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Sample records for reticular calcium release

  1. Calcium release from experimental dental materials.

    PubMed

    Okulus, Zuzanna; Buchwald, Tomasz; Voelkel, Adam

    2016-11-01

    The calcium release from calcium phosphate-containing experimental dental restorative materials was examined. The possible correlation of ion release with initial calcium content, solubility and degree of curing (degree of conversion) of examined materials was also investigated. Calcium release was measured with the use of an ion-selective electrode in an aqueous solution. Solubility was established by the weighing method. Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of the degree of conversion, while initial calcium content was examined with the use of energy-dispersive spectroscopy. For examined materials, the amount of calcium released was found to be positively correlated with solubility and initial calcium content. It was also found that the degree of conversion does not affect the ability of these experimental composites to release calcium ions. PMID:27524015

  2. Dynamics of intrinsic dendritic calcium signaling during tonic firing of thalamic reticular neurons.

    PubMed

    Chausson, Patrick; Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C

    2013-01-01

    The GABAergic neurons of the nucleus reticularis thalami that control the communication between thalamus and cortex are interconnected not only through axo-dendritic synapses but also through gap junctions and dendro-dendritic synapses. It is still unknown whether these dendritic communication processes may be triggered both by the tonic and the T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent high frequency burst firing of action potentials displayed by nucleus reticularis neurons during wakefulness and sleep, respectively. Indeed, while it is known that activation of T-type Ca(2+) channels actively propagates throughout the dendritic tree, it is still unclear whether tonic action potential firing can also invade the dendritic arborization. Here, using two-photon microscopy, we demonstrated that dendritic Ca(2+) responses following somatically evoked action potentials that mimic wake-related tonic firing are detected throughout the dendritic arborization. Calcium influx temporally summates to produce dendritic Ca(2+) accumulations that are linearly related to the duration of the action potential trains. Increasing the firing frequency facilitates Ca(2+) influx in the proximal but not in the distal dendritic compartments suggesting that the dendritic arborization acts as a low-pass filter in respect to the back-propagating action potentials. In the more distal compartment of the dendritic tree, T-type Ca(2+) channels play a crucial role in the action potential triggered Ca(2+) influx suggesting that this Ca(2+) influx may be controlled by slight changes in the local dendritic membrane potential that determine the T-type channels' availability. We conclude that by mediating Ca(2+) dynamic in the whole dendritic arborization, both tonic and burst firing of the nucleus reticularis thalami neurons might control their dendro-dendritic and electrical communications. PMID:23991078

  3. Modulation of GABA release from the thalamic reticular nucleus by cocaine and caffeine: role of serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Goitia, Belén; Rivero-Echeto, María Celeste; Weisstaub, Noelia V; Gingrich, Jay A; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Bisagno, Verónica; Urbano, Francisco J

    2016-02-01

    Serotonin receptors are targets of drug therapies for a variety of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Cocaine inhibits the re-uptake of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine, and noradrenaline, whereas caffeine blocks adenosine receptors and opens ryanodine receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum. We studied how 5-HT and adenosine affected spontaneous GABAergic transmission from thalamic reticular nucleus. We combined whole-cell patch clamp recordings of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSCs) in ventrobasal thalamic neurons during local (puff) application of 5-HT in wild type (WT) or knockout mice lacking 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A -/-). Inhibition of mIPSCs frequency by low (10 μM) and high (100 μM) 5-HT concentrations was observed in ventrobasal neurons from 5-HT2A -/- mice. In WT mice, only 100 μM 5-HT significantly reduced mIPSCs frequency. In 5-HT2A -/- mice, NAN-190, a specific 5-HT1A antagonist, prevented the 100 μM 5-HT inhibition while blocking H-currents that prolonged inhibition during post-puff periods. The inhibitory effects of 100 μM 5-HT were enhanced in cocaine binge-treated 5-HT2A -/- mice. Caffeine binge treatment did not affect 5-HT-mediated inhibition. Our findings suggest that both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are present in pre-synaptic thalamic reticular nucleus terminals. Serotonergic-mediated inhibition of GABA release could underlie aberrant thalamocortical physiology described after repetitive consumption of cocaine. Our findings suggest that both 5-HT1A , 5-HT2A and A1 receptors are present in pre-synaptic TRN terminals. 5-HT1A and A1 receptors would down-regulate adenylate cyclase, whereas 5-HT1A would also increase the probability of the opening of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRK). Sustained opening of GIRK channels would hyperpolarize pre-synaptic terminals activating H-currents, resulting in less GABA release. 5-HT2A -would activate PLC and IP3 , increasing intracellular [Ca(2+) ] and

  4. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. PMID:26613410

  5. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  6. Adenosine A1 Receptors in Mouse Pontine Reticular Formation Depress Breathing, Increase Anesthesia Recovery Time, and Decrease Acetylcholine Release

    PubMed Central

    Gettys, George C.; Liu, Fang; Kimlin, Ed; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical and preclinical data demonstrate the analgesic actions of adenosine. Central administration of adenosine agonists, however, suppresses arousal and breathing by poorly understood mechanisms. This study tested the two-tailed hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of C57BL/6J mice modulate breathing, behavioral arousal, and PRF acetylcholine release. Methods Three sets of experiments used 51 mice. First, breathing was measured by plethysmography after PRF microinjection of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-sulfophenyl adenosine (SPA) or saline. Second, mice were anesthetized with isoflurane and time to recovery of righting response (RoRR) was quantified after PRF microinjection of SPA or saline. Third, acetylcholine release in the PRF was measured before and during microdialysis delivery of SPA, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX), or SPA and DPCPX. Results First, SPA significantly decreased respiratory rate (−18%), tidal volume (−12%) and minute ventilation (−16%). Second, SPA concentration accounted for 76% of the variance in RoRR. Third, SPA concentration accounted for a significant amount of the variance in acetylcholine release (52%), RoRR (98%), and breathing rate (86%). DPCPX alone caused a concentration-dependent increase in acetylcholine, decrease in RoRR, and decrease in breathing rate. Coadministration of SPA and DPCPX blocked the SPA-induced decrease in acetylcholine and increase in RoRR. Conclusions Endogenous adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors in the PRF modulates breathing, behavioral arousal, and acetylcholine release. The results support the interpretation that an adenosinergic-cholinergic interaction within the PRF comprises one neurochemical mechanism underlying the wakefulness stimulus for breathing. PMID:23263018

  7. Mastoparan binds to glycogen phosphorylase to regulate sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Yutaka; Atsumi, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2003-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor, a Ca(2+)-releasing channel in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), plays an important role in the excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal muscle. In a previous study [Hirata, Nakahata and Ohizumi (2000) Mol. Pharmacol. 57, 1235-1242], we reported that mastoparan caused Ca(2+) release through ryanodine receptor from the heavy fraction of SR (HSR) isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle, and that it specifically bound to a 97 kDa protein which was distinct from Ca(2+)-pump or triadin. The present study was undertaken to identify and characterize the 97 kDa mastoparan-binding protein. The 97 kDa protein was purified from solubilized HSR by DEAE-Sepharose column chromatography and preparative SDS/PAGE. The partial amino acid sequence of the purified 97 kDa protein was matched with that of glycogen phosphorylase (GP). The proteolytic cleavage pattern of the 97 kDa protein was identical with that of GP. Furthermore, [(125)I-Tyr(3)]mastoparan specifically bound to GP. Interestingly, mastoparan-induced Ca(2+) release was inhibited by exogenous addition of GP-a, and mastoparan dissociated GP from HSR. These results indicate that the 97 kDa mastoparan-binding protein is GP, which negatively regulates Ca(2+) release from HSR. There may be a functional cross-talk between Ca(2+) release from HSR and glycogenolysis for energy supply mediated through GP in skeletal muscles. PMID:12519071

  8. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  9. Calcium release-activated calcium current in rat mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hoth, M; Penner, R

    1993-06-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of membrane currents and fura-2 measurements of free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were used to study the biophysical properties of a calcium current activated by depletion of intracellular calcium stores in rat peritoneal mast cells. 2. Calcium influx through an inward calcium release-activated calcium current (ICRAC) was induced by three independent mechanisms that result in store depletion: intracellular infusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) or extracellular application of ionomycin (active depletion), and intracellular infusion of calcium chelators (ethylene glycol bis-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)) to prevent reuptake of leaked-out calcium into the stores (passive depletion). 3. The activation of ICRAC induced by active store depletion has a short delay (4-14 s) following intracellular infusion of InsP3 or extracellular application of ionomycin. It has a monoexponential time course with a time constant of 20-30 s and, depending on the complementary Ca2+ buffer, a mean normalized amplitude (at 0 mV) of 0.6 pA pF-1 (with EGTA) and 1.1 pA pF-1 (with BAPTA). 4. After full activation of ICRAC by InsP3 in the presence of EGTA (10 mM), hyperpolarizing pulses to -100 mV induced an instantaneous inward current that decayed by 64% within 50 ms. This inactivation is probably mediated by [Ca2+]i, since the decrease of inward current in the presence of the fast Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (10 mM) was only 30%. 5. The amplitude of ICRAC was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 3.3 mM. Inward currents were nonsaturating up to -200 mV. 6. The selectivity of ICRAC for Ca2+ was assessed by using fura-2 as the dominant intracellular buffer (at a concentration of 2 mM) and relating the absolute changes in the calcium-sensitive fluorescence (390 nm excitation) with the calcium current integral

  10. The control of calcium release in heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Cannell, M B; Cheng, H; Lederer, W J

    1995-05-19

    The control of calcium release from intracellular stores (the sarcoplasmic reticulum) in cardiac muscle was examined with the use of a confocal microscope and voltage clamp techniques. Depolarization evoked graded calcium release by altering the extent of spatial and temporal summation of elementary calcium release events called "calcium sparks." These evoked sparks were triggered by local L-type calcium channel currents in a stochastic manner, were similar at different potentials, and resembled spontaneous calcium sparks. Once triggered, the calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during a calcium spark was independent of the duration of the triggering calcium influx. These results were used to develop a unifying model for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling that explains the large (but paradoxically stable) amplification of the trigger calcium influx by a combination of digital and analog behavior. PMID:7754384

  11. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  12. The calcium-binding protein parvalbumin modulates the firing 1 properties of the reticular thalamic nucleus bursting neurons.

    PubMed

    Albéri, Lavinia; Lintas, Alessandra; Kretz, Robert; Schwaller, Beat; Villa, Alessandro E P

    2013-06-01

    The reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) of the mouse is characterized by an overwhelming majority of GABAergic neurons receiving afferences from both the thalamus and the cerebral cortex and sending projections mainly on thalamocortical neurons. The RTN neurons express high levels of the "slow Ca(2+) buffer" parvalbumin (PV) and are characterized by low-threshold Ca(2+) currents, I(T). We performed extracellular recordings in ketamine/xylazine anesthetized mice in the rostromedial portion of the RTN. In the RTN of wild-type and PV knockout (PVKO) mice we distinguished four types of neurons characterized on the basis of their firing pattern: irregular firing (type I), medium bursting (type II), long bursting (type III), and tonically firing (type IV). Compared with wild-type mice, we observed in the PVKOs the medium bursting (type II) more frequently than the long bursting type and longer interspike intervals within the burst without affecting the number of spikes. This suggests that PV may affect the firing properties of RTN neurons via a mechanism associated with the kinetics of burst discharges. Ca(v)3.2 channels, which mediate the I(T) currents, were more localized to the somatic plasma membrane of RTN neurons in PVKO mice, whereas Ca(v)3.3 expression was similar in both genotypes. The immunoelectron microscopy analysis showed that Ca(v)3.2 channels were localized at active axosomatic synapses, thus suggesting that the differential localization of Ca(v)3.2 in the PVKOs may affect bursting dynamics. Cross-correlation analysis of simultaneously recorded neurons from the same electrode tip showed that about one-third of the cell pairs tended to fire synchronously in both genotypes, independent of PV expression. In summary, PV deficiency does not affect the functional connectivity between RTN neurons but affects the distribution of Ca(v)3.2 channels and the dynamics of burst discharges of RTN cells, which in turn regulate the activity in the thalamocortical circuit

  13. Lactococcus lactis release from calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, C P; Gaudy, C; Poncelet, D; Neufeld, R J

    1992-01-01

    Cell release during milk fermentation by Lactococcus lactis immobilized in calcium alginate beads was examined. Numbers of free cells in the milk gradually increased from 1 x 10(6) to 3 x 10(7) CFU/ml upon successive reutilization of the beads. Rinsing the beads between fermentations did not influence the numbers of free cells in the milk. Cell release was not affected by initial cell density within the beads or by alginate concentration, although higher acidification rates were achieved with increased cell loading. Coating alginate beads with poly-L-lysine (PLL) did not significantly reduce the release of cells during five consecutive fermentations. A double coating of PLL and alginate reduced cell release by a factor of approximately 50. However, acidification of milk with beads having the PLL-alginate coating was slower than that with uncoated beads. Immersing the beads in ethanol to kill cells on the periphery reduced cell release, but acidification activity was maintained. Dipping the beads in aluminum nitrate or a hot CaCl2 solution was not as effective as dipping them in ethanol. Ethanol treatment or heating of the beads appears to be a promising method for maintaining acidification activity while minimizing viable cell release due to loosely entrapped cells near the surface of the alginate beads. PMID:1622208

  14. Differential effects of sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibition on charge movements and calcium transients in intact amphibian skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sangeeta; Skepper, Jeremy N; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2002-03-15

    A hypothesis in which intramembrane charge reflects a voltage sensing process allosterically coupled to transitions in ryanodine receptor (RyR)-Ca(2+) release channels as opposed to one driven by release of intracellularly stored Ca(2+) would predict that such charging phenomena should persist in skeletal muscle fibres unable to release stored Ca(2+). Charge movement components were accordingly investigated in intact voltage-clamped amphibian fibres treated with known sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors. Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) pretreatment abolished Ca(2+) transients in fluo-3-loaded fibres following even prolonged applications of caffeine (10 mM) or K(+) (122 mM). Both CPA and thapsigargin (TG) transformed charge movements that included delayed (q(gamma)) "hump" components into simpler decays. However, steady-state charge-voltage characteristics were conserved to values (maximum charge, Q(max) approximately equal to 20-25 nC microF(-1); transition voltage, V* approximately equal to -40 to-50 mV; steepness factor, k approximately equal to 6-9 mV; holding voltage -90 mV) indicating persistent q(gamma) charge. The features of charge inactivation similarly suggested persistent q(beta) and q(gamma) charge contributions in CPA-treated fibres. Perchlorate (8.0 mM) restored the delayed kinetics shown by "on" q(gamma) charge movements, prolonged their "off" decays, conserved both Q(max) and k, yet failed to restore the capacity of such CPA-treated fibres for Ca(2+) release. Introduction of perchlorate (8.0 mM) or caffeine (0.2 mM) to tetracaine (2.0 mM)-treated fibres, also known to restore q(gamma) charge, similarly failed to restore Ca(2+) transients. Steady-state intramembrane q(gamma) charge thus persists with modified kinetics that can be restored to its normally complex waveform by perchlorate, even in intact muscle fibres unable to release Ca(2+). It is thus unlikely that q(gamma) charge movement is a consequence of SR Ca(2+) release rather than

  15. Structural aspects of calcium-release activated calcium channel function

    PubMed Central

    Stathopulos, Peter B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca2+) entry is the process by which molecules located on the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) respond to decreased luminal Ca2+ levels by signaling Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC) channels to open on the plasma membrane (PM). This activation of PM CRAC channels provides a sustained cytosolic Ca2+ elevation associated with myriad physiological processes. The identities of the molecules which mediate SOCE include stromal interaction molecules (STIMs), functioning as the ER/SR luminal Ca2+ sensors, and Orai proteins, forming the PM CRAC channels. This review examines the current available high-resolution structural information on these CRAC molecular components with particular focus on the solution structures of the luminal STIM Ca2+ sensing domains, the crystal structures of cytosolic STIM fragments, a closed Orai hexameric crystal structure and a structure of an Orai1 N-terminal fragment in complex with calmodulin. The accessible structural data are discussed in terms of potential mechanisms of action and cohesiveness with functional observations. PMID:24213636

  16. Voltage-gated and calcium-gated calcium release during depolarization of skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemond, V; Csernoch, L; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1991-01-01

    The role of elevated intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) in activating calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied in skeletal muscle fibers microinjected with strong calcium buffers. After the injection of 3.8 +/- 0.5 mM (mean +/- S.E. of mean, n = 16) BAPTA (1,2-bis[o-aminophenoxy]ethane- N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) or 2.2-2.8 mM fura-2 the normal increase in [Ca2+] during a depolarizing pulse was virtually eliminated. Even though calcium was released from the SR the kinetics of this release were markedly altered: the extensive buffering selectively eliminated the early peak component of SR calcium release with no effect on the maintained steady level. Microinjections of similar volumes but with low concentrations of fura-2 had no significant effect on the release waveform. The calcium released by voltage-dependent activation during depolarization may thus be involved in activating further calcium release, that is, in a calcium-induced calcium release mechanism. PMID:1660317

  17. Nitric Oxide-Induced Calcium Release: Activation of Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor, a Calcium Release Channel, through Non-Enzymatic Post-Translational Modification by Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Sho

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a typical gaseous messenger involved in a wide range of biological processes. In our classical knowledge, effects of NO are largely achieved by activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase to form cyclic guanosine-3′, 5′-monophosphate. However, emerging evidences have suggested another signaling mechanism mediated by NO: “S-nitrosylation” of target proteins. S-nitrosylation is a covalent addition of an NO group to a cysteine thiol/sulfhydryl (RSH), and categorized into non-enzymatic post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins, contrasted to enzymatic PTM of proteins, such as phosphorylation mediated by various protein kinases. Very recently, we found novel intracellular calcium (Ca2+) mobilizing mechanism, NO-induced Ca2+ release (NICR) in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is mediated by type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), a Ca2+ release channel expressed in endoplasmic-reticular membrane. Furthermore, NICR is indicated to be dependent on S-nitrosylation of RyR1, and involved in synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum. In this review, molecular mechanisms and functional significance of NICR, as well as non-enzymatic PTM of proteins by gaseous signals, are described. PMID:24130553

  18. Depletion of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during calcium release in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M F; Simon, B J; Szucs, G

    1987-11-01

    1. Free intracellular calcium transients (delta[Ca2+] were monitored in cut segments of frog skeletal muscle fibres voltage clamped in a double Vaseline-gap chamber and stretched to sarcomere lengths that eliminated fibre movement. The measured calcium transients were used to calculate the rate of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.) as previously described (Melzer, Rios & Schneider, 1984, 1987). 2. Conditioning pulses were found to suppress the rate of calcium release in test pulses applied after the conditioning pulse. Various combinations of conditioning and test pulses were used to investigate the basis of the suppression of calcium release by the conditioning pulse. 3. Using a constant test pulse applied at varying intervals after a constant conditioning pulse, recovery from suppression of release was found to occur in two phases. During the fast phase of recovery, which was completed within about 1 s, the rate of calcium release was smaller and had a different wave form than the unconditioned control release. The early peak in release that is characteristic of the control release wave form was absent or depressed. During the slow phase of recovery, which required about 1 min for completion, the release wave form was the same as control but was simply scaled down compared to the control. 4. Conditioning pulses also slowed the rate of decay of delta[Ca2+] after a constant test pulse, probably due to an increased occupancy by calcium of slowly equilibrating myoplasmic sites that bind some of the calcium released by the conditioning pulse. Since calcium binding to these sites contributes to the decay of delta[Ca2+], their increased occupancy would slow the decay of delta[Ca2+] following the test pulse. This effect was used to estimate the calcium occupancy of the slowly equilibrating sites. 5. Comparison of the time course of the slow recovery from suppression of release following a constant conditioning pulse with the time course of the loss of

  19. Coupled gating between cardiac calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors).

    PubMed

    Marx, S O; Gaburjakova, J; Gaburjakova, M; Henrikson, C; Ondrias, K; Marks, A R

    2001-06-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling in heart muscle requires the activation of Ca(2+)-release channels/type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) by Ca(2+) influx. RyR2s are arranged on the sarcoplasmic reticular membrane in closely packed arrays such that their large cytoplasmic domains contact one another. We now show that multiple RyR2s can be isolated under conditions such that they remain physically coupled to one another. When these coupled channels are examined in planar lipid bilayers, multiple channels exhibit simultaneous gating, termed "coupled gating." Removal of the regulatory subunit, the FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6), functionally but not physically uncouples multiple RyR2 channels. Coupled gating between RyR2 channels may be an important regulatory mechanism in excitation-contraction coupling as well as in other signaling pathways involving intracellular Ca(2+) release. PMID:11397781

  20. Releasing effects in flame photometry: Determination of calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinnin, J.I.

    1960-01-01

    Strontium, lanthanum, neodymium, samarium, and yttrium completely release the flame emission of calcium from the depressive effects of sulfate, phosphate, and aluminate. Magnesium, beryllium, barium, and scandium release most of the calcium emission. These cations, when present in high concentration, preferentially form compounds with the depressing anions when the solution is evaporated rapidly in the flame. The mechanism of the interference and releasing effects is explained on the basis of the chemical equilibria in the evaporating droplets of solution and is shown to depend upon the nature of the compounds present in the aqueous phase of the solution. The need for background correction techniques is stressed. The releasing effect is used in the determination of calcium in silicate rocks without the need for separations.

  1. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs), located in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) membrane, are required for intracellular Ca2+ release that is involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In addition to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac cells and voltage-induced Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle cells, we recently identified another mode of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization mediated by RyR, i.e., nitric oxide-induced Ca2+ release (NICR), in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is evoked by neuronal activity, is dependent on S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) and is involved in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of cerebellar synapses. In this addendum, we examined whether peroxynitrite, which is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide, may also have an effect on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 and the cerebellar LTP. We found that scavengers of peroxynitrite have no significant effect either on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 or on the cerebellar LTP. We also found that an application of a high concentration of peroxynitrite does not reproduce neuronal activity-dependent Ca2+ release in Purkinje cells. These results support that NICR is induced by endogenous nitric oxide produced by neuronal activity through S-nitrosylation of RyR1. PMID:23247505

  2. Neurotensin effect on dopamine release and calcium transport in rat striatum: interactions with diphenylalkylamine calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Battaini, F; Govoni, S; Di Giovine, S; Trabucchi, M

    1986-03-01

    The release of dopamine was investigated in rat striatal slices exposed in vitro to neurotensin. This peptide increased basal and K+-evoked dopamine release. Moreover neurotensin antagonized the flunarizine-induced inhibition of K+-stimulated dopamine release. The K+-evoked 45Ca2+ accumulation was also inhibited by flunarizine. This effect was antagonized by neurotensin. The results suggest that dopamine release in rat striatum is regulated by different molecular events also of peptidergic nature having as possible mechanism of action an influence on calcium ion movements. PMID:3713871

  3. Integrated Luminal and Cytosolic Aspects of the Calcium Release Control

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Irina

    2003-01-01

    We propose here a unitary approach to the luminal and cytosolic control of calcium release. A minimal number of model elements that realistically describe different data sets are combined and adapted to correctly respond to various physiological constraints. We couple the kinetic properties of the inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptor/calcium channel with the dynamics of Ca2+ and K+ in both the lumen and cytosol, and by using a detailed simulation approach, we propose that local (on a radial distance ∼2 μm) calcium oscillations in permeabilized cells are driven by the slow inactivation of channels organized in discrete clusters composed of between six and 15 channels. Moreover, the character of these oscillations is found to be extremely sensitive to K+, so that the cytosolic and luminal calcium variations are in or out of phase if the store at equilibrium has tens or hundreds μM Ca2+, respectively, depending on the K+ gradient across the reticulum membrane. Different patterns of calcium signals can be reproduced through variation of only a few parameters. PMID:12609854

  4. Drug Release from Calcium Sulfate-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Bryan R.; Hilt, J. Zach; Puleo, David A.

    2015-01-01

    To help reduce the need for autografts, calcium sulfate-based bone graft substitutes are being developed to provide a stable platform to aid augmentation while having the ability to release a broad range of bioactive agents. Calcium sulfate (CS) has an excellent reputation as a biocompatible and osteoconductive substance, but addition of bioactive agents may further enhance these properties. Samples were produced with either directly loaded small, hydrophobic molecule (i.e., simvastatin), directly loaded hydrophilic protein (i.e., lysozyme), or 1 and 10 wt% of H6 poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) particles containing protein. Whereas sustained release of directly loaded simvastatin was achieved, direct loading of small amounts of lysozyme resulted in highly variable release. Direct loading of a larger amount of protein generated a large burst, 65% of total loading, followed by sustained release of protein. Release of lysozyme from 1 wt% PBAE particles embedded into CS was more controllable than when directly loaded, and for 10 wt% of protein-loaded PBAE particles, a higher burst was followed by sustained release, comparable to the results for the high direct loading. Compression testing determined that incorporation of directly loaded drug or drug-loaded PBAE particles weakened CS. In particular, PBAE particles had a significant effect on the strength of the composites, with a 25% and 80% decrease in strength for 1 wt% and 10 wt% particle loadings, respectively. CS-based composites demonstrated the ability to sustainably release both macromolecules and small molecules, supporting the potential for these materials to release a range of therapeutic agents. PMID:24788686

  5. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26878172

  6. Duramycin-induced calcium release in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Laura J; Crow, Chris; Maraveyas, Anthony; Madden, Leigh A

    2016-03-01

    Duramycin, through binding with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), has shown potential to be an effective antitumour agent. However, its mode of action in relation to tumour cells is not fully understood. PE expression on the surface of a panel of cancer cell lines was analysed using duramycin and subsequent antibody labelling, and then analysed by flow cytometry. Cell viability was also assessed by flow cytometry using annexin V and propidium iodide. Calcium ion (Ca) release by tumour cells in response to duramycin was determined by spectrofluorometry following incubation with Fluo-3, AM. Confocal microscopy was performed on the cancer cell line AsPC-1 to assess real-time cell response to duramycin treatment. Duramycin could detect cell surface PE expression on all 15 cancer cell lines screened, which was shown to be duramycin concentration dependent. However, higher concentrations induced necrotic cell death. Duramycin induced calcium ion (Ca) release from the cancer cell lines also in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner. Confocal microscopy showed an influx of propidium iodide into the cells over time and induced morphological changes. Duramycin induces Ca release from cancer cell lines in a time-dependent and concentration-dependent manner. PMID:26512767

  7. Prolonged calcium influx after termination of light-induced calcium release in invertebrate photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Nasi, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    In microvillar photoreceptors, light stimulates the phospholipase C cascade and triggers an elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ that is essential for the regulation of both visual excitation and sensory adaptation. In some organisms, influx through light-activated ion channels contributes to the Ca2+ increase. In contrast, in other species, such as Lima, Ca2+ is initially only released from an intracellular pool, as the light-sensitive conductance is negligibly permeable to calcium ions. As a consequence, coping with sustained stimulation poses a challenge, requiring an alternative pathway for further calcium mobilization. We observed that after bright or prolonged illumination, the receptor potential of Lima photoreceptors is followed by the gradual development of an after-depolarization that decays in 1–4 minutes. Under voltage clamp, a graded, slow inward current (Islow) can be reproducibly elicited by flashes that saturate the photocurrent, and can reach a peak amplitude in excess of 200 pA. Islow obtains after replacing extracellular Na+ with Li+, guanidinium, or N-methyl-d-glucamine, indicating that it does not reflect the activation of an electrogenic Na/Ca exchange mechanism. An increase in membrane conductance accompanies the slow current. Islow is impervious to anion replacements and can be measured with extracellular Ca2+ as the sole permeant species; Ba can substitute for Ca2+ but Mg2+ cannot. A persistent Ca2+ elevation parallels Islow, when no further internal release takes place. Thus, this slow current could contribute to sustained Ca2+ mobilization and the concomitant regulation of the phototransduction machinery. Although reminiscent of the classical store depletion–operated calcium influx described in other cells, Islow appears to diverge in some significant aspects, such as its large size and insensitivity to SKF96365 and lanthanum; therefore, it may reflect an alternative mechanism for prolonged increase of cytosolic calcium in photoreceptors. PMID

  8. The removal of myoplasmic free calcium following calcium release in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, W; Ríos, E; Schneider, M F

    1986-01-01

    +] after pulses of various amplitudes and durations in a given fibre. The basic procedure was to track delta [Ca2+] during each pulse when an undetermined calcium release was occurring, but to calculate the decay of delta [Ca2+] starting 14 ms after repolarization when release was assumed to be negligible. After appropriate selection of parameter values, the model reproduced most aspects of the decay of delta [Ca2+].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3487641

  9. Superresolution Modeling of Calcium Release in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mark A.; Williams, George S.B.; Kohl, Tobias; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Jafri, M. Saleet; Greenstein, Joseph L.; Lederer, W.J.; Winslow, Raimond L.

    2014-01-01

    Stable calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is critical for maintaining normal cellular contraction during cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. The fundamental element of CICR in the heart is the calcium (Ca2+) spark, which arises from a cluster of ryanodine receptors (RyR). Opening of these RyR clusters is triggered to produce a local, regenerative release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The Ca2+ leak out of the SR is an important process for cellular Ca2+ management, and it is critically influenced by spark fidelity, i.e., the probability that a spontaneous RyR opening triggers a Ca2+ spark. Here, we present a detailed, three-dimensional model of a cardiac Ca2+ release unit that incorporates diffusion, intracellular buffering systems, and stochastically gated ion channels. The model exhibits realistic Ca2+ sparks and robust Ca2+ spark termination across a wide range of geometries and conditions. Furthermore, the model captures the details of Ca2+ spark and nonspark-based SR Ca2+ leak, and it produces normal excitation-contraction coupling gain. We show that SR luminal Ca2+-dependent regulation of the RyR is not critical for spark termination, but it can explain the exponential rise in the SR Ca2+ leak-load relationship demonstrated in previous experimental work. Perturbations to subspace dimensions, which have been observed in experimental models of disease, strongly alter Ca2+ spark dynamics. In addition, we find that the structure of RyR clusters also influences Ca2+ release properties due to variations in inter-RyR coupling via local subspace Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]ss). These results are illustrated for RyR clusters based on super-resolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy. Finally, we present a believed-novel approach by which the spark fidelity of a RyR cluster can be predicted from structural information of the cluster using the maximum eigenvalue of its adjacency matrix. These results provide critical insights into CICR

  10. Tailored Sequential Drug Release from Bilayered Calcium Sulfate Composites

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Bryan R.; Puleo, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The current standard for treating infected bony defects, such as those caused by periodontal disease, requires multiple time-consuming steps and often multiple procedures to fight the infection and recover lost tissue. Releasing an antibiotic followed by an osteogenic agent from a synthetic bone graft substitute could allow for a streamlined treatment, reducing the need for multiple surgeries and thereby shortening recovery time. Tailorable bilayered calcium sulfate (CS) bone graft substitutes were developed with the ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutic agents. Bilayered composite samples having a shell and core geometry were fabricated with varying amounts (1 or 10 wt%) of metronidazole-loaded poly poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles embedded in the shell and simvastatin directly loaded into either the shell, core, or both. Microcomputed tomography (MicroCT) images showed the overall layered geometry as well as homogenous distribution of PLGA within the shells. Dissolution studies demonstrated that the amount of PLGA particles (i.e., 1 vs. 10 wt%) had a small but significant effect on the erosion rate (3% vs. 3.4% per day). Mechanical testing determined that introducing a layered geometry had a significant effect on the compressive strength, with an average reduction of 35%, but properties were comparable to mandibular trabecular bone. Sustained release of simvastatin directly loaded into CS demonstrated that changing the shell to core volume ratio dictates the duration of drug release from each layer. When loaded together in the shell or in separate layers, sequential release of metronidazole and simvastatin was achieved. By introducing a tunable layered geometry capable of releasing multiple drugs, CS-based bone graft substitutes could be tailored in order to help streamline multiple steps needed to regenerate tissue in infected defects. PMID:25175211

  11. Localised calcium release events in cells from the muscle of guinea-pig gastric fundus

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, S P; Bolton, T B

    2004-01-01

    After enzymatic dispersion of the muscle of the guinea-pig gastric fundus, single elongated cells were observed which differed from archetypal smooth muscle cells due to their knurled, tuberose or otherwise irregular surface morphology. These, but not archetypal smooth muscle cells, consistently displayed spontaneous localized (i.e. non-propagating) intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) release events. Such calcium events were novel in their magnitude and kinetic profiles. They included short transient events, plateau events and events which coalesced spatially or temporally (compound events). Quantitative analysis of the events with an automatic detection programme showed that their spatio-temporal characteristics (full width and full duration at half-maximum amplitude) were approximately exponentially distributed. Their amplitude distribution suggested the presence of two release modes. Carbachol application caused an initial cell-wide calcium transient followed by an increase in localized calcium release events. Pharmacological analysis suggested that localized calcium release was largely dependent on external calcium entry acting on both inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) to release stored calcium. Nominally calcium-free external solution immediately and reversibly abolished all localized calcium release without blocking the initial transient calcium release response to carbachol. This was inhibited by 2-APB (100 μm), ryanodine (10 or 50 μm) or U-73122 (1 μm). 2-APB (100 μm), xestospongin C (XeC, 10 μm) or U-73122 (1 μm) blocked both spontaneous localized calcium release and localized release stimulated by 10 μm carbachol. Ryanodine (50 μm) also inhibited spontaneous release, but enhanced localized release in response to carbachol. This study represents the first characterization of localized calcium release events in cells from the gastric fundus. PMID:14608011

  12. Effect of calcium concentration, hardening agent and drying condition on release characteristics of oral proteins from calcium pectinate gel beads.

    PubMed

    Sriamornsak, P

    1999-07-01

    Pectin has been investigated for its ability to produce solid calcium pectinate gel (CPG) beads containing bovine serum albumin (BSA). Several factors can influence the properties and release characteristics of the CPG beads. In this study, the effect of calcium concentration, hardening agent and drying condition on the encapsulation and release characteristics of BSA from the matrix gel beads made of calcium pectinate were studied. BSA release studies under conditions mimicking mouth to colon transit have shown that calcium pectinate protects the drug from being released completely in the physiological environment of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and is susceptible to the enzymatic action with consequent drug release. In addition, the release of BSA from CPG beads was strongly affected by calcium concentration and drying condition. However, the release was not particularly affected by the presence of hardening agent at the concentration of 1% or lower. Since the release of BSA as a model protein drug could be controlled by the regulation of the preparation conditions of CPG beads, the CPG beads may be used for a potential oral controlled release system for protein drugs. PMID:10379045

  13. Air bubble contact with endothelial cells in vitro induces calcium influx and IP3-dependent release of calcium stores

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Klinger, Alexandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Gas embolism is a serious complication of decompression events and clinical procedures, but the mechanism of resulting injury remains unclear. Previous work has demonstrated that contact between air microbubbles and endothelial cells causes a rapid intracellular calcium transient and can lead to cell death. Here we examined the mechanism responsible for the calcium rise. Single air microbubbles (50–150 μm), trapped at the tip of a micropipette, were micromanipulated into contact with individual human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) loaded with Fluo-4 (a fluorescent calcium indicator). Changes in intracellular calcium were then recorded via epifluorescence microscopy. First, we confirmed that HUVECs rapidly respond to air bubble contact with a calcium transient. Next, we examined the involvement of extracellular calcium influx by conducting experiments in low calcium buffer, which markedly attenuated the response, or by pretreating cells with stretch-activated channel blockers (gadolinium chloride or ruthenium red), which abolished the response. Finally, we tested the role of intracellular calcium release by pretreating cells with an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor blocker (xestospongin C) or phospholipase C inhibitor (neomycin sulfate), which eliminated the response in 64% and 67% of cases, respectively. Collectively, our results lead us to conclude that air bubble contact with endothelial cells causes an influx of calcium through a stretch-activated channel, such as a transient receptor potential vanilloid family member, triggering the release of calcium from intracellular stores via the IP3 pathway. PMID:21633077

  14. Cytotoxicity, calcium release, and pH changes generated by novel calcium phosphate cement formulations.

    PubMed

    Khashaba, Rania M; Lockwood, Petra E; Lewis, Jill B; Messer, Regina L; Chutkan, Norman B; Borke, James L

    2010-05-01

    Few published studies describe the biological properties of calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) for dental applications. We measured several biologically relevant properties of 3 CPCs over an extended (8 wk) interval. Monocalcium phosphate, calcium oxide, and synthetic hydroxyapatite were combined with either modified polyacrylic acid, light-activated modified polyalkenoic acid, or 35% w/w polymethyl vinyl ether maleic acid to obtain Types I, II, and III CPCs, respectively. Set cements were placed in direct contact with L929 fibroblasts for up to 8 weeks. Media Ca(+2) and pH were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and pH electrode respectively. Cell mitochondrial function was measured by MTT assay. Type I cements suppressed mitochondrial activity > 90% (vs. Teflon controls), but significantly (p < 0.05) improved to control levels over 8 weeks. Type II cements suppressed mitochondrial activity > 90% at all times. Type III cements elevated mitochondrial activity significantly after 7 wks. The pH profiles approached neutrality by 24 h, and all cements released calcium into the storage medium at all periods (24 h - 8 wk). We concluded that several types of cements had long-term biological profiles that show promise for dental applications. PMID:20235188

  15. Fabrications of zinc-releasing biocement combining zinc calcium phosphate to calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Shinya; Hiasa, Masahiro; Yasue, Akihiro; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Hamada, Kenichi; Asaoka, Kenzo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Recently, zinc-releasing bioceramics have been the focus of much attention owing to their bone-forming ability. Thus, some types of zinc-containing calcium phosphate (e.g., zinc-doped tricalcium phosphate and zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite) are examined and their osteoblastic cell responses determined. In this investigation, we studied the effects of zinc calcium phosphate (ZCP) derived from zinc phosphate incorporated into calcium phosphate cement (CPC) in terms of its setting reaction and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cell responses. Compositional analysis by powder X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that HAP crystals were precipitated in the CPC containing 10 or 30wt% ZCP after successfully hardening. However, the crystal growth observed by scanning electron microscopy was delayed in the presence of additional ZCP. These findings indicate that the additional zinc inhibits crystal growth and the conversion of CPC to the HAP crystals. The proliferation of the cells and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were enhanced when 10wt% ZCP was added to CPC. Taken together, ZCP added CPC at an appropriate fraction has a potent promotional effect on bone substitute biomaterials. PMID:24090874

  16. Detection, Properties, and Frequency of Local Calcium Release from the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum in Teleost Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Tort, Lluis; Benítez, Raul; Hove-Madsen, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) plays a central role in the regulation of cardiac contraction and rhythm in mammals and humans but its role is controversial in teleosts. Since the zebrafish is an emerging model for studies of cardiovascular function and regeneration we here sought to determine if basic features of SR calcium release are phylogenetically conserved. Confocal calcium imaging was used to detect spontaneous calcium release (calcium sparks and waves) from the SR. Calcium sparks were detected in 16 of 38 trout atrial myocytes and 6 of 15 ventricular cells. The spark amplitude was 1.45±0.03 times the baseline fluorescence and the time to half maximal decay of sparks was 27±3 ms. Spark frequency was 0.88 sparks µm−1 min−1 while calcium waves were 8.5 times less frequent. Inhibition of SR calcium uptake reduced the calcium transient (F/F0) from 1.77±0.17 to 1.12±0.18 (p = 0.002) and abolished calcium sparks and waves. Moreover, elevation of extracellular calcium from 2 to 10 mM promoted early and delayed afterdepolarizations (from 0.6±0.3 min−1 to 8.1±2.0 min−1, p = 0.001), demonstrating the ability of SR calcium release to induce afterdepolarizations in the trout heart. Calcium sparks of similar width and duration were also observed in zebrafish ventricular myocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study to consistently report calcium sparks in teleosts and demonstrate that the basic features of calcium release through the ryanodine receptor are conserved, suggesting that teleost cardiac myocytes is a relevant model to study the functional impact of abnormal SR function. PMID:21897853

  17. The Role of Calcium in Lipoprotein Release by the LDL Receptor†

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenze; Michaely, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The LDL receptor (LDLR) mediates efficient endocytosis of VLDL, VLDL remnants and LDL. As part of the uptake process, the LDLR releases lipoproteins in endosomes. Released lipoproteins are subsequently trafficked to lysosomes for degradation, while the LDLR recycles back to the cell surface for further rounds of uptake. Endosomes have at least two features that can promote lipoprotein release: an acidic pH and low concentrations of free calcium. The relative contributions of acidic pH and low free calcium to lipoprotein release are not known. Here, we generated fibroblasts that express either normal LDLR or an LDLR variant that is unable to employ the acid-dependent release mechanism to determine the relative contributions of acidic pH and low free calcium on lipoprotein release. We show that endosomal concentrations of free calcium can drive lipoprotein release at rates that are similar to those of acid-dependent release and that the calcium-dependent and acid-dependent mechanisms can cooperate during lipoprotein release. Assessment of lipoprotein uptake by these two cell lines showed that LDL uptake requires the acid-dependent mechanism, while uptake of the VLDL remnant, β-VLDL, does not. We propose that endosomes use both the acid-dependent and calcium-dependent release mechanisms to drive lipoprotein release and that the acid-dependent process is only required for LDL release. PMID:19583244

  18. Biphasic release of indomethacin from HPMC/pectin/calcium matrix tablet: I. Characterization and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Baojian; Chen, Zhukang; Wei, Xiuli; Sun, Ningyun; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wei

    2007-11-01

    Calcium-induced crosslinking of pectin acts as the dominating factor controlling drug release from pectin-based matrices. The same interaction was employed to modify indomethacin release from HPMC/pectin/calcium matrix in this study. The aim was to characterize the release profiles, and to study the formulation variables and the underlying mechanisms. The matrix tablet was made up of pectin HM 70, calcium chloride and HPMC K4M, and prepared by the wet granulation method. In vitro release was performed in water and characterized by the power law. Matrix erosion was evaluated by studying the weight loss and pectin release. Biphasic release of indomethacin from the HPMC/pectin/calcium matrix tablet was observed, and extraordinary power law exponent n values of over 1.0 were observed. Increase in calcium amount led to more significant retardation on drug release. The two power law parameters, n and K, correlated to the amount of calcium in the matrix. A lag time of over 4 h can be achieved at HPMC/pectin/calcium chloride amount of 100 mg/100 mg/100 mg. Both matrix weight loss and pectin release were linearly correlated to indomethacin release, indicating erosion-controlled drug release mechanisms. The hybrid matrix showed retarded erosion and hydration rate, which served as the basis for retarded indomethacin release. It is concluded that the pectin/calcium interaction can be employed to modify drug release from HPMC/pectin/calcium matrix tablet with biphasic release patterns for potential timed or site-specific drug delivery. PMID:17540549

  19. Microtubule-Dependent Mitochondria Alignment Regulates Calcium Release in Response to Nanomechanical Stimulus in Heart Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Miragoli, Michele; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Bhargava, Anamika; Wright, Peter T; Sikkel, Markus; Schobesberger, Sophie; Diakonov, Ivan; Novak, Pavel; Castaldi, Alessandra; Cattaneo, Paola; Lyon, Alexander R; Lab, Max J; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Arrhythmogenesis during heart failure is a major clinical problem. Regional electrical gradients produce arrhythmias, and cellular ionic transmembrane gradients are its originators. We investigated whether the nanoscale mechanosensitive properties of cardiomyocytes from failing hearts have a bearing upon the initiation of abnormal electrical activity. Hydrojets through a nanopipette indent specific locations on the sarcolemma and initiate intracellular calcium release in both healthy and heart failure cardiomyocytes, as well as in human failing cardiomyocytes. In healthy cells, calcium is locally confined, whereas in failing cardiomyocytes, calcium propagates. Heart failure progressively stiffens the membrane and displaces sub-sarcolemmal mitochondria. Colchicine in healthy cells mimics the failing condition by stiffening the cells, disrupting microtubules, shifting mitochondria, and causing calcium release. Uncoupling the mitochondrial proton gradient abolished calcium initiation in both failing and colchicine-treated cells. We propose the disruption of microtubule-dependent mitochondrial mechanosensor microdomains as a mechanism for abnormal calcium release in failing heart. PMID:26725114

  20. Simulations of intracellular calcium release dynamics in response to a high-intensity, ultrashort electric pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R. P.; Nguyen, A.; Sridhara, V.; Hu, Q.; Nuccitelli, R.; Beebe, S. J.; Kolb, J.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2007-04-01

    Numerical simulations for electrically induced, intracellular calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum are reported. A two-step model is used for self-consistency. Distributed electrical circuit representation coupled with the Smoluchowski equation yields the ER membrane nanoporation for calcium outflow based on a numerical simulation. This is combined with the continuum Li-Rinzel model and drift diffusion for calcium dynamics. Our results are shown to be in agreement with reported calcium release data. A modest increase (rough doubling) of the cellular calcium is predicted in the absence of extra-cellular calcium. In particular, the applied field of 15kV/cm with 60ns pulse duration makes for a strong comparison. No oscillations are predicted and the net recovery period of about 5min are both in agreement with published experimental results. A quantitative explanation for the lack of such oscillatory behavior, based on the density dependent calcium fluxes, is also provided.

