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Sample records for retina obtenidos con

  1. Infrared retina

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Tyo, J. Scott; Jang, Woo-Yong

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  2. Cancers Affecting the Retina

    MedlinePlus

    ... or ARMD) Epiretinal Membrane Detachment of the Retina Retinitis Pigmentosa Blockage of Central Retinal Veins and Branch Retinal ... or ARMD) Epiretinal Membrane Detachment of the Retina Retinitis Pigmentosa Blockage of Central Retinal Veins and Branch Retinal ...

  3. CNTF AND RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Rong; Tao, Weng; Li, Yiwen; Sieving, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of the most studied neurotrophic factors for neuroprotection of the retina. A large body of evidence demonstrates that CNTF promotes rod photoreceptor survival in almost all animal models. Recent studies indicate that CNTF also promotes cone photoreceptor survival and cone outer segment regeneration in the degenerating retina and improves cone function in dogs with congenital achromotopsia. In addition, CNTF is a neuroprotective factor and an axogenesis factor for retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). This review focuses on the effects of exogenous CNTF on photoreceptors and RGCs in the mammalian retina and the potential clinical application of CNTF for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:22182585

  4. Retina and Omega-3

    PubMed Central

    Querques, Giuseppe; Forte, Raimondo; Souied, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, several epidemiological studies based on food frequency questionnaires suggest that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids could have a protective role in reducing the onset and progression of retinal diseases. The retina has a high concentration of omega-3, particularly DHA, which optimizes fluidity of photoreceptor membranes, retinal integrity, and visual function. Furthermore, many studies demonstrated that DHA has a protective, for example antiapoptotic, role in the retina. From a nutritional point of view, it is known that western populations, particularly aged individuals, have a higher than optimal omega-6/omega-3 ratio and should enrich their diet with more fish consumption or have DHA supplementation. This paper underscores the potential beneficial effect of omega-3 fatty acids on retinal diseases. PMID:22175009

  5. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  6. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  7. Retina vascular network recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascini, Guido; Passerini, Giorgio; Puliti, Paolo; Zingaretti, Primo

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of morphological and structural modifications of the retina vascular network is an interesting investigation method in the study of diabetes and hypertension. Normally this analysis is carried out by qualitative evaluations, according to standardized criteria, though medical research attaches great importance to quantitative analysis of vessel color, shape and dimensions. The paper describes a system which automatically segments and recognizes the ocular fundus circulation and micro circulation network, and extracts a set of features related to morphometric aspects of vessels. For this class of images the classical segmentation methods seem weak. We propose a computer vision system in which segmentation and recognition phases are strictly connected. The system is hierarchically organized in four modules. Firstly the Image Enhancement Module (IEM) operates a set of custom image enhancements to remove blur and to prepare data for subsequent segmentation and recognition processes. Secondly the Papilla Border Analysis Module (PBAM) automatically recognizes number, position and local diameter of blood vessels departing from optical papilla. Then the Vessel Tracking Module (VTM) analyses vessels comparing the results of body and edge tracking and detects branches and crossings. Finally the Feature Extraction Module evaluates PBAM and VTM output data and extracts some numerical indexes. Used algorithms appear to be robust and have been successfully tested on various ocular fundus images.

  8. Benzodiazepine binding to bovine retina.

    PubMed

    Osborne, N N

    1980-02-01

    [3H]Diazepam binds to membrane preparations of the retina, suggesting that benzodiazepine receptors exist in this tissue. The binding characteristics are similar to those known to occur in the brain, with affinity constants in the same range. Unlike the finding in the brain, [3H]diazepam binding in the retina is not stimulated by GABA and other GABA agonists. These findings indicate that benzodiazepine receptors may have a more general function and not only be associated with anxiety or emotional behaviour. PMID:6302572

  9. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of these procedures create a scar that helps seal the retina to the back of the eye. ... around the retinal tear. The scarring that results seals the retina to the underlying tissue, helping to ...

  10. A Computational Framework for Realistic Retina Modeling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cañada, Pablo; Morillas, Christian; Pino, Begoña; Ros, Eduardo; Pelayo, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    Computational simulations of the retina have led to valuable insights about the biophysics of its neuronal activity and processing principles. A great number of retina models have been proposed to reproduce the behavioral diversity of the different visual processing pathways. While many of these models share common computational stages, previous efforts have been more focused on fitting specific retina functions rather than generalizing them beyond a particular model. Here, we define a set of computational retinal microcircuits that can be used as basic building blocks for the modeling of different retina mechanisms. To validate the hypothesis that similar processing structures may be repeatedly found in different retina functions, we implemented a series of retina models simply by combining these computational retinal microcircuits. Accuracy of the retina models for capturing neural behavior was assessed by fitting published electrophysiological recordings that characterize some of the best-known phenomena observed in the retina: adaptation to the mean light intensity and temporal contrast, and differential motion sensitivity. The retinal microcircuits are part of a new software platform for efficient computational retina modeling from single-cell to large-scale levels. It includes an interface with spiking neural networks that allows simulation of the spiking response of ganglion cells and integration with models of higher visual areas. PMID:27354192

  11. Enkephalin in the goldfish retina

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.Y.; Fry, K.R.; Lam, D.M.; Watt, C.B.

    1986-12-01

    Enkephalin-like immunoreactive amacrine cells were visualized using the highly sensitive avidin-biotin method. The somas of these cells were situated in the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers. Enkephalin-stained processes were observed in layers 1, 3, and 5 of the inner plexiform layer. The biosynthesis of sulfur-containing compounds in the goldfish retina was studied by means of a pulse-chase incubation with /sup 35/S-methionine. A /sup 35/S-labeled compound, which comigrated with authentic Met5-enkephalin on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was synthesized and was bound competitively by antibodies to enkephalin and by opiate receptors. This compound was tentatively identified as Met5-enkephalin. The newly synthesized /sup 35/S-Met5-enkephalin was released upon depolarization of the retina with a high K+ concentration. This K+-stimulated release was greatly suppressed by 5 mM Co/sup 2 +/, suggesting that the release was Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent. Using a double-label technique, enkephalin immunoreactivity and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake were colocalized to some amacrine cells, whereas others labeled only for enkephalin or GABA. The possible significance of enkephalin-GABA interactions is also discussed.

  12. The Functional Architecture of the Retina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masland, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    Examines research related to the retina's coding of visual input with emphasis on the organization of two kinds of ganglion cell receptive fields. Reviews current techniques for examining the shapes and arrangement in the retina of entire populations of nerve cells. (ML)

  13. Cytogenesis in the monkey retina

    SciTech Connect

    La Vail, M.M.; Rapaport, D.H.; Rakic, P. )

    1991-07-01

    Time of cell origin in the retina of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) was studied by plotting the number of heavily radiolabeled nuclei in autoradiograms prepared from 2- to 6-month-old animals, each of which was exposed to a pulse of 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR) on a single embryonic (E) or postnatal (P) day. Cell birth in the monkey retina begins just after E27, and approximately 96% of cells are generated by E120. The remaining cells are produced during the last (approximately 45) prenatal days and into the first several weeks after birth. Cell genesis begins near the fovea, and proceeds towards the periphery. Cell division largely ceases in the foveal and perifoveal regions by E56. Despite extensive overlap, a class-specific sequence of cell birth was observed. Ganglion and horizontal cells, which are born first, have largely congruent periods of cell genesis with the peak between E38 and E43, and termination around E70. The first labeled cones were apparent by E33, and their highest density was achieved between E43 and E56, tapering to low values at E70, although some cones are generated in the far periphery as late as E110. Amacrine cells are next in the cell birth sequence and begin genesis at E43, reach a peak production between E56 and E85, and cease by E110. Bipolar cell birth begins at the same time as amacrines, but appears to be separate from them temporally since their production reaches a peak between E56 and E102, and persists beyond the day of birth. Mueller cells and rod photoreceptors, which begin to be generated at E45, achieve a peak, and decrease in density at the same time as bipolar cells, but continue genesis at low density on the day of birth. Thus, bipolar, Mueller, and rod cells have a similar time of origin.

  14. Glycogen metabolism in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2004-02-01

    It has been reported that glycogen levels in retina vary with retinal vascularization. However, the electrical activity of isolated retina depends on glucose supply, suggesting that it does not contain energetic reserves. We determined glycogen levels and pyruvate and lactate production under various conditions in isolated retina. Ex vivo retinas from light- and dark-adapted rats showed values of 44 +/- 0.3 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein, respectively. The glycogen content of retinas from light-adapted animals was reduced by 50% when they were transferred to darkness. Glycogen levels were low in retinas incubated in glucose-free media and increased in the presence of glucose. The highest glycogen values were found in media containing 20 mm of glucose. A rapid increase in lactate production was observed in the presence of glucose. Surprisingly, glycogen levels were the lowest and lactate production was also very low in the presence of 30 mm glucose. Our results suggest that glycogen can be used as an immediate accessible energy reserve in retina. We speculate on the possibility that gluconeogenesis may play a protective role by removal of lactic acid. PMID:14756809

  15. Trazando la materia oscura con cúmulos globulares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, J. C.

    Se describe la estrategia adoptada para mapear la distribución de materia oscura y bariónica en galaxias elípticas cuyos cúmulos globulares están siendo observados con los telescopios VLT y Gemini. Se ejemplifican los resultados con los datos obtenidos en el cúmulo de Fornax.

  16. Complex computation in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Nikhil Rajiv

    Elucidating the general principles of computation in neural circuits is a difficult problem requiring both a tractable model circuit as well as sophisticated measurement tools. This thesis advances our understanding of complex computation in the salamander retina and its underlying circuitry and furthers the development of advanced tools to enable detailed study of neural circuits. The retina provides an ideal model system for neural circuits in general because it is capable of producing complex representations of the visual scene, and both its inputs and outputs are accessible to the experimenter. Chapter 2 describes the biophysical mechanisms that give rise to the omitted stimulus response in retinal ganglion cells described in Schwartz et al., (2007) and Schwartz and Berry, (2008). The extra response to omitted flashes is generated at the input to bipolar cells, and is separable from the characteristic latency shift of the OSR apparent in ganglion cells, which must occur downstream in the circuit. Chapter 3 characterizes the nonlinearities at the first synapse of the ON pathway in response to high contrast flashes and develops a phenomenological model that captures the effect of synaptic activation and intracellular signaling dynamics on flash responses. This work is the first attempt to model the dynamics of the poorly characterized mGluR6 transduction cascade unique to ON bipolar cells, and explains the second lobe of the biphasic flash response. Complementary to the study of neural circuits, recent advances in wafer-scale photolithography have made possible new devices to measure the electrical and mechanical properties of neurons. Chapter 4 reports a novel piezoelectric sensor that facilitates the simultaneous measurement of electrical and mechanical signals in neural tissue. This technology could reveal the relationship between the electrical activity of neurons and their local mechanical environment, which is critical to the study of mechanoreceptors

  17. Flipping coins in the fly retina.

    PubMed

    Mikeladze-Dvali, Tamara; Desplan, Claude; Pistillo, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    Color vision in Drosophila melanogaster relies on the presence of two different subtypes of ommatidia: the "green" and "blue." These two classes are distributed randomly throughout the retina. The decision of a given ommatidium to take on the "green" or "blue" fate seems to be based on a stochastic mechanism. Here we compare the stochastic choice of photoreceptors in the fly retina with other known examples of random choices in both sensory and other systems. PMID:16243594

  18. Imaging Single Cells in the Living Retina

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    A quarter century ago, we were limited to a macroscopic view of the retina inside the living eye. Since then, new imaging technologies, including confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and adaptive optics fundus imaging, transformed the eye into a microscope in which individual cells can now be resolved noninvasively. These technologies have enabled a wide range of studies of the retina that were previously impossible. PMID:21596053

  19. Spectral imaging of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Mordant, D J; Al-Abboud, I; Muyo, G; Gorman, A; Sallam, A; Ritchie, P; Harvey, A R; McNaught, A I

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The work described here involved the use of a modified fundus camera to obtain sequential hyperspectral images of the retina in 14 normal volunteers and in 1 illustrative patient with a retinal vascular occlusion. Methods The paper describes analysis techniques, which allow oximetry within retinal vessels; these results are presented as retinal oximetry maps. Results Using spectral images, with wavelengths between 556 and 650 nm, the mean oxygen saturation (OS) value in temporal retinal arterioles in normal volunteers was 104.3 (±16.7), and in normal temporal retinal venules was 34.8 (±17.8). These values are comparable to those quoted in the literature, although, the venular saturations are slightly lower than those values found by other authors; explanations are offered for these differences. Discussion The described imaging and analysis techniques produce a clinically useful map of retinal oximetric values. The results from normal volunteers and from one illustrative patient are presented. Further developments, including the recent development of a ‘snapshot' spectral camera, promises enhanced non-invasive retinal vessel oximetry mapping. PMID:21390065

  20. Radioadaptive Cytoprotective Pathways in the Mouse Retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Wotring, V.; Theriot, C.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation implies a risk of tissue degeneration. Radiation retinopathy is a complication of radiotherapy and exhibits common features with other retinopathies and neuropathies. Exposure to a low radiation dose elicits protective cellular events (radioadaptive response), reducing the stress of a subsequent higher dose. To assess the risk of radiation-induced retinal changes and the extent to which a small priming dose reduces this risk, we used a mouse model exposed to a source of Cs-137-gamma radiation. Gene expression profiling of retinas from non-irradiated control C57BL/6J mice (C) were compared to retinas from mice treated with a low 50 mGy dose (LD), a high 6 Gy dose (HD), and a combined treatment of 50 mGy (priming) and 6 Gy (challenge) doses (LHD). Whole retina RNA was isolated and expression analysis for selected genes performed by RTqPCR. Relevant target genes associated with cell death/survival, oxidative stress, cellular stress response and inflammation pathways, were analyzed. Cellular stress response genes were upregulated at 4 hr after the challenge dose in LHD retinas (Sirt1: 1.5 fold, Hsf1: 1.7 fold, Hspa1a: 2.5 fold; Hif1a: 1.8 fold, Bag1: 1.7). A similar trend was observed in LD animals. Most antioxidant enzymes (Hmox1, Sod2, Prdx1, Cygb, Cat1) and inflammatory mediators (NF B, Ptgs2 and Tgfb1) were upregulated in LHD and LD retinas. Expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2 was upregulated in LD (6-fold) and LHD (4-fold) retinas. In conclusion, cytoprotective gene networks activation in the retina suggests a radioadaptive response to a priming irradiation dose, with mitigation of the deleterious effects of a subsequent high dose exposure. The enhancement of these cytoprotective mechanisms has potential value as a countermeasure to ocular alterations caused by radiation alone or in combination with other factors in spaceflight environments.

  1. Neurotransmitter properties of the newborn human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Frederick, J.M.; Rayborn, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    Human retinal tissue from a newborn was examined autoradiographically for the presence of high-affinity uptake and localization of the following putative neurotransmitters: dopamine, glycine, GABA, aspartate, and glutamate. In addition, the dopamine content of this newborn retina was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. Our study reveals that specific uptake mechanisms for /sup 3/H-glycine, /sup 3/H-dopamine, and /sup 3/H-GABA are present at birth. However, the number and distribution of cells labeled with each of these /sup 3/H-transmitters are not identical to those observed in adult human retinas. Furthermore, the amount of endogenous dopamine in the newborn retina is approximately 1/20 the adult level. Photoreceptor-specific uptake of /sup 3/H-glutamate and /sup 3/H-aspartate are not observed. These findings indicate that, while some neurotransmitter-specific properties are present at birth, significant maturation of neurotransmitter systems occurs postnatally.

  2. Parallel processing in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Wässle, Heinz

    2004-10-01

    Our eyes send different 'images' of the outside world to the brain - an image of contours (line drawing), a colour image (watercolour painting) or an image of moving objects (movie). This is commonly referred to as parallel processing, and starts as early as the first synapse of the retina, the cone pedicle. Here, the molecular composition of the transmitter receptors of the postsynaptic neurons defines which images are transferred to the inner retina. Within the second synaptic layer - the inner plexiform layer - circuits that involve complex inhibitory and excitatory interactions represent filters that select 'what the eye tells the brain'. PMID:15378035

  3. Vascular tumors of the choroid and retina

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, P Mahesh; Ramanjulu, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Vascular tumors of the retina and choroid can be seen occasionally. In the following article, the key clinical and diagnostic features of the major retinal and choroidal vascular tumors, their systemic associations, and the literature pertaining to the most currently available treatment strategies are reviewed. PMID:25827544

  4. The Neurovascular Retina in Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Anne B.; Hansen, Ronald M.; Moskowitz, Anne; Akula, James D.

    2009-01-01

    The continuing worldwide epidemic of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a leading cause of childhood visual impairment, strongly motivates further research into mechanisms of the disease. Although the hallmark of ROP is abnormal retinal vasculature, a growing body of evidence supports a critical role for the neural retina in the ROP disease process. The age of onset of ROP coincides with the rapid developmental increase in rod photoreceptor outer segment length and rhodopsin content of the retina with escalation of energy demands. Using a combination of non-invasive electroretinographic (ERG), psychophysical, and image analysis procedures, the neural retina and its vasculature have been studied in prematurely born human subjects, both with and without ROP, and in rats that model the key vascular and neural parameters found in human ROP subjects. These data are compared to comprehensive numeric summaries of the neural and vascular features in normally developing human and rat retina. In rats, biochemical, anatomical, and molecular biological investigations are paired with the non-invasive assessments. ROP, even if mild, primarily and persistently alters the structure and function of photoreceptors. Post-receptor neurons and retinal vasculature, which are intimately related, are also affected by ROP; conspicuous neurovascular abnormalities disappear, but subtle structural anomalies and functional deficits may persist years after clinical ROP resolves. The data from human subjects and rat models identify photoreceptor and post-receptor targets for interventions that promise improved outcomes for children at risk for ROP. PMID:19563909

  5. Eye formation in the absence of retina

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, Eric C.; Liu, Chaomei; Shah, Rina; Smith, April N.; Lang, Richard A.; Jamrich, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Eye development is a complex process that involves the formation of the retina and the lens, collectively called the eyeball, as well as the formation of auxiliary eye structures such as the eyelid, lacrimal gland, cornea and conjunctiva. The developmental requirements for the formation of each individual structure are only partially understood. We have shown previously that the homeobox-containing gene Rx is a key component in eye formation, as retinal structures do not develop and retina-specific gene expression is not observed in Rx-deficient mice. In addition, Rx−/− embryos do not develop any lens structure, despite the fact that Rx is not expressed in the lens. This demonstrates that during normal mammalian development, retina-specific gene expression is necessary for lens formation. In this paper we show that lens formation can be restored in Rx-deficient embryos experimentally, by the elimination of β-catenin expression in the head surface ectoderm. This suggests that β-catenin is involved in lens specification either through Wnt signaling or through its function in cell adhesion. In contrast to lens formation, we demonstrate that the development of auxiliary eye structures does not depend on retina-specific gene expression or retinal morphogenesis. These results point to the existence of two separate developmental processes involved in the formation of the eye and its associated structures. One involved in the formation of the eyeball and the second involved in the formation of the auxiliary eye structures. PMID:18675797

  6. Vascular Precursors in Developing Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Takuya; McLeod, D. Scott; Prow, Tarl; Merges, Carol; Grebe, Rhonda; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prior investigation has demonstrated that angioblasts are present in the inner retinas of human embryos and fetuses and that they differentiate and organize to form the primordial retinal vasculature. The purpose of this study was to characterize these angioblasts further and examine ligands that might control their migration and differentiation. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to localize stroma-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), its receptor CXCR4, stem cell factor (SCF), and its receptor c-Kit on sections obtained from human eyes at from 6 to 23 weeks’ gestation (WG). Coexpression of CD39 (marker for retinal angioblasts and endothelial cells) and CXCR4 or c-Kit was investigated by confocal microscopy. Results SDF-1 was prominent in inner retina with the greatest reaction product near the internal limiting membrane (ILM). SCF immunoreactivity was also confined to the inner retina and increased significantly between 7 and 12 WG. The level of both ligands declined by 22 WG. A layer of CXCR4+ and c-Kit+ precursors, some of which coexpressed CD39, existed in the inner retina from 7 to 12 WG. With migration, c-Kit was downregulated, whereas CD39+ cells continued to express CXCR4 as they formed cords. With canalization, CXCR4 expression was downregulated. Conclusions Embryonic human retina has a pool of precursors (CXCR4+ and c-Kit+) that enlarged centrifugally during fetal development. From this pool emerges angioblasts, which migrate anteriorly into the nerve fiber layer where SDF-1 and SCF levels are highest. c-Kit expression declines with apparent migration, and CXCR4 expression declines with canalization of new vessels. Both SCF and SDF-1 are associated with the differentiation of retinal precursors into angioblasts and their migration to sites of vessel assembly. PMID:18436851

  7. Computational adaptive optics of the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Fredrick A.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that patient-specific ocular aberrations limit imaging resolution in the human retina. Previously, hardware adaptive optics (HAO) has been employed to measure and correct these aberrations to acquire high-resolution images of various retinal structures. While the resulting aberration-corrected images are of great clinical importance, clinical use of HAO has not been widespread due to the cost and complexity of these systems. We present a technique termed computational adaptive optics (CAO) for aberration correction in the living human retina without the use of hardware adaptive optics components. In CAO, complex interferometric data acquired using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is manipulated in post-processing to adjust the phase of the optical wavefront. In this way, the aberrated wavefront can be corrected. We summarize recent results in this technology for retinal imaging, including aberration-corrected imaging in multiple retinal layers and practical considerations such as phase stability and image optimization.

  8. The Dept. of Energy Artificial Retina project

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-10

    LLNL has assisted in the development of the first long-term retinal prosthesis - called an artificial retina - that can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye. This work has been done in collaboration with four national laboratories (Argonne, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Sandia), four universities (the California Institute of Technology, the Doheny Eye Institute at USC, North Carolina State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz), an industrial partner (Second Sight® Medical Products Inc. of Sylmar, Calif.) and the U.S. Department of Energy. With this device, application-specific integrated circuits transform digital images from a camera into electric signals in the eye that the brain uses to create a visual image. In clinical trials, patients with vision loss were able to successfully identify objects, increase mobility and detect movement using the artificial retina.

  9. The Dept. of Energy Artificial Retina project

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-09-01

    LLNL has assisted in the development of the first long-term retinal prosthesis - called an artificial retina - that can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye. This work has been done in collaboration with four national laboratories (Argonne, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Sandia), four universities (the California Institute of Technology, the Doheny Eye Institute at USC, North Carolina State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz), an industrial partner (Second Sight® Medical Products Inc. of Sylmar, Calif.) and the U.S. Department of Energy. With this device, application-specific integrated circuits transform digital images from a camera into electric signals in the eye that the brain uses to create a visual image. In clinical trials, patients with vision loss were able to successfully identify objects, increase mobility and detect movement using the artificial retina.

  10. Silicon retina for optical tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohbehn, K.; Jenkins, R. E.; Sun, X.; Andreou, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    There are a host of position sensors, such as quadcells and CCD's, which are candidates for detecting optical position errors and providing error signals for a mirror positioning loop. We are developing a novel, very high bandwidth, biologically inspired position sensor for optical position tracking systems. We present recent test results and design issues for the use of biologically inspired silicon retinas for spaceborne optical position tracking systems.

  11. TRPM3 Expression in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R. Lane; Xiong, Wei-Hong; Peters, James H.; Tekmen-Clark, Merve; Strycharska-Orczyk, Iwona; Reed, Brian T.; Morgans, Catherine W.; Duvoisin, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels constitute a large family of cation permeable ion channels that serve crucial functions in sensory systems by transducing environmental changes into cellular voltage and calcium signals. Within the retina, two closely related members of the melastatin TRP family, TRPM1 and TRPM3, are highly expressed. TRPM1 has been shown to be required for the depolarizing response to light of ON-bipolar cells, but the role of TRPM3 in the retina is unknown. Immunohistochemical staining of mouse retina with an antibody directed against the C-terminus of TRPM3 labeled the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and a subset of cells in the ganglion cell layer. Within the IPL, TRPM3 immunofluorescence was markedly stronger in the OFF sublamina than in the ON sublamina. Electroretinogram recordings showed that the scotopic and photopic a- and b-waves of TRPM3-/- mice are normal indicating that TRPM3 does not play a major role in visual processing in the outer retina. TRPM3 activity was measured by calcium imaging and patch-clamp recording of immunopurified retinal ganglion cells. Application of the TRPM3 agonist, pregnenolone sulfate (PS), stimulated increases in intracellular calcium in ~40% of cells from wild type and TRPM1‑/‑ mice, and the PS-stimulated increases in calcium were blocked by co-application of mefenamic acid, a TRPM3 antagonist. No PS-stimulated changes in fluorescence were observed in ganglion cells from TRPM3-/- mice. Similarly, PS-stimulated currents that could be blocked by mefenamic acid were recorded from wild type retinal ganglion cells but were absent in ganglion cells from TRPM3-/- mice. PMID:25679224

  12. The avian egg and the retina

    PubMed Central

    MALCOLM, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for study of blood flow has been derived from the avian egg, utilizing the theories of crystallography and photosynthesis. The model is employed to explain the form of the eye and the function of the cells of the human retina, with special reference to colour vision and the pathology of migraine. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4736600

  13. Three-dimensional printing of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Barbara; Hsiao, Wen-Kai; Martin, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Biological three-dimensional printing has received a lot of media attention over recent years with advances made in printing cellular structures, including skin and heart tissue for transplantation. Although limitations exist in creating functioning organs with this method, the hope has been raised that creating a functional retina to cure blindness is within reach. The present review provides an update on the advances made toward this goal. Recent findings It has recently been shown that two types of retinal cells, retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, can be successfully printed using a piezoelectric inkjet printer. Importantly, the cells remained viable and did not change certain phenotypic features as a result of the printing process. In addition, recent advances in the creation of complex and viable three-dimensional cellular structures have been made. Summary Some first promising steps toward the creation of a functional retina have been taken. It now needs to be investigated whether recent findings can be extended to other cells of the retina, including those derived from human tissue, and if a complex and viable retinal structure can be created through three-dimensional printing. PMID:27045545

  14. Connecting the Retina to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Eloisa

    2014-01-01

    The visual system is beautifully crafted to transmit information of the external world to visual processing and cognitive centers in the brain. For visual information to be relayed to the brain, a series of axon pathfinding events must take place to ensure that the axons of retinal ganglion cells, the only neuronal cell type in the retina that sends axons out of the retina, find their way out of the eye to connect with targets in the brain. In the past few decades, the power of molecular and genetic tools, including the generation of genetically manipulated mouse lines, have multiplied our knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in the sculpting of the visual system. Here, we review major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the differentiation of RGCs, guidance of their axons from the retina to the primary visual centers, and the refinement processes essential for the establishment of topographic maps and eye-specific axon segregation. Human disorders, such as albinism and achiasmia, that impair RGC axon growth and guidance and, thus, the establishment of a fully functioning visual system will also be discussed. PMID:25504540

  15. The mammalian retina as a clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Fukuhara, Chiaki

    2002-01-01

    Many physiological, cellular, and biochemical parameters in the retina of vertebrates show daily rhythms that, in many cases, also persist under constant conditions. This demonstrates that they are driven by a circadian pacemaker. The presence of an autonomous circadian clock in the retina of vertebrates was first demonstrated in Xenopus laevis and then, several years later, in mammals. In X. laevis and in chicken, the retinal circadian pacemaker has been localized in the photoreceptor layer, whereas in mammals, such information is not yet available. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the identification of a group of genes that are believed to constitute the molecular core of the circadian clock. These genes are expressed in the retina, although with a slightly different 24-h profile from that observed in the central circadian pacemaker. This result suggests that some difference (at the molecular level) may exist between the retinal clock and the clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalamus. The present review will focus on the current knowledge of the retinal rhythmicity and the mechanisms responsible for its control.

  16. Connecting the retina to the brain.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Lynda; Herrera, Eloisa

    2014-01-01

    The visual system is beautifully crafted to transmit information of the external world to visual processing and cognitive centers in the brain. For visual information to be relayed to the brain, a series of axon pathfinding events must take place to ensure that the axons of retinal ganglion cells, the only neuronal cell type in the retina that sends axons out of the retina, find their way out of the eye to connect with targets in the brain. In the past few decades, the power of molecular and genetic tools, including the generation of genetically manipulated mouse lines, have multiplied our knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in the sculpting of the visual system. Here, we review major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the differentiation of RGCs, guidance of their axons from the retina to the primary visual centers, and the refinement processes essential for the establishment of topographic maps and eye-specific axon segregation. Human disorders, such as albinism and achiasmia, that impair RGC axon growth and guidance and, thus, the establishment of a fully functioning visual system will also be discussed. PMID:25504540

  17. Reactive gliosis in the adult zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer L; Ranski, Alexandra H; Morgan, Gregory W; Thummel, Ryan

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to mammals, zebrafish posses the remarkable ability to regenerate retinal neurons. Damage to the zebrafish retina induces Müller glia to act as stem cells, generating retinal progenitors for regeneration. In contrast, injury in the mammalian retina results in Müller glial reactive gliosis, a characteristic gliotic response that is normally detrimental to vision. Understanding the signaling pathways that determine how Müller glia respond to injury is a critical step toward promoting regeneration in the mammalian retina. Here we report that zebrafish Müller glia exhibit signs of reactive gliosis even under normal regenerative conditions and that cell cycle inhibition increases this response. Persistently reactive Müller glia increase their neuroprotective functions, temporarily saving photoreceptors from a cytotoxic light lesion. However, the absence of a sustained proliferation response results in a significant inhibition of retinal regeneration. Interestingly, when cell cycle inhibition is released, a partial recovery of regeneration is observed. Together, these data demonstrate that zebrafish Müller glia possess both gliotic and regenerative potential. PMID:26492821

  18. Effect of diabetes on glycogen metabolism in rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Hernández-Berrones, Jethro; Luna-Ulloa, Luis Bernardo; Coffe, Víctor; Salceda, Rocío

    2008-07-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in retina. The regulatory mechanisms that maintain glucose homeostasis in retina could include hormonal action. Retinopathy is one of the chemical manifestations of long-standing diabetes mellitus. In order to better understand the effect of hyperglycemia in retina, we studied glycogen content as well as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase activities in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retina and compared them with other tissues. Glycogen levels in normal rat retina are low (46 +/- 4.0 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein). However, high specific activity of glycogen synthase was found in retina, indicating a substantial capacity for glycogen synthesis. In diabetic rats, glycogen synthase activity increased between 50% and 100% in retina, brain cortex and liver of diabetic rats, but only retina exhibited an increase in glycogen content. Although, total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase levels were similar in normal and diabetic retina, activation of glycogen synthase by glucose-6-P was remarkable increased. Glycogen phosphorylase activity decreased 50% in the liver of diabetic animals; it was not modified in the other tissues examined. We conclude that the increase in glycogen levels in diabetic retina was due to alterations in glycogen synthase regulation. PMID:18274898

  19. Insulin-like activity in the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Das, A.

    1986-01-01

    A number of studies have recently demonstrated that insulin or a homologous peptide may be synthesized outside the pancreas also. The present study was designed to investigate whether insulin-like activity exists in the retina, and if it exists, whether it is due to local synthesis of insulin or a similar peptide in the retina. To determine whether the insulin-like immunoreactivity in retinal glial cells is due to binding and uptake or local synthesis of insulin, a combined approach of immunocytochemistry and in situ DNA-RNA hybridization techniques was used on cultured rat retinal glial cells. Insulin-like immunoreactivity was demonstrated in the cytoplasma of these cells. In situ hybridization studies using labeled rat insulin cDNA indicated that these cells contain the mRNA necessary for de novo synthesis of insulin or a closely homologous peptide. Since human retinal cells have, as yet, not been conveniently grown in culture, an ocular tumor cell line, human Y79 retinoblastoma was used as a model to extend these investigations. The presence of insulin-like immunoreactivity as well as insulin-specific mRNA was demonstrated in this cell line. Light microscopic autoradiography following incubation of isolated rat retinal cells with /sup 125/I-insulin showed the presence of insulin binding sites on the photoreceptors and amarcine cells. On the basis of these observations that rat retina glial cells, including Muller cells are sites of synthesis of insulin or a similar peptide, a model for the pathogenesis of dabetic retinopathy is proposed.

  20. Modeling laser damage to the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Clifton D.

    This dissertation presents recent progress in several areas related to modeling laser damage to the retina. In Chapter 3, we consider the consequences of using the Arrhenius damage model to predict the damage thresholds of multiple pulse, or repetitive pulse, exposures. We have identified a few fundamental trends associated with the multiple pulse damage predictions made by the Arrhenius model. These trends differ from what would be expected by non-thermal mechanisms, and could prove useful in differentiating thermal and non-thermal damage. Chapter 4 presents a new rate equation damage model hypothesized to describe photochemical damage. The model adds a temperature dependent term to the simple rate equation implied by the principle of reciprocity that is characteristic of photochemical damage thresholds. A recent damage threshold study, conducted in-vitro, has revealed a very sharp transition between thermal and photochemical damage threshold trends. For the wavelength used in the experiment (413 nm), thermal damage thresholds were observed at exposure levels that were twice the expected photochemical damage threshold, based on the traditional understanding of photochemical damage. Our model accounts for this observed trend by introducing a temperature dependent quenching, or repair, rate to the photochemical damage rate. For long exposures that give a very small temperature rise, the model reduces to the principle of reciprocity. Near the transition region between thermal and photochemical damage, the model allows the damage threshold to be set by thermal mechanisms, even at exposure above the reciprocity exposure. In Chapter 5, we describe a retina damage model that includes thermal lensing in the eye by coupling beam propagation and heat transfer models together. Thermal lensing has recently been suggested as a contributing factor to the large increase in measured retinal damage thresholds in the near infrared. The transmission of the vitreous decreases

  1. Artificial Retina Project: Electromagnetic and Thermal Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-08-29

    This award supported the investigation on electromagnetic and thermal effects associated with the artificial retina, designed in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, and private companies. Our work over the two years of support under this award has focused mainly on 1) Design of new telemetry coils for optimal power and data transfer between the implant and the external device while achieving a significant size reduction with respect to currently used coils; 2) feasibility study of the virtual electrode configuration 3) study the effect of pulse shape and duration on the stimulation efficacy.

