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Sample records for retinal hemorrhage

  1. [Unusual retinal abnormality: retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy].

    PubMed

    Errera, M-H; Dupas, B; Man, H; Gualino, V; Gaudric, A; Massin, P

    2011-03-01

    A diet restricted to rice and boiled fruit and vegetables leads to vitamin C deficiency. We describe the third case, to our knowledge, of retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy. Reduced bilateral visual acuity in a 50-year-old patient was associated with macrocytic anemia, denutrition, and cutaneous ecchymoses. Oral vitamin C treatment provided subjective clinical improvement and regression of the retinal hemorrhages on fundus examination, with no side effects. Vitamin C plays an important role in collagen stability in vascular and bone walls. PMID:21392843

  2. Morphometrical analysis of retinal hemorrhages in the shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Betz, P; Puschel, K; Miltner, E; Lignitz, E; Eisenmenger, W

    1996-03-01

    A morphometrical analysis of retinal hemorrhages was performed in cases of physical child abuse including the shaken baby syndrome and in controls (severe head injury, intravital brain death, non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage, SIDS including cardiopulmonary resuscitation). The extent of the retinal hemorrhages was significantly different between both groups. In all cases of physical child abuse, massive retinal hemorrhages in at least one eye could be found ranging between a maximum value of 19.2 and 73.2% of the entire retinal area. In contrast, only two cases of the control group (severe head injury with skull fractures and intracranial bleeding following traffic accident or fall) showed slight hemorrhages of 3.33 or 1.18% of the retinal area but only in one eye. Therefore, the results provide evidence that massive intraretinal hemorrhages indicate violent shaking -- in particular in association with other signs of physical child abuse. PMID:8855047

  3. Retinal hemorrhagic lesions from femtosecond visible laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Cindy D.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Cain, Clarence P.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Roach, William P.

    1994-08-01

    We present our clinical evaluation of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic 90 fs single pulses in rabbits and primates. The rabbit and primate eye present unique in vivo models for evaluation of retinal and choroidal laser induced hemorrhages with distinct differences in their retinal anatomy. We found two different hemorrhagic events to occur in the posterior pole with delivery of 90 fs pulses. First, in the Dutch Belted rabbit, we found large amounts of energy per pulse (from 20 to 60 times ED50) were required for formation of subretinal hemorrhages. Second, in the Rhesus monkey, we found significant numbers of small intraretinal hemorrhages from relatively low energy 90 fs pulses. Both the Dutch Belted rabbit and the Rhesus monkey failed to consistently show subretinal hemorrhagic lesions form very high pulse energies. Our findings suggest more energy absorption at the level of the retinal circulation than the choroidal circulation with our pulse parameters. The effects of the laser on the retinal circulation may be due to the use of a wavelength of 580 nm. At this wavelength the oxyhemoglobin to melanin absorption ratio is nearly at its peak (approximately 0.40), perhaps allowing improved absorption in the retinal vasculature. One precaution with this finding, however, are the distinct differences between primate and non-primate ocular systems. Further studies are required to resolve the differences in damage at the level of the RPE and choroid between rabbits and primates.

  4. Retinal Hemorrhage in Abusive Head Trauma: Finding a Common Language

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Alex V.; Cordovez, Jose A.; Leiby, Benjamin E.; Pequignot, Edward; Tandon, Anamika

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the performance of a refined Web-based tool for documenting retinal hemorrhage characteristics in suspected abusive head trauma. Methods: Using a comprehensive tabular secure platform, with access to digital images in color, black and white, and 4-zone system schematic overlay, four pediatric ophthalmologists performed pilot testing with 80 images for tool refinement. In a second phase, retinal hemorrhages were documented by number, zone, and type. Interobserver agreement was calculated using the Fleiss kappa coefficient. Intraobserver agreement was calculated using Cohen’s kappa statistic. We used surface area mapping software for further analysis. Results: Interobserver agreement was good (kappa 0.4–0.6) and very good (kappa 0.6–0.8) for all questions in Zone A (peripapillary). For zones C (midperiphery) and D (peripheral retina), agreement was very good for all questions except number of hemorrhages, for which agreement was good. Zone B (macula) showed good and fair agreement except for superficial hemorrhage, for which agreement was poor. There was very good intraobserver agreement for number (kappa 0.68, 0.65, 0.67) and type of hemorrhages in zones A, B, and C. Surface area mapping results revealed no significant differences between zones A and B. Zones C and D had significantly less hemorrhage than A and B. Conclusions: Our tool performed with good or very good interobserver and intraobserver agreement in almost all domains. We attribute zone B underperformance to the significant increased area covered by hemorrhages compared to zones C and D and the lack of contrast with normal anatomical structures in zone A. PMID:25075150

  5. Automated Detection of Malarial Retinopathy-Associated Retinal Hemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vinayak S.; Maude, Richard J.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Tang, Li; Garvin, Mona K.; Sayeed, Abdullah Abu; Ghose, Aniruddha; Hassan, Mahtab Uddin; Abràmoff, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To develop an automated method for the detection of retinal hemorrhages on color fundus images to characterize malarial retinopathy, which may help in the assessment of patients with cerebral malaria. Methods. A fundus image dataset from 14 patients (200 fundus images, with an average of 14 images per patient) previously diagnosed with malarial retinopathy was examined. We developed a pattern recognition–based algorithm, which extracted features from image watershed regions called splats (tobogganing). A reference standard was obtained by manual segmentation of hemorrhages, which assigned a label to each splat. The splat features with the associated splat label were used to train a linear k-nearest neighbor classifier that learnt the color properties of hemorrhages and identified the splats belonging to hemorrhages in a test dataset. In a crossover design experiment, data from 12 patients were used for training and data from two patients were used for testing, with 14 different permutations; and the derived sensitivity and specificity values were averaged. Results. The experiment resulted in hemorrhage detection sensitivities in terms of splats as 80.83%, and in terms of lesions as 84.84%. The splat-based specificity was 96.67%, whereas for the lesion-based analysis, an average of three false positives was obtained per image. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was reported as 0.9148 for splat-based, and as 0.9030 for lesion-based analysis. Conclusions. The method provides an automated means of detecting retinal hemorrhages associated with malarial retinopathy. The results matched well with the reference standard. With further development, this technique may provide automated assistance for screening and quantification of malarial retinopathy. PMID:22915035

  6. Evaluation of Temporal Association Between Vaccinations and Retinal Hemorrhage in Children

    PubMed Central

    Binenbaum, Gil; Christian, Cindy W.; Guttmann, Katy; Huang, Jiayan; Ying, Gui-shuang; Forbes, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Vaccinations have been proposed as a cause of retinal hemorrhage in children, primarily as part of a defense strategy in high-stakes abusive head trauma cases. If vaccination injections cause retinal hemorrhage, this consideration would affect the evaluation of children for suspected child abuse. Objectives To describe the prevalence and causes of retinal hemorrhage among infants and young children in an outpatient ophthalmology clinic and to test the hypothesis that, if vaccination injections cause retinal hemorrhage, then retinal hemorrhage would be seen frequently and be temporally associated with immunization. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective cohort study between June 1, 2009, and August 30, 2012, at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia pediatric ophthalmology clinics among 5177 children 1 to 23 months old undergoing a dilated fundus examination as an outpatient for any reason. Children with intraocular surgery or active retinal neovascularization were excluded from the study. Main outcomes and Measures The prevalence and causes of retinal hemorrhage, as well as the temporal association between vaccination injection within 7, 14, or 21 days preceding examination and retinal hemorrhage. Results Among 7675 outpatient fundus examinations, 9 of 5177 children had retinal hemorrhage for a prevalence of 0.17% (95% CI, 0.09%-0.33%). All 9 had abusive head trauma diagnosable with nonocular findings. Among a subset of 2210 children who had complete immunization records and underwent 3425 fundoscopic examinations, 163 children had an eye examination within 7 days of vaccination, 323 within 14 days, and 494 within 21 days. No children had retinal hemorrhage within 7 days of vaccination, 1 child had hemorrhage within 14 days, and no additional child had hemorrhage within 21 days. There was no temporal association between vaccination injection and retinal hemorrhage in the prior 7 days (P > .99), 14 days (P = .33), or 21 days (P = .46

  7. Meningocele-induced positional syncope and retinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bekavac, Ivo; Halloran, John I

    2003-05-01

    Meningocele is recognized as a rare, usually asymptomatic condition not associated with acute neurologic symptoms. We herein describe the case of a patient with a longstanding history of a lower back "mass" and recurrent syncope who became acutely unresponsive and developed bilateral retinal hemorrhages when she was placed in the supine position to undergo carotid sonography. MR imaging revealed a large, dorsal lumbar meningocele. The episode likely was caused by acutely increased intracranial pressure caused by displacement of CSF from the meningocele intracranially. PMID:12748081

  8. Association between retinal hemorrhagic pattern and macular perfusion status in eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, Yuki; Uji, Akihito; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ooto, Sotaro; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Ayako; Iida, Yuto; Miwa, Yuko; Hata, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study included 63 eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) to evaluate the retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior poles and explore their clinical relevance in macular perfusion differentiation. Retinal hemorrhagic patterns and macular perfusion status were evaluated via fundus photography and fluorescein angiography, respectively. Macular perfusion was judged as nonischemic in 30, ischemic in 28, and undeterminable in 5 among the 63 eyes. Predominant hemorrhagic patterns were flame-shaped in 39 (67.2%) and non-flame-shaped in 19 (32.8%) eyes. All 39 eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage showed a nonischemic macula. Of the 19 eyes classified as having a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage, 13 (68.4%) had an ischemic macula and 6 (31.6%) had a nonischemic macula (P < 0.001). Parallelism in eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage was higher than in those with a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage (P < 0.001), and in those with a nonischemic macula versus those with an ischemic macula (P < 0.001). The area under the curve for parallelism was 0.975 (P < 0.001), suggesting an accurate diagnostic parameter for macular perfusion differentiation. In conclusion, we objectively evaluated retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior pole in BRVO using the parallelism method, which was useful in differentiating macular perfusion status. PMID:27334338

  9. Vitreous hemorrhage secondary to retinal vasculopathy in a patient with dyskeratosis congenita.

    PubMed

    Finzi, Alessandro; Morara, Mariachiara; Pichi, Francesco; Veronese, Chiara; Ciardella, Antonio P

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to report a case of vitreous hemorrhage secondary to retinal vasculitis in a patient with dyskeratosis congenita. A 16-year-old white male was referred to the Ophthalmology Clinic due to deterioration of vision in his left eye. Medical history was significant for dyskeratosis congenita associated with thrombocytopenia. General physical examination revealed reticular pigmentation on the upper half of the chest, vertical ridges and splitting of finger nails, and oral mucosal leukoplakia. Ophthalmological examination of the anterior segment was unremarkable. Retinal examination revealed vitreous hemorrhage in the left eye veiling the retinal details. A possible history of trauma was denied. Fundus examination of the right eye showed retinal vascular sheathing with a few dot and blot retinal hemorrhages. Fluorescein angiography revealed extensive areas of non-perfusion beyond the equator in the right eye, later treated with scatter laser photocoagulation. We performed a 23-gauge vitrectomy with endolaser treatment of the new vascularization areas in the left eye. After 6 months, best-corrected visual acuity in the right and left eye was 20/20 and 20/25, respectively. Rather than being confined to anterior segment abnormalities like conjunctivitis, blepharitis and nasolacrimal duct obstruction which are reported in the literature, dyskeratosis congenita can cause significant visual loss due to retinal vasculitis and vitreous hemorrhage. Therefore physicians and ophthalmologists should be aware of this possibility and prompt diagnosis and treatment could prevent further visual loss in such patients. PMID:24114504

  10. Significance of retinal laser lesion location and subretinal hemorrhage in bridging choroidal neovascular complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuschereba, Steven T.; Clarkson, Donna R.; Valo, Lynn M.; Brown, Jeremiah, Jr.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2003-06-01

    Purpose: To determine funduscopic criteria that will help predict when bridging choroidal neovascular (CNV) complexes will develop after laser retinal trauma and to define early preventive treatment targets. Methods: Ten rhesus monkeys were used and retinal lesions were produced by Nd:YAG exposures (20ns, 1-2mJ, 1064nm, min. spot size) simulating human accidental laser trauma to the central fundus. Funduscopy and fluorescein/ICG angiography were conducted at day 1, 4, and 14, and at 2 and 4 months, and animals terminated for histologic evaluation. Predisposition for bridging fibrovascular complexes was evaluated for single lesions, two small lesions showing coalescing hemorrhages, and multiple lesions involved with large field subretinal and vitreous hemorrhages. Results: Elevated CNVs were present in all single lesions with confined subretinal hemorrhages. All lesion sets that showed initial and small coalescing subretinal hemorrhages formed bridging CNV scars. No bridging CNVs occurred in lesion sets involving a vitreous hemorrhage adjacent to a confined, but small subretinal hemorrhage. In large field subretinal hemorrhages involving multiple laser lesions, complex CNV formation occurred. Extensive secondary photoreceptor losses occurred in confined hemorrhage and CNV zones. Conclusion: Trauma presenting with evidence of coalescing and confined subretinal hemorrhages between two adjacent lesions has a high chance of forming choroidal neovascular bridge complexes between the involved lesions. CNV formation may be related to the long residence time, break down products, and clearance processes of extravasated blood. Removal of trapped blood and curtailing angiogenesis and cellular proliferation may be helpful treatment strategies.

  11. Hemorrhagic Occlusive Retinal Vasculitis After First Eye Cataract Surgery Without Subsequent Second Eye Involvement.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Nicole; Savini, Giacomo; Barboni, Piero; Ducoli, Pietro; Ciardella, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    A case of monocular postoperative hemorrhagic occlusive retinal vasculitis (HORV) after uncomplicated bilateral cataract surgery is described. HORV is a severe syndrome that leads to painless visual loss after uncomplicated cataract surgery. The same surgical procedure was adopted in both eyes except for the use of intracameral vancomycin, which was injected only in the eye that developed HORV. Diffuse retinal ischemia with vascular sheathing and intraretinal hemorrhages were detected during the fourth postoperative day. Despite treatment, the patient developed severe neovascular glaucoma. This case supports the causative role of vancomycin in the pathogenesis of HORV and suggests avoiding it for chemoprophylaxis. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:764-766.]. PMID:27548454

  12. Vasculitis-like hemorrhagic retinal angiopathy in Wegener’s granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Granulomatosis with polyangiitis, also known as Wegener’s granulomatosis, is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease that can also involve the eyes. We report a case of massive retinal and preretinal hemorrhages with perivascular changes as the initial signs in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s granulomatosis). Case presentation A 39-year-old Caucasian male presented with blurred vision in his right eye, myalgia and arthralgia, recurrent nose bleeds and anosmia. Fundus image of his right eye showed massive retinal hemorrhages and vasculitis-like angiopathy, although no fluorescein extravasation was present in fluorescein angiography. Laboratory investigations revealed an inflammation with increased C-reactive protein, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and neutrophil count. Tests for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) were positive for c-ANCA (cytoplasmatic ANCA) and PR3-ANCA (proteinase 3-ANCA). Renal biopsy demonstrated a focal segmental necrotizing glomerulonephritis. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s granulomatosis) was diagnosed and a combined systemic therapy of cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids was initiated. During 3 months of follow-up, complete resorption of retinal hemorrhages was seen and general complaints as well as visual acuity improved during therapy. Conclusion Vasculitis-like retinal changes can occur in Wegener’s granulomatosis. Despite massive retinal and preretinal hemorrhages that cause visual impairment, immunosuppressive therapy can improve ocular symptoms. PMID:24021028

  13. Risk factors associated with retinal hemorrhage in suspected abusive head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Zachary N.; Thurber, Clinton J.; Chuang, Alice Z.; Kumar, Kartik S.; Davis, Garvin H.; Kellaway, Judianne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine risk factors associated with retinal hemorrhage (RH) in pediatric abusive head trauma (AHT) suspects. Methods Records of children aged 0–3 years hospitalized for suspected AHT from January 2007 to November 2011 were retrospectively reviewed in this case–control study. Children were classified into case and control groups based on RH presence. Medical history, presenting symptoms, reasons, and characteristics of injury were recorded. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors. Results A total of 168 children (104 males) were included. Of these, 103 were classified as cases and 65 as controls. The mean age (with standard deviation) was 9.3 ± 8.3 months (range, 1 day-36 months). Of the 103 cases, 22 (21%) had subretinal hemorrhage, 9 (9%) had retinoschisis, and 1 (1%) had vitreous hemorrhage. Children presenting with lethargy or altered mental status (P < 0.0001), subdural hemorrhage (P < 0.0001), and other radiologic findings (eg, cerebral ischemia, diffuse axonal injury, hydrocephalus, or solid organ injury; P = 0.01546) were likely to have RH. All 23 children with skull or nonskull fracture without intracranial hemorrhage did not have RH (P < 0.0001 both categories). Conclusions Retinal hemorrhages were almost never found in the absence of intracranial hemorrhage and not found in the setting of fracture without intracranial hemorrhage. PMID:25828822

  14. Case report of optic disc drusen with simultaneous peripapillary subretinal hemorrhage and central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Law, David Zhiwei; Yang, Francine Pei Lin; Teoh, Stephen Charn Beng

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old Chinese gentleman presented with right eye floaters and photopsia over one week. His visual acuities were 20/20 bilaterally. Posterior segment examination showed a right eye swollen optic disc and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) associated with an area of subretinal hemorrhage adjacent to the optic disc. Fundus fluorescein (FA) and indocyanine green angiographies (ICGA) of the right eye did not demonstrate choroidal neovascularization (CNV), polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), or retinal ischemia. Ultrasound B-scan revealed optic disc drusen (ODD). In view of good vision and absence of CNV, he was managed conservatively with spontaneous resolution after two months. Commonly, ODD may directly compress and mechanically rupture subretinal vessels at the optic disc, resulting in peripapillary subretinal hemorrhage, as was likely the case in our patient. Mechanical impairment of peripapillary circulation also results in retinal ischemia and may trigger the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and/or polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), leading to subretinal haemorrhage. Compromise in central venous outflow with increased retinal central venous pressure from the direct mechanical effects of enlarging ODD results in central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). Patients with subretinal hemorrhage and CRVO from ODD should be monitored closely for the development of potentially sight-threatening complications. PMID:25544921

  15. Splat feature classification with application to retinal hemorrhage detection in fundus images.

    PubMed

    Tang, Li; Niemeijer, Meindert; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Garvin, Mona K; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    A novel splat feature classification method is presented with application to retinal hemorrhage detection in fundus images. Reliable detection of retinal hemorrhages is important in the development of automated screening systems which can be translated into practice. Under our supervised approach, retinal color images are partitioned into nonoverlapping segments covering the entire image. Each segment, i.e., splat, contains pixels with similar color and spatial location. A set of features is extracted from each splat to describe its characteristics relative to its surroundings, employing responses from a variety of filter bank, interactions with neighboring splats, and shape and texture information. An optimal subset of splat features is selected by a filter approach followed by a wrapper approach. A classifier is trained with splat-based expert annotations and evaluated on the publicly available Messidor dataset. An area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.96 is achieved at the splat level and 0.87 at the image level. While we are focused on retinal hemorrhage detection, our approach has potential to be applied to other object detection tasks. PMID:23193310

  16. Progressive Outer Retinal Necrosis Combined with Vitreous Hemorrhage in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    You, Yong Sung; Lee, Sung Jin; Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Chang Hyun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To describe an unusual case of rapidly progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) with vitreous hemorrhage in a 41-year-old woman with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), who had retinitis developed from what was probably varicellar-zoster virus combined with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex type 1,2, as proven by the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP). Methods This study is a case report detailing clinical follow-up and an aqueous humor test by PCR-RFLP. Results The deep, white retinal lesions coalesced and progressively expanded in a circumferential manner, with sparing of the perivascular retina. However, retinal and vitreous hemorrhages, unusual findings for PORN, could be noted around the optic nerve. Varicellar-zoster virus (VZV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and herpes simplex types 1,2 (HSV-1,2) were detected in the aqueous humor by PCR. Conclusions PORN has been described as a variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy, occurring particularly in patients with AIDS. Although the etiologic agent has been reported to be VZV, concurrent or combined etiologic agents can include HSV-1, HSV-2, and CMV in AIDS patients. Therefore, combined antiviral therapy with acyclovir and ganciclovir could be more reasonable as an initial therapy. PMID:17460434

  17. Traumatic endophthalmitis presenting as isolated retinal vasculitis and white-centered hemorrhages: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Relhan, Nidhi; Jalali, Subhadra; Nalamada, Suma; Dave, Vivek; Mathai, Annie

    2012-01-01

    The article reports a case and review of the literature of endophthalmitis presenting as isolated retinal vasculitis. A 26-year-old male was observed to have white-centered retinal hemorrhages and retinal vasculitis following an occult scleral perforation. At presentation, the visual acuity was 20/60. With clinical suspicion of early endophthalmitis, he underwent wound exploration, scleral tear repair, vitreous biopsy and administration of intravitreal antibiotics. Microbiology evaluation revealed significant presence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis. Final visual acuity improved to 20/20 at 6 weeks postoperatively. Literature search revealed eight similar cases, all of them due to Staphylococcus species. Retinal vasculitis and white-centered retinal hemorrhages can be a presenting sign of early endophthalmitis, especially with non-fulminant pathogens like S. epidermidis. PMID:22824604

  18. Retinal Vessel Analysis (RVA) in the Context of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - A Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Miriam; Clusmann, Hans; Fuest, Matthias; Mueller, Marguerite; Brockmann, Marc Alexander; Vilser, Walthard; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Hoellig, Anke; Seiz, Marcel; Thomé, Claudius; Kotliar, Konstantin; Schubert, Gerrit Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background Timely detection of impending delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is essential to improve outcome, but poses a diagnostic challenge. Retinal vessels as an embryological part of the intracranial vasculature are easily accessible for analysis and may hold the key to a new and non-invasive monitoring technique. This investigation aims to determine the feasibility of standardized retinal vessel analysis (RVA) in the context of SAH. Methods In a prospective pilot study, we performed RVA in six patients awake and cooperative with SAH in the acute phase (day 2–14) and eight patients at the time of follow-up (mean 4.6±1.7months after SAH), and included 33 age-matched healthy controls. Data was acquired using a manoeuvrable Dynamic Vessel Analyzer (Imedos Systems UG, Jena) for examination of retinal vessel dimension and neurovascular coupling. Results Image quality was satisfactory in the majority of cases (93.3%). In the acute phase after SAH, retinal arteries were significantly dilated when compared to the control group (124.2±4.3MU vs 110.9±11.4MU, p<0.01), a difference that persisted to a lesser extent in the later stage of the disease (122.7±17.2MU, p<0.05). Testing for neurovascular coupling showed a trend towards impaired primary vasodilation and secondary vasoconstriction (p = 0.08, p = 0.09 resp.) initially and partial recovery at the time of follow-up, indicating a relative improvement in a time-dependent fashion. Conclusion RVA is technically feasible in patients with SAH and can detect fluctuations in vessel diameter and autoregulation even in less severely affected patients. Preliminary data suggests potential for RVA as a new and non-invasive tool for advanced SAH monitoring, but clinical relevance and prognostic value will have to be determined in a larger cohort. PMID:27388619

  19. Central Retinal Venous Pressure in Eyes of Normal-Tension Glaucoma Patients with Optic Disc Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ko Eun; Kim, Dong Myung; Flammer, Josef; Kim, Kyoung Nam

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare central retinal venous pressure (CRVP) among eyes with and without optic disc hemorrhage (ODH) in bilateral normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) patients and NTG eyes without an episode of ODH. Methods In this prospective study, 22 bilateral NTG patients showing a unilateral ODH and 29 bilateral NTG patients without an episode of ODH were included. Eyes were categorized into group A (n = 22, eyes with ODH), group B (n = 22, fellow eyes without ODH), and group C (n = 29, NTG eyes without an episode of ODH). A contact lens ophthalmodynamometer was used to measure CRVP and central retinal arterial pressure (CRAP). Results Intraocular pressure (IOP) measured on the day of contact lens ophthalmodynamometry showed no difference among groups. However, the mean baseline IOP in group A was significantly lower than that in group C (P = .008). The CRVP in group A (29.1 ± 10.8 mmHg) was significantly lower than that in group C (40.1 ± 8.8 mmHg, P = .001), but similar to that in group B (30.5 ± 8.7 mmHg, P = .409). A similar relationship was noted for CRAP. No significant eye-associated variable for ODH was found in group A and B by conditional logistic regression analysis (all P > 0.05). However, multivariate logistic regression analysis in groups A and C revealed that low mean baseline IOP (odds ratio [OR] = 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49-0.98, P = 0.043) and low CRVP (OR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.95, P = 0.003) were associated with ODH. Conclusions CRVP was lower in NTG eyes with ODH than in eyes without an episode of ODH, but similar to that of fellow eyes without ODH. These imply less likelihood of association between increased central retinal venous resistance and ODH. PMID:25996599