  1. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone release by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, L.A.; Yasumoto, T.; Aurbach, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, a toxin derived from a marine dinoflagellate, is a potent activator of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. To further test the hypothesis that inhibition of PTH secretion by calcium is mediated via a calcium channel we studied the effect of maitotoxin on dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Maitotoxin inhibited PTH release in a dose-dependent fashion, and inhibition was maximal at 1 ng/ml. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA blocked the inhibition of PTH by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin enhanced the effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and increased the rate of radiocalcium uptake in parathyroid cells. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that interacts with calcium channels in the parathyroid cell, did not affect the inhibition of PTH secretion by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin, by its action on calcium channels allows entry of extracellular calcium and inhibits PTH release. Our results suggest that calcium channels are involved in the release of PTH. Inhibition of PTH release by maitotoxin is not sensitive to pertussis toxin, suggesting that maitotoxin may act distal to the site interacting with a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, or maitotoxin could interact with other ions or second messengers to inhibit PTH release.

  2. Preparation of TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites with controllable drug release.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunling; Li, Ping; Liu, Yan; Luo, Fei; Xiao, Xiufeng

    2016-10-01

    Nanotube structures such as TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays produced by self-ordering electrochemical anodization have been extensively explored for drug delivery applications. In this study, we presented a new implantable drug delivery system that combined mesoporous calcium silicate coating with nanotube structures to achieve a controllable drug release of water soluble and antiphlogistic drug loxoprofen sodium. The results showed that the TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites were successfully fabricated by a simple template method and the deposition of mesoporous calcium silicate increased with the soaking time. Moreover, the rate of deposition of biological mesoporous calcium silicate on amorphous TNTs was better than that on anatase TNTs. Further, zinc-incorporated mesoporous calcium silicate coating, produced by adding a certain concentration of zinc nitrate into the soaking system, displayed improved chemical stability. A significant improvement in the drug release characteristics with reduced burst release and sustained release was demonstrated. PMID:27287140

  3. Calcium channels in PDGF-stimulated A172 cells open after intracellular calcium release and are not voltage-dependent.

    PubMed

    Szöllösi, J; Feuerstein, B G; Vereb, G; Pershadsingh, H A; Marton, L J

    1991-07-01

    Using laser image cytometry and Indo-1 fluorescence, we investigated the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) of confluent A172 human glioblastoma cells stimulated by the BB homodimer of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). The shape of the calcium transients and the delay time between stimulation and the beginning of the transient varied considerably. The percentage of responsive cells, the peak [Ca2+]i and the duration of the response were directly related to PDGF-BB dose, while the delay time was inversely related; the maximal response occurred at a PDGF-BB concentration of 20 ng/ml. Studies with EGTA and inorganic calcium-channel blockers (Ni2+, La3+) showed that the increase of [Ca2+]i resulted from initial release of intracellular stores and subsequent calcium influx across the plasma membrane. Opening of calcium channels in the plasma membrane, monitored directly by studying Mn2+ quenching of Indo-1 fluorescence, was stimulated by PDGF-BB and blocked by La3+; the opening occurred 55 +/- 10 s after the initial increase in [Ca2+]i. Therefore, in these tumor cells, intracellular release always occurs before channel opening in the plasma membrane. Depolarization of cells with high extracellular [K+] did not generally induce calcium transients but did decrease calcium influx. L-type calcium-channel blockers (verapamil, nifedipine, and diltiazem) had little or no effect on the calcium influx induced by PDGF-BB. These results indicate that PDGF-BB induces calcium influx by a mechanism independent of voltage-sensitive calcium channels in A172 human glioblastoma cells. PMID:1657394

  4. Reduced levels of intracellular calcium releasing in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Javier; Mediero, Matías; Lozano, Graciela M; Bejarano, Ignacio; Ortiz, Águeda; García, Juan F; Pariente, José A; Rodríguez, Ana B

    2009-01-01

    Background Asthenozoospermia is one of the most common findings present in infertile males characterized by reduced or absent sperm motility, but its aetiology remains unknown in most cases. In addition, calcium is one of the most important ions regulating sperm motility. In this study we have investigated the progesterone-evoked intracellular calcium signal in ejaculated spermatozoa from men with normospermia or asthenozoospermia. Methods Human ejaculates were obtained from healthy volunteers and asthenospermic men by masturbation after 4–5 days of abstinence. For determination of cytosolic free calcium concentration, spermatozoa were loaded with the fluorescent ratiometric calcium indicator Fura-2. Results Treatment of spermatozoa from normospermic men with 20 micromolar progesterone plus 1 micromolar thapsigargin in a calcium free medium induced a typical transient increase in cytosolic free calcium concentration due to calcium release from internal stores. Similar results were obtained when spermatozoa were stimulated with progesterone alone. Subsequent addition of calcium to the external medium evoked a sustained elevation in cytosolic free calcium concentration indicative of capacitative calcium entry. However, when progesterone plus thapsigargin were administered to spermatozoa from patients with asthenozoospermia, calcium signal and subsequent calcium entry was much smaller compared to normospermic patients. As expected, pretreatment of normospermic spermatozoa with both the anti-progesterone receptor c262 antibody and with progesterone receptor antagonist RU-38486 decreased the calcium release induced by progesterone. Treatment of spermatozoa with cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide decreased the calcium entry evoked by depletion of internal calcium stores in normospermic patients, whereas these treatments proved to be ineffective at modifying the calcium entry in patients with asthenozoospermia. Conclusion Our results suggest that spermatozoa from

  5. Time course of transmitter release calculated from simulations of a calcium diffusion model.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, W M; Zucker, R S

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional presynaptic calcium diffusion model developed to account for characteristics of transmitter release was modified to provide for binding of calcium to a receptor and subsequent triggering of exocytosis. When low affinity (20 microM) and rapid kinetics were assumed for the calcium receptor triggering exocytosis, and stimulus parameters were selected to match those of experiments, the simulations predicted a virtual invariance of the time course of transmitter release to paired stimulation, stimulation with pulses of different amplitude, and stimulation in different calcium solutions. The large temperature sensitivity of experimental release time course was explained by a temperature sensitivity of the model's final rate limiting exocytotic process. Inclusion of calcium tail currents and a saturable buffer with finite binding kinetics resulted in high peak calcium transients near release sites, exceeding 100 microM. Models with a single class of calcium binding site to the secretory trigger molecule failed to produce sufficient synaptic facilitation under this condition. When at least one calcium ion binds to a different site having higher affinity and slow kinetics, facilitation again reaches levels similar to those seen experimentally. It is possible that the neurosecretory trigger molecule reacts with calcium at more than one class of binding site. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:1354503

  6. Neocortical GABA release at high intracellular sodium and low extracellular calcium: an anti-seizure mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rassner, Michael P; Moser, Andreas; Follo, Marie; Joseph, Kevin; van Velthoven-Wurster, Vera; Feuerstein, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    In epilepsy, the GABA and glutamate balance may be disrupted and a transient decrease in extracellular calcium occurs before and during a seizure. Flow Cytometry based fluorescence activated particle sorting experiments quantified synaptosomes from human neocortical tissue, from both epileptic and non-epileptic patients (27.7% vs. 36.9% GABAergic synaptosomes, respectively). Transporter-mediated release of GABA in human and rat neocortical synaptosomes was measured using the superfusion technique for the measurement of endogenous GABA. GABA release was evoked by either a sodium channel activator or a sodium/potassium-ATPase inhibitor when exocytosis was possible or prevented, and when the sodium/calcium exchanger was active or inhibited. The transporter-mediated release of GABA is because of elevated intracellular sodium. A reduction in the extracellular calcium increased this release (in both non-epileptic and epileptic, except Rasmussen encephalitis, synaptosomes). The inverse was seen during calcium doubling. In humans, GABA release was not affected by exocytosis inhibition, that is, it was solely transporter-mediated. However, in rat synaptosomes, an increase in GABA release at zero calcium was only exhibited when the exocytosis was prevented. The absence of calcium amplified the sodium/calcium exchanger activity, leading to elevated intracellular sodium, which, together with the stimulation-evoked intracellular sodium increment, enhanced GABA transporter reversal. Sodium/calcium exchange inhibitors diminished GABA release. Thus, an important seizure-induced extracellular calcium reduction might trigger a transporter- and sodium/calcium exchanger-related anti-seizure mechanism by augmenting transporter-mediated GABA release, a mechanism absent in rats. Uniquely, the additional increase in GABA release because of calcium-withdrawal dwindled during the course of illness in Rasmussen encephalitis. Seizures cause high Na(+) influx through action potentials. A

  7. Evaluation of calcium ion release and change in pH on combining calcium hydroxide with different vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Charu; Shetty, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intracanal medicaments have traditionally been used in endodontics to disinfect root canals between appointments. Calcium hydroxide is widely used as an intracanal medicament for disinfection and to promote periapical healing. It is stable for long periods, harmless to the body, and bactericidal in a limited area. The efficacy of calcium hydroxide as a disinfectant is dependent on the availability of the hydroxyl ions in the solution that depends on the vehicle in which the calcium hydroxide is carried. In general, three types of vehicles are used: Aqueous, viscous or oily. Some in vitro studies have shown that the type of vehicle has a direct relationship with the concentration and the velocity of ionic liberation as well as with the antibacterial action when the paste is carried into a contaminated area. Aim of the Study: To evaluate the calcium ion release and measure the change in pH of the environment that occurred when calcium hydroxide was combined with different vehicles (distilled water, propylene glycol, calcium hydroxide containing gutta-percha points and chitosan) over different time periods. Materials and Methods: Forty single rooted mandibular first premolar teeth were decoronated for this study. Working length was established and the root canals were enlarged and irrigation accomplished with 2 ml of NaOCl solution after every file. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups. The canals were then packed with different preparations of calcium hydroxide using the following vehicles-distilled water, propylene glycol, gutta-percha points and chitosan. Calcium ion release in different groups was analyzed using an ultraviolet spectrophotometer at 220 nm. The change in pH of was determined using a pH meter. Results were statistically evaluated using one-way ANOVA test. Result: For calcium ion release, Group 2 showed cumulative drug release of 81.97% at the end of 15 days, whereas Group 1, 3 and 4 showed a release of 99.53, 17.98, 74

  8. The effect of radiopacifiers agents on pH, calcium release, radiopacity, and antimicrobial properties of different calcium hydroxide dressings.

    PubMed

    Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; García-Godoy, Franklin; Moldauer, Bertram Ivan; Gagliardi Minotti, Paloma; Tercília Grizzo, Larissa; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, pH level, calcium ion release, and radiopacity of calcium hydroxide pastes associated with three radiopacifying agents (iodoform, zinc oxide, and barium sulfate). For the pH and calcium release tests, 45 acrylic teeth were utilized and immersed in ultrapure water. After 24 h, 72 h, and 7 days the solution was analyzed by using a pH meter and an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Polyethylene tubes filled with the pastes were used to perform the radiopacity test. For the antimicrobial test, 25 dentin specimens were infected intraorally in order to induce the biofilm colonization and treated with the pastes for 7 days. The Live/Dead technique and a confocal microscope were used to obtain the ratio of live cells. Parametric and nonparametric statistical tests were performed to show differences among the groups (P < 0.05). The pH analysis at 7 days showed significant differences (P < 0.05) among the groups. No differences among the pastes were found in the calcium release test on the 7th day (P > 0.05). The calcium hydroxide/iodoform samples had the highest radiopacity and antimicrobial activity against the biofilm-infected dentin in comparison to the other pastes (P < 0.05). Calcium hydroxide mixed with 17% iodoform and 35% propylene glycol into a paste had the highest pH, calcium ion release, radiopacity, and the greatest antimicrobial action versus similar samples mixed with BaSO4 or ZnO. PMID:25990864

  9. Mechanisms of caffeine activation of single calcium-release channels of sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Sitsapesan, R; Williams, A J

    1990-01-01

    1. Calcium-release channels of sheep cardiac junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum were incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers. Single-channel current fluctuations were recorded under voltage clamp conditions. 2. Channels incorporate into the bilayer with a fixed orientation and channel open probability is regulated by the calcium concentration at the cytosolic face of the membrane. 3. Addition of caffeine (0.5-2.0 mM) to the cytosolic side of the membrane increased the open probability of the calcium-activated calcium-release channel by increasing the frequency of opening without significant alteration to the durations of open events. This effect was observed at both 0.1 and 10 microM-activating cytosolic calcium. 4. Caffeine (0.5-2.0 mM) did not activate the channel at a subactivating cytosolic calcium concentration (80 pM). 5. At subactivating calcium concentrations, channels could be activated by higher concentrations of caffeine (greater than 5.0 mM) revealing a second, calcium-independent, mechanism for channel activation. Channel openings induced by these high concentrations of caffeine at subactivating calcium concentrations displayed different kinetics from those observed with calcium as the sole activating ligand or with combinations of calcium and low concentrations of caffeine. 6. Activation of channel opening by caffeine in the presence of calcium did not affect single-channel conductance. Channel openings produced by caffeine at subactivating cytosolic calcium concentrations had identical conductance and relative permeability to those seen on calcium activation. 7. Channels activated by caffeine at both activating and subactivating calcium concentrations were characteristically modified by ryanodine, Ruthenium Red, ATP and magnesium, implying that the same channel is involved under both conditions. PMID:2167363

  10. Neurotransmitter release from bradykinin-stimulated PC12 cells. Stimulation of cytosolic calcium and neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed Central

    Appell, K C; Barefoot, D S

    1989-01-01

    The effect of bradykinin on intracellular free Ca2+ and neurotransmitter secretion was investigated in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12. Bradykinin was shown to induce a rapid, but transient, increase in intracellular free Ca2+ which could be separated into an intracellular Ca2+ release component and an extracellular Ca2+ influx component. The bradykinin-induced stimulation of intracellular free Ca2+ displayed a similar time course, concentration dependencies and extracellular Ca2+ dependence as that found for neurotransmitter release, indicating an association between intracellular free Ca2+ levels and neurotransmitter secretion. The selective BK1-receptor antagonist des-Arg9,[Leu8]BK (where BK is bradykinin) did not significantly affect the stimulation of intracellular free Ca2+ or neurotransmitter release. In contrast, these effects of bradykinin were effectively blocked by the selective BK2-receptor antagonist [Thi5,8,D-Phe7]BK, and mimicked by the BK2 partial agonist [D-Phe7]BK in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulation of intracellular free Ca2+ and neurotransmitter release induced by bradykinin was shown not to involve voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels, since calcium antagonists had no effect on either response at concentrations which effectively inhibit depolarization-induced responses. These results indicate that bradykinin, acting through the interaction with the BK2 receptor, stimulates an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ leading to neurotransmitter secretion. Furthermore, bradykinin-induced responses involve the release of intracellular Ca2+ and the influx of extracellular Ca2+ that is not associated with the activation of voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. PMID:2574973

  11. Permeation through the calcium release channel of cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D; Xu, L; Tripathy, A; Meissner, G; Eisenberg, B

    1997-01-01

    Current voltage (I-V) relations were measured from the calcium release channel (CRC) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiac muscle in 12 KCl solutions, symmetrical and asymmetrical, from 25 mM to 2 M. I-V curves are nearly linear, in the voltage range +/- 150 mV approximately 12kT/e, even in asymmetrical solutions, e.g., 2 M // 100 mM. It is awkward to describe straight lines as sums of exponentials in a wide range of solutions and potentials, and so traditional barrier models have difficulty fitting this data. Diffusion theories with constant fields predict curvilinear I-V relations, and so they are also unsatisfactory. The Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) form a diffusion theory with variable fields. They fit the data by using adjustable parameters for the diffusion constant of each ion and for the effective density of fixed (i.e., permanent) charge P(x) along the channel's "filter" (7-A diameter, 10 A long). If P(x) is described by just one parameter, independent of x (i.e., P(x) = P0 = -4.2 M), the fits are satisfactory (RMS error/RMS current = 6.4/67), and the estimates of diffusion coefficients are reasonable D(K) = 1.3 x 10(-6) cm2/s, D(Cl) = 3.9 x 10(-6) cm2/s. The CRC seems to have a small selectivity filter with a very high density of permanent charge. This may be a design principle of channels specialized for large flux. The Appendix derives barrier models, and their prefactor, from diffusion theories (with variable fields) and argues that barrier models are poor descriptions of CRCs in particular and open channels in general. PMID:9284302

  12. Evaluation of calcium ion, hydroxyl ion release and pH levels in various calcium hydroxide based intracanal medicaments: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Fulzele, Punit; Baliga, Sudhindra; Thosar, Nilima; Pradhan, Debaprya

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Evaluation of calcium ion and hydroxyl ion release and pH levels in various calcium hydroxide based intracanal medicaments. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate calcium and hydroxyl ion release and pH levels of calcium hydroxide based products, namely, RC Cal, Metapex, calcium hydroxide with distilled water, along with the new gutta-percha points with calcium hydroxide. Materials and Methods: The materials were inserted in polyethylene tubes and immersed in deionized water. The pH variation, Ca++ and OH- release were monitored periodically for 1 week. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was carried out using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests with PASW Statistics version 18 software to compare the statistical difference. Results: After 1 week, calcium hydroxide with distilled water and RC Cal raised the pH to 12.7 and 11.8, respectively, while a small change was observed for Metapex, calcium hydroxide gutta-percha points. The calcium released after 1 week was 15.36 mg/dL from RC Cal, followed by 13.04, 1.296, 3.064 mg/dL from calcium hydroxide with sterile water, Metapex and calcium hydroxide gutta-percha points, respectively. Conclusions: Calcium hydroxide with sterile water and RC Cal pastes liberate significantly more calcium and hydroxyl ions and raise the pH higher than Metapex and calcium hydroxidegutta-percha points. PMID:22346155

  13. Calcium influx, but not intracellular calcium release, supports PACAP-mediated ERK activation in HEK PAC1 receptor cells.

    PubMed

    May, Victor; Clason, Todd A; Buttolph, Thomas R; Girard, Beatrice M; Parsons, Rodney L

    2014-11-01

    In HEK cells expressing GFP-tagged PAC1Hop1 receptors, PACAP augments ERK phosphorylation through two parallel pathways: one through PACAP/PAC1 receptor internalization/endosome MEK/ERK signaling and the other through PLC/DAG/PKC activation. We examined whether elevation of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) was required for either of the PACAP/PAC1 receptor-mediated ERK activation mechanisms. The PACAP (25 nM)-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)]i was greater with cells maintained in Ca(2+)-containing than in Ca(2+)-deficient solution, suggesting that both calcium release from internal stores and calcium influx contributed to the rise in [Ca(2+)]i. A thapsigargin-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i also was greater with calcium in the external solution. OAG, the cell permeable analogue of DAG, increased [Ca(2+)]i, but only in Ca(2+)-containing solution. Decreasing external calcium or depleting internal calcium stores did not block PACAP-induced PAC1 receptor internalization. Omission of calcium from the external solution, but not thapsigargin pretreatment, significantly blunted PACAP-stimulated ERK phosphorylation. The PKC inhibitor BimI decreased PACAP-mediated ERK activation in both Ca(2+)-containing or Ca(2+)-deficient solutions. In contrast, following Pitstop 2 pretreatment to block endocytic mechanisms, PACAP activated ERK only when calcium was present in the external solution. We conclude that the endosome signaling pathway is largely calcium-independent whereas calcium influx appears necessary for the PLC/DAG/PKC component of PACAP-induced ERK activation. PMID:24723666

  14. Preparation and evaluation of sustained release calcium alginate beads and matrix tablets of acetazolamide.

    PubMed

    Barzegar-Jalali, M; Hanaee, J; Omidi, Y; Ghanbarzadeh, S; Ziaee, S; Bairami-Atashgah, R; Adibkia, K

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop sustained release dosage forms of acetazolamide (ACZ) preparing its calcium alginate beads and matrix tablets. ACZ was incorporated into calcium alginate beads using microencapsulation method. Two methods were applied to prolong ACZ release rate. In the first method, the drug was incorporated into calcium alginate beads either alone or with various polymers in internal phase. The second method involved the preparation of matrix tablet from the beads benefiting direct compression method with or without various polymers in external phase. The release rate of these prepared formulations and an innovator's sustained-release capsule (Diamox®) were assessed. In-vitro dissolution studies revealed that the matrix tablets prepared by the second method containing NaCMC could sustain ACZ release properly and the drug released until 9 h. It was also found that several parameters such as concentration of sodium alginate, calcium chloride and ACZ; type and concentration of polymers; syringe needle size as well as distance between needle tip and surface of the calcium chloride could affect the properties of beads, matrix tablets and subsequently release profile. Preparation of polymer free beads, incorporation of polymers in internal phase of the beads and direct compression of the beads did not give sustained release property. Whereas, incorporation of NaCMC in the external phase of the beads in matrix tablets or in combination with alginate powder in directly compressed conventional tablets could produce dosage form with sustained release property similar to reference formulation. PMID:23447074

  15. Calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels mediate the β(2)-adrenergic regulation of Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Keller, Michael J; Lecuona, Emilia; Prakriya, Murali; Cheng, Yuan; Soberanes, Saul; Budinger, G R Scott; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2014-12-20

    β2-Adrenergic agonists have been shown to regulate Na,K-ATPase in the alveolar epithelium by recruiting Na,K-ATPase-containing vesicles to the plasma membrane of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Here, we provide evidence that β2-agonists induce store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in AECs. This calcium entry is necessary for β2-agonist-induced recruitment of Na,K-ATPase to the plasma membrane of AECs. Specifically, we show that β2-agonists induce SOCE via stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1)-associated calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. We also demonstrate that the magnitude of SOCE affects the abundance of Na,K-ATPase at the plasma membrane of AECs. PMID:25447523

  16. Calcium Release-Activated Calcium (CRAC) Channels Mediate the β2-Adrenergic Regulation of Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael J.; Lecuona, Emilia; Prakriya, Murali; Cheng, Yuan; Soberanes, Saul; Scott Budinger, G.R.; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2014-01-01

    β2-adrenergic agonists have been shown to regulate Na,K-ATPase in the alveolar epithelium by recruiting Na,K-ATPase-containing vesicles to the plasma membrane of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Here, we provide evidence that β2-agonists induce store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in AECs. This calcium entry is necessary for β2-agonist-induced recruitment of Na,K-ATPase to the plasma membrane of AECs. Specifically, we show that β2-agonists induce SOCE via stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1)-associated calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. We also demonstrate that the magnitude of SOCE affects the abundance of Na,K-ATPase at the plasma membrane of AECs. PMID:25447523

  17. Reduction of calcium release site models via fast/slow analysis and iterative aggregation/disaggregation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan; Kemper, Peter; Smith, Gregory D

    2009-09-01

    Mathematical models of calcium release sites derived from Markov chain models of intracellular calcium channels exhibit collective gating reminiscent of the experimentally observed phenomenon of calcium puffs and sparks. Such models often take the form of stochastic automata networks in which the transition probabilities of each channel depend on the local calcium concentration and thus the state of the other channels. In order to overcome the state-space explosion that occurs in such compositionally defined calcium release site models, we have implemented several automated procedures for model reduction using fast/slow analysis. After categorizing rate constants in the single channel model as either fast or slow, groups of states in the expanded release site model that are connected by fast transitions are lumped, and transition rates between reduced states are chosen consistent with the conditional probability distribution among states within each group. For small problems these conditional probability distributions can be numerically calculated from the full model without approximation. For large problems the conditional probability distributions can be approximated without the construction of the full model by assuming rapid mixing of states connected by fast transitions. Alternatively, iterative aggregation/disaggregation may be employed to obtain reduced calcium release site models in a memory-efficient fashion. Benchmarking of several different iterative aggregation/disaggregation-based fast/slow reduction schemes establishes the effectiveness of automated calcium release site reduction utilizing the Koury-McAllister-Stewart method. PMID:19792032

  18. Release of Intracellular Calcium Stores Facilitates Coxsackievirus Entry into Polarized Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozym, Rebecca A.; Morosky, Stefanie A.; Kim, Kwang S.; Cherry, Sara; Coyne, Carolyn B.

    2010-01-01

    Group B coxsackieviruses (CVB) are associated with viral-induced heart disease and are among the leading causes of aseptic meningitis worldwide. Here we show that CVB entry into polarized brain microvasculature and aortic endothelial cells triggers a depletion of intracellular calcium stores initiated through viral attachment to the apical attachment factor decay-accelerating factor. Calcium release was dependent upon a signaling cascade that required the activity of the Src family of tyrosine kinases, phospholipase C, and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor isoform 3. CVB-mediated calcium release was required for the activation of calpain-2, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease, which controlled the vesicular trafficking of internalized CVB particles. These data point to a specific role for calcium signaling in CVB entry into polarized endothelial monolayers and highlight the unique signaling mechanisms used by these viruses to cross endothelial barriers. PMID:20949071

  19. The impact of calcium current reversal on neurotransmitter release in the electrically stimulated retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werginz, Paul; Rattay, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Objective. In spite of intense theoretical and experimental investigations on electrical nerve stimulation, the influence of reversed ion currents on network activity during extracellular stimulation has not been investigated so far. Approach. Here, the impact of calcium current reversal on neurotransmitter release during subretinal stimulation was analyzed with a computational multi-compartment model of a retinal bipolar cell (BC) that was coupled with a four-pool model for the exocytosis from its ribbon synapses. Emphasis was laid on calcium channel dynamics and how these channels influence synaptic release. Main results. Stronger stimulation with anodic pulses caused transmembrane voltages above the Nernst potential of calcium in the terminals and, by this means, forced calcium ions to flow in the reversed direction from inside to the outside of the cell. Consequently, intracellular calcium concentration decreased resulting in a reduced vesicle release or preventing release at all. This mechanism is expected to lead to a pronounced ring-shaped pattern of exocytosis within a group of neighbored BCs when the stronger stimulated cells close to the electrode fail in releasing vesicles. Significance. Stronger subretinal stimulation causes failure of synaptic exocytosis due to reversal of calcium flow into the extracellular space in cells close to the electrode.

  20. Long-Lasting Sparks: Multi-Metastability and Release Competition in the Calcium Release Unit Network

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhen; Karma, Alain; Weiss, James N.; Qu, Zhilin

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) sparks are elementary events of biological Ca signaling. A normal Ca spark has a brief duration in the range of 10 to 100 ms, but long-lasting sparks with durations of several hundred milliseconds to seconds are also widely observed. Experiments have shown that the transition from normal to long-lasting sparks can occur when ryanodine receptor (RyR) open probability is either increased or decreased. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and computationally that long-lasting sparks emerge as a collective dynamical behavior of the network of diffusively coupled Ca release units (CRUs). We show that normal sparks occur when the CRU network is monostable and excitable, while long-lasting sparks occur when the network dynamics possesses multiple metastable attractors, each attractor corresponding to a different spatial firing pattern of sparks. We further highlight the mechanisms and conditions that produce long-lasting sparks, demonstrating the existence of an optimal range of RyR open probability favoring long-lasting sparks. We find that when CRU firings are sparse and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load is high, increasing RyR open probability promotes long-lasting sparks by potentiating Ca-induced Ca release (CICR). In contrast, when CICR is already strong enough to produce frequent firings, decreasing RyR open probability counter-intuitively promotes long-lasting sparks by decreasing spark frequency. The decrease in spark frequency promotes intra-SR Ca diffusion from neighboring non-firing CRUs to the firing CRUs, which helps to maintain the local SR Ca concentration of the firing CRUs above a critical level to sustain firing. In this setting, decreasing RyR open probability further suppresses long-lasting sparks by weakening CICR. Since a long-lasting spark terminates via the Kramers’ escape process over a potential barrier, its duration exhibits an exponential distribution determined by the barrier height and noise strength, which is modulated

  1. Location of Release Sites and Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels Relative to Calcium Channels at the Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, A. J.; Rabl, K.; Riccardi, G. E.; Brecha, N. C.; Stella, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicle release from photoreceptor ribbon synapses is regulated by L-type Ca2+ channels, which are in turn regulated by Cl− moving through calcium-activated chloride [Cl(Ca)] channels. We assessed the proximity of Ca2+ channels to release sites and Cl(Ca) channels in synaptic terminals of salamander photoreceptors by comparing fast (BAPTA) and slow (EGTA) intracellular Ca2+ buffers. BAPTA did not fully block synaptic release, indicating some release sites are <100 nm from Ca2+ channels. Comparing Cl(Ca) currents with predicted Ca2+ diffusion profiles suggested that Cl(Ca) and Ca2+ channels average a few hundred nanometers apart, but the inability of BAPTA to block Cl(Ca) currents completely suggested some channels are much closer together. Diffuse immunolabeling of terminals with an antibody to the putative Cl(Ca) channel TMEM16A supports the idea that Cl(Ca) channels are dispersed throughout the presynaptic terminal, in contrast with clustering of Ca2+ channels near ribbons. Cl(Ca) currents evoked by intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation through flash photolysis of DM-nitrophen exhibited EC50 values of 556 and 377 nM with Hill slopes of 1.8 and 2.4 in rods and cones, respectively. These relationships were used to estimate average submembrane [Ca2+]i in photoreceptor terminals. Consistent with control of exocytosis by [Ca2+] nanodomains near Ca2+ channels, average submembrane [Ca2+]i remained below the vesicle release threshold (∼400 nM) over much of the physiological voltage range for cones. Positioning Ca2+ channels near release sites may improve fidelity in converting voltage changes to synaptic release. A diffuse distribution of Cl(Ca) channels may allow Ca2+ influx at one site to influence relatively distant Ca2+ channels. PMID:21084687

  2. Melanopsin triggers the release of internal calcium stores in response to light.

    PubMed

    Kumbalasiri, T; Rollag, M D; Isoldi, M C; Castrucci, A M de Lauro; Provencio, I

    2007-01-01

    Melanopsin is the photopigment that confers photosensitivity upon intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). This subset of retinal ganglion cells comprises less than 2% of all RGCs in the mammalian retina. The paucity of melanopsin-positive cells has made studies on melanopsin signaling difficult to pursue in ipRGCs. To address this issue, we have established several cell lines consisting of a transformed human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293) stably expressing human melanopsin. With these cell lines, we have investigated the intracellular rise in calcium triggered upon light activation of melanopsin. Our human melanopsin-expressing cells exhibit an irradiance-dependent increase in intracellular calcium. Control cells expressing human melanopsin, where the Schiff-base lysine has been mutated to alanine, show no responses to light. Chelating extracellular calcium has no effect on the light-induced increase in intracellular calcium suggesting that calcium is mobilized from intracellular stores. This involvement of intracellular stores has been confirmed through their depletion by thapsigargin, which inhibits a subsequent light-induced increase in intracellular calcium. Addition of the nonselective cation channel blocker lanthanum does not alter light-induced rises in intracellular calcium, further supporting that melanopsin triggers a release of internal calcium from internal stores. HEK293 cells stably expressing melanopsin have proven to be a useful tool to study melanopsin-initiated signaling. PMID:16961436

  3. Diffusive spatio-temporal noise in a first-passage time model for intracellular calcium release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegg, Mark B.; Rüdiger, Sten; Erban, Radek

    2013-04-01

    The intracellular release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum is controlled by ion channels. The resulting calcium signals exhibit a rich spatio-temporal signature, which originates at least partly from microscopic fluctuations. While stochasticity in the gating transition of ion channels has been incorporated into many models, the distribution of calcium is usually described by deterministic reaction-diffusion equations. Here we test the validity of the latter modeling approach by using two different models to calculate the frequency of localized calcium signals (calcium puffs) from clustered IP3 receptor channels. The complexity of the full calcium system is here limited to the basic opening mechanism of the ion channels and, in the mathematical reduction simplifies to the calculation of a first passage time. Two models are then studied: (i) a hybrid model, where channel gating is treated stochastically, while calcium concentration is deterministic and (ii) a fully stochastic model with noisy channel gating and Brownian calcium ion motion. The second model utilises the recently developed two-regime method [M. B. Flegg, S. J. Chapman, and R. Erban, "The two-regime method for optimizing stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations," J. R. Soc., Interface 9, 859-868 (2012)], 10.1098/rsif.2011.0574 in order to simulate a large domain with precision required only near the Ca2+ absorbing channels. The expected time for a first channel opening that results in a calcium puff event is calculated. It is found that for a large diffusion constant, predictions of the interpuff time are significantly overestimated using the model (i) with a deterministic non-spatial calcium variable. It is thus demonstrated that the presence of diffusive noise in local concentrations of intracellular Ca2+ ions can substantially influence the occurrence of calcium signals. The presented approach and results may also be relevant for other cell-physiological first-passage time problems with

  4. Effect of non-cross-linked calcium on characteristics, swelling behaviour, drug release and mucoadhesiveness of calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Dalaty, Adnan Al; Karam, Ayman; Najlah, Mohammad; Alany, Raid G; Khoder, Mouhamad

    2016-04-20

    In this study, ibuprofen-loaded calcium alginate beads (CABs) with varying amounts of non-cross-linked calcium (NCL-Ca) were prepared using different washing methods. The influence of NCL-Ca on beads properties was investigated. Increasing the number or duration of washes led to significant decreases in the amount of NCL-Ca whereas the impact of the volume of washes was not significant. Approximately 70% of the initial amount of Ca(2+) was NCL-Ca which was removable by washing while only 30% was cross-linked (CL-Ca). Ca(2+) release from the CABs was bimodal; NCL-Ca was burst-released followed by a slower release of CL-Ca. Washing methods and the amount of NCL-Ca had significant influences on the encapsulation efficiency, beads weight, beads swelling, drug release profile and the mucoadhesiveness of CABs. This study highlighted the importance of washing methods and the amount of NCL-Ca to establish CABs properties and understand their behaviour in the simulated intestinal fluids (SIFs). PMID:26876840

  5. Asenapine modulates nitric oxide release and calcium movements in cardiomyoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Grossini, Elena; Gramaglia, Carla; Farruggio, Serena; Camillo, Lara; Mary, David; Vacca, Giovanni; Zeppegno, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of asenapine on nitric oxide (NO) release and Ca2+ transients in H9C2 cell line, which were either subjected to peroxidation or not. Materials and Methods: H9C2 were treated with asenapine alone or in presence of intracellular kinase blockers, serotoninergic and dopaminergic antagonists, and voltage Ca2+ channels inhibitors. Experiments were also performed in H9C2 treated with hydrogen peroxide. NO release and intracellular Ca2+ were measured through specific probes. Results: In H9C2, asenapine differently modulated NO release and Ca2+ movements depending on peroxidative condition. The Ca2+ pool mobilized by asenapine mainly originated from the extracellular space and was slightly affected by thapsigargin. Moreover, the effects of asenapine were reduced or prevented by kinases blockers, dopaminergic and serotoninergic receptors inhibitors, and voltage Ca2+ channels blockers. Conclusions: On the basis of our findings, we can conclude that asenapine by interacting with its specific receptors, exerts dual effects on NO release and Ca2+ homeostasis in H9C2; this would be of particular clinical relevance when considering their role in cardiac function modulation. PMID:27127388

  6. Release of O2- and LTC4 by murine eosinophils: role of intra- and extracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    de Andres, B; del Pozo, V; Martin, E; Palomino, P; Lahoz, C

    1990-01-01

    Using an experimental model of mouse peritoneal eosinophilia, we investigated the role of Ca2+ in the in vitro activation of these cells challenged with specific Mesocestoides corti antigen. We have detected LTC4, a metabolite derived from arachidonic acid by way of 5'lipo-oxygenase and superoxide anion from the oxidative burst, as inflammatory mediators produced by activated eosinophils. Preincubation with hyperimmune mice serum increases the amount of LTC4 and superoxide anion in response to the antigenic extract. Release of O2- is inhibited by Verapamil (a voltage-gated calcium channel) and Quin 2 (an intracellular trapped chelator of calcium). Also, LTC4 produced by preincubated eosinophils challenged with M. corti is dramatically inhibited by Quin 2. Our results suggest an intact mechanism for calcium control for the release of these inflammatory mediators by eosinophils, after specific antigenic stimulation. PMID:1689695

  7. Suppression of store overload-induced calcium release by hydroxylated metabolites of carvedilol.

    PubMed

    Malig, Thomas; Xiao, Zhichao; Chen, S R Wayne; Back, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Carvedilol is a drug widely used in the treatment of heart failure and associated cardiac arrhythmias. A unique action of carvedilol is its suppression of store overload-induced calcium release (SOICR) through the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2), which can trigger ventricular arrhythmias. Since the effects of carvedilol metabolites on SOICR have not yet been investigated, three carvedilol metabolites hydroxylated at the 3-, 4' and 5'-positions were synthesized and assayed for SOICR inhibition in mutant HEK 293 cells expressing the RyR2 mutant R4496C. This cell line is especially prone to SOICR and calcium release through the defective RyR2 channel was measured with a calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye. These results revealed that the 3- and 4'-hydroxy derivatives are slightly more effective than carvedilol in suppressing SOICR, while the 5'-analog proved slightly less active. Metabolic deactivation of carvedilol via these hydroxylation pathways is therefore insignificant. PMID:26584883

  8. The proarrhythmic antihistaminic drug terfenadine increases spontaneous calcium release in human atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Hove-Madsen, Leif; Llach, Anna; Molina, Cristina E; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Farré, Jordi; Roura, Santiago; Cinca, Juan

    2006-12-28

    Spontaneous calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac myocytes plays a central role in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. Compounds intended for therapeutical use that interfere with intracellular calcium handling may therefore have an undesired proarrhythmic potential. Here we have used isolated human atrial myocytes to compare the effect of the proarrhythmic antihistaminic drug terfenadine with the non-proarrhythmic antihistaminic drugs fexofenadine and rupatadine on intracellular calcium homeostasis. Perforated patch-clamp technique was used to measure ionic currents and to detect spontaneous calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Our results show that the compound terfenadine, with known arrhythmogenic effects, inhibits L-type calcium current (I(Ca)) with an IC(50) of 185 nM when cells are stimulated at 1.0 Hz. The inhibitory effect of 0.3 muM terfenadine increased from 19+/-4% at stimulation frequency of 0.2 Hz to 63+/-6% at 2.0 Hz. Moreover, terfenadine also increased spontaneous calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At a concentration of 1 muM, terfenadine significantly increased the spontaneous Na-Ca exchange current (I(NCX)) frequency from 0.48+/-0.25 to 1.93+/-0.67 s(-1). In contrast, fexofenadine and rupatadine did not change I(Ca) or the frequency of spontaneous I(NCX). We conclude that the proarrhythmic antihistaminic drug terfenadine alters intracellular calcium handling in isolated human atrial myocytes. This experimental model may be suitable to screen for potential arrhythmogenic side-effects of compounds intended for therapeutical use. PMID:17078945

  9. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Release Channels in Ventricles of Older Adult Hamsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholl, Peter A.; Howlett, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Whether the density of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors in the heart declines with age is not clear. We investigated age-related changes in the density of [3H]-ryanodine receptors in crude ventricular homogenates, which contained all ligand binding sites in heart and in isolated junctional SR membranes.…

  10. Releasing-addition method for the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, J.J.

    1963-01-01

    Study of the interferences of silica and sulfate in the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters has led to the development of a method requiring no prior chemical separations. The interference effects of silica, sulfate, potassium, sodium, aluminum, and phosphate are overcome by an addition technique coupled with the use of magnesium as a releasing agent. ?? 1963.

