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Sample records for retinal remodeling triggered

  1. Synaptic remodeling of neuronal circuits in early retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptor degenerations are a major cause of blindness and among the most common forms of neurodegeneration in humans. Studies of mouse models revealed that synaptic dysfunction often precedes photoreceptor degeneration, and that abnormal synaptic input from photoreceptors to bipolar cells causes circuits in the inner retina to become hyperactive. Here, we provide a brief overview of frequently used mouse models of photoreceptor degenerations. We then discuss insights into circuit remodeling triggered by early synaptic dysfunction in the outer and hyperactivity in the inner retina. We discuss these insights in the context of other experimental manipulations of synaptic function and activity. Knowledge of the plasticity and early remodeling of retinal circuits will be critical for the design of successful vision rescue strategies. PMID:26500497

  2. Retinal Remodeling: Concerns, Emerging Remedies and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Vidhyasankar; Cherukuri, Pitchaiah; Poria, Deepak; Goel, Manvi; Dagar, Sushma; Dhingra, Narender K.

    2016-01-01

    Deafferentation results not only in sensory loss, but also in a variety of alterations in the postsynaptic circuitry. These alterations may have detrimental impact on potential treatment strategies. Progressive loss of photoreceptors in retinal degenerative diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, leads to several changes in the remnant retinal circuitry. Müller glial cells undergo hypertrophy and form a glial seal. The second- and third-order retinal neurons undergo morphological, biochemical and physiological alterations. A result of these alterations is that retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the output neurons of the retina, become hyperactive and exhibit spontaneous, oscillatory bursts of spikes. This aberrant electrical activity degrades the signal-to-noise ratio in RGC responses, and thus the quality of information they transmit to the brain. These changes in the remnant retina, collectively termed “retinal remodeling”, pose challenges for genetic, cellular and bionic approaches to restore vision. It is therefore crucial to understand the nature of retinal remodeling, how it affects the ability of remnant retina to respond to novel therapeutic strategies, and how to ameliorate its effects. In this article, we discuss these topics, and suggest that the pathological state of the retinal output following photoreceptor loss is reversible, and therefore, amenable to restorative strategies. PMID:26924962

  3. Retinal Remodeling and Metabolic Alterations in Human AMD

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bryan W.; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L.; Ferrell, William D.; Watt, Carl B.; Tucker, James; Marc, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal degeneration resulting in central visual field loss, ultimately causing debilitating blindness. AMD affects 18% of Americans from 65 to 74, 30% older than 74 years of age and is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness in Western populations. While many genetic and environmental risk factors are known for AMD, we currently know less about the mechanisms mediating disease progression. The pathways and mechanisms through which genetic and non-genetic risk factors modulate development of AMD pathogenesis remain largely unexplored. Moreover, current treatment for AMD is palliative and limited to wet/exudative forms. Retina is a complex, heterocellular tissue and most retinal cell classes are impacted or altered in AMD. Defining disease and stage-specific cytoarchitectural and metabolic responses in AMD is critical for highlighting targets for intervention. The goal of this article is to illustrate cell types impacted in AMD and demonstrate the implications of those changes, likely beginning in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), for remodeling of the the neural retina. Tracking heterocellular responses in disease progression is best achieved with computational molecular phenotyping (CMP), a tool that enables acquisition of a small molecule fingerprint for every cell in the retina. CMP uncovered critical cellular and molecular pathologies (remodeling and reprogramming) in progressive retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We now applied these approaches to normal human and AMD tissues mapping progression of cellular and molecular changes in AMD retinas, including late-stage forms of the disease. PMID:27199657

  4. Adenosine triphosphate-induced photoreceptor death and retinal remodeling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vessey, Kirstan A; Greferath, Ursula; Aplin, Felix P; Jobling, Andrew I; Phipps, Joanna A; Ho, Tracy; De Iongh, Robbert U; Fletcher, Erica L

    2014-01-01

    Many common causes of blindness involve the death of retinal photoreceptors, followed by progressive inner retinal cell remodeling. For an inducible model of retinal degeneration to be useful, it must recapitulate these changes. Intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has recently been found to induce acute photoreceptor death. The aim of this study was to characterize the chronic effects of ATP on retinal integrity. Five-week-old, dark agouti rats were administered 50 mM ATP into the vitreous of one eye and saline into the other. Vision was assessed using the electroretinogram and optokinetic response and retinal morphology investigated via histology. ATP caused significant loss of visual function within 1 day and loss of 50% of the photoreceptors within 1 week. At 3 months, 80% of photoreceptor nuclei were lost, and total photoreceptor loss occurred by 6 months. The degeneration and remodeling were similar to those found in heritable retinal dystrophies and age-related macular degeneration and included inner retinal neuronal loss, migration, and formation of new synapses; Müller cell gliosis, migration, and scarring; blood vessel loss; and retinal pigment epithelium migration. In addition, extreme degeneration and remodeling events, such as neuronal and glial migration outside the neural retina and proliferative changes in glial cells, were observed. These extreme changes were also observed in the 2-year-old P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat model of retinitis pigmentosa. This ATP-induced model of retinal degeneration may provide a valuable tool for developing pharmaceutical therapies or for testing electronic implants aimed at restoring vision. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2928–2950, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24639102

  5. Calcium preconditioning triggers neuroprotection in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Sean K.; Weatherly, Monique E.; Ware, Lillian; Linn, David M.; Linn, Cindy L.

    2010-01-01

    In the mammalian retina, excitotoxicity has been shown to be involved in apoptotic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and is associated with certain retinal disease states including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinal ischemia. Previous studies from this lab (Wehrwein et al., 2004) have demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) and nicotine protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated adult pig RGCs through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Activation of nAChRs in these RGCs triggers cell survival signaling pathways and inhibits apoptotic enzymes (Asomugha et al., 2010). However, the link between binding of nAChRs and activation of neuroprotective pathways is unknown. In this study, we examine the hypothesis that calcium permeation through nAChR channels is required for ACh-induced neuroprotection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated pig RGCs. RGCs were isolated from other retinal tissue using a two step panning technique and cultured for 3 days under different conditions. In some studies, calcium imaging experiments were performed using the fluorescent calcium indicator, fluo-4, and demonstrated that calcium permeates the nAChR channels located on pig RGCs. In other studies, the extracellular calcium concentration was altered to determine the effect on nicotine-induced neuroprotection. Results support the hypothesis that calcium is required for nicotine-induced neuroprotection in isolated pig RGCs. Lastly, studies were performed to analyze the effects of preconditioning on glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and neuroprotection. In these studies, a preconditioning dose of calcium was introduced to cells using a variety of mechanisms before a large glutamate insult was applied to cells. Results from these studies support the hypothesis that preconditioning cells with a relatively low level of calcium before an excitotoxic insult leads to neuroprotection. In the future, these results could provide important information

  6. Bacterioopsin-triggered retinal biosynthesis is inhibited by bacteriorhodopsin formation in Halobacterium salinarium.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, A; Sonar, S

    1999-08-13

    Factors regulating retinal biosynthesis in halobacteria are not clearly understood. In halobacteria, events leading to the biosynthesis of bacteriorhodopsin have been proposed to participate in stringent regulation of retinal biosynthesis. The present study describes a novel approach of in vivo introductions of mRNA and membrane proteins via liposome fusion to test their role in cellular metabolism. Both the bacterioopsin-encoding mRNA and the liposome-encapsulated bacterioopsin (apoprotein) are independently introduced in spheroplasts of the purple membrane-negative strain Halobacterium salinarium that initially contain neither bacterioopsin nor retinal. Isoprenoid analyses of these cells indicate that the expression/presence of bacterioopsin triggers retinal biosynthesis from lycopene, and its subsequent binding to opsin generates bacteriorhodopsin. When bacteriorhodopsin and excess retinal were independently introduced into spheroplasts of purple membrane-negative cells, the introduction of bacteriorhodopsin resulted in an accumulation of lycopene, indicating an inhibition of retinal biosynthesis. These results provide direct evidence that the formation of bacterioopsin acts as a trigger for lycopene conversion to beta-carotene in retinal biosynthesis. The trigger for this event does not lie with either transcription or translation of the bop gene. It is clearly associated with the folded and the membrane-integrated state of bacterioopsin. On the other hand, the trigger signaling inhibition of retinal biosynthesis does not lie with the presence of excess retinal but with the correctly folded, retinal-bound form, bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:10438533

  7. Calcium preconditioning triggers neuroprotection in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Brandt, S K; Weatherly, M E; Ware, L; Linn, D M; Linn, C L

    2011-01-13

    In the mammalian retina, excitotoxicity has been shown to be involved in apoptotic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and is associated with certain retinal disease states including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinal ischemia. Previous studies from this lab [Wehrwein E, Thompson SA, Coulibaly SF, Linn DM, Linn CL (2004) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 45:1531-1543] have demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) and nicotine protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated adult pig RGCs through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Activation of nAChRs in these RGCs triggers cell survival signaling pathways and inhibits apoptotic enzymes [Asomugha CO, Linn DM, Linn CL (2010) J Neurochem 112:214-226]. However, the link between binding of nAChRs and activation of neuroprotective pathways is unknown. In this study, we examine the hypothesis that calcium permeation through nAChR channels is required for ACh-induced neuroprotection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated pig RGCs. RGCs were isolated from other retinal tissue using a two step panning technique and cultured for 3 days under different conditions. In some studies, calcium imaging experiments were performed using the fluorescent calcium indicator, fluo-4, and demonstrated that calcium permeates the nAChR channels located on pig RGCs. In other studies, the extracellular calcium concentration was altered to determine the effect on nicotine-induced neuroprotection. Results support the hypothesis that calcium is required for nicotine-induced neuroprotection in isolated pig RGCs. Lastly, studies were performed to analyze the effects of preconditioning on glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and neuroprotection. In these studies, a preconditioning dose of calcium was introduced to cells using a variety of mechanisms before a large glutamate insult was applied to cells. Results from these studies support the hypothesis that preconditioning cells with a relatively low level of calcium before

  8. βA3/A1-crystallin in astroglial cells regulates retinal vascular remodeling during development

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Debasish; Klise, Andrew; Sergeev, Yuri; Hose, Stacey; Bhutto, Imran A.; Hackler, Laszlo; Malpic-llanos, Tanya; Samtani, Sonia; Grebe, Rhonda; Goldberg, Morton F.; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding; Nath, Avindra; Zack, Donald J.; Fariss, Robert N.; McLeod, D. Scott; Sundin, Olof; Broman, Karl W.; Lutty, Gerard A.; Zigler, J. Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is a complex process critical to development of the mature vascular system. Astrocytes are known to be indispensable for initial formation of the retinal vasculature; our studies with the Nuc1 rat provide novel evidence that these cells are also essential in the retinal vascular remodeling process. Nuc1 is a spontaneous mutation in the Sprague–Dawley rat originally characterized by nuclear cataracts in the heterozygote and microphthalmia in the homozygote. We report here that the Nuc1 allele results from mutation of the βA3/A1-crystallin gene, which in the neural retina is expressed only in astrocytes. We demonstrate striking structural abnormalities in Nuc1 astrocytes with profound effects on the organization of intermediate filaments. While vessels form in the Nuc1 retina, the subsequent remodeling process required to provide a mature vascular network is deficient. Our data implicate βA3/A1-crystallin as an important regulatory factor mediating vascular patterning and remodeling in the retina. PMID:17931883

  9. LPS Remodeling Triggers Formation of Outer Membrane Vesicles in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Elhenawy, Wael; Bording-Jorgensen, Michael; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Haurat, M. Florencia; Wine, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are proposed to mediate multiple functions during pathogenesis and symbiosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for OMV formation remain poorly understood. It has been shown in eukaryotic membranes that lipids with an inverted-cone shape favor the formation of positive membrane curvatures. Based on these studies, we formulated the hypothesis that lipid A deacylation might impose shape modifications that result in the curvature of the outer membrane (OM) and subsequent OMV formation. We tested the effect of lipid A remodeling on OMV biogenesis employing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model organism. Expression of the lipid A deacylase PagL resulted in increased vesiculation, without inducing an envelope stress response. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed profound differences in the patterns of lipid A in OM and OMV, with accumulation of deacylated lipid A forms exclusively in OMV. OMV biogenesis by intracellular bacteria upon macrophage infection was drastically reduced in a pagL mutant strain. We propose a novel mechanism for OMV biogenesis requiring lipid A deacylation in the context of a multifactorial process that involves the orchestrated remodeling of the outer membrane. PMID:27406567

  10. Rod photoreceptors protect from cone degeneration-induced retinal remodeling and restore visual responses in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Carole J.; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Fadool, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Humans are largely dependent upon cone-mediated vision. However, death or dysfunction of rods, the predominant photoreceptor subtype, results in secondary loss of cones, remodeling of retinal circuitry and blindness. The changes in circuitry may contribute to the vision deficit and undermine attempts at restoring sight. We exploit zebrafish larvae as a genetic model to specifically characterize changes associated with photoreceptor degenerations in a cone-dominated retina. Photoreceptors form synapses with two types of second order neurons, bipolar cells and horizontal cells. Using cell-specific reporter gene expression and immunolabeling for postsynaptic glutamate receptors, significant remodeling is observed following cone degeneration in the pde6cw59 larval retina but not rod degeneration in the Xops:mCFPq13 line. In adults, rods and cones are present in approximately equal numbers, and in pde6cw59 mutants glutamate receptor expression and synaptic structures in the outer plexiform layer are preserved, and visual responses are gained in these once-blind fish. We propose that the abundance of rods in the adult protects the retina from cone degeneration-induced remodeling. We test this hypothesis by genetically manipulating the number of rods in larvae. We show that an increased number and uniform distribution of rods in lor/tbx2bp22bbtl or six7 morpholino-injected larvae protect from pde6cw59-induced secondary changes. The observations that remodeling is a common consequence of photoreceptor death across species, and that in zebrafish a small number of surviving photoreceptors afford protection from degeneration-induced changes provides a model for systematic analysis of factors that slow or even prevent the secondary deteriorations associated with neural degenerative disease. PMID:23365220

  11. Retinal dysfunction, photoreceptor protein dysregulation and neuronal remodelling in the R6/1 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Batcha, Abrez Hussain; Greferath, Una; Jobling, Andrew I; Vessey, Kirstan A; Ward, Michelle M; Nithianantharajah, Jess; Hannan, Anthony J; Kalloniatis, Michael; Fletcher, Erica L

    2012-03-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurological disease characterised by motor dysfunction, cognitive impairment and personality changes. Previous work in HD patients and animal models of the disease has also highlighted retinal involvement. This study characterised the changes in retinal structure and function early within the progression of disease using the R6/1 mouse model of HD. The retinal phenotype was observed to occur at the same time in the disease process as other neurological deficits such as motor dysfunction (by 13 weeks of age). There was a specific functional deficit in cone response to the electroretinogram and using immunocytochemical techniques, this dysfunction was found to be likely due to a progressive and complete loss of cone opsin and transducin protein expression by 20 weeks of age. In addition, there was an increase in Müller cell gliosis and the presence of ectopic rod photoreceptor terminals. This retinal remodelling is also observed in downstream neurons, namely the rod and cone bipolar cells. While R6/1 mice exhibit significant retinal pathology simultaneously with other more classical HD alterations, this doesn't lead to extensive cell loss. These findings suggest that in HD, cone photoreceptors are initially targeted, possibly via dysregulation of protein expression or trafficking and that this process is subsequently accompanied by increased retinal stress and neuronal remodelling also involving the rod pathway. As retinal structure and connectivity are well characterised, the retina may provide a useful model tissue in which to characterise the mechanisms important in the development of neuronal pathology in HD. PMID:22198376

  12. Overexpression of Snail in retinal pigment epithelial triggered epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Li, Min; Xu, Ding; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Guodong; Wang, Fang

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • First reported overexpression of Snail in RPE cells could directly trigger EMT. • Further confirmed the regulator role of Snail in RPE cells EMT in vitro. • Snail may be a potential therapeutic target to prevent the fibrosis of PVR. - Abstract: Snail transcription factor has been implicated as an important regulator in epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) during tumourigenesis and fibrogenesis. Our previous work showed that Snail transcription factor was activated in transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) induced EMT in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and may contribute to the development of retinal fibrotic disease such as proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). However, whether Snail alone has a direct role on retinal pigment epithelial–mesenchymal transition has not been investigated. Here, we analyzed the capacity of Snail to drive EMT in human RPE cells. A vector encoding Snail gene or an empty vector were transfected into human RPE cell lines ARPE-19 respectively. Snail overexpression in ARPE-19 cells resulted in EMT, which was characterized by the expected phenotypic transition from a typical epithelial morphology to mesenchymal spindle-shaped. The expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin and Zona occludin-1 (ZO-1) were down-regulated, whereas mesenchymal markers a-smooth muscle actin (a-SMA) and fibronectin were up-regulated in Snail expression vector transfected cells. In addition, ectopic expression of Snail significantly enhanced ARPE-19 cell motility and migration. The present data suggest that overexpression of Snail in ARPE-19 cells could directly trigger EMT. These results may provide novel insight into understanding the regulator role of Snail in the development of retinal pigment epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  13. Neutrophil Attack Triggers Extracellular Trap-Dependent Candida Cell Wall Remodeling and Altered Immune Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hopke, Alex; Nicke, Nadine; Hidu, Erica E.; Degani, Genny; Popolo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens hide immunogenic epitopes from the host to evade immunity, persist and cause infection. The opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which can cause fatal disease in immunocompromised patient populations, offers a good example as it masks the inflammatory epitope β-glucan in its cell wall from host recognition. It has been demonstrated previously that β-glucan becomes exposed during infection in vivo but the mechanism behind this exposure was unknown. Here, we show that this unmasking involves neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) mediated attack, which triggers changes in fungal cell wall architecture that enhance immune recognition by the Dectin-1 β-glucan receptor in vitro. Furthermore, using a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, we demonstrate the requirement for neutrophils in triggering these fungal cell wall changes in vivo. Importantly, we found that fungal epitope unmasking requires an active fungal response in addition to the stimulus provided by neutrophil attack. NET-mediated damage initiates fungal MAP kinase-driven responses, particularly by Hog1, that dynamically relocalize cell wall remodeling machinery including Chs3, Phr1 and Sur7. Neutrophil-initiated cell wall disruptions augment some macrophage cytokine responses to attacked fungi. This work provides insight into host-pathogen interactions during disseminated candidiasis, including valuable information about how the C. albicans cell wall responds to the biotic stress of immune attack. Our results highlight the important but underappreciated concept that pattern recognition during infection is dynamic and depends on the host-pathogen dialog. PMID:27223610

  14. Neutrophil Attack Triggers Extracellular Trap-Dependent Candida Cell Wall Remodeling and Altered Immune Recognition.

    PubMed

    Hopke, Alex; Nicke, Nadine; Hidu, Erica E; Degani, Genny; Popolo, Laura; Wheeler, Robert T

    2016-05-01

    Pathogens hide immunogenic epitopes from the host to evade immunity, persist and cause infection. The opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which can cause fatal disease in immunocompromised patient populations, offers a good example as it masks the inflammatory epitope β-glucan in its cell wall from host recognition. It has been demonstrated previously that β-glucan becomes exposed during infection in vivo but the mechanism behind this exposure was unknown. Here, we show that this unmasking involves neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) mediated attack, which triggers changes in fungal cell wall architecture that enhance immune recognition by the Dectin-1 β-glucan receptor in vitro. Furthermore, using a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, we demonstrate the requirement for neutrophils in triggering these fungal cell wall changes in vivo. Importantly, we found that fungal epitope unmasking requires an active fungal response in addition to the stimulus provided by neutrophil attack. NET-mediated damage initiates fungal MAP kinase-driven responses, particularly by Hog1, that dynamically relocalize cell wall remodeling machinery including Chs3, Phr1 and Sur7. Neutrophil-initiated cell wall disruptions augment some macrophage cytokine responses to attacked fungi. This work provides insight into host-pathogen interactions during disseminated candidiasis, including valuable information about how the C. albicans cell wall responds to the biotic stress of immune attack. Our results highlight the important but underappreciated concept that pattern recognition during infection is dynamic and depends on the host-pathogen dialog. PMID:27223610

  15. Retinal orientation and interactions in rhodopsin reveal a two-stage trigger mechanism for activation.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A; Ziliox, Martine; Hirshfeld, Amiram; Zaitseva, Ekaterina; Vogel, Reiner; Sheves, Mordechai; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2016-01-01

    The 11-cis retinal chromophore is tightly packed within the interior of the visual receptor rhodopsin and isomerizes to the all-trans configuration following absorption of light. The mechanism by which this isomerization event drives the outward rotation of transmembrane helix H6, a hallmark of activated G protein-coupled receptors, is not well established. To address this question, we use solid-state NMR and FTIR spectroscopy to define the orientation and interactions of the retinal chromophore in the active metarhodopsin II intermediate. Here we show that isomerization of the 11-cis retinal chromophore generates strong steric interactions between its β-ionone ring and transmembrane helices H5 and H6, while deprotonation of its protonated Schiff's base triggers the rearrangement of the hydrogen-bonding network involving residues on H6 and within the second extracellular loop. We integrate these observations with previous structural and functional studies to propose a two-stage mechanism for rhodopsin activation. PMID:27585742

  16. Early remodeling of Müller cells in the rd/rd mouse model of retinal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chua, Jacqueline; Nivison-Smith, Lisa; Fletcher, Erica L; Trenholm, Stuart; Awatramani, Gautam B; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2013-08-01

    We studied the anatomical remodeling and gliosis of retinal Müller cells in the rd/rd mouse model of photoreceptor degeneration. A computational calculation of glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity was developed so we could specifically quantify changes in Müller cell anatomy between control mice (C57Bl/6) and the dystrophic strain. We found no change in the number of Müller cell somata between mice strains, indicating no cell proliferation as a function of development and degeneration. The retinal area occupied by the total Müller cell body (soma and processes) was significantly less in the rd/rd mouse retina compared with control mice. When only the outer retina was considered, we found rd/rd Müller cell processes were dramatically reduced during the cone phase of photoreceptor degeneration. However, at older ages an increase in Müller cell processes was seen. Conversely, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression showed a significant increase during cone degeneration followed by a reduction in older ages. Müller cell electrophysiology, particularly K(+) currents and membrane potential, was similar between rd/rd and control Müller cells during cone degeneration. Together, these results show that glial remodeling in the rd/rd retina follows separate phases-an initial conservative glial response involving the loss of Müller cells processes, hyperexpression of GFAP, and preservation of normal electrophysiology followed by an active growth of Müller cell processes, glial seal formation, and attenuation of GFAP expression after complete photoreceptor loss. PMID:23348616

  17. Observation of Human Retinal Remodeling in Octogenarians with a Resveratrol Based Nutritional Supplement

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Stuart; Stiles, William; Ulanski, Lawrence; Carroll, Donn; Podella, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Rare spontaneous remissions from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) suggest the human retina has large regenerative capacity, even in advanced age. We present examples of robust improvement of retinal structure and function using an OTC oral resveratrol (RV) based nutritional supplement called Longevinex® or L/RV (circa 2004, Resveratrol Partners, LLC, Las Vegas, NV, USA). RV, a polyphenolic phytoalexin caloric-restriction mimic, induces hormesis at low doses with widespread beneficial effects on systemic health. RV alone inhibits neovascularization in the murine retina. Thus far, published evidence includes L/RV mitigation of experimentally induced murine cardiovascular reperfusion injury, amelioration of human atherosclerosis serum biomarkers in a human Japanese randomized placebo controlled trial, modulation of micro RNA 20b and 539 that control hypoxia-inducing-factor (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) genes in the murine heart (RV inhibited micro RNA20b 189-fold, L/RV 1366-fold). Little is known about the effects of L/RV on human ocular pathology. Methods: Absent FDA IRB approval, but with permission from our Chief of Staff and medical center IRB, L/RV is reserved for AMD patients, on a case-by-case compassionate care basis. Patients include those who progress on AREDS II type supplements, refuse intra-vitreal anti-VEGF injections or fail to respond to Lucentis®, Avastin® or Eylea®. Patients are clinically followed traditionally as well as with multi-spectral retinal imaging, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, cone glare recovery and macular visual fields. Three cases are presented. Results: Observed dramatic short-term anti-VEGF type effect including anatomic restoration of retinal structure with a suggestion of improvement in choroidal blood flow by near IR multispectral imaging. The visual function improvement mirrors the effect seen anatomically. The effect is bilateral with the added benefit of better RPE function

  18. Losartan Treatment Protects Retinal Ganglion Cells and Alters Scleral Remodeling in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pitha, Ian F.; Nguyen, Cathy; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Nguyen, Thao D.; Pease, Mary Ellen; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Berlinicke, Cynthia A.; Mitchell, Katherine L.; Kim, Jessica; Jefferys, Joan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if oral losartan treatment decreases the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death caused by experimental intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation in mice. Methods We produced IOP increase in CD1 mice and performed unilateral optic nerve crush. Mice received oral losartan, spironolactone, enalapril, or no drug to test effects of inhibiting angiotensin receptors. IOP was monitored by Tonolab, and blood pressure was monitored by tail cuff device. RGC loss was measured in masked axon counts and RGC bodies by β-tubulin labeling. Scleral changes that could modulate RGC injury were measured including axial length, scleral thickness, and retinal layer thicknesses, pressure-strain behavior in inflation testing, and study of angiotensin receptors and pathways by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Results Losartan treatment prevented significant RGC loss (median loss = 2.5%, p = 0.13), while median loss with water, spironolactone, and enalapril treatments were 26%, 28% and 43%; p < 0.0001). The lower RGC loss with losartan was significantly less than the loss with spironolactone or enalapril (regression model p = 0.001; drug treatment group term p = 0.01). Both losartan and enalapril significantly lowered blood pressure (p< 0.001), but losartan was protective, while enalapril led to worse than water-treated RGC loss. RGC loss after crush injury was unaffected by losartan treatment (difference from control p = 0.9). Survival of RGC in cell culture was not prolonged by sartan treatment. Axonal transport blockade after 3 day IOP elevations was less in losartan-treated than in control glaucoma eyes (p = 0.007). Losartan inhibited effects of glaucoma, including reduction in extracellular signal-related kinase activity and modification of glaucoma-related changes in scleral thickness and creep under controlled IOP. Conclusions The neuroprotective effect of losartan in mouse glaucoma is associated with adaptive changes

  19. JNK Controls the Onset of Mitosis in Planarian Stem Cells and Triggers Apoptotic Cell Death Required for Regeneration and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Almuedo-Castillo, María; Crespo, Xenia; Seebeck, Florian; Bartscherer, Kerstin; Salò, Emili; Adell, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of lost tissues depends on the precise interpretation of molecular signals that control and coordinate the onset of proliferation, cellular differentiation and cell death. However, the nature of those molecular signals and the mechanisms that integrate the cellular responses remain largely unknown. The planarian flatworm is a unique model in which regeneration and tissue renewal can be comprehensively studied in vivo. The presence of a population of adult pluripotent stem cells combined with the ability to decode signaling after wounding enable planarians to regenerate a complete, correctly proportioned animal within a few days after any kind of amputation, and to adapt their size to nutritional changes without compromising functionality. Here, we demonstrate that the stress-activated c-jun–NH2–kinase (JNK) links wound-induced apoptosis to the stem cell response during planarian regeneration. We show that JNK modulates the expression of wound-related genes, triggers apoptosis and attenuates the onset of mitosis in stem cells specifically after tissue loss. Furthermore, in pre-existing body regions, JNK activity is required to establish a positive balance between cell death and stem cell proliferation to enable tissue renewal, remodeling and the maintenance of proportionality. During homeostatic degrowth, JNK RNAi blocks apoptosis, resulting in impaired organ remodeling and rescaling. Our findings indicate that JNK-dependent apoptotic cell death is crucial to coordinate tissue renewal and remodeling required to regenerate and to maintain a correctly proportioned animal. Hence, JNK might act as a hub, translating wound signals into apoptotic cell death, controlled stem cell proliferation and differentiation, all of which are required to coordinate regeneration and tissue renewal. PMID:24922054

  20. Hematopoietic stem cell arrival triggers dynamic remodeling of the perivascular niche.

    PubMed

    Tamplin, Owen J; Durand, Ellen M; Carr, Logan A; Childs, Sarah J; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Li, Pulin; Yzaguirre, Amanda D; Speck, Nancy A; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-01-15

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) can reconstitute and sustain the entire blood system. We generated a highly specific transgenic reporter of HSPCs in zebrafish. This allowed us to perform high-resolution live imaging on endogenous HSPCs not currently possible in mammalian bone marrow. Using this system, we have uncovered distinct interactions between single HSPCs and their niche. When an HSPC arrives in the perivascular niche, a group of endothelial cells remodel to form a surrounding pocket. This structure appears conserved in mouse fetal liver. Correlative light and electron microscopy revealed that endothelial cells surround a single HSPC attached to a single mesenchymal stromal cell. Live imaging showed that mesenchymal stromal cells anchor HSPCs and orient their divisions. A chemical genetic screen found that the compound lycorine promotes HSPC-niche interactions during development and ultimately expands the stem cell pool into adulthood. Our studies provide evidence for dynamic niche interactions upon stem cell colonization. PAPERFLICK: PMID:25594182

  1. Membrane Glycerolipid Remodeling Triggered by Nitrogen and Phosphorus Starvation in Phaeodactylum tricornutum1

    PubMed Central

    Abida, Heni; Dolch, Lina-Juana; Meï, Coline; Villanova, Valeria; Conte, Melissa; Block, Maryse A.; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bastien, Olivier; Tirichine, Leïla; Bowler, Chris; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Jouhet, Juliette; Maréchal, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms constitute a major phylum of phytoplankton biodiversity in ocean water and freshwater ecosystems. They are known to respond to some chemical variations of the environment by the accumulation of triacylglycerol, but the relative changes occurring in membrane glycerolipids have not yet been studied. Our goal was first to define a reference for the glycerolipidome of the marine model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, a necessary prerequisite to characterize and dissect the lipid metabolic routes that are orchestrated and regulated to build up each subcellular membrane compartment. By combining multiple analytical techniques, we determined the glycerolipid profile of P. tricornutum grown with various levels of nitrogen or phosphorus supplies. In different P. tricornutum accessions collected worldwide, a deprivation of either nutrient triggered an accumulation of triacylglycerol, but with different time scales and magnitudes. We investigated in depth the effect of nutrient starvation on the Pt1 strain (Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa no. 1055/3). Nitrogen deprivation was the more severe stress, triggering thylakoid senescence and growth arrest. By contrast, phosphorus deprivation induced a stepwise adaptive response. The time scale of the glycerolipidome changes and the comparison with large-scale transcriptome studies were consistent with an exhaustion of unknown primary phosphorus-storage molecules (possibly polyphosphate) and a transcriptional control of some genes coding for specific lipid synthesis enzymes. We propose that phospholipids are secondary phosphorus-storage molecules broken down upon phosphorus deprivation, while nonphosphorus lipids are synthesized consistently with a phosphatidylglycerol-to-sulfolipid and a phosphatidycholine-to-betaine lipid replacement followed by a late accumulation of triacylglycerol. PMID:25489020

  2. Restoring visual function to blind mice with a photoswitch that exploits electrophysiological remodeling of retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Polosukhina, Aleksandra; Degtyar, Vadim E.; Gallerani, Nicholas; Smith, Caleb M.; Friedman, Aaron; Van Gelder, Russell N.; Trauner, Dirk; Kaufer, Daniela; Kramer, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are blinding diseases caused by the degeneration of rods and cones, leaving the remainder of the visual system unable to respond to light. Here we report a chemical photoswitch named DENAQ that restores retinal responses to white light of intensity similar to ordinary daylight. A single intraocular injection of DENAQ photosensitizes the blind retina for days, restoring electrophysiological and behavioral responses with no toxicity. Experiments on mouse strains with functional, non-functional, or degenerated rods and cones show that DENAQ is effective only in retinas with degenerated photoreceptors. DENAQ confers light sensitivity on a hyperpolarization-activated inward current that is enhanced in degenerated retina, enabling optical control of retinal ganglion cell firing The acceptable light sensitivity, favorable spectral sensitivity, and selective targeting to diseased tissue make DENAQ a prime drug candidate for vision restoration in patients with end-stage RP and AMD. PMID:24559673

  3. Restoring visual function to blind mice with a photoswitch that exploits electrophysiological remodeling of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Polosukhina, Aleksandra; Degtyar, Vadim E; Gallerani, Nicholas; Smith, Caleb M; Friedman, Aaron; Van Gelder, Russell N; Trauner, Dirk; Kaufer, Daniela; Kramer, Richard H

    2014-02-19

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are blinding diseases caused by the degeneration of rods and cones, leaving the remainder of the visual system unable to respond to light. Here, we report a chemical photoswitch named DENAQ that restores retinal responses to white light of intensity similar to ordinary daylight. A single intraocular injection of DENAQ photosensitizes the blind retina for days, restoring electrophysiological and behavioral responses with no toxicity. Experiments on mouse strains with functional, nonfunctional, or degenerated rods and cones show that DENAQ is effective only in retinas with degenerated photoreceptors. DENAQ confers light sensitivity on a hyperpolarization-activated inward current that is enhanced in degenerated retina, enabling optical control of retinal ganglion cell firing. The acceptable light sensitivity, favorable spectral sensitivity, and selective targeting to diseased tissue make DENAQ a prime drug candidate for vision restoration in patients with end-stage RP and AMD. PMID:24559673

  4. Non-Physiologic Blood Flow Triggers Endothelial and Arterial Remodeling In Vivo: Implications for Novel LVADs with a Peripheral Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Carlo R.; Spence, Paul A.; Siess, Thorsten; Raess, Daniel H.; Koenig, Steven C.; Dowling, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Assisted circulation with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) triggered arterial remodeling that allowed a peripheral artery to accommodate the altered hemodynamics of a novel partial-support pump. Further delineation of remodeling pathways may be of significance for the emerging field of partial circulatory support. PMID:24332190

  5. Inner Segment Remodeling and Mitochondrial Translocation in Cone Photoreceptors in Age-Related Macular Degeneration With Outer Retinal Tubulation

    PubMed Central

    Litts, Katie M.; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Freund, K. Bailey; Zhang, Yuhua; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify impressions of mitochondrial translocation in degenerating cones and to determine the nature of accumulated material in the subretinal space with apparent inner segment (IS)-like features by examining cone IS ultrastructure. Methods. Human donor eyes with advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) were screened for outer retinal tubulation (ORT) in macula-wide, high-resolution digital sections. Degenerating cones inside ORT (ORT cones) and outside ORT (non-ORT cones) from AMD eyes and unaffected cones in age-matched control eyes were imaged using transmission electron microscopy. The distances of mitochondria to the external limiting membrane (ELM), cone IS length, and cone IS width at the ELM were measured. Results. Outer retinal tubulation and non-ORT cones lose outer segments (OS), followed by shortening of IS and mitochondria. In non-ORT cones, IS broaden. Outer retinal tubulation and non-ORT cone IS myoids become undetectable due to mitochondria redistribution toward the nucleus. Some ORT cones were found lacking IS and containing mitochondria in the outer fiber (between soma and ELM). Unlike long, thin IS mitochondria in control cones, ORT and non-ORT IS mitochondria are ovoid or reniform. Shed IS, some containing mitochondria, were found in the subretinal space. Conclusions. In AMD, macula cones exhibit loss of detectable myoid due to IS shortening in addition to OS loss, as described. Mitochondria shrink and translocate toward the nucleus. As reflectivity sources, translocating mitochondria may be detectable using in vivo imaging to monitor photoreceptor degeneration in retinal disorders. These results improve the knowledge basis for interpreting high-resolution clinical retinal imaging. PMID:25758815

  6. Retinal Light Damage: Mechanisms and Protection

    PubMed Central

    Organisciak, Daniel T.; Vaughan, Dana K.

    2009-01-01

    By its action on rhodopsin, light triggers the well-known visual transduction cascade, but can also induce cell damage and death through phototoxic mechanisms -- a comprehensive understanding of which is still elusive despite more than 40 years of research. Herein, we integrate recent experimental findings to address several hypotheses of retinal light damage, premised in part on the close anatomical and metabolic relationships between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium. We begin by reviewing the salient features of light damage, recently joined by evidence for retinal remodeling which has implications for the prognosis of recovery of function in retinal degenerations. We then consider select factors that influence the progression of the damage process and the extent of visual cell loss. Traditional, genetically-modified, and emerging animal models are discussed, with particular emphasis on cone visual cells. Exogenous and endogenous retinal protective factors are explored, with implications for light damage mechanisms and some suggested avenues for future research. Synergies are known to exist between our long term light environment and photoreceptor cell death in retinal disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of light damage in a variety of animal models can provide valuable insights into the effects of light in clinical disorders and may form the basis of future therapies to prevent or delay visual cell loss. PMID:19951742

  7. Viral infection of the marine alga Emiliania huxleyi triggers lipidome remodeling and induces the production of highly saturated triacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Malitsky, Sergey; Ziv, Carmit; Rosenwasser, Shilo; Zheng, Shuning; Schatz, Daniella; Porat, Ziv; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Aharoni, Asaph; Vardi, Assaf

    2016-04-01

    Viruses that infect marine photosynthetic microorganisms are major ecological and evolutionary drivers of microbial food webs, estimated to turn over more than a quarter of the total photosynthetically fixed carbon. Viral infection of the bloom-forming microalga Emiliania huxleyi induces the rapid remodeling of host primary metabolism, targeted towards fatty acid metabolism. We applied a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based lipidomics approach combined with imaging flow cytometry and gene expression profiling to explore the impact of viral-induced metabolic reprogramming on lipid composition. Lytic viral infection led to remodeling of the cellular lipidome, by predominantly inducing the biosynthesis of highly saturated triacylglycerols (TAGs), coupled with a significant accumulation of neutral lipids within lipid droplets. Furthermore, TAGs were found to be a major component (77%) of the lipidome of isolated virions. Interestingly, viral-induced TAGs were significantly more saturated than TAGs produced under nitrogen starvation. This study highlights TAGs as major products of the viral-induced metabolic reprogramming during the host-virus interaction and indicates a selective mode of membrane recruitment during viral assembly, possibly by budding of the virus from specialized subcellular compartments. These findings provide novel insights into the role of viruses infecting microalgae in regulating metabolism and energy transfer in the marine environment and suggest their possible biotechnological application in biofuel production. PMID:26856244

  8. Combination of T-cell therapy and trigger of inflammation induces remodeling of the vasculature and tumor eradication.

    PubMed

    Ganss, Ruth; Ryschich, Eduard; Klar, Ernst; Arnold, Bernd; Hämmerling, Günter J

    2002-03-01

    In a transgenic mouse model of multistep carcinogenesis, highly angiogenic insulinomas contain an irregular vascular network and develop an intrinsic resistance to leukocyte infiltration and effector function. Even persistently high levels of activated tumor-specific T lymphocytes fail to eradicate the tumors. In contrast, we show that irradiation before adoptive transfer results in complete macroscopic tumor regression. Thus, effective tumor therapy requires a proinflammatory microenvironment that permits T cells to extravasate and to destroy the tumor. Early after initiation of the irradiation/adoptive transfer therapy, the capillary network reacquires an almost normal appearance, a likely consequence of strong induction of the chemokines monokine induced by IFN-gamma (Mig) and IFN-inducible protein 10 (IP10). This remodeling of the vasculature in a proinflammatory environment may directly affect lymphocyte extravasation and effector function. Therefore, irradiation/adoptive transfer therapy combines antigen-driven tumor cell eradication with anti-angiogenic effects on tumor endothelium, a powerful synergy that has not been previously appreciated. PMID:11888921

  9. STATE TRANSITION7-Dependent Phosphorylation Is Modulated by Changing Environmental Conditions, and Its Absence Triggers Remodeling of Photosynthetic Protein Complexes1

    PubMed Central

    Bergner, Sonja Verena; Scholz, Martin; Trompelt, Kerstin; Barth, Johannes; Gäbelein, Philipp; Steinbeck, Janina; Xue, Huidan; Clowez, Sophie; Fucile, Geoffrey; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel; Fufezan, Christian; Hippler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In plants and algae, the serine/threonine kinase STN7/STT7, orthologous protein kinases in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), respectively, is an important regulator in acclimation to changing light environments. In this work, we assessed STT7-dependent protein phosphorylation under high light in C. reinhardtii, known to fully induce the expression of LIGHT-HARVESTING COMPLEX STRESS-RELATED PROTEIN3 (LHCSR3) and a nonphotochemical quenching mechanism, in relationship to anoxia where the activity of cyclic electron flow is stimulated. Our quantitative proteomics data revealed numerous unique STT7 protein substrates and STT7-dependent protein phosphorylation variations that were reliant on the environmental condition. These results indicate that STT7-dependent phosphorylation is modulated by the environment and point to an intricate chloroplast phosphorylation network responding in a highly sensitive and dynamic manner to environmental cues and alterations in kinase function. Functionally, the absence of the STT7 kinase triggered changes in protein expression and photoinhibition of photosystem I (PSI) and resulted in the remodeling of photosynthetic complexes. This remodeling initiated a pronounced association of LHCSR3 with PSI-LIGHT HARVESTING COMPLEX I (LHCI)-ferredoxin-NADPH oxidoreductase supercomplexes. Lack of STT7 kinase strongly diminished PSII-LHCII supercomplexes, while PSII core complex phosphorylation and accumulation were significantly enhanced. In conclusion, our study provides strong evidence that the regulation of protein phosphorylation is critical for driving successful acclimation to high light and anoxic growth environments and gives new insights into acclimation strategies to these environmental conditions. PMID:25858915

  10. Cellular responses following retinal injuries and therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Nicolás; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Campello, Laura; Maneu, Victoria; De la Villa, Pedro; Lax, Pedro; Pinilla, Isabel

    2014-11-01

    Retinal neurodegenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinitis pigmentosa each have a different etiology and pathogenesis. However, at the cellular and molecular level, the response to retinal injury is similar in all of them, and results in morphological and functional impairment of retinal cells. This retinal degeneration may be triggered by gene defects, increased intraocular pressure, high levels of blood glucose, other types of stress or aging, but they all frequently induce a set of cell signals that lead to well-established and similar morphological and functional changes, including controlled cell death and retinal remodeling. Interestingly, an inflammatory response, oxidative stress and activation of apoptotic pathways are common features in all these diseases. Furthermore, it is important to note the relevant role of glial cells, including astrocytes, Müller cells and microglia, because their response to injury is decisive for maintaining the health of the retina or its degeneration. Several therapeutic approaches have been developed to preserve retinal function or restore eyesight in pathological conditions. In this context, neuroprotective compounds, gene therapy, cell transplantation or artificial devices should be applied at the appropriate stage of retinal degeneration to obtain successful results. This review provides an overview of the common and distinctive features of retinal neurodegenerative diseases, including the molecular, anatomical and functional changes caused by the cellular response to damage, in order to establish appropriate treatments for these pathologies. PMID:25038518

  11. Retinal ganglion cell death is triggered by paraptosis via reactive oxygen species production: a brief literature review presenting a novel hypothesis in glaucoma pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Xu, Kun; Zhang, Hongbing; Zhao, Junhong; Zhu, Xiuping; Wang, Yangzheng; Wu, Renyi

    2014-09-01

    Accumulative evidence has indicated that apoptosis is the common pathway for retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and that autophagy promotes survival of RGCs in glaucoma. In the present review, it was hypothesized that the progressive death of RGCs in glaucoma involves another novel non‑apoptotic programmed cell death, known as 'paraptosis', in the early stages of glaucoma. Paraptosis may be accompanied by apoptosis and/or autophagy in the moderate and severe stages. The secondary hypothesis suggests that paraptosis in glaucomatous RGCs may be triggered by damage to cellular mitochondria, and is associated with mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our preliminary laboratory studies, using transmission electron microscopy, provided evidence that supports the primary hypothesis. The secondary hypothesis is currently under investigation. These two hypotheses provide a novel way to investigate the mechanisms of cell death in glaucomatous RGCs and targeting paraptosis may be a promising strategy for RGC-protecting drug discovery. PMID:24969312

  12. Thermal Stress Triggers Broad Pocillopora damicornis Transcriptomic Remodeling, while Vibrio coralliilyticus Infection Induces a More Targeted Immuno-Suppression Response

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Dupiol, Jeremie; Dheilly, Nolwenn M.; Rondon, Rodolfo; Grunau, Christoph; Cosseau, Céline; Smith, Kristina M.; Freitag, Michael; Adjeroud, Mehdi; Mitta, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Global change and its associated temperature increase has directly or indirectly changed the distributions of hosts and pathogens, and has affected host immunity, pathogen virulence and growth rates. This has resulted in increased disease in natural plant and animal populations worldwide, including scleractinian corals. While the effects of temperature increase on immunity and pathogen virulence have been clearly identified, their interaction, synergy and relative weight during pathogenesis remain poorly documented. We investigated these phenomena in the interaction between the coral Pocillopora damicornis and the bacterium Vibrio coralliilyticus, for which the infection process is temperature-dependent. We developed an experimental model that enabled unraveling the effects of thermal stress, and virulence vs. non-virulence of the bacterium. The physiological impacts of various treatments were quantified at the transcriptome level using a combination of RNA sequencing and targeted approaches. The results showed that thermal stress triggered a general weakening of the coral, making it more prone to infection, non-virulent bacterium induced an ‘efficient’ immune response, whereas virulent bacterium caused immuno-suppression in its host. PMID:25259845

  13. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of ...

  14. Synaptotagmin-7 Is Essential for Ca2+-Triggered Delayed Asynchronous Release But Not for Ca2+-Dependent Vesicle Priming in Retinal Ribbon Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Bacaj, Taulant

    2015-01-01

    Most synapses release neurotransmitters in two phases: (1) a fast synchronous phase lasting a few milliseconds; and (2) a delayed “asynchronous” phase lasting hundreds of milliseconds. Ca2+ triggers fast synchronous neurotransmitter release by binding to synaptotagmin-1, synaptotagmin-2, or synaptotagmin-9, but how Ca2+ triggers delayed asynchronous release has long remained enigmatic. Recent results suggested that consistent with the Ca2+-sensor function of synaptotagmin-7 in neuroendocrine exocytosis, synaptotagmin-7 also functions as a Ca2+ sensor for synaptic vesicle exocytosis but operates during delayed asynchronous release. Puzzlingly, a subsequent study postulated that synaptotagmin-7 is not a Ca2+ sensor for release but mediates Ca2+-dependent vesicle repriming after intense stimulation. To address these issues, we here analyzed synaptic transmission at rod bipolar neuron–AII amacrine cell synapses in acute mouse retina slices as a model system. Using paired recordings, we show that knock-out of synaptotagmin-7 selectively impairs delayed asynchronous release but not fast synchronous release. Delayed asynchronous release was blocked in wild-type synapses by intracellular addition of high concentrations of the slow Ca2+-chelator EGTA, but EGTA had no effect in synaptotagmin-7 knock-out neurons because delayed asynchronous release was already impaired. Moreover, direct measurements of vesicle repriming failed to uncover an effect of the synaptotagmin-7 knock-out on vesicle repriming. Our data demonstrate that synaptotagmin-7 is selectively essential for Ca2+-dependent delayed asynchronous release in retinal rod bipolar cell synapses, that its function can be blocked by simply introducing a slow Ca2+ buffer into the cells, and that synaptotagmin-7 is not required for normal vesicle repriming. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT How Ca2+ triggers delayed asynchronous release has long remained enigmatic. Synaptotagmin-7 has been implicated recently as Ca2+ sensor in

  15. Preservation of retinotopic map in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Xie, John; Wang, Gene-Jack; Yow, Lindy; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Cela, Carlos J; Jadvar, Hossein; Lazzi, Gianluca; Dhrami-Gavazi, Elona; Tsang, Stephen H

    2012-05-01

    Retinal degenerations trigger the loss of photoreceptors and cause the remaining de-afferented neural retina to undergo remodeling. Concerns over this potential retinal synaptic reorganization following visual loss have raised questions regarding the usefulness of visual restoration via retinal electrical stimulation. We have used quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) and 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) to objectively evaluate the connection between the retina and the primary visual cortex under both light and transcorneal electrical stimulation (TcES) in five subjects with retinal degeneration (RD) who have had more than ten years of light-perception-only best visual acuity and five age-matched normal-sighted controls. All subjects underwent quantitative PET with FDG as the metabolic tracer during stimulation of the right eye under both light stimulation condition and transcorneal electrical stimulation (TcES) using ERG-Jet contact lens electrode. Cortical activation maps from each stimulation condition were obtained using statistical parametric mapping. TcES phosphene threshold current and qualitative visual cortex activation from both stimulation conditions were compared between the two subject groups. Average phosphene threshold current was 0.72 ± 0.18 mA for the five normal-sighted controls and 3.08 ± 2.01 mA for the retinal degenerative subjects. Phosphene threshold current was significantly higher in retinal degenerative subjects compared to normal-sighted controls (p < 0.05). We found both light stimulation and TcES resulted in retinotopically mapped primary visual cortex activation in both groups. In addition, the patterns of early visual area activation between the two subject groups are more similar during TcES than light stimulation. Our findings suggest primary visual cortex continues to maintain its retinotopy in RD subjects despite prolonged visual loss. PMID:22685713

  16. Cytomegalovirus retinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to prevent its return. Alternative Names Cytomegalovirus retinitis Images Eye CMV retinitis CMV (cytomegalovirus) References Crumpacker CS. ... 5. Read More Antibody HIV/AIDS Immune response Retinal detachment Systemic WBC count Update Date 12/10/ ...

  17. Engagement of Arginine Finger to ATP Triggers Large Conformational Changes in NtrC1 AAA+ ATPase for Remodeling Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baoyu; Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; De Carlo, Sacha; Hanson, Jeffrey A.; Yang, Haw; Nixon, B. Tracy

    2010-11-19

    The NtrC-like AAA+ ATPases control virulence and other important bacterial activities through delivering mechanical work to {sigma}54-RNA polymerase to activate transcription from {sigma}54-dependent genes. We report the first crystal structure for such an ATPase, NtrC1 of Aquifex aeolicus, in which the catalytic arginine engages the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP. Comparing the new structure with those previously known for apo and ADP-bound states supports a rigid-body displacement model that is consistent with large-scale conformational changes observed by low-resolution methods. First, the arginine finger induces rigid-body roll, extending surface loops above the plane of the ATPase ring to bind {sigma}54. Second, ATP hydrolysis permits Pi release and retraction of the arginine with a reversed roll, remodeling {sigma}54-RNAP. This model provides a fresh perspective on how ATPase subunits interact within the ring-ensemble to promote transcription, directing attention to structural changes on the arginine-finger side of an ATP-bound interface.

  18. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  19. Changes in morphology of retinal ganglion cells with eccentricity in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E E; Greferath, U; Fletcher, E L

    2016-05-01

    Ganglion cells are the output neurons of the retina and are known to remodel during the subtle plasticity changes that occur following the death of photoreceptors in inherited retinal degeneration. We examine the influence of retinal eccentricity on anatomical remodelling and ganglion cell morphology well after photoreceptor loss. Rd1 mice that have a mutation in the β subunit of phosphodiesterase 6 were used as a model of retinal degeneration and gross remodelling events were examined by processing serial sections for immunocytochemistry. Retinal wholemounts from rd1-Thy1 and control Thy1 mice that contained a fluorescent protein labelling a subset of ganglion cells were processed for immunohistochemistry at 11 months of age. Ganglion cells were classified based on their soma size, dendritic field size and dendritic branching pattern and their dendritic fields were analysed for their length, area and quantity of branching points. Overall, more remodelling was found in the central compared with the peripheral retina. In addition, the size and complexity of A2, B1, C1 and D type ganglion cells located in the central region of the retina decreased. We propose that the changes in ganglion cell morphology are correlated with remodelling events in these regions and impact the function of retinal circuitry in the degenerated retina. PMID:26670589

  20. Pulsatile Fluid Shear in Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frangos, John A.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to elucidate the sensitivity to transients in fluid shear stress in bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is clearly a function of the local mechanical environment which includes interstitial fluid flow. Traditionally, load-induced remodeling has been associated with low frequency (1-2 Hz) signals attributed to normal locomotion. McLeod and Rubin, however, demonstrated in vivo remodeling events associated with high frequency (15-30 Hz) loading. Likewise, other in vivo studies demonstrated that slowly applied strains did not trigger remodeling events. We therefore hypothesized that the mechanosensitive pathways which control bone maintenance and remodeling are differentially sensitive to varying rates of applied fluid shear stress.

  1. Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated from the laboratory to the clinical over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives. Improved mobility and object detection are some of the more notable findings from the clinical trials. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. This paper reviews the recent clinical trials, highlights technology breakthroughs that will contribute to next generation of retinal prostheses. PMID:24710817

  2. Foveomacular retinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kuming, B S

    1986-01-01

    A group of patients is described who developed the clinical features of foveomacular retinitis. No causative factors were isolated, and all patients strongly denied any type of sun gazing. It is possible that there is a group of patients who have the features of foveomacular retinitis but have not had any direct exposure to the sun. These patients would then constitute a primary type of foveomacular retinitis, as opposed to a secondary type which has a known cause and is synonymous with solar retinopathy. Images PMID:3790482

  3. Retinal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision Diabetic eye disease Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is ... children. Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula Macular hole - ...

  4. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... immediately. Treatment How is retinal detachment treated? Small holes and tears are treated with laser surgery or ... laser surgery tiny burns are made around the hole to “weld” the retina back into place. Cryopexy ...