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography Follow-up of an Unusual Case of Old Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment With a Hemorrhagic Macrocyst at the Macula.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Koushik; Bypareddy, Ravi; Chawla, Rohan; Kumawat, Babulal

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old female presented with visual acuity of hand movement close to face, an old inferior rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD), and a large hemorrhagic macular macrocyst (HMM) in the right eye. After 2 weeks of successful vitreoretinal surgery, the HMM started decreasing in height and resolved by 3 months. On optical coherence tomography, a zone of hyperreflectivity in the outer retinal layers was evident on resolution of the cyst. At final follow-up, the visual acuity improved to 1/60 only. Though HMM resolved completely after retinal reattachment, alteration and thickening of microarchitecture of the outer retinal layers ensued. PMID:26599252

  1. A finite element analysis of the retinal hemorrhages accompanied by shaken baby syndrome/abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Makoto; Yamazaki, Junpei; Mizunuma, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to elucidate the mechanism of the retinal hemorrhage (RH) accompanied by shaken baby syndrome or abusive head trauma (SBS/AHT) by analyses using a computational model. We focused on a hypothesis that the vitreoretinal traction due to acceleration and deceleration caused by abusive shaking leads to retinal hemorrhage. A finite element (FE) mechanical model with simple spherical geometry was constructed. When the FE mechanical model was virtually shaken, the intensity of the stress applied to the retinal plane agreed well with the results from an analysis using a physical model made of agar gel. Impacts due to falling events induced more intensive tensile stresses, but with shorter duration, than the shake did. By applying a mathematical theory on tackiness, we propose a hypothesis that the time integration of the stress, in the unit of Pa·s, would be a good predictor of the RH accompanied by SBS/AHT. A single cycle of abusive shake amounted to 101Pa·s of time integration of inflicted stress, while a single impact event amounted to 36Pa·s. This would explain the paradoxical observation that shaking induces RH while RH due to impact events is only seen in a major event such as a fatal motor vehicle accident. PMID:25282076

  2. History of an abusive head trauma including a lucid interval and a retinal hemorrhage is most likely false.

    PubMed

    De Leeuw, Marc; Beuls, Emile Aloïs; Jorens, Philippe G; Parizel, Paul M; Jacobs, Werner

    2013-09-01

    A lucid interval (LI) is the period of time between regaining consciousness after a short period of unconsciousness, resulting from a head injury and deteriorating after the onset of neurologic signs and symptoms caused by that injury. The incentive for this study was the case of a father who left his 14-week-old infant with the nanny in whose custody the infant had collapsed. The nanny denied involvement in the injury, and the father became a suspect. Of 47 abusive head trauma (AHT) cases, 8 were found to have an LI in the past. The history of the cases were thoroughly analyzed and compared with evidence in the literature. An LI is not compatible with an inertial brain injury. Shaking has either an immediate effect or no effect, which means that an LI occurs only in pure impact or blunt injuries. When "shaking lesions" are found including a retinal hemorrhage while the history mentions an LI, the story most likely is false, regardless of whether the perpetrator confesses. The finding of an LI may change the assessment of an AHT case. Lucid interval is a valuable variable in the diagnostic accuracy of an AHT. PMID:23896724

  3. Genetic pediatric retinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Say, Emil Anthony T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary pediatric retinal diseases are a diverse group of disorders with pathologies affecting different cellular structures or retinal development. Many can mimic typical pediatric retinal disease such as retinopathy of prematurity, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema. Multisystem involvement is frequently seen in hereditary pediatric retinal disease. A thorough history coupled with a good physical examination can oftentimes lead the ophthalmologist or pediatrician to the correct genetic test and correct diagnosis. In some instances, evaluation of parents or siblings may be required to determine familial involvement when the history is inconclusive or insufficient and clinical suspicion is high.

  4. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of ...

  5. [Non-traumatic vitreous hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Conart, J-B; Berrod, J-P

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous vitreous hemorrhage is a serious disease whose incidence is 7 per 100,000 people per year. Posterior vitreous detachment with or without retinal tear, diabetic retinopathy, vascular proliferation after retinal vein occlusion, age-related macular degeneration and Terson's syndrome are the most common causes. Repeated ultrasonography may ignore a retinal tear or detachment and delay vitrectomy that is the only treatment for serious forms. The occurrence of retinal tear or detachment is a surgical emergency as well as rubeosis or diabetic tractional retinal detachment involving the macula. Intravitreal injection of antiangiogenic agents are helpful in clearing the vitreous cavity, facilitating laser photocoagulation and reducing the risks of bleeding during preretinal neovascular membranes dissection. PMID:26826742

  6. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  7. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  8. Cytomegalovirus retinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to prevent its return. Alternative Names Cytomegalovirus retinitis Images Eye CMV retinitis CMV (cytomegalovirus) References Crumpacker CS. ... 5. Read More Antibody HIV/AIDS Immune response Retinal detachment Systemic WBC count Update Date 12/10/ ...

  9. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    MedlinePlus

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... Four different dengue viruses are known to cause dengue hemorrhagic fever. Dengue hemorrhagic fever occurs when a person is bitten by ...

  10. Diode laser contact transscleral retinal photocoagulation: a clinical study.

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, D A; Schwartz, S; Dowler, J G; Ulbig, M; Blach, R K; Hamilton, P A

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To examine the clinical efficacy of contact transscleral retinal photocoagulation with a diode laser. METHODS--Transscleral retinal photocoagulation was performed on 36 eyes. The conditions treated included peripheral retinal breaks associated with retinal detachments (30 eyes) and giant retinal tears (six eyes). Of the 30 eyes with retinal detachments, 28 underwent transscleral photocoagulation to the site of drainage of subretinal fluid in an attempt to reduce the risk of hemorrhage. RESULTS--Threshold lesions were obtained with irradiances of between 95.4 W/cm2 and 191 W/cm2. Satisfactory chorioretinal adhesion was achieved in all eyes with retinal breaks and giant retinal tears. The only significant complications of treatment encountered were punctate choroidal haemorrhages (three eyes). Drainage related choroidal haemorrhage following earlier photocoagulation occurred in two of 28 eyes. CONCLUSIONS--This study confirms the clinical potential of transscleral diode laser photocoagulation in the therapy of surgical retinal conditions. Images PMID:8562540

  11. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  12. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage is motor vehicle crashes. Risks include: Aneurysm in other blood vessels Fibromuscular ... lumbar puncture ( spinal tap ) may be done. Other tests that may be done include: Cerebral angiography of ...

  13. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... can result from the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm — a weakened, dilated area of a blood vessel ... blood vessels in the brain even after the aneurysm that caused the hemorrhage is treated. Most of ...

  14. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... malformation (AVM) Bleeding disorder Bleeding from a cerebral aneurysm Head injury Unknown cause (idiopathic) Use of blood ... subarachnoid hemorrhage is motor vehicle crashes. Risks include: Aneurysm in other blood vessels Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) and ...

  15. [Hyphema with secondary hemorrhage: think about sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Karim, A; Laghmari, M; Dahreddine, M; Guedira, K; Ibrahimy, W; Essakali, N; Mohcine, Z

    2004-04-01

    The Authors report a case of a 13-Year-old white child who presented a grade I hyphema, anterior chamber inflammation after trauma. He presented a secondary hemorrhage with increased intraocular pressure that was not controlled within 48 h, thus requiring surgical intervention. A hemoglobin electrophoresis and hemostasis test showed a sickle cell trait. After hemorrhage resorption, the ocular fundus showed substantial retinal hemorrhage. The final visual outcome was poor and attributed to optic atrophy. Sickle cell trait is a significant risk factor for secondary hemorrhage, increased intraocular pressure, and permanent visual impairement in children who have traumatic hyphemas following blunt trauma. PMID:15173649

  16. Vitreous Hemorrhage in Pediatric Age Group

    PubMed Central

    AlHarkan, Dora H.; Kahtani, Eman S.; Gikandi, Priscilla W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To identify and study causes of vitreous hemorrhage (VH) in pediatric age group and to investigate factors predicting visual and anatomical outcomes. Procedure. A retrospective review of patients aged 16 years or less with the diagnosis of vitreous hemorrhage from January 2005 until December 2010. Results. A total number of 230 patients (240 eyes) were identified. Traumatic vitreous hemorrhage accounted for 82.5%. In cases of accidental trauma, final visual acuity of 20/200 was significantly associated with visual acuity of ≥20/200 at presentation and the absence of retinal detachment at last follow-up. Patients with nontraumatic vitreous hemorrhage were significantly younger with higher rates of enucleation/evisceration/exenteration and retinal detachment at last follow-up compared to traumatic cases. Conclusion. Trauma is the most common cause of VH in pediatric age group. In this group, initial visual acuity was the most important predictor for visual outcome, and the presence of retinal detachment is a negative predictor for final good visual outcome. The outcome is significantly worse in nontraumatic cases compared to traumatic cases. PMID:25505975

  17. New therapeutic modalities of retinal laser injury. Final report, 1 Mar 89-1 Mar 92

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, T.T.; Tso, M.O.

    1992-03-31

    Efficacies of three different regimens of high dose of methylprednisolone (MP) treatment on laser-induced non-hemorrhage retinal injury and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) in sub-retinal hemorrhage laser injury were evaluated in a sub-human primate model and a rat model respectively. Clinical, histopathological, and morphometric criteria were employed for evaluating the efficacy of MP. High dose and prolonged treatment (4 days) was the most effective regimen while high dose for 8 hours showed limited effect in non-hemorrhagic retinal injury. Intravitreal t-PA showed no apparent beneficial effect in sub-retinal hemorrhage after laser injury. Hence, patients with laser retinal injury may benefit from high dose MP treatment for an appropriate period of time.

  18. Retinal complications with elevated circulating plasma C5a associated with interferon-alpha therapy for chronic active hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Sugano, S; Yanagimoto, M; Suzuki, T; Sato, M; Onmura, H; Aizawa, H; Makino, H

    1994-11-01

    Retinal hemorrhage is a complication of interferon therapy of unknown pathogenesis. We report two chronic active hepatitis C patients who developed retinal hemorrhage and/or cotton wool patches during interferon-alpha therapy 4 and 12 wk after beginning treatment. At the time of the hemorrhage, plasma-activated complement 5, a known potent intravascular aggregator of granulocytes, increased to 54 ng/ml in one patient and to 29 ng/ml in the other patient. When the hemorrhage resolved, it decreased to under 5 ng/ml. Our cases suggest that complement activation occurs in patients treated with interferon-alpha and that activation of complement 5 can lead to retinal capillary infarction and retinal hemorrhage. High levels of activated complement 5 may predict retinal artery infarction or perhaps microvascular emboli in the other organs. PMID:7942735

  19. Potential for Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Rift Valley Fever Virus Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Gerhardt, Shoshana; Muiruri, Samuel; Muchiri, Eric; Peters, Clarence J.; Morrill, John; Lucas, Alexander H.; King, Charles H.; Kazura, James; LaBeaud, Angelle Desiree

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a significant threat to human health because it can progress to retinitis, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever. The timing of onset of Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) retinitis suggests an autoimmune origin. To determine whether RVFV retinitis is associated with increased levels of IgG against retinal tissue, we measured and compared levels of IgG against healthy human eye tissue by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that serum samples from RVFV-exposed Kenyans with retinitis (n = 8) were slightly more likely to have antibodies against retinal tissue than control populations, but the correlation was not statistically significant. Further investigation into the possible immune pathogenesis of RVFV retinitis could lead to improved therapies to prevent or treat this severe complication. PMID:23918215

  20. Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated from the laboratory to the clinical over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives. Improved mobility and object detection are some of the more notable findings from the clinical trials. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. This paper reviews the recent clinical trials, highlights technology breakthroughs that will contribute to next generation of retinal prostheses. PMID:24710817

  1. Foveomacular retinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kuming, B S

    1986-01-01

    A group of patients is described who developed the clinical features of foveomacular retinitis. No causative factors were isolated, and all patients strongly denied any type of sun gazing. It is possible that there is a group of patients who have the features of foveomacular retinitis but have not had any direct exposure to the sun. These patients would then constitute a primary type of foveomacular retinitis, as opposed to a secondary type which has a known cause and is synonymous with solar retinopathy. Images PMID:3790482

  2. [Cerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Nakase, Hiroyuki; Motoyama, Yasushi; Yamada, Shuichi

    2016-04-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remains a serious condition for which early aggressive care is warranted. Japanese evidence-based stroke guidelines were published in 2015 to present the current and comprehensive recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke. In the spontaneous ICH, topics focused on prevention, management in the acute and chronic stage, complications, management of coagulopathy and blood pressure, prevention and control of secondary brain injury and intracranial pressure, the role of surgery, and other pathologies of ICH. The management of ICH in pregnancy and the puerperium was newly added. These guidelines provide a framework for goal-directed treatment of the patient with ICH. PMID:27333758

  3. Retinal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision Diabetic eye disease Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is ... children. Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula Macular hole - ...

  4. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... immediately. Treatment How is retinal detachment treated? Small holes and tears are treated with laser surgery or ... laser surgery tiny burns are made around the hole to “weld” the retina back into place. Cryopexy ...

  5. Combined branch retinal vein and artery occlusion in toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Aggio, Fabio Bom; Novelli, Fernando José de; Rosa, Evandro Luis; Nobrega, Mário Junqueira

    2016-01-01

    A 22-year-old man complained of low visual acuity and pain in his left eye for five days. His ophthalmological examination revealed 2+ anterior chamber reaction and a white, poorly defined retinal lesion at the proximal portion of the inferotemporal vascular arcade. There were retinal hemorrhages in the inferotemporal region extending to the retinal periphery. In addition, venous dilation, increased tortuosity, and ischemic retinal whitening along the inferotemporal vascular arcade were also observed. A proper systemic work-up was performed, and the patient was diagnosed with ocular toxoplasmosis. He was treated with an anti-toxoplasma medication, and his condition slowly improved. Inferior macular inner and middle retinal atrophy could be observed on optical coherence tomography as a sequela of ischemic injury. To our knowledge, this is the first report of combined retinal branch vein and artery occlusion in toxoplasmosis resulting in a striking and unusual macular appearance. PMID:27463632

  6. Retinal detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the first symptoms of new flashes of light and floaters. ... diabetes. See your eye care specialist once a year. You may need more frequent visits if you have risk factors for retinal detachment. Be alert to symptoms of new flashes of light and floaters.

  7. Retinal arteriolar occlusions due to cytomegalovirus retinitis in elderly patients without HIV

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Five of 7 (71%) elderly immunocompetent patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis had retinal arteriolar occlusions versus 2 of 8 (25%) elderly immunocompromised patients and 1 of 19 (5%) younger HIV-infected patients. Compared to HIV-infected patients, elderly patients were more likely to have occlusive events, neovascularization or hemorrhage, and underlying vasculopathy. The purpose of this study is to report the novel finding of extensive retinal arteriolar occlusions and neovascularization in immunocompetent patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis. This is a retrospective observational cohort study of cytomegalovirus retinitis (CMVR) in a university setting. Seven patients were elderly but not immunocompromised, 8 were elderly and iatrogenically immunocompromised, and 16 were HIV-infected. All patients underwent polymerase chain reaction testing of intraocular fluid. Primary outcome measure was visual acuity. Secondary outcome measures were vascular occlusions, ischemic complications, and response to treatment. Results Mean age was 73, 70, and 41 years for immunocompetent, immunocompromised, and HIV-infected patients, respectively. Diabetes and vascular disease were common in the elderly. Vision loss to less than 5/200 occurred in 50% of the immunocompetent elderly patients, and 17% of CMV eyes in immunocompromised and HIV patients. Occlusion of the entire retinal vasculature occurred in 4/7 (57%) of immunocompetent patients despite lack of Zone I involvement, and rubeosis occurred in three, disc neovascularization in one, and vitreous hemorrhage in two patients. Vascular occlusive events were less common in immunocompromised patients and rare in the HIV-infected. Conclusions CMVR in non-HIV-infected elderly patients is associated with retinal arteriolar occlusions. An intact host immune response may increase damage to retinal vessels. Prompt diagnosis may avert catastrophic vision loss. PMID:23514532

  8. Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Mar. 01, 2016 How does a detached or torn retina affect your vision? If a retinal tear is occurring, you may ...

  9. Retinal metastasis from unknown primary: diagnosis, management, and clinicopathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Taubenslag, Kenneth J.; Kim, Stephen J.; Attia, Albert; Abel, Ty W.; Nickols, Hilary Highfield; Ancell, Kristin K.; Daniels, Anthony B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 75-year-old man was incidentally found to have a yellow-white retinal lesion with scattered hemorrhages. He was empirically treated elsewhere for viral retinitis without resolution and later transferred to the Vanderbilt Eye Institute, where retinal biopsy with silicone oil tamponade showed retinal metastasis. He had no prior history of cancer, and multiple systemic imaging evaluations failed to identify a primary site. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the biopsy were consistent with non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Due to the radiation-attenuating properties of silicone oil, the patient underwent silicone oil removal prior to receiving external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The retinal metastasis responded completely to EBRT, and at final follow-up, 18 months after initial presentation, no primary tumor has been identified. PMID:27330472

  10. Spontaneous absorption of extensive subinternal limiting membrane hemorrhage in shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Tatiana Tarules; Zacharias, Leandro Cabral; Pimentel, Sérgio Luis Gianotti

    2014-01-01

    The Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) is characterized by subdural hematomas (SH), retinal hemorrhages (RH), and multiple fractures of long bones without external evidence of head trauma. Subinternal limiting membrane (ILM) hemorrhage, also known as macular schisis, is a characteristic finding of this entity. There is no guideline on the right time to indicate surgical treatment. This report describes an abused child with massive sub-ILM hemorrhage, which showed spontaneous absorption after less than two months of follow-up. Due to the possible spontaneous resolution, we suggest an initial conservative treatment in cases of sub-ILM hemorrhage related to SBS. PMID:25548698

  11. Spontaneous Absorption of Extensive Subinternal Limiting Membrane Hemorrhage in Shaken Baby Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Tatiana Tarules; Zacharias, Leandro Cabral; Pimentel, Sérgio Luis Gianotti

    2014-01-01

    The Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) is characterized by subdural hematomas (SH), retinal hemorrhages (RH), and multiple fractures of long bones without external evidence of head trauma. Subinternal limiting membrane (ILM) hemorrhage, also known as macular schisis, is a characteristic finding of this entity. There is no guideline on the right time to indicate surgical treatment. This report describes an abused child with massive sub-ILM hemorrhage, which showed spontaneous absorption after less than two months of follow-up. Due to the possible spontaneous resolution, we suggest an initial conservative treatment in cases of sub-ILM hemorrhage related to SBS. PMID:25548698

  12. Col4a1 mutations cause progressive retinal neovascular defects and retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Marcel V.; Mao, Mao; Pawlikowski, Bradley T.; Kvezereli, Manana; Duncan, Jacque L.; Libby, Richard T.; John, Simon W. M.; Gould, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in collagen, type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1), a major component of basement membranes, cause multisystem disorders in humans and mice. In the eye, these include anterior segment dysgenesis, optic nerve hypoplasia and retinal vascular tortuosity. Here we investigate the retinal pathology in mice carrying dominant-negative Col4a1 mutations. To this end, we examined retinas longitudinally in vivo using fluorescein angiography, funduscopy and optical coherence tomography. We assessed retinal function by electroretinography and studied the retinal ultrastructural pathology. Retinal examinations revealed serous chorioretinopathy, retinal hemorrhages, fibrosis or signs of pathogenic angiogenesis with chorioretinal anastomosis in up to approximately 90% of Col4a1 mutant eyes depending on age and the specific mutation. To identify the cell-type responsible for pathogenesis we generated a conditional Col4a1 mutation and determined that primary vascular defects underlie Col4a1-associated retinopathy. We also found focal activation of Müller cells and increased expression of pro-angiogenic factors in retinas from Col4a1+/Δex41mice. Together, our findings suggest that patients with COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations may be at elevated risk of retinal hemorrhages and that retinal examinations may be useful for identifying patients with COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations who are also at elevated risk of hemorrhagic strokes. PMID:26813606

  13. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research and potential therapies are also discussed. PMID:17275656

  14. Branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sadaf; Mirza, Sajid Ali; Shokh, Ishrat

    2008-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusions (RVO) are the second commonest sight threatening vascular disorder. Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) are the two basic types of vein occlusion. Branch retinal vein occlusion is three times more common than central retinal vein occlusion and- second only to diabetic retinopathy as the most common retinal vascular cause of visual loss. The origin of branch retinal vein occlusion undoubtedly includes both systemic factors such as hypertension and local anatomic factors such as arteriovenous crossings. Branch retinal vein occlusion causes a painless decrease in vision, resulting in misty or distorted vision. Current treatment options don't address the underlying aetiology of branch retinal vein occlusion. Instead they focus on treating sequelae of the occluded venous branch, such as macular oedema, vitreous haemorrhage and traction retinal detachment from neovascularization. Evidences suggest that the pathogenesis of various types of retinal vein occlusion, like many other ocular vascular occlusive disorders, is a multifactorial process and there is no single magic bullet that causes retinal vein occlusion. A comprehensive management of patients with retinal vascular occlusions is necessary to correct associated diseases or predisposing abnormalities that could lead to local recurrences or systemic event. Along with a review of the literature, a practical approach for the management of retinal vascular occlusions is required, which requires collaboration between the ophthalmologist and other physicians: general practitioner, cardiologist, internist etc. as appropriate according to each case. PMID:19385476

  15. Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grade 1 is also referred to as germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH). Grades 3 and 4 involve more ... 2015:chap 60. Volpe JJ. Intracranial hemorrhage: germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage. In Volpe JJ, ed. Neurology of ...

  16. Thalamic infarcts and hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Amici, Serena

    2012-01-01

    The anatomy and supply of thalamic arteries are briefly described here. Thalamic infarcts and small-size hemorrhages are classified according to their sites: (1) posterolateral, (2) anterolateral, (3) medial, and (4) dorsal. (1) Posterolateral hemorrhages or lateral thalamic infarcts are usually characterized by severe motor impairment and sensory loss. Transient reduced consciousness, vertical-gaze abnormalities, and small fixed pupils may be evidenced. (2) Patients with anterolateral hemorrhages or tuberothalamic artery infarcts present frontal-type neuropsychological symptoms associated with mild hemiparesis and hemihypesthesia. (3) Medially located hemorrhages or paramedian artery infarcts have decreased levels of consciousness, vertical- and horizontal-gaze abnormalities, amnesia, and abulia. (4) Dorsal hemorrhages or posterior choroidal artery infarcts present with minimal transient hemiparesis and hemihypesthesia; apraxia, aphasia, and amnesia have also been described. PMID:22377880

  17. Massive choroidal hemorrhage associated with low molecular weight heparin therapy.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Leibovitch, I; Goldstein, M; Loewenstein, A

    2002-04-01

    An 84-year-old woman with unstable angina pectoris was treated with subcutaneous enoxaparine (Clexane) for several days before presenting with severe pain and decreased vision in her left eye. The intraocular pressure was 70 mmHg, and fundus examination showed a pigmented choroidal lesion and associated choroidal and retinal detachment. Ultrasonography was consistent with choroidal hemorrhage, and she was diagnosed as having acute glaucoma secondary to massive subchoroidal hemorrhage. Medical control of the intraocular pressure resulted in a significant clinical improvement. Intraocular hemorrhage and angle-closure glaucoma are rare and previously unreported complications in patients treated with low molecular weight heparin. It is important to be aware of this ocular complication as these drugs are so often used. PMID:11943940

  18. Laser injury to multiple retinal foci

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, J.J.; Cohen, H.B.; Stuck, B.E.; Rudd, G.P.; Beresky, D.E.; Wertz, F.D.

    1987-01-01

    A 21-year-old man received an accidental laser injury to three separate foci of the retina of his right eye from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser target designator emitting at 1064 nm, operating at 10 Hz, with a pulse duration of 20 ns. The nominal output of this device was 50 mJ, and the diameter of the output beam was approximately 4 cm. The extent of injury consisted of retinal necrosis, subretinal hemorrhage, vitreous hemorrhage, and striate retinopathy. The initial visual acuity was 20/400, but quickly recovered to 20/30. One year following injury the visual acuity was 20/40. Mature chorioretinal scars were apparent. A preretinal membrane was evident with marked wrinkling effect on the macular area of the retina.