  11. Adsorption and release of amino acids mixture onto apatitic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Rhilassi, A.; Mourabet, M.; El Boujaady, H.; Bennani-Ziatni, M.; Hamri, R. El; Taitai, A.

    2012-10-01

    Study focused on the interaction of adsorbate with poorly crystalline apatitic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral. Calcium phosphates prepared in water-ethanol medium at physiological temperature (37 °C) and neutral pH, their Ca/P ratio was between 1.33 and 1.67. Adsorbate used in this paper takes the mixture form of two essential amino acids L-lysine and DL-leucine which have respectively a character hydrophilic and hydrophobic. Adsorption and release are investigated experimentally; they are dependent on the phosphate type and on the nature of adsorbate L-lysine, DL-leucine and their mixture. Adsorption of mixture of amino acids on the apatitic calcium phosphates is influenced by the competition between the two amino acids: L-lysine and DL-leucine which exist in the medium reaction. The adsorption kinetics is very fast while the release kinetics is slow. The chemical composition of apatite has an influence on both adsorption and release. The interactions adsorbate-adsorbent are electrostatic type. Adsorption and release reactions of the amino acid mixture are explained by the existence of the hydrated surface layer of calcium phosphate apatite. The charged sbnd COOsbnd and sbnd NH3+ of adsorbates are the strongest groups that interact with the surface of apatites, the adsorption is mainly due to the electrostatic interaction between the groups sbnd COOsbnd of amino acids and calcium Ca2+ ions of the apatite. Comparative study of interactions between adsorbates (L-lysine, DL-leucine and their mixture) and apatitic calcium phosphates is carried out in vitro by using UV-vis and infrared spectroscopy IR techniques.

  12. ATP Released by Electrical Stimuli Elicits Calcium Transients and Gene Expression in Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, with an EC50 value of 7.8 ± 3.1 μm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 μm suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y2 receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 μm ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca2+ homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  13. Aβ42 oligomers selectively disrupt neuronal calcium release.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Cristian; Kipanyula, Maulilio J; Agostini, Mario; Pozzan, Tullio; Fasolato, Cristina

    2015-02-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides correlates with aging and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ peptides, which cause early synaptic dysfunctions, spine loss, and memory deficits, also disturb intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. By cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) measurements, we here define the short-term effects of synthetic Aβ42 on neuronal Ca(2+) dynamics. When applied acutely at submicromolar concentration, as either oligomers or monomers, Aβ42 did not cause Ca(2+) release or Ca(2+) influx. Similarly, 1-hour treatment with Aβ42 modified neither the resting cytosolic Ca(2+) level nor the long-lasting Ca(2+) influx caused by KCl-induced depolarization. In contrast, Aβ42 oligomers, but not monomers, significantly altered Ca(2+) release from stores with opposite effects on inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)- and caffeine-induced Ca(2+) mobilization without alteration of the total store Ca(2+) content. Ca(2+) dysregulation by Aβ42 oligomers involves metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and requires network activity and the intact exo-endocytotic machinery, being prevented by tetrodotoxin and tetanus toxin. These findings support the idea that Ca(2+) store dysfunction is directly involved in Aβ42 neurotoxicity and represents a potential therapeutic target in AD-like dementia. PMID:25453559

  14. A slow release calcium delivery system for the study of reparative dentine formation.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A R; Kirk, E E; Robinson, D H; Kardos, T B

    1998-06-01

    Several liquid, semi-solid and solid delivery systems were formulated and tested to devise a method of reproducibly administering accurate micro-doses of calcium into a 700 microns diameter cavity in a rat maxillary incisor tooth, in the absence of hydroxyl ions. Development of this delivery system was necessary to facilitate studies of the mechanisms of pulpal repair and odontoblast differentiation. The principal requirements for the delivery system were that it should be easily administered into a small pulp exposure in the rat incisor and that a greater than 1000-fold range in calcium ion concentrations could be incorporated and delivered for a period of 2-3 days, preferably in an acidic environment to minimize the effect of non-specific nucleation under alkaline conditions. Poly- (ethylene) glycol microspheres were found to be an ideal vehicle. Under the in vitro dissolution conditions used, complete release of all calcium salts occurred within 12-15 hours, except for the very water-insoluble calcium stearate. It was anticipated that the release of calcium ions would be significantly more prolonged in vivo because of the physical constraints of the prepared cavity as well as the restricted access to fluid flow. PMID:9863419

  15. Induction of skeletal muscle contracture and calcium release from isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles by sanguinarine

    PubMed Central

    Hu, C M; Cheng, H W; Cheng, Y W; Kang, J J

    2000-01-01

    The benzophenanthrine alkaloid, sanguinarine, was studied for its effects on isolated mouse phrenic-nerve diaphragm preparations. Sanguinarine induced direct, dose-dependent effects on muscle contractility. Sanguinarine-induced contracture was partially inhibited when the extracellular Ca2+ was removed or when the diaphragm was pretreated with nifedipine. Depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) internal calcium stores completely blocked the contracture. Sanguinarine induced Ca2+ release from the actively loaded SR vesicles was blocked by ruthenium red and dithiothreitol (DTT), consistent with the ryanodine receptor (RyR) as the site of sanguinarine action. Sanguinarine altered [3H]-ryanodine binding to the RyR of isolated SR vesicles, potentiating [3H]-ryanodine binding at lower concentrations and inhibiting binding at higher concentrations. All of these effects were reversed by DTT, suggesting that sanguinarine-induced Ca2+ release from SR occurs through oxidation of critical SH groups of the RyR SR calcium release channel. PMID:10807666

  16. Effect of degree of esterification of pectin and calcium amount on drug release from pectin-based matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Sungthongjeen, Srisagul; Sriamornsak, Pornsak; Pitaksuteepong, Tasana; Somsiri, Atawit; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2004-02-12

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of 2 formulation variables, the pectin type (with different degrees of esterification [DEs]) and the amount of calcium, on drug release from pectin-based matrix tablets. Pectin matrix tablets were prepared by blending indomethacin (a model drug), pectin powder, and various amounts of calcium acetate and then tableting by automatic hydraulic press machine. Differential scanning calorimetry, powder x-ray diffraction, and Fourier transformed-infrared spectroscopy studies of the compressed tablets revealed no drug-polymer interaction and the existence of drug with low crystallinity. The in-vitro release studies in phosphate buffer (United States Pharmacopeia) and tris buffer indicated that the lower the DE, the greater the time for 50% of drug release (T50). This finding is probably because of the increased binding capacity of pectin to calcium. However, when the calcium was excluded, the pectins with different DEs showed similar release pattern with insignificant difference of T50. When the amount of calcium acetate was increased from 0 to 12 mg/tablet, the drug release was significantly slower. However, a large amount of added calcium (ie, 24 mg/tablet) produced greater drug release because of the partial disintegration of tablets. The results were more pronounced in phosphate buffer, where the phosphate ions induced the precipitation of calcium phosphate. In conclusion, both pectin type and added calcium affect the drug release from the pectin-based matrix tablets. PMID:15198530

  17. Regulation of dendritic calcium release in striatal spiny projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Joshua L; Shen, Weixing; Rafalovich, Igor; Sebel, Luke E; Day, Michelle; Chan, C Savio; Surmeier, D James

    2013-11-01

    The induction of corticostriatal long-term depression (LTD) in striatal spiny projection neurons (SPNs) requires coactivation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and L-type Ca(2+) channels. This combination leads to the postsynaptic production of endocannabinoids that act presynaptically to reduce glutamate release. Although the necessity of coactivation is agreed upon, why it is necessary in physiologically meaningful settings is not. The studies described here attempt to answer this question by using two-photon laser scanning microscopy and patch-clamp electrophysiology to interrogate the dendritic synapses of SPNs in ex vivo brain slices from transgenic mice. These experiments revealed that postsynaptic action potentials induce robust ryanodine receptor (RYR)-dependent Ca(2+)-induced-Ca(2+) release (CICR) in SPN dendritic spines. Depolarization-induced opening of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels was necessary for CICR. CICR was more robust in indirect pathway SPNs than in direct pathway SPNs, particularly in distal dendrites. Although it did not increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration alone, group I mGluR activation enhanced CICR and slowed Ca(2+) clearance, extending the activity-evoked intraspine transient. The mGluR modulation of CICR was sensitive to antagonism of inositol trisphosphate receptors, RYRs, src kinase, and Cav1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels. Uncaging glutamate at individual spines effectively activated mGluRs and facilitated CICR induced by back-propagating action potentials. Disrupting CICR by antagonizing RYRs prevented the induction of corticostriatal LTD with spike-timing protocols. In contrast, mGluRs had no effect on the induction of long-term potentiation. Taken together, these results make clearer how coactivation of mGluRs and L-type Ca(2+) channels promotes the induction of activity-dependent LTD in SPNs. PMID:23966676

  18. Simulations of inositol phosphate metabolism and its interaction with InsP(3)-mediated calcium release.

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Jyoti; Bhalla, Upinder S

    2002-01-01

    Inositol phosphates function as second messengers for a variety of extracellular signals. Ins(1,4,5)P(3) generated by phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate, triggers numerous cellular processes by regulating calcium release from internal stores. The Ins(1,4,5)P(3) signal is coupled to a complex metabolic cascade involving a series of phosphatases and kinases. These enzymes generate a range of inositol phosphate derivatives, many of which have signaling roles of their own. We have integrated published biochemical data to build a mass action model for InsP(3) metabolism. The model includes most inositol phosphates that are currently known to interact with each other. We have used this model to study the effects of a G-protein coupled receptor stimulus that activates phospholipase C on the inositol phosphates. We have also monitored how the metabolic cascade interacts with Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-mediated calcium release. We find temporal dynamics of most inositol phosphates to be strongly influenced by the elaborate networking. We also show that Ins(1,3,4,5)P(4) plays a key role in InsP(3) dynamics and allows for paired pulse facilitation of calcium release. Calcium oscillations produce oscillatory responses in parts of the metabolic network and are in turn temporally modulated by the metabolism of InsP(3). PMID:12202356

  19. Synergistic effect of calcium and bicarbonate in enhancing arsenate release from ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfield, Samantha L.; Bostick, Benjamin C.

    2010-09-01

    Many groundwater systems contain anomalously high arsenic concentrations, associated with less than expected retention of As by adsorption to iron (hydr)oxides. Although carbonates are ubiquitous in aquifers, their relationship to arsenate mobilization is not well characterized. This research examines arsenate release from poorly crystalline iron hydroxides in abiotic systems containing calcium and magnesium with bicarbonate under conditions of static and dynamic flow (pH 7.5-8). Aqueous arsenic levels remained low when arsenate-bearing ferrihydrite was equilibrated with artificial groundwater solution containing Ca, Mg, and HCO 3-. In batch titrations in which a solution of Ca and HCO 3- was added repeatedly, the ferrihydrite surface became saturated with adsorbed Ca and HCO 3-, and aqueous As levels increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude. In columns containing Ca or Mg and HCO 3-, As solubility initially mimicked titrations, but then rapidly increased by an additional order of magnitude (reaching 12 μM As). Separately, calcium chloride and other simple salts did not induce As release, although sodium bicarbonate and lactate facilitated minor As release under flow. Results indicate that adsorption of calcium or magnesium with bicarbonate leads to As desorption from ferrihydrite, to a degree greater than expected from competitive effects alone, especially under dynamic flow. This desorption may be an important mechanism of As mobilization in As-impacted, circumneutral aquifers, especially those undergoing rapid mineralization of organic matter, which induces calcite dissolution and the production of dissolved calcium and bicarbonate.

  20. The effects of thermal stimuli on intracellular calcium change and histamine releases in rat basophilic leukemia mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-Hui; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2012-05-01

    The effects of thermal stimuli on rat basophilic leukemia mast cells were studied. The cells in calcium-contained or calcium-free buffers were thermally stimulated in the temperature range of 25-60 °C. The corresponding calcium ion concentration in cells [Ca2+]i as well as the released histamine from cells was measured with fluorescence staining methods. The ruthenium red (RR), a block of membrane calcium channels (transient receptor potential family V (TRPV)), was used in experiments. Under the stimulus of 25-50 °C, no significant difference on [Ca2+]i was found between these three groups of the cells in calcium-contained buffer without or with RR and cells in calcium-free saline, indicating that the increased calcium in cytosol did not result from the extracellular buffer but came from the intracellular calcium stores. The [Ca2+]i continuously increased under the temperature of 50-60 °C, but the RR and calcium-free saline can obviously diminish the [Ca2+]i increase at these high temperatures, reflecting that the opening of the TRPV2 channels leads to a calcium influx resulting in the [Ca2+]i increment. The histamine release also became significant in these cases. Since the released histamine is a well-known mediator for the microcirculation promotion, the histamine release from mast cells could be one of the mechanisms of thermal therapy.

  1. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release.

    PubMed

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D; Stewart, Alan J; Pitt, Samantha J

    2015-07-10

    Aberrant Zn(2+) homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn(2+) modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca(2+) dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn(2+) is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn(2+) concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca(2+). At concentrations of free Zn(2+) >1 nm, Zn(2+) is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca(2+) is removed. Zn(2+) is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca(2+). Millimolar levels of free Zn(2+) were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn(2+) modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca(2+) waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn(2+) elicit Ca(2+) release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca(2+). This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn(2+) in shaping Ca(2+) dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating. PMID:26041778

  2. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D.; Stewart, Alan J.; Pitt, Samantha J.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Zn2+ homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn2+ modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca2+ dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn2+ is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn2+ concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca2+. At concentrations of free Zn2+ >1 nm, Zn2+ is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca2+ is removed. Zn2+ is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca2+. Millimolar levels of free Zn2+ were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn2+ modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca2+ waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn2+ elicit Ca2+ release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca2+. This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn2+ in shaping Ca2+ dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating. PMID:26041778

  3. Angiogenesis in calcium phosphate scaffolds by inorganic copper ion release.

    PubMed

    Barralet, Jake; Gbureck, Uwe; Habibovic, Pamela; Vorndran, Elke; Gerard, Catherine; Doillon, Charles J

    2009-07-01

    Angiogenesis in a tissue-engineered device may be induced by incorporating growth factors (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]), genetically modified cells, and=or vascular cells. It represents an important process during the formation and repair of tissue and is essential for nourishment and supply of reparative and immunological cells. Inorganic angiogenic factors, such as copper ions, are therefore of interest in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering due to their low cost, higher stability, and potentially greater safety compared with recombinant proteins or genetic engineering approaches. The purpose of this study was to compare tissue responses to 3D printed macroporous bioceramic scaffolds implanted in mice that had been loaded with either VEGF or copper sulfate. These factors were spatially localized at the end of a single macropore some 7 mm from the surface of the scaffold. Controls without angiogenic factors exhibited only poor tissue growth within the blocks; in contrast, low doses of copper sulfate led to the formation of microvessels oriented along the macropore axis. Further, wound tissue ingrowth was particularly sensitive to the quantity of copper sulfate and was enhanced at specific concentrations or in combination with VEGF. The potential to accelerate and guide angiogenesis and wound healing by copper ion release without the expense of inductive protein(s) is highly attractive in the area of tissue-engineered bone and offers significant future potential in the field of regenerative biomaterials. PMID:19182977

  4. Molecular mechanisms of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-induced calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Van der Linden, Ilse; Van Kolen, Kristof; Verhoeven, Kim F C; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing calcium signal transduction of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors CRF(1) and CRF(2(a)) stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells were investigated. Calcium signaling strictly depended on intracellular calcium sources, and this is the first study to establish a prominent contribution of the three major G-protein families to CRF receptor-mediated calcium signaling. Overexpression of Galpha(q/11) and Galpha(16) led to leftward shifts of the agonist concentration-response curves. Blockade of Galpha(q/11) proteins by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology partially reduced agonist-mediated calcium responses in CRF(1)- and CRF(2(a))-expressing HEK293 cells, thereby proving a contribution of the G(q) protein family. A small but significant inhibition of calcium signaling was recorded by pharmacological inhibition of G(i/o) proteins with pertussis toxin treatment. This effect was mediated by direct binding of Gbetagamma subunits to phospholipase C. G(i/o) inhibition also elevated cAMP responses in CRF receptor-overexpressing HEK293 cells and in Y79 retinoblastoma cells endogenously expressing human CRF(1) and CRF(2(a)) receptors, thereby demonstrating natural coupling of G(i) proteins to both CRF receptors. The strongest reduction of CRF receptor-mediated calcium mobilization was noted when blocking the G(s) signaling protein either by cholera toxin or by siRNA. It is noteworthy that simultaneous inhibition of two G-proteins shed light on the additive effects of G(s) and G(q) on the calcium signaling and, hence, that they act in parallel. On the other hand, G(i) coupling required prior G(s) activation. PMID:19098121

  5. Effect of different organic and inorganic blockers of calcium entry on the release of endogenous dopamine from tuberoinfundibular neurones.

    PubMed

    Annunziato, L; Amoroso, S; Taglialatela, M; De Natale, G; Di Renzo, G F

    1986-05-01

    In the present study the effect of different blockers of calcium entry belonging to different chemical classes on basal and K+-elicited release of endogenous dopamine (DA) from tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurones was studied in vitro. For this purpose fragments of hypothalamus containing arcuate-periventricular nuclei and median eminence were incubated in vitro and endogenous DA released into the medium was assayed by radioenzymatic assay. The organic blockers of calcium entry, nitrendipine, nimodipine, nifedipine, diltiazem and flunarizine did not modify basal or K+-evoked release of endogenous DA, unless very large concentrations (100 microM) of nifedipine or diltiazem were used. The phenylalkylamine methoxyverapamil (D-600) consistently inhibited K+-stimulated release of endogenous DA in concentrations of 50 and 100 microM. Cobalt and lanthanum, two ions with an ionic radius similar to that of calcium and which are known to inhibit calcium fluxes through nerve membranes, significantly blocked release of endogenous DA elicited by 35 mM K+. In summary, the results of the present study showed that calcium channels in the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic system displayed a different sensitivity to various classes of blockers of calcium entry. Inorganic blockers of calcium entry, like lanthanum and cobalt, appeared to be the most effective in blocking Ca2+-dependent release of endogenous DA, whereas, among the organic calcium antagonists, phenylalkylamines seemed to possess a certain degree of effectiveness. PMID:3736788

  6. Calcium released by photolysis of DM-nitrophen stimulates transmitter release at squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, K R; Zucker, R S

    1990-01-01

    1. Transmitter release at the squid giant synapse was stimulated by photolytic release of Ca2+ from the 'caged' Ca2+ compound DM-nitrophen (Kaplan & Ellis-Davies, 1988) inserted into presynaptic terminals. 2. Competing binding reactions cause the amount of Ca2+ released by DM-nitrophen photolysis to depend on the concentrations of DM-nitrophen, total Ca2+, Mg+, ATP and native cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffer. Measurements of presynaptic [Ca2+] changes by co-injection of the fluorescent indicator dye Fura-2 show that DM-nitrophen photolysis causes a transient rise in Ca2+ followed by decay within about 150 ms to an increased steady-state level. 3. Rapid photolysis of Ca2(+)-loaded nitrophen within the presynaptic terminal was followed in less than a millisecond by depolarization of the postsynaptic membrane. As with action potential-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), the light-evoked response was partially and reversibly blocked by 1-3 mM-kainic acid which desensitizes postsynaptic glutamate receptors. 4. Release was similar in magnitude and rate to normal action potential-mediated EPSPs. 5. The release of transmitter by photolysis of Ca2(+)-loaded DM-nitrophen was not affected by removal of Ca2+ from the saline or addition of tetrodotoxin. Photolysis of DM-nitrophen injected into presynaptic terminals without added Ca2+ did not stimulate release of transmitter nor did it interfere with normal action potential-mediated release. 6. Stimulation of presynaptic action potentials in Ca2(+)-free saline during the light-evoked response did not elicit increased release of transmitter if the ganglion was bathed in Ca2(+)-free saline, i.e. in the absence of Ca2+ influx. Increasing the intensity of the light or stimulating presynaptic action potentials in Ca2(+)-containing saline increased the release of transmitter. Therefore the failure of presynaptic voltage change to increase transmitter release resulting from release of caged Ca2+ was not due to saturation or

  7. Calcium buffering properties of sarcoplasmic reticulum and calcium-induced Ca2+ release during the quasi-steady level of release in twitch fibers from frog skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fénelon, Karine; Lamboley, Cédric R.H.; Carrier, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the properties of the intrinsic Ca2+ buffers in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of cut fibers from frog twitch muscle. The concentrations of total and free calcium ions within the SR ([CaT]SR and [Ca2+]SR) were measured, respectively, with the EGTA/phenol red method and tetramethylmurexide (a low affinity Ca2+ indicator). Results indicate SR Ca2+ buffering was consistent with a single cooperative-binding component or a combination of a cooperative-binding component and a linear binding component accounting for 20% or less of the bound Ca2+. Under the assumption of a single cooperative-binding component, the most likely resting values of [Ca2+]SR and [CaT]SR are 0.67 and 17.1 mM, respectively, and the dissociation constant, Hill coefficient, and concentration of the Ca-binding sites are 0.78 mM, 3.0, and 44 mM, respectively. This information can be used to calculate a variable proportional to the Ca2+ permeability of the SR, namely d[CaT]SR/dt ÷ [Ca2+]SR (denoted release permeability), in experiments in which only [CaT]SR or [Ca2+]SR is measured. In response to a voltage-clamp step to −20 mV at 15°C, the release permeability reaches an early peak followed by a rapid decline to a quasi-steady level that lasts ∼50 ms, followed by a slower decline during which the release permeability decreases by at least threefold. During the quasi-steady level of release, the release amplitude is 3.3-fold greater than expected from voltage activation alone, a result consistent with the recruitment by Ca-induced Ca2+ release of 2.3 SR Ca2+ release channels neighboring each channel activated by its associated voltage sensor. Release permeability at −60 mV increases as [CaT]SR decreases from its resting physiological level to ∼0.1 of this level. This result argues against a release termination mechanism proposed in mammalian muscle fibers in which a luminal sensor of [Ca2+]SR inhibits release when [CaT]SR declines to a low level

  8. Releasing phosphorus from calcium for struvite fertilizer production from anaerobically digested dairy effluent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianxi; Bowers, Keith E; Harrison, Joseph H; Chen, Shulin

    2010-01-01

    Being a non-renewable resource and a source of potential water pollution, phosphorus could be recovered from animal manure in the form of struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O) to be used as a slow-release fertilizer. It was found recently that the majority of phosphorus in anaerobically digested dairy effluent is tied up in a fine suspended calcium-phosphate solid, thus becoming unavailable for struvite formation. Acidification and use of a chelating agent were investigated for converting the calcium-associated phosphorus in the digested effluent to dissolved phosphate ions, so that struvite can be produced. The results demonstrated that the phosphorus in the effluent was released into the solution by lowering the pH. In addition, the phosphorus concentration in the solution increased significantly with increased ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) concentration, as EDTA has a high stability constant with calcium. Most of the phosphorus (91%) was released into the solution after adding EDTA. Further, the freed phosphorus ion precipitated out as struvite provided that sufficient magnesium ions (Mg2+) were present in the solution. Furthermore, the phase structure of the solid precipitate obtained from the EDTA treatment matched well with standard struvite, based on the data from X-ray diffraction analysis. These results provide methods for altering the forms of phosphorus for the design and application of phosphorus-removal technologies for dairy wastewater management. PMID:20112536

  9. Calcium channel dynamics limit synaptic release in response to prosthetic stimulation with sinusoidal waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Jeng, Jed S.; Kelly, Shawn K.; Hartveit, Espen; Fried, Shelley I.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular electric stimulation with sinusoidal waveforms has been shown to allow preferential activation of individual types of retinal neurons by varying stimulus frequency. It is important to understand the mechanisms underlying this frequency dependence as a step towards improving methods of preferential activation. In order to elucidate these mechanisms, we implemented a morphologically realistic model of a retinal bipolar cell and measured the response to extracellular stimulation with sinusoidal waveforms. We compared the frequency response of a passive membrane model to the kinetics of voltage-gated calcium channels that mediate synaptic release. The passive electrical properties of the membrane exhibited lowpass filtering with a relatively high cutoff frequency (nominal value = 717 Hz). This cutoff frequency was dependent on intra-axonal resistance, with shorter and wider axons yielding higher cutoff frequencies. However, we found that the cutoff frequency of bipolar cell synaptic release was primarily limited by the relatively slow opening kinetics of Land T-type calcium channels. The cutoff frequency of calcium currents depended nonlinearly on stimulus amplitude, but remained lower than the cutoff frequency of the passive membrane model for a large range of membrane potential fluctuations. These results suggest that while it may be possible to modulate the membrane potential of bipolar cells over a wide range of stimulus frequencies, synaptic release will only be initiated at the lower end of this range. PMID:21628768

  10. Loading and release of doxycycline hyclate from strontium-substituted calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Alkhraisat, M Hamdan; Rueda, C; Cabrejos-Azama, J; Lucas-Aparicio, J; Mariño, F Tamimi; Torres García-Denche, J; Jerez, L Blanco; Gbureck, U; Cabarcos, E Lopez

    2010-04-01

    Novel Sr-substituted calcium phosphate cement (CPC) loaded with doxycycline hyclate (DOXY-h) was employed to elucidate the effect of strontium substitution on antibiotic delivery. The cement was prepared using as reactants Sr-substituted beta-tricalcium phosphate (Sr-beta-TCP) and acidic monocalcium phosphate monohydrate. Two different methods were used to load DOXY-h: (i) the adsorption on CPC by incubating the set cement in drug-containing solutions; and (ii) the use of antibiotic solution as the cement liquid phase. The results revealed that the Sr-substituted cement efficiently adsorbs the antibiotic, which is attributed to an enhanced accessibility to the drug-binding sites within this CPC. DOXY-h desorption is influenced by the initial adsorbed amount and the cement matrix type. Furthermore, the fraction of drug released from CPCs set with DOXY-h solution was higher, and the release rate was faster for the CPC prepared with 26.7% Sr-beta-TCP. The analysis of releasing profiles points to Fickian diffusion as the mechanism responsible for antibiotic delivery. We can conclude that Sr substitution in secondary calcium phosphate cements improves their efficiency for DOXY-h adsorption and release. The antibiotic loading method provides a way to switch from rapid and complete to slower and prolonged drug release. PMID:19879982

  11. Residual free calcium is not responsible for facilitation of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed Central

    Blundon, J A; Wright, S N; Brodwick, M S; Bittner, G D

    1993-01-01

    An increase in internal free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in the presynaptic terminal is often assumed to directly produce facilitation of neurotransmitter release. Using a Ca(2+)-activated potassium conductance as a bioassay for free [Ca2+]i in the presynaptic terminal of the crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) opener neuromuscular junction, we now demonstrate that free [Ca2+]i has a decay time constant (tau) of 1-4 msec, whereas facilitation of neurotransmitter release has a decay tau of 7-43 msec. In addition, facilitation of neurotransmitter release can be markedly different at times when free [Ca2+]i values and presynaptic membrane voltages are equal. We conclude that free [Ca2+]i in the presynaptic terminal is not directly responsible for facilitation of neurotransmitter release. Our data suggest that facilitation results from bound Ca2+ or some long-lived consequence of bound Ca2+. PMID:8105475

  12. A highly calcium-selective cation current activated by intracellular calcium release in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Delles, C; Haller, T; Dietl, P

    1995-08-01

    1. The whole-cell patch clamp technique and fluorescence microscopy with the Ca2+ indicators fura-2 and fluo-3 were used to measure the whole-cell current and the free intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. 2. In a Ca(2+)-free bath solution, thapsigargin (TG) caused a transient increase of [Ca2+]i. Subsequent addition of Ca2+ caused a long lasting elevation of [Ca2+]i. 3. In a Ca(2+)-free bath solution, extracellular application of TG, ATP or ionomycin, or intracellular application of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), caused a small but significant inward current (Iin) and a transient outward Ca(2+)-dependent K+ current (IK(Ca)), consistent with intracellular Ca2+ release. Subsequent addition of Ca2+ induced a prominent Iin with a current density of -4.2 +/- 0.7 pA pF-1. This Iin was unaffected by inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (IP4). 4. Na+ replacement by mannitol, N-methyl-D-glucamine+ (NMG+), aminomethylidin-trimethanol+ (Tris+) or choline+ reduced Iin by 54, 65, 52 and 56%, respectively. This indicates an apparent Ca2+ selectivity over Na+ of 26:1. Iin was, however, unaffected by replacing Cl- with gluconate- or by the K+ channel blocker charybdotoxin (CTX). 5. Iin was completely blocked by La3+ (IC50 = 0.77 microM). Consistently, La3+ completely reversed the TG-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i. SK&F 96365 (1-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-propoxyl]-1-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-ethyl-1H-im idazole) HCl did not inhibit the TG-induced Iin. It did, however, exhibit a biphasic effect on [Ca2+]i, consisting of an initial Ca2+ decay and a subsequent Ca2+ elevation. La3+ completely reversed the SK&F 96365-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i. 6. In the absence of Na+, Iin was dependent on the bath Ca2+ concentration (EC50 = 1.02 mM). Ca2+ replacement by Ba2+ or Mn2+ resulted in a reduction of Iin by 95 and 94%, respectively. 7. From these experiments we conclude that Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, induced by different independent

  13. Effect of calcium ions on the gelling and drug release characteristics of xanthan matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Sasa; Pavli, Matej; Kristl, Julijana

    2008-06-01

    Xanthan is a well-known biopolymer. It is an anionic polysaccharide, whose primary structure depends on the bacterial strain and fermentation conditions. Xanthan was extensively studied in combination with galactomannans, and over 90 patents cover the technology of this preparation. Our aim was to investigate the relation between the physical properties of a xanthan matrix in the absence or presence of calcium ions and its influence on the release of pentoxifylline. The release of pentoxifylline from xanthan tablets in purified water was shown to be very slow and governed by the process of polymer relaxation. The presence of calcium ions significantly increased the drug release, changing the release mechanism into a more diffusion controlled one. Xanthan matrices showed substantially faster and more extensive swelling in water than in the presence of Ca2+ ions. Surprisingly, negative correlation between drug release and degree of swelling was obtained for xanthan: the higher the swelling, the slower the drug release. Higher ionic strength led to lower erosion of xanthan tablets, and the gel layers formed were more rigid and of firmer texture, as shown by rheological experiments and textural profiling. The results indicate that the presence of Ca2+ ions in the solution or in matrices does not cause crosslinking of xanthan polymers, but causes charge screening of ionized groups on the trisaccharide side chains of xanthan, leading to lower inter-molecular repulsion and changing water arrangement. The understanding of the parameters influencing drug release leads to the conclusion that xanthan is suitable for controlled release formulations, especially with the incorporation of certain small counterions. PMID:18248802

  14. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is inexpensive, but is absorbed best when taken ... antacid products, such as Tums® and Rolaids®, contain calcium carbonate. Each pill or chew provides 200–400 mg ...