  2. MicroRNAs in the Neural Retina

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Nigel G. F.

    2014-01-01

    The health and function of the visual system rely on a collaborative interaction between diverse classes of molecular regulators. One of these classes consists of transcription factors, which are known to bind to DNA and control the transcription activities of their target genes. For a long time, it was thought that the transcription factors were the only regulators of gene expression. More recently, however, a novel class of regulators emerged. This class consists of a large number of small noncoding endogenous RNAs, namely, miRNAs. The miRNAs compose an essential component of posttranscriptional gene regulation, since they ultimately control the fate of gene transcripts. The retina, as a part of the central nervous system, is a well-established model for unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal and glial functions. Numerous recent efforts have been made towards identification of miRNAs and their inferred roles in the visual pathway. In this review, we summarize the current state of our knowledge regarding the expression and function of miRNA in the neural retina and we discuss their potential uses as biomarkers for some retinal disorders. PMID:24745005

  3. Glycinergic pathways in the goldfish retina

    SciTech Connect

    Marc, R.E.; Lam, D.M.

    1981-02-01

    Autoradiographic localization of high affinity (3H)glycine uptake in the retina of the goldfish has been used to study some anatomical and physiological properties of potentially glycinergic neurons. There are two classes of retinal cells exhibiting high affinity glycine uptake: Aa amacrine cells and I2 interplexiform cells. Aa amacrine cells constitute about 20% of the somas in the amacrine cell layer and send their dendrites to the middle of the inner plexiform layer. There they are both pre- and postsynaptic primarily to other amacrine cells. Photic modulation of glycine uptake indicates that they are probably red-hyperpolarizing/green-depolarizing neurons. I2 interplexiform cells are a newly discovered type of interplexiform cell; in the outer plexiform layer, they receive direct synaptic input from the somas of red-dominated GABAergic H1 horizontal cells and are apparently presynaptic to dendrites of unidentified types of horizontal cells. The connections of I2 interplexiform cells have not been successfully characterized in the inner plexiform layer. These findings extend our knowledge of neurochemically specific pathways in the cyprinid retina and indicate that glycine, like GABA, is a neurotransmitter primarily involved with circuits coding ''red'' information.

  4. Cell death in the developing vertebrate retina.

    PubMed

    Vecino, Elena; Hernández, María; García, Mónica

    2004-01-01

    Programmed cell death occurs naturally, as a physiological process, during the embryonic development of multicellular organisms. In the retina, which belongs to the central nervous system, at least two phases of cell death have been reported to occur during development. An early phase takes place concomitant with the processes of neurogenesis, cell migration and cell differentiation. A later phase affecting mainly neurons occurs when connections are established and synapses are formed, resulting in selective elimination of inappropriate connections. This pattern of cell death in the developing retina is common among different vertebrates. However, the timing and magnitude of retinal cell death varies among species. In addition, a precise regulation of apoptosis during retinal development has been described. Factors such as neurotrophins, among many others, and electrical activity influence the survival of retinal cells during the course of development. In this paper, we present a summary of these different aspects of programmed cell death during retinal development, and examine how these differ among different species. PMID:15558487

  5. Small field tritanopia in the peripheral retina.

    PubMed

    Volbrecht, Vicki J

    2016-07-01

    If stimuli are made sufficiently small, color-normal individuals report a loss in hue perception, in particular a decrease in the perception of green, in both the fovea and peripheral retina. This effect is referred to as small field tritanopia. It is not clear, however, how rod input may alter the dynamics of small field tritanopia in the peripheral retina. This paper looks at peripheral hue-naming data obtained for small stimuli at mesopic and photopic retinal illuminances under conditions that minimize (bleach) and maximize (no bleach) rod contribution. The data show that attenuation in the perception of green occurs with larger stimuli in the no-bleach condition than in the bleach condition. As retinal illuminance increases, the stimulus size that elicits small field tritanopia decreases, but the stimulus size is still larger under the no-bleach condition. Small field tritanopia in both the bleach and no-bleach conditions may be related to short-wavelength-sensitive (S) cone activity and its potential role in the mediation of the perception of green. The differences in stimulus size for small field tritanopia may be explained by rod input into the magnocellular and koniocellular pathways, which compromises the strength of the chromatic signals and creates a differential loss in the perception of green as compared to the other elemental hues. PMID:27409678

  6. Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptors in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    The retina transforms light entering the eye into a sophisticated neural representation of our visual world. Specialized synapses, cells, and circuits in the retina have evolved to encode luminance, contrast, motion, and other complex visual features. Although a great deal has been learned about the cellular morphology and circuitry that underlies this image processing, many of the synapses in the retina remain incompletely understood. For example, excitatory synapses in the retina feature the full panoply of glutamate receptors, but in most cases specific roles for different receptor subtypes are unclear. In this brief review, I will discuss recent progress toward understanding how Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-GluARs) contribute to synaptic transmission and newly discovered forms of synaptic plasticity in the retina. PMID:21991245

  7. Metabolic differentiation in the embryonic retina.

    PubMed

    Agathocleous, Michalis; Love, Nicola K; Randlett, Owen; Harris, Julia J; Liu, Jinyue; Murray, Andrew J; Harris, William A

    2012-08-01

    Unlike healthy adult tissues, cancers produce energy mainly by aerobic glycolysis instead of oxidative phosphorylation. This adaptation, called the Warburg effect, may be a feature of all dividing cells, both normal and cancerous, or it may be specific to cancers. It is not known whether, in a normally growing tissue during development, proliferating and postmitotic cells produce energy in fundamentally different ways. Here we show in the embryonic Xenopus retina in vivo, that dividing progenitor cells depend less on oxidative phosphorylation for ATP production than non-dividing differentiated cells, and instead use glycogen to fuel aerobic glycolysis. The transition from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation is connected to the cell differentiation process. Glycolysis is indispensable for progenitor proliferation and biosynthesis, even when it is not used for ATP production. These results suggest that the Warburg effect can be a feature of normal proliferation in vivo, and that the regulation of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation is critical for normal development. PMID:22750943

  8. Development of the Retina and Optic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Benjamin E.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the development of the retina and visual pathways has seen enormous advances during the past twenty-five years. New imaging technologies, coupled with advances in molecular biology, have permitted a fuller appreciation of the histotypical events associated with proliferation, fate determination, migration, differentiation, pathway navigation, target innervation, synaptogenesis and cell death, and in many instances, in understanding the genetic, molecular, cellular and activity-dependent mechanisms underlying those developmental changes. The present review considers those advances associated with the lineal relationships between retinal nerve cells, the production of retinal nerve cell diversity, the migration, patterning and differentiation of different types of retinal nerve cells, the determinants of the decussation pattern at the optic chiasm, the formation of the retinotopic map, and the establishment of ocular domains within the thalamus. PMID:20647017

  9. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Dabir, Supriya; Khanna, Anjani; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Roy, Abhijit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified. PMID:24492503

  10. Infrared camera based on a curved retina.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Delphine; Fendler, Manuel; Berger, Frédéric; Cloix, Baptiste; Pornin, Cyrille; Baier, Nicolas; Druart, Guillaume; Primot, Jérôme; le Coarer, Etienne

    2012-02-15

    Design of miniature and light cameras requires an optical design breakthrough to achieve good optical performance. Solutions inspired by animals' eyes are the most promising. The curvature of the retina offers several advantages, such as uniform intensity and no field curvature, but this feature is not used. The work presented here is a solution to spherically bend monolithic IR detectors. Compared to state-of-the-art methods, a higher fill factor is obtained and the device fabrication process is not modified. We made an IR eye camera with a single lens and a curved IR bolometer. Images captured are well resolved and have good contrast, and the modulation transfer function shows better quality when comparing with planar systems. PMID:22344137

  11. Lateral interactions in the outer retina

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Wallace B.; Mangel, Stuart C.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral interactions in the outer retina, particularly negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones and direct feed-forward input from horizontal cells to bipolar cells, play a number of important roles in early visual processing, such as generating center-surround receptive fields that enhance spatial discrimination. These circuits may also contribute to post-receptoral light adaptation and the generation of color opponency. In this review, we examine the contributions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways to early visual processing. We begin by reviewing the properties of bipolar cell receptive fields, especially with respect to modulation of the bipolar receptive field surround by the ambient light level and to the contribution of horizontal cells to the surround. We then review evidence for and against three proposed mechanisms for negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones: 1) GABA release by horizontal cells, 2) ephaptic modulation of the cone pedicle membrane potential generated by currents flowing through hemigap junctions in horizontal cell dendrites, and 3) modulation of cone calcium currents (ICa) by changes in synaptic cleft proton levels. We also consider evidence for the presence of direct horizontal cell feed-forward input to bipolar cells and discuss a possible role for GABA at this synapse. We summarize proposed functions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways. Finally, we examine the mechanisms and functions of two other forms of lateral interaction in the outer retina: negative feedback from horizontal cells to rods and positive feedback from horizontal cells to cones. PMID:22580106

  12. Topography of ganglion cell production in the cat's retina

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, C.; Polley, E.H.

    1985-03-01

    The ganglion cells of the cat's retina form several classes distinguishable in terms of soma size, axon diameter, dendritic morphology, physiological properties, and central connections. Labeling with (/sup 3/H)thymidine shows that the ganglion cells which survive in the adult are produced as several temporally shifted, overlapping waves: medium-sized cells are produced before large cells, whereas the smallest ganglion cells are produced throughout the period of ganglion cell generation. Large cells and medium-sized cells show the same distinctive pattern of production, forming rough spirals around the area centralis. The oldest cells tend to lie superior and nasal to the area centralis, whereas cells in the inferior nasal retina and inferior temporal retina are, in general, progressively younger. Within each retinal quadrant, cells nearer the area centralis tend to be older than cells in the periphery, but there is substantial overlap. The retinal raphe divides the superior temporal quadrant into two zones with different patterns of cell addition. Superior temporal retina near the vertical meridian adds cells only slightly later than superior nasal retina, whereas superior temporal retina near the horizontal meridian adds cells very late, contemporaneously with inferior temporal retina. The broader wave of production of smaller ganglion cells seems to follow this same spiral pattern at its beginning and end. The presence of the area centralis as a nodal point about which ganglion cell production in the retinal quadrants pivots suggests that the area centralis is already an important retinal landmark even at the earliest stages of retinal development.

  13. Development of diabetes-induced acidosis in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Andrey V; Henderson, Desmond; Linsenmeier, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesized that the retina of diabetic animals would be unusually acidic due to increased glycolytic metabolism. Acidosis in tumors and isolated retina has been shown to lead to increased VEGF. To test the hypothesis we have measured the transretinal distribution of extracellular H(+) concentration (H(+)-profiles) in retinae of control and diabetic dark-adapted intact Long-Evans rats with ion-selective electrodes. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Intact rat retinae are normally more acidic than blood with a peak of [H(+)]o in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) that averages 30 nM higher than H(+) in the choroid. Profiles in diabetic animals were similar in shape, but diabetic retinae began to be considerably more acidic after 5 weeks of diabetes. In retinae of 1-3 month diabetics the difference between the ONL and choroid was almost twice as great as in controls. At later times, up to 6 months, some diabetics still demonstrated abnormally high levels of [H(+)]o, but others were even less acidic than controls, so that the average level of acidosis was not different. Greater variability in H(+)-profiles (both between animals and between profiles recorded in one animal) distinguished the diabetic retinae from controls. Within animals, this variability was not random, but exhibited regions of higher and lower H(+). We conclude that retinal acidosis begins to develop at an early stage of diabetes (1-3 months) in rats. However, it does not progress, and the acidity of diabetic rat retina was diminished at later stages (3-6 months). Also the diabetes-induced acidosis has a strongly expressed local character. As result, the diabetic retinas show much wider variability in [H(+)] distribution than controls. pH influences metabolic and neural processes, and these results suggest that local acidosis could play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27262608

  14. The acid mucopolysaccharides of cattle retina

    PubMed Central

    Berman, E. R.; Bach, G.

    1968-01-01

    1. Two polysaccharides were isolated from the interstitial matrix surrounding the photoreceptor cells of cattle retina. They were liberated from this region of the tissue in a soluble form after agitation of whole retinas in 0·9% sodium chloride. One, which comprises two-thirds of the polysaccharides present, is a hyaluronidase-sensitive `half-sulphated' chondroitin sulphate containing uronic acid, galactosamine and sulphate in the molar proportions 1·27:1·0:0·54. The other is a hyaluronidase-resistant non-sulphated heteropolysaccharide for which the name sialoglycan is proposed. It contains galactose, glucosamine and sialic acid in the molar proportions 2·4:1·0:0·4. Both polysaccharides contain only small amounts of nitrogen in excess of the amount calculated from their amino sugar and sialic acid content. 2. A similar combination of mucopolysaccharides is associated with the pigment epithelial-cell layer but in quantities only one-fifth of those present in the adjacent matrix area. 3. The ease with which they are released into aqueous media is consistent with the assumption that they are present in the extracellular spaces in both of these tissue layers. 4. The retinal residue left after removal of the two soluble polysaccharides is rich in amino sugar- and sialic acid-containing polymers, which appear to be firmly bound to the tissue fragments. 5. About one-third of the sialic acid and one-tenth of the amino sugar could be extracted with chloroform–methanol. The components in this fraction were tentatively identified as gangliosides. 6. Digestion of the chloroform–methanol-insoluble residue with Pronase yielded as the principal product a heteropolysaccharide containing 16·5% of glucosamine, 24·3% of neutral sugar (galactose plus fucose) and 18·1% of sialic acid. This substance has been classified as a sialoglycan of composition similar to (but not identical with) that of the soluble one isolated from the matrix area of the tissue. ImagesFig. 1

  15. Early functional neural networks in the developing retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, R. O. L.; Chernjavsky, A.; Smith, S. J.; Shatz, C. J.

    1995-04-01

    IN the adult mammalian retina, the principal direction of information flow is along a vertical pathway from photoreceptors to retinal interneurons to ganglion cells, the output neurons of the retina. We report here, however, that initially in development, at a time when the photoreceptors are not yet even present, there are already functionally defined networks within the retina. These networks are spontaneously active rather than visually driven, and they involve horizontal rather than vertical pathways. By means of optical recording using the calcium-sensitive dye Fura-2, we have found that sets of retinal ganglion cells and amacrine cells, a type of retinal interneuron, undergo synchronized oscillations in intracellular calcium concentration. These oscillations are highly correlated among subgroups of neighbouring cells, and spread in a wave-like fashion tangentially across the retina. Thus, in development of retinal circuitry, the initial patterning of neuronal function occurs in the horizontal domain before the adult pattern of vertical information transfer emerges.

  16. Transplanted neurons integrate into adult retinas and respond to light.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Praseeda; Wang, Yan; Nguyen, Tu; Huang, Abigail; Muller, Kenneth J; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) degenerate in diseases like glaucoma and are not replaced in adult mammals. Here we investigate whether transplanted RGCs can integrate into the mature retina. We have transplanted GFP-labelled RGCs into uninjured rat retinas in vivo by intravitreal injection. Transplanted RGCs acquire the general morphology of endogenous RGCs, with axons orienting towards the optic nerve head of the host retina and dendrites growing into the inner plexiform layer. Preliminary data show in some cases GFP(+) axons extending within the host optic nerves and optic tract, reaching usual synaptic targets in the brain, including the lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus. Electrophysiological recordings from transplanted RGCs demonstrate the cells' electrical excitability and light responses similar to host ON, ON-OFF and OFF RGCs, although less rapid and with greater adaptation. These data present a promising approach to develop cell replacement strategies in diseased retinas with degenerating RGCs. PMID:26843334

  17. Transplanted neurons integrate into adult retinas and respond to light

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Praseeda; Wang, Yan; Nguyen, Tu; Huang, Abigail; Muller, Kenneth J.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) degenerate in diseases like glaucoma and are not replaced in adult mammals. Here we investigate whether transplanted RGCs can integrate into the mature retina. We have transplanted GFP-labelled RGCs into uninjured rat retinas in vivo by intravitreal injection. Transplanted RGCs acquire the general morphology of endogenous RGCs, with axons orienting towards the optic nerve head of the host retina and dendrites growing into the inner plexiform layer. Preliminary data show in some cases GFP+ axons extending within the host optic nerves and optic tract, reaching usual synaptic targets in the brain, including the lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus. Electrophysiological recordings from transplanted RGCs demonstrate the cells' electrical excitability and light responses similar to host ON, ON–OFF and OFF RGCs, although less rapid and with greater adaptation. These data present a promising approach to develop cell replacement strategies in diseased retinas with degenerating RGCs. PMID:26843334

  18. Simple Experiments on the Physics of Vision: The Retina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortel, Adolf

    2005-01-01

    Many simple experiments can be performed in the classroom to explore the physics of vision. Students can learn of the two types of receptive cells (rods and cones), their distribution on the retina and the existence of the blind spot.

  19. Light-evoked S-nitrosylation in the retina.

    PubMed

    Tooker, Ryan E; Vigh, Jozsef

    2015-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in the retina is triggered by light stimulation. NO has been shown to modulate visual signal processing at multiple sites in the vertebrate retina, via activation of the most sensitive target of NO signaling, soluble guanylate cyclase. NO can also alter protein structure and function and exert biological effects directly by binding to free thiol groups of cysteine residues in a chemical reaction called S-nitrosylation. However, in the central nervous system, including the retina, this reaction has not been considered to be significant under physiological conditions. Here we provide immunohistochemical evidence for extensive S-nitrosylation that takes place in the goldfish and mouse retinas under physiologically relevant light intensities, in an intensity-dependent manner, with a strikingly similar pattern in both species. Pretreatment with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), which occludes S-nitrosylation, or with 1-(2-trifluromethylphenyl)imidazole (TRIM), an inhibitor of neuronal NO synthase, eliminated the light-evoked increase in S-nitrosylated protein immunofluorescence (SNI) in the retinas of both species. Similarly, light did not increase SNI, above basal levels, in retinas of transgenic mice lacking neuronal NO synthase. Qualitative analysis of the light-adapted mouse retina with mass spectrometry revealed more than 300 proteins that were S-nitrosylated upon illumination, many of which are known to participate directly in retinal signal processing. Our data strongly suggest that in the retina light-evoked NO production leads to extensive S-nitrosylation and that this process is a significant posttranslational modification affecting a wide range of proteins under physiological conditions. PMID:25823749

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of zinc protoporphyrin fluorescence in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Lane, Stephen

    2010-02-01

    We have used Monte Carlo simulation of autofluorescence in the retina to determine that noninvasive detection of nutritional iron deficiency is possible. Nutritional iron deficiency (which leads to iron deficiency anemia) affects more than 2 billion people worldwide, and there is an urgent need for a simple, noninvasive diagnostic test. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) is a fluorescent compound that accumulates in red blood cells and is used as a biomarker for nutritional iron deficiency. We developed a computational model of the eye, using parameters that were identified either by literature search, or by direct experimental measurement to test the possibility of detecting ZPP non-invasively in retina. By incorporating fluorescence into Steven Jacques' original code for multi-layered tissue, we performed Monte Carlo simulation of fluorescence in the retina and determined that if the beam is not focused on a blood vessel in a neural retina layer or if part of light is hitting the vessel, ZPP fluorescence will be 10-200 times higher than background lipofuscin fluorescence coming from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer directly below. In addition we found that if the light can be focused entirely onto a blood vessel in the neural retina layer, the fluorescence signal comes only from ZPP. The fluorescence from layers below in this second situation does not contribute to the signal. Therefore, the possibility that a device could potentially be built and detect ZPP fluorescence in retina looks very promising.

  1. Expression of myelin genes in the developing chick retina.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Hitosh; Ueda, Takayuki; Uno, Aoi; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2011-12-01

    In submammalian animals including chicks, the retina contains oligodendrocytes (OLs), and axons in the optic fiber layer are wrapped with compact myelin within the retina; however, the expression of myelin genes in the chick retina has not been demonstrated yet. In the present study, we examined the expression of three myelin genes (proteolipid protein, PLP; myelin basic protein, MBP; cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, CNP) and PLP in the developing chick retina, in comparison to the localization of Mueller cells. In situ hybridization demonstrated that all three myelin genes began to be expressed at E14 in the chick embryo retina. They are mostly restricted to the ganglion cell layer and the optic fiber layer, with a few exceptions in the inner nuclear layer where Mueller cells reside; however, PLP mRNA+ cells do not express glutamine synthetase, or vice versa. The present results elucidate that myelin genes are expressed only by OLs that are mostly localized in the innermost layer of the developing chick retina. PMID:21872683

  2. Transformation of stimulus correlations by the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Jason; Simmons, Kristina; Tkacik, Gasper; Homann, Jan; Yee, Heather; Palmer, Stephanie; Nelson, Phillip; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2014-03-01

    Correlations in the responses of sensory neurons seem to waste neural resources, but can carry cues about structured stimuli and help the brain correct for response errors. To assess how the retina negotiates this tradeoff, we measured simultaneous responses from many retinal ganglion cells presented with natural and artificial stimuli that varied in correlation structure. Responding to spatio-temporally structured stimuli such as natural movies, pairs of ganglion cells were more correlated than in response to white noise checkerboards, but were much less correlated than predicted by a non-adapting functional model of retinal response. Meanwhile, responding to stimuli with purely spatial correlations, pairs of ganglion cells showed increased correlations consistent with a static, non-adapting receptive field and nonlinearity. We found that in response to spatio- temporally correlated stimuli, ganglion cells had faster temporal kernels and tended to have stronger surrounds. These properties of individual cells, along with gain changes that opposed changes in effective contrast at the ganglion cell input, largely explained the pattern of correlations across stimuli.

  3. Gene Transcription Profile of the Detached Retina (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Zacks, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Separation of the neurosensory retina from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) yields many morphologic and functional consequences, including death of the photoreceptor cells, Müller cell hypertrophy, and inner retinal rewiring. Many of these changes are due to the separation-induced activation of specific genes. In this work, we define the gene transcription profile within the retina as a function of time after detachment. We also define the early activation of kinases that might be responsible for the detachment-induced changes in gene transcription. Methods: Separation of the retina from the RPE was induced in Brown-Norway rats by the injection of 1% hyaluronic acid into the subretinal space. Retinas were harvested at 1, 7, and 28 days after separation. Gene transcription profiles for each time point were determined using the Affymetrix Rat 230A gene microarray chip. Transcription levels in detached retinas were compared to those of nondetached retinas with the BRB-ArrayTools Version 3.6.0 using a random variance analysis of variance (ANOVA) model. Confirmation of the significant transcriptional changes for a subset of the genes was performed using microfluidic quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays. Kinase activation was explored using Western blot analysis to look for early phosphorylation of any of the 3 main families of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK): the p38 family, the Janus kinase family, and the p42/p44 family. Results: Retinas separated from the RPE showed extensive alterations in their gene transcription profile. Many of these changes were initiated as early as 1 day after separation, with significant increases by 7 days. ANOVA analysis defined 144 genes that had significantly altered transcription levels as a function of time after separation when setting a false discovery rate at ≤0.1. Confirmatory RT-PCR was performed on 51 of these 144 genes. Differential transcription detected on the microarray

  4. Age-related changes in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Townes-Anderson, E; Colantonio, A; St Jules, R S

    1998-05-01

    Tiger salamanders have been used in visual science because of the large size of their cells and the ease of preparation and maintenance of in vitro retinal preparations. We have found that salamanders over 27 cm in length show a variety of visual abnormalities. Compared to smaller animals (15-23 cm), large animals exhibited a decrease in visual responses determined by tests of the optomotor reflex. Small animals responded correctly an average of 84.5% of the time in visual testing at three light levels compared to an average of 68.4% for the large animals with the poorest visual performance at the lowest level of illumination. In addition, large animals contained (i) histological degeneration of the outer retina, in particular, loss and disruption of outer segments and abnormalities of the retinal pigmented epithelium, (ii) loss of cells, including photoreceptors, by apoptosis as evaluated with the TUNEL technique, and (iii) an increase in the number of macrophages and lymphocytes within the retina as determined by morphological examination. These histological changes were present in all large animals and all quadrants of their retinas. In contrast, small animals showed virtually no retinal degeneration, no TUNEL-positive cells, and few immune-like cells in the retina. Since large animals are also older animals. the visual changes are age-related. Loss of visual function and histological degeneration in the outer retina also typify aged human eyes. Thus, we propose that large salamanders serve as an animal model for age-related retinal degeneration. In addition to providing a source of aging retina that is readily accessible to experimental manipulation, the salamander provides a pigmented retina with a mixed (2:1, rod:cone) population of photoreceptors, similar to the degeneration-prone parafoveal region of the human eye. PMID:9631666

  5. Characterization of glucagon-expressing neurons in the chicken retina

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andy J.; Skorupa, Dana; Schonberg, David L.; Walton, Nathaniel A.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently identified large glucagon-expressing neurons that densely ramify neurites in the peripheral edge of the retina and regulate the proliferation of progenitors in the circumferential marginal zone (CMZ) of the postnatal chicken eye (Fischer et al., 2005). However, nothing is known about the transmitters and proteins that are expressed by the glucagon-expressing neurons in the avian retina. We used antibodies to cell-distinguishing markers to better characterize the different types of glucagon-expressing neurons. We found that the large glucagon-expressing neurons were immunoreactive for substance P, neurofilament, Pax6, AP2α, HuD, calretinin, trkB and trkC. Colocalization of glucagon and substance P in the large glucagon-expressing neurons indicates that these cells are the “bullwhip cells” that have been briefly described by Ehrlich, Keyser and Karten (1987). Similar to the bullwhip cells, the conventional glucagon-expressing amacrine cells were immunoreactive for calretinin, HuD, Pax6, and AP2α. Unlike bullwhip cells, the conventional glucagon-expressing amacrine cells were immunoreactive for GABA. While glucagon-immunoreactive amacrine cells were negative for substance P in central regions of the retina, a subset of this type of amacrine cell was immunoreactive for substance P in far peripheral regions of the retina. An additional type of glucagon/substance P-expressing neuron, resembling the bullwhip cells, was found in far peripheral and dorsal regions of the retina. Based on morphology, distribution within the retina, and histological markers, we conclude that there may be 4 different types of glucagon-expressing neurons in the avian retina. PMID:16572462

  6. Intravitreal Injection of AAV2 Transduces Macaque Inner Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lu; Greenberg, Kenneth; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D.; Masella, Benjamin D.; Wolfe, Robert; Visel, Meike; Stone, Daniel; Libby, Richard T.; DiLoreto, David; Schaffer, David; Flannery, John; Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) has been shown to be effective in transducing inner retinal neurons after intravitreal injection in several species. However, results in nonprimates may not be predictive of transduction in the human inner retina, because of differences in eye size and the specialized morphology of the high-acuity human fovea. This was a study of inner retina transduction in the macaque, a primate with ocular characteristics most similar to that of humans. Methods. In vivo imaging and histology were used to examine GFP expression in the macaque inner retina after intravitreal injection of AAV vectors containing five distinct promoters. Results. AAV2 produced pronounced GFP expression in inner retinal cells of the fovea, no expression in the central retina beyond the fovea, and variable expression in the peripheral retina. AAV2 vector incorporating the neuronal promoter human connexin 36 (hCx36) transduced ganglion cells within a dense annulus around the fovea center, whereas AAV2 containing the ubiquitous promoter hybrid cytomegalovirus (CMV) enhancer/chicken-β-actin (CBA) transduced both Müller and ganglion cells in a dense circular disc centered on the fovea. With three shorter promoters—human synapsin (hSYN) and the shortened CBA and hCx36 promoters (smCBA and hCx36sh)—AAV2 produced visible transduction, as seen in fundus images, only when the retina was altered by ganglion cell loss or enzymatic vitreolysis. Conclusions. The results in the macaque suggest that intravitreal injection of AAV2 would produce high levels of gene expression at the human fovea, important in retinal gene therapy, but not in the central retina beyond the fovea. PMID:21310920

  7. The effect of accelerated argon ions on the retina.

    PubMed

    Krebs, W; Krebs, I; Merriam, G R; Worgul, B V

    1988-07-01

    It has been postulated that high energy heavy ions cause a unique form of damage in living tissue, which results from the high linear energy transfer of accelerated single particles. We have searched for these single-particle effects, so-called "microlesions," in composite electron micrographs of retinas of rats which had been irradiated with a dose of 1 Gy of 570 MeV/amu argon ions. The calculated rate of energy deposition of the radiation in the retina was about 100 keV/micron and the influence was four particles per 100 micron 2. Different areas of the irradiated retinas which combined would have been expected to be traversed by approximately 2400 particles were examined. We were unable to detect ultrastructural changes in the irradiated retinas distinct from those of controls. The spatial cellular densities of pigment epithelial and photoreceptor cells remained within the normal range when examined at 24 h and at 6 months after irradiation. These findings suggest that the retina is relatively resistant to heavy-ion irradiation and that under the experimental conditions the passage of high energy argon ions does not cause retinal microlesions that can be detected by ultrastructural analysis. PMID:3393633

  8. Selective Gene Transfer to the Retina Using Intravitreal Ultrasound Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Shozo; Tachibana, Katsuro; Yamashita, Toshifumi; Shirasawa, Makoto; Terasaki, Hiroto; Uchino, Eisuke; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal ultrasound (US) irradiation for green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmid transfer into the rabbit retina using a miniature US transducer. Intravitreal US irradiation was performed by a slight modification of the transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy system utilizing a small probe. After vitrectomy, the US probe was inserted through a scleral incision. A mixture of GFP plasmid (50 μL) and bubble liposomes (BLs; 50 μL) was injected into the vitreous cavity, and US was generated to the retina using a SonoPore 4000. The control group was not exposed to US. After 72 h, the gene-transfer efficiency was quantified by counting the number of GFP-positive cells. The retinas that received plasmid, BL, and US showed a significant increase in the number (average ± SEM) of GFP-positive cells (32 ± 4.9; n = 7; P < 0.01 ). No GFP-positive cells were observed in the control eyes (n = 7). Intravitreal retinal US irradiation can transfer the GFP plasmid into the retina without causing any apparent damage. This procedure could be used to transfer genes and drugs directly to the retina and therefore has potential therapeutic value. PMID:22518277

  9. Opsin expression in adult, developing, and regenerating newt retinas.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Shunsuke; Hiramatsu, Hidemasa; Takahashi, Yusuke; Hisatomi, Osamu; Kobayashi, Yuko; Sakami, Sanae; Saito, Takehiko; Tokunaga, Fumio

    2002-06-30

    Japanese common newts (Cynops pyrrhogaster) have an ability to regenerate their neural retina even as adults. Although extensive research has been carried out attempting to understand this retinal regeneration, the molecules characterized in newt retina are limited. We isolated cDNAs encoding three putative opsins (Cp-Rh, -LWS and -SWS1), in addition to Cp-SWS2 [Takahashi et al., FEBS Lett. 501 (2001) 151-155] from a cDNA library of adult newt retina. Our immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization studies demonstrated that Cp-Rh is selectively expressed in rods, whereas the other opsins are expressed in cones. The distribution of opsin mRNAs in normal and regenerated retinas is very similar. In both developing and regenerating retinas, Cp-Rh and its mRNA first appeared in immature rods at the beginning or just after the formation of plexiform layers. Cp-Rh was initially found isotropically in the plasma membrane, and then translocalized to the apical region along with the maturation of regenerating rods. This suggests that reorganization of the intracellular structure takes place during maturation of the regenerating newt photoreceptors. PMID:12106689

  10. Aberrant Activity in Degenerated Retinas Revealed by Electrical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zeck, Günther

    2016-01-01

    In this review, I present and discuss the current understanding of aberrant electrical activity found in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of rod-degenerated (rd) mouse retinas. The reported electrophysiological properties revealed by electrical imaging using high-density microelectrode arrays can be subdivided between spiking activity originating from retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and local field potentials (LFPs) reflecting strong trans-membrane currents within the GCL. RGCs in rd retinas show increased and rhythmic spiking compared to age-matched wild-type retinas. Fundamental spiking frequencies range from 5 to 15 Hz in various mouse models. The rhythmic RGC spiking is driven by a presynaptic network comprising AII amacrine and bipolar cells. In the healthy retina this rhythm-generating circuit is inhibited by photoreceptor input. A unique physiological feature of rd retinas is rhythmic LFP manifested as spatially-restricted low-frequency (5–15 Hz) voltage changes. Their spatiotemporal characterization revealed propagation and correlation with RGC spiking. LFPs rely on gap-junctional coupling and are shaped by glycinergic and by GABAergic transmission. The aberrant RGC spiking and LFPs provide a simple readout of the functionality of the remaining retinal circuitry which can be used in the development of improved vision restoration strategies. PMID:26903810

  11. Microgravity effects on neural retina regeneration in the newt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E. N.; Anton, H. J.; Mitashov, V. I.