  19. A Rare Cause of Retinal Artery Occlusion in Severe Hypernatremic Dehydration in Newborns.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Pinar Altiaylik; Kabatas, Emrah Utku; Kurtul, Bengi Ece; Dilli, Dilek; Zenciroglu, Aysegul; Okumus, Nurullah

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal hypernatremia is an important electrolyte disorder that may have serious complications. It may be a rare and underdiagnosed cause of venous and arterial thrombosis, leading to severe brain damage by cerebral edema and intracranial hemorrhage. Here, the authors present a case of bilateral central retinal artery occlusion in a newborn with severe hypernatremic dehydration who is found to be normal in terms of other causes of retinal arterial thromboembolization. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:482-485.]. PMID:27183555

  20. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia - HHT

    MedlinePlus

    ... Throughout Body Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disorder that affects about one in 5,000 people and causes arterial blood to flow directly into the veins, creating weakened ballooned vessels that can rupture. Interventional radiologists ...

  1. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fever with Renal Syndrome Hendra Virus Disease Kyasanur Forest Disease Lassa Fever Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis (LCM) Marburg Hemorrhagic ... the rodent species carrying several of the New World arenaviruses, live in geographically restricted areas. Therefore, the ...

  2. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  3. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biological pro...

  4. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retinitis pigmentosa retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of related eye disorders that ...

  6. The retinal ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Adams, N A; Awadein, Ahmed; Toma, Hassanain S

    2007-09-01

    While the functions of many of the proteins located in or associated with the photoreceptor cilia are poorly understood, disruption of the function of these proteins may result in a wide variety of phenotypes ranging from isolated retinal degeneration to more pleiotropic phenotypes. Systemic findings include neurosensory hearing loss, developmental delay, situs-inversus, infertility, disorders of limb and digit development, obesity, kidney disease, liver disease, and respiratory disease. The concept of "retinal ciliopathies" brings to attention the importance of further molecular analysis of this organelle as well as provides a potential common target for therapies for these disorders. The retinal ciliopathies include retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, cone-dystrophy, cone-rod dystrophy, Leber congenital amaurosis, as well as retinal degenerations associated with Usher syndrome, primary ciliary dyskinesia, Senior-Loken syndrome, Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Laurence-Moon syndrome, McKusick-Kaufman syndrome, and Biemond syndrome. Mutations for these disorders have been found in retinitis pigmentosa-1 (RP1), retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR), retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein (RPGR-IP), as well as the Usher, Bardet-Biedl, and nephronophthisis genes. Other systemic disorders associated with retinal degenerations that may also involve ciliary abnormalities include: Alstrom, Edwards-Sethi, Ellis-van Creveld, Jeune, Meckel-Gruber, Orofaciodigital Type 9, and Gurrieri syndromes. Understanding these conditions as ciliopathies may help the ophthalmologist to recognize associations between seemingly unrelated diseases and have a high degree of suspicion that a systemic finding may be present. PMID:17896309

  7. Hemorrhagic intraretinal macrocyst: Differential diagnoses and report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Rishi, Pukhraj; Rishi, Ekta; Sen, Pratik Ranjan; Sharma, Tarun

    2011-01-01

    Retinal 'cysts' may be single or multiple, ranging from two-to-ten disc diameters in size, and occur in eyes with longstanding retinal detachment. The authors describe a retinal macrocyst larger than ten disc diameters, with a blood-filled cavity, and its ultrasound findings. Improved retinal nourishment following retinal reattachment gradually reverses the process responsible for cystic degeneration, with the eventual collapse of the cyst (within days or weeks). Surprisingly, this giant cyst did not collapse for almost three years despite retinal reattachment. The internal mobile echogenic contents were suggestive of blood. The possible reason of blood in the cyst could be rupture of the retinal blood vessels in the cyst cavity. This could be a recurrent phenomenon, which did not allow the cyst to collapse. The Hemorrhagic Intraretinal Macrocyst needs to be differentiated from mimicking clinical conditions, namely, retinoschisis, choroidal melanoma, subretinal abscess, choroidal hemangioma, and the like. It could take up to a few years to collapse spontaneously, following successful retinal reattachment. PMID:21713238

  8. Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (Marburg HF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... was first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, ...

  9. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Update.

    PubMed

    Dority, Jeremy S; Oldham, Jeffrey S

    2016-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a debilitating, although uncommon, type of stroke with high morbidity, mortality, and economic impact. Modern 30-day mortality is as high as 40%, and about 50% of survivors have permanent disability. Care at high-volume centers with dedicated neurointensive care units is recommended. Euvolemia, not hypervolemia, should be targeted, and the aneurysm should be secured early. Neither statin therapy nor magnesium infusions should be initiated for delayed cerebral ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm is just one component of delayed cerebral edema. Hyponatremia is common in subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with longer length of stay, but not increased mortality. PMID:27521199

  10. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Parambil, Joseph G

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an underrecognized and underdiagnosed autosomal-dominant angiodysplasia that has an estimated prevalence of 1 in 5000 individuals, with variable clinical presentations even within family members with identical mutations. The most common manifestations are telangiectasias of the skin and nasal mucosa. However, HHT can often be complicated by the presence of arteriovenous malformations and telangiectasias in the lungs, brain, gastrointestinal tract, and liver that are often silent and can lead to life-threatening complications of stroke and hemorrhage. This article reviews HHT for the pulmonologist, who is not uncommonly the first practitioner to encounter these patients. PMID:27514597

  11. PRIMARY POSTPARTUM HEMORRHAGE

    PubMed Central

    Melody, George F.

    1951-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage is the outstanding cause of maternal mortality, and a redoubtable contributor to puerperal death from other causes, notably infection and renal failure. The clinical situations in which hemorrhage is liable to occur must be better known, so that anticipatory and preventive measures can be taken. Recent knowledge about defibrinated blood in women with degenerative changes at the placental site must be incorporated in the thinking and practice of physicians dealing with obstetrical cases. The indications, limitations, and hazards of the various anesthetic methods available for parturient women should be carefully considered in the circumstances of each case. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:14886749

  12. Pontine infarcts and hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Pontine infarcts are often part of a large ischemia involving the brainstem, although infarcts may be restricted to the pons. In both cases, infarcts in the pons are characterized by interesting clinical patterns resulting from a variety of cranial nerve dysfunctions, eye movement disorders and motor, sensory and cerebellar manifestations, either isolated or in combination. The anteromedial and anterolateral territories are the most commonly involved. Penetrating branch artery disease is the most common etiology. Ten percent of all intracerebral hemorrhages are located in the pons, and small hemorrhages in this brainstem structure may, in some instances, give rise to unusual clinical manifestations. PMID:22377887

  13. Advantages of diabetic tractional retinal detachment repair

    PubMed Central

    Sternfeld, Amir; Axer-Siegel, Ruth; Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Weinberger, Dov; Ehrlich, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes and complications of patients with diabetic tractional retinal detachment (TRD) treated with pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). Patients and methods We retrospectively studied a case series of 24 eyes of 21 patients at a single tertiary, university-affiliated medical center. A review was carried out on patients who underwent PPV for the management of TRD due to proliferative diabetic retinopathy from October 2011 to November 2013. Preoperative and final visual outcomes, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and medical background were evaluated. Results A 23 G instrumentation was used in 23 eyes (95.8%), and a 25 G instrumentation in one (4.2%). Mean postoperative follow-up time was 13.3 months (4–30 months). Visual acuity significantly improved from logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (LogMAR) 1.48 to LogMAR 1.05 (P<0.05). Visual acuity improved by ≥3 lines in 75% of patients. Intraoperative complications included iatrogenic retinal breaks in seven eyes (22.9%) and vitreal hemorrhage in nine eyes (37.5%). In two eyes, one sclerotomy was enlarged to 20 G (8.3%). Postoperative complications included reoperation in five eyes (20.8%) due to persistent subretinal fluid (n=3), vitreous hemorrhage (n=1), and dislocated intraocular lens (n=1). Thirteen patients (54.2%) had postoperative vitreous hemorrhage that cleared spontaneously, five patients (20.8%) required antiglaucoma medications for increased intraocular pressure, seven patients (29.2%) developed an epiretinal membrane, and two patients (8.3%) developed a macular hole. Conclusion Patients with diabetic TRD can benefit from PPV surgery. Intraoperative and postoperative complications can be attributed to the complexity of this disease. PMID:26604667

  14. Luminosity and contrast normalization in color retinal images based on standard reference image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S. Varnousfaderani, Ehsan; Yousefi, Siamak; Belghith, Akram; Goldbaum, Michael H.

    2016-03-01

    Color retinal images are used manually or automatically for diagnosis and monitoring progression of a retinal diseases. Color retinal images have large luminosity and contrast variability within and across images due to the large natural variations in retinal pigmentation and complex imaging setups. The quality of retinal images may affect the performance of automatic screening tools therefore different normalization methods are developed to uniform data before applying any further analysis or processing. In this paper we propose a new reliable method to remove non-uniform illumination in retinal images and improve their contrast based on contrast of the reference image. The non-uniform illumination is removed by normalizing luminance image using local mean and standard deviation. Then the contrast is enhanced by shifting histograms of uniform illuminated retinal image toward histograms of the reference image to have similar histogram peaks. This process improve the contrast without changing inter correlation of pixels in different color channels. In compliance with the way humans perceive color, the uniform color space of LUV is used for normalization. The proposed method is widely tested on large dataset of retinal images with present of different pathologies such as Exudate, Lesion, Hemorrhages and Cotton-Wool and in different illumination conditions and imaging setups. Results shows that proposed method successfully equalize illumination and enhances contrast of retinal images without adding any extra artifacts.

  15. Unusual presentation: pulmonary hemosiderosis with celiac disease and retinitis pigmentosa in a child.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Ozlem; Keskin, Mehmet; Guler, Elif; Tutar, Ediz; Saygili, Oguzhan; Kucukosmanoglu, Ercan; Kor, Yilmaz; Celik, Haydar; Coskun, Enes

    2011-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare disease characterized by anemia, hemoptysis and recurrent alveolar hemorrhage. The combination of IPH and celiac disease (CD) is extremely rare. We report a 9-year-old boy with Lane-Hamilton syndrome, co-occurrence of pulmonary hemosiderosis with CD. This presentation is unique presentation because he has also retinal pigmentation. PMID:21337729

  16. VANISHING RETINAL DETACHMENT

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe a case of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in the setting of chronic kidney disease that exhibited complete retinal reattachment after serial hemodialysis. Methods: Retrospective case report. Results: A 58-year-old woman with acute vision loss was found to have a macula-involving rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Due to chronic kidney disease, she continued with routinely scheduled hemodialysis for 1 week until surgical clearance was obtained. Preoperative examination revealed complete reattachment of the retina with a persistent retinal tear. Barrier laser was applied to the tear and the retina remained attached until the most recent follow-up 8 months later. The workup of alternate etiologies was unrevealing. Conclusion: This case describes a temporal association between hemodialysis and resolution of subretinal fluid due to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. A potential causal linkage is suggested based on shifting fluid dynamics associated with hemodialysis. A shift in treatment paradigm is not advised. PMID:26352323

  17. Atraumatic multifocal intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Fetcko, Kaleigh M; Hendricks, Benjamin K; Scott, John; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2016-09-01

    This article describes a patient with atraumatic multifocal intracerebral, subarachnoid, and bilateral frontal convexity acute subdural hematomas. The patient is a 46-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a spontaneous severe progressive headache. Following a description of the case, this article reviews the reported incidence, proposed etiology, and current management strategies for multifocal spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27234608

  18. Prohemostatic interventions in obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Basso, Olga

    2012-04-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Pregnancy is associated with substantial hemostatic changes, resulting in a relatively hypercoagulable state. Acquired coagulopathy can, however, develop rapidly in severe obstetric hemorrhage. Therefore, prohemostatic treatments based on high fresh frozen plasma and red blood cell (FFP:RBC) ratio transfusion and procoagulant agents (fibrinogen concentrates, recombinant activated factor VII, and tranexamic acid) are crucial aspects of management. Often, evidence from trauma patients is applied to obstetric hemorrhage management, although distinct differences exist between the two situations. Therefore, until efficacy and safety are demonstrated in obstetric hemorrhage, clinicians should be cautious about wholesale adoption of high FFP:RBC ratio products. Applications of transfusion protocols, dedicated to massive obstetric hemorrhage and multidisciplinarily developed, currently remain the best available option. Similarly, while procoagulant agents appear promising in treatment of obstetric hemorrhage, caution is nonetheless warranted as long as clear evidence in the context of obstetric hemorrhage is lacking. PMID:22510859

  19. Differential Diagnosis of Retinal Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M.; Herbort, Carl P.; Tabbara, Khalid F.

    2009-01-01

    Retinal vaculitis is a sight-threatening inflammatory eye condition that involves the retinal vessels. Detection of retinal vasculitis is made clinically, and confirmed with the help of fundus fluorescein angiography. Active vascular disease is characterized by exudates around retinal vessels resulting in white sheathing or cuffing of the affected vessels. In this review, a practical approach to the diagnosis of retinal vasculitis is discussed based on ophthalmoscopic and fundus fluorescein angiographic findings. PMID:20404987

  20. The Use of Ophthalmic Ultrasonography to Identify Retinal Injuries Associated With Abusive Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Becky J; Trimboli-Heidler, Carmelina; Spaeder, Michael C; Miller, Marijean M; Dean, Nathan P; Cohen, Joanna S

    2016-05-01

    Abusive head trauma includes any nonaccidental injury inflicted to a child's head and body. It is often characterized by, but not limited to, the repetitive acceleration-deceleration forces with or without blunt head impact. It has a mortality rate of 30%, and 80% of survivors experience permanent neurologic damage. In this case series, we hypothesize that bedside ultrasonography can be useful in the identification of retinal injuries that are consistent with abusive head trauma. Ocular manifestations of abusive head trauma are identified by dilated ophthalmic examination showing retinal hemorrhages that are too numerous to count, multilayered, and extending to the periphery. Traumatic retinoschisis, splitting of the retinal layers with or without blood accumulating in the intervening space, is exclusive for abusive head trauma in infants without a history of significant cerebral crush injury. Direct visualization of intraocular structures is difficult when the eyelids are swollen shut or when dilatation must be delayed. We present a series of 11 patients with brain injuries who underwent ophthalmic point-of-care ultrasonography that revealed traumatic retinoschisis on average 60 hours earlier than direct ophthalmic visualization. Dilated ophthalmic examinations and autopsy reports confirmed retinoschisis and other forms of retinal hemorrhages that were too numerous to count, multilayered, and extending to the periphery in all 11 patients. One patient did not have a dilated ophthalmic examination; however, traumatic retinoschisis and retinal hemorrhages were confirmed on autopsy. Ocular point-of-care ultrasonography is a promising tool to investigate abusive head trauma through the identification of traumatic retinoschisis and retinal hemorrhages when pupillary dilatation and direct ophthalmic examination is delayed. PMID:26481265

  1. Evaluation of retinal laser lesion healing by perimetric electroretinography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, Elmar T.

    1996-04-01

    Eight Cynomolgus fasciculata who had graded laser lesions placed in one eye 6 years previously were evaluated by a stimulation and electrophysiologic recording technique to produce maps of retinal function. All animal testing was performed under IACUC approved protocols. The single q-switched pulses from a neodymium-YAG laser produced lesions of 4 types: no visible change, minimal visible lesions, `white dot' lesions (localized circumscribed retinal blanching) and `red dot' lesions (contained retinal hemorrhage) in the eye at the time of placement. Single exposures had been made in four locations: 5 degrees superior, inferior and temporal to the fovea, and one foveally. The multifocal (perimetric) electroretinogram was recorded from specialized contact lenses through hospital grade amplifiers. Initial analyses gave field maps that demonstrated apparent relative loss of function in some lesion sites. However, these losses were variable and occasionally patchy (i.e. disconnected areas of low signal). Repeated examinations of the same retinal areas showed high variability, even with 15 minute acquisition times and no apparent gaze drift. Apparent losses did not appear to correlate with visible retinal changes at the lesion site. Further research is needed to determine the biological substrate for this variability in response topography.

  2. Retinal vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Otani, Atsushi; Friedlander, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the potential use of stem cells for therapeutic angiogenesis in the treatment of retinal diseases. We demonstrate that the clinical utility of these EPC may be not limited in the treatment of ischemic retinal diseases but may also have application for the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders and for a form of cell-based gene therapy. One of the greatest potential benefits of bone marrow derived EPC therapy is the possible use of autologous grafts. Nonetheless, potential toxicities and unregulated cell growth will need to be carefully evaluated before this approach is brought to the clinics. PMID:15804843

  3. Management of Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hinson, Holly E.; Ziai, Wendy C.

    2011-01-01

    Brain hemorrhage is the most fatal form of stroke and has the highest morbidity of any stroke subtype. Intraventricular extension of hemorrhage (IVH) is a particularly poor prognostic sign, with expected mortality between 50% and 80%. IVH is a significant and independent contributor to morbidity and mortality, yet therapy directed at ameliorating intraventricular clot has been limited. Conventional therapy centers on managing hypertension and intracranial pressure while correcting coagulopathy and avoiding complications such as rebleeding and hydrocephalus. Surgical therapy alone has not changed the natural history of the disease significantly. However, fibrinolysis in combination with extraventricular drainage shows promise as a technique to reduce intraventricular clot volume and to manage the concomitant complications of IVH. PMID:20425231

  4. Phenylpropanolamine and cerebral hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, J.R.; LeBlanc, H.J.

    1985-05-01

    Computerized tomography, carotid angiograms, and arteriography were used to diagnose several cases of cerebral hemorrhage following the use of phenylpropanolamine. The angiographic picture in one of the three cases was similar to that previously described in association with amphetamine abuse and pseudoephedrine overdose, both substances being chemically and pharmacologically similar to phenylpropanolamine. The study suggests that the arterial change responsible for symptoms may be due to spasm rather than arteriopathy. 14 references, 5 figures.

  5. [Spontaneous intraperitoneal hemorrhage: etiology].

    PubMed

    Ksontini, R; Roulet, D; Cosendey, B A; Cavin, R

    2001-10-01

    Spontaneous intraperitoneal hemorrhage is a rare and sometime fatal condition. The clinical presentation may range from a non-specific abdominal pain to an acute abdomen with hemodynamic instability. Often, a preoperative diagnosis cannot be obtained. Immediate surgical exploration remains the treatment of choice. However, pre or postoperative diagnosis can sometime be confirmed and treated with interventional radiology. In rare cases, the site of bleeding remains unknown despite intraoperative exploration and radiographic studies. PMID:11715286

  6. Hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Romero, Javier M; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Primary or nontraumatic spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 10-15% of all strokes, and has a poor prognosis. ICH has a mortality rate of almost 50% when associated with intraventricular hemorrhage within the first month, and 80% rate of dependency at 6 months from onset. Neuroimaging is critical in identifying the underlying etiology and thus assisting in the important therapeutic decisions. There are several imaging modalities available in the workup of patients who present with ICH, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). A review of the current imaging approach, as well as a differential diagnosis of etiologies and imaging manifestations of primary versus secondary intraparenchymal hemorrhage, is presented. Active bleeding occurs in the first hours after symptom onset, with early neurologic deterioration. Identifying those patients who are more likely to have hematoma expansion is an active area of research, and there are many ongoing therapeutic trials targeting this specific patient population at risk. PMID:27432674

  7. [Acute retinal necrosis].

    PubMed

    Lucke, K; Reinking, U; el-Hifnawi, E; Dennin, R H; Laqua, H

    1988-12-01

    The authors report on three patients with acute retinal necrosis who were treated with the virostatic agent Acyclovir and who underwent vitreoretinal surgery with silicone oil filling for total retinal detachment. In two eyes the retina was reattached, but useful vision was only preserved in one patient. Titers from blood and the vitreous, as well as microscopic findings in retinal biopsies, support the view that the necrosis is caused by a herpes simplex virus infection. After therapy with Acyclovir was instituted no further progression on the necrosis was observed. However, the development of retinal detachment could not be prevented. Early diagnosis and antiviral therapy are essential to improve the otherwise poor prognosis in this rare syndrome. PMID:3221657

  8. Retinal vein occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Berrocal MH, Rodriguez FJ, et al. Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group (PACORES). Comparison of two doses ... retinal vein occlusion: results from the Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group at 6 months of follow- ...

  9. Retinal detachment in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Poole, T A; Obstbaum, S A

    1979-07-01

    In a series of cataract patients excluding myopic individuals, under age 60 years, and cases in which vitreous loss occurred, retinal detachment was no less frequent after intracapsular cataract extraction and Sputnik iris supported lenses than in controls. Both groups were followed up for a minimum of two years. The detachments predominantly occurred from retinal breaks in areas of the retina that looked normal preoperatively. PMID:464014

  10. Bilateral macular hemorrhage due to megaloblastic anemia: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Vaggu, Sree Kumar; Bhogadi, Preethi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old female patient who presented with sudden, painless, nonprogressive diminished vision in both eyes (best corrected visual acuity in right eye - 6/60 and left eye - 6/36). An ophthalmological evaluation revealed bilateral pale tarsal conjunctiva and bilateral macular hemorrhage. Hematological evaluation revealed the presence of megalocytic anemia (with hemoglobin - 4.9 g%). General examination showed severe pallor. On systemic examination, no abnormality was detected, confirmed by ultrasonography abdomen. Other causes. This case documents the rare occurrence of bilateral subinternal limiting membrane macular hemorrhage with megaloblastic anemia without thrombocytopenia and other retinal features of anemic retinopathy. PMID:27050355

  11. Giant retinal tears.

    PubMed

    Shunmugam, Manoharan; Ang, Ghee Soon; Lois, Noemi

    2014-01-01

    A giant retinal tear (GRT) is a full-thickness neurosensory retinal break that extends circumferentially around the retina for three or more clock hours in the presence of a posteriorly detached vitreous. Its incidence in large population-based studies has been estimated as 1.5% of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments, with a significant male preponderance, and bilaterality in 12.8%. Most GRTs are idiopathic, with trauma, hereditary vitreoretinopathies and high myopia each being causative in decreasing frequency. The vast majority of GRTs are currently managed with a pars plana vitrectomy; the use of adjunctive circumferential scleral buckling is debated, but no studies have shown a clear anatomical or visual advantage with its use. Similarly, silicone oil tamponade does not influence long-term outcomes when compared with gas. Primary and final retinal reattachment rates are achieved in 88% and 95% of patients, respectively. Even when the retina remains attached, however, visual recovery may be limited. Furthermore, fellow eyes of patients with a GRT are at higher risk of developing retinal tears and retinal detachment. Prophylactic treatment under these circumstances may be considered but there is no firm evidence of its efficacy at the present time. PMID:24138895

  12. Retinal vein occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... hypertension) Other eye conditions, such as glaucoma , macular edema, or vitreous hemorrhage The risk of these disorders ... in the front part of the eye Macular edema, caused by the leakage of fluid in the ...

  13. [Hemorrhagic stroke associated to neurocysticercosis].