  15. Hollow silica nanospheres coated with insoluble calcium salts for pH-responsive sustained release of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuming; Fang, Qilong; Li, Han; Shi, Weike; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Jing; Jia, Weili; Yang, Lin

    2016-08-23

    Hollow silica nanospheres coated with biocompatible and pH-sensitive inorganic insoluble calcium salts including calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite have been successfully prepared. The results indicate that the nanospheres can efficiently load doxorubicin and release it in a pH-responsive and sustained manner, and improve the treatment efficacy significantly. PMID:27501741

  16. The involvement of actin, calcium channels and exocytosis proteins in somato-dendritic oxytocin and vasopressin release

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Vicky; Leng, Gareth; Ludwig, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Hypothalamic magnocellular neurons release vasopressin and oxytocin not only from their axon terminals into the blood, but also from their somata and dendrites into the extracellular space of the brain, and this can be regulated independently. Differential release of neurotransmitters from different compartments of a single neuron requires subtle regulatory mechanisms. Somato-dendritic, but not axon terminal release can be modulated by changes in intracellular calcium concentration [(Ca2+)] by release of calcium from intracellular stores, resulting in priming of dendritic pools for activity-dependent release. This review focuses on our current understanding of the mechanisms of priming and the roles of actin remodeling, voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCCs) and SNARE proteins in the regulation somato-dendritic and axon terminal peptide release. PMID:22934017

  17. A biocompatible hybrid material with simultaneous calcium and strontium release capability for bone tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J Carlos; Wacha, András; Gomes, Pedro S; Alves, Luís C; Fernandes, M Helena Vaz; Salvado, Isabel M Miranda; Fernandes, M Helena R

    2016-05-01

    The increasing interest in the effect of strontium in bone tissue repair has promoted the development of bioactive materials with strontium release capability. According to literature, hybrid materials based on the system PDMS-SiO2 have been considered a plausible alternative as they present a mechanical behavior similar to the one of the human bone. The main purpose of this study was to obtain a biocompatible hybrid material with simultaneous calcium and strontium release capability. A hybrid material, in the system PDMS-SiO2-CaO-SrO, was prepared with the incorporation of 0.05 mol of titanium per mol of SiO2. Calcium and strontium were added using the respective acetates as sources, following a sol-gel technique previously developed by the present authors. The obtained samples were characterized by FT-IR, solid-state NMR, and SAXS, and surface roughness was analyzed by 3D optical profilometry. In vitro studies were performed by immersion of the samples in Kokubo's SBF for different periods of time, in order to determine the bioactive potential of these hybrids. Surfaces of the immersed samples were observed by SEM, EDS and PIXE, showing the formation of calcium phosphate precipitates. Supernatants were analyzed by ICP, revealing the capability of the material to simultaneously fix phosphorus ions and to release calcium and strontium, in a concentration range within the values reported as suitable for the induction of the bone tissue repair. The material demonstrated to be cytocompatible when tested with MG63 osteoblastic cells, exhibiting an inductive effect on cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity. PMID:26952443

  18. Growth Associated Protein 43 Is Expressed in Skeletal Muscle Fibers and Is Localized in Proximity of Mitochondria and Calcium Release Units

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Simone; Morabito, Caterina; Paolini, Cecilia; Boncompagni, Simona; Pilla, Raffaele; Fanò-Illic, Giorgio; Mariggiò, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal Growth Associated Protein 43 (GAP43), also known as B-50 or neuromodulin, is involved in mechanisms controlling pathfinding and branching of neurons during development and regeneration. For many years this protein was classified as neuron-specific, but recent evidences suggest that a) GAP43 is expressed in the nervous system not only in neurons, but also in glial cells, and b) probably it is present also in other tissues. In particular, its expression was revealed in muscles from patients affected by various myopathies, indicating that GAP43 can no-longer considered only as a neuron-specific molecule. We have investigated the expression and subcellular localization of GAP43 in mouse satellite cells, myotubes, and adult muscle (extensor digitorum longus or EDL) using Western blotting, immuno-fluorescence combined to confocal microscopy and electron microscopy. Our in vitro results indicated that GAP43 is indeed expressed in both myoblasts and differentiating myotubes, and its cellular localization changes dramatically during maturation: in myoblasts the localization appeared to be mostly nuclear, whereas with differentiation the protein started to display a sarcomeric-like pattern. In adult fibers, GAP43 expression was evident with the protein labeling forming (in longitudinal views) a double cross striation reminiscent of the staining pattern of other organelles, such as calcium release units (CRUs) and mitochondria. Double immuno-staining and experiments done in EDL muscles fixed at different sarcomere lengths, allowed us to determine the localization, from the sarcomere Z-line, of GAP43 positive foci, falling between that of CRUs and of mitochondria. Staining of cross sections added a detail to the puzzle: GAP43 labeling formed a reticular pattern surrounding individual myofibrils, but excluding contractile elements. This work leads the way to further investigation about the possible physiological and structural role of GAP43 protein in adult fiber

  19. Calcium release channel RyR2 regulates insulin release and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, Gaetano; Pagano, Gennaro; Sardu, Celestino; Xie, Wenjun; Reiken, Steven; D’Ascia, Salvatore Luca; Cannone, Michele; Marziliano, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Guise, Theresa A.; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of several types of cells, including cardiomyocytes and pancreatic β cells. In cardiomyocytes, RyR2-dependent Ca2+ release is critical for excitation-contraction coupling; however, a functional role for RyR2 in β cell insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus remains controversial. Here, we took advantage of rare RyR2 mutations that were identified in patients with a genetic form of exercise-induced sudden death (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT]). As these mutations result in a “leaky” RyR2 channel, we exploited them to assess RyR2 channel function in β cell dynamics. We discovered that CPVT patients with mutant leaky RyR2 present with glucose intolerance, which was heretofore unappreciated. In mice, transgenic expression of CPVT-associated RyR2 resulted in impaired glucose homeostasis, and an in-depth evaluation of pancreatic islets and β cells from these animals revealed intracellular Ca2+ leak via oxidized and nitrosylated RyR2 channels, activated ER stress response, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased fuel-stimulated insulin release. Additionally, we verified the effects of the pharmacological inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ leak in CPVT-associated RyR2-expressing mice, in human islets from diabetic patients, and in an established murine model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Taken together, our data indicate that RyR2 channels play a crucial role in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. PMID:25844899

  20. Calcium Binding-Mediated Sustained Release of Minocycline from Hydrophilic Multilayer Coatings Targeting Infection and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiling; Nix, Camilla A.; Ercan, Utku K.; Gerstenhaber, Jonathan A.; Joshi, Suresh G.; Zhong, Yinghui

    2014-01-01

    Infection and inflammation are common complications that seriously affect the functionality and longevity of implanted medical implants. Systemic administration of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs often cannot achieve sufficient local concentration to be effective, and elicits serious side effects. Local delivery of therapeutics from drug-eluting coatings presents a promising solution. However, hydrophobic and thick coatings are commonly used to ensure sufficient drug loading and sustained release, which may limit tissue integration and tissue device communications. A calcium-mediated drug delivery mechanism was developed and characterized in this study. This novel mechanism allows controlled, sustained release of minocycline, an effective antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drug, from nanoscale thin hydrophilic polyelectrolyte multilayers for over 35 days at physiologically relevant concentrations. pH-responsive minocycline release was observed as the chelation between minocycline and Ca2+ is less stable at acidic pH, enabling ‘smart’ drug delivery in response to infection and/or inflammation-induced tissue acidosis. The release kinetics of minocycline can be controlled by varying initial loading, Ca2+ concentration, and Ca2+ incorporation into different layers, enabling facile development of implant coatings with versatile release kinetics. This drug delivery platform can potentially be used for releasing any drug that has high Ca2+ binding affinity, enabling its use in a variety of biomedical applications. PMID:24409292

  1. Phospholipase C and D regulation of Src, calcium release and membrane fusion during Xenopus laevis development.

    PubMed

    Stith, Bradley J

    2015-05-15

    This review emphasizes how lipids regulate membrane fusion and the proteins involved in three developmental stages: oocyte maturation to the fertilizable egg, fertilization and during first cleavage. Decades of work show that phosphatidic acid (PA) releases intracellular calcium, and recent work shows that the lipid can activate Src tyrosine kinase or phospholipase C during Xenopus fertilization. Numerous reports are summarized to show three levels of increase in lipid second messengers inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and sn 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) during the three different developmental stages. In addition, possible roles for PA, ceramide, lysophosphatidylcholine, plasmalogens, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, membrane microdomains (rafts) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate in regulation of membrane fusion (acrosome reaction, sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, and calcium release are discussed. The role of six lipases involved in generating putative lipid second messengers during fertilization is also discussed: phospholipase D, autotaxin, lipin1, sphingomyelinase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2. More specifically, proteins involved in developmental events and their regulation through lipid binding to SH3, SH4, PH, PX, or C2 protein domains is emphasized. New models are presented for PA activation of Src (through SH3, SH4 and a unique domain), that this may be why the SH2 domain of PLCγ is not required for Xenopus fertilization, PA activation of phospholipase C, a role for PA during the calcium wave after fertilization, and that calcium/calmodulin may be responsible for the loss of Src from rafts after fertilization. Also discussed is that the large DAG increase during fertilization derives from phospholipase D production of PA and lipin dephosphorylation to DAG. PMID:25748412

  2. Phospholipase C and D regulation of Src, calcium release and membrane fusion during Xenopus laevis development

    PubMed Central

    Stith, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes how lipids regulate membrane fusion and the proteins involved in three developmental stages: oocyte maturation to the fertilizable egg, fertilization and during first cleavage. Decades of work show that phosphatidic acid (PA) releases intracellular calcium, and recent work shows that the lipid can activate Src tyrosine kinase or phospholipase C during Xenopus fertilization. Numerous reports are summarized to show three levels of increase in lipid second messengers inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and sn 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) during the three different developmental stages. In addition, possible roles for PA, ceramide, lysophosphatidylcholine, plasmalogens, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, membrane microdomains (rafts) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate in regulation of membrane fusion (acrosome reaction, sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, and calcium release are discussed. The role of six lipases involved in generating putative lipid second messengers during fertilization is also discussed: phospholipase D, autotaxin, lipin1, sphingomyelinase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2. More specifically, proteins involved in developmental events and their regulation through lipid binding to SH3, SH4, PH, PX, or C2 protein domains is emphasized. New models are presented for PA activation of Src (through SH3, SH4 and a unique domain), that this may be why the SH2 domain of PLCγ is not required for Xenopus fertilization, PA activation of phospholipase C, a role for PA during the calcium wave after fertilization, and that calcium/calmodulin may be responsible for the loss of Src from rafts after fertilization. Also discussed is that the large DAG increase during fertilization derives from phospholipase D production of PA and lipin dephosphorylation to DAG. PMID:25748412

  3. Erosive effects of different acids on bovine enamel: release of calcium and phosphate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hannig, Christian; Hamkens, Arne; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Rengin; Attin, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    The present study intended to investigate minimal erosive effects of different acids on enamel during short time incubation via determination of calcium and phosphate dissolution. Bovine enamel specimens were eroded for 1-5 min with eight different acids of pH 2, 2.3 and 3 (citric (CA), maleic (MA), lactic (LA), tartaric (TA), phosphoric (PA), oxalic (OA), acetic (AA) and hydrochloric acid (HCl)). Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) release were determined photometrically using arsenazo III (calcium) and malachite green (phosphate) as substrates. Each subgroup contained eight enamel specimens. Amount of titratable acid was determined for all acidic solutions. MA, LA, TA, AA and HCl caused linear release of Ca and P, PA of Ca, CA of P. For CA, MA, LA, TA, AA, PA and HCl mineral loss was shown to be pH-dependent. Ca dissolution varied between 28.6+/-4.4 (LA, pH 2) and 2.4+/-0.7 nmol mm(-2)min(-1) (HCl, pH 3), P dissolution ranged between 17.2+/-2.6 (LA, pH 2) and 1.4+/-0.4 nmol mm(-2)min(-1) (HCl, pH 3). LA was one of the most erosive acids. AA was very erosive at pH 3. HCl and MA were shown to have the lowest erosive effects. There was only a weak correlation (r=0.28) between P and Ca release and the amount of titratable acid. The method of the present study allows investigation of minimal erosive effects via direct determination of P and Ca dissolution. During short time exposition at constant pH level, erosive effects mainly depend on pH and type of acid but not on amount of titratable acid. PMID:15848147

  4. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them ... in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and ...

  5. Controlled Release of Chemotherapeutic Platinum-Bisphosphonate Complexes from Injectable Calcium Phosphate Cements.

    PubMed

    Farbod, Kambiz; Sariibrahimoglu, Kemal; Curci, Alessandra; Hayrapetyan, Astghik; Hakvoort, Jan N W; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Iafisco, Michele; Margiotta, Nicola; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we present a method to release chemotherapeutic platinum-bisphosphonate (Pt-BP) complexes from apatitic calcium phosphate cements (CPCs). Pt-BP-loaded hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HA NPs) were added at different ratios to the powder phase of the cements, which contained poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres as porogens to accelerate their degradation. In vitro release kinetics of Pt-BP complexes revealed that the release rate of Pt species can be tuned by varying the amount of drug-loaded HA NPs as well as modifying the chemical structure of the Pt-BP complex to tailor its affinity with HA NPs. In addition, the incorporation of PLGA microspheres into the CPCs increased the degradation rate of the materials without affecting the release rate of Pt species. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the free Pt-BP complexes and Pt-BP-loaded CPCs was evaluated using both human osteosarcoma cancer cells (MG-63) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (h-BMMSCs). This study demonstrated that both free Pt-BP complexes and the releasates from the CPCs were antiproliferative in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, their antiproliferative activity was higher on MG-63 cells compared to h-BMMSC primary cells. In summary, it was shown that injectable CPCs can be rendered chemotherapeutically active by incorporation of HA NPs loaded with HA-binding Pt-BP complexes. PMID:27083055

  6. Caveolin 3 Is Associated with the Calcium Release Complex and Is Modified via in Vivo Triadin Modification†

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The triadin isoforms Trisk 95 and Trisk 51 are both components of the skeletal muscle calcium release complex. To investigate the specific role of Trisk 95 and Trisk 51 isoforms in muscle physiology, we overexpressed Trisk 95 or Trisk 51 using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in skeletal muscle of newborn mice. Overexpression of either Trisk 95 or Trisk 51 alters the muscle fiber morphology, while leaving unchanged the expression of the ryanodine receptor, the dihydropyridine receptor, and calsequestrin. We also observe an aberrant expression of caveolin 3 in both Trisk 95- and Trisk 51-overexpressing skeletal muscles. Using a biochemical approach, we demonstrate that caveolin 3 is associated with the calcium release complex in skeletal muscle. Taking advantage of muscle and non-muscle cell culture models and triadin null mouse skeletal muscle, we further dissect the molecular organization of the caveolin 3-containing calcium release complex. Our data demonstrate that the association of caveolin 3 with the calcium release complex occurs via a direct interaction with the transmembrane domain of the ryanodine receptor. Taken together, these data suggest that caveolin 3-containing membrane domains and the calcium release complex are functionally linked and that Trisk 95 and Trisk 51 are instrumental to the regulation of this interaction, the integrity of which may be crucial for muscle physiology. PMID:20565104

  7. Calcium currents and peptide release from neurohypophysial terminals are inhibited by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Wang, X M; Dayanithi, G; Lemos, J R; Nordmann, J J; Treistman, S N

    1991-11-01

    The effects of EtOH on peptide release and on high-threshold, voltage-activated calcium (Ca++) channels were examined in acutely dissociated rat neurohypophysial terminals. These terminals release the peptide hormones, arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin. Release of AVP from isolated intact neurohypophyses, induced by either electrical stimulation or elevated potassium, was inhibited by clinically relevant concentrations of EtOH. "Whole-cell" patch-clamp recording methods were used to study the effects of EtOH on voltage-activated Ca++ currents (ICa) in the peptidergic nerve terminals. Amplitudes of both fast-inactivating ICa and long-lasting ICa were reduced in EtOH, and the reduction in ICa did not result from a shift in its current-voltage or steady-state inactivation relationships. Only the fast-inactivating component recovered after removal of EtOH. The effects of EtOH on ICa could not be attributed to changes in osmolarity. In contrast to ICa, the fast, transient K+ current was insensitive to EtOH. These results suggest that EtOH-induced reduction of ICa in the peptidergic nerve terminals produces a decrease in AVP release, resulting in lowered plasma AVP levels. PMID:1941619

  8. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  9. Calcium uptake and release by isolated cortices and microsomes from the unfertilized egg of the sea urchin strongylocentrotus droebachiensis

    SciTech Connect

    Oberdorf, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Two subcellular fractions of the sea urchin egg were studied for their potential role in regulating the transient rise in cytosolic calcium that accompanies fertilization. Isolated cortices from unfertilized sea urchin eggs sequester calcium in an ATP dependent manner when incubated in a medium containing free calcium levels characteristic of the resting cell. This ATP dependent calcium uptake activity, measured in the presence of 5mM Na Azide to prevent mitochondrial accumulation, was increased by oxalate, and was blocked by 150 ..mu..M quercetin and 50 ..mu..M vanadate. Cortices preloaded with /sup 45/Ca in the presence of ATP dramatically increased their rate of calcium efflux upon the addition of (1) the calcium ionophore A23187 (10 ..mu..M), (2) trifluoperazine (200 ..mu..M), (3) concentrations of free calcium that activated cortical granule exocytosis, and (4) the calcium mobilizing agent inositol trisphosphate (IP3). This pool of calcium is most likely sequestered in the portion of the egg's endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that remains associated with the cortical region during its isolation. They have developed a method for obtaining a high yield of purified microsomal vesicles from whole eggs. This preparation also demonstrates ATP dependent calcium sequestering activity which increases in the presence of oxalate and has similar sensitivities to calcium transport inhibitors, however the isolated microsomal vesicles did not show any detectable release of calcium when exposed to IP3. Procedures originally developed for purifying calsequestrin were used to partially purify a 58,000 MW protein from the egg's microsomal vesicles.

  10. Influence of glucocorticoids on histamine release and 45calcium uptake by isolated rat mast cells.

    PubMed

    Grosman, N; Jensen, S M

    1984-01-01

    Hydrocortisone and prednisolone inhibited the histamine release from isolated rat mast cells induced by antigen, the ionophore A23187, and compound 48/80 in the absence and in the presence of calcium. Hydrocortisone reduced the response to the different releasing agents by 50% in the concentration range 2-6 X 10(-4) M, whereas prednisolone was about 1.5 times more potent. The inhibitory effect of hydrocortisone had a rapid onset of action and maximal inhibition was observed after preincubation for 20 minutes. The effect of hydrocortisone was reversed by including 2 mM glucose in the medium. The reversal was only partial with antigen and the ionophore A23187, indicating a greater energy requirement of these releasing agents compared with compound 48/80. The inhibition of the histamine release was accompanied by a concentration-related inhibition of the 45Ca uptake, except with the ionophore. The inhibition of the 45Ca uptake was also reversed by glucose, but differences were noted concerning the influence of preincubation time. The observations are explained by an association of 45Ca to cellular material, e.g. granules, secondary to the release process. The effects of hydrocortisone and prednisolone were qualitatively identical and were not observed with estriol. The glucocorticoid inhibition of histamine release does not seem to be caused by effects on phospholipase activity or cyclic AMP metabolism. The present observations are fully consistent with an impaired mitochondrial function as the mechanism for the mast cell effects of the glucocorticoids. PMID:6199955

  11. Antibacterial activity and ion release of bonding agent containing amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Nancy; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Chow, Laurence C.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries at the margins is a primary reason for restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop bonding agent with the double benefits of antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, to investigate the effects of NACP filler level and solution pH on Ca and P ion release from adhesive, and to examine the antibacterial and dentin bond properties. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) were synthesized. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) primer and adhesive served as control. DMADDM was incorporated into primer and adhesive at 5% by mass. NACP was incorporated into adhesive at filler mass fractions of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial bonding agents. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases from the cured adhesive samples were measured vs. filler level and solution pH of 7, 5.5 and 4. Results Adding 5% DMADDM and 10–40% NACP into bonding agent, and water-aging for 28 days, did not affect dentin bond strength, compared to SBMP control at 1 day (p > 0.1). Adding DMADDM into bonding agent substantially decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production. Total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci were greatly reduced for bonding agents containing DMADDM. Increasing NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive increased the Ca and P ion release by an order of magnitude. Decreasing solution pH from 7 to 4 increased the ion release from adhesive by 6–10 folds. Significance Bonding agents containing antibacterial DMADDM and remineralizer NACP were formulated to have Ca and P ion release, which increased with NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive. NACP adhesive was “smart” and dramatically increased the ion release at cariogenic pH 4, when these ions would be most-needed to inhibit caries. Therefore, bonding agent

  12. Activation of Src and release of intracellular calcium by phosphatidic acid during Xenopus laevis fertilization.

    PubMed

    Bates, Ryan C; Fees, Colby P; Holland, William L; Winger, Courtney C; Batbayar, Khulan; Ancar, Rachel; Bergren, Todd; Petcoff, Douglas; Stith, Bradley J

    2014-02-01

    We report a new step in the fertilization in Xenopus laevis which has been found to involve activation of Src tyrosine kinase to stimulate phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) which increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to release intracellular calcium ([Ca](i)). Molecular species analysis and mass measurements suggested that sperm activate phospholipase D (PLD) to elevate phosphatidic acid (PA). We now report that PA mass increased 2.7 fold by 1 min after insemination and inhibition of PA production by two methods inhibited activation of Src and PLCγ, increased [Ca](i) and other fertilization events. As compared to 14 other lipids, PA specifically bound Xenopus Src but not PLCγ. Addition of synthetic PA activated egg Src (an action requiring intact lipid rafts) and PLCγ as well as doubling the amount of PLCγ in rafts. In the absence of elevated [Ca](i), PA addition elevated IP3 mass to levels equivalent to that induced by sperm (but twice that achieved by calcium ionophore). Finally, PA induced [Ca](i) release that was blocked by an IP3 receptor inhibitor. As only PLD1b message was detected, and Western blotting did not detect PLD2, we suggest that sperm activate PLD1b to elevate PA which then binds to and activates Src leading to PLCγ stimulation, IP3 elevation and [Ca](i) release. Due to these and other studies, PA may also play a role in membrane fusion events such as sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and the large, late increase in sn 1,2-diacylglycerol in fertilization. PMID:24269904

  13. Dissolved Calcium and Magnesium Carbonates Promote Arsenate Release From Ferrihydrite in Flow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfield, S. L.; Bostick, B. C.

    2007-12-01

    Field data from water systems around the world have shown that arsenic can reach toxic concentrations in dynamic groundwater systems. This is generally in contrast to analogous static systems at circumneutral pH, where arsenic is strongly retained by sorption to iron (hydr)oxides. Our research examines the effect of calcium and magnesium carbonates on As(V) mobility. In both dynamic flow and static experiments, arsenate was pre- sorbed to poorly crystalline iron hydroxides (1-10% sorption capacity), with varying aqueous compositions including calcium, magnesium, carbonate, sulfate, lactate, and other common groundwater species (pH 7.5-8). Thus we investigated how the dissolution of common carbonate minerals, specifically CaCO3 and MgCO3, affect arsenic behavior in the context of groundwater solutions. Under static (batch) conditions, no measurable arsenic (<10 μg/L) is released into solutions containing alkaline earth metals (AEMs) and carbonates. When elevated concentrations of AEMs and carbonate are introduced by dynamic flow, however, arsenic is mobilized at up to 500 μg/L, releasing significant proportions the total arsenic present. This is only the case when both of these species are present; with other common ion pairs, little to no arsenic is released. These results indicate that arsenate adsorption is kinetically controlled under flow conditions, resulting in very different mobility relative to otherwise equivalent static systems. Furthermore, the combination of alkaline earth metals and carbonates promotes As(V) mobility in column-based systems. We propose that these phenomena indicate a combination of physical and chemical effects by which diffusion limitation becomes dominant in limiting arsenic sorption in flow systems. Many carbonate-buffered aquifers, as well as those undergoing rapid mineralization of organic matter, could be affected by these processes of AEM-carbonate-limited sorption and increased arsenic mobility.

  14. Activation of Src and release of intracellular calcium by phosphatidic acid during Xenopus laevis fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Ryan C.; Fees, Colby P.; Holland, William L.; Winger, Courtney C.; Batbayar, Khulan; Ancar, Rachel; Bergren, Todd; Petcoff, Douglas; Stith, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new step in the fertilization in Xenopus laevis which has been found to involve activation of Src tyrosine kinase to stimulate phospholipase C-γ (PLC- γ) which increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to release intracellular calcium ([Ca]i). Molecular species analysis and mass measurements suggested that sperm activate phospholipase D (PLD) to elevate phosphatidic acid (PA). We now report that PA mass increased 2.7 fold by 1 minute after insemination and inhibition of PA production by two methods inhibited activation of Src and PLCγ, increased [Ca]i and other fertilization events. As compared to 14 other lipids, PA strongly bound Xenopus Src but not PLCγ. Addition of synthetic PA activated egg Src (an action requiring intact lipid rafts) and PLCγ as well as doubling the amount of PLCγ in rafts. In the absence of elevated [Ca]i, PA addition elevated IP3 mass to levels equivalent to that induced by sperm (but twice that achieved by calcium ionophore). Finally, PA induced [Ca]i release that was blocked by an IP3 receptor inhibitor. As only PLD1b message was detected, and Western blotting did not detect PLD2, we suggest that sperm activate PLD1b to elevate PA which then binds to and activates Src leading to PLCγ stimulation, IP3 elevation and [Ca]i release. Due to these and other studies, PA may also play a role in membrane fusion events such as sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and the large, late increase in sn 1,2-diacylglycerol in fertilization. PMID:24269904

  15. Dopamine-induced oscillations of the pyloric pacemaker neuron rely on release of calcium from intracellular stores.

    PubMed

    Kadiri, Lolahon R; Kwan, Alex C; Webb, Watt W; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M

    2011-09-01

    Endogenously bursting neurons play central roles in many aspects of nervous system function, ranging from motor control to perception. The properties and bursting patterns generated by these neurons are subject to neuromodulation, which can alter cycle frequency and amplitude by modifying the properties of the neuron's ionic currents. In the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus, the anterior burster (AB) neuron is a conditional oscillator in the presence of dopamine (DA) and other neuromodulators and serves as the pacemaker to drive rhythmic output from the pyloric network. We analyzed the mechanisms by which DA evokes bursting in the AB neuron. Previous work showed that DA-evoked bursting is critically dependent on external calcium (Harris-Warrick RM, Flamm RE. J Neurosci 7: 2113-2128, 1987). Using two-photon microscopy and calcium imaging, we show that DA evokes the release of calcium from intracellular stores well before the emergence of voltage oscillations. When this release from intracellular stores is blocked by antagonists of ryanodine or inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor channels, DA fails to evoke AB bursting. We further demonstrate that DA enhances the calcium-activated inward current, I(CAN), despite the fact that it significantly reduces voltage-activated calcium currents. This suggests that DA-induced release of calcium from intracellular stores activates I(CAN), which provides a depolarizing ramp current that underlies endogenous bursting in the AB neuron. PMID:21676929

  16. Estradiol coupling to human monocyte nitric oxide release is dependent on intracellular calcium transients: evidence for an estrogen surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Prevot, V; Beauvillain, J C; Fimiani, C; Welters, I; Cadet, P; Breton, C; Pestel, J; Salzet, M; Bilfinger, T V

    1999-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that estrogen acutely stimulates constitutive NO synthase (cNOS) activity in human peripheral monocytes by acting on an estrogen surface receptor. NO release was measured in real time with an amperometric probe. 17beta-estradiol exposure to monocytes stimulated NO release within seconds in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas 17alpha-estradiol had no effect. 17beta-estradiol conjugated to BSA (E2-BSA) also stimulated NO release, suggesting mediation by a membrane surface receptor. Tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor inhibitor, antagonized the action of both 17beta-estradiol and E2-BSA, whereas ICI 182,780, a selective inhibitor of the nuclear estrogen receptor, had no effect. We further showed, using a dual emission microfluorometry in a calcium-free medium, that the 17beta-estradiol-stimulated release of monocyte NO was dependent on the initial stimulation of intracellular calcium transients in a tamoxifen-sensitive process. Leeching out the intracellular calcium stores abolished the effect of 17beta-estradiol on NO release. RT-PCR analysis of RNA obtained from the cells revealed a strong estrogen receptor-alpha amplification signal and a weak beta signal. Taken together, a physiological dose of estrogen acutely stimulates NO release from human monocytes via the activation of an estrogen surface receptor that is coupled to increases in intracellular calcium. PMID:10490972

  17. Ions Release and pH of Calcium Hydroxide-, Chlorhexidine- and Bioactive Glass-Based Endodontic Medicaments.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Freire, Laila Gonzales; Carvalho, Alexandre Pinheiro Lima de; Duarte, Marco Antonio Húngaro; Bauer, José; Gavini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated pH and release of calcium, sodium and phosphate ions from different medications in human dentin. Fifty premolars were prepared and randomly divided into groups: (CHX) - 2% chlorhexidine gel; (CHX + CH) - CHX + calcium hydroxide PA; (CH) - CH + propylene glycol 600; (NPBG) - experimental niobium phosphate bioactive glass + distilled water; (BG) - bioactive glass (Bio-Gran) + distilled water. The specimens were immersed in deionized water and the pH variations were measured. The quantification of ions in the solutions was made by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES) at 10 min, 24 h, 7, 14, 21 and 30 days. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey`s test, with a significance level of 5%. CH had the highest level of calcium ions release at 30 days, while CHX and BG released more sodium ions. BG, NPBG and CHX released a higher amount of phosphate ions. The pH of CH was significantly higher compared with the other groups. CH favored the greatest increase of pH and calcium ions release. The bioactive glasses released more sodium and phosphate ions and presented an alkaline pH immediately and after 30 days. PMID:27224568

  18. Functional calcium release channel formed by the carboxyl-terminal portion of ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, M B; Zhao, J; Takeshima, H; Ma, J

    1997-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is one of the key proteins involved in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in skeletal muscle, where it functions as a Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane. RyR consists of a single polypeptide of approximately 560 kDa normally arranged in a homotetrameric structure, which contains a carboxyl (C)-terminal transmembrane domain and a large amino (N)-terminal cytoplasmic domain. To test whether the carboxyl-terminal portion of RyR is sufficient to form a Ca2+ release channel, we expressed the full-length (RyR-wt) and C-terminal (RyR-C, approximately 130 kDa) RyR proteins in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and measured their Ca2+ release channel functions in planar lipid bilayer membranes. The single-channel properties of RyR-wt were found to be similar to those of RyR from skeletal muscle SR. The RyR-C protein forms a cation-selective channel that shares some of the channel properties with RyR-wt, including activation by cytoplasmic Ca2+ and regulation by ryanodine. Unlike RyR-wt, which exhibits a linear current-voltage relationship and inactivates at millimolar Ca2+, the channels formed by RyR-C display significant inward rectification and fail to close at high cytoplasmic Ca2+. Our results show that the C-terminal portion of RyR contains structures sufficient to form a functional Ca2+ release channel, but the N-terminal portion of RyR also affects the ion-conduction and calcium-dependent regulation of the Ca2+ release channel. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9284301

  19. In vitro release modulation from crosslinked pellets for site-specific drug delivery to the gastrointestinal tract. II. Physicochemical characterization of calcium-alginate, calcium-pectinate and calcium-alginate-pectinate pellets.

    PubMed

    Pillay, V; Fassihi, R

    1999-05-20

    Pellets of calcium-alginate, calcium-pectinate and calcium-alginate-pectinate were produced via crosslinking in an aqueous medium for site-specific drug delivery in the gastrointestinal tract. A comparative study of their physicochemical characteristics by means of texture analysis, modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MTDSC), scanning electron microscopy and swelling dynamics under different pH conditions was undertaken. It was found that the incorporation of low methoxylated pectin (i.e., degree of methoxylation approximately 35%) together with alginate appears to influence the degree of crosslinking and subsequently the physical, mechanical and resilience behavior. In general, texture analysis of various pellets indicated that both strength and resilience profiles were in the order of calcium-alginate>/=calcium-alginate-pectinate>calcium-pectinate. Calcium-alginate pellets were found to be viscoelastic, while calcium-pectinate was highly brittle. Through the application of MTDSC, depolymerization transitions, reversing and non-reversing heat flow were determined and interpreted for each formulation. Scanning electron microscopy and micro-thermal analysis revealed distinct morphological differences in each case. The influence of and nature of crosslinking, and textural properties of such pellets on drug release rate modulation is discussed. PMID:10332058

  20. Impaired Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Uptake and Release Promote Electromechanically and Spatially Discordant Alternans: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Seth H.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac electrical dynamics are governed by cellular-level properties, such as action potential duration (APD) restitution and intracellular calcium (Ca) handling, and tissue-level properties, including conduction velocity restitution and cell–cell coupling. Irregular dynamics at the cellular level can lead to instabilities in cardiac tissue, including alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the action potential and/or the intracellular Ca transient. In this study, we incorporate a detailed single cell coupled map model of Ca cycling and bidirectional APD-Ca coupling into a spatially extended tissue model to investigate the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca uptake and release properties on alternans and conduction block. We find that an intermediate SR Ca uptake rate and larger SR Ca release resulted in the widest range of stimulus periods that promoted alternans. However, both reduced SR Ca uptake and release promote arrhythmogenic spatially and electromechanically discordant alternans, suggesting a complex interaction between SR Ca handling and alternans characteristics at the cellular and tissue level. PMID:27385917

  1. LOX-1 regulates estrogenesis via intracellular calcium release from bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, J M; Vernunft, A; Krüger, B; Plinski, C; Viergutz, T

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol produced by ovarian granulosa cells triggers the luteinizing hormone surge which in turn initiates ovulation in female mammals. Disturbances in estradiol production from granulosa cells are a major reason for reproductive dysfunctions in dairy cows. Endogenous estradiol production might be altered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). Inhibition of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), a receptor of ox-LDL, leads to increased estrogenesis in granulosa cells. This activity is mediated by calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-dependent and ER-independent calcium pools. Inhibition of the LOX-1 signal transduction pathway is followed by mitochondrial alterations. The membrane potential ΔΨ increases and the ROS production decreases in mitochondria after blocking LOX-1. Our data indicate that blocking the LOX-1 receptor signal pathway might be a promising way to improve steroid hormone concentrations in metabolically highly active female mammals and, therefore, to defend against reproductive dysfunctions in humans and animals. PMID:24115745

  2. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M. Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues1. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus. PMID:12717445

  3. Calcium Release from Intra-Axonal Endoplasmic Reticulum Leads to Axon Degeneration through Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Rosario; Martinez, Nicolas W.; Lillo, Jorge; Pihan, Phillipe; Hernandez, Diego; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal degeneration represents an early pathological event in neurodegeneration, constituting an important target for neuroprotection. Regardless of the initial injury, which could be toxic, mechanical, metabolic, or genetic, degeneration of axons shares a common mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction and production of reactive oxygen species. Critical steps in this degenerative process are still unknown. Here we show that calcium release from the axonal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through ryanodine and IP3 channels activates the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and contributes to axonal degeneration triggered by both mechanical and toxic insults in ex vivo and in vitro mouse and rat model systems. These data reveal a critical and early ER-dependent step during axonal degeneration, providing novel targets for axonal protection in neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:24849352

  4. The human cardiac muscle ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel: identification, primary structure and topological analysis.

    PubMed

    Tunwell, R E; Wickenden, C; Bertrand, B M; Shevchenko, V I; Walsh, M B; Allen, P D; Lai, F A

    1996-09-01

    Rapid Ca2+ efflux from intracellular stores during cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling is mediated by the ryanodine-sensitive calcium-release channel, a large homotetrameric complex present in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. We report here the identification, primary structure and topological analysis of the ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel from human cardiac muscle (hRyR-2). Consistent with sedimentation and immunoblotting studies on the hRyR-2 protein, sequence analysis of ten overlapping cDNA clones reveals an open reading frame of 14901 nucleotides encoding a protein of 4967 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 564 569 Da for hRyR-2. In-frame insertions corresponding to eight and ten amino acid residues were found in two of the ten cDNAs isolated, suggesting that novel, alternatively spliced transcripts of the hRyR-2 gene might exist. Six hydrophobic stretches, which are present within the hRyR-2 C-terminal 500 amino acids and are conserved in all RyR sequences, may be involved in forming the transmembrane domain that constitutes the Ca(2+)-conducting pathway, in agreement with competitive ELISA studies with a RyR-2-specific antibody. Sequence alignment of hRyR-2 with other RyR isoforms indicates a high level of overall identity within the RyR family, with the exception of two important regions that exhibit substantial variability. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the RyR-2 isoform diverged from a single ancestral gene before the RyR-1 and RyR-3 isoforms to form a distinct branch of the RyR family tree. PMID:8809036

  5. Nitric oxide induces rapid, calcium-dependent release of vesicular glutamate and ATP from cultured rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bal-Price, Anna; Moneer, Zahid; Brown, Guy C

    2002-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO; 1 microM) or an NO donor (500 microM diethylenetriamine-nitric oxide, DETA-NONOate) caused rapid glutamate and ATP release from cultured rat cortical astrocytes. NO-induced glutamate release was prevented by calcium chelators (EGTA or BAPTA-AM) and an inhibitor of vesicular exocytosis (botulinum neurotoxin C, BoTx-C), but not by a glutamate transport inhibitor, L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (t-PDC), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin), or an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), and was not induced by mitochondrial respiratory inhibitors (myxothiazol or azide). Similarly to glutamate, NO-induced ATP release was also completely blocked by BAPTA-AM and BoTx-C, suggesting again a vesicular, calcium-dependent mechanism of release. Addition of DETA-NONOate (500 microM) to fura-2-loaded astrocytes induced a rapid, transient increase in intracellular calcium levels followed by a lower, sustained level of calcium entry. The latter was blocked by gadolinium (1 microM), an inhibitor of capacitative Ca(2+) entry. Thus, NO appears to cause rapid exocytosis of vesicular glutamate and ATP from astrocytes by raising intracellular calcium levels. Astrocytes activated by lipopolysaccharide/endotoxin and interferon-gamma to express inducible NO synthase (iNOS) maintained substantially higher extracellular glutamate levels than nonactivated cells or activated cells treated with an iNOS inhibitor (1400W), but the rate of glutamate uptake by these cells was similar. This suggests that NO from inflammatory-activated astrocytes causes release of astrocytic glutamate. NO-induced release of astrocytic glutamate and ATP may be important in physiological or pathological communication between astrocytes and neurons. PMID:12420311

  6. Calcium-deficient apatite: influence of granule size and consolidation mode on release and in vitro activity of vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Obadia, L; Amador, G; Daculsi, G; Bouler, J-M

    2003-03-01

    The use of dynamic compaction and isostatic compression to consolidate calcium phosphate powder loaded with a therapeutic agent avoids a sintering step that could destroy the drug. The present study applied these consolidation methods to vancomycin-loaded calcium-deficient apatite powder, using three granulometric fractions (40-80, 80-200 and 200-500 micrometer). In vitro release profiles were determined via an original system derived from low-pressure liquid chromatography. The biological activity of vancomycin was measured by an in vitro standardized bacteriologic assay, which showed that the drug is completely active after association with calcium phosphate. Regardless of the consolidation method and granulometric fraction used, release profiles were not significantly different and therefore adaptable to injectable suspensions. PMID:12527267

  7. Comparison of the calcium release channel of cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by target inactivation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, S.G.; Inui, Makoto; Chadwick, C.C.; Boucek, R.J. Jr.; Jung, C.Y.; Fleischer, S. )

    1989-02-07

    The calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum which triggers muscle contraction in excitation-contraction coupling has recently been isolated. The channel has been found to be morphologically identical with the feet structures of the junctional face membrane of terminal cisternae and consists of an oligomer of a unique high molecular weight polypeptide. In this study, the authors compare the target size of the calcium release channel from heart and skeletal muscle using target inactivation analysis. The target molecular weights of the calcium release channel estimated by measuring ryanodine binding after irradiation are similar for heart (139,000) and skeletal muscle (143,000) and are smaller than the monomeric unit (estimated to be about 360,000). The target size, estimated by measuring polypeptide remaining after irradiation, was essentially the same for heart and skeletal muscle, 1,061,000 and 1,070,000, respectively, indicating an oligomeric association of protomers. Thus, the calcium release channel of both cardiac and skeletal muscle reacts uniquely with regard to target inactivation analysis in that (1) the size by ryanodine binding is smaller than the monomeric unit and (2) a single hit leads to destruction of more than one polypeptide, by measuring polypeptide remaining. The target inactivation analysis studies indicate that heart and skeletal muscle receptors are structurally very similar.

  8. Enzymatic production by tissue extracts of a metabolite of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with calcium-releasing ability

    SciTech Connect

    Tich, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    This research investigated the occurrence and characterization of the metabolite in mammalian tissues. In all mammalian tissues tested, including rabbit liver, heart, spleen, kidney, and brain, the factor to convert NAD into its active metabolite was present. The conversion exhibited many characteristics of an enzymatic process such as temperature sensitivity, concentration dependence and protease sensitivity. Production of the NAD metabolite occurred within a time frame of 15-45 minutes at 37{degree}C, depending upon the particular preparation. The metabolite was isolated using high performance liquid chromatography from all mammalian tissues. This purified metabolite was then tested for its effectiveness in releasing intracellular calcium in an intact cell by microinjecting it into unfertilized sea urchin eggs. These eggs undergo a massive morphological change upon fertilization which is dependent upon the release of calcium from inside the cell. Upon injection of the NAD metabolite into unfertilized eggs, this same morphological change was observed showing indirectly that the metabolite released intracellular calcium from an intact, viable cell. In addition, radioactive studies using {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} loaded into permeabilized hepatocytes, indicated in preliminary studies that the NAD metabolite could also release calcium from intracellular stores of mammalian cells.

  9. Fluoride varnishes with calcium glycerophosphate: fluoride release and effect on in vitro enamel demineralization.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Peters, Bianca Glerean; Rios, Daniela; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Sampaio, Fabio Correia; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Bönecker, Marcelo José Strazzeri

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to assess the amount of fluoride (F) released from varnishes containing calcium glycerophosphate (CaGP) and (2) to assess the effect of the experimental varnishes on in vitro demineralization. Six test groups using 5 varnishes: base varnish (no active ingredients); Duraphat® (2.26% NaF); Duofluorid® (5.63% NaF/CaF2); experimental varnish 1 (1% CaGP/5.63% NaF/CaF2); experimental varnish 2 (5% CaGP/5.63% NaF/CaF2); and no varnish were set up. In stage 1, 60 acrylic blocks were randomly distributed into 6 groups (n = 10). Then 300 µg of each varnish was applied to each block. The blocks were immersed in deionized water, which was changed after 1, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours. Fluoride concentration in the water was analyzed using a fluoride electrode. In stage 2, 60 bovine enamel samples were distributed into 6 groups (n = 10), and treated with 300 µg of the respective varnish. After 6 h the varnish was removed and the samples were subjected to a 7-day in vitro pH cycle (6 h demineralization/18 h remineralization per day). The demineralization was measured using surface hardness. The results showed that both experimental varnishes released more fluoride than Duofluorid® and Duraphat® (p < 0.05), but Duraphat® showed the best preventive effect by decreasing enamel hardness loss (p < 0.05). Therefore, we conclude that even though (1) the experimental varnishes containing CaGP released greater amounts of F, (2) they did not increase in the preventive effect against enamel demineralization. PMID:26176358

  10. Doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is associated with a decrease in calcium release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a chronic rabbit model.

