility than the thin film phase.

  18. A Simplified Technique for Evaluating Human "CCR5" Genetic Polymorphism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falteisek, Lukáš; Cerný, Jan; Janštová, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    To involve students in thinking about the problem of AIDS (which is important in the view of nondecreasing infection rates), we established a practical lab using a simplified adaptation of Thomas's (2004) method to determine the polymorphism of HIV co-receptor CCR5 from students' own epithelial cells. CCR5 is a receptor involved in…

  19. Genetic polymorphisms predicting the outcome of bone marrow transplants.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Anne M; Middleton, Peter G; Rocha, Vanderson; Gluckman, Eliane; Holler, Ernst

    2004-12-01

    Analysis of non-histocompatibility leucocyte antigen (HLA) functional genomics, together with conventional risk factors in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can lead to predicting outcome in HLA-matched sibling transplant recipients. Polymorphisms of cytokine genes including tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-10, interferon gamma and interleukin (IL)-6, associate with more severe acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD). Donor genotype for IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) has been associated with reduced aGvHD severity. Other genotypes (patient IL-1Ra, IL-6 and donor IL-1 alpha) have been associated with chronic GvHD, or overall survival (Vitamin D receptor and oestrogen receptor). Polymorphisms within genes associated with host defence/inflammatory responses (mannose binding lectin genes, myeloperoxidase genes and the FC gamma receptors) have been associated with infections. Polymorphisms of pharmacogenes, such as methylenetetrahydrofolate-reductase, have been associated with aGvHD and other post-transplant complications. The NOD2 gene polymorphism, associated with Crohn's disease, has been shown to be associated with risk of gut GvHD. The majority of the studies have been carried out in single centre HLA-matched sibling cohorts and in relatively few matched unrelated donor transplants. This review gives an overall perspective of the current field of non-HLA genetics with regard to HSCT outcome, clinical relevance and potential application of the results to clinical management of HSCT. PMID:15566351

  20. Association between ERCC5 gene polymorphisms and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Na, Nari; Dun, Eer; Ren, Lidong; Li, Guoxin

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to evaluate the association between ERCC5 polymorphism and breast cancer risk. 325 breast cancer patients and 325 controls were recruited in our study between January 2011 and March 2014. ERCC5 rs1047768, rs2094258, rs2296147, rs751402 and rs873601 polymorphisms were genotyped, using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. By logistic regression analysis, we found that individuals with AA genotype of rs2094258 was associated with increased risk of breast cancer when compared with wide-type genotype, and the OR (95% CI) was 1.80 (1.12-2.92) for AA genotype. Individuals with GA+GG genotype of rs2094258 were significantly correlated with increased risk of breast cancer in tobacco smokers, and the OR (95% CI) was 7.35 (1.21-47.20). In conclusion, our study indicated that ERCC5 rs2094258 polymorphism may contribute to the risk of breast cancer. PMID:26045839

  1. The Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase Polymorphisms in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jason J.; Stanfill, Ansley; Pourmotabbed, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains the fifth leading cause of mortality in the United States with an annual rate of over 128,000 deaths per year. Differences in incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcome have long been noted when comparing ischemic stroke among different ethnicities. The observation that racial disparities exist in clinical outcomes after stroke has resulted in genetic studies focusing on specific polymorphisms. Some studies have focused on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMPs are a ubiquitous group of proteins with extensive roles that include extracellular matrix remodeling and blood-brain barrier disruption. MMPs play an important role in ischemic stroke pathophysiology and clinical outcome. This review will evaluate the evidence for associations between polymorphisms in MMP-1, 2, 3, 9, and 12 with ischemic stroke incidence, pathophysiology, and clinical outcome. The role of polymorphisms in MMP genes may influence the presentation of ischemic stroke and be influenced by racial and ethnic background. However, contradictory evidence for the role of MMP polymorphisms does exist in the literature, and further studies will be necessary to consolidate our understanding of these multi-faceted proteins. PMID:27529234

  2. The role of MBL2 gene polymorphism in sepsis incidence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Ning, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This case-control study was aimed to explore the role of mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene rs1800450 polymorphism (codon 54 A/B, G230A) in the development of sepsis in Han Chinese. Methods: MBL2 rs1800450 polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). MBL serum level was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Associations between rs1800450 and sepsis susceptibility was detected by Chi-square test and represented by odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Correlation of rs1800450 genotypes and MBL serum level was assessed using t test. Result: Variant A allele frequency was significantly observed in cases than that in controls, indicating a significant association with the susceptibility of sepsis (OR = 1.979, 95% CI = 1.200-3.262). GA genotype also relate to the onset of sepsis (OR = 2.090, 95% CI = 1.163-3.753). MBL serum concentrations were significantly different between case and control groups (P<0.001). Meanwhile, variant allele carriers had lower serum level compared with wild homozygous (P<0.001). Conclusion: Variant A allele in MBL2 gene rs1800450 polymorphism might increase the risk of sepsis via decrease the MBL serum level. PMID:26823854

  3. Systematic Identification of Balanced Transposition Polymorphisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Faddah, Dina A.; Ganko, Eric W.; McCoach, Caroline; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Hanlon, Sean E.; Mann, Frederick G.; Mieczkowska, Joanna O.; Jones, Corbin D.; Lieb, Jason D.; Vision, Todd J.

