Science.gov

Sample records for rethinking natural interactions

  1. Rethinking natural altruism: simple reciprocal interactions trigger children's benevolence.

    PubMed

    Cortes Barragan, Rodolfo; Dweck, Carol S

    2014-12-01

    A very simple reciprocal activity elicited high degrees of altruism in 1- and 2-y-old children, whereas friendly but nonreciprocal activity yielded little subsequent altruism. In a second study, reciprocity with one adult led 1- and 2-y-olds to provide help to a new person. These results question the current dominant claim that social experiences cannot account for early occurring altruistic behavior. A third study, with preschool-age children, showed that subtle reciprocal cues remain potent elicitors of altruism, whereas a fourth study with preschoolers showed that even a brief reciprocal experience fostered children's expectation of altruism from others. Collectively, the studies suggest that simple reciprocal interactions are a potent trigger of altruism for young children, and that these interactions lead children to believe that their relationships are characterized by mutual care and commitment. PMID:25404334

  2. Rethinking natural altruism: Simple reciprocal interactions trigger children’s benevolence

    PubMed Central

    Cortes Barragan, Rodolfo; Dweck, Carol S.

    2014-01-01

    A very simple reciprocal activity elicited high degrees of altruism in 1- and 2-y-old children, whereas friendly but nonreciprocal activity yielded little subsequent altruism. In a second study, reciprocity with one adult led 1- and 2-y-olds to provide help to a new person. These results question the current dominant claim that social experiences cannot account for early occurring altruistic behavior. A third study, with preschool-age children, showed that subtle reciprocal cues remain potent elicitors of altruism, whereas a fourth study with preschoolers showed that even a brief reciprocal experience fostered children’s expectation of altruism from others. Collectively, the studies suggest that simple reciprocal interactions are a potent trigger of altruism for young children, and that these interactions lead children to believe that their relationships are characterized by mutual care and commitment. PMID:25404334

  3. Rethinking Terrestrial Pedagogy: Nature, Cultures, and Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Huey-Li

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I offer a clarification of the ambiguities surrounding the pivotal concepts that have shaped and will continue to shape environmental education movement in the United States and beyond: nature, conservation, sustainable development, and environmental justice. I point out that dualistic frameworks not only polarize environmental…

  4. Emergent Interactions: Rethinking the Relationship between Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between teaching and learning is represented in contemporary higher education research which has looked at the correlations between students' approaches to learning and teachers' approaches to teaching. This article proposes a rethinking of this relationship, building on a critical realist perspective. Here, the teaching-learning…

  5. Rethinking the Natural Capital Metaphor: Implications for Education and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    One way in which the concept of sustainable development has been understood is through the metaphor of natural capital. This sees that the natural world has performing functions similar to those of economic capital. This metaphor is usually developed by applying to Nature standard economic techniques for capital valuation. However, where valuation…

  6. Rethinking the senses and their interactions: the case for sensory pluralism

    PubMed Central

    Fulkerson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    I argue for sensory pluralism. This is the view that there are many forms of sensory interaction and unity, and no single category that classifies them all. In other words, sensory interactions do not form a single natural kind. This view suggests that how we classify sensory systems (and the experiences they generate) partly depends on our explanatory purposes. I begin with a detailed discussion of the issue as it arises for our understanding of thermal perception, followed by a general account and defense of sensory pluralism. PMID:25540630

  7. Natural interaction for unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Glenn; Purman, Ben; Schermerhorn, Paul; Garcia-Sampedro, Guillermo; Lanting, Matt; Quist, Michael; Kawatsu, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Military unmanned systems today are typically controlled by two methods: tele-operation or menu-based, search-andclick interfaces. Both approaches require the operator's constant vigilance: tele-operation requires constant input to drive the vehicle inch by inch; a menu-based interface requires eyes on the screen in order to search through alternatives and select the right menu item. In both cases, operators spend most of their time and attention driving and minding the unmanned systems rather than on being a warfighter. With these approaches, the platform and interface become more of a burden than a benefit. The availability of inexpensive sensor systems in products such as Microsoft Kinect™ or Nintendo Wii™ has resulted in new ways of interacting with computing systems, but new sensors alone are not enough. Developing useful and usable human-system interfaces requires understanding users and interaction in context: not just what new sensors afford in terms of interaction, but how users want to interact with these systems, for what purpose, and how sensors might enable those interactions. Additionally, the system needs to reliably make sense of the user's inputs in context, translate that interpretation into commands for the unmanned system, and give feedback to the user. In this paper, we describe an example natural interface for unmanned systems, called the Smart Interaction Device (SID), which enables natural two-way interaction with unmanned systems including the use of speech, sketch, and gestures. We present a few example applications SID to different types of unmanned systems and different kinds of interactions.

  8. Rethinking Natural Environment Practice: Implications from Examining Various Interpretations and Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chai, Angie Y.; Zhang, Chun; Bisberg, Marilyn

    2006-01-01

    Early intervention professionals have implemented natural environment practices for over a decade, despite the continued debate on how to interpret and implement this practice. This article reviews several theoretical frameworks for understanding natural environment practice, and also summarizes different approaches for implementation. The authors…

  9. Troublesome toxins: Time to re-think plant-herbivore interactions in vertebrate ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swihart, R.K.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Feng, Z.; Bryant, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Earlier models of plant-herbivore interactions relied on forms of functional response that related rates of ingestion by herbivores to mechanical or physical attributes such as bite size and rate. These models fail to predict a growing number of findings that implicate chemical toxins as important determinants of plant-herbivore dynamics. Specifically, considerable evidence suggests that toxins set upper limits on food intake for many species of herbivorous vertebrates. Herbivores feeding on toxin-containing plants must avoid saturating their detoxification systems, which often occurs before ingestion rates are limited by mechanical handling of food items. In light of the importance of plant toxins, a new approach is needed to link herbivores to their food base. We discuss necessary features of such an approach, note recent advances in herbivore functional response models that incorporate effects of plant toxins, and mention predictions that are consistent with observations in natural systems. Future ecological studies will need to address explicitly the importance of plant toxins in shaping plant and herbivore communities.

  10. Rethinking Drinking: Alcohol and Your Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Rethinking Drinking: Alcohol and Your Health Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents RETHINKING DRINKING Alcohol and Your Health Visit NIAAA's Fully Interactive Web ...

  11. Rethinking Drinking: Alcohol and Your Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Rethinking Drinking: Alcohol and Your Health Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents RETHINKING DRINKING Alcohol and Your Health Visit NIAAA's Fully Interactive Web site. Tools to ...

  12. Rousseau and the Fable: Rethinking the Fabulous Nature of Educational Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Tyson E.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Tyson Lewis reevaluates Jean-Jacques Rousseau's assessment of the pedagogical value of fables in Emile's education using Giorgio Agamben's theory of poetic production and Thomas Keenan's theory of the inherent ambiguity of the fable. From this perspective, the "unreadable" nature of the fable that Rousseau exposed is not simply the…

  13. Rethinking the Nature of Disaster: From Failed Instruments of Learning to a Post-Social Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stewart

    2008-01-01

    Recent disasters have been of such scale and complexity that both the common assumptions made about learning from them, and the traditional approaches distinguishing natural from technological disasters (and now terrorism) are thus challenged. Beck's risk thesis likewise signals the need for a paradigmatic change. Despite sociological inflections…

  14. "Before Today, I Was Afraid of Trees": Rethinking Nature Deficit Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Doug

    2011-01-01

    Science teachers in urban schools often serve students whose experiences with the natural environment are more obviously constrained by human factors than their suburban or rural counterparts. At the same time, parents and teachers are contending with an increase in sedentary indoor activities that have affected youth of every demographic. Coupled…

  15. Holocene Changes in Land Cover and Greenhouse-gas Concentrations: Rethinking Natural vs Anthropogenic Causation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Holocene has witnessed a switch from a nature-dominated to a human-dominated Earth system. Although globally-significant human impacts (wildfire, megafaunal extinctions) occurred during the late Pleistocene, it was the advent of agriculture that led to the progressive transformation of land cover, and which distinguishes the Holocene from previous interglacial periods. A wide array of data provide clear evidence of local-to-regional human disturbance from ~5 ka BP, in some cases earlier. There is more uncertainty about when the anthropogenic "footprint" became detectable at a global scale, and there has consequently been debate about how much of the pre-industrial increase in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations is attributable to human causation, linked to processes such as deforestation (CO2) and wet rice cultivation (CH4). Although there has been recent progress in developing quantitative methods for translating pollen data into palaeo-land cover, such as the REVEALS model of Sugita (Holocene 2007) coupled to GIS, this has yet to be widely applied to existing data bases, and most pollen-based land-use reconstructions remain qualitative or semi-quantitative. Lake trophic status, sediment flux / soil erosion, and microcharcoal records of biomass burning provide alternative proxies that integrate regional-scale landscape disturbance. These proxy data along with documentary sources imply that globally-significant changes in land cover occurred prior to ~250 BP which must have altered atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations by this time. The polarised debate for and against early anthropogenic impact on global carbon cycling mirrors our industrial-era division between nature and society, both conceptually (e.g. Cartesian dualism) and on the ground (e.g. demarcating land between monoculture agriculture and wilderness). However, for the period before ~1750 AD, this likely represents a false dichotomy, because pre-industrial societies more often formed part

  16. Rethinking Echolalia: Repetition as Interactional Resource in the Communication of a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterponi, Laura; Shankey, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Echolalia is a pervasive phenomenon in verbal children with autism, traditionally conceived of as an automatic behavior with no communicative function. However, recently it has been shown that echoes may serve interactional goals. This article, which presents a case study of a six-year-old child with autism, examines how social interaction…

  17. Rethinking the nature of fibrolamellar bone: an integrative biological revision of sauropod plexiform bone formation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Koen; Prondvai, Edina

    2014-02-01

    We present novel findings on sauropod bone histology that cast doubt on general palaeohistological concepts concerning the true nature of woven bone in primary cortical bone and its role in the rapid growth and giant body sizes of sauropod dinosaurs. By preparing and investigating longitudinal thin sections of sauropod long bones, of which transverse thin sections were published previously, we found that the amount of woven bone in the primary complex has been largely overestimated. Using comparative cellular and light-extinction characteristics in the two section planes, we revealed that the majority of the bony lamina consists of longitudinally organized primary bone, whereas woven bone is usually represented only by a layer a few cells thin in the laminae. Previous arguments on sauropod biology, which have been based on the overestimated amount, misinterpreted formation process and misjudged role of woven bone in the plexiform bone formation of sauropod dinosaurs, are thereby rejected. To explain the observed pattern in fossil bones, we review the most recent advances in bone biology concerning bone formation processes at the cellular and tissue levels. Differentiation between static and dynamic osteogenesis (SO and DO) and the revealed characteristics of SO- versus DO-derived bone tissues shed light on several questions raised by our palaeohistological results and permit identification of these bone tissues in fossils with high confidence. By presenting the methods generally used for investigating fossil bones, we show that the major cause of overestimation of the amount of woven bone in previous palaeohistological studies is the almost exclusive usage of transverse sections. In these sections, cells and crystallites of the longitudinally organized primary bone are cut transversely, thus cells appear rounded and crystallites remain dark under crossed plane polarizers, thereby giving the false impression of woven bone. In order to avoid further confusion in

  18. Rethinking Human-Centered Computing: Finding the Customer and Negotiated Interactions at the Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wales, Roxana; O'Neill, John; Mirmalek, Zara

    2003-01-01

    The breakdown in the air transportation system over the past several years raises an interesting question for researchers: How can we help improve the reliability of airline operations? In offering some answers to this question, we make a statement about Huuman-Centered Computing (HCC). First we offer the definition that HCC is a multi-disciplinary research and design methodology focused on supporting humans as they use technology by including cognitive and social systems, computational tools and the physical environment in the analysis of organizational systems. We suggest that a key element in understanding organizational systems is that there are external cognitive and social systems (customers) as well as internal cognitive and social systems (employees) and that they interact dynamically to impact the organization and its work. The design of human-centered intelligent systems must take this outside-inside dynamic into account. In the past, the design of intelligent systems has focused on supporting the work and improvisation requirements of employees but has often assumed that customer requirements are implicitly satisfied by employee requirements. Taking a customer-centric perspective provides a different lens for understanding this outside-inside dynamic, the work of the organization and the requirements of both customers and employees In this article we will: 1) Demonstrate how the use of ethnographic methods revealed the important outside-inside dynamic in an airline, specifically the consequential relationship between external customer requirements and perspectives and internal organizational processes and perspectives as they came together in a changing environment; 2) Describe how taking a customer centric perspective identifies places where the impact of the outside-inside dynamic is most critical and requires technology that can be adaptive; 3) Define and discuss the place of negotiated interactions in airline operations, identifying how these

  19. Interaction of pesticides with natural organic material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Burcar, P.J.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1969-01-01

    Two examples of the interaction of pesticides with natural organic materials have been investigated. Sodium humate solubilizes DDT in water and humic acid strongly sorbs 2,4,5-T. These two types of interactions are indicative of the types that one would expect when any organic pesticide is applied to a natural soil-water system.

  20. Two Fundamental Principles of Nature's Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tian; Wang, Shouhong

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we present two fundamental principles of nature's interactions, the principle of interaction dynamics (PID) and the principle of representation invariance (PRI). Intuitively, PID takes the variation of the action functional under energy-momentum conservation constraint. PID offers a completely different and natural way of introducing Higgs fields. PRI requires that physical laws be independent of representations of the gauge groups. These two principles give rise to a unified field model for four interactions, which can be naturally decoupled to study individual interactions. With these two principles, we are able to derive 1) a unified theory for dark matter and dark energy, 2) layered strong and weak interaction potentials, and 3) the energy levels of subatomic particles. Supported in part by NSF, ONR and Chinese NSF.

  1. Rethinking Resource Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaubien, Anne; Stevens, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the need for rethinking resource sharing to offer both library users and nonlibrary users options to obtain the material they seek from both libraries and commerical sources. The article discusses several programs that are emerging including the "GoGetter" function, the Rethinking Resource Sharing Manifesto, user needs, and…

  2. Learning procedures from interactive natural language instructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, Scott B.; Laird, John E.

    1994-01-01

    Despite its ubiquity in human learning, very little work has been done in artificial intelligence on agents that learn from interactive natural language instructions. In this paper, the problem of learning procedures from interactive, situated instruction is examined in which the student is attempting to perform tasks within the instructional domain, and asks for instruction when it is needed. Presented is Instructo-Soar, a system that behaves and learns in response to interactive natural language instructions. Instructo-Soar learns completely new procedures from sequences of instruction, and also learns how to extend its knowledge of previously known procedures to new situations. These learning tasks require both inductive and analytic learning. Instructo-Soar exhibits a multiple execution learning process in which initial learning has a rote, episodic flavor, and later executions allow the initially learned knowledge to be generalized properly.

  3. Bacteria-phage interactions in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Muñoz, Samuel L; Koskella, Britt

    2014-01-01

    Phages are considered the most abundant and diverse biological entities on Earth and are notable not only for their sheer abundance, but also for their influence on bacterial hosts. In nature, bacteria-phage relationships are complex and have far-reaching consequences beyond particular pairwise interactions, influencing everything from bacterial virulence to eukaryotic fitness to the carbon cycle. In this review, we examine bacteria and phage distributions in nature first by highlighting biogeographic patterns and nonhost environmental influences on phage distribution, then by considering the ways in which phages and bacteria interact, emphasizing phage life cycles, bacterial responses to phage infection, and the complex patterns of phage host specificity. Finally, we discuss phage impacts on bacterial abundance, genetics, and physiology, and further aim to clarify distinctions between current theoretical models and point out areas in need of future research. PMID:25131402

  4. Rethinking language in autism.

    PubMed

    Sterponi, Laura; de Kirby, Kenton; Shankey, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we invite a rethinking of traditional perspectives of language in autism. We advocate a theoretical reappraisal that offers a corrective to the dominant and largely tacitly held view that language, in its essence, is a referential system and a reflection of the individual's cognition. Drawing on scholarship in Conversation Analysis and linguistic anthropology, we present a multidimensional view of language, showing how it also functions as interactional accomplishment, social action, and mode of experience. From such a multidimensional perspective, we revisit data presented by other researchers that include instances of prototypical features of autistic speech, giving them a somewhat different-at times complementary, at times alternative-interpretation. In doing so, we demonstrate that there is much at stake in the view of language that we as researchers bring to our analysis of autistic speech. Ultimately, we argue that adopting a multidimensional view of language has wide ranging implications, deepening our understanding of autism's core features and developmental trajectory. PMID:24916453

  5. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform. PMID:23070491

  6. Gestures for natural interaction with video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourati, Nesrine; Marilly, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    In the context of immersive communications, we propose a method enabling natural video interactions through hand gesture recognition between users and a video meeting system. The interaction can be performed either by the mean of hand posture recognition or by the dynamic hand gesture recognition according to user's preference. The statistical approach adopted in our work to recognize hand posture has shown accurate results for both performance evaluation and user test. Besides, the combination of data-mining fields and signal processing for dynamic gestures recognition allows us to define the appropriate rules and to reduce the confusion between gestures. Furthermore, the hand region extraction is based on both skin color and background subtraction to avoid the detection of static objects that have a similar skin color. Finally, the collected user's feedback allows as to evaluate our approach from the user's point of view and to define the limitations that will be discussed in our perspectives in order to improve the results.

  7. Rethinking Roe.

    PubMed

    Scofield, G R

    1993-01-01

    This article maintains that when the US Supreme Court chose to decide Roe vs. Wade based on the concepts of privacy and personhood, it made a mistake that has crippled the approach to the problems raised by abortion. The Court opened itself to immediate challenge by ruling that a fetus is not a person and that a woman's right to abortion is tied to fetal viability. This approach has been further compromised by advances in medical technology which have substantially increased fetal viability. While one problem with insisting upon the right to privacy is that the Constitution fails to mention the concept, the real question about privacy concerns the nature of the relationship which should exist between the individual and the state. When pro-life forces voice an intention to eradicate privacy, they (perhaps unwittingly) play into the hands of those who view privacy as an impediment to the government's ability to assert itself in individual lives. The use of this concept to justify abortion leaves people wondering why privacy rather than life has anything to do with abortion. Just because the Roe decision is flawed, however, does not imply that it must or should be overturned. Roe was not wrongly decided, it was simply poorly decided, and both Roe and its opponents attempt to deny that the Court faced a tragic choice that implicates essential values which can not be decided in absolute terms. In order to reach a solution that demonstrates a respect for life and liberty, we must look beyond these concepts to that of equity. When considering rape, incest, and even contraception and the pursuit of motherhood, it is easy to see that we are a long way from equalizing sexual relations between men and women. The equity approach opens a much broader view of what abortion is really about, which is the status and role of women in society. While Roe has polarized women, centering the debate on a belief in equity may have generated solidarity and consensus around that principle

  8. Resilience to Interacting multi-natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    Conventional analyses of hazard assessment tend to focus on individual hazards in isolation. However, many parts of the world are usually affected by multiple natural hazards with the potential for interacting relationships. The understanding of such interactions, their impacts and the related uncertainties, are an important and topical area of research. Interacting multi-hazards may appear in different forms, including 1) CASCADING HAZARDS (a primary hazard triggering one or more secondary hazards such as an earthquake triggering landslides which may block river channels with dammed lakes and ensued floods), 2) CONCURRING HAZARDS (two or more primary hazards coinciding to trigger or exacerbate secondary hazards such as an earthquake and a rainfall event simultaneously creating landslides), and 3) ALTERING HAZARDS (a primary hazard increasing the probability of a secondary hazard occurring such as major earthquakes disturbing soil/rock materials by violent ground shaking which alter the regional patterns of landslides and debris flows in the subsequent years to come). All three types of interacting multi-hazards may occur in natural hazard prone regions, so it is important that research on hazard resilience should cover all of them. In the past decades, great progresses have been made in tackling disaster risk around the world. However, there are still many challenging issues to be solved, and the disasters over recent years have clearly demonstrated the inadequate resilience in our highly interconnected and interdependent systems. We have identified the following weaknesses and knowledge gaps in the current disaster risk management: 1) although our understanding in individual hazards has been greatly improved, there is a lack of sound knowledge about mechanisms and processes of interacting multi-hazards. Therefore, the resultant multi-hazard risk is often significantly underestimated with severe consequences. It is also poorly understood about the spatial and

  9. Rethinking wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I.

    2013-03-01

    ). Wedges expand linearly from 0 to 1 GtC y-1 from 2010 to 2060. The total avoided emissions per wedge is 25 GtC, such that altogether the hidden, stabilization and phase-out wedges represent 775 GtC of cumulative emissions. Unless current climate targets are sacrificed, solving the climate problem requires significantly reducing emissions over the next 50 years. Just how significant those reductions need to be will depend on a global trade-off between the damages imposed by climatic changes and the costs of avoiding them. But given substantial uncertainties associated with climate model projections (e.g., climate sensitivity), the arbitrary nature of targets like 500 ppm and 2 °C, and the permanence implied by the term 'solution', the ultimate solution to the climate problem is a complete phase-out of carbon emissions. 3. Counting wedges But significantly reducing current emissions while also sustaining historical growth rates of the global economy is likely to require many more than seven wedges. Gross world product (GWP) projections embedded in the A2 scenario imply as many as 31 wedges would be required to completely phase-out emissions, grouped into three distinct groups: (1) 12 'hidden' wedges that represent the continued decarbonization of our energy system at historical rates (i.e. decreases in the carbon intensity of the global economy that are assumed to regardless of any additional efforts to mitigate emissions) [9, 39]. (2) 9 'stabilization' wedges that represent additional efforts to mitigate emissions above and beyond the technological progress already assumed by the scenario [1]. And (3), 10 'phase-out' wedges that represent the complete transition from energy infrastructure and land-use practices that emit CO2 (on net) to the atmosphere to infrastructure and practices which do not (figure 2) [9, 14, 40]. There is good reason to be concerned that at least some number of the hidden wedges will not come to be—that the rates of decarbonization assumed by

  10. NICA: Natural Interaction with a Caring Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carolis, Berardina; Mazzotta, Irene; Novielli, Nicole

    Ambient Intelligence solutions may provide a great opportunity for elderly people to live longer at home. Assistance and care are delegated to the intelligence embedded in the environment. However, besides considering service-oriented response to the user needs, the assistance has to take into account the establishment of social relations. We propose the use of a robot NICA (as the name of the project Natural Interaction with a Caring Agent) acting as a caring assistant that provides a social interface with the smart home services. In this paper, we introduce the general architecture of the robot's "mind" and then we focus on the need to properly react to affective and socially oriented situations.

  11. Rethinking Language in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterponi, Laura; de Kirby, Kenton; Shankey, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we invite a rethinking of traditional perspectives of language in autism. We advocate a theoretical reappraisal that offers a corrective to the dominant and largely tacitly held view that language, in its essence, is a referential system and a reflection of the individual's cognition. Drawing on scholarship in Conversation…

  12. Rethinking Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Rethinking Early Childhood Education" is alive with the conviction that teaching young children involves values and vision. This anthology collects inspiring stories about social justice teaching with young children. Included here is outstanding writing from childcare teachers, early-grade public school teachers, scholars, and parents. This book…

  13. Rethinking the River.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenbaum, David

    1994-01-01

    Examines the ecological impacts of the Mississippi River flood of 1993 and the rethinking of river management practices that has resulted. Provides a map of the flood area which shows the occurrence of rare wildlife found in or near the region's rivers. (LZ)

  14. Rethinking TV History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomery, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    Proposes a rethinking of historical analysis of U. S. television history, to begin at the local level. Offers a case study of the place of Washington, DC, as a site for network news. Notes that, as a community, Washington presents an important site where forces such as migration and suburbanization shaped the early history of television. (SR)

  15. On the Nature of Interaction in SLA: A Philosophical Stream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maftoon, Parviz; Shakouri, Nima

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have long grappled with situating the stance of interaction in SLA, but it is only recently that interaction has begun to receive consideration from SLA quarters. Delving into the nature of interaction and the prerequisite of interaction in real world, in general, and in classroom, in particular, the authors hold that based on…

  16. The role of magnetic interactions in natural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muxworthy, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    Inter-particle magnetic interactions between crystals in natural systems strongly affect their magnetic response. In the Bullerwell Lecture 2011, Adrian Muxworthy discusses how these interactions affect our ability to recover from rocks information about the ancient geomagnetic field behaviour, plate tectonics and palaeogeography, and how magnetotactic bacteria utilize interactions to improve navigational efficiency.

  17. Nature of the effective interaction between dendrimers

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Taraknath Dasgupta, Chandan Maiti, Prabal K.

    2014-10-14

    We have performed fully atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the effective interaction between two polyamidoamine dendrimers. Using the umbrella sampling technique, we have obtained the potential of mean force (PMF) between the dendrimers and investigated the effects of protonation level and dendrimer size on the PMF. Our results show that the interaction between the dendrimers can be tuned from purely repulsive to partly attractive by changing the protonation level. The PMF profiles are well-fitted by the sum of an exponential and a Gaussian function with the weight of the exponential function dominating over that of the Gaussian function. This observation is in disagreement with the results obtained in previous analytic [C. Likos, M. Schmidt, H. Löwen, M. Ballauff, D. Pötschke, and P. Lindner, Macromolecules 34, 2914 (2001)] and coarse-grained simulation [I. Götze, H. Harreis, and C. Likos, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 7761 (2004)] studies which predicted the effective interaction to be Gaussian.

  18. Analyzing Acoustic Interactions in Natural Bullfrog Choruses

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Andrea Megela; Simmons, James A.; Bates, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of acoustic interactions between animals in active choruses is complex because of the large numbers of individuals present, their high calling rates, and the considerable numbers of vocalizations that either overlap or show close temporal alternation. The authors describe a methodology for recording chorus activity in bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) using multiple, closely-spaced acoustic sensors that provide simultaneous estimates of sound direction and sound characteristics. This method provides estimates of location of individual callers, even under conditions of call overlap. This is a useful technique for understanding the complexity of the acoustic scene faced by animals vocalizing in groups. PMID:18729655

  19. Natural enemy interactions constrain pest control in complex agricultural landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Emily A.; Reineking, Björn; Seo, Bumsuk; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2013-01-01

    Biological control of pests by natural enemies is a major ecosystem service delivered to agriculture worldwide. Quantifying and predicting its effectiveness at large spatial scales is critical for increased sustainability of agricultural production. Landscape complexity is known to benefit natural enemies, but its effects on interactions between natural enemies and the consequences for crop damage and yield are unclear. Here, we show that pest control at the landscape scale is driven by differences in natural enemy interactions across landscapes, rather than by the effectiveness of individual natural enemy guilds. In a field exclusion experiment, pest control by flying insect enemies increased with landscape complexity. However, so did antagonistic interactions between flying insects and birds, which were neutral in simple landscapes and increasingly negative in complex landscapes. Negative natural enemy interactions thus constrained pest control in complex landscapes. These results show that, by altering natural enemy interactions, landscape complexity can provide ecosystem services as well as disservices. Careful handling of the tradeoffs among multiple ecosystem services, biodiversity, and societal concerns is thus crucial and depends on our ability to predict the functional consequences of landscape-scale changes in trophic interactions. PMID:23513216

  20. Natural enemy interactions constrain pest control in complex agricultural landscapes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily A; Reineking, Björn; Seo, Bumsuk; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2013-04-01

    Biological control of pests by natural enemies is a major ecosystem service delivered to agriculture worldwide. Quantifying and predicting its effectiveness at large spatial scales is critical for increased sustainability of agricultural production. Landscape complexity is known to benefit natural enemies, but its effects on interactions between natural enemies and the consequences for crop damage and yield are unclear. Here, we show that pest control at the landscape scale is driven by differences in natural enemy interactions across landscapes, rather than by the effectiveness of individual natural enemy guilds. In a field exclusion experiment, pest control by flying insect enemies increased with landscape complexity. However, so did antagonistic interactions between flying insects and birds, which were neutral in simple landscapes and increasingly negative in complex landscapes. Negative natural enemy interactions thus constrained pest control in complex landscapes. These results show that, by altering natural enemy interactions, landscape complexity can provide ecosystem services as well as disservices. Careful handling of the tradeoffs among multiple ecosystem services, biodiversity, and societal concerns is thus crucial and depends on our ability to predict the functional consequences of landscape-scale changes in trophic interactions. PMID:23513216

  1. Experimental analysis of nature-nurture interactions.

    PubMed

    Wyman, Robert J

    2005-06-01

    The presumed opposition of nature and nurture has been a major concern of western civilization since its beginnings. Christian theologians interpreted Adam and Eve's eating of the forbidden fruit as the origin of an inherited 'original sin'. Saint Augustine explicitly applied the concept to human mental development, arguing that, because of original sin, children are inclined toward evil and education requires physical punishment. For centuries, it was considered parents' moral and religious obligation, not to nurture their children, in our current sense of that word, but to beat the willfulness out of them. 16thC humanists fought back, arguing that "schools have become torture chambers" while it is adults "who corrupt young minds with evil". Locke's (1690) statement that children are born as a 'white paper' was crucial in rejecting the dogma of an inborn (and sinful) nature. The original sin vs. white paper argument merged with another ancient dichotomy: inborn instinct (which controls animal behavior) vs. the reason and free will which humans have. Darwin made the concept of inherited instinct, common to both man and animals, one cornerstone of his theory of evolution. The 20(th)C saw scientists recast the debate as instinct vs. learning, bitterly argued between behaviorists and ethologists. Laboratory experimentation and field observation showed that behavior could develop without learning but also that conditioning paradigms could powerfully mold behavior. The progress of genetics and neurobiology has led to the modern synthesis that neural development, and hence behavior, results from the interdependent action of both heredity and environment. PMID:15880766

  2. What are the Benefits of Interacting with Nature?

    PubMed Central

    Keniger, Lucy E.; Gaston, Kevin J.; Irvine, Katherine N.; Fuller, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    There is mounting empirical evidence that interacting with nature delivers measurable benefits to people. Reviews of this topic have generally focused on a specific type of benefit, been limited to a single discipline, or covered the benefits delivered from a particular type of interaction. Here we construct novel typologies of the settings, interactions and potential benefits of people-nature experiences, and use these to organise an assessment of the benefits of interacting with nature. We discover that evidence for the benefits of interacting with nature is geographically biased towards high latitudes and Western societies, potentially contributing to a focus on certain types of settings and benefits. Social scientists have been the most active researchers in this field. Contributions from ecologists are few in number, perhaps hindering the identification of key ecological features of the natural environment that deliver human benefits. Although many types of benefits have been studied, benefits to physical health, cognitive performance and psychological well-being have received much more attention than the social or spiritual benefits of interacting with nature, despite the potential for important consequences arising from the latter. The evidence for most benefits is correlational, and although there are several experimental studies, little as yet is known about the mechanisms that are important for delivering these benefits. For example, we do not know which characteristics of natural settings (e.g., biodiversity, level of disturbance, proximity, accessibility) are most important for triggering a beneficial interaction, and how these characteristics vary in importance among cultures, geographic regions and socio-economic groups. These are key directions for future research if we are to design landscapes that promote high quality interactions between people and nature in a rapidly urbanising world. PMID:23466828

  3. Natural Interaction Based Online Military Boxing Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chenglei; Wang, Lu; Sun, Bing; Yin, Xu; Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Li; Lu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Military boxing, a kind of Chinese martial arts, is widespread and health beneficial. In this paper, the authors introduce a military boxing learning system realized by 3D motion capture, Web3D and 3D interactive technologies. The interactions with the system are natural and intuitive. Users can observe and learn the details of each action of the…

  4. Rethinking resilience from indigenous perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Dandeneau, Stéphane; Marshall, Elizabeth; Phillips, Morgan Kahentonni; Williamson, Karla Jessen

    2011-02-01

    The notions of resilience that have emerged in developmental psychology and psychiatry in recent years require systematic rethinking to address the distinctive cultures, geographic and social settings, and histories of adversity of indigenous peoples. In Canada, the overriding social realities of indigenous peoples include their historical rootedness to a specific place (with traditional lands, communities, and transactions with the environment) and the profound displacements caused by colonization and subsequent loss of autonomy, political oppression, and bureaucratic control. We report observations from an ongoing collaborative project on resilience in Inuit, Métis, Mi'kmaq, and Mohawk communities that suggests the value of incorporating indigenous constructs in resilience research. These constructs are expressed through specific stories and metaphors grounded in local culture and language; however, they can be framed more generally in terms of processes that include: regulating emotion and supporting adaptation through relational, ecocentric, and cosmocentric concepts of self and personhood; revisioning collective history in ways that valorize collective identity; revitalizing language and culture as resources for narrative self-fashioning, social positioning, and healing; and renewing individual and collective agency through political activism, empowerment, and reconciliation. Each of these sources of resilience can be understood in dynamic terms as emerging from interactions between individuals, their communities, and the larger regional, national, and global systems that locate and sustain indigenous agency and identity. This social-ecological view of resilience has important implications for mental health promotion, policy, and clinical practice. PMID:21333035

  5. Tuning inter-virus interactions in natural aquatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Nathan W.; Udit, Andrew K.; Gutierrez, Leonardo; Nguyen; Finn, M. G.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2009-03-01

    Polymeric natural organic matter (NOM) originating from plants and animals is ubiquitous in natural aquatic environments. Many water-borne pathogens, including viruses, readily associate with NOM, which has a statistical distribution of charged and hydrophobic groups. Virus-NOM association influences the transport of viruses in groundwater environments, but little is known about this interaction, or how NOM can induce new inter-virus interactions. To better understand the interaction between NOM and aqueous contaminants, we use the MS2 and Qbeta viruses (diameters ˜ 27nm) as surrogate water-borne pathogens. Small Angle X-ray Scattering is used to characterize the inter-particle interaction between viruses over a range of NOM concentrations and different salt types and concentrations.