  5. Retinal Changes in an ATP-Induced Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Aplin, Felix P.; Vessey, Kirstan A.; Luu, Chi D.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fletcher, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    In rodents and felines, intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been shown to induce photoreceptor death providing a tractable model of retinal degeneration in these species. This study investigated the long term effects of photoreceptor loss in an ATP induced feline model of retinal degeneration. Six normal sighted felines were unilaterally blinded using intravitreal ATP injections and assessed using electroretinography (ERG) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). At 30 h (n = 3) or 12 weeks (n = 3) post-injection, the animals were euthanized and the eyes enucleated. Retinae were sectioned and labeled using immunohistochemistry for markers of cell death, neural remodeling and gliosis. Ongoing cell death and retinal degeneration was observed in the outer retina at both 30 h and 12 weeks following unilateral ATP injection. Markers of mid to late-stage retinal remodeling such as cell displacement and aberrant neurite growth were observed in the inner retina at 12 weeks post-injection. Ganglion cells appeared to remain intact in ATP injected eyes. Müller cell gliosis was observed throughout the inner and outer retina, in some parts completely enveloping and/or displacing the surviving neural tissue. Our data suggests that the ATP injected feline retina continues to undergo progressive retinal degeneration and exhibits abnormalities consistent with a description of retinal remodeling commonly seen in other models of retinal degeneration. These findings validate the use of intravitreal ATP injection in feline as a large animal model of retinal degeneration which may aid in development of therapies aiming to restore visual function after photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:27199678

  6. Retinal detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the first symptoms of new flashes of light and floaters. ... diabetes. See your eye care specialist once a year. You may need more frequent visits if you have risk factors for retinal detachment. Be alert to symptoms of new flashes of light and floaters.

  7. Selective Impairment of a Subset of Ran-GTP-binding Domains of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Suffices to Recapitulate the Degeneration of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) Triggered by Ranbp2 Ablation*

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Hemangi; Saha, Arjun; Senda, Eugene; Cho, Kyoung-in; Haque, MdEmdadul; Yu, Minzhong; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Hao, Ying; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration underpins diseases triggered by disparate genetic lesions, noxious insults, or both. The pleiotropic Ranbp2 controls the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic pathological stressors impinging on cellular viability. However, the physiological targets and mechanisms controlled by Ranbp2 in tissue homeostasis, such as RPE, are ill defined. We show that mice, RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−, with selective Ranbp2 ablation in RPE develop pigmentary changes, syncytia, hypoplasia, age-dependent centrifugal and non-apoptotic degeneration of the RPE, and secondary leakage of choriocapillaris. These manifestations are accompanied by the development of F-actin clouds, metalloproteinase-11 activation, deregulation of expression or subcellular localization of critical RPE proteins, atrophic cell extrusions into the subretinal space, and compensatory proliferation of peripheral RPE. To gain mechanistic insights into what Ranbp2 activities are vital to the RPE, we performed genetic complementation analyses of transgenic lines of bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 harboring loss of function of selective Ranbp2 domains expressed in a Ranbp2−/− background. Among the transgenic lines produced, only TgRBD2/3*-HA::RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−-expressing mutations, which selectively impair binding of RBD2/3 (Ran-binding domains 2 and 3) of Ranbp2 to Ran-GTP, recapitulate RPE degeneration, as observed with RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−. By contrast, TgRBD2/3*-HA expression rescues the degeneration of cone photoreceptors lacking Ranbp2. The RPE of RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/− and TgRBD2/3*-HA::RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/− share proteostatic deregulation of Ran GTPase, serotransferrin, and γ-tubulin and suppression of light-evoked electrophysiological responses. These studies unravel selective roles of Ranbp2 and its RBD2 and RBD3 in RPE survival and functions. We posit that the control of Ran GTPase by Ranbp2 emerges as a novel therapeutic target in diseases

  8. Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Mar. 01, 2016 How does a detached or torn retina affect your vision? If a retinal tear is occurring, you may ...

  9. Apelin Is Required for Non-Neovascular Remodeling in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Jenny A.G.; Fruttiger, Marcus; Abraham, Sabu; Lange, Clemens A.K.; Stone, Jay; Gandhi, Pranita; Wang, Xiaomeng; Bainbridge, James; Moss, Stephen E.; Greenwood, John

    2012-01-01

    Retinal pathologies are frequently accompanied by retinal vascular responses, including the formation of new vessels by angiogenesis (neovascularization). Pathological vascular changes may also include less well characterized traits of vascular remodeling that are non-neovascular, such as vessel pruning and the emergence of dilated and tortuous vessel phenotypes (telangiectasis). The molecular mechanisms underlying neovascular growth versus non-neovascular remodeling are poorly understood. We therefore undertook to identify novel regulators of non-neovascular remodeling in the retina by using the dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat and the retinal dystrophy 1 (RD1) mouse, both of which display pronounced non-neovascular remodeling. Gene expression profiling of isolated retinal vessels from these mutant rodent models and wild-type controls revealed 60 differentially expressed genes. These included the genes for apelin (Apln) and for its receptor (Aplnr), both of which were strongly up-regulated in the mutants. Crossing RD1 mice into an Apln-null background substantially reduced vascular telangiectasia. In contrast, Apln gene deletion had no effect in two models of neovascular pathology [laser-induced choroidal neovascularization and the very low density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr)-knockout mouse]. These findings suggest that in these models apelin has minimal effect on sprouting retinal angiogenesis, but contributes significantly to pathogenic non-neovascular remodeling. PMID:22067912

  10. Mechanism of chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2010-02-23

    Results from biochemical and structural studies of the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex prompt a proposal for the remodeling mechanism: RSC binding to the nucleosome releases the DNA from the histone surface and initiates DNA translocation (through one or a small number of DNA base pairs); ATP binding completes translocation, and ATP hydrolysis resets the system. Binding energy thus plays a central role in the remodeling process. RSC may disrupt histone-DNA contacts by affecting histone octamer conformation and through extensive interaction with the DNA. Bulging of the DNA from the octamer surface is possible, and twisting is unavoidable, but neither is the basis of remodeling. PMID:20142505

  11. Repetitive magnetic stimulation improves retinal function in a rat model of retinal dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Tzameret, Adi; Levi, Nir; Kalish, Sapir; Sher, Ifat; Zangen, Avraham; Belkin, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with retinal dystrophies affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration is characterized by photoreceptor cell death and concomitant remodeling of remaining retinal cells. Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (RMS) is a non-invasive technique that creates alternating magnetic fields by brief electric currents transmitted through an insulated coil. These magnetic field generate action potentials in neurons, and modulate the expression of neurotransmitter receptors, growth factors and transcription factors which mediate plasticity. This technology has been proven effective and safe in various psychiatric disorders. Here we determined the effect of RMS on retinal function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model for retinal dystrophy. Four week-old RCS and control Spargue Dawley (SD) rats received sham or RMS treatment over the right eye (12 sessions on 4 weeks). RMS treatment at intensity of at 40% of the maximal output of a Rapid2 stimulator significantly increased the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave responses by up to 6- or 10-fold in the left and right eye respectively, 3-5 weeks following end of treatment. RMS treatment at intensity of 25% of the maximal output did not significant effect b-wave responses following end of treatment with no adverse effect on ERG response or retinal structure of SD rats. Our findings suggest that RMS treatment induces delayed improvement of retinal functions and may induce plasticity in the retinal tissue. Furthermore, this non-invasive treatment may possibly be used in the future as a primary or adjuvant treatment for retinal dystrophy.

  12. Purinergic signaling in retinal degeneration and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Purinergic signaling is centrally involved in mediating the degeneration of the injured and diseased retina, the induction of retinal gliosis, and the protection of the retinal tissue from degeneration. Dysregulated calcium signaling triggered by overactivation of P2X7 receptors is a crucial step in the induction of neuronal and microvascular cell death under pathogenic conditions like ischemia-hypoxia, elevated intraocular pressure, and diabetes, respectively. Overactivation of P2X7 plays also a pathogenic role in inherited and age-related photoreceptor cell death and in the age-related dysfunction and degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium. Gliosis of micro- and macroglial cells, which is induced and/or modulated by purinergic signaling and associated with an impaired homeostatic support to neurons, and the ATP-mediated propagation of retinal gliosis from a focal injury into the surrounding noninjured tissue are involved in inducing secondary cell death in the retina. On the other hand, alterations in the glial metabolism of extracellular nucleotides, resulting in a decreased level of ATP and an increased level of adenosine, may be neuroprotective in the diseased retina. Purinergic signals stimulate the proliferation of retinal glial cells which contributes to glial scarring which has protective effects on retinal degeneration and adverse effects on retinal regeneration. Pharmacological modulation of purinergic receptors, e.g., inhibition of P2X and activation of adenosine receptors, may have clinical importance for the prevention of photoreceptor, neuronal, and microvascular cell death in diabetic retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma, respectively, for the clearance of retinal edema, and the inhibition of dysregulated cell proliferation in proliferative retinopathies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:25998275

  13. Branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sadaf; Mirza, Sajid Ali; Shokh, Ishrat

    2008-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusions (RVO) are the second commonest sight threatening vascular disorder. Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) are the two basic types of vein occlusion. Branch retinal vein occlusion is three times more common than central retinal vein occlusion and- second only to diabetic retinopathy as the most common retinal vascular cause of visual loss. The origin of branch retinal vein occlusion undoubtedly includes both systemic factors such as hypertension and local anatomic factors such as arteriovenous crossings. Branch retinal vein occlusion causes a painless decrease in vision, resulting in misty or distorted vision. Current treatment options don't address the underlying aetiology of branch retinal vein occlusion. Instead they focus on treating sequelae of the occluded venous branch, such as macular oedema, vitreous haemorrhage and traction retinal detachment from neovascularization. Evidences suggest that the pathogenesis of various types of retinal vein occlusion, like many other ocular vascular occlusive disorders, is a multifactorial process and there is no single magic bullet that causes retinal vein occlusion. A comprehensive management of patients with retinal vascular occlusions is necessary to correct associated diseases or predisposing abnormalities that could lead to local recurrences or systemic event. Along with a review of the literature, a practical approach for the management of retinal vascular occlusions is required, which requires collaboration between the ophthalmologist and other physicians: general practitioner, cardiologist, internist etc. as appropriate according to each case. PMID:19385476

  14. Osteocyte-Driven Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Bellido, Teresita

    2013-01-01

    Osteocytes, the most abundant cells in bone, have been long postulated to detect and respond to mechanical and hormonal stimuli and to coordinate the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The discovery that the inhibitor of bone formation sclerostin is primarily expressed in osteocytes in bone and it is downregulated by anabolic stimuli provided a mechanism by which osteocytes influence the activity of osteoblasts. Advances of the last few years provided experimental evidence demonstrating that osteocytes also participate in the recruitment of osteoclasts and the initiation of bone remodeling. Apoptotic osteocytes trigger yet to be identified signals that attract osteoclast precursors to specific areas of bone, which in turn differentiate to mature, bone resorbing osteoclasts. Osteocytes are also the source of molecules that regulate generation and activity of osteoclasts, such as OPG and RANKL; and genetic manipulations of the mouse genome leading to loss or gain of function, or to altered expression of either molecule in osteocytes, markedly affect bone resorption. This review highlights these investigations and discusses how the novel concept of osteocyte-driven bone resorption and formation impacts our understanding of the mechanisms by which current therapies control bone remodeling. PMID:24002178

  15. Crude Saponins of Panax notoginseng Have Neuroprotective Effects To Inhibit Palmitate-Triggered Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Apoptosis and Loss of Postsynaptic Proteins in Staurosporine Differentiated RGC-5 Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-dan; Zhu, Hua-zhang; Li, Shi-wei; Yang, Jia-ming; Xiao, Yang; Kang, Qiang-rong; Li, Chen-yang; Zhao, Yun-shi; Zeng, Yong; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jian; He, Zhen-dan; Ying, Ying

    2016-02-24

    Increased apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) contributes to the gradual loss of retinal neurons at the early phase of diabetic retinopathy (DR). There is an urgent need to search for drugs with neuroprotective effects against apoptosis of RGCs for the early treatment of DR. This study aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of saponins extracted from Panax notoginseng, a traditional Chinese medicine, on apoptosis of RGCs stimulated by palmitate, a metabolic factor for the development of diabetes and its complications, and to explore the potential molecular mechanism. We showed that crude saponins of P. notoginseng (CSPN) inhibited the increased apoptosis and loss of postsynaptic protein PSD-95 by palmitate in staurosporine-differentiated RGC-5 cells. Moreover, CSPN suppressed palmitate-induced reactive oxygen species generation and endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP and caspase 12 pathways. Thus, our findings address the potential therapeutic significance of CSPN for the early stage of DR. PMID:26832452

  16. Genetic pediatric retinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Say, Emil Anthony T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary pediatric retinal diseases are a diverse group of disorders with pathologies affecting different cellular structures or retinal development. Many can mimic typical pediatric retinal disease such as retinopathy of prematurity, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema. Multisystem involvement is frequently seen in hereditary pediatric retinal disease. A thorough history coupled with a good physical examination can oftentimes lead the ophthalmologist or pediatrician to the correct genetic test and correct diagnosis. In some instances, evaluation of parents or siblings may be required to determine familial involvement when the history is inconclusive or insufficient and clinical suspicion is high.

  17. Retinal prosthetics, optogenetics, and chemical photoswitches.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert; Pfeiffer, Rebecca; Jones, Bryan

    2014-10-15

    Three technologies have emerged as therapies to restore light sensing to profoundly blind patients suffering from late-stage retinal degenerations: (1) retinal prosthetics, (2) optogenetics, and (3) chemical photoswitches. Prosthetics are the most mature and the only approach in clinical practice. Prosthetic implants require complex surgical intervention and provide only limited visual resolution but can potentially restore navigational ability to many blind patients. Optogenetics uses viral delivery of type 1 opsin genes from prokaryotes or eukaryote algae to restore light responses in survivor neurons. Targeting and expression remain major problems, but are potentially soluble. Importantly, optogenetics could provide the ultimate in high-resolution vision due to the long persistence of gene expression achieved in animal models. Nevertheless, optogenetics remains challenging to implement in human eyes with large volumes, complex disease progression, and physical barriers to viral penetration. Now, a new generation of photochromic ligands or chemical photoswitches (azobenzene-quaternary ammonium derivatives) can be injected into a degenerated mouse eye and, in minutes to hours, activate light responses in neurons. These photoswitches offer the potential for rapidly and reversibly screening the vision restoration expected in an individual patient. Chemical photoswitch variants that persist in the cell membrane could make them a simple therapy of choice, with resolution and sensitivity equivalent to optogenetics approaches. A major complexity in treating retinal degenerations is retinal remodeling: pathologic network rewiring, molecular reprogramming, and cell death that compromise signaling in the surviving retina. Remodeling forces a choice between upstream and downstream targeting, each engaging different benefits and defects. Prosthetics and optogenetics can be implemented in either mode, but the use of chemical photoswitches is currently limited to downstream

  18. Retinal Prosthetics, Optogenetics, and Chemical Photoswitches

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Three technologies have emerged as therapies to restore light sensing to profoundly blind patients suffering from late-stage retinal degenerations: (1) retinal prosthetics, (2) optogenetics, and (3) chemical photoswitches. Prosthetics are the most mature and the only approach in clinical practice. Prosthetic implants require complex surgical intervention and provide only limited visual resolution but can potentially restore navigational ability to many blind patients. Optogenetics uses viral delivery of type 1 opsin genes from prokaryotes or eukaryote algae to restore light responses in survivor neurons. Targeting and expression remain major problems, but are potentially soluble. Importantly, optogenetics could provide the ultimate in high-resolution vision due to the long persistence of gene expression achieved in animal models. Nevertheless, optogenetics remains challenging to implement in human eyes with large volumes, complex disease progression, and physical barriers to viral penetration. Now, a new generation of photochromic ligands or chemical photoswitches (azobenzene-quaternary ammonium derivatives) can be injected into a degenerated mouse eye and, in minutes to hours, activate light responses in neurons. These photoswitches offer the potential for rapidly and reversibly screening the vision restoration expected in an individual patient. Chemical photoswitch variants that persist in the cell membrane could make them a simple therapy of choice, with resolution and sensitivity equivalent to optogenetics approaches. A major complexity in treating retinal degenerations is retinal remodeling: pathologic network rewiring, molecular reprogramming, and cell death that compromise signaling in the surviving retina. Remodeling forces a choice between upstream and downstream targeting, each engaging different benefits and defects. Prosthetics and optogenetics can be implemented in either mode, but the use of chemical photoswitches is currently limited to downstream

  19. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retinitis pigmentosa retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of related eye disorders that ...

  20. The retinal ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Adams, N A; Awadein, Ahmed; Toma, Hassanain S

    2007-09-01

    While the functions of many of the proteins located in or associated with the photoreceptor cilia are poorly understood, disruption of the function of these proteins may result in a wide variety of phenotypes ranging from isolated retinal degeneration to more pleiotropic phenotypes. Systemic findings include neurosensory hearing loss, developmental delay, situs-inversus, infertility, disorders of limb and digit development, obesity, kidney disease, liver disease, and respiratory disease. The concept of "retinal ciliopathies" brings to attention the importance of further molecular analysis of this organelle as well as provides a potential common target for therapies for these disorders. The retinal ciliopathies include retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, cone-dystrophy, cone-rod dystrophy, Leber congenital amaurosis, as well as retinal degenerations associated with Usher syndrome, primary ciliary dyskinesia, Senior-Loken syndrome, Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Laurence-Moon syndrome, McKusick-Kaufman syndrome, and Biemond syndrome. Mutations for these disorders have been found in retinitis pigmentosa-1 (RP1), retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR), retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein (RPGR-IP), as well as the Usher, Bardet-Biedl, and nephronophthisis genes. Other systemic disorders associated with retinal degenerations that may also involve ciliary abnormalities include: Alstrom, Edwards-Sethi, Ellis-van Creveld, Jeune, Meckel-Gruber, Orofaciodigital Type 9, and Gurrieri syndromes. Understanding these conditions as ciliopathies may help the ophthalmologist to recognize associations between seemingly unrelated diseases and have a high degree of suspicion that a systemic finding may be present. PMID:17896309

  1. VANISHING RETINAL DETACHMENT

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe a case of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in the setting of chronic kidney disease that exhibited complete retinal reattachment after serial hemodialysis. Methods: Retrospective case report. Results: A 58-year-old woman with acute vision loss was found to have a macula-involving rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Due to chronic kidney disease, she continued with routinely scheduled hemodialysis for 1 week until surgical clearance was obtained. Preoperative examination revealed complete reattachment of the retina with a persistent retinal tear. Barrier laser was applied to the tear and the retina remained attached until the most recent follow-up 8 months later. The workup of alternate etiologies was unrevealing. Conclusion: This case describes a temporal association between hemodialysis and resolution of subretinal fluid due to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. A potential causal linkage is suggested based on shifting fluid dynamics associated with hemodialysis. A shift in treatment paradigm is not advised. PMID:26352323

  2. Immunoregulation of bone remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajai; Mehdi, Abbass A; Srivastava, Rajeshwer N; Verma, Nar Singh

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling, a continuous physiological process maintains the strength of the bones, which maintains a delicate balance between bone formation and resorption process. This review gives an insight to the complex interaction and correlation between the bone remodeling and the corresponding changes in host immunological environment and also summarises the most recent developments occuring in the understanding of this complex field. T cells, both directly and indirectly increase the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand (RANKL); a vital step in the activation of osteoclasts, thus positively regulates the osteoclastogenesis. Though various cytokines, chemikines, transcription factors and co-stimulatory molecules are shared by both skeletal and immune systems, but researches are being conducted to establish and analyse their role and / or control on this complex but vital process. The understanding of this part of research may open new horizons in the management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, resulting into bone loss and that of osteoporosis also. PMID:22837895

  3. Triggering Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  4. Perspectives on biomechanical growth and remodeling mechanisms in glaucoma⋆

    PubMed Central

    Grytz, Rafael; Girkin, Christopher A.; Libertiaux, Vincent; Downs, J. Crawford

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma is a blinding diseases in which damage to the axons results in loss of retinal ganglion cells. Experimental evidence indicates that chronic intraocular pressure elevation initiates axonal insult at the level of the lamina cribrosa. The lamina cribrosa is a porous collagen structure through which the axons pass on their path from the retina to the brain. Recent experimental studies revealed the extensive structural changes of the lamina cribrosa and its surrounding tissues during the development and progression of glaucoma. In this perspective paper we review the experimental evidence for growth and remodeling mechanisms in glaucoma including adaptation of tissue anisotropy, tissue thickening/thinning, tissue elongation/shortening and tissue migration. We discuss the existing predictive computational approaches that try to elucidate the potential biomechanical basis of theses growth and remodeling mechanisms and highlight open questions, challenges, and avenues for further development. PMID:23109748

  5. Remodeling and Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigueza, Wendi V.; Williams, Kevin Jon; Rothblat, George H.; Phillips, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    In normal physiology, cells are exposed to cholesterol acceptors of different sizes simultaneously. The current study examined the possible interactions between two different classes of acceptors, one large (large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles, LUVs) and one small (HDL or other small acceptors), added separately or in combination to Fu5AH rat hepatoma cells. During a 24-hour incubation, LUVs of palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine at 1 mg phospholipid (PL) per milliliter extracted ≈20% of cellular unesterified cholesterol (UC) label and mass in a slow, continuous fashion (half-time [t½] for UC efflux was ≈50 hours) and human HDL3 at 25 μg PL per milliliter extracted ≈15% cellular UC label with no change in cellular cholesterol mass (t½ of ≈8 hours). In contrast, the combination of LUVs and HDL3 extracted over 90% of UC label (t½ of ≈4 hours) and ≈50% of the UC mass, indicating synergy. To explain this synergy, specific particle interactions were examined, namely, remodeling, in which the two acceptors alter each other’s composition and thus the ability to mobilize cellular cholesterol, and shuttling, in which the small acceptor ferries cholesterol from cells to the large acceptor. To examine remodeling, LUVs and HDL were coincubated and reisolated before application to cells. This HDL became UC depleted, PL enriched, and lost a small amount of apolipoprotein A-I. Compared with equivalent numbers of control HDL particles, remodeled HDL caused faster efflux (t½ ≈4 hours) and exhibited a greater capacity to sequester cellular cholesterol over 24 hours (≈38% versus ≈15% for control HDL), consistent with their enrichment in PL. Remodeled LUVs still extracted ≈20% of cellular UC. Thus, remodeling accounted for some but not all of the synergy between LUVs and HDL. To examine shuttling, several approaches were used. First, reisolation of particles after an 8-hour exposure to cells revealed that HDL contained very little of the cellular UC

  6. Differential Diagnosis of Retinal Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M.; Herbort, Carl P.; Tabbara, Khalid F.

    2009-01-01

    Retinal vaculitis is a sight-threatening inflammatory eye condition that involves the retinal vessels. Detection of retinal vasculitis is made clinically, and confirmed with the help of fundus fluorescein angiography. Active vascular disease is characterized by exudates around retinal vessels resulting in white sheathing or cuffing of the affected vessels. In this review, a practical approach to the diagnosis of retinal vasculitis is discussed based on ophthalmoscopic and fundus fluorescein angiographic findings. PMID:20404987

  7. Retinal vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Otani, Atsushi; Friedlander, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the potential use of stem cells for therapeutic angiogenesis in the treatment of retinal diseases. We demonstrate that the clinical utility of these EPC may be not limited in the treatment of ischemic retinal diseases but may also have application for the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders and for a form of cell-based gene therapy. One of the greatest potential benefits of bone marrow derived EPC therapy is the possible use of autologous grafts. Nonetheless, potential toxicities and unregulated cell growth will need to be carefully evaluated before this approach is brought to the clinics. PMID:15804843

  8. Remodeling with the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Bodzin, S.

    1997-05-01

    Remodeling is the perfect time to improve daylighting, direct gain heating and shading with passive solar techniques. It can also provide the best opportunity to add solar water heating or even photoboltaics to a home. This article describes addition of such energy efficient plans to a home in terms of what is needed and what the benefits are: adding windows, North glass, east and west glass, south glass, daylighting, the roof, shingles and roofing tiles, walls and floors, solar hot water, photovoltaics. Two side bars discuss the sunplace: a passive solar room and angles and overhangs.

  9. Retinal compensatory changes after light damage in albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Montalbán-Soler, Luis; Alarcón-Martínez, Luis; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Galindo-Romero, Caridad; Bezerra de Sá, Fabrízio; García-Ayuso, Diego; Avilés-Trigueros, Marcelino; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the anatomic and functional changes triggered by light exposure in the albino mouse retina and compare them with those observed in the albino rat. Methods BALB/c albino mice were exposed to 3,000 lx of white light during 24 h and their retinas analyzed from 1 to 180 days after light exposure (ALE). Left pupil mydriasis was induced with topical atropine. Retinal function was analyzed by electroretinographic (ERG) recording. To assess retinal degeneration, hematoxylin and eosin staining, the TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) technique, and quantitative immunohistofluorescence for synaptophysin and protein kinase Cα (PKCα) were used in cross sections. Intravenous injection of horseradish peroxidase and Fluoro-Gold™ tracing were used in whole-mounted retinas to study the retinal vasculature and the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) population, respectively. Results Light exposure caused apoptotic photoreceptor death in the central retina. This death was more severe in the dorsal than in the ventral retina, sparing the periphery. Neither retinal vascular leakage nor retinal ganglion cell death was observed ALE. The electroretinographic a-wave was permanently impaired, while the b-wave decreased but recovered gradually by 180 days ALE. The scotopic threshold responses, associated with the inner retinal function, diminished at first but recovered completely by 14 days ALE. This functional recovery was concomitant with the upregulation of protein kinase Cα and synaptophysin. Similar results were obtained in both eyes, irrespective of mydriasis. Conclusions In albino mice, light exposure induces substantial retinal damage, but the surviving photoreceptors, together with compensatory morphological/molecular changes, allow an important restoration of the retinal function. PMID:22509098

  10. Retinal vein occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Berrocal MH, Rodriguez FJ, et al. Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group (PACORES). Comparison of two doses ... retinal vein occlusion: results from the Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group at 6 months of follow- ...

  11. [Acute retinal necrosis].

    PubMed

    Lucke, K; Reinking, U; el-Hifnawi, E; Dennin, R H; Laqua, H

    1988-12-01

    The authors report on three patients with acute retinal necrosis who were treated with the virostatic agent Acyclovir and who underwent vitreoretinal surgery with silicone oil filling for total retinal detachment. In two eyes the retina was reattached, but useful vision was only preserved in one patient. Titers from blood and the vitreous, as well as microscopic findings in retinal biopsies, support the view that the necrosis is caused by a herpes simplex virus infection. After therapy with Acyclovir was instituted no further progression on the necrosis was observed. However, the development of retinal detachment could not be prevented. Early diagnosis and antiviral therapy are essential to improve the otherwise poor prognosis in this rare syndrome. PMID:3221657

  12. The Unfolded Protein Response in Retinal Vascular Diseases: Implications and Therapeutic Potential Beyond Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sarah X.; Ma, Jacey H.; Bhatta, Maulasri; Fliesler, Steven J.; Wang, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex, step-wise process of new vessel formation that is involved in both normal embryonic development as well as postnatal pathological processes, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Aberrant blood vessel growth, also known as neovascularization, in the retina and the choroid is a major cause of vision loss in severe eye diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, retinopathy of prematurity, and central and branch retinal vein occlusion. Yet, retinal neovascularization is causally and dynamically associated with vasodegeneration, ischemia, and vascular remodeling in retinal tissues. Understanding the mechanisms of retinal neovascularization is an urgent unmet need for developing new treatments for these devastating diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests a vital role for the unfolded protein response (UPR) in regulation of angiogenesis, in part through coordinating the secretion of pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as VEGF, and modulating endothelial cell survival and activity. Herein, we summarize current research in the context of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and UPR signaling in retinal angiogenesis and vascular remodeling, highlighting potential implications of targeting these stress response pathways in the prevention and treatment of retinal vascular diseases that result in visual deficits and blindness. PMID:25529848

  13. Retinal detachment in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Poole, T A; Obstbaum, S A

    1979-07-01

    In a series of cataract patients excluding myopic individuals, under age 60 years, and cases in which vitreous loss occurred, retinal detachment was no less frequent after intracapsular cataract extraction and Sputnik iris supported lenses than in controls. Both groups were followed up for a minimum of two years. The detachments predominantly occurred from retinal breaks in areas of the retina that looked normal preoperatively. PMID:464014

  14. Giant retinal tears.

    PubMed

    Shunmugam, Manoharan; Ang, Ghee Soon; Lois, Noemi

    2014-01-01

    A giant retinal tear (GRT) is a full-thickness neurosensory retinal break that extends circumferentially around the retina for three or more clock hours in the presence of a posteriorly detached vitreous. Its incidence in large population-based studies has been estimated as 1.5% of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments, with a significant male preponderance, and bilaterality in 12.8%. Most GRTs are idiopathic, with trauma, hereditary vitreoretinopathies and high myopia each being causative in decreasing frequency. The vast majority of GRTs are currently managed with a pars plana vitrectomy; the use of adjunctive circumferential scleral buckling is debated, but no studies have shown a clear anatomical or visual advantage with its use. Similarly, silicone oil tamponade does not influence long-term outcomes when compared with gas. Primary and final retinal reattachment rates are achieved in 88% and 95% of patients, respectively. Even when the retina remains attached, however, visual recovery may be limited. Furthermore, fellow eyes of patients with a GRT are at higher risk of developing retinal tears and retinal detachment. Prophylactic treatment under these circumstances may be considered but there is no firm evidence of its efficacy at the present time. PMID:24138895

  15. Astrocytes and Müller Cell Alterations During Retinal Degeneration in a Transgenic Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Campello, Laura; Pinilla, Isabel; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa includes a group of progressive retinal degenerative diseases that affect the structure and function of photoreceptors. Secondarily to the loss of photoreceptors, there is a reduction in retinal vascularization, which seems to influence the cellular degenerative process. Retinal macroglial cells, astrocytes, and Müller cells provide support for retinal neurons and are fundamental for maintaining normal retinal function. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of macroglial changes during retinal degeneration in P23H rats. Methods: Homozygous P23H line-3 rats aged from P18 to 18 months were used to study the evolution of the disease, and SD rats were used as controls. Immunolabeling with antibodies against GFAP, vimentin, and transducin were used to visualize macroglial cells and cone photoreceptors. Results: In P23H rats, increased GFAP labeling in Müller cells was observed as an early indicator of retinal gliosis. At 4 and 12 months of age, the apical processes of Müller cells in P23H rats clustered in firework-like structures, which were associated with ring-like shaped areas of cone degeneration in the outer nuclear layer. These structures were not observed at 16 months of age. The number of astrocytes was higher in P23H rats than in the SD matched controls at 4 and 12 months of age, supporting the idea of astrocyte proliferation. As the disease progressed, astrocytes exhibited a deteriorated morphology and marked hypertrophy. The increase in the complexity of the astrocytic processes correlated with greater connexin 43 expression and higher density of connexin 43 immunoreactive puncta within the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of P23H vs. SD rat retinas. Conclusions: In the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa, the loss of photoreceptors triggers major changes in the number and morphology of glial cells affecting the inner retina. PMID:26733810

  16. PARP1 Gene Knock-Out Increases Resistance to Retinal Degeneration without Affecting Retinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Sahaboglu, Ayse; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Kaur, Jasvir; Sancho-Pelluz, Javier; Huber, Gesine; Fahl, Edda; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca; Zrenner, Eberhart; Ekström, Per; Löwenheim, Hubert; Seeliger, Mathias; Paquet-Durand, François

    2010-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases affecting photoreceptors and causing blindness in humans. Previously, excessive activation of enzymes belonging to the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) group was shown to be involved in photoreceptor degeneration in the human homologous rd1 mouse model for RP. Since there are at least 16 different PARP isoforms, we investigated the exact relevance of the predominant isoform - PARP1 - for photoreceptor cell death using PARP1 knock-out (KO) mice. In vivo and ex vivo morphological analysis using optic coherence tomography (OCT) and conventional histology revealed no major alterations of retinal phenotype when compared to wild-type (wt). Likewise, retinal function as assessed by electroretinography (ERG) was normal in PARP1 KO animals. We then used retinal explant cultures derived from wt, rd1, and PARP1 KO animals to test their susceptibility to chemically induced photoreceptor degeneration. Since photoreceptor degeneration in the rd1 retina is triggered by a loss-of-function in phosphodiesterase-6 (PDE6), we used selective PDE6 inhibition to emulate the rd1 situation on non-rd1 genotypes. While wt retina subjected to PDE6 inhibition showed massive photoreceptor degeneration comparable to rd1 retina, in the PARP1 KO situation, cell death was robustly reduced. Together, these findings demonstrate that PARP1 activity is in principle dispensable for normal retinal function, but is of major importance for photoreceptor degeneration under pathological conditions. Moreover, our results suggest that PARP dependent cell death or PARthanatos may play a major role in retinal degeneration and highlight the possibility to use specific PARP inhibitors for the treatment of RP. PMID:21124852

  17. To Remodel or To Build?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Todd

    2009-01-01

    The question of remodeling an existing house to make it wheelchair accessible or building a new barrier-free house is a difficult decision. This article presents some initial questions and considerations followed by a list of pros and cons for remodeling an existing house vs. building a new house.

  18. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids. PMID:27511757

  19. No-Regrets Remodeling, 2nd Edition

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    No-Regrets Remodeling, sponsored by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is an informative publication that walks homeowners and/or remodelers through various home remodeling projects. In addition to remodeling information, the publication provides instruction on how to incorporate energy efficiency into the remodeling process. The goal of the publication is to improve homeowner satisfaction after completing a remodeling project and to provide the homeowner with a home that saves energy and is comfortable and healthy.

  20. Therapeutic Approaches to Histone Reprogramming in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent data have revealed epigenetic derangements and subsequent chromatin remodeling as a potent biologic switch for chronic inflammation and cell survival which are important therapeutic targets in the pathogenesis of several retinal degenerations. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a major component of this system and serve as a unique control of the chromatin remodeling process. With a multitude of targeted HDAC inhibitors now available, their use in both basic science and clinical studies has widened substantially. In the field of ocular biology, there are data to suggest that HDAC inhibition may suppress neovascularization and may be a possible treatment for retinitis pigmentosa and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the effects of these inhibitors on cell survival and chemokine expression in the chorioretinal tissues remain very unclear. Here, we review the multifaceted biology of HDAC activity and pharmacologic inhibition while offering further insight into the importance of this epigenetic pathway in retinal degenerations. Our laboratory investigations aim to open translational avenues to advance dry AMD therapeutics while exploring the role of acetylation on inflammatory gene expression in the aging and degenerating retina. PMID:26427391

  1. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  2. The Effect of Inital-Phase Bone Remodeling on Implant Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Ting; Oh, Tae-Ju; Rudek, Ivan; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2016-01-01

    This case series aimed to investigate the initial-phase bone remodeling during implant wound healing and to discuss the possible contributing factors. A total of 11 implants with polished collars were placed in premaxillary regions via flapless approach with the aid of computer technology. After 15 months of follow-up, the results suggested that the presence of polished collars triggered bone resorption via a bone remodeling mechanism. The overall vertical crestal resorption was 0.78 ± 0.46 mm on average. This initial-phase bone remodeling primarily occurred within the first 3 months postoperatively. The slightly exposed polished collar may not worsen crestal bone level. PMID:27560679

  3. Chromatin remodeling in cardiovascular development and physiology

    PubMed Central

    Han, Pei; Hang, Calvin T.; Yang, Jin; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin regulation provides an important means of controlling cardiac gene expression under different physiological and pathological conditions. Processes that direct the development of normal embryonic hearts and pathology of stressed adult hearts may share general mechanisms that govern cardiac gene expression by chromatin-regulating factors. These common mechanisms may provide a framework for us to investigate the interactions among diverse chromatin remodelers/modifiers and various transcription factors in the fine regulation of gene expression, essential for all aspects of cardiovascular biology. Aberrant cardiac gene expression, triggered by a variety of pathological insults, can cause heart diseases in both animals and humans. The severity of cardiomyopathy and heart failure correlates strongly with abnormal cardiac gene expression. Therefore, controlling cardiac gene expression presents a promising approach to the treatment of human cardiomyopathy. This review focuses on the roles of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factors and chromatin-modifying enzymes in the control of gene expression during cardiovascular development and disease. PMID:21293009

  4. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  5. Tickling the retina: integration of subthreshold electrical pulses can activate retinal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, S.; Jalligampala, A.; Zrenner, E.; Rathbun, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The field of retinal prosthetics has made major progress over the last decade, restoring visual percepts to people suffering from retinitis pigmentosa. The stimulation pulses used by present implants are suprathreshold, meaning individual pulses are designed to activate the retina. In this paper we explore subthreshold pulse sequences as an alternate stimulation paradigm. Subthreshold pulses have the potential to address important open problems such as fading of visual percepts when patients are stimulated at moderate pulse repetition rates and the difficulty in preferentially stimulating different retinal pathways. Approach. As a first step in addressing these issues we used Gaussian white noise electrical stimulation combined with spike-triggered averaging to interrogate whether a subthreshold sequence of pulses can be used to activate the mouse retina. Main results. We demonstrate that the retinal network can integrate multiple subthreshold electrical stimuli under an experimental paradigm immediately relevant to retinal prostheses. Furthermore, these characteristic stimulus sequences varied in their shape and integration window length across the population of retinal ganglion cells. Significance. Because the subthreshold sequences activate the retina at stimulation rates that would typically induce strong fading (25 Hz), such retinal ‘tickling’ has the potential to minimize the fading problem. Furthermore, the diversity found across the cell population in characteristic pulse sequences suggests that these sequences could be used to selectively address the different retinal pathways (e.g. ON versus OFF). Both of these outcomes may significantly improve visual perception in retinal implant patients.

  6. Firearm trigger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  7. Retinal profile and structural differences between myopes and emmetropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Christopher Anderson

    Refractive development has been shown to be influenced by optical defocus in the eye and the interpretation of this signal appears to be localized in the retina. Optical defocus is not uniform across the retina and has been suggested as a potential cause of myopia development. Specifically hyperopic focus, i.e. focusing light behind the retina, may signal the eye to elongate, causing myopia. This non-uniform hyperopic signal appears to be due to the retinal shape. Ultimately, these signals are detected by the retina in an as yet undetermined manner. The purpose of this thesis is to examine the retinal profile using a novel method developed at Indiana University and then to examine retinal structural changes across the retina associated with myopia. Myopes exhibited more prolate retinas than hyperopes/emmetropes using the SD OCT. Using the SD OCT, this profile difference was detectable starting at 5 degrees from the fovea, which was closer than previously reported in the literature. These results agreed significantly with results found from peripheral refraction and peripheral axial length at 10 degrees. Overall, the total retina was thinner for myopes than hyperopes/emmetropes. It was also statistically significantly thinner for the Outer Nuclear Layer (ONL), Inner Nuclear Layer (INL) and Outer Plexiform Layer (OPL) but not for other retinal layers such as the Ganglion Layer. Thinning generally occurred outside of 5 degrees. The SD OCT method provided a nearly 10 fold increase in sensitivity which allowed for detection of profile changes closer to the fovea. The location of the retinal changes may be interesting as the layers that showed significant differences in thickness are also layers that contain cells believed to be associated with refractive development (amacrine, bipolar, and photoreceptor cells.) The reason for the retinal changes cannot be determined with this study, but possible theories include stretch due to axial elongation, neural remodeling due to

  8. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  9. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Beach, James

    2014-01-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry. PMID:25237591

  10. Redox regulation of vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Ashley, Euan A; Ali, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is a dynamic process of structural and functional changes in response to biochemical and biomechanical signals in a complex in vivo milieu. While inherently adaptive, dysregulation leads to maladaptive remodeling. Reactive oxygen species participate in homeostatic cell signaling in tightly regulated- and compartmentalized cellular circuits. It is well established that perturbations in oxidation-reduction (redox) homeostasis can lead to a state of oxidative-, and more recently, reductive stress. We provide an overview of the redox signaling in the vasculature and review the role of oxidative- and reductive stress in maladaptive vascular remodeling. Particular emphasis has been placed on essential processes that determine phenotype modulation, migration and fate of the main cell types in the vessel wall. Recent advances in systems biology and the translational opportunities they may provide to specifically target the redox pathways driving pathological vascular remodeling are discussed. PMID:26483132

  11. Plant cell remodeling by autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jimi; Lee, Han Nim; Chung, Taijoon

    2014-01-01

    Plant seedlings are not photoautotrophs until they are equipped with photosynthetic machinery. Some plant cells are remodeled after being exposed to light, and a group of peroxisomal proteins are degraded during the remodeling. Autophagy was proposed as one of the mechanisms for the degradation of peroxisomal proteins. We recently showed that ATG7-dependent autophagy is partially responsible for the degradation of obsolete peroxisomal proteins during Arabidopsis seedling growth. PMID:24492493

  12. The Rate of Vitamin A Dimerization in Lipofuscinogenesis, Fundus Autofluorescence, Retinal Senescence and Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Washington, Ilyas; Saad, Leonide

    2016-01-01

    One of the earliest events preceding several forms of retinal degeneration is the formation and accumulation of vitamin A dimers in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and underlying Bruch's membrane (BM). Such degenerations include Stargardt disease, Best disease, forms of retinitis pigmentosa, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since their discovery in the 1990's, dimers of vitamin A, have been postulated as chemical triggers driving retinal senescence and degeneration. There is evidence to suggest that the rate at which vitamin A dimerizes and the eye's response to the dimerization products may dictate the retina's lifespan. Here, we present outstanding questions, finding the answers to which may help to elucidate the role of vitamin A dimerization in retinal degeneration. PMID:26427431

  13. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  14. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  15. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  16. Dynamics of lung defense in pneumonia: resistance, resilience, and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Quinton, Lee J; Mizgerd, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is initiated by microbes in the lung, but physiological processes integrating responses across diverse cell types and organ systems dictate the outcome of respiratory infection. Resistance, or actions of the host to eradicate living microbes, in the lungs involves a combination of innate and adaptive immune responses triggered by air-space infection. Resilience, or the ability of the host tissues to withstand the physiologically damaging effects of microbial and immune activities, is equally complex, precisely regulated, and determinative. Both immune resistance and tissue resilience are dynamic and change throughout the lifetime, but we are only beginning to understand such remodeling and how it contributes to the incidence of severe pneumonias, which diminishes as childhood progresses and then increases again among the elderly. Here, we review the concepts of resistance, resilience, and remodeling as they apply to pneumonia, highlighting recent advances and current significant knowledge gaps. PMID:25148693

  17. Dynamics of Lung Defense in Pneumonia: Resistance, Resilience, and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Quinton, Lee J.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is initiated by microbes in the lung, but physiological processes integrating responses across diverse cell types and organ systems dictate the outcome of respiratory infection. Resistance, or actions of the host to eradicate living microbes, in the lungs involves a combination of innate and adaptive immune responses triggered by air-space infection. Resilience, or the ability of the host tissues to withstand the physiologically damaging effects of microbial and immune activities, is equally complex, precisely regulated, and determinative. Both immune resistance and tissue resilience are dynamic and change throughout the lifetime, but we are only beginning to understand such remodeling and how it contributes to the incidence of severe pneumonias, which diminishes as childhood progresses and then increases again among the elderly. Here, we review the concepts of resistance, resilience, and remodeling as they apply to pneumonia, highlighting recent advances and current significant knowledge gaps. PMID:25148693

  18. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  19. [News in Retinal Imaging].

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, R; Schmidl, D; Garhöfer, G; Schmetterer, L

    2015-09-01

    New developments in retinal imaging have revolutionised ophthalmology in recent years. In particular, optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides highly resolved and well reproducible images and has rung in a new era in ophthalmological imaging. The technology was introduced in the early 1990 s, and has rapidly developed. There have been improvements in resolution, sensitivity and processing speed. There have also been developments in functional processing. OCT angiography is the first application in routine clinical work. PMID:26372783

  20. Rapid Hebbian axonal remodeling mediated by visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Munz, Martin; Gobert, Delphine; Schohl, Anne; Poquérusse, Jessie; Podgorski, Kaspar; Spratt, Perry; Ruthazer, Edward S

    2014-05-23

    We examined how correlated firing controls axon remodeling, using in vivo time-lapse imaging and electrophysiological analysis of individual retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons that were visually stimulated either synchronously or asynchronously relative to neighboring inputs in the Xenopus laevis optic tectum. RGCs stimulated out of synchrony rapidly lost the ability to drive tectal postsynaptic partners while their axons grew and added many new branches. In contrast, synchronously activated RGCs produced fewer new branches, but these were more stable. The effects of synchronous activation were prevented by the inhibition of neurotransmitter release and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade, which is consistent with a role for synaptic NMDAR activation in the stabilization of axonal branches and suppression of further exploratory branch addition. PMID:24855269

  1. A secreted bacterial protease tailors the Staphylococcus aureus virulence repertoire to modulate bone remodeling during osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Cassat, James E.; Hammer, Neal D.; Campbell, J. Preston; Benson, Meredith A.; Perrien, Daniel S.; Mrak, Lara N.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Torres, Victor J.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Osteomyelitis is a common manifestation of invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection. Pathogen-induced bone destruction limits antimicrobial penetration to the infectious focus and compromises treatment of osteomyelitis. To investigate mechanisms of S. aureus-induced bone destruction, we developed a murine model of osteomyelitis. Micro-computed tomography of infected femurs revealed that S. aureus triggers profound alterations in bone turnover. The bacterial regulatory locus sae was found to be critical for osteomyelitis pathogenesis, as Sae-regulated factors promote pathologic bone remodeling and intraosseous bacterial survival. Exoproteome analyses revealed the Sae-regulated protease aureolysin as a major determinant of the S. aureus secretome and identified the phenol soluble modulins as aureolysin-degraded, osteolytic peptides that trigger osteoblast cell death and bone destruction. These studies establish a murine model for pathogen-induced bone remodeling, define Sae as critical for osteomyelitis pathogenesis, and identify protease-dependent exoproteome remodeling as a major determinant of the staphylococcal virulence repertoire. PMID:23768499

  2. Air pollution and adverse cardiac remodeling: clinical effects and basic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yonggang; Goodson, Jamie M.; Zhang, Bo; Chin, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has long been known to trigger cardiovascular events, primarily through activation of local and systemic inflammatory pathways that affect the vasculature. Detrimental effects of air pollution exposure on heart failure and cardiac remodeling have also been described in human populations. Recent studies in both human subjects and animal models have provided insights into the basic physiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms that play a role in adverse cardiac remodeling. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between air pollution and cardiovascular disease, describe the clinical effects of air pollution exposure on cardiac remodeling, describe the basic mechanisms that affect remodeling as described in human and animal systems and will discuss future areas of investigation. PMID:26042051

  3. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  4. Retinal Thickening and Photoreceptor Loss in HIV Eyes without Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Arcinue, Cheryl A.; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; El-Emam, Sharif Y.; Ma, Feiyan; Doede, Aubrey; Sharpsten, Lucie; Gomez, Maria Laura; Freeman, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the presence of structural changes in HIV retinae (i.e., photoreceptor density and retinal thickness in the macula) compared with age-matched HIV-negative controls. Methods Cohort of patients with known HIV under CART (combination Antiretroviral Therapy) treatment were examined with a flood-illuminated retinal AO camera to assess the cone photoreceptor mosaic and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to assess retinal layers and retinal thickness. Results Twenty-four eyes of 12 patients (n = 6 HIV-positive and 6 HIV-negative) were imaged with the adaptive optics camera. In each of the regions of interest studied (nasal, temporal, superior, inferior), the HIV group had significantly less mean cone photoreceptor density compared with age-matched controls (difference range, 4,308–6,872 cones/mm2). A different subset of forty eyes of 20 patients (n = 10 HIV-positive and 10 HIV-negative) was included in the retinal thickness measurements and retinal layer segmentation with the SD-OCT. We observed significant thickening in HIV positive eyes in the total retinal thickness at the foveal center, and in each of the three horizontal B-scans (through the macular center, superior, and inferior to the fovea). We also noted that the inner retina (combined thickness from ILM through RNFL to GCL layer) was also significantly thickened in all the different locations scanned compared with HIV-negative controls. Conclusion Our present study shows that the cone photoreceptor density is significantly reduced in HIV retinae compared with age-matched controls. HIV retinae also have increased macular retinal thickness that may be caused by inner retinal edema secondary to retinovascular disease in HIV. The interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE, as well as possible low-grade ocular inflammation causing diffuse inner retinal edema, may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV-positive patients without overt retinitis. PMID:26244973

  5. Occlusion of retinal capillaries caused by glial cell proliferation in chronic ocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, E; Ripandelli, G; Feher, J; Plateroti, A M; Plateroti, R; Kovacs, I; Plateroti, P; Taurone, S; Artico, M

    2015-01-01

    The inner blood-retinal barrier is a gliovascular unit in which glial cells surround capillary endothelial cells and regulate retinal capillaries by paracrine interactions. During chronic ocular inflammation, microvascular complications can give rise to vascular proliferative lesions, which compromise visual acuity. This pathologic remodelling caused by proliferating Müller cells determines occlusion of retinal capillaries. The aim of the present study was to identify qualitative and quantitative alterations in the retinal capillaries in patients with post-traumatic chronic ocular inflammation or post-thrombotic vascular glaucoma. Moreover, we investigated the potential role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in retinal inflammation. Our electron microscopy findings demonstrated that during chronic ocular inflammation, thickening of the basement membrane, loss of pericytes and endothelial cells and proliferation of Müller cells occur with irreversible occlusion of retinal capillaries. Angiogenesis takes place as part of a regenerative reaction that results in fibrosis. We believe that VEGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines may be potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of this disease although further studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:25792393

  6. [Application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Retinal oximeter is a new machine which has been used in the diagnose, treatment and research of several ophthalmic diseases for recent years. It allows ophthalmologists to gain retinal oxygen saturation directly. Therefore, retinal oximeter might be useful for ophthalmologists to understand ophthalmic diseases more deeper and clarify the impact of ischemia on retinal function. It has been reported in the literatures that retinal oximeter has potentially useful diagnostic and therapeutic indications in various eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein and artery occlusion, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, et al. In this thesis, the application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology is reviewed. PMID:26850588

  7. Retinal Failure in Diabetes: a Feature of Retinal Sensory Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ellyn J; Gardner, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Physiologic adaptations mediate normal responses to short-term and long-term stresses to ensure organ function. Organ failure results if adaptive responses fail to resolve persistent stresses or maladaptive reactions develop. The retinal neurovascular unit likewise undergoes adaptive responses to diabetes resulting in a retinal sensory neuropathy analogous to other sensory neuropathies. Vision-threatening diabetic retinal neuropathy results from unremitting metabolic and inflammatory stresses, leading to macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, states of "retinal failure." Current regulatory strategies focus primarily on the retinal failure stages, but new diagnostic modalities and understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy may facilitate earlier treatment to maintain vision in persons with diabetes. PMID:26458378

  8. Retinal Image Quality Assessment for Spaceflight-Induced Vision Impairment Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Amanda Cadao; Raghunandan, Sneha; Vyas, Ruchi; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Taibbi, Giovanni; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Grant, Maria; Chalam, Kakarla; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Long-term exposure to space microgravity poses significant risks for visual impairment. Evidence suggests such vision changes are linked to cephalad fluid shifts, prompting a need to directly quantify microgravity-induced retinal vascular changes. The quality of retinal images used for such vascular remodeling analysis, however, is dependent on imaging methodology. For our exploratory study, we hypothesized that retinal images captured using fluorescein imaging methodologies would be of higher quality in comparison to images captured without fluorescein. A semi-automated image quality assessment was developed using Vessel Generation Analysis (VESGEN) software and MATLAB® image analysis toolboxes. An analysis of ten images found that the fluorescein imaging modality provided a 36% increase in overall image quality (two-tailed p=0.089) in comparison to nonfluorescein imaging techniques.

  9. Rho Kinases and Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toru; Liao, James K

    2016-06-24

    Hypertensive cardiac remodeling is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis, which can lead to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. The Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCKs) are members of the serine/threonine protein kinase family, which mediates the downstream effects of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA. There are 2 isoforms: ROCK1 and ROCK2. They have different functions in different types of cells and tissues. There is growing evidence that ROCKs contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases, including cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, and subsequent heart failure. Recent experimental studies using ROCK inhibitors, such as fasudil, have shown the benefits of ROCK inhibition in cardiac remodeling. Mice lacking each ROCK isoform also exhibit reduced myocardial fibrosis in a variety of pathological models of cardiac remodeling. Indeed, clinical studies with fasudil have suggested that ROCKs could be potential novel therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the roles of ROCKs in the development of cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy and discuss their therapeutic potential for deleterious cardiac remodeling. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1491-1498). PMID:27251065

  10. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  11. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  12. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:21743764

  13. Quantitative analysis of retinal OCT.

    PubMed

    Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Clinical acceptance of 3-D OCT retinal imaging brought rapid development of quantitative 3-D analysis of retinal layers, vasculature, retinal lesions as well as facilitated new research in retinal diseases. One of the cornerstones of many such analyses is segmentation and thickness quantification of retinal layers and the choroid, with an inherently 3-D simultaneous multi-layer LOGISMOS (Layered Optimal Graph Image Segmentation for Multiple Objects and Surfaces) segmentation approach being extremely well suited for the task. Once retinal layers are segmented, regional thickness, brightness, or texture-based indices of individual layers can be easily determined and thus contribute to our understanding of retinal or optic nerve head (ONH) disease processes and can be employed for determination of disease status, treatment responses, visual function, etc. Out of many applications, examples provided in this paper focus on image-guided therapy and outcome prediction in age-related macular degeneration and on assessing visual function from retinal layer structure in glaucoma. PMID:27503080

  14. [Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells].