    Data on forelimb and eye lens regenerationin in urodeles under spaceflight conditions (SFC) have been obtained in our previous studies. Today, evidence is available that SFC stimulate regeneration in experimental animals rather than inhibit it. The results of control on-ground experiments with simulated microgravity suggest that the stimulatory effect of SFC is due largely to weightlessness. An original experimental model is proposed, which is convenient for comprehensively analyzing neural regeneration under SFC. The initial results described here concern regeneration of neural retina in Pleurodeles waltl newts exposed to microgravity simulated in radial clinostat. After clinorotation for seven days (until postoperation day 16), a positive effect of altered gravity on structural restoration of detached neural retina was confirmed by a number of criteria. Specifically, an increased number of Müllerian glial cells, an increased relative volume of the plexiform layers, reduced cell death, advanced redifferentiation of retinal pigment epithelium, and extended areas of neural retina reattachment were detected in experimental newts. Moreover, cell proliferation in the inner nuclear layer of neural retina increased as compared with control. Thus, low gravity appears to intensify natural cytological and molecular mechanisms of neural retina regeneration in lower vertebrates.

  12. Synaptic mechanisms of adaptation and sensitization in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Anton; Leung, Kin-Mei; Odermatt, Benjamin; Lagnado, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Sensory systems continually adjust the way stimuli are processed. What are the circuit mechanisms underlying this plasticity? We investigated how synapses in the retina of zebrafish adjust to changes in the temporal contrast of a visual stimulus by imaging activity in vivo. Following an increase in contrast, bipolar cell synapses with strong initial responses depressed, whereas synapses with weak initial responses facilitated. Depression and facilitation predominated in different strata of the inner retina, where bipolar cell output was anticorrelated with the activity of amacrine cell synapses providing inhibitory feedback. Pharmacological block of GABAergic feedback converted facilitating bipolar cell synapses into depressing ones. These results indicate that depression intrinsic to bipolar cell synapses causes adaptation of the ganglion cell response to contrast, whereas depression in amacrine cell synapses causes sensitization. Distinct microcircuits segregating to different layers of the retina can cause simultaneous increases or decreases in the gain of neural responses. PMID:23685718

  13. Phototransduction Influences Metabolic Flux and Nucleotide Metabolism in Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianhai; Rountree, Austin; Cleghorn, Whitney M; Contreras, Laura; Lindsay, Ken J; Sadilek, Martin; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Raftery, Dan; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Kanow, Mark; Chan, Lawrence; Tsang, Stephen H; Sweet, Ian R; Hurley, James B

    2016-02-26

    Production of energy in a cell must keep pace with demand. Photoreceptors use ATP to maintain ion gradients in darkness, whereas in light they use it to support phototransduction. Matching production with consumption can be accomplished by coupling production directly to consumption. Alternatively, production can be set by a signal that anticipates demand. In this report we investigate the hypothesis that signaling through phototransduction controls production of energy in mouse retinas. We found that respiration in mouse retinas is not coupled tightly to ATP consumption. By analyzing metabolic flux in mouse retinas, we also found that phototransduction slows metabolic flux through glycolysis and through intermediates of the citric acid cycle. We also evaluated the relative contributions of regulation of the activities of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and the aspartate-glutamate carrier 1. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of the retinal metabolome showed that phototransduction also influences steady-state concentrations of 5'-GMP, ribose-5-phosphate, ketone bodies, and purines. PMID:26677218

  14. MEMS technologies for epiretinal stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokwa, W.

    2004-09-01

    It has been shown that electrical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells yields visual sensations. Therefore, a retina implant for blind humans suffering from retinitis pigmentosa based on this concept seems to be feasible. In Germany, there are two projects funded by the government working on different approaches namely the subretinal and the epiretinal approaches. This paper describes the epiretinal approach for such a system. The extraocular part of this system records visual images. The images are transformed by a neural net into corresponding signals for stimulation of the retinal ganglion cells. These signals are transmitted to a receiver unit of an intraocular implant, the retina stimulator. Integrated circuitry of this unit decodes the signals and transfers the data to a stimulation circuitry that selects stimulation electrodes placed onto the retina and generates current pulses to the electrodes. By this, action potentials in retinal ganglion cells are evoked, causing a visual sensation. This paper concentrates on the MEMS part of this implant.

  15. A Possible Role of Neuroglobin in the Retina After Optic Nerve Injury: A Comparative Study of Zebrafish and Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Sugitani, Kayo; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Wakasugi, Keisuke; Kato, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a new member of the family of heme proteins and is specifically expressed in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems in all vertebrates. In particular, the retina has a 100-fold higher concentration of Ngb than do other nervous tissues. The role of Ngb in the retina is yet to be clarified. Therefore, to understand the functional role of Ngb in the retina after optic nerve injury (ONI), we used two types of retina, from zebrafish and mice, which have permissible and non-permissible capacity for nerve regeneration after ONI, respectively. After ONI, the Ngb protein in zebrafish was upregulated in the amacrine cells within 3 days, whereas in the mouse retina, Ngb was downregulated in the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) within 3 days. Zebrafish Ngb (z-Ngb) significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in retinal explant culture. According to these results, we designed an overexpression experiment with the mouse Ngb (m-Ngb) gene in RGC-5 cells (retinal precursor cells). The excess of m-Ngb actually rescued RGC-5 cells under hypoxic conditions and significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in cell culture. These data suggest that mammalian Ngb has positive neuroprotective and neuritogenic effects that induce nerve regeneration after ONI. PMID:26427474

  16. Retina-like sensor image coordinates transformation and display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fengmei; Cao, Nan; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-03-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera, the image acquisition, coordinates transformation and interpolation need to be realized. Both of the coordinates transformation and interpolation are computed in polar coordinate due to the sensor's particular pixels distribution. The image interpolation is based on sub-pixel interpolation and its relative weights are got in polar coordinates. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes the real-time image acquisition, coordinate transformation and interpolation.

  17. Electrical coupling between cones in turtle retina.

    PubMed Central

    Detwiler, P B; Hodgkin, A L

    1979-01-01

    1. The electrical coupling between cones of known spectral sensitivity in the peripheral part of the turtle's retina was studied by passing current through a micro-electrode inserted into one cone and recording with a second micro-electrode inserted into a neighbouring cone. 2. Spatial sensitivity profiles were determined by recording flash responses to a long narrow strip of light which was moved across the impaled cones in orthogonal directions. These measurements gave both the length constant lambda of electrical spread in the cone network and the separation of the two cones. 3. The cone separation determined from the spatial profiles agreed closely with that measured directly by injecting a fluorescent dye into two cones. 4. The length constant lambda varied from 18 to 39 micron with a mean of 25 micron for red-sensitive cones and 26 micron for green-sensitive cones. 5. The majority of cone pairs studied were electrically coupled provided they had the same spectral sensitivity and were separated by less than 60 micron: thirty-two out of thirty-six red-red pairs, two out of two green-green pairs, none out of eight red-green pairs: no blue cones were observed. 6. The strength of electrical coupling was expressed as a mutual resistance defined as the voltage in one cell divided by the current flowing into the other. Mutual resistances decreased from a maximum value of about 30 M omega at separations close to zero to 0.2 M omega, the lower limit of detectable coupling at separations of about 60 micron. Mutual resistances were always positive and were independent of which cell was directly polarized. The coupling seemed to be ohmic and any rectification or non-linearity probably arose in the cone membranes rather than in the coupling resistances. 7. The results were analysed in terms of the Lamb & Simon (1977) theories of square and hexagonal lattices, which approximate to the continuous sheet model except in the case of the cone to which current is applied. 8. The

  18. Whole-Retina Reduced Electrophysiological Activity in Mice Bearing Retina-Specific Deletion of Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Bedore, Jake; Martyn, Amanda C.; Li, Anson K. C.; Dolinar, Eric A.; McDonald, Ian S.; Coupland, Stuart G.; Prado, Vania F.; Prado, Marco A.; Hill, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite rigorous characterization of the role of acetylcholine in retinal development, long-term effects of its absence as a neurotransmitter are unknown. One of the unanswered questions is how acetylcholine contributes to the functional capacity of mature retinal circuits. The current study investigates the effects of disrupting cholinergic signalling in mice, through deletion of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in the developing retina, pigmented epithelium, optic nerve and optic stalk, on electrophysiology and structure of the mature retina. Methods & Results A combination of electroretinography, optical coherence tomography imaging and histological evaluation assessed retinal integrity in mice bearing retina- targeted (embryonic day 12.5) deletion of VAChT (VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox) and littermate controls at 5 and 12 months of age. VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice did not show any gross changes in nuclear layer cellularity or synaptic layer thickness. However, VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice showed reduced electrophysiological response of the retina to light stimulus under scotopic conditions at 5 and 12 months of age, including reduced a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potential (OP) amplitudes and decreased OP peak power and total energy. Reduced a-wave amplitude was proportional to the reduction in b-wave amplitude and not associated with altered a-wave 10%-90% rise time or inner and outer segment thicknesses. Significance This study used a novel genetic model in the first examination of function and structure of the mature mouse retina with disruption of cholinergic signalling. Reduced amplitude across the electroretinogram wave form does not suggest dysfunction in specific retinal cell types and could reflect underlying changes in the retinal and/or extraretinal microenvironment. Our findings suggest that release of acetylcholine by VAChT is essential for the normal electrophysiological response of the mature mouse retina. PMID:26226617

  19. Glaucoma related Proteomic Alterations in Human Retina Samples

    PubMed Central

    Funke, Sebastian; Perumal, Natarajan; Beck, Sabine; Gabel-Scheurich, Silke; Schmelter, Carsten; Teister, Julia; Gerbig, Claudia; Gramlich, Oliver W.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H.

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma related proteomic changes have been documented in cell and animal models. However, proteomic studies investigating on human retina samples are still rare. In the present work, retina samples of glaucoma and non-glaucoma control donors have been examined by a state-of-the-art mass spectrometry (MS) workflow to uncover glaucoma related proteomic changes. More than 600 proteins could be identified with high confidence (FDR < 1%) in human retina samples. Distinct proteomic changes have been observed in 10% of proteins encircling mitochondrial and nucleus species. Numerous proteins showed a significant glaucoma related level change (p < 0.05) or distinct tendency of alteration (p < 0.1). Candidates were documented to be involved in cellular development, stress and cell death. Increase of stress related proteins and decrease of new glaucoma related candidates, ADP/ATP translocase 3 (ANT3), PC4 and SRFS1-interacting protein 1 (DFS70) and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCp2) could be documented by MS. Moreover, candidates could be validated by Accurate Inclusion Mass Screening (AIMS) and immunostaining and supported for the retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL) by laser capture microdissection (LCM) in porcine and human eye cryosections. The workflow allowed a detailed view into the human retina proteome highlighting new molecular players ANT3, DFS70 and MeCp2 associated to glaucoma. PMID:27425789

  20. Müller glia cell reprogramming and retina regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Müller glia are the major glial component of the retina. They are one of the last retinal cell types to be born during development and they function to maintain retinal homeostasis and integrity. In mammals, Müller glia respond to retinal injury in a variety of ways that can be either protective or detrimental to retinal function. Although under special circumstances these cells can be coaxed to proliferate and generate neurons, these responses are meager and insufficient for repairing a damaged retina. By contrast, in teleost fish (such as zebrafish) the response of Müller glia to retinal injury involves a reprogramming event that imparts retinal stem cell characteristics and allows them to produce a proliferating population of progenitors that can regenerate all major retinal cell types and restore vision. Recent studies have revealed a number of important mechanisms underlying Müller glia reprogramming and retina regeneration in fish that may lead to new strategies for stimulating retina regeneration in mammals. PMID:24894585

  1. Functional Architecture of the Retina: Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoon, Mrinalini; Okawa, Haruhisa; Santina, Luca Della; Wong, Rachel O.L.

    2014-01-01

    Structure and function are highly correlated in the vertebrate retina, a sensory tissue that is organized into cell layers with microcircuits working in parallel and together to encode visual information. All vertebrate retinas share a fundamental plan, comprising five major neuronal cell classes with cell body distributions and connectivity arranged in stereotypic patterns. Conserved features in retinal design have enabled detailed analysis and comparisons of structure, connectivity and function across species. Each species, however, can adopt structural and/or functional retinal specializations, implementing variations to the basic design in order to satisfy unique requirements in visual function. Recent advances in molecular tools, imaging and electrophysiological approaches have greatly facilitated identification of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that establish the fundamental organization of the retina and the specializations of its microcircuits during development. Here, we review advances in our understanding of how these mechanisms act to shape structure and function at the single cell level, to coordinate the assembly of cell populations, and to define their specific circuitry. We also highlight how structure is rearranged and function is disrupted in disease, and discuss current approaches to re-establish the intricate functional architecture of the retina. PMID:24984227

  2. Ganglion Cell Regeneration Following Whole-Retina Destruction in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Sherpa, Tshering; Fimbel, Shane M.; Mallory, Dianne E.; Maaswinkel, Hans; Spritzer, Scott D.; Sand, Jordan A.; Li, L.; Hyde, David R.; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2008-01-01

    The retinas of adult teleost fish can regenerate neurons following injury. The current study provides the first documentation of functional whole retina regeneration in the zebrafish, Danio rerio, following intraocular injection of the cytotoxin, ouabain. Loss and replacement of laminated retinal tissue was monitored by analysis of cell death and cell proliferation, and by analysis of retina-specific gene expression patterns. The spatiotemporal process of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) regeneration was followed through the use of selective markers, and was found to largely recapitulate the spatiotemporal process of embryonic ganglion cell neurogenesis, over a more protracted time frame. However, the re-expression of some ganglion cell markers was not observed. The growth and pathfinding of ganglion cell axons was evaluated by measurement of the optic nerve head (ONH), and the restoration of normal ONH size was found to correspond to the time of recovery of two visually-mediated behaviors. However, some abnormalities were noted, including overproduction of RGCs, and progressive and excessive growth of the ONH at longer recovery times. This model system for whole-retina regeneration has provided an informative view of the regenerative process. PMID:18000816

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated to the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model ...

  4. Assessment of Glial Function in the In Vivo Retina

    PubMed Central

    Srienc, Anja I.; Kornfield, Tess E.; Mishra, Anusha; Burian, Michael A.; Newman, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Glial cells, traditionally viewed as passive elements in the CNS, are now known to have many essential functions. Many of these functions have been revealed by work on retinal glial cells. This work has been conducted almost exclusively on ex vivo preparations and it is essential that retinal glial cell functions be characterized in vivo as well. To this end, we describe an in vivo rat preparation to assess the functions of retinal glial cells. The retina of anesthetized, paralyzed rats is viewed with confocal microscopy and laser speckle flowmetry to monitor glial cell responses and retinal blood flow. Retinal glial cells are labeled with the Ca2+ indicator dye Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 and the caged Ca2+ compound NP-EGTA by injection of the compounds into the vitreous humor. Glial cells are stimulated by photolysis of caged Ca2+ and the activation state of the cells assessed by monitoring Ca2+ indicator dye fluorescence. We find that, as in the ex vivo retina, retinal glial cells in vivo generate both spontaneous and evoked intercellular Ca2+ waves. We also find that stimulation of glial cells leads to the dilation of neighboring retinal arterioles, supporting the hypothesis that glial cells regulate blood flow in the retina. This in vivo preparation holds great promise for assessing glial cell function in the healthy and pathological retina. PMID:22144328

  5. CHANGES IN NEUROTRANSMITTER GENE EXPRESSION IN THE AGING RETINA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To understand mechanisms of neurotoxicity in susceptible populations, we examined age-related changes in constitutive gene expression in the retinas of young (4mos), middle-aged (11 mos) and aged (23 mos) male Long Evans rats. Derived from a pouch of the forebrain during develop...

  6. Distribution of cone photoreceptors in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Szél, A; Röhlich, P; Caffé, A R; van Veen, T

    1996-12-15

    The retina of mammals contains various amounts of cone photoreceptors that are relatively evenly distributed and display a radially or horizontally oriented area of peak density. In most mammalian species two spectrally different classes of cone can be distinguished with various histochemical and physiological methods. These cone classes occur in a relatively constant ratio, middle-to-longwave sensitive cones being predominant over short-wave cones. Recent observations do not support the idea that each cone subpopulation is uniformly distributed across the retina. With appropriate type-specific markers, unexpected patterns of colour cone topography have been revealed in certain species. In the mouse and the rabbit, the "standard" uniform pattern was found to be confined exclusively to the dorsal retina. In a ventral zone of variable width all cones express short-wave pigment, a phenomenon whose biological significance is not known yet. Dorso-ventral asymmetries have been described in lower vertebrates, matching the spectral distribution of light reaching the retina from various sectors of the visual field. It is not clear, however, whether the retinal cone fields in mammals carry out a function similar to that of their counterparts in fish and amphibians. Since in a number of mammalian species short-wave cones are the first to differentiate, and the expression of the short-wave pigment seems to be the default pathway of cone differentiation, we suggest that the short-wave sensitive cone fields are rudimentary areas conserving an ancestral stage of the photopigment evolution. PMID:9016448

  7. The Virtual Retina: Is Good Educational Technology Always Strategic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowie, Sandra

    Educational technology units must continually monitor their strategic plans to ensure that they are aligned with the realities of their institutions. Strategic dissonance occurs when previously successful strategies are no longer achieving the same positive outcomes. The Virtual Retina CD-ROM project is used in this paper as an example of…

  8. New spectral imaging techniques for blood oximetry in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabboud, Ied; Muyo, Gonzalo; Gorman, Alistair; Mordant, David; McNaught, Andrew; Petres, Clement; Petillot, Yvan R.; Harvey, Andrew R.

    2007-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging of the retina presents a unique opportunity for direct and quantitative mapping of retinal biochemistry - particularly of the vasculature where blood oximetry is enabled by the strong variation of absorption spectra with oxygenation. This is particularly pertinent both to research and to clinical investigation and diagnosis of retinal diseases such as diabetes, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. The optimal exploitation of hyperspectral imaging however, presents a set of challenging problems, including; the poorly characterised and controlled optical environment of structures within the retina to be imaged; the erratic motion of the eye ball; and the compounding effects of the optical sensitivity of the retina and the low numerical aperture of the eye. We have developed two spectral imaging techniques to address these issues. We describe first a system in which a liquid crystal tuneable filter is integrated into the illumination system of a conventional fundus camera to enable time-sequential, random access recording of narrow-band spectral images. Image processing techniques are described to eradicate the artefacts that may be introduced by time-sequential imaging. In addition we describe a unique snapshot spectral imaging technique dubbed IRIS that employs polarising interferometry and Wollaston prism beam splitters to simultaneously replicate and spectrally filter images of the retina into multiple spectral bands onto a single detector array. Results of early clinical trials acquired with these two techniques together with a physical model which enables oximetry map are reported.

  9. In vivo Electroporation of Morpholinos into the Adult Zebrafish Retina

    PubMed Central

    Thummel, Ryan; Bailey, Travis J.; Hyde, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Many devastating inherited eye diseases result in progressive and irreversible blindness because humans cannot regenerate dying or diseased retinal neurons. In contrast, the adult zebrafish retina possesses the robust ability to spontaneously regenerate any neuronal class that is lost in a variety of different retinal damage models, including retinal puncture, chemical ablation, concentrated high temperature, and intense light treatment 1-8. Our lab extensively characterized regeneration of photoreceptors following constant intense light treatment and inner retinal neurons after intravitreal ouabain injection 2, 5, 9. In all cases, resident Müller glia re-enter the cell cycle to produce neuronal progenitors, which continue to proliferate and migrate to the proper retinal layer, where they differentiate into the deficient neurons. We characterized five different stages during regeneration of the light-damaged retina that were highlighted by specific cellular responses. We identified several differentially expressed genes at each stage of retinal regeneration by mRNA microarray analysis 10. Many of these genes are also critical for ocular development. To test the role of each candidate gene/protein during retinal regeneration, we needed to develop a method to conditionally limit the expression of a candidate protein only at times during regeneration of the adult retina. Morpholino oligos are widely used to study loss of function of specific proteins during the development of zebrafish, Xenopus, chick, mouse, and tumors in human xenografts 11-14. These modified oligos basepair with complementary RNA sequence to either block the splicing or translation of the target RNA. Morpholinos are stable in the cell and can eliminate or "knockdown" protein expression for three to five days 12. Here, we describe a method to efficiently knockdown target protein expression in the adult zebrafish retina. This method employs lissamine-tagged antisense morpholinos that are injected

  10. Impact of bronchopulmonary dysplasia on brain and retina

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Annie Wing Hoi; Ma, Emilie Xiao Hang; Vadivel, Arul; Jung, Suna; Khoja, Zehra; Stephens, Laurel; Thébaud, Bernard; Wintermark, Pia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many premature newborns develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a chronic lung disease resulting from prolonged mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia. BPD survivors typically suffer long-term injuries not only to the lungs, but also to the brain and retina. However, currently it is not clear whether the brain and retinal injuries in these newborns are related only to their prematurity, or also to BPD. We investigated whether the hyperoxia known to cause histologic changes in the lungs similar to BPD in an animal model also causes brain and retinal injuries. Sprague Dawley rat pups were exposed to hyperoxia (95% O2, ‘BPD’ group) or room air (21% O2, ‘control’ group) from postnatal day 4–14 (P4–14); the rat pups were housed in room air between P14 and P28. At P28, they were sacrificed, and their lungs, brain, and eyes were extracted. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed on lung and brain sections; retinas were stained with Toluidine Blue. Hyperoxia exposure resulted in an increased mean linear intercept in the lungs (P<0.0001). This increase was associated with a decrease in some brain structures [especially the whole-brain surface (P=0.02)], as well as a decrease in the thickness of the retinal layers [especially the total retina (P=0.0008)], compared to the room air control group. In addition, a significant negative relationship was observed between the lung structures and the brain (r=−0.49, P=0.02) and retina (r=−0.70, P=0.0008) structures. In conclusion, hyperoxia exposure impaired lung, brain, and retina structures. More severe lung injuries correlated with more severe brain and retinal injuries. This result suggests that the same animal model of chronic neonatal hyperoxia can be used to simultaneously study lung, brain and retinal injuries related to hyperoxia. PMID:26988760

  11. Vibratome Sectioning Mouse Retina to Prepare Photoreceptor Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Clérin, Emmanuelle; Yang, Ying; Forster, Valérie; Fontaine, Valérie; Sahel, José-Alain; Léveillard, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    The retina is a part of the central nervous system that has organized architecture, with neurons in layers from the photoreceptors, both rods and cones in contact with the retinal pigmented epithelium in the most distant part on the retina considering the direction of light, and the ganglion cells in the most proximal distance. This architecture allows the isolation of the photoreceptor layer by vibratome sectioning. The dissected neural retina of a mouse aged 8 days is flat-embedded in 4% gelatin on top of a slice of 20% gelatin photoreceptor layer facing down. Using a vibratome and a double edged razor blade, the 100 µm thick inner retina is sectioned. This section contains the ganglion cells and the inner layer with notably the bipolar cells. An intermediary section of 15 µm is discarded before 200 µm of the outer retina containing the photoreceptors is recovered. The gelatin is removed by heating at 37 °C. Pieces of outer layer are incubated in 500 µl of Ringer's solution with 2 units of activated papain for 20 min at 37 °C. The reaction is stopped by adding 500 µl 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), then 25 units of DNAse I is added before centrifugation at RT, washed several times to remove serum and the cells are resuspended in 500 µl of DMEM and seeded at 1 x 105 cells/cm2. The cells are grown to 5 days in vitro and their viability scored using live/dead assay. The purity of the culture is first determined by microscopic observation during the experiment. The purity is then validated by seeding and fixing cells on a histological slide and analyzing using a rabbit polyclonal anti-SAG, a photoreceptor marker and mouse monoclonal anti-RHO, a rod photoreceptor specific marker. Alternatively, the photoreceptor layer (97% rods) can be used for gene or protein expression analysis and for transplantation. PMID:25548881

  12. Impact of bronchopulmonary dysplasia on brain and retina.

    PubMed

    Poon, Annie Wing Hoi; Ma, Emilie Xiao Hang; Vadivel, Arul; Jung, Suna; Khoja, Zehra; Stephens, Laurel; Thébaud, Bernard; Wintermark, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Many premature newborns develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a chronic lung disease resulting from prolonged mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia. BPD survivors typically suffer long-term injuries not only to the lungs, but also to the brain and retina. However, currently it is not clear whether the brain and retinal injuries in these newborns are related only to their prematurity, or also to BPD. We investigated whether the hyperoxia known to cause histologic changes in the lungs similar to BPD in an animal model also causes brain and retinal injuries. Sprague Dawley rat pups were exposed to hyperoxia (95% O2, 'BPD' group) or room air (21% O2, 'control' group) from postnatal day 4-14 (P4-14); the rat pups were housed in room air between P14 and P28. At P28, they were sacrificed, and their lungs, brain, and eyes were extracted. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed on lung and brain sections; retinas were stained with Toluidine Blue. Hyperoxia exposure resulted in an increased mean linear intercept in the lungs (P<0.0001). This increase was associated with a decrease in some brain structures [especially the whole-brain surface (P=0.02)], as well as a decrease in the thickness of the retinal layers [especially the total retina (P=0.0008)], compared to the room air control group. In addition, a significant negative relationship was observed between the lung structures and the brain (r=-0.49,P=0.02) and retina (r=-0.70,P=0.0008) structures. In conclusion, hyperoxia exposure impaired lung, brain, and retina structures. More severe lung injuries correlated with more severe brain and retinal injuries. This result suggests that the same animal model of chronic neonatal hyperoxia can be used to simultaneously study lung, brain and retinal injuries related to hyperoxia. PMID:26988760

  13. Experimental occlusion of the central artery of the retina. IV: Retinal tolerance time to acute ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, S. S.; Weingeist, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    Ophthalmoscopic, fluorescein angiographic, electrophysiological, and morphological studies on 63 eyes of rhesus monkeys with acute transient experimental occlusion of the central artery of the retina (OCAR) showed that the retina suffered irreparable damage after ischaemia of 105 minutes but recovered well after ischaemia of 97-98 minutes. The tolerance time of the brain to acute transient ischaemia is many times shorter than that of the retina. The metabolism of ischaemic neurones (in the retina and brain) is discussed with a view to explaining this difference, and also the various factors possibly responsible for the retina's longer tolerance to ischaemia, as compared to the brain. PMID:7426553

  14. Artificial retina: the multichannel processing of the mammalian retina achieved with a neuromorphic asynchronous light acquisition device.

    PubMed

    Lorach, Henri; Benosman, Ryad; Marre, Olivier; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Sahel, José A; Picaud, Serge

    2012-12-01

    Objective. Accurate modeling of retinal information processing remains a major challenge in retinal physiology with applications in visual rehabilitation and prosthetics. Most of the current artificial retinas are fed with static frame-based information, losing thereby the fundamental asynchronous features of biological vision. The objective of this work is to reproduce the spatial and temporal properties of the majority of ganglion cell (GC) types in the mammalian retina. Approach. Here, we combined an asynchronous event-based light sensor with a model pulling nonlinear subunits to reproduce the parallel filtering and temporal coding occurring in the retina. We fitted our model to physiological data and were able to reconstruct the spatio-temporal responses of the majority of GC types previously described in the mammalian retina (Roska et al 2006 J. Neurophysiol. 95 3810-22). Main results. Fitting of the temporal and spatial components of the response was achieved with high coefficients of determination (median R(2) = 0.972 and R(2) = 0.903, respectively). Our model provides an accurate temporal precision with a reliability of only few milliseconds-peak of the distribution at 5 ms-similar to biological retinas (Berry et al 1997 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 94 5411-16; Gollisch and Meister 2008 Science 319 1108-11). The spiking statistics of the model also followed physiological measurements (Fano factor: 0.331). Significance. This new asynchronous retinal model therefore opens new perspectives in the development of artificial visual systems and visual prosthetic devices. PMID:23075696

  15. Diosmin Protects Rat Retina from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Nianting; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Gong, Yuanyuan; Yin, Lili

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective Diosmin, a natural flavone glycoside, possesses antioxidant activity and has been used to alleviate ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The aim of this study was to clarify whether the administration of diosmin has a protective effect against I/R injury induced using the high intraocular pressure (IOP) model in rat retina, and to determine the possible antioxidant mechanisms involved. Methods Retinal I/R injury was induced in the rats by elevating the IOP to 110 mmHg for 60 min. Diosmin (100 mg/kg) or vehicle solution was administered intragastrically 30 min before the onset of ischemia and then daily after I/R injury until the animals were sacrificed. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of total-superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT) in the retinal tissues were determined 24 h after I/R injury. At 7 days post-I/R injury, electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded, and the density of surviving retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was estimated by counting retrograde tracer-labeled cells in whole-mounted retinas. Retinal histological changes were also examined and quantified using light microscopy. Results Diosmin significantly decreased the MDA levels and increased the activities of T-SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT in the retina of rats compared with the ischemia group (P<0.05), and suppressed the I/R-induced reduction in the a- and b-wave amplitudes of the ERG (P<0.05). The thickness of the entire retina, inner nuclear layer, inner plexiform layer, and outer retinal layer and the number of cells in the ganglion cell layer were significantly less after I/R injury (P<0.05), and diosmin remarkably ameliorated these changes on retinal morphology. Diosmin also attenuated the I/R-induced loss of RGCs of the rat retina (P<0.05). Conclusion Diosmin protected the retina from I/R injury, possibly via a mechanism involving the regulation of oxidative parameters. PMID:22509733

  16. Recovery of the rabbit retina after light damage (preliminary observations).

    PubMed

    McKechnie, N M; Foulds, W S

    1980-01-01

    The retinae of anaesthetised Dutch rabbits were exposed to one of two intensities of white light for a period of 1 h. After exposure the animals were allowed to recover for various periods up to 4 weeks. The animals were then killed, and retinal and choroidal tissue was taken for investigation by both light and electron microscopy. Exposure to the lower intensity produced disruption of the visual cell outer segments and distension of the pigment epithelium. Recovery from this insult was rapid although disturbances in rod disc stacking and a loss of cone cell outer segments were evident 4 weeks after exposure. Exposure to the higher intensity resulted in necrosis of visual cells and pigment epithelial cells. Non-native phagocytic cells were active in the removal of cellular debris. Recovery from this insult was not observed. Four weeks after exposure much of the previously illuminated retina was reduced to disorganised Müller cells and occasional macrophages. PMID:6906139

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography and Raman Spectroscopy of the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Liu, R; Chan, J; Lane, S; Werner, J S

    2009-01-16

    Imaging the structure and correlating it with the biochemical content of the retina holds promise for fundamental research and for clinical applications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used to image the 3D structure of the retina and while the added functionality of biochemical analysis afforded by Raman scattering could provide critical molecular signatures for clinicians and researchers, there are many technical challenges to combining these imaging modalities. We present an ex vivo OCT microscope combined with Raman spectroscopy capable of collecting morphological and molecular information about a sample simultaneously. The combined instrument will be used to investigate remaining technical challenges to combine these imaging modalities, such as the laser power levels needed to achieve a Raman signal above the noise level without damaging the sample.

  18. Numerical computational of fluid flow through a detached retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiann, Lim Yeou; Ismail, Zuhaila; Shafie, Sharidan; Fitt, Alistair

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a phenomenon of fluid flow through a detached retina is studied. Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment happens when vitreous humour flow through a detached retina. The exact mechanism of Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment is complex and remains incomplete. To understand the fluid flow, a paradigm mathematical model is developed and is approximated by the lubrication theory. The numerical results of the velocity profile and pressure distribution are computed by using Finite Element Method. The effects of fluid mechanical on the retinal detachment is discussed and analyzed. Based on the analysis, it is found that the retinal detachment deformation affects the pressure distribution. It is important to comprehend the development of the retinal detachment so that a new treatment method can be developed.

  19. A polyaxonal amacrine cell population in the primate retina.

    PubMed

    Greschner, Martin; Field, Greg D; Li, Peter H; Schiff, Max L; Gauthier, Jeffrey L; Ahn, Daniel; Sher, Alexander; Litke, Alan M; Chichilnisky, E J

    2014-03-01

    Amacrine cells are the most diverse and least understood cell class in the retina. Polyaxonal amacrine cells (PACs) are a unique subset identified by multiple long axonal processes. To explore their functional properties, populations of PACs were identified by their distinctive radially propagating spikes in large-scale high-density multielectrode recordings of isolated macaque retina. One group of PACs exhibited stereotyped functional properties and receptive field mosaic organization similar to that of parasol ganglion cells. These PACs had receptive fields coincident with their dendritic fields, but much larger axonal fields, and slow radial spike propagation. They also exhibited ON-OFF light responses, transient response kinetics, sparse and coordinated firing during image transitions, receptive fields with antagonistic surrounds and fine spatial structure, nonlinear spatial summation, and strong homotypic neighbor electrical coupling. These findings reveal the functional organization and collective visual signaling by a distinctive, high-density amacrine cell population. PMID:24599459

  20. Transcriptomic analyses of Onecut1 and Onecut2 deficient retinas.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Jillian J; Trimarchi, Jeffrey M

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we further explore the data generated for the research article "Onecut1 and Onecut2 play critical roles in the development of the mouse retina". To better understand the functionality of the Onecut family of transcription factors in retinogenesis, we investigated the retinal transcriptomes of developing and mature mice to identify genes with differential expression. This data article reports the full transcriptomes resulting from these experiments and provides tables detailing the differentially expressed genes between wildtype and Onecut1 or 2 deficient retinas. The raw array data of our transcriptomes as generated using Affymetrix microarrays are available on the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) browser (Reference number GSE57917 and GSE57918GSE57917GSE57918). PMID:26484186

  1. Modeling and Simulation of Microelectrode-Retina Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, M

    2002-11-30

    The goal of the retinal prosthesis project is the development of an implantable microelectrode array that can be used to supply visually-driven electrical input to cells in the retina, bypassing nonfunctional rod and cone cells, thereby restoring vision to blind individuals. This goal will be achieved through the study of the fundamentals of electrical engineering, vision research, and biomedical engineering with the aim of acquiring the knowledge needed to engineer a high-density microelectrode-tissue hybrid sensor that will restore vision to millions of blind persons. The modeling and simulation task within this project is intended to address the question how best to stimulate, and communicate with, cells in the retina using implanted microelectrodes.