  6. Reviewing and visualizing the interactions of natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Joel C.; Malamud, Bruce D.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a broad overview, characterization, and visualization of the interaction relationships between 21 natural hazards, drawn from six hazard groups (geophysical, hydrological, shallow Earth, atmospheric, biophysical, and space hazards). A synthesis is presented of the identified interaction relationships between these hazards, using an accessible visual format particularly suited to end users. Interactions considered are primarily those where a primary hazard triggers or increases the probability of secondary hazards occurring. In this paper we do the following: (i) identify, through a wide-ranging review of grey- and peer-review literature, 90 interactions; (ii) subdivide the interactions into three levels, based on how well we can characterize secondary hazards, given information about the primary hazard; (iii) determine the spatial overlap and temporal likelihood of the triggering relationships occurring; and (iv) examine the relationship between primary and secondary hazard intensities for each identified hazard interaction and group these into five possible categories. In this study we have synthesized, using accessible visualization techniques, large amounts of information drawn from many scientific disciplines. We outline the importance of constraining hazard interactions and reinforce the importance of a holistic (or multihazard) approach to natural hazard assessment. This approach allows those undertaking research into single hazards to place their work within the context of other hazards. It also communicates important aspects of hazard interactions, facilitating an effective analysis by those working on reducing and managing disaster risk within both the policy and practitioner communities.

  7. Re-thinking residential mobility

    PubMed Central

    van Ham, Maarten; Findlay, Allan M.

    2015-01-01

    While researchers are increasingly re-conceptualizing international migration, far less attention has been devoted to re-thinking short-distance residential mobility and immobility. In this paper we harness the life course approach to propose a new conceptual framework for residential mobility research. We contend that residential mobility and immobility should be re-conceptualized as relational practices that link lives through time and space while connecting people to structural conditions. Re-thinking and re-assessing residential mobility by exploiting new developments in longitudinal analysis will allow geographers to understand, critique and address pressing societal challenges. PMID:27330243

  8. How Many Protein-Protein Interactions Types Exist in Nature?

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Pralay; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    “Protein quaternary structure universe” refers to the ensemble of all protein-protein complexes across all organisms in nature. The number of quaternary folds thus corresponds to the number of ways proteins physically interact with other proteins. This study focuses on answering two basic questions: Whether the number of protein-protein interactions is limited and, if yes, how many different quaternary folds exist in nature. By all-to-all sequence and structure comparisons, we grouped the protein complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) into 3,629 families and 1,761 folds. A statistical model was introduced to obtain the quantitative relation between the numbers of quaternary families and quaternary folds in nature. The total number of possible protein-protein interactions was estimated around 4,000, which indicates that the current protein repository contains only 42% of quaternary folds in nature and a full coverage needs approximately a quarter century of experimental effort. The results have important implications to the protein complex structural modeling and the structure genomics of protein-protein interactions. PMID:22719985

  9. How many protein-protein interactions types exist in nature?

    PubMed

    Garma, Leonardo; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Mitra, Pralay; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    "Protein quaternary structure universe" refers to the ensemble of all protein-protein complexes across all organisms in nature. The number of quaternary folds thus corresponds to the number of ways proteins physically interact with other proteins. This study focuses on answering two basic questions: Whether the number of protein-protein interactions is limited and, if yes, how many different quaternary folds exist in nature. By all-to-all sequence and structure comparisons, we grouped the protein complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) into 3,629 families and 1,761 folds. A statistical model was introduced to obtain the quantitative relation between the numbers of quaternary families and quaternary folds in nature. The total number of possible protein-protein interactions was estimated around 4,000, which indicates that the current protein repository contains only 42% of quaternary folds in nature and a full coverage needs approximately a quarter century of experimental effort. The results have important implications to the protein complex structural modeling and the structure genomics of protein-protein interactions. PMID:22719985

  10. The Nature of Teacher-Child Interactions in Emotion Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Dawn V.

    2010-01-01

    Emotions find their meanings within human relationships that permit emotions to be experienced, expressed, and explored. Social and emotional competence, marked by an understanding, expression, and control of emotion, is one of the hallmarks of emotional discourse--demonstrated in the very nature of interactive communication as individuals relate…

  11. Solar-wind interactions - Nature and composition of lunar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, N. R.

    1975-01-01

    The nature and composition of the lunar atmosphere are examined on the basis of solar-wind interactions, and the nature of the species in the trapped-gas layer is discussed using results of theoretical and experimental investigations. It is shown that the moon has a highly tenuous atmosphere consisting of various species derived from five sources: solar-wind interaction products, cosmic-ray interaction products, effects of meteoritic impacts, planetary degassing, and radioactive-decay products. Atmospheric concentrations are determined for those species derived from solar-wind protons, alpha particles, and oxygen ions. Carbon chemistry is briefly discussed, and difficulties encountered in attempts to determine quantitatively the concentrations of molecular oxygen, atomic oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane are noted. The calculated concentrations are shown to be in good agreement with observations by the Apollo 17 lunar-surface mass spectrometer and orbital UV spectrometer.

  12. Query2Question: Translating Visualization Interaction into Natural Language.

    PubMed

    Nafari, Maryam; Weaver, Chris

    2015-06-01

    Richly interactive visualization tools are increasingly popular for data exploration and analysis in a wide variety of domains. Existing systems and techniques for recording provenance of interaction focus either on comprehensive automated recording of low-level interaction events or on idiosyncratic manual transcription of high-level analysis activities. In this paper, we present the architecture and translation design of a query-to-question (Q2Q) system that automatically records user interactions and presents them semantically using natural language (written English). Q2Q takes advantage of domain knowledge and uses natural language generation (NLG) techniques to translate and transcribe a progression of interactive visualization states into a visual log of styled text that complements and effectively extends the functionality of visualization tools. We present Q2Q as a means to support a cross-examination process in which questions rather than interactions are the focus of analytic reasoning and action. We describe the architecture and implementation of the Q2Q system, discuss key design factors and variations that effect question generation, and present several visualizations that incorporate Q2Q for analysis in a variety of knowledge domains. PMID:26357239

  13. The Nature of Intermolecular Interactions Between Aromatic Amino Acid Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Gervasio, Francesco; Chelli, Riccardo; Procacci, Piero; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2002-05-01

    The nature of intermolecular interactions between aromatic amino acid residues has been investigated by a combination of molecular dynamics and ab initio methods. The potential energy surface of various interacting pairs, including tryptophan, phenilalanine, and tyrosine, was scanned for determining all the relevant local minima by a combined molecular dynamics and conjugate gradient methodology with the AMBER force field. For each of these minima, single-point correlated ab initio calculations of the binding energy were performed. The agreement between empirical force field and ab initio binding energies of the minimum energy structures is excellent. Aromatic-aromatic interactions can be rationalized on the basis of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, whereas charge transfer or polarization phenomena are small for all intermolecular complexes and, particularly, for stacked structures.

  14. The Re-Think Tree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gear, Jim

    1993-01-01

    The Re-Think Tree is a simple framework to help individuals assess and improve their behaviors related to environmental issues. The branches of the tree in order of priority are refuse, reduce, re-use, and recycle. Roots of the tree include such things as public opinion, education, and watchdog groups. (KS)

  15. The Birth of Rethinking Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Bob

    2011-01-01

    The author often says that Rethinking Schools began on his kitchen table with a can of rubber cement and an Apple IIe computer. But that's not exactly true. In some ways the publication started a year and half earlier in a study group of teachers and community activists who were struggling to figure out how to apply a generally progressive,…

  16. Rethinking Popular Culture and Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Elizabeth, Ed.; Sensoy, Ozlem, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Rethinking Popular Culture and Media" is a provocative collection of articles that begins with the idea that the "popular" in classrooms and in the everyday lives of teachers and students is fundamentally political. This anthology includes outstanding articles by elementary and secondary public school teachers, scholars, and activists who…

  17. Genetic Interactions Between Transcription Factors Cause Natural Variation in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Justin; Lorenz, Kim; Cohen, Barak

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the genetic basis of phenotypic diversity is limited by the paucity of examples in which multiple, interacting loci have been identified. We show that natural variation in the efficiency of sporulation, the program in yeast that initiates the sexual phase of the life cycle, between oak tree and vineyard strains is due to allelic variation between four nucleotide changes in three transcription factors: IME1, RME1, and RSF1. Furthermore, we identified that selection has shaped quantitative variation in yeast sporulation between strains. These results illustrate how genetic interactions between transcription factors are a major source of phenotypic diversity within species. PMID:19164747

  18. Does textual feedback hinder spoken interaction in natural language?

    PubMed

    Le Bigot, Ludovic; Terrier, Patrice; Jamet, Eric; Botherel, Valerie; Rouet, Jean-Francois

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of textual feedback on the content and outcome of spoken interaction with a natural language dialogue system. More specifically, the assumption that textual feedback could disrupt spoken interaction was tested in a human-computer dialogue situation. In total, 48 adult participants, familiar with the system, had to find restaurants based on simple or difficult scenarios using a real natural language service system in a speech-only (phone), speech plus textual dialogue history (multimodal) or text-only (web) modality. The linguistic contents of the dialogues differed as a function of modality, but were similar whether the textual feedback was included in the spoken condition or not. These results add to burgeoning research efforts on multimodal feedback, in suggesting that textual feedback may have little or no detrimental effect on information searching with a real system. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The results suggest that adding textual feedback to interfaces for human-computer dialogue could enhance spoken interaction rather than create interference. The literature currently suggests that adding textual feedback to tasks that depend on the visual sense benefits human-computer interaction. The addition of textual output when the spoken modality is heavily taxed by the task was investigated. PMID:20069480

  19. Rethinking Multicultural Education: Teaching for Racial and Cultural Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au, Wayne, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1980s, "Rethinking Schools" magazine has been renowned for its commitment to racial equality in education. Now, "Rethinking Multicultural Education: Teaching for Racial and Cultural Justice" has collected the best Rethinking Schools articles that deal with race and culture. "Rethinking Multicultural Education" moves beyond a simplistic…

  20. Rethinking the 2000 ACRL Standards: Some Things to Consider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlthau, Carol C.

    2013-01-01

    I propose three "rethinks" to consider in recasting the ACRL Standards for information literacy for the coming decades. First, rethink the concept of information need. Second, rethink the notion that information literacy is composed of a set of abilities for "extracting information." Third, rethink the holistic process of…

  1. Nature of Amide Carbonyl−Carbonyl Interactions in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Noncovalent interactions define and modulate biomolecular structure, function, and dynamics. In many protein secondary structures, an intimate interaction exists between adjacent carbonyl groups of the main-chain amide bonds. As this short contact contributes to the energetics of protein conformational stability as well as protein−ligand interactions, understanding its nature is crucial. The intimacy of the carbonyl groups could arise from a charge−charge or dipole−dipole interaction, or n→π * electronic delocalization. This last putative origin, which is reminiscent of the Bürgi−Dunitz trajectory, involves delocalization of the lone pairs (n) of the oxygen (Oi−1) of a peptide bond over the antibonding orbital (π*) of the carbonyl group (Ci=Oi) of the subsequent peptide bond. By installing isosteric chemical substituents in a peptidic model system and using NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and ab initio calculations to analyze the consequences, the intimate interaction between adjacent carbonyl groups is shown to arise primarily from n→π* electronic delocalization. This finding has implications for organic, biological, and medicinal chemistry. PMID:19469574

  2. Groundwater surface water interaction study using natural isotopes tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Kim, Yong Chul; Cho, Soo Young; Lee, Kil Yong

    2015-04-01

    Tritium and stable isotopes are a component of the water molecule, they are the most conservative tracer for groundwater study. And also, radon is natural radioactive nuclide and well dissolved in groundwater. Therefore, these isotopes are used natural tracer for the study of surface water and groundwater interaction of water curtain greenhouse area. The study area used groundwater as a water curtain for warming tool of greenhouse during the winter, and is associated with issues of groundwater shortage while being subject to groundwater-river water interaction. During the winter time, these interactions were studied by using Rn-222, stable isotopes and H-3. These interaction was monitored in multi depth well and linear direction well of groundwater flow. And dam effect was also compared. Samples were collected monthly from October 2013 to April 2014. Radon and tritium were analyzed using Quantulus low background liquid scintillation counter and stable isotopes were analyzed using an IRIS (Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectroscopy ; L2120-i, Picarro). During the winter time, radon concentration was varied from 0.07 Bq/L to 8.9 Bq/L and different interaction was showed between dam. Surface water intrusion was severe at February and restored April when greenhouse warming was ended. The stable isotope results showed different trend with depth and ranged from -9.16 ‰ to -7.24 ‰ for δ 18O value, while the δD value was ranged from -57.86 ‰ to -50.98 ‰. The groundwater age as dated by H-3 was ranged 0.23 Bq/L - 0.59 Bq/L with an average value of 0.37 Bq/L.

  3. Natural Rubber-Filler Interactions: What Are the Parameters?

    PubMed

    Chan, Alan Jenkin; Steenkeste, Karine; Canette, Alexis; Eloy, Marie; Brosson, Damien; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre

    2015-11-17

    Reinforcement of a polymer matrix through the incorporation of nanoparticles (fillers) is a common industrial practice that greatly enhances the mechanical properties of the composite material. The origin of such mechanical reinforcement has been linked to the interaction between the polymer and filler as well as the homogeneous dispersion of the filler within the polymer matrix. In natural rubber (NR) technology, knowledge of the conditions necessary to achieve more efficient NR-filler interactions is improving continuously. This study explores the important physicochemical parameters required to achieve NR-filler interactions under dilute aqueous conditions by varying both the properties of the filler (size, composition, surface activity, concentration) and the aqueous solution (ionic strength, ion valency). By combining fluorescence and electron microscopy methods, we show that NR and silica interact only in the presence of ions and that heteroaggregation is favored more than homoaggregation of silica-silica or NR-NR. The interaction kinetics increases with the ion valence, whereas the morphology of the heteroaggregates depends on the size of silica and the volume percent ratio (dry silica/dry NR). We observe dendritic structures using silica with a diameter (d) of 100 nm at a ∼20-50 vol % ratio, whereas we obtain raspberry-like structures using silica with d = 30 nm particles. We observe that in liquid the interaction is controlled by the hydrophilic bioshell, in contrast to dried conditions, where hydrophobic polymer dominates the interaction of NR with the fillers. A good correlation between the nanoscopic aggregation behavior and the macroscopic aggregation dynamics of the particles was observed. These results provide insight into improving the reinforcement of a polymer matrix using NR-filler films. PMID:26488560

  4. Econo-Thermodynamics: The Nature of Economic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimkes, Juergen

    2006-03-01

    Physicists often model economic interactions like collisions of atoms in gases: by interaction one agent gains, the other loses. This leads to a Boltzmann distribution of capital, which has been observed in wealth distributions of different countries. However, economists object: no economic agent will attend a market in which he gets robbed! This conflict may be resolved by writing basic laws of economics into terms of calculus. In these terms the daily struggle for survival of all economic systems turns out to be a Carnot cycle that is driven by energy: heat pumps and economic production depend on oil, GNP and oil consumption run parallel for all countries. Motors and markets are based on the same laws of calculus (macro-economics) and statistics (micro-economics). Economic interactions mean exploiting a third party (nature) and are indeed close to robbing! A baker sells bread to his customers, but the flour comes from nature. Banks sells loans to investors, but the money comes from savers. Econo-thermodynamics is a thrilling new interdisciplinary field.

  5. Rethinking Schools and the Power of Silver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleeter, Christine

    2011-01-01

    This 25th anniversary of "Rethinking Schools" can be thought of as its silver anniversary. Silver itself must be considered through contrasting lenses. On the one hand, as lessons in "Rethinking Globalization" teach, silver and gold were the basis of Europe's horrendous exploitation of Latin America. On the other hand, silver is often associated…

  6. Tubulin-Interactive Natural Products as Anticancer Agents1

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, David G. I.

    2009-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the discovery, structures, and biological activities of anticancer natural products which act by inhibiting or promoting the assembly of tubulin to microtubules. The emphasis is on providing recent information on those compounds in clinical use or in advanced clinical trials. The vinca alkaloids, the combretastatins, NPI-2358, the halichondrin B analog eribulin, dolastatin 10, noscapine, hemiasterlin, and rhizoxin are discussed as tubulin polymerization inhibitors, while the taxanes and the epothilones are the major classes of tubulin polymerization promoters presented, with brief treatments of discodermolide, eleutherobin, and laulimalide. The challenges and future directions of tubulin-interactive natural products-based drug discovery programs are also discussed briefly. PMID:19125622

  7. Effect Of Interaction On Apertures Of Multisegmented Natural Veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Y.; Germanovich, L. N.; Vermilye, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    Echelons of multisegmented fluid-driven natural fractures (such as dikes, veins, and sometimes joints) with consecutive overlapping are one of the most common types of structures in the Earth­_s crust. The mechanical behavior of these fractures is quite different from that of single fractures, because of the interaction between the segments. In this work we compute the apertures of a highly segmented calcite vein, with 71 segments, in siltstone (Culpeper Quarry, Virginia) described by Vermilye and Scholz [1995]. The effect of elastic interaction between the segments is considered at three different special scales and accurately evaluated by solving the corresponding system of singular integral equations. For comparison, the case of ignored interaction is also considered. Our results unambiguously suggest that the effect of interaction highly affects the vein apertures. By using two net pressures in the vein as fitting parameters, it is possible to obtain an excellent match of the computed and measured apertures (based on 3,000 data points). This indicates two episodes in the history of vein evolution. Based on the performed simulation, a concept of effective fracture (vein) has been suggested. This is a single fracture of the same overall size (length) as the real vein. It is also pressurized by two net pressures that are determined by fitting the field data. As a result, practically the same net pressures are obtained as by accounting for the full interaction between the vein segments. The concept of effective fracture allows the sufficiently accurate computation of the vein (fracture) apertures, but without considering the interaction between the multiple segments.

  8. [The interactions between natural products and OATP1B1].

    PubMed

    Shi, Mei-zhi; Liu, Yu; Bian, Jia-lin; Jin, Meng; Gui, Chun-shan

    2015-07-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) is an important liver-specific uptake transporter, which mediates transport of numerous endogenous substances and drugs from blood into hepatocytes. To identify and investigate potential modulators of OATP1B1 from natural products, the effect of 21 frequently used natural compounds and extracts on OATP1B1-mediated fluorescein methotrexate transport was studied by using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing OATP1B1 (CHO-OATP1B1) in 96-well plates. This method could be used for the screening of large compound libraries. Our studies showed that some flavonoids (e.g., quercetin, quercitrin, rutin, chrysanthemum flavonoids and mulberrin) and triterpenoids (e.g., glycyrrhetinic acid and glycyrrhizic acid) were inhibitors of OATP1B1 with IC50 values less than 16 µmol · L(-1). The IC50 value of glycyrrhetinic acid on OATP1B1 was comparable to its blood concentration in clinics, indicating an OATPlB1-mediated drug-drug interaction could occur. Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that flavonoids had much higher inhibitory activity than their glycosides. Furthermore, the type and length of saccharides had a significant effect on their activity. In addition, we used OATP1B1 substrates fluvastatin and rosuvastatin as probe drugs to investigate the substrate-dependent effect of several natural compounds on the function of OATP1B1 in vitro. Our results demonstrated that the effect of these natural products on the function of OATPlB1 was substrate-dependent. In summary, this study would be conducive to predicting and avoiding potential OATP1B1-mediated drug-drug and drug-food interactions and thus provide the experimental basis and guidance for rational drug use. PMID:26552146

  9. Interacting vs. non-interacting single domain behavior in natural and synthetic samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisowski, S.

    1981-01-01

    The disparity in response to high alternating field (AF) demagnetization for samples containing fine magnetic carriers is apparently related to the degree of interactions between those carriers. The presence of interaction fields between single domain (SD) grains can be tested by plotting isothermal remanence (IRM) acquisition vs. saturation remanence (SIRM) demagnetization. For the case of noninteracting SD grains, the two curves will be symmetrical. For the interacting SD case, the acquisition curve will be steepest at higher field, and the demagnetization curve steepest at lower fields, resulting in nonsymmetry. The point of intersection of the two curves approximates the remanent coercive force (H sub RC) field for all cases. Minor hysteresis loops and anhysteretic remanence (ARM) acquisition curves are also strongly influenced by interaction fields. Because of the difficulty in dispersing strongly magnetic grains, fine grained synthetic samples made with highly magnetic materials will not display equivalent AF stability to natural samples with fine, dispersed grains.

  10. Interaction between manufactured gold nanoparticles and naturally occurring organic macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Diegoli, Sara; Manciulea, Adriana L; Begum, Shakiela; Jones, Ian P; Lead, Jamie R; Preece, Jon A

    2008-08-25

    The increasing exploitation of nanomaterials into many consumer and other products is raising concerns as these nanomaterials are likely to be released into the environment. Due to our lack of knowledge about the environmental chemistry, transport and ecotoxicology of nanomaterials, it is of paramount importance to study how natural aquatic colloids can interact with manufactured gold nanoparticles as these interactions will determine their environmental fate and behaviour. In this context, our work aims to quantify the effect of naturally occurring riverine macromolecules--International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) Suwannee River Humic Acid Standard (SRHA)--on citrate- and acrylate-stabilized gold nanoparticles. The influence of SRHA on the stability of the gold colloids was studied as a function of pH by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). At high ionic strengths (0.1 M), extensive and rapid aggregation occurred, while more subtle effects were observed at lower ionic strength values. Evidence was found that SRHA enhances particle stability at extreme pH values (ionic strength<0.01 M) by substituting and/or over-coating the original stabilizer on the gold nanoparticle surface, thus affecting surface charge and chemistry. These findings have important implications for the fate and behaviour of nanoparticles in the environment and their ecotoxicity. PMID:18534664

  11. Fungal ABC transporters and microbial interactions in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Schoonbeek, Henk-jan; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Waard, Maarten A

    2002-11-01

    In natural environments, microorganisms are exposed to a wide variety of antibiotic compounds produced by competing organisms. Target organisms have evolved various mechanisms of natural resistance to these metabolites. In this study, the role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in interactions between the plant-pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea and antibiotic-producing Pseudomonas bacteria was investigated in detail. We discovered that 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN), broad-spectrum antibiotics produced by Pseudomonas spp., induced expression of several ABC transporter genes in B. cinerea. Phenazines strongly induced expression of BcatrB, and deltaBcatrB mutants were significantly more sensitive to these antibiotics than their parental strain. Treatment of B. cinerea germlings with PCN strongly affected the accumulation of [14C]fludioxonil, a phenylpyrrole fungicide known to be transported by BcatrB, indicating that phenazines also are transported by BcatrB. Pseudomonas strains producing phenazines displayed a stronger antagonistic activity in vitro toward ABcatrB mutants than to the parental B. cinerea strain. On tomato leaves, phenazine-producing Pseudomonas strains were significantly more effective in reducing gray mold symptoms incited by a ABcatrB mutant than by the parental strain. We conclude that the ABC transporter BcatrB provides protection to B. cinerea in phenazine-mediated interactions with Pseudomonas spp. Collectively, these results indicate that fungal ABC transporters can play an important role in antibiotic-mediated interactions between bacteria and fungi in plant-associated environments. The implications of these findings for the implementation and sustainability of crop protection by antagonistic microorganisms are discussed. PMID:12423022

  12. Use of interactive immersive visualization techniques for natural resources management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Ian D.; Karadaglis, Chris

    1996-03-01

    Natural resources management typically requires prediction of environmental changes over long time periods. In the case of forest management, for example, decisions can affect timber production, water catchment properties, recreational values, aesthetic values, energy usage or employment opportunities. This paper presents an application of advanced visualization techniques in combination with a geographic information system and linear programming in this context. The emphasis is on provision of visual feedback on the outcome of decision options. This main interactive window include a 3D view of the management area based initially on remote sensing imagery draped on a digital terrain model. Also on screen are a slider for time (from the present to 200 years hence), and sliders for decision variables such as required job support level, extent of habit conservation or catchment performance. As the time, or the decision variables are altered by the user the result is presented through replacement of textures in the 3D view to represent the changes in land cover. Initially the visualization is based on prior modeling in a well-defined decision space. The system reads model output in ARC/INFO export format while interactive visualization is based on the Silicon Graphics Performer Toolkit.

  13. Rethinking Tree Planting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kock, Henry

    1994-01-01

    This author contends that observing and understanding natural succession is far more valuable to students than memories of planting lonely seedlings in a schoolyard. An approach that provides a richer experience using an holistic approach to habitat restoration is explored. (LZ)

  14. Rethinking Virtual Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Virtual reference services seem a natural extension of libraries digital collections and the emphasis on access to the library anytime, anywhere. If patrons use the library from home, it makes sense to provide them with person-to-person online reference. The Library of Congress (LC), OCLC, and several large library systems have developed and…

  15. Rethinking Drinking | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Rethinking Drinking Rethinking Drinking Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Do ... samhsa.gov Do You Have a Problem with Drinking? Ever felt you should cut down on your ...

  16. Rethinking Resources: Multimodal Pedagogies in the ESL Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Pippa

    2000-01-01

    Describes a process for rethinking resources in the English-as-a-Second-Language classroom. Rethinking resources is possible through multimodal pedagogies that recognize students as remakers and transformers of the representational resources available to them. (Author/VWL)

  17. The nature of electrical interaction of Schottky contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Torkhov, N. A.

    2011-08-15

    Electrical interaction between metal-semiconductor contacts combined in a diode matrix with a Schottky barrier manifests itself in an appreciable variation in their surface potentials and static current-volt-characteristics. The necessary condition for appearance of electrical interaction between such contacts consists in the presence of a peripheral electric field (a halo) around them; this field propagates to a fairly large distances (<30 {mu}m). The sufficient condition is the presence of regions where the above halos overlap. It has been shown that variation in the surface potential and the current-voltage characteristics of contacts occurs under the effect of the intrinsic electric field of the contact's periphery and also under the effect of an electric field at matrix periphery; the latter field is formed as a result of superposition of electric fields of halos which form its contacts. The degree of the corresponding effect is governed by the distance between contacts and by the total charge of the space charge regions for all contacts of the matrix: their number, sizes (diameter D{sub i,j}), concentration of doping impurities in the semiconductor N{sub D}, and physical nature of a metal-semiconductor system with a Schottky barrier (with the barrier height {phi}{sub b}). It is established that bringing the contacts closer leads to a relative decrease in the threshold value of the 'dead' zone in the forward current-voltage characteristics, an increase in the effective height of the barrier, and an insignificant increase in the nonideality factor. An increase in the total area of contacts (a total electric charge in the space charge region) in the matrix brings about an increase in the threshold value of the 'dead' zone, a relative decrease in the effective barrier height, and an insignificant increase in the ideality factor.