    PubMed

    Tellez-Zenteno, J F; Negrete-Pulido, O; Cantú, C; Márquez, C; Vega-Boada, F; García Ramos, G

    2003-06-01

    A well-known complication of neurocysticercosis is cerebral arteritis, which is usually manifested by cerebral ischemia. Only anecdotal cases of hemorrhagic stroke associated to this parasitosis have been described. Previously there are only two reported cases of this association. One of these cases had an intracystic hemorrhage confirmed by autopsy without cerebrovascular risk factors. Autopsy revealed an inflammatory arteriopathy adjacent to the cyst intracystic hemorrhage. The second case had a subarachnoidal hemorrhage secondary to the rupture of an aneurysm in the right anteroinferior cerebellar artery. At surgery, the aneurysm was found to be surrounded by a thickened-leptomeninges, which histologically showed the presence of cysticercous with dense inflammation. Our first patient was a 32 year-old female developed a lenticulo-capsular hemorrhage around a cysticercotic lesion. The second patient was a 34 year-old male developed an intracystic hemorrhage. As cerebral angiography was normal in both patients, cerebral hemorrhages were considered to be related to cysticercotic arteritis of small penetrating vessels. We conclude that cysticercosis is associated with differenttypes of intracranial hemorrhage, as documented the present cases. In neurocysticercosis endemic areas, cysticercotic arteritis should be added to the list of causes of intracranial hemorrhage in young people. PMID:12768515

  14. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids. PMID:27511757

  15. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  16. Hemorrhagic radiation cystitis.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, William M; Henderson, Randal H; Costa, Joseph A; Hoppe, Bradford S; Dagan, Roi; Bryant, Curtis M; Nichols, Romaine C; Williams, Christopher R; Harris, Stephanie E; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2015-06-01

    The optimal management of persistent hemorrhagic radiation cystitis is ill-defined. Various options are available and include oral agents (ie, sodium pentosan polysulfate), intravenous drugs (ie, WF10), topical agents (ie, formalin), hyperbaric oxygen, and endoscopic procedures (ie, electrical cautery, argon plasma coagulation, laser coagulation). In general, it is best to manage patients conservatively and intervene only when necessary with the option least likely to exacerbate the cystitis. More aggressive measures should be employed only when more conservative approaches fail. Bladder biopsies should be avoided, unless findings suggest a bladder tumor, because they may precipitate a complication. PMID:24322335

  17. Retinal photoreceptor focal disruption secondary to accidental Nd:YAG laser exposure.

    PubMed

    Milani, Paolo; Pierro, Luisa; Pece, Alfredo; Marino, Valerio; Scialdone, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    Retinal injuries caused by accidental laser exposure include retinal or vitreous hemorrhages, macular holes and edema. We describe the imaging of a bilateral macular lesion secondary to accidental Nd:YAG laser exposure. Observational case report. We performed color photography, fluorescein angiography and autofluorescence (AF) with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope, as well as time-domain and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). After accidental exposure to a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser, a patient experienced blurred vision in the left eye (LE) with visual acuity of 20/60. Color, fluorescein angiography and OCT imaging showed a retinal hemorrhage in the foveal area of the left eye and in the inferomacular region of the asymptomatic right eye. Steroid therapy was then administered, and 5 days later there was rapid improvement with progressive re-absorption of the hemorrhages and functional recovery. At 6 month follow-up, visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes with unremarkable biomicroscopy, except for focal foveal retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy in the LE. In comparison to previous hemorrhages, OCT could visualize focal disruption of the photoreceptor IS/OS junction in both eyes. Due to different macular pigment distribution and lesion localization, 787 nm near-infrared AF depicted a small hypofluorescent spot in both eyes, whilst at 488 nm AF a black spot became evident in the right eye only. Despite the re-absorption of foveal hemorrhage and the functional recovery, AF and OCT imaging highlighted the persistence of small focal disruptions of the photoreceptor outer segments and RPE. PMID:22002418

  18. Analysis of subconjunctival hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sahinoglu-Keskek, Nedime; Cevher, Selim; Ergin, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine associated conditions, gender distribution and location of subconjunctival hemorrhage (SCH). Methodology: This retrospective, observational and non-interventional study involved total of 50 patients with SCH aged 0.16-88 years. The conjunctiva was divided into 4 equal areas. The data about the subjects with SCH that includes age, gender, medical history, ocular history and location of hemorrhage were noted for all patients. Results: The patients with SCH consisted of 21 (42%) women and 29 (58%) men, with a mean age of 29.56 years. Of the 50 patients, 34 (68%) had traumatic and 16 (32%) had spontaneous SCH. Of traumatic SCH group 24 (70.6%) were men and 10 (29.4%) were women. SCH was more common in the temporal areas than other areas (40.5%). Conclusion: The most associated condition in spontaneous SCH was hypertension. SCH was found to be predominant in the temporal areas among all patients. In traumatic SCH, temporal areas were affected more, whereas in spontaneous SCH, nasal and temporal areas were affected equally. Traumatic etiology was more likely seen in men than women. PMID:24353524

  19. Automated lesion detectors in retinal fundus images.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, I N; Kumar, S; Oliveira, C M; Ramos, J D; Engquist, B

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a sight-threatening condition occurring in persons with diabetes, which causes progressive damage to the retina. The early detection and diagnosis of DR is vital for saving the vision of diabetic persons. The early signs of DR which appear on the surface of the retina are the dark lesions such as microaneurysms (MAs) and hemorrhages (HEMs), and bright lesions (BLs) such as exudates. In this paper, we propose a novel automated system for the detection and diagnosis of these retinal lesions by processing retinal fundus images. We devise appropriate binary classifiers for these three different types of lesions. Some novel contextual/numerical features are derived, for each lesion type, depending on its inherent properties. This is performed by analysing several wavelet bands (resulting from the isotropic undecimated wavelet transform decomposition of the retinal image green channel) and by using an appropriate combination of Hessian multiscale analysis, variational segmentation and cartoon+texture decomposition. The proposed methodology has been validated on several medical datasets, with a total of 45,770 images, using standard performance measures such as sensitivity and specificity. The individual performance, per frame, of the MA detector is 93% sensitivity and 89% specificity, of the HEM detector is 86% sensitivity and 90% specificity, and of the BL detector is 90% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Regarding the collective performance of these binary detectors, as an automated screening system for DR (meaning that a patient is considered to have DR if it is a positive patient for at least one of the detectors) it achieves an average 95-100% of sensitivity and 70% of specificity at a per patient basis. Furthermore, evaluation conducted on publicly available datasets, for comparison with other existing techniques, shows the promising potential of the proposed detectors. PMID:26378502

  20. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  1. Simulataneous occlusion of the central retinal artery and vein.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R D

    1979-01-01

    Combined CRAO/CRVO in our patients occurred with rapid visual loss, usually over a few hours, associated with evidence of inflammation and/or cellular infiltration of the retrobulbar portion of the optic nerve. The ophthalmoscopic appearance was characteristic, with papilledema and hemorrhages of various types in the posterior pole. The retina also showed ischemic changes, with a milky-white color and cherry-red macula. Fluorescein angiography, when possible, showed no retinal vascular flow, and normal choroidal flow. After six to eight weeks, optic atrophy was evident and the retinal vessels were markedly narrowed or obliterated. The macula showed typical cystic changes. Neovascularization often developed, leading to neovascular glaucoma as the end result. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 7 C FIGURE 8 A FIGURE 8 B PMID:583535

  2. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Beach, James

    2014-01-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry. PMID:25237591

  3. Neuroinflammation after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mracsko, Eva; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a particularly severe type of stroke for which no specific treatment has been established yet. Although preclinical models of ICH have substantial methodological limitations, important insight into the pathophysiology has been gained. Mounting evidence suggests an important contribution of inflammatory mechanisms to brain damage and potential repair. Neuroinflammation evoked by intracerebral blood involves the activation of resident microglia, the infiltration of systemic immune cells and the production of cytokines, chemokines, extracellular proteases and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies focused on innate immunity including microglia, monocytes and granulocytes. More recently, the role of adaptive immune cells has received increasing attention. Little is currently known about the interactions among different immune cell populations in the setting of ICH. Nevertheless, immunomodulatory strategies are already being explored in ICH. To improve the chances of translation from preclinical models to patients, a better characterization of the neuroinflammation in patients is desirable. PMID:25477782

  4. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Racsa, Lori D; Kraft, Colleen S; Olinger, Gene G; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-01-15

    There are 4 families of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), including Filoviridae. Ebola virus is one virus within the family Filoviridae and the cause of the current outbreak of VHF in West Africa. VHF-endemic areas are found throughout the world, yet traditional diagnosis of VHF has been performed in large reference laboratories centered in Europe and the United States. The large amount of capital needed, as well as highly trained and skilled personnel, has limited the availability of diagnostics in endemic areas except in conjunction with governmental and nongovernmental entities. However, rapid diagnosis of VHF is essential to efforts that will limit outbreaks. In addition, increased global travel suggests VHF diagnoses may be made outside of the endemic areas. Thus, understanding how to diagnose VHF is imperative for laboratories worldwide. This article reviews traditional and current diagnostic modalities for VHF. PMID:26354968

  5. [Hemorrhagic disorders in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Ludwig, H

    1999-10-01

    When bleeding disorders coincide with pregnancy, they might be congenital or acquired diseases, if not arising as a more acute complication of the pregnancy itself. The paper gives a review of the most common bleeding disorders out of internal medical constellations. History taking is the most effective way to open the diagnostic approach. If childbearing is desired the couple in question should be counselled accordingly in collaboration with a hematologist. Some conditions might be unfavourable, e.g. hemophila in male offspring, others might be serious but manageable, as in v. Willebrand-Disease or autoimmunologic thrombocytopenic purpura. Prenatal invasive diagnostics with fetal blood sampling at an early stage of pregnancy may reduce the hazards for the baby insofar, as it allows the more precise estimation of fetal risks at birth. Cesarean section will not in all cases be the way of choice (e.g. in v. Willebrand-Disease), in others it might be the better way to deliver a fetus at risk in order to avoid intracranial hemorrhage (in severe cases of ITP). Always both, mother and fetus, are at risk, but almost in any cases in different shades and grades of severeness. There is rarely a firm correlation of the maternal and the fetal hemostatic parameters in cases of connatal or acquired hemorrhagic disorders. Pregnancy itself leads to a certain compensation of defects in clotting factors, since the synthesis of factors increase or they are circulating more in activated form. Pregnancy is a state of a silently ongoing intravascular coagulation at least in the uteroplacental circulation. From there it is linked with the general circulation of the maternal organism. When immunologic etiologies in thrombocytopenias play a role, there will always be the incalculable rate of placental transfer of antiplatelet-antibodies to the fetus. The entire field requires knowledge, counseling, collaboration and foresight. PMID:10549234

  6. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation and Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... absorption, unmasking the lesion's boundary relative to healthy brain tissue; however, if surgery is contemplated, it should not be delayed so long after a bleed that the lesion begins to shrink, making extraction more difficult. Hemorrhage Rates What is ...

  7. Pathogenesis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses belong to the most devastating emerging human diseases and represent serious public health problems. Arenavirus VHFs in humans are acute diseases characterized by fever and, in severe cases, different degrees of hemorrhages associated with a shock syndrome in the terminal stage. Over the past years, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of arenaviruses at the cellular level, in particular their ability to subvert the host cell's innate antiviral defenses. Clinical studies and novel animal models have provided important new information about the interaction of hemorrhagic arenaviruses with the host's adaptive immune system, in particular virus-induced immunosuppression, and have provided the first hints towards an understanding of the terminal hemorrhagic shock syndrome. The scope of this article is to review our current knowledge on arenavirus VHF pathogenesis with an emphasis on recent developments. PMID:21171877

  8. Methods for improved hemorrhage control

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death from age 1 to 34 years and is the fifth leading cause of death overall in the USA, with uncontrolled hemorrhage being the leading cause of potentially preventable death. Improving our ability to control hemorrhage may represent the next major hurdle in reducing trauma mortality. New techniques, devices, and drugs for hemorrhage control are being developed and applied across the continuum of trauma care: prehospital, emergency room, and operative and postoperative critical care. This brief review focuses on drugs directed at life-threatening hemorrhage. The most important of these new drugs are injectable hemostatics, fibrin foams, and dressings. The available animal studies are encouraging and human studies are required. PMID:15196327

  9. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  10. Dengue and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, Duane J.

    1998-01-01

    Dengue fever, a very old disease, has reemerged in the past 20 years with an expanded geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased epidemic activity, the development of hyperendemicity (the cocirculation of multiple serotypes), and the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in new geographic regions. In 1998 this mosquito-borne disease is the most important tropical infectious disease after malaria, with an estimated 100 million cases of dengue fever, 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 25,000 deaths annually. The reasons for this resurgence and emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the waning years of the 20th century are complex and not fully understood, but demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure changes in the past 30 years have contributed greatly. This paper reviews the changing epidemiology of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever by geographic region, the natural history and transmission cycles, clinical diagnosis of both dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, serologic and virologic laboratory diagnoses, pathogenesis, surveillance, prevention, and control. A major challenge for public health officials in all tropical areas of the world is to devleop and implement sustainable prevention and control programs that will reverse the trend of emergent dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:9665979

  11. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  12. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  13. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  14. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  15. [News in Retinal Imaging].

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, R; Schmidl, D; Garhöfer, G; Schmetterer, L

    2015-09-01

    New developments in retinal imaging have revolutionised ophthalmology in recent years. In particular, optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides highly resolved and well reproducible images and has rung in a new era in ophthalmological imaging. The technology was introduced in the early 1990 s, and has rapidly developed. There have been improvements in resolution, sensitivity and processing speed. There have also been developments in functional processing. OCT angiography is the first application in routine clinical work. PMID:26372783

  16. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  17. Retinal Thickening and Photoreceptor Loss in HIV Eyes without Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Arcinue, Cheryl A.; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; El-Emam, Sharif Y.; Ma, Feiyan; Doede, Aubrey; Sharpsten, Lucie; Gomez, Maria Laura; Freeman, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the presence of structural changes in HIV retinae (i.e., photoreceptor density and retinal thickness in the macula) compared with age-matched HIV-negative controls. Methods Cohort of patients with known HIV under CART (combination Antiretroviral Therapy) treatment were examined with a flood-illuminated retinal AO camera to assess the cone photoreceptor mosaic and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to assess retinal layers and retinal thickness. Results Twenty-four eyes of 12 patients (n = 6 HIV-positive and 6 HIV-negative) were imaged with the adaptive optics camera. In each of the regions of interest studied (nasal, temporal, superior, inferior), the HIV group had significantly less mean cone photoreceptor density compared with age-matched controls (difference range, 4,308–6,872 cones/mm2). A different subset of forty eyes of 20 patients (n = 10 HIV-positive and 10 HIV-negative) was included in the retinal thickness measurements and retinal layer segmentation with the SD-OCT. We observed significant thickening in HIV positive eyes in the total retinal thickness at the foveal center, and in each of the three horizontal B-scans (through the macular center, superior, and inferior to the fovea). We also noted that the inner retina (combined thickness from ILM through RNFL to GCL layer) was also significantly thickened in all the different locations scanned compared with HIV-negative controls. Conclusion Our present study shows that the cone photoreceptor density is significantly reduced in HIV retinae compared with age-matched controls. HIV retinae also have increased macular retinal thickness that may be caused by inner retinal edema secondary to retinovascular disease in HIV. The interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE, as well as possible low-grade ocular inflammation causing diffuse inner retinal edema, may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV-positive patients without overt retinitis. PMID:26244973

  18. [Application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Retinal oximeter is a new machine which has been used in the diagnose, treatment and research of several ophthalmic diseases for recent years. It allows ophthalmologists to gain retinal oxygen saturation directly. Therefore, retinal oximeter might be useful for ophthalmologists to understand ophthalmic diseases more deeper and clarify the impact of ischemia on retinal function. It has been reported in the literatures that retinal oximeter has potentially useful diagnostic and therapeutic indications in various eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein and artery occlusion, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, et al. In this thesis, the application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology is reviewed. PMID:26850588

  19. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  20. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  1. Inner retinal damage after exposure to green diode laser during a laser show

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sohee; Lee, Won Ki

    2014-01-01

    Here we report two cases of retinal damage after exposure to a 510 nm laser diode during a laser show. The first patient was a 20-year-old female who presented with decreased visual acuity in her right eye after visiting a dance party with a diode laser show (wavelength 510 nm, power 2 mW), although she did not directly see the light. Retinal examination revealed a sub-internal limiting membrane hemorrhage and a small laser burn. The second patient was a 20-year-old female who visited for decreased vision in her left eye. She described similar events as the first patient. An exposure to green diode laser can result in retinal damage. It is strongly recommended that certified personnel operate laser devices used in indoor laser shows under strict regulation. PMID:25506208

  2. Obstetric hemorrhage: A global review.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Dena; Nathan, Lisa; Chazotte, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage remains the number one cause of maternal death globally despite the fact that it is largely a preventable and most often a treatable condition. While the global problem is appreciated, some may not realize that in the United States postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of mortality and unfortunately, the incidence is on the rise. In New York, obstetric hemorrhage is the second leading cause of maternal mortality in the state. National data suggests that hemorrhage is disproportionally overrepresented as a contributor to severe maternal morbidity and we suspect as we explore further this will be true in New York State as well. Given the persistent and significant contribution to maternal mortality, it may be useful to analyze the persistence of this largely preventable cause of death within the framework of the historic "Three Delays" model of maternal mortality. The ongoing national and statewide problem with postpartum hemorrhage will be reviewed in this context of delays in an effort to inform potential solutions. PMID:26742599

  3. Retinal Failure in Diabetes: a Feature of Retinal Sensory Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ellyn J; Gardner, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Physiologic adaptations mediate normal responses to short-term and long-term stresses to ensure organ function. Organ failure results if adaptive responses fail to resolve persistent stresses or maladaptive reactions develop. The retinal neurovascular unit likewise undergoes adaptive responses to diabetes resulting in a retinal sensory neuropathy analogous to other sensory neuropathies. Vision-threatening diabetic retinal neuropathy results from unremitting metabolic and inflammatory stresses, leading to macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, states of "retinal failure." Current regulatory strategies focus primarily on the retinal failure stages, but new diagnostic modalities and understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy may facilitate earlier treatment to maintain vision in persons with diabetes. PMID:26458378

  4. Long-Term Follow-Up Case of Multiple Retinal Arterial Macroaneurysms Developing Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion following Ruptured Macroaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Terubayashi, Yuya; Kida, Teruyo; Fukumoto, Masanori; Sugasawa, Jun; Morishita, Seita; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinal arterial macroaneurysm (RAM) has been reported in association with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), and usually BRVO precedes RAM. We present a long-term follow-up case report of unilateral multiple RAMs that developed BRVO following ruptured RAM in the same retinal quadrant. Case Presentation An 80-year-old woman presented with floaters in her right eye in June 2012. Visual acuity (VA) was 20/25 in her right eye with posterior capsular opacity. Her fundus showed the first ruptured RAM at the superotemporal vascular arcade with subinternal limiting membrane and subretinal hemorrhages not involving the macula. These were absorbed gradually with a VA of 20/20. After 2 years, the second RAM at the proximal superotemporal vascular arcade developed and impending BRVO occurred with macular edema at the distal site of the RAM. With the RAM located close to the arteriovenous crossing, her VA was dropped to 20/60. Intravitreal injection of ranibizumab was performed and macular edema was resolved with improved vision of 20/30. Three months later, she realized a sudden vision loss of 2/200. Her posterior pole showed massive pre- and subretinal hemorrhages, and vitrectomy was performed. The source of bleeding was the third RAM's rupture in a different artery. Her vision improved to 20/30. The unaffected eye showed no RAMs. Conclusion We experienced a long-term follow-up case of multiple RAMs showing different courses. We should cautiously note that BRVO can occur following RAM at the arteriovenous crossing. PMID:27462250

  5. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  6. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:21743764

  7. Quantitative analysis of retinal OCT.

    PubMed

    Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Clinical acceptance of 3-D OCT retinal imaging brought rapid development of quantitative 3-D analysis of retinal layers, vasculature, retinal lesions as well as facilitated new research in retinal diseases. One of the cornerstones of many such analyses is segmentation and thickness quantification of retinal layers and the choroid, with an inherently 3-D simultaneous multi-layer LOGISMOS (Layered Optimal Graph Image Segmentation for Multiple Objects and Surfaces) segmentation approach being extremely well suited for the task. Once retinal layers are segmented, regional thickness, brightness, or texture-based indices of individual layers can be easily determined and thus contribute to our understanding of retinal or optic nerve head (ONH) disease processes and can be employed for determination of disease status, treatment responses, visual function, etc. Out of many applications, examples provided in this paper focus on image-guided therapy and outcome prediction in age-related macular degeneration and on assessing visual function from retinal layer structure in glaucoma. PMID:27503080

  8. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  9. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) [PDF - 2 pages] Virus Ecology Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) Information for Specific Groups ... Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Outbreak Distribution Map Resources Virus Ecology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  10. Quantitative intracerebral brain hemorrhage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncaric, Sven; Dhawan, Atam P.; Cosic, Dubravko; Kovacevic, Domagoj; Broderick, Joseph; Brott, Thomas

    1999-05-01

    In this paper a system for 3-D quantitative analysis of human spontaneous intracerebral brain hemorrhage (ICH) is described. The purpose of the developed system is to perform quantitative 3-D measurements of the parameters of ICH region and from computed tomography (CT) images. The measured parameter in this phase of the system development is volume of the hemorrhage region. The goal of the project is to measure parameters for a large number of patients having ICH and to correlate measured parameters to patient morbidity and mortality.

  11. Growing Hemorrhagic Choroidal Fissure Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Gelal, Fazıl; Gurkan, Gokhan; Feran, Hamit

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal fissure cysts are often incidentally discovered. They are usually asymptomatic. The authors report a case of growing and hemorrhagic choroidal fissure cyst which was treated surgically. A 22-year-old female presented with headache. Cranial MRI showed a left-sided choroidal fissure cyst. Follow-up MRI showed that the size of the cyst had increased gradually. Twenty months later, the patient was admitted to our emergency department with severe headache. MRI and CT showed an intracystic hematoma. Although such cysts usually have a benign course without symptoms and progression, they may rarely present with intracystic hemorrhage, enlargement of the cyst and increasing symptomatology. PMID:26962426

  12. Retinal connectivity and primate vision

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barry B.; Martin, Paul R.; Grünert, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    The general principles of retinal organization are now well known. It may seem surprising that retinal organization in the primate, which has a complex visual behavioral repertoire, appears relatively simple. In this review, we primarily consider retinal structure and function in primate species. Photoreceptor distribution and connectivity are considered as are connectivity in the outer and inner retina. One key issue is the specificity of retinal connections; we suggest that the retina shows connectional specificity but this is seldom complete, and we consider here the functional consequences of imprecise wiring. Finally, we consider how retinal systems can be linked to psychophysical descriptions of different channels, chromatic and luminance, which are proposed to exist in the primate visual system. PMID:20826226

  13. Retinal connectivity and primate vision.

    PubMed

    Lee, Barry B; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2010-11-01

    The general principles of retinal organization are now well known. It may seem surprising that retinal organization in the primate, which has a complex visual behavioral repertoire, appears relatively simple. In this review, we primarily consider retinal structure and function in primate species. Photoreceptor distribution and connectivity are considered as are connectivity in the outer and inner retina. One key issue is the specificity of retinal connections; we suggest that the retina shows connectional specificity but this is seldom complete, and we consider here the functional consequences of imprecise wiring. Finally, we consider how retinal systems can be linked to psychophysical descriptions of different channels, chromatic and luminance, which are proposed to exist in the primate visual system. PMID:20826226

  14. [Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells].

    PubMed

    Skorkovská, K; Skorkovská, Š

    2015-06-01

    Recently discovered intrinsically photosensitive melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells contribute to circadian photoentrainment and pupillary constriction; recent works have also brought new evidence for their accessory role in the visual system in humans. Pupil light reaction driven by individual photoreceptors can be isolated by means of the so called chromatic pupillography. The use of chromatic stimuli to elicit different pupillary responses may become an objective clinical pupil test in the detection of retinal diseases and in assessing new therapeutic approaches particularly in hereditary retinal degenerations like retinitis pigmentosa. In advanced stages of disease, the pupil light reaction is even more sensitive than standard electroretinography for detecting residual levels of photoreceptor activity. This review summarizes current knowledge on intrinsically photosensitive retinal cells and highlights its possible implications for clinical practice. PMID:26201360

  15. Symptomatic Tarlov Cyst Following Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Woo Keun; Hong, Seung-Koan

    2011-01-01

    Most of Tarlov or perineurial cysts remain asymptomatic throughout the patient's life. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Hemorrhage has been suggested as one of the possible causes and trauma with resultant hemorrhage into subarachnoid space has been suggested as an origin of these cysts. However, Tarlov cysts related to spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been reported. The authors report a case of Tarlov cyst which was symptomatic following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22053232

  16. [Multifocal Vitelliform Retinal Lesion].