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput techniques for detecting DNA polymorphisms generally do not identify changes in which the genomic position of a sequence, but not its copy number, varies among individuals. To explore such balanced structural polymorphisms, we used array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to conduct a genome-wide screen for single-copy genomic segments that occupy different genomic positions in the standard laboratory strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S90) and a polymorphic wild isolate (Y101) through analysis of six tetrads from a cross of these two strains. Paired-end high-throughput sequencing of Y101 validated four of the predicted rearrangements. The transposed segments contained one to four annotated genes each, yet crosses between S90 and Y101 yielded mostly viable tetrads. The longest segment comprised 13.5 kb near the telomere of chromosome XV in the S288C reference strain and Southern blotting confirmed its predicted location on chromosome IX in Y101. Interestingly, inter-locus crossover events between copies of this segment occurred at a detectable rate. The presence of low-copy repetitive sequences at the junctions of this segment suggests that it may have arisen through ectopic recombination. Our methodology and findings provide a starting point for exploring the origins, phenotypic consequences, and evolutionary fate of this largely unexplored form of genomic polymorphism. PMID:19503594

  4. A Polymorphism in Mitochondrial DNA Associated with IQ?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skuder, Patricia; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Of 100 DNA markers examined in an allelic association study, only 1 showed a replicated association with IQ in samples totaling 107 children. How the gene marked by the particular restriction fragment length polymorphism was tracked and its mitochondrial origin identified is described. (SLD)

  5. Association between ERCC5 gene polymorphisms and gastric cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Guo, B W; Yang, L; Zhao, R; Hao, S Z

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the role of ERCC5 gene polymorphisms (rs17655 and rs751402) in the development of gastric cancer in a Chinese population. A total of 142 gastric cancer patients whose diagnoses were confirmed by pathology, and 274 control subjects were recruited from Tangshan Gongren Hospital between March 2013 and March 2015. Genotyping of ERCC5 rs17655 and rs751402 polymorphisms was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Compared with the control subjects, we found that gastric cancer patients were more likely to be older, smoke tobacco, drink alcohol, and suffer from Helicobacter pylori infection. Using a chi-square test, a significant difference was observed in the distribution ofERCC5 rs751402 genotypes between patient and control groups (chi-square = 7.79, P = 0.02). In addition, unconditional multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the AA genotype of rs751402 significantly increased gastric cancer risk compared to the GG genotype [odds ratio (OR) = 2.61, 95%CI = 1.23-5.49; P = 0.005]. Moreover, we found that the AA genotype correlated with elevated risk of gastric cancer when compared to the GG+AG genotype under a recessive model (OR = 2.21, 95%CI = 1.11-4.39; P = 0.01). In conclusion, we suggest that the ERCC5 rs751402 polymorphism is associated with development of gastric cancer. PMID:27323183

  6. Molecular understanding of the compaction behavior of indomethacin polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Khomane, Kailas S; More, Parth K; Raghavendra, Guru; Bansal, Arvind K

    2013-02-01

    Polymorphs enable us to gain molecular insights into the compaction behavior of pharmaceutical powders. Two polymorphs (α and γ) of indomethacin (IMC) were investigated for in-die and out-of-die compaction behavior using compressibility, tabletability and compactibility (CTC) profile, stress-strain relationship, and Heckel, Kawakita and Walker equations. Compaction studies were performed on a fully instrumented rotary tabletting machine. CTC analysis revealed that the γ-form has increased compressibility while the α-form showed greater compactibility. The α-form also showed increased tabletability over the γ-form at all the compaction pressures. Lower values of Py (Heckel parameter) and 1/b (Kawakita parameter) indicated increased deformation behavior of γ-form. Stress-strain analysis also supports the increased compressibility of γ-form. In addition, Walker analysis showed higher compressibility coefficient (W) for α-form, consistent with its greater tabletability. Thus, tabletability of IMC polymorphs was governed by the compactibility of the material. Detailed examination of crystallographic data revealed that the presence of a slip plane system in the γ-form offered it increased compressibility and deformation behavior. However, the α-form showed greater compactibility by virtue of closer molecular packing (higher true density). Hence, although direct correlation between tabletability and the presence of slip planes in the crystals has been reported, prediction solely based on this crystallographic feature must be avoided. The present work reiterates the influence of the crystal packing on the tabletability of the pharmaceutical polymorphs. PMID:23301663

  7. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Predict Symptom Severity of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Yun; Chen, Rong; Ke, Xiaoyan; Cheng, Lu; Chu, Kangkang; Lu, Zuhong; Herskovits, Edward H.

    2012-01-01

    Autism is widely believed to be a heterogeneous disorder; diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical criteria, although genetic, as well as environmental, influences are thought to be prominent factors in the etiology of most forms of autism. Our goal is to determine whether a predictive model based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)…

  8. Bulk segregant analysis using single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bulk segregant analysis using microarrays, and extreme array mapping have recently been used to rapidly identify genomic regions associated with phenotypes in multiple species. These experiments, however require the identification of single feature polymorphisms between the cross parents for each ne...

  9. Sleep and COMT Polymorphism in ADHD Children: Preliminary Actigraphic Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Reut; Grizenko, Natalie; Schwartz, George; Amor, Leila Ben; Gauthier, Julie; de Guzman, Rosherrie; Joober, Ridha

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether COMT (catechol-O-methyltransferase) polymorphism modulates aspects of sleep in children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Nightly sleep actigraphic recordings during a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical study (1 week of 0.5 mg/kg MPH; 1 week of placebo) were…

  10. A Laboratory Exercise for Genotyping Two Human Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernando, James; Carlson, Bradley; LeBard, Timothy; McCarthy, Michael; Umali, Finianne; Ashton, Bryce; Rose, Ferrill F., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic decrease in the cost of sequencing a human genome is leading to an era in which a wide range of students will benefit from having an understanding of human genetic variation. Since over 90% of sequence variation between humans is in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), a laboratory exercise has been devised in order to…

  11. Polymorphism among EST-based markers in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) has a narrow genetic base. This is in part due to population genetic processes such as founder events, genetic bottlenecks, and natural and artificial selection during domestication. We characterize the nucleotide polymorphism in 26 EST-based markers...