  18. Outer satellite atmospheres: Their nature and planetary interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, W. H.; Combi, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Significant insights regarding the nature and interactions of Io and the planetary magnetosphere were gained through modeling studies of the spatial morphology and brightness of the Io sodium cloud. East-west intensity asymmetries in Region A are consistent with an east-west electric field and the offset of the magnetic and planetary-spin axes. East-west orbital asymmetries and the absolute brightness of Region B suggest a low-velocity (3 km/sec) satellite source of 1 to 2 x 10(26) sodium atoms/sec. The time-varying spatial structure of the sodium directional features in near Region C provides direct evidence for a magnetospheric-wind-driven escape mechanism with a high-velocity (20 km/sec) source of 1 x 10(26) atoms/sec and a flux distribution enhanced at the equator relative to the poles. A model for the Io potassium cloud is presented and analysis of data suggests a low velocity source rate of 5 x 10(24) atoms/sec. To understand the role of Titan and non-Titan sources for H atoms in the Saturn system, the lifetime of hydrogen in the planetary magnetosphere was incorporated into the earlier Titan torus model of Smyth (1981) and its expected impact discussed. A particle trajectory model for cometary hydrogen is presented and applied to the Lyman-alpha distribution of Comet Kohoutek (1973XII).

  19. A Natural Interaction Interface for UAVs Using Intuitive Gesture Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandarana, Meghan; Trujillo, Anna; Shimada, Kenji; Allen, Danette

    2016-01-01

    The popularity of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is increasing as technological advancements boost their favorability for a broad range of applications. One application is science data collection. In fields like Earth and atmospheric science, researchers are seeking to use UAVs to augment their current portfolio of platforms and increase their accessibility to geographic areas of interest. By increasing the number of data collection platforms UAVs will significantly improve system robustness and allow for more sophisticated studies. Scientists would like be able to deploy an available fleet of UAVs to fly a desired flight path and collect sensor data without needing to understand the complex low-level controls required to describe and coordinate such a mission. A natural interaction interface for a Ground Control System (GCS) using gesture recognition is developed to allow non-expert users (e.g., scientists) to define a complex flight path for a UAV using intuitive hand gesture inputs from the constructed gesture library. The GCS calculates the combined trajectory on-line, verifies the trajectory with the user, and sends it to the UAV controller to be flown.

  20. Natural and pyrogenic humic acids at goethite and natural oxide surfaces interacting with phosphate.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Tjisse; Mia, Shamim; Duhaut, Pierre-Benoît; Molleman, Bastiaan

    2013-08-20

    Fulvic and humic acids have a large variability in binding to metal (hydr) oxide surfaces and interact differently with oxyanions, as examined here experimentally. Pyrogenic humic acid has been included in our study since it will be released to the environment in the case of large-scale application of biochar, potentially creating Darks Earths or Terra Preta soils. A surface complexation approach has been developed that aims to describe the competitive behavior of natural organic matter (NOM) in soil as well as model systems. Modeling points unexpectedly to a strong change of the molecular conformation of humic acid (HA) with a predominant adsorption in the Stern layer domain at low NOM loading. In soil, mineral oxide surfaces remain efficiently loaded by mineral-protected organic carbon (OC), equivalent with a layer thickness of ≥ ~0.5 nm that represents at least 0.1-1.0% OC, while surface-associated OC may be even three times higher. In natural systems, surface complexation modeling should account for this pervasive NOM coverage. With our charge distribution model for NOM (NOM-CD), the pH-dependent oxyanion competition of the organo-mineral oxide fraction can be described. For pyrogenic HA, a more than 10-fold increase in dissolved phosphate is predicted at long-term applications of biochar or black carbon. PMID:23875678

  1. Interfacial interaction between the epoxidized natural rubber and silica in natural rubber/silica composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tiwen; Jia, Zhixin; Luo, Yuanfang; Jia, Demin; Peng, Zheng

    2015-02-01

    The epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) as an interfacial modifier was used to improve the mechanical and dynamical mechanical properties of NR/silica composites. In order to reveal the interaction mechanism between ENR and silica, the ENR/Silica model compound was prepared by using an open mill and the interfacial interaction of ENR with silica was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and stress-strain testing. The results indicated that the ring-opening reaction occurs between the epoxy groups of ENR chains and Si-OH groups on the silica surfaces and the covalent bonds are formed between two phases, which can improve the dispersion of silica in the rubber matrix and enhance the interfacial combination between rubber and silica. The ring-opening reaction occurs not only in vulcanization process but also in mixing process, meanwhile, the latter seems to be more important due to the simultaneous effects of mechanical force and temperature.

  2. Insights From Natural Host-Parasite Interactions: The Drosophila Model

    PubMed Central

    Keebaugh, Erin S.; Schlenke, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Immune responses against opportunistic pathogens have been extensively studied in Drosophila, leading to a detailed map of the genetics behind innate immunity networks including the Toll, Imd, Jak-Stat, and JNK pathways. However, immune mechanisms of other organisms, particularly plants, have primarily been investigated using natural pathogens. It was the use of natural pathogens in plant research that revealed the plant R/Avr system, a specialized immune response derived from antagonistic coevolution between plant immune proteins and their natural pathogens’ virulence proteins. Thus, we recommend that researchers begin to use natural Drosophila pathogens to identify novel immune mechanisms that may have arisen through antagonistic coevolution with common natural pathogens. In this review, we address the benefits of using natural pathogens in research, describe the known natural pathogens of Drosophila, and discuss exciting prospects for future research on select natural pathogens of Drosophila. PMID:23764256

  3. Interactions in Natural Colloid Systems "Biosolids" - Soil and Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinichenko, Kira V.; Nikovskaya, Galina N.; Ulberg, Zoya R.

    2016-04-01

    The "biosolids" are complex biocolloid system arising in huge amounts (mln tons per year) from biological municipal wastewater treatment. These contain clusters of nanoparticles of heavy metal compounds (in slightly soluble or unsoluble forms, such as phosphates, sulphates, carbonates, hydroxides, and etc.), cells, humic substances and so on, involved in exopolysaccharides (EPS) net matrix. One may consider that biosolids are the natural nanocomposite. Due to the presence of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other macro- and microelements (heavy metals), vitamins, aminoacids, etc., the biosolids are a depot of bioelements for plant nutrition. Thus, it is generally recognized that most rationally to utilize them for land application. For this purpose the biocolloid process was developed in biosolids system by initiation of microbial vital ability followed by the synthesis of EPS, propagation of ecologically important microorganisms, loosening of the structure and weakening of the coagulation contacts between biosolids colloids, but the structure integrity maintaining [1,2]. It was demonstrated that the applying of biosolids with metabolizing microorganisms to soil provided the improving soil structure, namely the increasing of waterstable aggregates content (70% vs. 20%). It occurs due to flocculation ability of biosolids EPS. The experimental modelling of mutual interactions in systems of soils - biosolids (with metabolizing microorganisms) were realized and their colloid and chemical mechanisms were formulated [3]. As it is known, the most harmonious plant growth comes at a prolonged entering of nutrients under the action of plant roots exudates which include pool of organic acids and polysaccharides [4]. Special investigations showed that under the influence of exudates excreted by growing plants, the biosolids microelements can release gradually from immobilized state into environment and are able to absorb by plants. Thus, the biosolids can serve as an active

  4. Rethinking Recycling in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.; Behn, M. D.; Jagoutz, O.

    2012-12-01

    Hacker et al EPSL 2011 and Behn et al Nature Geosci 2011 investigated pathways for return of buoyant, subducted material to arc crust. These include (1) diapirs rising into the hot mantle wedge, with extensive melts adding a component to arc magmas, (2) flow of material back up a relatively cold "subduction channel", adding solids to the lower crust and small-degree partial melts to the upper crust, (3) flow from the forearc along the base of arc crust, and (4) imbrication of forearc material into arc crust. These processes add felsic, incompatible-element-rich components to arc crust. The flux of incompatible elements such as Th in arc lavas, thought to be mainly recycled from subducted sediments, is > sediment subduction flux. There are large uncertainties: arc crustal growth rates are imprecise; young, primitive arc lavas may not be representative of magmatic flux into arc crust; sediment subduction flux may have varied. Nevertheless, this result is found for all arcs examined, using recently published growth rates. Perhaps arc growth rates that include subduction erosion are systematically overestimated. Instead or in addition, maybe significant Th comes from material other than sediments. Here, we consider the implications of pathways 1-4 for arc growth rates and incompatible element enrichment, in the context of subduction erosion and arc-arc collision. Subducting arc lithologies can become separated, with only felsic components returned to arc crust. Buoyant lithologies are mobile in viscous instabilities at > 700-800°C. Whereas thin layers such as sediments may become mobile all at once, instabilities may periodically strip the hottest parts from the top of thick buoyant layers, replacing them with hot mantle. In arc-arc collision, the top of a subducting plate starts at about 0°C on the seafloor, so heating is slow. In subduction erosion, forearc material in the subducting package can be > 200°C before erosion so buoyant lithologies reach 700-800

  5. Interface interactions of natural rubber and protein/fiber aggregates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanical properties of natural rubber are improved with a renewable filler for rubber applications. Aggregates of protein and fiber that constitute soy protein concentrate were shear-reduced and used to enhance the tensile modulus of the natural rubber. The aqueous dispersion of the shear-reduced ...

  6. A unifying framework for quantifying the nature of animal interactions.

    PubMed

    Potts, Jonathan R; Mokross, Karl; Lewis, Mark A

    2014-07-01

    Collective phenomena, whereby agent-agent interactions determine spatial patterns, are ubiquitous in the animal kingdom. On the other hand, movement and space use are also greatly influenced by the interactions between animals and their environment. Despite both types of interaction fundamentally influencing animal behaviour, there has hitherto been no unifying framework for the models proposed in both areas. Here, we construct a general method for inferring population-level spatial patterns from underlying individual movement and interaction processes, a key ingredient in building a statistical mechanics for ecological systems. We show that resource selection functions, as well as several examples of collective motion models, arise as special cases of our framework, thus bringing together resource selection analysis and collective animal behaviour into a single theory. In particular, we focus on combining the various mechanistic models of territorial interactions in the literature with step selection functions, by incorporating interactions into the step selection framework and demonstrating how to derive territorial patterns from the resulting models. We demonstrate the efficacy of our model by application to a population of insectivore birds in the Amazon rainforest. PMID:24829284

  7. A unifying framework for quantifying the nature of animal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Jonathan R.; Mokross, Karl; Lewis, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Collective phenomena, whereby agent–agent interactions determine spatial patterns, are ubiquitous in the animal kingdom. On the other hand, movement and space use are also greatly influenced by the interactions between animals and their environment. Despite both types of interaction fundamentally influencing animal behaviour, there has hitherto been no unifying framework for the models proposed in both areas. Here, we construct a general method for inferring population-level spatial patterns from underlying individual movement and interaction processes, a key ingredient in building a statistical mechanics for ecological systems. We show that resource selection functions, as well as several examples of collective motion models, arise as special cases of our framework, thus bringing together resource selection analysis and collective animal behaviour into a single theory. In particular, we focus on combining the various mechanistic models of territorial interactions in the literature with step selection functions, by incorporating interactions into the step selection framework and demonstrating how to derive territorial patterns from the resulting models. We demonstrate the efficacy of our model by application to a population of insectivore birds in the Amazon rainforest. PMID:24829284

  8. Unraveling the nature of interaction between substituted phenol and amiodarone.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Walid M I; Abo Dena, Ahmed S

    2014-02-01

    A comprehensive study of the interaction between nitrophenols (π-acceptors) and amiodarone (AM) was performed using electronic absorption spectra. The key point is to clarify the erroneous interpretation of the interaction between nitrophenols and one of the basic organic drugs. Matching of the experimental UV-vis spectra and the theoretical ones obtained by DFT calculations revealed that the tertiary amino group of AM reacts with the phenol compounds under investigation via proton-transfer but not charge-transfer (C.T.) mechanisms, unlike what is commonly known about this type of interaction. The interaction was carried out in solutions of different basic pH values to study the effect of hydrogen ion concentration on the reaction. The results show that the reaction is a simple acid-base reaction. As a result, this reaction cannot be used by analytical chemists for determination of one of the studied compounds due to its very low selectivity. TD-DFT as well as geometry optimization of the nitrophenols were calculated with the B3LYP functional, using aug-cc-pvDZ and LanL2DZ as basis sets for ionic and neutral compounds, respectively. The theoretical spectra of possible interactions between AM and nitrophenols result in the same spectra of ionized nitrophenols alone, indicating no possibility for the formation of charge-transfer complexes. PMID:24428617

  9. Interactions between Natural Health Products and Oral Anticoagulants: Spontaneous Reports in the Italian Surveillance System of Natural Health Products

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Angelica; Gallo, Eugenia; Benemei, Silvia; Vietri, Michele; Lapi, Francesco; Volpi, Roberta; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Gori, Luigi; Mugelli, Alessandro; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Vannacci, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The safety of vitamin K antagonists (VKA) use can be compromised by many popular herbal supplements taken by individuals. The literature reports that 30% of warfarin-treated patients self-medicates with herbs. Possible interactions represent an health risk. We aimed to identify all herbs-oral anticoagulants interactions collected in the Italian database of suspected adverse reactions to “natural health” products. Methods. The Italian database of spontaneous reports of suspected adverse reactions to natural products was analyzed to address herb-VKAs interactions. Results. From 2002 to 2009, we identified 12 reports with 7 cases of INR reduction in patients treated with warfarin (n = 3) and acenocoumarol (n = 4), and 5 cases of INR increase (all warfarin associated). It was reported 8 different herbal products as possibly interacting. Discussion. Our study confirms the risk of interactions, highlighting the difficulty to characterize them and their mechanisms and, finally, prevent their onset. The reported data underline the urgent need of healthcare providers being aware of the possible interaction between natural products and VKA, also because of the critical clinical conditions affecting patients. This is the first step to have the best approach to understand possible INR alterations linked to herb-VKA interaction and to rightly educate patients in treatment with VKA. PMID:21274401

  10. Speed Limits: Orientation and Semantic Context Interactions Constrain Natural Scene Discrimination Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Jochem W.; Kochy, Nick; Schalk, Franziska; Gruschow, Marcus; Heinze, Hans-Jochen

    2008-01-01

    The visual system rapidly extracts information about objects from the cluttered natural environment. In 5 experiments, the authors quantified the influence of orientation and semantics on the classification speed of objects in natural scenes, particularly with regard to object-context interactions. Natural scene photographs were presented in an…

  11. Covalent interaction of ascorbic acid with natural products

    PubMed Central

    Kesinger, Nicholas G.; Stevens, Jan F.

    2009-01-01

    While ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) is mostly known as a cofactor for proline hydroxylase and as a biological antioxidant, it also forms covalent bonds with natural products which we here refer to as ‘ascorbylation’. A number of natural products containing an ascorbate moiety has been isolated and characterized from a variety of biological sources, ranging from marine algae to flowering plants. Most of these compounds are formed as a result of nucleophilic substitution or addition by ascorbate, e.g. the ascorbigens from Brassica species are ascorbylated indole derivatives. Some ascorbylated tannins appear to be formed from electrophilic addition to dehydroascorbic acid. There are also examples of annulations of ascorbate with dietary polyphenols, e.g., epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and resveratrol derivatives. Herein is a survey of thirty-three ascorbylated natural products and their reported biological activities. PMID:19875138

  12. A Simple Model for Human and Nature Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motesharrei, S.; Rivas, J.; Kalnay, E.

    2012-12-01

    There are widespread concerns that current trends in population and resource-use are unsustainable, but the possibilities of an overshoot and collapse remain unclear and controversial. Collapses of civilizations have occurred many times in the past 5000 years, often followed by centuries of economic, intellectual, and population decline. Many different natural and social phenomena have been invoked to explain specific collapses, but a general explanation remains elusive. Two important features seem to appear across societies that have collapsed: Ecological Strain and Economic Stratification. Our new model (Human And Nature DYnamics, HANDY) has just four equations that describe the evolution of Elites, Commoners, Nature, and Wealth. Mechanisms leading to collapse are discussed and the measure "Carrying Capacity" is developed and defined. The model shows that societal collapse can happen due to either one of two independent factors: (1) over-consumption of natural resources, and/or (2) deep inequity between Elites and Commoners. The model also portrays two distinct types of collapse: (i) collapse followed by recovery of nature, and (ii) full collapse. The model suggests that the estimation of Carrying Capacity is a practical means for early detection of a collapse. Collapse can be avoided, and population can reach a sustainable equilibrium, if the rate of depletion of nature is reduced to a sustainable level, and if resources are distributed in a reasonably equitable fashion.; A type-ii (full) collapse is shown in this figure. With high inequality and high depletion, societies are doomed to collapse. Wealth starts to decrease when population rises above the carrying capacity. The large gap between carrying capacity and its maximum is a result of depletion factor being much larger than the sustainable limit. ; It is possible to overshoot, oscillate, and eventually converge to an equilibrium, even in an inequitable society. However, it requires policies that control

  13. Molecular Diagnosis of Natural enemy-host Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cryptic behaviors, small size, and rapid movement and feeding actions of arthropod natural enemies dictate the need for alternative technologies for the study of trophic linkages to replace the traditional approaches of direct observation and laboratory experimentation. Many molecular approaches...

  14. The nature of species interactions shifts profoundly between time periods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Species interactions change through time, for example ontogenetically, successionally, and evolutionarily. They also change as environmental conditions change, both within years (seasonally) and between years (year effects). The former are relatively well-studied, but the latter have received less a...

  15. Nature of electron-lattice interaction in superconducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, T.; Dmowski, W.; McQueeney, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Various experimental results show that in high temperature superconducting oxides the lattice responds rather anomalously to the onset of superconductivity. This suggests that some unconventional electron-lattice interaction may be at work in these solids which could be important to the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. The authors describe their recent experimental observations by neutron and X-ray scattering as well as some theoretical results which support this view, and discuss their implications.

  16. Effects of Human-Nature Interactions on Wildlife Habitat Dynamics: The Case of Wolong Nature Reserve for Giant Pandas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vina, A.; Tuanmu, M.; Yang, W.; Liu, J.

    2012-12-01

    Human activities continue to induce the degradation of natural ecosystems, thus threatening not only the long-term survival of many wildlife species around the world, but also the resilience of natural ecosystems to global environmental changes. In response, many conservation efforts are emerging as adaptive strategies for coping with the degradation of natural ecosystems. Among them, the establishment of nature reserves is considered to be the most effective. However the effectiveness of nature reserves depends on the type and intensity of human activities occurring within their boundaries. But many of these activities constitute important livelihood systems for local human populations. Therefore, to enhance the effectiveness of conservation actions without significantly affecting local livelihood systems, it is essential to understand the complexity of human-nature interactions and their effects on the spatio-temporal dynamics of natural ecosystems. In this study, we evaluated the relation between giant panda habitat dynamics, conservation efforts and human activities in Wolong Nature Reserve for Giant Pandas, Sichuan Province, China. This reserve supports ca. 10% of the entire wild giant panda population but is also home to ca. 4,900 local residents. The spatio-temporal dynamics of giant panda habitat over the last four decades were analyzed using a time series of remotely sensed imagery acquired by different satellite sensor systems, including the Landsat Multi-Spectral Scanner, the Landsat Thematic Mapper and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Our assessment suggests that when local residents were actively involved in conservation efforts (through a payment for ecosystem services scheme established since around 2000) panda habitat started to recover, thus enhancing the resilience capacity of natural ecosystems in the Reserve. This reversed a long-term (> 30 years) trend of panda habitat degradation. The study not only has direct

  17. Rethinking reproductive "tourism" as reproductive "exile".

    PubMed

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Patrizio, Pasquale

    2009-09-01

    Whereas reproductive "tourism" implies leisure travel, reproductive "exile" bespeaks the numerous difficulties and constraints faced by infertile patients who are "forced" to travel globally for assisted reproduction. Given this reality, it is time to rethink the language of "reproductive tourism," replacing it with more accurate and patient-centered terms. PMID:19249025

  18. Natural cold baryogenesis from strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Konstandin, Thomas; Servant, Géraldine E-mail: geraldine.servant@cern.ch

    2011-07-01

    The mechanism of ''cold electroweak baryogenesis'' has been so far unpopular because its proposal has relied on the ad-hoc assumption of a period of hybrid inflation at the electroweak scale with the Higgs acting as the waterfall field. We argue here that cold baryogenesis can be naturally realized without the need to introduce any slow-roll potential. Our point is that composite Higgs models where electroweak symmetry breaking arises via a strongly first-order phase transition provide a well-motivated framework for cold baryogenesis. In this case, reheating proceeds by bubble collisions and we argue that this can induce changes in Chern-Simons number, which in the presence of new sources of CP violation commonly lead to baryogenesis. We illustrate this mechanism using as a source of CP violation an effective dimension-six operator which is free from EDM constraints, another advantage of cold baryogenesis compared to the standard theory of electroweak baryogenesis. Our results are general as they do not rely on any particular UV completion but only on a stage of supercooling ended by a first-order phase transition in the evolution of the universe, which can be natural if there is nearly conformal dynamics at the TeV scale. Besides, baryon-number violation originates from the Standard Model only.

  19. The temporary nature of number-space interactions.

    PubMed

    Fias, Wim; van Dijck, Jean-Philippe

    2016-03-01

    It is commonly accepted that the mental representation and processing of numbers and of space are tightly linked. This is evident from studies that have shown relations between math ability and visuospatial skill. Also, math instruction and education rely strongly on visuospatial tools and strategies. The dominant explanation for these number-space interactions is that the mental representation of numbers takes the form of a mental number line with numbers positioned in ascending order according to our reading habits. A long-standing debate is whether the link between numbers and space can be considered as evidence for a spatial number representation in long-term semantic memory, or whether this spatial frame is a temporary representation that emerges in working memory (WM) during task execution. We summarise our recent work that suggests basic number processing tasks do not operate on a long-term spatial memory representation, but on a representation constructed in serial order WM, where the elements are spatially coded as a function of their ordinal position in the memorised sequence. Implications for a new theoretical framework linking serial order WM and basic number processing are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26913783

  20. Wave-Current Interaction in a Natural Tidal Inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, S.; Akan, C.; Özkan-Haller, H. T.

    2012-12-01

    The nearshore environment is characterized by complex hydrodynamics with high spatial and temporal variability, wave breaking, turbulence and other nonlinear processes. At a river mouth or an inlet, more complicated wave-current interaction processes and dynamics are involved. In this research we are intended to further develop and apply a dynamical coupled model system to the New River Inlet case. The modeling system consistent of a three-dimensional (3D) ocean model and a third generation spectral wind wave model to the above mentioned challenging environments. It seems even after inclusion of different physical processes (e.g. roller evolution, wave-current bottom boundary, wave enhanced eddy-viscosity) together with complicated mathematical methods (e.g. Vortex force (VF) formulation), there is still a lack of predictability compared to field observations. Here we also explore to what extent data assimilation techniques might be able to enhance the hydrodynamical modeling results and give a better understanding of the importance of different inputs parameters (e.g.bathymetry, surface roller).

  1. The nature of the metal-CO interaction and bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagus, P. S.; Nelin, C. J.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of CO on metal surfaces is represented by molecular orbital cluster models of CO at an on top site and adsorbed normal to the surface carbon end down. Ab initio SCF and MCSCF calculations are performed for several clusters. The new constrained space orbital variation CSOV approach is used to analyze the bonding and to compare CO adsorption on Al, representative of sp metals, with that on Cu, representative of transition metals. There is a large repulsion between the superposed free CO and metal charge distributions which is considerably smaller for Cu than for Al because there are fewer valence sigma electrons for Cu than for Al. The CSOV analysis shows that the metal to CO pi donation is much more important than the CO to metal sigma donation. It is also shown that for Cu, the d pi contribution to the metal pi donation is larger than the valence 4p pi contribution. The d pi donation is compared between Fe, Ni, and Cu and this donation and the metal-CO interaction are found to be different in the order Fe greater than Ni greater than Cu.

  2. Infant Directed Speech in Natural Interaction--Norwegian Vowel Quantity and Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englund, Kjellrun T.; Behne, Dawn M.

    2005-01-01

    An interactive face-to-face setting is used to study natural infant directed speech (IDS) compared to adult directed speech (ADS). With distinctive vowel quantity and vowel quality, Norwegian IDS was used in a natural quasi-experimental design. Six Norwegian mothers were recorded over a period of 6 months alone with their infants and in an adult…

  3. Nature of Interactions among Young Children and Adult Caregivers in a Children's Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Caitlin McMunn; Welch, Meghan M.

    2014-01-01

    This naturalistic, qualitative study examines the nature of child- and adult-led interactions in a children's museum. Using dialogic learning as a theoretical framework, the study examines how children and adults engage in interactions while learning at a museum. Findings suggest that children and adults are almost equally likely to lead…

  4. Tasks, Teacher Feedback, and Learner Modified Output in Naturally Occurring Classroom Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurzynski-Weiss, Laura; Revesz, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Tasks and interactional feedback have received much attention in instructed second language acquisition research in recent years. However, little research exists that has investigated feedback and task factors together during naturally occurring teacher-student interaction in classroom settings. To bridge this gap, the current study explored the…

  5. Nature Utilizes Unusual High London Dispersion Interactions for Compact Membranes Composed of Molecular Ladders.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J Philipp; Schreiner, Peter R

    2014-03-11

    London dispersion interactions play a key role in nature, in particular, in membranes that constitute natural barriers. Here we demonstrate that the spatial alignment of "molecular ladders" ([n]ladderanes), i.e., highly unusual and strained all-trans-fused cyclobutane moieties, leads to much larger attractive dispersion interactions as compared to alkyl chains of the same length. This provides a rationale for the occurrence of peculiar ladderane fatty acids in the dense cell walls of anammox bacteria. Despite the energetic penalty paid for the assembly of such strained polycycles, the advantage lies in significantly higher, dispersion-dominated interaction energies as compared to straight-chain hydrocarbon moieties commonly found in fatty acids. We discern the dispersion contributions to the total interaction energies using a variety of computational methods including modern dispersion-corrected density functional theory and high level ab initio approaches. Utilizing larger assemblies, we also show that the intermolecular interactions behave additively. PMID:26580198

  6. An Investigation of the Nature and Form of Interactions in Live Interactive Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Ron; McLoughlin, Catherine

    Live interactive television (LIT) is a popular medium for delivering educational programs to students in remote areas in Australia. The medium uses television to deliver a live one-way video signal and standard telephony to provide two-way audio communication between the instructor and students. Much of the potential of this medium is derived from…

  7. Long-range interactions and the sign of natural amplitudes in two-electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Giesbertz, Klaas J. H.; Leeuwen, Robert van

    2013-09-14

    In singlet two-electron systems, the natural occupation numbers of the one-particle reduced density matrix are given as squares of the natural amplitudes which are defined as the expansion coefficients of the two-electron wave function in a natural orbital basis. In this work, we relate the sign of the natural amplitudes to the nature of the two-body interaction. We show that long-range Coulomb-type interactions are responsible for the appearance of positive amplitudes and give both analytical and numerical examples that illustrate how the long-distance structure of the wave function affects these amplitudes. We further demonstrate that the amplitudes show an avoided crossing behavior as function of a parameter in the Hamiltonian and use this feature to show that these amplitudes never become zero, except for special interactions in which infinitely many of them can become zero simultaneously when changing the interaction strength. This mechanism of avoided crossings provides an alternative argument for the non-vanishing of the natural occupation numbers in Coulomb systems.