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, D A; Atkinson, J B; Olson, R D; Buck, S; Cusack, B J; Fleischer, S; Boucek, R J

    1993-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a highly effective cancer chemotherapeutic agent that produces a dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that limits its clinical usefulness. Clinical and animal studies of morphological changes during the early stages of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy have suggested that the sarcoplasmic reticulum, the intracellular membrane system responsible for myoplasmic calcium regulation in adult mammalian heart, may be the early target of doxorubicin. To detect changes in the calcium pump protein or the calcium release channel (ryanodine receptor) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum during chronic doxorubicin treatment, rabbits were treated with intravenous doxorubicin (1 mg/kg) twice weekly for 12 to 18 doses. Pair-fed controls received intravenous normal saline. The severity of cardiomyopathy was scored by light and electron microscopy of left ventricular papillary muscles. Developed tension was measured in isolated atrial strips. In subcellular fractions from heart, [3H]ryanodine binding was decreased in doxorubicin-treated rabbits (0.33 +/- 0.03 pmol/mg) compared with control rabbits (0.66 +/- 0.02 pmol/mg; P < 0.0001). The magnitude of the decrease in [3H]ryanodine binding correlated with both the severity of the cardiomyopathy graded by pathology score (light and electron microscopy) and the decrease in developed tension in isolated atrial strips. Bmax for [3H]ryanodine binding and the amount of immunoreactive ryanodine receptor by Western blot analysis using sequence-specific antibody were both decreased, consistent with a decrease in the amount of calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum in doxorubicin-treated rabbits. In contrast, there was no decrease in the amount or the activity of the calcium pump protein of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in doxorubicin-treated rabbits. Doxorubicin treatment did not decrease [3H]ryanodine binding or the amount of immunoreactive calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle. Since the sarcoplasmic

  11. The Effects of Electrical Stimuli on Calcium Change and Histamine Release in Rat Basophilic Leukemia Mast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Wu, Zu-Hui; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2013-06-01

    We apply electric fields at different frequencies of 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 kHz to the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) mast cells in calcium-containing or calcium-free buffers. The stimuli cause changes of the intracellular calcium ion concentration [Ca2+]i as well as the histamine. The [Ca2+]i increases when the frequency of the external electric field increases from 100 Hz to 10 kHz, and then decreases when the frequency further increases from 10 kHz to 100 kHz, showing a peak at 100 kHz. A similar frequency dependence of the histamine release is also found. The [Ca2+]i and the histamine releases at 100 Hz are about the same as the values of the control group with no electrical stimulation. The ruthenium red (RR), an inhibitor to the TRPV (transient receptor potential (TRP) family V) channels across the cell membrane, is used in the experiment to check whether the electric field stimuli act on the TRPV channels. Under an electric field of 10 kHz, the [Ca2+]i in a calcium-concentration buffer is about 3.5 times as much as that of the control group with no electric stimulation, while the [Ca2+]i in a calcium-free buffer is only about 2.2 times. Similar behavior is also found for the histamine release. RR blockage effect on the [Ca2+]i decrease is statistically significant (~75%) when mast cells in the buffer with calcium are stimulated with a 10 kHz electric field in comparison with the result without the RR treatment. This proves that TRPVs are the channels that calcium ions inflow through from the extracellular environment under electrical stimuli. Under this condition, the histamine is also released following a similar way. We suggest that, as far as an electric stimulation is concerned, an application of ac electric field of 10 kHz is better than other frequencies to open TRPV channels in mast cells, and this would cause a significant calcium influx resulting in a significant histamine release, which could be one of the mechanisms for electric therapy.

  12. In situ cross-linking of sodium alginate with calcium and aluminum ions to sustain the release of theophylline from polymeric matrices.

    PubMed

    Nokhodchi, Ali; Tailor, Anish

    2004-12-01

    Small matrices of calcium alginate or aluminium alginate have been investigated as possible controlled release systems for drugs. The objective of the present study was to sustain the release of theophylline from alginate matrices using different concentrations of aluminium chloride and calcium chloride in presence and absence of HPMC. Tablets containing differing concentrations of aluminium and calcium chloride were produced and the release rate of theophylline was tested using the basket dissolution apparatus over 8 h. Increasing amounts of aluminium chloride from 0.0001 to 0.00068 moles decreased the release of theophylline from 95.1 +/- 0.27 to 29.5 +/- 1.5, indicating a significant effect of aluminium ions on a reduction in the release rate of theophylline from sodium alginate matrices. In the case of matrices containing different concentrations of calcium ions, as the concentration of calcium chloride increased, the release rate increased to an optimum then declined after this. This was due to insufficient calcium ions being available to cross-link with the sodium alginate to form an insoluble gel. The effect of aluminium ions, as this is a trivalent ion compared to calcium, which is a divalent ion, aluminium ions are able to decrease the release rate with a smaller concentration compared to calcium ions. The results also showed that the presence of HPMC caused a reduction in release rate of theophylline from alginate matrices containing calcium chloride. Whereas, in the case of alginate matrices containing aluminium chloride the release rate of theophylline increased in presence of HPMC. For comparing the dissolution data, dissolution efficiency (DE) was used. The values of DE are consistent with the dissolution data. The results show that within a formulation series, DE values generally decrease when the cation concentration increases and this criterion can be used to describe the effect of calcium and aluminium ions on the release behaviour of theophylline

  13. Polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis is involved in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Nicola A; Lillycrop, Karen A; Fielding, Barbara; Torrens, Christopher; Hanson, Mark A; Burdge, Graham C

    2015-10-01

    Stimulation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) α1-adrenoceptors induces myosin phosphorylation and vasoconstriction via mobilisation of intracellular calcium and production of specific eicosanoids. Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved, although the precise mechanism is not known. To address this, we characterised PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells and determined its role in intracellular calcium release and eicosanoid production. Murine VSM cells converted 18:2n-6 to longer chain PUFA including 22:5n-6. Δ6 (D6d) and Δ5 (D5d) desaturase, and elongase (Elovl) 5 were expressed. Elovl2 was not detected in human, mouse or rat VSM cells, or in rat or mouse aortae, but tit was not associated with hypermethylation of its promoter. D6d or D5d inhibition reduced 18:3n-6 and 20:4n-6 synthesis, respectively, and induced concentration-related decrease in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release, and in PGE2 and PGF2α secretion. Together these findings suggest that PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved in calcium release associated with vasoconstriction. PMID:26324193

  14. A new hand-held optical reflectometer to measure enamel erosion: correlation with surface hardness and calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Baumann, Tommy; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the surface reflection intensity (SRI) was measured from enamel with different induced erosion degrees using a hand-held pen-size reflectometer (Hand-Held) and a Table-Top reflectometer. To validate the Hand-Held reflectometer, we correlated its optical signals with the change of surface microhardness (SMH), and amount of calcium released from the enamel samples during erosion. We used 124 tooth enamel specimens that were exposed to an erosive challenge of either 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 minutes. SRI and SMH were measured before and after the erosive challenge and we also measured the amount of calcium released to the citric acid. Relative SRI loss (rSRIloss) and relative SMH loss (rSMHloss) were calculated. rSRIloss from the Hand-Held and the Table-Top reflectometers were similar and significantly correlated to rSMHloss and calcium release. The regression analyses showed a significant association between rSRIloss from both reflectometers and rSMHloss and calcium, showing that both reflectometers can be used to measure erosive demineralization of enamel. The Hand-Held reflectometer is capable of assessing in vitro erosion, correlating to other commonly used methods. It is small, easy to handle and provides fast measurement, being a possible candidate to measure erosion in clinical studies. PMID:27121129

  15. Self-organization of the reticular structure of polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, M. R.; Roldugin, V. I.

    2010-08-01

    The morphology of block samples and coatings of reticular polyurethane were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The morphology was correlated with the internal stresses that appeared in the coatings during their formation. A scenario of the self-assembly of complex structures in reticular polymers was suggested. The boundary between the structural elements of the supermolecular level was found to be strained.

  16. Coherence and frequency in the reticular activating system (RAS)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit 1) electrical coupling mainly in GABAergic cells, and 2) gamma band activity in virtually all of the cells. Specifically, cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) 1) show electrical coupling, and 2) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanism behind electrical coupling is important because the stimulant modafinil was shown to increase electrical coupling. We also provide recent findings demonstrating that all cells in the PPN and Pf have high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential to gamma band activity. On the other hand, all SubCD, and some PPN, cells manifested sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep-wake control based on transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. We speculate that continuous sensory input will modulate coupling and induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. PMID:23044219

  17. The modulation of placental lactogen release by opioids: a role for extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Petit, A; Gallo-Payet, N; Bellabarba, D; Lehoux, J G; Bélisle, S

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported that kappa opioids stimulated the release of human placental lactogen (hPL) from trophoblastic cells and that this effect was prevented by co-incubation with naloxone. We also reported that adenylate cyclase was not directly involved in this process. In order to understand the post-receptor events mediating hPL release by opioids in the human placenta, we studied the role of extracellular calcium. Human trophoblastic cells obtained by trypsin digestion were cultured for 48 h in Ham's F-10 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), 200 U/ml penicillin, and 200 micrograms/ml streptomycin. 45Ca2+ influx was then measured by filtration on glass-fiber filters. We observed a time- and dose-dependent stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx by ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) with an EC50 of 0.5 nM and a maximal stimulation of 196% over control. This effect was completely blocked by naloxone, a non-specific opioid antagonist, and by nor-binaltorphimine, a specific kappa antagonist. We also demonstrated that U-50,488 (kappa agonist) had the same stimulatory effect as EKC (221 +/- 25% of control). D-Ala2,NMe-Phe4,Gly-ol5)-enkephalin (DAGO) (mu agonist) slightly stimulated Ca2+ influx (128 +/- 5% of control, p > 0.05) whereas D-Ser2,Leu,Thr6)-enkephalin (DSLET) (delta agonist) had no effect. Pre-incubation of trophoblastic cells with pertussis toxin (PTX) did not affect the EKC-induced 45Ca2+ influx, suggesting that this placental opiate effect is not coupled with PTX-sensitive G proteins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7684340

  18. Ryanodine receptors/calcium release channels in heart failure and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Marks, A R

    2001-04-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) ions are second messengers in signaling pathways in all types of cells. They regulate muscle contraction, electrical signals which determine the cardiac rhythm and cell growth pathways in the heart. In the past decade cDNA cloning has provided clues as to the molecular structure of the intracellular Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyR, and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, IP3R) on the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) and an understanding of how these molecules regulate Ca2+ homeostasis in the heart is beginning to emerge. The intracellular Ca2+ release channels form a distinct class of ion channels distinguished by their structure, size, and function. Both RyRs and IP3Rs have gigantic cytoplasmic domains that serve as scaffolds for modulatory proteins that regulate the channel pore located in the carboxy terminal 10% of the channel sequence. The channels are tetramers comprised of four RyR or IP3R subunits. RyR2 is required for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in the heart. Using co-sedimentation and co-immunoprecipitation we have defined a macromolecular complex comprised of RyR2, FKBP12.6, PKA, the protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A, and an anchoring protein mAKAP. We have shown that protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of RyR2 dissociates FKBP12.6 and regulates the channel open probability (P(o)). In failing human hearts RyR2 is PKA hyperphosphorylated resulting in defective channel function due to increased sensitivity to Ca2+-induced activation. PMID:11273716

  19. Contractile function is unaltered in diaphragm from mice lacking calcium release channel isoform 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, J. S.; Takeshima, H.; Hamilton, S. L.; Reid, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses at least two isoforms of the calcium release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (RyR1 and RyR3). Whereas the function of RyR1 is well defined, the physiological significance of RyR3 is unclear. Some authors have suggested that RyR3 participates in excitation-contraction coupling and that RyR3 may specifically confer resistance to fatigue. To test this hypothesis, we measured contractile function of diaphragm strips from adult RyR3-deficient mice (exon 2-targeted mutation) and their heterozygous and wild-type littermates. In unfatigued diaphragm, there were no differences in isometric contractile properties (twitch characteristics, force-frequency relationships, maximal force) among the three groups. Our fatigue protocol (30 Hz, 0.25 duty cycle, 37 degrees C) depressed force to 25% of the initial force; however, lack of RyR3 did not accelerate the decline in force production. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to higher frequencies and was depressed in fatigued diaphragm; lack of RyR3 did not exaggerate these changes. We therefore provide evidence that RyR3 deficiency does not alter contractile function of adult muscle before, during, or after fatigue.

  20. RNA editing of the human serotonin 5-HT(2C) receptor delays agonist-stimulated calcium release.

    PubMed

    Price, R D; Sanders-Bush, E

    2000-10-01

    RNA encoding the human 5-HT(2C) receptor undergoes adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing events at five positions in the putative second intracellular loop, with a corresponding reduction in receptor/G-protein coupling. Agonist-stimulated calcium release was examined in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts stably expressing the nonedited human INI (hINI) or the edited hVSV or hVGV variants. We hypothesized that different receptor isoforms would show altered dynamics of agonist-induced calcium release. The three isoforms showed a rightward shift in agonist concentration-response curves for eliciting calcium release (EC(50) values: hINI, 2.2 nM; hVSV, 15 nM; hVGV, 49 nM). Additionally, the hVGV receptor showed a blunted and delayed [Ca(2+)](i) peak compared with the hINI or hVSV receptor isoforms. These distinctions in agonist-induced [Ca(2+)](i) release imply that edited 5-HT(2C) receptors may produce distinct physiological responses within the central nervous system. PMID:10999958

  1. Aqueous Black Colloids of Reticular Nanostructured Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanca, S. E.; Fritzsche, W.; Dellith, J.; Froehlich, F.; Undisz, A.; Deckert, V.; Krafft, C.; Popp, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since ancient times, noble gold has continuously contributed to several aspects of life from medicine to electronics. It perpetually reveals its new features. We report the finding of a unique form of gold, reticular nanostructured gold (RNG), as an aqueous black colloid, for which we present a one-step synthesis. The reticules consist of gold crystals that interconnect to form compact strands. RNG exhibits high conductivity and low reflection, and these features, coupled with the high specific surface area of the material, could prove valuable for applications in electronics and catalysis. Due to high absorption throughout the visible and infrared domain, RNG has the potential to be applied in the construction of sensitive solar cells or as a substrate for Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Aqueous Black Colloids of Reticular Nanostructured Gold

    PubMed Central

    Stanca, S. E.; Fritzsche, W.; Dellith, J.; Froehlich, F.; Undisz, A.; Deckert, V.; Krafft, C.; Popp, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since ancient times, noble gold has continuously contributed to several aspects of life from medicine to electronics. It perpetually reveals its new features. We report the finding of a unique form of gold, reticular nanostructured gold (RNG), as an aqueous black colloid, for which we present a one-step synthesis. The reticules consist of gold crystals that interconnect to form compact strands. RNG exhibits high conductivity and low reflection, and these features, coupled with the high specific surface area of the material, could prove valuable for applications in electronics and catalysis. Due to high absorption throughout the visible and infrared domain, RNG has the potential to be applied in the construction of sensitive solar cells or as a substrate for Raman spectroscopy. PMID:25600497

  3. Measurement of calcium release due to inositol trisphosphate receptors in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Casas, Mariana; Altamirano, Francisco; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calcium transients elicited by IP(3) receptors upon electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells (slow calcium signals) are often hard to visualize due to their relatively small amplitude compared to the large transient originated from ryanodine receptors associated to excitation-contraction coupling. The study of slow calcium transients, however, is relevant due to their function in regulation of muscle gene expression and in the process of excitation-transcription coupling. Discussed here are the procedures used to record slow calcium signals from both cultured mouse myotubes and from cultured adult skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:22130849

  4. Local Release of Antibiotics for Surgical Site Infection Management Using High-Purity Calcium Sulfate: An In Vitro Elution Study

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, John J.; Florance, Hannah; Robinson, Matthew T.; Michell, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to characterize the elution of four antibiotics from pharmaceutical-grade calcium sulfate beads and show that the eluted antibiotics retained efficacy. Methods: Calcium sulfate was combined with gentamicin, tobramycin, vancomycin, or rifampicin (ratio: 20 g of calcium sulfate, to 240 mg, 500 mg, 900 mg, and 600 mg of antibiotic, respectively). Three grams of beads were immersed in 4 mL of sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 37°C. At each time point (4, 8, 24 h; 2, 7, 14, 28, 42 d), eluates were removed for analysis by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The antimicrobial efficacy of antibiotics combined with calcium sulfate beads after 42 d was tested by a modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion assay. Results: All samples showed a generally exponential decay in the eluted antibiotic concentration. At the first time point, both gentamicin and tobramycin had eluted to a peak concentration of approximately 10,000 mcg/mL. For rifampicin, the peak concentration occurred at 24 h, whereas for vancomycin, it occurred at 48 h. The eluted concentrations exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration for common periprosthetic joint infection pathogens for the entire span of the 42 study days. Mass spectrometry confirmed all antibiotics were unchanged when eluted from the calcium sulfate carrier. Antimicrobial efficacy was unaltered after 42 d in combination with calcium sulfate at 37°C. Conclusions: Pharmaceutical-grade calcium sulfate has the potential for targeted local release of tobramycin, gentamicin, vancomycin, and rifampicin over a clinically meaningful time period. PMID:25148101

  5. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Stochastic spontaneous calcium release events trigger premature ventricular complexes by overcoming electrotonic load

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fernando O.; Shiferaw, Yohannes; Prassl, Anton J.; Boyle, Patrick M.; Vigmond, Edward J.; Plank, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    Aims Premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) due to spontaneous calcium (Ca) release (SCR) events at the cell level can precipitate ventricular arrhythmias. However, the mechanistic link between SCRs and PVC formation remains incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the conditions under which delayed afterdepolarizations resulting from stochastic subcellular SCR events can overcome electrotonic source–sink mismatch, leading to PVC initiation. Methods and results A stochastic subcellular-scale mathematical model of SCR was incorporated in a realistic model of the rabbit ventricles and Purkinje system (PS). Elevated levels of diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ (CaSR) were imposed until triggered activity was observed, allowing us to compile statistics on probability, timing, and location of PVCs. At CaSR≥ 1500 µmol/L PVCs originated in the PS. When SCR was incapacitated in the PS, PVCs also emerged in the ventricles, but at a higher CaSR (≥1550 µmol/L) and with longer waiting times. For each model configuration tested, the probability of PVC occurrence increased from 0 to 100% within a well-defined critical CaSR range; this transition was much more abrupt in organ-scale models (∼50 µmol/L CaSR range) than in the tissue strand (∼100 µmol/L) or single-cell (∼450 µmol/L) models. Among PVCs originating in the PS, ∼68% were located near Purkinje-ventricular junctions (<1 mm). Conclusion SCR events overcome source–sink mismatch to trigger PVCs at a critical CaSR threshold. Above this threshold, PVCs emerge due to increased probability and reduced variability in timing of SCR events, leading to significant diastolic depolarization. Sites of lower electronic load, such as the PS, are preferential locations for triggering. PMID:25969391

  7. Chronic diabetes increases advanced glycation end products on cardiac ryanodine receptors/calcium-release channels.

    PubMed

    Bidasee, Keshore R; Nallani, Karuna; Yu, Yongqi; Cocklin, Ross R; Zhang, Yinong; Wang, Mu; Dincer, U Deniz; Besch, Henry R

    2003-07-01

    Decrease in cardiac contractility is a hallmark of chronic diabetes. Previously we showed that this defect results, at least in part, from a dysfunction of the type 2 ryanodine receptor calcium-release channel (RyR2). The mechanism(s) underlying RyR2 dysfunction is not fully understood. The present study was designed to determine whether non-cross-linking advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on RyR2 increase with chronic diabetes and if formation of these post-translational complexes could be attenuated with insulin treatment. Overnight digestion of RyR2 from 8-week control animals (8C) with trypsin afforded 298 peptides with monoisotopic mass (M+H(+)) >or=500. Digestion of RyR2 from 8-week streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals (8D) afforded 21% fewer peptides, whereas RyR2 from 6-week diabetic/2-week insulin-treated animals generated 304 peptides. Using an in-house PERLscript algorithm, search of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass data files identified several M+H(+) peaks corresponding to theoretical RyR2 peptides with single N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)-lysine, imidazolone A, imidazone B, pyrraline, or 1-alkyl-2-formyl-3,4-glycosyl pyrrole modification that were present in 8D but not 8C. Insulin treatment minimized production of some of these nonenzymatic glycation products. These data show for the first time that AGEs are formed on intracellular RyR2 during diabetes. Because AGE complexes are known to compromise protein activity, these data suggest a potential mechanism for diabetes-induced RyR2 dysfunction. PMID:12829653

  8. Calsequestrin and the calcium release channel of skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Beard, N A; Laver, D R; Dulhunty, A F

    2004-05-01

    Calsequestrin is by far the most abundant Ca(2+)-binding protein in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal and cardiac muscle. It allows the Ca2+ required for contraction to be stored at total concentrations of up to 20mM, while the free Ca2+ concentration remains at approximately 1mM. This storage capacity confers upon muscle the ability to contract frequently with minimal run-down in tension. Calsequestrin is highly acidic, containing up to 50 Ca(2+)-binding sites, which are formed simply by clustering of two or more acidic residues. The Kd for Ca2+ binding is between 1 and 100 microM, depending on the isoform, species and the presence of other cations. Calsequestrin monomers have a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa and contain approximately 400 residues. The monomer contains three domains each with a compact alpha-helical/beta-sheet thioredoxin fold which is stable in the presence of Ca2+. The protein polymerises when Ca2+ concentrations approach 1mM. The polymer is anchored at one end to ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ release channels either via the intrinsic membrane proteins triadin and junctin or by binding directly to the RyR. It is becoming clear that calsequestrin has several functions in the lumen of the SR in addition to its well-recognised role as a Ca2+ buffer. Firstly, it is a luminal regulator of RyR activity. When triadin and junctin are present, calsequestrin maximally inhibits the Ca2+ release channel when the free Ca2+ concentration in the SR lumen is 1mM. The inhibition is relieved when the Ca2+ concentration alters, either because of small changes in the conformation of calsequestrin or its dissociation from the junctional face membrane. These changes in calsequestrin's association with the RyR amplify the direct effects of luminal Ca2+ concentration on RyR activity. In addition, calsequestrin activates purified RyRs lacking triadin and junctin. Further roles for calsequestrin are indicated by the kinase activity of the protein, its

  9. Cytosolic and nuclear calcium signaling in atrial myocytes: IP3-mediated calcium release and the role of mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Hohendanner, Felix; Maxwell, Joshua T; Blatter, Lothar A

    2015-01-01

    In rabbit atrial myocytes Ca signaling has unique features due to the lack of transverse (t) tubules, the spatial arrangement of mitochondria and the contribution of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor-induced Ca release (IICR). During excitation-contraction coupling action potential-induced elevation of cytosolic [Ca] originates in the cell periphery from Ca released from the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (j-SR) and then propagates by Ca-induced Ca release from non-junctional (nj-) SR toward the cell center. The subsarcolemmal region between j-SR and the first array of nj-SR Ca release sites is devoid of mitochondria which results in a rapid propagation of activation through this domain, whereas the subsequent propagation through the nj-SR network occurs at a velocity typical for a propagating Ca wave. Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca uptake with the Ca uniporter blocker Ru360 accelerates propagation and increases the amplitude of Ca transients (CaTs) originating from nj-SR. Elevation of cytosolic IP3 levels by rapid photolysis of caged IP3 has profound effects on the magnitude of subcellular CaTs with increased Ca release from nj-SR and enhanced CaTs in the nuclear compartment. IP3 uncaging restricted to the nucleus elicites ‘mini’-Ca waves that remain confined to this compartment. Elementary IICR events (Ca puffs) preferentially originate in the nucleus in close physical association with membrane structures of the nuclear envelope and the nucleoplasmic reticulum. The data suggest that in atrial myocytes the nucleus is an autonomous Ca signaling domain where Ca dynamics are primarily governed by IICR. PMID:25891132

  10. Gamma Band Activity in the Reticular Activating System

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high-threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep–wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep–wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem–thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep–wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by pre-conscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of

  11. The atrazine metabolite diaminochlorotriazine suppresses LH release from murine LβT2 cells by suppressing GnRH-induced intracellular calcium transients

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Gregory P.; Tjalkens, Ronald B.; Hanneman, William H.

    2013-01-01

    The primary metabolite of the herbicide atrazine (ATRA), diaminochlorotriazine (DACT), has been suggested to cause disruption in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis leading to inhibition of luteinizing hormone (LH) release. DACT is a reactive electrophile known to form covalent protein adducts both in vitro and in vivo following ATRA exposure and maybe targeting proteins involved in GnRH-induced calcium signaling and subsequent LH release. To test this hypothesis, LβT2 pituitary cells were exposed to 300 μM DACT for 24 hrs and examined by fluorescence microscopy for GnRH-induced changes in intracellular calcium and LH release. LβT2 cells exposed to DACT had markedly diminished GnRH-induced intracellular calcium transients and a significant decreased LH release in response to GnRH. DACT appeared to cause a selective decrease in caffeine-sensitive ryanodine receptor-operated calcium stores in LβT2 cells, rather than in thapsigargin-sensitive ER calcium stores. This sensitivity correlated with the formation of covalent protein adducts by DACT, as determined by mass spectrometry. ERp57 was identified by mass spectrometry as a target of DACT adduction in the ER that could potentially mediate the effects of DACT on inhibition of GnRH-induced calcium signaling and inhibition of LH release. Intracellular calcium responses to GnRH and release of LH were restored in DACT-treated cells with the addition of a calcium ionophore (A23187). These data suggest that DACT forms adducts on proteins involved in calcium handling within the ER and that dysfunction in this critical signaling system is associated with loss of normal sensitivity to GnRH and subsequent decreased release of LH. PMID:24052811

  12. Comparative evaluation of the calcium release from mineral trioxide aggregate and its mixture with glass ionomer cement in different proportions and time intervals – An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Surbhi; Vivekananda Pai, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Addition of glass ionomer cement (GIC) has been suggested to improve the setting time and handling characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). This study evaluated the effect of adding GIC to MTA in terms of calcium release, an issue that has not been previously studied. Materials and methods The study comprised four groups with five samples each: a control group of MTA alone and experimental groups I (1MTA:1GIC), II (2MTA:1GIC), and III (1MTA:2GIC) based on the mixture of MTA and GIC powders in the respective proportions by volume. Calcium release from the samples was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry at 15 min, 6 h, 24 h, and 1 week after setting. The level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results Groups I (1MTA:1GIC) and III (1MTA:2GIC) released significantly less calcium than the control group at all time periods, except at 15 min for group I. Group II (2MTA:1GIC) showed no significant difference in calcium release compared to the control at any time period. Group II exhibited greater calcium release than group I or III at all time periods, with significant differences between groups I and II at 1 week and between groups I and III at 24 h and 1 week. There were no statistical differences in calcium release between groups I and III. Conclusions Adding GIC to improve the setting time and handling properties of the MTA powder can be detrimental to the calcium-releasing ability of the resultant mixture, depending on the proportion of GIC added. Adding MTA and GIC at a proportion of 2:1 by volume did not impact calcium release from the mixture. These findings should be verified through further clinical studies. PMID:26644757

  13. Neuronal calcium sensor-1 deletion in the mouse decreases motivation and dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Ng, Enoch; Varaschin, Rafael K; Su, Ping; Browne, Caleb J; Hermainski, Joanna; Le Foll, Bernard; Pongs, Olaf; Liu, Fang; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Roder, John C; Wong, Albert H C

    2016-03-15

    Calcium sensors detect intracellular calcium changes and interact with downstream targets to regulate many functions. Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 (NCS-1) or Frequenin is widely expressed in the nervous system, and involved in neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity and learning. NCS-1 interacts with and regulates dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) internalization and is implicated in disorders like schizophrenia and substance abuse. However, the role of NCS-1 in behaviors dependent on dopamine signaling in the striatum, where D2R is most highly expressed, is unknown. We show that Ncs-1 deletion in the mouse decreases willingness to work for food. Moreover, Ncs-1 knockout mice have significantly lower activity-dependent dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens core in acute slice recordings. In contrast, food preference, responding for conditioned reinforcement, ability to represent changes in reward value, and locomotor response to amphetamine are not impaired. These studies identify novel roles for NCS-1 in regulating activity-dependent striatal dopamine release and aspects of motivated behavior. PMID:26738968

  14. Mini-dystrophin Expression Down-regulates IP3-mediated Calcium Release Events in Resting Dystrophin-deficient Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balghi, Haouaria; Sebille, Stéphane; Mondin, Ludivine; Cantereau, Anne; Constantin, Bruno; Raymond, Guy; Cognard, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We present here evidence for the enhancement, at rest, of an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)–mediated calcium signaling pathway in myotubes from dystrophin-deficient cell lines (SolC1(−)) as compared to a cell line from the same origin but transfected with mini-dystrophin (SolD(+)). With confocal microscopy, the number of sites discharging calcium (release site density [RSD]) was quantified and found more elevated in SolC1(−) than in SolD(+) myotubes. Variations of membrane potential had no significant effect on this difference, and higher resting [Ca2+]i in SolC1(−) (Marchand, E., B. Constantin, H. Balghi, M.C. Claudepierre, A. Cantereau, C. Magaud, A. Mouzou, G. Raymond, S. Braun, and C. Cognard. 2004. Exp. Cell Res. 297:363–379) cannot explain alone higher RSD. The exposure with SR Ca2+ channel inhibitors (ryanodine and 2-APB) and phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122) significantly reduced RSD in both cell types but with a stronger effect in dystrophin-deficient SolC1(−) myotubes. Immunocytochemistry allowed us to localize ryanodine receptors (RyRs) as well as IP3 receptors (IP3Rs), IP3R-1 and IP3R-2 isoforms, indicating the presence of both RyRs-dependent and IP3-dependent release systems in both cells. We previously reported evidence for the enhancement, through a Gi protein, of the IP3-mediated calcium signaling pathway in SolC1(−) as compared to SolD(+) myotubes during a high K+ stimulation (Balghi, H., S. Sebille, B. Constantin, S. Patri, V. Thoreau, L. Mondin, E. Mok, A. Kitzis, G. Raymond, and C. Cognard. 2006. J. Gen. Physiol. 127:171–182). Here we show that, at rest, these regulation mechanisms are also involved in the modulation of calcium release activities. The enhancement of resting release activity may participate in the calcium overload observed in dystrophin-deficient myotubes, and our findings support the hypothesis of the regulatory role of mini-dystrophin on intracellular signaling. PMID:16847098

  15. Contractions induced by a calcium-triggered release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of single skinned cardiac cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fabiato, A; Fabiato, F

    1975-01-01

    1. Fragments of single cardiac cells were obtained by homogenization of ventricular tissue from adult rats. Remaining pieces of sacrolemma were removed by micro-dissection. Tension was recorded from the ends of the skinned (sarcolemma-free) cells with a photodiode force transducer. 2. In the presence of a strong buffering of the free [Ca2+] with 4-0 mM total EGTA, a tonic tension was obtained that increased according to t sigmoid curve when the free ([Ca2+] was increased from 10(-6-75)M to 10(-5-0)M. This curve was not modified by the destruction of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) by the detergent Brij 58. Therefore, the tonic tension corresponded to the direct effect of the free [Ca2+] present in the buffer on the myofilaments. 3. In the presence of a slight buffering of the free [Ca2+] with 0-050 mM total EGTA, cyclic contractions were observed that were attributed to cyclic releases and re-sequestrations of Ca2+ by the SR. The absence of effect of azide and ruthenium red on the cyclic contractions obtained at a free [Ca2+] lower than 10(-6-50)M demonstrated that the mitochondria played no role in the triggering of these contractions. 4. Cyclic contractions were induced by a slight variation of free [Ca2+] in the buffer from 10(-7-65)M to 10(-7-40)M. Their amplitude at 10(-7-40)M free Ca2+ was equal to the tonic tension developed by a free [Ca2+] 20 times higher applied to the myofilaments when the SR was destroyed by detergent or functionally inhibited by high total [EGTA]. It was concluded that these cyclic contractions corresponded to a Ca2+-triggered release of Ca2+ from the SR. 5. The cyclic contractions were induced by the filling of the SR with Ca2+ to a critical level at which it released a fraction of the Ca2+ it contained. Each contraction was followed by a re-sequestration of Ca2+, the kinetics of which conditioned the duration of the cycles. 6. The amplitude of the cyclic contractions increased when the free [Ca2+] that triggered them was increased

  16. Reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in living mouse cochleae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Kemp, David

    2016-08-30

    It is commonly believed that the exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing depends on outer hair cells which generate forces for amplifying sound-induced basilar membrane vibrations, yet how cellular forces amplify vibrations is poorly understood. In this study, by measuring subnanometer vibrations directly from the reticular lamina at the apical ends of outer hair cells and from the basilar membrane using a custom-built heterodyne low-coherence interferometer, we demonstrate in living mouse cochleae that the sound-induced reticular lamina vibration is substantially larger than the basilar membrane vibration not only at the best frequency but surprisingly also at low frequencies. The phase relation of reticular lamina to basilar membrane vibration changes with frequency by up to 180 degrees from ∼135 degrees at low frequencies to ∼-45 degrees at the best frequency. The magnitude and phase differences between reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations are absent in postmortem cochleae. These results indicate that outer hair cells do not amplify the basilar membrane vibration directly through a local feedback as commonly expected; instead, they actively vibrate the reticular lamina over a broad frequency range. The outer hair cell-driven reticular lamina vibration collaboratively interacts with the basilar membrane traveling wave primarily through the cochlear fluid, which boosts peak responses at the best-frequency location and consequently enhances hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity. PMID:27516544

  17. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Katharine L.; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites—a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Methods Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Key Results Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine—intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling—had no impact on these effects. Conclusions We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections. PMID:25933382

  18. Endomorphin-2 is Released from Newborn Rat Primary Sensory Neurons in a Frequency- and Calcium- Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Scanlin, Heather L.; Carroll, Elizabeth A.; Jenkins, Victoria K.; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that endomorphins, endogenous mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists, modulate synaptic transmission in both somatic and visceral sensory pathways. Here we show that endomorphin-2 (END-2) is expressed in newborn rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and nodose-petrosal ganglion complex (NPG) neurons, and rarely co-localizes with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In order to examine activity-dependent release of END-2 from neurons, we established a model using dispersed cultures of DRG and NPG cells activated by patterned electrical field stimulation. To detect release of END-2, we developed a novel rapid capture ELISA, in which END-2 capture antibody was added to neuronal cultures shortly before their electrical stimulation. The conventional assay was effective at reliably detecting END-2 only when the cells were stimulated in the presence of CTAP, a MOR-selective antagonist. This suggests that the strength of the novel assay is related primarily to rapid capture of released END-2 before it binds to endogenous MORs. Using the rapid capture ELISA, we found that stimulation protocols known to induce plastic changes at sensory synapses were highly effective at releasing END-2. Removal of extracellular calcium or blocking voltage-activated calcium channels significantly reduced the release. Together, our data provide the first evidence that END-2 is expressed by newborn DRG neurons of all sizes found in this age group, and can be released from these, as well as from NPG neurons, in an activity-dependent manner. These results point to END-2 as a likely mediator of activity-dependent plasticity in sensory pathways. PMID:18513316

  19. Endomorphin-2 is released from newborn rat primary sensory neurons in a frequency- and calcium-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Scanlin, Heather L; Carroll, Elizabeth A; Jenkins, Victoria K; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2008-05-01

    Recent evidence indicates that endomorphins, endogenous mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists, modulate synaptic transmission in both somatic and visceral sensory pathways. Here we show that endomorphin-2 (END-2) is expressed in newborn rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and nodose-petrosal ganglion complex (NPG) neurons, and rarely co-localizes with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In order to examine activity-dependent release of END-2 from neurons, we established a model using dispersed cultures of DRG and NPG cells activated by patterned electrical field stimulation. To detect release of END-2, we developed a novel rapid capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in which END-2 capture antibody was added to neuronal cultures shortly before their electrical stimulation. The conventional assay was effective at reliably detecting END-2 only when the cells were stimulated in the presence of CTAP, a MOR-selective antagonist. This suggests that the strength of the novel assay is related primarily to rapid capture of released END-2 before it binds to endogenous MORs. Using the rapid capture ELISA, we found that stimulation protocols known to induce plastic changes at sensory synapses were highly effective at releasing END-2. Removal of extracellular calcium or blocking voltage-activated calcium channels significantly reduced the release. Together, our data provide the first evidence that END-2 is expressed by newborn DRG neurons of all sizes found in this age group, and can be released from these, as well as from NPG neurons, in an activity-dependent manner. These results point to END-2 as a likely mediator of activity-dependent plasticity in sensory pathways. PMID:18513316

  20. Mitochondria buffer non-toxic calcium loads and release calcium through the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and sodium/calcium exchanger in rat basal forebrain neurons.