    PubMed

    Skorkovská, K; Skorkovská, Š

    2015-06-01

    Recently discovered intrinsically photosensitive melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells contribute to circadian photoentrainment and pupillary constriction; recent works have also brought new evidence for their accessory role in the visual system in humans. Pupil light reaction driven by individual photoreceptors can be isolated by means of the so called chromatic pupillography. The use of chromatic stimuli to elicit different pupillary responses may become an objective clinical pupil test in the detection of retinal diseases and in assessing new therapeutic approaches particularly in hereditary retinal degenerations like retinitis pigmentosa. In advanced stages of disease, the pupil light reaction is even more sensitive than standard electroretinography for detecting residual levels of photoreceptor activity. This review summarizes current knowledge on intrinsically photosensitive retinal cells and highlights its possible implications for clinical practice. PMID:26201360

  15. Retinal connectivity and primate vision

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barry B.; Martin, Paul R.; Grünert, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    The general principles of retinal organization are now well known. It may seem surprising that retinal organization in the primate, which has a complex visual behavioral repertoire, appears relatively simple. In this review, we primarily consider retinal structure and function in primate species. Photoreceptor distribution and connectivity are considered as are connectivity in the outer and inner retina. One key issue is the specificity of retinal connections; we suggest that the retina shows connectional specificity but this is seldom complete, and we consider here the functional consequences of imprecise wiring. Finally, we consider how retinal systems can be linked to psychophysical descriptions of different channels, chromatic and luminance, which are proposed to exist in the primate visual system. PMID:20826226

  16. Retinal connectivity and primate vision.

    PubMed

    Lee, Barry B; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2010-11-01

    The general principles of retinal organization are now well known. It may seem surprising that retinal organization in the primate, which has a complex visual behavioral repertoire, appears relatively simple. In this review, we primarily consider retinal structure and function in primate species. Photoreceptor distribution and connectivity are considered as are connectivity in the outer and inner retina. One key issue is the specificity of retinal connections; we suggest that the retina shows connectional specificity but this is seldom complete, and we consider here the functional consequences of imprecise wiring. Finally, we consider how retinal systems can be linked to psychophysical descriptions of different channels, chromatic and luminance, which are proposed to exist in the primate visual system. PMID:20826226

  17. [Multifocal Vitelliform Retinal Lesion].

    PubMed

    Streicher, T; Špirková, J; Ilavská, M

    2015-06-01

    The authors present retrospective follow up of patient with bilateral multifocal vitelliform retinal lesion during the 18 years period. At this time, spontaneous improvement of objective picture on retina and subjective visual troubles was observed. It is probable, that this case is a part of the same symptom complex as a variant of Best´s hereditary disease. This conclusion was based on initial stadium of phenotypical expressivity and additional evaluations. The course and outcomes of visual functions were different. The hereditary transmission was not confirmed. PMID:26201364

  18. Stereotyped initiation of retinal waves by bipolar cells via presynaptic NMDA autoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong-Wei; Li, Xiao-Quan; Kawakami, Koichi; Du, Jiu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Glutamatergic retinal waves, the spontaneous patterned neural activities propagating among developing retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), instruct the activity-dependent refinement of visuotopic maps. However, its initiation and underlying mechanism remain largely elusive. Here using larval zebrafish and multiple in vivo approaches, we discover that bipolar cells (BCs) are responsible for the generation of glutamatergic retinal waves. The wave originates from BC axon terminals (ATs) and propagates laterally to nearby BCs and vertically to downstream RGCs and the optic tectum. Its initiation is triggered by the activation of and consequent glutamate release from BC ATs, and is mediated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors (NMDARs) expressed at these ATs. Intercellular asymmetry of NMDAR expression at BC ATs enables the preferential initiation of waves at the temporal retina, where BC ATs express more NMDARs. Thus, our findings indicate that glutamatergic retinal waves are initiated by BCs through a presynaptic NMDA autoreceptor-dependent process. PMID:27586999

  19. [Phototransduction mediated by melanopsin in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Solís, Carlos Augusto; Pérez-León, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Melanopsin is the most recent photopigment described. As all the other opsins, it attaches in the retina as chromophore. Its amino acid sequence resembles more invertebrate opsins than those of vertebrates. The signal transduction pathway of opsins in vertebrates is based on the coupling to the G protein transducin, triggering a signaling cascade that results in the hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane. On the contrary, the photoreceptors of invertebrates activate the Gq protein pathway, which leads to depolarizing responses. Phototransduction mediated by melanopsin leads to the depolarization of those cells where it is expressed, the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells; the cellular messengers and the ion channel type(s) responsible for the cells´ response is still unclear. Studies to elucidate the signaling cascade of melanopsin in heterologous expression systems, in retina and isolated/cultured intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, have provided evidence for the involvement of protein Gq and phospholipase C together with the likely participation of an ion channel member of the transient receptor potential-canonical family, a transduction pathway similar to invertebrate photopigments, particularly Drosophila melanogaster. The intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells are the sole source of retinal inferences to the suprachiasmatic nucleus; thus, clarifying completely the melanopsin signaling pathway will impact the chronobiology field, including the clinical aspects. PMID:26581535

  20. Senataxin controls meiotic silencing through ATR activation and chromatin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Abrey J; Becherel, Olivier J; Luff, John E; Graham, Mark E; Richard, Derek; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    Senataxin, defective in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2, protects the genome by facilitating the resolution of RNA–DNA hybrids (R-loops) and other aspects of RNA processing. Disruption of this gene in mice causes failure of meiotic recombination and defective meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, leading to male infertility. Here we provide evidence that the disruption of Setx leads to reduced SUMOylation and disruption of protein localization across the XY body during meiosis. We demonstrate that senataxin and other DNA damage repair proteins, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner, are SUMOylated, and a marked downregulation of both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner and TopBP1 leading to defective activation and signaling through ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein occurs in the absence of senataxin. Furthermore, chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4, a component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase chromatin remodeler that interacts with both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein and senataxin was not recruited efficiently to the XY body, triggering altered histone acetylation and chromatin conformation in Setx−/− pachytene-staged spermatocytes. These results demonstrate that senataxin has a critical role in ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein- and chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4-mediated transcriptional silencing and chromatin remodeling during meiosis providing greater insight into its critical role in gene regulation to protect against neurodegeneration. PMID:27462424

  1. Myofascial trigger point pain.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial trigger point pain is an extremely prevalent cause of persistent pain disorders in all parts of the body, not just the head, neck, and face. Features include deep aching pain in any structure, referred from focally tender points in taut bands of skeletal muscle (the trigger points). Diagnosis depends on accurate palpation with 2-4 kg/cm2 of pressure for 10 to 20 seconds over the suspected trigger point to allow the referred pain pattern to develop. In the head and neck region, cervical muscle trigger points (key trigger points) often incite and perpetuate trigger points (satellite trigger points) and referred pain from masticatory muscles. Management requires identification and control of as many perpetuating factors as possible (posture, body mechanics, psychological stress or depression, poor sleep or nutrition). Trigger point therapies such as spray and stretch or trigger point injections are best used as adjunctive therapy. PMID:24864393

  2. Synapse Loss and Dendrite Remodeling in a Mouse Model of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Ryan H.; Qu, Juan; John, Simon W. M.; Howell, Gareth R.; Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that synaptic pruning precedes retinal ganglion cell degeneration in glaucoma, causing early dysfunction to retinal ganglion cells. To begin to assess this, we studied the excitatory synaptic inputs to individual ganglion cells in normal mouse retinas and in retinas with ganglion cell degeneration from glaucoma (DBA/2J), or following an optic nerve crush. Excitatory synapses were labeled by AAV2-mediated transfection of ganglion cells with PSD-95-GFP. After both insults the linear density of synaptic inputs to ganglion cells decreased. In parallel, the dendritic arbors lost complexity. We did not observe any cells that had lost dendritic synaptic input while preserving a normal or near-normal morphology. Within the temporal limits of these observations, dendritic remodeling and synapse pruning thus appear to occur near-simultaneously. PMID:26637126

  3. Frontiers in growth and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-06-01

    Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. PMID:22919118

  4. Frontiers in growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. PMID:22919118

  5. Advances in understanding cartilage remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yefu; Xu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage remodeling is currently among the most popular topics in osteoarthritis research. Remodeling includes removal of the existing cartilage and replacement by neo-cartilage. As a loss of balance between removal and replacement of articular cartilage develops (particularly, the rate of removal surpasses the rate of replacement), joints will begin to degrade. In the last few years, significant progress in molecular understanding of the cartilage remodeling process has been made. In this brief review, we focus on the discussion of some current “controversial” observations in articular cartilage degeneration: (1) the biological effect of transforming growth factor-beta 1 on developing and mature articular cartilages, (2) the question of whether aggrecanase 1 (ADAMTS4) and aggrecanase 2 (ADAMTS5) are key enzymes in articular cartilage destruction, and (3) chondrocytes versus chondron in the development of osteoarthritis. It is hoped that continued discussion and investigation will follow to better clarify these topics. Clarification will be critical for those in search of novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:26380073

  6. Endothelial Msx1 transduces hemodynamic changes into an arteriogenic remodeling response

    PubMed Central

    Vandersmissen, Ine; Craps, Sander; Depypere, Maarten; Coppiello, Giulia; van Gastel, Nick; Maes, Frederik; Carmeliet, Geert; Schrooten, Jan; Jones, Elizabeth A.V.; Umans, Lieve; Devlieger, Roland; Koole, Michel; Gheysens, Olivier; Zwijsen, An; Aranguren, Xabier L.

    2015-01-01

    Collateral remodeling is critical for blood flow restoration in peripheral arterial disease and is triggered by increasing fluid shear stress in preexisting collateral arteries. So far, no arterial-specific mediators of this mechanotransduction response have been identified. We show that muscle segment homeobox 1 (MSX1) acts exclusively in collateral arterial endothelium to transduce the extrinsic shear stimulus into an arteriogenic remodeling response. MSX1 was specifically up-regulated in remodeling collateral arteries. MSX1 induction in collateral endothelial cells (ECs) was shear stress driven and downstream of canonical bone morphogenetic protein–SMAD signaling. Flow recovery and collateral remodeling were significantly blunted in EC-specific Msx1/2 knockout mice. Mechanistically, MSX1 linked the arterial shear stimulus to arteriogenic remodeling by activating the endothelial but not medial layer to a proinflammatory state because EC but not smooth muscle cellMsx1/2 knockout mice had reduced leukocyte recruitment to remodeling collateral arteries. This reduced leukocyte infiltration in EC Msx1/2 knockout mice originated from decreased levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1)/vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), whose expression was also in vitro driven by promoter binding of MSX1. PMID:26391659

  7. PIMASERTIB AND SEROUS RETINAL DETACHMENTS

    PubMed Central

    AlAli, Alaa; Bushehri, Ahmad; Park, Jonathan C.; Krema, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of multifocal serous retinal detachments associated with pimasertib. Methods: The authors report a 26-year-old patient who developed bilateral multifocal serous retinal detachments appearing 2 days after starting pimasertib (as part of a clinical trial investigating its use in low-grade metastatic ovarian cancer) and rapidly resolving 3 days after stopping it. Conclusion: The mechanism of MEK inhibitor induced visual toxicity remains unclear. The pathophysiology of multifocal serous retinal detachments as a complication of pimasertib is still poorly understood. PMID:26444523

  8. LIM Kinase, a Newly Identified Regulator of Presynaptic Remodeling by Rod Photoreceptors After Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Rod photoreceptors retract their axon terminals and develop neuritic sprouts in response to retinal detachment and reattachment, respectively. This study examines the role of LIM kinase (LIMK), a component of RhoA and Rac pathways, in the presynaptic structural remodeling of rod photoreceptors. Methods Phosphorylated LIMK (p-LIMK), the active form of LIMK, was examined in salamander retina with Western blot and confocal microscopy. Axon length within the first 7 hours and process growth after 3 days of culture were assessed in isolated rod photoreceptors treated with inhibitors of upstream regulators ROCK and p21-activated kinase (Pak) (Y27632 and IPA-3) and a direct LIMK inhibitor (BMS-5). Porcine retinal explants were also treated with BMS-5 and analyzed 24 hours after detachment. Because Ca2+ influx contributes to axonal retraction, L-type channels were blocked in some experiments with nicardipine. Results Phosphorylated LIMK is present in rod terminals during retraction and in newly formed processes. Axonal retraction over 7 hours was significantly reduced by inhibition of LIMK or its regulators, ROCK and Pak. Process growth was reduced by LIMK or Pak inhibition especially at the basal (axon-bearing) region of the rod cells. Combining Ca2+ channel and LIMK inhibition had no additional effect on retraction but did further inhibit sprouting after 3 days. In detached porcine retina, LIMK inhibition reduced rod axonal retraction and improved retinal morphology. Conclusions Thus structural remodeling, in the form of either axonal retraction or neuritic growth, requires LIMK activity. LIM kinase inhibition may have therapeutic potential for reducing pathologic rod terminal plasticity after retinal injury. PMID:26658506

  9. Factors regulating capillary remodeling in a reversible model of inflammatory corneal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mukwaya, Anthony; Peebo, Beatrice; Xeroudaki, Maria; Ali, Zaheer; Lennikov, Anton; Jensen, Lasse; Lagali, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Newly formed microcapillary networks arising in adult organisms by angiogenic and inflammatory stimuli contribute to pathologies such as corneal and retinal blindness, tumor growth, and metastasis. Therapeutic inhibition of pathologic angiogenesis has focused on targeting the VEGF pathway, while comparatively little attention has been given to remodeling of the new microcapillaries into a stabilized, functional, and persistent vascular network. Here, we used a novel reversible model of inflammatory angiogenesis in the rat cornea to investigate endogenous factors rapidly invoked to remodel, normalize and regress microcapillaries as part of the natural response to regain corneal avascularity. Rapid reversal of an inflammatory angiogenic stimulus suppressed granulocytic activity, enhanced recruitment of remodelling macrophages, induced capillary intussusception, and enriched pathways and processes involving immune cells, chemokines, morphogenesis, axonal guidance, and cell motility, adhesion, and cytoskeletal functions. Whole transcriptome gene expression analysis revealed suppression of numerous inflammatory and angiogenic factors and enhancement of endogenous inhibitors. Many of the identified genes function independently of VEGF and represent potentially new targets for molecular control of the critical process of microvascular remodeling and regression in the cornea. PMID:27561355

  10. Factors regulating capillary remodeling in a reversible model of inflammatory corneal angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mukwaya, Anthony; Peebo, Beatrice; Xeroudaki, Maria; Ali, Zaheer; Lennikov, Anton; Jensen, Lasse; Lagali, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Newly formed microcapillary networks arising in adult organisms by angiogenic and inflammatory stimuli contribute to pathologies such as corneal and retinal blindness, tumor growth, and metastasis. Therapeutic inhibition of pathologic angiogenesis has focused on targeting the VEGF pathway, while comparatively little attention has been given to remodeling of the new microcapillaries into a stabilized, functional, and persistent vascular network. Here, we used a novel reversible model of inflammatory angiogenesis in the rat cornea to investigate endogenous factors rapidly invoked to remodel, normalize and regress microcapillaries as part of the natural response to regain corneal avascularity. Rapid reversal of an inflammatory angiogenic stimulus suppressed granulocytic activity, enhanced recruitment of remodelling macrophages, induced capillary intussusception, and enriched pathways and processes involving immune cells, chemokines, morphogenesis, axonal guidance, and cell motility, adhesion, and cytoskeletal functions. Whole transcriptome gene expression analysis revealed suppression of numerous inflammatory and angiogenic factors and enhancement of endogenous inhibitors. Many of the identified genes function independently of VEGF and represent potentially new targets for molecular control of the critical process of microvascular remodeling and regression in the cornea. PMID:27561355

  11. Long Noncoding RNA-GAS5: A Novel Regulator of Hypertension-Induced Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang-Ning-Zhi; Shan, Kun; Yao, Mu-Di; Yao, Jin; Wang, Jia-Jian; Li, Xiang; Liu, Ban; Zhang, Yang-Yang; Ji, Yong; Jiang, Qin; Yan, Biao

    2016-09-01

    Vascular remodeling is an important pathological feature of hypertension, leading to increased vascular resistance and reduced compliance. Endothelial cell (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) dysfunction is involved in vascular remodeling. Long noncoding RNAs are potential regulators of EC and VSMC function. Herein, we determined whether long noncoding RNA-growth arrest-specific 5 (GAS5) is involved in hypertension-related vascular remodeling. We revealed that GAS5 knockdown aggravated hypertension-induced microvascular dysfunction as shown by increased retinal neovascularization and capillary leakage. GAS5 regulated the remodeling of arteries, including caudal arteries, carotid arteries, renal arteries, and thoracic arteries. GAS5 was mainly expressed in ECs and VSMCs, and its expression was significantly downregulated in hypertension. GAS5 knockdown affected endothelial activation, endothelial proliferation, VSMC phenotypic conversion, and EC-VSMC communication in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistically, GAS5 regulated EC and VSMC function through β-catenin signaling. This study identified GAS5 as a critical regulator in hypertension and demonstrated the potential of gene therapy and drug development for treating hypertension. PMID:27432865

  12. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  13. Building retinal connectomes.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W; Lauritzen, J Scott; Watt, Carl B; Anderson, James R

    2012-08-01

    Understanding vertebrate vision depends on knowing, in part, the complete network graph of at least one representative retina. Acquiring such graphs is the business of synaptic connectomics, emerging as a practical technology due to improvements in electron imaging platform control, management software for large-scale datasets, and availability of data storage. The optimal strategy for building complete connectomes uses transmission electron imaging with 2 nm or better resolution, molecular tags for cell identification, open-access data volumes for navigation, and annotation with open-source tools to build 3D cell libraries, complete network diagrams and connectivity databases. The first forays into retinal connectomics have shown that even nominally well-studied cells have much richer connection graphs than expected. PMID:22498714

  14. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  15. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  16. Nutrition and retinal degenerations.

    PubMed

    Berson, E L

    2000-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the understanding and management of degenerative diseases of the retina involving photoreceptors. Nutritional approaches to treatment have proved successful in the case of the common forms of retinitis pigmentosa (supplementation with vitamin A), Bassen-Kornzweig disease (supplementation with vitamins A, E, and K), gyrate atrophy (low-protein, low-arginine diet and/or supplementation with vitamin B6), and Refsum disease (low-phytol, low-phytanic acid diet). The night blindness associated with Sorsby fundus dystrophy can be reversed over the short term with vitamin A. A significant trend for decreased risk for advanced or exudative ARMD has been reported among those whose diets contain a higher content of carotenoids, such as spinach and collard greens. A randomized trial is in progress to determine whether beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E as well as trace minerals, particularly zinc, will modify the course of ARMD. The difficulties that patients with retinal degenerations face as a result of their diminishing vision, sometimes over decades, cannot be underestimated. Nutritional therapy has proved effective in modifying the course of a number of these conditions; the therapeutic benefit of nutritional modification in diseases that have a genetic basis is of particular interest. Further research is warranted to determine the mechanisms by which these treatments provide their benefit as well as to identify other conditions that may yield to nutritional intervention. Risk-factor analyses of well-defined populations followed over time with food-frequency questionnaires in conjunction with careful assessments of visual function may reveal other dietary constituents that can modify the course of degenerative diseases of the retina. PMID:11064860

  17. Molecular genetics of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Farber, D. B.; Heckenlively, J. R.; Sparkes, R. S.; Bateman, J. B.

    1991-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a model for the study of genetic diseases. Its genetic heterogeneity is reflected in the different forms of inheritance (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked) and, in a few families, in the presence of mutations in the visual pigment rhodopsin. Clinical and molecular genetic studies of these disorders are discussed. Animal models of retinal degeneration have been investigated for many years with the hope of gaining insight into the cause of photoreceptor cell death. Recently, the genes responsible for two of these animal disorders, the rds and rd mouse genes, have been isolated and characterized. The retinal degeneration of the rd mouse is presented in detail. The possible involvement of human analogues of these mouse genes in human retinal diseases is being investigated. Images PMID:1771877

  18. Triggered Jovian radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1985-01-01

    Certain Jovian radio emissions seem to be triggered from outside, by much weaker radio waves from the sun. Recently found in the Voyager observations near Jupiter, such triggering occurs at hectometric wavelengths during the arrival of solar radio bursts, with the triggered emissions lasting sometimes more than an hour as they slowly drifted toward higher frequencies. Like the previous discovery of similar triggered emissions at the earth, this suggests that Jupiter's emissions might also originate from natural radio lasers.

  19. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  20. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  1. General pathophysiology in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Wert, Katherine J; Lin, Jonathan H; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    Retinal degeneration, including that seen in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common form of neural degenerative disease in the world. There is great genetic and allelic heterogeneity of the various retinal dystrophies. Classifications of these diseases can be ambiguous, as there are similar clinical presentations in retinal degenerations arising from different genetic mechanisms. As would be expected, alterations in the activity of the phototransduction cascade, such as changes affecting the renewal and shedding of the photoreceptor OS, visual transduction, and/or retinol metabolism have a great impact on the health of the retina. Mutations within any of the molecules responsible for these visual processes cause several types of retinal and retinal pigment epithelium degenerative diseases. Apoptosis has been implicated in the rod cell loss seen in a mouse model of RP, but the precise mechanisms that connect the activation of these pathways to the loss of phosphodiesterase (PDE6β) function has yet to be defined. Additionally, the activation of apoptosis by CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), after activation of the unfolded protein response pathway, may be responsible for cell death, although the mechanism remains unknown. However, the mechanisms of cell death after loss of function of PDE6, which is a commonly studied mammalian model in research, may be generalizable to loss of function of different key proteins involved in the phototransduction cascade. PMID:24732759

  2. General Pathophysiology in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Lin, Jonathan H.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration, including that seen in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common form of neural degenerative disease in the world. There is great genetic and allelic heterogeneity of the various retinal dystrophies. Classifications of these diseases can be ambiguous, as there are similar clinical presentations in retinal degenerations arising from different genetic mechanisms. As would be expected, alterations in the activity of the phototransduction cascade, such as changes affecting the renewal and shedding of the photoreceptor OS, visual transduction, and/ or retinol metabolism have a great impact on the health of the retina. Mutations within any of the molecules responsible for these visual processes cause several types of retinal and retinal pigment epithelium degenerative diseases. Apoptosis has been implicated in the rod cell loss seen in a mouse model of RP, but the precise mechanisms that connect the activation of these pathways to the loss of phosphodiesterase (PDE6β) function has yet to be defined. Additionally, the activation of apoptosis by CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), after activation of the unfolded protein response pathway, may be responsible for cell death, although the mechanism remains unknown. However, the mechanisms of cell death after loss of function of PDE6, which is a commonly studied mammalian model in research, may be generalizable to loss of function of different key proteins involved in the phototransduction cascade. PMID:24732759

  3. The mechanics of retinal detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; Siegel, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We present a model of the mechanical and fluid forces associated with exudative retinal detachments where the retinal photoreceptor cells separate typically from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By computing the total fluid volume flow arising from transretinal, vascular, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) pump currents, we determine the conditions under which the subretinal fluid pressure exceeds the maximum yield stress holding the retina and RPE together, giving rise to an irreversible, extended retinal delamination. We also investigate localized, blister-like retinal detachments by balancing mechanical tension in the retina with both the retina-RPE adhesion energy and the hydraulic pressure jump across the retina. For detachments induced by traction forces, we find a critical radius beyond which the blister is unstable to growth. Growth of a detached blister can also be driven by inflamed tissue within which e.g., the hydraulic conductivities of the retina or choroid increase, the RPE pumps fail, or the adhesion properties change. We determine the parameter regimes in which the blister either becomes unstable to growth, remains stable and finite-sized, or shrinks, allowing possible healing. This work supported by the Army Research Office through grant 58386MA

  4. Cytomegalovirus retinitis mimicking intraocular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gooi, Patrick; Farmer, James; Hurley, Bernard; Brodbaker, Elliott

    2008-12-01

    We present a case of an unusual retinal infiltrate requiring retinal biopsy for definitive diagnosis. A 62-year-old man with treated lymphoma presented with decreased vision in the right eye associated with a white retinal lesion, which extended inferonasally from an edematous disc. Intraocular lymphoma was considered as a diagnosis; thus, the patient was managed with vitrectomy and retinal biopsy. Cytological analysis of the vitreous aspirate could not rule out a lymphoproliferative disorder. The microbial analysis was negative. Histology of the lesion showed extensive necrosis and large cells with prominent nucleoli. To rule out lymphoma, a battery of immunostains was performed and all were negative. However the limited amount of tissue was exhausted in the process. Subsequently, a hematoxylin and eosin (H/E) slide was destained, on which a CMV immunostain was performed. This revealed positivity in the nuclei and intranuclear inclusions within the large atypical cells. A diagnosis of CMV retinitis was made. Retinal biopsy may provide a definitive diagnosis and direct patient care toward intravenous gancyclovir in the case of CMV or toward radiation and chemotherapy for intraocular lymphoma. When faced with a limited amount of tissue, destaining regular H/E slides is a possible avenue to performing additional immunohistochemical studies. PMID:19668455

  5. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, René M; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  6. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  7. Intrasaccadic perception triggers pupillary constriction.

    PubMed

    Mathôt, Sebastiaan; Melmi, Jean-Baptiste; Castet, Eric

    2015-01-01

    It is commonly believed that vision is impaired during saccadic eye movements. However, here we report that some visual stimuli are clearly visible during saccades, and trigger a constriction of the eye's pupil. Participants viewed sinusoid gratings that changed polarity 150 times per second (every 6.67 ms). At this rate of flicker, the gratings were perceived as homogeneous surfaces while participants fixated. However, the flickering gratings contained ambiguous motion: rightward and leftward motion for vertical gratings; upward and downward motion for horizontal gratings. When participants made a saccade perpendicular to the gratings' orientation (e.g., a leftward saccade for a vertical grating), the eye's peak velocity matched the gratings' motion. As a result, the retinal image was approximately stable for a brief moment during the saccade, and this gave rise to an intrasaccadic percept: A normally invisible stimulus became visible when eye velocity was maximal. Our results confirm and extend previous studies by demonstrating intrasaccadic perception using a reflexive measure (pupillometry) that does not rely on subjective report. Our results further show that intrasaccadic perception affects all stages of visual processing, from the pupillary response to visual awareness. PMID:26339536

  8. βA3/A1-crystallin is required for proper astrocyte template formation and vascular remodeling in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Debasish; Valapala, Mallika; Bhutto, Imran; Patek, Bonnie; Zhang, Cheng; Hose, Stacey; Yang, Fang; Cano, Marisol; Stark, Walter J.; Lutty, Gerard A.; Zigler, J. Samuel; Wawrousek, Eric F.

    2013-01-01

    Nuc1 is a spontaneous rat mutant resulting from a mutation in the Cryba1 gene, coding for βA3/A1-crystallin. Our earlier studies with Nuc1 provided novel evidence that astrocytes, which express βA3/A1-crystallin, have a pivotal role in retinal remodeling. The role of astrocytes in the retina is only beginning to be explored. One of the limitations in the field is the lack of appropriate animal models to better investigate the function of astrocytes in retinal health and disease. We have now established transgenic mice that overexpress the Nuc1 mutant form of Cryba1, specifically in astrocytes. Astrocytes in wild type mice show normal compact stellate structure, producing a honeycomb-like network. In contrast, in transgenics over-expressing the mutant (Nuc1) Cryba1 in astrocytes, bundle-like structures with abnormal patterns and morphology were observed. In the nerve fiber layer of the transgenic mice, an additional layer of astrocytes adjacent to the vitreous is evident. This abnormal organization of astrocytes affects both the superficial and deep retinal vascular density and remodeling. Fluorescein angiography showed increased venous dilation and tortuosity of branches in the transgenic retina, as compared to wild type. Moreover, there appear to be fewer interactions between astrocytes and endothelial cells in the transgenic retina than in normal mouse retina. Further, astrocytes overexpressing the mutant βA3/A1-crystallin migrate into the vitreous, and ensheath the hyaloid artery, in a manner similar to that seen in the Nuc1 rat. Together, these data demonstrate that developmental abnormalities of astrocytes can affect the normal remodeling process of both fetal and retinal vessels of the eye and that βA3/A1-crystallin is essential for normal astrocyte function in the retina. PMID:22427112

  9. Dynamin, a membrane remodelling GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Shawn M.; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Dynamin, the founding member of a family of dynamin-like GTPases (DLPs) implicated in membrane remodelling, has a critical role in endocytic membrane fission events. The use of complementary approaches, including live cell imaging, cell free-studies, X-ray crystallography and genetic studies in mice has greatly advanced our understanding of the mechanisms by which dynamin acts, its essential roles in cell physiology and the specific function of different dynamin isoforms. In addition, several connections between dynamin and human disease have also emerged that highlight specific contributions of this GTPase to the physiology of different tissues. PMID:22233676

  10. HDL biogenesis, remodeling, and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Zannis, Vassilis I; Fotakis, Panagiotis; Koukos, Georgios; Kardassis, Dimitris; Ehnholm, Christian; Jauhiainen, Matti; Chroni, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we review how HDL is generated, remodeled, and catabolized in plasma. We describe key features of the proteins that participate in these processes, emphasizing how mutations in apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and the other proteins affect HDL metabolism. The biogenesis of HDL initially requires functional interaction of apoA-I with the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and subsequently interactions of the lipidated apoA-I forms with lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Mutations in these proteins either prevent or impair the formation and possibly the functionality of HDL. Remodeling and catabolism of HDL is the result of interactions of HDL with cell receptors and other membrane and plasma proteins including hepatic lipase (HL), endothelial lipase (EL), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), apolipoprotein M (apoM), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1), the F1 subunit of ATPase (Ecto F1-ATPase), and the cubulin/megalin receptor. Similarly to apoA-I, apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A-IV were shown to form discrete HDL particles containing these apolipoproteins which may have important but still unexplored functions. Furthermore, several plasma proteins were found associated with HDL and may modulate its biological functions. The effect of these proteins on the functionality of HDL is the topic of ongoing research. PMID:25522986

  11. Intracranial pressure and skull remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, Timothy J.; Jordan Piluek, W.; Chang, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review bony changes resulting from alterations in intracranial pressure (ICP) and the implications for ophthalmologists and the patients for whom we care. Before addressing ophthalmic implications, we will begin with a brief overview of bone remodeling. Bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension and hypertension will be discussed. The primary objective of this review was to bring attention to bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension. Intracranial hypotension skull remodeling can result in enophthalmos. In advanced disease enophthalmos develops to a degree that is truly disfiguring. The most common finding for which subjects are referred is ocular surface disease, related to loss of contact between the eyelids and the cornea. Other abnormalities seen include abnormal ocular motility and optic atrophy. Recognition of such changes is important to allow for diagnosis and treatment prior to advanced clinical deterioration. Routine radiographic assessment of bony changes may allow for the identification of patient with abnormal ICP prior to the development of clinically significant disease. PMID:25859141

  12. Quantitative Imaging of Enzymatic Vitreolysis-Induced Fiber Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Filas, Benjamen A.; Shah, Nihar S.; Zhang, Qianru; Shui, Ying-Bo; Lake, Spencer P.; Beebe, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Collagen fiber remodeling in the vitreous body has been implicated in cases of vitreomacular traction, macular hole, and retinal detachment, and also may occur during pharmacologic vitreolysis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitative polarized light imaging (QPLI) as a tool for studying fiber organization in the vitreous and near the vitreoretinal interface in control and enzymatically perturbed conditions. Methods. Fiber alignment was measured in anterior-posterior sections of bovine and porcine vitreous. Additional tests were performed on bovine lenses and nasal-temporal vitreous sections. Effects of proteoglycan degradation on collagen fiber alignment using trypsin and plasmin were assessed at the microstructural level using electron microscopy and at the global level using QPLI. Results. Control vitreous showed fiber organization patterns consistent with the literature across multiple-length scales, including the global anterior-posterior coursing of vitreous fibers, as well as local fibers parallel to the equatorial vitreoretinal interface and transverse to the posterior interface. Proteoglycan digestion with trypsin or plasmin significantly increased fiber alignment throughout the vitreous (P < 0.01). The largest changes (3×) occurred in the posterior vitreous where fibers are aligned transverse to the posterior vitreoretinal interface (P < 0.01). Conclusions. Proteoglycan loss due to enzymatic vitreolysis differentially increases fiber alignment at locations where tractions are most common. We hypothesize that a similar mechanism leads to retinal complications during age-related vitreous degeneration. Structural changes to the entire vitreous body (as opposed to the vitreoretinal interface alone) should be evaluated during preclinical testing of pharmacological vitreolysis candidates. PMID:25468895

  13. Retinal AO OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Miller, Donald T.

    The last two decades have witnessed extraordinary advances in optical technology to image noninvasively and at high resolution the posterior segment of the eye. Two of the most impactful technological advancements over this period have arguably been optical coherence tomography (OCT) and adaptive optics (AO). The strengths of these technologies complement each other and when combined have been shown to provide unprecedented, micron-scale resolution (<3 μm) in all three dimensions and sensitivity to image the cellular retina in the living eye. This powerful extension of OCT, that is AO-OCT, is the focus of this chapter. It presents key aspects of designing and implementing AO-OCT systems. Particular attention is devoted to the relevant optical properties of the eye that ultimately define these systems, AO componentry and operation tailored for ophthalmic use, and of course use of the latest technologies and methods in OCT for ocular imaging. It surveys the wide range of AO-OCT designs that have been developed for retinal imaging, with AO integrated into every major OCT design configuration. Finally, it reviews the scientific and clinical studies reported to date that show the exciting potential of AO-OCT to image the microscopic retina and fundus in ways not previously possible with other noninvasive methods and a look to future developments in this rapidly growing field.

  14. Temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Baade, Alexander; Birngruber, Reginald; Roider, Johann; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Retinal photocoagulation lacks objective dosage in clinical use, thus the commonly applied lesions are too deep and strong, associated with pain reception and the risk of visual field defects and induction of choroidal neovascularisations. Optoacoustics allows real-time non-invasive temperature measurement in the fundus during photocoagulation by applying short probe laser pulses additionally to the treatment radiation, which excite the emission of ultrasonic waves. Due to the temperature dependence of the Grüneisen parameter, the amplitudes of the ultrasonic waves can be used to derive the temperature of the absorbing tissue. By measuring the temperatures in real-time and automatically controlling the irradiation by feedback to the treatment laser, the strength of the lesions can be defined. Different characteristic functions for the time and temperature dependent lesion sizes were used as rating curves for the treatment laser, stopping the irradiation automatically after a desired lesion size is achieved. The automatically produced lesion sizes are widely independent of the adjusted treatment laser power and individual absorption. This study was performed on anaesthetized rabbits and is a step towards a clinical trial with automatically controlled photocoagulation.

  15. Color Doppler imaging of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Galina; Kato, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Color Doppler imaging (CDI) is a widely used method for evaluating ocular circulation that has been used in a number of studies on retinal diseases. CDI assesses blood velocity parameters by using ultrasound waves. In ophthalmology, these assessments are mainly performed on the retrobulbar blood vessels: the ophthalmic, the central retinal, and the short posterior ciliary arteries. In this review, we discuss CDI use for the assessment of retinal diseases classified into the following: vascular diseases, degenerations, dystrophies, and detachment. The retinal vascular diseases that have been investigated by CDI include diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusions, retinal artery occlusions, ocular ischemic conditions, and retinopathy of prematurity. Degenerations and dystrophies included in this review are age-related macular degeneration, myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. CDI has been used for the differential diagnosis of retinal detachment, as well as the evaluation of retrobulbar circulation in this condition. CDI is valuable for research and is a potentially useful diagnostic tool in the clinical setting. PMID:20385332

  16. Stay away from asthma triggers

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma triggers - stay away from; Asthma triggers - avoiding; Reactive airway disease - triggers; Bronchial asthma - triggers ... to them. Have someone who does not have asthma cut the grass, or wear a facemask if ...

  17. The role of vascular remodeling and inflammation in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Penn, David L; Witte, Samantha R; Komotar, Ricardo J; Sander Connolly, E

    2014-01-01

    While the mechanisms triggering pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms have not been fully elucidated, different mechanisms have been proposed ranging from hemodynamic mechanisms to genetic predispositions. One mechanism that has been thoroughly explored is the physiological and pathological vascular remodeling that occurs in conjunction with inflammatory reactions resulting in the initiation and progression of these lesions. Both hemodynamic stimuli and vascular inflammation can trigger a series of biochemical reactions resulting in vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis and migration causing thinned, dilated areas of the cerebral vasculature. In addition, an imbalance between extracellular matrix remodeling proteins, such as matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors, can result in accelerated degradation of the internal elastic lamina and the adventitial layers, further weakening the vessel. While these processes occur under normal physiological conditions, situations that alter their balance such as inflammation caused by cigarette smoking or cocaine usage or hypoxia induced under chronic hypertensive conditions can alter the delicate balance of these reactions potentiating pathological remodeling and aneurysm development. The present study represents a thorough literature review of the vascular remodeling and inflammatory components to aneurysmal pathogenesis. PMID:24120708

  18. Photon Echoes from Retinal Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Philip James Maddigan

    This thesis focuses on the ultrafast isomerization reaction of retinal in both rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin, examples of sensory and energy transduction proteins that exploit the same photoactive chromophore for two very different functions. In bacteriorhodopsin, retinal isomerizes from an all-trans to 13-cis conformation as the primary event in light- driven proton pumping. In the visual pigment rhodopsin, the retinal chromophore isomerizes from an 11-cis to all-trans geometry as the primary step leading to our sense of vision. This diversity of function for nominally identical systems raises the question as to just how optimized are these proteins to arrive at such drastically different functions? Previous work has employed transient absorption spectroscopy to probe retinal protein photochemistry, but many of the relevant electronic and nuclear dynamics of isomerization are masked by inhomogeneous broadening effects and strong spectral overlap between reactant and photoproduct states. This work exploits the unique properties of two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy to deconvolve inhomogeneous broadening and spectral overlap effects and fully reveal the dynamics that direct retinal isomerization in proteins. In bacteriorhodopsin, vibrational coupling to the reaction coordinate results in a surface crossing event prior to the conventional conical intersection associated with isomerization to the J intermediate. In rhodopsin, however, a similarly early vibrationally-mediated barrier crossing event is observed, resulting in spectral signals consistent with the known photoproduct state appearing an order of magnitude faster than determined from conventional transient absorption measurements. The competing overlapping spectral signals that obscured the initial dynamics when probed with transient absorption spectroscopy are now clearly resolved with two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy. These experiments illustrate the critical role of the protein in directing

  19. Analysis by NASA's VESGEN Software of Retinal Blood Vessels Before and After 70-Day Bed Rest: A Retrospective Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghunandan, Sneha; Vyas, Ruchi J.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Taibbi, Giovanni; Zanello, Susana B.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Significant risks for visual impairment associated with increased intracranial pressure (VIIP) are incurred by microgravity spaceflight, especially long-duration missions. Impairments include decreased near visual acuity, posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, optic disc edema and cotton wool spots. We hypothesize that microgravity-induced fluid shifts result in pathological changes within the retinal blood vessels that precede development of visual and other ocular impairments. Potential contributions of retinal vascular remodeling to VIIP etiology are therefore being investigated by NASAs innovative VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software for two studies: (1) head-down tilt in human subjects before and after 70 days of bed rest, and (2) U.S. crew members before and after ISS missions. VESGEN analysis in previous research supported by the US National Institutes of Health identified surprising new opportunities to regenerate retinal vessels during early-stage, potentially reversible progression of the visually impairing and blinding disease, diabetic retinopathy.

  20. An Analysis of the Residential Remodeling Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scruggs, Kenneth

    The general purpose of the occupational analysis is to provide workable, basic information dealing with the many and varied duties performed in the residential remodeling occupation. The analysis only briefly covers the many areas of residential remodeling. The document opens with a brief introduction followed by a job description. The bulk of the…

  1. Bone remodeling and silicon deficiency in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alveolar bone undergoes continuous remodeling to meet physiologic and functional demands. The aim of the present work was to evaluate histologically and histomorphometrically the effect of silicon deficiency on bone modeling and remodeling in the periodontal cortical plate. Two groups of weaning mal...

  2. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Längst, Gernot; Manelyte, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development. PMID:26075616

  3. Multiscale Simulation of Protein Mediated Membrane Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ayton, Gary S.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins interacting with membranes can result in substantial membrane deformations and curvatures. This effect is known in its broadest terms as membrane remodeling. This review article will survey current multiscale simulation methodologies that have been employed to examine protein-mediated membrane remodeling. PMID:19922811

  4. Automated retinal robotic laser system.

    PubMed

    Barrett, S F; Wright, C H; Jerath, M R; Lewis, R S; Dillard, B C; Rylander, H G; Welch, A J

    1995-01-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas and the USAF Academy have worked toward the development of a retinal robotic laser system. The overall goal of this ongoing project is to precisely place and control the depth of laser lesions for the treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. Separate low speed prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion depth using lesion reflectance feedback parameters and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Both subsystems have been successfully demonstrated in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser. Recent efforts have concentrated on combining the two subsystems into a single prototype capable of simultaneously controlling both lesion depth and placement. We have designated this combined system CALOSOS for Computer Aided Laser Optics System for Ophthalmic Surgery. Following the dual-use concept, this system is being adapted for clinical use as a retinal treatment system as well as a research tool for military laser-tissue interaction studies. PMID:7654990

  5. Neuroglobin Protection in Retinal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anita S.Y.; Saraswathy, Sindhu; Rehak, Matus; Ueki, Mari

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a vertebrate globin that is predominantly expressed in the retina and brain. To explore the role of Ngb in retinal neuroprotection during ischemia reperfusion (IR), the authors examined the effect of Ngb overexpression in the retina in vivo by using Ngb-transgenic (Ngb-Tg) mice. Methods. Retinal IR was induced in Ngb overexpressing Ngb-Tg mice and wild type (WT) mice by cannulating the anterior chamber and transiently elevating the IOP for 60 minutes. After Day 7 of reperfusion, the authors evaluated Ngb mRNA and protein expression in nonischemic control as well as ischemic mice and its effect on retinal histology, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and apoptosis, using morphometry and immunohistochemistry, quantitative PCR analysis and Western blot techniques. Results. Ngb-Tg mice without ischemia overexpress Ngb mRNA 11.3-fold (SE ± 0.457, P < 0.05) higher than WT control mice, and this overexpression of Ngb protein was localized to the mitochondria of the ganglion cells, outer and inner plexiform layers, and photoreceptor inner segments. This overexpression of Ngb is associated with decreased mitochondrial DNA damage in Ngb-Tg mice with IR in comparison with WT. Ngb-Tg mice with IR also revealed significant preservation of retinal thickness, significantly less activated caspase 3 protein expression, and apoptosis in comparison with WT mice. Conclusions. Neuroglobin overexpression plays a neuroprotective role against retinal ischemia reperfusion injury due to decreasing of mitochondrial oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis. PMID:22167093

  6. Deletion of thioredoxin-interacting protein preserves retinal neuronal function by preventing inflammation and vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    El-Azab, M F; Baldowski, B R B; Mysona, B A; Shanab, A Y; Mohamed, I N; Abdelsaid, M A; Matragoon, S; Bollinger, K E; Saul, A; El-Remessy, A B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Retinal neurodegeneration is an early and critical event in several diseases associated with blindness. Clinically, therapies that target neurodegeneration fail. We aimed to elucidate the multiple roles by which thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) contributes to initial and sustained retinal neurodegeneration. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Neurotoxicity was induced by intravitreal injection of NMDA into wild-type (WT) and TXNIP-knockout (TKO) mice. The expression of apoptotic and inflammatory markers was assessed by immunohistochemistry, elisa and Western blot. Microvascular degeneration was assessed by periodic acid-Schiff and haematoxylin staining and retinal function by electroretinogram. KEY RESULTS NMDA induced early (1 day) and significant retinal PARP activation, a threefold increase in TUNEL-positive nuclei and 40% neuronal loss in ganglion cell layer (GCL); and vascular permeability in WT but not TKO mice. NMDA induced glial activation, expression of TNF-α and IL-1β that co-localized with Müller cells in WT but not TKO mice. In parallel, NMDA triggered the expression of NOD-like receptor protein (NLRP3), activation of caspase-1, and release of IL-1β and TNF-α in primary WT but not TKO Müller cultures. After 14 days, NMDA induced 1.9-fold microvascular degeneration, 60% neuronal loss in GCL and increased TUNEL-labelled cells in the GCL and inner nuclear layer in WT but not TKO mice. Electroretinogram analysis showed more significant reductions in b-wave amplitudes in WT than in TKO mice. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Targeting TXNIP expression prevented early retinal ganglion cell death, glial activation, retinal inflammation and secondary neuro/microvascular degeneration and preserved retinal function. TXNIP is a promising new therapeutic target for retinal neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24283717

  7. [Unusual retinal abnormality: retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy].

    PubMed

    Errera, M-H; Dupas, B; Man, H; Gualino, V; Gaudric, A; Massin, P

    2011-03-01

    A diet restricted to rice and boiled fruit and vegetables leads to vitamin C deficiency. We describe the third case, to our knowledge, of retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy. Reduced bilateral visual acuity in a 50-year-old patient was associated with macrocytic anemia, denutrition, and cutaneous ecchymoses. Oral vitamin C treatment provided subjective clinical improvement and regression of the retinal hemorrhages on fundus examination, with no side effects. Vitamin C plays an important role in collagen stability in vascular and bone walls. PMID:21392843

  8. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  9. Lipid Acyl Chain Remodeling in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Renne, Mike F.; Bao, Xue; De Smet, Cedric H.; de Kroon, Anton I. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane lipid homeostasis is maintained by de novo synthesis, intracellular transport, remodeling, and degradation of lipid molecules. Glycerophospholipids, the most abundant structural component of eukaryotic membranes, are subject to acyl chain remodeling, which is defined as the post-synthetic process in which one or both acyl chains are exchanged. Here, we review studies addressing acyl chain remodeling of membrane glycerophospholipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model organism that has been successfully used to investigate lipid synthesis and its regulation. Experimental evidence for the occurrence of phospholipid acyl chain exchange in cardiolipin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine is summarized, including methods and tools that have been used for detecting remodeling. Progress in the identification of the enzymes involved is reported, and putative functions of acyl chain remodeling in yeast are discussed. PMID:26819558

  10. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  11. Adipose Tissue Remodeling: Its Role in Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Choe, Sung Sik; Huh, Jin Young; Hwang, In Jae; Kim, Jong In; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secrete various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue-resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic overnutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response. PMID:27148161

  12. Adipose Tissue Remodeling: Its Role in Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Sung Sik; Huh, Jin Young; Hwang, In Jae; Kim, Jong In; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secrete various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue-resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic overnutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response. PMID:27148161

  13. Interstitial growth and remodeling of biological tissues: tissue composition as state variables.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kristin; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2014-01-01

    Growth and remodeling of biological tissues involves mass exchanges between soluble building blocks in the tissue's interstitial fluid and the various constituents of cells and the extracellular matrix. As the content of these various constituents evolves with growth, associated material properties, such as the elastic modulus of the extracellular matrix, may similarly evolve. Therefore, growth theories may be formulated by accounting for the evolution of tissue composition over time in response to various biological and mechanical triggers. This approach has been the foundation of classical bone remodeling theories that successfully describe Wolff's law by establishing a dependence between Young's modulus and bone apparent density and by formulating a constitutive relation between bone mass supply and the state of strain. The goal of this study is to demonstrate that adding tissue composition as state variables in the constitutive relations governing the stress-strain response and the mass supply represents a very general and straightforward method to model interstitial growth and remodeling in a wide variety of biological tissues. The foundation for this approach is rooted in the framework of mixture theory, which models the tissue as a mixture of multiple solid and fluid constituents. A further generalization is to allow each solid constituent in a constrained solid mixture to have its own reference (stress-free) configuration. Several illustrations are provided, ranging from bone remodeling to cartilage tissue engineering and cervical remodeling during pregnancy. PMID:23562499

  14. Interstitial Growth and Remodeling of Biological Tissues: Tissue Composition as State Variables

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kristin; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2013-01-01

    Growth and remodeling of biological tissues involves mass exchanges between soluble building blocks in the tissue’s interstitial fluid and the various constituents of cells and the extracellular matrix. As the content of these various constituents evolves with growth, associated material properties, such as the elastic modulus of the extracellular matrix, may similarly evolve. Therefore, growth theories may be formulated by accounting for the evolution of tissue composition over time in response to various biological and mechanical triggers. This approach has been the foundation of classical bone remodeling theories that successfully describe Wolff’s law by establishing a dependence between Young’s modulus and bone apparent density and by formulating a constitutive relation between bone mass supply and the state of strain. The goal of this study is to demonstrate that adding tissue composition as state variables in the constitutive relations governing the stress-strain response and the mass supply represents a very general and straightforward method to model interstitial growth and remodeling in a wide variety of biological tissues. The foundation for this approach is rooted in the framework of mixture theory, which models the tissue as a mixture of multiple solid and fluid constituents. A further generalization is to allow each solid constituent in a constrained solid mixture to have its own reference (stress-free) configuration. Several illustrations are provided, ranging from bone remodeling to cartilage tissue engineering and cervical remodeling during pregnancy. PMID:23562499

  15. Transcorneal Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Retinal Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-03

    Retinitis Pigmentosa; Macula Off; Primary Open Angle Glaucoma; Hereditary Macular Degeneration; Treated Retina Detachment; Retinal Artery Occlusion; Retinal Vein Occlusion; Non-Arthritic-Anterior-Ischemic Optic-Neuropathy; Hereditary Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy; Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration; Ischemic Macula Edema

  16. Clinical Trials in Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Seanna R.; Finn, Avni; Papakostas, Thanos D.; Eliott, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Research development is burgeoning for genetic and cellular therapy for retinal dystrophies. These dystrophies are the focus of many research efforts due to the unique biology and accessibility of the eye, the transformative advances in ocular imaging technology that allows for in vivo monitoring, and the potential benefit people would gain from success in the field – the gift of renewed sight. Progress in the field has revealed the immense complexity of retinal dystrophies and the challenges faced by researchers in the development of this technology. This study reviews the current trials and advancements in genetic and cellular therapy in the treatment of retinal dystrophies and also discusses the current and potential future challenges. PMID:26957839

  17. Retinal spot size with wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Eilert, Brent; Druessel, Jeffrey J.; Payne, Dale J.; Phillips, Shana L.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1997-06-01

    We have made an indirect in-vivo determination of spot size focusing in the rhesus monkey model. Measurement of the laser induced breakdown threshold both in-vitro and in-vivo allow correlation and assignment of a spot size after focusing through the living eye. We discuss and analyze the results and show how trends in minimum visible lesion data should be assessed in light of chromatic aberration. National laser safety standards are based on minimal visual lesion (MVL) threshold studies in different animal models. The energy required for a retinal lesion depends upon may parameters including wavelength and retinal spot size. We attempt to explain trends in reported MVL threshold studies using a model of the eye which allows calculation of changes in retinal spot size due to chromatic aberration.