  8. Macro and micro scale interactions between cohesive sediment tracers and natural mud.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kate; Manning, Andrew; Droppo, Ian; Leppard, Gary; Benson, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the dispersion patterns of fine, cohesive sediment (< 63 micron) is fundamental to the sustainable management of aquatic environments. In order to develop sediment transport models and predict sediment dispersion, accurate field techniques for the measurement of sediment transport are required. Although this is relatively simple for the sand sized fraction, measuring transport pathways for cohesive sediment is more problematic. Cohesive sediment tracers developed for this purpose include synthetic tracer particles (e.g. polymers) and labelled natural clays (e.g. Mahler et al. 1998, Yin et al. 1999, Krezoski 1985; Spencer et al. 2007) and a fundamental assumption is that the tracer has the same physical properties as natural sediment. For the cohesive fraction this means that the tracer must be incorporated into and transported via floc aggregates (Black et al. 2006). A few studies have examined the physical behaviour of cohesive tracers (e.g. Manning et al. in press) but most are limited to the examination of gross settling characteristics (e.g. Louisse et al. 1986) rather than floc formation and behaviour. This work focuses on a labelled natural clay; a Ho-montmorillonite (see Spencer et al. 2007). The aims of this work were to examine the physical characteristics, internal structure and settling dynamics of the tracer and to determine whether the tracer flocculated and interacted with natural estuarine muds at both macro- and microscales. To our knowledge, this is the first study to present data examining the flocculation characteristics and structure of cohesive sediment tracers and their interaction with natural sediment. Macroscale floc characteristics such as floc size and settling velocity measurements were obtained using the LabSFLOC - Laboratory Spectral Flocculation Characteristics - instrument. Floc density, porosity, dry mass, and mass settling flux were then calculated. Floc internal microstructure (1-2 nm) and elemental floc composition

  9. Pest control of aphids depends on landscape complexity and natural enemy interactions.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily A; Reineking, Björn; Seo, Bumsuk; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2015-01-01

    Aphids are a major concern in agricultural crops worldwide, and control by natural enemies is an essential component of the ecological intensification of agriculture. Although the complexity of agricultural landscapes is known to influence natural enemies of pests, few studies have measured the degree of pest control by different enemy guilds across gradients in landscape complexity. Here, we use multiple natural-enemy exclosures replicated in 18 fields across a gradient in landscape complexity to investigate (1) the strength of natural pest control across landscapes, measured as the difference between pest pressure in the presence and in the absence of natural enemies; (2) the differential contributions of natural enemy guilds to pest control, and the nature of their interactions across landscapes. We show that natural pest control of aphids increased up to six-fold from simple to complex landscapes. In the absence of pest control, aphid population growth was higher in complex than simple landscapes, but was reduced by natural enemies to similar growth rates across all landscapes. The effects of enemy guilds were landscape-dependent. Particularly in complex landscapes, total pest control was supplied by the combined contribution of flying insects and ground-dwellers. Birds had little overall impact on aphid control. Despite evidence for intraguild predation of flying insects by ground-dwellers and birds, the overall effect of enemy guilds on aphid control was complementary. Understanding pest control services at large spatial scales is critical to increase the success of ecological intensification schemes. Our results suggest that, where aphids are the main pest of concern, interactions between natural enemies are largely complementary and lead to a strongly positive effect of landscape complexity on pest control. Increasing the availability of seminatural habitats in agricultural landscapes may thus benefit not only natural enemies, but also the effectiveness of

  10. Pest control of aphids depends on landscape complexity and natural enemy interactions

    PubMed Central

    Reineking, Björn; Seo, Bumsuk; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2015-01-01

    Aphids are a major concern in agricultural crops worldwide, and control by natural enemies is an essential component of the ecological intensification of agriculture. Although the complexity of agricultural landscapes is known to influence natural enemies of pests, few studies have measured the degree of pest control by different enemy guilds across gradients in landscape complexity. Here, we use multiple natural-enemy exclosures replicated in 18 fields across a gradient in landscape complexity to investigate (1) the strength of natural pest control across landscapes, measured as the difference between pest pressure in the presence and in the absence of natural enemies; (2) the differential contributions of natural enemy guilds to pest control, and the nature of their interactions across landscapes. We show that natural pest control of aphids increased up to six-fold from simple to complex landscapes. In the absence of pest control, aphid population growth was higher in complex than simple landscapes, but was reduced by natural enemies to similar growth rates across all landscapes. The effects of enemy guilds were landscape-dependent. Particularly in complex landscapes, total pest control was supplied by the combined contribution of flying insects and ground-dwellers. Birds had little overall impact on aphid control. Despite evidence for intraguild predation of flying insects by ground-dwellers and birds, the overall effect of enemy guilds on aphid control was complementary. Understanding pest control services at large spatial scales is critical to increase the success of ecological intensification schemes. Our results suggest that, where aphids are the main pest of concern, interactions between natural enemies are largely complementary and lead to a strongly positive effect of landscape complexity on pest control. Increasing the availability of seminatural habitats in agricultural landscapes may thus benefit not only natural enemies, but also the effectiveness of

  11. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI) Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiguang; Sun, Xiyuan; Jiang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI) complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC) basis set. The Pu- O y l bond orders show significant linear dependence on bond length and the charge of oxygen atoms in plutonyl moiety. The closed-shell interactions were identified for Pu-Ligand bonds in most complexes with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses. Meanwhile, we found that some Pu-Ligand bonds, like Pu-OH(-), show weak covalent. The interactive nature of Pu-ligand bonds were revealed based on the interaction quantum atom (IQA) energy decomposition approach, and our results indicate that all Pu-Ligand interactions is dominated by the electrostatic attraction interaction as expected. Meanwhile it is also important to note that the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation contributions can not be ignored. By means of the non-covalent interaction (NCI) approach it has been found that some weak and repulsion interactions existed in plutonyl(VI) complexes, which can not be distinguished by QTAIM, can be successfully identified. PMID:27077844

  12. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI) Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiguang; Sun, Xiyuan; Jiang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI) complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC) basis set. The Pu–Oyl bond orders show significant linear dependence on bond length and the charge of oxygen atoms in plutonyl moiety. The closed-shell interactions were identified for Pu-Ligand bonds in most complexes with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses. Meanwhile, we found that some Pu–Ligand bonds, like Pu–OH−, show weak covalent. The interactive nature of Pu–ligand bonds were revealed based on the interaction quantum atom (IQA) energy decomposition approach, and our results indicate that all Pu–Ligand interactions is dominated by the electrostatic attraction interaction as expected. Meanwhile it is also important to note that the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation contributions can not be ignored. By means of the non-covalent interaction (NCI) approach it has been found that some weak and repulsion interactions existed in plutonyl(VI) complexes, which can not be distinguished by QTAIM, can be successfully identified. PMID:27077844

  13. Discrimination of Coronal Stops by Bilingual Adults: The Timing and Nature of Language Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundara, Megha; Polka, Linda

    2008-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the timing and nature of interaction between the two languages of bilinguals. For this purpose, we compared discrimination of Canadian French and Canadian English coronal stops by simultaneous bilingual, monolingual and advanced early L2 learners of French and English. French /d/ is phonetically…

  14. Utilizing Teaching Interactions to Facilitate Social Skills in the Natural Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassardjian, Alyne; Taubman, Mitchell; Rudrud, Eric; Leaf, Justin B.; Edwards, Andrew; McEachin, John; Leaf, Ron; Schulze, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder often display deficits in social skills. While research has shown behavioral interventions to be effective in teaching and/or increasing a variety of appropriate social skills, limited research has shown generalization of these skills to the natural setting. The Teaching Interaction procedure…

  15. Interpreters' Involvement in Multi-Party Interactions: The Nature of Participation as Listener and Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takimoto, Masato

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates two naturally occurring business interpreting situations where there are a number of participants. Unlike dialogue interpreting situations where there are only two primary interlocutors, the overall interaction shows more complexity in these multi-party situations. This, in turn, means that the interpreters' functions and…

  16. Introduction to Special Issue: Understanding the Nature-Nurture Interactions in Language and Learning Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berninger, Virginia Wise

    2001-01-01

    The introduction to this special issue on nature-nurture interactions notes that the following articles represent five biologically oriented research approaches which each provide a tutorial on the investigator's major research tool, a summary of current research understandings regarding language and learning differences, and a discussion of…

  17. Radiative natural SUSY spectrum from deflected AMSB scenario with messenger-matter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Yang, Jin Min; Zhang, Yang

    2016-04-01

    A radiative natural SUSY spectrum are proposed in the deflected anomaly mediation scenario with general messenger-matter interactions. Due to the contributions from the new interactions, positive slepton masses as well as a large | A t | term can naturally be obtained with either sign of deflection parameter and few messenger species (thus avoid the possible Landau pole problem). In this scenario, in contrast to the ordinary (radiative) natural SUSY scenario with under-abundance of dark matter (DM), the DM can be the mixed bino-higgsino and have the right relic density. The 125 GeV Higgs mass can also be easily obtained in our scenario. The majority of low EW fine tuning points can be covered by the XENON-1T direct detection experiments.

  18. Multimodal interactions in typically and atypically developing children: natural versus artificial environments.

    PubMed

    Giannopulu, Irini

    2013-11-01

    This review addresses the central role played by multimodal interactions in neurocognitive development. We first analyzed our studies of multimodal verbal and nonverbal cognition and emotional interactions within neuronal, that is, natural environments in typically developing children. We then tried to relate them to the topic of creating artificial environments using mobile toy robots to neurorehabilitate severely autistic children. By doing so, both neural/natural and artificial environments are considered as the basis of neuronal organization and reorganization. The common thread underlying the thinking behind this approach revolves around the brain's intrinsic properties: neuroplasticity and the fact that the brain is neurodynamic. In our approach, neural organization and reorganization using natural or artificial environments aspires to bring computational perspectives into cognitive developmental neuroscience. PMID:23689878

  19. Rethinking Piaget's Theory of Infancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, David

    1982-01-01

    Drawing on Piaget's own work and some contemporary studies of social interaction, the author concludes that one may reinterpret Piaget's descriptive psychology in terms of the infant's growing communicative competency. (Author/MP)

  20. Four basic levels of the interactions between humanity and the imbalanced Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    There are the clearly distinguishable four basic levels of interaction the humanity with the imbalanced Nature: 1 Level - Naivety: Self-healing Nature in defiance of the humanity activities. 2 Level - Collaboration: Restoration of Nature in cooperation with humanity. 3 Level - Conflict: The resistance of Nature against the humanity's interference. 4 Level - Disappearance: Nature destroys humanity as the trouble maker. On the first level the people were afraid and respected Nature and are taking from Nature only what Nature gave willingly. Therefore Nature could easy regenerate itself. So it was thousands of years and people become under the false impression that it will be forever. The first signs the end of this period was visible in the era of industrialization. It turned out that resources are not infinite, and the waste of humanity grows much faster than Nature can utilize or dispose it. But in the world still had plenty of the untouched places and industrialization continued to develop rapidly. Thus problems with Nature were dislocated into the colonies rather far off from the prosperous metropolitan countries. The false impression about the man's victory over Nature has increased. Very soon the main untouched place was used, and the global circulations bring the pollutions from colonies to the metropolis. The second level was started as processes to creating the national parks, natural reservations, etc. It was some beginning of the cooperation humanity with Nature. The invasion into the Nature of the colonies was intensified. In addition start increasing the pollution in the metropolis from the waste of resources which have been imported from the colonies. The third level was started and Nature began to resist and revenge to the self-confident man. But man didn't stop and continued create more and more aggressive processes which provoked some avalanches-looks reactions of Nature. Now people can start these avalanches, but cannot stop it. One of these man

  1. Rethinking the Tertiary Mathematics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petocz, Peter; Reid, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Mathematics curriculum at the tertiary level is located within a range of social and cultural theories, and is often constructed by academics seeking to promulgate a particular view of mathematics. We argue that such a curriculum should incorporate a real acknowledgement of the different ways in which students understand the nature of mathematics…

  2. Application of isothermal titration calorimetry as a tool to study natural product interactions.

    PubMed

    Callies, O; Hernández Daranas, A

    2016-07-28

    Covering: up to February 2015Over the past twenty-five years, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has become a potent tool for the study a great variety of molecular interactions. This technique is able to provide a complete thermodynamic profile of an interaction process in a single experiment, with a series of advantages in comparison to other comparable techniques, such as less amount of sample or no need of chemical modification or labelling. It is thus not surprising that ITC has been applied to study the manifold types of interactions of natural products to get new insights into the molecular key factors implied in the complexation process of this type of compounds. This review provides an overview over the applications of ITC as a potent tool to investigate interactions of natural products with proteins, nucleic acids, oligosaccharides, and other types of receptors. The examples have been selected depending on the impact that this technique had during the investigation and revision of the interactions involved in the bioactivity of a compound, lead optimization or technical applications. PMID:27186603

  3. The Nature of the Noncovalent Interactions between Benzene and C60 Fullerene.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Ming; Wang, Yi-Bo; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Weizhou

    2016-07-21

    Noncovalent interactions between aromatic compounds and fullerenes have received considerable attention in various fields of science and technology. Employing benzene (C6H6) and C60 fullerene as model molecules, we theoretically explored in the present study the nature of this kind of noncovalent interaction. Our results clearly show that the π···π stacking configurations of the complex C6H6···C60 are more strongly bound than in the C-H···π analogues, and the C-H···π interactions in the C-H···π configurations of C6H6···C60 are not of the hydrogen bonds. According to symmetry adapted perturbation theory analyses, all of the configurations of C6H6···C60 are dominated by dispersion forces. The percentage of the dispersion components in the overall attractive interactions for the π···π stacking configurations is smaller than the percentage of the dispersion components in the overall attractive interactions for the C-H···π configurations, whereas the percentage of the electrostatic terms in the overall attractive interactions for the π···π stacking configurations is larger than the percentage of the electrostatic terms in the overall attractive interactions for the C-H···π configurations. This is distinctly different from the case of the benzene dimer. PMID:27366821

  4. Natural and orthogonal model for estimating gene-gene interactions applied to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feifei; Ma, Jianzhong; Cai, Guoshuai; Fang, Shenying; Lee, Jeffrey E; Wei, Qingyi; Amos, Christopher I

    2014-05-01

    Epistasis, or gene-gene interaction, results from joint effects of genes on a trait; thus, the same alleles of one gene may display different genetic effects in different genetic backgrounds. In this study, we generalized the coding technique of a natural and orthogonal interaction (NOIA) model for association studies along with gene-gene interactions for dichotomous traits and human complex diseases. The NOIA model which has non-correlated estimators for genetic effects is important for estimating influence from multiple loci. We conducted simulations and data analyses to evaluate the performance of the NOIA model. Both simulation and real data analyses revealed that the NOIA statistical model had higher power for detecting main genetic effects and usually had higher power for some interaction effects than the usual model. Although associated genes have been identified for predisposing people to melanoma risk: HERC2 at 15q13.1, MC1R at 16q24.3 and CDKN2A at 9p21.3, no gene-gene interaction study has been fully explored for melanoma. By applying the NOIA statistical model to a genome-wide melanoma dataset, we confirmed the previously identified significantly associated genes and found potential regions at chromosomes 5 and 4 that may interact with the HERC2 and MC1R genes, respectively. Our study not only generalized the orthogonal NOIA model but also provided useful insights for understanding the influence of interactions on melanoma risk. PMID:24241239

  5. The nature of the interlayer interaction in bulk and few-layer phosphorus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shulenburger, Luke; Baczewski, A. D.; Zhu, Z.; Guan, J.; Tomanek, David

    2015-11-02

    Sensitive dependence of the electronic structure on the number of layers in few-layer phosphorene raises a question about the true nature of the interlayer interaction in so-called van der Waals (vdW) solids . We performed quantum Monte Carlo calculations and found that the interlayer interaction in bulk black phosphorus and related few-layer phosphorene is associated with a significant charge redistribution that is incompatible with purely dispersive forces and not captured by density functional theory calculations with different vdW corrected functionals. Lastly, these findings confirm the necessity of more sophisticated treatment of nonlocal electron correlation in total energy calculations.

  6. Using the Semi-Circular Bending Test to Investigate the Interaction Between Hydraulic and Natural Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Olson, J. E.; Prodanovic, M.

    2014-12-01

    Micro-seismic data shows that hydraulic fracture propagation is a complex process. When hydraulic fractures interact with pre-existing natural fractures, it can result in a complex fracture network. The interaction depends on in-situ stresses, rock and natural fracture mechanical properties, approach angle and hydraulic fracture treatment parameters. Most simulation studies treat natural fractures as frictional interfaces with cohesive properties. However, from core observation, partially cemented and fully cemented natural fractures are widely present and it is not clear that whether they fit the common description or not. In this study, semi-circular bending experiments are utilized to examine the fracture propagation paths. Synthetic hydrostone samples with embedded inclusions of different mechanical properties are used to mimic rock and cemented natural fractures. Simulation results are generated using finite element software ABAQUS. The extended finite element method (XFEM) capability of ABAQUS allows the fracture initiation and propagation along a solution dependent path without the need for re-meshing. The simulation results are used to explain the experimental observations. In a series of experiment and modeling work, we assess the influence of the fracture approach angle, inclusion strength, and inclusion thickness on fracture propagation. Current results indicate the fracture propagation direction is strongly influenced by pre-existing inclusions. The propagating fractures tend to cross the inclusion when the approach angle is high and divert into the inclusion when the approach angle is low. The crossing surface is thus not a clean cut, but with a jog distance that depends on the inclusion thickness and approach angle. Results imply that if hydraulic fractures have lower approach angles to pre-existing natural fractures, the ultimate fracture network is going to have higher complexity. The thickness of natural fractures can also add to the complexity.

  7. Nature of chalcogen hor ellipsis chalcogen contact interactions in organic donor-molecule salts

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, J.J.; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan . Dept. of Chemistry); Williams, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The nature of chalcogen{hor ellipsis}chalcogen contact interactions in organic donor-molecule salts was examined by performing ab initio SCF-MO/MP2 calculations on H{sub 2}X{hor ellipsis}XH{sub 2}(X = O, S, SE, Te) and MM2 calculations on donor dimers (TXF){sub 2} (X = S, SE, Te) and (BEDX-TTF){sub 2} (X = O, S). 14 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in interactions between natural products and drugs.

    PubMed

    Aszalos, Adorjan

    2008-12-01

    Medicinal use of natural products such as extracts of plants has existed for many years in China and in other countries and they are now available worldwide. Citrus fruit juices are consumed on a daily basis around the world. Modern medicine provides well-tested compounds or drugs for most sicknesses. However, the simultaneous consumption of plant extracts, food supplements, and fruit juices with drugs can create metabolic aberrations in humans. Interactions between drugs used simultaneously are regulated by government agencies. Not regulated, but warned against in drug inserts are potential interactions between drugs and food and food-additives containing certain compounds with potential side effects. Summarized here are the results of investigations that point out possible interactions at the level of transporter molecules by drugs and compounds of natural origin. These transporter molecules play important roles in absorption in the intestines, at the blood brain barrier, in the liver, the kidney and in some other parts of the human body. Drugs and metabolites pass through these pumps and may compete with compounds from food supplements. The most studied natural compounds that are potential modulators of these transport molecules are flavonoids, found in fruit juices, vegetables, flowers and tea. Mycotoxins found in cereal grains are also shown to modulate transporter proteins. We detail here how such constituents of natural origin were shown to modulate three types of the major transporter molecules, P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), multidrug resistance proteins (ABCCs) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2). Interference of these natural compounds with drugs at the transporter level is also discussed. PMID:19075617

  9. Interactions between Oil-Spill Pollutants and Natural Stressors Can Compound Ecotoxicological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Coastal estuaries are among the most biologically productive habitats on earth, yet are at risk from human activities including marine oil spills. The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill contaminated hundreds of kilometers of coastal habitat, particularly in Louisiana's delta. Coastal estuaries are naturally dynamic habitats where periodic and stochastic fluctuations, for example in temperature, salinity, nutrients, and hypoxia, are common. Such environmental variability regularly imposes suboptimal conditions for which resident species must continually compensate by drawing on diverse physiological abilities. However, exposures to oil, in addition to their direct toxic effects, may interfere with functions that normally enable physiological compensation for suboptimal conditions. This review summarizes the panoply of naturally-encountered stressors that may interact with oil, including salinity, hypoxia, pathogens, and competition, and the mechanisms that may underlie these interactions. Combined effects of these stressors can amplify the costs of oil-exposures to organisms in the real world, and contribute to impacts on fitness, populations, and communities, that may not have been predicted from direct toxicity of hydrocarbons alone. These interactions pose challenges for accurate and realistic assessment of risks and of actual damage. To meet these challenges, environmental scientists and managers must capitalize on the latest understanding of the complexities of chemical effects of natural stressors on organisms, and adopt integrative and holistic measures of effect from the molecular to whole-animal levels, in order to anticipate, characterize, diagnose, and solve, ecotoxicological problems. PMID:23842611

  10. Ab initio no core configuration interaction calculations in the natural orbital basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Chrysovalantis; Caprio, Mark A.; Vary, James P.; Maris, Pieter

    2015-10-01

    The natural orbital basis has been successfully used in the past in atomic and molecular structure calculations. The natural orbitals used in those calculations are calculated by diagonalizing the electron one-body density matrix. Here we develop natural orbitals for nuclear no-core configuration interaction (NCCI) calculations. A NCCI calculation using an initial single particle basis, such as the harmonic oscillator basis, must first be performed in order to obtain a one-body density matrix. The eigenvectors of the one-body density matrix are the natural orbitals, and the corresponding eigenvalues are the occupations of these natural orbitals in the nuclear wave function. According to these occupancies, the most important natural orbitals, in the sense of the most occupied, can then be selected and used in a NCCI calculation. We discuss ab initio nuclear NCCI calculations for light nuclei and assess their ability to provide faster convergence. Supported by the US DOE (under Grants DE-FG02-95ER-40934, DESC0008485 SciDAC/NUCLEI, and DE-FG02-87ER40371), and the US NSF (under Grant 0904782). Computational resources provided by NERSC (supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231), and NDCRC.

  11. Rethinking Theoretical Approaches to Stigma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jack K; Lang, Annie; Olafsdottir, Sigrun

    2008-01-01

    A resurgence of research and policy efforts on stigma both facilitates and forces a reconsideration of the levels and types of factors that shape reactions to persons with conditions that engender prejudice and discrimination. Focusing on the case of mental illness but drawing from theories and studies of stigma across the social sciences, we propose a framework that brings together theoretical insights from micro, meso and macro level research: Framework Integrating Normative Influences on Stigma (FINIS) starts with Goffman’s notion that understanding stigma requires a language of social relationships, but acknowledges that individuals do not come to social interaction devoid of affect and motivation. Further, all social interactions take place in a context in which organizations, media and larger cultures structure normative expectations which create the possibility of marking “difference”. Labelling theory, social network theory, the limited capacity model of media influence, the social psychology of prejudice and discrimination, and theories of the welfare state all contribute to an understanding of the complex web of expectations shaping stigma. FINIS offers the potential to build a broad-based scientific foundation based on understanding the effects of stigma on the lives of persons with mental illness, the resources devoted to the organizations and families who care for them, and policies and programs designed to combat stigma. We end by discussing the clear implications this framework holds for stigma reduction, even in the face of conflicting results. PMID:18436358

  12. Rethinking Global Water Governance for the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajami, N. K.; Cooley, H.

    2012-12-01

    Growing pressure on the world's water resources is having major impacts on our social and economic well-being. According to the United Nations, today, at least 1.1 billion people do not have access to clean drinking water. Pressures on water resources are likely to continue to worsen in response to decaying and crumbling infrastructure, continued population growth, climate change, degradation of water quality, and other challenges. If these challenges are not addressed, they pose future risks for many countries around the world, making it urgent that efforts are made to understand both the nature of the problems and the possible solutions that can effectively reduce the associated risks. There is growing understanding of the need to rethink governance to meet the 21st century water challenges. More and more water problems extend over traditional national boundaries and to the global community and the types and numbers of organizations addressing water issues are large and growing. Economic globalization and transnational organizations and activities point to the need for improving coordination and integration on addressing water issues, which are increasingly tied to food and energy security, trade, global climate change, and other international policies. We will present some of the key limitations of global water governance institutions and provide recommendations for improving these institutions to address 21st century global water challenges more effectively.

  13. Rethinking "posterior" tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Currently, many clinicians who help with breastfeeding problems are diagnosing "posterior" tongue-tie in infants and performing or referring for frenotomy. In this "Speaking Out" article, I argue that the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie has successfully raised awareness of the importance of impaired tongue function in breastfeeding difficulty. However, the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie also applies a reductionist, medicalized theoretical frame to the complex problem of impaired tongue function, risking unintended outcomes. Impaired tongue function arises out of multiple interacting and co-evolving factors, including the interplay between social behaviors concerning breastfeeding and mother-infant biology. Consideration of theoretical frames is vital if we are to build an evidence base through efficient use of the scarce resources available for clinical breastfeeding research and minimize unintended outcomes. PMID:24143939

  14. Interactions of bovine and caprine herpesviruses with the natural and the foreign hosts.

    PubMed

    Engels, M; Palatini, M; Metzler, A E; Probst, U; Kihm, U; Ackermann, M

    1992-11-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) and caprine herpesvirus 1 (CapHV1) are useful models to study virus-host interactions, as well as pathogenicity and latency, when comparing the outcome of infection in the natural and the foreign hosts. Molecular seroepidemiological analyses revealed that cross-reacting antibodies were mainly induced by glycoprotein gI (gB analogue), by the major capsid protein and by nonstructural proteins, whereas the most virus-specific antibodies were elicited by glycoproteins gIII and gIV. These glycoproteins, especially gIII (gC analogue), might therefore play an important role in the virus-host-interactions. As a basis for further studies, we re-evaluated observations concerning experimental infections with BHV1 and CapHV1 in the natural and the foreign hosts. All parameters indicated that both viruses were able to infect either host, but that the pathogenicity was restricted to the natural host. Latent virus could be reactivated exclusively from cows infected with BHV1. It was possible neither to reactivate BHV1 from goats, nor to reactivate CapHV1 from either species. The experiments indicated that the outcome of infection in the natural and the foreign host is dependent on host and viral factors, whereby gIII is only one important virus component involved. Further investigations in the host and host cell range of BHV1 and CapHV1 will help to clarify the role of factors responsible for virus-host-interactions. PMID:1336252

  15. Macro and micro scale interactions between cohesive sediment tracers and natural estuarine mud.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, K. L.; Manning, A. J.; Droppo, I. G.; Leppard, G. G.; Benson, T.

    2009-04-01

    Improving the understanding of dispersion patterns of the fine sediment fraction (< 63 micron) and associated contaminants is fundamental to the sustainable management of estuarine and marine environments. In order to develop sediment transport models and predict sediment dispersion, accurate and reliable field techniques for the measurement of sediment transport are required. Although this is relatively simple for the sand sized fraction, measuring transport pathways for the < 63 micron sediment fraction has been more problematic. There has been considerable effort within the scientific community to develop a tracer for the fine/cohesive sediment fraction. This has included the use of synthetic tracer particles and the labelling of natural clays (e.g. Mahler et al. 1998, Yin et al. 1999, Krezoski 1985; Spencer et al. 2007). Synthetic tracers have included polymer-based fluorescent tracers, with the same size, density and surface charge characteristics as the flocculated clay and silt fraction. A fundamental assumption of tracer technology is that the tracer has the same physical properties as the natural sediment it is intended to mimic. For sand-sized material matching particle size, shape and density has been easy to achieve. However, the < 63 micron sediment fraction is cohesive and in order to satisfy this assumption cohesive sediment tracers must be incorporated into and transported via floc aggregates (Black et al. 2006). This work focuses on the use of a labelled natural clay; a Ho-montmorillonite (see Spencer et al. 2007). The aim of the research was to determine whether this tracer interacted with and was transported via floc aggregates in saline environments and would therefore be a suitable cohesive sediment tracer in estuaries. Our objectives were to examine the physical characteristics, internal structure and settling dynamics of flocculated tracer and to determine the extent to which the tracer interacted with natural estuarine muds under laboratory

  16. [Interaction of human alpha-thrombin with organic ligands of ionic nature].

    PubMed

    Kolodzeĭskaia, M V; Chumachenko, Iu V; Volkov, G L

    2003-01-01

    Investigations results of human thrombin interaction with organic ligands of ion nature containing nonpolar groups are presented. It is shown that electrostatic interaction is the basic one under enzyme binding, while hydrophobic binding is only additional function in the reaction enzyme-ligand, this fact is confirmed by the absence of interaction between thrombin and rivanol which has a positive charge side by side with cumbrous hydrophobic group. New data are presented about the ligand specificity of binding sites of thrombin active centre. The importance of relative arrangement of hydrophobic ligand groups for interaction with enzyme is shown. It is supposed that thrombin binding with organic ligands occurs owing anionic site of beta-domain of active thrombin centre with the major aminoacids arginine and lysine (Lys 68, Arg 78, Arg 77, Arg 66 etc.). It is shown that the compounds containing negative group SO3 and have some cunbours hydrophobic groups interact more intensively with the enzyme. Thus, rosseline--with symmetrical hydrophobic nucleus (four benzene rings)--is the most efficient ligand for the binding with thrombin. The obtained investigation results evidence for bacteriostatical and stabilizing effect of low-molecular asobenzene ligands on rather labile thrombin molecules. PMID:15143519

  17. Strength and nature of hydrogen bonding interactions in mono- and di-hydrated formamide complexes.

    PubMed

    Angelina, Emilio L; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2011-05-12

    In this work, mono- and di-hydrated complexes of the formamide were studied. The calculations were performed at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of approximation. The atoms in molecules theory (AIM), based on the topological properties of the electronic density distribution, was used to characterize the different types of bonds. The analysis of the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in the most stable mono- and di-hydrated formamide complexes shows a mutual reinforcement of the interactions, and some of these complexes can be considered as "bifunctional hydrogen bonding hydration complexes". In addition, we analyzed how the strength and the nature of the interactions, in mono-hydrated complexes, are modified by the presence of a second water molecule in di-hydrated formamide complexes. Structural changes, cooperativity, and electron density redistributions demonstrate that the H-bonds are stronger in the di-hydrated complexes than in the corresponding mono-hydrated complexes, wherein the σ- and π-electron delocalization were found. To explain the nature of such interactions, we carried out the atoms in molecules theory in conjunction with reduced variational space self-consistent field (RVS) decomposition analysis. On the basis of the local Virial theorem, the characteristics of the local electron energy density components at the bond critical points (BCPs) (the 1/4∇ (2)ρ(b) component of electron energy density and the kinetic energy density) were analyzed. These parameters were used in conjunction with the electron density and the Laplacian of the electron density to analyze the characteristics of the interactions. The analysis of the interaction energy components for the systems considered indicates that the strengthening of the hydrogen bonds is manifested by an increased contribution of the electrostatic energy component represented by the kinetic energy density at the BCP. PMID:21506592

  18. Asymmetrical nature of the Trollius-Chiastocheta interaction: insights into the evolution of nursery pollination systems.

    PubMed

    Suchan, Tomasz; Beauverd, Mélanie; Trim, Naïké; Alvarez, Nadir

    2015-11-01

    The mutualistic versus antagonistic nature of an interaction is defined by costs and benefits of each partner, which may vary depending on the environment. Contrasting with this dynamic view, several pollination interactions are considered as strictly obligate and mutualistic. Here, we focus on the interaction between Trollius europaeus and Chiastocheta flies, considered as a specialized and obligate nursery pollination system - the flies are thought to be exclusive pollinators of the plant and their larvae develop only in T. europaeus fruits. In this system, features such as the globelike flower shape are claimed to have evolved in a coevolutionary context. We examine the specificity of this pollination system and measure traits related to offspring fitness in isolated T. europaeus populations, in some of which Chiastocheta flies have gone extinct. We hypothesize that if this interaction is specific and obligate, the plant should experience dramatic drop in its relative fitness in the absence of Chiastocheta. Contrasting with this hypothesis, T. europaeus populations without flies demonstrate a similar relative fitness to those with the flies present, contradicting the putative obligatory nature of this pollination system. It also agrees with our observation that many other insects also visit and carry pollen among T. europaeus flowers. We propose that the interaction could have evolved through maximization of by-product benefits of the Chiastocheta visits, through the male flower function, and selection on floral traits by the most effective pollinator. We argue this mechanism is also central in the evolution of other nursery pollination systems. PMID:26640658

  19. Biology, childhood trauma, and murder: rethinking justice.

    PubMed

    Heide, Kathleen M; Solomon, Eldra P

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews recent findings in the developmental neurophysiology of children subjected to psychological trauma. Studies link extreme neglect and abuse with long-term changes in the nervous and endocrine systems. A growing body of research literature indicates that individuals with severe trauma histories are at higher risk of behaving violently than those without such histories. This article links these two research areas by discussing how severe and protracted child abuse and/or neglect can lead to biological changes, putting these individuals at greater risk for committing homicide and other forms of violence than those without child maltreatment histories. The implications of these biological findings for forensic evaluations are discussed. Based on new understanding of the effects of child maltreatment, the authors invite law and mental health professionals to rethink their notions of justice and offender accountability, and they challenge policymakers to allocate funds for research into effective treatment and for service delivery. PMID:16516292

  20. Modeling the Interaction Between Hydraulic and Natural Fractures Using Dual-Lattice Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jing; Huang, Hai; Deo, Milind

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between hydraulic fractures (HF) and natural fractures (NF) will lead to complex fracture networks due to the branching and merging of natural and hydraulic fractures in unconventional reservoirs. In this paper, a newly developed hydraulic fracturing simulator based on discrete element method is used to predict the generation of complex fracture network in the presence of pre-existing natural fractures. By coupling geomechanics and reservoir flow within a dual lattice system, this simulator can effectively capture the poro-elastic effects and fluid leakoff into the formation. When HFs are intercepting single or multiple NFs, complex mechanisms such as direct crossing, arresting, dilating and branching can be simulated. Based on the model, the effects of injected fluid rate and viscosity, the orientation and permeability of NFs and stress anisotropy on the HF-NF interaction process are investigated. Combined impacts from multiple parameters are also examined in the paper. The numerical results show that large values of stress anisotropy, intercepting angle, injection rate and viscosity will impede the opening of NFs.