    PubMed

    Murchison, D; Griffith, W H

    2000-01-31

    Mitochondria participate in intracellular Ca2+ buffering and signalling. They are also major mediators of cell death. Toxic Ca2+ accumulation in mitochondria is widely believed to initiate cell death in many cell types by opening the permeability transition pore (PTP). In non-neuronal cells, the PTP has been implicated as a Ca2+ release mechanism in physiological Ca2+ signalling. In neurons, Ca2+ release from mitochondria has been attributed primarily to mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Using fura-2 ratiometric microfluorimetry in acutely dissociated rat basal forebrain neurons, we show that mitochondria are able to buffer non-toxic Ca2+ loads arising from caffeine-sensitive internal stores or from extracellular influx through voltage gated channels. We also show that these non-toxic Ca2+ loads are reversibly released from mitochondria through the PTP and the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Evoked Ca2+ transients have characteristic peak and shoulder features mediated by mitochondrial buffering and release. Depolarizing mitochondria with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP, 5 microM) causes release of mitochondrial Ca2+ and prevents Ca2+ uptake. In CCCP, the magnitudes of evoked Ca2+ transients are increased, and the peak and shoulder features are eliminated. The PTP antagonist, cyclosporin A, (CSA, 2 microM) and the Na+/Ca2+ exchange blocker, clonazepam, (CLO, 20 microM) reversibly inhibited both the shoulder features of evoked Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ transients associated with CCCP application. We suggest that central neuronal mitochondria buffer and release Ca2+ through the PTP and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger during physiological Ca2+ signalling. We also suggest that CLO blocks both the PTP and the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. PMID:10784115

  1. Ryanodine receptor sensitivity governs the stability and synchrony of local calcium release during cardiac excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Wescott, Andrew P; Jafri, M Saleet; Lederer, W J; Williams, George S B

    2016-03-01

    Calcium-induced calcium release is the principal mechanism that triggers the cell-wide [Ca(2+)]i transient that activates muscle contraction during cardiac excitation-contraction coupling (ECC). Here, we characterize this process in mouse cardiac myocytes with a novel mathematical action potential (AP) model that incorporates realistic stochastic gating of voltage-dependent L-type calcium (Ca(2+)) channels (LCCs) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channels (the ryanodine receptors, RyR2s). Depolarization of the sarcolemma during an AP stochastically activates the LCCs elevating subspace [Ca(2+)] within each of the cell's 20,000 independent calcium release units (CRUs) to trigger local RyR2 opening and initiate Ca(2+) sparks, the fundamental unit of triggered Ca(2+) release. Synchronization of Ca(2+) sparks during systole depends on the nearly uniform cellular activation of LCCs and the likelihood of local LCC openings triggering local Ca(2+) sparks (ECC fidelity). The detailed design and true SR Ca(2+) pump/leak balance displayed by our model permits investigation of ECC fidelity and Ca(2+) spark fidelity, the balance between visible (Ca(2+) spark) and invisible (Ca(2+) quark/sub-spark) SR Ca(2+) release events. Excess SR Ca(2+) leak is examined as a disease mechanism in the context of "catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT)", a Ca(2+)-dependent arrhythmia. We find that that RyR2s (and therefore Ca(2+) sparks) are relatively insensitive to LCC openings across a wide range of membrane potentials; and that key differences exist between Ca(2+) sparks evoked during quiescence, diastole, and systole. The enhanced RyR2 [Ca(2+)]i sensitivity during CPVT leads to increased Ca(2+) spark fidelity resulting in asynchronous systolic Ca(2+) spark activity. It also produces increased diastolic SR Ca(2+) leak with some prolonged Ca(2+) sparks that at times become "metastable" and fail to efficiently terminate. There is a huge margin of safety for

  2. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  3. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Lewis, Tommy L; Hirabayashi, Yusuke; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  4. Isolated P/Q Calcium Channel Deletion in Layer VI Corticothalamic Neurons Generates Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bomben, Valerie C.; Aiba, Isamu; Qian, Jing; Mark, Melanie D.; Herlitze, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Generalized spike-wave seizures involving abnormal synchronization of cortical and underlying thalamic circuitry represent a major category of childhood epilepsy. Inborn errors of Cacna1a, the P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel α subunit gene, expressed throughout the brain destabilize corticothalamic rhythmicity and produce this phenotype. To determine the minimal cellular lesion required for this network disturbance, we used neurotensin receptor 1 (Ntsr1) cre-driver mice to ablate floxed Cacna1a in layer VI pyramidal neurons, which supply the sole descending cortical synaptic input to thalamocortical relay cells and reticular interneurons and activate intrathalamic circuits. Targeted Cacna1a ablation in layer VI cells resulted in mice that display a robust spontaneous spike-wave absence seizure phenotype accompanied by behavioral arrest and inhibited by ethosuximide. To verify the selectivity of the molecular lesion, we determined that P/Q subunit proteins were reduced in corticothalamic relay neuron terminal zones, and confirmed that P/Q-mediated glutamate release was reduced at these synapses. Spike-triggered exocytosis was preserved by N-type calcium channel rescue, demonstrating that evoked release at layer VI terminals relies on both P/Q and N-type channels. Whereas intrinsic excitability of the P/Q channel depleted layer VI neurons was unaltered, T-type calcium currents in the postsynaptic thalamic relay and reticular cells were dramatically elevated, favoring rebound bursting and seizure generation. We find that an early P/Q-type release defect, limited to synapses of a single cell-type within the thalamocortical circuit, is sufficient to remodel synchronized firing behavior and produce a stable generalized epilepsy phenotype. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study dissects a critical component of the corticothalamic circuit in spike-wave epilepsy and identifies the developmental importance of P/Q-type calcium channel-mediated presynaptic glutamate release

  5. Discrepancy in calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and intracellular acidic stores for the protection of the heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Aseel; Babiker, Fawzi

    2016-09-01

    We and others have demonstrated a protective effect of pacing postconditioning (PPC) against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the mechanisms underlying this protection are not completely clear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the novel intracellular acidic stores (AS). Isolated rat hearts (n = 6 per group) were subjected to coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion using a modified Langendorff system. Cardiac hemodynamics and contractility were assessed using a data acquisition program, and cardiac injury was evaluated by creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. Hearts were subjected to 30 min of regional ischemia, produced by ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The hearts were also subjected to PPC (3 cycles of 30 s of left ventricle (LV) pacing alternated with 30 s of right atrium (RA) pacing) and/or were treated during reperfusion with agonists or antagonists of release of calcium from SR or AS. PPC significantly (P < 0.05) normalized LV, contractility, and coronary vascular dynamics and significantly (P < 0.001) decreased heart enzyme levels compared to the control treatments. The blockade of SR calcium release resulted in a significant (P < 0.01) recovery in LV function and contractility and a significant reduction in CK and LDH levels (P < 0.01) when applied alone or in combination with PPC. Interestingly, the release of calcium from AS alone or in combination with PPC significantly improved LV function and contractility (P < 0.05) and significantly decreased the CK and LDH levels (P < 0.01) compared to the control treatments. An additive effect was produced when agonism of calcium release from AS or blockade of calcium release from the SR was combined with PPC. Calcium release from AS and blockade of calcium release from the SR protect the heart against I

  6. Intracellular calcium stores drive slow non-ribbon vesicle release from rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minghui; Križaj, David; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2014-01-01

    Rods are capable of greater slow release than cones contributing to overall slower release kinetics. Slow release in rods involves Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). By impairing release from ribbons, we found that unlike cones where release occurs entirely at ribbon-style active zones, slow release from rods occurs mostly at ectopic, non-ribbon sites. To investigate the role of CICR in ribbon and non-ribbon release from rods, we used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy as a tool for visualizing terminals of isolated rods loaded with fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dyes and synaptic vesicles loaded with dextran-conjugated pH-sensitive rhodamine. We found that rather than simply facilitating release, activation of CICR by ryanodine triggered release directly in rods, independent of plasma membrane Ca2+ channel activation. Ryanodine-evoked release occurred mostly at non-ribbon sites and release evoked by sustained depolarization at non-ribbon sites was mostly due to CICR. Unlike release at ribbon-style active zones, non-ribbon release did not occur at fixed locations. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-tracker dye in rod terminals showed that ER extends continuously from synapse to soma. Release of Ca2+ from terminal ER by lengthy depolarization did not significantly deplete Ca2+ from ER in the perikaryon. Collectively, these results indicate that CICR-triggered release at non-ribbon sites is a major mechanism for maintaining vesicle release from rods and that CICR in terminals may be sustained by diffusion of Ca2+ through ER from other parts of the cell. PMID:24550779

  7. Nerve-released acetylcholine contracts urinary bladder smooth muscle by inducing action potentials independently of IP3-mediated calcium release.

    PubMed

    Nausch, Bernhard; Heppner, Thomas J; Nelson, Mark T

    2010-09-01

    Nerve-released ACh is the main stimulus for contraction of urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM). Here, the mechanisms by which ACh contracts UBSM are explored by determining Ca(2+) and electrical signals induced by nerve-released ACh. Photolysis of caged inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) evoked Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Electrical field stimulation (20 Hz) induced Ca(2+) waves within the smooth muscle that were present only during stimulus application. Ca(2+) waves were blocked by inhibition of muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) with atropine and depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) stores with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), and therefore likely reflect activation of IP(3) receptors (IP(3)Rs). Electrical field stimulation also increased excitability to induce action potentials (APs) that were accompanied by Ca(2+) flashes, reflecting Ca(2+) entry through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) during the action potential. The evoked Ca(2+) flashes and APs occurred as a burst with a lag time of approximately 1.5 s after onset of stimulation. They were not inhibited by blocking IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) waves, but by blockers of mAChRs (atropine) and VDCCs (diltiazem). Nerve-evoked contractions of UBSM strips were greatly reduced by blocking VDCCs, but not by preventing IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) signaling with cyclopiazonic acid or inhibition of PLC with U73122. These results indicate that ACh released from nerve varicosities induces IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) waves during stimulation; but contrary to expectations, these signals do not appear to participate in contraction. In addition, our data provide compelling evidence that UBSM contractions evoked by nerve-released ACh depend on increased excitability and the resultant Ca(2+) entry through VDCCs during APs. PMID:20573989

  8. Somato-axodendritic release of oxytocin into the brain due to calcium amplification is essential for social memory.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-07-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is released into the brain from the cell soma, axons, and dendrites of neurosecretory cells in the hypothalamus. Locally released OT can activate OT receptors, form inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and elevate intracellular free calcium (Ca(2+)) concentrations [(Ca(2+)) i ] in self and neighboring neurons in the hypothalamus, resulting in further OT release: i.e., autocrine or paracrine systems of OT-induced OT release. CD38-dependent cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is also involved in this autoregulation by elevating [Ca(2+)] i via Ca(2+) mobilization through ryanodine receptors on intracellular Ca(2+) pools that are sensitive to both Ca(2+) and cADPR. In addition, it has recently been reported that heat stimulation and hyperthermia enhance [Ca(2+)] i increases by Ca(2+) influx, probably through TRPM2 cation channels, suggesting that cADPR and TRPM2 molecules act as Ca(2+) signal amplifiers. Thus, OT release is not simply due to depolarization-secretion coupling. Both of these molecules play critical roles not only during labor and milk ejection in reproductive females, but also during social behavior in daily life in both genders. This was clearly demonstrated in CD38 knockout mice in that social behavior was impaired by reduction of [Ca(2+)] i elevation and subsequent OT secretion. Evidence for the associations of CD38 with social behavior and psychiatric disorder is discussed, especially in subjects with autism spectrum disorder. PMID:26586001

  9. Effects of shear stress on intracellular calcium change and histamine release in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenzhong; Chen, Jiyao; Zhou, Luwei

    2009-01-01

    Massage, one form of physical therapy, is widely used for a large number of musculoskeletal disorders, but its exact mechanism still remains to be elucidated. One hypothesis is that the shear stress caused by massage may induce cutaneous mast cells to release histamine, thereby improving the local tissue microcirculation of blood. In the present work, a mast cell line (rat basophilic leukemia cells, RBL-2H3) was used in vitro to study cellular responses to the stimulus of shear stress generated by a rotating rotor in a cell dish. The intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]c) was studied by confocal fluorescence microscopy with Fluo-3/AM staining and the released histamine was measured with a fluorescence spectrometer using o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) staining. An elevation of [Ca2+]c occurred immediately after the shear stress, followed by histamine release. However, both [Ca2+]c increase and histamine release disappeared when a Ca2+-free saline was used, indicating that the rise in the [Ca2+]c is due to a Ca2+ influx from the extracellular buffer. Furthermore, Ruthenium red, a transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) inhibitor, could effectively block the shear stressinduced histamine release, suggesting that TRPV membrane proteins are the likely targets of the shear stress. Because histamine is a well-known mediator of microvascular tissue dilation, these results may have an important impact on understanding the mechanism involved in massage therapy. PMID:19888909

  10. A new, nongenomic estrogen action: the rapid release of intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Morley, P; Whitfield, J F; Vanderhyden, B C; Tsang, B K; Schwartz, J L

    1992-09-01

    We have investigated the effects of steroids on the intracellular calcium ion concentration [Ca2+]i in chicken granulosa cells obtained from the two largest preovulatory follicles of laying hens. [Ca2+]i was measured in cells loaded with the Ca(2+)-responsive fluorescent dye fura-2. The resting [Ca2+]i in these cells was 100 +/- 5 nM. There was an immediate (i.e. less than 5 sec) 4- to 8-fold increase in [Ca2+]i in all of the 76 cells examined after the addition of 10(-7) M estradiol-17 bdta. Estradiol-17 beta was effective between 10(-10)-10(-6) M. Estradiol-17 alpha, estrone, and estriol (10(-8)-10(-6) M) were as effective as estradiol-17 beta, but the progestins, pregnenolone, and progesterone, and the androgens, testosterone, androstenedione, or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone were ineffective at concentrations up to 10(-5) M. The prompt estradiol-17 beta-induced [Ca2+]i spike was not affected by incubating the cells in Ca(2+)-free medium containing 2 mM EGTA or by pretreating them with the Ca2+ channel blockers lanthanum (1 mM), cobalt (5 mM), methoxyverapamil (D600; 50 microM), or nifedipine (20 microM). The estrogen-triggered [Ca2+]i surge was also not affected by pretreating the cells with the conventional estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen (10(-5) M), or the RNA and protein synthesis inhibitors actinomycin D (1 microgram/ml) and cycloheximide (1 microgram/ml), but was abolished by pretreating the cells with inhibitors of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis, neomycin (1.5 mM) and U-73,122 (2.5 microM). The closely related, but inactive, compound U-73,343 (1 microM) did not affect the estrogen-triggered [Ca2+]i surge. Estradiol-17 beta (10(-7) M), but not progesterone (10(-5) M), also triggered a large [Ca2+]i surge in pig granulosa cells, which, like the [Ca2+]i surge in chicken granulosa cells, was almost immediate, transient, and unaffected by incubation in Ca(2+)-free medium or pretreatment with methoxyverapamil (D600; 50 microM), lanthanum (1 mM), or

  11. Up-regulation of ryanodine receptor expression increases the calcium-induced calcium release and spontaneous calcium signals in cerebral arteries from hindlimb unloaded rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Luc; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Prevot, Anne; Macrez, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume. Consequently, astronauts' body pressure is modified so that the upright blood pressure gradient is abolished, thereby inducing a modification in cerebral blood pressure. This effect is mimicked in the hindlimb unloaded rat model. After a duration of 8 days of unloading, Ca2+ signals activated by depolarization and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate intracellular release were increased in cerebral arteries. In the presence of ryanodine and thapsigargin, the depolarization-induced Ca2+ signals remained increased in hindlimb suspended animals, indicating that Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism were both increased. Spontaneous Ca2+ waves and localized Ca2+ events were also investigated. Increases in both amplitude and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ waves were measured in hindlimb suspension conditions. After pharmacological segregation of Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ sparklets, their kinetic parameters were characterized. Hindlimb suspension induced an increase in the frequencies of both Ca2+ localized events, suggesting an increase of excitability. Labeling with bodipy compounds suggested that voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptor expressions were increased. Finally, the expression of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 (RyR1) was increased in hindlimb unloading conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that RyR1 expression and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels activity are the focal points of the regulation of Ca2+ signals activated by vasoconstriction in rat cerebral arteries with an increase of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx. PMID:24233561

  12. A thalamic reticular networking model of consciousness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    [Background] It is reasonable to consider the thalamus a primary candidate for the location of consciousness, given that the thalamus has been referred to as the gateway of nearly all sensory inputs to the corresponding cortical areas. Interestingly, in an early stage of brain development, communicative innervations between the dorsal thalamus and telencephalon must pass through the ventral thalamus, the major derivative of which is the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN). The TRN occupies a striking control position in the brain, sending inhibitory axons back to the thalamus, roughly to the same region where they receive afferents. [Hypotheses] The present study hypothesizes that the TRN plays a pivotal role in dynamic attention by controlling thalamocortical synchronization. The TRN is thus viewed as a functional networking filter to regulate conscious perception, which is possibly embedded in thalamocortical networks. Based on the anatomical structures and connections, modality-specific sectors of the TRN and the thalamus appear to be responsible for modality-specific perceptual representation. Furthermore, the coarsely overlapped topographic maps of the TRN appear to be associated with cross-modal or unitary conscious awareness. Throughout the latticework structure of the TRN, conscious perception could be accomplished and elaborated through accumulating intercommunicative processing across the first-order input signal and the higher-order signals from its functionally associated cortices. As the higher-order relay signals run cumulatively through the relevant thalamocortical loops, conscious awareness becomes more refined and sophisticated. [Conclusions] I propose that the thalamocortical integrative communication across first- and higher-order information circuits and repeated feedback looping may account for our conscious awareness. This TRN-modulation hypothesis for conscious awareness provides a comprehensive rationale regarding previously reported

  13. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced calcium release from platelet plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rengasamy, A.; Feinberg, H.

    1988-02-15

    A platelet membrane preparation, enriched in plasma membrane markers, took up /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in exchange for intravesicular Na+ and released it after the addition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). The possibility that contaminating dense tubular membrane (DTS) vesicles contributed the Ca/sup 2 +/ released by IP3 was eliminated by the addition of vanadate to inhibit Ca/sup +/-ATPase-mediated DTS Ca/sup 2 +/ sequestration and by the finding that only plasma membrane vesicles exhibit Na/sup +/-dependent Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake. Ca/sup 2 +/ released by IP3 was dependent on low extravesicular Ca/sup 2 +/ concentrations. IP3-induced Ca/sup 2 +/ release was additive to that released by Na/sup +/ addition while GTP or polyethylene glycol (PEG) had no effect. These results strongly suggest that IP3 facilitates extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ influx in addition to release from DTS membranes.

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection of Host Epithelial Cells via Polymeric Immunoglobulin Receptor Transiently Induces Calcium Release from Intracellular Stores*

    PubMed Central

    Asmat, Tauseef M.; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Räth, Susann; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2011-01-01

    The pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) is a major adhesin of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) that interacts in a human-specific manner with the ectodomain of the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) produced by respiratory epithelial cells. This interaction promotes bacterial colonization and bacterial internalization by initiating host signal transduction cascades. Here, we examined alterations of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) levels in epithelial cells during host cell infections with pneumococci via the PspC-hpIgR mechanism. The release of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores in host cells was significantly increased by wild-type pneumococci but not by PspC-deficient pneumococci. The increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent on phospholipase C as pretreatment of cells with a phospholipase C-specific inhibitor U73122 abolished the increase in [Ca2+]i. In addition, we demonstrated the effect of [Ca2+]i on pneumococcal internalization by epithelial cells. Uptake of pneumococci was significantly increased after pretreatment of epithelial cells with the cell-permeable calcium chelator 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid-tetraacetoxymethyl ester or use of EGTA as an extracellular Ca2+-chelating agent. In contrast, thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ATPase, which increases [Ca2+]i in a sustained fashion, significantly reduced pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion. Importantly, pneumococcal adherence to pIgR-expressing cells was not altered in the presence of inhibitors as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that pneumococcal infections induce mobilization of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores. This may constitute a defense response of host cells as the experimental reduction of intracellular calcium levels facilitates pneumococcal internalization by pIgR-expressing cells, whereas elevated calcium levels diminished bacterial internalization by host epithelial

  15. The initial response of Limulus ventral photoreceptors to bright flashes. Released calcium as a synergist to excitation

    PubMed Central

    Payne, R; Fein, A

    1986-01-01

    The leading edge of the response of Limulus ventral photoreceptors to brief flashes was investigated using a voltage clamp. The leading edge of responses increases linearly with flash intensity when dim flashes produce less than one photoisomerization per square micron of cell surface. Brighter flashes accelerate the initial portion of the response, resulting in a fourth-power relationship between the magnitude of the response at brief times after the flash and the flash intensity. The onset of this nonlinearity with increasing flash intensity is determined by the local density of photoisomerizations within the receptor. Responses to bright 10-15-mum-diam spots therefore rise faster than responses to diffuse flashes producing the same number of photoisomerizations within the receptor. Background illumination shortens the response latency and suppresses the initial nonlinearity. These phenomena can be explained by a model of transduction in which light activates two parallel cascades of reactions. Particles released by the first of these cascades open ionic channels, while the second produces an agent that accelerates the rate of production of particles by the first. Injection of the calcium buffer EGTA slows the initial portion of the response to bright flashes and suppresses its nonlinearity, which suggests that the accelerating agent released by the second cascade is calcium. PMID:3081681

  16. The response of a human bronchial epithelial cell line to histamine: Intracellular calcium changes and extracellular release of inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, T.L.; Paradiso, A.M.; Madden, M.C.; McKinnon, K.P.; Devlin, R.B. )

    1991-11-01

    Epithelial cells are likely to modulate inflammation and tissue repair in the airways, but the factors responsible for these processes remain unclear. Because human airway epithelia are infrequently available for in vitro studies, transformed epithelial cell lines are of interest as models. The authors therefore investigated the response of an SV-40/adenovirus-transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) to histamine, a mediator with relevance for airway diseases. The intracellular calcium response to histamine (10(-4) M) was measured, using Fura-2 and microspectrofluorimetry. Histamine induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium that originated from intracellular sources; this effect was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine, suggesting that BEAS cells retain functioning histamine receptors. BEAS cells were grown to confluence on microporous, collagen-coated filters, allowing measurement of vectorial release of soluble mediators. Monolayers exposed to histamine for 30 min released interleukin-6 and fibronectin in the apical direction, in a dose-dependent manner. Little eicosanoid production was induced by histamine, either in the apical or the basolateral direction, although BEAS cells constitutively produced small amounts of prostaglandin E2 and 15-HETE. However, these cells formed large amounts of eicosanoids in response to ozone exposure as a positive control. Comparison of their data with published reports for human airway epithelia in primary culture suggests that the BEAS cell line is, in a number of respects, a relevant model for the study of airway epithelial responses to a variety of stimuli.

  17. Lifeguard Inhibits Fas Ligand-mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum-Calcium Release Mandatory for Apoptosis in Type II Apoptotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Urresti, Jorge; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Coccia, Elena; Arévalo, Juan Carlos; Castellano, José; Fernández-Sanz, Celia; Galenkamp, Koen M O; Planells-Ferrer, Laura; Moubarak, Rana S; Llecha-Cano, Núria; Reix, Stéphanie; García-Dorado, David; Barneda-Zahonero, Bruna; Comella, Joan X

    2016-01-15

    Death receptors are members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily involved in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Lifeguard (LFG) is a death receptor antagonist mainly expressed in the nervous system that specifically blocks Fas ligand (FasL)-induced apoptosis. To investigate its mechanism of action, we studied its subcellular localization and its interaction with members of the Bcl-2 family proteins. We performed an analysis of LFG subcellular localization in murine cortical neurons and found that LFG localizes mainly to the ER and Golgi. We confirmed these results with subcellular fractionation experiments. Moreover, we show by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that LFG interacts with Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, but not with Bax or Bak, and this interaction likely occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum. We further investigated the relationship between LFG and Bcl-XL in the inhibition of apoptosis and found that LFG protects only type II apoptotic cells from FasL-induced death in a Bcl-XL dependent manner. The observation that LFG itself is not located in mitochondria raises the question as to whether LFG in the ER participates in FasL-induced death. Indeed, we investigated the degree of calcium mobilization after FasL stimulation and found that LFG inhibits calcium release from the ER, a process that correlates with LFG blockage of cytochrome c release to the cytosol and caspase activation. On the basis of our observations, we propose that there is a required step in the induction of type II apoptotic cell death that involves calcium mobilization from the ER and that this step is modulated by LFG. PMID:26582200

  18. Glutamate-induced glutamate release: A proposed mechanism for calcium bursting in astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larter, Raima; Craig, Melissa Glendening

    2005-12-01

    Here we present a new model for the generation of complex calcium-bursting patterns in astrocytes, a type of brain cell recently implicated in a variety of neural functions including memory formation. The model involves two positive feedback processes, in which the key feedback species are calcium ion and glutamate. The latter is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and has been shown to be involved in bidirectional communication between astrocytes and nearby neurons. The glutamate feedback process considered here is shown to be critical for the generation of complex bursting oscillations in the astrocytes and to, perhaps, code for information which may be passed from neuron to neuron via the astrocyte. These processes may be involved in memory storage and formation as well as in mechanisms which lead to dynamical diseases such as epilepsy.

  19. In situ mineralization of anticancer drug into calcium carbonate monodisperse nanospheres and their pH-responsive release property.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tiezhu; Wan, Zhanghui; Liu, Zhiyuan; Li, Haihong; Wang, Hao; Lu, Nan; Chen, Zhenhua; Mei, Xifan; Ren, Xiuli

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we facilitated the preparation of uniform calcium carbonate nanospheres and the encapsulation of anticancer drug (Doxorubicin, Dox) in one step by a facile bio-inspired mineralization method at room temperature. Hesperidin (Hesp), a natural originated flavanone glycoside, was introduced as crystallization modifier. The obtained Dox encapsulated CaCO3 nanospheres (Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs) having a narrow size range of ~200nm. The drug loading/release studies reveal that these Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs have a drug loading efficiency (DLE) of 83% and drug loading content (DLC) of 14wt%. Besides, the release of Dox from Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs was pH depended. At pH=7.4, only a small amount (~28%) of Dox was released. While at pH=5.0, all amount of incorporated Dox was released. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) image reveals the Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs can internalize the cells. These results suggest the Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs can be potentially used to utilize pH-responsive delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:27040233

  20. Interaction of calcium sulfate with xanthan gum: effect on in vitro bioadhesion and drug release behavior from xanthan gum based buccal discs of buspirone.

    PubMed

    Jaipal, A; Pandey, M M; Abhishek, A; Vinay, S; Charde, S Y

    2013-11-01

    Bioadhesive polymers in buccal drug delivery systems play an important role in delivery of therapeutic drug molecules for local and systemic action. Xanthan gum, a GRAS listed natural polymer was used to design buccal discs of buspirone hydrochloride by direct compression method. Effect of calcium sulfate on bioadhesive and drug release behavior of xanthan gum buccal discs was studied. Varying amount of calcium sulfate (0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50%, w/w) in combination with xanthan gum was used to prepare buccal bioadhesive discs. Increase in calcium sulfate concentration resulted in faster drug release and decreased the bioadhesive strength of the designed discs. Further, in rheological evaluation it was observed that viscosity of xanthan gum gel reduces with increasing concentration of calcium sulfate. Compatibility of drug with various excipients was assessed using DSC and FTIR techniques. PMID:23907052

  1. Action Potential-Evoked Calcium Release Is Impaired in Single Skeletal Muscle Fibers from Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Quiñonez, Marbella; Shieh, Perry; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Cruz, Daniel; Deng, Mario C.; Vergara, Julio L.; Middlekauff, Holly R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF) has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+) release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers. Methods and Findings Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms) was markedly (2.6-fold) and significantly (p<0.05) smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms). This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers. Conclusions These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients. PMID:25310188

  2. Effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-02-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of l-(/sup 3/H)norepinephrine ((/sup 3/H)NE) was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any detectable effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced an increase in the basal release of (/sup 3/H)NE. Intracellular free Ca++ also was increased by ethanol concentrations greater than 100 mM. The elevation of basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca++ by concentrations of ethanol greater than 100 mM occurred independently of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ and transmitter secretion. These results suggest that the effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release are associated with the effects of ethanol on intracellular free Ca++.

  3. Ethanol's effects on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake, metabolism or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced both a stimulation of the release of (/sup 3/H)NE as well as an increase in intracellular free Ca2+. The increase in basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca2+ occurred independent of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ or transmitter section. These results demonstrate the relationship of the effects of ethanol on cellular free Ca2+ and neurotransmitter release.

  4. Crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom induces the release of glutamate from cerebrocortical synaptosomes via N and P/Q calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Lomeo, Rosangela da Silva; Gonçalves, Ana Paula de Faria; da Silva, Carolina Nunes; de Paula, André Tunes; Costa Santos, Danielle Oliveira; Fortes-Dias, Consuelo Latorre; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; de Lima, Maria Elena

    2014-07-01

    Crotoxin (Crtx), the main toxin in the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus snake, is a heterodimer with a basic subunit, CB, and an acidic subunit, CA. CB is a phospholipase A2 that depends on CA to specifically bind to the cell membrane. This toxin acts in the central nervous system (CNS) causing chronic seizure effects and other cytotoxic effects. Here, we report its action on glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes. Aiming at a better understanding of the mechanism of action of Crtx, calcium channel blockers were used and internalization studies were performed in cerebellar granule neurons. Our results show that Crtx induces calcium-dependent glutamate release via N and P/Q calcium channels. In addition, the CB subunit of Crtx is shown to be internalized. This internalization does not depend on the presence of CA subunit neither on the PLA2 activity of CB. A correlation between CB internalization and glutamate release remains to be established. PMID:24751366

  5. Mechanisms of calcium release induced by GTP and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.L.; Chueh, S.H.; Mullaney, J.M.; Mallet, M.K.

    1987-05-01

    Recent studies show that Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from ER is controlled by a sensitive and specific guanine nucleotide regulatory mechanism. Using microsomes of permeabilized cells derived from N1E-115 neuroblastoma or DDT/sub 1/MF-2 smooth muscle cell lines, both GTP and IP/sub 3/ effect Ca/sup 2 +/ release from a common intracellular pool; however, the mechanisms of activation of Ca/sup 2 +/ release by the two agents appear distinct with regard to several parameters. Studies using liver microsomes are currently investigating whether similar distinctions between the actions of IP/sub 3/ and GTP exist in other cell types. At present it is unknown if GTP-activated Ca/sup 2 +/ release is mediated by a G-protein-like activity. Studies indicate that such release is not altered by pertussis toxin. Since GTP..gamma..S is inactive and blocks the action of GTP, a modified G-protein activation process must be invoked. Current investigations are attempting to identify the protein(s) involved in GTP-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ release by direct photo-crosslinking experiments using (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)GTP. Successful labeling of many nucleotide-binding proteins has been accomplished; most but not all labeling is displaced by ATP. GTP-specifically labeled proteins are being assessed as candidates for the GTP-mediated release process.

  6. Histamine release by exocytosis from rat mast cells on reduction of extracellular sodium: a secretory response inhibited by calcium, strontium, barium or magnesium.

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, D E; Douglas, W W

    1976-01-01

    1. Histamine release from peritoneal mast cells of the rat was stimulated when the cells were exposed for 10 min to sodium-deficient media where all NaCl had been replaced by KC1, RbC1, glucose, sucrose, mannitol, or Tris, provided calcium was less than about 0-5 mM. 2. Light and electron microscopy showed the response to be exocytosis. 3. The chelating agents, EDTA and EGTA, abolished the response to sodium lack and their inhibitory effects were reversed by re-incubating cells with calcium but not magnesium. 4. The response was inhibited by dinitrophenol combined with glucose-deprivation. 5. The response was inversely related to the concentrations of sodium and calcium below 137-5 and 0-5 mM respectively. 6. The related alkaline earth metals, barium, strontium, and magnesium, resembled calcium in inhibiting the response to sodium lack. 7. No secretory response was seen when the cells were exposed for 10 min to calcium-free medium in which lithium replaced sodium. Exposure to this medium for 60 min, however, elicited secretion. 8. It is concluded that when extracellular calcium is low, a reduction in extracellular sodium induces a conventional exocytotic secretory response dependent on energy and cellular calcium. It is suggested that sodium lack may mobilize calcium from a cellular site possibly the inner aspect of the plasma membrane. Images A B C D E F G H PMID:59804

  7. Sulfur mustard-induced increase in intracellular free calcium level and arachidonic acid release from cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Legere, R.H.; Majerus, B.J.; Petrali, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanism of action of the alkylating agent bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM) was studied using the in thai vitro mouse neuroblastoma-rat glioma hybrid NG 108-1 S clonal p cell line model. Following 0.3 mM SM exposure, cell viability remained high (>80% of untreated control) up to 9 hr and then declined steadily to about 40% of control after 20-24 hr. During the early period of SM exposure, when there was no significant cell viability loss, the following effects were observed. The cellular glutathione level decreased 20% after 1 hr and 34% after 6 hr. Between 2 and 6 hr, there was a time-dependent increase (about 10 to 30%) in intracellular free calcium (Ca2+), which was localized to the limiting membrane of swollen endoplasmic reticula and mitochondria, to euchromatin areas of the nucleus, and to areas of the cytosol and plasma membrane. Moreover,there was also a time-dependent increase in the release of isotopically labeled arachidonic acid ((3H)AA) from cellular membranes. Increase in (3H)AA release was 28% at 3 hr and about 60-80% between 6 and 9 hr. This increase in I3HIAA release was inhibited by quinacrine (20 uM), which is a phospholipase (PLA2) inhibitor. At 16 hr after SM exposure, there was a large increase (about 200% of control) in I3HIAA release, which was coincident with a 50% loss of cell viability. These results suggest a Ca2+-mediated toxic mechanism of SM via PLA2 activation and arachidonate release.

  8. Drug release of pH/temperature-responsive calcium alginate/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) semi-IPN beads.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun; Alves, Natália M; Mano, João F

    2006-05-23

    A series of semi-interpenetrating, polymer network (semi-IPN), hydrogel beads, composed of calcium alginate (Ca-alginate) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAM), were prepared for a pH/temperature-sensitive drug delivery study. The equilibrium swelling showed the independent pH- and thermo- responsive nature of the developed materials. At pH=2.1, the release amount of indomethacin incorporated into these beads was about 10% within 400 min, while this value approached to 95% at pH=7.4. The release rate of the drug was higher at 37 degrees C than that at 25 degrees C and increased slightly with increasing PNIPAAM content. These results suggest that the Ca-alginate/PNIPAAM beads have the potential to be used as an effective pH/temperature sustainable delivery system of bioactive agents. [GRAPHS: SEE TEXT] A summary of the temperature- and pH-dependence on the release of the drug over a period of 450 min. The effect of the temperature on the swelling of the beads is shown in the inset. PMID:16671051

  9. Mechanochemical synthesis of zinc-apatitic calcium phosphate and the controlled zinc release for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yusuke; Mori, Hiroe; Chou, Joshua; Otsuka, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    In this study, in order to control zinc (Zn)-release from calcium phosphate (CaP), the crystalline forms of CaP-containing Zn were modified by wet ball milling and/or heat treatment. The CaP (CaO:CaHPO4:ZnO = 7:20:3, molar ratio) was ground in a ball mill with the addition of purified water, and the ground products were heated to 400 °C and 800 °C. The physicochemical properties of these ground products were measured by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Zn release characteristics from the samples were evaluated using a dissolution tester. The results of XRD and IR suggested that the structures of the starting materials were destroyed after 2.5 h of grinding, and new apatite-like amorphous solid containing Zn was generated. The Zn-release from the ground products was markedly suppressed after 2.5 h of grinding. PMID:26165245

  10. Curcumin induces crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis mediated by calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomal destabilization and mitochondrial events

    PubMed Central

    Moustapha, A; Pérétout, PA; Rainey, NE; Sureau, F; Geze, M; Petit, J-M; Dewailly, E; Slomianny, C; Petit, PX

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a major active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa, L.), has anticancer effects. In vitro studies suggest that curcumin inhibits cancer cell growth by activating apoptosis, but the mechanism underlying these effects is still unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms leading to apoptosis in curcumin-treated cells. Curcumin induced endoplasmic reticulum stress causing calcium release, with a destabilization of the mitochondrial compartment resulting in apoptosis. These events were also associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization and of caspase-8 activation, mediated by cathepsins and calpains, leading to Bid cleavage. Truncated tBid disrupts mitochondrial homeostasis and enhance apoptosis. We followed the induction of autophagy, marked by the formation of autophagosomes, by staining with acridine orange in cells exposed curcumin. At this concentration, only the early events of apoptosis (initial mitochondrial destabilization with any other manifestations) were detectable. Western blotting demonstrated the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II (light chain 3), a marker of active autophagosome formation. We also found that the production of reactive oxygen species and formation of autophagosomes following curcumin treatment was almost completely blocked by N-acetylcystein, the mitochondrial specific antioxidants MitoQ10 and SKQ1, the calcium chelators, EGTA-AM or BAPTA-AM, and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter inhibitor, ruthenium red. Curcumin-induced autophagy failed to rescue all cells and most cells underwent type II cell death following the initial autophagic processes. All together, these data imply a fail-secure mechanism regulated by autophagy in the action of curcumin, suggesting a therapeutic potential for curcumin. Offering a novel and effective strategy for the treatment of malignant cells. PMID:27551451

  11. Induction of calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle by xanthone and norathyriol.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, J. J.; Cheng, Y. W.; Ko, F. N.; Kuo, M. L.; Lin, C. N.; Teng, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Effects of xanthone and its derivative, 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone (norathyriol), on Ca2+ release and ryanodine binding were studied in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles from rabbit skeletal muscle. 2. Both xanthone and norathyriol dose-dependently induced Ca2+ release from the actively loaded SR vesicles which was blocked by ruthenium red, a specific Ca2+ release inhibitor, and Mg2+. 3. Xanthone and norathyriol also dose-dependently increased apparent [3H]-ryanodine binding. Norathyriol, but not xanthone, produced a synergistic effect on binding activation when added concurrently with caffeine. 4. In the presence of Mg2+, which inhibits ryanodine binding, both caffeine and norathyriol, but not xanthone, could restore the binding to the level observed in the absence of Mg2+. 5. Xanthone activated the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of isolated SR vesicles dose-dependently reaching 70% activation at 300 microM. 6. When tested in mouse diaphragm, norathyriol potentiated the muscle contraction followed by twitch depression and contracture in either a Ca(2+) -free bathing solution or one containing 2.5 mM Ca2+. These norathyriol-induced effects on muscle were inhibited by pretreatment with ruthenium red or ryanodine. 7. These data suggest that xanthone and norathyriol can induce Ca2+ release from the SR of skeletal muscle through a direct interaction with the Ca2+ release channel, also known as the ryanodine receptor. Images Figure 6 PMID:8842439

  12. Regulator of G-protein signaling 2 (RGS2) suppresses premature calcium release in mouse eggs.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Miranda L; Lowther, Katie M; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; McDonough, Caitlin E; Lee, Katherine N; Evsikov, Alexei V; Uliasz, Tracy F; Chidiac, Peter; Williams, Carmen J; Mehlmann, Lisa M

    2015-08-01

    During oocyte maturation, capacity and sensitivity of Ca(2+) signaling machinery increases dramatically, preparing the metaphase II (MII)-arrested egg for fertilization. Upon sperm-egg fusion, Ca(2+) release from IP3-sensitive endoplasmic reticulum stores results in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) oscillations that drive egg activation and initiate early embryo development. Premature Ca(2+) release can cause parthenogenetic activation prior to fertilization; thus, preventing inappropriate Ca(2+) signaling is crucial for ensuring robust MII arrest. Here, we show that regulator of G-protein signaling 2 (RGS2) suppresses Ca(2+) release in MII eggs. Rgs2 mRNA was recruited for translation during oocyte maturation, resulting in ∼ 20-fold more RGS2 protein in MII eggs than in fully grown immature oocytes. Rgs2-siRNA-injected oocytes matured to MII; however, they had increased sensitivity to low pH and acetylcholine (ACh), which caused inappropriate Ca(2+) release and premature egg activation. When matured in vitro, RGS2-depleted eggs underwent spontaneous Ca(2+) increases that were sufficient to cause premature zona pellucida conversion. Rgs2(-/-) females had reduced litter sizes, and their eggs had increased sensitivity to low pH and ACh. Rgs2(-/-) eggs also underwent premature zona pellucida conversion in vivo. These findings indicate that RGS2 functions as a brake to suppress premature Ca(2+) release in eggs that are poised on the brink of development. PMID:26160904

  13. The BRCA1 Tumor Suppressor Binds to Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors to Stimulate Apoptotic Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Hedgepeth, Serena C.; Garcia, M. Iveth; Wagner, Larry E.; Rodriguez, Ana M.; Chintapalli, Sree V.; Snyder, Russell R.; Hankins, Gary D. V.; Henderson, Beric R.; Brodie, Kirsty M.; Yule, David I.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Boehning, Darren

    2015-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) is a ubiquitously expressed endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident calcium channel. Calcium release mediated by IP3Rs influences many signaling pathways, including those regulating apoptosis. IP3R activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, including binding to proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors to regulate cell death. Here we show that the IP3R binds to the tumor suppressor BRCA1. BRCA1 binding directly sensitizes the IP3R to its ligand, IP3. BRCA1 is recruited to the ER during apoptosis in an IP3R-dependent manner, and, in addition, a pool of BRCA1 protein is constitutively associated with the ER under non-apoptotic conditions. This is likely mediated by a novel lipid binding activity of the first BRCA1 C terminus domain of BRCA1. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation by which BRCA1 can act as a proapoptotic protein. PMID:25645916

  14. Probing the intracellular calcium sensitivity of transmitter release during synaptic facilitation.

    PubMed

    Felmy, Felix; Neher, Erwin; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2003-03-01

    In nerve terminals, residual Ca(2+) remaining from previous activity can cause facilitation of transmitter release by a mechanism that is still under debate. Here we show that the intracellular Ca(2+) sensitivity of transmitter release at the calyx of Held is largely unchanged during facilitation, which leaves an increased microdomain Ca(2+) signal as a possible mechanism for facilitation. We measured the Ca(2+) dependencies of facilitation, as well as of transmitter release, to estimate the required increment in microdomain Ca(2+). These measurements show that linear summation of residual and microdomain Ca(2+) accounts for only 30% of the observed facilitation. However, a small degree of supralinearity in the summation of intracellular Ca(2+) signals, which might be caused by saturation of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffer(s), is sufficient to explain facilitation at this CNS synapse. PMID:12628170

  15. Electron probe microanalysis of calcium release and magnesium uptake by endoplasmic reticulum in bee photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, O; Walz, B; Somlyo, A V; Somlyo, A P

    1991-01-01

    Honey bee photoreceptors contain large sacs of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can be located unequivocally in freeze-dried cryosections. The elemental composition of the ER was determined by electron probe x-ray microanalysis and was visualized in high-resolution x-ray maps. In the ER of dark-adapted photoreceptors, the Ca concentration was 47.5 +/- 1.1 mmol/kg (dry weight) (mean +/- SEM). During a 3-sec nonsaturating light stimulus, approximately 50% of the Ca content was released from the ER. Light stimulation also caused a highly significant increase in the Mg content of the ER; the ratio of Mg uptake to Ca released was approximately 0.7. Our results show unambiguously that the ER is the source of Ca2+ release during cell stimulation and suggest that Mg2+ can nearly balance the charge movement of Ca2+. Images PMID:1992466

  16. Electron probe microanalysis of calcium release and magnesium uptake by endoplasmic reticulum in bee photoreceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, O.; Walz, B. ); Somlyo, A.V.; Somlyo, A.P. )

    1991-02-01

    Honey bee photoreceptors contain large sacs of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can be located unequivocally in freeze-dried cryosections. The elemental compositon of the ER was determined by electron probe x-ray microanalysis and was visualized in high-resolution x-ray maps. In the ER of dark-adapted photoreceptors, the Ca concentration was 47.5 {plus minus} 1.1 mmol/kg (dry weight). During a 3-sec nonsaturating light stimulus, {approximately}50% of the Ca content was released from the ER. Light stimulation also caused a highly significant increase in the Mg content of the ER; the ratio of Mg uptake to Ca released was {approximately}0.7. Our results show unambiguously that the ER is the source of Ca{sup 2+} release during cell stimulation and suggest the Mg{sup 2+} can nearly balance the charge movement of Ca{sup 2+}.