  18. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eui Seok; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. PMID:25667739

  19. Thyroid Hormone and Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism affect the cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism is known to be associated with enhanced atherosclerosis and ischemic heart diseases. The accelerated atherosclerosis in the hypothyroid state has been traditionally ascribed to atherogenic lipid profile, diastolic hypertension, and impaired endothelial function. However, recent studies indicate that thyroid hormone has direct anti-atherosclerotic effects, such as production of nitric oxide and suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation. These data suggest that thyroid hormone inhibits atherogenesis through direct effects on the vasculature as well as modification of risk factors for atherosclerosis. This review summarizes the basic and clinical studies on the role of thyroid hormone in vascular remodeling. The possible application of thyroid hormone mimetics to the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis is also discussed. PMID:26558400

  20. Calcium signalling remodelling and disease.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    A wide range of Ca2+ signalling systems deliver the spatial and temporal Ca2+ signals necessary to control the specific functions of different cell types. Release of Ca2+ by InsP3 (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) plays a central role in many of these signalling systems. Ongoing transcriptional processes maintain the integrity and stability of these cell-specific signalling systems. However, these homoeostatic systems are highly plastic and can undergo a process of phenotypic remodelling, resulting in the Ca2+ signals being set either too high or too low. Such subtle dysregulation of Ca2+ signals have been linked to some of the major diseases in humans such as cardiac disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22435804

  1. Exploring the retinal connectome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James R.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Shaw, Margaret V.; Yang, Jia-Hui; DeMill, David; Lauritzen, James S.; Lin, Yanhua; Rapp, Kevin D.; Mastronarde, David; Koshevoy, Pavel; Grimm, Bradley; Tasdizen, Tolga; Whitaker, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A connectome is a comprehensive description of synaptic connectivity for a neural domain. Our goal was to produce a connectome data set for the inner plexiform layer of the mammalian retina. This paper describes our first retinal connectome, validates the method, and provides key initial findings. Methods We acquired and assembled a 16.5 terabyte connectome data set RC1 for the rabbit retina at ≈2 nm resolution using automated transmission electron microscope imaging, automated mosaicking, and automated volume registration. RC1 represents a column of tissue 0.25 mm in diameter, spanning the inner nuclear, inner plexiform, and ganglion cell layers. To enhance ultrastructural tracing, we included molecular markers for 4-aminobutyrate (GABA), glutamate, glycine, taurine, glutamine, and the in vivo activity marker, 1-amino-4-guanidobutane. This enabled us to distinguish GABAergic and glycinergic amacrine cells; to identify ON bipolar cells coupled to glycinergic cells; and to discriminate different kinds of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells based on their molecular signatures and activity. The data set was explored and annotated with Viking, our multiuser navigation tool. Annotations were exported to additional applications to render cells, visualize network graphs, and query the database. Results Exploration of RC1 showed that the 2 nm resolution readily recapitulated well known connections and revealed several new features of retinal organization: (1) The well known AII amacrine cell pathway displayed more complexity than previously reported, with no less than 17 distinct signaling modes, including ribbon synapse inputs from OFF bipolar cells, wide-field ON cone bipolar cells and rod bipolar cells, and extensive input from cone-pathway amacrine cells. (2) The axons of most cone bipolar cells formed a distinct signal integration compartment, with ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses targeting diverse cell types. Both ON and OFF bipolar cells receive

  2. Retinal Image Quality During Accommodation

    PubMed Central

    López-Gil, N.; Martin, J.; Liu, T.; Bradley, A.; Díaz-Muñoz, D.; Thibos, L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We asked if retinal image quality is maximum during accommodation, or sub-optimal due to accommodative error, when subjects perform an acuity task. Methods Subjects viewed a monochromatic (552nm), high-contrast letter target placed at various viewing distances. Wavefront aberrations of the accommodating eye were measured near the endpoint of an acuity staircase paradigm. Refractive state, defined as the optimum target vergence for maximising retinal image quality, was computed by through-focus wavefront analysis to find the power of the virtual correcting lens that maximizes visual Strehl ratio. Results Despite changes in ocular aberrations and pupil size during binocular viewing, retinal image quality and visual acuity typically remain high for all target vergences. When accommodative errors lead to sub-optimal retinal image quality, acuity and measured image quality both decline. However, the effect of accommodation errors of on visual acuity are mitigated by pupillary constriction associated with accommodation and binocular convergence and also to binocular summation of dissimilar retinal image blur. Under monocular viewing conditions some subjects displayed significant accommodative lag that reduced visual performance, an effect that was exacerbated by pharmacological dilation of the pupil. Conclusions Spurious measurement of accommodative error can be avoided when the image quality metric used to determine refractive state is compatible with the focusing criteria used by the visual system to control accommodation. Real focusing errors of the accommodating eye do not necessarily produce a reliably measurable loss of image quality or clinically significant loss of visual performance, probably because of increased depth-of-focus due to pupil constriction. When retinal image quality is close to maximum achievable (given the eye’s higher-order aberrations), acuity is also near maximum. A combination of accommodative lag, reduced image quality, and reduced

  3. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  4. New Wrinkles in Retinal Densitometry

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Benjamin D.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinal densitometry provides objective information about retinal function. But, a number of factors, including retinal reflectance changes that are not directly related to photopigment depletion, complicate its interpretation. We explore these factors and suggest a method to minimize their impact. Methods. An adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to measure changes in photoreceptor reflectance in monkeys before and after photopigment bleaching with 514-nm light. Reflectance measurements at 514 nm and 794 nm were recorded simultaneously. Several methods of normalization to extract the apparent optical density of the photopigment were compared. Results. We identified stimulus-related fluctuations in 794-nm reflectance that are not associated with photopigment absorptance and occur in both rods and cones. These changes had a magnitude approaching those associated directly with pigment depletion, precluding the use of infrared reflectance for normalization. We used a spatial normalization method instead, which avoided the fluctuations in the near infrared, as well as a confocal AOSLO designed to minimize light from layers other than the receptors. However, these methods produced a surprisingly low estimate of the apparent rhodopsin density (animal 1: 0.073 ± 0.006, animal 2: 0.032 ± 0.003). Conclusions. These results confirm earlier observations that changes in photopigment absorption are not the only source of retinal reflectance change during dark adaptation. It appears that the stray light that has historically reduced the apparent density of cone photopigment in retinal densitometry arises predominantly from layers near the photoreceptors themselves. Despite these complications, this method provides a valuable, objective measure of retinal function. PMID:25316726

  5. Transcriptome analysis and molecular signature of human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Strunnikova, N.V.; Maminishkis, A.; Barb, J.J.; Wang, F.; Zhi, C.; Sergeev, Y.; Chen, W.; Edwards, A.O.; Stambolian, D.; Abecasis, G.; Swaroop, A.; Munson, P.J.; Miller, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a polarized cell layer critical for photoreceptor function and survival. The unique physiology and relationship to the photoreceptors make the RPE a critical determinant of human vision. Therefore, we performed a global expression profiling of native and cultured human fetal and adult RPE and determined a set of highly expressed ‘signature’ genes by comparing the observed RPE gene profiles to the Novartis expression database (SymAtlas: http://wombat.gnf.org/index.html) of 78 tissues. Using stringent selection criteria of at least 10-fold higher expression in three distinct preparations, we identified 154 RPE signature genes, which were validated by qRT-PCR analysis in RPE and in an independent set of 11 tissues. Several of the highly expressed signature genes encode proteins involved in visual cycle, melanogenesis and cell adhesion and Gene ontology analysis enabled the assignment of RPE signature genes to epithelial channels and transporters (ClCN4, BEST1, SLCA20) or matrix remodeling (TIMP3, COL8A2). Fifteen RPE signature genes were associated with known ophthalmic diseases, and 25 others were mapped to regions of disease loci. An evaluation of the RPE signature genes in a recently completed AMD genomewide association (GWA) data set revealed that TIMP3, GRAMD3, PITPNA and CHRNA3 signature genes may have potential roles in AMD pathogenesis and deserve further examination. We propose that RPE signature genes are excellent candidates for retinal diseases and for physiological investigations (e.g. dopachrome tautomerase in melanogenesis). The RPE signature gene set should allow the validation of RPE-like cells derived from human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells for cell-based therapies of degenerative retinal diseases. PMID:20360305

  6. Expression Profiling after Retinal Detachment and Reattachment: A Possible Role for Aquaporin-0

    PubMed Central

    Farjo, Rafal; Peterson, Ward M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Retinal detachment (RD) is associated with acute visual loss caused by anatomic displacement of the photoreceptors and with chronic visual loss/disturbance caused by retinal remodeling and photoreceptor cell death, which may occur even after successful reattachment. The P2Y2 receptor agonist INS37217 improves the rate of retinal reattachment in animal models of induced RD, and has been shown to also significantly enhance the rate of ERG recovery in a mouse model of RD. The identification of genes modulated by INS37217 may allow further drug discovery for treating RD and edema. Methods To identify genes involved in RD and subsequent reattachment, a retinal microarray screen was performed using a mouse model of RD in the presence or absence of INS37217. Results Ninety-two genes were identified as differentially expressed across three time points, most of which were upregulated in the presence of this agonist. Furthermore, it was shown that RD alters the expression of aquaporin-0 (AQP-0), and this modulation is prevented by treatment with INS37217. The presence of AQP-0 in retinal bipolar cells was also demonstrated, whereas it was previously thought to be specific to the lens. Mice lacking functional alleles of AQP-0 had a photo-transduction deficit as assessed by electroretinography; however, their photoreceptor structure was normal, indicative of a problem with signal transmission between neurons. Conclusions This study establishes the genes involved in RD and reattachment, and also demonstrates for the first time a physiologically significant role for AQP-0 in retinal function. PMID:18234993

  7. Causality and headache triggers

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Dana P.; Smitherman, Todd A.; Martin, Vincent T.; Penzien, Donald B.; Houle, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the conditions necessary to assign causal status to headache triggers. Background The term “headache trigger” is commonly used to label any stimulus that is assumed to cause headaches. However, the assumptions required for determining if a given stimulus in fact has a causal-type relationship in eliciting headaches have not been explicated. Methods A synthesis and application of Rubin’s Causal Model is applied to the context of headache causes. From this application the conditions necessary to infer that one event (trigger) causes another (headache) are outlined using basic assumptions and examples from relevant literature. Results Although many conditions must be satisfied for a causal attribution, three basic assumptions are identified for determining causality in headache triggers: 1) constancy of the sufferer; 2) constancy of the trigger effect; and 3) constancy of the trigger presentation. A valid evaluation of a potential trigger’s effect can only be undertaken once these three basic assumptions are satisfied during formal or informal studies of headache triggers. Conclusions Evaluating these assumptions is extremely difficult or infeasible in clinical practice, and satisfying them during natural experimentation is unlikely. Researchers, practitioners, and headache sufferers are encouraged to avoid natural experimentation to determine the causal effects of headache triggers. Instead, formal experimental designs or retrospective diary studies using advanced statistical modeling techniques provide the best approaches to satisfy the required assumptions and inform causal statements about headache triggers. PMID:23534872

  8. AMY trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yoshihide

    1989-04-01

    A trigger system of the AMY detector at TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is described briefly. The system uses simple track segment and shower cluster counting scheme to classify events to be triggered. It has been operating successfully since 1987.

  9. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  10. The trophic effect of ouabain on retinal ganglion cells is mediated by IL-1β and TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Salles von-Held-Ventura, Juliana; Mázala-de-Oliveira, Thalita; Cândida da Rocha Oliveira, Amanda; Granja, Marcelo Gomes; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Giestal-de-Araujo, Elizabeth

    2016-09-01

    Ouabain is a steroid hormone that binds to the enzyme Na(+), K(+) - ATPase and stimulates different intracellular pathways controlling growth, proliferation and cell survival. IL-1β and TNF-α are pleiotropic molecules, conventionally regarded as pro-inflammatory cytokines with well-known effects in the immune system. In addition, IL-1β and TNF-α also play important roles in the nervous system including neuroprotective effects. Previous data from our group showed that ouabain treatment is able to induce an increase in retinal ganglion cell survival kept in mixed retinal cell cultures. The aim of this work was to investigate if IL-1β and TNF-α could be mediating the trophic effect of ouabain on retinal ganglion cells. Our results show that the trophic effect of ouabain on retinal ganglion cell was inhibited by either anti-IL-1β or anti-TNF-α antibodies. In agreement, IL-1β or TNF-α increased the retinal ganglion cells survival in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, ouabain treatment induces a temporal release of TNF-α and IL-1β from retinal cell cultures. Interestingly, TNF-α and IL-1β regulate each other intracellular levels. Our results suggest that ouabain treatment triggers the activation of TNF-α and IL-1β signaling pathways leading to an increase in retinal ganglion cell survival. PMID:27412645

  11. Stress-induced remodeling of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Bruce S

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of steroid hormone receptors in brain regions that mediate virtually every aspect of brain function has broadened the definition of 'neuroendocrinology' to include the reciprocal communication between the brain and the body via hormonal and neural pathways. The brain is the central organ of stress and adaptation to stress because it perceives and determines what is threatening, as well as determining the behavioral and physiological responses to the stressor. The adult and developing brain possess remarkable structural and functional plasticity in response to stress, including neurogenesis leading to neuronal replacement, dendritic remodeling, and synapse turnover. Stress causes an imbalance of neural circuitry subserving cognition, decision-making, anxiety and mood that can alter expression of those behaviors and behavioral states. The two Brain Research papers noted in this review played an important role in triggering these advances. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. PMID:26740399

  12. Chromatin Remodeling Inactivates Activity Genes and Regulates Neural Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kelly K.; Hemberg, Martin; Reddy, Naveen C.; Cho, Ha Y.; Guthrie, Arden N.; Oldenborg, Anna; Heiney, Shane A.; Ohmae, Shogo; Medina, Javier F.; Holy, Timothy E.; Bonni, Azad

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcription influences neuronal connectivity, but the roles and mechanisms of inactivation of activity-dependent genes have remained poorly understood. Genome-wide analyses in the mouse cerebellum revealed that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex deposits the histone variant H2A.z at promoters of activity-dependent genes, thereby triggering their inactivation. Purification of translating mRNAs from synchronously developing granule neurons (Sync-TRAP) showed that conditional knockout of the core NuRD subunit Chd4 impairs inactivation of activity-dependent genes when neurons undergo dendrite pruning. Chd4 knockout or expression of NuRD-regulated activity genes impairs dendrite pruning. Imaging of behaving mice revealed hyperresponsivity of granule neurons to sensorimotor stimuli upon Chd4 knockout. Our findings define an epigenetic mechanism that inactivates activity-dependent transcription and regulates dendrite patterning and sensorimotor encoding in the brain. PMID:27418512

  13. Rapid light-induced activation of retinal microglia in mice lacking Arrestin-1

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Emily S.; Zam, Azhar; Zhang, Pengfei; Pechko, Alina; Wang, Xinlei; FitzGerald, Paul; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Burns, Marie E.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia dynamically prune synaptic contacts during development, and digest waste that accumulates in degeneration and aging. In many neurodegenerative diseases, microglial activation and phagocytosis gradually increase over months or years, with poorly defined initial triggering events. Here, we describe rapid retinal microglial activation in response to physiological light levels in a mouse model of photoreceptor degeneration that arises from defective rhodopsin deactivation and prolonged signaling. Activation, migration and proliferation of microglia proceeded along a well-defined time course apparent within 12 hours of light onset. Retinal imaging in vivo with optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed dramatic increases in light-scattering from photoreceptors prior to the outer nuclear layer thinning classically used as a measure of retinal neurodegeneration. This model is valuable for mechanistic studies of microglial activation in a well-defined and optically accessible neural circuit, and for the development of novel methods for detecting early signs of pending neurodegeneration in vivo. PMID:25091460

  14. Suppression and retinal correspondence in intermittent exotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J; Record, C D

    1986-01-01

    Suppression scotomas and retinal projection (retinal correspondence) were measured in six intermittent exotropes during deviation. Measurements used red-green anaglyph stimuli presented on a black background which could be varied from 3.4 minutes of arc to 3 degrees 24'. Results showed non-suppression of all points between the fovea and the diplopia point. Harmonious anomalous retinal correspondence was usually observed. Two subjects had spontaneous changes from anomalous retinal correspondence to normal retinal correspondence without a concurrent change in ocular position. Conventional testing resulted in more variable results in regard to retinal correspondence and suppression, suggesting that non-suppression and anomalous retinal correspondence occur when black backgrounds are used for testing. PMID:3756124

  15. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Education Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa includes a number of inherited diseases which usually result in blindness. The disease is progressive in nature and begins with the deterioration of cells in the eye responsible for peripheral vision. As the condition worsens there is a gradual loss of peripheral vision and night blindness. Proper educational planning requires…

  16. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so- called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all ’interesting” decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. Methods studied include cascading, ensembling and blending techniques. Furthermore, novel boosting techniques have been implemented that will help reduce systematic uncertainties in Run 2 measurements. We demonstrate that the reoptimized topological trigger is expected to significantly improve on the Run 1 performance for a wide range of b-hadron decays.

  17. Unfolded protein response-induced dysregulation of calcium homeostasis promotes retinal degeneration in rat models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, V; Kotla, P; Strang, C; Gorbatyuk, M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) in rats is closely associated with a persistently activated unfolded protein response (UPR). If unchecked, the UPR might trigger apoptosis, leading to photoreceptor death. One of the UPR-activated cellular signaling culminating in apoptotic photoreceptor cell death is linked to an increase in intracellular Ca2+. Therefore, we validated whether ADRP retinas experience a cytosolic Ca2+ overload, and whether sustained UPR in the wild-type retina could promote retinal degeneration through Ca2+-mediated calpain activation. We performed an ex vivo experiment to measure intracellular Ca2+ in ADRP retinas as well as to detect the expression levels of proteins that act as Ca2+ sensors. In separate experiments with the subretinal injection of tunicamycin (UPR inducer) and a mixture of calcium ionophore (A231278) and thapsigargin (SERCA2b inhibitor) we assessed the consequences of a sustained UPR activation and increased intracellular Ca2+ in the wild-type retina, respectively, by performing scotopic ERG, histological, and western blot analyses. Results of the study revealed that induced UPR in the retina activates calpain-mediated signaling, and increased intracellular Ca2+ is capable of promoting retinal degeneration. A significant decline in ERG amplitudes at 6 weeks post treatment was associated with photoreceptor cell loss that occurred through calpain-activated CDK5-pJNK-Csp3/7 pathway. Similar calpain activation was found in ADRP rat retinas. A twofold increase in intracellular Ca2+ and up- and downregulations of ER membrane-associated Ca2+-regulated IP3R channels and SERCA2b transporters were detected. Therefore, sustained UPR activation in the ADRP rat retinas could promote retinal degeneration through increased intracellular Ca2+ and calpain-mediated apoptosis.

  18. Unfolded protein response-induced dysregulation of calcium homeostasis promotes retinal degeneration in rat models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, V; Kotla, P; Strang, C; Gorbatyuk, M

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) in rats is closely associated with a persistently activated unfolded protein response (UPR). If unchecked, the UPR might trigger apoptosis, leading to photoreceptor death. One of the UPR-activated cellular signaling culminating in apoptotic photoreceptor cell death is linked to an increase in intracellular Ca2+. Therefore, we validated whether ADRP retinas experience a cytosolic Ca2+ overload, and whether sustained UPR in the wild-type retina could promote retinal degeneration through Ca2+-mediated calpain activation. We performed an ex vivo experiment to measure intracellular Ca2+ in ADRP retinas as well as to detect the expression levels of proteins that act as Ca2+ sensors. In separate experiments with the subretinal injection of tunicamycin (UPR inducer) and a mixture of calcium ionophore (A231278) and thapsigargin (SERCA2b inhibitor) we assessed the consequences of a sustained UPR activation and increased intracellular Ca2+ in the wild-type retina, respectively, by performing scotopic ERG, histological, and western blot analyses. Results of the study revealed that induced UPR in the retina activates calpain-mediated signaling, and increased intracellular Ca2+ is capable of promoting retinal degeneration. A significant decline in ERG amplitudes at 6 weeks post treatment was associated with photoreceptor cell loss that occurred through calpain-activated CDK5-pJNK-Csp3/7 pathway. Similar calpain activation was found in ADRP rat retinas. A twofold increase in intracellular Ca2+ and up- and downregulations of ER membrane-associated Ca2+-regulated IP3R channels and SERCA2b transporters were detected. Therefore, sustained UPR activation in the ADRP rat retinas could promote retinal degeneration through increased intracellular Ca2+ and calpain-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26844699

  19. On the retinal toxicity of intraocular glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Torriglia, Alicia; Valamanesh, Fatemeh; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2010-12-15

    Corticosteroids are hormones involved in many physiological responses such as stress, immune modulation, protein catabolism and water homeostasis. The subfamily of glucocorticoids is used systemically in the treatment of inflammatory diseases or allergic reactions. In the eye, glucocorticoides are used to treat macular edema, inflammation and neovascularization. The most commonly used glucocorticoid is triamcinolone acetonide (TA). The pharmaceutical formulation of TA is not adapted for intravitreal administration but has been selected by ophthalmologists because its very low intraocular solubility provides sustained effect. Visual benefits of intraocular TA do not clearly correlate with morpho-anatomical improvements, suggesting potential toxicity. We therefore studied, non-common, but deleterious effects of glucocorticoids on the retina. We found that the intravitreal administration of TA is beneficial in the treatment of neovascularization because it triggers cell death of endothelial cells of neovessels by a caspase-independent mechanism. However, this treatment is toxic for the retina because it induces a non-apoptotic, caspase-independent cell death related to paraptosis, mostly in the retinal pigmented epithelium cells and the Müller cells. PMID:20654583

  20. Lead Poisoning in Remodeling of Old Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Bart

    1973-01-01

    An article based on Dr. Muriel D. Wolf's study of elevated blood lead levels in children and adults present during the remodeling of old homes. Lead poisoning examples, symptoms, and precautions are given. (ST)

  1. Bone Remodeling Under Pathological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenmei; Li, Shuai; Pacios, Sandra; Wang, Yu; Graves, Dana T

    2016-01-01

    Bone is masterfully programmed to repair itself through the coupling of bone formation following bone resorption, a process referred to as coupling. In inflammatory or other conditions, the balance between bone resorption and bone formation shifts so that a net bone loss results. This review focuses on four pathologic conditions in which remodeling leads to net loss of bone, postmenopausal osteoporosis, arthritis, periodontal disease, and disuse bone loss, which is similar to bone loss associated with microgravity. In most of these there is an acceleration of the resorptive process due to increased formation of bone metabolic units. This initially leads to a net bone loss since the time period of resorption is much faster than the time needed for bone formation that follows. In addition, each of these processes is characterized by an uncoupling that leads to net bone loss. Mechanisms responsible for increased rates of bone resorption, i.e. the formation of more bone metabolic units, involve enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased expression of RANKL. Moreover, the reasons for uncoupling are discussed which range from a decrease in expression of growth factors and bone morphogenetic proteins to increased expression of factors that inhibit Wnt signaling. PMID:26599114

  2. Remodeling kitchens: A smorgasbord of energy savings

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, B.

    1995-09-01

    The kitchen is often the busiest room in the house and is most likely to remodeled repeatedly over the life of a house. The kitchen also represents a concentration of household energy use. Remodeling a kitchen can mean introducing a host of new energy-saving features or making major energy blunders. This article discusses ways to utilized the best features: layout and design; appliances; lighting; windows and skylights; ventilation; insulation and air sealing; water; household recycling; green building materials.

  3. Effect of material damping on bone remodelling.

    PubMed

    Misra, J C; Samanta, S

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the effect of internal material damping on the stresses, strains, and surface and internal remodelling behaviour in a section of axisymmetrical bone with a force-fitted axially oriented medullary pin. The bone response to several loading situations is modelled using visco-elastic equations. An approximate method is developed to analyse the proposed mathematical model. By considering a numerical example, the effect of material damping on the remodelling stresses is quantified. PMID:3584150

  4. Chromatin remodeling by nucleosome disassembly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2006-02-28

    The RSC chromatin-remodeling complex completely disassembles a nucleosome in the presence of the histone chaperone Nap1 and ATP. Disassembly occurs in a stepwise manner, with the removal of H2A/H2B dimers, followed by the rest of the histones and the release of naked DNA. RSC and related chromatin-remodeling complexes may be responsible for the removal of promoter nucleosomes during transcriptional activation in vivo. PMID:16492771

  5. Biomechanics of vascular mechanosensation and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Flowing blood exerts a frictional force, fluid shear stress (FSS), on the endothelial cells that line the blood and lymphatic vessels. The magnitude, pulsatility, and directional characteristics of FSS are constantly sensed by the endothelium. Sustained increases or decreases in FSS induce vessel remodeling to maintain proper perfusion of tissue. In this review, we discuss these mechanisms and their relevance to physiology and disease, and propose a model for how information from different mechanosensors might be integrated to govern remodeling. PMID:26715421

  6. Activation of Neuropeptide Y Receptors Modulates Retinal Ganglion Cell Physiology and Exerts Neuroprotective Actions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Martins, João; Elvas, Filipe; Brudzewsky, Dan; Martins, Tânia; Kolomiets, Bogdan; Tralhão, Pedro; Gøtzsche, Casper R.; Cavadas, Cláudia; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Woldbye, David P. D.; Picaud, Serge; Santiago, Ana R.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is expressed in mammalian retina but the location and potential modulatory effects of NPY receptor activation remain largely unknown. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is a hallmark of several retinal degenerative diseases, particularly glaucoma. Using purified RGCs and ex vivo rat retinal preparations, we have measured RGC intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and RGC spiking activity, respectively. We found that NPY attenuated the increase in the [Ca2+]i triggered by glutamate mainly via Y1 receptor activation. Moreover, (Leu31, Pro34)−NPY, a Y1/Y5 receptor agonist, increased the initial burst response of OFF-type RGCs, although no effect was observed on RGC spontaneous spiking activity. The Y1 receptor activation was also able to directly modulate RGC responses by attenuating the NMDA-induced increase in RGC spiking activity. These results suggest that Y1 receptor activation, at the level of inner or outer plexiform layers, leads to modulation of RGC receptive field properties. Using in vitro cultures of rat retinal explants exposed to NMDA, we found that NPY pretreatment prevented NMDA-induced cell death. However, in an animal model of retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury, pretreatment with NPY or (Leu31, Pro34)−NPY was not able to prevent apoptosis or rescue RGCs. In conclusion, we found modulatory effects of NPY application that for the first time were detected at the level of RGCs. However, further studies are needed to evaluate whether NPY neuroprotective actions detected in retinal explants can be translated into animal models of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:26311075

  7. Retinal vasculature classification using novel multifractal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Ward, W. O. C.; Duan, Jinming; Auer, D. P.; Gowland, Penny; Bai, L.

    2015-11-01

    Retinal blood vessels have been implicated in a large number of diseases including diabetic retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases, which cause damages to retinal blood vessels. The availability of retinal vessel imaging provides an excellent opportunity for monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, and automatic analysis of retinal vessels will help with the processes. However, state of the art vascular analysis methods such as counting the number of branches or measuring the curvature and diameter of individual vessels are unsuitable for the microvasculature. There has been published research using fractal analysis to calculate fractal dimensions of retinal blood vessels, but so far there has been no systematic research extracting discriminant features from retinal vessels for classifications. This paper introduces new methods for feature extraction from multifractal spectra of retinal vessels for classification. Two publicly available retinal vascular image databases are used for the experiments, and the proposed methods have produced accuracies of 85.5% and 77% for classification of healthy and diabetic retinal vasculatures. Experiments show that classification with multiple fractal features produces better rates compared with methods using a single fractal dimension value. In addition to this, experiments also show that classification accuracy can be affected by the accuracy of vessel segmentation algorithms.

  8. Case report of optic disc drusen with simultaneous peripapillary subretinal hemorrhage and central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Law, David Zhiwei; Yang, Francine Pei Lin; Teoh, Stephen Charn Beng

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old Chinese gentleman presented with right eye floaters and photopsia over one week. His visual acuities were 20/20 bilaterally. Posterior segment examination showed a right eye swollen optic disc and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) associated with an area of subretinal hemorrhage adjacent to the optic disc. Fundus fluorescein (FA) and indocyanine green angiographies (ICGA) of the right eye did not demonstrate choroidal neovascularization (CNV), polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), or retinal ischemia. Ultrasound B-scan revealed optic disc drusen (ODD). In view of good vision and absence of CNV, he was managed conservatively with spontaneous resolution after two months. Commonly, ODD may directly compress and mechanically rupture subretinal vessels at the optic disc, resulting in peripapillary subretinal hemorrhage, as was likely the case in our patient. Mechanical impairment of peripapillary circulation also results in retinal ischemia and may trigger the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and/or polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), leading to subretinal haemorrhage. Compromise in central venous outflow with increased retinal central venous pressure from the direct mechanical effects of enlarging ODD results in central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). Patients with subretinal hemorrhage and CRVO from ODD should be monitored closely for the development of potentially sight-threatening complications. PMID:25544921

  9. Common Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... your bedding on the hottest water setting. Outdoor Air Pollution Outdoor air pollution can trigger an asthma attack. This pollution can ... your newspaper to plan your activities for when air pollution levels will be low. Cockroach Allergen Cockroaches and ...

  10. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... smell given off by paint or gas, and air pollution. If you notice that an irritant triggers your ... or other tobacco products around you. If outdoor air pollution is a problem, running the air conditioner or ...

  11. ELECTRONIC TRIGGER CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.A.G.

    1958-01-01

    An electronic trigger circuit is described of the type where an output pulse is obtained only after an input voltage has cqualed or exceeded a selected reference voltage. In general, the invention comprises a source of direct current reference voltage in series with an impedance and a diode rectifying element. An input pulse of preselected amplitude causes the diode to conduct and develop a signal across the impedance. The signal is delivered to an amplifier where an output pulse is produced and part of the output is fed back in a positive manner to the diode so that the amplifier produces a steep wave front trigger pulsc at the output. The trigger point of the described circuit is not subject to variation due to the aging, etc., of multi-electrode tabes, since the diode circuit essentially determines the trigger point.

  12. Calorimetry Triggering in ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Igonkina, O.; Achenbach, R.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Alexandre, G.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.; Aracena, I.; Backlund, S.; Baines, J.; Barnett, B.M.; Bauss, B.; Bee, C.; Behera, P.; Bell, P.; Bendel, M.; Benslama, K.; Berry, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Bohm, C.; Bold, T.; /UC, Irvine /AGH-UST, Cracow /Birmingham U. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Rutherford /Montreal U. /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Lisbon, LIFEP /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Birmingham U. /Copenhagen U. /Copenhagen U. /Brookhaven /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Montreal U. /SLAC /CERN /Michigan State U. /Chile U., Catolica /City Coll., N.Y. /Oxford U. /La Plata U. /McGill U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /CERN /Rutherford /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Birmingham U. /Montreal U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Liverpool U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Geneva U. /Birmingham U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /AGH-UST, Cracow /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Michigan State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /CERN /Montreal U. /Stockholm U. /Arizona U. /Regina U. /Regina U. /Rutherford /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /City Coll., N.Y. /University Coll. London /Humboldt U., Berlin /Queen Mary, U. of London /Argonne /LPSC, Grenoble /Arizona U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Antonio Narino U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Chile U., Catolica /Indiana U. /Manchester U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Rutherford /City Coll., N.Y. /Stockholm U. /La Plata U. /Antonio Narino U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Antonio Narino U. /Pavia U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Pennsylvania U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Chile U., Catolica /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Rutherford /Barcelona, IFAE /Nevis Labs, Columbia U. /CERN /Antonio Narino U. /McGill U. /Rutherford /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /Rutherford /Chile U., Catolica /Brookhaven /Oregon U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /McGill U. /Antonio Narino U. /Antonio Narino U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Sydney U. /Rutherford /McGill U. /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Moscow State U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Birmingham U. /Geneva U. /Oregon U. /Barcelona, IFAE /University Coll. London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Birmingham U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Oregon U. /La Plata U. /Geneva U. /Chile U., Catolica /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Regina U. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Oxford U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /UC, Irvine /UC, Irvine /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rutherford /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /CERN /Geneva U. /Copenhagen U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Stockholm U. /University Coll. London

    2011-12-08

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2/10{sup 5} to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  13. Dynamics of the Ethanolamine Glycerophospholipid Remodeling Network

    PubMed Central

    Hermansson, Martin; Somerharju, Pentti; Chuang, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Acyl chain remodeling in lipids is a critical biochemical process that plays a central role in disease. However, remodeling remains poorly understood, despite massive increases in lipidomic data. In this work, we determine the dynamic network of ethanolamine glycerophospholipid (PE) remodeling, using data from pulse-chase experiments and a novel bioinformatic network inference approach. The model uses a set of ordinary differential equations based on the assumptions that (1) sn1 and sn2 acyl positions are independently remodeled; (2) remodeling reaction rates are constant over time; and (3) acyl donor concentrations are constant. We use a novel fast and accurate two-step algorithm to automatically infer model parameters and their values. This is the first such method applicable to dynamic phospholipid lipidomic data. Our inference procedure closely fits experimental measurements and shows strong cross-validation across six independent experiments with distinct deuterium-labeled PE precursors, demonstrating the validity of our assumptions. In constrast, fits of randomized data or fits using random model parameters are worse. A key outcome is that we are able to robustly distinguish deacylation and reacylation kinetics of individual acyl chain types at the sn1 and sn2 positions, explaining the established prevalence of saturated and unsaturated chains in the respective positions. The present study thus demonstrates that dynamic acyl chain remodeling processes can be reliably determined from dynamic lipidomic data. PMID:23251394

  14. Mitochondria, myocardial remodeling, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Verdejo, Hugo E; del Campo, Andrea; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Gutierrez, Tomás; Toro, Barbra; Quiroga, Clara; Pedrozo, Zully; Munoz, Juan Pablo; Garcia, Lorena; Castro, Pablo F; Lavandero, Sergio

    2012-12-01

    The process of muscle remodeling lies at the core of most cardiovascular diseases. Cardiac adaptation to pressure or volume overload is associated with a complex molecular change in cardiomyocytes which leads to anatomic remodeling of the heart muscle. Although adaptive at its beginnings, the sustained cardiac hypertrophic remodeling almost unavoidably ends in progressive muscle dysfunction, heart failure and ultimately death. One of the features of cardiac remodeling is a progressive impairment in mitochondrial function. The heart has the highest oxygen uptake in the human body and accordingly it has a large number of mitochondria, which form a complex network under constant remodeling in order to sustain the high metabolic rate of cardiac cells and serve as Ca(2+) buffers acting together with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, this high dependence on mitochondrial metabolism has its costs: when oxygen supply is threatened, high leak of electrons from the electron transport chain leads to oxidative stress and mitochondrial failure. These three aspects of mitochondrial function (Reactive oxygen species signaling, Ca(2+) handling and mitochondrial dynamics) are critical for normal muscle homeostasis. In this article, we will review the latest evidence linking mitochondrial morphology and function with the process of myocardial remodeling and cardiovascular disease. PMID:22972531

  15. Epigenomic regulation of oncogenesis by chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Li, D-Q; Müller, S; Knapp, S

    2016-08-25

    Disruption of the intricate gene expression program represents one of major driving factors for the development, progression and maintenance of human cancer, and is often associated with acquired therapeutic resistance. At the molecular level, cancerous phenotypes are the outcome of cellular functions of critical genes, regulatory interactions of histones and chromatin remodeling complexes in response to dynamic and persistent upstream signals. A large body of genetic and biochemical evidence suggests that the chromatin remodelers integrate the extracellular and cytoplasmic signals to control gene activity. Consequently, widespread dysregulation of chromatin remodelers and the resulting inappropriate expression of regulatory genes, together, lead to oncogenesis. We summarize the recent developments and current state of the dysregulation of the chromatin remodeling components as the driving mechanism underlying the growth and progression of human tumors. Because chromatin remodelers, modifying enzymes and protein-protein interactions participate in interpreting the epigenetic code, selective chromatin remodelers and bromodomains have emerged as new frontiers for pharmacological intervention to develop future anti-cancer strategies to be used either as single-agent or in combination therapies with chemotherapeutics or radiotherapy. PMID:26804164

  16. Dynamic Triggering Stress Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Huizar, H.; Velasco, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    It has been well established that static (permanent) stress changes can trigger nearby earthquakes, within a few fault lengths from the causative event, whereas triggering by dynamic (transient) stresses carried by seismic waves both nearby and at remote distances has not been as well documented nor understood. An analysis of the change in the local stress caused by the passing of surfaces waves is important for the understanding of this phenomenon. In this study, we modeled the change in the stress that the passing of Rayleigh and Loves waves causes on a fault plane of arbitrary orientation, and applied a Coulomb failure criteria to calculate the potential of these stress changes to trigger reverse, normal or strike-slip failure. We preliminarily test these model results with data from dynamically triggering earthquakes in the Australian Bowen Basin. In the Bowen region, the modeling predicts a maximum triggering potential for Rayleigh waves arriving perpendicularly to the strike of the reverse faults present in the region. The modeled potentials agree with our observations, and give us an understanding of the dynamic stress orientation needed to trigger different type of earthquakes.

  17. Retinal vascular changes in hypertensive patients in Ibadan, Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Oluleye, Sunday Tunji; Olusanya, Bolutife Ayokunu; Adeoye, Abiodun Moshood

    2016-01-01

    Background Earlier studies in Nigeria reported the rarity of retinal vascular changes in hypertensives. The aim of this study was to describe the various retinal vascular changes in the hypertensive patients of Nigeria. Patients and methods Nine hundred and three hypertensive patients were studied. This study was approved by the ethical and research committee of the University of Ibadan and University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were measured. Cardiac echocardiography was performed on 156 patients. All patients had dilated fundoscopy and fundus photography using the Kowa portable fundus camera and an Apple iPhone with 20 D lens. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (Version 21). Results The mean age of patients was 57 years with a male:female ratio of 1. No retinopathy was found in 556 (61.5%) patients. In all, 175 (19.4%) patients had features of hypertensive retinopathy. Retinal vascular occlusion was a significant finding in 121 patients (13.4%), of which branch retinal vein occlusion, 43 (4.7%), and central retinal vein occlusion, 30 (3.3%), were the most prominent ones in cases. Hemicentral retinal vein occlusion, 26 (2.9%), and central retinal artery occlusion, 17 (1.9%), were significant presentations. Other findings included nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in five (0.6%) patients, hypertensive choroidopathy in seven (0.8%) patients, and hemorrhagic choroidal detachment in five (0.6%) patients. Left ventricular (LV) geometry was abnormal in 85 (55.5%) patients. Concentric remodeling, eccentric hypertrophy, and concentric hypertrophy were observed in 43 (27.6%), 26 (17.2%), and 15 (9.7%) patients, respectively. LV hypertrophy was found in 42 (27%) patients, while 60 (39%) patients had increased relative wall thickness. In this study, bivariate analysis showed a correlation between LV relative wall thickness and severity of retinopathy in both eyes

  18. The severity of retinal pathology in homozygous Crb1rd8/rd8 mice is dependent on additional genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Carvalho, Livia S; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha Kleine; Cowing, Jill A; Greenaway, Simon; Chu, Colin J; Herrmann, Philipp; Smith, Alexander J; Munro, Peter M G; Potter, Paul; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phenotype-genotype correlations in retinal degeneration is a major challenge. Mutations in CRB1 lead to a spectrum of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies with variable phenotypes suggesting the influence of modifying factors. To establish the contribution of the genetic background to phenotypic variability associated with the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation, we compared the retinal pathology of Crb1(rd8/rd8)/J inbred mice with that of two Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines backcrossed with C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. Topical endoscopic fundal imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy fundus images of all three Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines showed a significant increase in the number of inferior retinal lesions that was strikingly variable between the lines. Optical coherence tomography, semithin, ultrastructural morphology and assessment of inflammatory and vascular marker by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the lesions were associated with photoreceptor death, Müller and microglia activation and telangiectasia-like vascular remodelling-features that were stable in the inbred, variable in the second, but virtually absent in the third Crb1(rd8/rd8) line, even at 12 months of age. This suggests that the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation is necessary, but not sufficient for the development of these degenerative features. By whole-genome SNP analysis of the genotype-phenotype correlation, a candidate region on chromosome 15 was identified. This may carry one or more genetic modifiers for the manifestation of the retinal pathology associated with mutations in Crb1. This study also provides insight into the nature of the retinal vascular lesions that likely represent a clinical correlate for the formation of retinal telangiectasia or Coats-like vasculopathy in patients with CRB1 mutations that are thought to depend on such genetic modifiers. PMID:25147295

  19. Role of retinal metabolism in methanol-induced retinal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, C.D. |; Lee, E.W.; Terzo, T.S.; Louis-Ferdinand, R.T.

    1995-08-01

    Methanol is a toxicant that causes systemic and ocular toxicity after acute exposure. The folate-reduced (FR) rat is an excellent animal model that mimics characteristic human methanol toxic responses. The present study examines the role of the methanol metabolites formaldehyde and formate in the initiation of methanol-induced retinal toxicity. After a single oral dose of 3.0 g/kg methanol, blood methanol concentrations were not significantly different in FR rats compared with folate-sufficient (FS) (control) rats. However, FR rats treated with 3.0 g/kg methanol displayed elevated blood (14.6 mM) and vitreous humor (19.5 mM) formate levels and abnormal electroretinograms (loss of b-wave) 48 h postdose. FR rats pretreated with disulfiram (DSF) prior to 3.0 g/kg methanol treatment failed to display these symptoms. Formaldehyde was not detected in blood or vitreous humor with or without DSF treatment, suggesting that formate is the toxic metabolite in methanol-induced retinal toxicity. Additionally, creating a blood formate profile (14.2 mM at 48 h) similar to that observed in methanol-treated rats by iv infusion of pH-buffered formate does not alter the electroretinogram as is observed with methanol treatment. These data suggest that intraretinal metabolism of methanol is necessary for the formate-mediated initiation of methanol-induced retinal toxicity. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Cardiac remodelling and RAS inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Carlos M

    2016-06-01

    Risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes are known to augment the activity and tissue expression of angiotensin II (Ang II), the major effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Overstimulation of the RAS has been implicated in a chain of events that contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular (CV) disease, including the development of cardiac remodelling. This chain of events has been termed the CV continuum. The concept of CV disease existing as a continuum was first proposed in 1991 and it is believed that intervention at any point within the continuum can modify disease progression. Treatment with antihypertensive agents may result in regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, with different drug classes exhibiting different degrees of efficacy. The greatest decrease in left ventricular mass is observed following treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), which inhibit Ang II formation. Although ACE-Is and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) provide significant benefits in terms of CV events and stroke, mortality remains high. This is partly due to a failure to completely suppress the RAS, and, as our knowledge has increased, an escape phenomenon has been proposed whereby the human sequence of the 12 amino acid substrate angiotensin-(1-12) is converted to Ang II by the mast cell protease, chymase. Angiotensin-(1-12) is abundant in a wide range of organs and has been shown to increase blood pressure in animal models, an effect abolished by the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. This review explores the CV continuum, in addition to examining the influence of the RAS. We also consider novel pathways within the RAS and how new therapeutic approaches that target this are required to further reduce Ang II formation, and so provide patients with additional benefits from a more complete blockade of the RAS. PMID:27105891

  1. Role of retinal vascular endothelial cells in development of CMV retinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, N A; Zhang, J; Ishimoto, S

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is known to occur in association with retinal microangiopathy in individuals with marked immunodeficiency, glial cells are believed to be the initial target cells in the development of retinitis. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that CMV gains access to the retinal glia because of altered vascular permeability. In an attempt to address the hypothesis, we studied 30 autopsy eyes of AIDS patients with systemic CMV infection, with or without clinically apparent CMV retinitis. METHODS: The autopsy eyes were processed in three ways. First, dual immunohistochemical studies were done by using anti-CMV antibodies for immediate early, early, and late antigens. The retinal cell types infected with the virus were then determined by using anti-GFAP, anti-VonWillebrand's factor, neuronal specific enolase, and leukocyte marker CD68. Second, selected eyes were processed for in situ hybridization with DNA probe specific to CMV. Third, an eye with clinically apparent CMV retinitis was submitted for electron microscopic examination. RESULTS: At the site of retinal necrosis in those eyes with a clinical diagnosis of CMV retinitis, the immunohistochemical, in situ hybridization, and ultrastructural examinations revealed that CMV was present primarily in the Müller cells and in perivascular glial cells. Adjacent to these infected cells, focal areas of positive staining for CMV antigen were seen in the glial cells, neuronal cells, and retinal pigment epithelial cells. At these sites most of the retinal capillaries were devoid of endothelial cells. Few vessels located at the advancing margin of retinal necrosis showed the presence of viral proteins in the endothelial cells. CONCLUSIONS: The present results indicate that retinal vascular endothelial cells could be the initial target in the development of viral retinitis, with subsequent spread of the infection to perivascular glia, Müller cells, and other retinal cells, including the

  2. Current perspectives of herpesviral retinitis and choroiditis.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, H N; Priya, K; Biswas, J

    2004-10-01

    Vision-threatening viral retinitis are primarily caused by members of the herpesvirus family. The biology and molecular characterization of herpesviruses, clinical presentations of retinopathies, pathology and pathogenesis including the host responses, epidemiology and the laboratory methods of aetiological diagnosis of these diseases are described. Clinical syndromes are acute retinal necrosis (ARN), progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN), cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis, multifocal choroiditis and serpiginous choroiditis besides other viral retinopathies. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) retinitis is more common in immunocompetent persons while varicella zoster virus (VZV) affects both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients equally. CMV retinitis is most common among patients with AIDS. The currently employed laboratory methods of antigen detection, virus isolation and antibody detection by enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) have low sensitivity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has increased the value of diagnosis due to its high clinical sensitivity and absolute specificity in detection of herpesviruses in intraocular specimens. PMID:16295367

  3. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: β-thalassemia major, β-TI: β-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  4. Gene Therapy for Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Samiy, Nasrollah

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has a growing research potential particularly in the field of ophthalmic and retinal diseases owing to three main characteristics of the eye; accessibility in terms of injections and surgical interventions, its immune-privileged status facilitating the accommodation to the antigenicity of a viral vector, and tight blood-ocular barriers which save other organs from unwanted contamination. Gene therapy has tremendous potential for different ocular diseases. In fact, the perspective of gene therapy in the field of eye research does not confine to exclusive monogenic ophthalmic problems and it has the potential to include gene based pharmacotherapies for non-monogenic problems such as age related macular disease and diabetic retinopathy. The present article has focused on how gene transfer into the eye has been developed and used to treat retinal disorders with no available therapy at present. PMID:25709778

  5. Retinitis pigmentosa in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J; Bartmann, L; Ramesar, R; Beighton, P

    1993-11-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal disorders which are a common cause of genetic blindness. The relative frequencies of the different forms of RP in South Africa, as determined from the register at the DNA banking centre for RP at the Department of Human Genetics, University of Cape Town, are presented and discussed. Of the 125 families analysed, 29 (23%) showed autosomal dominant, 33 (27%) autosomal recessive and 3 (3%) X-linked inheritance. In 10 families the pedigree data were insufficient to allow accurate genetic subtyping and a further 50 patients were sporadic without a family history of RP or other syndromic features which would allow categorization. PMID:8313621

  6. Retinal vein occlusion: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Rosangela; Torres Gimeno, Ana; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Bandello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a pathology noted for more than 150 years. Although a lot has been written on the matter, it is still a frequent condition with multifactorial etiopathogenesis with many unclear aspects. The RVO pathogenesis has varied systemic and local implications that make it difficult to elaborate treatment guidelines. The management of the patient with RVO is very complex and a multidisciplinary approach is required in order to identify and correct the associated risk factors. Laser therapy remains the gold standard in RVO, but only modest functional improvement has been shown in branch retinal occlusion forms. Multicenter studies of intravitreal drugs present them as an option to combine with laser. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids and sustained-release implants are the future weapons to stop disease progression and get a better visual outcome. Consequently, it is useful to clarify some aspects of the pathology that allow a better patient management. PMID:20938213

  7. Operational challenges of retinal prostheses.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Erich W; Fink, Wolfgang; Wilke, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Two computational models for research on retinal implants are presented. In the first model, the electric field produced by a multi-electrode array in a uniform retina is calculated. It is shown how cross talk of activated electrodes and the resulting bunching of field lines in monopole and dipole activation prevent high resolution imaging with retinal implants. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how sequential stimulation and multipolar stimulation may overcome this limitation. In the second model a target volume, i.e., a probe cylinder approximating a bipolar cell, in the retina is chosen, and the passive Heaviside cable equation is solved inside this target volume to calculate the depolarization of the cell membrane. The depolarization as a function of time indicates that shorter signals stimulate better as long as the current does not change sign during stimulation of the retina, i.e., mono-phasic stimulation. Both computational models are equally applicable to epiretinal, subretinal, and suprachoroidal vision implants. PMID:25443535

  8. Acquired retinal folds in the cat.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, A D

    1976-06-01

    Retinal folds were found in 5 cats. The apparent cause of the folding was varied: in 1 cat the folds appeared after a localized retinal detachment; in 2 cats the condition accompanied other intraocular abnormalities associated with feline infectious peritonitis; 1 cat had active keratitis, and the retinal changes were thought to have been injury related; and 1 cat, bilaterally affected, had chronic glomerulonephritis. PMID:945253

  9. Mechanical loading up-regulates early remodeling signals from osteocytes subjected to physical damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wu, Michael; You, Lidan

    2015-12-16

    In the mineralized bone matrix, mechanical loading causes micrometer-sized cracks. These cracks trigger targeted remodeling along the micro-crack. Physical damage to osteocytes was shown to be involved in the initiation of this remodeling process. However, the role of subsequent mechanical loading osteocyte response to physical damage is unclear. In this study, we have designed and developed an in vitro cell model to study the impact of mechanical loading on osteocytes with physical damage. Specifically, a system was developed to create sub-cellular physical damage on MLO-Y4 osteocytes in vitro. This model re-created the spatial distribution of non-viable cells and VEGF expression around microdamage as reported in vivo. Using this system, the short term (24h) effects of fluid shear stress in regulation of osteocyte response to physical damage were investigated. We have observed that the mechanical stimuli had an additive effect in terms of COX-2, VEGF mRNA expressions, as well as PGE2, VEGF concentrations in the media. Interestingly, other inflammatory signals such as IL-6 and TNF-α did not change with these stimuli, at this time point. Moreover, fluid shear also had a modulating effect in regulation of osteoclast differentiation by osteocyte with physical damage. These results show that (1) subcellular physical damage upregulates remodeling signals in osteocytes at early time point, (2) mechanical loading substantially upregulates these signals for remodeling in osteocytes with physical damage. PMID:26596719

  10. Angiographic results of retinal-retinal anastomosis and retinal-choroidal anastomosis after treatments in eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masaaki; Iida, Tomohiro; Kano, Mariko; Itagaki, Kanako

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the angiographic results of retinal-retinal anastomosis (RRA) and retinal-choroidal anastomosis (RCA) for eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) after treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab injections as monotherapy or intravitreal bevacizumab combined with photodynamic therapy. Methods In this interventional, consecutive case series, we retrospectively reviewed five naïve eyes from four patients (mean age 80 years) treated with three consecutive monthly intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 mL) injections as initial treatment, and followed up for at least 3 months. In cases with over 3 months of follow-up and having recurrence of RAP or leakage by fluorescein angiography, retreatment was performed with a single intravitreal bevacizumab injection and photodynamic therapy. Results Indocyanine green angiography showed RRA in three eyes with subretinal neovascularization and RCA in two eyes with choroidal neovascularization at baseline. At 3 months after baseline (month 3), neither the RRA nor RCA was occluded in any eye on indocyanine green angiography. Retreatment with intravitreal bevacizumab plus photodynamic therapy was performed in three eyes at months 3 (persistent leakage on fluorescein angiography), 6, and 7 (recurrence of RAP lesion), which achieved obvious occlusion of the RRA and RCA. Mean best-corrected visual acuity improved from 0.13 to 0.21 at month 3 (P = 0.066). No complications or systemic adverse events were noted. Conclusion Although intravitreal bevacizumab for RAP was effective in improving visual acuity during short-term follow-up, intravitreal bevacizumab could not achieve complete occlusion of RRA and RCA, which could lead to recurrence of a RAP lesion and exudation. Retreatment with intravitreal bevacizumab plus photodynamic therapy ultimately achieved complete occlusion of the RRA and RCA. PMID:22969283

  11. Retinal pathways influence temporal niche

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Susan E.; Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Hillson, Holly; Menaker, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In mammals, light input from the retina entrains central circadian oscillators located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). The phase of circadian activity rhythms with respect to the external light:dark cycle is reversed in diurnal and nocturnal species, although the phase of SCN rhythms relative to the light cycle remains unchanged. Neural mechanisms downstream from the SCN are therefore believed to determine diurnality or nocturnality. Here, we report a switch from nocturnal to diurnal entrainment of circadian activity rhythms in double-knockout mice lacking the inner-retinal photopigment melanopsin (OPN4) and RPE65, a key protein used in retinal chromophore recycling. These mice retained only a small amount of rod function. The change in entrainment phase of Rpe65−/−;Opn4−/− mice was accompanied by a reversal of the rhythm of clock gene expression in the SCN and a reversal in acute masking effects of both light and darkness on activity, suggesting that the nocturnal to diurnal switch is due to a change in the neural response to light upstream from the SCN. A switch from nocturnal to diurnal activity rhythms was also found in wild-type mice transferred from standard intensity light:dark cycles to light:dark cycles in which the intensity of the light phase was reduced to scotopic levels. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which changes in retinal input can mediate acute temporal-niche switching. PMID:18695249

  12. Retinal Cell Degeneration in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Masayuki; Aoki, Hitomi; Hirata, Akihiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Green, Paul G.; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of various retinal cell degeneration models in animal induced by chemicals (N-methyl-d-aspartate- and CoCl2-induced), autoimmune (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis), mechanical stress (optic nerve crush-induced, light-induced) and ischemia (transient retinal ischemia-induced). The target regions, pathology and proposed mechanism of each model are described in a comparative fashion. Animal models of retinal cell degeneration provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of the disease, and will facilitate the development of novel effective therapeutic drugs to treat retinal cell damage. PMID:26784179

  13. Retinal Effects Of Blue Light Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, William T.; Mueller, Harold A.; Ruffolo, J. J.

    1980-10-01

    Recent research has shown that blue light exposure is an important factor in certain types of retinal injury. The mammalian ocular media transmits the spectral band 400-1400 nm to the retina. The short wavelengths (400-550 nm) produce a photochemical or actinic type of damage, while the longer wavelengths (550-1400 nm) produce thermal damage. Distinction between the two types of retinal damage are discussed briefly and the importance of the blue light effect for solar retinitis and eclipse blindness is emphasized. The significance of blue light retinal injury is summarized for various environmental and occupational exposures.

  14. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Hoz, Rosa; Rojas, Blanca; Ramírez, Ana I.; Salazar, Juan J.; Gallego, Beatriz I.; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia) provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies. PMID:27294114

  15. [Novel mechanism for retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Suzuma, Kiyoshi

    2015-03-01

    I. A new therapeutic target for diabetic retinopathy. Recent reports state that succinate may be an independent retinal angiogenic factor. We evaluated concentrations in vitreous from proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and found that succinate increased significantly in PDR. Interestingly, levels of succinate from bevacizumab-pre-injected PDR were normal, suggesting that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) had a positive feedback mechanism for succinate since succinate was previously reported to induce VEGF. II. A new understanding of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). We evaluated retinal blood flow velocity with laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG) made in Japan, and found that cases in which both macular edema and retinal blood flow velocity improved after anti-VEGF therapy had better prognosis. In ischemic CRVO at final visit, mean retinal blood velocity was less than 50% of fellow eyes after 1st anti-VEGF therapy, suggesting that those cases might have poor prognosis. LSFG is useful for evaluation and decision in CRVO treatment. III. From exploration for mechanism in retinal vascular diseases to re-vascularization therapy. The standard treatment for retinal non-perfusion area is scatter laser photocoagulation, which is both invasive of the peripheral retina and may prove destructive. Re-vascularization is an ideal strategy for treatment of retinal non-perfusion area. To develop a new methods for re-vascularization in retinal non-perfusion area, we have designed experiments using a retina without vasculature differentiated from induced pluripotent stem(iPS) cells. PMID:25854111

  16. Retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, M; Suzuma, K; Inaba, I; Ogura, Y; Yoneda, K; Okamoto, H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis, one of the most common forms of dermatitis in Japan, has markedly increased in Japan in the past 10 years. To clarify pathogenic mechanisms of retinal detachment in such cases, we retrospectively studied clinical characteristics of retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis. METHODS: We examined the records of 80 patients (89 eyes) who had retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis. The patients were classified into three groups according to lens status: group A, eyes with clear lenses (40 eyes); group B, eyes with cataract (38 eyes), and group C, aphakic or pseudophakic eyes (11 eyes). RESULTS: No significant differences were noted in the ratio of males to females, age distribution, refractive error, or characteristic of retinal detachment among the three groups. The types of retinal breaks, however, were different in eyes with and without lens changes. While atrophic holes were dominant in group A, retinal dialysis was mainly seen in groups B and C. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that anterior vitreoretinal traction may play an important role in the pathogenesis of retinal breaks in eyes with atopic cataract and that the same pathological process may affect the formation of cataract and tractional retinal breaks in patients with atopic dermatitis. PMID:8664234

  17. Trigger mechanism for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.R.

    1989-02-28

    A trigger mechanism is described for a blower-vacuum apparatus having a trigger mounted within a handle and a small engine comprising: a throttle; a ''L'' shaped lever having first and second legs mounted for rotation about an intermediate pivot within the handle when the trigger is depressed, interconnecting the trigger and the throttle, the second leg having first teeth defined therein, the lever further having idle, full throttle and stop positions; a normally raised latch means adapted to be rotated and axially depressed, the latch means having second teeth situated on a cam to engage the first teeth for holding the lever in an intermediate position between the idle and full throttle positions when the latch means is rotated. The latch means further are cam teeth into potential engagement with the lever teeth when the trigger is depressed, lever is biased to the stop position; and idle adjusting means means for intercepting the second leg for preventing the second leg from reaching the stop position when the latch means is raised.