  2. Maximizing contrast resolution in the outer retina of mammals

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert G.; Taylor, W. Rowland

    2010-01-01

    The outer retina removes the first-order correlation, the background light level, and thus more efficiently transmits contrast. This removal is accomplished by negative feedback from horizontal cell to photoreceptors. However, the optimal feedback gain to maximize the contrast sensitivity and spatial resolution is not known. The objective of this study was to determine, from the known structure of the outer retina, the synaptic gains that optimize the response to spatial and temporal contrast within natural images. We modeled the outer retina as a continuous 2D extension of the discrete 1D model of Yagi et al. (Proc Int Joint Conf Neural Netw 1: 787–789, 1989). We determined the spatio-temporal impulse response of the model using small-signal analysis, assuming that the stimulus did not perturb the resting state of the feedback system. In order to maximize the efficiency of the feedback system, we derived the relationships between time constants, space constants, and synaptic gains that give the fastest temporal adaptation and the highest spatial resolution of the photoreceptor input to bipolar cells. We found that feedback which directly modulated photoreceptor calcium channel activation, as opposed to changing photoreceptor voltage, provides faster adaptation to light onset and higher spatial resolution. The optimal solution suggests that the feedback gain from horizontal cells to photoreceptors should be ~0.5. The model can be extended to retinas that have two or more horizontal cell networks with different space constants. The theoretical predictions closely match experimental observations of outer retinal function. PMID:20361204

  3. Immunohistochemical and Calcium Imaging Methods in Wholemount Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C.; De Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the tools, reagents, and the practical steps that are needed for: 1) successful preparation of wholemount retinas for immunohistochemistry and, 2) calcium imaging for the study of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) mediated calcium signaling in retinal ganglion cells. The calcium imaging method we describe circumvents issues concerning non-specific loading of displaced amacrine cells in the ganglion cell layer. PMID:25349920

  4. Photovoltage of Rods and Cones in the Macaque Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeweis, David M.; Schnapf, Julie L.

    1995-05-01

    The kinetics, gain, and reliability of light responses of rod and cone photoreceptors are important determinants of overall visual sensitivity. In voltage recordings from photoreceptors in an intact primate retina, rods were found to be functionally isolated from each other, unlike the tightly coupled rods of cold-blooded vertebrates. Cones were observed to receive excitatory input from rods, which indicates that the cone pathway also processes rod signals. This input might be expected to degrade the spatial resolution of mesopic vision.

  5. Inhibition of HDAC2 Protects the Retina From Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Alsarraf, Oday; Dahrouj, Mohammad; Platt, Kenneth A.; Chou, C. James; Rice, Dennis S.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Protein acetylation is an essential mechanism in regulating transcriptional and inflammatory events. Studies have shown that nonselective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can protect the retina from ischemic injury in rats. However, the role of specific HDAC isoforms in retinal degenerative processes remains obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of HDAC2 isoform in a mouse model of ischemic retinal injury. Methods. Localization of HDAC2 in mice retinas was evaluated by immunohistochemical analyses. To investigate whether selective reduction in HDAC2 activity can protect the retina from ischemic injury, Hdac2+/− mice were utilized. Electroretinographic (ERG) and morphometric analyses were used to assess retinal function and morphology. Results. Our results demonstrated that HDAC2 is primarily localized in nuclei in inner nuclear and retinal ganglion cell layers, and HDAC2 activity accounted for approximately 35% of the total activities of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 6 in the retina. In wild-type mice, ERG a- and b-waves from ischemic eyes were significantly reduced when compared to pre-ischemia baseline values. Morphometric examination of these eyes revealed significant degeneration of inner retinal layers. In Hdac2+/− mice, ERG a- and b-waves from ischemic eyes were significantly greater than those measured in ischemic eyes from wild-type mice. Morphologic measurements demonstrated that Hdac2+/− mice exhibit significantly less retinal degeneration than wild-type mice. Conclusions. This study demonstrated that suppressing HDAC2 expression can effectively reduce ischemic retinal injury. Our results support the idea that the development of selective HDAC2 inhibitors may provide an efficacious treatment for ischemic retinal injury. PMID:23696608

  6. Plastic retina: image enhancement using polymer grid triode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeger, Alan J.; Heeger, David J.; Langan, John D.; Yang, Yang

    1996-02-01

    An array of polymer grid triodes (PGTs) connected through a common grid functions as a 'plastic retina' which provides local contrast gain control for image enhancement. This device, made from layers of conducting polymers, functions as an active resistive network that performs center-surround filtering. The PGT array with common grid is a continuous analog of the discrete approach of Mead, with a variety of fabrication advantages and with a significant saving of 'real estate' within the unit cell of each pixel.

  7. The Retina and Other Light-sensitive Ocular Clocks.

    PubMed

    Besharse, Joseph C; McMahon, Douglas G

    2016-06-01

    Ocular clocks, first identified in the retina, are also found in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), cornea, and ciliary body. The retina is a complex tissue of many cell types and considerable effort has gone into determining which cell types exhibit clock properties. Current data suggest that photoreceptors as well as inner retinal neurons exhibit clock properties with photoreceptors dominating in nonmammalian vertebrates and inner retinal neurons dominating in mice. However, these differences may in part reflect the choice of circadian output, and it is likely that clock properties are widely dispersed among many retinal cell types. The phase of the retinal clock can be set directly by light. In nonmammalian vertebrates, direct light sensitivity is commonplace among body clocks, but in mice only the retina and cornea retain direct light-dependent phase regulation. This distinguishes the retina and possibly other ocular clocks from peripheral oscillators whose phase depends on the pace-making properties of the hypothalamic central brain clock, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). However, in mice, retinal circadian oscillations dampen quickly in isolation due to weak coupling of its individual cell-autonomous oscillators, and there is no evidence that retinal clocks are directly controlled through input from other oscillators. Retinal circadian regulation in both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates uses melatonin and dopamine as dark- and light-adaptive neuromodulators, respectively, and light can regulate circadian phase indirectly through dopamine signaling. The melatonin/dopamine system appears to have evolved among nonmammalian vertebrates and retained with modification in mammals. Circadian clocks in the eye are critical for optimum visual function where they play a role fine tuning visual sensitivity, and their disruption can affect diseases such as glaucoma or retinal degeneration syndromes. PMID:27095816

  8. Effects and Responses to Spaceflight in the Mouse Retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Theriot, Corey; Westby, Christian; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Several stress environmental factors are combined in a unique fashion during spaceflight, affecting living beings widely across their physiological systems. Recently, attention has been placed on vision changes in astronauts returning from long duration missions. Alterations include hyperoptic shift, globe flattening, choroidal folds and optic disc edema, which are probably associated with increased intracranial pressure. These observations justify a better characterization of the ocular health risks associated with spaceflight. This study investigates the impact of spaceflight on the biology of the mouse retina. Within a successful tissue sharing effort, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (Animal Enclosure Module) mice were used as ground controls. Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage was higher in the flight samples compared to controls on R+1, and decreased on R+7. A trend toward higher oxidative and cellular stress response gene expression was also observed on R+1 compared to AEM controls, and these levels decreased on R+7. Several genes coding for key antioxidant enzymes, namely, heme-oxygenase-1, peroxiredoxin, and catalase, were among those upregulated after flight. Likewise, NF B and TGFbeta1, were upregulated in one flight specimen that overall showed the most elevated oxidative stress markers on R+1. In addition, retinas from vivarium control mice evidenced higher oxidative stress markers, NF B and TGFbeta1, likely due to the more intense illumination in vivarium cages versus the AEM. These preliminary data suggest that spaceflight represents a source of environmental stress that translates into oxidative and cellular stress in the retina, which is partially reversible upon return to Earth. Further work is needed to dissect the contribution of the various spaceflight factors (microgravity, radiation) and to

  9. In vivo intrinsic optical signal imaging of mouse retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Benquan; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-03-01

    Intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging is a promising noninvasive method for advanced study and diagnosis of eye diseases. Before pursuing clinical applications, more IOS studies employing animal models are necessary to establish the relationship between IOS distortions and eye diseases. Ample mouse models are available for investigating the relationship between IOS distortions and eye diseases. However, in vivo IOS imaging of mouse retinas is challenging due to the small ocular lens (compared to frog eyes) and inevitable eye movements. We report here in vivo IOS imaging of mouse retinas using a custom-designed functional OCT. The OCT system provided high resolution (3 μm) and high speed (up to 500 frames/s) imaging of mouse retinas. An animal holder equipped with a custom designed ear bar and bite bar was used to minimize eye movement due to breathing and heartbeats. Residual eye movement in OCT images was further compensated by accurate image registration. Dynamic OCT imaging revealed rapid IOSs from photoreceptor outer segments immediately (<10 ms) after the stimulation delivery, and unambiguous IOS changes were also observed from inner retinal layers with delayed time courses compared to that of photoreceptor IOSs.

  10. Light pollution: the possible consequences of excessive illumination on retina.

    PubMed

    Contín, M A; Benedetto, M M; Quinteros-Quintana, M L; Guido, M E

    2016-02-01

    Light is the visible part of the electromagnetic radiation within a range of 380-780 nm; (400-700 on primates retina). In vertebrates, the retina is adapted to capturing light photons and transmitting this information to other structures in the central nervous system. In mammals, light acts directly on the retina to fulfill two important roles: (1) the visual function through rod and cone photoreceptor cells and (2) non-image forming tasks, such as the synchronization of circadian rhythms to a 24 h solar cycle, pineal melatonin suppression and pupil light reflexes. However, the excess of illumination may cause retinal degeneration or accelerate genetic retinal diseases. In the last century human society has increased its exposure to artificial illumination, producing changes in the Light/Dark cycle, as well as in light wavelengths and intensities. Although, the consequences of unnatural illumination or light pollution have been underestimated by modern society in its way of life, light pollution may have a strong impact on people's health. The effects of artificial light sources could have direct consequences on retinal health. Constant exposure to different wavelengths and intensities of light promoted by light pollution may produce retinal degeneration as a consequence of photoreceptor or retinal pigment epithelium cells death. In this review we summarize the different mechanisms of retinal damage related to the light exposure, which generates light pollution. PMID:26541085

  11. The major cell populations of the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Jeon, C J; Strettoi, E; Masland, R H

    1998-11-01

    We report a quantitative analysis of the major populations of cells present in the retina of the C57 mouse. Rod and cone photoreceptors were counted using differential interference contrast microscopy in retinal whole mounts. Horizontal, bipolar, amacrine, and Müller cells were identified in serial section electron micrographs assembled into serial montages. Ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells were counted by subtracting the number of axons in the optic nerve, learned from electron microscopy, from the total neurons of the ganglion cell layer. The results provide a base of reference for future work on genetically altered animals and put into perspective certain recent studies. Comparable data are now available for the retinas of the rabbit and the monkey. With the exception of the monkey fovea, the inner nuclear layers of the three species contain populations of cells that are, overall, quite similar. This contradicts the previous belief that the retinas of lower mammals are "amacrine-dominated", and therefore more complex, than those of higher mammals. PMID:9786999

  12. Photoreceptor types and distributions in the retinae of insectivores.

    PubMed

    Peichl, L; Künzle, H; Vogel, P

    2000-01-01

    The retinae of insectivores have been rarely studied, and their photoreceptor arrangements and expression patterns of visual pigments are largely unknown. We have determined the presence and distribution of cones in three species of shrews (common shrew Sorex araneus, greater white-toothed shrew Crocidura russula, dark forest shrew Crocidura poensis; Soricidae) and in the lesser hedgehog tenrec Echinops telfairi (Tenrecidae). Special cone types were identified and quantified in flattened whole retinae by antisera/antibodies recognizing the middle-to-long-wavelength-sensitive (M/L-)cone opsin and the short-wavelength-sensitive (S-)cone opsin, respectively. A combination of immunocytochemistry with conventional histology was used to assess rod densities and cone/rod ratios. In all four species the rods dominate at densities of about 230,000-260,000/mm2. M/L- and S-cones are present, comprising between 2% of the photoreceptors in the nocturnal Echinops telfairi and 13% in Sorex araneus that has equal diurnal and nocturnal activity phases. This suggests dichromatic color vision like in many other mammals. A striking feature in all four species are dramatically higher S-cone proportions in ventral than in dorsal retina (0.5% vs. 2.5-12% in Sorex, 5-15% vs. 30-45% in Crocidura poensis, 3-12% vs. 20-50% in Crocidura russula, 10-30% vs. 40-70% in Echinops). The functional and comparative aspects of these structural findings are discussed. PMID:11193110

  13. Parallel information processing channels created in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    In the retina, several parallel channels originate that extract different attributes from the visual scene. This review describes how these channels arise and what their functions are. Following the introduction four sections deal with these channels. The first discusses the “ON” and “OFF” channels that have arisen for the purpose of rapidly processing images in the visual scene that become visible by virtue of either light increment or light decrement; the ON channel processes images that become visible by virtue of light increment and the OFF channel processes images that become visible by virtue of light decrement. The second section examines the midget and parasol channels. The midget channel processes fine detail, wavelength information, and stereoscopic depth cues; the parasol channel plays a central role in processing motion and flicker as well as motion parallax cues for depth perception. Both these channels have ON and OFF subdivisions. The third section describes the accessory optic system that receives input from the retinal ganglion cells of Dogiel; these cells play a central role, in concert with the vestibular system, in stabilizing images on the retina to prevent the blurring of images that would otherwise occur when an organism is in motion. The last section provides a brief overview of several additional channels that originate in the retina. PMID:20876118

  14. Targeted microinjection into cells and retina using optoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-12-01

    The laser microbeam has enabled highly precise noncontact delivery of exogenous materials into targeted cells without compromising cell viability, which has been a highly challenging task for traditional methods. Here, we report targeted delivery of impermeable substances into mammalian cells and goldfish retinal explants subsequent to ultrafast laser microbeam assisted injection. Introduction of impermeable dye into the cell through localized pore formation was confirmed by distinct fluorescence at the site of pore formation on the membrane and its spatiotemporal diffusion pattern through the nucleus. Indirect optoporation by bubble formation, external to cell, led to a similar spatial diffusion pattern but with a larger time constant for injection. Using optimized laser intensity, exposure, and a spatial irradiation pattern, desired spatial transfection patterns in goldfish retina explants were achieved as confirmed by the expression of injected plasmids encoded for light-activable channelrhodopsin-2 ion-channel, tagged with fluorescent protein. Laser assisted delivery of exogenous material into a specific area of three-dimensional neuronal tissue, such as the retina, will help to understand the functioning of neuronal circuitry of normal and degenerated retina.

  15. Statistics of Optical Coherence Tomography Data From Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    de Juan, Joaquín; Ferrone, Claudia; Giannini, Daniela; Huang, David; Koch, Giorgio; Russo, Valentina; Tan, Ou; Bruni, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has recently become one of the primary methods for noninvasive probing of the human retina. The pseudoimage formed by OCT (the so-called B-scan) varies probabilistically across pixels due to complexities in the measurement technique. Hence, sensitive automatic procedures of diagnosis using OCT may exploit statistical analysis of the spatial distribution of reflectance. In this paper, we perform a statistical study of retinal OCT data. We find that the stretched exponential probability density function can model well the distribution of intensities in OCT pseudoimages. Moreover, we show a small, but significant correlation between neighbor pixels when measuring OCT intensities with pixels of about 5 µm. We then develop a simple joint probability model for the OCT data consistent with known retinal features. This model fits well the stretched exponential distribution of intensities and their spatial correlation. In normal retinas, fit parameters of this model are relatively constant along retinal layers, but varies across layers. However, in retinas with diabetic retinopathy, large spikes of parameter modulation interrupt the constancy within layers, exactly where pathologies are visible. We argue that these results give hope for improvement in statistical pathology-detection methods even when the disease is in its early stages. PMID:20304733

  16. Anti-excitotoxic activity of trimetazidine in the retina.

    PubMed

    Payet, Olivier; D'Aldin, Christine; Maurin, Laurence; Bonne, Claude; Muller, Agnès

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of the neuroprotective activity of trimetazidine in animal retina stressed by ischemia or kainate. Flash electroretinograms were recorded in guinea pigs after ischemia, induced by an acute increase in the intraocular pressure (IOP), or after an intravitreal injection of kainate. Treatment with trimetazidine per os afforded a significant protection of the electroretinogram against the ischemic as well as the excitotoxic insult as an antioxidant (dimethylthiourea) and a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (nitroarginine) did. The effect of the drug on the extracellular accumulation of glutamate induced by chemical ischemia was studied by incubating rat retina in vitro. Trimetazidine was able to inhibit the extracellular glutamate accumulation, which represents the first step of the excitotoxic phenomenon. Then the compound activity on the glial uptake of glutamate was studied in a rat Müller cell line (rMC-1) in culture. Chemical ischemia inhibited the active 3H-glutamate transport, an effect that was reversed by trimetazidine, at micromolar concentrations. These results demonstrate that trimetazidine which is recognized as an efficient drug against ischemic injuries, is also capable of protecting the retina against excitotoxicity by reducing ischemia-induced accumulation of glutamate due in particular to glial transporter inhibition. PMID:15006162

  17. A Crystallin Gene Network in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Justin P.; Wang, XiangDi; Freeman, Natalie E.; Ma, Zhiwei; Lu, Anna; Hejtmancik, Fielding; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the regulation of crystallin genes and protein in the mouse retina using the BXD recombinant inbred (RI) strains. Illumina Sentrix BeadChip Arrays (MouseWG-6v2) were used to analyze mRNA levels in 75 BXD RI strains along with the parental strains (C57Bl/6J and DBA/2J), and the reciprocal crosses in the Hamilton Eye Institute (HEI) Retina Dataset (www.genenetwork.org). Protein levels were investigated using immunoblots to quantify levels of proteins and indirect immunohistochemistry to define the distribution of protein. Algorithms in the Genomatix program were used to identify transcription factor binding sites common to the regulatory sequences in the 5′ regions of co-regulated set of crystallin and other genes as compared to a set of control genes. As subset of genes, including many encoding lens crystallins is part of a tightly co-regulated network that is active in the retina. Expression of this crystallin network appears to be binary in nature, being expressed either at relatively low levels or being highly upregulated. Relative to a control set of genes, the 5′ regulatory sequences of the crystallin network genes show an increased frequency of a set of common transcription factor-binding sites, the most common being those of the Maf family. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of human lens epithelial cells (HLEC) and rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC) confirmed the functionality of these sites, showing that MafA binds the predicted sites of CRYGA and CRYGD in HLE and CRYAB, CRYGA, CRYBA1, and CRYBB3 in RGC cells. In the retina there is a highly correlated group of genes containing many members of the α- β- and γ-crystallin families. These genes can be dramatically upregulated in the retina. One transcription factor that appears to be involved in this coordinated expression is the MAF family transcription of factors associated with both lens and extralenticular expression of crystallin genes. PMID:23978599

  18. Seeing double: visual physiology of double-retina eye ontogeny in stomatopod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Feller, Kathryn D; Cohen, Jonathan H; Cronin, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    Stomatopod eye development is unusual among crustaceans. Just prior to metamorphosis, an adult retina and associated neuro-processing structures emerge adjacent to the existing material in the larval compound eye. Depending on the species, the duration of this double-retina eye can range from a few hours to several days. Although this developmental process occurs in all stomatopod species observed to date, the retinal physiology and extent to which each retina contributes to the animal's visual sensitivity during this transition phase is unknown. We investigated the visual physiology of stomatopod double retinas using microspectrophotometry and electroretinogram recordings from different developmental stages of the Western Atlantic species Squilla empusa. Though microspectrophotometry data were inconclusive, we found robust ERG responses in both larval and adult retinas at all sampled time points indicating that the adult retina responds to light from the very onset of its emergence. We also found evidence of an increase in the response dynamics with ontogeny as well as an increase in sensitivity of retinal tissue during the double-retina phase relative to single retinas. These data provide an initial investigation into the ontogeny of vision during stomatopod double-retina eye development. PMID:25471793

  19. Dual cameras acquisition and display system of retina-like sensor camera and rectangular sensor camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Nan; Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-04-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera and a traditional rectangular sensor camera, dual cameras acquisition and display system need to be built. We introduce the principle and the development of retina-like senor. Image coordinates transformation and interpolation based on sub-pixel interpolation need to be realized for our retina-like sensor's special pixels distribution. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, rectangular sensor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes two cameras' acquisition and display.

  20. [A complication in gas surgery: injection of gas beneath the retina in a pseudophakic eye].

    PubMed

    Lincoff, H; Kreissig, I; Jakobiec, F

    1987-02-01

    Report on an inadvertent injection of gas beneath the retina in a pseudophakic eye. The gas was injected through the pupil to tamponade a retinal break. Instead, however, it found its way under the retina, increasing the extent of the detachment. A thick, transparent membrane posterior to the intraocular lens prevented the gas from entering the vitreous space and diverted it laterally behind the iris to the ciliary body, where it penetrated between layers of the ciliary epithelium and entered the subretinal space. The gas became visible under the retina. The bullous redetachment had a mother-of-pearl-like opalescence characteristic of gas beneath the retina. PMID:3573664

  1. Measuring In Vivo Free Radical Production by the Outer Retina

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Bredell, Bryce X.; Davis, Christopher; Samardzija, Marijana; Grimm, Christian; Roberts, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Excessive and continuously produced free radicals in the outer retina are implicated in retinal aging and the pathogenesis of sight-threatening retinopathies, yet measuring outer retinal oxidative stress in vivo remains a challenge. Here, we test the hypothesis that continuously produced paramagnetic free radicals from the outer retina can be measured in vivo using high-resolution (22-μm axial resolution) 1/T1magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without and with a confirmatory quench (quench-assisted MRI). Methods Low-dose sodium iodate–treated and diabetic C57Bl6/J mice (and their controls), and rod-dominated (129S6) or cone-only R91W;Nrl−/− mice were studied. In dark-adapted groups, 1/T1 was mapped transretinally in vivo without or with (1) the antioxidant combination of methylene blue (MB) and α-lipoic acid (LPA), or (2) light exposure; in subgroups, retinal superoxide production was measured ex vivo (lucigenin). Results In the sodium iodate model, retinal superoxide production and outer retina-specific 1/T1 values were both significantly greater than normal and corrected to baseline with MB+LPA therapy. Nondiabetic mice at two ages and 1.2-month diabetic mice (before the appearance of oxidative stress) had similar transretinal 1/T1 profiles. By 2.3 months of diabetes, only outer retinal 1/T1 values were significantly greater than normal and were corrected to baseline with MB+LPA therapy. In mice with healthy photoreceptors, a light quench caused 1/T1 of rods, but not cones, to significantly decrease from their values in the dark. Conclusions Quench-assisted MRI is a feasible method for noninvasively measuring normal and pathologic production of free radicals in photoreceptors/RPE in vivo. PMID:26670830

  2. MicroRNA Expression in the Glaucomatous Retina

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Hari; Cepurna, William O.; Johnson, Elaine C.; Morrison, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose MicroRNAs are small, endogenous noncoding RNAs that modulate posttranscriptional gene expression. Although the contribution of microRNAs to the pathogenesis of glaucomatous damage is unknown, supporting evidence from central nervous system (CNS) research suggests they may play a role. It was therefore hypothesized that microRNAs known to be altered in CNS injury are also altered in experimental glaucoma. Methods Intraocular pressure (IOP) was elevated in rats by unilateral injection of hypertonic saline and IOP monitored for 5 weeks. After rats were killed, retrobulbar optic nerve sections were graded for damage. MicroRNA was extracted from whole retinae of eyes with advanced nerve damage (n = 8) and from normal, noninjected control eyes (n = 8). Quantitative PCRs were performed using a panel of 17 microRNAs, reported from CNS research to be implicated in mechanisms also linked to glaucomatous damage. Computationally and experimentally derived gene targets were identified for the differentially expressed microRNAs. These were then integrated with existing gene array data. Functional interpretation was performed using the Molecular Signatures Database and DAVID Functional Annotation Clustering. Results Eight microRNAs were significantly downregulated in glaucomatous retinae compared with controls (miR-181c, miR-497, miR-204, let-7a, miR-29b, miR-16, miR106b, and miR-25); miR-27a was significantly upregulated. Enrichment of targets associated with extracellular matrix/cell proliferation, immune system, and regulation of apoptosis were observed. Cholesterol homeostasis and mTORC-1 pathways showed reduced expression. Conclusions MicroRNAs are differentially expressed in retinae of eyes with advanced glaucomatous damage compared with normal controls. Integrating microRNA with gene expression data may improve understanding of the complex biological responses produced by chronically elevated IOP. PMID:26720444

  3. Protective and Antioxidant Effects of PPARα in the Ischemic Retina

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Elizabeth; Ding, Lexi; Wang, Zhongxiao; Cheng, Rui; Chen, Qian; Moore, Robert; Takahashi, Yusuke; Ma, Jian-xing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Previous studies have demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) agonists have therapeutic effects in diabetic retinopathy, although the mechanism of action remains incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate PPARα's protective effects in the ischemic retina, and to delineate its molecular mechanism of action. Methods. For the oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model, wild-type (WT), and PPARα knockout (PPARα−/−) mice were exposed to 75% O2 from postnatal day 7 (P7) to P12 and treated with the PPARα agonist fenofibric acid (Feno-FA) from P12 to P16. At P17, the effects of Feno-FA on retinal glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, apoptotic DNA cleavage, and TUNEL labeling were analyzed. Cultured retinal cells were exposed to CoCl2 to induce hypoxia, and TUNEL staining and 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein dye were used to measure apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Western blotting was used to measure GFAP levels and cell signaling. Results. Feno-FA decreased retinal apoptosis and oxidative stress in WT but not PPARα−/− OIR mice. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha knockout OIR mice showed increased retinal cell death and glial activation in comparison to WT OIR mice. Feno-FA treatment and PPARα overexpression protected cultured retinal cells from hypoxic cell death and decreased ROS levels. Nuclear hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-1α) and nicotine adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-4 (Nox 4) were increased in OIR retinas and downregulated by Feno-FA in WT but not in PPARα−/− mice. Conclusions. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha has a potent antiapoptotic effect in the ischemic retina. This protective effect may be mediated in part through downregulation of HIF-1α/Nox 4 and consequently alleviation of oxidative stress. PMID:24825105

  4. Cadmium effects on the retina of adult Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Avallone, Bice; Crispino, Roberta; Cerciello, Raimondo; Simoniello, Palma; Panzuto, Raffaele; Maria Motta, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the effects of cadmium pollution on the vision of adult zebrafish, Danio rerio. Retinal morpho-cytological alterations were investigated by light and electron microscopy, while the functionality of cadmium-exposed retinae was assessed by re-illumination behavioral tests with white or colored light. Our results demonstrate that cadmium toxicity causes significant degeneration and loss of organization at both macro and microscopic levels. These alterations impair functional responses particularly through an increase in light sensitivity. Metallothioneins were not seen to be up-regulated, while the recovery of visual acuity is due to a regenerative process by Müller cells. PMID:25528674

  5. Specifying and controlling the optical image on the human retina.

    PubMed

    Westheimer, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    A review covering the trends that led to the current state of knowledge in the areas of: (a) schematic models of the eye, and the definition of the retinal image in terms of first-order optics; (b) the description of the actual image on the retina and methods for accessing and characterizing it; (c) available procedures for controlling the quality of the retinal image in defined situations; and (d) intra-receptoral optical effects that cause differences between the light distribution on the retinal surface and at the level of interaction with photopigment molecules. PMID:16099192

  6. Developmental expression of dysbindin in Muller cells of rat retina.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, Andrea; Gaddini, Lucia; Macchia, Gianfranco; Varano, Monica; Petrucci, Tamara C; Macioce, Pompeo; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Ceccarini, Marina

    2013-11-01

    Dysbindin, the product of the DTNBP1 gene, was identified by yeast two hybrid assay as a binding partner of dystrobrevin, a cytosolic component of the dystrophin protein complex. Although its functional role has not yet been completely elucidated, the finding that dysbindin assembles into the biogenesis of lysosome related organelles complex 1 (BLOC-1) suggests that it participates in intracellular trafficking and biogenesis of organelles and vesicles. Dysbindin is ubiquitous and in brain is expressed primarily in neurons. Variations at the dysbindin gene have been associated with increased risk for schizophrenia. As anomalies in retinal function have been reported in patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders, we investigated the expression of dysbindin in the retina. Our results show that differentially regulated dysbindin isoforms are expressed in rat retina during postnatal maturation. Interestingly, we found that dysbindin is mainly localized in Müller cells. The identification of dysbindin in glial cells may open new perspectives for a better understanding of the functional involvement of this protein in visual alterations associated to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:23954924

  7. Types of bipolar cells in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Krishna K; Bujan, Sascha; Haverkamp, Silke; Feigenspan, Andreas; Wässle, Heinz

    2004-01-26

    We studied the morphology of bipolar cells in fixed vertical tissue sections (slices) of the mouse retina by injecting the cells with Lucifer Yellow and Neurobiotin. Nine different cone bipolar cell types and one rod bipolar cell type were distinguished. The major criteria for classifying the cells were the branching pattern and stratification level of their axon terminals in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). To assess this, the IPL was subdivided into five strata of equal width. The slices were immunostained for calretinin, which labels three horizontal bands serving as a standard measure for the precise localization of the axon terminals. Immunostaining the retina with antibodies against the G-protein Ggamma13, a marker for ON-bipolar cells, made it possible to separate OFF- and ON-bipolar cells. At least two OFF-cone bipolar cells (Types 1 and 2) were immunolabeled with antibodies against the neurokinin 3 receptors (NK3R). A further OFF- and an ON-cone bipolar cell (Types 3 and 5) were immunostained with antibodies against the calcium-binding protein CaB5. The bipolar cell types described here were compared with previous schemes of rat and primate bipolar cells. Homologous types between the three species are discussed. PMID:14689473

  8. Ischemia-induced spreading depolarization in the retina.

    PubMed

    Srienc, Anja I; Biesecker, Kyle R; Shimoda, Angela M; Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A

    2016-09-01

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a metabolically costly phenomenon that affects the brain in both health and disease. Following severe stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or traumatic brain injury, cortical spreading depolarization exacerbates tissue damage and enlarges infarct volumes. It is not known, however, whether spreading depolarization also occurs in the retina in vivo. We report now that spreading depolarization episodes are generated in the in vivo rat retina following retinal vessel occlusion produced by photothrombosis. The properties of retinal spreading depolarization are similar to those of cortical spreading depolarization. Retinal spreading depolarization waves propagate at a velocity of 3.0 ± 0.1 mm/min and are associated with a negative shift in direct current potential, a transient cessation of neuronal spiking, arteriole constriction, and a decrease in tissue O2 tension. The frequency of retinal spreading depolarization generation in vivo is reduced by administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the 5-HT(1D) agonist sumatriptan. Branch retinal vein occlusion is a leading cause of vision loss from vascular disease. Our results suggest that retinal spreading depolarization could contribute to retinal damage in acute retinal ischemia and demonstrate that pharmacological agents can reduce retinal spreading depolarization frequency after retinal vessel occlusion. Blocking retinal spreading depolarization generation may represent a therapeutic strategy for preserving vision in branch retinal vein occlusion patients. PMID:27389181

  9. Third harmonic generation microscopy of a mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Tim C.; Domingue, Scott R.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Bartels, Randy A.; Ammar, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate lipid-specific imaging of the retina through the use of third harmonic generation (THG), a multiphoton microscopic technique in which tissue contrast is generated from optical inhomogeneities. Methods A custom fiber laser and multiphoton microscope was constructed and optimized for simultaneous two-photon autofluorescence (TPAF) and THG retinal imaging. Imaging was performed using fixed-frozen sections of mouse eyes without the use of exogenous fluorescent dyes. In parallel experiments, a fluorescent nuclear stain was used to verify the location of the retinal cell nuclei. Results Simultaneous THG and TPAF images revealed all retinal layers with subcellular resolution. In BALB/c strains, the THG signal stems from the lipidic organelles of the cellular and nuclear membranes. In the C57BL/6 strain, the THG signal from the RPE cells originates from the pigmented granules. Conclusions THG microscopy can be used to image structures of the mouse retina using contrast inherent to the tissue and without the use of a fluorescent dye or exogenously expressed recombinant protein. PMID:25999681

  10. Survey of intravitreal injection techniques among retina specialists in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Ori; Segal-Trivitz, Yael; Nemet, Arie Y; Geffen, Noa; Nesher, Ronit; Mimouni, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe antivascular endothelial growth factor intravitreal injection techniques of retinal specialists in order to establish a cornerstone for future practice guidelines. Methods All members of the Israeli Retina Society were contacted by email to complete an anonymous, 19-question, Internet-based survey regarding their intravitreal injection techniques. Results Overall, 66% (52/79) completed the survey. Most (98%) do not instruct patients to discontinue anticoagulant therapy and 92% prescribe treatment for patients in the waiting room. Three quarters wear sterile gloves and prepare the patient in the supine position. A majority (71%) use sterile surgical draping. All respondents apply topical analgesics and a majority (69%) measure the distance from the limbus to the injection site. A minority (21%) displace the conjunctiva prior to injection. A majority of the survey participants use a 30-gauge needle and the most common quadrant for injection is superotemporal (33%). Less than half routinely assess postinjection optic nerve perfusion (44%). A majority (92%) apply prophylactic antibiotics immediately after the injection. Conclusion The majority of retina specialists perform intravitreal injections similarly. However, a relatively large minority performs this procedure differently. Due to the extremely low percentage of complications, it seems as though such differences do not increase the risk. However, more evidence-based medicine, a cornerstone for practice guidelines, is required in order to identify the intravitreal injection techniques that combine safety and efficacy while causing as little discomfort to the patients as possible. PMID:27366050

  11. Multipurpose semistatic shift registers for digital programmable retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Thierry M.