  17. 5-HT2B receptor-mediated calcium release from ryanodine-sensitive intracellular stores in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ullmer, C.; Boddeke, H. G.; Schmuck, K.; Lübbert, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have characterized the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced calcium signalling in endothelial cells from the human pulmonary artery. Using RT-PCR we show, that of all cloned G-protein coupled 5-HT receptors, these cells express only 5-HT1D beta, 5-HT2B and little 5-HT4 receptor mRNA. 2. In endothelial cells 5-HT inhibits the formation of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) via 5-HT1D beta receptors but fails to activate phosphoinositide (PI) turnover. However, the latter pathway is strongly activated by histamine. 3. Despite the lack of detectable inositol phosphate (IP) formation in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells, 5-HT (pD2 = 5.82 +/- 0.06, n = 6) or the selective 5-HT2 agonist, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) (pD2 = 5.66 +/- 0.03, n = 7) elicited transient calcium signals comparable to those evoked by histamine (pD2 = 6.44 +/- 0.01, n = 7). Since 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNAs are not detectable in pulmonary artery endothelial cells, activation of 5-HT2B receptors is responsible for the transient calcium release. The calcium transients are independent of the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, since DOI does not stimulate 5-HT1D beta receptors. 4. Both, the 5-HT- and histamine-stimulated calcium signals were also observed when the cells were placed in calcium-free medium. This indicates that 5-HT triggers calcium release from intracellular stores. 5. Heparin is an inhibitor of the IP3-activated calcium release channels on the endoplasmic reticulum. Intracellular infusion of heparin through patch pipettes in voltage clamp experiments failed to block 5-HT-induced calcium signals, whereas it abolished the histamine response. This supports the conclusion that the 5-HT-induced calcium release is independent of IP3 formation. 6. Unlike the histamine response, the 5-HT response was sensitive to micromolar concentrations of ryanodine and, to a lesser extent, ruthenium red. This implies that 5-HT2B receptors trigger calcium

  18. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release via ryanodine receptors regulates neuronal function

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Chen, Yili; Ito, Akihiro; Murayama, Takashi; Oyamada, Hideto; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Sato, Osamu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Mori, Nozomu; Oguchi, Katsuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito; Iino, Masamitsu

    2012-01-01

    Mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores regulates a multitude of cellular functions, but the role of intracellular Ca2+ release via the ryanodine receptor (RyR) in the brain remains incompletely understood. We found that nitric oxide (NO) directly activates RyRs, which induce Ca2+ release from intracellular stores of central neurons, and thereby promote prolonged Ca2+ signalling in the brain. Reversible S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) triggers this Ca2+ release. NO-induced Ca2+ release (NICR) is evoked by type 1 NO synthase-dependent NO production during neural firing, and is essential for cerebellar synaptic plasticity. NO production has also been implicated in pathological conditions including ischaemic brain injury, and our results suggest that NICR is involved in NO-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that NICR via RyR1 plays a regulatory role in the physiological and pathophysiological functions of the brain. PMID:22036948

  19. Novel nanocomposite biomaterials with controlled copper/calcium release capability for bone tissue engineering multifunctional scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Cattalini, J. P.; Hoppe, A.; Pishbin, F.; Roether, J.; Boccaccini, A. R.; Lucangioli, S.; Mouriño, V.

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to develop novel composite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering (BTE) made of bioactive glass nanoparticles (Nbg) and alginate cross-linked with Cu2+ or Ca2+ (AlgNbgCu, AlgNbgCa, respectively). Two-dimensional scaffolds were prepared and the nanocomposite biomaterials were characterized in terms of morphology, mechanical strength, bioactivity, biodegradability, swelling capacity, release profile of the cross-linking cations and angiogenic properties. It was found that both Cu2+ and Ca2+ are released in a controlled and sustained manner with no burst release observed. Finally, in vitro results indicated that the bioactive ions released from both nanocomposite biomaterials were able to stimulate the differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells towards the osteogenic lineage. In addition, the typical endothelial cell property of forming tubes in Matrigel was observed for human umbilical vein endothelial cells when in contact with the novel biomaterials, particularly AlgNbgCu, which indicates their angiogenic properties. Hence, novel nanocomposite biomaterials made of Nbg and alginate cross-linked with Cu2+ or Ca2+ were developed with potential applications for preparation of multifunctional scaffolds for BTE. PMID:26269233

  20. Sustained release of neurotrophin-3 via calcium phosphate-coated sutures promotes axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Amgad; Thompson, Daniel L; Hellenbrand, Daniel J; Lee, Jae-Sung; Madura, Casey J; Wesley, Meredith G; Dillon, Natalie J; Sharma, Tapan; Enright, Connor J; Murphy, William L

    2016-07-01

    Because of the dynamics of spinal cord injury (SCI), the optimal treatment will almost certainly be a combination approach to control the environment and promote axonal growth. This study uses peripheral nerve grafts (PNGs) as scaffolds for axonal growth while delivering neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) via calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings on surgical sutures. CaP coating was grown on sutures, and NT-3 binding and release were characterized in vitro. Then, the NT-3-loaded sutures were tested in a complete SCI model. Rats were analyzed for functional improvement and axonal growth into the grafts. The CaP-coated sutures exhibited a burst release of NT-3, followed by a sustained release for at least 20 days. Functionally, the rats with PNGs + NT-3-loaded sutures and the rats treated with PNGs scored significantly higher than controls on day 56 postoperatively. However, functional scores in rats treated with PNGs + NT-3-loaded suture were not significantly different from those of rats treated with PNGs alone. Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) labeling rostral to the graft was not observed in any controls, but CTB labeling rostral to the graft was observed in almost all rats that had had a PNG. Neurofilament labeling on transverse sections of the graft revealed that the rats treated with the NT-3-loaded sutures had significantly more axons per graft than rats treated with an NT-3 injection and rats without NT-3. These data demonstrate that PNGs serve as scaffolds for axonal growth after SCI and that CaP-coated sutures can efficiently release NT-3 to increase axonal regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27015737

  1. Results of critical velocity experiments with barium, strontium, and calcium releases from CRRES satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hampton, D. L.; Delamere, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) chemical release program in September 1990, two Ba and also one each Sr and Ca canisters of a boron-titanium thermite mixture, which vaporizes the element on ignition, were released near perigee after dusk in the South Pacific to study the critical velocity effect proposed by Alfven. The critical velocities of these three elements are 2.7, 3.5, and 5.4 km/s respectively, all well below the orbital velocity of 9.4 km/s. On September 10, 1990, a Sr and Ba pair (G-13, or critical ionization velocity (CIV) I) was released near Rarotonga at approximately 515 km altitude in a background electron density of 3.4 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. On September 14, 1990, G-14 or CIV II released a Ca and Ba pair west of New Caledonia near 595 km at an electron density of 1.5 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. Ions of all three elements were observed with low-light level imagers from two aircraft after they had transited up the magnetic field lines into the sunlight. Emissions from the spherically expanding neutral gas shells below the solar terminator, observed with cameras filtered for the Ba(+) ion line at 4554 A and also in unfiltered imagers for approximately 15 s after release, are probably due to excitation by hot electrons created in the CIV process. The ions created clearly lost much of their energy, which we now show can be explained by elastic collisions: Ba(+) + O. Inventories of the observed ions indicate yields of 0.15% and 1.84% for Ba in the first and second experiments, 0.02% for Sr and 0.27% for Ca. Ionization from all the releases continued along the satellite trajectory much longer (greater than 45 s) than expected for a CIV process. The ion production along the satellite track versus time typically shows a rapid rise to a peak in a few seconds followed by an exponential decrease to a level essentially constant rate. The characteristic distances for CIV I and II are 47 and 62 km, respectively. We interpret the

  2. Colocalization of calcium entry and exocytotic release sites in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, I M; Finnegan, J M; Monck, J R; Wightman, R M; Fernandez, J M

    1995-01-01

    "Snapshot" images of localized Ca2+ influx into patch-clamped chromaffin cells were captured by using a recently developed pulsed-laser imaging system. Transient opening of voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels gave rise to localized elevations of Ca2+ that had the appearance of either "hotspots" or partial rings found immediately beneath the plasma membrane. When the Ca2+ imaging technique was employed in conjunction with flame-etched carbon-fiber electrodes to spatially map the release sites of catecholamines, it was observed that the sites of Ca2+ entry and catecholamine release were colocalized. These results provide functional support for the idea that secretion occurs from "active zone"-like structures in neuroendocrine cells. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7708668

  3. Role of calcium in the interaction of alpha and beta adrenoceptor-mediated renin release in isolated, constant pressure perfused rabbit kidneys.

    PubMed

    Opgenorth, T J; Zehr, J E

    1983-10-01

    These experiments were designed to study the role of calcium in the modulation of renin secretion by alpha and beta adrenoceptors. Rabbit kidneys were isolated and single-pass perfused with a modified Ringer's solution. Renal perfusion pressure was precisely controlled by an electronic servocontrol system. Tubular events were minimized by ligation of the ureter before initiating the studies. Under these conditions the predominant factor modifying renin secretion was assumed to originate directly on the juxtaglomerular cells. Isoproterenol infused at 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 nM/min/g of kidney weight increased renin secretion in a dose-dependent manner whereas phenylephrine infused at identical molar doses did not. In addition, phenylephrine (5.0 nM/min/g of kidney weight) blocked the usual response to isoproterenol. Removal of calcium from the perfusing medium had no effect on either the response to isoproterenol or the lack of a response to phenylephrine. On the other hand, when calcium is removed from the perfusate or when D-600, a calcium channel blocker, is added to calcium-containing medium, phenylephrine failed to block the usual response to isoproterenol. We conclude that the suppression of beta adrenoceptor stimulation of renin release by alpha adrenoceptor agonists is calcium dependent by a final mechanism as yet undefined, but probably involving movement of calcium into the juxtaglomerular cells. PMID:6312014

  4. Ryanodine receptor cluster fragmentation and redistribution in persistent atrial fibrillation enhance calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Macquaide, Niall; Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Hotta, Jun-ichi; Sempels, Wouter; Lenaerts, Ilse; Holemans, Patricia; Hofkens, Johan; Jafri, M. Saleet; Willems, Rik; Sipido, Karin R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims In atrial fibrillation (AF), abnormalities in Ca2+ release contribute to arrhythmia generation and contractile dysfunction. We explore whether ryanodine receptor (RyR) cluster ultrastructure is altered and is associated with functional abnormalities in AF. Methods and results Using high-resolution confocal microscopy (STED), we examined RyR cluster morphology in fixed atrial myocytes from sheep with persistent AF (N = 6) and control (Ctrl; N = 6) animals. RyR clusters on average contained 15 contiguous RyRs; this did not differ between AF and Ctrl. However, the distance between clusters was significantly reduced in AF (288 ± 12 vs. 376 ± 17 nm). When RyR clusters were grouped into Ca2+ release units (CRUs), i.e. clusters separated by <150 nm, CRUs in AF had more clusters (3.43 ± 0.10 vs. 2.95 ± 0.02 in Ctrl), which were more dispersed. Furthermore, in AF cells, more RyR clusters were found between Z lines. In parallel experiments, Ca2+ sparks were monitored in live permeabilized myocytes. In AF, myocytes had >50% higher spark frequency with increased spark time to peak (TTP) and duration, and a higher incidence of macrosparks. A computational model of the CRU was used to simulate the morphological alterations observed in AF cells. Increasing cluster fragmentation to the level observed in AF cells caused the observed changes, i.e. higher spark frequency, increased TTP and duration; RyR clusters dispersed between Z-lines increased the occurrence of macrosparks. Conclusion In persistent AF, ultrastructural reorganization of RyR clusters within CRUs is associated with overactive Ca2+ release, increasing the likelihood of propagating Ca2+ release. PMID:26490742

  5. Relationships between hormone-induced calcium release and 86rubidium uptake stimulation in starfish oocytes.

    PubMed

    Guerrier, P; Moreau, M; Dorée, M

    1979-09-01

    86Rubidium+ uptake, but not 86Rubidium efflux, is strongly stimulated after addition of the meiosis inducing hormone 1-methyladenine (1-MeAde) to prophase blocked oocytes of the starfish Marthasterias glacialis. This stimulation is a transient process which does not require the continuous presence of 1-MeAde and is elicited within 1 minute of contact. 1-MeAde and its biologically active structural analogs fully stimulate Rb+ uptake at concentrations which are about two orders of magnitude lower than those required to trigger meiosis reinitiation but which already release underthreshold levels of Ca2+ from the inner part of the plasma membrane. External Ca2+ concentrations effective in triggering meiosis reinitiation also stimulate Rb+ influx, while drugs like D600, theophyllin and caffein which suppress the hormone induced Ca2+ release, simultaneously preclude the stimulation of Rb+ uptake. Dithiothreitol (DTT) which mimicks 1-MeAde action in releasing Ca2+ and inducing meiosis acts both on the efflux and on active and passive Rb+ influxes. Ouabain, the classical inhibitor of the Na+, K+ pump does not preclude meiosis reinitiation under the influence of 1-MeAde, its agonists of mimetics. It suppresses the active component of Rb+ uptake both in control or stimulate oocytes. When applied only in preincubation before starting the hormone treatment, it cannot however inhibit the stimulation of Rb+ uptake, while basal pump inhibition is preserved. These results demonstrate that stimulation of the active Rb+ or K+ transport is not indispensable to meiosis reinitiation. They suggest moreover that the hormone induced Ca2+ release from the plasma membrane may be responsible for unmasking new ouabain sensitive transport sites. PMID:515475

  6. Calcium release through P2X4 activates calmodulin to promote endolysosomal membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qi; Zhong, Xi Zoë; Zou, Yuanjie; Murrell-Lagnado, Ruth; Zhu, Michael X.

    2015-01-01

    Intra-endolysosomal Ca2+ release is required for endolysosomal membrane fusion with intracellular organelles. However, the molecular mechanisms for intra-endolysosomal Ca2+ release and the downstream Ca2+ targets involved in the fusion remain elusive. Previously, we demonstrated that endolysosomal P2X4 forms channels activated by luminal adenosine triphosphate in a pH-dependent manner. In this paper, we show that overexpression of P2X4, as well as increasing endolysosomal P2X4 activity by alkalinization of endolysosome lumen, promoted vacuole enlargement in cells and endolysosome fusion in a cell-free assay. These effects were prevented by inhibiting P2X4, expressing a dominant-negative P2X4 mutant, and disrupting the P2X4 gene. We further show that P2X4 and calmodulin (CaM) form a complex at endolysosomal membrane where P2X4 activation recruits CaM to promote fusion and vacuolation in a Ca2+-dependent fashion. Moreover, P2X4 activation-triggered fusion and vacuolation were suppressed by inhibiting CaM. Our data thus suggest a new molecular mechanism for endolysosomal membrane fusion involving P2X4-mediated endolysosomal Ca2+ release and subsequent CaM activation. PMID:26101220

  7. Calcium-Alginate Hydrogel-Encapsulated Fibroblasts Provide Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicola C.; Shelton, Richard M.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Vascularization of engineered or damaged tissues is essential to maintain cell viability and proper tissue function. Revascularization of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart after myocardial infarction is particularly important, since hypoxia can give rise to chronic heart failure due to inappropriate remodeling of the LV after death of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Fibroblasts can express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays a major role in angiogenesis and also acts as a chemoattractant and survival factor for CMs and cardiac progenitors. In this in vitro model study, mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in 2% w/v Ca-alginate were shown to remain viable for 150 days. Semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that over 21 days of encapsulation, fibroblasts continued to express VEGF, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that there was sustained release of VEGF from the Ca-alginate during this period. The scaffold degraded gradually over the 21 days, without reduction in volume. Cells released from the Ca-alginate at 7 and 21 days as a result of scaffold degradation were shown to retain viability, to adhere to fibronectin in a normal manner, and continue to express VEGF, demonstrating their potential to further contribute to maintenance of cardiac function after scaffold degradation. This model in vitro study therefore demonstrates that fibroblasts encapsulated in Ca-alginate provide sustained release of VEGF. PMID:23082964

  8. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium release from two compressed fertilizers: column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Alvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.; Fernández-Marcos, M. L.; Romar-Gasalla, A.

    2014-07-01

    We used soil columns to study nutrients release from two compressed NPK fertilizers. The columns were filled with soil material from the surface horizon of a granitic soil. Tablets of two slow-release NPK fertilizers (11-18-11 or 8-8-16) were placed into the soil, and then water was percolated through the columns in a saturated regime. Percolates were analyzed for N, P, K, Ca and Mg. These nutrients were also determined in soil and fertilizer tablets at the end of the trials. Nutrient concentrations were high in the first percolates, reaching a steady state when 1426 mm water have percolated, which is equivalent to approximately 1.5 years of rainfall in the geographic area. In the whole trial, both tablets lost more than 80% of their initial N, P and K contents. However, K, Ca and Mg were the most leached, whereas N and P were lost in leachates to a lesser extent. Nutrient release was slower from the tablet with composition 8-8-16 than from the 11-18-11 fertilizer. In view of that, the 8-8-16 tablet can be considered more adequate for crops with a nutrient demand sustained over time. At the end of the trial, the effects of these fertilizers on soil chemical parameters were still evident.

  9. Stretch of Contracting Cardiac Muscle Abruptly Decreases the Rate of Phosphate Release at High and Low Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Catherine; West, Tim G.; Curtin, Nancy A.; Ferenczi, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The contractile performance of the heart is linked to the energy that is available to it. Yet, the heart needs to respond quickly to changing demands. During diastole, the heart fills with blood and the heart chambers expand. Upon activation, contraction of cardiac muscle expels blood into the circulation. Early in systole, parts of the left ventricle are being stretched by incoming blood, before contraction causes shrinking of the ventricle. We explore here the effect of stretch of contracting permeabilized cardiac trabeculae of the rat on the rate of inorganic phosphate (Pi) release resulting from ATP hydrolysis, using a fluorescent sensor for Pi with millisecond time resolution. Stretch immediately reduces the rate of Pi release, an effect observed both at full calcium activation (32 μmol/liter of Ca2+), and at a physiological activation level of 1 μmol/liter of Ca2+. The results suggest that stretch redistributes the actomyosin cross-bridges toward their Pi-containing state. The redistribution means that a greater fraction of cross-bridges will be poised to rapidly produce a force-generating transition and movement, compared with cross-bridges that have not been subjected to stretch. At the same time stretch modifies the Pi balance in the cytoplasm, which may act as a cytoplasmic signal for energy turnover. PMID:22692210

  10. Calcium sulfate spinal cord scaffold: a study on degradation and fibroblast growth factor 1 loading and release.

    PubMed

    Åberg, Jonas; Eriksson, Olof; Spens, Erika; Nordblom, Jonathan; Mattsson, Per; Sjödahl, Johan; Svensson, Mikael; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-02-01

    Currently, there is no regenerative strategy for the spinal cord that is part of clinical standard of core. Current paths usually include combinations of scaffold materials and active molecules. In a recent study, a permanent dental resin scaffold for treatment of spinal cord injury was designed. The results from studies on rats were promising. However, for potential clinical use, a biodegradable scaffold material that facilitates drug delivery and the regeneration of the spinal cord needs to be developed. Also a biodegradable material is expected to allow a better evaluation of the efficacy of the surgical method. In this article, the suitability of hardened calcium sulfate cement (CSC) for use as degradable spinal cord scaffolds is investigated in bench studies and in vitro studies. Compressive strength, degradation and microstructure, and the loading capability of heparin-activated fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) via soaking were evaluated. The CSC could easily be injected into the scaffold mold and the obtained scaffolds had sufficient strength to endure the loads applied during surgery. When hardened, the CSC formed a porous microstructure suitable for loading of active substances. It was shown that 10 min of FGF1 soaking was enough to obtain a sustained active FGF1 release for 20-35 days. The results showed that CSC is a promising material for spinal cord scaffold fabrication, since it is biodegradable, has sufficient strength, and allows loading and controlled release of active FGF1. PMID:20624845

  11. XANES Demonstrates the Release of Calcium Phosphates from Alkaline Vertisols to Moderately Acidified Solution.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karl O; Tighe, Matthew K; Guppy, Christopher N; Milham, Paul J; McLaren, Timothy I; Schefe, Cassandra R; Lombi, Enzo

    2016-04-19

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) minerals may comprise the main phosphorus (P) reserve in alkaline soils, with solubility dependent on pH and the concentration of Ca and/or P in solution. Combining several techniques in a novel way, we studied these phenomena by progressively depleting P from suspensions of two soils (low P) using an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) and from a third soil (high P) with AEM together with a cation-exchange membrane. Depletions commenced on untreated soil, then continued as pH was manipulated and maintained at three constant pH levels: the initial pH (pHi) and pH 6.5 and 5.5. Bulk P K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed that the main forms of inorganic P in each soil were apatite, a second more soluble CaP mineral, and smectite-sorbed P. With moderate depletion of P at pHi or pH 6.5, CaP minerals became more prominent in the spectra compared to sorbed species. The more soluble CaP minerals were depleted at pH 6.5, and all CaP minerals were exhausted at pH 5.5, showing that the CaP species present in these alkaline soils are soluble with decreases of pH in the range achievable by rhizosphere acidification. PMID:26974327

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of the effects of vesicle geometry on calcium microdomains and neurotransmitter release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limsakul, Praopim; Modchang, Charin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the effects of synaptic vesicle geometry on Ca2+ diffusion dynamics in presynaptic terminals using MCell, a realistic Monte Carlo algorithm that tracks individual molecules. By modeling the vesicle as a sphere and an oblate or a prolate spheroid with a reflective boundary, we measure the Ca2+ concentration at various positions relative to the vesicle. We find that the presence of a vesicle as a diffusion barrier modifies the shape of the [Ca2+] microdomain in the vicinity of the vesicle. Ca2+ diffusion dynamics also depend on the distance between the vesicle and the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and on the shape of the vesicle. The oblate spheroidal vesicle increases the [Ca2+] up to six times higher than that in the absence of a vesicle, while the prolate spheroidal vesicle can increase the [Ca2+] only 1.4 times. Our results also show that the presence of vesicles that have different geometries can maximally influence the [Ca2+] microdomain when the vesicle is located less than 50 nm from VGCCs.

  13. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium release from two compressed fertilizers: column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Alvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.; Fernández-Marcos, M. L.; Romar-Gasalla, A.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study nutrients release from two compressed nitrogen-potassium-phosphorous (NPK) fertilizers. In the Lourizán Forest Center, tablet-type controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) were prepared by compressing various mixtures of fertilizers without covers or binders. We used soil columns (50 cm long and 7.3 cm inner diameter) that were filled with soil from the surface layer (0-20 cm) of an A horizon corresponding to a Cambic Umbrisol. Tablets of two slow-release NPK fertilizers (11-18-11 or 8-8-16) were placed into the soil (within the first 3 cm), and then water was percolated through the columns in a saturated regime for 80 days. Percolates were analyzed for N, P, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. These elements were also determined in soil and fertilizer tablets at the end of the trials. Nutrient concentrations were high in the first leachates and reached a steady state when 1426 mm of water had been percolated, which is equivalent to approximately 1.5 years of rainfall in this geographic area. In the whole trial, both tablets lost more than 80% of their initial N, P and K contents. However, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ were the most leached, whereas N and P were lost in leachates to a lesser extent. Nutrient release was slower from the tablet with a composition of 8-8-16 than from the 11-18-11 fertilizer. In view of that, the 8-8-16 tablet can be considered more adequate for crops with a nutrient demand sustained over time. At the end of the trial, the effects of these fertilizers on soil chemical parameters were still evident, with a significant increase of pH, available Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, P and effective cation exchange capacity (eCEC) in the fertilized columns, as well as a significant decrease in exchangeable Al3+, reaching values < 0.08 cmol (+) kg-1.

  14. Influence of 2% chlorhexidine on pH, calcium release and setting time of a resinous MTA-based root-end filling material.

    PubMed

    Jacinto, Rogério Castilho; Linhares-Farina, Giane; Sposito, Otávio da Silva; Zanchi, César Henrique; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    The addition of chlorhexidine (CHX) to a resinous experimental Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (E-MTA) based root-end filling material is an alternative to boost its antimicrobial activity. However, the influence of chlorhexidine on the properties of this material is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2% chlorhexidine on the pH, calcium ion release and setting time of a Bisphenol A Ethoxylate Dimethacrylate/Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (Bis-EMA/MTA) based dual-cure experimental root-end filling material (E-MTA), in comparison with E-MTA without the addition of CHX and with conventional white MTA (W-MTA). The materials were placed in polyethylene tubes, and immersed in deionized water to determine pH (digital pH meter) and calcium ion release (atomic absorption spectrometry technique). The setting time of each material was analyzed using Gilmore needles. The data were statistically analyzed at a significance level of 5%. E-MTA + CHX showed an alkaline pH in the 3 h period of evaluation, the alkalinity of which decreased but remained as such for 15 days. The pH of E-MTA + CHX was higher than the other two materials after 7 days, and lower after 30 days (p < 0.05). All of the materials were found to release calcium ions throughout the 30 days of the study. The addition of CHX increased the calcium ion release of E-MTA to levels statistically similar to W-MTA. E-MTA showed shorter initial and final setting time, compared with W-MTA (p < 0.05). The addition of 2% CHX to MTA prevented setting of the material. The addition of CHX to E-MTA increased its pH and calcium ion release. However, it also prevented setting of the material. PMID:25715035

  15. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors induce calcium mobilization through cross-talk with Gq-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2010-09-10

    The cross-talk between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and muscarinic receptors was investigated by measuring evoked transient increases in cytosolic calcium concentration. HEK293 cells stably expressing human CRF type 1 (hCRF(1)) and type 2(a) (hCRF(2(a))) receptors were stimulated with the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol and shortly after by a CRF agonist. Unexpectedly, this second response was enhanced when compared to stimulating naive cells either with carbachol or CRF agonist only. Priming with 100 microM carbachol increased the maximal CRF agonist response and shifted its concentration-response curve to the left to attain almost the same potency as for stimulating the production of the natural second messenger cyclic AMP. Yet, priming did not affect CRF agonist-stimulated cyclic AMP production itself. Carbachol priming was not restricted to recombinant CRF receptors only since endogenously expressed beta(2)-adrenoceptors also started to produce a robust calcium signal. Without priming no such signal was observed. Similar findings were made in the human retinoblastoma cell line Y79 for endogenously expressed CRF(1) receptors and the type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide receptors but not for the CRF(2(a)) receptors. This differentiation between CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors was further supported by use of selective agonists and antagonists. The results suggest that stimulating a Gq-coupled receptor shortly before stimulating a Gs-coupled receptor may result in a parallel signaling event on top of the classical cyclic AMP pathway. PMID:20594969

  16. Characteristics of cocaine block of purified cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channels.

    PubMed Central

    Tsushima, R G; Kelly, J E; Wasserstrom, J A

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the effects of cocaine on the SR Ca2+ release channel purified from canine cardiac muscle. Cocaine induced a flicker block of the channel from the cytoplasmic side, which resulted in an apparent reduction in the single-channel current amplitude without a marked reduction in the single-channel open probability. This block was evident only at positive holding potentials. Analysis of the block revealed that cocaine binds to a single site with an effective valence of 0.93 and an apparent dissociation constant at 0 mV (Kd(0)) of 38 mM. The kinetics of cocaine block were analyzed by amplitude distribution analysis and showed that the voltage and concentration dependence lay exclusively in the blocking reaction, whereas the unblocking reaction was independent of both voltage and concentration. Modification of the channel by ryanodine dramatically attenuated the voltage and concentration dependence of the on rates of cocaine block while diminishing the off rates to a lesser extent. In addition, ryanodine modification changed the effective valence of cocaine block to 0.52 and the Kd(0) to 110 mM, suggesting that modification of the channel results in an alteration in the binding site and its affinity for cocaine. These results suggest that cocaine block of the SR Ca2+ release channel is due to the binding at a single site within the channel pore and that modification of the channel by ryanodine leads to profound changes in the kinetics of cocaine block. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:8785282

  17. Epinephrine impairs insulin release by a mechanism distal to calcium mobilization. Similarity to lipoxygenase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms that enable epinephrine (EPI) and lipoxygenase inhibitors to impede insulin secretion are unknown. We examined the possibility that EPI inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/ fluxes as its major mechanism by studying /sup 45/Ca efflux from prelabeled, intact rat islets. EPI (2.5 x 10(-7) to 1 x 10(-5) M) inhibited insulin release induced by the influx of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ (46 mM K+) or the mobilization of intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ stores (2 mM Ba/sup 2 +/), but it did not reduce the /sup 45/Ca efflux stimulated by either agonist. EPI also nullified insulin release induced by isobutylmethylxanthine or dibutyryl cAMP, with minimal or no effects on /sup 45/Ca efflux, and blocked the insulinotropic effects of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (a direct activator of protein kinase C), which is believed primarily to sensitize the exocytotic apparatus to Ca/sup 2 +/ without mobilizing additional Ca/sup 2 +/. Previously we reported that similar effects were induced by inhibitors of pancreatic islet lipoxygenase. In this study, however, pretreatment with either the alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine or pertussis toxin did not block the effects of lipoxygenase inhibitors, although either agent did block the effects of EPI. Thus, EPI, via an alpha 2-receptor mechanism, is able to reduce exocytosis largely distal to, or independent of, changes in Ca/sup 2 +/ flux, cAMP formation or its Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilizing action, or generation of protein kinase C activators. Therefore, EPI may reduce the sensitivity of the exocytotic apparatus to Ca/sup 2 +/. Inhibition of islet lipoxygenase may have a similar effect; however, in this case, the effect would have to be unrelated, or distal, to stimulation of alpha 2-receptors.

  18. The calcium release-activated calcium channel Orai1 represents a crucial component in hypertrophic compensation and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jaime S; Buckley, Cadie L; Alvarez, Ernest M; Schorlemmer, Anita; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    As exceptionally calcium selective store-operated channels, Orai channels play a prominent role in cellular calcium signaling. While most studied in the immune system, we are beginning to recognize that Orai1 provides unique calcium signaling pathways in numerous tissue contexts. To assess the involvement of Orai1 in cardiac hypertrophy we used transverse aortic constriction to model pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in Orai1 deficient mice. We demonstrate that Orai1 deficient mice have significantly decreased survival in this pressure overload model. Transthoracic echocardiography reveals that Orai1 deficient mice develop rapid dilated cardiomyopathy, with greater loss of function, and histological and molecular data indicate that this pathology is associated with significant apoptosis, but not major differences in cellular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and some major hypertrophic makers. Orai1 represents a crucial calcium entry mechanism in the compensation of the heart to pressure overload over-load, and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:24135962

  19. The calcium release-activated calcium channel Orai1 represents a crucial component in hypertrophic compensation and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jaime S; Buckley, Cadie L; Alvarez, Ernest M; Schorlemmer, Anita; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    As exceptionally calcium selective store-operated channels, Orai channels play a prominent role in cellular calcium signaling. While most studied in the immune system, we are beginning to recognize that Orai1 provides unique calcium signaling pathways in numerous tissue contexts. To assess the involvement of Orai1 in cardiac hypertrophy we used transverse aortic constriction to model pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in Orai1 deficient mice. We demonstrate that Orai1 deficient mice have significantly decreased survival in this pressure overload model. Transthoracic echocardiography reveals that Orai1 deficient mice develop rapid dilated cardiomyopathy, with greater loss of function, and histological and molecular data indicate that this pathology is associated with significant apoptosis, but not major differences in cellular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and some major hypertrophic makers. Orai1 represents a crucial calcium entry mechanism in the compensation of the heart to pressure overload over-load, and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:24135962

  20. Charge movement and SR calcium release in frog skeletal muscle can be related by a Hodgkin-Huxley model with four gating particles.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, B. J.; Hill, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Charge movement currents (IQ) and calcium transients (delta[Ca2+]) were measured simultaneously in frog skeletal muscle fibers, voltage clamped in a double vaseline gap chamber, using Antipyrylazo III as the calcium indicator. The rate of release of calcium from the SR (Rrel) was calculated from the calcium transients using the removal model of Melzer, W., E. Rios, and M. F. Schneider (1987. Biophys. J. 51:849-863.). IQ and delta [Ca2+] were calculated for 100 ms depolarizing test pulses to membrane potentials from -30 to +20 mV. To eliminate an inactivating component of Rrel, each test pulse was preceded by a large, fixed prepulse to +20 mV. The resulting Rrel records, which represent the noninactivating component of Rrel, were compared with integral of IQdt.(Q), the total charge that moves. The voltage dependence of the steady state Rrel was steeper then that of Q and shifted to the right. During depolarization, the Rrel waveform was similar to that of Q but was delayed by several ms, while, during repolarization, Rrel preceded Q. All of these results could be explained with a Hodgkin-Huxley type model for E-C coupling in which four voltage sensors in the t-tubule membrane which give rise to IQ must all be in their activating positions for the calcium release channel in the SR membrane to open. his model is consistent with the structural architecture of the triadic junction in which four dihydropyridine receptors (the voltage sensors for E-C coupling) in the t-tubule membrane are closely associated with each ryanodine receptor(the calcium release channel) in the SR membrane [Block, B. A., T. Imagawa, K. P. Campbell, and C. Franzini-Armstrong. 1988. J.Cell. Biol. 107:2587-2600.]). Some aspects of this work have appeared in abstract form (Simon, B. J., and D. Hill. 1991. Biophys. J.59:64a. ([Abstr.]). PMID:1318090

  1. ATP release due to Thy-1–integrin binding induces P2X7-mediated calcium entry required for focal adhesion formation

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez, Mauricio; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Alvarez, Alvaro; Kong, Milene; Muñoz, Nicolás; Eisner, Verónica; Jaimovich, Enrique; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    Thy-1, an abundant mammalian glycoprotein, interacts with αvβ3 integrin and syndecan-4 in astrocytes and thus triggers signaling events that involve RhoA and its effector p160ROCK, thereby increasing astrocyte adhesion to the extracellular matrix. The signaling cascade includes calcium-dependent activation of protein kinase Cα upstream of Rho; however, what causes the intracellular calcium transients required to promote adhesion remains unclear. Purinergic P2X7 receptors are important for astrocyte function and form large non-selective cation pores upon binding to their ligand, ATP. Thus, we evaluated whether the intracellular calcium required for Thy-1-induced cell adhesion stems from influx mediated by ATP-activated P2X7 receptors. Results show that adhesion induced by the fusion protein Thy-1-Fc was preceded by both ATP release and sustained intracellular calcium elevation. Elimination of extracellular ATP with Apyrase, chelation of extracellular calcium with EGTA, or inhibition of P2X7 with oxidized ATP, all individually blocked intracellular calcium increase and Thy-1-stimulated adhesion. Moreover, Thy-1 mutated in the integrin-binding site did not trigger ATP release, and silencing of P2X7 with specific siRNA blocked Thy-1-induced adhesion. This study is the first to demonstrate a functional link between αvβ3 integrin and P2X7 receptors, and to reveal an important, hitherto unanticipated, role for P2X7 in calcium-dependent signaling required for Thy-1-stimulated astrocyte adhesion. PMID:21502139

  2. Phosphate release and force generation in cardiac myocytes investigated with caged phosphate and caged calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, A; Walker, J W

    1996-01-01

    The phosphate (P(i)) dissociation step of the cross-bridge cycle was investigated in skinned rat ventricular myocytes to examine its role in force generation and Ca(2+) regulation in cardiac muscle. Pulse photolysis of caged P(i) (alpha-carboxyl-2-nitrobenzyl phosphate) produced up to 3 mM P(i) within the filament lattice, resulting in an approximately exponential decline in steady-state tension. The apparent rate constant, k (rho i), increased linearly with total P(i) concentration (initial plus photoreleased), giving an apparent second-order rate constant for P(i) binding of 3100 M(-1) s(-1), which is intermediate in value between fast and slow skeletal muscles. A decrease in the level of Ca(2+) activation to 20% of maximum tension reduced k (rho i) by twofold and increased the relative amplitude by threefold, consistent with modulation of P(i) release by Ca2+. A three-state model, with separate but coupled transitions for force generation and P(i) dissociation, and a Ca(2+)-sensitive forward rate constant for force generation, was compatible with the data. There was no evidence for a slow phase of tension decline observed previously in fast skeletal fibers at low Ca(2+), suggesting differences in cooperative mechanisms in cardiac and skeletal muscle. In separate experiments, tension development was initiated from a relaxed state by photolysis of caged Ca(2+). The apparent rate constant, k(Ca), was accelerated in the presence of high P(i) consistent with close coupling between force generation and P(i) dissociation, even when force development was initiated from a relaxed state. k(Ca) was also dependent on the level of Ca(2+) activation. However, significant quantitative differences between k (rho i) and k(Ca), including different sensitivities to Ca(2+) and P(i) indicate that caged Ca(2+) tension transients are influenced by additional Ca(2+)-dependent but P i-independent steps that occur before P(i) release. Data from both types of measurements suggest that

  3. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone-related protein release by extracellular calcium in dispersed cells from human parathyroid hyperplasia secondary to chronic renal failure and adenoma.

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, H.; Hara, M.; Honda, K.; Kuroda, M.; Usui, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Hara, S.; Shishiba, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) release from parathyroid cells and extracellular calcium ion concentration was investigated in three cases of parathyroid hyperplasia secondary to chronic renal failure and in four cases of parathyroid adenoma. Amounts of PTHrP released from individual parathyroid cells dispersed from surgical specimens were estimated by cell immunoblot assay. Parathyroid cells from both hyperplasias and adenomas showed significant suppression in the release of PTHrP with increase in extracellular calcium ions, but the amounts of PTHrP released from adenoma cells were significantly larger than from hyperplasia cells. The maximal value for PTHrP released within 120 minutes from adenoma cells was 2.91 +/- 2.11 x 10(-2) fmol/cell ([Ca2+], 0.4 mmol/L), and the minimal value was 1.32 +/- 0.35 x 10(-2) fmol/cell ([Ca2+], 2.0 mmol/L). On the other hand, the maximal value for PTHrP released from hyperplasia cells was 1.79 +/- 1.56 x 10(-2) fmol/cell ([Ca2+], 0.4 mmol/L), and the minimal value was 0.32 +/- 0.19 x 10(-2) fmol/cell ([Ca2+], 2.0 mmol/L). These results demonstrate actual release of PTHrP from abnormal parathyroid tissues into the extracellular space with the response to extracellular calcium ions depending on the cell status. Given the lack of definite histological criteria to differentiate between hyperplasias and adenomas in the parathyroid gland, the presently demonstrated significant difference in the ability to release PTHrP is important in pointing to parathyroid hyperplasia secondary to chronic renal failure as a distinct pathological entity separate from parathyroid adenoma. Images Figure 3 PMID:7778690

  4. Preparation and physical characterization of calcium sulfate cement/silica-based mesoporous material composites for controlled release of BMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Honglue; Yang, Shengbing; Dai, Pengyi; Li, Wuyin; Yue, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As a commonly used implant material, calcium sulfate cement (CSC), has some shortcomings, including low compressive strength, weak osteoinduction capability, and rapid degradation. In this study, silica-based mesoporous materials such as SBA-15 were synthesized and combined with CSC to prepare CSC/SBA-15 composites. The properties of SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms. SBA-15 was blended into CSC at 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt%, referred to as CSC, CSC-5S (5% mass ratio), CSC-10S (10% mass ratio), and CSC-20S (20% mass ratio), respectively. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and compression tests were used to determine the structure and mechanical properties of the composites, respectively. The formation of hydroxyapatite on composite surfaces was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction after soaking in simulated body fluid. BMP-2 was loaded into the composites by vacuum freeze-drying, and its release characteristics were detected by Bradford protein assay. The in vitro degradation of the CSC/SBA-15 composite was investigated by measuring weight loss. The results showed that the orderly, nanostructured, mesoporous SBA-15 possessed regular pore size and structure. The compressive strength of CSC/SBA-15 increased with the increase in SBA-15 mass ratio, and CSC-20S demonstrated the maximum strength. Compared to CSC, hydroxyapatite that formed on the surfaces of CSC/SBA-15 was uniform and compact. The degradation rate of CSC/SBA-15 decreased with increasing mass ratio of SBA-15. The adsorption of BMP-2 increased and released at a relatively slow rate; the release rate of BMP-2 in CSC-20S was the slowest, and presented characteristics of low doses of release. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the physical properties of pure CSC incorporated with SBA-15 could be improved significantly, which made the CSC/SBA-15 composite more suitable for bone repair

  5. Preparation and physical characterization of calcium sulfate cement/silica-based mesoporous material composites for controlled release of BMP-2.