  12. Discovery, Validation and Characterization of 1039 Cattle Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified approximately 13000 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by comparison of repeat-masked BAC-end sequences from the cattle RPCI-42 BAC library with whole-genome shotgun contigs of cattle genome assembly Btau 1.0. Genotyping of a subset of these SNPs was performed on a panel ...

  13. PEROXIDASE GENE POLYMORPHISM IN BUFFALOGRASS AND OTHER GRASSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant peroxidases are a family of related proteins possessing highly conserved domains. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on these conserved domains can be used to amplify DNA sequences coding for peroxidases from plants with unsequenced genomes. Polymorphisms in peroxidase genes among buffa...

  14. High polymorphism at microsatellite loci in the Chinese donkey.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R F; Xie, W M; Zhang, T; Lei, C Z

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships between Chinese donkey breeds, 415 individuals representing ten breeds were investigated using ten microsatellite markers. The observed number of alleles, mean effective number of alleles (NE), mean expected heterozygosity (HE), and polymorphic information content (PIC) of each breed and polymorphic locus were analyzed. The results showed that seven (HTG7, HTG10, AHT4, HTG6, HMS6, HMS3, and HMS7) of ten microsatellite loci were polymorphic. The mean PIC, HE, and NE of seven polymorphic loci for the ten donkey breeds were 0.7679, 0.8072, and 6.0275, respectively. These results suggest that domestic Chinese donkey breeds possess higher levels of genetic diversity and heterozygosity than foreign donkeys. A neighbor-joining tree based on Nei's standard genetic distance showed that there was close genetic distance among Xinjiang, Qingyang, Xiji, and Guanzhong donkey breeds. In addition, Mongolia and Dezhou donkey breeds were placed in the same category. The phylogenetic tree revealed that the genetic relationships between Chinese donkey breeds are consistent with their geographic distribution and breeding history. PMID:27420967

  15. Development of a fingerprinting panel using medically relevant polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Deanna S; Ivacic, Lynn C; McCarty, Catherine A

    2009-01-01

    Background For population based biorepositories to be of use, rigorous quality control and assurance must be maintained. We have designed and validated a panel of polymorphisms for individual sample identification consisting of 36 common polymorphisms that have been implicated in a wide range of diseases and an additional sex marker. This panel uniquely identifies our biorepository of approximately 20,000 samples and would continue to uniquely identify samples in biorepositories of over 100 million samples. Methods A panel of polymorphisms associated with at least one disease state in multiple populations was constructed using a cut-off of 0.20 or greater confirmed minor allele frequency in a European Caucasian population. The fingerprinting assay was tested using the MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry method of allele determination on a Sequenom platform with a panel of 28 Caucasian HapMap samples; the results were compared with known genotypes to ensure accuracy. The frequencies of the alleles were compared to the expected frequencies from dbSNP and any genotype that did not achieve Hardy Weinberg equilibrium was excluded from the final assay. Results The final assay consisted of the AMG sex marker and 36 medically relevant polymorphisms with representation on each chromosome, encompassing polymorphisms on both the Illumina 550K bead array and the Affymetrix 6.0 chip (with over a million polymorphisms) platform. The validated assay has a P(ID) of 6.132 × 10-15 and a Psib(ID) of 3.077 × 10-8. This assay allows unique identification of our biorepository of 20,000 individuals as well and ensures that as we continue to recruit individuals they can be uniquely fingerprinted. In addition, diseases such as cancer, heart disease diabetes, obesity, and respiratory disease are well represented in the fingerprinting assay. Conclusion The polymorphisms in this panel are currently represented on a number of common genotyping platforms making QA/QC flexible enough to accommodate a

  16. Do polymorphisms in chemosensory genes matter for human ingestive behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, John E.; Feeney, Emma L.; Allen, Alissa L.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, basic research in chemoreceptor genetics and neurobiology have revolutionized our understanding of individual differences in chemosensation. From an evolutionary perspective, chemosensory variations appear to have arisen in response to different living environments, generally in the avoidance of toxins and to better detect vital food sources. Today, it is often assumed that these differences may drive variable food preferences and choices, with downstream effects on health and wellness. A growing body of evidence indicates chemosensory variation is far more complex than previously believed. However, just because a genetic polymorphism results in altered receptor function in cultured cells or even behavioral phenotypes in the laboratory, this variation may not be sufficient to influence food choice in free living humans. Still, there is ample evidence to indicate allelic variation in TAS2R38 predicts variation in bitterness of synthetic pharmaceuticals (e.g., propylthiouracil) and natural plant compounds (e.g., goitrin), and this variation associates with differential intake of alcohol and vegetables. Further, this is only one of 25 unique bitter taste genes (TAS2Rs) in humans, and emerging evidence suggests other TAS2Rs may also contain polymorphisms that a functional with respect to ingestive behavior. For example, TAS2R16 polymorphisms are linked to the bitterness of naturally occurring plant compounds and alcoholic beverage intake, a TAS2R19 polymorphism predicts differences in quinine bitterness and grapefruit bitterness and liking, and TAS2R31 polymorphisms associate with differential bitterness of plant compounds like aristolochic acid and the sulfonyl amide sweeteners saccharin and acesulfame-K. More critically with respect to food choices, these polymorphisms may vary independently from each other within and across individuals, meaning a monolithic one-size-fits-all approach to bitterness needs to be abandoned. Nor are genetic