    PubMed

    Streicher, T; Špirková, J; Ilavská, M

    2015-06-01

    The authors present retrospective follow up of patient with bilateral multifocal vitelliform retinal lesion during the 18 years period. At this time, spontaneous improvement of objective picture on retina and subjective visual troubles was observed. It is probable, that this case is a part of the same symptom complex as a variant of Best´s hereditary disease. This conclusion was based on initial stadium of phenotypical expressivity and additional evaluations. The course and outcomes of visual functions were different. The hereditary transmission was not confirmed. PMID:26201364

  17. ROLLER COASTER RETINOPATHY: CASE REPORT OF SYMPTOMATIC BILATERAL INTRARETINAL HEMORRHAGES AFTER SHAKING INJURY IN AN OTHERWISE HEALTHY ADULT

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Yogin P.; Saraf, Steven S.; Desai, Uday R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Traumatic head injuries not involving the eye have been known to cause retinal injury through multiple mechanisms. Abusive head trauma remains the prototypical example. We propose to demonstrate the first case of bilateral multiple retinal hemorrhages in a young healthy adult related to riding multiple theme park roller coasters. Methods: The patient was evaluated with a complete ophthalmic examination including dilated extended ophthalmoscopy, fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and fundus photography. Results: The patient was found to have a bilateral symptomatic macular retinopathy characterized by multiple intraretinal hemorrhages. Given the lack of other systemic findings and negative medical workup, her signs and symptoms were thought to be attributed to the same day attendance of a theme park and riding of multiple roller coasters. Conclusion: Theme park roller coasters, as well as other attractions, may affect the eye at the vitreoretinal interface. This type of acceleration–deceleration injury should be considered in the differential of an adolescent or adult patient with retinal hemorrhage in the absence of other pathologic processes to explain clinical findings. PMID:26630245

  18. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  19. Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed to place a tube (shunt) in the brain to drain fluid. Outlook (Prognosis) How well the infant does depends on how premature the baby is and the grade of the hemorrhage. Less than half of babies with lower-grade ... Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  20. Prolonged abulia following putaminal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, N; Fanella, S; Gopinath, S; Goodwin, A

    2001-01-01

    Abulia, akinetic mutism, and other conditions causing reduced activity and slowness are a continuum of severity of behavior. Unilateral lesions usually cause transient symptoms. This article describes a patient with prolonged abulia lasting 12 weeks after aspontaneous left putaminal hemorrhage. He developed seizures that could be a contributing factor. The pathophysiologic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:17903806

  1. Octreotide, a Somatostatin Analogue, Fails to Inhibit Hypoxia-induced Retinal Neovascularization in the Neonatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Averbukh, Edward; Halpert, Michael; Yanko, Ravit; Yanko, Lutza; Peèr, Jacob; Levinger, Samuel; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Octreotide, a somatostatin analogue, has been shown to prevent angiogenesis in diverse in vitro models. We evaluated its effect on retinal neovascularization in vivo, using a neonatal rat retinopathy model. Methods: We used, on alternating days, hypoxia (10% O2) and hyperoxia (50% O2) during the first 14 days of neonatal rats, to induce retinal neovascularization. Half of the rats were injected subcutaneously with octreotide 0.7 μg/g BW twice daily. At day 18 the eyes were evaluated for the presence of epiretinal and vitreal hemorrhage, neovascularization and epiretinal proliferation. Octreotide pharmacokinetics and its effect on serum growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) were examined in 28 rats. Results: Serum octreotide levels were 667 μg/1 two hours after injection, 26.4 μg/1 after nine hours and 3.2 μg/1 after 14 hours. GH levels were decreased by 40% (p = 0.002) two hours after injection but thereafter returned to baseline. IGF-I levels were unchanged two hours after injection and were elevated by 26% 14 hours after injection (p = 0.02). Epiretinal membranes were highly associated with epiretinal hemorrhages (p < 0.001), while retinal neovascularization was notably associated with vitreal hemorrhages (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Twice-daily injections of octreotide failed to produce sustained decrease in serum GH, but produced rebound elevation of serum IGF-I. Accordingly, no statistically significant effect of injections on retinal pathology was noted. This finding, however, does not contradict our assumption that GH suppression may decrease the severity of retinopathy. PMID:11469389

  2. Hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization in zebrafish embryos: a potential model of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Ching; Chang, Chao-Yuan; Kao, Alex; Hsi, Brian; Lee, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Yau-Hung; Wang, I-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity, formerly known as a retrolental fibroplasia, is a leading cause of infantile blindness worldwide. Retinopathy of prematurity is caused by the failure of central retinal vessels to reach the retinal periphery, creating a nonperfused peripheral retina, resulting in retinal hypoxia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, vitreoretinal fibrosis, and loss of vision. We established a potential retinopathy of prematurity model by using a green fluorescent vascular endothelium zebrafish transgenic line treated with cobalt chloride (a hypoxia-inducing agent), followed by GS4012 (a vascular endothelial growth factor inducer) at 24 hours postfertilization, and observed that the number of vascular branches and sprouts significantly increased in the central retinal vascular trunks 2-4 days after treatment. We created an angiography method by using tetramethylrhodamine dextran, which exhibited severe vascular leakage through the vessel wall into the surrounding retinal tissues. The quantification of mRNA extracted from the heads of the larvae by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a twofold increase in vegfaa and vegfr2 expression compared with the control group, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in the hypoxic condition. In addition, we demonstrated that the hypoxic insult could be effectively rescued by several antivascular endothelial growth factor agents such as SU5416, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab. In conclusion, we provide a simple, highly reproducible, and clinically relevant retinopathy of prematurity model based on zebrafish embryos; this model may serve as a useful platform for clarifying the mechanisms of human retinopathy of prematurity and its progression. PMID:25978439

  3. Hypoxia-Induced Retinal Neovascularization in Zebrafish Embryos: A Potential Model of Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Alex; Hsi, Brian; Lee, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Yau-Hung; Wang, I-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity, formerly known as a retrolental fibroplasia, is a leading cause of infantile blindness worldwide. Retinopathy of prematurity is caused by the failure of central retinal vessels to reach the retinal periphery, creating a nonperfused peripheral retina, resulting in retinal hypoxia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, vitreoretinal fibrosis, and loss of vision. We established a potential retinopathy of prematurity model by using a green fluorescent vascular endothelium zebrafish transgenic line treated with cobalt chloride (a hypoxia-inducing agent), followed by GS4012 (a vascular endothelial growth factor inducer) at 24 hours postfertilization, and observed that the number of vascular branches and sprouts significantly increased in the central retinal vascular trunks 2–4 days after treatment. We created an angiography method by using tetramethylrhodamine dextran, which exhibited severe vascular leakage through the vessel wall into the surrounding retinal tissues. The quantification of mRNA extracted from the heads of the larvae by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a twofold increase in vegfaa and vegfr2 expression compared with the control group, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in the hypoxic condition. In addition, we demonstrated that the hypoxic insult could be effectively rescued by several antivascular endothelial growth factor agents such as SU5416, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab. In conclusion, we provide a simple, highly reproducible, and clinically relevant retinopathy of prematurity model based on zebrafish embryos; this model may serve as a useful platform for clarifying the mechanisms of human retinopathy of prematurity and its progression. PMID:25978439

  4. PIMASERTIB AND SEROUS RETINAL DETACHMENTS

    PubMed Central

    AlAli, Alaa; Bushehri, Ahmad; Park, Jonathan C.; Krema, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of multifocal serous retinal detachments associated with pimasertib. Methods: The authors report a 26-year-old patient who developed bilateral multifocal serous retinal detachments appearing 2 days after starting pimasertib (as part of a clinical trial investigating its use in low-grade metastatic ovarian cancer) and rapidly resolving 3 days after stopping it. Conclusion: The mechanism of MEK inhibitor induced visual toxicity remains unclear. The pathophysiology of multifocal serous retinal detachments as a complication of pimasertib is still poorly understood. PMID:26444523

  5. Intraventricular hemorrhage expansion in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Witsch, Jens; Bruce, Eliza; Meyers, Emma; Velazquez, Angela; Schmidt, J. Michael; Suwatcharangkoon, Sureerat; Agarwal, Sachin; Park, Soojin; Falo, M. Cristina; Connolly, E. Sander

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether delayed appearance of intraventricular hemorrhage (dIVH) represents an independent entity from intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) present on admission CT or is primarily related to the time interval between symptom onset and admission CT. Methods: A total of 282 spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients, admitted February 2009–March 2014 to the neurological intensive care unit of a tertiary care university hospital, were prospectively enrolled in the ICH Outcomes Project. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine associations with acute mortality and functional long-term outcome (modified Rankin Scale). Results: A cohort of 282 ICH patients was retrospectively studied: 151 (53.5%) had intraventricular hemorrhage on initial CT scan (iIVH). Of the remaining 131 patients, 19 (14.5%) developed IVH after the initial CT scan (dIVH). The median times from symptom onset to admission CT were 1.1, 6.0, and 7.4 hours for the dIVH, iIVH, and no IVH groups (Mann-Whitney U test, dIVH vs iIVH, p < 0.001) and median time from onset to dIVH detection was 7.2 hours. The increase in ICH volume following hospital admission was larger in dIVH than in iIVH and no IVH patients (mean 17.6, 0.2, and 0.4 mL). After controlling for components of the ICH score and hematoma expansion, presence of IVH on initial CT was associated with discharge mortality and poor outcome at 3, 6, and 12 months, but dIVH was not associated with any of the outcome measures. Conclusions: In ICH patients, associated IVH on admission imaging is commonly encountered and is associated with poor long-term outcome. In contrast, dIVH on subsequent scans is far less common and does not appear to portend worse outcome. PMID:25663233

  6. Building retinal connectomes.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W; Lauritzen, J Scott; Watt, Carl B; Anderson, James R

    2012-08-01

    Understanding vertebrate vision depends on knowing, in part, the complete network graph of at least one representative retina. Acquiring such graphs is the business of synaptic connectomics, emerging as a practical technology due to improvements in electron imaging platform control, management software for large-scale datasets, and availability of data storage. The optimal strategy for building complete connectomes uses transmission electron imaging with 2 nm or better resolution, molecular tags for cell identification, open-access data volumes for navigation, and annotation with open-source tools to build 3D cell libraries, complete network diagrams and connectivity databases. The first forays into retinal connectomics have shown that even nominally well-studied cells have much richer connection graphs than expected. PMID:22498714

  7. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  8. Nutrition and retinal degenerations.

    PubMed

    Berson, E L

    2000-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the understanding and management of degenerative diseases of the retina involving photoreceptors. Nutritional approaches to treatment have proved successful in the case of the common forms of retinitis pigmentosa (supplementation with vitamin A), Bassen-Kornzweig disease (supplementation with vitamins A, E, and K), gyrate atrophy (low-protein, low-arginine diet and/or supplementation with vitamin B6), and Refsum disease (low-phytol, low-phytanic acid diet). The night blindness associated with Sorsby fundus dystrophy can be reversed over the short term with vitamin A. A significant trend for decreased risk for advanced or exudative ARMD has been reported among those whose diets contain a higher content of carotenoids, such as spinach and collard greens. A randomized trial is in progress to determine whether beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E as well as trace minerals, particularly zinc, will modify the course of ARMD. The difficulties that patients with retinal degenerations face as a result of their diminishing vision, sometimes over decades, cannot be underestimated. Nutritional therapy has proved effective in modifying the course of a number of these conditions; the therapeutic benefit of nutritional modification in diseases that have a genetic basis is of particular interest. Further research is warranted to determine the mechanisms by which these treatments provide their benefit as well as to identify other conditions that may yield to nutritional intervention. Risk-factor analyses of well-defined populations followed over time with food-frequency questionnaires in conjunction with careful assessments of visual function may reveal other dietary constituents that can modify the course of degenerative diseases of the retina. PMID:11064860

  9. Molecular genetics of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Farber, D. B.; Heckenlively, J. R.; Sparkes, R. S.; Bateman, J. B.

    1991-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a model for the study of genetic diseases. Its genetic heterogeneity is reflected in the different forms of inheritance (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked) and, in a few families, in the presence of mutations in the visual pigment rhodopsin. Clinical and molecular genetic studies of these disorders are discussed. Animal models of retinal degeneration have been investigated for many years with the hope of gaining insight into the cause of photoreceptor cell death. Recently, the genes responsible for two of these animal disorders, the rds and rd mouse genes, have been isolated and characterized. The retinal degeneration of the rd mouse is presented in detail. The possible involvement of human analogues of these mouse genes in human retinal diseases is being investigated. Images PMID:1771877

  10. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  11. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage: evaluation with MDCT.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jorge A; Park, Seong Ho; Fletcher, Joel G; Fidler, Jeff L

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical problem, with high associated morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation of gastrointestinal hemorrhage varies with the location of the bleeding source, the intensity of the bleed, and the presence of comorbidities that affect the ability to tolerate blood loss. Conventional endoscopic examinations are usually the initial diagnostic tests in patients presenting with overt gastrointestinal hemorrhage. However, implementation of upper tract endoscopy and colonoscopy in the emergency setting can be challenging due to inconsistent availability of the service and difficulties in achieving adequate colonic cleansing in emergent situations. Thus, imaging tests are often relied upon to establish the location and the cause of bleeding, either for initial diagnosis or after non-revealing upper and lower tract endoscopies ("obscure" bleeding). This article discusses the imaging evaluation of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and reviews the imaging appearance of the most common causes, taking into account the two most relevant clinical presentations: overt bleeding and obscure bleeding. PMID:25637128

  12. The mechanics of retinal detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; Siegel, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We present a model of the mechanical and fluid forces associated with exudative retinal detachments where the retinal photoreceptor cells separate typically from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By computing the total fluid volume flow arising from transretinal, vascular, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) pump currents, we determine the conditions under which the subretinal fluid pressure exceeds the maximum yield stress holding the retina and RPE together, giving rise to an irreversible, extended retinal delamination. We also investigate localized, blister-like retinal detachments by balancing mechanical tension in the retina with both the retina-RPE adhesion energy and the hydraulic pressure jump across the retina. For detachments induced by traction forces, we find a critical radius beyond which the blister is unstable to growth. Growth of a detached blister can also be driven by inflamed tissue within which e.g., the hydraulic conductivities of the retina or choroid increase, the RPE pumps fail, or the adhesion properties change. We determine the parameter regimes in which the blister either becomes unstable to growth, remains stable and finite-sized, or shrinks, allowing possible healing. This work supported by the Army Research Office through grant 58386MA

  13. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  14. General pathophysiology in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Wert, Katherine J; Lin, Jonathan H; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    Retinal degeneration, including that seen in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common form of neural degenerative disease in the world. There is great genetic and allelic heterogeneity of the various retinal dystrophies. Classifications of these diseases can be ambiguous, as there are similar clinical presentations in retinal degenerations arising from different genetic mechanisms. As would be expected, alterations in the activity of the phototransduction cascade, such as changes affecting the renewal and shedding of the photoreceptor OS, visual transduction, and/or retinol metabolism have a great impact on the health of the retina. Mutations within any of the molecules responsible for these visual processes cause several types of retinal and retinal pigment epithelium degenerative diseases. Apoptosis has been implicated in the rod cell loss seen in a mouse model of RP, but the precise mechanisms that connect the activation of these pathways to the loss of phosphodiesterase (PDE6β) function has yet to be defined. Additionally, the activation of apoptosis by CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), after activation of the unfolded protein response pathway, may be responsible for cell death, although the mechanism remains unknown. However, the mechanisms of cell death after loss of function of PDE6, which is a commonly studied mammalian model in research, may be generalizable to loss of function of different key proteins involved in the phototransduction cascade. PMID:24732759

  15. General Pathophysiology in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Lin, Jonathan H.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration, including that seen in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common form of neural degenerative disease in the world. There is great genetic and allelic heterogeneity of the various retinal dystrophies. Classifications of these diseases can be ambiguous, as there are similar clinical presentations in retinal degenerations arising from different genetic mechanisms. As would be expected, alterations in the activity of the phototransduction cascade, such as changes affecting the renewal and shedding of the photoreceptor OS, visual transduction, and/ or retinol metabolism have a great impact on the health of the retina. Mutations within any of the molecules responsible for these visual processes cause several types of retinal and retinal pigment epithelium degenerative diseases. Apoptosis has been implicated in the rod cell loss seen in a mouse model of RP, but the precise mechanisms that connect the activation of these pathways to the loss of phosphodiesterase (PDE6β) function has yet to be defined. Additionally, the activation of apoptosis by CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), after activation of the unfolded protein response pathway, may be responsible for cell death, although the mechanism remains unknown. However, the mechanisms of cell death after loss of function of PDE6, which is a commonly studied mammalian model in research, may be generalizable to loss of function of different key proteins involved in the phototransduction cascade. PMID:24732759

  16. Cytomegalovirus retinitis mimicking intraocular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gooi, Patrick; Farmer, James; Hurley, Bernard; Brodbaker, Elliott

    2008-12-01

    We present a case of an unusual retinal infiltrate requiring retinal biopsy for definitive diagnosis. A 62-year-old man with treated lymphoma presented with decreased vision in the right eye associated with a white retinal lesion, which extended inferonasally from an edematous disc. Intraocular lymphoma was considered as a diagnosis; thus, the patient was managed with vitrectomy and retinal biopsy. Cytological analysis of the vitreous aspirate could not rule out a lymphoproliferative disorder. The microbial analysis was negative. Histology of the lesion showed extensive necrosis and large cells with prominent nucleoli. To rule out lymphoma, a battery of immunostains was performed and all were negative. However the limited amount of tissue was exhausted in the process. Subsequently, a hematoxylin and eosin (H/E) slide was destained, on which a CMV immunostain was performed. This revealed positivity in the nuclei and intranuclear inclusions within the large atypical cells. A diagnosis of CMV retinitis was made. Retinal biopsy may provide a definitive diagnosis and direct patient care toward intravenous gancyclovir in the case of CMV or toward radiation and chemotherapy for intraocular lymphoma. When faced with a limited amount of tissue, destaining regular H/E slides is a possible avenue to performing additional immunohistochemical studies. PMID:19668455

  17. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, René M; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  18. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  19. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology. PMID:26036792

  20. Acute suprachoroidal hemorrhage during phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, A K; Fox, P D

    2000-06-01

    We present a case of acute suprachoroidal hemorrhage that developed during routine phacoemulsification in an 85-year-old patient after uneventful administration of periocular anesthesia. Pre-existing risk factors included advanced age, glaucoma, myopia, and hypertension. The scleral tunnel prevented major expulsion of intraocular contents; however, raised intraocular pressure prevented intraocular lens implantation. The rarity of this condition raises questions regarding the further management and precautions related to it. PMID:10889443

  1. Dabigatran-Associated Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Szarlej, Dorota K.; Rincon, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolization in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Although dabigatran has a favorable safety profile, predictable pharmacokinetics, fewer drug interactions than warfarin, and does not require monitoring, clinical data regarding dabigatran reversal are limited. In addition, currently available laboratory assays allow measurement of the presence, but not extent, of dabigatran-associated anticoagulation. Patient age, renal function, weight, concurrent drug therapy, adherence, and concomitant disease states can affect dabigatran’s efficacy and safety. Management of dabigatran-related intracranial hemorrhage must be approached on a case-by-case basis and include assessment of degree of anticoagulation, severity of hemorrhage, renal function, timing of last dabigatran dose, and risk of thromboembolic events. Initial management includes dabigatran discontinuation and general supportive measures. Oral activated charcoal should be administered in those who ingested dabigatran within 2 hours. Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (4PCCs), activated PCC, or recombinant activated factor VII use may be reasonable but is not evidence based. Reserve fresh frozen plasma for patients with dilutional coagulopathy. If readily available, hemodialysis should be considered, particularly in patients with advanced kidney injury or excessive risk of thromboembolic events. More clinical studies are needed to determine a standardized approach to treating dabigatran-associated intracranial hemorrhage. Institutional protocol development will facilitate safe, efficacious, and timely use of the limited management options. PMID:26425251

  2. Stimulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation causes breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Sen, H A; Campochiaro, P A

    1991-06-01

    Pigmented rabbits were given an intravitreous injection of 0.1 ml of various concentrations of test drug, and vitreous fluorophotometry was done 6 and 24 hr after injection. Dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP caused reversible intravitreous fluorescein leakage only at relatively high concentrations. Adrenergic agents that are effective stimulators of adenylate cyclase (epinephrine, isoproterenol, and norepinephrine) caused transient intravitreous fluorescein leakage (2.3-3.1-fold above baseline) that was significantly greater than that caused by phenylephrine (1.1-fold above baseline), an adrenergic agent that is a poor stimulator of adenylate cyclase. Prostaglandins E1 and E2, which are good stimulators of adenylate cyclase, caused striking disruption of the blood-ocular barriers, and prostaglandins that are not good stimulators of adenylate cyclase had little or no effect on these barriers. The magnitude of the prostaglandin E1 effect (9.3-fold above baseline) was similar to that of N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), the most potent adenosine agonist, and was greater than one would predict based on its effect on adenylate cyclase in vitro. Prostaglandin E1, like NECA, also caused retinal vasodilation and hemorrhages. These data suggest that stimulation of intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation may be a common feature of mediators that cause breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier, but there may be another as yet unexplained feature shared by PGE1 and NECA that makes them particularly effective and capable of causing retinal vasodilation and hemorrhages. PMID:1647374

  3. A 25-Year-Old Man with Exudative Retinal Detachments and Infiltrates without Hematological or Neurological Findings Found to Have Relapsed Precursor T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jordan S.; Lopez, James S.; Kavanaugh, Arthur Scott; Liang, Chanping; Mata, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-T-ALL) may cause ocular pathologies such as cotton-wool spots, retinal hemorrhage, and less commonly, retinal detachment or leukemic infiltration of the retina itself. However, these findings are typically accompanied by the pathognomonic hematological signs of acute leukemia. Case Presentation In this case report and review of the literature, we describe a particularly unusual case of a 25-year-old man who presented to our hospital with bilateral exudative retinal detachments associated with posterior pole thickening without any hematological or neurological findings. The patient, who had a history of previously treated pre-T-ALL in complete remission, was found to have leukemia cell infiltration on retinal biopsy. Conclusion Our case underscores the fact that the ophthalmologist may be the first provider to detect the relapse of previously treated leukemia, and that ophthalmic evaluation is critical for detecting malignant ocular infiltrates. PMID:26483676

  4. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Dutta, Tanya; Melcer, Joshua; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac manifestations are recognized complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy is one complication that is seen in acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. It can present as transient diffuse left ventricular dysfunction or as transient regional wall motion abnormalities. It occurs more frequently with neurologically severe-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with increased morbidity and poor clinical outcomes. Managing this subset of patients is challenging. Early identification followed by a multidisciplinary team approach can potentially improve outcomes. PMID:25606704

  5. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    Manos, Daria; Hamer, Okka; Müller, Nestor L

    2007-11-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage is a relatively common complication of blunt chest trauma. Occasionally, it may result from pulmonary barotrauma after scuba diving or from sports activities not associated with barotrauma such as long breath-hold diving. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from a bungee jump in a previously healthy man. Bungee jumping is an increasingly popular sport with relatively few reported injuries. To our knowledge pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described. PMID:18043394

  6. Hemorrhagic cystitis: A challenge to the urologist

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, R.; Kumar, Santosh; Dorairajan, Lalgudi N.

    2010-01-01

    Severe hemorrhagic cystitis often arises from anticancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies. Infectious etiologies are less common causes except in immunocompromised hosts. These cases can be challenging problems for the urologist and a source of substantial morbidity and sometimes mortality for the patients. A variety of modalities of treatment have been described for the management of hemorrhagic cystitis but there is none that is uniformly effective. Some progress has been made in the understanding and management of viral hemorrhagic cystitis. This article reviews the common causes of severe hemorrhagic cystitis and the currently available management options. PMID:20877590

  7. Spontaneous Massive Adrenal Hemorrhage: A Management Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anshuman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a rare but life-threatening condition. Small focal hemorrhage may present subclinically, but massive hemorrhage may lead to rapid cardiovascular collapse and ultimately death if not diagnosed appropriately and treated quickly. Most cases reported in the literature have been treated conservatively. In an event of increasing hemorrhage during conservative management, it may be tricky to intervene surgically because of the hematoma around the gland. Here we describe a case where we managed a large spontaneous AH by a combination of angioembolization and laparoscopic adrenalectomy. PMID:27579389

  8. A novel platform for minimally invasive delivery of cellular therapy as a thin layer across the subretina for treatment of retinal degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Tzameret, Adi; Kalish, Sapir E.; Belkin, Michael; Meir, Amilia; Treves, Avraham J.; Nagler, Arnon; Sher, Ifat

    2015-03-01

    Incurable retinal degenerations affect millions worldwide. Stem cell transplantation rescued visual functions in animal models of retinal degeneration. In those studies cells were transplanted in subretinal "blebs", limited number of cells could be injected and photoreceptor rescue was restricted to areas in proximity to the injection sites. We developed a minimally-invasive surgical platform for drug and cell delivery in a thin layer across the subretina and extravascular spaces of the choroid. The novel system is comprised of a syringe with a blunt-tipped needle and an adjustable separator. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were transplanted in eyes of RCS rats and NZW rabbits through a longitudinal triangular scleral incision. No immunosuppressants were used. Retinal function was determined by electroretinogram analysis and retinal structure was determined by histological analysis and OCT. Transplanted cells were identified as a thin layer across the subretina and extravascular spaces of the choroid. In RCS rats, cell transplantation delayed photoreceptor degeneration across the entire retina and significantly enhanced retinal functions. No retinal detachment or choroidal hemorrhages were observed in rabbits following transplantation. This novel platform opens a new avenue for drug and cell delivery, placing the transplanted cells in close proximity to the damaged RPE and retina as a thin layer, across the subretina and thereby slowing down cell death and photoreceptor degeneration, without retinal detachment or choroidal hemorrhage. This new transplantation system may increase the therapeutic effect of other cell-based therapies and therapeutic agents. This study is expected to directly lead to phase I/II clinical trials for autologous hBM-MSCs transplantation in retinal degeneration patients.