  1. Pollinator Interactions with Yellow Starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis) across Urban, Agricultural, and Natural Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Misha; Kremen, Claire; Roderick, George K.

    2014-01-01

    Pollinator-plant relationships are found to be particularly vulnerable to land use change. Yet despite extensive research in agricultural and natural systems, less attention has focused on these interactions in neighboring urban areas and its impact on pollination services. We investigated pollinator-plant interactions in a peri-urban landscape on the outskirts of the San Francisco Bay Area, California, where urban, agricultural, and natural land use types interface. We made standardized observations of floral visitation and measured seed set of yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis), a common grassland invasive, to test the hypotheses that increasing urbanization decreases 1) rates of bee visitation, 2) viable seed set, and 3) the efficiency of pollination (relationship between bee visitation and seed set). We unexpectedly found that bee visitation was highest in urban and agricultural land use contexts, but in contrast, seed set rates in these human-altered landscapes were lower than in natural sites. An explanation for the discrepancy between floral visitation and seed set is that higher plant diversity in urban and agricultural areas, as a result of more introduced species, decreases pollinator efficiency. If these patterns are consistent across other plant species, the novel plant communities created in these managed landscapes and the generalist bee species that are favored by human-altered environments will reduce pollination services. PMID:24466050

  2. Antimony in the environment: A review focused on natural waters. III. Microbiota relevant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filella, Montserrat; Belzile, Nelson; Lett, Marie-Claire

    2007-02-01

    Antimony is ubiquitously present in the environment as a result of natural processes and human activities. Antimony is not considered to be an essential element for plants or animals. In this third review paper on the occurrence of antimony in natural waters, the interactions of antimony with microbiota are discussed in relation to its fate in natural waters. This paper covers the following aspects: occurrence in microbiota, uptake transport mechanisms, pathways of Sb(III) removal from cells involved in antimony tolerance, oxidation and reduction of antimony by living organisms, phytochelatin induction and biomethylation. This review is based on a careful and systematic examination of a comprehensive collection of papers on the above mentioned aspects of the subject. All data are quoted from the original sources. Relatively little existing information falls within the strict scope of this review and, when relevant, discussion on the interactions of antimony with reference microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and different protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania, has been included.

  3. a Unified Perspective on the Nature of Pairwise Interatomic Interactions from Ar2 to Carbon Monoxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales, Charles K.; Rivera-Rivera, Luis A.; McElmurry, Blake A.; Lucchese, Robert R.; Bevan, John W.; Walton, Jay R.

    2014-06-01

    A method is developed that gives a unified perspective on the nature of a wide range of pairwise interatomic interactions. The approach is applied to the diatomic molecules CO, H2+, H2, HF, LiH, Li2, O2, and Ar2, and one-dimensional cuts through the potentials of OC-HBr, OC-HF, OC-HCCH, OC-HCN, OC-HCl, OC-HI, OC-BrCl, and OC-Cl2. Systems selected for investigation illustrate different bound categories varying from van der Waals, halogen bonded, hydrogen bonded to strongly bound covalently bound carbon monoxide with binding energies varying over almost three orders of magnitude, from 99.3 wn to 90683 wn. Accurate semi-empirically determined Rydberg-Klein-Rees or morphed interatomic potentials are used in transformations for this wide range of species to a reduced potential demonstrating commonality in their fundamental nature.

  4. Hsp12p and PAU genes are involved in ecological interactions between natural yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Damaríz; Berná, Luisa; Stefanini, Irene; Baruffini, Enrico; Bergerat, Agnes; Csikász-Nagy, Attila; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2015-08-01

    The coexistence of different yeasts in a single vineyard raises the question on how they communicate and why slow growers are not competed out. Genetically modified laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are extensively used to investigate ecological interactions, but little is known about the genes regulating cooperation and competition in ecologically relevant settings. Here, we present evidences of Hsp12p-dependent altruistic and contact-dependent competitive interactions between two natural yeast isolates. Hsp12p is released during cell death for public benefit by a fast-growing strain that also produces a killer toxin to inhibit growth of a slow grower that can enjoy the benefits of released Hsp12p. We also show that the protein Pau5p is essential in the defense against the killer effect. Our results demonstrate that the combined action of Hsp12p, Pau5p and a killer toxin is sufficient to steer a yeast community. PMID:26079802

  5. Natural gas storage and end user interaction: A progress report, September 30, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, L.R. Jr.; Reich, S.; Godec, M.L.

    1995-07-01

    In late 1994, ICF Resources began a contract with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to conduct a study of natural gas storage and end user interaction. This study is being conducted in three phases: the first phase is an assessment of the market requirements for natural gas storage and in particular to identify those end user requirements for storage that could benefit from METC-sponsored research and development (R&D) in storage technology; the second phase will address the particular technical and economic feasibility for expanding conventional storage; and the third phase will address alternative, unconventional technologies. ICF is approaching the conclusion of the first phase of the study and the second phase has begun. This paper summarizes the scope of the study and reports some of the preliminary findings of the first phase. We begin by providing an overview of the goals of the effort and of natural gas storage. We will address the evolving market requirements for storage and the regulatory and institutional changes that are having a major impact on the use of natural gas storage. We address the demand for storage and the alternatives for meeting this demand, with specific reference to regional and end use issues.

  6. The interaction of sexually and naturally selected traits in the adaptive radiations of cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Salzburger, Walter

    2009-01-01

    The question of how genetic variation translates into organismal diversity has puzzled biologists for decades. Despite recent advances in evolutionary and developmental genetics, the mechanisms that underlie adaptation, diversification and evolutionary innovation remain largely unknown. The exceptionally diverse species flocks of cichlid fishes are textbook examples of adaptive radiation and explosive speciation and emerge as powerful model systems to study the genetic basis of animal diversification. East Africa's hundreds of endemic cichlid species are akin to a natural mutagenesis screen and differ greatly not only in ecologically relevant (hence naturally selected) characters such as mouth morphology and body shape, but also in sexually selected traits such as coloration. One of the most fascinating aspects of cichlid evolution is the frequent occurrence of evolutionary parallelisms, which has led to the question whether selection alone is sufficient to produce these parallel morphologies, or whether a developmental or genetic bias has influenced the direction of diversification. Here, I review fitness-relevant traits that could be responsible for the cichlids' evolutionary success and assess whether these were shaped by sexual or natural selection. I then focus on the interaction and the relative importance of sexual vs. natural selection in cichlid evolution. Finally, I discuss what is currently known about the genes underlying the morphogenesis of adaptively relevant traits and highlight the importance of the forthcoming cichlid genomes in the quest of the genetic basis of diversification in this group. PMID:18992003

  7. Interaction of flavonoids, the naturally occurring antioxidants with different media: A UV-visible spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseem, Bushra; Shah, S. W. H.; Hasan, Aurangzeb; Sakhawat Shah, S.

    2010-04-01

    Quantitative parameters for interaction of flavonoids—the naturally occurring antioxidants, with solvents and surfactants are determined using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The availability of flavonoids; kaempferol, apigenin, kaempferide and rhamnetin in micelles of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is reflected in terms of partition coefficient, Kc. Thermodynamic calculations show that the process of transfer of flavonoid molecules to anionic micelles of SDS is energy efficient. A distortion in flavonoid's morphology occurs in case of kaempferol and apigenin in surfactant and water, exhibited in terms of a new band in the UV region of electronic spectra of these flavonoids. The partition coefficients of structurally related flavonoids are correlated with their antioxidant activities.

  8. The nature of the hydrogen bond: A synthesis from the interacting quantum atoms picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Pendás, A.; Blanco, M. A.; Francisco, E.

    2006-11-01

    The interacting quantum atoms approach [IQA, as presented by Blanco et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 1, 1096 (2005)] is applied to standard hydrogen bonded dimers. IQA is an interpretation tool based on a real space energy decomposition scheme fully consistent with the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. It provides a partition of every physical term present in the Hamiltonian into atomic and interatomic contributions. The procedure is orbital-free and self-contained, needing neither external references nor artificial intermediate states. Binding is the result of a competition between the destabilizing deformations suffered by the interacting fragments upon interaction and the stabilizing interaction energy itself. According to IQA, there is no incompatibility between the prevalent electrostatic image of hydrogen bonded systems and that favoring important covalent contributions. Depending on how we gather the different energetic terms, we may recover electrostatic or covalent pictures from the same underlying quantum mechanical description. Our results show that the nonclassical contributions to hydrogen bonding are spatially localized, involving only the H atom and its two nearest neighbors. IQA is well suited as a comparative tool. Its thin energetic decomposition allows us to recover exactly (or to a very good approximation) the quantities of the most widely used energy decomposition schemes. Such a comparison sheds light on the virtues and faults of the different methods and on the origin of the 50years old debate regarding the covalent/electrostatic nature of the hydrogen bond.

  9. Assessing Natural Product-Drug Interactions: An End-to-End Safety Framework.

    PubMed

    Roe, Amy L; Paine, Mary F; Gurley, Bill J; Brouwer, Kenneth R; Jordan, Scott; Griffiths, James C

    2016-04-01

    The use of natural products (NPs), including herbal medicines and other dietary supplements, by North Americans continues to increase across all age groups. This population has access to conventional medications, with significant polypharmacy observed in older adults. Thus, the safety of the interactions between multi-ingredient NPs and drugs is a topic of paramount importance. Considerations such as history of safe use, literature data from animal toxicity and human clinical studies, and NP constituent characterization would provide guidance on whether to assess NP-drug interactions experimentally. The literature is replete with reports of various NP extracts and constituents as potent inhibitors of drug metabolizing enzymes, and transporters. However, without standard methods for NP characterization or in vitro testing, extrapolating these reports to clinically-relevant NP-drug interactions is difficult. This lack of a clear definition of risk precludes clinicians and consumers from making informed decisions about the safety of taking NPs with conventional medications. A framework is needed that describes an integrated robust approach for assessing NP-drug interactions; and, translation of the data into formulation alterations, dose adjustment, labelling, and/or post-marketing surveillance strategies. A session was held at the 41st Annual Summer Meeting of the Toxicology Forum in Colorado Springs, CO, to highlight the challenges and critical components that should be included in a framework approach. PMID:26776752

  10. Molecular interaction of human brain acetylcholinesterase with a natural inhibitor huperzine-B: an enzoinformatics approach.

    PubMed

    Alam, Aftab; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Ahmad, Syed S; Ansari, Mohammad A; Shakil, Shahnawaz; Rizvi, Syed M D; Shakil, Shazi; Imran, Mohammad; Haneef, Mohammad; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-04-01

    The present study emphasizes the molecular interactions between human brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the natural ligand Huperzine-B and its comparison to 'AChE-Tolserine interactions'. Docking between Huperzine-B and AChE was performed using 'Autodock4.2'. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both play an equally important role in the correct positioning of Huperzine-B within the 'catalytic site' of AChE to permit docking. However, docking of Tolserine to AChE is largely dominated by hydrophobic interactions. Such information may aid in the design of versatile AChE-inhibitors, and is expected to aid in safe clinical use of Huperzine-B. Scope still remains in the determination of the three-dimensional structure of AChE-Huperzine-B complex by X-ray crystallography to validate the described data. Furthermore, this study confirms that Huperzine-B is a more efficient inhibitor of human brain AChE compared to tolserine with reference to Ki and ΔG values. PMID:24059299

  11. Nature of amine-surfactant interactions at the air-solution interface.

    PubMed

    Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Zhang, X L; Taylor, D J F

    2009-04-01

    significant in the context of understanding the unusual nature of the PEI/surfactant interaction and of using small molecular weight additives rather than much larger molecular weight polymers to manipulate adsorption properties. PMID:19714886

  12. QSAR modeling and molecular interaction analysis of natural compounds as potent neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaying; Mei, Hu

    2016-04-26

    Different QSAR models of 40 natural compounds as neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) are developed to comprehend chemical-biological interactions and predict activities against neuraminidase (NA) from Clostridium perfringens. Based on the constitutional, topological and conformational descriptors, R(2) and Q(2) values of the obtained SRA model are 0.931 and 0.856. The R(2) and Q(2) values of the constructed HQSAR and almond models are 0.903 and 0.767, 0.904 and 0.511, respectively. Based on the pharmacophore alignment, R(2) and Q(2) values of the optimal CoMSIA model are 0.936 and 0.654. Moreover, Rtest(2) and Qext(2) of values of SRA, HQSAR, almond and CoMSIA models are 0.611 and 0.565, 0.753 and 0.750, 0.612 and 0.582, 0.582 and 0.571, respectively. So, QSAR models have good predictive capability. They can be further used to evaluate and screen new compounds. Moreover, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic factors have high contributions to activities. To understand molecular interactions between natural compounds and NA from Clostridium perfringens, molecular docking is investigated. The docking results elucidate that Arg266, Asp291, Asp328, Tyr485, Glu493, Arg555, Arg615 and Tyr655 are especially the key residues in the active site of 2bf6. Hydrogen bonds and electrostatics are key factors, which impact the interactions between NIs and NA. So, the influential factors of interactions between NIs and NA in the docking results are in agreement with the QSAR results. PMID:27008437

  13. Metabolic Network Modeling of Microbial Interactions in Natural and Engineered Environmental Systems.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garcia, Octavio; Lear, Gavin; Singhal, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    We review approaches to characterize metabolic interactions within microbial communities using Stoichiometric Metabolic Network (SMN) models for applications in environmental and industrial biotechnology. SMN models are computational tools used to evaluate the metabolic engineering potential of various organisms. They have successfully been applied to design and optimize the microbial production of antibiotics, alcohols and amino acids by single strains. To date however, such models have been rarely applied to analyze and control the metabolism of more complex microbial communities. This is largely attributed to the diversity of microbial community functions, metabolisms, and interactions. Here, we firstly review different types of microbial interaction and describe their relevance for natural and engineered environmental processes. Next, we provide a general description of the essential methods of the SMN modeling workflow including the steps of network reconstruction, simulation through Flux Balance Analysis (FBA), experimental data gathering, and model calibration. Then we broadly describe and compare four approaches to model microbial interactions using metabolic networks, i.e., (i) lumped networks, (ii) compartment per guild networks, (iii) bi-level optimization simulations, and (iv) dynamic-SMN methods. These approaches can be used to integrate and analyze diverse microbial physiology, ecology and molecular community data. All of them (except the lumped approach) are suitable for incorporating species abundance data but so far they have been used only to model simple communities of two to eight different species. Interactions based on substrate exchange and competition can be directly modeled using the above approaches. However, interactions based on metabolic feedbacks, such as product inhibition and synthropy require extensions to current models, incorporating gene regulation and compounding accumulation mechanisms. SMN models of microbial interactions can

  14. Metabolic Network Modeling of Microbial Interactions in Natural and Engineered Environmental Systems

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Garcia, Octavio; Lear, Gavin; Singhal, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    We review approaches to characterize metabolic interactions within microbial communities using Stoichiometric Metabolic Network (SMN) models for applications in environmental and industrial biotechnology. SMN models are computational tools used to evaluate the metabolic engineering potential of various organisms. They have successfully been applied to design and optimize the microbial production of antibiotics, alcohols and amino acids by single strains. To date however, such models have been rarely applied to analyze and control the metabolism of more complex microbial communities. This is largely attributed to the diversity of microbial community functions, metabolisms, and interactions. Here, we firstly review different types of microbial interaction and describe their relevance for natural and engineered environmental processes. Next, we provide a general description of the essential methods of the SMN modeling workflow including the steps of network reconstruction, simulation through Flux Balance Analysis (FBA), experimental data gathering, and model calibration. Then we broadly describe and compare four approaches to model microbial interactions using metabolic networks, i.e., (i) lumped networks, (ii) compartment per guild networks, (iii) bi-level optimization simulations, and (iv) dynamic-SMN methods. These approaches can be used to integrate and analyze diverse microbial physiology, ecology and molecular community data. All of them (except the lumped approach) are suitable for incorporating species abundance data but so far they have been used only to model simple communities of two to eight different species. Interactions based on substrate exchange and competition can be directly modeled using the above approaches. However, interactions based on metabolic feedbacks, such as product inhibition and synthropy require extensions to current models, incorporating gene regulation and compounding accumulation mechanisms. SMN models of microbial interactions can

  15. Abundance and phenology patterns of two pond-breeding salamanders determine species interactions in natural populations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Thomas L; Hocking, Daniel J; Conner, Christopher A; Earl, Julia E; Harper, Elizabeth B; Osbourn, Michael S; Peterman, William E; Rittenhouse, Tracy A G; Semlitsch, Raymond D

    2015-03-01

    Phenology often determines the outcome of interspecific interactions, where early-arriving species often dominate interactions over those arriving later. The effects of phenology on species interactions are especially pronounced in aquatic systems, but the evidence is largely derived from experimental studies. We examined whether differences in breeding phenology between two pond-breeding salamanders (Ambystoma annulatum and A. maculatum) affected metamorph recruitment and demographic traits within natural populations, with the expectation that the fall-breeding A. annulatum would negatively affect the spring-breeding A. maculatum. We monitored populations of each species at five ponds over 4 years using drift fences. Metamorph abundance and survival of A. annulatum were affected by intra- and interspecific processes, whereas metamorph size and date of emigration were primarily influenced by intraspecific effects. Metamorph abundance, snout-vent length, date of emigration and survival for A. maculatum were all predicted by combinations of intra- and interspecific effects, but often showed negative relationships with A. annulatum metamorph traits and abundance. Size and date of metamorphosis were strongly correlated within each species, but in opposite patterns (negative for A. annulatum and positive for A. maculatum), suggesting that the two species use alternative strategies to enhance terrestrial survival and that these factors may influence their interactions. Our results match predictions from experimental studies that suggest recruitment is influenced by intra- and interspecific processes which are determined by phenological differences between species. Incorporating spatiotemporal variability when modeling population dynamics is necessary to understand the importance of phenology in species interactions, especially as shifts in phenology occur under climate change. PMID:25413866

  16. Different types of interactions of links in artificial and natural ecosystems under anthropogenic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somova, Lydia; Pisman, Tamara; Mikheeva, Galina; Pechurkin, Nickolay

    The life of organisms in an ecosystem depends not only on abiotic factors, but also on the interaction of organisms in which they come with each other. The study of mechanisms of the bioregulation based on ecological - biochemical interactions of ecosystem links is necessary to know the ecosystem development, its stability, survival of ecosystem organisms. It is of high importance as for the creation of artificial ecosystems, and also for the study of natural ecosystems under anthropogenic pressure on them. To create well-functioning ecosystems is necessary to study and consider the basic types of relationships between organisms. The basic types of interactions between organisms have been studied with simple terrestrial and water ecosystems. 1. The interaction of microbiocenoses and plants were studied in experiments with agrocenoses. Microbiocenosis proposed for increase of productivity of plants and for obtaining ecologically pure production of plants has been created taking into account mutual relationships between species of microorganisms. 2. The experimental model of the atmosphere closed «autotroph - heterotroph» system in which heterotrophic link was the mixed population of yeasts (Candida utilis and Candida guilliermondii) was studied. The algae Chlorella vulgaris was used as an autotroph link. It was shown, that the competition result for heterotrophic link depended on strategy of populations of yeast in relation to a substrate and oxygen utilization. 3. As a result of experimental and theoretical modelling of a competition of algae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus quadricauda at continuous cultivation, the impossibility of their coexistence in the conditions of limitation on nitrogen was shown. 4. Pray-predator interactions between algae (Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus quadricauda) and invertebrates (Paramecium caudatum, Brachionus plicatilis) were studied in experimental closed ecosystem. This work was partly supported by the Russian Foundation for

  17. Milk Thistle Constituents Inhibit Raloxifene Intestinal Glucuronidation: A Potential Clinically Relevant Natural Product–Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gufford, Brandon T.; Chen, Gang; Vergara, Ana G.; Lazarus, Philip; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2015-01-01

    Women at high risk of developing breast cancer are prescribed selective estrogen response modulators, including raloxifene, as chemoprevention. Patients often seek complementary and alternative treatment modalities, including herbal products, to supplement prescribed medications. Milk thistle preparations, including silibinin and silymarin, are top-selling herbal products that may be consumed by women taking raloxifene, which undergoes extensive first-pass glucuronidation in the intestine. Key constituents in milk thistle, flavonolignans, were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs), with IC50s ≤ 10 μM. Taken together, milk thistle preparations may perpetrate unwanted interactions with raloxifene. The objective of this work was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of individual milk thistle constituents on the intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene using human intestinal microsomes and human embryonic kidney cell lysates overexpressing UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10, isoforms highly expressed in the intestine that are critical to raloxifene clearance. The flavonolignans silybin A and silybin B were potent inhibitors of both raloxifene 4′- and 6-glucuronidation in all enzyme systems. The Kis (human intestinal microsomes, 27–66 µM; UGT1A1, 3.2–8.3 µM; UGT1A8, 19–73 µM; and UGT1A10, 65–120 µM) encompassed reported intestinal tissue concentrations (20–310 µM), prompting prediction of clinical interaction risk using a mechanistic static model. Silibinin and silymarin were predicted to increase raloxifene systemic exposure by 4- to 5-fold, indicating high interaction risk that merits further evaluation. This systematic investigation of the potential interaction between a widely used herbal product and chemopreventive agent underscores the importance of understanding natural product–drug interactions in the context of cancer prevention. PMID:26070840

  18. Milk Thistle Constituents Inhibit Raloxifene Intestinal Glucuronidation: A Potential Clinically Relevant Natural Product-Drug Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gufford, Brandon T; Chen, Gang; Vergara, Ana G; Lazarus, Philip; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2015-09-01

    Women at high risk of developing breast cancer are prescribed selective estrogen response modulators, including raloxifene, as chemoprevention. Patients often seek complementary and alternative treatment modalities, including herbal products, to supplement prescribed medications. Milk thistle preparations, including silibinin and silymarin, are top-selling herbal products that may be consumed by women taking raloxifene, which undergoes extensive first-pass glucuronidation in the intestine. Key constituents in milk thistle, flavonolignans, were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs), with IC50s ≤ 10 μM. Taken together, milk thistle preparations may perpetrate unwanted interactions with raloxifene. The objective of this work was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of individual milk thistle constituents on the intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene using human intestinal microsomes and human embryonic kidney cell lysates overexpressing UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10, isoforms highly expressed in the intestine that are critical to raloxifene clearance. The flavonolignans silybin A and silybin B were potent inhibitors of both raloxifene 4'- and 6-glucuronidation in all enzyme systems. The Kis (human intestinal microsomes, 27-66 µM; UGT1A1, 3.2-8.3 µM; UGT1A8, 19-73 µM; and UGT1A10, 65-120 µM) encompassed reported intestinal tissue concentrations (20-310 µM), prompting prediction of clinical interaction risk using a mechanistic static model. Silibinin and silymarin were predicted to increase raloxifene systemic exposure by 4- to 5-fold, indicating high interaction risk that merits further evaluation. This systematic investigation of the potential interaction between a widely used herbal product and chemopreventive agent underscores the importance of understanding natural product-drug interactions in the context of cancer prevention. PMID:26070840

  19. Effects of structure on the interactions between five natural antimicrobial compounds and phospholipids of bacterial cell membrane on model monolayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monolayers composed of bacterial phospholipids were used as model membranes to study interactions of naturally occurring phenolic compounds 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, 2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzaldehyde and the plant essential oil compounds carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and geraniol, previously found to be...

  20. Destructive Interactions Between Mitigation Strategies and the Causes of Unexpected Failures in Natural Hazard Mitigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S. J.; Fearnley, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Large investments in the mitigation of natural hazards, using a variety of technology-based mitigation strategies, have proven to be surprisingly ineffective in some recent natural disasters. These failures reveal a need for a systematic classification of mitigation strategies; an understanding of the scientific uncertainties that affect the effectiveness of such strategies; and an understanding of how the different types of strategy within an overall mitigation system interact destructively to reduce the effectiveness of the overall mitigation system. We classify mitigation strategies into permanent, responsive and anticipatory. Permanent mitigation strategies such as flood and tsunami defenses or land use restrictions, are both costly and 'brittle': when they malfunction they can increase mortality. Such strategies critically depend on the accuracy of the estimates of expected hazard intensity in the hazard assessments that underpin their design. Responsive mitigation strategies such as tsunami and lahar warning systems rely on capacities to detect and quantify the hazard source events and to transmit warnings fast enough to enable at risk populations to decide and act effectively. Self-warning and voluntary evacuation is also usually a responsive mitigation strategy. Uncertainty in the nature and magnitude of the detected hazard source event is often the key scientific obstacle to responsive mitigation; public understanding of both the hazard and the warnings, to enable decision making, can also be a critical obstacle. Anticipatory mitigation strategies use interpretation of precursors to hazard source events and are used widely in mitigation of volcanic hazards. Their critical limitations are due to uncertainties in time, space and magnitude relationships between precursors and hazard events. Examples of destructive interaction between different mitigation strategies are provided by the Tohoku 2011 earthquake and tsunami; recent earthquakes that have impacted

  1. Genetic variations and miRNA-target interactions contribute to natural phenotypic variations in Populus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhui; Xie, Jianbo; Chen, Beibei; Quan, Mingyang; Li, Ying; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-10-01

    Variation in regulatory factors, including microRNAs (miRNAs), contributes to variation in quantitative and complex traits. However, in plants, variants in miRNAs and their target genes that contribute to natural phenotypic variation, and the underlying regulatory networks, remain poorly characterized. We investigated the associations and interactions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNAs and their target genes with phenotypes in 435 individuals from a natural population of Populus. We used RNA-seq to identify 217 miRNAs differentially expressed in a tension wood system, and identified 1196 candidate target genes; degradome sequencing confirmed 60 of the target sites. In addition, 72 miRNA-target pairs showed significant co-expression. Gene ontology (GO) term analysis showed that most of the genes in the co-regulated pairs participate in biological regulation. Genome resequencing found 5383 common SNPs (frequency ≥ 0.05) in 139 miRNAs and 31 037 SNPs in 819 target genes. Single-SNP association analyses identified 232 significant associations between wood traits (P ≤ 0.05) and SNPs in 102 miRNAs and 1387 associations with 478 target genes. Among these, 102 miRNA-target pairs associated with the same traits. Multi-SNP associations found 102 epistatic pairs associated with traits. Furthermore, a reconstructed regulatory network contained 12 significantly co-expressed pairs, including eight miRNAs and nine targets associated with traits. Lastly, both expression and genetic association showed that miR156i, miR156j, miR396a and miR6445b were involved in the formation of tension wood. This study shows that variants in miRNAs and target genes contribute to natural phenotypic variation and annotated roles and interactions of miRNAs and their target genes by genetic association analysis. PMID:27265357

  2. Integrating natural language processing and web GIS for interactive knowledge domain visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Fangming

    Recent years have seen a powerful shift towards data-rich environments throughout society. This has extended to a change in how the artifacts and products of scientific knowledge production can be analyzed and understood. Bottom-up approaches are on the rise that combine access to huge amounts of academic publications with advanced computer graphics and data processing tools, including natural language processing. Knowledge domain visualization is one of those multi-technology approaches, with its aim of turning domain-specific human knowledge into highly visual representations in order to better understand the structure and evolution of domain knowledge. For example, network visualizations built from co-author relations contained in academic publications can provide insight on how scholars collaborate with each other in one or multiple domains, and visualizations built from the text content of articles can help us understand the topical structure of knowledge domains. These knowledge domain visualizations need to support interactive viewing and exploration by users. Such spatialization efforts are increasingly looking to geography and GIS as a source of metaphors and practical technology solutions, even when non-georeferenced information is managed, analyzed, and visualized. When it comes to deploying spatialized representations online, web mapping and web GIS can provide practical technology solutions for interactive viewing of knowledge domain visualizations, from panning and zooming to the overlay of additional information. This thesis presents a novel combination of advanced natural language processing - in the form of topic modeling - with dimensionality reduction through self-organizing maps and the deployment of web mapping/GIS technology towards intuitive, GIS-like, exploration of a knowledge domain visualization. A complete workflow is proposed and implemented that processes any corpus of input text documents into a map form and leverages a web

  3. Investigation of adverse effects of interactions between herbal drugs and natural blood clotting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Adhyapak, M S; Kachole, M S

    2016-05-01

    Throughout the world, herbal medicines are consumed by most of the patients without considering their adverse effects. Many herbal medicines/plant extracts have been reported to interact with the natural blood clotting system. In continuation to this effort, thirty medicinal plant extracts were allowed to interact with citrated human blood and the clotting time was measured after re-calcification in vitro using Lee and White method. The aq. leaf ext. of Syzygium cumini and Camellia sinensis significantly prolonged the clotting time. In response to the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time tests, the ext. of C. sinensis showed normal APTT and marginally prolonged the PT to 16.7 s (control-15.2 s) while S. cumini showed normal PT but significantly prolonged the APTT to 66.9 s (control-20.7 s). This suggests that, C. sinensis acts on the extrinsic pathway while S. cumini on the intrinsic pathway. There are some common herbal formulations that are frequently used by the patients which contain above plant materials, like, Syzygium cumin in anti-diabetic formulations, while the ext. of C. sinensis is consumed frequently as beverage in many part of the world. Hence, patients having known bleeding tendency or haemophilia disease should take into account the interaction potential of these plants with the natural blood clotting system while taking herbal formulations containing above plants; specially, the patients suffering from intrinsic pathway factor deficiency should keep a limit on the consumption of S. cumini while extrinsic pathway factor deficiency patients should limit C. sinensis. Also, the medical practitioners should consider the patient's food consumption history before doing any major surgical procedures. PMID:26340850