  17. Do polymorphisms in chemosensory genes matter for human ingestive behavior?

    PubMed

    Hayes, John E; Feeney, Emma L; Allen, Alissa L

    2013-12-01

    In the last decade, basic research in chemoreceptor genetics and neurobiology have revolutionized our understanding of individual differences in chemosensation. From an evolutionary perspective, chemosensory variations appear to have arisen in response to different living environments, generally in the avoidance of toxins and to better detect vital food sources. Today, it is often assumed that these differences may drive variable food preferences and choices, with downstream effects on health and wellness. A growing body of evidence indicates chemosensory variation is far more complex than previously believed. However, just because a genetic polymorphism results in altered receptor function in cultured cells or even behavioral phenotypes in the laboratory, this variation may not be sufficient to influence food choice in free living humans. Still, there is ample evidence to indicate allelic variation in TAS2R38 predicts variation in bitterness of synthetic pharmaceuticals (e.g., propylthiouracil) and natural plant compounds (e.g., goitrin), and this variation associates with differential intake of alcohol and vegetables. Further, this is only one of 25 unique bitter taste genes (TAS2Rs) in humans, and emerging evidence suggests other TAS2Rs may also contain polymorphisms that a functional with respect to ingestive behavior. For example, TAS2R16 polymorphisms are linked to the bitterness of naturally occurring plant compounds and alcoholic beverage intake, a TAS2R19 polymorphism predicts differences in quinine bitterness and grapefruit bitterness and liking, and TAS2R31 polymorphisms associate with differential bitterness of plant compounds like aristolochic acid and the sulfonyl amide sweeteners saccharin and acesulfame-K. More critically with respect to food choices, these polymorphisms may vary independently from each other within and across individuals, meaning a monolithic one-size-fits-all approach to bitterness needs to be abandoned. Nor are genetic

  18. Mutations and a polymorphism in the tuberin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Northup, H.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Au, K.S.; Rodriguez, E.

    1994-09-01

    Two deletions and a polymorphism have been identified in the recently described tuberin gene. The tuberin gene (designated TSC2) when mutated causes tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Fifty-three affected individuals (30 from families with multiple affected and 23 isolated cases) were screened with the tuberin cDNA for gross deletions or rearrangements. Both deletions were found in families with multiple affected members (family designations: HOU-5 and HOU-22). The approximate size of the deletion in HOU-5 is ten kilobases and eliminates a BamHI restriction site. The deletion includes a portion of the 5{prime} half of the tuberin cDNA. The deletion in HOU-22 occurs in the 3{prime} half of the gene. The deletions are being further characterized. A HindIII restriction site polymorphism was detected by a 0.5 kilobase probe from the 5{prime} coding region of the tuberin gene in an individual from a family linked to chromosome 9 (posterior probability of linkage 93%). The polymorphism did not segregate with TSC in the family. The family had previously been shown to give negative results with multiple markers on chromosome 16. The polymorphism was also seen in one individual among a panel of 20 randomly selected unaffected individuals. Thirty-five additional affected probands (five from families and 30 isolated cases) are being tested with the tuberin cDNA. Testing for subtle mutations is our panel of 80 affected probands is underway utilizing SSCP. Additional mutations or polymorphisms detected will be reported. The tuberin cDNA was a kind gift of The European Chromosome 16 Tuberous Sclerosis Consortium.

  19. CC chemokine receptor 5 gene polymorphisms in beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Silveira, L; Spagnolo, P; Gillespie, M; Gottschall, E B; Welsh, K I; du Bois, R M; Newman, L S; Maier, L A

    2010-08-01

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is expressed on type-1 T-helper cells, which are involved in the pathogenesis of the granulomatous lung disease chronic beryllium disease (CBD). CCR5 gene (CCR5) polymorphisms are associated with sarcoidosis severity. The present study explores associations between CCR5 polymorphisms and CBD and its disease progression. Eight CCR5 polymorphisms were genotyped in CBD (n = 88), beryllium sensitisation (BeS; n = 86) and beryllium-exposed nondiseased controls (n = 173) using PCR with sequence-specific primers. Pulmonary function and bronchoalveolar lavage data were examined for associations with genotypes. There were no significant differences in genotype and allele frequency between CBD, BeS individuals and controls. In CBD, associations were found with decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity and the CCR5 -3458 thymidine (T)T genotype (p<0.0001), and an increase in alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference at rest (p = 0.003) and at maximum exercise (p = 0.01) and the -5663 adenine allele. Increased bronchoalveolar lavage lymphocyte numbers were associated with CCR5 -2459 guanine/-2135T (p = 0.01) only in the combined CBD and BeS group. This is the first study showing that CCR5 polymorphisms are associated with worsening pulmonary function over time in CBD, suggesting that CCR5 is important in the progression of pulmonary function in CBD. Further studies would be useful to clarify the mechanism whereby CCR5 polymorphisms affect progression of CBD. PMID:20075058

  20. The interleukin-1 family gene polymorphisms and Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Khalilzadeh, O; Anvari, M; Esteghamati, A; Momen-Heravi, F; Mahmoudi, M; Rashidi, A; Amiri, H M; Ranjbar, M; Tabataba-Vakili, S; Amirzargar, A

    2010-09-01

    Genetic factors, including cytokine gene polymorphisms, are potential contributors to the pathogenesis of the Graves' disease (GD). We attempted in this study to determine the association between GD and the following polymorphisms in the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family genes: IL-1alpha (-889C/T), IL-1ss (-511C/T), IL-1ss (+3962C/T), IL-1R (Pst-1 1970C/T) and IL-1RA (Mspa-I 11100C/T). We studied 107 patients with an established diagnosis of GD and 140 healthy controls. Cytokine typing was performed by the polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers assay. Genotype distributions among patients were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for all polymorphisms. The frequency of the IL-1alpha -889T allele was significantly higher in patients than in controls (51.9% vs. 31.6%, OR=2.33, 95% CI=1.61-3.38; p<0.0001). The IL-1RA Msp-I 11100C allele was significantly more frequent in patients than in controls (50.0% vs. 22.9%, OR=3.38, 95% CI=2.29-4.97, p<0.0001). No significant associations were found for other polymorphisms. Although the IL-1 family has well-known roles in GD pathogenesis, the contributions of their genetic variations to the disease are unclear. In this study, we documented a highly significant association between GD and polymorphism in IL-1alpha and IL-1RA genes. Further studies in other populations are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:20400062