  9. Temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Baade, Alexander; Birngruber, Reginald; Roider, Johann; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Retinal photocoagulation lacks objective dosage in clinical use, thus the commonly applied lesions are too deep and strong, associated with pain reception and the risk of visual field defects and induction of choroidal neovascularisations. Optoacoustics allows real-time non-invasive temperature measurement in the fundus during photocoagulation by applying short probe laser pulses additionally to the treatment radiation, which excite the emission of ultrasonic waves. Due to the temperature dependence of the Grüneisen parameter, the amplitudes of the ultrasonic waves can be used to derive the temperature of the absorbing tissue. By measuring the temperatures in real-time and automatically controlling the irradiation by feedback to the treatment laser, the strength of the lesions can be defined. Different characteristic functions for the time and temperature dependent lesion sizes were used as rating curves for the treatment laser, stopping the irradiation automatically after a desired lesion size is achieved. The automatically produced lesion sizes are widely independent of the adjusted treatment laser power and individual absorption. This study was performed on anaesthetized rabbits and is a step towards a clinical trial with automatically controlled photocoagulation.

  10. Retinal AO OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Miller, Donald T.

    The last two decades have witnessed extraordinary advances in optical technology to image noninvasively and at high resolution the posterior segment of the eye. Two of the most impactful technological advancements over this period have arguably been optical coherence tomography (OCT) and adaptive optics (AO). The strengths of these technologies complement each other and when combined have been shown to provide unprecedented, micron-scale resolution (<3 μm) in all three dimensions and sensitivity to image the cellular retina in the living eye. This powerful extension of OCT, that is AO-OCT, is the focus of this chapter. It presents key aspects of designing and implementing AO-OCT systems. Particular attention is devoted to the relevant optical properties of the eye that ultimately define these systems, AO componentry and operation tailored for ophthalmic use, and of course use of the latest technologies and methods in OCT for ocular imaging. It surveys the wide range of AO-OCT designs that have been developed for retinal imaging, with AO integrated into every major OCT design configuration. Finally, it reviews the scientific and clinical studies reported to date that show the exciting potential of AO-OCT to image the microscopic retina and fundus in ways not previously possible with other noninvasive methods and a look to future developments in this rapidly growing field.

  11. Color Doppler imaging of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Galina; Kato, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Color Doppler imaging (CDI) is a widely used method for evaluating ocular circulation that has been used in a number of studies on retinal diseases. CDI assesses blood velocity parameters by using ultrasound waves. In ophthalmology, these assessments are mainly performed on the retrobulbar blood vessels: the ophthalmic, the central retinal, and the short posterior ciliary arteries. In this review, we discuss CDI use for the assessment of retinal diseases classified into the following: vascular diseases, degenerations, dystrophies, and detachment. The retinal vascular diseases that have been investigated by CDI include diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusions, retinal artery occlusions, ocular ischemic conditions, and retinopathy of prematurity. Degenerations and dystrophies included in this review are age-related macular degeneration, myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. CDI has been used for the differential diagnosis of retinal detachment, as well as the evaluation of retrobulbar circulation in this condition. CDI is valuable for research and is a potentially useful diagnostic tool in the clinical setting. PMID:20385332

  12. High-dose methylprednisolone treatment of laser-induced retinal injury exacerbates acute inflammation and long-term scarring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuschereba, Steven T.; Cross, Michael E.; Scales, David K.; Pizarro, Jose M.; Edsall, Peter R.; Stuck, Bruce E.; Marshall, John

    1999-06-01

    Purpose. To evaluate therapeutics for attenuating retinal laser injury. Methods. New Zealand Red rabbits (n=76) were pretreated (IV) with either a single dose of hydroxyethyl starch conjugated deferoxamine (HES-DFO, n=29) (6.1 ml/kg, 16.4 mg/ml) or methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MP, n=22) (30 mg/kg, followed by taper of 30, 20, 20, and 10 mg/kg/day for a total of 5d). Controls were untreated (n=25). Fifteen min later, animals were irradiated with a multiline cw argon laser (285 mW, 10 msec pulse durations, 16 lesions/eye). Funduscopy, fluorescein angiography, histology, and morphometry were performed at 10 min, 1h, 3h, 24h, 1 mo, and 6 mo after irradiation. Leukocytes were counted at lesion centers for retinal and choroidal compartments at 1, 3, and 24h. Results. At 3h, percent area incrase for the lesions was highest for MP (44%) and lowest for HES-DFO (16%)(p<0.05). In hemorrhagic lesions, MP treatment resulted in the highest increase of retinal neotrophils by 24h (p<0.05), and by 1 and 6 mo extensive chorio-retinal scarring occurred in nonhemorrhagic and hemorrhagic lesions. Also, no benefit was demonstrated on sparing of photoreceptors with MP treatment. Conclusions. Treatment of laser-induced retinal injury with methylprednisolone (MP) exacerbates acute inflammation and long-term chorio-retinal scarring; however, hydroxyethyl starch conjugated deferoxamine therapy ameliorates these aspects of injury. Data suggest caution in the use of MP therapy for laser injuries.

  13. Photon Echoes from Retinal Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Philip James Maddigan

    This thesis focuses on the ultrafast isomerization reaction of retinal in both rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin, examples of sensory and energy transduction proteins that exploit the same photoactive chromophore for two very different functions. In bacteriorhodopsin, retinal isomerizes from an all-trans to 13-cis conformation as the primary event in light- driven proton pumping. In the visual pigment rhodopsin, the retinal chromophore isomerizes from an 11-cis to all-trans geometry as the primary step leading to our sense of vision. This diversity of function for nominally identical systems raises the question as to just how optimized are these proteins to arrive at such drastically different functions? Previous work has employed transient absorption spectroscopy to probe retinal protein photochemistry, but many of the relevant electronic and nuclear dynamics of isomerization are masked by inhomogeneous broadening effects and strong spectral overlap between reactant and photoproduct states. This work exploits the unique properties of two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy to deconvolve inhomogeneous broadening and spectral overlap effects and fully reveal the dynamics that direct retinal isomerization in proteins. In bacteriorhodopsin, vibrational coupling to the reaction coordinate results in a surface crossing event prior to the conventional conical intersection associated with isomerization to the J intermediate. In rhodopsin, however, a similarly early vibrationally-mediated barrier crossing event is observed, resulting in spectral signals consistent with the known photoproduct state appearing an order of magnitude faster than determined from conventional transient absorption measurements. The competing overlapping spectral signals that obscured the initial dynamics when probed with transient absorption spectroscopy are now clearly resolved with two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy. These experiments illustrate the critical role of the protein in directing

  14. Automated retinal robotic laser system.

    PubMed

    Barrett, S F; Wright, C H; Jerath, M R; Lewis, R S; Dillard, B C; Rylander, H G; Welch, A J

    1995-01-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas and the USAF Academy have worked toward the development of a retinal robotic laser system. The overall goal of this ongoing project is to precisely place and control the depth of laser lesions for the treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. Separate low speed prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion depth using lesion reflectance feedback parameters and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Both subsystems have been successfully demonstrated in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser. Recent efforts have concentrated on combining the two subsystems into a single prototype capable of simultaneously controlling both lesion depth and placement. We have designated this combined system CALOSOS for Computer Aided Laser Optics System for Ophthalmic Surgery. Following the dual-use concept, this system is being adapted for clinical use as a retinal treatment system as well as a research tool for military laser-tissue interaction studies. PMID:7654990

  15. Neuroglobin Protection in Retinal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anita S.Y.; Saraswathy, Sindhu; Rehak, Matus; Ueki, Mari

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a vertebrate globin that is predominantly expressed in the retina and brain. To explore the role of Ngb in retinal neuroprotection during ischemia reperfusion (IR), the authors examined the effect of Ngb overexpression in the retina in vivo by using Ngb-transgenic (Ngb-Tg) mice. Methods. Retinal IR was induced in Ngb overexpressing Ngb-Tg mice and wild type (WT) mice by cannulating the anterior chamber and transiently elevating the IOP for 60 minutes. After Day 7 of reperfusion, the authors evaluated Ngb mRNA and protein expression in nonischemic control as well as ischemic mice and its effect on retinal histology, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and apoptosis, using morphometry and immunohistochemistry, quantitative PCR analysis and Western blot techniques. Results. Ngb-Tg mice without ischemia overexpress Ngb mRNA 11.3-fold (SE ± 0.457, P < 0.05) higher than WT control mice, and this overexpression of Ngb protein was localized to the mitochondria of the ganglion cells, outer and inner plexiform layers, and photoreceptor inner segments. This overexpression of Ngb is associated with decreased mitochondrial DNA damage in Ngb-Tg mice with IR in comparison with WT. Ngb-Tg mice with IR also revealed significant preservation of retinal thickness, significantly less activated caspase 3 protein expression, and apoptosis in comparison with WT mice. Conclusions. Neuroglobin overexpression plays a neuroprotective role against retinal ischemia reperfusion injury due to decreasing of mitochondrial oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis. PMID:22167093

  16. Transcorneal Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Retinal Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-03

    Retinitis Pigmentosa; Macula Off; Primary Open Angle Glaucoma; Hereditary Macular Degeneration; Treated Retina Detachment; Retinal Artery Occlusion; Retinal Vein Occlusion; Non-Arthritic-Anterior-Ischemic Optic-Neuropathy; Hereditary Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy; Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration; Ischemic Macula Edema

  17. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eui Seok; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. PMID:25667739

  18. Clinical Trials in Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Seanna R.; Finn, Avni; Papakostas, Thanos D.; Eliott, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Research development is burgeoning for genetic and cellular therapy for retinal dystrophies. These dystrophies are the focus of many research efforts due to the unique biology and accessibility of the eye, the transformative advances in ocular imaging technology that allows for in vivo monitoring, and the potential benefit people would gain from success in the field – the gift of renewed sight. Progress in the field has revealed the immense complexity of retinal dystrophies and the challenges faced by researchers in the development of this technology. This study reviews the current trials and advancements in genetic and cellular therapy in the treatment of retinal dystrophies and also discusses the current and potential future challenges. PMID:26957839

  19. Retinal spot size with wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Eilert, Brent; Druessel, Jeffrey J.; Payne, Dale J.; Phillips, Shana L.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1997-06-01

    We have made an indirect in-vivo determination of spot size focusing in the rhesus monkey model. Measurement of the laser induced breakdown threshold both in-vitro and in-vivo allow correlation and assignment of a spot size after focusing through the living eye. We discuss and analyze the results and show how trends in minimum visible lesion data should be assessed in light of chromatic aberration. National laser safety standards are based on minimal visual lesion (MVL) threshold studies in different animal models. The energy required for a retinal lesion depends upon may parameters including wavelength and retinal spot size. We attempt to explain trends in reported MVL threshold studies using a model of the eye which allows calculation of changes in retinal spot size due to chromatic aberration.

  20. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by phospholipase C-β3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung Min; Baek, Seung Hoon; Kim, Young Hwan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, Sun Ja; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae; Bae, Sun Sik

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis has an essential role in many pathophysiologies. Here, we show that phospholipase C-β3 (PLC-β3) isoform regulates endothelial cell function and retinal angiogenesis. Silencing of PLC-β3 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) significantly delayed proliferation, migration and capillary-like tube formation. In addition, mice lacking PLC-β3 showed impaired retinal angiogenesis with delayed endothelial proliferation, reduced endothelial cell activation, abnormal vessel formation and hemorrhage. Finally, tumor formation was significantly reduced in mice lacking PLC-β3 and showed irregular size and shape of blood vessels. These results suggest that regulation of endothelial function by PLC-β3 may contribute to angiogenesis. PMID:27311705

  1. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by phospholipase C-β3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung Min; Baek, Seung Hoon; Kim, Young Hwan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, Sun Ja; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae; Bae, Sun Sik

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis has an essential role in many pathophysiologies. Here, we show that phospholipase C-β3 (PLC-β3) isoform regulates endothelial cell function and retinal angiogenesis. Silencing of PLC-β3 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) significantly delayed proliferation, migration and capillary-like tube formation. In addition, mice lacking PLC-β3 showed impaired retinal angiogenesis with delayed endothelial proliferation, reduced endothelial cell activation, abnormal vessel formation and hemorrhage. Finally, tumor formation was significantly reduced in mice lacking PLC-β3 and showed irregular size and shape of blood vessels. These results suggest that regulation of endothelial function by PLC-β3 may contribute to angiogenesis. PMID:27311705

  2. Exploring the retinal connectome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James R.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Shaw, Margaret V.; Yang, Jia-Hui; DeMill, David; Lauritzen, James S.; Lin, Yanhua; Rapp, Kevin D.; Mastronarde, David; Koshevoy, Pavel; Grimm, Bradley; Tasdizen, Tolga; Whitaker, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A connectome is a comprehensive description of synaptic connectivity for a neural domain. Our goal was to produce a connectome data set for the inner plexiform layer of the mammalian retina. This paper describes our first retinal connectome, validates the method, and provides key initial findings. Methods We acquired and assembled a 16.5 terabyte connectome data set RC1 for the rabbit retina at ≈2 nm resolution using automated transmission electron microscope imaging, automated mosaicking, and automated volume registration. RC1 represents a column of tissue 0.25 mm in diameter, spanning the inner nuclear, inner plexiform, and ganglion cell layers. To enhance ultrastructural tracing, we included molecular markers for 4-aminobutyrate (GABA), glutamate, glycine, taurine, glutamine, and the in vivo activity marker, 1-amino-4-guanidobutane. This enabled us to distinguish GABAergic and glycinergic amacrine cells; to identify ON bipolar cells coupled to glycinergic cells; and to discriminate different kinds of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells based on their molecular signatures and activity. The data set was explored and annotated with Viking, our multiuser navigation tool. Annotations were exported to additional applications to render cells, visualize network graphs, and query the database. Results Exploration of RC1 showed that the 2 nm resolution readily recapitulated well known connections and revealed several new features of retinal organization: (1) The well known AII amacrine cell pathway displayed more complexity than previously reported, with no less than 17 distinct signaling modes, including ribbon synapse inputs from OFF bipolar cells, wide-field ON cone bipolar cells and rod bipolar cells, and extensive input from cone-pathway amacrine cells. (2) The axons of most cone bipolar cells formed a distinct signal integration compartment, with ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses targeting diverse cell types. Both ON and OFF bipolar cells receive

  3. Retinal Image Quality During Accommodation

    PubMed Central

    López-Gil, N.; Martin, J.; Liu, T.; Bradley, A.; Díaz-Muñoz, D.; Thibos, L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We asked if retinal image quality is maximum during accommodation, or sub-optimal due to accommodative error, when subjects perform an acuity task. Methods Subjects viewed a monochromatic (552nm), high-contrast letter target placed at various viewing distances. Wavefront aberrations of the accommodating eye were measured near the endpoint of an acuity staircase paradigm. Refractive state, defined as the optimum target vergence for maximising retinal image quality, was computed by through-focus wavefront analysis to find the power of the virtual correcting lens that maximizes visual Strehl ratio. Results Despite changes in ocular aberrations and pupil size during binocular viewing, retinal image quality and visual acuity typically remain high for all target vergences. When accommodative errors lead to sub-optimal retinal image quality, acuity and measured image quality both decline. However, the effect of accommodation errors of on visual acuity are mitigated by pupillary constriction associated with accommodation and binocular convergence and also to binocular summation of dissimilar retinal image blur. Under monocular viewing conditions some subjects displayed significant accommodative lag that reduced visual performance, an effect that was exacerbated by pharmacological dilation of the pupil. Conclusions Spurious measurement of accommodative error can be avoided when the image quality metric used to determine refractive state is compatible with the focusing criteria used by the visual system to control accommodation. Real focusing errors of the accommodating eye do not necessarily produce a reliably measurable loss of image quality or clinically significant loss of visual performance, probably because of increased depth-of-focus due to pupil constriction. When retinal image quality is close to maximum achievable (given the eye’s higher-order aberrations), acuity is also near maximum. A combination of accommodative lag, reduced image quality, and reduced

  4. New Wrinkles in Retinal Densitometry

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Benjamin D.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinal densitometry provides objective information about retinal function. But, a number of factors, including retinal reflectance changes that are not directly related to photopigment depletion, complicate its interpretation. We explore these factors and suggest a method to minimize their impact. Methods. An adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to measure changes in photoreceptor reflectance in monkeys before and after photopigment bleaching with 514-nm light. Reflectance measurements at 514 nm and 794 nm were recorded simultaneously. Several methods of normalization to extract the apparent optical density of the photopigment were compared. Results. We identified stimulus-related fluctuations in 794-nm reflectance that are not associated with photopigment absorptance and occur in both rods and cones. These changes had a magnitude approaching those associated directly with pigment depletion, precluding the use of infrared reflectance for normalization. We used a spatial normalization method instead, which avoided the fluctuations in the near infrared, as well as a confocal AOSLO designed to minimize light from layers other than the receptors. However, these methods produced a surprisingly low estimate of the apparent rhodopsin density (animal 1: 0.073 ± 0.006, animal 2: 0.032 ± 0.003). Conclusions. These results confirm earlier observations that changes in photopigment absorption are not the only source of retinal reflectance change during dark adaptation. It appears that the stray light that has historically reduced the apparent density of cone photopigment in retinal densitometry arises predominantly from layers near the photoreceptors themselves. Despite these complications, this method provides a valuable, objective measure of retinal function. PMID:25316726

  5. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  6. A novel method for retinal exudate segmentation using signal separation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Imani, Elaheh; Pourreza, Hamid-Reza

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the major causes of blindness in the world. Early diagnosis of this disease is vital to the prevention of visual loss. The analysis of retinal lesions such as exudates, microaneurysms and hemorrhages is a prerequisite to detect diabetic disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and macular edema in fundus images. This paper presents an automatic method for the detection of retinal exudates. The novelty of this method lies in the use of Morphological Component Analysis (MCA) algorithm to separate lesions from normal retinal structures to facilitate the detection process. In the first stage, vessels are separated from lesions using the MCA algorithm with appropriate dictionaries. Then, the lesion part of retinal image is prepared for the detection of exudate regions. The final exudate map is created using dynamic thresholding and mathematical morphologies. Performance of the proposed method is measured on the three publicly available DiaretDB, HEI-MED and e-ophtha datasets. Accordingly, the AUC of 0.961 and 0.948 and 0.937 is achieved respectively, which are greater than most of the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:27393810

  7. Retinal Vessel Caliber, Choroidal Thickness and Ocular Pulse Amplitude Measurements in Essential Thrombocythemia

    PubMed Central

    Pekel, Gökhan; Doğu, Mehmet Hilmi; Sarı, Hakan Ismail; Acer, Semra; Kasikci, Alper; Yagci, Ramazan; Çetin, Ebru Nevin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The choroid and retina receive most of the blood that enter to the eye, and this uptake may be affected by essential thrombocythemia (ET) in which thrombosis and hemorrhage is common. This study compares choroidal thickness, retinal vascular caliber, and ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) measurements between patients with ET and healthy adults. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven patients with ET and 37 age-sex-matched healthy adults were recruited in this cross-sectional and comparative study. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography was used to measure the subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) and retinal vascular caliber measurements. The Pascal dynamic contour tonometer was used for OPA and intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of measurements between the groups. Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis was used to detect correlations between the variables. A P < 0.05 was statistically significant. Results: SFCT, OPA, and IOP measurements were not statistically significant differences between the study group and the control group (P > 0.05, all comparisons). Blood platelet counts were not associated with choroidal thickness, OPA, and IOP (P > 0.05). Retinal arteriolar and venular calibers were statistically, significantly thicker in healthy controls when compared to the study group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results indicate that choroidal thickness and pulsatile blood flow are not significantly affected in ET and under high blood platelet counts. Retinal arteriolar and venular calibers are thinner in ET when compared to age-sex matched healthy controls. PMID:26957845

  8. Spontaneous bilateral adrenal hemorrhage following cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Meryl; Lim, Chetana; Salloum, Chady

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. This diagnosis is often missed because the symptoms and laboratory results are usually nonspecific. We report a case of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage associated with acute primary adrenal insufficiency following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The knowledge of this uncommon complication following any abdominal surgery allows timey diagnosis and rapid treatment. PMID:27275469

  9. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in a yak

    PubMed Central

    Raabis, Sarah M.; Byers, Stacey R.; Han, Sushan; Callan, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) infection was diagnosed in a 3-year-old yak. The yak had signs of intermittent tremors, dysphagia, oral ulcerative lesions, hemorrhagic enteritis, tachypnea, and thrombocytopenia. Postmortem diagnostics confirmed EHDV (serotype 2) using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Gross and histopathological results were consistent with EHDV reported in other species. PMID:24688138

  10. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  11. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Warfarin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Bülent; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Baha, Reshat Mehmet; Zeytun, Neslihan Ebru Eryaşar; Yetisgen, Azize

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening clinical pathologic syndrome caused by a variety of diseases. We report a case of DAH related to therapy of warfarin use. In this case report, we present the diffuse alveolar hemorrhage case as a rare and life-threatening complication of warfarin. PMID:26347781

  12. Macrovascular Lesions Underlying Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jacky; Cord, Branden J; O'Rourke, Timothy K; Maina, Renee M; Sommaruga, Samuel; Matouk, Charles C

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a morbid disease with a high case fatality rate. Prognosis, rehemorrhage rates, and acute, clinical decision making are greatly affected by the underlying etiology of hemorrhage. This review focuses on the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of structural, macrovascular lesions presenting with ICH, including ruptured aneurysms, brain arteriovenous malformations, cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas, and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:27214699

  13. Bullous hemorrhagic dermatosis induced by enoxaparin.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Ana Isabel; Lopes, Leonor; Soares-Almeida, Luis; Filipe, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    The bullous hemorrhagic dermatosis induced by enoxaparin is a rare adverse reaction, which may be under-reported given its favorable evolution. We report a 71-year-old man who developed hemorrhagic bullae at sites distant from subcutaneous enoxaparin injections. It is important that clinicians be aware of the different adverse reactions of these widely used drugs. PMID:25942690

  14. [Hemorrhagic complications during warfarin treatment].