  18. Cygnus Trigger System

    SciTech Connect

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two radiographic sources (Cygnus 1, Cygnus 2) each with a dose rating of 4 rads at 1 m, and a 1-mm diameter spot size. The electrical specifications are: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This facility is located in an underground environment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for subcritical tests, which are single-shot, high-value events. In such an application there is an emphasis on reliability and reproducibility. A robust, low-jitter trigger system is a key element for meeting these goals. The trigger system was developed with both commercial and project-specific equipment. In addition to the traditional functions of a trigger system there are novel features added to protect the investment of a high-value shot. Details of the trigger system, including elements designed specifically for a subcritical test application, will be presented. The individual electronic components have their nominal throughput, and when assembled have a system throughput with a measured range of jitter. The shot-to-shot jitter will be assessed both individually and in combination. Trigger reliability and reproducibility results will be presented for a substantial number of shots executed at the NTS.

  19. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C; Højlund, K; Hatunic, M; Balkau, B; Nilsson, P M; Ferrannini, E

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions characterized by body size-dependent increase in stroke volume (SV) and blood pressure (BP). Subjects/Methods: Common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter (LD), IMT and CWS were measured in three different populations in order to study: (A) cross-sectional associations between SV, BP, anthropometric parameters and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24–159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). Results: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile was significantly higher (28±3 μm) as compared with those in the lower quartiles (8±3, 16±4 and 16±3 μm, P=0.001, P<0.05 and P=0.01, respectively). In addition, CCA CWS decreased during the observational period in the highest LD quartile (from 54.2±8.6 to 51.6±7.4 kPa, P<0.0001). As compared with gender- and age-matched lean individuals, obese subjects had highly increased CCA LD and BP (P<0.0001 for both), but only slightly higher CWS (P=0.05) due to a significant increase in IMT (P=0.005 after adjustment for confounders). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in obese subjects, the CCA wall thickens to compensate the luminal enlargement caused by body size-induced increase in SV, and therefore, to normalize the wall stress. CCA diameter in obesity could

  20. A fly's view of neuronal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Shiri P; Schuldiner, Oren

    2016-09-01

    Developmental neuronal remodeling is a crucial step in sculpting the final and mature brain connectivity in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Remodeling includes degenerative events, such as neurite pruning, that may be followed by regeneration to form novel connections during normal development. Drosophila provides an excellent model to study both steps of remodeling since its nervous system undergoes massive and stereotypic remodeling during metamorphosis. Although pruning has been widely studied, our knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms is far from complete. Our understanding of the processes underlying regrowth is even more fragmentary. In this review, we discuss recent progress by focusing on three groups of neurons that undergo stereotypic pruning and regrowth during metamorphosis, the mushroom body γ neurons, the dendritic arborization neurons and the crustacean cardioactive peptide peptidergic neurons. By comparing and contrasting the mechanisms involved in remodeling of these three neuronal types, we highlight the common themes and differences as well as raise key questions for future investigation in the field. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:618-635. doi: 10.1002/wdev.241 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27351747

  1. The role of midkine in skeletal remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Liedert, A; Schinke, T; Ignatius, A; Amling, M

    2014-01-01

    Bone tissue is subjected to continuous remodelling, replacing old or damaged bone throughout life. In bone remodelling, the coordinated activities of bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts ensure the maintenance of bone mass and strength. In early life, the balance of these cellular activities is tightly regulated by various factors, including systemic hormones, the mechanical environment and locally released growth factors. Age-related changes in the activity of these factors in bone remodelling can result in diseases with low bone mass, such as osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a systemic and age-related skeletal disease characterized by low bone mass and structural degeneration of bone tissue, predisposing the patient to an increased fracture risk. The growth factor midkine (Mdk) plays a key role in bone remodelling and it is expressed during bone formation and fracture repair. Using a mouse deficient in Mdk, our group have identified this protein as a negative regulator of bone formation and mechanically induced bone remodelling. Thus, specific Mdk antagonists might represent a therapeutic option for diseases characterized by low bone mass, such as osteoporosis. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24102259

  2. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  3. Video Event Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.; Lichter, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    Video event trigger (VET) processes video image data to generate trigger signal when image shows significant change like motion or appearance, disappearance, change in color, change in brightness, or dilation of object. System aids in efficient utilization of image-data-storage and image-data-processing equipment in applications in which many video frames show no changes and are wasteful to record and analyze all frames when only relatively few frames show changes of interest. Applications include video recording of automobile crash tests, automated video monitoring of entrances, exits, parking lots, and secure areas.

  4. TOTEM Trigger System Firmware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopal, Josef

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the TOTEM Trigger System Firmware that is operational at LHC since 2009. The TOTEM experiment is devoted to the forward hadronic physics at collision energy from 2.7 to 14TeV. It is composed of three different subdetectors that are placed at 9, 13.5, and 220m from the Interaction Point 5. A time-critical-logic firmware is implemented inside FPGA circuits to review collisions and to select the relevant ones to be stored by the Data Acquisition (DAQ). The Trigger system has been modified in the 2012-2013 LHC runs allowing the experiment to take data in cooperation with CMS.

  5. Chromatin Remodeling and Transcriptional Control in Innate Immunity: Emergence of Akirin2 as a Novel Player.

    PubMed

    Tartey, Sarang; Takeuchi, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of inflammatory gene expression has been at the forefront of studies of innate immunity and is coordinately regulated by transcription factors, including NF-κB, and chromatin modifiers. The growing evidence for involvement of chromatin in the regulation of gene expression in innate immune cells, has uncovered an evolutionarily conserved role of microbial sensing and chromatin remodeling. Toll-like receptors and RIG-I-like receptors trigger these signaling pathways leading to transcriptional expression of a set of genes involved in inflammation. Tightly regulated control of this gene expression is a paramount, and often foremost, goal of most biological endeavors. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress about the molecular mechanisms governing control of pro-inflammatory gene expression by an evolutionarily conserved novel nuclear protein Akirin2 in macrophages and its emergence as an essential link between NF-κB and chromatin remodelers for transcriptional regulation. PMID:26287257

  6. Chromatin Remodeling and Transcriptional Control in Innate Immunity: Emergence of Akirin2 as a Novel Player

    PubMed Central

    Tartey, Sarang; Takeuchi, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of inflammatory gene expression has been at the forefront of studies of innate immunity and is coordinately regulated by transcription factors, including NF-κB, and chromatin modifiers. The growing evidence for involvement of chromatin in the regulation of gene expression in innate immune cells, has uncovered an evolutionarily conserved role of microbial sensing and chromatin remodeling. Toll-like receptors and RIG-I-like receptors trigger these signaling pathways leading to transcriptional expression of a set of genes involved in inflammation. Tightly regulated control of this gene expression is a paramount, and often foremost, goal of most biological endeavors. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress about the molecular mechanisms governing control of pro-inflammatory gene expression by an evolutionarily conserved novel nuclear protein Akirin2 in macrophages and its emergence as an essential link between NF-κB and chromatin remodelers for transcriptional regulation. PMID:26287257

  7. Altered sensory processing and dendritic remodeling in hyperexcitable visual cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Eleonora; Restani, Laura; Pietrasanta, Marta; Panarese, Alessandro; Mazzoni, Alberto; Rossetto, Ornella; Middei, Silvia; Micera, Silvestro; Caleo, Matteo

    2016-07-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by impaired circuit function and a propensity for spontaneous seizures, but how plastic rearrangements within the epileptic focus trigger cortical dysfunction and hyperexcitability is only partly understood. Here we have examined alterations in sensory processing and the underlying biochemical and neuroanatomical changes in tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT)-induced focal epilepsy in mouse visual cortex. We documented persistent epileptiform electrographic discharges and upregulation of GABAergic markers at the completion of TeNT effects. We also found a significant remodeling of the dendritic arbors of pyramidal neurons, with increased dendritic length and branching, and overall reduction in spine density but significant preservation of mushroom, mature spines. Functionally, spontaneous neuronal discharge was increased, visual responses were less reliable, and electrophysiological and behavioural visual acuity was consistently impaired in TeNT-injected mice. These data demonstrate robust, long-term remodeling of both inhibitory and excitatory circuitry associated with specific disturbances of network function in neocortical epilepsy. PMID:26163822

  8. The dynamic sclera: extracellular matrix remodeling in normal ocular growth and myopia development.

    PubMed

    Harper, Angelica R; Summers, Jody A

    2015-04-01

    Myopia is a common ocular condition, characterized by excessive elongation of the ocular globe. The prevalence of myopia continues to increase, particularly among highly educated groups, now exceeding 80% in some groups. In parallel with the increased prevalence of myopia, are increases in associated blinding ocular conditions including glaucoma, retinal detachment and macular degeneration, making myopia a significant global health concern. The elongation of the eye is closely related to the biomechanical properties of the sclera, which in turn are largely dependent on the composition of the scleral extracellular matrix. Therefore an understanding of the cellular and extracellular events involved in the regulation of scleral growth and remodeling during childhood and young adulthood will provide future avenues for the treatment of myopia and its associated ocular complications. PMID:25819458

  9. Photoreceptor degeneration, structural remodeling and glial activation: a morphological study on a genetic mouse model for pericyte deficiency.

    PubMed

    Genové, G; Mollick, T; Johansson, K

    2014-10-24

    Interaction between pericytes and endothelial cells via platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) signaling is critical for the development of the retinal microvasculature. The PDGF-B retention motif controls the spatial distribution range of the growth factor in the vicinity of its producing endothelial cells allowing its recognition by PDGF receptor beta-(PDGFR-β)-carrying pericytes; this promotes recruitment of pericytes to the vascular basement membrane. Impairment of the PDGF-B signaling mechanism causes development of vascular abnormalities, and in the retina this consequently leads to defects in the neurological circuitry. The vascular pathology in the pdgf-b(ret/ret) (PDGF-B retention motif knockout) mouse retina has been previously reported; our study investigates the progressive neuronal defects and changes in the retinal morphology of this pericyte-deficient mouse model. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed retinal injuries to occur as early as postnatal day (P) 10 with substantial damage progressing from P15 and onward. Vascular abnormalities were apparent from P10, however, prominent neuronal defects were mostly observed from P15, beginning with the compromised integrity of the laminated retinal structure characterized by the presence of rosettes and focally distorted regions. Photoreceptor degeneration was observed by loss of both rod and cone cells, including the disassembly and altered structure of their synaptic terminals. Significant shortening of cone outer segments was observed from P10 and later stages; however, decrease in cone density was only observed at P28. Disorganization and dendrite remodeling of rod bipolar cells also added to the diminished neural and synaptic integrity. Moreover, in response to retinal injuries, Müller and microglial cells were observed to be in the reactive phenotype from P15 and onward. Such a sequence of events indicates that the pdgf-b(ret/ret) mouse model displays a short time frame between P10 and P15

  10. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and retinal vessel calibers in children with thalassemia minor

    PubMed Central

    Acer, Semra; Balcı, Yasemin I; Pekel, Gökhan; Ongun, Tuğba T; Polat, Aziz; Çetin, Ebru N; Yağcı, Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, subfoveal choroidal thickness, and retinal vessel caliber measurements in children with thalassemia minor. Methods: In this cross-sectional and comparative study, 30 thalassemia minor patients and 36 controls were included. Heidelberg spectral domain optical coherence tomography was used for peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, subfoveal choroidal thickness, and retinal vessel caliber measurements. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and subfoveal choroidal thickness between the two groups (p > 0.05). There was no correlation between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and hemoglobin values. Both the arterioral and venular calibers were higher in thalassemia minor group (p < 0.05). Conclusion: There is increased retinal arterioral and venular calibers in children with thalassemia minor compared with controls. PMID:27540484

  11. Retinal fundus imaging in mouse models of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Alex, Anne F; Heiduschka, Peter; Eter, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The development of in vivo retinal fundus imaging in mice has opened a new research horizon, not only in ophthalmic research. The ability to monitor the dynamics of vascular and cellular changes in pathological conditions, such as neovascularization or degeneration, longitudinally without the need to sacrifice the mouse, permits longer observation periods in the same animal. With the application of the high-resolution confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in experimental mouse models, access to a large spectrum of imaging modalities in vivo is provided. PMID:23150359

  12. Disambiguating Syntactic Triggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakas, William Gregory; Fodor, Janet Dean

    2012-01-01

    We present data from an artificial language domain that suggest new contributions to the theory of syntactic triggers. Whether a learning algorithm is capable of matching the achievements of child learners depends in part on how much parametric ambiguity there is in the input. For practical reasons this cannot be established for the domain of all…

  13. Triggered plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C W

    1988-02-23

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  14. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  15. Elastosis during airway wall remodeling explains multiple co-existing instability patterns.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Mona; Javili, Ali; Kuhl, Ellen

    2016-08-21

    Living structures can undergo morphological changes in response to growth and alterations in microstructural properties in response to remodeling. From a biological perspective, airway wall inflammation and airway elastosis are classical hallmarks of growth and remodeling during chronic lung disease. From a mechanical point of view, growth and remodeling trigger mechanical instabilities that result in inward folding and airway obstruction. While previous analytical and computational studies have focused on identifying the critical parameters at the onset of folding, few have considered the post-buckling behavior. All prior studies assume constant microstructural properties during the folding process; yet, clinical studies now reveal progressive airway elastosis, the degeneration of elastic fibers associated with a gradual stiffening of the inner layer. Here, we explore the influence of temporally evolving material properties on the post-bifurcation behavior of the airway wall. We show that a growing and stiffening inner layer triggers an additional subsequent bifurcation after the first instability occurs. Evolving material stiffnesses provoke failure modes with multiple co-existing wavelengths, associated with the superposition of larger folds evolving on top of the initial smaller folds. This phenomenon is exclusive to material stiffening and conceptually different from the phenomenon of period doubling observed in constant-stiffness growth. Our study suggests that the clinically observed multiple wavelengths in diseased airways are a result of gradual airway wall stiffening. While our evolving material properties are inspired by the clinical phenomenon of airway elastosis, the underlying concept is broadly applicable to other types of remodeling including aneurysm formation or brain folding. PMID:27211101

  16. Phase field approaches of bone remodeling based on TIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganghoffer, Jean-François; Rahouadj, Rachid; Boisse, Julien; Forest, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The process of bone remodeling includes a cycle of repair, renewal, and optimization. This adaptation process, in response to variations in external loads and chemical driving factors, involves three main types of bone cells: osteoclasts, which remove the old pre-existing bone; osteoblasts, which form the new bone in a second phase; osteocytes, which are sensing cells embedded into the bone matrix, trigger the aforementioned sequence of events. The remodeling process involves mineralization of the bone in the diffuse interface separating the marrow, which contains all specialized cells, from the newly formed bone. The main objective advocated in this contribution is the setting up of a modeling and simulation framework relying on the phase field method to capture the evolution of the diffuse interface between the new bone and the marrow at the scale of individual trabeculae. The phase field describes the degree of mineralization of this diffuse interface; it varies continuously between the lower value (no mineral) and unity (fully mineralized phase, e.g. new bone), allowing the consideration of a diffuse moving interface. The modeling framework is the theory of continuous media, for which field equations for the mechanical, chemical, and interfacial phenomena are written, based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Additional models for the cellular activity are formulated to describe the coupling of the cell activity responsible for bone production/resorption to the kinetics of the internal variables. Kinetic equations for the internal variables are obtained from a pseudo-potential of dissipation. The combination of the balance equations for the microforce associated to the phase field and the kinetic equations lead to the Ginzburg-Landau equation satisfied by the phase field with a source term accounting for the dissipative microforce. Simulations illustrating the proposed framework are performed in a one-dimensional situation showing the evolution of

  17. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    limitation of versions, less separation of the tendons from sclera, and thicker appearance of the scar segments. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in the repair procedure reduced the recurrence rate. Histologic examination of the clinical stretched scar specimens showed dense connective tissue that was less well organized compared with normal tendon. In the tissue culture studies, cells cultured from the stretched scar specimens grew rapidly and were irregularly shaped. A high-molecular-weight protein was identified in the culture medium. By contrast, cells cultured from normal tendon (controls) grew more slowly and regularly, stopped growing at 4 days, and produced less total protein than cultured stretched scar specimens. In the animal model studies, the collagenase-treated sites showed elongated scars with increased collagen between the muscle and the sclera, as well as increased collagen creep rates, compared with the saline-treated controls. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in collagenase-treated animal model surgery sites was associated with shorter, thicker scars compared with similar sites sutured with absorbable sutures. CONCLUSIONS: A lengthened or stretched, remodeled scar between an operated muscle tendon and sclera is a common occurrence and is a factor contributing to the variability of outcome after strabismus repair, even years later. This abnormality may be revealed by careful exploration of previously operated muscles. Definitive repair requires firm reattachment of tendon to sclera with nonabsorbable suture support. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 52

  18. Stromal miR-200s contribute to breast cancer cell invasion through CAF activation and ECM remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tang, X; Hou, Y; Yang, G; Wang, X; Tang, S; Du, Y-E; Yang, L; Yu, T; Zhang, H; Zhou, M; Wen, S; Xu, L; Liu, M

    2016-01-01

    The activation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) is a key event in tumor progression, and alternative extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins derived from CAFs induce ECM remodeling and cancer cell invasion. Here we found that miR-200 s, which are generally downregulated in activated CAFs in breast cancer tissues and in normal fibroblasts (NFs) activated by breast cancer cells, are direct mediators of NF reprogramming into CAFs and of ECM remodeling. NFs with downregulated miR-200 s displayed the traits of activated CAFs, including accelerated migration and invasion. Ectopic expression of miR-200 s in CAFs at least partially restored the phenotypes of NFs. CAF activation may be governed by the targets of miR-200 s, Fli-1 and TCF12, which are responsible for cell development and differentiation; Fli-1 and TCF12 were obviously elevated in CAFs. Furthermore, miR-200 s and their targets influenced collagen contraction by CAFs. The upregulation of fibronectin and lysyl oxidase directly by miR-200 or indirectly through Fli-1 or TCF12 contributed to ECM remodeling, triggering the invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells both in vitro and vivo. Thus, these data provide important and novel insights into breast CAF activation and ECM remodeling, which trigger tumor cell invasion. PMID:26068592

  19. Stromal miR-200s contribute to breast cancer cell invasion through CAF activation and ECM remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Tang, X; Hou, Y; Yang, G; Wang, X; Tang, S; Du, Y-E; Yang, L; Yu, T; Zhang, H; Zhou, M; Wen, S; Xu, L; Liu, M

    2016-01-01

    The activation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) is a key event in tumor progression, and alternative extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins derived from CAFs induce ECM remodeling and cancer cell invasion. Here we found that miR-200 s, which are generally downregulated in activated CAFs in breast cancer tissues and in normal fibroblasts (NFs) activated by breast cancer cells, are direct mediators of NF reprogramming into CAFs and of ECM remodeling. NFs with downregulated miR-200 s displayed the traits of activated CAFs, including accelerated migration and invasion. Ectopic expression of miR-200 s in CAFs at least partially restored the phenotypes of NFs. CAF activation may be governed by the targets of miR-200 s, Fli-1 and TCF12, which are responsible for cell development and differentiation; Fli-1 and TCF12 were obviously elevated in CAFs. Furthermore, miR-200 s and their targets influenced collagen contraction by CAFs. The upregulation of fibronectin and lysyl oxidase directly by miR-200 or indirectly through Fli-1 or TCF12 contributed to ECM remodeling, triggering the invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells both in vitro and vivo. Thus, these data provide important and novel insights into breast CAF activation and ECM remodeling, which trigger tumor cell invasion. PMID:26068592

  20. Argus II retinal prosthesis system: An update.

    PubMed

    Rachitskaya, Aleksandra V; Yuan, Alex

    2016-09-01

    This review focuses on a description of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system (Argus II; Second Sight Medical Products, Sylmar, CA) that was approved for humanitarian use by the FDA in 2013 in patients with retinitis pigmentosa with bare or no light perception vision. The article describes the components of Argus II, the studies on the implant, and future directions. PMID:26855177

  1. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Gabai, Andrea; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications. PMID:26139802

  2. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gabai, Andrea; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications. PMID:26139802

  3. Retinal cholesterol emboli during diagnostic cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Blanco, V R; Morís, C; Barriales, V; González, C

    2000-11-01

    Retinal embolism is a highly infrequent complication of cardiac catheterization of thrombotic, lipidic, and calcific etiology. We provide the first reported clinical case of retinal embolism caused by cholesterol crystal without systemic adverse effects as a severe complication of diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Cathet. Cardiovasc. Intervent. 51:323-325, 2000. PMID:11066118

  4. Ritual relieved axial dystonia triggered by gaze-evoked amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Jacome, D E

    1997-11-01

    A woman with chronic posttraumatic axial lateropulsion cervical dystonia ("belly dancer's head") found relief of her spontaneous dystonic spasms by the sequential performance of an elaborate motor ritual. During an episode of left optic papillitis caused by central retinal vein occlusion, gaze-evoked amaurosis of the left eye developed, preceded by achromatopsia, during left lateral gaze. Gaze-evoked amaurosis triggered axial dystonia, which was followed by her unique, stereotyped, dystonia-relieving ritual that simulated a slow dance. Visual symptoms improved progressively in 1 year. Eventually, she was unable to trigger her dystonia by eye movements. Spontaneous dystonia remained otherwise unchanged from before the episode of papillitis and was still relieved by her unique ritual. PMID:9365340

  5. Complement system in pathogenesis of AMD: dual player in degeneration and protection of retinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Kawa, Milosz P; Machalinska, Anna; Roginska, Dorota; Machalinski, Boguslaw

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness among the elderly, especially in Western countries. Although the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical course of the disease are well described, its pathogenesis is not entirely elucidated. AMD is associated with a variety of biochemical abnormalities, including complement components deposition in the retinal pigment epithelium-Bruch's membrane-choriocapillaris complex. Although the complement system (CS) is increasingly recognized as mediating important roles in retinal biology, its particular role in AMD pathogenesis has not been precisely defined. Unrestricted activation of the CS following injury may directly damage retinal tissue and recruit immune cells to the vicinity of active complement cascades, therefore detrimentally causing bystander damage to surrounding cells and tissues. On the other hand, recent evidence supports the notion that an active complement pathway is a necessity for the normal maintenance of the neurosensory retina. In this scenario, complement activation appears to have beneficial effect as it promotes cell survival and tissue remodeling by facilitating the rapid removal of dying cells and resulting cellular debris, thus demonstrating anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this review, we discuss both the beneficial and detrimental roles of CS in degenerative retina, focusing on the diverse aspects of CS functions that may promote or inhibit macular disease. PMID:25276841

  6. Proliferation Potential of Müller Glia after Retinal Damage Varies between Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Akiko; Sadamoto, Kazuyo; Fujii, Momo; Mandai, Michiko; Takahashi, Masayo

    2014-01-01

    Retinal Müller glia can serve as a source for regeneration of damaged retinal neurons in fish, birds and mammals. However, the proliferation rate of Müller glia has been reported to be low in the mammalian retina. To overcome this problem, growth factors and morphogens have been studied as potent promoters of Müller glial proliferation, but the molecular mechanisms that limit the proliferation of Müller glia in the mammalian retina remain unknown. In the present study, we found that the degree of damage-induced Müller glia proliferation varies across mouse strains. In mouse line 129×1/SvJ (129), there was a significantly larger proliferative response compared with that observed in C57BL/6 (B6) after photoreceptor cell death. Treatment with a Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inhibitor enhanced the proliferation of Müller glia in 129 but not in B6 mouse retinas. We therefore focused on the different gene expression patterns during retinal degeneration between B6 and 129. Expression levels of Cyclin D1 and Nestin correlated with the degree of Müller glial proliferation. A comparison of genome-wide gene expression between B6 and 129 showed that distinct sets of genes were upregulated in the retinas after damage, including immune response genes and chromatin remodeling factors. PMID:24747725

  7. A profile of transcriptomic changes in the rd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Uren, Philip J.; Lee, Justine T.; Doroudchi, M. Mehdi; Smith, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a photoreceptor disease that affects approximately 100,000 people in the United States. Treatment options are limited, and the prognosis for most patients is progressive vision loss. Unfortunately, understanding of the molecular underpinnings of RP initiation and progression is still limited. However, the development of animal models of RP, coupled with high-throughput sequencing, has provided an opportunity to study the underlying cellular and molecular changes in this disease. Methods Using RNA-Seq, we present the first retinal transcriptome analysis of the rd10 murine model of retinal degeneration. Results Our data confirm the loss of rod-specific transcripts and the increased relative expression of Müller-specific transcripts, emphasizing the important role of reactive gliosis and innate immune activation in RP. Moreover, we report substantial changes in relative isoform usage among neuronal differentiation and morphogenesis genes, including a marked shift to shorter transcripts. Conclusions Our analyses implicate remodeling of the inner retina and possible Müller cell dedifferentiation. PMID:25489233

  8. New mouse primary retinal degeneration (rd-3)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B.; Hawes, N.L.; Roderick, T.H. ); Heckenlively, J.R. )

    1993-04-01

    A new mouse retinal degeneration that appears to be an excellent candidate for modeling human retinitis pigmentosa is reported. In this degeneration, called rd-3, differentiation proceeds postnatally through 2 weeks, and photoreceptor degeneration starts by 3 weeks. The rod photoreceptor loss is essentially complete by 5 weeks, whereas remnant cone cells are seen through 7 weeks. This is the only mouse homozygous retinal degeneration reported to date in which photoreceptors are initially normal. Crosses with known mouse retinal degenerations rd, Rds, nr, and pcd are negative for retinal degeneration in offspring, and linkage analysis places rd-3 on mouse chromosome 1 at 10 [+-]2.5 cM distal to Akp-1. Homology mapping suggests that the homologous human locus should be on chromosome 1q. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Retinal pigment epithelium in incontinentia pigmenti.

    PubMed

    Mensheha-Manhart, O; Rodrigues, M M; Shields, J A; Shannon, G M; Mirabelli, R P

    1975-04-01

    An 18-month-old white girl with incontinentia pigmenti presented clinically with leukokoria of the right eye. B-scan ultrasound demonstrated a retrolental mass consistent with a detached retina. Histologic examination of the skin revealed changes compatible with the intermediate verrucous phase of the disease. Microscopic examination of the right eye showed retinal detachment and nodular proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium. The nodules contained macrophages laden with melanin and lipofuscin. An unusually large amount of lipofuscin was present for a child of this age. The basic pigmentary abnormality may affect the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in changes in the overlying neurosensory retina that may lead to the retinal dysplasia or retinal detachemnt often associated with this condition. PMID:1119517

  10. The cell stress machinery and retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Aguilà, Monica; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Novoselov, Sergey S; Parfitt, David A; Cheetham, Michael E

    2013-06-27

    Retinal degenerations are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterised by progressive loss of vision due to neurodegeneration. The retina is a highly specialised tissue with a unique architecture and maintaining homeostasis in all the different retinal cell types is crucial for healthy vision. The retina can be exposed to a variety of environmental insults and stress, including light-induced damage, oxidative stress and inherited mutations that can lead to protein misfolding. Within retinal cells there are different mechanisms to cope with disturbances in proteostasis, such as the heat shock response, the unfolded protein response and autophagy. In this review, we discuss the multiple responses of the retina to different types of stress involved in retinal degenerations, such as retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Understanding the mechanisms that maintain and re-establish proteostasis in the retina is important for developing new therapeutic approaches to fight blindness. PMID:23684651

  11. Texton-based segmentation of retinal vessels.

    PubMed

    Adjeroh, Donald A; Kandaswamy, Umasankar; Odom, J Vernon

    2007-05-01

    With improvements in fundus imaging technology and the increasing use of digital images in screening and diagnosis, the issue of automated analysis of retinal images is gaining more serious attention. We consider the problem of retinal vessel segmentation, a key issue in automated analysis of digital fundus images. We propose a texture-based vessel segmentation algorithm based on the notion of textons. Using a weak statistical learning approach, we construct textons for retinal vasculature by designing filters that are specifically tuned to the structural and photometric properties of retinal vessels. We evaluate the performance of the proposed approach using a standard database of retinal images. On the DRIVE data set, the proposed method produced an average performance of 0.9568 specificity at 0.7346 sensitivity. This compares well with the best-published results on the data set 0.9773 specificity at 0.7194 sensitivity [Proc. SPIE5370, 648 (2004)]. PMID:17429484

  12. Texton-based segmentation of retinal vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjeroh, Donald A.; Kandaswamy, Umasankar; Odom, J. Vernon

    2007-05-01

    With improvements in fundus imaging technology and the increasing use of digital images in screening and diagnosis, the issue of automated analysis of retinal images is gaining more serious attention. We consider the problem of retinal vessel segmentation, a key issue in automated analysis of digital fundus images. We propose a texture-based vessel segmentation algorithm based on the notion of textons. Using a weak statistical learning approach, we construct textons for retinal vasculature by designing filters that are specifically tuned to the structural and photometric properties of retinal vessels. We evaluate the performance of the proposed approach using a standard database of retinal images. On the DRIVE data set, the proposed method produced an average performance of 0.9568 specificity at 0.7346 sensitivity. This compares well with the best-published results on the data set 0.9773 specificity at 0.7194 sensitivity [Proc. SPIE5370, 648 (2004)].

  13. Retinal and choroidal TGF-beta in the tree shrew model of myopia: isoform expression, activation and effects on function.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Andrew Ian; Wan, Ran; Gentle, Alex; Bui, Bang Viet; McBrien, Neville Anthony

    2009-03-01

    A visually evoked signalling cascade, which begins in the retina, transverses the choroid, and mediates scleral remodelling, is considered to control eye growth. The ubiquitous cytokine TGF-beta has been associated with alterations in ocular growth, where alterations in scleral TGF-beta isoforms mediate the scleral remodelling that results in myopia. However, while the TGF-beta isoforms have been implicated in the scleral change during myopia development, it is unclear whether alterations in retinal and choroidal isoforms constitute part of the retinoscleral cascade. This study characterised the retinal and choroidal TGF-beta isoform profiles and TGF-beta2 activation during different stages of myopia development, as induced by form deprivation, in a mammalian model of eye growth. Using quantitative real-time PCR, the mRNA for all three mammalian isoforms of TGF-beta was detected in tree shrew retina and choroid. Distinct tissue-specific isoform profiles were observed for the retina (TGF-beta1:TGF-beta2:TGF-beta3=20:2085:1) and choroid (TGF-beta1:TGF-beta2:TGF-beta3=16:23:1), which remained constant over the development period under investigation. The active and latent pools of retinal TGF-beta2 were quantified using ELISA with the majority (>94%) of total TGF-beta2 found in the latent form. Unlike previous scleral data showing early and continuous decreases in TGF-beta isoform expression during myopia development, the levels of the three isoforms remained within normal ranges for retinal (TGF-beta1, -14 to +14%; TGF-beta2, -2 to +20%; TGF-beta3, -10 to +26%) and choroidal (TGF-beta1, -19 to +21%; TGF-beta2, -26 to +8%; TGF-beta3, -11 to +28%) tissues during myopia development (induction times of 3h, 7h, 11h, 24h, and 5 days). A 40% decrease in retinal TGF-beta2 activation was observed after 5 days of myopia development, however, there was no functional correlate of altered TGF-beta2 activity, as assessed by the retinal ERG response. Overall, these data highlight

  14. Morphological remodeling of C. elegans neurons during aging is modified by compromised protein homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Vayndorf, Elena M; Scerbak, Courtney; Hunter, Skyler; Neuswanger, Jason R; Toth, Marton; Parker, J Alex; Neri, Christian; Driscoll, Monica; Taylor, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cellular outcomes, such as neuronal remodeling, that are common to both healthy and diseased aging brains is essential to the development of successful brain aging strategies. Here, we used Caenorhabdits elegans to investigate how the expression of proteotoxic triggers, such as polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded huntingtin and silencing of proteostasis regulators, such as the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) and protein clearance components, may impact the morphological remodeling of individual neurons as animals age. We examined the effects of disrupted proteostasis on the integrity of neuronal cytoarchitecture by imaging a transgenic C. elegans strain in which touch receptor neurons express the first 57 amino acids of the human huntingtin (Htt) gene with expanded polyQs (128Q) and by using neuron-targeted RNA interference in adult wild-type neurons to knockdown genes encoding proteins involved in proteostasis. We found that proteostatic challenges conferred by polyQ-expanded Htt and knockdown of specific genes involved in protein homeostasis can lead to morphological changes that are restricted to specific domains of specific neurons. The age-associated branching of PLM neurons is suppressed by N-ter polyQ-expanded Htt expression, whereas ALM neurons with polyQ-expanded Htt accumulate extended outgrowths and other soma abnormalities. Furthermore, knockdown of genes important for ubiquitin-mediated degradation, lysosomal function, and autophagy modulated these age-related morphological changes in otherwise normal neurons. Our results show that the expression of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative disease such as Huntington’s disease modifies the morphological remodeling that is normally associated with neuronal aging. Our results also show that morphological remodeling of healthy neurons during aging can be regulated by the UPS and other proteostasis pathways. Collectively, our data highlight a model in which morphological remodeling during

  15. Selectivity for multiple stimulus features in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Fairhall, Adrienne L; Burlingame, C Andrew; Narasimhan, Ramesh; Harris, Robert A; Puchalla, Jason L; Berry, Michael J

    2006-11-01

    Under normal viewing conditions, retinal ganglion cells transmit to the brain an encoded version of the visual world. The retina parcels the visual scene into an array of spatiotemporal features, and each ganglion cell conveys information about a small set of these features. We study the temporal features represented by salamander retinal ganglion cells by stimulating with dynamic spatially uniform flicker and recording responses using a multi-electrode array. While standard reverse correlation methods determine a single stimulus feature--the spike-triggered average--multiple features can be relevant to spike generation. We apply covariance analysis to determine the set of features to which each ganglion cell is sensitive. Using this approach, we found that salamander ganglion cells represent a rich vocabulary of different features of a temporally modulated visual stimulus. Individual ganglion cells were sensitive to at least two and sometimes as many as six features in the stimulus. While a fraction of the cells can be described by a filter-and-fire cascade model, many cells have feature selectivity that has not previously been reported. These reverse models were able to account for 80-100% of the information encoded by ganglion cells. PMID:16914609

  16. Near-Infrared Photobiomodulation in Retinal Injury and Disease.

    PubMed

    Eells, Janis T; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Valter, Krisztina

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is growing that exposure of tissue to low energy photon irradiation in the far-red (FR) to near-infrared (NIR) range of the spectrum, collectively termed "photobiomodulation" (PBM) can restore the function of damaged mitochondria, upregulate the production of cytoprotective factors and prevent apoptotic cell death. PBM has been applied clinically in the treatment of soft tissue injuries and acceleration of wound healing for more than 40 years. Recent studies have demonstrated that FR/NIR photons penetrate diseased tissues including the retina. The therapeutic effects of PBM have been hypothesized to result from intracellular signaling pathways triggered when FR/NIR photons are absorbed by the mitochondrial photoacceptor molecule, cytochrome c oxidase, culminating in improved mitochondrial energy metabolism, increased cytoprotective factor production and cell survival. Investigations in rodent models of methanol-induced ocular toxicity, light damage, retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration have demonstrated the PBM attenuates photoreceptor cell death, protects retinal function and exerts anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:26427443

  17. Imaging Denatured Collagen Strands In vivo and Ex vivo via Photo-triggered Hybridization of Caged Collagen Mimetic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.; Yu, S. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Collagen is a major structural component of the extracellular matrix that supports tissue formation and maintenance. Although collagen remodeling is an integral part of normal tissue renewal, excessive amount of remodeling activity is involved in tumors, arthritis, and many other pathological conditions. During collagen remodeling, the triple helical structure of collagen molecules is disrupted by proteases in the extracellular environment. In addition, collagens present in many histological tissue samples are partially denatured by the fixation and preservation processes. Therefore, these denatured collagen strands can serve as effective targets for biological imaging. We previously developed a caged collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) that can be photo-triggered to hybridize with denatured collagen strands by forming triple helical structure, which is unique to collagens. The overall goals of this procedure are i) to image denatured collagen strands resulting from normal remodeling activities in vivo, and ii) to visualize collagens in ex vivo tissue sections using the photo-triggered caged CMPs. To achieve effective hybridization and successful in vivo and ex vivo imaging, fluorescently labeled caged CMPs are either photo-activated immediately before intravenous injection, or are directly activated on tissue sections. Normal skeletal collagen remolding in nude mice and collagens in prefixed mouse cornea tissue sections are imaged in this procedure. The imaging method based on the CMP-collagen hybridization technology presented here could lead to deeper understanding of the tissue remodeling process, as well as allow development of new diagnostics for diseases associated with high collagen remodeling activity. PMID:24513868

  18. Sildenafil alters retinal function in mouse carriers of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Nivison-Smith, Lisa; Zhu, Yuan; Whatham, Andrew; Bui, Bang V; Fletcher, Erica L; Acosta, Monica L; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra, has been reported to cause transient visual disturbance from inhibition of phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE6), a key enzyme in the visual phototransduction pathway. This study investigated the effects of sildenafil on the rd1(+/-) mouse, a model for carriers of Retinitis Pigmentosa which exhibit normal vision but may have a lower threshold for cellular stress caused by sildenafil due to a heterozygous mutation in PDE6. Sildenafil caused a dose-dependent decrease in electroretinogram (ERG) responses of normal mice which mostly recovered two days post administration. In contrast, rd1(+/-) mice exhibited a significantly reduced photoreceptor and a supernormal bipolar cell response to sildenafil within 1 h of treatment. Carrier mice retinae took two weeks to return to baseline levels suggesting sildenafil has direct effects on both the inner and outer retina and these effects differ significantly between normal and carrier mice. Anatomically, an increase in expression of the early apoptotic marker, cytochrome C in rd1(+/-) mice indicated that the effects of sildenafil on visual function may lead to degeneration. The results of this study are significant considering approximately 1 in 50 people are likely to be carriers of recessive traits leading to retinal degeneration. PMID:25239397

  19. Primary Reactions in Retinal Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diller, R.

    Conversion of sunlight into energy or information and their storage on a chemical level is essential for life on earth. An important family of chromoproteins performing these tasks is that of retinal binding proteins. Prominent examples are rhodopsin (Rh) [1,2] as the visual pigment in vertebrate and invertebrate animals, the archaeal rhodopsins bacteriorhodopsin (BR) [3] as a light driven proton pump, halorhodopsin (HR) [4,5] as a light driven chloride pump, sensory rhodopsin I and II (SRI, SRII) [6] as photoreceptors, and proteorhodopsin (PR) [7] as another bacterial proton pump.

  20. Strategies for Energy Efficient Remodeling: SEER 2003 Case Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    The goal of the Strategies for Energy Efficiency in Remodeling (SEER) project is to provide information, based on research and case studies, to remodelers and consumers about opportunities to increase home energy performance.

  1. Subdural hygroma after craniosynostosis remodeling surgery.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Praveen; Nagarjuna, Muralidhara; Shetty, Samarth; Salins, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of the cranial sutures and can cause functional impairment or cosmetic deformity. Surgical techniques for the correction of craniosynostosis have changed overtime, as so have the intraoperative and postoperative complications. Extensive surgeries involving fronto-orbital unit repositioning and cranial vault remodeling are associated with various complications. Intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage, venous infarct, air embolism, hydrocephalus, cerebrospinal fluid leak, as well as meningitis are a few complications associated with cranial vault remodeling surgery. Postoperative complications can increase the morbidity and mortality associated with these procedures. Identification of the complications and their timely management should be a part of every craniofacial reconstruction team's training program.In this article, we report a case of subdural hygroma in an infant after cranial vault remodeling procedure. Subdural hygroma is a known complication following head injuries and represents 5% to 20% of posttraumatic intracranial mass lesions. However, subdural hygroma developing after a cranial procedure is rare and has not been reported in the literature. Identification of the complication, close monitoring of the change in subdural fluid volume, and tapping of the fluid through the craniotomy site if indicated form the mainstay of management of subdural hygroma that develops after cranial vault remodeling surgery. PMID:25469899

  2. Interleukin-20 promotes airway remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenbin; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yuguo; Hao, Junqing; Xing, Chunyan; Chu, Qi; Wang, Guicheng; Zhao, Jiping; Wang, Junfei; Dong, Qian; Liu, Tian; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Liang

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that interleukin-20 (IL-20) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, and it has been implicated in psoriasis, lupus nephritis, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and ulcerative colitis. Little is known about the effects of IL-20 in airway remodeling in asthma. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the function of IL-20 in airway remodeling in asthma. To identify the expression of IL-20 and its receptor, IL-20R1/IL-20R2, in the airway epithelium in bronchial tissues, bronchial biopsy specimens were collected from patients and mice with asthma and healthy subjects and stained with specific antibodies. To characterize the effects of IL-20 in asthmatic airway remodeling, we silenced and stimulated IL-20 in cell lines isolated from mice by shRNA and recombinant protein approaches, respectively, and detected the expression of α-SMA and FN-1 by Western blot analysis. First, overexpression of IL-20 and its receptor, IL-20R1/IL-20R2, was detected in the airway epithelium collected from patients and mice with asthma. Second, IL-20 increased the expression of fibronectin-1 and α-SMA, and silencing of IL-20 in mouse lung epithelial (MLE)-12 cells decreased the expression of fibronectin-1 and α-SMA. IL-20 may be a critical cytokine in airway remodeling in asthma. This study indicates that targeting IL-20 and/or its receptors may be a new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:25028099

  3. Chromatin-modifying and -remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Kornberg, R D; Lorch, Y

    1999-04-01

    Nucleosomes have long been known to inhibit DNA transactions on chromosomes and a remarkable abundance of multiprotein complexes that either enhance or relieve this inhibition have been described. Most is known about chromatin-remodeling complexes that perturb nucleosome structure. PMID:10322131

  4. Challenging Modernization: Remodelling the Education Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butt, Graham; Gunter, Helen

    2005-01-01

    This special edition enables an in-depth look at the process of modernization of education in England, in relation to other international developments. In particular we focus on the reform of teachers? work by examining the antecedence of the current policy of remodelling through three articles based on the Evaluation of the Department for…

  5. Re-Modelling as De-Professionalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Meryl

    2006-01-01

    The article sets out the consequences of the British Government's remodelling agenda and its emphasis on less demarcation, for the professional status of teachers in England. It describes how the National Agreement on Raising Standards and Tackling Workload, reached between five of the six trade unions for teachers and headteachers paves the way…

  6. Arterial Remodeling Associates with CKD Progression

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Cédric; Karras, Alexandre; Laurent, Stéphane; Bozec, Erwan; Jacquot, Christian; Stengel, Bénédicte; Houillier, Pascal; Froissart, Marc; Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    In CKD, large arteries remodel and become increasingly stiff. The greater pulsatile pressure reaching the glomerulus as a result of increased aortic stiffness could induce renal damage, suggesting that the stiffening and remodeling of large arteries could affect the progression of CKD. We measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, aortic pressure and carotid remodeling and stiffness parameters in 180 patients with CKD (mean measured GFR, 32 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and followed them prospectively for a mean of 3.1 years. During follow-up, carotid stiffness significantly increased (+0.28 ± 0.05 m/s; P < 0.0001) but aortic stiffness did not. Carotid intima-media thickness decreased significantly during follow-up and the internal diameter of the carotid increased, producing increased circumferential wall stress (+2.08 ± 0.43 kPa/yr; P < 0.0001). In a linear mixed model, circumferential wall stress significantly associated with faster GFR decline after adjustment for risk factors of cardiovascular disease and progression of CKD. In a multivariable Cox model, carotid circumferential wall stress and pulse pressure independently associated with higher risk for ESRD. None of the arterial stiffness parameters associated with progression of CKD. In conclusion, maladaptive remodeling of the carotid artery and increased pulse pressure independently associate with faster decline of renal function and progression to ESRD. PMID:21493771

  7. Revealing remodeler function: Varied and unique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastlund, Allen

    Chromatin remodelers perform a necessary and required function for the successful expression of our genetic code. By modifying, shifting, or ejecting nucleosomes from the chromatin structure they allow access to the underlying DNA to the rest of the cell's machinery. This research has focused on two major remodeler motors from major families of chromatin remodelers: the trimeric motor domain of RSC and the motor domain of the ISWI family, ISWI. Using primarily stopped-flow spectrofluorometry, I have categorized the time-dependent motions of these motor domains along their preferred substrate, double-stranded DNA. Combined with collected ATP utilization data, I present the subsequent analysis and associated conclusions that stem from the underlying assumptions and models. Interestingly, there is little in common between the investigated proteins aside from their favored medium. While RSC exhibits modest translocation characteristics and highly effective motion with the ability for large molecular forces, ISWI is not only structurally different but highly inefficient in its motion leading to difficulties in determining its specific translocation mechanics. While chromatin remodeling is a ubiquitous facet of eukaryotic life, there remains much to be understood about their general mechanisms.

  8. Demarcation laser photocoagulation induced retinal necrosis and rupture resulting in large retinal tear formation.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Carlos; Pieramici, Dante J; Matsui, Rodrigo; Rabena, Melvin; Graue, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Retinal tears after laser photocoagulation are a rare complication that occurs after intense laser. It is talked about among retina specialist occurring particularly at the end of a surgical case while applying endophotocoagulation; to the best our knowledge, there are no reports in the literature of a large retinal tear induced after attempted in-office demarcation laser photocoagulation (DLP) that simulated a giant retinal tear. DLP has been employed in the management of selected cases of macula sparring rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Even though extension of the retinal detachment through the "laser barrier" is considered a failure of treatment, few complications have been described with the use of this less invasive retinal detachment repair technique. We describe a case of a high myopic woman who initially was treated with demarcation laser photocoagulation for an asymptomatic retinal detachment associated with a single horseshoe tear and a full thickness large retinal tear was created where the laser was placed. Intense laser photocoagulation resulted in abrupt laser induced retinal necrosis and rupture creating this large retinal break. Proper laser technique should reduce the risks associated with this procedure. PMID:25770055

  9. Developmental regression of hyaloid vasculature is triggered by neurons.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Yusuke; Yamada, Toru; Tai-Nagara, Ikue; Okabe, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Yuko; Ema, Masatsugu; Kubota, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-27

    Vascular development involves not only vascular growth, but also regression of transient or unnecessary vessels. Hyaloid vasculature is the temporary circulatory system in fetal eyes, which spontaneously degenerates when the retinal blood vessels start to grow. Failure of the hyaloid vessels to regress leads to disease in humans, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, which causes severe intraocular hemorrhage and impairs visual function. However, the mechanism underlying the endogenous program that mediates spontaneous regression of the hyaloid vessels is not well understood. In this study, we identify a robust switch triggering this program directed by neurons in mice. Marked up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) occurs in retinal neurons just after birth via distal-multipotent-mesodermal enhancer, a hemangioblast-specific enhancer of VEGFR2. Genetic deletion of neuronal VEGFR2 interrupts this program, resulting in massive hyaloid vessels that persist even during late postnatal days. This abnormality is caused by excessive VEGF proteins in the vitreous cavity as a result of impairment in the neuronal sequestration of VEGF. Collectively, our data indicate that neurons trigger transition from the fetal to the postnatal circulatory systems in the retina. PMID:27325890

  10. Optically triggered infrared photodetector.

    PubMed

    Ramiro, Íñigo; Martí, Antonio; Antolín, Elisa; López, Esther; Datas, Alejandro; Luque, Antonio; Ripalda, José M; González, Yolanda

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate a new class of semiconductor device: the optically triggered infrared photodetector (OTIP). This photodetector is based on a new physical principle that allows the detection of infrared light to be switched ON and OFF by means of an external light. Our experimental device, fabricated using InAs/AlGaAs quantum-dot technology, demonstrates normal incidence infrared detection in the 2-6 μm range. The detection is optically triggered by a 590 nm light-emitting diode. Furthermore, the detection gain is achieved in our device without an increase of the noise level. The novel characteristics of OTIPs open up new possibilities for third generation infrared imaging systems ( Rogalski, A.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 105 (9), 091101). PMID:25490236

  11. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  12. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.; Kippen, M.

    2004-09-28

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  13. Neural networks for triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, B. ); Campbell, M. ); Bedeschi, F. ); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. ); Nesti, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Unfolded Protein Responses in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sarah X.; Sanders, Emily; Fliesler, Steven J.; Wang, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the primary intracellular organelle responsible for protein and lipid biosynthesis, protein folding and trafficking, calcium homeostasis, and several other vital processes in cell physiology. Disturbance in ER function results in ER stress and subsequent activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR up-regulates ER chaperones, reduces protein translation, and promotes clearance of cytotoxic misfolded proteins to restore ER homeostasis. If this vital process fails, the cell will be signaled to enter apoptosis, resulting in cell death. Sustained ER stress also can trigger an inflammatory response and exacerbate oxidative stress, both of which contribute synergistically to tissue damage. Studies performed over the past decade have implicated ER stress in a broad range of human diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, diabetes, and vascular disorders. Several of these diseases also entail retinal dysfunction and degeneration caused by injury to retinal neurons and/or to the blood vessels that supply retinal cells with nutrients, trophic and homeostatic factors, oxygen, and other essential molecules, as well as serving as a conduit for removal of waste products and potentially toxic substances from the retina. Collectively, such injuries represent the leading cause of blindness world-wide in all age groups. Herein, we summarize recent progress on the study of ER stress and UPR signaling in retinal biology and discuss the molecular mechanisms and the potential clinical applications of targeting ER stress as a new therapeutic approach to prevent and treat neuronal degeneration in the retina. PMID:24792589

  15. The neural circuit mechanisms underlying the retinal response to motion reversal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eric Y; Chou, Janice; Park, Jeongsook; Schwartz, Greg; Berry, Michael J

    2014-11-19

    To make up for delays in visual processing, retinal circuitry effectively predicts that a moving object will continue moving in a straight line, allowing retinal ganglion cells to anticipate the object's position. However, a sudden reversal of motion triggers a synchronous burst of firing from a large group of ganglion cells, possibly signaling a violation of the retina's motion prediction. To investigate the neural circuitry underlying this response, we used a combination of multielectrode array and whole-cell patch recordings to measure the responses of individual retinal ganglion cells in the tiger salamander to reversing stimuli. We found that different populations of ganglion cells were responsible for responding to the reversal of different kinds of objects, such as bright versus dark objects. Using pharmacology and designed stimuli, we concluded that ON and OFF bipolar cells both contributed to the reversal response, but that amacrine cells had, at best, a minor role. This allowed us to formulate an adaptive cascade model (ACM), similar to the one previously used to describe ganglion cell responses to motion onset. By incorporating the ON pathway into the ACM, we were able to reproduce the time-varying firing rate of fast OFF ganglion cells for all experimentally tested stimuli. Analysis of the ACM demonstrates that bipolar cell gain control is primarily responsible for generating the synchronized retinal response, as individual bipolar cells require a constant time delay before recovering from gain control. PMID:25411485

  16. Measurement of retinal blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W., Jr.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    A fundus camera was modified to illuminate the retina of a rabbit model with low power laser light in order to obtain laser speckle images. A fast-exposure charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to capture laser speckle images of the retina. Image acquisition was synchronized with the arterial pulses of the rabbit to ensure that all images are obtained at the same point in the cardiac cycle. The rabbits were sedated and a speculum was inserted to prevent the eyelid from closing. Both albino (New Zealand; pigmented (Dutch belted) rabbits were used in the study. The rabbit retina is almost avascular. The measurements are obtained for choroidal tissue as well as retinal tissue. Because the retina is in a region of high metabolism, blood velocity is strongly affected by blood oxygen saturation. Measurements of blood velocity obtained over a wide range of O II saturations (58%-100%) showed that blood velocity increases with decreasing O II saturation. For most experiments, the left eye of the rabbit was used for laser measurements whereas the right eye served as a control. No observable difference between pre- and post-experimented eye was noted. Histological examinations of retinal tissue subjected to repeated laser measurements showed no indication of tissue damage.