    2000-05-01

    A digital programmable retina is a functional extension of a CMOS imager, in which every pixel is fitted with a tiny digital programmable processor. We actually call it a PAR, standing for Programmable Artificial Retina. From an architectural viewpoint, a PAR is a SIMD array processor with local optical input. A PAR is aimed at processing images on-site (where they are sensed) until they can be output from the array under concentrated form. The overall goal is to get compact, fast and inexpensive vision systems, e.g. for robotics applications. PAR design is subject to harsh constraints resulting from small pixel area and sensing/processing cohabitation. Meeting these constraints leads to using peculiar architectural and circuit technique solutions. In the last three generations of PARs we have designed, semi-static shift registers have played a crucial role in the maximization of computational power versus silicon area. In particular, the latter have been used to store, shift and--through some slight modifications--to perform local computations on images. Here, we show their abilities to support asynchronous propagation in order to implement `geodesic reconstruction', an extremely useful computational operator, in particular for image segmentation and then for object selection and manipulation purposes.

  12. A new approach towards a minimal invasive retina implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerding, H.

    2007-03-01

    The possibility of using retina implants ('retinal prostheses') for the restoration of basic orientation in blind patients suffering from distal retinal diseases is presently under investigation by at least 18 independent project groups worldwide. It is a common feature of all implants to bypass degenerated retinal layers and to transfer visual information into the retinal network either by direct electrical stimulation or by neurotransmitter release. Contemporary implant designs are differing in the position of stimulating electrodes (epiretinal, subretinal, external) and the anatomical arrangement of implant components (intraocular, extraocular). The latter is of high relevance with regard to possible implant-tissue interactions and biological reactions. During the last few years new types of implants appeared that reduce intraocular components which are now deposited on the outer scleral surface or even in extraorbital position. The extreme of this trend are completely extraocular implants with transchoroidal or extraocular stimulation of the retina. The new type of implant presented in this paper combines the principle of direct retinal stimulation and minimal invasive implantation in a way that stimulating electrodes are the only implant component penetrating the eye via sclera, choroid and retinal pigment epithelium. All other device elements are positioned in extraocular position. The new concept necessitates a paradigmatic change about surgical handling of the choroid and multiple penetrations of the eye. Successful data about this type of retinal prosthesis are already available from long-term observation in non-human primates.

  13. TRP channel gene expression in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Jared C; Wensel, Theodore G

    2011-12-01

    In order to identify candidate cation channels important for retinal physiology, 28 TRP channel genes were surveyed for expression in the mouse retina. Transcripts for all TRP channels were detected by RT-PCR and sequencing. Northern blotting revealed that mRNAs for 12 TRP channel genes are enriched in the retina. The strongest signals were observed for TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPM1, TRPM3, and TRPML1, and clear signals were obtained for TRPC4, TRPM7, TRPP2, TRPV2, and TRPV4. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence revealed widespread expression throughout multiple retinal layers for TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPML1, PKD1, and TRPP2. Striking localization of enhanced mRNA expression was observed for TRPC1 in the photoreceptor inner segment layer, for TRPM1 in the inner nuclear layer (INL), for TRPM3 in the INL, and for TRPML1 in the outer plexiform and nuclear layers. Strong immunofluorescence signal in cone outer segments was observed for TRPM7 and TRPP2. TRPC5 immunostaining was largely confined to INL cells immediately adjacent to the inner plexiform layer. TRPV2 antibodies stained photoreceptor axons in the outer plexiform layer. Expression of TRPM1 splice variants was strong in the ciliary body, whereas TRPM3 was strongly expressed in the retinal pigmented epithelium. PMID:22037305

  14. A Retina Inspired Model for Enhancing Visibility of Hazy Images

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian-Shi; Gao, Shao-Bing; Li, Chao-Yi; Li, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian retina seems far smarter than scientists have believed so far. Inspired by the visual processing mechanisms in the retina, from the layer of photoreceptors to the layer of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), we propose a computational model for haze removal from a single input image, which is an important issue in the field of image enhancement. In particular, the bipolar cells serve to roughly remove the low-frequency of haze, and the amacrine cells modulate the output of cone bipolar cells to compensate the loss of details by increasing the image contrast. Then the RGCs with disinhibitory receptive field surround refine the local haze removal as well as the image detail enhancement. Results on a variety of real-world and synthetic hazy images show that the proposed model yields results comparative to or even better than the state-of-the-art methods, having the advantage of simultaneous dehazing and enhancing of single hazy image with simple and straightforward implementation. PMID:26733857

  15. Pharmacological Analysis of Intrinsic Neuronal Oscillations in rd10 Retina

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sonia; Haselier, Christine; Mataruga, Anja; Thumann, Gabriele; Walter, Peter; Müller, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In the widely used mouse model of retinal degeneration, rd1, the loss of photoreceptors leads to rhythmic electrical activity of around 10–16 Hz in the remaining retinal network. Recent studies suggest that this oscillation is formed within the electrically coupled network of AII amacrine cells and ON-bipolar cells. A second mouse model, rd10, displays a delayed onset and slower progression of degeneration, making this mouse strain a better model for human retinitis pigmentosa. In rd10, oscillations occur at a frequency of 3–7 Hz, raising the question whether oscillations have the same origin in the two mouse models. As rd10 is increasingly being used as a model to develop experimental therapies, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying the spontaneous rhythmic activity. To study the properties of oscillations in rd10 retina we combined multi electrode recordings with pharmacological manipulation of the retinal network. Oscillations were abolished by blockers for ionotropic glutamate receptors and gap junctions. Frequency and amplitude of oscillations were modulated strongly by blockers of inhibitory receptors and to a lesser extent by blockers of HCN channels. In summary, although we found certain differences in the pharmacological modulation of rhythmic activity in rd10 compared to rd1, the overall pattern looked similar. This suggests that the generation of rhythmic activity may underlie similar mechanisms in rd1 and rd10 retina. PMID:24918437

  16. Crossover Inhibition Generates Sustained Visual Responses in the Inner Retina

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Juliana M.; Ruehle, Sabine; Ding, Huayu; Lagnado, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Summary In daylight, the input to the retinal circuit is provided primarily by cone photoreceptors acting as band-pass filters, but the retinal output also contains neuronal populations transmitting sustained signals. Using in vivo imaging of genetically encoded calcium reporters, we investigated the circuits that generate these sustained channels within the inner retina of zebrafish. In OFF bipolar cells, sustained transmission was found to depend on crossover inhibition from the ON pathway through GABAergic amacrine cells. In ON bipolar cells, the amplitude of low-frequency signals was regulated by glycinergic amacrine cells, while GABAergic inhibition regulated the gain of band-pass signals. We also provide the first functional description of a subset of sustained ON bipolar cells in which synaptic activity was suppressed by fluctuations at frequencies above ∼0.2 Hz. These results map out the basic circuitry by which the inner retina generates sustained visual signals and describes a new function of crossover inhibition. PMID:27068790

  17. Histotypic differentiation of neonatal mouse retina in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Caffé, A R; Visser, H; Jansen, H G; Sanyal, S

    1989-10-01

    Retinae from neonatal mice were explanted in toto, with or without the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and adjoining mesenchymal cells, and maintained in organ culture for up to 3 weeks. The explants remained flat, rosette formation was minimal and histogenetic changes followed in the normal sequence. After 11, 14 and 21 days in vitro the three cellular layers--the outer nuclear layer including well differentiated rod and cone perikarya, the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer--with the intervening plexiform layers were comparable to those of the in vivo eyes. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that in the explants without RPE the nuclear layers developed as in vivo, but receptor outer segments (ROS) were not formed. When the RPE was present, receptor inner segments appeared normal and ROS including profuse disc structures were developed. Presence of synaptic elements was also recognized. Mesenchymal cells, when present differentiated into choroidal and scleral tissues and appeared to play a supportive role for the RPE cells. The system is described in detail and its suitability for the analysis of various cellular and metabolic factors in the development of the retina is discussed. PMID:2612197

  18. Sector mapping method for 3D detached retina visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yi-Ran; Zhao, Yong; Zhong, Jie; Li, Ke; Lu, Cui-Xin; Zhang, Bing

    2016-10-01

    A new sphere-mapping algorithm called sector mapping is introduced to map sector images to the sphere of an eyeball. The proposed sector-mapping algorithm is evaluated and compared with the plane-mapping algorithm adopted in previous work. A simulation that maps an image of concentric circles to the sphere of the eyeball and an analysis of the difference in distance between neighboring points in a plane and sector were used to compare the two mapping algorithms. A three-dimensional model of a whole retina with clear retinal detachment was generated using the Visualization Toolkit software. A comparison of the mapping results shows that the central part of the retina near the optic disc is stretched and its edges are compressed when the plane-mapping algorithm is used. A better mapping result is obtained by the sector-mapping algorithm than by the plane-mapping algorithm in both the simulation results and real clinical retinal detachment three-dimensional reconstruction. PMID:27480739

  19. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  20. DEVELOPMENTAL CHANGES IN CARBACHOL-STIMULATED INOSITOLPHOSPHATE RELEASE IN PIGMENTED RAT RETINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Muscarinic stimulation of inositolphosphate (IP) release in the albino rat retina changes during development. ittle is known, however, about the developmental profile of receptor-stimulated IP release in pigmented rat retina. arbachol-stimulated EP release was studied in the whol...

  1. Selenium dependent glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in the retina of preterm human infants

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, H.; Hittner, H.; Barron, S.; Mehta, R.; Kretzer, F.

    1986-03-01

    GSH-Px activity was determined in the retina of 15 preterm human neonates with gestational ages of 17-28 weeks and birth weights of 120 to 960 g. GSH-Px activity was measured using the coupled assay. The infants survived from 0.5 to 9 hours after parturition. The retinas were removed within 3 hours of autopsy. Through electronmicroscopy, there was verification that the entire retina was removed and no contamination of other eye tissues occurred. After removal, the retinas were immediately dissolved in phosphate buffered pH 7.0 saline for assay of GSH-Px activity. The mean GSH-Px activity was 19.44 +/- 6.44 with a range of 11.1 to 32.8 units NAPH/sub 2/ oxidized/min/g protein. There was a negative correlation between birth weight and GSH-Px activity (r = -0.86) and between week of gestation and GSH-Px activity (r = -0.91). The neonatal retina GSH-Px activity was 2 to 15 times higher than found in adult retinas. Thus, this research demonstrates that selenium dependent GSH-Px activity is elevated in the preterm neonate's retina which indicates that retina GSH-Px activity may be an important antioxidation system in the premature neonate.

  2. A Comparison of Some Organizational Characteristics of the Mouse Central Retina and the Human Macula

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Juyea; Yee, Claudine; Williams, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models have greatly assisted our understanding of retinal degenerations. However, the mouse retina does not have a macula, leading to the question of whether the mouse is a relevant model for macular degeneration. In the present study, a quantitative comparison between the organization of the central mouse retina and the human macula was made, focusing on some structural characteristics that have been suggested to be important in predisposing the macula to stresses leading to degeneration: photoreceptor density, phagocytic load on the RPE, and the relative thinness of Bruch’s membrane. Light and electron microscopy measurements from retinas of two strains of mice, together with published data on human retinas, were used for calculations and subsequent comparisons. As in the human retina, the central region of the mouse retina possesses a higher photoreceptor cell density and a thinner Bruch’s membrane than in the periphery; however, the magnitudes of these periphery to center gradients are larger in the human. Of potentially greater relevance is the actual photoreceptor cell density, which is much greater in the mouse central retina than in the human macula, underlying a higher phagocytic load for the mouse RPE. Moreover, at eccentricities that correspond to the peripheral half of the human macula, the rod to cone ratio is similar between mouse and human. Hence, with respect to photoreceptor density and phagocytic load of the RPE, the central mouse retina models at least the more peripheral part of the macula, where macular degeneration is often first evident. PMID:25923208

  3. Effects of Aging and Anatomic Location on Gene Expression in Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hui; Fields, Mark A.; Hoshino, Risa; Priore, Lucian V. Del

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of age and topographic location on gene expression in human neural retina. Methods: Macular and peripheral neural retina RNA was isolated from human donor eyes for DNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Results: Total RNA integrity from human donors was preserved. Hierarchical clustering analysis demonstrates that the gene expression profiles of young, old, macula, and peripheral retina cluster into four distinct groups. Genes which are highly expressed in macular, peripheral, young, or old retina were identified, including inhibitors of Wnt Signaling Pathway (DKK1, FZD10, and SFRP2) which are preferably expressed in the periphery. Conclusion: The transcriptome of the human retina is affected by age and topographic location. Wnt pathway inhibitors in the periphery may maintain peripheral retinal cells in an undifferentiated state. Understanding the effects of age and topographic location on gene expression may lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions for age-related eye diseases. PMID:22666212

  4. FPGA-Based Real Time, Multichannel Emulated-Digital Retina Model Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vörösházi, Zsolt; Nagy, Zoltán; Szolgay, Péter

    2009-12-01

    The function of the low-level image processing that takes place in the biological retina is to compress only the relevant visual information to a manageable size. The behavior of the layers and different channels of the neuromorphic retina has been successfully modeled by cellular neural/nonlinear networks (CNNs). In this paper, we present an extended, application-specific emulated-digital CNN-universal machine (UM) architecture to compute the complex dynamic of this mammalian retina in video real time. The proposed emulated-digital implementation of multichannel retina model is compared to the previously developed models from three key aspects, which are processing speed, number of physical cells, and accuracy. Our primary aim was to build up a simple, real-time test environment with camera input and display output in order to mimic the behavior of retina model implementation on emulated digital CNN by using low-cost, moderate-sized field-programmable gate array (FPGA) architectures.

  5. Distribution of Cones in Human and Monkey Retina: Individual Variability and Radial Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, Christine A.; Sloan, Kenneth R.; Packer, Orin; Hendrickson, Anita E.; Kalina, Robert E.

    1987-05-01

    The distribution of photoreceptors is known for only one complete human retina and for the cardinal meridians only in the macaque monkey retina. Cones can be mapped in computer-reconstructed whole mounts of human and monkey retina. A 2.9-fold range in maximum cone density in the foveas of young adult human eyes may contribute to individual differences in acuity. Cone distribution is radially asymmetrical about the fovea in both species, as previously described for the distribution of retinal ganglion cells and for lines of visual isosensitivity. Cone density was greater in the nasal than in the temporal peripheral retina, and this nasotemporal asymmetry was more pronounced in monkey than in human retina.

  6. In vivo volumetric imaging of chicken retina with ultrahigh-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Moayed, Alireza Akhlagh; Hariri, Sepideh; Song, Eun Sun; Choh, Vivian; Bizheva, Kostadinka

    2011-01-01

    The chicken retina is an established animal model for myopia and light-associated growth studies. It has a unique morphology: it is afoveate and avascular; oxygen and nutrition to the inner retina is delivered by a vascular tissue (pecten) that protrudes into the vitreous. Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first in vivo, volumetric high-resolution images of the chicken retina. Images were acquired with an ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UHROCT) system with 3.5 µm axial resolution in the retina, at the rate of 47,000 A-scans/s. Spatial variations in the thickness of the nerve fiber and ganglion cell layers were mapped by segmenting and measuring the layer thickness with a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm. Volumetric visualization of the morphology and morphometric analysis of the chicken retina could aid significantly studies with chicken retinal models of ophthalmic diseases. PMID:21559138

  7. Compact high-speed line scanning quasi-confocal ophthalmoscope and retina imaging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi; Wang, Zhibin; Wei, Ling; Li, Xiqi; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2014-09-01

    A compact, high-speed line scanning quasi-confocal ophthalmoscope (LSO) for retina imaging is presented in this paper. By using a line beam to illuminate the retina, meanwhile a linear array sensor is used for imaging the retina, the LSO system significantly reduces the size, complexity, and cost comparing to a conventional confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (CSLO). With only one moving scanner to provide raster scanning of the line beam of the retina, the imaging frequency achieves 160 Hz and the lateral resolution is nearly 10 μm for 1024×330 pixels imaging mode. Preliminary experiments are performed for imaging the macula, the optic nerve head and other targets, providing high resolution and high speed videos of human retina.

  8. Rhythmic Ganglion Cell Activity in Bleached and Blind Adult Mouse Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Menzler, Jacob; Channappa, Lakshmi; Zeck, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa – a degenerative disease which often leads to incurable blindness- the loss of photoreceptors deprives the retina from a continuous excitatory input, the so-called dark current. In rodent models of this disease this deprivation leads to oscillatory electrical activity in the remaining circuitry, which is reflected in the rhythmic spiking of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). It remained unclear, however, if the rhythmic RGC activity is attributed to circuit alterations occurring during photoreceptor degeneration or if rhythmic activity is an intrinsic property of healthy retinal circuitry which is masked by the photoreceptor’s dark current. Here we tested these hypotheses by inducing and analysing oscillatory activity in adult healthy (C57/Bl6) and blind mouse retinas (rd10 and rd1). Rhythmic RGC activity in healthy retinas was detected upon partial photoreceptor bleaching using an extracellular high-density multi-transistor-array. The mean fundamental spiking frequency in bleached retinas was 4.3 Hz; close to the RGC rhythm detected in blind rd10 mouse retinas (6.5 Hz). Crosscorrelation analysis of neighbouring wild-type and rd10 RGCs (separation distance <200 µm) reveals synchrony among homologous RGC types and a constant phase shift (∼70 msec) among heterologous cell types (ON versus OFF). The rhythmic RGC spiking in these retinas is driven by a network of presynaptic neurons. The inhibition of glutamatergic ganglion cell input or the inhibition of gap junctional coupling abolished the rhythmic pattern. In rd10 and rd1 retinas the presynaptic network leads to local field potentials, whereas in bleached retinas additional pharmacological disinhibition is required to achieve detectable field potentials. Our results demonstrate that photoreceptor bleaching unmasks oscillatory activity in healthy retinas which shares many features with the functional phenotype detected in rd10 retinas. The quantitative physiological differences advance the

  9. Binding of amaranthin in photoreceptors of monkey retina.

    PubMed

    Uehara, F; Ohba, N; Sameshima, M; Unoki, K; Okubo, A; Yanagita, T; Sugata, M; Iwakiri, N; Nakagawa, S

    1994-01-01

    The binding of amaranthin, specific for the Gal beta 1,3 GalNAc and NeuAc alpha 2,3 Gal beta 1,3 GalNAc sequences, to the photoreceptors of the monkey retina was investigated using the avidin-biotinylated peroxidase method. Amaranthin bound to the surfaces of both cone and rod photoreceptors. This and previous lectin histochemical studies show that O-glycoside-linked glycoconjugates are present on the surfaces of both cones and rods: Gal beta 1,3 GalNAc and NeuAc alpha 2,3 Gal beta 1,3 GalNAc are the terminal sugars of the glycoconjugates around cones and rods, respectively. PMID:7723202

  10. Using Stem Cells to Model Diseases of the Outer Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yvon, Camille; Ramsden, Conor M.; Lane, Amelia; Powner, Michael B.; da Cruz, Lyndon; Coffey, Peter J.; Carr, Amanda-Jayne F.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration arises from the loss of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). It is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide with limited effective treatment options. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (IPSC)-derived retinal cells and tissues from individuals with retinal degeneration is a rapidly evolving technology that holds a great potential for its use in disease modelling. IPSCs provide an ideal platform to investigate normal and pathological retinogenesis, but also deliver a valuable source of retinal cell types for drug screening and cell therapy. In this review, we will provide some examples of the ways in which IPSCs have been used to model diseases of the outer retina including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), Usher syndrome (USH), Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), gyrate atrophy (GA), juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and age related macular degeneration (AMD). PMID:26106463

  11. Resonant imaging of carotenoid pigments in the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellermann, Werner; Emakov, Igor V.; McClane, Robert W.

    2002-06-01

    We have generated high spatial resolution images showing the distribution of carotenoid macular pigments in the human retina using Raman spectroscopy. A low level of macular pigments is associated with an increased risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Using excised human eyecups and resonant excitation of the pigment molecules with narrow bandwidth blue light from a mercury arc lamp, we record Raman images originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of lutein and zeaxanthin, the carotenoids comprising human macular pigments. Our Raman images reveal significant differences among subjects, both in regard to absolute levels as well as spatial distribution within the macula. Since the light levels used to obtain these images are well below established safety limits, this technique holds promise for developing a rapid screening diagnostic in large populations at risk for vision loss from age-related macular degeneration.

  12. Label-free nonlinear optical imaging of mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    He, Sicong; Ye, Cong; Sun, Qiqi; Leung, Christopher K.S.; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-01-01

    A nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy system integrating stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) was developed to image fresh mouse retinas. The morphological and functional details of various retinal layers were revealed by the endogenous NLO signals. Particularly, high resolution label-free imaging of retinal neurons and nerve fibers in the ganglion cell and nerve fiber layers was achieved by capturing endogenous SRS and TPEF signals. In addition, the spectral and temporal analysis of TPEF images allowed visualization of different fluorescent components in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fluorophores with short TPEF lifetime, such as A2E, can be differentiated from other long-lifetime components in the RPE. The NLO imaging method would provide important information for investigation of retinal ganglion cell degeneration and holds the potential to study the biochemical processes of visual cycle in the RPE. PMID:25798325

  13. Neuronal cell types and connectivity: lessons from the retina

    PubMed Central

    Seung, H. Sebastian; Sümbül, Uygar

    2014-01-01

    We describe recent progress towards defining neuronal cell types in the mouse retina, and attempt to extract lessons that may be generally useful in the mammalian brain. Achieving a comprehensive catalog of retinal cell types now appears within reach, because researchers have achieved consensus concerning two fundamental challenges. The first is accuracy—defining pure cell types rather than settling for neuronal classes that are mixtures of types. The second is completeness—developing methods guaranteed to eventually identify all cell types, as well as criteria for determining when all types have been found. Case studies illustrate how these two challenges are handled by combining state-of-the-art molecular, anatomical and physiological techniques. Progress is also being made in observing and modeling connectivity between cell types. Scaling up to larger brain regions, such as the cortex, will require not only technical advances but careful consideration of the challenges of accuracy and completeness. PMID:25233310

  14. Electroanatomy of a unique amacrine cell in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R F; Bloomfield, S A

    1983-01-01

    Intracellular electrophysiological recordings were obtained from a specialized class of "starburst" amacrine cells by using an isolated superperfused retina-eyecup preparation of the rabbit. These cells were injected intracellularly with horseradish peroxidase and identified with light microscopy. A computer-controlled image-processing system was used to map and display the three-dimensional dendritic organization and provide information on length and sublaminar distribution of dendritic processes. Starburst amacrines show an unusual dendritic architecture that includes thin intermediate dendritic segments. Analysis with steady-state cable equations suggests that these thin segments may provide electrical isolation of distal processes, raising the possibility that a single dendrite, which lies beyond the thin segment, may constitute a functional subunit of the cell. Images PMID:6574470

  15. Gene Delivery to the Retina: From Mouse to Man

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jean; Chung, Daniel C.; Maguire, Albert

    2013-01-01

    With the recent progress in identifying disease-causing genes in humans and in animal models, there are more and more opportunities for using retinal gene transfer to learn more about retinal physiology and also to develop therapies for blinding disorders. Success in preclinical studies for one form of inherited blindness have led to testing in human clinical trials. This paves the way to consider a number of other retinal diseases as ultimate gene therapy targets in human studies. The information presented here is designed to assist scientists and clinicians to use gene transfer to probe the biology of the retina and/or to move appropriate gene-based treatment studies from the bench to the clinic. PMID:22365778

  16. A test of metabolically efficient coding in the retina.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Vijay; Berry, Michael J

    2002-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that aspects of the neural code of retinal ganglion cells are optimized to transmit visual information at minimal metabolic cost. Under a broad ensemble of light patterns, ganglion cell spike trains consisted of sparse, precise bursts of spikes. These bursts were viewed as independent neural symbols. The noise in each burst was measured via repeated presentation of the visual stimulus, and the energy cost was estimated from the total charge flow during ganglion cell spiking. Given these costs and noise, the theory of efficient codes predicts an optimal distribution of symbol usage. Symbols that are either noisy or costly occur less frequently in this optimal code. We found good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the measured distribution of burst sizes for ganglion cells in the tiger salamander retina. PMID:12463343

  17. Wavefront optimized nonlinear microscopy of ex vivo human retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Bueno, Juan M.; Artal, Pablo

    2010-03-01

    A multiphoton microscope incorporating a Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor to control the ultrafast laser beam's wavefront aberrations has been developed. This instrument allowed us to investigate the impact of the laser beam aberrations on two-photon autofluorescence imaging of human retinal tissues. We demonstrated that nonlinear microscopy images are improved when laser beam aberrations are minimized by realigning the laser system cavity while wavefront controlling. Nonlinear signals from several human retinal anatomical features have been detected for the first time, without the need of fixation or staining procedures. Beyond the improved image quality, this approach reduces the required excitation power levels, minimizing the side effects of phototoxicity within the imaged sample. In particular, this may be important to study the physiology and function of the healthy and diseased retina.

  18. Raman spectroscopy using 1550 nm (retina-safe) laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, Carl; Huang, Hermes; Smith, Wayne; Farquharson, Stuart

    2011-05-01

    During the past decade, the use of portable Raman analyzers for field measurements has grown dramatically. However, most analyzers use 785 nm excitation lasers that can cause permanent eye damage. To overcome this safety concern, we have built a portable Fourier transform (FT) Raman analyzer using a 1550 nm retina-safe excitation laser and have compared its performance to our 1064 nm FT-Raman analyzer, which uses the same optical design. Raman theory predicts approximately five times lower peak intensities at 1550 nm. Although we found that intensities were as much as 20 times less intense, the analyzer is still capable of measuring spectra of sufficient quality to identify and differentiate chemicals. PMID:21513601

  19. MARCKS in advanced stages of neural retina histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    Myristoylated alanine-rich kinase C substrate (MARCKS), an actin-binding protein, is involved in several signal transduction pathways. It is susceptible to be phosphorylated by protein kinases as protein kinase C and some proline-directed kinases. These phosphorylations differently modulate its functions. We previously showed that a phosphorylation at its Ser25 (S25p-MARCKS) in chickens is a signature of this ubiquitous protein in neuron differentiation. To gain insight into the possible involvement of MARCKS in late retinal histogenesis, we compared the developmental expression patterns of the total protein and its S25p variants. Here we show that the most outstanding modifications occur at the outer retina, where S25p disappears at the end of embryonic development and where MARCKS is missing in adults. These results suggest diverse functional specializations in the different retinal layers. PMID:15855766

  20. Advances in color science: from retina to behavior

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Field, Greg D.; Horwitz, Gregory D.; Johnson, Elizabeth N.; Koida, Kowa; Mancuso, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Color has become a premier model system for understanding how information is processed by neural circuits, and for investigating the relationships among genes, neural circuits and perception. Both the physical stimulus for color and the perceptual output experienced as color are quite well characterized, but the neural mechanisms that underlie the transformation from stimulus to perception are incompletely understood. The past several years have seen important scientific and technical advances that are changing our understanding of these mechanisms. Here, and in the accompanying minisymposium, we review the latest findings and hypotheses regarding color computations in the retina, primary visual cortex and higher-order visual areas, focusing on non-human primates, a model of human color vision. PMID:21068298

  1. The developing and evolving retina: using time to organize form.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Barbara L

    2008-02-01

    Evolutionary and other functional accounts of the retina and its normal development highlight different aspects of control of its growth and form than genomic and mechanistic accounts. Discussing examples from opsin expression, developmental regulation of the eye's size and optical quality, regulation of eye size with respect to brain and body size, and the development of the fovea, these different aspects of control are contrasted. Contributions of mouse models, particularly with regard to relative timing of events in different species are reviewed, introducing a Web-based utility for exploration of timing issues (www.translatingtime.net). Variation at the individual level, in early experience, and also across species is an essential source of information to understand normal development and its pathologies. PMID:17692298

  2. Suppression of Acid Sphingomyelinase Protects the Retina from Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Wu, Bill X.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and mediates multiple responses involved in inflammatory and apoptotic signaling. However, the role ASMase plays in ischemic retinal injury has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate how reduced ASMase expression impacts retinal ischemic injury. Methods Changes in ceramide levels and ASMase activity were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis and ASMase activity. Retinal function and morphology were assessed by electroretinography (ERG) and morphometric analyses. Levels of TNF-α were determined by ELISA. Activation of p38 MAP kinase was assessed by Western blot analysis. Results In wild-type mice, ischemia produced a significant increase in retinal ASMase activity and ceramide levels. These increases were associated with functional deficits as measured by ERG analysis and significant structural degeneration in most retinal layers. In ASMase+/− mice, retinal ischemia did not significantly alter ASMase activity, and the rise in ceramide levels were significantly reduced compared to levels in retinas from wild-type mice. In ASMase+/− mice, functional and morphometric analyses of ischemic eyes revealed significantly less retinal degeneration than in injured retinas from wild-type mice. The ischemia-induced increase in retinal TNF-α levels was suppressed by the administration of the ASMase inhibitor desipramine, or by reducing ASMase expression. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that reducing ASMase expression provides partial protection from ischemic injury. Hence, the production of ceramide and subsequent mediators plays a role in the development of ischemic retinal injury. Modulating ASMase may present new opportunities for adjunctive therapies when treating retinal ischemic disorders. PMID:27571014

  3. Early Divergence of Central and Peripheral Neural Retina Precursors During Vertebrate Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Venters, Sara J.; Mikawa, Takashi; Hyer, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    During development of the vertebrate eye, optic tissue is progressively compartmentalized into functionally distinct tissues. From the central to the peripheral optic cup, the original optic neuroepithelial tissue compartmentalizes, forming retina, ciliary body and iris. The retina can be further sub-divided into peripheral and central compartments, where the central domain is specialized for higher visual acuity, having a higher ratio and density of cone photoreceptors in most species. Classically, models depict a segregation of the early optic cup into only two domains, neural and non-neural. Recent studies, however, uncovered discrete precursors for central and peripheral retina in the optic vesicle, indicating that the neural retina cannot be considered as a single unit with homogeneous specification and development. Instead, central and peripheral retina may be subject to distinct developmental pathways that underlie their specialization. This review focuses on lineage relationships in the retina and revisits the historical context for segregation of central and peripheral retina precursors before overt eye morphogenesis. PMID:25329498

  4. Clonal origins of cells in the pigmented retina of the zebrafish eye

    SciTech Connect

    Streisinger, G.; Coale, F.; Taggart, C.; Walker, C.; Grunwald, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Mosaic analysis has been used to study the clonal basis of the development of the pigmented retina of the zebrafish, Brachydanio rerio. Zebrafish embryos heterozygous for a recessive mutation at the gol-1 locus were exposed to gamma-irradiation at various developmental stages to create mosaic individuals consisting of wild-type pigmented cells and a clone of pigmentless (golden) cells in the eye. The contribution of individual embryonic cells to the pigmented retina was measured and the total number of cells in the embryo that contributed descendants to this tissue was determined. Until the 32-cell stage, almost every blastomere has some descendants that participate in the formation of the pigmented retina of the zebrafish. During subsequent cell divisions, up to the several thousand-cell stage, the number of ancestral cells is constant: approximately 40 cells are present that will give rise to progeny in the pigmented retina. Analysis of the size of clones in the pigmented retina indicates that the cells of this tissue do not arise through a rigid series of cell divisions originating in the early embryo. The findings that each cleavage stage cell contributes to the pigmented retina and yet the contribution of such cells is highly variable are consistent with the interpretation that clonal descendants of different blastomeres normally intermix extensively prior to formation of the pigmented retina.

  5. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein expression in the retina is regulated by light.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Souza, E M; Perche, O; Morgans, C W; Duvoisin, R M; Calaza, K C

    2016-05-01

    Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) is a RNA-binding protein that modulates protein synthesis at the synapse and its function is regulated by glutamate. The retina is the first structure that participates in vision, and uses glutamate to transduce electromagnetic signals from light to electrochemical signals to neurons. FMRP has been previously detected in the retina, but its localization has not been studied yet. In this work, our objectives were to describe the localization of FMRP in the retina, to determine whether different exposure to dark or light stimulus alters FMRP expression in the retina, and to compare the pattern in two different species, the mouse and chick. We found that both FMRP mRNA and protein are expressed in the retina. By immunohistochemistry analysis we found that both mouse and chick present similar FMRP expression localized mainly in both plexiform layers and the inner retina. It was also observed that FMRP is down-regulated by 24 h dark adaptation compared to its expression in the retina of animals that were exposed to light for 1 h after 24 h in the dark. We conclude that FMRP is likely to participate in retinal physiology, since its expression changes with light exposure. In addition, the expression pattern and regulation by light of FMRP seems well conserved since it was similar in both mouse and chick. PMID:26719241

  6. Pixel arrangement design of retina-like sensor based on forward motion imaging visual task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Cao, Fengmei; Bai, Tingzhu; Luo, Zhihu; Su, Yulu

    2014-11-01

    Retina-like sensor is a kind of anthropomorphic visual sensor, which mimic the distribution of photoreceptors in the human retina. They are applied in fields of machine vision and target tracking. However, there are few reports on retina-like sensor used for forward-motion imaging. During forward-motion imaging, as the objects being imaged move along the optical axis direction during the integration time, image quality becomes worse towards the border of the image. In order to get clearer image, retina-like sensor are trying to be designed based on the feature of forward-motion imaging. In this paper, firstly, the degraded law of rectilinear sensor used for forward-motion imaging is analyzed, the retina-like sensor model based on the feature of forward-motion imaging are proposed. Secondly, the output image of retina-like sensor and rectilinear sensor used during the forward-motion imaging for different scenes at different degeneration degrees are simulated, respectively. Thirdly, the simulated images of both two sensors are assessed by four different image quality assessment methods including visual information fidelity (VIF), complex wavelet structural similarity index (CW-SSIM), Gabor filtered image contrast similarity (GFCS) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR), besides, the data amount of two sensors are compared. Four image quality assessments all demonstrate that image quality of retina-like sensor based on the feature of forward motion imaging is superior to that of rectilinear sensor.