  4. The interaction of Saccharomyces paradoxus with its natural competitors on oak bark

    PubMed Central

    Kowallik, Vienna; Miller, Eric; Greig, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    The natural history of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is poorly understood and confounded by domestication. In nature, S. cerevisiae and its undomesticated relative S. paradoxus are usually found on the bark of oak trees, a habitat very different from wine or other human fermentations. It is unclear whether the oak trees are really the primary habitat for wild yeast, or whether this apparent association is due to biased sampling. We use culturing and high-throughput environmental sequencing to show that S. paradoxus is a very rare member of the oak bark microbial community. We find that S. paradoxus can grow well on sterile medium made from oak bark, but that its growth is strongly suppressed when the other members of the community are present. We purified a set of twelve common fungal and bacterial species from the oak bark community and tested how each affected the growth of S. paradoxus in direct competition on oak bark medium at summer and winter temperatures, identifying both positive and negative interactions. One Pseudomonas species produces a diffusible toxin that suppresses S. paradoxus as effectively as either the whole set of twelve species together or the complete community present in nonsterilized oak medium. Conversely, one of the twelve species, Mucilaginibacter sp., had the opposite effect and promoted S. paradoxus growth at low temperatures. We conclude that, in its natural oak tree habitat, S. paradoxus is a rare species whose success depends on the much more abundant microbial species surrounding it. PMID:25706044

  5. The interaction of Saccharomyces paradoxus with its natural competitors on oak bark.

    PubMed

    Kowallik, Vienna; Miller, Eric; Greig, Duncan

    2015-04-01

    The natural history of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is poorly understood and confounded by domestication. In nature, S. cerevisiae and its undomesticated relative S. paradoxus are usually found on the bark of oak trees, a habitat very different from wine or other human fermentations. It is unclear whether the oak trees are really the primary habitat for wild yeast, or whether this apparent association is due to biased sampling. We use culturing and high-throughput environmental sequencing to show that S. paradoxus is a very rare member of the oak bark microbial community. We find that S. paradoxus can grow well on sterile medium made from oak bark, but that its growth is strongly suppressed when the other members of the community are present. We purified a set of twelve common fungal and bacterial species from the oak bark community and tested how each affected the growth of S. paradoxus in direct competition on oak bark medium at summer and winter temperatures, identifying both positive and negative interactions. One Pseudomonas species produces a diffusible toxin that suppresses S. paradoxus as effectively as either the whole set of twelve species together or the complete community present in nonsterilized oak medium. Conversely, one of the twelve species, Mucilaginibacter sp., had the opposite effect and promoted S. paradoxus growth at low temperatures. We conclude that, in its natural oak tree habitat, S. paradoxus is a rare species whose success depends on the much more abundant microbial species surrounding it. PMID:25706044

  6. The nature and role of the gold-krypton interactions in small neutral gold clusters.

    PubMed

    Mancera, Luis A; Benoit, David M

    2015-03-26

    We investigate the nature and role of krypton embedding in small neutral gold clusters. For some of these clusters, we observe a particular site-dependent character of the Kr binding that does not completely follow the criterion of binding at low-coordinated sites, widely accepted for interaction of a noble gas with closed-shell metal systems such as metal surfaces. We aim at understanding the effect of low dimensionality and open-shell electronic structure of the odd-numbered clusters on the noble gas-metal cluster interaction. First, we investigate the role of attractive and repulsive forces, and the frontier molecular orbitals. Second, we investigate the Au-Kr interaction in terms of reactivity and bonding character. We use a reactivity index derived from Fukui formalism, and criteria provided by the electron localization function (ELF), in order to classify the type of bonding. We carry out this study on the minimum energy structures of neutral gold clusters, as obtained using pseudo potential plane-wave density functional theory (DFT). A model is proposed that includes the effect of attractive electrostatic, van der Waals and repulsive forces, together with effects originating from orbital overlap. This satisfactorily explains minimum configurations of the noble gas-gold cluster systems, the site preference of the noble gas atoms, and changes in electronic properties. PMID:25742369

  7. Computational strategies for understanding the nature of interaction in dioxin imprinted nanoporous trappers.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muntazir S; Pal, Sourav; Krupadam, Reddithota J

    2015-07-01

    A new computational model capable of understanding the nature of interactions in signature complexes formed between the template (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p dioxin (TCDD)) and the functional monomers (methacrylic acid (MAA)) using density functional theory (DFT) has been designed. The polymer precursors were optimized for geometries in polymerization media, computing the interaction energies between template molecules and functional monomers of transient pre-polymerized complexes (PPC), and structural and vibrational properties reference to theoretical infrared spectra were computed using DFT of B3LYP/6 311+G(d,p) hybrid functional method. Atom in molecule theory was used to analyze the hydrogen-bonding characteristics of PPC of MAA-TCDD. Considering the theoretical titrations conducted in a virtual solvent box, it was found that the 1:4 molar ratio was required to form the most stable PPC in a given solvent system. The electron density plots indicate strong hydrogen bonding as shown by the 2pz dominant highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) character that could be the preferable sites of binding for target molecule, TCDD. Considering HOMO approach, the active adsorption sites in molecularly imprinted polymer was modeled to get insight on molecular recognition property for targeted molecule, TCDD. The proposed computational protocol is simple, accurate, and novel to design the polymer and is useful to predict the properties of polymer systems than the conventional theoretical analysis of template-monomer interactions. PMID:25703338

  8. In-Situ Investigation of Interactions between Magnesium Ion and Natural Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Lu, Yujuan; Gao, Yuan; Benedetti, Marc F; Korshin, Gregory V

    2015-07-21

    Natural organic matter (NOM) generated in all niches of the environment constitutes a large fraction of the global pool of organic carbon while magnesium is one of the most abundant elements that has multiple roles in both biotic and abiotic processes. Although interactions between Mg(2+) and NOM have been recognized to affect many environmental processes, little is understood about relevant mechanisms and equilibria. This study addressed this deficiency and quantified Mg(2+)-NOM interactions using differential absorbance spectroscopy (DAS) in combination with the NICA-Donnan speciation model. DAS data were obtained for varying total Mg concentrations, pHs from 5.0 to 11.0 and ionic strengths from 0.001 to 0.3 mol L(-1). DAS results demonstrated the existence of strong interactions between magnesium and NOM at all examined conditions and demonstrated that the binding of Mg(2+) by NOM was accompanied by the replacement of protons in the protonation-active phenolic and carboxylic groups. The slope of the log-transformed absorbance spectra of NOM in the range of wavelength 350-400 nm was found to be indicative of the extent of Mg(2+)-NOM binding. The differential and absolute values of the spectral slopes were strongly correlated with the amount of NOM-bound Mg(2+) ions and with the concentrations of NOM-bound protons. PMID:26090773

  9. Collective interaction of microscale matters in natural analogy: human cancer cells vs. microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon; Postech Team

    2014-11-01

    Collective behaviors have been considered both in living and lifeless things as a natural phenomenon. During the ordering process, a sudden and spontaneous transition is typically generated between an order and a disorder according to the population density of interacting elements. In a cellular level collective behavior, the cells are distributed in the characteristic patterns according to the population density and the mutual interaction of the individual cells undergo density-dependent diffusive motion. On the other hand, density-controlled surface-modified hollow microsphere suspension induces an overpopulation via buoyancy which provides a driving force to induce an assembly. The collective behaviors of the cells and microspheres in a designed liquid medium are explained in terms of the deviation from the interparticle distance distribution and the induced strength to organize the particle position in a specific distance range. as a result, microscale particulate matters exhibit high resemblance in their pair correlation and dynamical heterogeneity in the intermediate range between a single individual and an agglomerate. Therefore, it is suggested that biological systems are analogically explained to be dominated by physically interactive aspects.

  10. The Impact of Interactive Computer Simulations on the Nature and Quality of Postgraduate Science Teachers' Explanations in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharia, Zacharias C.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated how individuals' construction of explanations--a way of ascertaining how well an individual understands a concept--develops from an interactive simulation. Specifically, the purpose was to investigate the effect of interactive computer simulations or science textbook assignments on the nature and quality of postgraduate…

  11. Nature of Teacher-Students' Interaction in Electronic Learning and Traditional Courses of Higher Education--A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, Sufiana Khatoon; Khurshed, Fauzia

    2011-01-01

    Present paper explores differential teacher-student interaction in electronic learning (el) and in face to face traditional learning (tl) courses at higher education. After thorough study literature available and getting information from university teachers teaching el and tl courses about the nature of teacher-students interaction in both modes…

  12. The nature of the solar wind interaction with CO2/CO-dominated comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houpis, H. L. F.; Mendis, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The nature of the interaction of the solar wind with the ionospheres (field-free ion cavities) of comets with CO or CO2 as their dominant volatile species is considered and compared with the solar wind interaction with H2O-diominated comets. Calculations of the heliocentric variation of scale lengths defined as the nuclear distance at which the mean free path for ion-neutral collisions becomes equal to the nuclear distance, and the ion and neutral stand-off distances are presented for different modes of energy addition, nuclear radii and ionization time scales. Results indicate that whereas little activity can be expected from H2O-dominated comets at distances beyond 3 AU, COand CO2-dominated comets can be expected to be quite prolific at such distances. In contrast to H2O-dominated comets characterized by weak shocks, CO/CO2-dominated comet solar wind interactions are found to produce strong bow shocks within a specific heliocentric distance for the isothermal case of a CO-dominated comet, and a weak shock outside of this distance. In the general case, two types of cometary ionosphere transitions are found: a transition from strong to weak bow shock and from a compressible (soft) to an incompressible (hard) ionosphere, and a transition from a soft to a hard ionosphere with the bow shock remaining weak at a heliocentric distance dependant on atmospheric optical depth, bolometric albedo, nuclear radius, latent heat of sublimation of nuclear material, ionization time scale and type of heat addition. It is pointed out that the behavior of Comet Humason can be explained by solar wind interactions with a CO- or CO2-dominated comet.

  13. Interactions Between Trypanosoma cruzi the Chagas Disease Parasite and Naturally Infected Wild Mepraia Vectors of Chile.

    PubMed

    Campos-Soto, Ricardo; Ortiz, Sylvia; Cordova, Ivan; Bruneau, Nicole; Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Solari, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    Chagas disease, which ranks among the world's most neglected diseases, is a chronic, systemic, parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Mepraia species are the wild vectors of this parasite in Chile. Host-parasite interactions can occur at several levels, such as co-speciation and ecological host fitting, among others. Thus, we are exploring the interactions between T. cruzi circulating in naturally infected Mepraia species in all areas endemic of Chile. We evaluated T. cruzi infection rates of 27 different haplotypes of the wild Mepraia species and identified their parasite genotypes using minicircle PCR amplification and hybridization tests with genotype-specific DNA probes. Infection rates were lower in northern Chile where Mepraia gajardoi circulates (10-35%); in central Chile, Mepraia spinolai is most abundant, and infection rates varied in space and time (0-55%). T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI, TcII, TcV, and Tc VI were detected. Mixed infections with two or more DTUs are frequently found in highly infected insects. T. cruzi DTUs have distinct, but not exclusive, ecological and epidemiological associations with their hosts. T. cruzi infection rates of M. spinolai were higher than in M. gajardoi, but the presence of mixed infection with more than one T. cruzi DTU was the same. The same T. cruzi DTUs (TcI, TcII, TcV, and TcVI) were found circulating in both vector species, even though TcI was not equally distributed. These results suggest that T. cruzi DTUs are not associated with any of the two genetically related vector species nor with the geographic area. The T. cruzi vectors interactions are discussed in terms of old and recent events. By exploring T. cruzi DTUs present in Mepraia haplotypes and species from northern to central Chile, we open the analysis on these invertebrate host-parasite interactions. PMID:26771702

  14. The front line of social capital creation--a natural experiment in symbolic interaction.

    PubMed

    Patulny, Roger; Siminski, Peter; Mendolia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers theoretical and empirical contributions to understanding the micro-sociological processes behind the creation of social capital. Theoretically, we argue that the emotional and shared experience of participating in symbolic interaction rituals may affect social capital in four different ways, via: (i) a 'citizenship' effect, connecting participants symbolically to the broader, civic society; (ii) a 'supportive' effect, bonding participants with each other; (iii) an exclusive 'tribal' effect, which crowds-out connections with other groups and the wider society; and (iv) an 'atomising' effect, whereby intense experiences create mental health problems that damage social capital. We illustrate this with a case study of Australian veterans of the Vietnam War. The randomness of the National Service conscription lotteries of that era translates into a high-quality natural experiment. We formulate several hypotheses about which of the four effects dominates for veterans who participated in the 'symbolic interaction' of training and deployment. We test these hypotheses using data from the 2006 Australian Census of Population and Housing, and the NSW 45 & Up Study. We found that war service reduced 'bonding' social capital, but increased 'bridging' social capital, and this is not explained completely by mental health problems. This suggests that while the combined 'tribal' and 'atomizing' effects of service outweigh the 'supportive' effects, the 'citizenship' effect is surprisingly robust. Although they feel unsupported and isolated, veterans are committed to their community and country. These paradoxical findings suggest that social capital is formed through symbolic interaction. The emotional and symbolic qualities of interaction rituals may formulate non-strategic (perhaps irrational) connections with society regardless of the status of one's personal support networks. PMID:24836279

  15. Re/Thinking the Nature of Technology in Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Mijung; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2016-01-01

    With increasing technological changes and needs in society, technology and engineering education has received much attention in school science. Yet, technology traditionally has been subordinated to science or simply taken as the application of science. This position has resulted in a limited understanding of teaching technological and engineering…

  16. Special issue: redox active natural products and their interaction with cellular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Claus

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, "natural" cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature's treasure chest of "green gold". Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-)organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic "sensor/effector" anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s) of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for "intracellular diagnostics". In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur Species (RSS), such techniques have

  17. Interaction-based evolution: how natural selection and nonrandom mutation work together

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The modern evolutionary synthesis leaves unresolved some of the most fundamental, long-standing questions in evolutionary biology: What is the role of sex in evolution? How does complex adaptation evolve? How can selection operate effectively on genetic interactions? More recently, the molecular biology and genomics revolutions have raised a host of critical new questions, through empirical findings that the modern synthesis fails to explain: for example, the discovery of de novo genes; the immense constructive role of transposable elements in evolution; genetic variance and biochemical activity that go far beyond what traditional natural selection can maintain; perplexing cases of molecular parallelism; and more. Presentation of the hypothesis Here I address these questions from a unified perspective, by means of a new mechanistic view of evolution that offers a novel connection between selection on the phenotype and genetic evolutionary change (while relying, like the traditional theory, on natural selection as the only source of feedback on the fit between an organism and its environment). I hypothesize that the mutation that is of relevance for the evolution of complex adaptation—while not Lamarckian, or “directed” to increase fitness—is not random, but is instead the outcome of a complex and continually evolving biological process that combines information from multiple loci into one. This allows selection on a fleeting combination of interacting alleles at different loci to have a hereditary effect according to the combination’s fitness. Testing and implications of the hypothesis This proposed mechanism addresses the problem of how beneficial genetic interactions can evolve under selection, and also offers an intuitive explanation for the role of sex in evolution, which focuses on sex as the generator of genetic combinations. Importantly, it also implies that genetic variation that has appeared neutral through the lens of traditional

  18. 5G: rethink mobile communications for 2020.

    PubMed

    Chih-Lin, I; Han, Shuangfeng; Xu, Zhikun; Sun, Qi; Pan, Zhengang

    2016-03-01

    The 5G network is anticipated to meet the challenging requirements of mobile traffic in the 2020s, which are characterized by super high data rate, low latency, high mobility, high energy efficiency and high traffic density. This paper provides an overview of China Mobile's 5G vision and potential solutions. Three key characteristics of 5G are analysed, i.e. super fast, soft and green. The main 5G R&D themes are further elaborated, which include five fundamental rethinkings of the traditional design methodologies. The 5G network design considerations are also discussed, with cloud radio access network, ultra-dense network, software defined network and network function virtualization examined as key potential solutions towards a green and soft 5G network. The paradigm shift to user-centric network operation from the traditional cell-centric operation is also investigated, where the decoupled downlink and uplink, control and data, and adaptive multiple connections provide sufficient means to achieve a user-centric 5G network with 'no more cells'. The software defined air interface is investigated under a uniform framework and can adaptively adapt the parameters to well satisfy various requirements in different 5G scenarios. PMID:26809577

  19. Microbial Dysbiosis: Rethinking Disease in Marine Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Suhelen; Gardiner, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    With growing environmental pressures placed on our marine habitats there is concern that the prevalence and severity of diseases affecting marine organisms will increase. Yet relative to terrestrial systems, we know little about the underlying causes of many of these diseases. Moreover, factors such as saprophytic colonizers and a lack of baseline data on healthy individuals make it difficult to accurately assess the role of specific microbial pathogens in disease states. Emerging evidence in the field of medicine suggests that a growing number of human diseases result from a microbiome imbalance (or dysbiosis), questioning the traditional view of a singular pathogenic agent. Here we discuss the possibility that many diseases seen in marine systems are, similarly, the result of microbial dysbiosis and the rise of opportunistic or polymicrobial infections. Thus, understanding and managing disease in the future will require us to also rethink definitions of disease and pathogenesis for marine systems. We suggest that a targeted, multidisciplinary approach that addresses the questions of microbial symbiosis in both healthy and diseased states, and at that the level of the holobiont, will be key to progress in this area. PMID:27446031

  20. Rethinking sanitation: panacea or Pandora's box.

    PubMed

    Esrey, S A

    2000-01-01

    In the 19th century, sanitation solutions were designed and built on the premises that human excreta was a waste suitable only for disposal and that the environment was capable of assimilating the waste. The prevailing view last century was that vapors from smells caused disease, and the best way to deal with excreta was to convey it to rivers and streams where it could be diluted and cleansed. Times have changed, the premises are outdated, and current solutions contribute, either directly or indirectly, to many of the problems faced by society today: water pollution, scarcity of fresh water, food insecurity, destruction and loss of soil fertility, loss of biodiversity, depletion of the ozone layer, and global warming. A common denominator of all these problems is how society deals with its wastes, specifically how it deals with human excrement. We have to rethink past premises, design and build new systems, and contribute to the solving of society's most pressing problems. The panacea of the 19th century is turning out to be the pandora's box of the 21st century. PMID:10842787

  1. Effect of nature of oxygen interactions on friction of titanium, aluminum, and molybdenum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Friction studies were conducted with a gold pin contacting titanium, aluminum, and molybdenum surfaces after exposure to oxygen with various methods. Oxygen was adsorbed on the surface, it reacted with the surface, and the surface was ion bombarded with oxygen. The presence of oxygen was monitored with Auger spectroscopy. Titanium friction varied with the mode of the metal-oxygen interaction. It was highest with the adsorbed oxygen and least with ion bombardment using oxygen. Aluminum exhibited lower friction values for the reacted and the ion bombarded surfaces than for the surface having the adsorbed layer. With molybdenum the friction coefficients were generally the same despite the nature of the surface treatment with oxygen.

  2. On the performance of atomic natural orbital basis sets: A full configuration interaction study

    SciTech Connect

    Illas, F. Departament de Quimica Fisica, Grup de Quimica Quantica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, C Ricart, J.M. ); Rubio, J. ); Bagus, P.S. )

    1990-10-01

    The performance of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets has been studied by comparing self-consistant field (SCF) and full configuration interaction (CI) results obtained for the first row atoms and hydrides. The ANO results have been compared with those obtained using a segmented basis set containing the same number of contracted basis functions. The total energies obtained with the ANO basis sets are always lower than the one obtained by using the segmented one. However, for the hydrides, differential electronic correlation energy obtained with the ANO basis set may be smaller than the one recovered with the segmented set. We relate this poorer differential correlation energy for the ANO basis set to the fact that only one contracted {ital d} function is used for the ANO and segmented basis sets.

  3. [Characteristics of Natural Selection in Populations of Nodule Bacteria (Rhizobium leguminosarum) Interacting With Different Host Plants].

    PubMed

    Andronov, E E; Igolkina, A A; Kimeklis, A K; Vorobyov, N I; Provorov, N A

    2015-10-01

    Using high throughput sequencing of the nodA gene, we studied the population dynamics of Rhizobium leguminosarum (bv. viciae, bv. trifolii) in rhizospheric and nodular subpopulations associated with the leguminous plants representing different cross-inoculation groups (Vicia sativa, Lathyrus pratensis of the vetch/vetchling/pea group and Trifolium hybridum of the clover group). The "rhizosphere-nodules" transitions result in either an increase or decrease in the frequencies of 10 of the 23 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (which were identified with 95% similarity) depending on the symbiotic specificity and phylogenetic positions of OTUs. Statistical and bioinformatical analysis of the population structures suggest that the type of natural selection responsible for these changes may be diversifying at the whole-population level and frequency-dependent at the OTU-specific level, ensuring the divergent evolution of rhizobia interacting with different host species. PMID:27169225

  4. Evolution of non-interacting entropic dark energy and its phantom nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Titus K.; Murali, Chinthak; Shejeelammal, J.

    2016-04-01

    Assuming the form of the entropic dark energy (EDE) as it arises from the surface term in the Einstein-Hilbert’s action, its evolution was analyzed in an expanding flat universe. The model parameters were evaluated by constraining the model using the Union data on Type Ia supernovae. We found that in the non-interacting case, the model predicts an early decelerated phase and a later accelerated phase at the background level. The evolutions of the Hubble parameter, dark energy (DE) density, equation of state parameter and deceleration parameter were obtained. The model hardly seems to be supporting the linear perturbation growth for the structure formation. We also found that the EDE shows phantom nature for redshifts z < 0.257. During the phantom epoch, the model predicts big rip effect at which both the scale factor of expansion and the DE density become infinitely large and the big rip time is found to be around 36 Giga years from now.

  5. Folding of the natural hammerhead ribozyme is enhanced by interaction of auxiliary elements

    PubMed Central

    PENEDO, J. CARLOS; WILSON, TIMOTHY J.; JAYASENA, SUMEDHA D.; KHVOROVA, ANASTASIA; LILLEY, DAVID M.J.

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown that the activity of the hammerhead ribozyme at μM magnesium ion concentrations is markedly increased by the inclusion of loops in helices I and II. We have studied the effect of such loops on the magnesium ion-induced folding of the ribozyme, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. We find that with the loops in place, folding into the active conformation occurs in a single step, in the μM range of magnesium ion concentration. Disruption of the loop–loop interaction leads to a reversion to two-step folding, with the second stage requiring mM concentrations of magnesium ion. Sodium ions also promote the folding of the natural form of the ribozyme at high concentrations, but the folding occurs as a two-stage process. The loops clearly act as important auxiliary elements in the function of the ribozyme, permitting folding to occur efficiently under physiological conditions. PMID:15100442

  6. Uncertainty of natural tracer methods for quantifying river-aquifer interaction in a large river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yueqing; Cook, Peter G.; Shanafield, Margaret; Simmons, Craig T.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of river-aquifer interaction is critical to the conjunctive management of surface water and groundwater, in particular in the arid and semiarid environment with much higher potential evapotranspiration than precipitation. A variety of natural tracer methods are available to quantify river-aquifer interaction at different scales. These methods however have only been tested in rivers with relatively low flow rates (mostly less than 5 m3 s-1). In this study, several natural tracers including heat, radon-222 and electrical conductivity were measured both on vertical riverbed profiles and on longitudinal river samples to quantify river-aquifer exchange flux at both point and regional scales in the Heihe River (northwest China; flow rate 63 m3 s-1). Results show that the radon-222 profile method can estimate a narrower range of point-scale flux than the temperature profile method. In particular, three vertical radon-222 profiles failed to estimate the upper bounds of plausible flux ranges. Results also show that when quantifying regional-scale river-aquifer exchange flux, the river chemistry method constrained the flux (5.20-10.39 m2 d-1) better than the river temperature method (-100 to 100 m2 d-1). The river chemistry method also identified spatial variability of flux, whereas the river temperature method did not have sufficient resolution. Overall, for quantifying river-aquifer exchange flux in a large river, both the temperature profile method and the radon-222 profile method provide useful complementary information at the point scale to complement each other, whereas the river chemistry method is recommended over the river temperature method at the regional scale.

  7. Interactions among wildland fires in a long-established Sierra Nevada natural fire area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, B.M.; Miller, J.D.; Thode, A.E.; Kelly, M.; van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Stephens, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate interactions between successive naturally occurring fires, and assess to what extent the environments in which fires burn influence these interactions. Using mapped fire perimeters and satellite-based estimates of post-fire effects (referred to hereafter as fire severity) for 19 fires burning relatively freely over a 31-year period, we demonstrate that fire as a landscape process can exhibit self-limiting characteristics in an upper elevation Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest. We use the term 'self-limiting' to refer to recurring fire as a process over time (that is, fire regime) consuming fuel and ultimately constraining the spatial extent and lessening fire-induced effects of subsequent fires. When the amount of time between successive adjacent fires is under 9 years, and when fire weather is not extreme (burning index <34.9), the probability of the latter fire burning into the previous fire area is extremely low. Analysis of fire severity data by 10-year periods revealed a fair degree of stability in the proportion of area burned among fire severity classes (unchanged, low, moderate, high). This is in contrast to a recent study demonstrating increasing high-severity burning throughout the Sierra Nevada from 1984 to 2006, which suggests freely burning fires over time in upper elevation Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forests can regulate fire-induced effects across the landscape. This information can help managers better anticipate short- and long-term effects of allowing naturally ignited fires to burn, and ultimately, improve their ability to implement Wildland Fire Use programs in similar forest types. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  8. Mimicking bubble use in nature: propulsion of Janus particles due to hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions.

    PubMed

    Pinchasik, Bat-El; Möhwald, Helmuth; Skirtach, Andre G

    2014-07-01

    Bubbles are widely used by animals in nature in order to fulfill important functions. They are used by animals in order to walk underwater or to stabilize themselves at the water/air interface. The main aim of this work is to imitate such phenomena, which is the essence of biomimetics. Here, bubbles are used to propel and to control the location of Janus particles in an aqueous medium. The synthesis of Janus SiO2-Ag and polystyrene-Ag (PS-Ag) particles through embedment in Parafilm is presented. The Janus particles, partially covered with catalytically active Ag nanoparticles, are redispersed in water and placed on a glass substrate. The active Ag sites are used for the splitting of H2O2 into water and oxygen. As a result, an oxygen bubble is formed on one side of the particle and promotes its propulsion. Once formed, the bubble-particle complex is stable and therefore, can be manipulated by tuning hydrophilic-hydrophobic interactions with the surface. In this way a transition between two- and three- dimensional motion is possible by changing the hydrophobicity of the substrate. Similar principles are used in nature. PMID:24664591

  9. Color and shape interactions in the recognition of natural scenes by human and monkey observers.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Stefanie; Fischer, Elvira; Logothetis, Nikos K; Rainer, Gregor

    2009-01-01

    Trichromatic color vision is a fundamental aspect of the visual system shared by humans and non-human primates. In human observers, color has been shown to facilitate object identification. However, little is known about the role that color plays in higher level vision of non-human primates. Here, we addressed this question and studied the interaction between luminance- and color-based structural information for the recognition of natural scenes. We present psychophysical data showing that both monkey and human observers equally profited from color when recognizing natural scenes, and they were equally impaired when scenes were manipulated using colored noise. This effect was most prominent for degraded image conditions. By using a specific procedure for stimulus degradation, we found that the improvement as well as the impairment in visual memory performance is due to contribution of image color independent of luminance-based object information. Our results demonstrate that humans as well as non-human primates exploit their sensory ability of color vision to achieve higher performance in visual recognition tasks especially when shape features are degraded. PMID:19757892

  10. HAZPAC; an interactive map of Pacific Rim natural hazards, population, and infrastructure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bemis, B.L.; Goss, H.V.; Yurkovich, E.S.; Perron, T.J.; Howell, D.G.

    2002-01-01

    This is an online version of a CD-ROM publication. The text files that describe using this publication make reference to software provided on the disc. For this online version the software can be downloaded for free from Adobe Systems and Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI). Welcome to HAZPAC! HAZPAC is an interactive map about natural hazard risk in the Pacific Rim region. It is intended to communicate to a broad audience the ideas of 'Crowding the Rim,' which is an international, public-private partnership that fosters collaborative solutions for regional risks. HAZPAC, which stands for 'HAZards of the PACific,' uses Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to help people visualize the socioeconomic connections and shared hazard vulnerabilities among Pacific Rim countries, as well as to explore the general nature of risk. Please refer to the 'INTRODUCTION TO HAZPAC' section of the readme file below to determine which HAZPAC project will be right for you. Once you have decided which HAZPAC project is suitable for you, please refer to the 'GETTING STARTED' sections in the readme file for some basic information that will help you begin using HAZPAC. Also, we highly recommend that you follow the Tutorial exercises in the project-specific HAZPAC User Guides. The User Guides are PDF (Portable Document Format) files that must be read with Adobe Acrobat Reader (a free copy of Acrobat Reader is available using the link near the bottom of this page).