  17. Fixation strategies for retinal immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Stradleigh, Tyler W; Ishida, Andrew T

    2015-09-01

    Immunohistochemical and ex vivo anatomical studies have provided many glimpses of the variety, distribution, and signaling components of vertebrate retinal neurons. The beauty of numerous images published to date, and the qualitative and quantitative information they provide, indicate that these approaches are fundamentally useful. However, obtaining these images entailed tissue handling and exposure to chemical solutions that differ from normal extracellular fluid in composition, temperature, and osmolarity. Because the differences are large enough to alter intercellular and intracellular signaling in neurons, and because retinae are susceptible to crush, shear, and fray, it is natural to wonder if immunohistochemical and anatomical methods disturb or damage the cells they are designed to examine. Tissue fixation is typically incorporated to guard against this damage and is therefore critically important to the quality and significance of the harvested data. Here, we describe mechanisms of fixation; advantages and disadvantages of using formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde as fixatives during immunohistochemistry; and modifications of widely used protocols that have recently been found to improve cell shape preservation and immunostaining patterns, especially in proximal retinal neurons. PMID:25892361

  18. Fixation Strategies For Retinal Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical and ex vivo anatomical studies have provided many glimpses of the variety, distribution, and signaling components of vertebrate retinal neurons. The beauty of numerous images published to date, and the qualitative and quantitative information they provide, indicate that these approaches are fundamentally useful. However, obtaining these images entailed tissue handling and exposure to chemical solutions that differ from normal extracellular fluid in composition, temperature, and osmolarity. Because the differences are large enough to alter intercellular and intracellular signaling in neurons, and because retinae are susceptible to crush, shear, and fray, it is natural to wonder if immunohistochemical and anatomical methods disturb or damage the cells they are designed to examine. Tissue fixation is typically incorporated to guard against this damage and is therefore critically important to the quality and significance of the harvested data. Here, we describe mechanisms of fixation; advantages and disadvantages of using formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde as fixatives during immunohistochemistry; and modifications of widely used protocols that have recently been found to improve cell shape preservation and immunostaining patterns, especially in proximal retinal neurons. PMID:25892361

  19. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of

  20. A mechanical model of retinal detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; Siegel, Michael

    2012-08-01

    We present a model of the mechanical and fluid forces associated with exudative retinal detachments where the retinal photoreceptor cells separate, typically from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By computing the total fluid volume flow arising from transretinal, vascular and RPE pump currents, we determine the conditions under which the subretinal fluid pressure exceeds the maximum yield stress holding the retina and RPE together, giving rise to an irreversible, extended retinal delamination. We also investigate localized, blister-like retinal detachments by balancing mechanical tension in the retina with both the retina-RPE adhesion energy and the hydraulic pressure jump across the retina. For detachments induced by traction forces, we find a critical radius beyond which the blister is unstable to growth. Growth of a detached blister can also be driven by inflamed lesions in which the tissue has a higher choroidal hydraulic conductivity, has insufficient RPE pump activity, or has defective adhesion bonds. We determine the parameter regimes in which the blister either becomes unstable to growth, remains stable and finite-sized, or shrinks, allowing possible healing. The corresponding stable blister radius and shape are calculated. Our analysis provides a quantitative description of the physical mechanisms involved in exudative retinal detachments and can help guide the development of retinal reattachment protocols or preventative procedures.

  1. Retinal microvascular network attenuation in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael A.; McGowan, Amy J.; Cardwell, Chris R.; Cheung, Carol Y.; Craig, David; Passmore, Peter; Silvestri, Giuliana; Maxwell, Alexander P.; McKay, Gareth J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral small-vessel disease has been implicated in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The retinal microvasculature enables the noninvasive visualization and evaluation of the systemic microcirculation. We evaluated retinal microvascular parameters in a case-control study of AD patients and cognitively normal controls. Methods Retinal images were computationally analyzed and quantitative retinal parameters (caliber, fractal dimension, tortuosity, and bifurcation) measured. Regression models were used to compute odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) for AD with adjustment for confounders. Results Retinal images were available in 213 AD participants and 294 cognitively normal controls. Persons with lower venular fractal dimension (OR per standard deviation [SD] increase, 0.77 [CI: 0.62–0.97]) and lower arteriolar tortuosity (OR per SD increase, 0.78 [CI: 0.63–0.97]) were more likely to have AD after appropriate adjustment. Discussion Patients with AD have a sparser retinal microvascular network and retinal microvascular variation may represent similar pathophysiological events within the cerebral microvasculature of patients with AD. PMID:26634224

  2. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, K. V.; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases. PMID:27195091

  3. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chalam, K V; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases. PMID:27195091

  4. Dynamic Remodeling of the Magnetosome Membrane Is Triggered by the Initiation of Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Elias; Subramanian, Poorna; Li, Zhuo; Jensen, Grant J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of membrane-bound organelles that direct the biomineralization of magnetic nanoparticles. These magnetosome compartments are a model for studying the biogenesis and subcellular organization of bacterial organelles. Previous studies have suggested that discrete gene products build and assemble magnetosomes in a stepwise fashion. Here, using an inducible system, we show that the stages of magnetosome formation are highly dynamic and interconnected. During de novo formation, magnetosomes first organize into discontinuous chain fragments that are subsequently connected by the bacterial actin-like protein MamK. We also find that magnetosome membranes are not uniform in size and can grow in a biomineralization-dependent manner. In the absence of biomineralization, magnetosome membranes stall at a diameter of ~50 nm. Those that have initiated biomineralization then expand to significantly larger sizes and accommodate mature magnetic particles. We speculate that such a biomineralization-dependent checkpoint for membrane growth establishes the appropriate conditions within the magnetosome to ensure successful nucleation and growth of magnetic particles. PMID:26884433

  5. Retinal venous pressure: the role of endothelin.

    PubMed

    Flammer, Josef; Konieczka, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The retinal venous pressure (RVP) can be measured non-invasively. While RVP is equal to or slightly above intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy people, it is often markedly increased in patients with eye or systemic diseases. Beside a mechanical obstruction, the main cause of such an elevation is a local dysregulation of a retinal vein, particularly a constriction induced by endothelin-1 (ET-1). A local increase of ET-1 can result from a high plasma level, as ET-1 can diffuse from the fenestrated capillaries of the choroid into the optic nerve head (ONH), bypassing the blood retinal barrier. A local increase can also result from increased local production either by a sick neighboring artery or retinal tissue. Generally, the main factors increasing ET-1 are inflammations and hypoxia, either locally or in a remote organ. RVP is known to be increased in patients with glaucoma, retinal vein occlusion (RVO), diabetic retinopathy, high mountain disease, and primary vascular dysregulation (PVD). PVD is the major vascular component of Flammer syndrome (FS). An increase of RVP decreases perfusion pressure, which heightens the risk for hypoxia. An increase of RVP also elevates transmural pressure, which in turn heightens the risk for retinal edema. In patients with RVO, a high level of RVP may not only be a consequence but also a potential cause of the occlusion; therefore, it risks causing a vicious circle. Narrow retinal arteries and particularly dilated retinal veins are known risk indicators for future cardiovascular events. As the major cause for such a retinal venous dilatation is an increased RVP, RVP may likely turn out to be an even stronger predictor. PMID:26504500

  6. Macrophages promote vasculogenesis of retinal neovascularization in an oxygen-induced retinopathy model in mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Yu-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Qin; Hou, Hui-Yuan; Su, Jing-Bo; Yao, Li-Bo; Zhang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the role of macrophages in oxygen-induced retinal neovascularization (NV) in mice, particularly the involvement of bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) and the underlying mechanisms, BMCs from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice were transplanted into postnatal day (P) 1 mice after irradiation. The mice were exposed to 75 % oxygen from P7 to P12 to initiate oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). The macrophages were depleted by injection of clodronate-liposomes (lip) intraperitoneally. The eyes were collected at P12 and P17. Retinal flatmounts and histopathological cross-sections were performed to analyze the severity of retinal NV and BMC recruitment. BMCs immunopositive for CD31 (PECAM-1; endothelial cell marker) and α-SMA (smooth muscle cell marker) antigens were detected using a confocal microscope. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. The VEGF, SDF-1, CXCR4 and CD45 protein expression was detected by western blot examination. The retinal avascular area in OIR mice at P12 was unaffected after macrophage depletion carried out twice (38.27 ± 1.92 % reduction) using clodronate-lip. The retinal avascular area and the NV area at P17 were reduced after macrophage depletion four times (79.53 ± 1.02 % reduction); these findings were supported by retinal flatmounts and histopathological cross-sections. Macrophage depletion led to significant inhibition of BMC recruitment into the NV tufts at P17, with decreased expression of retinal VEGF, SDF-1, CXCR4 and CD45. The recruited BMCs differentiated primarily into CD31-positive endothelial cells (ECs) and α-SMA-positive smooth muscle cells (SMCs). This study suggested that macrophages promoted the vasculogenesis of retinal NV, particularly the contribution of BMCs in the mouse OIR model, which might be triggered by VEGF and SDF-1 production. PMID:26841878

  7. Regulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated transcription in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong Lan; Jeong, Kwang Won

    2016-04-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor with pleiotropic effects in normal physiology or vascular development, xenobiotic metabolism, and cancer. A previous study has reported that BRG1, a component of the SWI/SNF complex, is a coactivator for AHR and is recruited to the promoter region of the CYP1A1 gene in mouse hepatocytes. Recent data suggest that AHR is also expressed in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19), which play a crucial role in retinal physiology and the visual cycle. Multiple studies have shown that the AHR plays an important role in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration. However, the mechanism of AHR transcriptional activation in retinal pigment cells has not been reported. Here, we demonstrate that the AHR signaling pathway is active in ARPE-19 cells, as in hepatocytes, but with different target gene specificity. We also found that chromatin remodeling by the BRG1-containing SWI/SNF complex is required for the AHR-mediated expression of target genes in ARPE-19 cells. We identified a novel enhancer region (-12 kb) of the CYP1A1 gene in ARPE-19 cells, to which both AHR and BRG1 are recruited in a ligand-dependent manner. BRG1 is associated with the AHR in ARPE-19 cells, and the C-terminal activation domain of the AHR directly interacts with BRG1. Furthermore, depletion of BRG1 caused a reduction in chromatin accessibility at the CYP1A1 enhancer. These results suggest that ARPE-19 cells possess an AHR-mediated transcription pathway with different target gene specificity, and that BRG1 is required for AHR-mediated transcription in ARPE-19 cells. PMID:26966070

  8. Cancer-associated retinopathy with retinal phlebitis.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Y; Ohara, S; Sakamoto, T; Kohno, T; Nakao, F

    1993-12-01

    A 50-year-old man with cancer-associated retinopathy was investigated using light and electron microscopy, immunofluorescence studies, and western blotting. He had visual disturbance, ring-like scotoma, and night blindness bilaterally. There were narrowed retinal arterioles and dilated retinal venules. Oral corticosteroid therapy had positive effects. Immunostaining using the patient's serum revealed a positive reaction in the ganglion cell layer of normal retina. Western blotting showed that the patient's serum antibody reacted with normal retinal proteins of 24 and 48 kDa. Multiple metastases were evident at autopsy. PMID:8110675

  9. Retinal isomerization dynamics in dry bacteriorhodopsin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonna, Anne; Groma, Géza I.; Vos, Marten H.

    2005-10-01

    The primary photoprocesses in neutral and acid forms of oriented dried bacteriorhodopsin films were investigated by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy. The excitation energy dependence of the signals was used to distinguish photochemistry from processes involving photophysics of photocycle intermediates. Both the kinetics and the quantum yield of all- trans excited state decay by retinal photoisomerization and subsequent J → K transition were found to be very similar as in hydrated environments. Therefore, unlike slower photocycle phases, communication of the retinal with the environment does not play a role in retinal isomerization. Our results are important for understanding recent nonlinear optical applications of such films.

  10. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling. PMID:17386182

  11. Retinal Stimulation on Rabbit Using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Based Multichip Flexible Stimulator toward Retinal Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Takashi; Asano, Ryosuke; Sugitani, Sachie; Taniyama, Mari; Terasawa, Yasuo; Nunoshita, Masahiro; Nakauchi, Kazuaki; Fujikado, Takashi; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-04-01

    The Functionality of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) LSI-based, multichip flexible retinal stimulator was demonstrated in retinal stimulation experiments on rabbits. A 1×4-configured multichip stimulator was fabricated for application to experiments on animals. An experimental procedure including surgical operations was developed, and retinal stimulation was performed with the fabricated multichip stimulator. Neural responses on the visual cortex were successfully evoked by the fabricated stimulator. The stimulator is confirmed to be applicable to acute animal experiments.

  12. Triggered Codeswitching between Cognate Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broersma, Mirjam

    2009-01-01

    This study shows further evidence for triggered codeswitching. In natural speech from a Dutch-English bilingual, codeswitches occurred more often directly next to a cognate (or "trigger word") than elsewhere. This evidence from typologically related, cognate languages extends previous evidence for triggering between typologically unrelated…

  13. Osmotic stress-induced remodeling of the cortical cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Di Ciano, Caterina; Nie, Zilin; Szászi, Katalin; Lewis, Alison; Uruno, Takehito; Zhan, Xi; Rotstein, Ori D; Mak, Alan; Kapus, András

    2002-09-01

    Osmotic stress is known to affect the cytoskeleton; however, this adaptive response has remained poorly characterized, and the underlying signaling pathways are unexplored. Here we show that hypertonicity induces submembranous de novo F-actin assembly concomitant with the peripheral translocation and colocalization of cortactin and the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex, which are key components of the actin nucleation machinery. Additionally, hyperosmolarity promotes the association of cortactin with Arp2/3 as revealed by coimmunoprecipitation. Using various truncation or phosphorylation-incompetent mutants, we show that cortactin translocation requires the Arp2/3- or the F-actin binding domain, but the process is independent of the shrinkage-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin. Looking for an alternative signaling mechanism, we found that hypertonicity stimulates Rac and Cdc42. This appears to be a key event in the osmotically triggered cytoskeletal reorganization, because 1) constitutively active small GTPases translocate cortactin, 2) Rac and cortactin colocalize at the periphery of hypertonically challenged cells, and 3) dominant-negative Rac and Cdc42 inhibit the hypertonicity-provoked cortactin and Arp3 translocation. The Rho family-dependent cytoskeleton remodeling may be an important osmoprotective response that reinforces the cell cortex. PMID:12176742

  14. Vascular remodeling after ischemic stroke: mechanisms and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialing; Wang, Yongting; Akamatsu, Yosuke; Lee, Chih Cheng; Stetler, R Anne; Lawton, Michael T.; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The brain vasculature has been increasingly recognized as a key player that directs brain development, regulates homeostasis, and contributes to pathological processes. Following ischemic stroke, the reduction of blood flow elicits a cascade of changes and leads to vascular remodeling. However, the temporal profile of vascular changes after stroke is not well understood. Growing evidence suggests that the early phase of cerebral blood volume (CBV) increase is likely due to the improvement in collateral flow, also known as arteriogenesis, whereas the late phase of CBV increase is attributed to the surge of angiogenesis. Arteriogenesis is triggered by shear fluid stress followed by activation of endothelium and inflammatory processes, while angiogenesis induces a number of pro-angiogenic factors and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The status of collaterals in acute stroke has been shown to have several prognostic implications, while the causal relationship between angiogenesis and improved functional recovery has yet to be established in patients. A number of interventions aimed at enhancing cerebral blood flow including increasing collateral recruitment are under clinical investigation. Transplantation of EPCs to improve angiogenesis is also underway. Knowledge in the underlying physiological mechanisms for improved arteriogenesis and angiogenesis shall lead to more effective therapies for ischemic stroke. PMID:24291532

  15. Cell Death and Tissue Remodeling in Planarian Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pellettieri, Jason; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Watanabe, Shigeki; Mancuso, Joel; Green, Douglas R.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2010-01-01

    Many long-lived organisms, including humans, can regenerate some adult tissues lost to physical injury or disease. Much of the previous research on mechanisms of regeneration has focused on adult stem cells, which give rise to new tissue necessary for the replacement of missing body parts. Here we report that apoptosis of differentiated cells complements stem cell division during regeneration in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Specifically, we developed a whole-mount TUNEL assay that allowed us to document two dramatic increases in the rate of apoptosis following amputation – an intial localized response near the wound site and a subsequent systemic response that varies in magnitude depending on the type of fragment examined. The latter cell death response can be induced in uninjured organs, occurs in the absence of planarian stem cells, and can also be triggered by prolonged starvation. Taken together, our results implicate apoptosis in the restoration of proper anatomical scale and proportion through remodeling of existing tissues. We also report results from initial mechanistic studies of apoptosis in planarians, which revealed that a S. mediterranea homolog of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 is required for cell survival in adult animals. We propose that apoptosis is a central mechanism working in concert with stem cell division to restore anatomical form and function during metazoan regeneration. PMID:19766622

  16. Aquaporin 4-specific T cells and NMO-IgG cause primary retinal damage in experimental NMO/SD.

    PubMed

    Zeka, Bleranda; Hastermann, Maria; Kaufmann, Nathalie; Schanda, Kathrin; Pende, Marko; Misu, Tatsuro; Rommer, Paulus; Fujihara, Kazuo; Nakashima, Ichiro; Dahle, Charlotte; Leutmezer, Fritz; Reindl, Markus; Lassmann, Hans; Bradl, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica/spectrum disorder (NMO/SD) is a severe, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In the majority of patients, it is associated with the presence of pathogenic serum autoantibodies (the so-called NMO-IgGs) directed against the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4), and with the formation of large, astrocyte-destructive lesions in spinal cord and optic nerves. A large number of recent studies using optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated that damage to optic nerves in NMO/SD is also associated with retinal injury, as evidenced by retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning and microcystic inner nuclear layer abnormalities. These studies concluded that retinal injury in NMO/SD patients results from secondary neurodegeneration triggered by optic neuritis.However, the eye also contains cells expressing AQP4, i.e., Müller cells and astrocytes in the retina, epithelial cells of the ciliary body, and epithelial cells of the iris, which raised the question whether the eye can also be a primary target in NMO/SD. Here, we addressed this point in experimental NMO/SD (ENMO) induced in Lewis rat by transfer of AQP4268-285-specific T cells and NMO-IgG.We show that these animals show retinitis and subsequent dysfunction/damage of retinal axons and neurons, and that this pathology occurs independently of the action of NMO-IgG. We further show that in the retinae of ENMO animals Müller cell side branches lose AQP4 reactivity, while retinal astrocytes and Müller cell processes in the RNFL/ganglionic cell layers are spared. These changes only occur in the presence of both AQP4268-285-specific T cells and NMO-IgG.Cumulatively, our data show that damage to retinal cells can be a primary event in NMO/SD. PMID:27503347

  17. Subnanosecond trigger system for ETA

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, E.G.; Lauer, E.J.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers D.; Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-05-30

    A high-voltage trigger system capable of triggering 30, 250 kV spark gaps; each with less than +- 1 ns jitter has been constructed. In addition to low jitter rates, the trigger system must be capable of delivering the high voltage pulses to the spark gaps either simultaneously or sequentially as determined by other system requirements. The trigger system consists of several stages of pulse amplification culminating in 160 kV pulses having 30 ns risetime. The trigger system is described and test data provided.

  18. Nuclear Migration During Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Baye, Lisa M.; Link, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we focus on the mechanisms, regulation, and cellular consequences of nuclear migration in the developing retina. In the nervous system, nuclear migration is prominent during both proliferative and post-mitotic phases of development. Interkinetic nuclear migration is the process where the nucleus oscillates from the apical to basal surfaces in proliferative neuroepithelia. Proliferative nuclear movement occurs in step with the cell cycle, with M-phase being confined to the apical surface and G1-, S-, and G2-phases occurring at more basal locations. Later, following cell cycle exit, some neuron precursors migrate by nuclear translocation. In this mode of cellular migration, nuclear movement is the driving force for motility. Following discussion of the key components and important regulators for each of these processes, we present an emerging model where interkinetic nuclear migration functions to distinguish cell fates among retinal neuroepithelia. PMID:17560964

  19. Retinal Adaptation to Object Motion

    PubMed Central

    Ölveczky, Bence P.; Baccus, Stephen A.; Meister, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Summary Due to fixational eye movements, the image on the retina is always in motion, even when one views a stationary scene. When an object moves within the scene, the corresponding patch of retina experiences a different motion trajectory than the surrounding region. Certain retinal ganglion cells respond selectively to this condition, when the motion in the cell’s receptive field center is different from that in the surround. Here we show that this response is strongest at the very onset of differential motion, followed by gradual adaptation with a time course of several seconds. Different subregions of a ganglion cell’s receptive field can adapt independently. The circuitry responsible for differential motion adaptation lies in the inner retina. Several candidate mechanisms were tested, and the adaptation most likely results from synaptic depression at the synapse from bipolar to ganglion cell. Similar circuit mechanisms may act more generally to emphasize novel features of a visual stimulus. PMID:18031685

  20. Buckling Reduces eNOS Production and Stimulates Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Arteries in Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yangming; Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-09-01

    Artery buckling alters the fluid shear stress and wall stress in the artery but its temporal effect on vascular wall remodeling is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the early effect of artery buckling on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and extracellular matrix remodeling. Bilateral porcine carotid arteries were maintained in an ex vivo organ culture system with and without buckling while under the same physiological pressure and flow rate for 3-7 days. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, fibronectin, elastin, collagen I, III and IV, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), and eNOS were determined using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that MMP-2 expression level was significantly higher in buckled arteries than in the controls and higher at the inner curve than at the outer curve of buckled arteries, while collagen IV content showed an opposite trend, suggesting that artery buckling increased MMP-2 expression and collagen IV degradation in a site-specific fashion. However, no differences for MMP-9, fibronectin, elastin, collagen I, III, and TIMP-2 were observed among the outer and inner curve sides of buckled arteries and straight controls. Additionally, eNOS expression was significantly decreased in buckled arteries. These results suggest that artery buckling triggers uneven wall remodeling that could lead to development of tortuous arteries. PMID:26913855

  1. Deciliation is associated with dramatic remodeling of epithelial cell junctions and surface domains.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Christian E; Sanzone, Kaitlin M; Spiczka, Krystle S; Sheff, David R; Sandra, Alexander; Yeaman, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Stress-induced shedding of motile cilia (autotomy) has been documented in diverse organisms and likely represents a conserved cellular reaction. However, little is known about whether primary cilia are shed from mammalian epithelial cells and what impact deciliation has on polarized cellular organization. We show that several chemically distinct agents trigger autotomy in epithelial cells. Surprisingly, deciliation is associated with a significant, but reversible increase in transepithelial resistance. This reflects substantial reductions in tight junction proteins associated with "leaky" nephron segments (e.g., claudin-2). At the same time, apical trafficking of gp80/clusterin and gp114/CEACAM becomes randomized, basal-lateral delivery of Na,K-ATPase is reduced, and expression of the nonciliary apical protein gp135/podocalyxin is greatly decreased. However, ciliogenesis-impaired MDCK cells do not undergo continual junction remodeling, and mature cilia are not required for autotomy-associated remodeling events. Deciliation and epithelial remodeling may be mechanistically linked processes, because RNAi-mediated reduction of Exocyst subunit Sec6 inhibits ciliary shedding and specifically blocks deciliation-associated down-regulation of claudin-2 and gp135. We propose that ciliary autotomy represents a signaling pathway that impacts the organization and function of polarized epithelial cells. PMID:19005211

  2. Rapid Remodeling of Invadosomes by Gi-coupled Receptors: DISSECTING THE ROLE OF Rho GTPases.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, Katarzyna M; Leyton-Puig, Daniela; Argenzio, Elisabetta; Boumeester, Anja J; van Butselaar, Bram; Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I; van Leeuwen, Frank N; Innocenti, Metello; Jalink, Kees; Moolenaar, Wouter H

    2016-02-26

    Invadosomes are actin-rich membrane protrusions that degrade the extracellular matrix to drive tumor cell invasion. Key players in invadosome formation are c-Src and Rho family GTPases. Invadosomes can reassemble into circular rosette-like superstructures, but the underlying signaling mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that Src-induced invadosomes in human melanoma cells (A375M and MDA-MB-435) undergo rapid remodeling into dynamic extracellular matrix-degrading rosettes by distinct G protein-coupled receptor agonists, notably lysophosphatidic acid (LPA; acting through the LPA1 receptor) and endothelin. Agonist-induced rosette formation is blocked by pertussis toxin, dependent on PI3K activity and accompanied by localized production of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, whereas MAPK and Ca(2+) signaling are dispensable. Using FRET-based biosensors, we show that LPA and endothelin transiently activate Cdc42 through Gi, concurrent with a biphasic decrease in Rac activity and differential effects on RhoA. Cdc42 activity is essential for rosette formation, whereas G12/13-mediated RhoA-ROCK signaling suppresses the remodeling process. Our results reveal a Gi-mediated Cdc42 signaling axis by which G protein-coupled receptors trigger invadosome remodeling, the degree of which is dictated by the Cdc42-RhoA activity balance. PMID:26740622

  3. Remodeling of Calcium Entry Pathways in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) entry pathways play important roles in control of many cellular functions, including long-term proliferation, migration and cell death. In recent years, it is becoming increasingly clear that, in some types of tumors, remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways could contribute to cancer hallmarks such as excessive proliferation, cell migration and invasion as well as resistance to cell death or survival. In this chapter we briefly review findings related to remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways in cancer with emphasis on the mechanisms that contribute to increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and store-operated currents (SOCs) in colorectal cancer cells. Finally, since SOCE appears critically involved in colon tumorogenesis, the inhibition of SOCE by aspirin and other NSAIDs and its possible contribution to colon cancer chemoprevention is reviewed. PMID:27161240

  4. Chromatin Remodeling, DNA Damage Repair and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohua; Yip, Raymond KH; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental and endogenous conditions causing DNA damage, which is detected and repaired by conserved DNA repair pathways to maintain genomic integrity. Chromatin remodeling is critical in this process, as the organization of eukaryotic DNA into compact chromatin presents a natural barrier to all DNA-related events. Studies on human premature aging syndromes together with normal aging have suggested that accumulated damages might lead to exhaustion of resources that are required for physiological functions and thus accelerate aging. In this manuscript, combining the present understandings and latest findings, we focus mainly on discussing the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulation of aging. PMID:23633913

  5. Regulatory and Economic Considerations of Retinal Drugs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankoor R; Williams, George A

    2016-01-01

    The advent of anti-VEGF therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration and macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion and diabetes mellitus has prevented blindness in tens of thousands of people. However, the costs of these drugs are without precedent in ophthalmic drug therapeutics. An analysis of the financial implications of retinal drugs and the impact of the Food and Drug Administration on treatment of retinal disease must include not only an evaluation of the direct costs of the drugs and the costs associated with their administration, but also the cost savings which accrue from their clinical benefit. This chapter will discuss the financial and regulatory issues associated with retinal drugs. PMID:26502165

  6. Retinal vein occlusion: pathophysiology and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Karia, Niral

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the current thinking about retinal vein occlusion. It gives an overview of its pathophysiology and discusses the evidence behind the various established and emerging treatment paradigms. PMID:20689798

  7. Expression Profiling of Developing Zebrafish Retinal Cells.

    PubMed

    Mullally, Madelyn; Albrecht, Caitlin; Horton, Mary; Laboissonniere, Lauren A; Goetz, Jillian J; Chowdhury, Rebecca; Manning, Alicia; Wester, Andrea K; Bose, Quinton; Trimarchi, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    During retinal development, a variety of different types of neurons are produced. Understanding how each of these types of retinal nerve cells is generated is important from a developmental biology perspective. It is equally important if one is interested in how to regenerate cells after an injury or a disease. To gain more insight into how retinal neurons develop in the zebrafish, we performed single-cell mRNA profiling and in situ hybridizations (ISHs) on retinal sections and whole-mount zebrafish. Through the series of ISHs, designed and performed solely by undergraduate students in the laboratory, we were able to retrospectively identify our single-cell mRNA profiles as most likely coming from developing amacrine cells. Further analysis of these profiles will reveal genes that can be mutated using genome editing techniques. Together these studies increase our knowledge of the genes driving development of different cell types in the zebrafish retina. PMID:26982811

  8. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of these procedures create a scar that helps seal the retina to the back of the eye. ... around the retinal tear. The scarring that results seals the retina to the underlying tissue, helping to ...

  9. What Is Next for Retinal Gene Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberghe, Luk H.

    2015-01-01

    The field of gene therapy for retinal blinding disorders is experiencing incredible momentum, justified by hopeful results in early stage clinical trials for inherited retinal degenerations. The premise of the use of the gene as a drug has come a long way, and may have found its niche in the treatment of retinal disease. Indeed, with only limited treatment options available for retinal indications, gene therapy has been proven feasible, safe, and effective and may lead to durable effects following a single injection. Here, we aim at putting into context the promise and potential, the technical, clinical, and economic boundaries limiting its application and development, and speculate on a future in which gene therapy is an integral component of ophthalmic clinical care. PMID:25877395

  10. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  11. Perspectives on biological growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, D.; Ateshian, G. A.; Arruda, E. M.; Cowin, S. C.; Dumais, J.; Goriely, A.; Holzapfel, G. A.; Humphrey, J. D.; Kemkemer, R.; Kuhl, E.; Olberding, J. E.; Taber, L. A.; Garikipati, K.

    2011-01-01

    The continuum mechanical treatment of biological growth and remodeling has attracted considerable attention over the past fifteen years. Many aspects of these problems are now well-understood, yet there remain areas in need of significant development from the standpoint of experiments, theory, and computation. In this perspective paper we review the state of the field and highlight open questions, challenges, and avenues for further development. PMID:21532929

  12. Doppler optical coherence tomography of retinal circulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ou; Wang, Yimin; Konduru, Ranjith K; Zhang, Xinbo; Sadda, SriniVas R; Huang, David

    2012-01-01

    Noncontact retinal blood flow measurements are performed with a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using a circumpapillary double circular scan (CDCS) that scans around the optic nerve head at 3.40 mm and 3.75 mm diameters. The double concentric circles are performed 6 times consecutively over 2 sec. The CDCS scan is saved with Doppler shift information from which flow can be calculated. The standard clinical protocol calls for 3 CDCS scans made with the OCT beam passing through the superonasal edge of the pupil and 3 CDCS scan through the inferonal pupil. This double-angle protocol ensures that acceptable Doppler angle is obtained on each retinal branch vessel in at least 1 scan. The CDCS scan data, a 3-dimensional volumetric OCT scan of the optic disc scan, and a color photograph of the optic disc are used together to obtain retinal blood flow measurement on an eye. We have developed a blood flow measurement software called "Doppler optical coherence tomography of retinal circulation" (DOCTORC). This semi-automated software is used to measure total retinal blood flow, vessel cross section area, and average blood velocity. The flow of each vessel is calculated from the Doppler shift in the vessel cross-sectional area and the Doppler angle between the vessel and the OCT beam. Total retinal blood flow measurement is summed from the veins around the optic disc. The results obtained at our Doppler OCT reading center showed good reproducibility between graders and methods (<10%). Total retinal blood flow could be useful in the management of glaucoma, other retinal diseases, and retinal diseases. In glaucoma patients, OCT retinal blood flow measurement was highly correlated with visual field loss (R(2)>0.57 with visual field pattern deviation). Doppler OCT is a new method to perform rapid, noncontact, and repeatable measurement of total retinal blood flow using widely available Fourier-domain OCT instrumentation. This new technology may improve the

  13. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:27463140

  14. Diode laser contact transscleral retinal photocoagulation: a clinical study.

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, D A; Schwartz, S; Dowler, J G; Ulbig, M; Blach, R K; Hamilton, P A

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To examine the clinical efficacy of contact transscleral retinal photocoagulation with a diode laser. METHODS--Transscleral retinal photocoagulation was performed on 36 eyes. The conditions treated included peripheral retinal breaks associated with retinal detachments (30 eyes) and giant retinal tears (six eyes). Of the 30 eyes with retinal detachments, 28 underwent transscleral photocoagulation to the site of drainage of subretinal fluid in an attempt to reduce the risk of hemorrhage. RESULTS--Threshold lesions were obtained with irradiances of between 95.4 W/cm2 and 191 W/cm2. Satisfactory chorioretinal adhesion was achieved in all eyes with retinal breaks and giant retinal tears. The only significant complications of treatment encountered were punctate choroidal haemorrhages (three eyes). Drainage related choroidal haemorrhage following earlier photocoagulation occurred in two of 28 eyes. CONCLUSIONS--This study confirms the clinical potential of transscleral diode laser photocoagulation in the therapy of surgical retinal conditions. Images PMID:8562540

  15. Link between vitamin D and airway remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Berraies, Anissa; Hamzaoui, Kamel; Hamzaoui, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, many epidemiologic studies have investigated the link between vitamin D deficiency and asthma. Most studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of asthma and allergies. Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with asthma severity and loss of control, together with recurrent exacerbations. Remodeling is an early event in asthma described as a consequence of production of mediators and growth factors by inflammatory and resident bronchial cells. Consequently, lung function is altered, with a decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second and exacerbated airway hyperresponsiveness. Subepithelial fibrosis and airway smooth muscle cell hypertrophy are typical features of structural changes in the airways. In animal models, vitamin D deficiency enhances inflammation and bronchial anomalies. In severe asthma of childhood, major remodeling is observed in patients with low vitamin D levels. Conversely, the antifibrotic and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D in smooth muscle cells have been described in several experiments. In this review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge regarding the relationship between vitamin D and asthma, and focus on its effect on airway remodeling and its potential therapeutic impact for asthma. PMID:24729717

  16. Tissue Remodelling following Resection of Porcine Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nygård, Ingvild Engdal; Mortensen, Kim Erlend; Hedegaard, Jakob; Conley, Lene Nagstrup; Bendixen, Christian; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur; Revhaug, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To study genes regulating the extracellular matrix (ECM) and investigate the tissue remodelling following liver resection in porcine. Methods. Four pigs with 60% partial hepatectomy- (PHx-) induced liver regeneration were studied over six weeks. Four pigs underwent sham surgery and another four pigs were used as controls of the normal liver growth. Liver biopsies were taken upon laparotomy, after three and six weeks. Gene expression profiles were obtained using porcine-specific oligonucleotide microarrays. Immunohistochemical staining was performed and a proliferative index was assessed. Results. More differentially expressed genes were associated with the regulation of ECM in the resection group compared to the sham and control groups. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) and collagen 1, alpha 2 (COL1A2) were both upregulated in the early phase of liver regeneration, validated by immunopositive cells during the remodelling phase of liver regeneration. A broadened connective tissue was demonstrated by Masson's Trichrome staining, and an immunohistochemical staining against pan-Cytokeratin (pan-CK) demonstrated a distinct pattern of migrating cells, followed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive nuclei. Conclusions. The present study demonstrates both a distinct pattern of PCNA positive nuclei and a deposition of ECM proteins in the remodelling phase of liver regeneration. PMID:26240819

  17. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1-2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome. PMID:26895087

  18. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1–2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10051.001 PMID:26895087

  19. MicroRNA and vascular remodelling in acute vascular injury and pulmonary vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Robert A.; Hata, Akiko; MacLean, Margaret R.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular remodelling is an integral pathological process central to a number of cardiovascular diseases. The complex interplay between distinct cell populations in the vessel wall following vascular injury leads to inflammation, cellular dysfunction, pro-growth signals in the smooth muscle cell (SMC) compartment, and the acquisition of a synthetic phenotype. Although the signals for vascular remodelling are diverse in different pathological contexts, SMC proliferation and migration are consistently observed. It is therefore critical to elucidate key mechanisms central to these processes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding sequences of RNA that have the capacity to regulate many genes, pathways, and complex biological networks within cells, acting either alone or in concert with one another. In diseases such as cancer and cardiac disease, the role of miRNA in disease pathogenesis has been documented in detail. In contrast, despite a great deal of interest in miRNA, relatively few studies have directly assessed the role of miRNA in vascular remodelling. The potential for modulation of miRNA to achieve therapeutic benefits in this setting is attractive. Here, we focus on the role of miRNA in vascular inflammation and remodelling associated with acute vascular injury (vein graft disease, angioplasty restenosis, and in-stent restenosis) as well as in vascular remodelling associated with the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:22065733

  20. Photoreceptor Cells Influence Retinal Vascular Degeneration in Mouse Models of Retinal Degeneration and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Tang, Jie; Du, Yunpeng; Saadane, Aicha; Tonade, Deoye; Samuels, Ivy; Veenstra, Alex; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Loss of photoreceptor cells is associated with retinal vascular degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa, whereas the presence of photoreceptor cells is implicated in vascular degeneration in diabetic retinopathy. To investigate how both the absence and presence of photoreceptors could damage the retinal vasculature, we compared two mouse models of photoreceptor degeneration (opsin−/− and RhoP23H/P23H ) and control C57Bl/5J mice, each with and without diabetes. Methods Retinal thickness, superoxide, expression of inflammatory proteins, ERG and optokinetic responses, leukocyte cytotoxicity, and capillary degeneration were evaluated at 1 to 10 months of age using published methods. Results Retinal photoreceptor cells degenerated completely in the opsin mutants by 2 to 4 months of age, and visual function subsided correspondingly. Retinal capillary degeneration was substantial while photoreceptors were still present, but slowed after the photoreceptors degenerated. Diabetes did not further exacerbate capillary degeneration in these models of photoreceptor degeneration, but did cause capillary degeneration in wild-type animals. Photoreceptor cells, however, did not degenerate in wild-type diabetic mice, presumably because the stress responses in these cells were less than in the opsin mutants. Retinal superoxide and leukocyte damage to retinal endothelium contributed to the degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetes, and leukocyte-mediated damage was increased in both opsin mutants during photoreceptor cell degeneration. Conclusions Photoreceptor cells affect the integrity of the retinal microvasculature. Deterioration of retinal capillaries in opsin mutants was appreciable while photoreceptor cells were present and stressed, but was less after photoreceptors degenerated. This finding proves relevant to diabetes, where persistent stress in photoreceptors likewise contributes to capillary degeneration. PMID:27548901

  1. Retinal synaptic regeneration via microfluidic guiding channels.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping-Jung; Liu, Zongbin; Zhang, Kai; Han, Xin; Saito, Yuki; Xia, Xiaojun; Yokoi, Kenji; Shen, Haifa; Qin, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    In vitro culture of dissociated retinal neurons is an important model for investigating retinal synaptic regeneration (RSR) and exploring potentials in artificial retina. Here, retinal precursor cells were cultured in a microfluidic chip with multiple arrays of microchannels in order to reconstruct the retinal neuronal synapse. The cultured retinal cells were physically connected through microchannels. Activation of electric signal transduction by the cells through the microchannels was demonstrated by administration of glycinergic factors. In addition, an image-based analytical method was used to quantify the synaptic connections and to assess the kinetics of synaptic regeneration. The rate of RSR decreased significantly below 100 μM of inhibitor glycine and then approached to a relatively constant level at higher concentrations. Furthermore, RSR was enhanced by chemical stimulation with potassium chloride. Collectively, the microfluidic synaptic regeneration chip provides a novel tool for high-throughput investigation of RSR at the cellular level and may be useful in quality control of retinal precursor cell transplantation. PMID:26314276

  2. Retinal oxygenation via the choroidal circulation.

    PubMed Central

    Landers, M B

    1978-01-01

    The possibility of supplying normal amounts of oxygen to the inner layers of the retina by diffusion from the choroid in the presence of retinal arterial obstruction was studied in cats and rhesus monkeys. While the animals were under general anesthesia, an oxygen electrode was placed in the vitreous cavity immediately adjacent to the retina, and a retinal artery blocker probe was used to occlude various segments of the retina blood supply. The inspired oxygen concentration was alternated between 20% and 100%. The choroidal circulation was intermittently occluded by elevating the intraocular pressure. In all animals it was possible to return the oxygen tension of the innermost retina to normal concentrations or above while the retinal arterial circulation alone was occluded, by having the animal breathe 100% oxygen at one atmosphere pressure. This could not be done when the intraocular pressure was elevated to 85 mm Hg, occluding the choroidal as well as the retinal circulation. The electroretinogram and the visually evoked response were recorded in cats while the retinal circulation was occluded and the inspired oxygen concentration changed from 20% to 100% at one atmosphere pressure. The electroretinogram and the visually evoked response were extinguished by occluding the retinal circulation while the animal was breathing 20% oxygen, and these responses were returned to normal by changing to a 100% inspired oxygen concentration. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:112752

  3. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life. PMID:19820803

  4. Ranolazine reduces remodeling of the right ventricle and provoked arrhythmias in rats with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liles, John T; Hoyer, Kirsten; Oliver, Jason; Chi, Liguo; Dhalla, Arvinder K; Belardinelli, Luiz

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease that often results in right ventricular (RV) failure and death. During disease progression, structural and electrical remodeling of the right ventricle impairs pump function, creates proarrhythmic substrates, and triggers for arrhythmias. Notably, RV failure and lethal arrhythmias are major contributors to cardiac death in patients with PAH that are not directly addressed by currently available therapies. Ranolazine (RAN) is an antianginal, anti-ischemic drug that has cardioprotective effects in experimental and clinical settings of left-sided heart dysfunction. RAN also has antiarrhythmic effects due to inhibition of the late sodium current in cardiomyocytes. We therefore hypothesized that RAN could reduce the maladaptive structural and electrical remodeling of the right ventricle and could prevent triggered ventricular arrhythmias in the monocrotaline rat model of PAH. Indeed, in both in vivo and ex vivo experimental settings, chronic RAN treatment reduced electrical heterogeneity (right ventricular-left ventricular action potential duration dispersion), shortened heart-rate corrected QT intervals in the right ventricle, and normalized RV dysfunction. Chronic RAN treatment also dose-dependently reduced ventricular hypertrophy, reduced circulating levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, and decreased the expression of fibrotic markers. In addition, the acute administration of RAN prevented isoproterenol-induced ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation and subsequent cardiovascular death in rats with established PAH. These results support the notion that RAN can improve the electrical and functional properties of the right ventricle, highlighting its potential benefits in the setting of RV impairment. PMID:25770134

  5. Arterial remodeling of basilar atherosclerosis in isolated pontine infarction.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao; Hua, Ting; Xu, Yu; Liu, Xue-Yuan; Huang, Jing

    2015-04-01

    Isolated pontine infarctions are usually classified as paramedian pontine infarction (PPI) and lacunar pontine infarction (LPI). Although they have different shapes and locations, some recent studies proved that they might both be associated with basilar artery atherosclerosis in pathogenesis. This study aimed to explore the difference of basilar artery remodeling between two subtypes of pontine infarctions. Patients with PPI or LPI were scanned by High-resolution MRI (HR-MRI). The MR images of patients with basilar artery atherosclerosis were further analyzed to measure the vessel, lumen and wall areas at different segments of basilar arteries. Stenosis rate and remodeling index were calculated according to which arterial remodeling was divided into positive, intermediate and negative remodeling. Vascular risk factors and remodeling-related features were compared between PPI and LPI, and also between patients with and without positive remodeling. 34 patients with PPI and 21 patients with LPI had basilar artery atherosclerosis identified by HR-MRI. Positive remodeling was dominant in LPI group while in PPI group, three subtypes of remodeling were equal. Patients with positive remodeling had higher levels of low-density lipoprotein and homocysteine. Positive remodeling of basilar artery might reflect the low stability of basilar atherosclerotic plaques, which was more closely associated with LPI than PPI. PMID:25367406

  6. Immunologic and inflammatory mechanisms that drive asthma progression to remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Broide, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Although histologic features of airway remodeling have been well characterized in asthma, the immunologic and inflammatory mechanisms that drive progression of asthma to remodeling are still incompletely understood. Conceptually, airway remodeling may be due to persistent inflammation and/or aberrant tissue repair mechanisms. It is likely that several immune and inflammatory cell types and mediators are involved in mediating airway remodeling. In addition, different features of airway remodeling are likely mediated by different inflammatory pathways. Several important candidate mediators of remodeling have been identified including TGF-β and Th2 cytokines (including IL-5 and IL-13), as well as VEGF, ADAM-33, and MMP-9. Mouse models of airway remodeling have provided important insight into potential mechanisms by which TGF-β activation of the Smad 2/3 signaling pathway may contribute to airway remodeling. Human studies have demonstrated that anti-IL-5 reduces levels of airway eosinophils expressing TGF-β, as well as levels of airway remodeling as assessed by bronchial biopsies. Further such studies confirming these observations, as well as alternate studies targeting additional individual cell types, cytokines, and mediators are needed in human subjects with asthma to determine the role of candidate mediators of inflammation on the development and progression of airway remodeling. PMID:18328887

  7. Astrocytic Ephrin-B1 Regulates Synapse Remodeling Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nikolakopoulou, Angeliki M.; Koeppen, Jordan; Garcia, Michael; Leish, Joshua; Obenaus, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can result in tissue alterations distant from the site of the initial injury, which can trigger pathological changes within hippocampal circuits and are thought to contribute to long-term cognitive and neuropsychological impairments. However, our understanding of secondary injury mechanisms is limited. Astrocytes play an important role in brain repair after injury and astrocyte-mediated mechanisms that are implicated in synapse development are likely important in injury-induced synapse remodeling. Our studies suggest a new role of ephrin-B1, which is known to regulate synapse development in neurons, in astrocyte-mediated synapse remodeling following TBI. Indeed, we observed a transient upregulation of ephrin-B1 immunoreactivity in hippocampal astrocytes following moderate controlled cortical impact model of TBI. The upregulation of ephrin-B1 levels in hippocampal astrocytes coincided with a decline in the number of vGlut1-positive glutamatergic input to CA1 neurons at 3 days post injury even in the absence of hippocampal neuron loss. In contrast, tamoxifen-induced ablation of ephrin-B1 from adult astrocytes in ephrin-B1loxP/yERT2-CreGFAP mice accelerated the recovery of vGlut1-positive glutamatergic input to CA1 neurons after TBI. Finally, our studies suggest that astrocytic ephrin-B1 may play an active role in injury-induced synapse remodeling through the activation of STAT3-mediated signaling in astrocytes. TBI-induced upregulation of STAT3 phosphorylation within the hippocampus was suppressed by astrocyte-specific ablation of ephrin-B1 in vivo, whereas the activation of ephrin-B1 in astrocytes triggered an increase in STAT3 phosphorylation in vitro. Thus, regulation of ephrin-B1 signaling in astrocytes may provide new therapeutic opportunities to aid functional recovery after TBI. PMID:26928051

  8. Electrotonic remodeling following myocardial infarction in dogs susceptible and resistant to sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Carlos L; McConnell, Patrick I; Kukielka, Monica; Dzwonczyk, Roger; Clymer, Bradley D; Howie, Michael B; Billman, George E

    2008-02-01

    Passive electrical remodeling following myocardial infarction (MI) is well established. These changes can alter electrotonic loading and trigger the remodeling of repolarization currents, a potential mechanism for ventricular fibrillation (VF). However, little is known about the role of passive electrical markers as tools to identify VF susceptibility post-MI. This study investigated electrotonic remodeling in the post-MI ventricle, as measured by myocardial electrical impedance (MEI), in animals prone to and resistant to VF. MI was induced in dogs by a two-stage left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery ligation. Before infarction, MEI electrodes were placed in remote (left circumflex, LCX) and infarcted (LAD) myocardium. MEI was measured in awake animals 1, 2, 7, and 21 days post-MI. Subsequently, VF susceptibility was tested by a 2-min LCX occlusion during exercise; 12 animals developed VF (susceptible, S) and 12 did not (resistant, R). The healing infarct had lower MEI than the normal myocardium. This difference was stable by day 2 post-MI (287 +/- 32 Omega vs. 425 +/- 62 Omega, P < 0.05). Significant differences were observed between resistant and susceptible animals 7 days post-MI; susceptible dogs had a wider electrotonic gradient between remote and infarcted myocardium (R: 89 +/- 60 Omega vs. S: 180 +/- 37 Omega). This difference increased over time in susceptible animals (252 +/- 53 Omega at 21 days) due to post-MI impedance changes on the remote myocardium. These data suggest that early electrotonic changes post-MI could be used to assess later arrhythmia susceptibility. In addition, passive-electrical changes could be a mechanism driving active-electrical remodeling post-MI, thereby facilitating the induction of arrhythmias. PMID:18048585

  9. Connecting Mechanics and Bone Cell Activities in the Bone Remodeling Process: An Integrated Finite Element Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain–damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.’s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone

  10. Long-term outcomes in patients undergoing vitrectomy for retinal detachment due to viral retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, David RP; Chin, Eric K; Tarantola, Ryan M; Tegins, Elizabeth O; Lopez, Christopher A; Boldt, Herbert Culver; Gehrs, Karen M; Sohn, Elliott H; Russell, Stephen R; Folk, James C; Mahajan, Vinit B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the outcomes in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) secondary to viral retinitis. Patients and methods This was a retrospective, consecutive, noncomparative, interventional case series of 12 eyes in ten patients with RRD secondary to viral retinitis. Results of vitreous or aqueous biopsy, effect of antiviral therapeutics, time to retinal detachment, course of visual acuity, and anatomic and surgical outcomes were investigated. Results There were 1,259 cases of RRD during the study period, with 12 cases of RRD secondary to viral retinitis (prevalence of 0.95%). Follow-up was available for a mean period of 4.4 years. Varicella zoster virus was detected in six eyes, herpes simplex virus in two eyes, and cytomegalovirus in two eyes. Eight patients were treated with oral valacyclovir and two patients with intravenous acyclovir. Lack of optic nerve involvement correlated with improved final visual acuity of 20/100 or greater. Pars plana vitrectomy (n=12), silicone-oil tamponade (n=11), and scleral buckling (n=10) provided successful anatomic retinal reattachment in all cases, with no recurrent retinal detachment and no cases of hypotony during the follow-up period. Conclusion Varicella zoster virus was the most frequent cause of viral retinitis, and lack of optic nerve involvement was predictive of a favorable visual acuity prognosis. Vitrectomy with silicone-oil tamponade and scleral buckle placement provided stable anatomical outcomes. PMID:26229423

  11. Electroretinographic effects of retinal dragging and retinal folds in eyes with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yaguchi, Yukari; Katagiri, Satoshi; Fukushima, Yoko; Yokoi, Tadashi; Nishina, Sachiko; Kondo, Mineo; Azuma, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the retinal function of retinal dragging (Rdrag) and radial retinal folds (Rfolds) in eyes with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) using full-field electroretinography (ERG). Seventeen eyes of nine patients with FEVR who had Rdrag or Rfolds were retrospectively studied. Eyes were classified into four groups according to the severity of the retinal alterations: Group 1, without Rdrag or Rfolds (5 eyes); Group 2, with Rdrag (4 eyes); Group 3, with Rfolds (6 eyes); and Group 4, with Rfolds in which all major retinal vessels were involved (2 eyes). The amplitudes of all ERG components and the implicit times of the photopic a- and b-waves and 30-Hz flicker responses were decreased or prolonged as the severity of the retinal alterations increased (P < 0.01). The photopic negative response was most severely affected and nearly undetectable in all eyes in Groups 3 and 4, although the other ERG components were detectable in all eyes in Group 3 and one eye in Group 4. These results suggest the decrease of retinal functions was correlated with the degree of severity of Rdrag and Rfolds in eyes with FEVR. In addition, the function of the retinal ganglion cells appears to be more severely affected compared with the others. PMID:27456314

  12. Effector triggered immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce virulence factors called effectors, which are important components of the infection process. Effectors aid in pathogenesis by facilitating bacterial attachment, pathogen entry into or exit from the host cell, immunoevasion, and immunosuppression. Effectors also have the ability to subvert host cellular processes, such as hijacking cytoskeletal machinery or blocking protein translation. However, host cells possess an evolutionarily conserved innate immune response that can sense the pathogen through the activity of its effectors and mount a robust immune response. This “effector triggered immunity” (ETI) was first discovered in plants but recent evidence suggest that the process is also well conserved in metazoans. We will discuss salient points of the mechanism of ETI in metazoans from recent studies done in mammalian cells and invertebrate model hosts. PMID:25513770

  13. The CMS high level trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system: the Level 1 Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running on the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. Here we will present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simpler single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We will discuss the optimisation of the triggers and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  14. The CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High-Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  15. Membrane-bound and soluble Fas ligands have opposite functions in photoreceptor cell death following separation from the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, H; Murakami, Y; Kataoka, K; Notomi, S; Mantopoulos, D; Trichonas, G; Miller, J W; Gregory, M S; Ksander, B R; Marshak-Rothstein, A; Vavvas, D G

    2015-01-01

    Fas ligand (FasL) triggers apoptosis of Fas-positive cells, and previous reports described FasL-induced cell death of Fas-positive photoreceptors following a retinal detachment. However, as FasL exists in membrane-bound (mFasL) and soluble (sFasL) forms, and is expressed on resident microglia and infiltrating monocyte/macrophages, the current study examined the relative contribution of mFasL and sFasL to photoreceptor cell death after induction of experimental retinal detachment in wild-type, knockout (FasL−/−), and mFasL-only knock-in (ΔCS) mice. Retinal detachment in FasL−/− mice resulted in a significant reduction of photoreceptor cell death. In contrast, ΔCS mice displayed significantly more apoptotic photoreceptor cell death. Photoreceptor loss in ΔCS mice was inhibited by a subretinal injection of recombinant sFasL. Thus, Fas/FasL-triggered cell death accounts for a significant amount of photoreceptor cell loss following the retinal detachment. The function of FasL was dependent upon the form of FasL expressed: mFasL triggered photoreceptor cell death, whereas sFasL protected the retina, indicating that enzyme-mediated cleavage of FasL determines, in part, the extent of vision loss following the retinal detachment. Moreover, it also indicates that treatment with sFasL could significantly reduce photoreceptor cell loss in patients with retinal detachment. PMID:26583327

  16. A dynamic zone defines interneuron remodeling in the adult neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Chung Allen; Chen, Jerry L.; Huang, Hayden; Leslie, Jennifer H.; Amitai, Yael; So, Peter T.; Nedivi, Elly

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of structural remodeling to long-term adult brain plasticity is unclear. Here, we investigate features of GABAergic interneuron dendrite dynamics and extract clues regarding its potential role in cortical function and circuit plasticity. We show that remodeling interneurons are contained within a “dynamic zone” corresponding to a superficial strip of layers 2/3, and remodeling dendrites respect the lower border of this zone. Remodeling occurs primarily at the periphery of dendritic fields with addition and retraction of new branch tips. We further show that dendrite remodeling is not intrinsic to a specific interneuron class. These data suggest that interneuron remodeling is not a feature predetermined by genetic lineage, but rather, it is imposed by cortical laminar circuitry. Our findings are consistent with dynamic GABAergic modulation of feedforward and recurrent connections in response to top-down feedback and suggest a structural component to functional plasticity of supragranular neocortical laminae. PMID:19066223

  17. AAV Mediated GDNF Secretion From Retinal Glia Slows Down Retinal Degeneration in a Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D; Guerin, Karen I; Hoffmann, Natalie V; Visel, Meike; Klimczak, Ryan R; Schaffer, David V; Flannery, John G

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in over 80 identified genes can induce apoptosis in photoreceptors, resulting in blindness with a prevalence of 1 in 3,000 individuals. This broad genetic heterogeneity of disease impacting a wide range of photoreceptor functions renders the design of gene-specific therapies for photoreceptor degeneration impractical and necessitates the development of mutation-independent treatments to slow photoreceptor cell death. One promising strategy for photoreceptor neuroprotection is neurotrophin secretion from Müller cells, the primary retinal glia. Müller glia are excellent targets for secreting neurotrophins as they span the entire tissue, ensheath all neuronal populations, are numerous, and persist through retinal degeneration. We previously engineered an adeno-associated virus (AAV) variant (ShH10) capable of efficient and selective glial cell transduction through intravitreal injection. ShH10-mediated glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) secretion from glia, generates high GDNF levels in treated retinas, leading to sustained functional rescue for over 5 months. This GDNF secretion from glia following intravitreal vector administration is a safe and effective means to slow the progression of retinal degeneration in a rat model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and shows significant promise as a gene therapy to treat human retinal degenerations. These findings also demonstrate for the first time that glia-mediated secretion of neurotrophins is a promising treatment that may be applicable to other neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:21522134

  18. Toward high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Vankov, Alexander; Asher, Alon; Baccus, Steven

    2005-04-01

    It has been already demonstrated that electrical stimulation of retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), while several thousand pixels are required for functional restoration of sight. We present a design of the optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system that can activate a retinal stimulating array with pixel density up to 2,500 pix/mm2 (geometrically corresponding to a visual acuity of 20/80), and allows for natural eye scanning rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera. The system operates similarly to "virtual reality" imaging devices used in military and medical applications. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. Such a system provides a broad field of vision by allowing for natural eye scanning. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for simultaneous utilization of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical control of the implant allows for simple adjustment of image processing algorithms and for learning. A major prerequisite for high resolution stimulation is the proximity of neural cells to the stimulation sites. This can be achieved with sub-retinal implants constructed in a manner that directs migration of retinal cells to target areas. Two basic implant geometries are described: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. Possibility of the tactile neural stimulation is also examined.