  7. Mass spectrometric identification and quantification of 5-methoxytryptophol in quail retina

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.W.; Chan, S.F.; Lee, P.P.; Pang, S.F. )

    1989-12-29

    The occurrence of 5-methoxytryptophol (5-MTL) in the quail retina was investigated by capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/selected ion monitoring using a deuterated internal standard. Based on ion intensity ratios in the mass spectra of pentafluoropropionyl and heptafluorobutyryl derivatives of 5-MTL and deuterated 5-MTL, 5-MTL was unequivocally identified in the quail retina. Similar to the circadian rhythm of retinal melatonin, retinal 5-MTL also exhibited a diurnal variation with high levels at mid-dark. However, no significant correlation between the diurnal levels of 5-MTL and melatonin was observed in the quail retina at mid-light or mid-dark.

  8. Semiconductor Nanorod–Carbon Nanotube Biomimetic Films for Wire-Free Photostimulation of Blind Retinas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube based platform for wire-free, light induced retina stimulation. A plasma polymerized acrylic acid midlayer was used to achieve covalent conjugation of semiconductor nanorods directly onto neuro-adhesive, three-dimensional carbon nanotube surfaces. Photocurrent, photovoltage, and fluorescence lifetime measurements validate efficient charge transfer between the nanorods and the carbon nanotube films. Successful stimulation of a light-insensitive chick retina suggests the potential use of this novel platform in future artificial retina applications. PMID:25350365

  9. Evaluation of Electrical Stimulus Current Applied to Retina Cells for Retinal Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motonami, Keita; Watanabe, Taiichiro; Deguchi, Jun; Fukushima, Takafumi; Tomita, Hiroshi; Sugano, Eriko; Sato, Manami; Kurino, Hiroyuki; Tamai, Makoto; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa

    2006-04-01

    We have proposed a novel multilayer stacked retinal prosthesis chip based on three-dimensional integration technology. Implantable stimulus electrode arrays in polyimide flexible cables were fabricated for the electrical stimulation of the retina. To evaluate optimal retinal stimulus current, electrically evoked potential (EEP) was recorded in animal experiments using Japanese white rabbits. The EEP waveform was compared with visually evoked potential (VEP) waveform. The amplitude of the recorded EEP increased with stimulus current. The EEP waveform shows a similar behavior to the VEP waveform, indicating that the electrical stimulation of the retina can be exploited for the blind to perceive incident light to the retina.

  10. Effect of CW YAG and argon green lasers on experimentally detached retinas.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B J

    1984-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of argon-green (514.5 nm) and CW neodymium YAG (1060 nm) wavelengths on experimentally detached retinas of primates. Neither laser produced damage to the sensory retina of the fovea. The argon green wavelength, which was absorbed by haemoglobin in the vessel or by extravasated red blood cells, created vasospasm and nerve fiber layer damage. The beam of the CW YAG was not absorbed by haemoglobin; therefore, no vasospasm could be produced on experimentally detached retinas. PMID:6547800

  11. Transplantation of ocular stem cells: the role of injury in incorporation and differentiation of grafted cells in the retina.

    PubMed

    Chacko, David M; Das, Ani V; Zhao, Xing; James, Jackson; Bhattacharya, Sumitra; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2003-04-01

    The incorporation of transplanted cells into the host retina is one of the prerequisites for successful cell replacement therapy to treat retinal degeneration. To test the hypothesis that injury promotes cell incorporation, stem cells/progenitors were isolated from the retina, ciliary epithelium or limbal epithelium and transplanted into the eyes of rats with retinal injury. Different stem cell/progenitor populations incorporated into traumatized or diseased retina but not into the normal retina. The proportion of cells incorporated into the inner retina was consistently higher than in the outer retina. The transplanted cells expressed markers specific to cells of the lamina into which they were incorporated suggesting that cues for specific differentiation are localized within the inner and outer retina. These findings demonstrate that injury-induced cues play a significant role in promoting the incorporation of ocular stem cells/progenitors regardless of their origin or their differentiation along specific retinal sublineage. PMID:12668063

  12. Illumination-invariant face recognition with a contrast sensitive silicon retina

    SciTech Connect

    Buhmann, J.M.; Lades, M.; Eeckman, F.

    1993-11-29

    Changes in lighting conditions strongly effect the performance and reliability of computer vision systems. We report face recognition results under drastically changing lighting conditions for a computer vision system which concurrently uses a contrast sensitive silicon retina and a conventional, gain controlled CCD camera. For both input devices the face recognition system employs an elastic matching algorithm with wavelet based features to classify unknown faces. To assess the effect of analog on-chip preprocessing by the silicon retina the CCD images have been digitally preprocessed with a bandpass filter to adjust the power spectrum. The silicon retina with its ability to adjust sensitivity increases the recognition rate up to 50 percent. These comparative experiments demonstrate that preprocessing with an analog VLSI silicon retina generates image data enriched with object-constant features.

  13. FENTHION PRODUCES PERSISTENT DECREASES IN MUSCARINIC RECEPTOR FUNCTION IN THE ADULT RAT RETINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    reports have suggested that exposure to organophosphate pesticides damages the visual system. he Prolonged effects of an acute dose of fenthion (dimethyl 3-methyl-4-methylthiophenyl phosphorothionate) were studied on the cholinergic system in the rat retina. enthion was administe...

  14. Retina-on-a-chip: a microfluidic platform for point access signaling studies.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Kirsten H; Echevarria, Franklin D; Li, Deyu; Sappington, Rebecca M; Edd, Jon F

    2015-12-01

    We report on a microfluidic platform for culture of whole organs or tissue slices with the capability of point access reagent delivery to probe the transport of signaling events. Whole mice retina were maintained for multiple days with negative pressure applied to tightly but gently bind the bottom of the retina to a thin poly-(dimethylsiloxane) membrane, through which twelve 100 μm diameter through-holes served as fluidic access points. Staining with toluidine blue, transport of locally applied cholera toxin beta, and transient response to lipopolysaccharide in the retina demonstrated the capability of the microfluidic platform. The point access fluidic delivery capability could enable new assays in the study of various kinds of excised tissues, including retina. PMID:26559199

  15. Retina-on-a-chip: a microfluidic platform for point access signaling studies

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Kirsten H.; Echevarria, Franklin D.; Li, Deyu; Sappington, Rebecca M.; Edd, Jon F.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a microfluidic platform for culture of whole organs or tissue slices with the capability of point access reagent delivery to probe the transport of signaling events. Whole mice retina were maintained for multiple days with negative pressure applied to tightly but gently bind the bottom of the retina to a thin poly-(dimethylsiloxane) membrane, through which twelve 100 μm diameter through-holes served as fluidic access points. Staining with toluidine blue, transport of locally applied cholera toxin beta, and transient response to lipopolysaccharide in the retina demonstrated the capability of the microfluidic platform. The point access fluidic delivery capability could enable new assays in the study of various kinds of excised tissues, including retina. PMID:26559199

  16. Müller glia provide essential tensile strength to the developing retina

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Ryan B.; Randlett, Owen; Oswald, Julia; Yoshimatsu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the cellular basis of tissue integrity in a vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) tissue, we eliminated Müller glial cells (MG) from the zebrafish retina. For well over a century, glial cells have been ascribed a mechanical role in the support of neural tissues, yet this idea has not been specifically tested in vivo. We report here that retinas devoid of MG rip apart, a defect known as retinoschisis. Using atomic force microscopy, we show that retinas without MG have decreased resistance to tensile stress and are softer than controls. Laser ablation of MG processes showed that these cells are under tension in the tissue. Thus, we propose that MG act like springs that hold the neural retina together, finally confirming an active mechanical role of glial cells in the CNS. PMID:26416961

  17. Ubiquitous presence of gluconeogenic regulatory enzyme, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, within layers of rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Mamczur, Piotr; Mazurek, Jakub

    2010-01-01

    To shed some light on gluconeogenesis in mammalian retina, we have focused on fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), a regulatory enzyme of the process. The abundance of the enzyme within the layers of the rat retina suggests that, in mammals in contrast to amphibia, gluconeogenesis is not restricted to one specific cell of the retina. We propose that FBPase, in addition to its gluconeogenic role, participates in the protection of the retina against reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the nuclear localization of FBPase and of its binding partner, aldolase, in the retinal cells expressing the proliferation marker Ki-67 indicates that these two gluconeogenic enzymes are involved in non-enzymatic nuclear processes. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00441-010-1008-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20614135

  18. [CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RETINA IN CHRONIC STRESS IN LABORATORY RATS OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS].

    PubMed

    Nesterova, A A; Yermilov, V V; Tiurenkov, I N; Smirnov, A V; Grigoriyeva, N V; Zagrebin, V L; Rogova, L N; Antoshkin, O N; Dovgalyov, A O

    2016-01-01

    The retina was studied in albino laboratory male rats of two age groups (12 and 24 months), 10 animals in each subjected to chronic combined stress. The stress was caused in animals by simultaneous exposure to pulsed light, loud sound, swinging and restriction of mobility for 7 days, 30 mm daily. The retina of intact rats of the corresponding age groups (n = 20) served as control. Enucleated eyes of stressed and control animals were processed with standard histological technique and stained with Nissl's method and hematoxylin-eosin. The retina of the stressed animals of both age groups showed the decrease in the number of cells and the disarrangement of its layers, most pronounced in the layers of photoreceptor neurons and ganglion cells. The comparative morphometric analysis demonstrated a reduction of the layer thickness and cell numerical density in the retina of stressed animals, both young (12 months) and old (24 months), as compared to that of control animals. PMID:27487662

  19. Potential for neural regeneration after neurotoxic injury in the adult mammalian retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooto, Sotaro; Akagi, Tadamichi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Akita, Joe; Mandai, Michiko; Honda, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Masayo

    2004-09-01

    It has long been believed that the retina of mature mammals is incapable of regeneration. In this study, using the N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotoxicity model of adult rat retina, we observed that some Müller glial cells were stimulated to proliferate in response to a toxic injury and produce bipolar cells and rod photoreceptors. Although these newly produced neurons were limited in number, retinoic acid treatment promoted the number of regenerated bipolar cells. Moreover, misexpression of basic helix-loop-helix and homeobox genes promoted the induction of amacrine, horizontal, and rod photoreceptor specific phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that retinal neurons regenerated even in adult mammalian retina after toxic injury. Furthermore, we could partially control the fate of the regenerated neurons with extrinsic factors or intrinsic genes. The Müller glial cells constitute a potential source for the regeneration of adult mammalian retina and can be a target for drug delivery and gene therapy in retinal degenerative diseases.

  20. Frequency spectrum might act as communication code between retina and visual cortex I

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xu; Gong, Bo; Lu, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    AIM To explore changes and possible communication relationship of local potential signals recorded simultaneously from retina and visual cortex I (V1). METHODS Fourteen C57BL/6J mice were measured with pattern electroretinogram (PERG) and pattern visually evoked potential (PVEP) and fast Fourier transform has been used to analyze the frequency components of those signals. RESULTS The amplitude of PERG and PVEP was measured at about 36.7 µV and 112.5 µV respectively and the dominant frequency of PERG and PVEP, however, stay unchanged and both signals do not have second, or otherwise, harmonic generation. CONCLUSION The results suggested that retina encodes visual information in the way of frequency spectrum and then transfers it to primary visual cortex. The primary visual cortex accepts and deciphers the input visual information coded from retina. Frequency spectrum may act as communication code between retina and V1. PMID:26682156

  1. Electrooptical model of the first retina layers of a visual analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chibalashvili, Y. L.; Riabinin, A. D.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Chibalashvili, Y. L.; Shkvar, A. M.

    1979-01-01

    An electrooptical principle of converting and transmitting optical signals is proposed and used as the basis for constructing a model of the upper layers of the retina of the visual analyzer of animals. An evaluation of multichannel fibrous optical systems, in which the conversion of optical signals is based on the electrooptical principle, to model the upper retina layers is presented. The symbolic circuit of the model and its algorithm are discussed.

  2. Immunohistochemical localization of glycogen synthase and GSK3β: control of glycogen content in retina.

    PubMed

    Pérezleón, Jorge Alberto; Osorio-Paz, Ixchel; Francois, Liliana; Salceda, Rocío

    2013-05-01

    Glycogen has an important role in energy handling in several brain regions. In the brain, glycogen is localized in astrocytes and its role in several normal and pathological processes has been described, whereas in the retina, glycogen metabolism has been scarcely investigated. The enzyme glycogen phosphorylase has been located in retinal Müller cells; however the cellular location of glycogen synthase (GS) and its regulatory partner, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), has not been investigated. Our aim was to localize these enzymes in the rat retina by immunofluorescence techniques. We found both GS and GSK3β in Müller cells in the synaptic layers, and within the inner segments of photoreceptor cells. The presence of these enzymes in Müller cells suggests that glycogen could be regulated within the retina as in other tissues. Indeed, we showed that glycogen content in the whole retina in vitro was increased by high glucose concentrations, glutamate, and insulin. In contrast, retina glycogen levels were not modified by norepinephrine nor by depolarization with high KCl concentrations. Insulin also induced an increase in glycogen content in cultured Müller cells. The effect of insulin in both, whole retina and cultured Müller cells was blocked by inhibitors of phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase, strongly suggesting that glycogen content in retina is modulated by the insulin signaling pathway. The expression of GS and GSK3β in the synaptic layers and photoreceptor cells suggests an important role of GSK3β regulating glycogen synthase in neurons, which opens multiple feasible roles of insulin within the retina. PMID:23512644

  3. Transcriptome networks in the mouse retina: An exon level BXD RI database

    PubMed Central

    King, Rebecca; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Differences in gene expression provide diverse retina phenotypes and may also contribute to susceptibility to injury and disease. The present study defines the transcriptome of the retina in the BXD RI strain set, using the Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.0 ST array to investigate all exons of traditional protein coding genes, non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs. These data are presented in a highly interactive database on the GeneNetwork website. Methods In the Normal Retina Database, the mRNA levels of the transcriptome from retinas was quantified using the Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.0 ST array. This database consists of data from male and female mice. The data set includes a total of 52 BXD RI strains, the parental strains (C57BL/6J and DBA/2J), and a reciprocal cross. Results In combination with GeneNetwork, the Department of Defense (DoD) Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) Normal Retina Database provides a large resource for mapping, graphing, analyzing, and testing complex genetic networks. Protein-coding and non-coding RNAs can be used to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that contribute to expression differences among the BXD strains and to establish links between classical ocular phenotypes associated with differences in the genomic sequence. Using this resource, we extracted transcriptome signatures for retinal cells and defined genetic networks associated with the maintenance of the normal retina. Furthermore, we examined differentially expressed exons within a single gene. Conclusions The high level of variation in mRNA levels found among the BXD RI strains makes it possible to identify expression networks that underline differences in retina structure and function. Ultimately, we will use this database to define changes that occur following blast injury to the retina. PMID:26604663

  4. A Comparative Analysis of the Endocannabinoid System in the Retina of Mice, Tree Shrews, and Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Elkrief, Laurent; Casanova, Christian; Bouchard, Jean-François; Ptito, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system is widely expressed in various parts of the central nervous system, including the retina. The localization of the key eCB receptors, particularly CB1R and CB2R, has been recently reported in rodent and primate retinas with striking interspecies differences. Little is known about the distribution of the enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these eCBs. We therefore examined the expression and localization of the main components of the eCB system in the retina of mice, tree shrews, and monkeys. We found that CB1R and FAAH distributions are well-preserved among these species. However, expression of NAPE-PLD is circumscribed to the photoreceptor layer only in monkeys. In contrast, CB2R expression is variable across these species; in mice, CB2R is found in retinal neurons but not in glial cells; in tree shrews, CB2R is expressed in Müller cell processes of the outer retina and in retinal neurons of the inner retina; in monkeys, CB2R is restricted to Müller cells. Finally, the expression patterns of MAGL and DAGLα are differently expressed across species. Overall, these results provide evidence that the eCB system is differently expressed in the retina of these mammals and suggest a distinctive role of eCBs in visual processing. PMID:26977322

  5. Why has Nature Chosen Lutein and Zeaxanthin to Protect the Retina?

    PubMed Central

    Widomska, Justyna; Subczynski, Witold K

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with a low level of macular carotenoids in the eye retina. Only two carotenoids, namely lutein and zeaxanthin are selectively accumulated in the human eye retina from blood plasma where more than twenty other carotenoids are available. The third carotenoid which is found in the human retina, meso-zeaxanthin is formed directly in the retina from lutein. All these carotenoids, named also macular xanthophylls, play key roles in eye health and retinal disease. Macular xanthophylls are thought to combat light-induced damage mediated by reactive oxygen species by absorbing the most damaging incoming wavelength of light prior to the formation of reactive oxygen species (a function expected of carotenoids in nerve fibers) and by chemically and physically quenching reactive oxygen species once they are formed (a function expected of carotenoids in photoreceptor outer segments). There are two major hypotheses about the precise location of macular xanthophylls in the nerve fiber layer of photoreceptor axons and in photoreceptor outer segments. According to the first, macular xanthophylls transversely incorporate in the lipid-bilayer portion of membranes of the human retina. According to the second, macular xanthophylls are protein-bound by membrane-associated, xanthophyll-binding proteins. In this review we indicate specific properties of macular xanthophylls that could help explain their selective accumulation in the primate retina with special attention paid to xanthophyll-membrane interactions. PMID:24883226

  6. Morphometric analysis of the retina from horses infected with the Borna disease virus.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, J; Kuhrt, H; Stahl, T; Kacza, J; Seeger, J; Weber, M; Uhlig, A; Reichenbach, A; Grosche, A; Pannicke, T

    2007-01-01

    Borna disease (BD) is a fatal disorder of horses, often characterized by blindness. Although degeneration of retinal neurons has been demonstrated in a rat model, there are controversial data concerning whether a similar degeneration occurs in the retina of infected horses. To investigate whether BD may cause degeneration of photoreceptors and possibly of other neuronal cells at least at later stages of the disease, we performed a detailed quantitative morphologic study of retinal tissue from Borna-diseased horses. BD was diagnosed by detection of pathognomonic Joest-Degen inclusion bodies in the postmortem brains. Paraffin sections of paraformaldehyde-fixed retinae were used for histologic and immunohistochemical stainings. Numbers of neurons and Müller glial cells were counted, and neuron-to-Müller cell ratios were calculated. Among tissues from 9 horses with BD, we found retinae with strongly altered histologic appearance as well as retinae with only minor changes. The neuron-to-Müller cell ratio for the whole retina was significantly smaller in diseased animals (8.5 +/- 0.4; P < .01) as compared with controls (17.6 +/- 0.8). It can be concluded that BD in horses causes alterations of the retinal histology of a variable degree. The study provides new data about the pathogenesis of BD concerning the retina and demonstrates that a loss of photoreceptors may explain the observed blindness in infected horses. PMID:17197624

  7. Adaptation of the Central Retina for High Acuity Vision: Cones, the Fovea and the Avascular Zone

    PubMed Central

    Provis, Jan M; Dubis, Adam M; Maddess, Ted; Carroll, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Presence of a fovea centralis is directly linked to molecular specification of an avascular area in central retina, before the fovea (or `pit') begins to form. Modeling suggests that mechanical forces, generated within the eye, initiate formation of a pit within the avascular area, and its later remodeling in the postnatal period. Within the avascular area the retina is dominated by `midget' circuitry, in which signals are transferred from a single cone to a single bipolar cell, then a single ganglion cell. Thus in inner, central retina there are relatively few lateral connections between neurons. This renders the region adaptable to tangential forces, that translocate of ganglion cells laterally / centrifugally, to form the fovea. Optical coherence tomography enables live imaging of the retina, and shows that there is greater variation in the morphology of foveae in humans than previously thought. This variation is associated with differences in size of the avascular area and appears to be genetically based, but can be modified by environmental factors, including prematurity. Even when the fovea is absent (foveal hypoplasia), cones in central retina adopt an elongated and narrow morphology, enabling them to pack more densely to increase the sampling rate, and to act as more effective waveguides. Given these findings, what then is the adaptive advantage of a fovea? We suggest that the advantages of having a pit in central retina are relatively few, and minor, but together work to enhance acuity. PMID:23500068

  8. A Comparative Analysis of the Endocannabinoid System in the Retina of Mice, Tree Shrews, and Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Elkrief, Laurent; Casanova, Christian; Bouchard, Jean-François; Ptito, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system is widely expressed in various parts of the central nervous system, including the retina. The localization of the key eCB receptors, particularly CB1R and CB2R, has been recently reported in rodent and primate retinas with striking interspecies differences. Little is known about the distribution of the enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these eCBs. We therefore examined the expression and localization of the main components of the eCB system in the retina of mice, tree shrews, and monkeys. We found that CB1R and FAAH distributions are well-preserved among these species. However, expression of NAPE-PLD is circumscribed to the photoreceptor layer only in monkeys. In contrast, CB2R expression is variable across these species; in mice, CB2R is found in retinal neurons but not in glial cells; in tree shrews, CB2R is expressed in Müller cell processes of the outer retina and in retinal neurons of the inner retina; in monkeys, CB2R is restricted to Müller cells. Finally, the expression patterns of MAGL and DAGLα are differently expressed across species. Overall, these results provide evidence that the eCB system is differently expressed in the retina of these mammals and suggest a distinctive role of eCBs in visual processing. PMID:26977322

  9. Blood supply to the retina and the lens in the gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed

    Imada, Hideki; Isomura, Genzoh; Miyachi, Ei-ichi

    2003-03-01

    The blood supply to the retina and the lens in 32 gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) of both sexes from infancy to maturity was studied under light and stereoscopic microscopes, and a scanning electron microscope. Mercox (CL-2R; Dai Nippon Ink, Tokyo, Japan) was injected into the left ventricle of 30 animals in order to visualize the blood supply to the retina and the lens from the ophthalmic artery. The central retinal artery arises from the ophthalmic artery, passes through the papilla of the optic nerve together with the central retinal vein and penetrates the vitreous space (cavity of the eye) between the lens and the internal limiting membrane of the retina, where it divides into the central branches covering the lens and the parietal branches to supply the retina. The former passes through the hyaloid space after branching several arterioles and then covers the lens like a network from its medial and marginal sides. Different from small experimental animals, the parietal branches, just after separating from the central one, divides into the nasal, dorsal and temporal branches in the vitreous space, each of which then subdivides to distribute across the retina on the inner limiting membrane, then delineates the membrana vasculosa retinae. This basal pattern of vasculization 1 day after birth continues to death. Both the central and parietal branches of the central retinal artery correspond to the branches of the hyaloid artery in embryo and the latter is preserved in adult gerbils. PMID:12680468

  10. Cholesterol in mouse retina originates primarily from in situ de novo biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Joseph B; Mast, Natalia; Bederman, Ilya R; Li, Yong; Brunengraber, Henri; Björkhem, Ingemar; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2016-02-01

    The retina, a thin tissue in the back of the eye, has two apparent sources of cholesterol: in situ biosynthesis and cholesterol available from the systemic circulation. The quantitative contributions of these two cholesterol sources to the retinal cholesterol pool are unknown and have been determined in the present work. A new methodology was used. Mice were given separately deuterium-labeled drinking water and chow containing 0.3% deuterium-labeled cholesterol. In the retina, the rate of total cholesterol input was 21 μg of cholesterol/g retina • day, of which 15 μg of cholesterol/g retina • day was provided by local biosynthesis and 6 μg of cholesterol/g retina • day was uptaken from the systemic circulation. Thus, local cholesterol biosynthesis accounts for the majority (72%) of retinal cholesterol input. We also quantified cholesterol input to mouse brain, the organ sharing important similarities with the retina. The rate of total cerebral cholesterol input was 121 μg of cholesterol/g brain • day with local biosynthesis providing 97% of total cholesterol input. Our work addresses a long-standing question in eye research and adds new knowledge to the potential use of statins (drugs that inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis) as therapeutics for age-related macular degeneration, a common blinding disease. PMID:26630912

  11. Spatiotemporal features of early neuronogenesis differ in wild-type and albino mouse retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rachel, Rivka A.; Dolen, Gul; Hayes, Nancy L.; Lu, Alice; Erskine, Lynda; Nowakowski, Richard S.; Mason, Carol A.

    2002-01-01

    In albino mammals, lack of pigment in the retinal pigment epithelium is associated with retinal defects, including poor visual acuity from a photoreceptor deficit in the central retina and poor depth perception from a decrease in ipsilaterally projecting retinal fibers. Possible contributors to these abnormalities are reported delays in neuronogenesis (Ilia and Jeffery, 1996) and retinal maturation (Webster and Rowe, 1991). To further determine possible perturbations in neuronogenesis and/or differentiation, we used cell-specific markers and refined birth dating methods to examine these events during retinal ganglion cell (RGC) genesis in albino and pigmented mice from embryonic day 11 (E11) to E18. Our data indicate that relative to pigmented mice, more ganglion cells are born in the early stages of neuronogenesis in the albino retina, although the initiation of RGC genesis in the albino is unchanged. The cellular organization of the albino retina is perturbed as early as E12. In addition, cell cycle kinetics and output along the nasotemporal axis differ in retinas of albino and pigmented mice, both absolutely, with the temporal aspect of the retina expanded in albino, and relative to the position of the optic nerve head. Finally, blocking melanin synthesis in pigmented eyecups in culture leads to an increase in RGC differentiation, consistent with a role for melanin formation in regulating RGC neuronogenesis. These results point to spatiotemporal defects in neuronal production in the albino retina, which could perturb expression of genes that specify cell fate, number, and/or projection phenotype.

  12. Cholesterol in the retina: the best is yet to come

    PubMed Central

    Pikuleva, Irina A.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Historically understudied, cholesterol in the retina is receiving more attention now because of genetic studies showing that several cholesterol-related genes are risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and because eye pathology studies showing high cholesterol content of drusen, aging Bruch's membrane, and newly found subretinal lesions. The challenge before us is determining how the cholesterol-AMD link is realized. Meeting this challenge will require an excellent understanding these genes’ roles in retinal physiology and how chorioretinal cholesterol is maintained. In the first half of this review, we will succinctly summarize physico-chemical properties of cholesterol, its distribution in the human body, general principles of maintenance and metabolism, and differences in cholesterol handling in human and mouse that impact on experimental approaches. This information will provide a backdrop to the second part of the review focusing on unique aspects of chorioretinal cholesterol homeostasis, aging in Bruch's membrane, cholesterol in AMD lesions, a model for lesion biogenesis, a model for macular vulnerability based on vascular biology, and alignment of AMD-related genes and pathobiology using cholesterol and an atherosclerosis-like progression as unifying features. We conclude with recommendations for the most important research steps we can take towards delineating the cholesterol-AMD link. PMID:24704580

  13. Electrophysiological fingerprints of OFF bipolar cells in rat retina.

    PubMed

    Vielma, Alex H; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Retinal bipolar cells (BCs) divide photoreceptor output into different channels for the parallel extraction of temporal and chromatic stimulus properties. In rodents, five types of OFF BCs have been differentiated, based on morphological and functional criteria, but their electrophysiological characterization remains incomplete. This study analyzed OFF BCs with the patch clamp technique in acute slices of rat retina. Their specific voltage-dependent currents and glutamate responses are shown to represent individual fingerprints which define the signal processing and filtering properties of each cell type and allow their unequivocal identification. Two additions to the rat BC repertoire are presented: OFF BC-2', a variation of BC-2 with wider axonal arbours and prominent Na(+) currents, is described for the first time in rodents, and OFF BC-3b, previously identified in mouse, is electrophysiologically characterized in rat. Moreover, the glutamate responses of rat OFF BCs are shown to be differentially sensitive to AMPA- and kainate-receptor blockers and to modulation by nitric oxide (NO) through a cGMP-dependent mechanism. These results contribute to our understanding of the diversity and function of bipolar cells in mammals. PMID:27457753

  14. Microcystic macular edema detection in retina OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swingle, Emily K.; Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Howard S.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful imaging tool that is particularly useful for exploring retinal abnormalities in ophthalmological diseases. Recently, it has been used to track changes in the eye associated with neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) where certain tissue layer thicknesses have been associated with disease progression. A small percentage of MS patients also exhibit what has been called microcystic macular edema (MME), where uid collections that are thought to be pseudocysts appear in the inner nuclear layer. Very little is known about the cause of this condition so it is important to be able to identify precisely where these pseudocysts occur within the retina. This identi cation would be an important rst step towards furthering our understanding. In this work, we present a detection algorithm to nd these pseudocysts and to report on their spatial distribution. Our approach uses a random forest classi er trained on manual segmentation data to classify each voxel as pseudocyst or not. Despite having a small sample size of ve subjects, the algorithm correctly identi es 84.6% of pseudocysts as compared to manual delineation. Finally, using our method, we show that the spatial distribution of pseudocysts within the macula are generally contained within an annulus around the fovea.

  15. Development of asymmetric inhibition underlying direction selectivity in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Hamby, Aaron M.; Zhou, Kaili; Feller, Marla B.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing precise synaptic connections is crucial to the development of functional neural circuits. The direction-selective circuit in the retina relies upon highly selective wiring of inhibitory inputs from starburst amacrine cells1 (SACs) onto four subtypes of on–off direction-selective ganglion cell (DSGC), each preferring motion in one of four cardinal directions2. It has been reported in rabbit that the SACs on the ‘null’ sides of DSGCs form functional GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-mediated synapses, whereas those on the preferred sides do not3. However, it is not known how the asymmetric wiring between SACs and DSGCs is established during development. Here we report that in transgenic mice with cell-type-specific labelling, the synaptic connections from SACs to DSGCs were of equal strength during the first postnatal week, regardless of whether the SAC was located on the preferred or null side of the DSGC. However, by the end of the second postnatal week, the strength of the synapses made from SACs on the null side of a DSGC significantly increased whereas those made from SACs located on the preferred side remained constant. Blocking retinal activity by intraocular injections of muscimol or gabazine during this period did not alter the development of direction selectivity. Hence, the asymmetric inhibition between the SACs and DSGCs is achieved by a developmental program that specifically strengthens the GABA-mediated inputs from SACs located on the null side, in a manner not dependent on neural activity. PMID:21131947

  16. High resolution confocal polarimeter for the living human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, D.; Paterson, C.

    2011-09-01

    There is strong evidence that the living human retina has polarization signatures that could be linked to the presence of Glaucoma, an ocular disease that is the second cause of blindness in the western world. In a polarization sensitive ophthalmoscope, the amount of light that can be used is limited for the safety of the subject, and the return is typically a small fraction of the light used for illumination, of the order of 10-6. Furthermore, the acquisition rates have to be sufficiently fast to avoid eye-movement artifacts. The light-budget available to produce a polarization image with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope is typically in the order of 10 nW, and pixel acquisition sampling rates are of several MHz. We are currently developing an imaging instrument for vision research and clinical vision applications and aim to introduce it to the medical and clinical environment using objective methods of image quality assessment. Here we discuss the stringent imaging requirements, polarimeter design, and show high resolution polarization retinal images.

  17. Electrophysiological fingerprints of OFF bipolar cells in rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Vielma, Alex H.; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Retinal bipolar cells (BCs) divide photoreceptor output into different channels for the parallel extraction of temporal and chromatic stimulus properties. In rodents, five types of OFF BCs have been differentiated, based on morphological and functional criteria, but their electrophysiological characterization remains incomplete. This study analyzed OFF BCs with the patch clamp technique in acute slices of rat retina. Their specific voltage-dependent currents and glutamate responses are shown to represent individual fingerprints which define the signal processing and filtering properties of each cell type and allow their unequivocal identification. Two additions to the rat BC repertoire are presented: OFF BC-2′, a variation of BC-2 with wider axonal arbours and prominent Na+ currents, is described for the first time in rodents, and OFF BC-3b, previously identified in mouse, is electrophysiologically characterized in rat. Moreover, the glutamate responses of rat OFF BCs are shown to be differentially sensitive to AMPA- and kainate-receptor blockers and to modulation by nitric oxide (NO) through a cGMP-dependent mechanism. These results contribute to our understanding of the diversity and function of bipolar cells in mammals. PMID:27457753

  18. Spare the rods and spoil the retina: revisited.

    PubMed

    Sivaprasad, S; Arden, G

    2016-02-01

    Visual function improves with oxygen inhalation in people with diabetes even in the absence of visible retinopathy. Rods consume the most oxygen in the retina due to the high metabolic activity required to maintain the dark current. Therefore, Arden hypothesized that in diabetes where oxygen supply may also be affected due to the changes in retinal vasculature, prevention of dark adaptation may be a viable option to prevent or decrease the rate of progression of diabetic retinopathy. Animal experiments have proven that the absence of rods decreases the development of retinal neovascularisation. The same principle applies to panretinal photocoagulation, an established treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Recently, a few clinical studies have also shown that preventing dark adaptation by suppressing rods with 500-nm light source at night decreases the rate of progression of early diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy in the short-term. We await the results of a large two-year multi-centre trial (CLEOPATRA trial) to evaluate the long-term effects of decreasing dark adaptation by applying a 500nm light source as a mask over eyes with non-central diabetic macular oedema. PMID:26656085

  19. Optimal Prediction in the Retina and Natural Motion Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, Jared M.; Palmer, Stephanie E.