    PubMed

    Tan, Honglue; Yang, Shengbing; Dai, Pengyi; Li, Wuyin; Yue, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As a commonly used implant material, calcium sulfate cement (CSC), has some shortcomings, including low compressive strength, weak osteoinduction capability, and rapid degradation. In this study, silica-based mesoporous materials such as SBA-15 were synthesized and combined with CSC to prepare CSC/SBA-15 composites. The properties of SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. SBA-15 was blended into CSC at 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt%, referred to as CSC, CSC-5S (5% mass ratio), CSC-10S (10% mass ratio), and CSC-20S (20% mass ratio), respectively. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and compression tests were used to determine the structure and mechanical properties of the composites, respectively. The formation of hydroxyapatite on composite surfaces was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction after soaking in simulated body fluid. BMP-2 was loaded into the composites by vacuum freeze-drying, and its release characteristics were detected by Bradford protein assay. The in vitro degradation of the CSC/SBA-15 composite was investigated by measuring weight loss. The results showed that the orderly, nanostructured, mesoporous SBA-15 possessed regular pore size and structure. The compressive strength of CSC/SBA-15 increased with the increase in SBA-15 mass ratio, and CSC-20S demonstrated the maximum strength. Compared to CSC, hydroxyapatite that formed on the surfaces of CSC/SBA-15 was uniform and compact. The degradation rate of CSC/SBA-15 decreased with increasing mass ratio of SBA-15. The adsorption of BMP-2 increased and released at a relatively slow rate; the release rate of BMP-2 in CSC-20S was the slowest, and presented characteristics of low doses of release. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the physical properties of pure CSC incorporated with SBA-15 could be improved significantly, which made the CSC/SBA-15 composite more suitable for bone repair

  6. The TRPC6 channel activator hyperforin induces the release of zinc and calcium from mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tu, Peng; Gibon, Julien; Bouron, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Hyperforin, an extract of the medicinal plant hypericum perforatum (also named St John's wort), possesses antidepressant properties. Recent data showed that it elevates the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+) by activating diacylglycerol-sensitive C-class of transient receptor potential (TRPC6) channels without activating the other isoforms (TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, and TRPC7). This study was undertaken to further characterize the cellular neuronal responses induced by hyperforin. Experiments conducted on cortical neurons in primary culture and loaded with fluorescent probes for Ca(2+) (Fluo-4) and Zn(2+) (FluoZin-3) showed that it not only controls the activity of plasma membrane channels but it also mobilizes these two cations from internal pools. Experiments conducted on isolated brain mitochondria indicated that hyperforin, like the inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation, carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP), collapses the mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, it promotes the release of Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) from these organelles via a ruthenium red-sensitive transporter. In fact, hyperforin exerts complex actions on CNS neurons. This antidepressant not only triggers the entry of cations via plasma membrane TRPC6 channels but it displays protonophore-like properties. As hyperforin is now use to probe the functions of native TRPC6 channels, our data indicate that caution is required when interpreting results obtained with this antidepressant. PMID:19845832

  7. Live Imaging of Nicotine Induced Calcium Signaling and Neurotransmitter Release Along Ventral Hippocampal Axons.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chongbo; Talmage, David A; Role, Lorna W

    2015-01-01

    Sustained enhancement of axonal signaling and increased neurotransmitter release by the activation of pre-synaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is an important mechanism for neuromodulation by acetylcholine (ACh). The difficulty with access to probing the signaling mechanisms within intact axons and at nerve terminals both in vitro and in vivo has limited progress in the study of the pre-synaptic components of synaptic plasticity. Here we introduce a gene-chimeric preparation of ventral hippocampal (vHipp)-accumbens (nAcc) circuit in vitro that allows direct live imaging to analyze both the pre- and post-synaptic components of transmission while selectively varying the genetic profile of the pre- vs post-synaptic neurons. We demonstrate that projections from vHipp microslices, as pre-synaptic axonal input, form multiple, reliable glutamatergic synapses with post-synaptic targets, the dispersed neurons from nAcc. The pre-synaptic localization of various subtypes of nAChRs are detected and the pre-synaptic nicotinic signaling mediated synaptic transmission are monitored by concurrent electrophysiological recording and live cell imaging. This preparation also provides an informative approach to study the pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms of glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in vitro. PMID:26132461

  8. Multifunctional Eu3+/Gd3+ dual-doped calcium phosphate vesicle-like nanospheres for sustained drug release and imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Huang, Peng; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Wu, Jin; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2012-09-01

    A facile room-temperature solution method is reported for the preparation of multifunctional Eu(3+) and Gd(3+) dual-doped calcium phosphate (CaP) (Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP) vesicle-like nanospheres in the presence of an amphiphilic block copolymer polylactide-block-monomethoxy(polyethyleneglycol) (PLA-mPEG). The photoluminescent (PL) and magnetic multifunctions of CaP vesicle-like nanospheres are realized by dual-doping with Eu(3+)/Gd(3+) ions. Under the excitation at 393 nm, Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres exhibit a strong near-infrared (NIR) emission at 700 nm, and the PL intensity can be adjusted by varying Eu(3+) and Gd(3+) concentrations. Furthermore, Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres can be used as the drug nanocarrier and have a high drug loading capacity and ultralong sustained drug release using ibuprofen as a model drug. The drug release from the drug delivery system of Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres can sustain for a very long period of time (more than 80 days). The as-prepared Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres exhibit essentially inappreciable toxicity to the cells in vitro. The noninvasive visualization of nude mice with subcutaneous injection indicates that the Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres are suitable for in vivo bio-imaging. In vivo imaging tests using the subcutaneous injection model of nude mice indicate that Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres can be used as an imaging agent for the NIR luminescence imaging. Thus, the Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres are promising for applications in the biomedical fields such as multifunctional drug delivery systems and tissue engineering scaffolds with bio-imaging guidance. PMID:22721725

  9. Electrophysiological effects of ryanodine derivatives on the sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-release channel.

    PubMed Central

    Tinker, A; Sutko, J L; Ruest, L; Deslongchamps, P; Welch, W; Airey, J A; Gerzon, K; Bidasee, K R; Besch, H R; Williams, A J

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the effects of a number of derivatives of ryanodine on K+ conduction in the Ca2+ release channel purified from sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In a fashion comparable to that of ryanodine, the addition of nanomolar to micromolar quantities to the cytoplasmic face (the exact amount depending on the derivative) causes the channel to enter a state of reduced conductance that has a high open probability. However, the amplitude of that reduced conductance state varies between the different derivatives. In symmetrical 210 mM K+, ryanodine leads to a conductance state with an amplitude of 56.8 +/- 0.5% of control, ryanodol leads to a level of 69.4 +/- 0.6%, ester A ryanodine modifies to one of 61.5 +/- 1.4%, 9,21-dehydroryanodine to one of 58.3 +/- 0.3%, 9 beta,21beta-epoxyryanodine to one of 56.8 +/- 0.8%, 9-hydroxy-21-azidoryanodine to one of 56.3 +/- 0.4%, 10-pyrroleryanodol to one of 52.2 +/- 1.0%, 3-epiryanodine to one of 42.9 +/- 0.7%, CBZ glycyl ryanodine to one of 29.4 +/- 1.0%, 21-p-nitrobenzoyl-amino-9-hydroxyryanodine to one of 26.1 +/- 0.5%, beta-alanyl ryanodine to one of 14.3 +/- 0.5%, and guanidino-propionyl ryanodine to one of 5.8 +/- 0.1% (chord conductance at +60 mV, +/- SEM). For the majority of the derivatives the effect is irreversible within the lifetime of a single-channel experiment (up to 1 h). However, for four of the derivatives, typified by ryanodol, the effect is reversible, with dwell times in the substate lasting tens of seconds to minutes. The effect caused by ryanodol is dependent on transmembrane voltage, with modification more likely to occur and lasting longer at +60 than at -60 mV holding potential. The addition of concentrations of ryanodol insufficient to cause modification does not lead to an increase in single-channel open probability, such as has been reported for ryanodine. At concentrations of > or = 500 mu M, ryanodine after initial rapid modification of the channel leads to irreversible closure

  10. Time course and magnitude of the calcium release induced by bright light in salamander rods

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Hugh R; Fain, Gordon L

    2002-01-01

    not reflect an increase in outer segment [Ca2+]i. Neither the rapid nor the slower components of fluorescence increase were affected by exposure of the outer segment to 10 μm of the membrane-permeant compound N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridyl-methyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), which chelates heavy metals such as Zn2+, or 100 μm 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborate (2-APB), a membrane-permeant blocker of IP3 receptors. These results appear to exclude a role for changes in heavy metal concentration or Ca2+ release via IP3 receptors in the light-induced increases in dye fluorescence. Estimates of absolute Ca2+ concentration and of rod buffering capacity suggest that the slower components of fluorescence increase represent the release of around 10–50 μmoles Ca2+ per litre cytoplasmic volume from bound or sequestered stores after bleaching. PMID:12154182

  11. Disrupted Calcium Release as a Mechanism for Atrial Alternans Associated with Human Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kelly C.; Bayer, Jason D.; Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, but our knowledge of the arrhythmogenic substrate is incomplete. Alternans, the beat-to-beat alternation in the shape of cardiac electrical signals, typically occurs at fast heart rates and leads to arrhythmia. However, atrial alternans have been observed at slower pacing rates in AF patients than in controls, suggesting that increased vulnerability to arrhythmia in AF patients may be due to the proarrythmic influence of alternans at these slower rates. As such, alternans may present a useful therapeutic target for the treatment and prevention of AF, but the mechanism underlying alternans occurrence in AF patients at heart rates near rest is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine how cellular changes that occur in human AF affect the appearance of alternans at heart rates near rest. To achieve this, we developed a computational model of human atrial tissue incorporating electrophysiological remodeling associated with chronic AF (cAF) and performed parameter sensitivity analysis of ionic model parameters to determine which cellular changes led to alternans. Of the 20 parameters tested, only decreasing the ryanodine receptor (RyR) inactivation rate constant (kiCa) produced action potential duration (APD) alternans seen clinically at slower pacing rates. Using single-cell clamps of voltage, fluxes, and state variables, we determined that alternans onset was Ca2+-driven rather than voltage-driven and occurred as a result of decreased RyR inactivation which led to increased steepness of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release slope. Iterated map analysis revealed that because SR Ca2+ uptake efficiency was much higher in control atrial cells than in cAF cells, drastic reductions in kiCa were required to produce alternans at comparable pacing rates in control atrial cells. These findings suggest that RyR kinetics may play a critical role in altered Ca2+ homeostasis which drives proarrhythmic

  12. Aβ and NMDAR activation cause mitochondrial dysfunction involving ER calcium release.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ildete Luísa; Ferreiro, Elisabete; Schmidt, Jeannette; Cardoso, João M; Pereira, Cláudia M F; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Oliveira, Catarina R; Rego, A Cristina

    2015-02-01

    Early cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) seem to be correlated to dysregulation of glutamate receptors evoked by amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide. Aβ interference with the activity of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) may be a relevant factor for Aβ-induced mitochondrial toxicity and neuronal dysfunction. To evaluate the role of mitochondria in NMDARs activation mediated by Aβ, we followed in situ single-cell simultaneous measurement of cytosolic free Ca(2+)(Cai(2+)) and mitochondrial membrane potential in primary cortical neurons. Our results show that direct exposure to Aβ + NMDA largely increased Cai(2+) and induced immediate mitochondrial depolarization, compared with Aβ or NMDA alone. Mitochondrial depolarization induced by rotenone strongly inhibited the rise in Cai(2+) evoked by Aβ or NMDA, suggesting that mitochondria control Ca(2+) entry through NMDARs. However, incubation with rotenone did not preclude mitochondrial Ca(2+) (mitCa(2+)) retention in cells treated with Aβ. Aβ-induced Cai(2+) and mitCa(2+) rise were inhibited by ifenprodil, an antagonist of GluN2B-containing NMDARs. Exposure to Aβ + NMDA further evoked a higher mitCa(2+) retention, which was ameliorated in GluN2B(-/-) cortical neurons, largely implicating the involvement of this NMDAR subunit. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) and mitCa(2+) uniporter (MCU) evidenced that Aβ + NMDA-induced mitCa(2+) rise involves ER Ca(2+) release through IP3R and mitochondrial entry by the MCU. Altogether, data highlight mitCa(2+) dyshomeostasis and subsequent dysfunction as mechanisms relevant for early neuronal dysfunction in AD linked to Aβ-mediated GluN2B-composed NMDARs activation. PMID:25442114

  13. Inhibition of Rac1 reduces store overload-induced calcium release and protects against ventricular arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Lu, Xiangru; Gui, Le; Wu, Yan; Sims, Stephen M; Wang, Guoping; Feng, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Rac1 is a small GTPase and plays key roles in multiple cellular processes including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, whether Rac1 activation during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) contributes to arrhythmogenesis is not fully understood. We aimed to study the effects of Rac1 inhibition on store overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR) and ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Adult Rac1(f/f) and cardiac-specific Rac1 knockdown (Rac1(ckd) ) mice were subjected to myocardial I/R and their electrocardiograms (ECGs) were monitored for ventricular arrhythmia. Myocardial Rac1 activity was increased and ventricular arrhythmia was induced during I/R in Rac1(f/f) mice. Remarkably, I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia was significantly decreased in Rac1(ckd) compared to Rac1(f/f) mice. Furthermore, treatment with Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 decreased I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia. Ca(2+) imaging analysis showed that in response to a 6 mM external Ca(2+) concentration challenge, SOICR was induced with characteristic spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) waves in Rac1(f/f) cardiomyocytes. Notably, SOICR was diminished by pharmacological and genetic inhibition of Rac1 in adult cardiomyocytes. Moreover, I/R-induced ROS production and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) oxidation were significantly inhibited in the myocardium of Rac1(ckd) mice. We conclude that Rac1 activation induces ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Inhibition of Rac1 suppresses SOICR and protects against ventricular arrhythmia. Blockade of Rac1 activation may represent a new paradigm for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia in ischaemic heart disease. PMID:27222313

  14. Block by ruthenium red of the ryanodine-activated calcium release channel of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The effects of ruthenium red and the related compounds tetraamine palladium (4APd) and tetraamine platinum (4APt) were studied on the ryanodine activated Ca2+ release channel reconstituted in planar bilayers with the immunoaffinity purified ryanodine receptor. Ruthenium red, applied at submicromolar concentrations to the myoplasmic side (cis), induced an all-or-none flickery block of the ryanodine activated channel. The blocking effect was strongly voltage dependent, as large positive potentials that favored the movement of ruthenium red into the channel conduction pore produced stronger block. The half dissociation constants (Kd) for ruthenium red block of the 500 pS channel were 0.22, 0.38, and 0.62 microM, at +100, +80, and +60 mV, respectively. Multiple ruthenium red molecules seemed to be involved in the inhibition, because a Hill coefficient of close to 2 was obtained from the dose response curve. The half dissociation constant of ruthenium red block of the lower conductance state of the ryanodine activated channel (250 pS) was higher (Kd = 0.82 microM at +100 mV), while the Hill coefficient remained approximately the same (nH = 2.7). Ruthenium red block of the channel was highly asymmetric, as trans ruthenium red produced a different blocking effect. The blocking and unblocking events (induced by cis ruthenium red) can be resolved at the single channel level at a cutoff frequency of 2 kHz. The closing rate of the channel in the presence of ruthenium red increased linearly with ruthenium red concentration, and the unblocking rate of the channel was independent of ruthenium red concentrations. This suggests that ruthenium red block of the channel occurred via a simple blocking mechanism. The on-rate of ruthenium red binding to the channel was 1.32 x 10(9) M-1 s-1, and the off-rate of ruthenium red binding was 0.75 x 10(3) s-1 at +60 mV, in the presence of 200 nM ryanodine. The two related compounds, 4APd and 4APt, blocked the channel in a similar way to that

  15. The role of PIP2 and the IP3/DAG pathway in intracellular calcium release and cell survival during nanosecond electric pulse exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, Zachary A.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Estlack, Larry E.; Roth, Caleb C.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2015-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) is a membrane phospholipid of particular importance in cell-signaling pathways. Hydrolysis of PIP2 releases inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) from the membrane, activating IP3 receptors on the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and facilitating a release of intracellular calcium stores and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Recent studies suggest that nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause depletion of PIP2 in the cellular membrane, activating the IP3 signaling pathway. However, the exact mechanism(s) causing this observed depletion of PIP2 are unknown. Complicating the matter, nsPEF create nanopores in the plasma membrane, allowing calcium to enter the cell and thus causing an increase in intracellular calcium. While elevated intracellular calcium can cause activation of phospholipase C (PLC) (a known catalyst of PIP2 hydrolysis), PIP2 depletion has been shown to occur in the absence of both extracellular and intracellular calcium. These observations have led to the hypothesis that the high electric field itself may be playing a direct role in the hydrolysis of PIP2 from the plasma membrane. To support this hypothesis, we used edelfosine to block PLC and prevent activation of the IP3/DAG pathway in Chinese Hamster Ovarian (CHO) cells prior to applying nsPEF. Fluorescence microscopy was used to monitor intracellular calcium bursts during nsPEF, while MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) survivability assays were utilized to determine whether edelfosine improved cell survival during nsPEF exposure. This work is critical to refine the role of PIP2 in the cellular response to nsPEF, and also to determine the fundamental biological effects of high electric field exposures.

  16. Carbon-Based Solid-State Calcium Ion-Selective Microelectrode and Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy: A Quantitative Study of pH-Dependent Release of Calcium Ions from Bioactive Glass.

    PubMed

    Ummadi, Jyothir Ganesh; Downs, Corey J; Joshi, Vrushali S; Ferracane, Jack L; Koley, Dipankar

    2016-03-15

    Solid-state ion-selective electrodes are used as scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) probes because of their inherent fast response time and ease of miniaturization. In this study, we report the development of a solid-state, low-poly(vinyl chloride), carbon-based calcium ion-selective microelectrode (Ca(2+)-ISME), 25 μm in diameter, capable of performing an amperometric approach curve and serving as a potentiometric sensor. The Ca(2+)-ISME has a broad linear response range of 5 μM to 200 mM with a near Nernstian slope of 28 mV/log[a(Ca(2+))]. The calculated detection limit for Ca(2+)-ISME is 1 μM. The selectivity coefficients of this Ca(2+)-ISME are log K(Ca(2+),A) = -5.88, -5.54, and -6.31 for Mg(2+), Na(+), and K(+), respectively. We used this new type of Ca(2+)-ISME as an SECM probe to quantitatively map the chemical microenvironment produced by a model substrate, bioactive glass (BAG). In acidic conditions (pH 4.5), BAG was found to increase the calcium ion concentration from 0.7 mM ([Ca(2+)] in artificial saliva) to 1.4 mM at 20 μm above the surface. In addition, a solid-state dual SECM pH probe was used to correlate the release of calcium ions with the change in local pH. Three-dimensional pH and calcium ion distribution mapping were also obtained by using these solid-state probes. The quantitative mapping of pH and Ca(2+) above the BAG elucidates the effectiveness of BAG in neutralizing and releasing calcium ions in acidic conditions. PMID:26861499

  17. 6-Methoxyluteolin from Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum suppresses histamine release and calcium influx via down-regulation of FcεRI α chain expression.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sun-Yup; Park, Jeong-Ro; Byun, Dae-Seok

    2012-05-01

    Mast cells and basophils are important effector cells in immunoglobulin-E (IgE)-mediated allergic reactions. Using the human basophilic KU812F cells, we assessed the inhibitory effects of 6-methoxyluteolin, isolated from Chrysanthemum zawadskii, in the FcεRI-mediated allergic reaction. We determined that 6-methoxyluteolin inhibited anti-FcεRI α chain antibody (CRA-1)-induced histamine release, as well as elevation of intracellular calcium concentration [Ca2+]i in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of 6-methoxyluteolin on the cell surface expression and the mRNA level of the FcεRI α chain were determined by flow cytometric analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR), respectively. Therefore, these results show that 6- methoxyluteolin is a potent inhibitor of histamine release and calcium influx via down-regulation of the FcεRI α chain. PMID:22561855

  18. Thalamic reticular nucleus in Caiman crocodilus: forebrain connections.

    PubMed

    Pritz, Michael B

    2016-08-01

    Forebrain connections of the thalamic reticular nucleus associated with the lateral forebrain bundle were analyzed in Caiman crocodilus. Both the compact portion, the dorsal peduncular nucleus, and the diffuse part, the perireticular region, associated with the lateral forebrain bundle, were studied. A small tracer injection into the dorsal peduncular nucleus demonstrated reciprocal connections with a restricted portion of the dorsal thalamus. Tracer placements into this nucleus retrogradely labeled cells in a caudal portion of the ventrolateral area of the telencephalon. These results are compared with similar studies in other amniotes. PMID:27233216

  19. Reticular synthesis and the design of new materials.

    PubMed

    Yaghi, Omar M; O'Keeffe, Michael; Ockwig, Nathan W; Chae, Hee K; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Kim, Jaheon

    2003-06-12

    The long-standing challenge of designing and constructing new crystalline solid-state materials from molecular building blocks is just beginning to be addressed with success. A conceptual approach that requires the use of secondary building units to direct the assembly of ordered frameworks epitomizes this process: we call this approach reticular synthesis. This chemistry has yielded materials designed to have predetermined structures, compositions and properties. In particular, highly porous frameworks held together by strong metal-oxygen-carbon bonds and with exceptionally large surface area and capacity for gas storage have been prepared and their pore metrics systematically varied and functionalized. PMID:12802325

  20. Absence of triadin, a protein of the calcium release complex, is responsible for cardiac arrhythmia with sudden death in human

    PubMed Central

    Roux-Buisson, Nathalie; Cacheux, Marine; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Fauconnier, Jeremy; Brocard, Julie; Denjoy, Isabelle; Durand, Philippe; Guicheney, Pascale; Kyndt, Florence; Leenhardt, Antoine; Le Marec, Hervé; Lucet, Vincent; Mabo, Philippe; Probst, Vincent; Monnier, Nicole; Ray, Pierre F.; Santoni, Elodie; Trémeaux, Pauline; Lacampagne, Alain; Fauré, Julien; Lunardi, Joël; Marty, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an inherited arrhythmogenic disease so far related to mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RYR2) or the cardiac calsequestrin (CASQ2) genes. Because mutations in RYR2 or in CASQ2 are not retrieved in all CPVT cases, we searched for mutations in the physiological protein partners of RyR2 and CSQ2 in a large cohort of CPVT patients with no detected mutation in these two genes. Based on a candidate gene approach, we focused our investigations on triadin and junctin, two proteins that link RyR2 and CSQ2. Mutations in the triadin (TRDN) and in the junctin (ASPH) genes were searched in a cohort of 97 CPVT patients. We identified three mutations in triadin which cosegregated with the disease on a recessive mode of transmission in two families, but no mutation was found in junctin. Two TRDN mutations, a 4 bp deletion and a nonsense mutation, resulted in premature stop codons; the third mutation, a p.T59R missense mutation, was further studied. Expression of the p.T59R mutant in COS-7 cells resulted in intracellular retention and degradation of the mutant protein. This was confirmed after in vivo expression of the mutant triadin in triadin knock-out mice by viral transduction. In this work, we identified TRDN as a new gene responsible for an autosomal recessive form of CPVT. The mutations identified in the two families lead to the absence of the protein, thereby demonstrating the importance of triadin for the normal function of the cardiac calcium release complex in humans. PMID:22422768

  1. Retention and release of oil-in-water emulsions from filled hydrogel beads composed of calcium alginate: impact of emulsifier type and pH.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Benjamin; Saberi, Amir Hossein; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, David Julian

    2015-03-21

    Delivery systems based on filled hydrogel particles (microgels) can be fabricated from natural food-grade lipids and biopolymers. The potential for controlling release characteristics by modulating the electrostatic interactions between emulsifier-coated lipid droplets and the biopolymer matrix within hydrogel particles was investigated. A multistage procedure was used to fabricate calcium alginate beads filled with lipid droplets stabilized by non-ionic, cationic, anionic, or zwitterionic emulsifiers. Oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by Tween 60, DTAB, SDS, or whey protein were prepared by microfluidization, mixed with various alginate solutions, and then microgels were formed by simple extrusion into calcium solutions. The microgels were placed into a series of buffer solutions with different pH values (2 to 11). Lipid droplets remained encapsulated under acidic and neutral conditions, but were released under highly basic conditions (pH 11) due to hydrogel swelling when the alginate concentration was sufficiently high. Lipid droplet release increased with decreasing alginate concentration, which could be attributed to an increase in the pore size of the hydrogel matrix. These results have important implications for the design of delivery systems to entrap and control the release of lipophilic bioactive components within filled hydrogel particles. PMID:25646949

  2. Altered expression of triadin 95 causes parallel changes in localized Ca2+ release events and global Ca2+ signals in skeletal muscle cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, János; Gönczi, Monika; Sztretye, Monika; Dienes, Beatrix; Oláh, Tamás; Szabó, László; Csoma, Eszter; Szentesi, Péter; Szigeti, Gyula P; Marty, Isabelle; Csernoch, László

    2008-01-01

    The 95 kDa triadin (Trisk 95), an integral protein of the sarcoplasmic reticular membrane in skeletal muscle, interacts with both the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and calsequestrin. While its role in the regulation of calcium homeostasis has been extensively studied, data are not available on whether the overexpression or the interference with the expression of Trisk 95 would affect calcium sparks the localized events of calcium release (LCRE). In the present study LCRE and calcium transients were studied using laser scanning confocal microscopy on C2C12 cells and on primary cultures of skeletal muscle. Liposome- or adenovirus-mediated Trisk 95 overexpression and shRNA interference with triadin translation were used to modify the level of the protein. Stable overexpression in C2C12 cells significantly decreased the amplitude and frequency of calcium sparks, and the frequency of embers. In line with these observations, depolarization-evoked calcium transients were also suppressed. Similarly, adenoviral transfection of Trisk 95 into cultured mouse skeletal muscle cells significantly decreased both the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous global calcium transients. Inhibition of endogenous triadin expression by RNA interference caused opposite effects. Primary cultures of rat skeletal muscle cells expressing endogenous Trisk 95 readily generated spontaneous calcium transients but rarely produced calcium sparks. Their transfection with specific shRNA sequence significantly reduced the triadin-specific immunoreactivity. Functional experiments on these cells revealed that while caffeine-evoked calcium transients were reduced, LCRE appeared with higher frequency. These results suggest that Trisk 95 negatively regulates RyR function by suppressing localized calcium release events and global calcium signals in cultured muscle cells. PMID:18845610

  3. Thalamic reticular impairment underlies attention deficit in Ptchd1(Y/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Wells, Michael F; Wimmer, Ralf D; Schmitt, L Ian; Feng, Guoping; Halassa, Michael M

    2016-04-01

    Developmental disabilities, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), intellectual disability (ID), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), affect one in six children in the USA. Recently, gene mutations in patched domain containing 1 (PTCHD1) have been found in ~1% of patients with ID and ASD. Individuals with PTCHD1 deletion show symptoms of ADHD, sleep disruption, hypotonia, aggression, ASD, and ID. Although PTCHD1 is probably critical for normal development, the connection between its deletion and the ensuing behavioural defects is poorly understood. Here we report that during early post-natal development, mouse Ptchd1 is selectively expressed in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a group of GABAergic neurons that regulate thalamocortical transmission, sleep rhythms, and attention. Ptchd1 deletion attenuates TRN activity through mechanisms involving small conductance calcium-dependent potassium currents (SK). TRN-restricted deletion of Ptchd1 leads to attention deficits and hyperactivity, both of which are rescued by pharmacological augmentation of SK channel activity. Global Ptchd1 deletion recapitulates learning impairment, hyper-aggression, and motor defects, all of which are insensitive to SK pharmacological targeting and not found in the TRN-restricted deletion mouse. This study maps clinically relevant behavioural phenotypes onto TRN dysfunction in a human disease model, while also identifying molecular and circuit targets for intervention. PMID:27007844

  4. Phase Composition Control of Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Tunable Drug Delivery Kinetics and Treatment of Osteomyelitis. Part 1: Preparation and Drug Release

    PubMed Central

    Uskoković, Vuk; Desai, Tejal A.

    2012-01-01

    Developed in this study is a multifunctional material for simultaneous osseoinduction and drug delivery, potentially applicable in the treatment of osteomyelitis. It is composed of agglomerates of nanoparticles of calcium phosphate (CAP) with different monophasic contents. The drug loading capacity and the release kinetics were investigated on two model drug compounds with different chemical structures, sizes and adsorption propensities: bovine serum albumin and fluorescein. Loading of CAP powders with small molecule drugs was achieved by physisorption and desiccation-induced agglomeration of nanoparticulate subunits into microscopic blocks. The material dissolution rate and the drug release rate depended on the nature of the CAP phase, decreasing from monocalcium phosphate to monetite to amorphous CAP and calcium pyrophosphate to hydroxyapatite. The sustained release of the two model drugs was shown to be directly relatable to the degradation rate of CAP carriers. It was demonstrated that the degradation rate of the carrier and the drug release kinetics could be made tunable within the time scale of 1–2 h for the most soluble CAP phase, monocalcium phosphate, to 1–2 years for the least soluble one, hydroxyapatite. From the standpoint of antibiotic therapy for osteomyelitis, typically lasting for six weeks, the most prospective CAP powder was amorphous CAP with its release time scale for a small organic molecule, the same category to which antibiotics belong, of 1 – 2 months under the conditions applied in our experiments. By combining these different CAP phases in various proportions, drug release profiles could be tailored to the therapeutic occasion. PMID:23115118

  5. Phase composition control of calcium phosphate nanoparticles for tunable drug delivery kinetics and treatment of osteomyelitis. I. Preparation and drug release.

    PubMed

    Uskoković, Vuk; Desai, Tejal A

    2013-05-01

    Developed in this study is a multifunctional material for simultaneous osseoinduction and drug delivery, potentially applicable in the treatment of osteomyelitis. It is composed of agglomerates of nanoparticles of calcium phosphate (CAP) with different monophasic contents. The drug-loading capacity and the release kinetics were investigated on two model drug compounds with different chemical structures, sizes, and adsorption propensities: bovine serum albumin and fluorescein. Loading of CAP powders with small molecule drugs was achieved by physisorption and desiccation-induced agglomeration of nanoparticulate subunits into microscopic blocks. The material dissolution rate and the drug release rate depended on the nature of the CAP phase, decreasing from monocalcium phosphate to monetite to amorphous CAP and calcium pyrophosphate to hydroxyapatite. The sustained release of the two model drugs was shown to be directly relatable to the degradation rate of CAP carriers. It was demonstrated that the degradation rate of the carrier and the drug release kinetics could be made tunable within the time scale of 1-2 h for the most soluble CAP phase, monocalcium phosphate, to 1-2 years for the least soluble one, hydroxyapatite. From the standpoint of antibiotic therapy for osteomyelitis, typically lasting for 6 weeks, the most prospective CAP powder was amorphous CAP with its release time scale for a small organic molecule, the same category to which antibiotics belong, of 1-2 months under the conditions applied in our experiments. By combining these different CAP phases in various proportions, drug release profiles could be tailored to the therapeutic occasion. PMID:23115118

  6. Calcium channel subtypes contributing to acetylcholine release from normal, 4-aminopyridine-treated and myasthenic syndrome auto-antibodies-affected neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Giovannini, F; Sher, E; Webster, R; Boot, J; Lang, B

    2002-01-01

    Acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction relies on rapid, local and transient calcium increase at presynaptic active zones, triggered by the ion influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) clustered on the presynaptic membrane. Pharmacological investigation of the role of different VDCC subtypes (L-, N-, P/Q- and R-type) in spontaneous and evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release was carried out in adult mouse neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) under normal and pathological conditions. ω-Agatoxin IVA (500 nM), a specific P/Q-type VDCC blocker, abolished end plate potentials (EPPs) in normal NMJs. However, when neurotransmitter release was potentiated by the presence of the K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), an ω-agatoxin IVA- and ω-conotoxin MVIIC-resistant component was detected. This resistant component was only partially sensitive to 1 μM ω-conotoxin GVIA (N-type VDCC blocker), but insensitive to any other known VDCC blockers. Spontaneous release was dependent only on P/Q-type VDCC in normal NMJs. However, in the presence of 4-AP, it relied on L-type VDCCs too. ACh release from normal NMJs was compared with that of NMJs of mice passively injected with IgGs obtained from patients with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), a disorder characterized by a compromised neurotransmitter release. Differently from normal NMJs, in LEMS IgGs-treated NMJs an ω-agatoxin IVA-resistant EPP component was detected, which was only partially blocked by calciseptine (1 μM), a specific L-type VDCC blocker. Altogether, these data demonstrate that multiple VDCC subtypes are present at the mouse NMJ and that a resistant component can be identified under ‘pharmacological' and/or ‘pathological' conditions. PMID:12163346

  7. Calcium homeostasis in a local/global whole cell model of permeabilized ventricular myocytes with a Langevin description of stochastic calcium release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Weinberg, Seth H; Hao, Yan; Sobie, Eric A; Smith, Gregory D

    2015-03-01

    Population density approaches to modeling local control of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release in cardiac myocytes can be used to construct minimal whole cell models that accurately represent heterogeneous local Ca(2+) signals. Unfortunately, the computational complexity of such "local/global" whole cell models scales with the number of Ca(2+) release unit (CaRU) states, which is a rapidly increasing function of the number of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) per CaRU. Here we present an alternative approach based on a Langevin description of the collective gating of RyRs coupled by local Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]). The computational efficiency of this approach no longer depends on the number of RyRs per CaRU. When the RyR model is minimal, Langevin equations may be replaced by a single Fokker-Planck equation, yielding an extremely compact and efficient local/global whole cell model that reproduces and helps interpret recent experiments that investigate Ca(2+) homeostasis in permeabilized ventricular myocytes. Our calculations show that elevated myoplasmic [Ca(2+)] promotes elevated network sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) [Ca(2+)] via SR Ca(2+)-ATPase-mediated Ca(2+) uptake. However, elevated myoplasmic [Ca(2+)] may also activate RyRs and promote stochastic SR Ca(2+) release, which can in turn decrease SR [Ca(2+)]. Increasing myoplasmic [Ca(2+)] results in an exponential increase in spark-mediated release and a linear increase in nonspark-mediated release, consistent with recent experiments. The model exhibits two steady-state release fluxes for the same network SR [Ca(2+)] depending on whether myoplasmic [Ca(2+)] is low or high. In the later case, spontaneous release decreases SR [Ca(2+)] in a manner that maintains robust Ca(2+) sparks. PMID:25485896

  8. Effect of particle size of calcium phosphate based bioceramic drug delivery carrier on the release kinetics of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Swamiappan

    2013-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is the constituent of calcium phosphate based bone cement and it is extensively used as a bone substitute and drug delivery vehicle in various biomedical applications. In the present study we investigated the release kinetics of ciprofloxacin loaded HAP and analyzed its ability to function as a targeted and sustained release drug carrier. Synthesis of HAP was carried out by combustion method using tartaric acid as a fuel and nitric acid as an oxidizer. Powder XRD and FTIR techniques were employed to characterize the phase purity of the drug carrier and to verify the chemical interaction between the drug and carrier. The synthesized powders were sieve separated to make two different drug carriers with different particle sizes and the surface topography of the pellets of the drug carrier was imaged by AFM. Surface area and porosity of the drug carrier was carried out using surface area analyzer. The in-vitro drug release kinetics was performed in simulated body fluid, at 37.3°C. The amount of ciprofloxacin released is measured using UV-visible spectroscopy following the characteristic λ max of 278 nm. The release saturates around 450 h which indicates that it can be used as a targeted and sustained release carrier for bone infections.

  9. Hydrogeochemical signatures of catchment evolution - the role of calcium and sulphate release in the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohle, Ina; Hu, Yuzhu; Schaaf, Wolfgang; Gerwin, Werner; Hinz, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment is an ecohydrological system in an initial state of development. The catchment with an area of 6 ha was built up from quaternary sediments in the post-mining landscape of Lusatia in Eastern Germany and serves as a critical zone observatory for detecting ecosystem transition. The soil substrate is characterized as sands to loamy sands with low carbonate contents but significant amounts of gypsum in the sediments of the catchment. The catchment undergoes a strong transition from an abiotic system in the initial years to a system with growing influence of biota. Concerning the hydrology, a regime shift from surface runoff to groundwater flow dominated processes is significant. It is of interest, whether the catchment transition is also reflected by hydrogeochemical indicators. We assume gypsum dissolution as dominant process at the catchment scale. In order to investigate the hydrogeochemical evolution of the catchment we analysed electric conductivity, calcium and sulphate concentrations and pH-values of biweekly composite samples from 2007-2013 of the atmospheric deposition, of runoff and soil water. The two observation points in the flowing water represent surface runoff and groundwater discharge respectively. Soil water has been analysed at four soil pits in three depths. The monitoring data were provided by the Research Platform Chicken Creek (https://www.tu-cottbus.de/projekte/en/oekosysteme/startseite.html). From the macroscopic data analysis we found an exponential decay of the electric conductivity, calcium and sulphate concentrations in the flowing waters and some of the soil pits. In the flowing water, the decrease slope of the electric conductivity and the calcium and sulphate concentrations is almost identical. The calcium / sulphate molar ratio as an indicator of gypsum dissolution is almost equal to one up to 2010, afterwards more calcium than sulphate is released. The pH-values in the flowing

  10. Cardiac effects of the extract and active components of Radix stephaniae tetrandrae. I. Electrically-induced intracellular calcium transient and protein release during the calcium paradox.

    PubMed

    Wu, S; Yu, X C; Shan, J; Wong, T M; Chen, C F; Pang, K T

    2001-05-11

    The present study was designed to compare the cardiac actions of the extract and individual components, tetrandrine (Tet) and fangchinoline (Fan), of Radix stephaniae tetrandrae (RST). We measured the electrically induced [Ca2+]i transient in single rat ventricular myocytes and protein release following perfusion with a Ca2+ free solution (the Ca2+ paradox) from the isolated perfused rat heart, both of which are known to relate to Ca2+ influx. We found that Tet inhibited both electrically induced [Ca2+]i transient and protein release during the Ca2+ paradox, while Fan had no significant effects. The RST extract containing 9% Tet and 6% Fan by weight also affected the [Ca2+]i transient, and was only slightly, though significantly, less effective/potent than Tet alone. On the other hand, RST extract had a significantly greater inhibitory effect on protein release during the Ca2+ paradox than Tet alone. The observations suggest that the RST extract, which contains a mixture of components, may have more potent effects in the heart than its main active component. PMID:11432451