    PubMed

    Gumulec, J; Kessler, P; Penka, M; Klodová, D; Králová, S; Brejcha, M; Wróbel, M; Sumná, E; Blatný, J; Klaricová, K; Riedlová, P; Lasota, Z

    2006-03-01

    Bleeding is probably the major complication of anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists represented nowadays mostly by warfarin in the Czech Republic. The main risk factors in hemorrhagic complications of warfarinisation are the intensity and instability of the anticoagulant treatment, individual patient characteristics, warfarin interactions with other drugs and the length of the anticoagulant therapy. Severe bleeding in warfarin patients is most effectively brought about by a fast and complete undoing of the anticoagulation effect of the drug employing the prothrombin complex concentrate and slow i.v. vitamin K1 infusion regardless of the reason for the anticoagulation. This approach can secure the minimalisation of the bleeding's negative consequences. A less severe bleeding or asymptomatic increase in the international normalized ratio can be treated effectively by skipping or decreasing of the warfarin dosage and/or oral administration of vitamin K1 (i.v. administration only in selected higher risk cases) that does result only in a partial consolidation of coagulopathy but of such type that the risk of thrombotic event requires. The article's goal is to contribute to the treatment standardization in patients with warfarin overdose and/or with hemorrhagic complications due to warfarin treatment and it is available at www.thrombosis.cz. The guidelines include a ready-reference chart whose objective is immediate and quick crash course in the clinical practice. PMID:16637455

  15. Subchorionic hemorrhage treatment with dydrogesterone.

    PubMed

    Pelinescu-Onciul, Dimitrie

    2007-10-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of progestogenic therapy for the prevention of spontaneous abortions in patients with subchorionic hemorrhage. One hundred pregnant women with bleeding and ultrasonographic evidence of subchorionic hematoma were treated with oral dydrogesterone 40 mg/day. Only cases in which the embryo was viable were included. The follow-up included ultrasonography and intravaginal examination. Of the 100 pregnancies, 93 had a favorable evolution with maintenance of pregnancy. The abortion rate was therefore 7%. This compares with an abortion rate of 18.7% obtained in a previous study in women with subchorionic hematoma treated with micronized progesterone. The abortion rate was therefore reduced by up to 37% with dydrogesterone, as most cases had large-volume hematomas at the first visit and thus a poor prognosis. In conclusion, the marked immunomodulatory effect of dydrogesterone in maintaining a T helper-2 cytokine balance means that it is a good choice for preventing abortion in women suffering from subchorionic hemorrhage. PMID:17943544

  16. [Treatment alternatives in massive hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Hinojosa, E; Murillo-Cabezas, F; Puppo-Moreno, A; Leal-Noval, S R

    2012-10-01

    Massive hemorrhage is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in trauma patients, and is one of the most important causes in any patient following major surgery. Conventional treatment consists of volume replacement, including the transfusion of blood products, so that tissue perfusion and oxygenation may be maintained. Associated hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy is a lethal triad. This review focuses on the latest therapeutic management of massive hemorrhage. The authors advocate the use of crystalloids as per protocol (controlled volumes) in order to achieve a systolic blood pressure of 85mmHg. The administration of the three blood products (red cells, plasma, and platelets) should be on a 1:1:1 basis. Where possible, this in turn should be guided by thromboelastography performed at point of care near the patient. Coagulopathy can occur early and late. With the exception of tranexamic acid, the cost-benefit relationships of the hemostatic agents, such as fibrinogen, prothrombin complex, and recombinant F VII, are subject to discussion. PMID:22321860

  17. A Degenerative Retinal Process in HIV-Associated Non-Infectious Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, William R.; Sprague, L. James; Gomez, Maria Laura; Cheng, Lingyun; El-Emam, Sharif; Mojana, Francesca; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Bosten, Jenny; Ayyagari, Radha; Hardiman, Gary

    2013-01-01

    HIV retinopathy is the most common non-infectious complication in the eyes of HIV-positive individuals. Oncotic lesions in the retinal nerve fiber layer, referred to as cotton wool spots (CWS), and intraretinal (IR) hemorrhages are frequently observed but are not unique to this pathology. HIV-positive patients have impaired color vision and contrast sensitivity, which worsens with age. Evidence of inner–retinal lesions and damage have been documented ophthalmoscopically, however their long term structural effect has not been investigated. It has been hypothesized that they may be partially responsible for loss of visual function and visual field. In this study we utilized clinical data, retinal imaging and transcriptomics approaches to comprehensively interrogate non-infectious HIV retinopathy. The methods employed encompassed clinical examinations, fundus photography, indirect ophthalmoscopy, Farmsworth-Munsell 100 hue discrimination testing and Illumina BeadChip analyses. Here we show that changes in the outer retina, specifically in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptor outer segments (POS) contribute to vision changes in non-infectious HIV retinopathy. We find that in HIV-positive retinae there is an induction of rhodopsin and other transcripts (including PDE6A, PDE6B, PDE6G, CNGA1, CNGB1, CRX, NRL) involved in visual transduction, as well as structural components of the rod photoreceptors (ABCA4 and ROM1). This is consistent with an increased rate of renewal of rod outer segments induced via increased phagocytosis by HIV-infected RPE previously reported in culture. Cone-specific transcripts (OPN1SW, OPN1LW, PDE6C, PDE6H and GRK7) are uniformly downregulated in HIV positive retina, likely due to a partial loss of cone photoreceptors. Active cotton wool spots and intraretinal hemorrhages (IRH) may not affect photoreceptors directly and the interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV

  18. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  19. Suppression and retinal correspondence in intermittent exotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J; Record, C D

    1986-01-01

    Suppression scotomas and retinal projection (retinal correspondence) were measured in six intermittent exotropes during deviation. Measurements used red-green anaglyph stimuli presented on a black background which could be varied from 3.4 minutes of arc to 3 degrees 24'. Results showed non-suppression of all points between the fovea and the diplopia point. Harmonious anomalous retinal correspondence was usually observed. Two subjects had spontaneous changes from anomalous retinal correspondence to normal retinal correspondence without a concurrent change in ocular position. Conventional testing resulted in more variable results in regard to retinal correspondence and suppression, suggesting that non-suppression and anomalous retinal correspondence occur when black backgrounds are used for testing. PMID:3756124

  20. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Education Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa includes a number of inherited diseases which usually result in blindness. The disease is progressive in nature and begins with the deterioration of cells in the eye responsible for peripheral vision. As the condition worsens there is a gradual loss of peripheral vision and night blindness. Proper educational planning requires…

  1. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy causing large contralateral hemorrhage during surgery for lobar hemorrhage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Neishi, Hiroyuki; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kitai, Ryuhei; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2015-03-01

    We report a rare case of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) causing large contralateral hemorrhage during surgery for lobar hemorrhage. A 62-year-old woman presented with lobar hemorrhage in the left frontal and parietal lobes recurring over the previous 1 month. Because we could not detect the origin of the lobar hemorrhage, we performed a biopsy around the lobar hemorrhage site with the removal of a hematoma. During the surgery, we identified acute brain swelling without bleeding from the operative field. Intraoperative computed tomography demonstrated new large lobar hemorrhage of the right parietal lobe, which we could promptly remove. Specimens around hematomas on both sides were pathologically diagnosed as CAA on immunohistochemical examination. After the surgery, she suffered from lobar hemorrhage three times in the space of only 3 months. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no reported case of CAA causing intracranial hemorrhage of another lesion during surgery. Neurosurgeons should know a possibility of intraoperative hemorrhage in surgeries for lobar hemorrhage caused by CAA. PMID:25601180

  2. [Management of major postpartum hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Nebout, Sophie; Merbai, Nadia; Faitot, Valentina; Keita, Hawa

    2014-02-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is defined by loss of greater than 500 mL of blood following vaginal delivery or 1,000 mL of blood following cesarean section, in the first 24 hours postpartum. Its incidence is up to 5% and the severe forms represent 1% of births. PPH is the first cause of obstetrical maternal mortality in France and 90% of these deaths are considered as preventable. Its management is multidisciplinary (obstetricians, anesthetists, midwives, biologists and interventional radiologists), based on treatment protocols where time is a major prognosis factor. In case of failure of the initial measures (oxytocin, manual placenta removal, uterus and birth canal examination), the management of severe forms includes active resuscitation (intravenous fluids, blood transfusion, vasoactive drugs), haemostatic interventions (sulprostone, tamponnade and haemostatic suture, surgical procedures and arterial embolization) and the correction of any potential coagulopathy (administration of blood products and haemostatic agents). PMID:24373716

  3. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Carette, Marie-France Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-07-15

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  4. Intracerebral hemorrhage due to developmental venous anomalies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodi; Wang, Yuzhou; Chen, Wenming; Wang, Wensheng; Chen, Kaizhe; Liao, Huayin; Lu, Jianjun; Li, Zhigang

    2016-04-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) and cavernous malformations (CM) are a common form of mixed vascular malformation. The relationship between DVA, CM and hemorrhage is complicated. It is important to differentiate hemorrhagic CM and hemorrhagic DVA. A retrospective review of all patients with acute spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) between 1 May 2008 and 1 May 2013 was performed. ICH due to DVA or CM were identified and compared for demographic features, clinical symptoms, neurological deficits, and radiological findings. A total of 1706 patients with acute spontaneous ICH were admitted to our hospital during the study period. Among these, 10 (0.59%) were caused by DVA and 42 (2.47%) were caused by CM. No significant differences were found in age (p=0.252) or sex ratio (p=1.000) between the two groups. Compared with CM-induced ICH, DVA-induced ICH were characterized by cerebellar predominance (p=0.000) and less severe neurological deficits (p=0.008). Infratentorial hemorrhagic DVA are characterized by cerebellar predominance and benign clinical course. Infratentorial hemorrhagic CM are mainly located in the brainstem. DVA should be given suspected rather than CM when considering the etiology of a cerebellar hemorrhage, especially in young adults. PMID:26803466

  5. Resolution of Persistent Cystoid Macular Edema due to Central Retinal Vein Occlusion in a Vitrectomized Eye following Intravitreal Implant of Dexamethasone 0.7 mg

    PubMed Central

    Reibaldi, Michele; Russo, Andrea; Zagari, Marco; Toro, Mario; Grande De, Vittorio; Cifalinò, Valentina; Rametta, Stefania; Faro, Salvatore; Longo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of vitreoretinal surgery for vitreous hemorrhage secondary to central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). Because of the persistence of macular edema (ME), she received 2 intravitreal injections of bevacizumab 0.5 mg (Avastin®, Genentech/Roche) three months after vitrectomy, without functional or anatomical improvement. Six months after vitrectomy, she therefore received an intravitreal implant of dexamethasone 0.7 mg (Ozurdex®). An improvement in her best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness, as measured by optical coherence tomography, was detected 7 days after the injection, and complete resolution of the ME and retinal hemorrhages was observed 6 months after the injection. Dexamethasone intravitreal implant might be an effective treatment option in ME secondary to CRVO, also in vitrectomized eyes. PMID:22615698

  6. Retinal vascular changes in hypertensive patients in Ibadan, Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Oluleye, Sunday Tunji; Olusanya, Bolutife Ayokunu; Adeoye, Abiodun Moshood

    2016-01-01

    Background Earlier studies in Nigeria reported the rarity of retinal vascular changes in hypertensives. The aim of this study was to describe the various retinal vascular changes in the hypertensive patients of Nigeria. Patients and methods Nine hundred and three hypertensive patients were studied. This study was approved by the ethical and research committee of the University of Ibadan and University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were measured. Cardiac echocardiography was performed on 156 patients. All patients had dilated fundoscopy and fundus photography using the Kowa portable fundus camera and an Apple iPhone with 20 D lens. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (Version 21). Results The mean age of patients was 57 years with a male:female ratio of 1. No retinopathy was found in 556 (61.5%) patients. In all, 175 (19.4%) patients had features of hypertensive retinopathy. Retinal vascular occlusion was a significant finding in 121 patients (13.4%), of which branch retinal vein occlusion, 43 (4.7%), and central retinal vein occlusion, 30 (3.3%), were the most prominent ones in cases. Hemicentral retinal vein occlusion, 26 (2.9%), and central retinal artery occlusion, 17 (1.9%), were significant presentations. Other findings included nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in five (0.6%) patients, hypertensive choroidopathy in seven (0.8%) patients, and hemorrhagic choroidal detachment in five (0.6%) patients. Left ventricular (LV) geometry was abnormal in 85 (55.5%) patients. Concentric remodeling, eccentric hypertrophy, and concentric hypertrophy were observed in 43 (27.6%), 26 (17.2%), and 15 (9.7%) patients, respectively. LV hypertrophy was found in 42 (27%) patients, while 60 (39%) patients had increased relative wall thickness. In this study, bivariate analysis showed a correlation between LV relative wall thickness and severity of retinopathy in both eyes

  7. SLE presenting as multiple hemorrhagic complications.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, M C; Alungal, J; Hashim, S; Ali, M M; Musambil, M

    2015-09-01

    A 24 year old female with hereditary spastic paraplegia presented with intermittent headache for one year. She also had lower abdominal pain and vomiting for two months. She was pale, had icterus and mild splenomegaly. On diagnostic evaluation she was found to have hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and bilateral adrenal, subdural, soft tissue (scalp and orbit) hemorrhages due to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) antibodies were negative. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage without associated APS is a rare phenomenon in SLE. We describe a case of SLE presenting with sequence of rare hemorrhagic complications in concert. PMID:25716420

  8. Retinal vasculature classification using novel multifractal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Ward, W. O. C.; Duan, Jinming; Auer, D. P.; Gowland, Penny; Bai, L.

    2015-11-01

    Retinal blood vessels have been implicated in a large number of diseases including diabetic retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases, which cause damages to retinal blood vessels. The availability of retinal vessel imaging provides an excellent opportunity for monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, and automatic analysis of retinal vessels will help with the processes. However, state of the art vascular analysis methods such as counting the number of branches or measuring the curvature and diameter of individual vessels are unsuitable for the microvasculature. There has been published research using fractal analysis to calculate fractal dimensions of retinal blood vessels, but so far there has been no systematic research extracting discriminant features from retinal vessels for classifications. This paper introduces new methods for feature extraction from multifractal spectra of retinal vessels for classification. Two publicly available retinal vascular image databases are used for the experiments, and the proposed methods have produced accuracies of 85.5% and 77% for classification of healthy and diabetic retinal vasculatures. Experiments show that classification with multiple fractal features produces better rates compared with methods using a single fractal dimension value. In addition to this, experiments also show that classification accuracy can be affected by the accuracy of vessel segmentation algorithms.

  9. Role of retinal metabolism in methanol-induced retinal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, C.D. |; Lee, E.W.; Terzo, T.S.; Louis-Ferdinand, R.T.

    1995-08-01

    Methanol is a toxicant that causes systemic and ocular toxicity after acute exposure. The folate-reduced (FR) rat is an excellent animal model that mimics characteristic human methanol toxic responses. The present study examines the role of the methanol metabolites formaldehyde and formate in the initiation of methanol-induced retinal toxicity. After a single oral dose of 3.0 g/kg methanol, blood methanol concentrations were not significantly different in FR rats compared with folate-sufficient (FS) (control) rats. However, FR rats treated with 3.0 g/kg methanol displayed elevated blood (14.6 mM) and vitreous humor (19.5 mM) formate levels and abnormal electroretinograms (loss of b-wave) 48 h postdose. FR rats pretreated with disulfiram (DSF) prior to 3.0 g/kg methanol treatment failed to display these symptoms. Formaldehyde was not detected in blood or vitreous humor with or without DSF treatment, suggesting that formate is the toxic metabolite in methanol-induced retinal toxicity. Additionally, creating a blood formate profile (14.2 mM at 48 h) similar to that observed in methanol-treated rats by iv infusion of pH-buffered formate does not alter the electroretinogram as is observed with methanol treatment. These data suggest that intraretinal metabolism of methanol is necessary for the formate-mediated initiation of methanol-induced retinal toxicity. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Peribulbar anesthesia causing bilateral orbital hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Garft, Kyla; Burt, Peter; Burt, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral orbital hemorrhage as a complication of peribulbar anesthesia in a 78 year old man. Initially, unilateral orbital hemorrhage occurred but quickly spread to the contralateral side. Neuroophthalmological assessment revealed a proptosed tense globe with normal retinovascular findings. Visual acuity was adversely affected and this was conservatively managed with no lasting ophthalmic sequela. This patient’s case was reported as it illustrates an unusual complication of bilateral spread of orbital hemorrhage secondary to peribulbar anesthesia. It highlights how early ophthalmic assessment can ensure a good visual outcome in the setting of appropriate ophthalmic monitoring. The mechanisms of orbital hemorrhage spread and appropriate management options are discussed. PMID:27013899

  11. Clinical aspects of Marburg hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Mehedi, Masfique; Groseth, Allison; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Marburg virus belongs to the genus Marburgvirus in the family Filoviridae and causes a severe hemorrhagic fever, known as Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), in both humans and nonhuman primates. Similar to the more widely known Ebola hemorrhagic fever, MHF is characterized by systemic viral replication, immunosuppression and abnormal inflammatory responses. These pathological features of the disease contribute to a number of systemic dysfunctions including hemorrhages, edema, coagulation abnormalities and, ultimately, multiorgan failure and shock, often resulting in death. A detailed understanding of the pathological processes that lead to this devastating disease remains elusive, a fact that contributes to the lack of licensed vaccines or effective therapeutics. This article will review the clinical aspects of MHF and discuss the pathogenesis and possible options for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:22046196

  12. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in yaks (Bos grunniens).

    PubMed

    Van Campen, Hana; Davis, Charlie; Flinchum, John D; Bishop, Jeanette V; Schiebel, Anita; Duncan, Colleen; Spraker, Terry

    2013-05-01

    An epizootic of hemorrhagic disease associated with Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 2 (EHDV-2) infections in yaks from 5 herds occurred in Colorado between August 21 and October 3, 2012. Affected yaks presented with fever, lethargy, anorexia, dyspnea, and swollen conjunctivae. Ulcerated dental pads, mucoid sanguineous nasal discharge, petechial hemorrhages in multiple organs, pulmonary edema, and serosanguinous fluid in the thorax, abdomen, and pericardial sac were observed at necropsy. Blood and tissue samples from 8 yaks with similar clinical signs and necropsy findings were positive for EHDV-2 by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and 5 yaks were seropositive for EHDV. Tests for malignant catarrhal fever (Ovine herpesvirus 2), Bovine viral diarrhea virus, Bovine herpesvirus 1, Foot-and-mouth disease virus, and Vesicular stomatitis virus were negative. The findings indicate that yaks are susceptible to infection with EHDV-2 and exhibit the clinical signs, and gross and histologic lesions of hemorrhagic disease observed in other ruminant species. PMID:23572453

  13. Role of retinal vascular endothelial cells in development of CMV retinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, N A; Zhang, J; Ishimoto, S

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is known to occur in association with retinal microangiopathy in individuals with marked immunodeficiency, glial cells are believed to be the initial target cells in the development of retinitis. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that CMV gains access to the retinal glia because of altered vascular permeability. In an attempt to address the hypothesis, we studied 30 autopsy eyes of AIDS patients with systemic CMV infection, with or without clinically apparent CMV retinitis. METHODS: The autopsy eyes were processed in three ways. First, dual immunohistochemical studies were done by using anti-CMV antibodies for immediate early, early, and late antigens. The retinal cell types infected with the virus were then determined by using anti-GFAP, anti-VonWillebrand's factor, neuronal specific enolase, and leukocyte marker CD68. Second, selected eyes were processed for in situ hybridization with DNA probe specific to CMV. Third, an eye with clinically apparent CMV retinitis was submitted for electron microscopic examination. RESULTS: At the site of retinal necrosis in those eyes with a clinical diagnosis of CMV retinitis, the immunohistochemical, in situ hybridization, and ultrastructural examinations revealed that CMV was present primarily in the Müller cells and in perivascular glial cells. Adjacent to these infected cells, focal areas of positive staining for CMV antigen were seen in the glial cells, neuronal cells, and retinal pigment epithelial cells. At these sites most of the retinal capillaries were devoid of endothelial cells. Few vessels located at the advancing margin of retinal necrosis showed the presence of viral proteins in the endothelial cells. CONCLUSIONS: The present results indicate that retinal vascular endothelial cells could be the initial target in the development of viral retinitis, with subsequent spread of the infection to perivascular glia, Müller cells, and other retinal cells, including the

  14. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: β-thalassemia major, β-TI: β-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  15. Current perspectives of herpesviral retinitis and choroiditis.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, H N; Priya, K; Biswas, J

    2004-10-01

    Vision-threatening viral retinitis are primarily caused by members of the herpesvirus family. The biology and molecular characterization of herpesviruses, clinical presentations of retinopathies, pathology and pathogenesis including the host responses, epidemiology and the laboratory methods of aetiological diagnosis of these diseases are described. Clinical syndromes are acute retinal necrosis (ARN), progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN), cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis, multifocal choroiditis and serpiginous choroiditis besides other viral retinopathies. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) retinitis is more common in immunocompetent persons while varicella zoster virus (VZV) affects both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients equally. CMV retinitis is most common among patients with AIDS. The currently employed laboratory methods of antigen detection, virus isolation and antibody detection by enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) have low sensitivity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has increased the value of diagnosis due to its high clinical sensitivity and absolute specificity in detection of herpesviruses in intraocular specimens. PMID:16295367

  16. Predicting Hemorrhagic Transformation of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Lawrence, Erin; Dziedzic, Peter; Gottesman, Rebecca F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increases the morbidity and mortality of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulation is often indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation, low ejection fraction, or mechanical valves who are hospitalized with acute stroke, but increases the risk of HT. Risk quantification would be useful. Prior studies have investigated risk of systemic hemorrhage in anticoagulated patients, but none looked specifically at HT. In our previously published work, age, infarct volume, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly predicted HT. We created the hemorrhage risk stratification (HeRS) score based on regression coefficients in multivariable modeling and now determine its validity in a prospectively followed inpatient cohort. A total of 241 consecutive patients presenting to 2 academic stroke centers with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation over a 2.75-year period were included. Neuroimaging was evaluated for infarct volume and HT. Hemorrhages were classified as symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and by severity. HeRS scores were calculated for each patient and compared to actual hemorrhage status using receiver operating curve analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) comparing predicted odds of hemorrhage (HeRS score) to actual hemorrhage status was 0.701. Serum glucose (P < 0.001), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), and warfarin use prior to admission (P = 0.002) were also associated with HT in the validation cohort. With these variables, AUC improved to 0.854. Anticoagulation did not significantly increase HT; but with higher intensity anticoagulation, hemorrhages were more likely to be symptomatic and more severe. The HeRS score is a valid predictor of HT in patients with ischemic stroke and indication for anticoagulation. PMID:26765425

  17. Hemorrhagic sarcoid pleural effusion: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Onkar; Nair, Vidya; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of pleura by sarcoidosis remains a rare manifestation and varies from pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pleural thickening, hydropneumothorax, trapped lung, hemothorax, or chylothorax. Sarcoid pleural effusions presenting as hemorrhagic effusions are even more rare. We report a case of active pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting as hemorrhagic pleural effusion requiring tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. The rarity of the presentation prompted us to report this case.