    2016-03-01

    Almost all behaviors involve making predictions. Whether an organism is trying to catch prey, avoid predators, or simply move through a complex environment, the organism uses the data it collects through its senses to guide its actions by extracting from these data information about the future state of the world. A key aspect of the prediction problem is that not all features of the past sensory input have predictive power, and representing all features of the external sensory world is prohibitively costly both due to space and metabolic constraints. This leads to the hypothesis that neural systems are optimized for prediction. Here we describe theoretical and computational efforts to define and quantify the efficient representation of the predictive information by the brain. Another important feature of the prediction problem is that the physics of the world is diverse enough to contain a wide range of possible statistical ensembles, yet not all inputs are probable. Thus, the brain might not be a generalized predictive machine; it might have evolved to specifically solve the prediction problems most common in the natural environment. This paper summarizes recent results on predictive coding and optimal predictive information in the retina and suggests approaches for quantifying prediction in response to natural motion. Basic statistics of natural movies reveal that general patterns of spatiotemporal correlation are present across a wide range of scenes, though individual differences in motion type may be important for optimal processing of motion in a given ecological niche.

  20. Neuroprotective role of erythropoietin by antiapoptosis in the retina.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyewon; Lee, Hyunju; Lamoke, Folami; Hrushesky, William J M; Wood, Patricia A; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2009-08-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) stimulates red blood cell production, in part by inhibiting apoptosis of the red blood cell precursors. The erythropoietic effects of EPO are circadian stage dependent. Retinal injury due to light occurs through oxidative mechanisms and is manifest by retinal and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells apoptosis. The visual cycle might be circadian coordinated as a means of effectively protecting the retina from the detrimental effects of light-induced, oxygen-dependent, free radical-mediated damage, especially at the times of day when light is more intense. We show that the retinal expression of EPO and its receptor (EPOR), as well as subsequent Janus kinase 2 (Jak2) phosphorylations, are each tightly linked to a specific time after oxidative stress and in anticipation of daily light onset. This is consistent with physiological protection against daily light-induced, oxidatively mediated retinal apoptosis. In vitro, we verify that EPO protects RPE cells from light, hyperoxia, and hydrogen peroxide-induced retinal cell apoptosis, and that these stimuli increase EPO and EPOR expression in cultured RPE cells. Together, these data support the premise that EPO and its EPOR interactions represent an important retinal shield from physiologic and pathologic light-induced oxidative injury. PMID:19301424

  1. Transcriptome profiling of the rat retina after optic nerve transection

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masayuki; Tanaka, Yuji; Omodaka, Kazuko; Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Nakamura, Orie; Tsuda, Satoru; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases characterized by alterations in the contour of the optic nerve head (ONH), with corresponding visual field defects and progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). This progressive RGC death is considered to originate in axonal injury caused by compression of the axon bundles in the ONH. However, the molecular pathomechanisms of axonal injury-induced RGC death are not yet well understood. Here, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to examine transcriptome changes in rat retinas 2 days after optic nerve transection (ONT), and then used computational techniques to predict the resulting alterations in the transcriptional regulatory network. RNA-seq revealed 267 differentially expressed genes after ONT, 218 of which were annotated and 49 unannotated. We also identified differentially expressed transcripts, including potentially novel isoforms. An in silico pathway analysis predicted that CREB1 was the most significant upstream regulator. Thus, this study identified genes and pathways that may be involved in the pathomechanisms of axonal injury. We believe that our data should serve as a valuable resource to understand the molecular processes that define axonal injury-driven RGC death and to discover novel therapeutic targets for glaucoma. PMID:27353354

  2. Speeding rod recovery improves temporal resolution in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Fortenbach, Christopher R.; Kessler, Christopher; Peinado, Gabriel; Burns, Marie E.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal resolution of the visual system progressively increases with light intensity. Under scotopic conditions, temporal resolution is relatively poor, and may be limited by both retinal and cortical processes. Rod photoresponses themselves are quite slow because of the slowly deactivating biochemical cascade needed for light transduction. Here, we have used a transgenic mouse line with faster than normal rod phototransduction deactivation (RGS9-overexpressors) to test whether rod signaling to second-order retinal neurons is rate-limited by phototransduction or by other mechanisms. We compared electrical responses of individual wild-type and RGS9-overexpressing (RGS9-ox) rods to steady illumination and found that RGS9-ox rods required 2-fold brighter light for comparable activation, owing to faster G-protein deactivation. When presented with flickering stimuli, RGS9-ox rods showed greater magnitude fluctuations around a given steady-state current amplitude. Likewise, in vivo electroretinography (ERG) and whole-cell recording from OFF-bipolar, rod bipolar, and horizontal cells of RGS9-ox mice displayed larger than normal magnitude flicker responses, demonstrating an improved ability to transmit frequency information across the rod synapse. Slow phototransduction recovery therefore limits synaptic transmission of increments and decrements of light intensity across the first retinal synapse in normal retinas, apparently sacrificing temporal responsiveness for greater overall sensitivity in ambient light. PMID:25748270

  3. Tgfbi/Bigh3 silencing activates ERK in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Oberson, Anne; Bustamante, Mauro; Tasinato, Andrea; Hummler, Edith; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2015-11-01

    BIGH3 is a secreted protein, part of the extracellular matrix where it interacts with collagen and integrins on the cell surface. BIGH3 can play opposing roles in cancer, acting as either tumor suppressor or promoter, and its mutations lead to different forms of corneal dystrophy. Although many studies have been carried out, little is known about the physiological role of BIGH3. Using the cre-loxP system, we generated a mouse model with disruption of the Bigh3 genomic locus. Bigh3 silencing did not result in any apparent phenotype modifications, the mice remained viable and fertile. We were able to determine the presence of BIGH3 in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In the absence of BIGH3, a transient decrease in the apoptotic process involved in retina maturation was observed, leading to a transient increase in the INL thickness at P15. This phenomenon was accompanied by an increased activity of the pro-survival ERK pathway. PMID:26387839

  4. Mouse Embryonic Retina Delivers Information Controlling Cortical Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bonetti, Ciro; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2010-01-01

    The relative contribution of extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms to cortical development is an intensely debated issue and an outstanding question in neurobiology. Currently, the emerging view is that interplay between intrinsic genetic mechanisms and extrinsic information shape different stages of cortical development [1]. Yet, whereas the intrinsic program of early neocortical developmental events has been at least in part decoded [2], the exact nature and impact of extrinsic signaling are still elusive and controversial. We found that in the mouse developing visual system, acute pharmacological inhibition of spontaneous retinal activity (retinal waves-RWs) during embryonic stages increase the rate of corticogenesis (cell cycle withdrawal). Furthermore, early perturbation of retinal spontaneous activity leads to changes of cortical layer structure at a later time point. These data suggest that mouse embryonic retina delivers long-distance information capable of modulating cell genesis in the developing visual cortex and that spontaneous activity is the candidate long-distance acting extrinsic cue mediating this process. In addition, these data may support spontaneous activity to be a general signal coordinating neurogenesis in other developing sensory pathways or areas of the central nervous system. PMID:21170332

  5. Network Analysis and Visualization of Mouse Retina Connectivity Data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The largest available cellular level connectivity map, of a 0.1 mm sample of the mouse retina Inner Plexiform Layer, was analysed using network models and visualized using spectral graph layouts and observed cell coordinates. This allows key nodes in the network to be identified with retinal neurons. Their strongest synaptic links can trace pathways in the network, elucidating possible circuits. Modular decomposition of the network, by sampling signal flows over nodes and links using the InfoMap method, shows discrete modules of cone bipolar cells that form a tiled mosaic in the retinal plane. The highest flow nodes, calculated by InfoMap, proved to be the most useful landmarks for elucidating possible circuits. Their dominant links to high flow amacrine cells reveal possible circuits linking bipolar through to ganglion cells and show an Off-On discrimination between the Left-Right sections of the sample. Circuits suggested by this analysis confirm known roles for some cells and point to roles for others. PMID:27414405

  6. Phenotypic and functional characterization of Bst+/− mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Riazifar, Hamidreza; Sun, Guoli; Wang, Xinjian; Rupp, Alan; Vemaraju, Shruti; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Lang, Richard A.; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Hattar, Samer; Guan, Min-Xin; Huang, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The belly spot and tail (Bst+/−) mouse phenotype is caused by mutations of the ribosomal protein L24 (Rpl24). Among various phenotypes in Bst+/− mice, the most interesting are its retinal abnormalities, consisting of delayed closure of choroid fissures, decreased ganglion cells and subretinal vascularization. We further characterized the Bst+/− mouse and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms to assess the feasibility of using this strain as a model for stem cell therapy of retinal degenerative diseases due to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss. We found that, although RGCs are significantly reduced in retinal ganglion cell layer in Bst+/− mouse, melanopsin+ RGCs, also called ipRGCs, appear to be unchanged. Pupillary light reflex was completely absent in Bst+/− mice but they had a normal circadian rhythm. In order to examine the pathological abnormalities in Bst+/− mice, we performed electron microscopy in RGC and found that mitochondria morphology was deformed, having irregular borders and lacking cristae. The complex activities of the mitochondrial electron transport chain were significantly decreased. Finally, for subretinal vascularization, we also found that angiogenesis is delayed in Bst+/− associated with delayed hyaloid regression. Characterization of Bst+/− retina suggests that the Bst+/− mouse strain could be a useful murine model. It might be used to explore further the pathogenesis and strategy of treatment of retinal degenerative diseases by employing stem cell technology. PMID:26035379

  7. Surrogate electroretinographic markers for assessing therapeutic efficacy in the retina.

    PubMed

    Birch, David G

    2004-09-01

    Visual acuity remains the primary surrogate marker for clinical trials in ophthalmology (and the primary outcome for most US Food and Drug Administration applications) due to its long history, ease of measurement and clear relationship to clinically meaningful characteristics of daily life. However, treatment trials are being planned for diseases that are currently untreatable where visual acuity may not be the most appropriate outcome measure. Specialized electroretinographic tests can be powerful surrogate markers in such trials. The selection of outcome measures and surrogate markers depends in part on whether the goal is to preserve remaining vision in a progressive retinal degeneration or to improve vision in an eye that has already undergone extensive degeneration. Among the electroretinographic tests available are those involving the whole retina (full-field electroretinographic), the posterior pole (pattern electroretinographic) or focal areas within the macula (multifocal electroretinographic). The advantages and disadvantages of each will be discussed along with selected applications of each test to a specific category of disease. PMID:15347262

  8. Generating 3D anatomically detailed models of the retina from OCT data sets: implications for computational modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalbaf, Farzaneh; Dokos, Socrates; Lovell, Nigel H.; Turuwhenua, Jason; Vaghefi, Ehsan

    2015-12-01

    Retinal prosthesis has been proposed to restore vision for those suffering from the retinal pathologies that mainly affect the photoreceptors layer but keep the inner retina intact. Prior to costly risky experimental studies computational modelling of the retina will help to optimize the device parameters and enhance the outcomes. Here, we developed an anatomically detailed computational model of the retina based on OCT data sets. The consecutive OCT images of individual were subsequently segmented to provide a 3D representation of retina in the form of finite elements. Thereafter, the electrical properties of the retina were modelled by implementing partial differential equation on the 3D mesh. Different electrode configurations, that is bipolar and hexapolar configurations, were implemented and the results were compared with the previous computational and experimental studies. Furthermore, the possible effects of the curvature of retinal layers on the current steering through the retina were proposed and linked to the clinical observations.

  9. Nonvisual photoreceptors of the deep brain, pineal organs and retina.

    PubMed

    Vigh, B; Manzano, M J; Zádori, A; Frank, C L; Lukáts, A; Röhlich, P; Szél, A; Dávid, C

    2002-04-01

    The role of the nonvisual photoreception is to synchronise periodic functions of living organisms to the environmental light periods in order to help survival of various species in different biotopes. In vertebrates, the so-called deep brain (septal and hypothalamic) photoreceptors, the pineal organs (pineal- and parapineal organs, frontal- and parietal eye) and the retina (of the "lateral" eye) are involved in the light-based entrain of endogenous circadian clocks present in various organs. In humans, photoperiodicity was studied in connection with sleep disturbances in shift work, seasonal depression, and in jet-lag of transmeridional travellers. In the present review, experimental and molecular aspects are discussed, focusing on the histological and histochemical basis of the function of nonvisual photoreceptors. We also offer a view about functional changes of these photoreceptors during pre- and postnatal development as well as about its possible evolution. Our scope in some points is different from the generally accepted views on the nonvisual photoreceptive systems. The deep brain photoreceptors are hypothalamic and septal nuclei of the periventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-contacting neuronal system. Already present in the lancelet and representing the most ancient type of vertebrate nerve cells ("protoneurons"), CSF-contacting neurons are sensory-type cells sitting in the wall of the brain ventricles that send a ciliated dendritic process into the CSF. Various opsins and other members of the phototransduction cascade have been demonstrated in telencephalic and hypothalamic groups of these neurons. In all species examined so far, deep brain photoreceptors play a role in the circadian and circannual regulation of periodic functions. Mainly called pineal "glands" in the last decades, the pineal organs actually represent a differentiated form of encephalic photoreceptors. Supposed to be intra- and extracranially outgrown groups of deep brain photoreceptors

  10. mfERG Response Dynamics of the Aging Retina

    PubMed Central

    Gerth, Christina; Sutter, Erich E.; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine age-related changes in retinal response dynamics derived from multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs). Methods MfERG data were obtained from 70 subjects with normal phakic eyes, age 9 to 80 years. Whereas the first- and higher-order kernels resulting from the mfERG contain detailed information regarding the nonlinear response dynamics of the retina, they do not lend themselves directly to an easy and intuitive interpretation. To achieve a better appreciation of fast adaptive mechanisms and their changes with aging, regional averages of the kernel series were translated at different retinal eccentricities (0°−5°, 5°−15°, and 15°−25°) into responses generated in different contexts. Specifically, the effect of aging on responses to stimuli presented in isolation was compared with the effect on responses adapted by preceding stimuli (“forward” effect). The interference of the immediately following stimuli with the response generation (“backward effect”) was also considered. Results Age-related changes were found in the isolated flash response as well as in the backward and forward interactions between consecutive flash responses. Larger fractional changes with age were found in response density than in implicit time, and the rate of change with age was larger for responses to isolated flashes than for responses adapted by preceding flashes. Conclusions Senescent changes in the isolated flash response and in consecutive flash interactions derived from the binary kernel series indicate an aging process at an early stage in the visual system. Mechanisms of retinal adaptation may partially compensate for age-related reductions in the isolated flash response. PMID:14507891

  11. Electrical responses of rods in the retina of Bufo marinus

    PubMed Central

    Cervetto, L.; Pasino, E.; Torre, V.

    1977-01-01

    1. Intracellular responses to flashes and steps of light have been recorded from the outer segment and the cell body of rods in the retina of the Bufo marinus. The identification of the origin of recorded responses has been confirmed by intracellular marking. 2. Responses to flashes delivered in darkness or superimposed on a background were analysed. Responses recorded from outer segments conform to the principle of `spectral univariance'. The shape of the response is not affected by enlarging the spot diameter from 150 to 1000 μm. 3. The membrane potential measured in darkness at the outer segments varied from -15 to -25 mV. Injection of steady hyperpolarizing currents increases the size of the response to light; depolarizing currents reduce the response. The mean value of the input resistance is 97 ± 30 MΩ in darkness and increases by 20-30% during illumination. 4. The responses obtained from the cell body of rods have the same shape, time course and spectral sensitivity of those recorded at the outer segment. Injection of steady current at the cell body produces different effects than at the outer segment: hyperpolarizing currents reduce the amplitude of the response to light; depolarizing currents increase the response. 5. The experimental data are fitted according to a model similar to that used to describe the responses of turtle cones (Baylor & Hodgkin, 1974; Baylor, Hodgkin & Lamb, 1974a, b). 6. The model reproduces the electrical responses of the rod outer segment to a variety of stimuli: (a) brief flashes and steps of light in dark adapted conditions; (b) bright flashes superimposed on background illuminations; (c) pairs of flashes delivered at different time intervals. Responses to hyperpolarizing steps of current are also reproduced by the model. ImagesABCD PMID:406383

  12. Adenovirus vectors targeting distinct cell types in the retina.

    PubMed

    Sweigard, J Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5DeltaRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5DeltaRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors. PMID:19892875

  13. Endocannabinoids in the Retina: From Marijuana to Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Yazulla, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The active component of the marijuana plant Cannabis sativa, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), produces numerous beneficial effects, including analgesia, appetite stimulation and nausea reduction, in addition to its psychotropic effects. THC mimics the action of endogenous fatty acid derivatives, referred to as endocannabinoids. The effects of THC and the endocannabinoids are mediated largely by metabotropic receptors that are distributed throughout the nervous and peripheral organ systems. There is great interest in endocannabinoids for their role in neuroplasticity as well as for therapeutic use in numerous conditions, including pain, stroke, cancer, obesity, osteoporosis, fertility, neurodegenerative diseases, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma and inflammatory diseases, among others. However, there has been relatively far less research on this topic in the eye and retina compared with the brain and other organ systems. The purpose of this review is to introduce the “cannabinergic” field to the retinal community. All of the fundamental work on cannabinoids has been performed in non-retinal preparations, necessitating extensive dependence on this literature for background. Happily, the retinal cannabinoid system has much in common with other regions of the central nervous system. For example, there is general agreement that cannabinoids suppress dopamine release and presynaptically reduce transmitter release from cones and bipolar cells. How these effects relate to light and dark adaptation, receptive field formation, temporal properties of ganglion cells or visual perception are unknown. The presence of multiple endocannabinoids, degradative enzymes with their bioactive metabolites, and receptors provides a broad spectrum of opportunities for basic research and to identify targets for therapeutic application to retinal diseases. PMID:18725316

  14. Endoscopic device for functional imaging of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Simon; Lohani, Sweyta; Martell, Bret; Soliz, Peter; Ts'o, Dan

    2011-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging of retinal function based on the recording of spatially distributed reflectance changes evoked by visual stimuli has to-date been performed primarily using modified commercial fundus cameras. We have constructed a prototype retinal functional imager, using a commercial endoscope (Storz) for the frontend optics, and a low-cost back-end that includes the needed dichroic beam splitter to separate the stimulus path from the imaging path. This device has been tested to demonstrate its performance for the delivery of adequate near infrared (NIR) illumination, intensity of the visual stimulus and reflectance return in the imaging path. The current device was found to be capable of imaging reflectance changes of 0.1%, similar to that observable using the modified commercial fundus camera approach. The visual stimulus (a 505nm spot of 0.5secs) was used with an interrogation illumination of 780nm, and a sequence of imaged captured. At each pixel, the imaged signal was subtracted and normalized by the baseline reflectance, so that the measurement was ΔR/R. The typical retinal activity signal observed had a ΔR/R of 0.3-1.0%. The noise levels were measured when no stimulus was applied and found to vary between +/- 0.05%. Functional imaging has been suggested as a means to provide objective information on retina function that may be a preclinical indicator of ocular diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. The endoscopic approach promises to yield a significantly more economical retinal functional imaging device that would be clinically important.

  15. A Novel Type of Complex Ganglion Cell in Rabbit Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sivyer, Benjamin; Venkataramani, Sowmya; Taylor, W. Rowland; Vaney, David I.

    2012-01-01

    The 15–20 physiological types of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can be grouped according to whether they fire to increased illumination in the receptive-field center (ON cells), decreased illumination (OFF cells), or both (ON-OFF cells). The diversity of RGCs has been best described in the rabbit retina, which has three types of ON-OFF RGCs with complex receptive-field properties: the ON-OFF direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs), the local edge detectors, and the uniformity detectors. Here we describe a novel type of bistratified ON-OFF RGC that has not been described in either physiological or morphological studies of rabbit RGCs. These cells stratify in the ON and OFF sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer, branching at about 30% and 60% depth, between the ON and OFF arbors of the bistratified DSGCs. Similar to the ON-OFF DSGCs, these cells respond with transient firing to both bright and dark spots flashed in the receptive field but, unlike the DSGCs, they show no directional preference for moving stimuli. We have termed these cells “transient ON-OFF” RGCs. Area-response measurements show that both the ON and the OFF spike responses have an antagonistic receptive-field organization, but with different spatial extents. Voltage-clamp recordings reveal transient excitatory inputs at light ON and light OFF; this excitation is strongly suppressed by surround stimulation, which also elicits direct inhibitory inputs to the cells at light ON and light OFF. Thus the receptive-field organization is mediated both within the presynaptic circuitry and by direct feed-forward inhibition. PMID:21800303

  16. Crizotinib-Induced Abnormal Signal Processing in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Toshiyuki; Iwasawa, Shunichiro; Kurimoto, Ryota; Maeda, Akemi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Kaneda, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Molecular target therapy for cancer is characterized by unique adverse effects that are not usually observed with cytotoxic chemotherapy. For example, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib causes characteristic visual disturbances, whereas such effects are rare when another ALK-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, alectinib, is used. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for these visual disturbances, the responses to light exhibited by retinal ganglion cells treated with these agents were evaluated using a C57BL6 mouse ex vivo model. Both crizotinib and alectinib changed the firing rate of ON and OFF type retinal ganglion cells. However, the ratio of alectinib-affected cells (15.7%) was significantly lower than that of crizotinib-affected cells (38.6%). Furthermore, these drugs changed the response properties to light stimuli of retinal ganglion cells in some of the affected cells, i.e., OFF cells responded to both ON and OFF stimuli, etc. Finally, the expressions of ALK (a target receptor of both crizotinib and alectinib) and of MET and ROS1 (additional target receptors of crizotinib) were observed at the mRNA level in the retina. Our findings suggest that these drugs might target retinal ganglion cells and that the potency of the drug actions on the light responses of retinal ganglion cells might be responsible for the difference in the frequencies of visual disturbances observed between patients treated with crizotinib and those treated with alectinib. The present experimental system might be useful for screening new molecular target agents prior to their use in clinical trials. PMID:26271036

  17. Optical imaging of the retina in response to the electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikado, Takashi; Okawa, Yoshitaka; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Hirohara, Yoko; Mihashi, Toshifumi; Tano, Yasuo

    2008-02-01

    Purposes: To determine if reflectance changes of the retina can be detected following electrical stimulation to the retina using a newly developed optical-imaging fundus camera. Methods: Eyes of cats were examined after pupil dilation. Retina was stimulated either focally by a ball-type electrode (BE) placed on the fenestrated sclera or diffusely using a ring-type electrode (RE) placed on the corneoscleral limbus. Electrical stimulation by biphasic pulse trains was applied for 4 seconds. Fundus images with near-infrared (800-880 nm) light were obtained between 2 seconds before and 20 seconds after the electrical stimulation (ES). A two-dimensional map of the reflectance changes (RCs) was constructed. The effect of Tetrodotoxin (TTX) was also investigated on RCs by ES using RE. Results: RCs were observed around the retinal locus where the stimulating electrodes were positioned (BE) or in the retina of the posterior pole (RE), in which the latency was about 0.5 to 1.0 sec and the peak time about 2 to 5 sec after the onset of ES. The intensity of the RCs increased with the increase of the stimulus current in both cases. RCs were completely suppressed after the injection of TTX. Conclusions: The functional changes of the retina either by focal or diffuse electrical stimulation were successfully detected by optical imaging of the retina. The contribution of retinal ganglion cells on RCs by ES was confirmed by TTX experiment. This method may be applied to the objective evaluation of the artificial retina.

  18. Cold Shock Proteins Are Expressed in the Retina Following Exposure to Low Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Larrayoz, Ignacio M; Rey-Funes, Manuel; Contartese, Daniela S; Rolón, Federico; Sarotto, Anibal; Dorfman, Veronica B; Loidl, Cesar F; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for some retinal conditions, including ischemic insults. Cold exposure elevates expression of cold-shock proteins (CSP), including RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), but their presence in mammalian retina is so far unknown. Here we show the effects of hypothermia on the expression of these CSPs in retina-derived cell lines and in the retina of newborn and adult rats. Two cell lines of retinal origin, R28 and mRPE, were exposed to 32°C for different time periods and CSP expression was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cold environment (8°C) and expression of CSPs in their retinas was studied by Western blotting, multiple inmunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy. RBM3 expression was upregulated by cold in both R28 and mRPE cells in a time-dependent fashion. On the other hand, CIRP was upregulated in R28 cells but not in mRPE. In vivo, expression of CSPs was negligible in the retina of newborn and adult rats kept at room temperature (24°C). Exposure to a cold environment elicited a strong expression of both proteins, especially in retinal pigment epithelium cells, photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine and horizontal cells, Müller cells, and ganglion cells. In conclusion, CSP expression rapidly rises in the mammalian retina following exposure to hypothermia in a cell type-specific pattern. This observation may be at the basis of the molecular mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its therapeutic effects in the retina. PMID:27556928

  19. Cold Shock Proteins Are Expressed in the Retina Following Exposure to Low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Contartese, Daniela S.; Rolón, Federico; Sarotto, Anibal; Dorfman, Veronica B.; Loidl, Cesar F.; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for some retinal conditions, including ischemic insults. Cold exposure elevates expression of cold-shock proteins (CSP), including RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), but their presence in mammalian retina is so far unknown. Here we show the effects of hypothermia on the expression of these CSPs in retina-derived cell lines and in the retina of newborn and adult rats. Two cell lines of retinal origin, R28 and mRPE, were exposed to 32°C for different time periods and CSP expression was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cold environment (8°C) and expression of CSPs in their retinas was studied by Western blotting, multiple inmunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy. RBM3 expression was upregulated by cold in both R28 and mRPE cells in a time-dependent fashion. On the other hand, CIRP was upregulated in R28 cells but not in mRPE. In vivo, expression of CSPs was negligible in the retina of newborn and adult rats kept at room temperature (24°C). Exposure to a cold environment elicited a strong expression of both proteins, especially in retinal pigment epithelium cells, photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine and horizontal cells, Müller cells, and ganglion cells. In conclusion, CSP expression rapidly rises in the mammalian retina following exposure to hypothermia in a cell type-specific pattern. This observation may be at the basis of the molecular mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its therapeutic effects in the retina. PMID:27556928

  20. Optical imaging of retina in response to grating stimuli in cats.

    PubMed

    Hirohara, Y; Mihashi, T; Kanda, H; Morimoto, T; Miyoshi, T; Wolffsohn, J S; Fujikado, T

    2013-04-01

    We examined the intrinsic signals in response to grating stimuli in order to determine whether the light-evoked intrinsic signals of the retina are due to changes in the photoreceptor activities induced by the image projected on to the retina or are due to neural activities of the inner retina. The retinas of the left eye of 12 cats under general anesthesia were examined by a functional imaging fundus camera. Near infrared light was used to monitor the reflectance changes (RCs) of the retina. Vertical grating were used to stimulate the retina at 4 Hz. The spatial frequencies of the gratings were 0.05, 0.11, 0.22, 0.43, 0.86, 1.73, and 3.46 cycles/degree (cpd). Ten images were averaged and used to analyze the RCs to obtain the peak value (PV) of a two dimensional fast Fourier transfer of the RCs. The wavefront aberrations (WA) were measured with a compact wavefront aberrometer and the spatial modulation transfer function (MTF) of the eye was calculated. The retinal reflectance image had a grating pattern. The PV of the spatial sensitivity curve was highest at low spatial frequencies (0.05 and 0.11 cpd), and the sensitivity decreased steeply with an increase in the spatial frequency. RCs were not detectable at 3.46 cpd. The MTF decreased gradually with increases in the spatial frequencies and was 0.68 at 3.46 cpd. The reflectance pattern of the retinal intrinsic signal elicited by grating stimuli of different spatial frequencies was different from that of the MTF. This suggests that the intrinsic signal represents not only the response of the photoreceptors but also other neuronal or vascular changes in the retina. PMID:23353892

  1. Ionotropic purinergic receptors P2X in frog and turtle retina: glial and neuronal localization.

    PubMed

    Vitanova, Lily Alexandrova; Kupenova, Petia Nikolova

    2014-06-01

    Purinergic signaling is represented in both the peripheral and central nervous system (CNS), and in particular in the retina, which may be regarded as a part of the CNS. While purigenic signaling is relatively well studied in mammalian retinas, little is known about it in retinas of lower vertebrates. The aim of present study was to investigate, using immunocytochemistry, the distribution of purinoreceptors P2X in retinas of frog and turtle, which are appropriate models of the brain neuron-to-glia interactions. The results showed widespread expression of all seven ionotropic purinoreceptors (P2X1-P2X7) in both frog and turtle retinas. They were predominantly expressed in Müller cells, the principal glial cells in the retina. All structures typical of Müller cells: the outer and the inner limiting membranes, the cells bodies in the inner nuclear layer, the radial processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), and the so called endfeet (frog) or the orthogonal arrays of particles (turtle) in the ganglion cells layer were immunostained. Colocalizations between P2X1-P2X7 and the glial cell marker Vimentin proved that the immunostaining was in the Müller cells. In addition to the glial staining, neuronal staining was also seen as fine puncta in the inner plexiform layer and by small dots and patches in the outer plexiform layer. Some cell bodies of horizontal, amacrine and ganglion cells were also stained. The results obtained imply that the purinergic P2X receptors may significantly contribute to the neuron-to-glia signaling in retinas of the lower vertebrates. PMID:24461518

  2. Neural retina identity is specified by lens-derived BMP signals.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Tanushree; Jidigam, Vijay K; Patthey, Cedric; Gunhaga, Lena

    2015-05-15

    The eye has served as a classical model to study cell specification and tissue induction for over a century. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the induction and maintenance of eye-field cells, and the specification of neural retina cells are poorly understood. Moreover, within the developing anterior forebrain, how prospective eye and telencephalic cells are differentially specified is not well defined. In the present study, we have analyzed these issues by manipulating signaling pathways in intact chick embryo and explant assays. Our results provide evidence that at blastula stages, BMP signals inhibit the acquisition of eye-field character, but from neural tube/optic vesicle stages, BMP signals from the lens are crucial for the maintenance of eye-field character, inhibition of dorsal telencephalic cell identity and specification of neural retina cells. Subsequently, our results provide evidence that a Rax2-positive eye-field state is not sufficient for the progress to a neural retina identity, but requires BMP signals. In addition, our results argue against any essential role of Wnt or FGF signals during the specification of neural retina cells, but provide evidence that Wnt signals together with BMP activity are sufficient to induce cells of retinal pigment epithelial character. We conclude that BMP activity emanating from the lens ectoderm maintains eye-field identity, inhibits telencephalic character and induces neural retina cells. Our findings link the requirement of the lens ectoderm for neural retina specification with the molecular mechanism by which cells in the forebrain become specified as neural retina by BMP activity. PMID:25968316

  3. Oxytocin Expression and Function in the Posterior Retina: A Novel Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Halbach, Patrick; Pillers, De-Ann M.; York, Nathaniel; Asuma, Matti P.; Chiu, Michelle A.; Luo, Wenxiang; Tokarz, Sara; Bird, Ian M.; Pattnaik, Bikash R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Oxytocin (OXT) is recognized as an ubiquitously acting nonapeptide hormone that is involved in processes ranging from parturition to neural development. Its effects are mediated by cell signaling that occurs as a result of oxytocin receptor (OXTR) activation. We sought to determine whether the OXT-OXTR signaling pathway is also expressed within the retina. Methods. Immunohistochemistry using cell-specific markers was used to localize OXT within the rhesus retina. Reverse transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expression of OXTR in both human and rhesus retina. Single-cell RT-PCR and Western blot analyses were used to determine the expression of OXTR in cultured human fetal RPE (hfRPE) cells. Human fetal RPE cells loaded with FURA-2 AM were studied by ratiometric Ca2+ imaging to assess transient mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Results. Oxytocin was expressed in the cone photoreceptor extracellular matrix of the rhesus retina. Oxytocin mRNA and protein were expressed in the human and rhesus RPE. Oxytocin mRNA and protein expression were observed in cultured hfRPE cells, and exposure of these cells to 100 nM OXT induced a transient 79 ± 1.5 nM increase of [Ca2+]i. Conclusions. Oxytocin and OXTR are present in the posterior retina, and OXT induces an increase in hfRPE [Ca2+]i. These results suggest that the OXT-OXTR signaling pathway is active in the retina. We propose that OXT activation of the OXTR occurs in the posterior retina and that this may serve as a paracrine signaling pathway that contributes to communication between the cone photoreceptor and the RPE. PMID:25593022

  4. Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) in Microglia of the Developing Quail Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Ana; Navascués, Julio; Cuadros, Miguel A.; Calvente, Ruth; Martín-Oliva, David; Ferrer-Martín, Rosa M.; Martín-Estebané, María; Carrasco, María-Carmen; Marín-Teva, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which produce large amounts of nitric oxide (NO), is induced in macrophages and microglia in response to inflammatory mediators such as LPS and cytokines. Although iNOS is mainly expressed by microglia that become activated in different pathological and experimental situations, it was recently reported that undifferentiated amoeboid microglia can also express iNOS during normal development. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development and after their activation with LPS by using the quail retina as model. iNOS expression was analyzed by iNOS immunolabeling, western-blot, and RT-PCR. NO production was determined by using DAR-4M AM, a reliable fluorescent indicator of subcellular NO production by iNOS. Embryonic, postnatal, and adult in situ quail retinas were used to analyze the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development. iNOS expression and NO production in LPS-treated microglial cells were investigated by an in vitro approach based on organotypic cultures of E8 retinas, in which microglial cell behavior is similar to that of the in situ retina, as previously demonstrated in our laboratory. We show here that amoeboid microglia in the quail retina express iNOS during normal development. This expression is stronger in microglial cells migrating tangentially in the vitreal part of the retina and is downregulated, albeit maintained, when microglia differentiate and become ramified. LPS treatment of retina explants also induces changes in the morphology of amoeboid microglia compatible with their activation, increasing their lysosomal compartment and upregulating iNOS expression with a concomitant production of NO. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that immature microglial cells express iNOS during normal development, suggesting a certain degree of activation. Furthermore, LPS treatment induces overactivation of amoeboid

  5. New developments in eye models with retina tissue phantoms for ophthalmic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, T. Scott; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2012-03-01

    We document our latest work in developing eye models with solid-state retinal tissue phantoms designed for demonstrating, validating and comparing ophthalmic Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) instruments. Eye models with retina tissue phantoms can serve a variety of purposes, including demonstrating OCT functionality and performance in both the clinic and exhibit hall, validating retina layer thickness measurements from different commercial OCT instruments and as an aide for the R&D engineer and field service technician in the development and repair of instruments, respectively. The ideal eye model for OCT, the optical cross-sectional imaging modality, would have a volumetric morphology and scattering and absorption properties similar to that of normal human retina. These include a multi-layered structure of equivalent thickness to nominal human retina layers, a foveal pit that can be used to orient the image, and a RPE/OS and choroid like layers to demonstrate the depth penetration of the OCT system. A solid state tissue phantom relieves the user of constant cleaning and maintenance associated with the more common water bath model eyes. Novel processes12 have been developed to create retinal layers model that closely mimic the reflectance and scattering coefficients of the real layers of the retina, as imaged by spectral bandwidth of OCT.