  1. Habitat-based polymorphism is common in stream fishes.

    PubMed

    Senay, Caroline; Boisclair, Daniel; Peres-Neto, Pedro R

    2015-01-01

    Morphological differences (size and shape) across habitats are common in lake fish where differences relate to two dominant contrasting habitats: the pelagic and littoral habitat. Repeated occurrence of littoral and pelagic morphs across multiple populations of several lake fish species has been considered as important evidence that polymorphism is adaptive in these systems. It has been suggested that these habitat-based polymorphic differences are due to the temporal stability of the differences between littoral and pelagic habitats. Although streams are spatially heterogeneous, they are also more temporally dynamic than lakes and it is still an open question whether streams provide the environmental conditions that promote habitat-based polymorphism. We tested whether fish from riffle, run and pool habitats, respectively, differed consistently in their morphology. Our test compared patterns of morphological variation (size and shape) in 10 fish species from the three stream habitat types in 36 separate streams distributed across three watersheds. For most species, body size and shape (after controlling for body size) differed across riffle, run and pool habitats. Unlike many lake species, the nature of these differences was not consistent across species, possibly because these species use these habitat types in different ways. Our results suggest that habitat-based polymorphism is an important feature also in stream fishes despite the fact that streams are temporally variable in contrast to lake systems. Future research is required to assess whether the patterns of habitat-based polymorphism encountered in streams have a genetic basis or they are simply the result of within generation phenotypic plasticity. PMID:25041645

  2. Polymorphic minisatellites in the mitochondrial DNAs of Oryza and Brassica.

    PubMed

    Honma, Yujiro; Yoshida, Yu; Terachi, Toru; Toriyama, Kinya; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2011-08-01

    Polymorphic analyses of angiosperm mitochondrial DNA are rare in comparison with chloroplast DNA, because few target sequences in angiosperm mitochondrial DNA are known. Minisatellites, a tandem array of repeated sequences with a repeat unit of 10 to ~100 bp, are popular target sequences of animal mitochondria, but Beta vulgaris is the only known angiosperm species for which such an analysis has been conducted. From this lack of information, it was uncertain as to whether polymorphic minisatellites existed in other angiosperm species. Ten plant mitochondrial DNAs were found to contain minisatellite-like repeated sequences, most of which were located in intergenic regions but a few occurred in gene coding and intronic regions. Oryza and Brassica accessions were selected as models for the investigation of minisatellite polymorphism because substantial systematic information existed. PCR analysis of 42 Oryza accessions revealed length polymorphisms in four of the five minisatellites. The mitochondrial haplotypes of the 16 Oryza accessions with chromosomal complement (genome) types of CC, BBCC and CCDD were identical but were clearly distinguished from BB-genome accessions, a result consistent with the notion that the cytoplasmic donor parent of the amphidiploid species might be the CC-genome species. Twenty-nine accessions of six major cultivated species of Brassica were classified into five mitochondrial haplotypes based on two polymorphic minisatellites out of six loci. The haplotypes of Brassica juncea and Brassica carinata accessions were identical to Brassica rapa and Brassica nigra accessions, respectively. The haplotypes of Brassica napus accessions were heterogeneous and unique, results that were consistent with previous studies. PMID:21562713

  3. BRCA1 polymorphism in breast cancer patients from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    JAURE, OMAR; ALONSO, ELIANA N.; BRAICO, DIEGO AGUILERA; NIETO, ALVARO; OROZCO, MANUELA; MORELLI, CECILIA; FERRO, ALEJANDRO M.; BARUTTA, ELENA; VINCENT, ESTEBAN; MARTÍNEZ, DOMINGO; MARTÍNEZ, IGNACIO; MAEGLI, MARIA INES; FRIZZA, ALEJANDRO; KOWALYZYN, RUBEN; SALVADORI, MARISA; GINESTET, PAUL; GONZALEZ DONNA, MARIA L.; BALOGH, GABRIELA A.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in females in Argentina, with an incidence rate similar to that in the USA. However, the contribution of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation in breast cancer incidence has not yet been investigated in Argentina. In order to evaluate which BRCA1 polymorphisms or mutations characterize female breast cancer in Argentina, the current study enrolled 206 females with breast cancer from several hospitals from the southeast of Argentina. A buccal smear sample was obtained in duplicate from each patient and the DNA samples were processed for polymorphism analysis using the single-strand conformational polymorphism technique. The polymorphisms in BRCA1 were investigated using a combination of 15 primers to analyze exons 2, 3, 5, 20 and 11 (including the 11.1 to 11.12 regions). The BRCA1 mutations were confirmed by direct sequencing. Samples were successfully examined from 154 females and, among these, 16 mutations were identified in the BRCA1 gene representing 13.9% of the samples analyzed. One patient was identified with a polymorphism in exon 2 (0.86%), four in exon 20 (3.48%), four in exon 11.3 (3.48%), one in exon 11.7 (0.86%), two in exon 11.8 (1.74%), one in exon 11.10 (0.86%) and one in exon 11.11 (0.86%). The most prevalent alteration in BRCA1 was located in exon 11 (11 out of 16 patients; 68.75%). The objective of our next study is to evaluate the prevalence of mutations in the BRCA2 gene and analyze the BRCA1 gene in the healthy relatives of BRCA1 mutation carriers. PMID:25624909