  11. Evaluating contributions of natural language parsers to protein–protein interaction extraction

    PubMed Central

    Miyao, Yusuke; Sagae, Kenji; Sætre, Rune; Matsuzaki, Takuya; Tsujii, Jun'ichi

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: While text mining technologies for biomedical research have gained popularity as a way to take advantage of the explosive growth of information in text form in biomedical papers, selecting appropriate natural language processing (NLP) tools is still difficult for researchers who are not familiar with recent advances in NLP. This article provides a comparative evaluation of several state-of-the-art natural language parsers, focusing on the task of extracting protein–protein interaction (PPI) from biomedical papers. We measure how each parser, and its output representation, contributes to accuracy improvement when the parser is used as a component in a PPI system. Results: All the parsers attained improvements in accuracy of PPI extraction. The levels of accuracy obtained with these different parsers vary slightly, while differences in parsing speed are larger. The best accuracy in this work was obtained when we combined Miyao and Tsujii's Enju parser and Charniak and Johnson's reranking parser, and the accuracy is better than the state-of-the-art results on the same data. Availability: The PPI extraction system used in this work (AkanePPI) is available online at http://www-tsujii.is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/-100downloads/downloads.cgi. The evaluated parsers are also available online from each developer's site. Contact: yusuke@is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp PMID:19073593

  12. Edges in agricultural landscapes: species interactions and movement of natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Macfadyen, Sarina; Muller, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural landscapes can be characterized as a mosaic of habitat patches interspersed with hostile matrix, or as a gradient of patches ranging from suitable to unsuitable for different species. Arthropods moving through these landscapes encounter a range of edges, with different permeability. Patches of native vegetation in these landscapes may support natural enemies of crop pests by providing alternate hosts for parasitic wasps and/or acting as a source for predatory insects. We test this by quantifying species interactions and measuring movement across different edge-types. A high diversity of parasitoid species used hosts in the native vegetation patches, however we recorded few instances of the same parasitoid species using hosts in both the native vegetation and the crop (canola). However, we did find overall greater densities of parasitoids moving from native vegetation into the crop. Of the parasitoid groups examined, parasitoids of aphids (Braconidae: Aphidiinae) frequently moved from native vegetation into canola. In contrast, parasitoids of caterpillars (Braconidae: Microgastrinae) moved commonly from cereal fields into canola. Late season samples showed both aphids and parasitoids moving frequently out of native vegetation, in contrast predators moved less commonly from native vegetation (across the whole season). The season-long net advantage or disadvantage of native vegetation for pest control services is therefore difficult to evaluate. It appears that the different edge-types alter movement patterns of natural enemies more so than herbivorous pest species, and this may impact pest control services. PMID:23555737

  13. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Interaction of Tubulin with Potent Natural Analogues of Podophyllotoxin.

    PubMed

    Antúnez-Mojica, Mayra; Rodríguez-Salarichs, Javier; Redondo-Horcajo, Mariano; León, Alejandra; Barasoain, Isabel; Canales, Ángeles; Cañada, F J; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Alvarez, Laura; Díaz, J Fernando

    2016-08-26

    Four natural analogues of podophyllotoxin obtained from the Mexican medicinal plant Bursera fagaroides, namely, acetyl podophyllotoxin (2), 5'-desmethoxy-β-peltatin A methyl ether (3), 7',8'-dehydro acetyl podophyllotoxin (4), and burseranin (5), have been characterized, and their interactions with tubulin have been investigated. Cytotoxic activity measurements, followed by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry studies, demonstrated that these compounds disrupt microtubule networks in cells and cause cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase in the A549 cell line. A tubulin binding assay showed that compounds 1-4 were potent assembly inhibitors, displaying binding to the colchicine site with Kb values ranging from 11.75 to 185.0 × 10(5) M(-1). In contrast, burseranin (5) was not able to inhibit tubulin assembly. From the structural perspective, the ligand-binding epitopes of compounds 1-3 have been mapped using STD-NMR, showing that B and E rings are the major points for interaction with the protein. The obtained results indicate that the inhibition of tubulin assembly of this family of compounds is more effective when there are at least two methoxyl groups at the E ring, along with a trans configuration of the lactone ring in the aryltetralin lignan core. PMID:27518758

  14. Motions and electrostatic interactions in natural and semisynthetic myoglobins: a carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance study

    SciTech Connect

    Maskalick, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    It is expected that the internal motions of amino acid side chains and protein backbone segments influence and are in turn affected by charge-charge and related interactions, steric constraints, hydrophobic forces, and hydrogen bonding. As an initial test of this theory /sup 13/C-enriched glycine, alanine, and isoleucine have been substituted for the amino terminal valine of sperm whale myoglobin using semisynthetic techniques. /sup 13/C-NMR has been used to analyze the motions of the side chain and the protonation state of the alpha amino group as a function of pH. The addition of a single methyl group to the side chain can alter the alpha amino pK value by as much as 0.3 pH units indicating a delicately balanced set of change-charge interactions between the alpha amino group and the rest of the protein. Further evidence in support of the state theory was found upon examination of the internal motions of seven of nine isoleucine vectors. These motions were extracted from natural abundance /sup 13/C-NMR relaxation data. The results suggest a strong possibility that concerted motions are important. Also, an increase in temperature from 32/sup 0/C to 52/sup 0/C leads to an electrostatically driven tightening of the myoglobin structure as evidenced by no significant increase in motion amplitude of most of the vectors.

  15. Risk dynamics: unraveling the role of socio-techno-nature interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, G.; Viglione, A.; Carr, G.; Kuil, L., Jr.; Brandimarte, L.; Yan, K.; Bloeschl, G.

    2015-12-01

    In disaster risk reduction, there is still a lack of methods capturing the dynamics of risk emerging from the complex interplay between physical and social processes. Two examples of these dynamics are the learning and levee effects. The learning effect is about the empirical evidence that more frequent hazardous events are often associated with decreasing societal vulnerability, e.g. human adaptation. The levee effect is about the stylized fact (discussed already by White in the 1940s) that less frequent hazardous events (sometimes paradoxically due to the implementation of risk prevention structures, such as levees) often lead to increasing societal vulnerability. We posit that current projections of future flood risk are not realistic because most analytical frameworks do not capture the aforementioned dynamics. Then, we propose an interdisciplinary approach whereby two-way interactions and feedbacks between social and physical processes are explicitly accounted for (Di Baldassarre et al., 2014; 2015). Here we show an application of this approach with a focus on flood risk changes, and demonstrate its capability to capture and explain the dynamics emerging from socio-techno-nature interactions. Lastly, the potentials and limitations of the proposed approach to assess risk dynamics in a rapidly changing environment are critically discussed.

  16. Dispersion interactions within the Piris natural orbital functional theory: the helium dimer.

    PubMed

    Piris, M; Lopez, X; Ugalde, J M

    2007-06-01

    The authors have investigated the description of the dispersion interaction within the Piris natural orbital functional (PNOF) theory. The PNOF arises from an explicit antisymmetric approach for the two-particle cumulant in terms of two symmetric matrices, Delta and Lambda. The functional forms of these matrices are obtained from the generalization of the two-particle system expressions, except for the off-diagonal elements of Delta. The mean value theorem and the partial sum rule obtained for the off-diagonal elements of Delta provide a prescription for deriving practical functionals. In particular, the previous employed approximation {Jpp/2} for the mean values {Jp*} affords several molecular properties but it is incapable to account for dispersion effects. In this work, the authors analyze a new approach for Jp* obtained by factorization of the matrix Delta within the bounds on its off-diagonal elements imposed by the positivity conditions of the two-particle reduced density matrix. Additional terms for the matrix elements of Lambda proportional to the square root of the holes are again introduced to describe properly the occupation numbers of the lowest occupied levels. The authors have found that the cross products between weakly occupied orbitals must be removed from the functional form of Lambda to obtain a correct long-range asymptotic behavior. The PNOF is used to predict the binding energy as well as the equilibrium distance of the helium dimer. The results are compared with the full configuration-interaction calculations and the corresponding experimental data. PMID:17567186

  17. Perceiving referential intent: Dynamics of reference in natural parent-child interactions.

    PubMed

    Trueswell, John C; Lin, Yi; Armstrong, Benjamin; Cartmill, Erica A; Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Gleitman, Lila R

    2016-03-01

    Two studies are presented which examined the temporal dynamics of the social-attentive behaviors that co-occur with referent identification during natural parent-child interactions in the home. Study 1 focused on 6.2 h of videos of 56 parents interacting during everyday activities with their 14-18 month-olds, during which parents uttered common nouns as parts of spontaneously occurring utterances. Trained coders recorded, on a second-by-second basis, parent and child attentional behaviors relevant to reference in the period (40 s) immediately surrounding parental naming. The referential transparency of each interaction was independently assessed by having naïve adult participants guess what word the parent had uttered in these video segments, but with the audio turned off, forcing them to use only non-linguistic evidence available in the ongoing stream of events. We found a great deal of ambiguity in the input along with a few potent moments of word-referent transparency; these transparent moments have a particular temporal signature with respect to parent and child attentive behavior: it was the object's appearance and/or the fact that it captured parent/child attention at the moment the word was uttered, not the presence of the object throughout the video, that predicted observers' accuracy. Study 2 experimentally investigated the precision of the timing relation, and whether it has an effect on observer accuracy, by disrupting the timing between when the word was uttered and the behaviors present in the videos as they were originally recorded. Disrupting timing by only ±1 to 2 s reduced participant confidence and significantly decreased their accuracy in word identification. The results enhance an expanding literature on how dyadic attentional factors can influence early vocabulary growth. By hypothesis, this kind of time-sensitive data-selection process operates as a filter on input, removing many extraneous and ill-supported word-meaning hypotheses from

  18. Selective toxin-lipid membrane interactions of natural, haemolytic Scyphozoan toxins analyzed by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Helmholz, Heike

    2010-10-01

    A comparison of the molecular interaction of natural Scyphozoan lysins with their bioactivity in a haemolytic assay was performed by establishing an efficient, automatable and reproducible procedure for the measurement of protein-membrane interactions. The toxin-membrane interactions were analyzed utilising a chip-based technology with immobilized liposomes as artificial cell membranes. The technique was established with streptolysin O as a cholesterol-selective model toxin and its cholesterol-selectivity has been proven. The haemolytic potency of protein fractions derived from the venom of the jellyfish Aurelia aurita and Cyanea capillata was tested and EC50 values of 35.3mug/mL and 43.1mug/mL against sheep and 13.5mug/mL and 8.8mug/mL against rabbit erythrocytes were measured. Cell membrane binding as a first step in the haemolytic process was analyzed using the Biacore((R)) technology. Major cell membrane lipids (cholesterol, sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine) were immobilized as pure liposomes and in binary mixtures. A preference for cholesterol and sphingomyelin of both jellyfish species was demonstrated. The specificity of the method was proven with a non-haemolytic A. aurita protein fraction that did not express a lipid binding. Additionally, an inactivated C. capillata lysine with negligible haemolytic activity showed a remaining but reduced adsorption onto lipid layers. The binding level of the lytic venom fraction of these dominant boreal jellyfish species increased as a function of protein concentration. The binding strength was expressed in RU50 values ranging from 12.4mug/mL to 35.4mug/mL, which were in the same order of magnitude as the EC50 values in the haemolytic assay. PMID:20599534

  19. Assessment of the nature interactions of β-amyloid protein by a nanoprobe method.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Leonardo; Mena, Juan; Morales-Alvarez, Aurora; Kogan, Marcelo J; Melo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    We present a method based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) to assess the work of adhesion between the interfaces of gold AFM tips functionalized with three peptides derived from β-sheet breaker LPFFD [CLPFFD-NH2 (i0) and their isomers CDLPFF-NH2 (i1) and CLPDFF-NH2 (i2)], and the beta-amyloid protein (Aβ1-42). β-Amyloid protein was deposited onto a highly oriented graphite (HOPG) surface as protofibrils and fibrils. The presence of the residues Leu (L), Phe (F), and Phe (F), which are also present in the native sequence, confirm that the peptides are able to bind to the aggregates of Aβ1-42 fibrils and protofibrils. Force of adhesion data were directly obtained from the maximum force on retraction, and the work of adhesion was calculated from the Jhonson-Kendall-Roberts model (JKR-Model). Both the polar and dispersive contributions to the surface energy of the peptides i0, i1, and i2, as well as Aβ1-42 fibrils and protofibrils, were determined by means of measuring the contact angle and using the two-fluid method. The macroscopic energies of the functionalized gold surfaces do not differ significantly between isomers, which confirms the similar nature of the peptides i0, i1, and i2 but suggests that the macroscopic measurements are not able to distinguish specific sequences. The nanoprobe reveals a typical adhesion work value associated with the interaction of protofibrils with i0 and i2; this value is three times higher than that of i1. The difference is attributed to the hydrophobic nature of protofibrils, the predominant exposition of hydrophobic residues of the peptides i0 and i2, with respect to i1, and the degree of functionalization. i0 and i2 presented a slight adhesion with Aβ fibrils, which is associated with the exposed hydrophilic groups of these fibrils (onto HOPG) compared to the protofibrils. However, i1 showed interaction with both Aβ fibrils and protofibrils. For this, we propose an explanation based on the fact that the peptide i1 locates

  20. Living on Borrowed Time: Rethinking Temporality, Self, Nihilism, and Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappleye, Jeremy; Komatsu, Hikaru

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to contribute to recent attempts to rethink the deepest foundations of the field, this paper offers news ways of contemplating time, specifically its relations to self, nihilism, and schooling. We briefly review how some leading Western thinkers have contemplated time before detailing Japanese scholars who have offered divergent, original,…

  1. Rethinking Classroom Management: Strategies for Prevention, Intervention, and Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belvel, Patricia Sequeira; Jordan, Maya Marcia

    This book illustrates an approach to achieving a positive, harmonious classroom environment which enables educators to evolve effectively from managers to leaders by rethinking their roles as teachers, discussing how to create classrooms where students are more self-managing and demonstrate mutual respect, self-esteem, and responsibility. Key…

  2. Rethinking Our Classrooms: Teaching for Equity and Justice. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Bill, Ed.; Harvey, Brenda, Ed.; Karp, Stan, Ed.; Miller, Larry, Ed.

    This companion volume to the first "Rethinking Our Classrooms" presents a collection of articles, curriculum ideas, lesson plans, poetry, and resources designed for educators seeking to pair concerns for social justice with student academic achievement. Topics are: (1) "The Power of Words," including "Where I'm From: Inviting Students' Lives into…

  3. Rethinking Mathematics: Teaching Social Justice by the Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutstein, Eric, Ed.; Peterson, Bob, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This unique collection of more than 30 articles shows teachers how to weave social-justice principles throughout the math curriculum, and how to integrate social-justice math into other curricular areas as well. "Rethinking Mathematics" presents teaching ideas, lesson plans and reflections by practicing classroom teachers and distinguished…

  4. Caution or Stasis: Using Research to Rethink Schools--Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blodget, Alden

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Alden Blodget reflects on his more than 50 years of working in what he terms "the tragicomedy club of school reform," and suggests a need to rethink not just classroom teaching methods but the entire system. Blodget states that if the current system is built on faulty assumptions about learning, then there must be a…

  5. Rethinking Themes for Teaching the Era of the Cold War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Norman L.; Rosenberg, Emily S.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that the "tried and true" strategies for teaching about the early Cold War years highlight the U.S. response to Soviet expansionism. Identifies four other focus themes: (1) debates over mass culture and youth culture; (2) gender and sexuality; (3) the civil rights era; and (4) rethinking the cold war itself. (CFR)

  6. Schooling for Happiness: Rethinking the Aims of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Tom

    2008-01-01

    The release of "The New Zealand Curriculum" causes us to rethink the aims of education. Dr Cavanagh offers an alternative set of aims to the vision outlined in the Ministry of Education document, which is based, at least in part, on socialisation into the corporate industrial world. Dr Cavanagh's position is focused on putting relationships at the…

  7. Rethinking Education for the Caribbean: A Radical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jules, Didacus

    2008-01-01

    The article reflects critically on the experience of the Caribbean Anglophone countries (CARICOM) in reforming their education systems to meet the challenges of the present era. It argues that education reform in the current conjuncture can no longer be incremental and that what is required is a fundamental rethinking of educational provision.…

  8. When Learning Counts: Rethinking Licenses for School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jacob E., Jr.; Copland, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    This report asks two fundamental questions: do the licenses that states require of school principals encompass the knowledge and skills those principals need to promote student learning? If not, what kind of policy framework would help decision makers, educators, and others rethink principal licenses and the school leadership they support? To find…

  9. Extending, Broadening and Rethinking Existing Research on Transfer of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volet, Simone

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this Special Issue was to generate a new integrated agenda for research on transfer of training. It brought together scholars from diverse perspectives and invited them to strive toward synergy. This article examines how this collection of articles, as well as other bodies of literature, can help extend, broaden and rethink current…

  10. Comment on "Schooling for Happiness: Rethinking the Aims of Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glynn, Ted

    2008-01-01

    This commentary presents the author's response to an article published in the last version of "Kairaranga" entitled "Schooling for Happiness: Rethinking the aims of education," written by Dr. Tom Cavanagh. He found it refreshing to read Cavanagh's article that focuses educators' energies onto re-visiting the wider socio-cultural goals of…

  11. Rethinking "At-Risk" in Drama Education: Beyond Prescribed Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Diane

    2005-01-01

    Concern over students deemed "at-risk" constructs youth as deficient and deviant without considering the experiences of youth themselves. My interest in "at-risk" grows out of my previous work with youth, in various drama education contexts and the fact that youth have told me they found the label offensive. My research re-thinks "at-risk" to…

  12. Rethinking Validation in Complex High-Stakes Assessment Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Martha J.; DeLuca, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    In this article we rethink validation within the complex contexts of high-stakes assessment. We begin by considering the utility of existing models for validation and argue that these models tend to overlook some of the complexities inherent to assessment use, including the multiple interpretations of assessment purposes and the potential…

  13. Rethinking the morality of animal research.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, J; Rowan, A N

    1985-10-01

    A review is provided of major ethical positions concerning the moral status of animals and the use of animals in research. These positions are characterized as ethical skepticism and relativism, absolute dominionism, anthropocentric consequentialism, reverence for life, utilitarianism, and abolitionism. The authors contend that any acceptable ethical discussion of the use of research animals must take into account suffering and well-being, pleasure, thought and reason, purposiveness, and self awareness. Other issues to be addressed are the nature of different animals and the principle of social interaction with humans. Justifications for animal research may be based on claims of benefits to humans, benefits to other animals, or the value of research to science and knowledge. PMID:3905706

  14. Illustrating the Interaction of Nature and People in Ecosystem Services: The Case of Terroir in Wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The ecosystem services (ES) approach is increasingly used in research and policy, with the Common International Framework on Ecosystem Services (CICES) "cascade" gaining traction as a framework for conceptualizing the production of ecosystem services by the natural environment, and then people consuming these services and obtaining benefits depending on their values. However, uptake of the ES concept on the ground by ecosystem managers, and understanding by everyday citizens, is still limited. One barrier is the challenge of providing tangible, examples of everyday benefits and values that people can readily connect with the biophysical structures and functions that underlie their provision. Winegrowing offers one promising case to illustrate the linkages all along the chain of production and consumption of ecosystem services. The sensitive winegrape has long been known for its properties of terroir, where the taste of wine reflects the environmental conditions of the place where it is grown, a feature valued by consumers. Here the CICES framework is illustrated with the case of winegrowing, demonstrating that the current linear model of natural production and human consumption of ES needs to be modified for this case because people influence each of the five stages by shaping and responding to their environment, producing a two-way interaction between people and the environment throughout. For example, while natural drivers such as climate and soils are key to the provision of the service of winegrape yields, landowners modify the biophysical environment through site selection and growers modify plant ecophysiological function through farming practices such as pruning and irrigation in order to influence the final service. Similarly, winemakers' expertise is needed to transform the service of winegrape yields into the product of wine that can be enjoyed and valued by consumers, whose preferences shape wine styles as well. This case illustrates how incorporating

  15. Experimental Determination of the Electrostatic Nature of Carbonyl Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions Using IR-NMR Correlations.

    PubMed

    Kashid, Somnath M; Bagchi, Sayan

    2014-09-18

    Hydrogen-bonding plays a fundamental role in the structure, function, and dynamics of various chemical and biological systems. Understanding the physical nature of interactions and the role of electrostatics in hydrogen-bonding has been the focus of several theoretical and computational research. We present an experimental approach involving IR-(13)C NMR correlations to determine the electrostatic nature of carbonyl hydrogen-bonding interactions. This report provides a direct experimental evidence of the classical nature of hydrogen-bonding interaction in carbonyls, independent of any theoretical approximation. These results have important implications in chemistry and biology and can be applied to probe the reaction mechanisms involving carbonyl activation/stabilization by hydrogen bonds using spectroscopic techniques. PMID:26276334

  16. Characteristics and nature of the halogen-bonding interactions between CCl3F and ozone: a supermolecular and SAPT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Yourdkhani, Sirous; Bahrami, Aidin

    2013-12-01

    The strength and nature of the halogen-bond interactions in CCl3F...O3 complexes were examined by means of ab initio quantum-chemical calculations and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT). Our calculations predict a trifurcated C-Cl...O interaction for the global minimum of CCl3F...O3 complex and several local minima, differing slightly in energy, separated by very low barriers. The calculations, which include a rigorous decomposition of the interaction energies, also indicate that the interaction of CCl3F molecule with O3 is characterised by contributions from both electrostatic and dispersion energies, with the contribution of the latter being dominant. The evaluated SAPT interaction energies for the CCl3F...O3 complexes are generally in good agreement with those obtained using the supermolecule CCSD(T) method, suggesting that SAPT is a proper method to study the intermolecular interactions in these complexes.

  17. Dissecting Oceanic Detachment Faults: Fault Zone Geometry, Deformation Mechanisms, and Nature of Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnemains, D.; Escartin, J.; Verlaguet, A.; Andreani, M.; Mevel, C.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the extreme strain localization at long-lived oceanic detachment faults rooting deeply below the axis, we present results of geological investigations at the 13°19'N detachment along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, conducted during the ODEMAR cruise (Nov-Dec13, NO Pourquoi Pas?) with ROV Victor6000 (IFREMER). During this cruise we investigated and sampled the corrugated fault to understand its geometry, nature of deformation, and links to fluid flow. We identified and explored 7 fault outcrops on the flanks of microbathymetric striations subparallel to extension. These outcrops expose extensive fault planes, with the most prominent ones extending 40-90m laterally, and up to 10 m vertically. These fault surfaces systematically show subhorizontal striations subparallel to extension, and define slabs of fault-rock that are flat and also striated at sample scale. Visual observations show a complex detachment fault zone, with anastomosing fault planes at outcrop scale (1-10 m), with a highly heterogeneous distribution of deformation. We observe heterogeneity in fault-rock nature at outcrop scale. In situ samples from striated faults are primarily basalt breccias with prior green-schist facies alteration, and a few ultramafic fault-rocks that show a complex deformation history, with early schistose textures, brittlely reworked as clasts within the fault. The basalt breccias show variable silicification and associated sulfides, recording important fluid-rock interactions during exhumation. To understand the link between fluid and deformation during exhumation, we will present microstructural observation of deformation textures, composition, and distribution and origin of quartz and sulfides, as well as constraints on the temperature of silicifying fluids from fluid inclusions in quartz. These results allow us to characterize in detail the detachment fault zone geometry, and investigate the timing of silicification relative to deformation.

  18. Infrared spectroscopic examination of the interaction of urea with the naturally occurring zeolite clinoptilolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byler, D.M.; Gerasimowicz, W.V.; Stockette, V.M.; Eberl, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has shown for the first time that the naturally occurring zeolite clinoptilolite can absorb urea, (NH2)2CO, under ambient conditions from either aqueous or ethanolic solutions. The two strongest NH stretching bands at 3441 and 3344 cm-1 in pure, solid urea shift to higher frequency (about 3504 and 3401 cm-1) after absorption. Two of the four urea bands in the 1800-1300 cm-1 range (at 1683 and 1467 cm-1) undergo marked downward shifts to about 1670 and 1445 cm-1. The other two bands show little change in frequency. The strong band at 1602 cm-1, however, diminishes in intensity to little more than an ill-defined shoulder on the 1626-cm-1 peak. When clinoptilolite is heated to 450 ??C and then treated with molten urea (ca. 140 ??C) for several minutes, and finally washed twice with ethanol to remove excess unreacted urea, further changes become apparent in the spectrum of the urea-treated clinoptilolite. The two NH stretching bands broaden without significant change in frequency. Two new bands appear in the midfrequency range at 1777 (weak) and 1719 (medium strong) cm-1. Of the four original midfrequency peaks, the one at 1602 cm-1 is now absent. Two others (1627 and 1440 cm-1) exhibit little change, while the fourth has broadened and shifted down to 1663 cm-1, where it appears as a shoulder on the band at 1627 cm-1. Both treatments clearly induce interaction between urea and the zeolite which seems to result in significant modifications in the nature of the hydrogen bonding of the substrate. ?? 1991.

  19. Nature of protein-CO2 interactions as elucidated via molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Michael L; Wilson, Angela K; Cundari, Thomas R

    2012-09-27

    Rising global temperatures require innovative measures to reduce atmospheric concentrations of CO(2). The most successful carbon capture technology on Earth is the enzymatic capture of CO(2) and its sequestration in the form of glucose. Efforts to improve upon or mimic this naturally occurring process will require a rich understanding of protein-CO(2) interactions. Toward that end, extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on the CO(2)-utilizing enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). Preliminary simulations were performed using implicit and explicit solvent models, which yielded similar results: arginine, lysine, tyrosine, and asparagine enhance the ability of a protein to bind carbon dioxide. Extensive explicit solvent simulations were performed for both wild-type PEPCK and five single-point PEPCK mutants, revealing three prevalent channels by which CO(2) enters (or exits) the active site cleft, as well as a fourth channel (observed only once), the existence of which can be rationalized in terms of the position of a key Arg residue. The strongest CO(2) binding sites in these simulations consist of appropriately positioned hydrogen bond donors and acceptors. Interactions between CO(2) and both Mn(2+) and Mg(2+) present in PEPCK are minimal due to the stable protein- and solvent-based coordination environments of these cations. His 232, suggested by X-ray crystallography as being a potential important CO(2) binding site, is indeed found to be particularly "CO(2)-philic" in these simulations. Finally, a recent mechanism, proposed on the basis of X-ray crystallography, for PEPCK active site lid closure is discussed in light of the MD trajectories. Overall, the results of this work will prove useful not only to scientists investigating PEPCK, but also to groups seeking to develop an environmentally benign, protein-based carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization system. PMID:22882078

  20. Natural gas conversion to higher hydrocarbons using plasma interactions with surfaces. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A.; Morgan, B.L.; Airey, R.W.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments are reported in which a methane plasma is created, and the methyl ions and hydrogen ions are accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 10 eV to greater than 100 eV, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces causes the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}m C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}m and C{sub 8} molecules. There is a decreasing percentage of larger molecules produced, in comparison with the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} types. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The yield of the higher hydrocarbons depends upon the external voltage used, and voltage can be used as a control parameter to adjust the output mixture proportions. A conversion energy of 2.59 kilowatt hours/killogram of output has been demonstrated, and a reduction of this by a factor of 10 is possible using known techniques. In batch experiments, the selectivity for C{sub 2} has varied from 47% to 88%, and selectivity for C{sub 6} has ranged from 0% to 12.8%. Other hydrocarbon selectivities also span a wide and useful range. The estimated costs for hydrocarbons produced with this technology are in the range of $200 per tonne, in production quantities, depending upon natural gas costs. Pilot production experiments are recommended to make these estimates more precise, and to address strategies for scaling the technology up to production levels. Applications are discussed.

  1. Natural Variation for Carbohydrate Content in Arabidopsis. Interaction with Complex Traits Dissected by Quantitative Genetics1

    PubMed Central

    Calenge, Fanny; Saliba-Colombani, Véra; Mahieu, Stéphanie; Loudet, Olivier; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise; Krapp, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Besides being a metabolic fuel, carbohydrates play important roles in plant growth and development, in stress responses, and as signal molecules. We exploited natural variation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to decipher the genetic architecture determining carbohydrate content. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) approach in the Bay-0 × Shahdara progeny grown in two contrasting nitrogen environments led to the identification of 39 QTLs for starch, glucose, fructose, and sucrose contents representing at least 14 distinct polymorphic loci. A major QTL for fructose content (FR3.4) and a QTL for starch content (ST3.4) were confirmed in heterogeneous inbred families. Several genes associated with carbon (C) metabolism colocalize with the identified QTL. QTLs for senescence-related traits, and for flowering time, water status, and nitrogen-related traits, previously detected with the same genetic material, colocalize with C-related QTLs. These colocalizations reflect the complex interactions of C metabolism with other physiological processes. QTL fine-mapping and cloning could thus lead soon to the identification of genes potentially involved in the control of different connected physiological processes. PMID:16798941

  2. Osteoarthritis: genes, nature-nurture interaction and the role of leptin.

    PubMed

    Garner, Malgorzata; Alshameeri, Zeiad; Khanduja, Vikas

    2013-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease affecting patients at different ages regardless of gender or ethnicity. As with many chronic diseases, OA is thought to have a multifactorial aetiology, which is not fully understood. Whereas the pathophysiological process of OA can be analysed at a cellular and molecular level, the interaction between genes and lifestyle remains an important factor in the development of this disease. The expanding awareness of different genes that may play a role in OA, together with many chemical mediators thought to be associated with the progression of the disease, will help in better management of this condition. Some of the chemical mediators recently implicated in this condition are the adipokines (leptin, adiponectin and resistin). Few but consistent studies suggest that leptin in association with obesity could be an important factor in OA aetiology. Hence, this could establish a strong and direct molecular link between patient life style (nurture) and the pathological process of OA (nature). However, neither a clear mechanism nor a direct clinical association linking leptin to OA has yet been established. In this article, we explore some of the genetic and environmental factors in OA aetiology. We discuss leptin in obesity and assess its possible association with OA aetiology. This should emphasise the important role of health professionals in treating obesity in order to control OA symptoms and possibly progression. PMID:24036528

  3. Interaction of natural survival instincts and internalized social norms exploring the Titanic and Lusitania disasters.