  19. Triggering with the LHCb calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Regis; LHCb Collaboration

    2009-04-01

    The LHCb experiment at the LHC has been conceived to pursue high precision studies of CP violation and rare phenomena in b hadron decays. The online selection is crucial in LHCb and relies on the calorimeters to trigger on high transverse energy electrons, photons, π0 and hadrons. In this purpose a dedicated electronic has been realized. The calorimeter trigger system has been commissioned and is used to trigger on cosmic muons before beams start circulating in the LHC. When the LHC will start, it will also provide a very useful interaction trigger.

  20. In Brief: Picturing the complex world of chromatin remodelling families.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Leora; Foulkes, William D

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, chromatin remodelling emerged as one of the most important causes of both abnormal development and cancer. Although much has been written about one or another of the complexes, no recent concise summary of the chromatin remodelling families as a whole is available. In this short review, we introduce the family members, briefly summarize their role in developmental abnormalities and neoplasia, and outline the different ways in which these families remodel chromatin. PMID:26174723

  1. Control of bone remodelling by applied dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyon, L. E.; Rubin, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The data showing the relationship between bone mass and peak strain magnitude prepared and submitted for publication. The data from experiments relating remodelling activity with static or dynamic loads were prepared and submitted for publication. Development of programs to relate the location of remodelling activity with he natural and artificial dynamic strain distributions continued. Experiments on the effect of different strain rates on the remodelling response continued.

  2. Interventions for asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration for preventing retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles P

    2015-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration are visible lesions that are risk factors for later retinal detachment. Retinal detachments occur when fluid in the vitreous cavity passes through tears or holes in the retina and separates the retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium. Creation of an adhesion surrounding retinal breaks and lattice degeneration, with laser photocoagulation or cryotherapy, has been recommended as an effective means of preventing retinal detachment. This therapy is of value in the management of retinal tears associated with the symptoms of flashes and floaters and persistent vitreous traction upon the retina in the region of the retinal break, because such symptomatic retinal tears are associated with a high rate of progression to retinal detachment. Retinal tears and holes unassociated with acute symptoms and lattice degeneration are significantly less likely to be the sites of retinal breaks that are responsible for later retinal detachment. Nevertheless, treatment of these lesions frequently is recommended, in spite of the fact that the effectiveness of this therapy is unproven. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of techniques used to treat asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration for the prevention of retinal detachment. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 2), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to February 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to February 2014), PubMed (January 1948 to February 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in

  3. Amyloidosis in Retinal Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Masuzzo, Ambra; Dinet, Virginie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Mascarelli, Frederic; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the central nervous system, the retina may reflect both physiological processes and abnormalities related to pathologies that affect the brain. Amyloidosis due to the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) was initially regarded as a specific and exclusive characteristic of neurodegenerative alterations seen in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. More recently, it was discovered that amyloidosis-related alterations, similar to those seen in the brain of Alzheimer's patients, also occur in the retina. Remarkably, these alterations were identified not only in primary retinal pathologies, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, but also in the retinas of Alzheimer's patients. In this review, we first briefly discuss the biogenesis of Aβ, a peptide involved in amyloidosis. We then discuss some pathological aspects (synaptic dysfunction, mitochondrial failure, glial activation, and vascular abnormalities) related to the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. We finally highlight common features shared by AD, AMD, and glaucoma in the context of Aβ amyloidosis and further discuss why the retina, due to the transparency of the eye, can be considered as a "window" to the brain. PMID:27551275

  4. Evolution of vertebrate retinal photoreception

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Trevor D.

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings shed light on the steps underlying the evolution of vertebrate photoreceptors and retina. Vertebrate ciliary photoreceptors are not as wholly distinct from invertebrate rhabdomeric photoreceptors as is sometimes thought. Recent information on the phylogenies of ciliary and rhabdomeric opsins has helped in constructing the likely routes followed during evolution. Clues to the factors that led the early vertebrate retina to become invaginated can be obtained by combining recent knowledge about the origin of the pathway for dark re-isomerization of retinoids with knowledge of the inability of ciliary opsins to undergo photoreversal, along with consideration of the constraints imposed under the very low light levels in the deep ocean. Investigation of the origin of cell classes in the vertebrate retina provides support for the notion that cones, rods and bipolar cells all originated from a primordial ciliary photoreceptor, whereas ganglion cells, amacrine cells and horizontal cells all originated from rhabdomeric photoreceptors. Knowledge of the molecular differences between cones and rods, together with knowledge of the scotopic signalling pathway, provides an understanding of the evolution of rods and of the rods' retinal circuitry. Accordingly, it has been possible to propose a plausible scenario for the sequence of evolutionary steps that led to the emergence of vertebrate photoreceptors and retina. PMID:19720653

  5. Multi-MHz retinal OCT

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Thomas; Wieser, Wolfgang; Reznicek, Lukas; Neubauer, Aljoscha; Kampik, Anselm; Huber, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the benefits and problems of in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the human retina at A-scan rates in excess of 1 MHz, using a 1050 nm Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) laser. Different scanning strategies enabled by MHz OCT line rates are investigated, and a simple multi-volume data processing approach is presented. In-vivo OCT of the human ocular fundus is performed at different axial scan rates of up to 6.7 MHz. High quality non-mydriatic retinal imaging over an ultra-wide field is achieved by a combination of several key improvements compared to previous setups. For the FDML laser, long coherence lengths and 72 nm wavelength tuning range are achieved using a chirped fiber Bragg grating in a laser cavity at 419.1 kHz fundamental tuning rate. Very large data sets can be acquired with sustained data transfer from the data acquisition card to host computer memory, enabling high-quality averaging of many frames and of multiple aligned data sets. Three imaging modes are investigated: Alignment and averaging of 24 data sets at 1.68 MHz axial line rate, ultra-dense transverse sampling at 3.35 MHz line rate, and dual-beam imaging with two laser spots on the retina at an effective line rate of 6.7 MHz. PMID:24156052

  6. Amyloidosis in Retinal Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Masuzzo, Ambra; Dinet, Virginie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Mascarelli, Frederic; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the central nervous system, the retina may reflect both physiological processes and abnormalities related to pathologies that affect the brain. Amyloidosis due to the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) was initially regarded as a specific and exclusive characteristic of neurodegenerative alterations seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. More recently, it was discovered that amyloidosis-related alterations, similar to those seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients, also occur in the retina. Remarkably, these alterations were identified not only in primary retinal pathologies, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, but also in the retinas of Alzheimer’s patients. In this review, we first briefly discuss the biogenesis of Aβ, a peptide involved in amyloidosis. We then discuss some pathological aspects (synaptic dysfunction, mitochondrial failure, glial activation, and vascular abnormalities) related to the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. We finally highlight common features shared by AD, AMD, and glaucoma in the context of Aβ amyloidosis and further discuss why the retina, due to the transparency of the eye, can be considered as a “window” to the brain. PMID:27551275

  7. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Michael Tri Hoang; Yau, King-Wai

    2010-10-01

    Life on earth is subject to alternating cycles of day and night imposed by the rotation of the earth. Consequently, living things have evolved photodetective systems to synchronize their physiology and behavior with the external light-dark cycle. This form of photodetection is unlike the familiar "image vision," in that the basic information is light or darkness over time, independent of spatial patterns. "Nonimage" vision is probably far more ancient than image vision and is widespread in living species. For mammals, it has long been assumed that the photoreceptors for nonimage vision are also the textbook rods and cones. However, recent years have witnessed the discovery of a small population of retinal ganglion cells in the mammalian eye that express a unique visual pigment called melanopsin. These ganglion cells are intrinsically photosensitive and drive a variety of nonimage visual functions. In addition to being photoreceptors themselves, they also constitute the major conduit for rod and cone signals to the brain for nonimage visual functions such as circadian photoentrainment and the pupillary light reflex. Here we review what is known about these novel mammalian photoreceptors. PMID:20959623

  8. Pregnancy-induced remodeling of heart valves.

    PubMed

    Pierlot, Caitlin M; Moeller, Andrew D; Lee, J Michael; Wells, Sarah M

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated remodeling of aortic and mitral valves leaflets under the volume loading and cardiac expansion of pregnancy. Those valves' leaflets enlarge with altered collagen fiber architecture, content, and cross-linking and biphasic changes (decreases, then increases) in extensibility during gestation. This study extends our analyses to right-sided valves, with additional compositional measurements for all valves. Valve leaflets were harvested from nonpregnant heifers and pregnant cows. Leaflet structure was characterized by leaflet dimensions, and ECM composition was determined using standard biochemical assays. Histological studies assessed changes in cellular and ECM components. Leaflet mechanical properties were assessed using equibiaxial mechanical testing. Collagen thermal stability and cross-linking were assessed using denaturation and hydrothermal isometric tension tests. Pulmonary and tricuspid leaflet areas increased during pregnancy by 35 and 55%, respectively. Leaflet thickness increased by 20% only in the pulmonary valve and largely in the fibrosa (30% thickening). Collagen crimp length was reduced in both the tricuspid (61%) and pulmonary (42%) valves, with loss of crimped area in the pulmonary valve. Thermomechanics showed decreased collagen thermal stability with surprisingly maintained cross-link maturity. The pulmonary leaflet exhibited the biphasic change in extensibility seen in left side valves, whereas the tricuspid leaflet mechanics remained largely unchanged throughout pregnancy. The tricuspid valve exhibits a remodeling response during pregnancy that is significantly diminished from the other three valves. All valves of the heart remodel in pregnancy in a manner distinct from cardiac pathology, with much similarity valve to valve, but with interesting valve-specific responses in the aortic and tricuspid valves. PMID:26371175

  9. Evaluation and management of pediatric rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wenick, Adam S.; Barañano, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric rhegmatogenous retinal detachments are rare, accounting for less than ten percent of all rhegmatogenous retinal detachments. While most retinal detachments in the adult population are related to posterior vitreous detachment, pediatric retinal detachment are often related to trauma or an underlying congenital abnormalities or genetic syndrome. The anatomy of pediatric eyes, the often late presentation of the disease, and the high incidence of bilateral pathology in children all pose significant challenges in the management of these patients. We discuss the epidemiology of pediatric rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, review the genetic syndromes associated with a high incidence of retinal detachment, and examine other common causes of retinal detachment in this age group. We then outline an approach to evaluation and management and describe the expected outcomes of repair of retinal detachment in the pediatric population. PMID:23961003

  10. Retinal imaging with virtual reality stimulus for studying Salticidae retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiesser, Eric; Canavesi, Cristina; Long, Skye; Jakob, Elizabeth; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2014-12-01

    We present a 3-path optical system for studying the retinal movement of jumping spiders: a visible OLED virtual reality system presents stimulus, while NIR illumination and imaging systems observe retinal movement.

  11. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes. PMID:25790500

  12. Four-wavelength retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Jonathan Jensen

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation documents the design and construction of a four-wavelength retinal vessel oximeter, the Eye Oximeter (EOX). The EOX scans low-powered laser beams (at 629, 678, 821 and 899 nm) into the eye and across a targeted retinal vessel to measure the transmittance of the blood within the vessel. From the transmittance measurements, the oxygen saturation of the blood within the vessel is computed. Retinal vessel oxygen saturation has been suggested as a useful parameter for monitoring a wide range of conditions including occult blood loss and a variety of ophthalmic diseases. An artificial eye that simulates the geometry of a human retinal vessel was constructed and used to calibrate the EOX saturation measurement. A number of different oximetry equations were developed and tested. From measurements made on whole human blood in the artificial eye, an oximetry equation that places a linear wavelength dependance on the scattering losses (3% decrease from 629 to 899 nm) is found to best calibrate the EOX oxygen saturation measurement. This calibration also requires that an adjustment be made to the absorption coefficient of hemoglobin at 629 nm that has been reported in the literature. More than 4,000 measurements were made in the eyes of three human subjects during the development of the EOX. Applying the oximetry equation developed through the in vitro experiments to human data, the average human retinal venous oxygen saturation is estimated to be 0.63 +/- 0.07 and the average human retinal arterial oxygen saturation is 0.99 +/- 0.03. Furthermore, measurements made away from the optic disk resulted in a larger variance in the calculated saturation when compared to measurements made on the optic disk. A series of EOX experiments using anesthetized swine helped to verify the sensitivity of the EOX measurement of oxygen saturation. It is found that the calibration in swine differed from the calibration in the artificial eye. An empirical calibration from the

  13. The NA62 trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivda, M.; NA62 Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The main aim of the NA62 experiment (NA62 Technical Design Report, [1]) is to study ultra-rare Kaon decays. In order to select rare events over the overwhelming background, central systems with high-performance, high bandwidth, flexibility and configurability are necessary, that minimize dead time while maximizing data collection reliability. The NA62 experiment consists of 12 sub-detector systems and several trigger and control systems, for a total channel count of less than 100,000. The GigaTracKer (GTK) has the largest number of channels (54,000), and the Liquid Krypton (LKr) calorimeter shares with it the largest raw data rate (19 GB/s). The NA62 trigger system works with 3 trigger levels. The first trigger level is based on a hardware central trigger unit, so-called L0 Trigger Processor (L0TP), and Local Trigger Units (LTU), which are all located in the experimental cavern. Other two trigger levels are based on software, and done with a computer farm located on surface. The L0TP receives information from triggering sub-detectors asynchronously via Ethernet; it processes the information, and then transmits a final trigger decision synchronously to each sub-detector through the Trigger and Timing Control (TTC) system. The interface between L0TP and the TTC system, which is used for trigger and clock distribution, is provided by the Local Trigger Unit board (LTU). The LTU can work in two modes: global and stand-alone. In the global mode, the LTU provides an interface between L0TP and TTC system. In the stand-alone mode, the LTU can fully emulate L0TP and so provides an independent way for each sub-detector for testing or calibration purposes. In addition to the emulation functionality, a further functionality is implemented that allows to synchronize the clock of the LTU with the L0TP and the TTC system. For testing and debugging purposes, a Snap Shot Memory (SSM) interface is implemented, that can work

  14. Jules Gonin. Pioneer of retinal detachment surgery.

    PubMed

    Wolfensberger, Thomas J

    2003-12-01

    Before the turn of the 20th century, eyes with a retinal detachment were considered doomed. Contrary to other branches of ophthalmology, such as cataract extraction, the surgical treatment of retinal detachment was still in its infancy, and the surgical success rates were less than five percent. From 1902 to 1921 Jules Gonin almost single handedly changed the landscape of retinal detachment surgery forever. He recognised that the retinal break was the cause--and not the consequence as it was largely believed at the time--of the retinal detachment, and that the treatment had at all costs to comprise the closure of the break by cauterisation. He named the procedure ignipuncture, as he cauterised the retina through the sclera with a very hot pointed instrument. Despite rigorously detailed clinical observations and increasing success rates, his discovery was not readily accepted and sometimes openly opposed by a large part of the ophthalmic establishment. It was not until 1929 that he received worldwide acclaim at the International Ophthalmological Congress in Amsterdam for his surgical technique. His legacy lives on in the eye hospital in Lausanne that bears his name, in the Gonin Medal awarded by the International Council of Ophthalmology every four years for the highest achievement in ophthalmology, and in a street named after him, the very street that he used to walk from his home to the hospital every day. PMID:14750617

  15. Triggering of repeated earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Zakrzhevskaya, N. A.; Sobolev, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the world's earthquakes with magnitudes M ≥ 6.5 for 1960-2013, it is shown that they cause global-scale coherent seismic oscillations which most distinctly manifest themselves in the period interval of 4-6 min during 1-3 days after the event. After these earthquakes, a repeated shock has an increased probability to occur in different seismically active regions located as far away as a few thousand km from the previous event, i.e., a remote interaction of seismic events takes place. The number of the repeated shocks N( t) decreases with time, which characterizes the memory of the lithosphere about the impact that has occurred. The time decay N( t) can be approximated by the linear, exponential, and powerlaw dependences. No distinct correlation between the spatial locations of the initial and repeated earthquakes is revealed. The probable triggering mechanisms of the remote interaction between the earthquakes are discussed. Surface seismic waves traveling several times around the Earth's, coherent oscillations, and global source are the most preferable candidates. This may lead to the accumulation and coalescence of ruptures in the highly stressed or weakened domains of a seismically active region, which increases the probability of a repeated earthquake.

  16. Specialized proresolving lipid mediators in patients with coronary artery disease and their potential for clot remodeling.

    PubMed

    Elajami, Tarec K; Colas, Romain A; Dalli, Jesmond; Chiang, Nan; Serhan, Charles N; Welty, Francine K

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation in arterial walls leads to coronary artery disease (CAD). Because specialized proresolving lipid mediators (SPMs; lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins) stimulate resolution of inflammation in animal models, we tested whether n-3 fatty acids impact SPM profiles in patients with CAD and promote clot remodeling. Six patients with stable CAD were randomly assigned to either treatment with daily 3.36 g Lovaza for 1 yr or without. Targeted lipid mediator-metabololipidomics showed that both groups had absence of resolvin D1 (RvD1), RvD2, RvD3, RvD5 and resolvin E1-all of which are present in healthy patients. Those not taking Lovaza had an absence of aspirin-triggered resolvin D3 (AT-RvD3) and aspirin-triggered lipoxin B4 (AT-LXB4). Lovaza treatment restored AT-RvD3 and AT-LXB4 and gave levels of RvD6 and aspirin-triggered protectin D1 (AT-PD1) twice as high (resolvin E2 ∼5 fold) as well as lower prostaglandins. Principal component analysis indicated positive relationships for patients with CAD who were receiving Lovaza with increased AT-RvD3, RvD6, AT-PD1, and AT-LXB4 SPMs identified in Lovaza-treated patients with CAD enhanced ∼50% at 1 nM macrophage uptake of blood clots. These results indicate that patients with CAD have lower levels and/or absence of specific SPMs that were restored with Lovaza; these SPMs promote macrophage phagocytosis of blood clots. Together, they suggest that low vascular SPMs may enable progression of chronic vascular inflammation predisposing to coronary atherosclerosis and to thrombosis.-Elajami, T. K., Colas, R. A., Dalli, J., Chiang, N., Serhan, C. N., Welty, F. K. Specialized proresolving lipid mediators in patients with coronary artery disease and their potential for clot remodeling. PMID:27121596

  17. Fermi GBM Early Trigger Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, Bill; Meegan, Charles

    2009-05-25

    Since the launch of the Fermi observatory on June 11 2008, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has seen approximately 250 triggers of which about 150 were cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GBM operates dozens of trigger algorithms covering various energy bands and timescales and is therefore sensitive to a wide variety of phenomena, both astrophysical and not.

  18. Low Vision Rehabilitation of Retinitis Pigmentosa. Practice Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rundquist, John

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a rod-cone dystrophy, commonly genetic in nature. Approximately 60-80% of those with retinitis pigmentosa inherit it by an autosomal recessive transmission (Brilliant, 1999). There have been some reported cases with no known family history. The symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa are decreased acuity, photophobia, night…

  19. Retinas in a Dish Peek into Inherited Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Duong, Thu T; Vasireddy, Vidyullatha; Mills, Jason A; Bennett, Jean

    2016-06-01

    Human retinal degeneration can cause blindness, and the lack of relevant model systems has made identifying underlying mechanisms challenging. Parfitt et al. (2016) generate three-dimensional retinal tissue from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells to identify how CEP290 mutations cause retinal degeneration, and show an antisense approach can correct disease-associated phenotypes. PMID:27257755

  20. Acute Variations in Retinal Vascular Oxygen Content in a Rabbit Model of Retinal Venous Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Saati, Saloomeh; Martin, Gabriel; Chader, Gerald; Humayun, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study the variation in intravascular oxygen saturation (oximetry) during an acute retinal vein occlusion (RVO) using hyperspectral computed tomographic spectroscopy based oximetry measurements. Methods Thirty rabbits were dilated and anesthetized for experiments. Baseline oximetry measurements were made using a custom-made hyperspectral computed tomographic imaging spectrometer coupled to a fundus camera. RVO were induced using argon green laser following an intravenous injection of Rose Bengal. RVO induction was confirmed by fluorescein angiography. Retinal oximetry measurements were repeated in arterial and venous branches one hour after RVO induction and up to 4 weeks afterwards. Comparison of retinal oximetry before and after vein occlusion was made using the Student T-test. Results One hour after RVO induction, we observed statistically significant reductions in the intravascular oxygen saturation in temporal retinal arteries (85.1±6.1% vs. 80.6±6.6%; p<0.0001) and veins (71.4±5.5% vs. 64.0±4.7%; p<0.0001). This decrease was reversible in animals that spontaneously recannulated the vein occlusion. There were no statistically significant differences in oxygen saturation in the nasal control arteries and veins before and after temporal vein RVO induction. Conclusions We demonstrate, for the first time, acute changes in the intravascular oxygen content of retinal vessels 1 hour after RVO. These changes are reversible upon spontaneous recannulation of retinal vessels. This study demonstrates that hyperspectral computer tomographic spectroscopy based oximetry can detect physiological variations in intravascular retinal oxygen saturation. The study also provides the first qualitative and quantitative evidence of the variation in retinal vascular oxygen content directly attributable to an acute retinal vein occlusion. PMID:23185567

  1. Inferior retinal light exposure is more effective than superior retinal exposure in suppressing melatonin in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Hanifin, John P.; Rollag, Mark D.; Wang, Jenny; Cooper, Howard; Brainard, George C.

    2003-01-01

    Illumination of different areas of the human retina elicits differences in acute light-induced suppression of melatonin. The aim of this study was to compare changes in plasma melatonin levels when light exposures of equal illuminance and equal photon dose were administered to superior, inferior, and full retinal fields. Nine healthy subjects participated in the study. Plexiglass eye shields were modified to permit selective exposure of the superior and inferior halves of the retinas of each subject. The Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer was used both to confirm intact full visual fields and to quantify exposure of upper and lower visual fields. On study nights, eyes were dilated, and subjects were exposed to patternless white light for 90 min between 0200 and 0330 under five conditions: (1) full retinal exposure at 200 lux, (2) full retinal exposure at 100 lux, (3) inferior retinal exposure at 200 lux, (4) superior retinal exposure at 200 lux, and (5) a dark-exposed control. Plasma melatonin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of exposure condition (F = 5.91, p < 0.005). Post hoc Fisher PLSD tests showed significant (p < 0.05) melatonin suppression of both full retinal exposures as well as the inferior retinal exposure; however, superior retinal exposure was significantly less effective in suppressing melatonin. Furthermore, suppression with superior retinal exposure was not significantly different from that of the dark control condition. The results indicate that the inferior retina contributes more to the light-induced suppression of melatonin than the superior retina at the photon dosages tested in this study. Findings suggest a greater sensitivity or denser distribution of photoreceptors in the inferior retina are involved in light detection for the retinohypothalamic tract of humans.

  2. Triggering requirements for SSC physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1989-04-01

    Some aspects of triggering requirements for high P{sub T} physics processes at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are described. A very wide range of trigger types will be required to enable detection of the large number of potential physics signatures possible at the SSC. Although in many cases trigger rates are not now well understood, it is possible to conclude that the ability to trigger on transverse energy, number and energy of jets, number and energy of leptons (electrons and muons), missing energy and combinations of these will be required. An SSC trigger system must be both highly flexible and redundant to ensure reliable detection of many new physics processes at the SSC.

  3. Norrin, Frizzled4, and Lrp5 signaling in endothelial cells controls a genetic program for retinal vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Wang, Yanshu; Cahill, Hugh; Yu, Minzhong; Badea, Tudor C.; Smallwood, Philip M.; Peachey, Neal S.; Nathans, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Disorders of vascular structure and function play a central role in a wide variety of CNS diseases. Mutations in the Frizzled4 (Fz4) receptor, Lrp5 co-receptor, or Norrin ligand cause retinal hypovascularization, but the role of Norrin/Fz4/Lrp signaling in vascular development has not been defined. Using mouse genetic and cell culture models, we show that loss of Fz4 signaling in endothelial cells causes defective vascular growth, which leads to chronic but reversible silencing of retinal neurons. Loss of Fz4 in all endothelial cells disrupts the blood brain barrier in the cerebellum, while excessive Fz4 signaling disrupts embryonic angiogenesis. Sox17, a transcription factor that is up-regulated by Norrin/Fz4/Lrp signaling, plays a central role in inducing the angiogenic program controlled by Norrin/Fz4/Lrp. These experiments establish a cellular basis for retinal hypovascularization diseases due to insufficient Frizzled signaling, and they suggest a broader role for Frizzled signaling in vascular growth, remodeling, maintenance, and disease. PMID:19837032

  4. Proteomic Profiling of Cigarette Smoke Induced Changes in Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells.

    PubMed

    Merl-Pham, Juliane; Gruhn, Fabian; Hauck, Stefanie M

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a medical condition usually affecting older adults and resulting in a loss of vision in the macula, the center of the visual field. The dry form of this disease presents with atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in the detachment of the retina and loss of photoreceptors. Cigarette smoke is one main risk factor for dry AMD and increases the risk of developing the disease by three times. In order to understand the influence of cigarette smoke on retinal pigment epithelial cells, cultured human ARPE-19 cells were treated with cigarette smoke extract for 24 h. Using quantitative mass spectrometry more than 3000 proteins were identified and their respective abundances were compared between cigarette smoke-treated and untreated cells. Altogether 1932 proteins were quantified with at least two unique peptides, with 686 proteins found to be significantly differentially abundant with p > 0.05. Of these proteins the abundance of 64 proteins was at least 2-fold down-regulated after cigarette smoke treatment while 120 proteins were 2-fold up-regulated. The analysis of associated biological processes revealed an alteration of proteins involved in RNA processing and transport as well as extracellular matrix remodelling in response to cigarette smoke treatment. PMID:26427490

  5. [Histamine in regulation of bone remodeling processes].

    PubMed

    Wiercigroch, Marek; Folwarczna, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bone remodeling is under autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and central nervous system control. One of the potential endogenous factors affecting bone remodeling is histamine, an endogenous amine which acts as a mediator of allergic reactions and neuromediator, and induces production of gastric acid. Histamine H₁ receptor antagonists are widely used in the treatment of allergic conditions, H₂ receptor antagonists in peptic ulcer disease, and betahistine (an H₃ receptor antagonist and H₁ receptor agonist) is used in the treatment of Ménière's disease. Excess histamine release in mastocytosis and allergic diseases may lead to development of osteoporosis. Clinical and population-based studies on the effects of histamine receptor antagonists on the skeletal system have not delivered unequivocal results. Expression of mRNA of histamine receptors has been discovered in bone cells (osteoblasts and osteoclasts). Histamine synthesis has been demonstrated in osteoclast precursors. Histamine increases bone resorption both by direct effects on osteoclast precursors and osteoclasts, and indirectly, by increasing the expression of RANKL in osteoblasts. In in vivo studies, H₁ and H₂ receptor antagonists exerted protective effects on the bone tissue, although not in all experimental models. In the present article, in vitro and in vivo studies conducted so far, concerning the effects of histamine and drugs modifying its activity on the skeletal system, have been reviewed. PMID:24018454

  6. Densitometric evaluation of periprosthetic bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Cervi, Valentina; Piolanti, Nicola; Ciapini, Gianluca; Andreani, Lorenzo; Castellini, Iacopo; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Summary The application of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in orthopaedic surgery gradually has been extended from the study of osteoporosis to different areas of interest like the study of the relation between bone and prosthetic implants. Aim of this review is to analyze changes that occur in periprosthetic bone after the implantation of a total hip arthroplasty (THA) or a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In THA the pattern of adaptive bone remodeling with different cementless femoral stems varies and it appears to be strictly related to the design and more specifically to where the femoral stem is fixed on bone. Short stems with metaphyseal fixation allow the maintenance of a more physiologic load transfer to the proximal femur decreasing the entity of bone loss. Femoral bone loss after TKA seems to be related to the stress shielding induced by the implants while tibial bone remodeling seems to be related to postoperative changes in knee alignment (varus/valgus) and consequently in tibial load transfer. After both THA and TKA stress shielding seems to be an inevitable phenomenon that occurs mainly in the first year after surgery. PMID:25568658

  7. PARP inhibition and postinfarction myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Halmosi, Robert; Deres, Laszlo; Gal, Roland; Eros, Krisztian; Sumegi, Balazs; Toth, Kalman

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease accounts for the greatest proportion of cardiovascular diseases therefore it is the major cause of death worldwide. Its therapeutic importance is indicated by still high mortality of myocardial infarction, which is one of the most severe forms of CVDs. Moreover, the risk of developing heart failure is very high among survivors. Heart failure is accompanied by high morbidity and mortality rate, therefore this topic is in the focus of researchers' interest. After a myocardial infarct, at first ventricular hypertrophy develops as a compensatory mechanism to decrease wall stress but finally leads to left ventricular dilation. This phenomenon is termed as myocardial remodeling. The main characteristics of underlying mechanisms involve cardiomyocyte growth, vessel changes and increased collagen production, in all of which several mechanical stress induced neurohumoral agents, oxidative stress and signal transduction pathways are involved. The long term activation of these processes ultimately leads to left ventricular dilation and heart failure with decreased systolic function. Oxidative stress causes DNA breaks producing the activation of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) enzyme that leads to energy depletion and unfavorable modulation of different kinase cascades (Akt-1/GSK-3β, MAPKs, various PKC isoforms) and thus it promotes the development of heart failure. Therefore inhibition of PARP enzyme could offer a promising new therapeutical approach to prevent the onset of heart failure among postinfarction patients. The purpose of this review is to give a comprehensive summary about the most significant experimental results and mechanisms in postinfarction remodeling. PMID:27392900

  8. Remodeling of the Fetal Collecting Duct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, Michael J.; Ivanova, Larissa; Toran, Nuria; Tarantal, Alice F.; Matsell, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital urinary tract obstruction induces changes to the renal collecting duct epithelium, including alteration and depletion of intercalated cells. To study the effects of obstruction on the ontogeny of intercalated cell development, we examined normal and obstructed human fetal and postnatal kidneys. In the normal human fetal kidney, intercalated cells originated in the medullary collecting duct at 8 weeks gestation and remained most abundant in the inner medulla throughout gestation. In the cortex, intercalated cells were rare at 18 and 26 weeks gestation and observed at low abundance at 36 weeks gestation. Although early intercalated cells exhibit an immature phenotype, Type A intercalated cells predominated in the inner and outer medullae at 26 and 36 weeks gestation with other intercalated cell subtypes observed rarely. Postnatally, the collecting duct epithelium underwent a remodeling whereby intercalated cells become abundant in the cortex yet absent from the inner medulla. In 18-week obstructed kidneys with mild to moderate injury, the intercalated cells became more abundant and differentiated than the equivalent age-matched normal kidney. In contrast, more severely injured ducts of the late obstructed kidney exhibited a significant reduction in intercalated cells. These studies characterize the normal ontogeny of human intercalated cell development and suggest that obstruction induces premature remodeling and differentiation of the fetal collecting duct epithelium. PMID:20035053

  9. Abnormal bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bogoch, Earl R.; Moran, Erica

    1998-01-01

    Osteopenia is responsible for substantial comorbidity in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and is an important factor in the surgical management of joint disease. In animal models of bone loss stimulated by inflammatory arthritis, increased bone remodelling and altered microstructure of bone have been documented. The subchondral bone plate near the joint surface is narrow and perforated by vascular inflammatory invasion, and in the shaft the thin cortices are weakened by giant resorption defects. Biomechanical tests and a mathematical model of bone strength suggest that cortical defects, much larger than those found in normal osteonal remodelling, are principally responsible for the experimentally observed loss of strength. Similarly, these defects may explain the increased femoral fracture risk in rheumatoid arthritis. The osteoclast, the cell resorbing bone, is demonstrated in increased number and activity in rheumatoid arthritis and in animal models. Bisphosphonates, drugs that inhibit osteoclast function, have been shown experimentally to reduce both focal and generalized osteopenia and to prevent loss of bone strength. Bisphosphonates also protect articular cartilage from damage characteristic of inflammatory arthritis. The mechanism of chondroprotection may be prevention of subchondral bone resorption by the osteoclast and also an altered distribution of bone marrow cells. Thus, bisphosphonates, currently in clinical use for other bone metabolic diseases, appear to have potential as prophylaxis and treatment for osteopenia and joint damage in inflammatory arthritis. PMID:9711159

  10. Hard tissue remodeling using biofabricated coralline biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Vago, Razi; Plotquin, Daniel; Bunin, Alex; Sinelnikov, Igor; Atar, Dan; Itzhak, David

    2002-01-01

    Biotechnical and biomedical approaches were combined in an attempt to identify potential uses of biofabricated marine carbonate materials in biomedical applications, particularly as biomatrices for remodeling bone and cartilage tissue. After grafting, it is desirable for bone ingrowth to proceed as quickly as possible because the strength of the implanted region depends on a good mechanical bond forming between the implant and surrounding regions in the body. Ingrowth can take place as a result of growth of tissue and cells into the implanted porous material, or it may be promoted by transplanting cells seeded onto such a material. The rate at which ingrowth occurs is dependent on many factors, including pore size and the interconnectivity of the implanted structure. In vivo graftings into osteochondral defects demonstrated that our biofabricated porous material is highly biocompatible with cartilage and bone tissue. The biofabricated matrix was well incorporated into the biphasic osteochondral area. Resorption was followed by bone and cartilage formation, and after 4 months, the biomaterial had been replaced by new tissue. Ossification was induced and enhanced without introduction of additional factors. We believe that this is the first time that such biofabricated materials have been used for biomedical purposes. In face of the obvious environmental disadvantages of harvesting from limited natural resources, we propose the use of bioengineered coralline and other materials such as those cultured by our group under field and laboratory conditions as a possible biomatrix for hard tissue remodeling. PMID:11741712

  11. Atrial remodeling, fibrosis, and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Jalife, José; Kaur, Kuljeet

    2015-08-01

    The fundamental mechanisms governing the perpetuation of atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common arrhythmia seen in clinical practice, are poorly understood, which explains in part why AF prevention and treatment remain suboptimal. Although some clinical parameters have been identified as predicting a transition from paroxysmal to persistent AF in some patients, the molecular, electrophysiological, and inflammation changes leading to such a progression have not been described in detail. Oxidative stress, atrial dilatation, calcium overload, inflammation, microRNAs, and myofibroblast activation are all thought to be involved in AF-induced atrial remodeling. However, it is unknown to what extent and at which time points such alterations influence the remodeling process that perpetuates AF. Here we postulate a working model that might open new pathways for future investigation into mechanisms of AF perpetuation. We start from the premise that the progression to AF perpetuation is the result of interplay among manifold signaling pathways with differing kinetics. Some such pathways have relatively fast kinetics (e.g., oxidative stress-mediated shortening of refractory period); others likely depend on molecular processes with slower kinetics (e.g., transcriptional changes in myocyte ion channel protein expression mediated through inflammation and fibroblast activation). We stress the need to fully understand the relationships among such pathways should one hope to identify novel, truly effective targets for AF therapy and prevention. PMID:25661032

  12. Tau Mislocation in Glucocorticoid-Triggered Hippocampal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Sara; Silva, Joana; Mota, Cristina; Vaz-Silva, João; Veloso, Ana; Pinto, Vítor; Sousa, Nuno; Cerqueira, João; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-09-01

    The exposure to high glucocorticoids (GC) triggers neuronal atrophy and cognitive deficits, but the exact cellular mechanisms underlying the GC-associated dendritic remodeling and spine loss are still poorly understood. Previous studies have implicated sustained GC elevations in neurodegenerative mechanisms through GC-evoked hyperphosphorylation of the cytoskeletal protein Tau while Tau mislocation has recently been proposed as relevant in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. In light of the dual cytoplasmic and synaptic role of Tau, this study monitored the impact of prolonged GC treatment on Tau intracellular localization and its phosphorylation status in different cellular compartments. We demonstrate, both by biochemical and ultrastructural analysis, that GC administration led to cytosolic and dendritic Tau accumulation in rat hippocampus, and triggered Tau hyperphosphorylation in epitopes related to its malfunction (Ser396/404) and cytoskeletal pathology (e.g., Thr231 and Ser262). In addition, we show, for the first time, that chronic GC administration also increased Tau levels in synaptic compartment; however, at the synapse, there was an increase in phosphorylation of Ser396/404, but a decrease of Thr231. These GC-triggered Tau changes were paralleled by reduced levels of synaptic scaffolding proteins such as PSD-95 and Shank proteins as well as reduced dendritic branching and spine loss. These in vivo findings add to our limited knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of GC-evoked synaptic atrophy and neuronal disconnection implicating Tau missorting in mechanism(s) of synaptic damage, beyond AD pathology. PMID:26328538

  13. Automated retinal layer segmentation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luisi, Jonathan; Briley, David; Boretsky, Adam; Motamedi, Massoud

    2014-05-01

    Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a valuable diagnostic tool in both clinical and research settings. The depth-resolved intensity profiles generated by light backscattered from discrete layers of the retina provide a non-invasive method of investigating progressive diseases and injury within the eye. This study demonstrates the application of steerable convolution filters capable of automatically separating gradient orientations to identify edges and delineate tissue boundaries. The edge maps were recombined to measure thickness of individual retinal layers. This technique was successfully applied to longitudinally monitor changes in retinal morphology in a mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and human data from age-related macular degeneration patients. The steerable filters allow for direct segmentation of noisy images, while novel recombination of weaker segmentations allow for denoising post-segmentation. The segmentation before denoising strategy allows the rapid detection of thin retinal layers even under suboptimal imaging conditions.

  14. Computer-aided retinal photocoagulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H.; Jerath, Maya R.; Lewis, R. Stephen; Dillard, Bryan C.; Rylander, Henry G.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1996-01-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Biomedical Engineering Laser Laboratory and the U.S. Air Force Academy's Department of Electrical Engineering are developing a computer-assisted prototype retinal photocoagulation system. The project goal is to rapidly and precisely automatically place laser lesions in the retina for the treatment of disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears while dynamically controlling the extent of the lesion. Separate prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion parameters (diameter or depth) using lesion reflectance feedback and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Successful subsystem testing results in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser are presented. A prototype integrated system design to simultaneously control lesion parameters and placement at clinically significant speeds is provided.

  15. Primary Vitreoretinal Lymphoma Masquerading as Refractory Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Zloto, Ofira; Elkader, Amir E. Abd; Fabian, Ido Didi; Vishnevskia-Dai, Vicktoria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a patient with primary vitreoretinal lymphoma masquerading as retinitis. Methods Retrospective review of the patient's clinical, histopathological and imaging records. Results Cytopathology was negative for malignancy, and preliminary polymerase chain reaction results supported the diagnosis of varicella zoster virus retinitis. Therefore, the patient was treated with antiviral therapy. However, under this treatment, the retinitis progressed. As a result, primary vitreoretinal lymphoma was suspected, and empirical treatment with intravitreal methotrexate injections was started. Under this treatment, the ocular features improved. Five months after initial ocular presentation and ocular resolution, the patient presented with central nervous system lymphoma. Conclusion This case should raise the awareness of the variable clinical presentations, the challenging diagnosis and treatment of primary vitreoretinal lymphoma. All cases should be continuously systemically evaluated. PMID:26557084

  16. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2016-03-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage. PMID:26325327

  17. Shedding New Light on Retinal Protein Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wand, Amir; Gdor, Itay; Zhu, Jingyi; Sheves, Mordechai; Ruhman, Sanford

    2013-04-01

    The ultrafast spectroscopic investigation of novel retinal proteins challenges existing notions concerning the course of primary events in these natural photoreceptors. We review two illustrations here. The first demonstrates that changes in the initial retinal configuration can alter the duration of photochemistry by nearly an order of magnitude in Anabaena sensory rhodopsin, making it as rapid as the ballistic photoisomerization in visual pigments. This prompted a reinvestigation of the much studied bacteriorhodopsin, leading to a similar trend as well, contrary to earlier reports. The second involves the study of xanthorhodopsin, an archaeal proton pump that includes an attached light-harvesting carotenoid. Pump-probe experiments demonstrate the efficient transfer of energy from carotenoid to retinal, providing a first glimpse at a cooperative multichromophore function, which is probably characteristic of many other proteins as well. Finally, we discuss measures required to advance our knowledge from kinetics to mode-specific dynamics concerning this expanding family of biological photoreceptors.

  18. Molecular biology of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, M; Zhou, H; Nathans, J

    1996-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells are the output neurons that encode and transmit information from the eye to the brain. Their diverse physiologic and anatomic properties have been intensively studied and appear to account well for a number of psychophysical phenomena such as lateral inhibition and chromatic opponency. In this paper, we summarize our current view of retinal ganglion cell properties and pose a number of questions regarding underlying molecular mechanisms. As an example of one approach to understanding molecular mechanisms, we describe recent work on several POU domain transcription factors that are expressed in subsets of retinal ganglion cells and that appear to be involved in ganglion cell development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8570601

  19. Retinoschisis transposition following a retinal detachment repair

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Katherine; Keller, Johannes; Haynes, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The authors have observed this phenomenon of translocation of the schisis cavity in a few previous cases and aim to report this unusual finding. Method: A patient with known superotemporal retinoschisis developed a distinctly separate inferotemporal retinal detachment in his left eye. This was repaired with a vitrectomy, cryotherapy and C2F6 tamponade under local anaesthetic. Following surgery, the retinoschisis was found in the inferonasal quadrant of the eye and remained stable as the gas dispersed. Result: We hypothesise that the tamponading agent compressed the viscous fluid within the area of schisis, displacing the area of schisis circumferentially. Conclusion: This case emphasises that as long as the retinal breaks are properly sealed, no intervention is required with the schisis during rhegmatogenous retinal detachment surgery.

  20. [Muscular Dystrophies Involving the Retinal Function].

    PubMed

    Jägle, H

    2016-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are rare disorders, with an incidence of approx. 20 in 100 000. Some dystrophies also affect retinal or optic nerve function. In such cases, the ophthalmological findings may be critical for differential diagnosis or patient counseling. For example in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, where the alteration in retinal function seems to reflect cerebral involvement. Other important forms are mitochondrial and metabolic disorders, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome and the Refsum syndrome. Molecular genetic analysis has become a major tool for differential diagnosis, but may be complex and demanding. This article gives an overview of major muscular dystrophies involving retinal function and their genetic origin, in order to guide differential diagnosis. PMID:27011029

  1. Prospects for retinal gene replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W; Ali, Robin R

    2009-04-01

    Inherited retinal degeneration, which includes conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), affects approximately 1/3000 of the population in the Western world. It is characterized by loss of vision and results from mutations in any one of >100 different genes. There are currently no effective treatments, but many of the genes have now been identified and their functions elucidated, providing a major impetus to develop gene-based treatments. Preliminary results from three clinical trials indicate that the treatment of a form of LCA by gene therapy can be safe and effective. Here, we discuss the potential for treating other forms of retinal degeneration by gene therapy, focusing on the gene defects that are likely to be the most amenable to treatment. PMID:19303164

  2. Dystroglycan is required for proper retinal layering.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Andrea; Cremisi, Federico; Dente, Luciana

    2006-02-15

    Dystroglycan (DG) is a transmembrane receptor linking the extracellular matrix to the internal cytoskeleton. Its structural function has been mainly characterized in muscle fibers, but DG plays signaling and developmental roles also in different tissues and cell types. We have investigated the effects of dystroglycan depletion during eye development of Xenopus laevis. We have injected a specific morpholino (Mo) antisense oligonucleotide in the animal pole of one dorsal blastomere of embryos at four cells stage. Mo-mediated loss of DG function caused disruption of the basal lamina layers, increased apoptosis and reduction of the expression domains of specific retinal markers, at early stages. Later in development, morphants displayed unilateral ocular malformations, such as microphtalmia and retinal delayering with photoreceptors and ganglion cells scattered throughout the retina or aggregated in rosette-like structures. These results recall the phenotypes observed in specific human diseases and suggest that DG presence is crucial at early stages for the organization of retinal architecture. PMID:16406325

  3. Integrated computer-aided retinal photocoagulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Oberg, Erik D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Cain, Clarence P.; Jerath, Maya R.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1996-05-01

    Successful retinal tracking subsystem testing results in vivo on rhesus monkeys using an argon continuous wave laser and an ultra-short pulse laser are presented. Progress on developing an integrated robotic retinal laser surgery system is also presented. Several interesting areas of study have developed: (1) 'doughnut' shaped lesions that occur under certain combinations of laser power, spot size, and irradiation time complicating measurements of central lesion reflectance, (2) the optimal retinal field of view to achieve simultaneous tracking and lesion parameter control, and (3) a fully digital versus a hybrid analog/digital tracker using confocal reflectometry integrated system implementation. These areas are investigated in detail in this paper. The hybrid system warrants a separate presentation and appears in another paper at this conference.