  4. A novel method for identifying polymorphic transposable elements via scanning of high-throughput short reads.

    PubMed

    Kang, Houxiang; Zhu, Dan; Lin, Runmao; Opiyo, Stephen Obol; Jiang, Ning; Shiu, Shin-Han; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2016-06-01

    Identification of polymorphic transposable elements (TEs) is important because TE polymorphism creates genetic diversity and influences the function of genes in the host genome. However, de novo scanning of polymorphic TEs remains a challenge. Here, we report a novel computational method, called PTEMD (polymorphic TEs and their movement detection), for de novo discovery of genome-wide polymorphic TEs. PTEMD searches highly identical sequences using reads supported breakpoint evidences. Using PTEMD, we identified 14 polymorphic TE families (905 sequences) in rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, and 68 (10,618 sequences) in maize. We validated one polymorphic TE family experimentally, MoTE-1; all MoTE-1 family members are located in different genomic loci in the three tested isolates. We found that 57.1% (8 of 14) of the PTEMD-detected polymorphic TE families in M. oryzae are active. Furthermore, our data indicate that there are more polymorphic DNA transposons in maize than their counterparts of retrotransposons despite the fact that retrotransposons occupy largest fraction of genomic mass. We demonstrated that PTEMD is an effective tool for identifying polymorphic TEs in M. oryzae and maize genomes. PTEMD and the genome-wide polymorphic TEs in M. oryzae and maize are publically available at http://www.kanglab.cn/blast/PTEMD_V1.02.htm. PMID:27098848

  5. A novel method for identifying polymorphic transposable elements via scanning of high-throughput short reads

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Houxiang; Zhu, Dan; Lin, Runmao; Opiyo, Stephen Obol; Jiang, Ning; Shiu, Shin-Han; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Identification of polymorphic transposable elements (TEs) is important because TE polymorphism creates genetic diversity and influences the function of genes in the host genome. However, de novo scanning of polymorphic TEs remains a challenge. Here, we report a novel computational method, called PTEMD (polymorphic TEs and their movement detection), for de novo discovery of genome-wide polymorphic TEs. PTEMD searches highly identical sequences using reads supported breakpoint evidences. Using PTEMD, we identified 14 polymorphic TE families (905 sequences) in rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, and 68 (10,618 sequences) in maize. We validated one polymorphic TE family experimentally, MoTE-1; all MoTE-1 family members are located in different genomic loci in the three tested isolates. We found that 57.1% (8 of 14) of the PTEMD-detected polymorphic TE families in M. oryzae are active. Furthermore, our data indicate that there are more polymorphic DNA transposons in maize than their counterparts of retrotransposons despite the fact that retrotransposons occupy largest fraction of genomic mass. We demonstrated that PTEMD is an effective tool for identifying polymorphic TEs in M. oryzae and maize genomes. PTEMD and the genome-wide polymorphic TEs in M. oryzae and maize are publically available at http://www.kanglab.cn/blast/PTEMD_V1.02.htm. PMID:27098848

  6. Formation of β Polymorphs in Milk Fats with Large Differences in Triacylglycerol Profiles.

    PubMed

    Tzompa-Sosa, Daylan A; Ramel, Pere R; van Valenberg, Hein J F; van Aken, George A

    2016-05-25

    In this study, we characterized the polymorphism of milk fat (MF) with various TAG compositions during isothermal crystallization at 20 °C. TAG composition of MF from seven individual cows was determined using GC-FID and MALDI-TOF MS, and MF polymorphism was studied using X-ray diffraction. Results showed that TAG profile determines the polymorphic behavior of MF. Saturated TAG with carbon numbers 34-38 promoted the formation of α polymorphs, whereas unsaturated TAG with 52-54 promoted the formation of the β polymorphs. Furthermore, MFs with unsaturated fatty acid profiles were increased in unsaturated TAG with 52-54 carbons. The presence of MF crystals in the β polymorph has been controversial over the years as most authors mainly find MF crystals in the α and β' form. In our work, we showed that the β polymorph is formed in MF on the basis of its TAG composition. PMID:27121766

  7. Genetic polymorphism of toll-like receptors 4 gene by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms, polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformational polymorphism to correlate with mastitic cows

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja H.; Patel, Nirmal A.; Rank, D. N.; Joshi, C. G.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: An attempt has been made to study the toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) gene polymorphism from cattle DNA to correlate with mastitis cows. Materials and Methods: In present investigation, two fragments of TLR4 gene named T4CRBR1 and T4CRBR2 of a 316 bp and 382 bp were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively from Kankrej (22) and Triple cross (24) cattle. The genetic polymorphisms in the two populations were detected by a single-strand conformational polymorphism in the first locus and by digesting the fragments with restriction endonuclease Alu I in the second one. Results: Results showed that both alleles (A and B) of two loci were found in all the two populations and the value of polymorphism information content indicated that these were highly polymorphic. Statistical results of χ2 test indicated that two polymorphism sites in the two populations fit with Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (p<0.05). Meanwhile, the effect of polymorphism of TLR4 gene on the somatic cell score (SCS) indicated the cattle with allele a in T4CRBR1 showed lower SCS than that of allele B (p<0.05). Thus, the allele A might play an important role in mastitis resistance in cows. Conclusion: The relationship between the bovine mastitis trait and the polymorphism of TLR4 gene indicated that the bovine TLR4 gene may play an important role in mastitis resistance. PMID:27047144

  8. Genes encoding conserved hypothetical proteins localized in the conjugative transfer region of plasmid pRet42a from Rhizobium etli CFN42 participate in modulating transfer and affect conjugation from different donors