    PubMed

    Frey, Bruno S; Savage, David A; Torgler, Benno

    2010-03-16

    To understand human behavior, it is important to know under what conditions people deviate from selfish rationality. This study explores the interaction of natural survival instincts and internalized social norms using data on the sinking of the Titanic and the Lusitania. We show that time pressure appears to be crucial when explaining behavior under extreme conditions of life and death. Even though the two vessels and the composition of their passengers were quite similar, the behavior of the individuals on board was dramatically different. On the Lusitania, selfish behavior dominated (which corresponds to the classical homo economicus); on the Titanic, social norms and social status (class) dominated, which contradicts standard economics. This difference could be attributed to the fact that the Lusitania sank in 18 min, creating a situation in which the short-run flight impulse dominated behavior. On the slowly sinking Titanic (2 h, 40 min), there was time for socially determined behavioral patterns to reemerge. Maritime disasters are traditionally not analyzed in a comparative manner with advanced statistical (econometric) techniques using individual data of the passengers and crew. Knowing human behavior under extreme conditions provides insight into how widely human behavior can vary, depending on differing external conditions. PMID:20194743

  4. Food plant derived disease tolerance and resistance in a natural butterfly-plant-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Eleanore D; Lefèvre, Thierry; Li, James; de Castillejo, Carlos Lopez Fernandez; Li, Hui; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2012-11-01

    Organisms can protect themselves against parasite-induced fitness costs through resistance or tolerance. Resistance includes mechanisms that prevent infection or limit parasite growth while tolerance alleviates the fitness costs from parasitism without limiting infection. Although tolerance and resistance affect host-parasite coevolution in fundamentally different ways, tolerance has often been ignored in animal-parasite systems. Where it has been studied, tolerance has been assumed to be a genetic mechanism, unaffected by the host environment. Here we studied the effects of host ecology on tolerance and resistance to infection by rearing monarch butterflies on 12 different species of milkweed food plants and infecting them with a naturally occurring protozoan parasite. Our results show that monarch butterflies experience different levels of tolerance to parasitism depending on the species of milkweed that they feed on, with some species providing over twofold greater tolerance than other milkweed species. Resistance was also affected by milkweed species, but there was no relationship between milkweed-conferred resistance and tolerance. Chemical analysis suggests that infected monarchs obtain highest fitness when reared on milkweeds with an intermediate concentration, diversity, and polarity of toxic secondary plant chemicals known as cardenolides. Our results demonstrate that environmental factors-such as interacting species in ecological food webs-are important drivers of disease tolerance. PMID:23106703

  5. Interactive effects of Na and K in killing by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichter, L.C.; MacCoubrey, I.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Contact-mediated lysis by human natural killer cells is inhibited by a number of drugs that block the predominant K channel. In this study the authors have further examined the role of the K channel and the interactions between passive K and Na transport in killing. Low external Na-inhibited killing and inhibition were not due to reduced inward current through the Na channels in the target cell. A role for the Na/H antiport is suggested since amiloride inhibited killing in a dose-dependent manner that was competitive with external Na. Depolarizing the killer cell with elevated external K did not inhibit killing. On the contrary, high K{sub 0} reduced the inhibition caused by low Na{sub 0} and by the K-channel blockers quinidine, verapamil, and retinoic acid. Hyperpolarizing the killer cell with low K{sub 0} or valinomycin inhibited killing. Hence, the primary role of the K channels during killing is not to maintain the negative membrane potential. On the contrary, depolarization may promote killing under conditions where killing is submaximal.

  6. Glutathione transferase from Plasmodium falciparum--interaction with malagashanine and selected plant natural products.

    PubMed

    Mangoyi, Rumbidzai; Hayeshi, Rose; Ngadjui, Bonventure; Ngandeu, Francois; Bezabih, Merhatibebe; Abegaz, Berhanu; Razafimahefa, Solofoniaina; Rasoanaivo, Philippe; Mukanganyama, Stanley

    2010-12-01

    A glutathione transferase (PfGST) isolated from Plasmodium falciparum has been associated with chloroquine resistance. A range of natural products including malagashanine (MG) were screened for inhibition of PfGST by a GST assay with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as a substrate. Only the sesquiterpene (JBC 42C), the bicoumarin (Tral-1), ellagic acid and curcumin, were shown to be potent inhibitors of PfGST with IC(50) values of 8.5, 12, 50 and 69 μM, respectively. Kinetic studies were performed on PfGST using ellagic acid as an inhibitor. Uncompetitive and mixed types of inhibition were obtained for glutathione (GSH) and 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). The K(i) for GSH and CDNB were -0.015 μM and 0.011 μM, respectively. Malagashanine (100 µM) only reduced the activity of PfGST to 80% but showed a time-dependent inactivation of PfGST with a t(1/2) of 34 minutes compared to >120 minutes in the absence of MG or in the presence of 5 mM GSH. This work facilitates the understanding of the interaction of PfGST with some plant derived compounds. PMID:20521884

  7. How do natural, uncultivated microbes interact with organic matter? Insights from single cell genomics and metagenomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, K. G.; Bird, J.; Schreiber, L.; Petersen, D.; Kjeldsen, K.; Schramm, A.; Stepanauskas, R.; Jørgensen, B. B.

    2013-12-01

    Since most of the microbes in marine sediments remain uncultured, little is known about the mechanisms by which these natural communities degrade organic matter (OM). Likewise, little is known about the make-up of labile OM in marine sediments beyond general functional classes such as proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, measured as monomers. However, microbes have complex interactions with specific polymers within these functional classes, which can be indicated by a microbe's enzymatic toolkit. We found that four single cell genomes of archaea have very different peptidase compositions than four single cells of bacteria, suggesting that archaea and bacteria may play different roles in OM degradation. We also found that predicted extracellular cysteine peptidases, which require chemically reducing conditions, were common in IMG database metagenomes from marine sediments, and absent in those from seawater. This suggests that the pathways, and not just the rates, of OM degradation may differ between seawater and sediments. By comparing enzyme classes in different organisms, or in different types of marine environments, we present an emerging view of the microbial potential for specific carbon remineralization pathways in marine sediments. In addition, the methods we present hold promise for characterizing OM degradation in any environment where genomic information is available.

  8. Nature of intramolecular interactions of vitamin C in view of interacting quantum atoms: the role of hydrogen bond cooperativity on geometry.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Saeid; Dabbagh, Hossein A; Eskandari, Kiamars

    2016-07-21

    The conformational analysis of six dihedral angles was calculated by second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with the correlation-consistent aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) was applied to gain a description of the atoms and chemical bonds. A high content of hydroxyl groups in vitamin C's (VC) structure leads to a wide range of intramolecular interactions. The nature of these interactions within the selected VC conformers was studied in view of the interacting quantum atom (IQA) approach. Complete IQA analysis of the atomic and interatomic interaction energies indicated hydrogen bond formation was responsible for the stability of most of the local minima in the potential energy surface. In these conformers, the tandem participation of interactions was operating by way of two- or three-centered (bifurcated) cooperative networks. For the intramolecular hydrogen bond interplay in cooperativity, changes of the IQA atomic and interatomic interaction energies of the participant interactions were monitored during the formation of cooperative networks. The results of the intramolecular cooperativity were evaluated with changes of the delocalization index and bond distances. PMID:27332782

  9. Hydrogeophysical Characterizations of Streambed Sedimentology and Stream-Groundwater Interactions in a Natural Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Y.; Lee, S.; Kim, H.; Lee, K.

    2011-12-01

    than values at 10 cm depth due to, getting to deep, existence of low permeable sediments like loamy sand and silt loam. Depositional features of streambed in a natural stream are predicted to affect both vertical water flux and pattern on surface water-groundwater interaction. This subject is supported by Brain Korea 21 and Korea Ministry of Environment as 'The GAIA Project (173-092-009)'

  10. The Nature of Negotiations in Face-to-Face versus Computer-Mediated Communication in Pair Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouhshad, Amir; Wigglesworth, Gillian; Storch, Neomy

    2016-01-01

    The Interaction Approach argues that negotiation for meaning and form is conducive to second language development. To date, most of the research on negotiations has been either in face-to-face (FTF) or text-based synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) modes. Very few studies have compared the nature of negotiations across the modes.…

  11. Nature and consequences of non-covalent interactions between flavonoids and macronutrients in foods.

    PubMed

    Bordenave, Nicolas; Hamaker, Bruce R; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2014-01-01

    Many of the potential health benefits of flavonoids have been associated with their specific chemical and biological properties including their ability to interact and bind non-covalently to macronutrients in foods. While flavonoid-protein interactions and binding have been the subject of intensive study, significantly less is understood about non-covalent interactions with carbohydrates and lipids. These interactions with macronutrients are likely to impact both the flavonoid properties in foods, such as their radical scavenging activity, and the food or beverage matrix itself, including their taste, texture and other sensorial properties. Overall, non-covalent binding of flavonoids with macronutrients is primarily driven by van der Waals interactions. From the flavonoid perspective, these interactions are modulated by characteristics such as degree of polymerization, molecular flexibility, number of external hydroxyl groups, or number of terminal galloyl groups. From the macronutrient standpoint, electrostatic and ionic interactions are generally predominant with carbohydrates, while hydrophobic interactions are generally predominant with lipids and mainly limited to interactions with flavonols. All of these interactions are involved in flavonoid-protein interactions. While primarily associated with undesirable characteristics in foods and beverages, such as astringency, negative impact on macronutrient digestibility and hazing, more recent efforts have attempted to leverage these interactions to develop controlled delivery systems or strategies to enhance flavonoids bioavailability. This paper aims at reviewing the fundamental bases for non-covalent interactions, their occurrence in food and beverage systems and their impact on the physico-chemical, organoleptic and some nutritional properties of food. PMID:24326533

  12. Oxygen Modulates Human Decidual Natural Killer Cell Surface Receptor Expression and Interactions with Trophoblasts1

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Alison E.; Goulwara, Sonu S.; Whitley, Guy S.; Cartwright, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Decidual natural killer (dNK) cells have been shown to both promote and inhibit trophoblast behavior important for decidual remodeling in pregnancy and have a distinct phenotype compared to peripheral blood NK cells. We investigated whether different levels of oxygen tension, mimicking the physiological conditions of the decidua in early pregnancy, altered cell surface receptor expression and activity of dNK cells and their interactions with trophoblast. dNK cells were isolated from terminated first-trimester pregnancies and cultured in oxygen tensions of 3%, 10%, and 21% for 24 h. Cell surface receptor expression was examined by flow cytometry, and the effects of secreted factors in conditioned medium (CM) on the trophoblast cell line SGHPL-4 were assessed in vitro. SGHPL-4 cells treated with dNK cell CM incubated in oxygen tensions of 10% were significantly more invasive (P < 0.05) and formed endothelial-like networks to a greater extent (P < 0.05) than SGHPL-4 cells treated with dNK cell CM incubated in oxygen tensions of 3% or 21%. After 24 h, a lower percentage of dNK cells expressed CD56 at 21% oxygen (P < 0.05), and an increased percentage of dNK cells expressed NKG2D at 10% oxygen (P < 0.05) compared to other oxygen tensions, with large patient variation. This study demonstrates dNK cell phenotype and secreted factors are modulated by oxygen tension, which induces changes in trophoblast invasion and endovascular-like differentiation. Alterations in dNK cell surface receptor expression and secreted factors at different oxygen tensions may represent regulation of function within the decidua during the first trimester of pregnancy. PMID:25232021

  13. Microbial Interactions with Natural Organic Matter Extracted from the Oak Ridge FRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Jagadamma, S.; Lancaster, A.; Adams, M. W. W.; Hazen, T.; Justice, N.; Chakraborty, R.

    2015-12-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is central to microbial food webs; however, little is known about the interplay between the physical and chemical characteristics of NOM and its turnover by microbial communities based upon biotic and abiotic parameters (e.g., biogenic precursors, redox state, bioavailability). Microbial activity changes the structures and properties that influence further bioavailability of NOM. To date, our understanding of these interactions is insufficient, and indigenous microbial activities that regulate NOM turnover are poorly resolved. It is critical to identify NOM characteristics to the structure and composition of microbial communities and to the metabolic potential of that community. Towards that end, sediment samples collected from the background area well FW305 (Oak Ridge Field Research Center, Oak Ridge, TN) were tested for NOM extraction methods that used three mild solvents, e.g., phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pyrophosphate, and MilliQ-water. MilliQ-water was finally chosen for extracting sediment samples via shaking and sonication. Groundwater from well FW301 was used as an inoculum to which the extracted NOM was added as carbon sources to feed native microbes. To identify the specific functional groups of extracted NOM that are bioavailable to indigenous microbes, several techniques, including FTIR, LC-MS, EEM, were applied to characterize the extracted NOM as well as the transformed NOM metabolites. 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing was also performed to identify the specific microbial diversity that was enriched and microbial isolates that preferentially grew with these NOM was also cultivated in the lab for future detailed studies.

  14. Effects of Naturally Occuring Arginine 14 Deletion on Phospholamban Conformational Dynamics and Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Soller, Kailey J.; Ha, Kim N.; Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    Phospholamban (PLN) is a single-pass membrane protein that regulates the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA). Phosphorylation of PLN at Ser16 reverses its inhibitory function under β-adrenergic stimulation, augmenting Ca2+ uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and muscle contractility. PLN exists in two conformations; a T state, where the cytoplasmic domain is helical and absorbed on the membrane surface, and an R state, where the cytoplasmic domain is unfolded and membrane detached. Previous studies from our group have shown that the PLN conformational equilibrium is crucial to SERCA regulation. Here, we used a combination of solution and solid-state NMR techniques to compare the structural topology and conformational dynamics of monomeric PLN (PLNAFA) with that of the PLNR14del, a naturally occurring deletion mutant that is linked to the progression of dilated cardiomyopathy. We found that the behavior of the inhibitory transmembrane domain of PLNR14del is similar to that of the native sequence. In contrast, the conformational dynamics of R14del both in micelles and lipid membranes are enhanced. We conclude that the deletion of Arg14 in the cytoplasmic region weakens the interactions with the membrane and shifts the conformational equilibrium of PLN toward the disordered R state. This conformational transition is correlated with the loss-of-function character of this mutant and is corroborated by SERCA’s activity assays. These findings further support our hypothesis that SERCA function is fine-tuned by PLN conformational dynamics and begin to explain the aberrant regulation of SERCA by the R14del mutant. PMID:25251363

  15. New physics at the weak scale: axigluon models, scale invariance and naturalness, and interacting dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, Gustavo Marques

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes all known elementary particles and their interactions. Despite its great experimental success, we know that the Standard Model is not a complete description of Nature and therefore new phenomena should be observed at higher energies. In the coming years the Large Hadron Collider will test the Standard Model by colliding protons with center of mass energies of up to 14 TeV providing some of the most stringent tests on the Standard Model. Experimental searches for Dark Matter provide a complementary program to test physics at the weak scale. In the near future new experimental data coming from direct detection experiments, and from satellites and telescopes will drastically improve our sensitivity to weak scale dark matter. This could lead to the first direct observation of dark matter, and thus of physics beyond the Standard Model. In this thesis I propose different extensions of the Standard Model and discuss their experimental consequences. I first discuss models for Axigluons, which are spin one particles in the adjoint representation of the SU(3) color gauge group. These models were motivated by the measurement of higher than predicted forward-backward asymmetry in top quark pair production at the Tevatron. I study different scenarios for Axigluon models that can explain the Tevatron result and explore their signatures at the Large Hadron Collider. Second I discuss the implications of ultraviolet scale invariance for the Standard Model, which has been advocated as a solution to the hierarchy problem. I show that in order to solve the hierarchy problem with scale invariance, new physics is required not far from the weak scale. In the last part of this thesis I propose a new model for dark matter, in which dark matter is charged under a hidden non-Abelian gauge group. This leads to modifications in the sensitivity of the usual experimental searches for dark matter in addition to distinct signatures in the Cosmic

  16. The Nature of Adolescent Learner Interaction in a Virtual High School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borup, J.; Graham, C.R.; Davies, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    This study used survey data to measure the effect of learners' reported interactions with content, peers, and instructors on several course outcomes in two virtual high school courses that emphasized interactive learning. Surveys found that the large majority of students viewed all investigated types of interaction as educational and motivational.…

  17. Rethinking dry eye disease: a perspective on clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bron, Anthony J; Tomlinson, Alan; Foulks, Gary N; Pepose, Jay S; Baudouin, Christophe; Geerling, Gerd; Nichols, Kelly K; Lemp, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    Publication of the DEWS report in 2007 established the state of the science of dry eye disease (DED). Since that time, new evidence suggests that a rethinking of traditional concepts of dry eye disease is in order. Specifically, new evidence on the epidemiology of the disease, as well as strategies for diagnosis, have changed the understanding of DED, which is a heterogeneous disease associated with considerable variability in presentation. These advances, along with implications for clinical care, are summarized herein. The most widely used signs of DED are poorly correlated with each other and with symptoms. While symptoms are thought to be characteristic of DED, recent studies have shown that less than 60% of subjects with other objective evidence of DED are symptomatic. Thus the use of symptoms alone in diagnosis will likely result in missing a significant percentage of DED patients, particularly with early/mild disease. This could have considerable impact in patients undergoing cataract or refractive surgery as patients with DED have less than optimal visual results. The most widely used objective signs for diagnosing DED all show greater variability between eyes and in the same eye over time compared with normal subjects. This variability is thought to be a manifestation of tear film instability which results in rapid breakup of the tearfilm between blinks and is an identifier of patients with DED. This feature emphasizes the bilateral nature of the disease in most subjects not suffering from unilateral lid or other unilateral destabilizing surface disorders. Instability of the composition of the tears also occurs in dry eye disease and shows the same variance between eyes. Finally, elevated tear osmolarity has been reported to be a global marker (present in both subtypes of the disease- aqueous-deficient dry eye and evaporative dry eye). Clinically, osmolarity has been shown to be the best single metric for diagnosis of DED and is directly related to

  18. Rethinking Management Education for the 21st Century. Research in Management Education and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankel, Charles, Ed.; DeFillippi, Robert, Ed.

    This book series focuses on trends in theory and practice likely to influence 21st century management education. This first volume examines a series of innovative and distinctive approaches to rethinking management education for the 21st century. Part 1 of the collection, "Rethinking What We Teach," contains: (1) "Development of Political Skill"…

  19. Feet to the Fire: New Orleans Kids Rethink Their Devastated School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholey, Jane; Burkes, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Kids Rethink New Orleans Schools is an organization of primarily middle school youth that formed after Hurricane Katrina destroyed most of the city's schools. This chapter describes Rethink's first six years of operation, which culminated in school system policy changes and an HBO documentary about the organization's groundbreaking work.

  20. Rethinking Soils: an under-investigated commons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Chrisopher; Mills, Jane; Ingram, Julie

    2015-04-01

    category of ecosystem services. As a result of the increasing evidence regarding soil threats, there is concern that the knowledge relating to soils is fragmented and incomplete. This is particular true regarding the complexity and functioning of soil systems and their interaction with human activities and the effectiveness of governance arrangements to promote resilience in the management of soils. Therefore discussions concerning soils needs to be taken from an interdisciplinary perspectives that embraces both natural and social sciences. This paper will seek to examine soils from a multi-scale governance/complex commons perspective. It will also consider how a commons perspective might be useful in reducing soil threats and in the development of effective prevention, remediation and restoration measures. This often requires a change in thinking about soil, perhaps considering it as a 'slow variable', able to drive long-term change or as a 'cultural asset' and 'knowledge resource'.

  1. Representing the nature of science in a science textbook: Exploring author-editor-publisher interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digiuseppe, Maurizio

    Current reforms in elementary and secondary science education call for students and teachers to develop more informed views of the nature of science---a process in which learning materials like science textbooks play a significant role. This dissertation reports on a case study of the development of representations of the nature of science in one unit of a senior high school chemistry textbook by the book's author, editor, and publisher. The study examines the multiple discourses that arose as the developers reflected on their personal and shared understandings of the nature of science; squared these understandings with mandated curricula, the educational needs of chemistry students and teachers, and the exigencies of large-scale commercial textbook publishing; and developed and incorporated into the textbook representations of the nature of science they believed were the most suitable. Analyses of the data in this study indicate that a number of factors significantly influenced the development of representations of the nature of science, including representational accuracy (the degree to which suggested representations of the nature of science conformed to what the developers believed were contemporary understandings of the nature of science), representational consistency (the degree to which similar representations of the nature of science in different parts of the textbook conveyed the same meaning), representational appropriateness (the age-, grade-, and reading-level suitability of the suggested nature of science representations), representational alignment (the degree to which suggested representations of the nature of science addressed the requirements of mandated curricula), representational marketability (the degree to which textbook developers believed suggested representations of the nature of science would affect sales of the textbook in the marketplace), and a number of "Workplace Resources" factors such as the availability of time, relevant expertise

  2. Interactions between radioactively labeled colloids and natural particles: Evidence for colloidal pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Liang-Saw; Santschi, Peter H.; Tang, Degui

    1997-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that colloidal forms of trace metals can be reactive intermediaries in the scavenging processes leading to the removal of their particulate forms. A series of radiotracer experiments using natural colloidal organic matter from Galveston Bay, USA were carried out in order to test this hypothesis. Suspended particle uptake of originally colloidally bound trace metals occurred in a matter of hours to days in estuarine waters. After ten days, the majority (>50%) of the colloidal trace metals had been transferred into the particulate phase (≥0.45 μm), except for 65Zn. Two distinctively different temporal regions of removal of colloidal trace metals were identified: a faster reaction during the first four hours, followed by a slower reaction after approximately one day. In a separate river water-seawater mixing experiment, the solid/solution partitioning of the radiotracers was investigated in the absence of suspended matter. About 30% of most of the elements, except Ag and Fe (˜60%), were associated with a newly formed particulate phase after eight days. There were two major trends: (1) the particulate fraction of 59Fe and 110Ag increased while the colloidal fraction decreased, suggesting a colloidal pumping mechanism. (2) The particulate fraction of 54Mn, 133Ba, 65Zn, 109Cd, 113Sn, and 60CO increased while the LMW (≤ 1 kDa) fraction decreased, suggesting a direct uptake into the particulate fraction with less involvement of a transitory colloidal phase. The values of the particle-water ( Kd) and colloid-water partitioning ( Kc) coefficients for most trace metals were similar to those observed in Galveston Bay waters, suggesting complementary results to field studies. The results from these experiments suggested two different pathways for colloidal tracer uptake by particles: (1) colloidal pumping of a major component (e.g., biopolymer) of the colloidal pool and (2) coagulation of trace components (e.g., phytochelatins) with varying

  3. Interaction between anthelmintic treatment and vaccine responses in ponies naturally infected with cyathostomins.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, M K; Rubinson, E F; Chambers, T M; Horohov, D W; Wagner, B; Betancourt, A; Reedy, S E; Jacobsen, S

    2015-04-15

    Anthelmintics and vaccines are commonly given concurrently in routine equine management, but it is unknown to what extent an interaction between the two exists. Cyathostomins can modulate the local immune response by stimulating a type 2 helper T cell (Th2) response. In addition, anti-inflammatory effects of ivermectin have been found in rodent models. It is unknown whether these anti-inflammatory effects affect the acute phase response elicited by commonly used vaccines. This study evaluated how the acute phase inflammatory response, leukocyte expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and vaccine-specific titers induced by simultaneous injection of three vaccines (West Nile Virus, Equine Herpes Rhinopneumonitis, and Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin) were modulated by concurrent administration of ivermectin or pyrantel pamoate in ponies naturally infected with cyathostomins. Mixed-breed yearling ponies were blocked by gender and fecal strongyle egg count, then randomly assigned to three treatment groups: ivermectin (n=8), pyrantel pamoate (n=8), and control (n=7). All ponies received vaccinations intramuscularly on days 0 and 29, and anthelmintics were administered on the same days. Whole blood, serum and plasma samples were collected one, three and 14 days after each vaccination. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of acute phase reactants (haptoglobin, serum amyloid A, fibrinogen and iron), mRNA expression levels of cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ) in leukocytes, and vaccine-specific antibody titers. A marked acute-phase response was noted following both vaccinations. In contrast, the pattern of change in cytokine expression was less pronounced and more variable. Statistical differences were observed between groups for haptoglobin, fibrinogen, IL-1β, IL-4, and IL-10, but differences were generally small and none of the vaccine titers were different between the groups. Taken together, the study

  4. Spatial and temporal patterns of nature-based tourism interactions with whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Douglas J.; Kobryn, Halina T.; Norman, Brad M.; Bejder, Lars; Tyne, Julian A.; Loneragan, Neil R.

    2014-07-01

    As with other nature-based tourism ventures, whale shark tourism is expanding rapidly worldwide, which highlights the need to understand more about the nature of these activities. Records of interactions between tour operators and whale sharks at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia (22.5°S, 113.5°E) were obtained from the Western Australian Department of Parks and Wildlife from 2006 to 2010 and evaluated to determine the scale of the tourism operations and the spatial and temporal distribution of interactions. The number of whale shark tours at Ningaloo increased by approx. 70% (520-886 tours per year) and the number of interactions with whale sharks by 370% between 2006 (694) and 2010 (3254). The locations of whale shark interactions recorded in logbooks (2006-2009) and electronic monitoring systems (2009 and 2010) were used to plot the smoothed densities of tour operator interactions with whale sharks. Generalised linear models were used to investigate how the presence/absence and number of whale shark interactions at North and South Ningaloo were influenced by the distance to the reef crest, the distance to passages and their interaction terms for the aggregated five-year data set. Over the five years, distance to the reef crest was the best predictor of the presence/absence of whale shark interactions at both North (interactions concentrated within 3 km of the reef crest) and South Ningaloo (interactions within 6 km of the reef crest) followed by distance to passages. The reef passages are very significant areas for tourism interactions with whale sharks at Ningaloo. The distribution of interactions at North and South Ningaloo varied from year to year, particularly in the strong La Niña year of 2010, when average sea surface temperatures remained above 24 °C and whale sharks were observed much later in the year than previously (late August). This study demonstrates the value of the data collected by the tour operators at Ningaloo Reef and managed by a

  5. Interactions between natural-occurring landscape conditions and land use influencing the abundance of riverine smallmouth bass, micropterus dolomieu

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, S.K.; Rabeni, C.F.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined how interactions between natural landscape features and land use influenced the abundance of smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu, in Missouri, USA, streams. Stream segments were placed into one of four groups based on natural-occurring watershed characteristics (soil texture and soil permeability) predicted to relate to smallmouth bass abundance. Within each group, stream segments were assigned forest (n = 3), pasture (n = 3), or urban (n = 3) designations based on the percentages of land use within each watershed. Analyses of variance indicated smallmouth bass densities differed between land use and natural conditions. Decision tree models indicated abundance was highest in forested stream segments and lowest in urban stream segments, regardless of group designation. Land use explained the most variation in decision tree models, but in-channel features of temperature, flow, and sediment also contributed significantly. These results are unique and indicate the importance of natural-occurring watershed conditions in defining the potential of populations and how finer-scale filters interact with land use to further alter population potential. Smallmouth bass has differing vulnerabilities to land-use attributes, and the better the natural watershed conditions are for population success, the more resilient these populations will be when land conversion occurs.

  6. Modulation of natural killer cell functions by interactions between 2B4 and CD48 in cis and in trans

    PubMed Central

    Claus, Maren; Wingert, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    SLAM-related receptors (SRRs) are important modulators of immune cell function. While most SRRs are homophilic, 2B4 (CD244) interacts with CD48, a GPI-anchored protein expressed on many haematopoietic cells. Here we show that natural killer (NK) cell-expressed 2B4 not only binds in trans to CD48 on neighbouring cells but also interacts in cis with CD48 on the same cell. 2B4 uses the same binding site to interact with CD48 in cis and in trans and structural flexibility of 2B4 is necessary for the cis interaction. Furthermore, the cis interaction is sufficient to induce basal phosphorylation of 2B4. However, cis interaction reduces the ability of 2B4 to bind CD48 in trans. As a consequence, stimulation-dependent phosphorylation of 2B4 upon binding to CD48 positive target cells is reduced. Interfering with the cis interaction therefore enhanced the lysis of CD48-expressing tumour cells. These data show that the density of 2B4 and CD48 on both the NK cell and the potential target cell modulates NK cell activity. PMID:27249817

  7. Rethinking the history of modern agriculture: British pig production, c.1910-65.

    PubMed

    Woods, Abigail

    2012-01-01

    This article uses a study of pig production in Britain, c.1910-65, to rethink the history of modern agriculture and its implications for human-animal relationships. Drawing on literature written by and for pig producers and experts, it challenges existing portrayals of a unidirectional, post-Second World War shift from traditional small-scale mixed farming to large, specialized, intensive systems. Rather, 'factory-style' pig production was already established in Britain by the 1930s, and its fortunes waxed and waned over time in relation to different kinds of outdoor production, which was still prominent in the mid-1960s. In revealing that the progressive proponents of both indoor and outdoor methods regarded them as modern and efficient, but defined and pursued these values in quite different ways, the article argues for a more historically situated understanding of agricultural modernity. Analysis reveals that regardless of their preferred production system, leading experts and producers were keen to develop what they considered to be natural methods that reflected the pig's natural needs and desires. They perceived pigs as active, sentient individuals, and believed that working in harmony with their natures was essential, even if this was, ultimately, for commercial ends. Such views contradict received accounts of modern farming as a utilitarian enterprise, concerned only with dominating and manipulating nature. They are used to argue that a romantic, moral view of the pig did not simply pre-date or emerge in opposition to modern agriculture, but, rather, was integral to it. PMID:23045887

  8. Interactive Perceptual Psychology: The Human Psychology That Mirrors the Naturalness of Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gary F.; Shoare, Linda

    This study presents results of research on the impact of Interactive Perceptual Psychology (IPP) on teachers. IPP is the psychology showing human behavior as the sum of internal energy derived from thinking, feeling, and acting. This energy comes from the interaction among 10 receptors found within each human being: (1) "man's" will; (2) internal…

  9. Utilization of mutants to analyze the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana and its naturally root-associated Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Persello-Cartieaux, F; David, P; Sarrobert, C; Thibaud, M C; Achouak, W; Robaglia, C; Nussaume, L

    2001-01-01

    A model system based on the Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Ws ecotype and its naturally colonizing Pseudomonas thivervalensis rhizobacteria was defined. Pseudomonas strains colonizing A. thaliana were found to modify the root architecture either in vivo or in vitro. A gnotobiotic system using bacteria labelled with green fluorescent protein revealed that P. thivervalensis exhibited a colonization profile similar to that of other rhizobacterial species. Mutants of A. thaliana affected in root hair development and possible hormone perception were used to analyze the plant genetic determinants of bacterial colonization. A screen for mutants insensitive to P. thivervalensis colonization yielded two mutants found to be auxin resistant. This further supports a proposed role for bacterial auxin in inducing morphological modifications of roots. This work paves the way for studying the interaction between plants and non-pathogenic rhizobacteria in a gnotobiotic system, derived from a natural association, where interactions between both partners can be genetically dissected. PMID:11216839

  10. Humic acids: Characterization and interactions in natural and wastewater systems. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the absorptive and complexation properties of humic and fulvic acids. Characterization and the occurrence of these acids in wastewater systems and natural systems are studied. The interaction of humic substances with metallic pollutants and chlorinated hydrocarbons, and removal of humic acids by precipitation are among the topics discussed. Wastewater treatment processes are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)