  18. Hemorrhagic sarcoid pleural effusion: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Jha, Onkar; Nair, Vidya; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of pleura by sarcoidosis remains a rare manifestation and varies from pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pleural thickening, hydropneumothorax, trapped lung, hemothorax, or chylothorax. Sarcoid pleural effusions presenting as hemorrhagic effusions are even more rare. We report a case of active pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting as hemorrhagic pleural effusion requiring tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. The rarity of the presentation prompted us to report this case. PMID:27625449

  19. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from roller coaster.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming; Tian, Qing; Shen, Hong

    2011-03-01

    Roller coasters are probably one of the more popular rides at amusement parks around the world, and there are few reported injuries. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from roller coaster in a previously healthy woman. The clinical course, management, and etiology of her case are discussed; and the literature is reviewed. To our knowledge, pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described. PMID:20825914

  20. Retinitis pigmentosa in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J; Bartmann, L; Ramesar, R; Beighton, P

    1993-11-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal disorders which are a common cause of genetic blindness. The relative frequencies of the different forms of RP in South Africa, as determined from the register at the DNA banking centre for RP at the Department of Human Genetics, University of Cape Town, are presented and discussed. Of the 125 families analysed, 29 (23%) showed autosomal dominant, 33 (27%) autosomal recessive and 3 (3%) X-linked inheritance. In 10 families the pedigree data were insufficient to allow accurate genetic subtyping and a further 50 patients were sporadic without a family history of RP or other syndromic features which would allow categorization. PMID:8313621

  1. Gene Therapy for Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Samiy, Nasrollah

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has a growing research potential particularly in the field of ophthalmic and retinal diseases owing to three main characteristics of the eye; accessibility in terms of injections and surgical interventions, its immune-privileged status facilitating the accommodation to the antigenicity of a viral vector, and tight blood-ocular barriers which save other organs from unwanted contamination. Gene therapy has tremendous potential for different ocular diseases. In fact, the perspective of gene therapy in the field of eye research does not confine to exclusive monogenic ophthalmic problems and it has the potential to include gene based pharmacotherapies for non-monogenic problems such as age related macular disease and diabetic retinopathy. The present article has focused on how gene transfer into the eye has been developed and used to treat retinal disorders with no available therapy at present. PMID:25709778

  2. Operational challenges of retinal prostheses.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Erich W; Fink, Wolfgang; Wilke, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Two computational models for research on retinal implants are presented. In the first model, the electric field produced by a multi-electrode array in a uniform retina is calculated. It is shown how cross talk of activated electrodes and the resulting bunching of field lines in monopole and dipole activation prevent high resolution imaging with retinal implants. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how sequential stimulation and multipolar stimulation may overcome this limitation. In the second model a target volume, i.e., a probe cylinder approximating a bipolar cell, in the retina is chosen, and the passive Heaviside cable equation is solved inside this target volume to calculate the depolarization of the cell membrane. The depolarization as a function of time indicates that shorter signals stimulate better as long as the current does not change sign during stimulation of the retina, i.e., mono-phasic stimulation. Both computational models are equally applicable to epiretinal, subretinal, and suprachoroidal vision implants. PMID:25443535

  3. Retinal vein occlusion: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Rosangela; Torres Gimeno, Ana; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Bandello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a pathology noted for more than 150 years. Although a lot has been written on the matter, it is still a frequent condition with multifactorial etiopathogenesis with many unclear aspects. The RVO pathogenesis has varied systemic and local implications that make it difficult to elaborate treatment guidelines. The management of the patient with RVO is very complex and a multidisciplinary approach is required in order to identify and correct the associated risk factors. Laser therapy remains the gold standard in RVO, but only modest functional improvement has been shown in branch retinal occlusion forms. Multicenter studies of intravitreal drugs present them as an option to combine with laser. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids and sustained-release implants are the future weapons to stop disease progression and get a better visual outcome. Consequently, it is useful to clarify some aspects of the pathology that allow a better patient management. PMID:20938213

  4. Acquired retinal folds in the cat.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, A D

    1976-06-01

    Retinal folds were found in 5 cats. The apparent cause of the folding was varied: in 1 cat the folds appeared after a localized retinal detachment; in 2 cats the condition accompanied other intraocular abnormalities associated with feline infectious peritonitis; 1 cat had active keratitis, and the retinal changes were thought to have been injury related; and 1 cat, bilaterally affected, had chronic glomerulonephritis. PMID:945253

  5. Angiographic results of retinal-retinal anastomosis and retinal-choroidal anastomosis after treatments in eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masaaki; Iida, Tomohiro; Kano, Mariko; Itagaki, Kanako

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the angiographic results of retinal-retinal anastomosis (RRA) and retinal-choroidal anastomosis (RCA) for eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) after treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab injections as monotherapy or intravitreal bevacizumab combined with photodynamic therapy. Methods In this interventional, consecutive case series, we retrospectively reviewed five naïve eyes from four patients (mean age 80 years) treated with three consecutive monthly intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 mL) injections as initial treatment, and followed up for at least 3 months. In cases with over 3 months of follow-up and having recurrence of RAP or leakage by fluorescein angiography, retreatment was performed with a single intravitreal bevacizumab injection and photodynamic therapy. Results Indocyanine green angiography showed RRA in three eyes with subretinal neovascularization and RCA in two eyes with choroidal neovascularization at baseline. At 3 months after baseline (month 3), neither the RRA nor RCA was occluded in any eye on indocyanine green angiography. Retreatment with intravitreal bevacizumab plus photodynamic therapy was performed in three eyes at months 3 (persistent leakage on fluorescein angiography), 6, and 7 (recurrence of RAP lesion), which achieved obvious occlusion of the RRA and RCA. Mean best-corrected visual acuity improved from 0.13 to 0.21 at month 3 (P = 0.066). No complications or systemic adverse events were noted. Conclusion Although intravitreal bevacizumab for RAP was effective in improving visual acuity during short-term follow-up, intravitreal bevacizumab could not achieve complete occlusion of RRA and RCA, which could lead to recurrence of a RAP lesion and exudation. Retreatment with intravitreal bevacizumab plus photodynamic therapy ultimately achieved complete occlusion of the RRA and RCA. PMID:22969283

  6. Occult hemorrhage in children with severe ITP.

    PubMed

    Flores, Adolfo; Buchanan, George R

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the frequency and significance of clinically unapparent or occult hemorrhage in ITP. Therefore, we prospectively explored the sites and frequency of occult bleeding in children with severe ITP at diagnosis or upon symptomatic relapse in a prospective, single-institution cohort study of patients ≤ 18 years of age and a platelet count ≤ 10,000/mm(3) . Data collected included bleeding severity assessment, urinalysis, fecal occult blood testing, and non-contrast brain MRI. Stool and urine samples were tested within 7 days of diagnosis or symptomatic relapse. Three months after diagnosis or relapse a noncontrast brain MRI evaluated hemosiderin deposits resulting from prior localized hemorrhage. Fifty-two ITP patients were enrolled with a mean platelet count of 4,000/mm(3) . A significant occurrence of occult hemorrhage was identified in the urine (27%) compared with clinically overt hematuria (0.91%, P < 0.0005). CNS microbleeding in the superficial cortex of the left frontal lobe was identified in one child with occult bleeding in the urinary tract. There was no relationship between occult hemorrhage and bleeding manifestations on physical examination. Occult hemorrhage was not a harbinger of subsequent bleeding. Our findings suggest that occult hemorrhage occurs with greater frequency than overt bleeding in children with severe ITP. CNS microbleeding is a potential risk in this patient population. Assessment of brain microbleeds and microscopic hematuria in this patient population require additional study. PMID:26661930

  7. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kobbe, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Campbell, Graeme C.; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Bergmann, Christian; Kadyrov, Mamed; Fischer, Horst; Glüer, Christian C.; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Pufe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes). Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α) were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing. PMID:26106256

  8. Retinal pathways influence temporal niche

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Susan E.; Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Hillson, Holly; Menaker, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In mammals, light input from the retina entrains central circadian oscillators located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). The phase of circadian activity rhythms with respect to the external light:dark cycle is reversed in diurnal and nocturnal species, although the phase of SCN rhythms relative to the light cycle remains unchanged. Neural mechanisms downstream from the SCN are therefore believed to determine diurnality or nocturnality. Here, we report a switch from nocturnal to diurnal entrainment of circadian activity rhythms in double-knockout mice lacking the inner-retinal photopigment melanopsin (OPN4) and RPE65, a key protein used in retinal chromophore recycling. These mice retained only a small amount of rod function. The change in entrainment phase of Rpe65−/−;Opn4−/− mice was accompanied by a reversal of the rhythm of clock gene expression in the SCN and a reversal in acute masking effects of both light and darkness on activity, suggesting that the nocturnal to diurnal switch is due to a change in the neural response to light upstream from the SCN. A switch from nocturnal to diurnal activity rhythms was also found in wild-type mice transferred from standard intensity light:dark cycles to light:dark cycles in which the intensity of the light phase was reduced to scotopic levels. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which changes in retinal input can mediate acute temporal-niche switching. PMID:18695249

  9. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Hoz, Rosa; Rojas, Blanca; Ramírez, Ana I.; Salazar, Juan J.; Gallego, Beatriz I.; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia) provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies. PMID:27294114

  10. Retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, M; Suzuma, K; Inaba, I; Ogura, Y; Yoneda, K; Okamoto, H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis, one of the most common forms of dermatitis in Japan, has markedly increased in Japan in the past 10 years. To clarify pathogenic mechanisms of retinal detachment in such cases, we retrospectively studied clinical characteristics of retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis. METHODS: We examined the records of 80 patients (89 eyes) who had retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis. The patients were classified into three groups according to lens status: group A, eyes with clear lenses (40 eyes); group B, eyes with cataract (38 eyes), and group C, aphakic or pseudophakic eyes (11 eyes). RESULTS: No significant differences were noted in the ratio of males to females, age distribution, refractive error, or characteristic of retinal detachment among the three groups. The types of retinal breaks, however, were different in eyes with and without lens changes. While atrophic holes were dominant in group A, retinal dialysis was mainly seen in groups B and C. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that anterior vitreoretinal traction may play an important role in the pathogenesis of retinal breaks in eyes with atopic cataract and that the same pathological process may affect the formation of cataract and tractional retinal breaks in patients with atopic dermatitis. PMID:8664234

  11. Retinal Cell Degeneration in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Masayuki; Aoki, Hitomi; Hirata, Akihiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Green, Paul G.; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of various retinal cell degeneration models in animal induced by chemicals (N-methyl-d-aspartate- and CoCl2-induced), autoimmune (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis), mechanical stress (optic nerve crush-induced, light-induced) and ischemia (transient retinal ischemia-induced). The target regions, pathology and proposed mechanism of each model are described in a comparative fashion. Animal models of retinal cell degeneration provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of the disease, and will facilitate the development of novel effective therapeutic drugs to treat retinal cell damage. PMID:26784179

  12. Retinal Effects Of Blue Light Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, William T.; Mueller, Harold A.; Ruffolo, J. J.

    1980-10-01

    Recent research has shown that blue light exposure is an important factor in certain types of retinal injury. The mammalian ocular media transmits the spectral band 400-1400 nm to the retina. The short wavelengths (400-550 nm) produce a photochemical or actinic type of damage, while the longer wavelengths (550-1400 nm) produce thermal damage. Distinction between the two types of retinal damage are discussed briefly and the importance of the blue light effect for solar retinitis and eclipse blindness is emphasized. The significance of blue light retinal injury is summarized for various environmental and occupational exposures.

  13. [Novel mechanism for retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Suzuma, Kiyoshi

    2015-03-01

    I. A new therapeutic target for diabetic retinopathy. Recent reports state that succinate may be an independent retinal angiogenic factor. We evaluated concentrations in vitreous from proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and found that succinate increased significantly in PDR. Interestingly, levels of succinate from bevacizumab-pre-injected PDR were normal, suggesting that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) had a positive feedback mechanism for succinate since succinate was previously reported to induce VEGF. II. A new understanding of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). We evaluated retinal blood flow velocity with laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG) made in Japan, and found that cases in which both macular edema and retinal blood flow velocity improved after anti-VEGF therapy had better prognosis. In ischemic CRVO at final visit, mean retinal blood velocity was less than 50% of fellow eyes after 1st anti-VEGF therapy, suggesting that those cases might have poor prognosis. LSFG is useful for evaluation and decision in CRVO treatment. III. From exploration for mechanism in retinal vascular diseases to re-vascularization therapy. The standard treatment for retinal non-perfusion area is scatter laser photocoagulation, which is both invasive of the peripheral retina and may prove destructive. Re-vascularization is an ideal strategy for treatment of retinal non-perfusion area. To develop a new methods for re-vascularization in retinal non-perfusion area, we have designed experiments using a retina without vasculature differentiated from induced pluripotent stem(iPS) cells. PMID:25854111

  14. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage following alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Ashutosh; Matuschak, George M

    2008-06-01

    This study describes an unusual patient with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) in whom diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) developed as a complication of alemtuzumab therapy following renal transplantation. A 26-year-old man with XLAS underwent retransplantation with a cadaveric renal allograft. He received alemtuzumab therapy as a part of an immunosuppressive induction protocol, and dyspnea and hemoptysis developed. A chest CT scan showed diffuse alveolar opacities. Bronchoscopy was performed to determine the cause of hemoptysis and hypoxia. BAL showed a characteristic increasingly bloody return in the sequential aliquots. There was no growth of pathogenic bacteria or evidence of opportunistic infection. Clinical improvement occurred with the initiation of steroids, and the patient required short-term mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of DAH associated with use of alemtuzumab therapy, although other pulmonary toxicities have been described. The prevalence of this form of pulmonary toxicity is unclear and requires further systematic study. PMID:18574290

  15. Management of hemorrhage in trauma.

    PubMed

    Schöchl, Herbert; Grassetto, Alberto; Schlimp, Christoph J

    2013-08-01

    Hemorrhage remains one of the leading causes of trauma-related deaths. Uncontrolled diffuse microvascular bleeding in the course of initial care is common, potentially resulting in exsanguination. Early and aggressive hemostatic intervention increases survival and reduces the incidence of massive transfusion. Thus, timely diagnosis of the underlying coagulation disorders is mandatory. It has been shown that standard coagulation tests do not sufficiently characterize trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC). This has led to increasing interest in alternatives, such as the viscoelastic test, to diagnose TIC and to provide the basis for a goal-directed hemostatic therapy. The concept of damage control resuscitation (DCR) has been introduced widely in trauma patients with severe bleeding. This strategy addresses important confounders of the coagulation process such as hemodilution, hypothermia, and acidosis; DCR is based on a damage control surgical approach, permissive hypotension, and improvement of hemostatic competence. Many studies have shown benefit in mortality when using high ratios of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) to red blood cells (RBC) as early treatment. However, there is increased awareness that coagulation factor concentrate could be beneficial in the treatment of trauma-induced coagulopathy. PMID:23910535

  16. Serial evaluation of retinal vascular changes in infants treated with intravitreal bevacizumab for aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity in zone I.

    PubMed

    Padhi, T R; Das, T; Rath, S; Pradhan, L; Sutar, S; Panda, K G; Modi, R; Jalali, S

    2016-03-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the serial changes in retinal vasculature in infants treated with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) for aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (APROP) in zone I.MethodsRetrospective analysis of serial changes in retinal vasculature after IVB in the seven eyes of four babies with APROP in zone I.ResultsThe initial regression, following IVB, was dramatic with reduction in vessel caliber and marked thinning and invisibility of the bridging shunts. Resurgent vascular development was very slow radially though there was continued abnormal vascular growth circumferentially. Common findings in all eyes were tangled vasculature and fine saw-toothed shunts. The variable findings were (1) new closely packed multilayered bridging shunts, long arching mature looking vessels, and finally a ridge at the periphery (n=3 eyes) at 52 weeks of postmenstrual age (PMA); (2) status quo at the stage of saw-toothed shunt and ridge in both eyes for a long time (n=2 eyes); and (3) multiple retinal hemorrhages within the vascularized retina and thick preretinal hemorrhage overlying the saw-toothed shunts and ridge that persisted for another 3 weeks and regressed 2 weeks after laser (n=1). The eyes that received bevacizumab alone (3) did not show any abnormal vascularization at 56 weeks of PMA or beyond.ConclusionsThe retinal vascularization following IVB was different than normal in terms of its time, speed, and morphology; few of these changes are first to be reported in the literature (Medline search) and warrants further studies. PMID:26584796

  17. Radial optic neurotomy in treating central retinal vein occlusion: a Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen-Na; Shao, Yan; Li, Xiao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the feasibility of radial optic neurotomy (RON) in central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) treatment with a Meta-analysis. METHODS Electronic databases were searched for comprehensive articles that compared efficacy of RON with that of other treatments in CRVO. Study quality was assessed and risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) with fix- or random-effects model were calculated according to the heterogeneity. RESULTS A total of 200 eyes from 5 studies were included. The results indicated that no significant differences were found between groups with and without RON in improvement of visual acuity (VA) at 6mo follow-up (pooled RR 0.51, 95%CI 0.22 to 1.18, P=0.117) while improvement of VA showed significantly favourable in patients receiving RON treatment at 12mo follow-up (pooled RR 2.27, 95%CI 1.31 to 3.95, P=0.004). For complications, RON treatment was more effective in reducing neovascular glaucoma (pooled RR 0.45, 95%CI 0.21 to 0.97, P=0.042) but was comparable in retinal detachment (pooled RR 2.41, 95%CI 0.51 to 11.39, P=0.267) and vitreous hemorrhage (pooled RR 0.91, 95%CI 0.33 to 2.46, P=0.847). CONCLUSION Compared with some certain treatment modalities, RON might offer better VA at 12mo and decrease the rate of neovascular glaucoma without changing the rate of retinal detachment and vitreous hemorrhage. Further studies are required considering the limitation of the research. PMID:27366695

  18. [The retinal nerve fiber layer in normal and glaucoma eyes].

    PubMed

    Jonas, J B; Schiro, D; Naumann, G O

    1993-12-01

    Glaucoma leads to changes of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). This study was performed to evaluate glaucomatous alterations of the RNFL and to correlate them with other parameters of glaucomatous optic nerve damage. The study included red-free wide-angle fundus photographs of the RNFL of 453 normal eyes and 609 eyes with glaucoma. We evaluated the visibility of the RNFL in different fundus regions and the occurrence of localized RNFL defects. In the glaucoma eyes, including those with "early" glaucomatous optic nerve damage, the visibility of RNFL was significantly lower than in the normal eyes. The degree of RNFL visibility correlated with other morphological and perimetric parameters. Localized RNFL defects were detected in 20% of the glaucoma eyes. Their frequency increased significantly (P < 0.01) from an "early" glaucoma stage to a subgroup with medium advanced glaucomatous damage and decreased again to a stage with marked glaucomatous changes. They were significantly more common in eyes with normal pressure glaucoma, followed by eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma and finally eyes with secondary open-angle glaucoma. They were significantly associated with optic disk hemorrhages and notches of the neuroretinal rim. The results indicate that the glaucomatous changes of the RNFL are correlated with the optic disk alterations. This holds true also for eyes with "early" glaucomatous damage. It suggests that during every routine ophthalmoscopy the RNFL should be examined. Localized RNFL defects indicate optic nerve damage with a specificity of more than 90%. The contrast between localized and diffuse RNFL loss, the varying frequency of localized RNFL defects in different types of glaucoma and the association between localized RNFL defects and optic disk hemorrhages are diagnostically and pathogenetically important. PMID:8124022

  19. Supernova hemorrhage: obliterative hemorrhage of brain arteriovenous malformations following γ knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew D; Hetts, Steven W; Young, William L; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T; English, Joey D

    2012-09-01

    Hemorrhage represents the most feared complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in both untreated patients and those treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Radiosurgery does not immediately lead to obliteration of the malformation, which often does not occur until years following treatment. Post-obliteration hemorrhage is rare, occurring months to years after radiosurgery, and has been associated with residual or recurrent AVM despite prior apparent nidus elimination. Three cases are reported of delayed intracranial hemorrhage in patients with cerebral AVMs treated with radiosurgery in which no residual AVM was found on catheter angiography at the time of delayed post-treatment hemorrhage. That the pathophysiology of these hemorrhages involves progressive venous outflow occlusion is speculated and the possible mechanistic link to subsequent vascular rupture is discussed. PMID:21990534

  20. Pulmonary hemorrhage syndrome associated with an autochthonous case of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Setlik, Robert F; Ouellette, Daniel; Morgan, Julia; McAllister, C Kenneth; Dorsey, David; Agan, Brian K; Horvath, Lynn; Zimmerman, Michelle K; Purcell, Bret

    2004-07-01

    Dengue fever is a major public health problem worldwide. Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a much rarer form of the disease, occurs when a person previously infected with dengue is re-infected with a different viral serotype. In recent years the infection rates of dengue and both clinical syndromes have increased along the United States-Mexico border. We present the case of a 61-year-old Laotian female who presented with a 1-week history of fever, altered mental status, oral ulceration, and rash. The patient developed diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage and anemia requiring multiple transfusions. She eventually sustained multi-organ system failure and expired. Both the titer data and serologies were consistent with the diagnosis of dengue hemorrhagic fever. We hypothesize that this syndrome was the result of re-infection occurring within the United States. This case is also unusual in that it is the second reported in the literature of pulmonary hemorrhages associated with dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:15301127

  1. A Case of Sudden Deafness with Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage and Sudden Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Jin; Jeong, Se Won; Lee, Jae Wook

    2015-01-01

    Sudden hearing deterioration may occur in our population, but it is difficult to explain the exact pathophysiology and the cause. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is usually useful to evaluate neural lesions such as acoustic schwannoma and hemorrhage in labyrinth. Recently some cases of SSNHL caused by intralabyrintine hemorrhage were reported by the advance of MRI. In the case of intralabyrintine hemorrhage, MRI showed a hyperintense signal in the labyrinth on the pre-contrast and contrast enhanced T1-weighted image and relatively weak intensity on T2-weighted image. The prognosis SSNHL by intralabyrintine hemorrhage is generally known to be poor. We report a case of sudden deafness with intralabyrintine hemorrhage who has a history of anticoagulant administration, with a review of literature. PMID:26771018

  2. Serous retinal detachment following panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) using Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) photocoagulator

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Georges; Wolff, Benjamin; Cornut, Pierre-Loïc; Mauget-Faÿsse, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To report a case of serous retinal detachment after Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) treatment in a diabetic woman. Methods: A 34-year-old diabetic woman presented with florid diabetic retinopathy after a miscarriage during the 20th week of pregnancy. Her Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA) was 20/40 right eye (OD) and 20/30 left eye (OS). Fundus exam showed multiple microaneurysms, large blot hemorrhages and venous dilation both eyes (OU). Fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) revealed large areas of capillary nonperfusion and panretinal neovascularisation in all quadrants OU. Macular Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography scan (SD-OCT) did not show any foveal thickening. Panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) was immediately performed OU during the same day. Results: Two days after PASCAL treatment, her BCVA decreased to 20/80 OU and worsened to Count Fingers (CF) during the following days. Fundus exam revealed an extensive serous retinal detachment confirmed on SD-OCT. 2 sub-conjunctival injections of 0.1 ml Betamethasone were done OU. One month later, BCVA improved to 20/30 and SD-OCT confirmed regression of retinal detachment. Conclusions: PASCAL is considered to be a safe treatment, but one has to be aware of its potential side effects. It has to be used with caution in pregnant women.

  3. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and retinal vessel calibers in children with thalassemia minor

    PubMed Central

    Acer, Semra; Balcı, Yasemin I; Pekel, Gökhan; Ongun, Tuğba T; Polat, Aziz; Çetin, Ebru N; Yağcı, Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, subfoveal choroidal thickness, and retinal vessel caliber measurements in children with thalassemia minor. Methods: In this cross-sectional and comparative study, 30 thalassemia minor patients and 36 controls were included. Heidelberg spectral domain optical coherence tomography was used for peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, subfoveal choroidal thickness, and retinal vessel caliber measurements. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and subfoveal choroidal thickness between the two groups (p > 0.05). There was no correlation between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and hemoglobin values. Both the arterioral and venular calibers were higher in thalassemia minor group (p < 0.05). Conclusion: There is increased retinal arterioral and venular calibers in children with thalassemia minor compared with controls. PMID:27540484

  4. Retinal fundus imaging in mouse models of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Alex, Anne F; Heiduschka, Peter; Eter, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The development of in vivo retinal fundus imaging in mice has opened a new research horizon, not only in ophthalmic research. The ability to monitor the dynamics of vascular and cellular changes in pathological conditions, such as neovascularization or degeneration, longitudinally without the need to sacrifice the mouse, permits longer observation periods in the same animal. With the application of the high-resolution confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in experimental mouse models, access to a large spectrum of imaging modalities in vivo is provided. PMID:23150359

  5. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage after heroin use.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neha; Bhalla, Mary Colleen; Frey, Jennifer A; Southern, Alison

    2015-08-01

    Heroin-associated stroke is a rare complication of use. Various proposed mechanisms of heroin-associated ischemic stroke have been proposed, including the following: cardioembolism in the setting of infective endocarditis, hypoxic ischemic brain injury in the setting of hypoxemia and hypotension, and infective arteritis or vasculitis from drug adulterants. A previously healthy 28-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with altered mental status and normal vitals after she was found wandering outside her apartment. During ambulance transport, she endorsed heroin use. The patient was alert but could not recall her name, place, or time. She intermittently responded "I don't know" to questioning and could not perform simple commands. No motor or sensory deficits were apparent other than sluggish pinpoint pupils. There were no signs of trauma other than antecubital track marks. Her laboratory results were unremarkable. Reevaluation at 2 hours after presentation showed persistent confusion and disorientation. A computed tomographic scan of the head was obtained, which showed a large 5.1 × 5-cm intraparenchymal hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe, vasogenic edema, and a 5-mm midline shift. A workup for cardioembolic, vasculitis, and other etiologies for stroke did not reveal an underlying cause. The patient remained confused with significant memory loss throughout her hospital stay and was eventually discharged to a long-term care facility. Drug abuse should be considered a risk factor for stoke in young adults. In patients with persistent neurologic deficits, physicians must be vigilant and order appropriate workup while managing drug overdose. PMID:25656330

  6. [Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by jaundice: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oulmaati, A; Hays, S; Mory-Thomas, N; Bretones, P; Bensaid, M; Jordan, I; Bonfils, M; Godbert, I; Picaud, J-C

    2012-04-01

    The clinical presentation of adrenal hemorrhage varies, depending on the extent of hemorrhage as well as the amount of adrenal cortex involved by the hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by late onset of neonatal jaundice. This adrenal hemorrhage most probably resulted from shoulder dystocia. The aim of this work was to focus on the fact that jaundice can be caused by adrenal hemorrhage and to emphasize the crucial importance of abdominal ultrasound in cases of persistent jaundice. PMID:22424898

  7. Retinal cholesterol emboli during diagnostic cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Blanco, V R; Morís, C; Barriales, V; González, C

    2000-11-01

    Retinal embolism is a highly infrequent complication of cardiac catheterization of thrombotic, lipidic, and calcific etiology. We provide the first reported clinical case of retinal embolism caused by cholesterol crystal without systemic adverse effects as a severe complication of diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Cathet. Cardiovasc. Intervent. 51:323-325, 2000. PMID:11066118

  8. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gabai, Andrea; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications. PMID:26139802

  9. Argus II retinal prosthesis system: An update.

    PubMed

    Rachitskaya, Aleksandra V; Yuan, Alex

    2016-09-01

    This review focuses on a description of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system (Argus II; Second Sight Medical Products, Sylmar, CA) that was approved for humanitarian use by the FDA in 2013 in patients with retinitis pigmentosa with bare or no light perception vision. The article describes the components of Argus II, the studies on the implant, and future directions. PMID:26855177

  10. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Gabai, Andrea; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications. PMID:26139802