    PubMed Central

    López-Fuentes, Eunice; Torres-Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Cervantes, Laura; Brom, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Among sequenced genomes, it is common to find a high proportion of genes encoding proteins that cannot be assigned a known function. In bacterial genomes, genes related to a similar function are often located in contiguous regions. The presence of genes encoding conserved hypothetical proteins (chp) in such a region may suggest that they are related to that particular function. Plasmid pRet42a from Rhizobium etli CFN42 is a conjugative plasmid containing a segment of approximately 30 Kb encoding genes involved in conjugative transfer. In addition to genes responsible for Dtr (DNA transfer and replication), Mpf (Mating pair formation) and regulation, it has two chp-encoding genes (RHE_PA00163 and RHE_PA00164) and a transcriptional regulator (RHE_PA00165). RHE_PA00163 encodes an uncharacterized protein conserved in bacteria that presents a COG4634 conserved domain, and RHE_PA00164 encodes an uncharacterized conserved protein with a DUF433 domain of unknown function. RHE_PA00165 presents a HTH_XRE domain, characteristic of DNA-binding proteins belonging to the xenobiotic response element family of transcriptional regulators. Interestingly, genes similar to these are also present in transfer regions of plasmids from other bacteria. To determine if these genes participate in conjugative transfer, we mutagenized them and analyzed their conjugative phenotype. A mutant in RHE_PA00163 showed a slight (10 times) but reproducible increase in transfer frequency from Rhizobium donors, while mutants in RHE_PA00164 and RHE_PA00165 lost their ability to transfer the plasmid from some Agrobacterium donors. Our results indicate that the chp-encoding genes located among conjugation genes are indeed related to this function. However, the participation of RHE_PA00164 and RHE_PA00165 is only revealed under very specific circumstances, and is not perceived when the plasmid is transferred from the original host. RHE_PA00163 seems to be a fine-tuning modulator for conjugative transfer

  9. '1-Antitrypsin polymorphism and systematics of eastern North American wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Federoff, N.E.

    2002-01-01

    We used data on the polymorphic status of '1-antitrypsin ('1AT) to study the relationship of Minnesota wolves to the gray wolf (Canis lupus), which was thought to have evolved in Eurasia, and to red wolves (Canis rufus) and coyotes (Canis latrans), which putatively evolved in North America. Recent evidence had indicated that Minnesota wolves might be more closely related to red wolves and coyotes. Samples from wild-caught Minnesota wolves and from captive wolves, at least some of which originated in Alaska and western Canada, were similarly polymorphic for '1AT, whereas coyote and red wolf samples were all monomorphic. Our findings, in conjunction with earlier results, are consistent with the Minnesota wolf being a gray wolf of Eurasian origin or possibly a hybrid between the gray wolf of Eurasian origin and the proposed North American wolf.

  10. Latitude-correlated genetic polymorphisms: selection or gene flow?

    PubMed

    Ciminelli, B M; Jodice, C; Scozzari, R; Corbo, R M; Nahum, M; Pompei, F; Santachiara-Benerecetti, S A; Santolamazza, C; Morpurgo, G P; Modiano, G

    2000-08-01

    Latitude-correlated polymorphisms can be due to either selection-driven evolution or gene flow. To discriminate between them, we propose an approach that studies subpopulations springing from a single population that have lived for generations at different latitudes and have had a low genetic admixture. These requirements are fulfilled to a large extent by Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jews. The original population lived at a latitude of 35 degrees N, where the Sephardis still live. The Ashkenazis, however, moved to a latitude of 50 degrees N, starting about 10 centuries ago. The present study examines 3 latitude-correlated polymorphisms: PGP, PGM1, and AHSG. We found that PGP*2 and AHSG*2 alleles most likely underwent selection-driven evolution, but that PGM1*ts allele was not similarly affected. Since temperature might have been considered a reasonable selective factor, we also studied a population living at >800 m above sea level from Aosta Valley (Italy). PMID:11048786

  11. Glutathione S-transferase class {pi} polymorphism in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Aivaliotis, M.J.; Cantu, T.; Gilligan, R.

    1995-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) comprises a family of isozymes with broad substrate specificities. One or more GST isozymes are present in most animal tissues and function in several detoxification pathways through the conjugation of reduced glutathione with various electrophiles, thereby reducing their potential toxicity. Four soluble GST isozymes encoded by genes on different chromosomes have been identified in humans. The acidic class pi GST, GSTP (previously designated GST-3), is widely distributed in adult tissues and appears to be the only GST isozyme present in leukocytes and placenta. Previously reported electrophoretic analyses of erythrocyte and leukocyte extracts revealed single bands of activity, which differed slightly in mobility between the two cell types, or under other conditions, a two-banded pattern. To our knowledge, no genetically determined polymorphisms have previously been reported in GSTP from any species. We now report a polymorphism of GSTP in baboon leukocytes, and present family data that verifies autosomal codominant inheritance. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Flow-cytometry-based DNA hybidization and polymorphism analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hong; Kommander, Kristina; White, P. S.; Nolan, John P.

    1998-05-01

    Functional analysis of the human genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well- suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. We are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. Our approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advantages of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  13. Folate: metabolism, genes, polymorphisms and the associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Nazki, Fakhira Hassan; Sameer, Aga Syed; Ganaie, Bashir Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Folate being an important vitamin of B Complex group in our diet plays an important role not only in the synthesis of DNA but also in the maintenance of methylation reactions in the cells. Folate metabolism is influenced by several processes especially its dietary intake and the polymorphisms of the associated genes involved. Aberrant folate metabolism, therefore, affects both methylation as well as the DNA synthesis processes, both of which have been implicated in the development of various diseases. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the processes involved in folate metabolism and consequences of deviant folate metabolism, particular emphasis is given to the polymorphic genes which have been implicated in the development of various diseases in humans, like vascular diseases, Down's syndrome, neural tube defects, psychiatric disorders and cancers. PMID:24091066