  6. Expression of hermes gene is restricted to the ganglion cells in the retina.

    PubMed

    Piri, Natik; Kwong, Jacky M K; Song, Min; Caprioli, Joseph

    2006-09-11

    The RNA binding protein with multiple splicing 2, or hermes, is a member of the RRM (RNA recognition motif) family of RNA-binding proteins. In this study, we show that the hermes gene is expressed in the rat retina, and its expression is restricted to the ganglion cell layer. Double in situ hybridization with riboprobes corresponding to the hermes gene and Thy-1, the RGC marker in the retina, showed that the majority of the Thy-1 positive cells in the ganglion cell layer were also hermes positive. This was also shown by co-localization of the hermes in situ hybridization signals with the retrogradely labeled RGCs. Our observations suggest that hermes is expressed in the majority, if not all, of RGCs and is not restricted to only certain RGC types. Hermes in situ hybridization signals were not detected in the retinal sections of optic nerve transected animals, which are characterized by rapid and specific RGC degeneration. The dramatic reduction of the hermes mRNA level in axotomized retinas was also observed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The specific expression of hermes in retinal ganglion cells qualifies this gene as a potential RGC marker in the retina. Outside the retina, hermes is expressed in the heart, liver, and kidney, and to a lesser degree in the cerebellum, cortex, lung, and small intestine. PMID:16870336

  7. [Guanidinoacetate-N-methyltransferase: location in mammalian retina and rat Harderian gland].

    PubMed

    Mardashchev, S R

    1975-01-01

    Homogenates of retinal external segments of rat, rabbit, beef and hen and of rat Harderian gland were found to possess a considerable activity of guanidineacetate-N-methyltransferase (GAMT, E.C. 2.1.1.2), comparable with the enzyme activity in liver, pancreas and testis. Permanent UV-illumination of rats (from 1 day to 1 week) resulted in the decrease of GAMT activity in retina and especially in Harderian gland. Caffeine (10(-4) M) and papaverine (10(-7) M) activated GAMT in retina and rat Harderian gland, while cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor (0.5-2 mkg/ml), eliminated caffeine-stimulated GAMT activity. Histamine (0.3 mkg/ml) inhibited GAMT activity both in retina and Harderian gland. A decrease of GAMT activity in retina, liver and testis of rat and an increase of the enzyme activity in rat pancreas and Harderian gland were observed in the presence of Mg2+ (5 mM). Physiological importance of GAMT and creatine in mammalian retina and rat Harderian gland is discussed. PMID:1203355

  8. Complement anaphylatoxin C3a is a potent inducer of embryonic chick retina regeneration.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Tracy; Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Reis, Edimara S; Echeverri Ruiz, Nancy P; Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Tzekou, Apostolia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Lambris, John D; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the initiation signals for tissue regeneration in vertebrates is one of the major challenges in regenerative biology. Much of the research thus far has indicated that certain growth factors have key roles. Here we show that complement fragment C3a is sufficient to induce complete regeneration of the embryonic chick retina from stem/progenitor cells present in the eye, independent of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling. Instead, C3a induces retina regeneration via STAT3 activation, which in turn activates the injury- and inflammation-responsive factors, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. This activation sets forth regulation of Wnt2b, Six3 and Sox2, genes associated with retina stem and progenitor cells. Thus, our results establish a mechanism for retina regeneration based on injury and inflammation signals. Furthermore, our results indicate a unique function for complement anaphylatoxins that implicate these molecules in the induction and complete regeneration of the retina, opening new avenues of experimentation in the field. PMID:23942241

  9. Mathematical and computational models of the retina in health, development and disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Paul A; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Luthert, Philip J; Foss, Alexander J E; Byrne, Helen M

    2016-07-01

    The retina confers upon us the gift of vision, enabling us to perceive the world in a manner unparalleled by any other tissue. Experimental and clinical studies have provided great insight into the physiology and biochemistry of the retina; however, there are questions which cannot be answered using these methods alone. Mathematical and computational techniques can provide complementary insight into this inherently complex and nonlinear system. They allow us to characterise and predict the behaviour of the retina, as well as to test hypotheses which are experimentally intractable. In this review, we survey some of the key theoretical models of the retina in the healthy, developmental and diseased states. The main insights derived from each of these modelling studies are highlighted, as are model predictions which have yet to be tested, and data which need to be gathered to inform future modelling work. Possible directions for future research are also discussed. Whilst the present modelling studies have achieved great success in unravelling the workings of the retina, they have yet to achieve their full potential. For this to happen, greater involvement with the modelling community is required, and stronger collaborations forged between experimentalists, clinicians and theoreticians. It is hoped that, in addition to bringing the fruits of current modelling studies to the attention of the ophthalmological community, this review will encourage many such future collaborations. PMID:27063291

  10. Optical imaging of fast light-evoked fast neural activation in amphibian retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; George, John S.

    2006-02-01

    High performance functional imaging is needed for dynamic measurements of neural processing in retina. Emerging techniques of visual prosthesis also require advanced methodology for reliable validation of electromagnetic stimulation of the retina. Imaging of fast intrinsic optical responses associated with neural activation promises a variety of technical advantages over traditional single and multi-channel electrophysiological techniques for these purposes, but the application of fast optical signals for neural imaging has been limited by low signal to noise ratio and high background light intensity. However, using optimized near infrared probe light and improved optical systems, we have improved the optical signals substantially, allowing single pass measurements. Fast photodiode measurements typically disclose dynamic transmitted light changes of whole retina at the level of 10 -4 dI/I, where dI is the dynamic optical change and I is the baseline light intensity. Using a fast high performance CCD, we imaged fast intrinsic optical responses from isolated retina activated by a visible light flash. Fast, high resolution imaging disclosed larger local optical responses, and showed evidence of multiple response components with both negative- and positive-going signals, on different timescales. Darkfield imaging techniques further enhanced the sensitivity of optical measurements. At single cell resolution, brightfield imaging disclosed maxima of optical responses ~5% dI/I, while darkfield imaging showed maxima of optical responses exceeding 10% dI/I. In comparison with simultaneous electrophysiological recording, optical imaging provided much better localized patterns of response over the activated area of the retina.

  11. Mouse retina explants after long-term culture in serum free medium.

    PubMed

    Caffé, A R; Ahuja, P; Holmqvist, B; Azadi, S; Forsell, J; Holmqvist, I; Söderpalm, A K; van Veen, T

    2001-11-01

    The neonatal mouse retina remains viable as an explant in serum-supplemented growth media for more than 4 weeks. Interpretation of drug effects on this tissue is compromised by the enigmatic composition of the serum. We sought to remove this ambiguity by culturing neonatal as well as late postnatal mouse retina in serum-free nutrient medium. In this study three important observations were made, (1) there is histotypic development of neonatal as well as preservation of late postnatal mouse retinal structure during long-term culture in serum-free medium, although the late postnatal tissue tends to show some loss of cells in the outer nuclear layer. (2) Protein expression in explant photoreceptor cells was similar to that in the litter-matched ones, except for green cone opsin and interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, although mRNA of the latter is present at similar amounts as in age-matched in vivo controls. (3) Cells of the inner retina stained by antibodies to calcium-binding proteins display some novel sprouting of processes. The results show that the mouse retina can be cultured as an explant for more than 4 weeks in a serum-free medium. This represents an important step forward because, (1) the possibility of interference of drug effects by unknown serum factors has been eliminated; and (2) the spent culture medium can be analyzed to investigate biomolecules released by the retina in vitro. PMID:11719023

  12. Correlation of diacylglycerol level and protein kinase C activity in rat retina to retinal circulation.

    PubMed

    Shiba, T; Inoguchi, T; Sportsman, J R; Heath, W F; Bursell, S; King, G L

    1993-11-01

    The increases in diacylglycerol (DAG) level and protein kinase C (PKC) activity have been characterized biochemically and functionally in the retina and the brain of diabetic rats as well as in cultured vascular cells. PKC specific activities were increased in the membraneous fraction of retina from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and the genetically determined diabetic BB rats, respectively, after 1 or 2 wk of diabetes, compared with control. The ratio of total PKC activities from membraneous and cytosol fractions was also increased in the retina of diabetic rats. With diabetes, all the isoenzymes and the total DAG level were increased in the rat retina, whereas no changes were found in the rat brain. Insulin treatment normalized plasma glucose levels and partially prevented the increases in the membraneous PKC activity and all the isoenzymes in the retina. In the retinal endothelial cells, the total DAG level and PKC specific activities are increased by 36 and 22%, respectively, in the membraneous pool when the glucose levels are changed from 5.5 to 22 mM. Activation of PKC activity and isoform beta II by the vitreal injection of phorbol dibutyrate mimicked the abnormal retinal blood circulation observed in diabetic rats (2.22 +/- 0.24 vs. 1.83 +/- 0.40 s). Thus diabetes and elevated glucose levels will increase DAG level and PKC activities and its isoenzyme specifically in vascular cells and may affect retinal hemodynamics. PMID:8238505

  13. Microglia response in retina and optic nerve in chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Lioba; Kuehn, Sandra; Pedreiturria, Xiomara; Haak, Kathrin; Pfarrer, Christiane; Dick, H Burkhard; Kleiter, Ingo; Joachim, Stephanie C

    2016-09-15

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a common rodent model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Yet, the long-term consequences for retina and optic nerve (ON) are unknown. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with an encephalitogenic peptide (MOG35-55) and the controls received the carriers or PBS. Clinical symptoms started at day 8, peaked at day 14, and were prevalent until day 60. They correlated with infiltration and demyelination of the ON. In MOG-immunized animals more microglia cells in the ONs and retinas were detected at day 60. Additionally, retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss was combined with an increased macroglia response. At this late stage, an increased number of microglia was associated with axonal damage in the ON and in the retina with RGC loss. Whether glial activation contributes to repair mechanisms or adversely affects the number of RGCs is currently unclear. PMID:27609273

  14. Experimental measurement of modulation transfer function of a retina-like sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Cao, Fengmei; Bai, Tingzhu; Cao, Nan; Liu, Changju; Deng, Guangping

    2014-11-01

    The retina-like sensor is a kind of anthropomorphic visual sensor. It plays an important role in both biological and machine vision due to its advantages of high resolution in the fovea, a wide field-of-view, and minimum pixel count. The space-variant property of the sensor makes it difficult to directly measure its modulation transfer function (MTF). The MTF of a retina-like sensor is measured with the bar-target pattern method. According to the pixel arrangement, the sensor is divided into rings and the MTF of each ring is measured using spoke targets with different periods. Comparison between the measured MTF and the theoretical MTF of the sensor showed that they coincide. The differences between them are also analyzed and discussed. The measured MTF helps to analyze the performance of an imaging system containing a retina-like sensor.

  15. A robust face recognition algorithm under varying illumination using adaptive retina modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Yuen Kiat; Yap, Vooi Voon; Nisar, Humaira

    2013-10-01

    Variation in illumination has a drastic effect on the appearance of a face image. This may hinder the automatic face recognition process. This paper presents a novel approach for face recognition under varying lighting conditions. The proposed algorithm uses adaptive retina modeling based illumination normalization. In the proposed approach, retina modeling is employed along with histogram remapping following normal distribution. Retina modeling is an approach that combines two adaptive nonlinear equations and a difference of Gaussians filter. Two databases: extended Yale B database and CMU PIE database are used to verify the proposed algorithm. For face recognition Gabor Kernel Fisher Analysis method is used. Experimental results show that the recognition rate for the face images with different illumination conditions has improved by the proposed approach. Average recognition rate for Extended Yale B database is 99.16%. Whereas, the recognition rate for CMU-PIE database is 99.64%.

  16. Alterations in glutamate cysteine ligase content in the retina of two retinitis pigmentosa animal models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vallejo, Violeta; Benlloch-Navarro, Soledad; Trachsel-Moncho, Laura; López-Pedrajas, Rosa; Almansa, Inmaculada; Romero, Francisco Javier; Miranda, María

    2016-07-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) comprises a group of rare genetic retinal disorders in which one of several different mutations induces photoreceptor death. Oxidative stress and glutathione (GSH) alterations may be related to the pathogenesis of RP. GSH has been shown to be present in high concentrations in the retina. In addition, the retina has the capability to synthesize GSH. In this study, we tested whether the two subunits of glutamate cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis, and the concentrations of retinal GSH, oxidized glutathione (GSSG), cysteine (Cys) and glutamate are altered in the retina of two different RP mice models. Retinas from C3H and rd1 mice at different postnatal days (P7, P11, P15, P19, P21 and P28) and from C57BL/6 and rd10 mice at P21 were obtained. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the protein content of catalytic and modulatory subunits from glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC and GCLM, respectively). In another set of experiments, control and rd1 mice were administered buthinine sulfoximine, a glutathione synthase inhibitor, or paraquat. GSH, GSSG, glutamate and Cys concentrations were determined, by HPLC. A decrease in retinal GCLC content was observed in C3H and rd1 mice with age, nevertheless, there was an increase in retinal GCLC in rd1 mice compared to control retinas at P19. No modifications in GCLM content with age and no difference between GCLM content in rd1 and control retinas were observed. The GSH concentration decreased in the rd1 retinas compared with control ones at P15, it increased at P19, and was again similar at P21 and P28. No changes in GSSG concentration in control retinas with age were observed; the GSSG levels in rd1 retinas were similar from P7 to P19 and then increased significantly at P21 and P28. Glutamate concentration was increased in the rd1 retinas compared to control mice from P7 to P15 and were comparable at P21 and P28. The Cys concentrations was measured in control and rd1

  17. Wiring patterns in the mouse retina: collecting evidence across the connectome, physiology and light microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Felice A; Wong, Rachel O L

    2014-01-01

    The visual system has often been thought of as a parallel processor because distinct regions of the brain process different features of visual information. However, increasing evidence for convergence and divergence of circuit connections, even at the level of the retina where visual information is first processed, chips away at a model of dedicated and distinct pathways for parallel information flow. Instead, our current understanding is that parallel channels may emerge, not from exclusive microcircuits for each channel, but from unique combinations of microcircuits. This review depicts diagrammatically the current knowledge and remaining puzzles about the retinal circuit with a focus on the mouse retina. Advances in techniques for labelling cells and genetic manipulations have popularized the use of transgenic mice. We summarize evidence gained from serial electron microscopy, electrophysiology and light microscopy to illustrate the wiring patterns in mouse retina. We emphasize the need to explore proposed retinal connectivity using multiple methods to verify circuits both structurally and functionally. PMID:25172948

  18. Review: Tauopathy in the retina and optic nerve: does it shadow pathological changes in the brain?

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Wing-Lau; Leung, Yen; Tsang, Andrea Wing-Ting; So, Kwok-Fai; Chiu, Kin

    2012-01-01

    Tau protein’s versatility lies in its functions within the central nervous system, including protein scaffolding and intracellular signaling. Tauopathy has been one of the most extensively studied neuropathologies among the neurodegenerative diseases. Because the retina and optic nerve are parts of the central nervous system, we hypothesize that tauopathy also plays a role in various eye diseases. However, little is known about tauopathy in the retina and optic nerve. Here, we summarize the findings from histopathological studies on animal models and human specimens with distinct neurodegenerative diseases. Similar pathological changes of tau protein can be found in Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal lobe dementia, and glaucoma. In view of the important roles of tauopathy in the brain, it is hoped that this review can stimulate research on eye diseases of the retina and optic nerve. PMID:23170062

  19. Flow of energy in the outer retina in darkness and in light.

    PubMed

    Linton, Jonathan D; Holzhausen, Lars C; Babai, Norbert; Song, Hongman; Miyagishima, Kiyoharu J; Stearns, George W; Lindsay, Ken; Wei, Junhua; Chertov, Andrei O; Peters, Theo A; Caffe, Romeo; Pluk, Helma; Seeliger, Mathias W; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Fong, Kimberly; Bolton, Laura; Kuok, Denise L T; Sweet, Ian R; Bartoletti, Theodore M; Radu, Roxana A; Travis, Gabriel H; Zagotta, Willam N; Townes-Anderson, Ellen; Parker, Ed; Van der Zee, Catharina E E M; Sampath, Alapakkam P; Sokolov, Maxim; Thoreson, Wallace B; Hurley, James B

    2010-05-11

    Structural features of neurons create challenges for effective production and distribution of essential metabolic energy. We investigated how metabolic energy is distributed between cellular compartments in photoreceptors. In avascular retinas, aerobic production of energy occurs only in mitochondria that are located centrally within the photoreceptor. Our findings indicate that metabolic energy flows from these central mitochondria as phosphocreatine toward the photoreceptor's synaptic terminal in darkness. In light, it flows in the opposite direction as ATP toward the outer segment. Consistent with this model, inhibition of creatine kinase in avascular retinas blocks synaptic transmission without influencing outer segment activity. Our findings also reveal how vascularization of neuronal tissue can influence the strategies neurons use for energy management. In vascularized retinas, mitochondria in the synaptic terminals of photoreceptors make neurotransmission less dependent on creatine kinase. Thus, vasculature of the tissue and the intracellular distribution of mitochondria can play key roles in setting the strategy for energy distribution in neurons. PMID:20445106

  20. Flow of energy in the outer retina in darkness and in light

    PubMed Central

    Linton, Jonathan D.; Holzhausen, Lars C.; Babai, Norbert; Song, Hongman; Miyagishima, Kiyoharu J.; Stearns, George W.; Lindsay, Ken; Wei, Junhua; Chertov, Andrei O.; Peters, Theo A.; Caffe, Romeo; Pluk, Helma; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Fong, Kimberly; Bolton, Laura; Kuok, Denise L. T.; Sweet, Ian R.; Bartoletti, Theodore M.; Radu, Roxana A.; Travis, Gabriel H.; Zagotta, Willam N.; Townes-Anderson, Ellen; Parker, Ed; Van der Zee, Catharina E. E. M.; Sampath, Alapakkam P.; Sokolov, Maxim; Thoreson, Wallace B.; Hurley, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Structural features of neurons create challenges for effective production and distribution of essential metabolic energy. We investigated how metabolic energy is distributed between cellular compartments in photoreceptors. In avascular retinas, aerobic production of energy occurs only in mitochondria that are located centrally within the photoreceptor. Our findings indicate that metabolic energy flows from these central mitochondria as phosphocreatine toward the photoreceptor’s synaptic terminal in darkness. In light, it flows in the opposite direction as ATP toward the outer segment. Consistent with this model, inhibition of creatine kinase in avascular retinas blocks synaptic transmission without influencing outer segment activity. Our findings also reveal how vascularization of neuronal tissue can influence the strategies neurons use for energy management. In vascularized retinas, mitochondria in the synaptic terminals of photoreceptors make neurotransmission less dependent on creatine kinase. Thus, vasculature of the tissue and the intracellular distribution of mitochondria can play key roles in setting the strategy for energy distribution in neurons. PMID:20445106

  1. An ultra-low power CMOS oscillating pixel array for retina implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kang-Ming; Yuan, Xiang-Hui; Meng, Li-Ya; Rao, Cheng

    2010-07-01

    A light-controlled oscillating array for retina prosthesis is presented. The unique advantage of the circuit is that it has a lower voltage and ultra-low power consumption. And it has some other features as below: it is applicable to the natural light illumination and each pixel is an independent oscillator whose frequency is proportional to the intensity of the incident light. The fundamental characteristics of the circuit are analyzed. It is fabricated with a standard 0.6 μm CMOS technology. The experimental results indicate that the proposed circuit can be used for retina implantation, taking the place of the suffered photoreceptor in the retina of the blind and partially recovering the blind’s eyesight.

  2. Ontogenic changes of kynurenine aminotransferase I activity and its expression in the chicken retina.

    PubMed

    Rejdak, Robert; Zielinska, Elzbieta; Shenk, Yana; Turski, Waldemar A; Okuno, Etsuo; Zarnowski, Tomasz; Zagorski, Zbigniew; Zrenner, Eberhart; Kohler, Konrad

    2003-06-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferases are key enzymes for the synthesis of kynurenic acid (KYNA), an endogenous glutamate receptor antagonist. The study described here examined ontogenic changes of kynurenine aminotransferase I (KAT I) activity and its expression in the chicken retina. KAT I activity measured on embryonic day 16 (E16) was significantly higher than at all other stages (E12, P0 and P7). Double labeling with antibodies against glutamine synthetase showed that on P7 KAT I was expressed in Müller cell endfeet and their processes in the inner retina. Since KAT I activity is high in the late embryonic stages, it is conceivable that it plays a neuromodulatory role in the retina during the late phase of embryogenesis. PMID:12782065

  3. The sarcoglycan-sarcospan complex localization in mouse retina is independent from dystrophins

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Patrice; Estrada, Francisco-Javier; Bordais, Agnès; Mornet, Dominique; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Vargas, Haydeé Rosas; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M.; Rendon, Alvaro

    2005-01-01

    The sarcoglycan–sarcospan (SG–SSPN) complex is part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that has been extensively characterized in muscle. To establish the framework for functional studies of sarcoglycans in retina here, we quantified sarcoglycans mRNA levels with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and performed immunohistochemistry to determine their cellular and subcellular distribution. We showed that the β-, δ-, γ-, ε-sarcoglycans and sarcospan are expressed in mouse retina. They are localized predominantly in the outer and the inner limiting membranes, probably in the Müller cells and also in the ganglion cells axons where the expression of dystrophins have never been reported. We also investigated the status of the sarcoglycans in the retina of mdx3cv mutant mice for all Duchene Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) gene products. The absence of dystrophin did not produce any change in the sarcoglycan–sarcospan components expression and distribution. PMID:15993965

  4. Hazardous effects of fried potato chips on the development of retina in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayyad, Hassan I; Sakr, Saber A; Badawy, Gamal M; Afify, Hanaa S

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the hazardous effects of fried potato chips upon the retina of two developmental stages of the albino rats aged 7 and 14 days from parturition. Methods Pregnant rats were arranged into two groups: control pregnant rats and consequently their delivered newborns until reaching 7 and 14 days old from parturition and fried potato chips group in which pregnant rats at the 6th day of gestation maintained on diet formed of fried potato chips supplied from the market mixed with standard diet at a concentration of 50% per each till 7 and 14 post-partum. Three fold integrated approaches were adopted, namely, histological, ultrastructural and proteomic analysis. Results Histological examination of the retina of the experimental offsprings revealed many histopathological changes, including massive degeneration, vacuolization and cell loss in the ganglion cell layer, as well as general reduction in retinal size. At the ultrastructural level, the retina of experimental offsprings exhibited number of deformities, including ill differentiated and degenerated nuclear layer, malformed and vacuolated pigment epithelium with vesiculated and fragmented rough endoplasmic reticulum, degenerated outer segment of photoreceptors, as well as swollen choriocapillaris and loss of neuronal cells. Proteomic analysis of retina of the two experimental developmental stages showed variations in the expressed proteins as a result of intoxication which illustrated the adverse toxic effects of fried potato chips upon the retina. Conclusions It can be concluded that the effect of fried potato chips on the development of retina in rats may be due to the presence of acrylamide or its metabolite. PMID:23569770

  5. A full reference image quality assessment method for retina-like sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhihu; Cao, Fengmei

    2013-12-01

    Retina_like sensor is characterized by a space-variant resolution mimicking the distribution of photoreceptors in the human retina. It is devided into two areas-the central area and the peripheral area. Density of pixels is highest in the center and decreases monotonically toward the periphery area. Such space-varant image allows high-resolution tasks using the central region while maintaining a lower resolution part providing relevant information about the background. In high speed forward motion field, because the image system is approaching or leaving the object in a high speed, the recorded image will be blurred radially. However, this kind of radial blur can be reduced by changing the pixel layout of retina_like sensor. So image quality assessment studies carried out on the different structures of the retina_like sensor output image can provide theoretical guidance for the establishment of the optimal layout of the retina_like sensor. This paper first analyzes the distortion process of the retina_like sensor output image in high-speed forward motion and find that such a distortion of the image including under-sampled distortion and radial blur distortion. Based on the characteristics of the distorted image, the author puts forward a full reference image quality assessment method, named Qretina, for such images. The method is according to the distortion process. Do under-sampling evaluation and radial fuzzy evaluation firstly, then weigh the two parts to get the final image quality evaluation results. The experimental results show that Qretina has better performance than the SSIM.

  6. Dynamic coupling of pattern formation and morphogenesis in the developing vertebrate retina.

    PubMed

    Picker, Alexander; Cavodeassi, Florencia; Machate, Anja; Bernauer, Sabine; Hans, Stefan; Abe, Gembu; Kawakami, Koichi; Wilson, Stephen W; Brand, Michael

    2009-10-01

    During embryonic development, pattern formation must be tightly synchronized with tissue morphogenesis to coordinate the establishment of the spatial identities of cells with their movements. In the vertebrate retina, patterning along the dorsal-ventral and nasal-temporal (anterior-posterior) axes is required for correct spatial representation in the retinotectal map. However, it is unknown how specification of axial cell positions in the retina occurs during the complex process of early eye morphogenesis. Studying zebrafish embryos, we show that morphogenetic tissue rearrangements during eye evagination result in progenitor cells in the nasal half of the retina primordium being brought into proximity to the sources of three fibroblast growth factors, Fgf8/3/24, outside the eye. Triple-mutant analysis shows that this combined Fgf signal fully controls nasal retina identity by regulating the nasal transcription factor Foxg1. Surprisingly, nasal-temporal axis specification occurs very early along the dorsal-ventral axis of the evaginating eye. By in vivo imaging GFP-tagged retinal progenitor cells, we find that subsequent eye morphogenesis requires gradual tissue compaction in the nasal half and directed cell movements into the temporal half of the retina. Balancing these processes drives the progressive alignment of the nasal-temporal retina axis with the anterior-posterior body axis and is controlled by a feed-forward effect of Fgf signaling on Foxg1-mediated cell cohesion. Thus, the mechanistic coupling and dynamic synchronization of tissue patterning with morphogenetic cell behavior through Fgf signaling leads to the graded allocation of cell positional identity in the eye, underlying retinotectal map formation. PMID:19823566

  7. Rod Photoreceptors Express GPR55 in the Adult Vervet Monkey Retina

    PubMed Central

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian; Ptito, Maurice; Bouchard, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids exert their actions mainly through two receptors, the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) and cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R). In recent years, the G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) was suggested as a cannabinoid receptor based on its activation by anandamide and tetrahydrocannabinol. Yet, its formal classification is still a matter of debate. CB1R and CB2R expression patterns are well described for rodent and monkey retinas. In the monkey retina, CB1R has been localized in its neural (cone photoreceptor, horizontal, bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells) and CB2R in glial components (Müller cells). The aim of this study was to determine the expression pattern of GPR55 in the monkey retina by using confocal microscopy. Our results show that GPR55 is strictly localized in the photoreceptor layer of the extrafoveal portion of the retina. Co-immunolabeling of GPR55 with rhodopsin, the photosensitive pigment in rods, revealed a clear overlap of expression throughout the rod structure with most prominent staining in the inner segments. Additionally, double-label of GPR55 with calbindin, a specific marker for cone photoreceptors in the primate retina, allowed us to exclude expression of GPR55 in cones. The labeling of GPR55 in rods was further assessed with a 3D visualization in the XZ and YZ planes thus confirming its exclusive expression in rods. These results provide data on the distribution of GPR55 in the monkey retina, different than CB1R and CB2R. The presence of GPR55 in rods suggests a function of this receptor in scotopic vision that needs to be demonstrated. PMID:24244730

  8. Unique topographic separation of two spectral classes of cones in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Szél, A; Röhlich, P; Caffé, A R; Juliusson, B; Aguirre, G; Van Veen, T

    1992-11-15

    We have found two immunologically distinguishable cone types in the retina of the mouse, each localized to two opposite halves of the eye. One cone type was labelled by the monoclonal antibody COS-1 specific to the middle-to-long wave sensitive visual pigment of the mammals, while the other type was stained by the shortwave-specific monoclonal antibody (OS-2). These results were confirmed with other antibodies directed against specific sequences of the visual pigments. As a result of the uneven distribution of the two cone types the mouse retina is divided into two fields separated by an oblique meridional line. The middlewave sensitive cones were present exclusively in the dorsal half of the mouse retina (M-field). The overwhelming majority of the shortwave sensitive cones occupied the ventral half (S-field), and only a small number was scattered among the middlewave sensitive cones in the dorsal retina. The ratio of the two cone types in the M-field corresponds to what has been found in the retina of other mammals, including rodents such as the gerbil and the rat. The S-field represents an entirely unique area with the unusually great number of shortwave sensitive cones and with the complete lack of the middlewave sensitive ones. The present study provides the structural basis for dichromacy in a rodent species considered for a long time to be monochromat. In addition, it shows that the ventral retina, containing exclusively S-cones in a relatively high density, is a unique retinal field not present in other mammalian species studied so far. PMID:1447405

  9. Characterization of a novel C-kinesin (KIFC3) abundantly expressed in vertebrate retina and RPE.

    PubMed

    Hoang, E; Bost-Usinger, L; Burnside, B

    1999-07-01

    Many forms of intracellular transport are mediated by microtubule-dependent motors of the kinesin superfamily (KIFs). To identify kinesins expressed in human retina and RPE, we used degenerate primer RT-PCR to amplify a approximately 440 bp kinesin motor domain fragment from human retinal and RPE messenger RNAs. Four distinct kinesins were detected: one C-kinesin (HsKIFC3); one kinesin from the unc104/KIF1 family [HsKIF1A]; and the ubiquitous and neuronal forms of conventional kinesin heavy chain [HsuKHC and HsnKHC]. The C-kinesin HsKIFC3 comprised 33.3% of the retinal clones and was 60% identical to FKIF2, the most abundant kinesin detected in a previous screen of fish retina and 95% identical to a fragment of MmKifC3 recently amplified from mouse brain. Elsewhere we have reported the sequence of HsKIFC3 and shown that it maps to the same locus on chromosome 16q13-q21 as Bardet-Biedl syndrome Type II, a hereditary retinal degeneration. We describe here the kinesin PCR screen of human retina and RPE and examine the tissue and subcellular distribution of KIFC3 in both fish and human retina using an antibody raised against a peptide conserved between FKIF2 and HsKIFC3. This peptide antibody identified a single approximately 80 kDa band in Western blots of fish and human retina and RPE. In both fish and human retina this antibody strongly labeled photoreceptor terminals in the outer plexiform layer, suggesting that FKIF2/KIFC3 may play some role in the photoreceptor synapse. PMID:10375449

  10. Dynamic Coupling of Pattern Formation and Morphogenesis in the Developing Vertebrate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Picker, Alexander; Cavodeassi, Florencia; Machate, Anja; Bernauer, Sabine; Hans, Stefan; Abe, Gembu; Kawakami, Koichi; Wilson, Stephen W.; Brand, Michael

    2009-01-01

    During embryonic development, pattern formation must be tightly synchronized with tissue morphogenesis to coordinate the establishment of the spatial identities of cells with their movements. In the vertebrate retina, patterning along the dorsal-ventral and nasal-temporal (anterior-posterior) axes is required for correct spatial representation in the retinotectal map. However, it is unknown how specification of axial cell positions in the retina occurs during the complex process of early eye morphogenesis. Studying zebrafish embryos, we show that morphogenetic tissue rearrangements during eye evagination result in progenitor cells in the nasal half of the retina primordium being brought into proximity to the sources of three fibroblast growth factors, Fgf8/3/24, outside the eye. Triple-mutant analysis shows that this combined Fgf signal fully controls nasal retina identity by regulating the nasal transcription factor Foxg1. Surprisingly, nasal-temporal axis specification occurs very early along the dorsal-ventral axis of the evaginating eye. By in vivo imaging GFP-tagged retinal progenitor cells, we find that subsequent eye morphogenesis requires gradual tissue compaction in the nasal half and directed cell movements into the temporal half of the retina. Balancing these processes drives the progressive alignment of the nasal-temporal retina axis with the anterior-posterior body axis and is controlled by a feed-forward effect of Fgf signaling on Foxg1-mediated cell cohesion. Thus, the mechanistic coupling and dynamic synchronization of tissue patterning with morphogenetic cell behavior through Fgf signaling leads to the graded allocation of cell positional identity in the eye, underlying retinotectal map formation. PMID:19823566