  14. HLA-B polymorphisms and intracellular assembly modes.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Malini; Geng, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules are ligands for antigen receptors of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) and inhibitory receptors of natural killer (NK) cells. The high degree of HLA class I polymorphism allows for the selection of distinct and diverse sets of antigenic peptide ligands for presentation to CTL. The extensive polymorphisms of the HLA class I genes also result in large variations in their intracellular folding and assembly characteristics. Recent findings indicate that North American HLA-B variants differ significantly in the stabilities of their peptide-deficient forms and in the requirements for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident factor tapasin for proper assembly. In HIV-infected individuals, the presence of tapasin-independent HLA-B allotypes links to more rapid progression to death. Further studies are important to better understand how the intrinsic structural characteristics of HLA class I folding intermediates affect immune responses mediated by CTL and NK cells. PMID:26239417

  15. Polymorphism in magic-sized Au144(SR)60 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kirsten M. Ø.; Juhas, Pavol; Tofanelli, Marcus A.; Heinecke, Christine L.; Vaughan, Gavin; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-small, magic-sized metal nanoclusters represent an important new class of materials with properties between molecules and particles. However, their small size challenges the conventional methods for structure characterization. Here we present the structure of ultra-stable Au144(SR)60 magic-sized nanoclusters obtained from atomic pair distribution function analysis of X-ray powder diffraction data. The study reveals structural polymorphism in these archetypal nanoclusters. In addition to confirming the theoretically predicted icosahedral-cored cluster, we also find samples with a truncated decahedral core structure, with some samples exhibiting a coexistence of both cluster structures. Although the clusters are monodisperse in size, structural diversity is apparent. The discovery of polymorphism may open up a new dimension in nanoscale engineering.

  16. Polymorphism in magic-sized Au144(SR)60 clusters

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kirsten M.Ø.; Juhas, Pavol; Tofanelli, Marcus A.; Heinecke, Christine L.; Vaughan, Gavin; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-small, magic-sized metal nanoclusters represent an important new class of materials with properties between molecules and particles. However, their small size challenges the conventional methods for structure characterization. Here we present the structure of ultra-stable Au144(SR)60 magic-sized nanoclusters obtained from atomic pair distribution function analysis of X-ray powder diffraction data. The study reveals structural polymorphism in these archetypal nanoclusters. In addition to confirming the theoretically predicted icosahedral-cored cluster, we also find samples with a truncated decahedral core structure, with some samples exhibiting a coexistence of both cluster structures. Although the clusters are monodisperse in size, structural diversity is apparent. The discovery of polymorphism may open up a new dimension in nanoscale engineering. PMID:27297400

  17. A new polymorph of Ln polysulfides (Ln = Pr and Nd)

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagisawa, Y.; Kume, S.

    1986-04-01

    A new polymorph of rare earth polysulfides was synthesized under high temperature-pressure conditions. Its X-ray diffraction patterns were indexed on an orthorhombic unit cell with the lattice constants of a = 0.8025, b = 1.6152 and c = 0.4062 for PrS/sub 2/ and a = 0.7977, b = 1.6012 and c = 0.4027 nm, for NdS/sub 2/. The calculated densities of the orthorhombic polysulfides are nearly the same as those of the allotropic phases with monoclinic symmetry. To compare the stability of the two polymorphs, the Madelung energies of the structures were calculated and that of the monoclinic phase, which is synthesized without applying pressures, was found to be lower than that of the orthorhombic phase.

  18. Influence of amorphous structure on polymorphism in vanadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Kevin H.; Schelhas, Laura T.; Garten, Lauren M.; Shyam, Badri; Mehta, Apurva; Ndione, Paul F.; Ginley, David S.; Toney, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    Normally we think of the glassy state as a single phase and therefore crystallization from chemically identical amorphous precursors should be identical. Here we show that the local structure of an amorphous precursor is distinct depending on the initial deposition conditions, resulting in significant differences in the final state material. Using grazing incidence total x-ray scattering, we have determined the local structure in amorphous thin films of vanadium oxide grown under different conditions using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Here we show that the subsequent crystallization of films deposited using different initial PLD conditions result in the formation of different polymorphs of VO2. This suggests the possibility of controlling the formation of metastable polymorphs by tuning the initial amorphous structure to different formation pathways.

  19. Associations of MICA Polymorphisms with Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingwen; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are characterized by inflammation resulting from the immune dysregulation that usually attacks joints, skin and internal organs. Many of them are considered as complex disease that may be predisposed by multiple genes and/or genetic loci, and triggered by environmental factors such as microbiome and cellular stress. The major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) is a highly polymorphic gene that encodes protein variants expressed under cellular stress conditions, and these MICA variants play important roles in immune activation and surveillance. Recently, accumulating evidences from both genetic and functional studies have suggested that MICA polymorphisms may be associated with various rheumatic diseases, and the expression of MICA variants may attribute to the altered immune responses in the diseases. The objective of this review is to discuss potential genetic associations and pathological relevance of MICA in inflammatory rheumatic diseases that may help us to understand pathogenesis contributing to the development of these diseases. PMID:26862354

  20. Complement factor H polymorphism and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Albert O; Ritter, Robert; Abel, Kenneth J; Manning, Alisa; Panhuysen, Carolien; Farrer, Lindsay A

    2005-04-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common, late-onset, and complex trait with multiple risk factors. Concentrating on a region harboring a locus for AMD on 1q25-31, the ARMD1 locus, we tested single-nucleotide polymorphisms for association with AMD in two independent case-control populations. Significant association (P = 4.95 x 10(-10)) was identified within the regulation of complement activation locus and was centered over a tyrosine-402 --> histidine-402 protein polymorphism in the gene encoding complement factor H. Possession of at least one histidine at amino acid position 402 increased the risk of AMD 2.7-fold and may account for 50% of the attributable risk of AMD. PMID:15761121