  4. Alteration of proteoglycan sulfation affects bone growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gualeni, Benedetta; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Marty-Morieux, Caroline; De Leonardis, Fabio; Franchi, Marco; Monti, Luca; Forlino, Antonella; Houillier, Pascal; Rossi, Antonio; Geoffroy, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is a chondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the SLC26A2 gene, leading to reduced intracellular sulfate pool in chondrocytes, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Hence, proteoglycans are undersulfated in the cartilage and bone of DTD patients. To characterize the bone phenotype of this skeletal dysplasia we used the Slc26a2 knock-in mouse (dtd mouse), that was previously validated as an animal model of DTD in humans. X-rays, bone densitometry, static and dynamic histomorphometry, and in vitro studies revealed a primary bone defect in the dtd mouse model. We showed in vivo that this primary bone defect in dtd mice is due to decreased bone accrual associated with a decreased trabecular and periosteal appositional rate at the cell level in one month-old mice. Although the osteoclast number evaluated by histomorphometry was not different in dtd compared to wild-type mice, urine analysis of deoxypyridinoline cross-links and serum levels of type I collagen C-terminal telopeptides showed a higher resorption rate in dtd mice compared to wild-type littermates. Electron microscopy studies showed that collagen fibrils in bone were thinner and less organized in dtd compared to wild-type mice. These data suggest that the low bone mass observed in mutant mice could possibly be linked to the different bone matrix compositions/organizations in dtd mice triggering changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities. Overall, these results suggest that proteoglycan undersulfation not only affects the properties of hyaline cartilage, but can also lead to unbalanced bone modeling and remodeling activities, demonstrating the importance of proteoglycan sulfation in bone homeostasis. PMID:23369989

  5. Targeting tubulointerstitial remodeling in proteinuric nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Saleh; Hijmans, Ryanne S; Poosti, Fariba; Dam, Wendy; Navis, Gerjan; van Goor, Harry; van den Born, Jacob

    2015-08-01

    Proteinuria is an important cause of tubulointerstitial damage. Anti-proteinuric interventions are not always successful, and residual proteinuria often leads to renal failure. This indicates the need for additional treatment modalities by targeting the harmful downstream consequences of proteinuria. We previously showed that proteinuria triggers renal lymphangiogenesis before the onset of interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. However, the interrelationship of these interstitial events in proteinuria is not yet clear. To this end, we specifically blocked lymphangiogenesis (anti-VEGFR3 antibody), monocyte/macrophage influx (clodronate liposomes) or lymphocyte and myofibroblast influx (S1P agonist FTY720) separately in a rat model to investigate the role and the possible interaction of each of these phenomena in tubulointerstitial remodeling in proteinuric nephropathy. Proteinuria was induced in 3-month old male Wistar rats by adriamycin injection. After 6 weeks, when proteinuria has developed, rats were treated for another 6 weeks by anti-VEGFR3 antibody, clodronate liposomes or FTY720 up to week 12. In proteinuric rats, lymphangiogenesis, influx of macrophages, T cells and myofibroblasts, and collagen III deposition and interstitial fibrosis significantly increased at week 12 vs week 6. Anti-VEGFR3 antibody prevented lymphangiogenesis in proteinuric rats, however, without significant effects on inflammatory and fibrotic markers or proteinuria. Clodronate liposomes inhibited macrophage influx and partly reduced myofibroblast expression; however, neither significantly prevented the development of lymphangiogenesis, nor fibrotic markers and proteinuria. FTY720 prevented myofibroblast accumulation, T-cell influx and interstitial fibrosis, and partially reduced macrophage number and proteinuria; however, it did not significantly influence lymphangiogenesis and collagen III deposition. This study showed that proteinuria-induced interstitial fibrosis cannot be

  6. Aged complement factor H knockout mice kept in a clean barriered environment have reduced retinal pathology.

    PubMed

    Hoh Kam, Jaimie; Morgan, James E; Jeffery, Glen

    2016-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the largest cause of visual loss in those over 60 years in the West and is a condition increasing in prevalence. Many diseases result from genetic/environmental interactions and 50% of AMD cases have an association with polymorphisms of the complement system including complement factor H. Here we explore interactions between genetic predisposition and environmental conditions in triggering retinal pathology in two groups of aged complement factor H knock out (Cfh(-/-)) mice. Mice were maintained over 9 months in either a conventional open environment or a barriered pathogen free environment. Open environment Cfh(-/-) mice had significant increases in subretinal macrophage numbers, inflammatory and stress responses and reduced photoreceptor numbers over mice kept in a pathogen free environment. Hence, environmental factors can drive retinal disease in these mice when linked to complement deficits impairing immune function. Both groups of mice had similar levels of retinal amyloid beta accumulation. Consequently there is no direct link between this and inflammation in Cfh(-/-) mice. PMID:27397653

  7. Retinal Oximetry in a Healthy Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yuki; Shimazaki, Takeru; Kobayashi, Nobuko; Miyoshi, Yukiko; Ono, Aoi; Kobayashi, Mamoru; Shiragami, Chieko; Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Tsujikawa, Akitaka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To establish the normative database of retinal oximetry using Oxymap T1 in a healthy Japanese population, and study the reproducibility of the measurements in Japanese. Methods We measured oxygen saturation in the major retinal vessels with Oxymap T1 in 252 eyes of 252 healthy Japanese subjects. Fundus images acquired using Oxymap T1 were processed using built-in Oxymap Analyzer software. Reproducibility of retinal oximetry was investigated using 20 eyes of 20 healthy subjects. Results The mean retinal oxygen saturation of 4 quadrants in healthy Japanese was 97.0 ± 6.9% in arteries and 52.8 ± 8.3% in veins. The mean arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation was 44.2 ± 9.2%. Both arterial and venous oxygen saturation were significantly lower in the temporal side of the retina, especially in the temporal-inferior vessels. However, the arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation was limited in the 4 quadrants. Interphotograph, intervisit, and interevaluator intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.936–0.979, 0.809–0.837, and 0.732–0.947, respectively. In the major retinal arteries, oxygen saturation increased with age (r = 0.18, p<0.01), at a rate of 0.67% per 10 years. However, venous oxygen saturation showed no correlation with age. Conclusions This study provides the normative database for the Japanese population. The arterial saturation value appears to be higher than other previous studies. Mean retinal oximetry in 4 quadrants with Oxymap T1 has high reproducibility. PMID:27434373

  8. Protease nexin-1 regulates retinal vascular development.

    PubMed

    Selbonne, Sonia; Francois, Deborah; Raoul, William; Boulaftali, Yacine; Sennlaub, Florian; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Bouton, Marie-Christine; Arocas, Véronique

    2015-10-01

    We recently identified protease nexin-1 (PN-1) or serpinE2, as a possibly underestimated player in maintaining angiogenic balance. Here, we used the well-characterized postnatal vascular development of newborn mouse retina to further investigate the role and the mechanism of action of PN-1 in physiological angiogenesis. The development of retinal vasculature was analysed by endothelial cell staining with isolectin B4. PN-1-deficient (PN-1(-/-)) retina displayed increased vascularization in the postnatal period, with elevated capillary thickness and density, compared to their wild-type littermate (WT). Moreover, PN-1(-/-) retina presented more veins/arteries than WT retina. The kinetics of retinal vasculature development, retinal VEGF expression and overall retinal structure were similar in WT and PN-1(-/-) mice, but we observed a hyperproliferation of vascular cells in PN-1(-/-) retina. Expression of PN-1 was analysed by immunoblotting and X-Gal staining of retinas from mice expressing beta-galactosidase under a PN-1 promoter. PN-1 was highly expressed in the first week following birth and then progressively decreased to a low level in adult retina where it localized on the retinal arteries. PCR arrays performed on mouse retinal RNA identified two angiogenesis-related factors, midkine and Smad5, that were overexpressed in PN-1(-/-) newborn mice and this was confirmed by RT-PCR. Both the higher vascularization and the overexpression of midkine and Smad5 mRNA were also observed in gastrocnemius muscle of PN-1(-/-) mice, suggesting that PN-1 interferes with these pathways. Together, our results demonstrate that PN-1 strongly limits physiological angiogenesis and suggest that modulation of PN-1 expression could represent a new way to regulate angiogenesis. PMID:26109427

  9. Reading Visual Braille with a Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lauritzen, Thomas Z.; Harris, Jordan; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Sahel, Jose A.; Dorn, Jessy D.; McClure, Kelly; Greenberg, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prostheses, which restore partial vision to patients blinded by outer retinal degeneration, are currently in clinical trial. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system was recently awarded CE approval for commercial use in Europe. While retinal prosthesis users have achieved remarkable visual improvement to the point of reading letters and short sentences, the reading process is still fairly cumbersome. This study investigates the possibility of using an epiretinal prosthesis to stimulate visual braille as a sensory substitution for reading written letters and words. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system, used in this study, includes a 10 × 6 electrode array implanted epiretinally, a tiny video camera mounted on a pair of glasses, and a wearable computer that processes the video and determines the stimulation current of each electrode in real time. In the braille reading system, individual letters are created by a subset of dots from a 3 by 2 array of six dots. For the visual braille experiment, a grid of six electrodes was chosen out of the 10 × 6 Argus II array. Groups of these electrodes were then directly stimulated (bypassing the camera) to create visual percepts of individual braille letters. Experiments were performed in a single subject. Single letters were stimulated in an alternative forced choice (AFC) paradigm, and short 2–4-letter words were stimulated (one letter at a time) in an open-choice reading paradigm. The subject correctly identified 89% of single letters, 80% of 2-letter, 60% of 3-letter, and 70% of 4-letter words. This work suggests that text can successfully be stimulated and read as visual braille in retinal prosthesis patients. PMID:23189036

  10. Metamorphopsia Associated with Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Koichiro; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Osaka, Rie; Nakano, Yuki; Fujita, Tomoyoshi; Shiragami, Chieko; Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Uji, Akihito; Muraoka, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To apply M-CHARTS for quantitative measurements of metamorphopsia in eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and to elucidate the pathomorphology that causes metamorphopsia. Methods This prospective study consisted of 42 consecutive patients (42 eyes) with acute BRVO. Both at baseline and one month after treatment with ranibizumab, metamorphopsia was measured with M-CHARTS, and the retinal morphological changes were examined with optical coherence tomography. Results At baseline, metamorphopsia was detected in the vertical and/or horizontal directions in 29 (69.0%) eyes; the mean vertical and horizontal scores were 0.59 ± 0.57 and 0.52 ± 0.67, respectively. The maximum inner retinal thickness showed no association with the M-CHARTS score, but the M-CHARTS score was correlated with the total foveal thickness (r = 0.43, p = 0.004), the height of serous retinal detachment (r = 0.31, p = 0.047), and the maximum outer retinal thickness (r = 0.36, p = 0.020). One month after treatment, both the inner and outer retinal thickness substantially decreased. However, metamorphopsia persisted in 26 (89.7%) of 29 eyes. The posttreatment M-CHARTS score was not correlated with any posttreatment morphological parameters. However, the posttreatment M-CHARTS score was weakly correlated with the baseline total foveal thickness (r = 0.35. p = 0.024) and closely correlated with the baseline M-CHARTS score (r = 0.78, p < 0.001). Conclusions Metamorphopsia associated with acute BRVO was quantified using M-CHARTS. Initial microstructural changes in the outer retina from acute BRVO may primarily account for the metamorphopsia. PMID:27123642

  11. Developing Extracellular Matrix Technology to Treat Retinal or Optic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Yolandi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult mammalian CNS neurons often degenerate after injury, leading to lost neurologic functions. In the visual system, retinal or optic nerve injury often leads to retinal ganglion cell axon degeneration and irreversible vision loss. CNS axon degeneration is increasingly linked to the innate immune response to injury, which leads to tissue-destructive inflammation and scarring. Extracellular matrix (ECM) technology can reduce inflammation, while increasing functional tissue remodeling, over scarring, in various tissues and organs, including the peripheral nervous system. However, applying ECM technology to CNS injuries has been limited and virtually unstudied in the visual system. Here we discuss advances in deriving fetal CNS-specific ECMs, like fetal porcine brain, retina, and optic nerve, and fetal non-CNS-specific ECMs, like fetal urinary bladder, and the potential for using tissue-specific ECMs to treat retinal or optic nerve injuries in two platforms. The first platform is an ECM hydrogel that can be administered as a retrobulbar, periocular, or even intraocular injection. The second platform is an ECM hydrogel and polymer “biohybrid” sheet that can be readily shaped and wrapped around a nerve. Both platforms can be tuned mechanically and biochemically to deliver factors like neurotrophins, immunotherapeutics, or stem cells. Since clinical CNS therapies often use general anti-inflammatory agents, which can reduce tissue-destructive inflammation but also suppress tissue-reparative immune system functions, tissue-specific, ECM-based devices may fill an important need by providing naturally derived, biocompatible, and highly translatable platforms that can modulate the innate immune response to promote a positive functional outcome. PMID:26478910

  12. Quantitative Autofluorescence and Cell Density Maps of the Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ach, Thomas; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Zhang, Tianjiao; Bentley, Mark J.; Gutierrez, Danielle B.; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Smith, R. Theodore; Sloan, Kenneth R.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Lipofuscin (LF) accumulation within RPE cells is considered pathogenic in AMD. To test whether LF contributes to RPE cell loss in aging and to provide a cellular basis for fundus autofluorescence (AF) we created maps of human RPE cell number and histologic AF. Methods. Retinal pigment epithelium–Bruch's membrane flat mounts were prepared from 20 donor eyes (10 ≤ 51 and 10 > 80 years; postmortem: ≤4.2 hours; no retinal pathologies), preserving foveal position. Phalloidin-binding RPE cytoskeleton and LF-AF (488-nm excitation) were imaged at up to 90 predefined positions. Maps were assembled from 83,330 cells in 1470 locations. From Voronoi regions representing each cell, the number of neighbors, cell area, and total AF intensity normalized to an AF standard was determined. Results. Highly variable between individuals, RPE-AF increases significantly with age. A perifoveal ring of high AF mirrors rod photoreceptor topography and fundus-AF. Retinal pigment epithelium cell density peaks at the fovea, independent of age, yet no net RPE cell loss is detectable. The RPE monolayer undergoes considerable lifelong re-modeling. The relationship of cell size and AF, a surrogate for LF concentration, is orderly and linear in both groups. Autofluorescence topography differs distinctly from the topography of age-related rod loss. Conclusions. Digital maps of quantitative AF, cell density, and packing geometry provide metrics for cellular-resolution clinical imaging and model systems. The uncoupling of RPE LF content, cell number, and photoreceptor topography in aging challenges LF's role in AMD. PMID:25034602

  13. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Elisa; Raoul, William; Calippe, Bertrand; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier; Paques, Michel; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined. Methods and Results We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGFβ, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC) dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, confirming the vascular instability induced by the experimental BRVO. Conclusion Experimental BRVO leads to acute endothelial cells apoptosis and increased permeability. Subsequently the upstream vascular network remains destabilized, characterized by pericyte dropout, un-physiologically high endothelial cells turnover and sensitivity to hypoxia. These early changes might pave the way for capillary loss and subsequent chronic ischemia and edema that characterize the late stage disease. PMID:26208283

  14. [Retinal vein occlusion: an interdisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Hatz, Katja; Martinez, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion provide a common cause of significant visual reduction but also late ocular complications. The medical care of these patients pursue two goals: On the one hand vision threatening complications need to be identified and treated, and on the other hand treatable risk factors are need to be identified and treated. This paper summarizes the common ophthalmological therapeutic approaches as well as recommended medical evaluations carried out by the general practitioner. This supports the interdisciplinary approach in evaluating and treating retinal vein occlusions by ophthalmologists and the general practitioners/specialist in internal medicine. PMID:26982647

  15. Laser speckle analysis of retinal vascular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Neganova, Anastasiia Y; Postnov, Dmitry D; Jacobsen, Jens Christian B.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Studies of vascular responses are usually performed on isolated vessels or on single vessels in vivo. This allows for precise measurements of diameter or blood flow. However, dynamical responses of the whole microvascular network are difficult to access experimentally. We suggest to use full-field laser speckle imaging to evaluate vascular responses of the retinal network. Image segmentation and vessel recognition algorithms together with response mapping allow us to analyze diameter changes and blood flow responses in the intact retinal network upon systemic administration of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II, the vasodilator acetylcholine or on the changing level of anesthesia in in vivo rat preparations.

  16. National Remodelling Team: Evaluation Study (Year 2). Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Claire; Wilson, Rebekah; Sharp, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    This report sets out to provide the National Remodelling Team (NRT) with comprehensive details on stakeholders' views about the second year of the remodelling programme. This report is divided into nine chapters: (1) Introduction; (2) outlines the aims of the evaluation and the methodology used; (3) describes the findings from the survey of local…

  17. Chromatin-remodeling and the initiation of transcription.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Kornberg, Roger D

    2015-11-01

    The nucleosome serves as a general gene repressor by the occlusion of regulatory and promoter DNA sequences. Repression is relieved by the SWI/SNF-RSC family of chromatin-remodeling complexes. Research reviewed here has revealed the essential features of the remodeling process. PMID:26537406

  18. Review: R28 retinal precursor cells: The first 20 years

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The R28 retinal precursor cell line was established 20 years ago, originating from a postnatal day 6 rat retinal culture immortalized with the 12S E1A (NP-040507) gene of the adenovirus in a replication-incompetent viral vector. Since that time, R28 cells have been characterized and used for a variety of in vitro and in vivo studies of retinal cell behavior, including differentiation, neuroprotection, cytotoxicity, and light stimulation, as well as retinal gene expression and neuronal function. While no cell culture is equivalent to the intact eye, R28 cells continue to provide an important experimental system for the study of many retinal processes. PMID:24644404

  19. Retinal arterial occlusive disease in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gold, D; Feiner, L; Henkind, P

    1977-09-01

    Four patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed an unusual form of occlusive retinal arterial disease. The most prominent clinical features of this disorder were deposition of yellow-white material in retinal arterial walls and evidence of multifocal retinal arterial occlusion. Fluorescein angiographic findings included nonperfusion of the obstructed arteries and the retinal capillary beds fed by them, and fluorescein leakage at the sites of involvement of the retinal arteries. This ocular complication of SLE is presumably a manifestation of the widespread systemic vascular problems seen in this disorder. It may be more common in patients with lupus involving the CNS. PMID:901267

  20. Rapid nutritional remodeling of the host cell upon attachment of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, William M; Price, Christopher T; Abu Kwaik, Yousef

    2014-01-01

    Upon entry of Legionella pneumophila into amoebas and macrophages, host-mediated farnesylation of the AnkB effector enables its anchoring to the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) membrane. On the LCV, AnkB triggers docking of K(48)-linked polyubiquitinated proteins that are degraded by the host proteasomes to elevate cellular levels of amino acids needed for intracellular proliferation. Interference with AnkB function triggers L. pneumophila to exhibit a starvation response and differentiate into the nonreplicative phase in response to the basal levels of cellular amino acids that are not sufficient to power intracellular proliferation of L. pneumophila. Therefore, we have determined whether the biological function of AnkB is temporally and spatially triggered upon bacterial attachment to the host cell to circumvent a counterproductive bacterial differentiation into the nonreplicative phase upon bacterial entry. Here, we show that upon attachment of L. pneumophila to human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs), the host farnesylation and ubiquitination machineries are recruited by the Dot/Icm system to the plasma membrane exclusively beneath sites of bacterial attachment. Transcription and injection of ankB is triggered by attached extracellular bacteria followed by rapid farnesylation and anchoring of AnkB to the cytosolic side of the plasma membrane beneath bacterial attachment, where K(48)-linked polyubiquitinated proteins are assembled and degraded by the proteasomes, leading to a rapid rise in the cellular levels of amino acids. Our data represent a novel strategy by an intracellular pathogen that triggers rapid nutritional remodeling of the host cell upon attachment to the plasma membrane, and as a result, a gratuitous surplus of cellular amino acids is generated to support proliferation of the incoming pathogen. PMID:24126522

  1. Macrophage plasticity and polarization in tissue repair and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alberto; Biswas, Subhra K; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Sica, Antonio; Locati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocyte plasticity includes the expression of functions related to the resolution of inflammation, tissue repair and remodelling, particularly when these cells are set in an M2 or an M2-like activation mode. Macrophages are credited with an essential role in remodelling during ontogenesis. In extraembryonic life, under homeostatic conditions, the macrophage trophic and remodelling functions are recapitulated in tissues such as bone, mammary gland, decidua and placenta. In pathology, macrophages are key components of tissue repair and remodelling that occur during wound healing, allergy, parasite infection and cancer. Interaction with cells bearing stem or progenitor cell properties is likely an important component of the role of macrophages in repair and remodelling. These properties of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage may represent a tool and a target for therapeutic exploitation. PMID:23096265

  2. Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia Presenting as Bilateral Retinal Haemorrhages with Multiple Retinal Infiltrates

    PubMed Central

    Barot, Rakesh K.; Gohel, Devadatta Jayantilal; Bhagat, Nupur

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) causes retinopathy manifesting as venous dilation and tortuosity, perivascular sheathing, retinal haemorrhages, microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots and optic nerve infiltration. Retina is the most commonly involved intraocular structure in CML. However, retinal involvement is a rare form of presentation of CML and few cases have been reported. We report a case of CML presenting as unilateral sudden visual loss. Fundus showed multiple white centered retinal haemorrhages in both eyes with unilateral macular oedema. Blood work-up showed raised WBC count, high platelet count and low Haemoglobin. Cytological analysis of bone marrow biopsy confirmed Philadelphia chromosome. After a course of Imatinib, visual acuity improved and haemorrhages resolved with normalization of macular thickness. In our case, patient presented early, leading to early detection producing better visual prognosis. This highlights the importance of detailed hematological work up in patients with retinal involvement to rule out leukaemic retinopathy.

  3. Probing how initial retinal configuration controls photochemical dynamics in retinal proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wand, A.; Rozin, R.; Eliash, T.; Friedman, N.; Jung, K. H.; Sheves, M.; Ruhman, S.

    2013-03-01

    The effects of the initial retinal configuration and the active isomerization coordinate on the photochemistry of retinal proteins (RPs) are assessed by comparing photochemical dynamics of two stable retinal ground state configurations (all-trans,15-anti vs. 13-cis,15-syn), within two RPs: Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin (ASR). Hyperspectral pump-probe spectroscopy shows that photochemistry starting from 13-cis retinal in both proteins is 3-10 times faster than when started in the all-trans state, suggesting that the hastening is ubiquitous to microbial RPs, regardless of their different biological functions and origin. This may also relate to the known disparity of photochemical rates between microbial RPs and visual pigments. Importance and possible underlying mechanisms are discussed as well.

  4. Pulsed thyristor trigger control circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A trigger control circuit is provided for producing firing pulses for the thyristor of a thyristor control system such as a power factor controller. The control circuit overcomes thyristor triggering problems involved with the current lag associated with controlling inductive loads and utilizes a phase difference signal, already present in the power factor controller, in deriving a signal for inhibiting generation of a firing pulse until no load current is flowing from the preceding half cycle and thereby ensuring that the thyristor is triggered on during each half cycle.

  5. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P.; Odom, Susan A.; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  6. Seismology: dynamic triggering of earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Gomberg, Joan; Johnson, Paul

    2005-10-01

    After an earthquake, numerous smaller shocks are triggered over distances comparable to the dimensions of the mainshock fault rupture, although they are rare at larger distances. Here we analyse the scaling of dynamic deformations (the stresses and strains associated with seismic waves) with distance from, and magnitude of, their triggering earthquake, and show that they can cause further earthquakes at any distance if their amplitude exceeds several microstrain, regardless of their frequency content. These triggering requirements are remarkably similar to those measured in the laboratory for inducing dynamic elastic nonlinear behaviour, which suggests that the underlying physics is similar. PMID:16208360

  7. Retinal Detachment Associated with AIDS-Related Cytomegalovirus Retinitis: Risk Factors in a Resource-Limited Setting

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Michael; Chen, Jenny; Ausayakhun, Somsanguan; Kunavisarut, Paradee; Vichitvejpaisal, Pornpattana; Ausayakhun, Sakarin; Jirawison, Choeng; Shantha, Jessica; Holland, Gary N; Heiden, David; Margolis, Todd P; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine risk factors predictive of retinal detachment in patients with cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in a setting with limited access to ophthalmic care. Design Case-control study. Methods Sixty-four patients with CMV retinitis and retinal detachment were identified from the Ocular Infectious Diseases and Retina Clinics at Chiang Mai University. Three control patients with CMV retinitis but no retinal detachment were selected for each case, matched by calendar date. The medical records of each patient were reviewed, with patient-level and eye-level features recorded for the clinic visit used to match cases and controls, and also for the initial clinic visit at which CMV retinitis was diagnosed. Risk factors for retinal detachment were assessed separately for each of these time points using multivariate conditional logistic regression models that included 1 eye from each patient. Results Patients with a retinal detachment were more likely than controls to have low visual acuity (OR, 1.24 per line of worse vision on the logMAR scale; 95%CI, 1.16-1.33) and bilateral disease (OR, 2.12; 95%CI, 0.92-4.90). Features present at the time of the initial diagnosis of CMV retinitis that predicted subsequent retinal detachment included bilateral disease (OR, 2.68; 95%CI, 1.18-6.08) and lesion size (OR, 2.64 per 10% increase in lesion size; 95%CI, 1.41-4.94). Conclusion Bilateral CMV retinitis and larger lesion sizes, each of which is a marker of advanced disease, were associated with subsequent retinal detachment. Earlier detection and treatment may reduce the likelihood that patients with CMV retinitis develop a retinal detachment. PMID:25448999

  8. PKC/MAPK signaling suppression by retinal pericyte conditioned medium prevents retinal endothelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tetsu; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi; Hori, Satoko; Tomi, Masatoshi; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2005-05-01

    Little is known about the regulation mechanism of endothelial cell proliferation by retinal pericytes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the suppression mechanism of retinal capillary endothelial cell growth by soluble factors derived from retinal pericytes. Conditioned medium of retinal pericytes (rPCT1-CM) suppressed ischemia-induced retinal neovascularization. The growth and DNA synthesis of TR-iBRB2 cells, a conditionally immortalized rat retinal capillary endothelial cell line, were suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner by concentrated rPCT1-CM. The number of human cultured endothelial cells was also reduced by rPCT1-CM. These results provide the first evidence that CM from the cultivation of pericytes alone can inhibit retinal neovascularization in vivo and in vitro. Although the growth reduction of TR-iBRB2 cells was only partly reversed by treatment of rPCT1-CM with antibodies to transforming growth factor-beta1, it was completely lost by heat-treatment of rPCT1-CM, suggesting that anti-angiogenic factors are soluble proteins. The levels of expression of G1/S-phase-related proteins, such as cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)4, cdk6, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, were reduced and a cdk inhibitor, p21(Cip1), was induced in rPCT1-CM-treated TR-iBRB2 cells. Moreover, phosphorylated p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p44/42 MAPK) in TR-iBRB2 cells was reduced by rPCT1-CM treatment and phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC)alpha/betaII, which is upstream of p44/42 MAPK, was also suppressed. In conclusion, CM from retinal pericytes suppresses PKC-p44/42 MAPK signaling, inhibits endothelial cell growth, and prevents retinal neovascularization. Anti-angiogenic factors derived from retinal pericytes are likely to play a critical role in the regulation of retinal endothelial cell growth. PMID:15499572

  9. Peripheral Retinal Vascular Patterns in Patients with Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, San-Ni; Hwang, Jiunn-Feng; Wu, Wen-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    This is an observational study of fluorescein angiography (FA) in consecutive patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in Changhua Christian Hospital to investigate the peripheral retinal vascular patterns in those patients. All patients had their age, sex, axial length (AXL), and refraction status (RF) recorded. According to the findings in FA of the peripheral retina, the eyes were divided into 4 groups: in group 1, there was a ramified pattern of peripheral retinal vasculature with gradual tapering; in group 2, there was an abrupt ending of peripheral vasculature with peripheral non-perfusion; in group 3, there was a curving route of peripheral vasculature forming vascular arcades or anastomosis; and in group 4, the same as in group 3, but with one or more wedge-shaped avascular notches. Comparisons of age, sex, AXL, and RF, association of breaks with lattice degeneration and retinal non-perfusion, surgical procedures utilized, and mean numbers of operations were made among the four groups. Of the 73 eyes studied, there were 13 eyes (17.8%) in group 1, 3 eyes (4.1%) in group 2, 40 eyes (54.8%) in group 3 and 17 eyes (23.3%) in group 4. Significant differences in age, AXL and RF, and association of retinal breaks to non-perfusion were noted among the four groups. Patients in group 1 had older ages, while younger ages were noted in groups 3 and 4. Eyes in group 1 had the shortest average AXL and were least myopic in contrast to the eyes in groups 3 and 4. Association of retinal breaks and retinal non-perfusion was significantly higher in groups 2, 3 and 4 than in group 1. In conclusion, peripheral vascular anomalies are common in cases with RRD. Patients with peripheral non-perfusion tend to be younger, with longer axial length and have the breaks associated with retinal non-perfusion. PMID:26909812

  10. Retinal arteriolar occlusions due to cytomegalovirus retinitis in elderly patients without HIV

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Five of 7 (71%) elderly immunocompetent patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis had retinal arteriolar occlusions versus 2 of 8 (25%) elderly immunocompromised patients and 1 of 19 (5%) younger HIV-infected patients. Compared to HIV-infected patients, elderly patients were more likely to have occlusive events, neovascularization or hemorrhage, and underlying vasculopathy. The purpose of this study is to report the novel finding of extensive retinal arteriolar occlusions and neovascularization in immunocompetent patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis. This is a retrospective observational cohort study of cytomegalovirus retinitis (CMVR) in a university setting. Seven patients were elderly but not immunocompromised, 8 were elderly and iatrogenically immunocompromised, and 16 were HIV-infected. All patients underwent polymerase chain reaction testing of intraocular fluid. Primary outcome measure was visual acuity. Secondary outcome measures were vascular occlusions, ischemic complications, and response to treatment. Results Mean age was 73, 70, and 41 years for immunocompetent, immunocompromised, and HIV-infected patients, respectively. Diabetes and vascular disease were common in the elderly. Vision loss to less than 5/200 occurred in 50% of the immunocompetent elderly patients, and 17% of CMV eyes in immunocompromised and HIV patients. Occlusion of the entire retinal vasculature occurred in 4/7 (57%) of immunocompetent patients despite lack of Zone I involvement, and rubeosis occurred in three, disc neovascularization in one, and vitreous hemorrhage in two patients. Vascular occlusive events were less common in immunocompromised patients and rare in the HIV-infected. Conclusions CMVR in non-HIV-infected elderly patients is associated with retinal arteriolar occlusions. An intact host immune response may increase damage to retinal vessels. Prompt diagnosis may avert catastrophic vision loss. PMID:23514532

  11. Plasma Kallikrein Mediates Retinal Vascular Dysfunction and Induces Retinal Thickening in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Clermont, Allen; Chilcote, Tamie J.; Kita, Takeshi; Liu, Jia; Riva, Priscilla; Sinha, Sukanto; Feener, Edward P.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Plasma kallikrein (PK) has been identified in vitreous fluid obtained from individuals with diabetic retinopathy and has been implicated in contributing to retinal vascular dysfunction. In this report, we examined the effects of PK on retinal vascular functions and thickness in diabetic rats. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We investigated the effects of a selective PK inhibitor, ASP-440, and C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), the primary physiological inhibitor of PK, on retinal vascular permeability (RVP) and hemodynamics in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. The effect of intravitreal PK injection on retinal thickness was examined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography. RESULTS Systemic continuous administration of ASP-440 for 4 weeks initiated at the time of diabetes onset inhibited RVP by 42% (P = 0.013) and 83% (P < 0.001) at doses of 0.25 and 0.6 mg/kg per day, respectively. Administration of ASP-440 initiated 2 weeks after the onset of diabetes ameliorated both RVP and retinal blood flow abnormalities in diabetic rats measured at 4 weeks’ diabetes duration. Intravitreal injection of C1-INH similarly decreased impaired RVP in rats with 2 weeks’ diabetes duration. Intravitreal injection of PK increased both acute RVP and sustained focal RVP (24 h postinjection) to a greater extent in diabetic rats compared with nondiabetic control rats. Intravitreal injection of PK increased retinal thickness compared with baseline to a greater extent (P = 0.017) in diabetic rats (from 193 ± 10 μm to 223 ± 13 μm) compared with nondiabetic rats (from 182 ± 8 μm to 193 ± 9 μm). CONCLUSIONS These results show that PK contributes to retinal vascular dysfunctions in diabetic rats and that the combination of diabetes and intravitreal injection of PK in rats induces retinal thickening. PMID:21444925

  12. Hindlimb Suspension as a Model to Study Ophthalmic Complications in Microgravity Status Report: Optimization of Rat Retina Flat Mounts Staining to Study Vascular Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theriot, Corey A.; Zanello, Susana B.

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary data from a prior tissue-sharing experiment has suggested that early growth response protein-1 (Egr1), a transcription factor involved in various stress responses in the vasculature, is induced in the rat retina after 14 days of hindlimb suspension (HS) and may be evidence that mechanical stress is occurring secondary to the cephalad fluid shift. This mechanical stress could cause changes in oxygenation of the retina, and the subsequent ischemia- or inflammation-driven hypoxia may lead to microvascular remodeling. This microvascular remodeling process can be studied using image analysis of retinal vessels and can be then be quantified by the VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software, a computational tool that quantifies remodeling patterns of branching vascular trees and capillary or vasculogenic networks. Our project investigates whether rodent HS is a valid model to study the effects of simulated-weightlessness on ocular structures and their relationship with intracranial pressure (ICP). One of the hypotheses to be tested is that HS-induced cephalad fluid shift is accompanied by vascular engorgement that produces changes in retinal oxygenation, leading to oxidative stress, hypoxia, microvascular remodeling, and cellular degeneration. We have optimized the procedure to obtain flat mounts of rat retina, staining of the endothelial lining in vasculature and acquisition of high quality images suitable for VESGEN analysis. Briefly, eyes were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde for 24 hours and retinas were detached and then mounted flat on microscope slides. The microvascular staining was done with endothelial cell-specific isolectin binding, coupled to Alexa-488 fluorophore. Image acquisition at low magnification and high resolution was performed using a new Leica SP8 confocal microscope in a tile pattern across the X,Y plane and multiple sections along the Z-axis. This new confocal microscope has the added capability of dye separation using the Linear

  13. Potential for Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Rift Valley Fever Virus Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Gerhardt, Shoshana; Muiruri, Samuel; Muchiri, Eric; Peters, Clarence J.; Morrill, John; Lucas, Alexander H.; King, Charles H.; Kazura, James; LaBeaud, Angelle Desiree

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a significant threat to human health because it can progress to retinitis, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever. The timing of onset of Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) retinitis suggests an autoimmune origin. To determine whether RVFV retinitis is associated with increased levels of IgG against retinal tissue, we measured and compared levels of IgG against healthy human eye tissue by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that serum samples from RVFV-exposed Kenyans with retinitis (n = 8) were slightly more likely to have antibodies against retinal tissue than control populations, but the correlation was not statistically significant. Further investigation into the possible immune pathogenesis of RVFV retinitis could lead to improved therapies to prevent or treat this severe complication. PMID:23918215

  14. An Unusual Case of Extensive Lattice Degeneration and Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Saurabh Kumar; Basaiawmoit, Jennifer V.

    2016-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is not infrequently encountered on a dilated retinal examination and many of them do not need any intervention. We report a case of atypical lattice degeneration variant with peripheral retinal detachment. An asymptomatic 35-year-old lady with minimal refractive error was found to have extensive lattice degeneration, peripheral retinal detachment and fibrotic changes peripherally with elevation of retinal vessels on dilated retinal examination. There were also areas of white without pressure, chorioretinal scarring and retinal breaks. All the changes were limited to beyond the equator but were found to span 360 degrees. She was treated with barrage laser all around to prevent extension of the retinal detachment posteriorly. She remained stable till her latest follow-up two years after the barrage laser. This case is reported for its rarity with a discussion of the probable differential diagnoses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such findings in lattice degeneration.

  15. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  16. Deficiency in the metabolite receptor SUCNR1 (GPR91) leads to outer retinal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lapalme, Eric; Leboeuf, Dominique; Carbadillo, Jose; Rubic, Tina; Picard, Emilie; Mawambo, Gaelle; Tetreault, Nicolas; Joyal, Jean-Sebastien; Chemtob, Sylvain; Sennlaub, Florian; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Guimond, Martin; Sapieha, Przemyslaw

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prominent cause of blindness in the Western world. To date, its molecular pathogenesis as well as the sequence of events leading to retinal degeneration remain largely ill-defined. While the invasion of choroidal neovasculature in the retina is the primary mechanism that precipitates loss of sight, an earlier dry form may accompany it. Here we provide the first evidence for the protective role of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE)-resident metabolite receptor, succinate receptor 1 (SUCNR1; G-Protein coupled Receptor-91 (GPR91), in preventing dry AMD-like lesions of the outer retina. Genetic analysis of 925 patients with geographic atrophy and 1199 AMD-free peers revealed an increased risk of developing geographic atrophy associated with intronic variants in the SUCNR1 gene. In mice, outer retinal expression of SUCNR1 is observed in the RPE as well as microglial cells and decreases progressively with age. Accordingly, Sucnr1−/− mice show signs of premature sub-retinal dystrophy with accumulation of oxidized-LDL, abnormal thickening of Bruch's membrane and a buildup of subretinal microglia. The accumulation of microglia in Sucnr1-deficient mice is likely triggered by the inefficient clearance of oxidized lipids by the RPE as bone marrow transfer of wild-type microglia into Sucnr1−/− mice did not salvage the patho-phenotype and systemic lipolysis was equivalent between wild-type and control mice. Our findings suggest that deficiency in SUCNR1 is a possible contributing factor to the pathogenesis of dry AMD and thus broaden our understanding of this clinically unmet need. PMID:23833031

  17. Progressive Degeneration of Retinal and Superior Collicular Functions in Mice With Sustained Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Mingna; Feng, Liang; Puyang, Zhen; Yi, Ji; Liang, Peiji; Zhang, Hao F.; Cang, Jianhua; Troy, John B.; Liu, Xiaorong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We investigated the progressive degeneration of retinal and superior collicular functions in a mouse model of sustained ocular hypertension. Methods. Focal laser illumination and injection of polystyrene microbeads were used to induce chronic ocular hypertension. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss was characterized by in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) and immunohistochemistry. Retinal dysfunction was also monitored by the full-field ERG. Retinal ganglion cell light responses were recorded using a 256-channel multielectrode array (MEA), and RGC subtypes were characterized by noncentered spike-triggered covariance (STC-NC) analysis. Single-unit extracellular recordings from superficial layers of the superior colliculus (SC) were performed to examine the receptive field (RF) properties of SC neurons. Results. The elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) lasted 4 months in mice treated with a combination of laser photocoagulation and microbead injection. Progressive RGC loss and functional degeneration were confirmed in ocular hypertensive (OHT) mice. These mice had fewer visually responsive RGCs than controls. Using the STC-NC analysis, we classified RGCs into ON, OFF, and ON-OFF functional subtypes. We showed that ON and OFF RGCs were more susceptible to the IOP elevation than ON-OFF RGCs. Furthermore, SC neurons of OHT mice had weakened responses to visual stimulation and exhibited mismatched ON and OFF subfields and irregular RF structure. Conclusions. We demonstrated that the functional degeneration of RGCs is subtype-dependent and that the ON and OFF pathways from the retina to the SC were disrupted. Our study provides a foundation to investigate the mechanisms underlying the progressive vision loss in experimental glaucoma. PMID:25722210

  18. Matrix Remodeling in Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Tejaswini; O'Reilly, Philip; Antony, Veena B; Gaggar, Amit; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema are chronic lung diseases characterized by a progressive decline in lung function, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. A hallmark of these diseases is recurrent or persistent alveolar epithelial injury, typically caused by common environmental exposures such as cigarette smoke. We propose that critical determinants of the outcome of the injury-repair processes that result in fibrosis versus emphysema are mesenchymal cell fate and associated extracellular matrix dynamics. In this review, we explore the concept that regulation of mesenchymal cells under the influence of soluble factors, in particular transforming growth factor-β1, and the extracellular matrix determine the divergent tissue remodeling responses seen in pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. PMID:26741177

  19. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted all the peroxidase substrates in the cell wall. If ROS-levels remain high during prolonged stress, OH°-radicals are formed which lead to polymer cleavage. In concert with xyloglucan modifying enzymes and expansins, the resulting cell wall loosening allows further growth of stressed organs. PMID:25709610

  20. Osteocytes: The master cells in bone remodelling.

    PubMed

    Prideaux, Matthew; Findlay, David M; Atkins, Gerald J

    2016-06-01

    Bone remodelling is an essential process for shaping and maintaining bone mass in the mature skeleton. During our lifetime bone is constantly being removed by osteoclasts and new bone is formed by osteoblasts. The activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts must be regulated under a strict balance to ensure that bone homeostasis is maintained. Osteocytes, which form an extensive, multi-functional syncytium throughout the bone, are increasingly considered to be the cells that maintain this balance. Current research is elucidating key signalling pathways by which the osteocyte exerts control over the other cell types in bone and over its own activities, and potential ways in which these pathways may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:26927500

  1. Bone Remodeling and Energy Metabolism: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Francisco J. A.; Rosen, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone mineral, adipose tissue and energy metabolism are interconnected by a complex and multilevel series of networks. Calcium and phosphorus are utilized for insulin secretion and synthesis of high energy compounds. Adipose tissue store lipids and cholecalciferol, which, in turn, can influence calcium balance and energy expenditure. Hormones long-thought to solely modulate energy and mineral homeostasis may influence adipocytic function. Osteoblasts are a target of insulin action in bone. Moreover, endocrine mediators, such as osteocalcin, are synthesized in the skeleton but regulate carbohydrate disposal and insulin secretion. Finally, osteoblasts and adipocytes originate from the same mesenchymal progenitor. The mutual crosstalk between osteoblasts and adipocytes within the bone marrow microenvironment plays a crucial role in bone remodeling. In the present review we provide an overview of the reciprocal control between bone and energy metabolism and its clinical implications. PMID:26273493

  2. Triggers and Anatomical Substrates in the Genesis and Perpetuation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; López-Mínguez, José Ramón; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Murillo, Margarita; Cabrera, José Angel

    2012-01-01

    The definition of atrial fibrillation (AF) as a functional electrical disorder does not reflect the significant underlying structural abnormalities. Atrial and Pulmonary Vein (PV) muscle sleeve microstructural remodeling is present, and establishes a vulnerable substrate for AF maintenance. In spite of an incomplete understanding of the anatomo-functional basis for AF, current evidence demonstrates that this arrhythmia usually requires a trigger for initiation and a vulnerable electrophysiological and/or anatomical substrate for maintenance. It is still unclear whether the trigger mechanisms include focal enhanced automaticity, triggered activity and/or micro re-entry from myocardial tissue. Initiation of AF can be favored by both parasympathetic and sympathetic stimulation, which also seem to play a role in maintaining AF. Finally, evolving clinical evidence demonstrates that inflammation is associated with new-onset and recurrent AF through a mechanism that possibly involves cellular degeneration, apoptosis, and subsequent atrial fibrosis. PMID:22920484

  3. Retinal topography maps in R: New tools for the analysis and visualization of spatial retinal data

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Brian A.; Collin, Shaun P.; Wainwright, Peter C.; Schmitz, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Retinal topography maps are a widely used tool in vision science, neuroscience, and visual ecology, providing an informative visualization of the spatial distribution of cell densities across the retinal hemisphere. Here, we introduce Retina, an R package for computational mapping, inspection of topographic model fits, and generation of average maps. Functions in Retina take cell count data obtained from retinal wholemounts using stereology software. Accurate visualizations and comparisons between different eyes have been difficult in the past, because of deformation and incisions of retinal wholemounts. We account for these issues by incorporation of the R package Retistruct, which results in a retrodeformation of the wholemount into a hemispherical shape, similar to the original eyecup. The maps are generated by thin plate splines, after the data were transformed into a two-dimensional space with an azimuthal equidistant plot projection. Retina users can compute retinal topography maps independent of stereology software choice and assess model fits with a variety of diagnostic plots. Functionality of Retina also includes species average maps, an essential feature for interspecific analyses. The Retina package will facilitate rigorous comparative studies in visual ecology by providing a robust quantitative approach to generate retinal topography maps. PMID:26230981

  4. Reactive retinal microglia, neuronal survival and the formation of retinal folds and detachments

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andy J.; Zelinka, Christopher; Milani-Nejad, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Reactive microglia and macrophages are prevalent in damaged retinas. Accordingly, we investigate how the activation or ablation of microglia/macrophages influences the survival of neurons in the chick retina in vivo. We applied intraocular injections of interleukin 6 (IL6) to stimulate the reactivity of microglia/macrophages and clodronate-liposomes to ablate microglia/macrophages. Activation of the microglia/macrophages with IL6 delays the death of retinal neurons from N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) -induced excitotoxicity. In addition, activation of microglia/macrophages combined with colchicine-mediated retinal damage diminished the survival of ganglion cells. Application of IL6 after an excitotoxic insult greatly exacerbates the damage, and causes widespread retinal detachments and folds, accompanied by accumulation of microglia/macrophages in the subretinal space. Damage-induced retinal folds and detachments were significantly reduced by the ablation of microglia/macrophages. We conclude that microglial reactivity is detrimental to the survival of ganglion cells in colchicine-damaged retinas and detrimental to the survival of photoreceptors in retinal folds. In addition, we conclude that IL6-treatment transiently protects amacrine and bipolar cells against an excitotoxic insult. We propose that suppressing reactivity of microglia/macrophages may be an effective means to lessen the damage and vision loss resulting from damage, in particular during retinal detachment injuries. PMID:25231952

  5. Relation of retinal blood flow and retinal oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker

    PubMed Central

    Palkovits, Stefan; Lasta, Michael; Told, Reinhard; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral and retinal blood flow are dependent on local neuronal activity. Several studies quantified the increase in cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during activity. In the present study we investigated the relation between changes in retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker and the influence of breathing gas mixtures with different fractions of O2 (FiO2; 100% 15% and 12%). Twenty-four healthy subjects were included. Retinal blood flow was studied by combining measurement of vessel diameters using the Dynamic Vessel Analyser with measurements of blood velocity using laser Doppler velocimetry. Oxygen saturation was measured using spectroscopic reflectometry and oxygen extraction was calculated. Flicker stimulation increased retinal blood flow (57.7 ± 17.8%) and oxygen extraction (34.6 ± 24.1%; p < 0.001 each). During 100% oxygen breathing the response of retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction was increased (p < 0.01 each). By contrast, breathing gas mixtures with 12% and 15% FiO2 did not alter flicker–induced retinal haemodynamic changes. The present study indicates that at a comparable increase in blood flow the increase in oxygen extraction in the retina is larger than in the brain. During systemic hyperoxia the blood flow and oxygen extraction responses to neural stimulation are augmented. The underlying mechanism is unknown. PMID:26672758

  6. Relation of retinal blood flow and retinal oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Stefan; Lasta, Michael; Told, Reinhard; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral and retinal blood flow are dependent on local neuronal activity. Several studies quantified the increase in cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during activity. In the present study we investigated the relation between changes in retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker and the influence of breathing gas mixtures with different fractions of O2 (FiO2; 100% 15% and 12%). Twenty-four healthy subjects were included. Retinal blood flow was studied by combining measurement of vessel diameters using the Dynamic Vessel Analyser with measurements of blood velocity using laser Doppler velocimetry. Oxygen saturation was measured using spectroscopic reflectometry and oxygen extraction was calculated. Flicker stimulation increased retinal blood flow (57.7 ± 17.8%) and oxygen extraction (34.6 ± 24.1%; p < 0.001 each). During 100% oxygen breathing the response of retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction was increased (p < 0.01 each). By contrast, breathing gas mixtures with 12% and 15% FiO2 did not alter flicker-induced retinal haemodynamic changes. The present study indicates that at a comparable increase in blood flow the increase in oxygen extraction in the retina is larger than in the brain. During systemic hyperoxia the blood flow and oxygen extraction responses to neural stimulation are augmented. The underlying mechanism is unknown. PMID:26672758

  7. Laser-induced retinal damage thresholds for annular retinal beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Paul K.; Zuclich, Joseph A.; Lund, David J.; Edsall, Peter R.; Till, Stephen; Stuck, Bruce E.; Hollins, Richard C.

    2004-07-01

    The dependence of retinal damage thresholds on laser spot size, for annular retinal beam profiles, was measured in vivo for 3 μs, 590 nm pulses from a flashlamp-pumped dye laser. Minimum Visible Lesion (MVL)ED50 thresholds in rhesus were measured for annular retinal beam profiles covering 5, 10, and 20 mrad of visual field; which correspond to outer beam diameters of roughly 70, 160, and 300 μm, respectively, on the primate retina. Annular beam profiles at the retinal plane were achieved using a telescopic imaging system, with the focal properties of the eye represented as an equivalent thin lens, and all annular beam profiles had a 37% central obscuration. As a check on experimental data, theoretical MVL-ED50 thresholds for annular beam exposures were calculated using the Thompson-Gerstman granular model of laser-induced thermal damage to the retina. Threshold calculations were performed for the three experimental beam diameters and for an intermediate case with an outer beam diameter of 230 μm. Results indicate that the threshold vs. spot size trends, for annular beams, are similar to the trends for top hat beams determined in a previous study; i.e., the threshold dose varies with the retinal image area for larger image sizes. The model correctly predicts the threshold vs. spot size trends seen in the biological data, for both annular and top hat retinal beam profiles.

  8. Aerobic exercise protects retinal function and structure from light-induced retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Eric C; Han, Moon K; Sellers, Jana T; Chrenek, Micah A; Hanif, Adam; Gogniat, Marissa A; Boatright, Jeffrey H; Pardue, Machelle T

    2014-02-12

    Aerobic exercise is a common intervention for rehabilitation of motor, and more recently, cognitive function (Intlekofer and Cotman, 2013; Wood et al., 2012). While the underlying mechanisms are complex, BDNF may mediate much of the beneficial effects of exercise to these neurons (Ploughman et al., 2007; Griffin et al., 2011; Real et al., 2013). We studied the effects of aerobic exercise on retinal neurons undergoing degeneration. We exercised wild-type BALB/c mice on a treadmill (10 m/min for 1 h) for 5 d/week or placed control mice on static treadmills. After 2 weeks of exercise, mice were exposed to either toxic bright light (10,000 lux) for 4 h to induce photoreceptor degeneration or maintenance dim light (25 lux). Bright light caused 75% loss of both retinal function and photoreceptor numbers. However, exercised mice exposed to bright light had 2 times greater retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei than inactive mice exposed to bright light. In addition, exercise increased retinal BDNF protein levels by 20% compared with inactive mice. Systemic injections of a BDNF tropomyosin-receptor-kinase (TrkB) receptor antagonist reduced retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei counts in exercised mice to inactive levels, effectively blocking the protective effects seen with aerobic exercise. The data suggest that aerobic exercise is neuroprotective for retinal degeneration and that this effect is mediated by BDNF signaling. PMID:24523530

  9. The genomic response of the retinal pigment epithelium to light damage and retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Rattner, Amir; Toulabi, Leila; Williams, John; Yu, Huimin; Nathans, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an essential role in maintaining the health of the retina. The RPE is also the site of pathologic processes in a wide variety of retinal disorders including monogenic retinal dystrophies, age-related macular degeneration, and retinal detachment. Despite intense interest in the RPE, little is known about its molecular response to ocular damage or disease. We have conducted a comprehensive analysis of changes in transcript abundance (the “genomic response”) in the murine RPE following light damage. Several dozen transcripts, many related to cell-cell signaling, show significant increases in abundance in response to bright light; transcripts encoding visual cycle proteins show a decrease in abundance. Similar changes are induced by retinal detachment. Environmental and genetic perturbations that modulate the RPE response to bright light suggest that this response is controlled by the retina. In contrast to the response to bright light, the RPE response to retinal detachment over-rides these modulatory affects. PMID:18815272

  10. Effect of cadmium chloride on the distal retinal pigment cells of the fiddler crab, Uca pugilator

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P.S.; Fingerman, M.; Nguyen, L.K.; Obih, P.

    1997-03-01

    Crustaceans have two sets of pigmentary effectors, chromatophores and retinal pigment cells. Retinal pigments control the amount of light striking the rhabdom, the photosensitive portion of each ommatidium, screening the rhabdom in bright light and uncovering it in darkness or dim light. Migration of the distal pigment in the fiddler crab, Uca pugilalor, is regulated by a light-adapting hormone and a dark-adapting hormone. The black chromatophores of this crab are also controlled by a pair of hormones. Both pigmentary effectors exhibit circadian rhythms. The effects of some organic and inorganic pollutants on the ability of Uca pugilator to change color have been described. Exposure of this crab to naphthalene or cadmium results in decreased ability to disperse the pigment in their black chromatophores, the exposed crabs becoming paler than the unexposed crabs. Norepinephrine triggers release of both the black pigment-dispersing hormone and the light-adapting hormone. In view of the facts that (a) these hormones which regulate the black chromatophores and distal pigment are synthesized in and released from the eyestalk neuroendocrine complex, (b) the black pigment-dispersing hormone and the light-adapting hormone may actually be the same hormone. having two different activities and (c) release of both the black pigment-dispersing hormone and the light-adapting hormone is triggered by norepinephrine, the present investigation was carried out to determine the effect of cadmium on distal pigment migration in Uca pugilator. More specifically, for comparison with the previously reported effect of cadmium on pigment migration in the black chromatophores, we wished to determine whether the distal pigment of fiddler crabs exposed to cadmium chloride is capable of as wide a range of movement as in unexposed crabs, and if not what might be the explanation. This is the first report of the effect of a pollutant on a retinal pigment of any crustacean. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. PNPLA3 mediates hepatocyte triacylglycerol remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ruhanen, Hanna; Perttilä, Julia; Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Zhou, You; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Ikonen, Elina; Käkelä, Reijo; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2014-04-01

    The I148M substitution in patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3(I148M)) determines a genetic form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. To elucidate the mode of PNPLA3 action in human hepatocytes, we studied effects of WT PNPLA3 (PNPLA3(WT)) and PNPLA3(I148M) on HuH7 cell lipidome after [(13)C]glycerol labeling, cellular turnover of oleic acid labeled with 17 deuterium atoms ([D17]oleic acid) in triacylglycerols (TAGs), and subcellular distribution of the protein variants. PNPLA3(I148M) induced a net accumulation of unlabeled TAGs, but not newly synthesized total [(13)C]TAGs. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that both PNPLA3(WT) and PNPLA3(I148M) induced a relative enrichment of TAGs with saturated FAs or MUFAs, with concurrent enrichment of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. PNPLA3(WT) associated in PCA with newly synthesized [(13)C]TAGs, particularly 52:1 and 50:1, while PNPLA3(I148M) associated with similar preexisting TAGs. PNPLA3(WT) overexpression resulted in increased [D17]oleic acid labeling of TAGs during 24 h, and after longer incubations their turnover was accelerated, effects not detected with PNPLA3(I148M). PNPLA3(I148M) localized more extensively to lipid droplets (LDs) than PNPLA3(WT), suggesting that the substitution alters distribution of PNPLA3 between LDs and endoplasmic reticulum/cytosol. This study reveals a function of PNPLA3 in FA-selective TAG remodeling, resulting in increased TAG saturation. A defect in TAG remodeling activity likely contributes to the TAG accumulation observed in cells expressing PNPLA3(I148M). PMID:24511104

  12. Nonautonomous Apoptosis Is Triggered by Local Cell Cycle Progression during Epithelial Replacement in Drosophila ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yu-ichiro; Kuranaga, Erina; Sugimura, Kaoru; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Miura, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Tissue remodeling involves collective cell movement, and cell proliferation and apoptosis are observed in both development and disease. Apoptosis and proliferation are considered to be closely correlated, but little is known about their coordinated regulation in physiological tissue remodeling in vivo. The replacement of larval abdominal epidermis with adult epithelium in Drosophila pupae is a simple model of tissue remodeling. During this process, larval epidermal cells (LECs) undergo apoptosis and are replaced by histoblasts, which are adult precursor cells. By analyzing caspase activation at the single-cell level in living pupae, we found that caspase activation in LECs is induced at the LEC/histoblast boundary, which expands as the LECs die. Manipulating histoblast proliferation at the LEC/histoblast boundary, either genetically or by UV illumination, indicated that local interactions with proliferating histoblasts triggered caspase activation in the boundary LECs. Finally, by monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of the S/G2/M phase in histoblasts in vivo, we found that the transition from S/G2 phases is necessary to induce nonautonomous LEC apoptosis at the LEC/histoblast boundary. The replacement boundary, formed as caspase activation is regulated locally by cell-cell communication, may drive the dynamic orchestration of cell replacement during tissue remodeling. PMID:21482673

  13. A Psychophysical Test for Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Thomas R; Mancini, Michael

    A new test designed to detect an hereditary eye disease called retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is described. This condition is revealed by pigmentation in the retina, but early diagnosis is difficult because the symptoms are subtle, and since it is genetically recessive it frequently occurs in families with no history of early blindness. In many cases…

  14. The Retinitis Pigmentosa Student: Selected Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Franklin N.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic features of RP (retinitis pigmentosa-an untreatable conditions usually resulting in night blindness) are discussed and functioning considerations in the classroom (including the use of protective devices and mobility aids) are noted. Classroom modifications such as darklined paper and black pens are suggested. (CL)

  15. Unsupervised Retinal Vessel Segmentation Using Combined Filters

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Wendeson S.; Teixeira, Joyce Vitor; Ren, Tsang Ing; Cavalcanti, George D. C.; Sijbers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Image segmentation of retinal blood vessels is a process that can help to predict and diagnose cardiovascular related diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, which are known to affect the retinal blood vessels’ appearance. This work proposes an unsupervised method for the segmentation of retinal vessels images using a combined matched filter, Frangi’s filter and Gabor Wavelet filter to enhance the images. The combination of these three filters in order to improve the segmentation is the main motivation of this work. We investigate two approaches to perform the filter combination: weighted mean and median ranking. Segmentation methods are tested after the vessel enhancement. Enhanced images with median ranking are segmented using a simple threshold criterion. Two segmentation procedures are applied when considering enhanced retinal images using the weighted mean approach. The first method is based on deformable models and the second uses fuzzy C-means for the image segmentation. The procedure is evaluated using two public image databases, Drive and Stare. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods perform well for vessel segmentation in comparison with state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26919587

  16. Unsupervised Retinal Vessel Segmentation Using Combined Filters.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Wendeson S; Teixeira, Joyce Vitor; Ren, Tsang Ing; Cavalcanti, George D C; Sijbers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Image segmentation of retinal blood vessels is a process that can help to predict and diagnose cardiovascular related diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, which are known to affect the retinal blood vessels' appearance. This work proposes an unsupervised method for the segmentation of retinal vessels images using a combined matched filter, Frangi's filter and Gabor Wavelet filter to enhance the images. The combination of these three filters in order to improve the segmentation is the main motivation of this work. We investigate two approaches to perform the filter combination: weighted mean and median ranking. Segmentation methods are tested after the vessel enhancement. Enhanced images with median ranking are segmented using a simple threshold criterion. Two segmentation procedures are applied when considering enhanced retinal images using the weighted mean approach. The first method is based on deformable models and the second uses fuzzy C-means for the image segmentation. The procedure is evaluated using two public image databases, Drive and Stare. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods perform well for vessel segmentation in comparison with state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26919587

  17. CERKL Knockdown Causes Retinal Degeneration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Marina; Burguera, Demian; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2013-01-01

    The human CERKL gene is responsible for common and severe forms of retinal dystrophies. Despite intense in vitro studies at the molecular and cellular level and in vivo analyses of the retina of murine knockout models, CERKL function remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to approach the developmental and functional features of cerkl in Danio rerio within an Evo-Devo framework. We show that gene expression increases from early developmental stages until the formation of the retina in the optic cup. Unlike the high mRNA-CERKL isoform multiplicity shown in mammals, the moderate transcriptional complexity in fish facilitates phenotypic studies derived from gene silencing. Moreover, of relevance to pathogenicity, teleost CERKL shares the two main human protein isoforms. Morpholino injection has been used to generate a cerkl knockdown zebrafish model. The morphant phenotype results in abnormal eye development with lamination defects, failure to develop photoreceptor outer segments, increased apoptosis of retinal cells and small eyes. Our data support that zebrafish Cerkl does not interfere with proliferation and neural differentiation during early developmental stages but is relevant for survival and protection of the retinal tissue. Overall, we propose that this zebrafish model is a powerful tool to unveil CERKL contribution to human retinal degeneration. PMID:23671706

  18. Changes in ganglion cells during retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Saha, Susmita; Greferath, Ursula; Vessey, Kirstan A; Grayden, David B; Burkitt, Anthony N; Fletcher, Erica L

    2016-08-01

    Inherited retinal degeneration such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is associated with photoreceptor loss and concomitant morphological and functional changes in the inner retina. It is not known whether these changes are associated with changes in the density and distribution of synaptic inputs to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). We quantified changes in ganglion cell density in rd1 and age-matched C57BL/6J-(wildtype, WT) mice using the immunocytochemical marker, RBPMS. Our data revealed that following complete loss of photoreceptors, (∼3months of age), there was a reduction in ganglion cell density in the peripheral retina. We next examined changes in synaptic inputs to A type ganglion cells by performing double labeling experiments in mice with the ganglion cell reporter lines, rd1-Thy1 and age-matched wildtype-Thy1. Ribbon synapses were identified by co-labelling with CtBP2 (RIBEYE) and conventional synapses with the clustering molecule, gephyrin. ON RGCs showed a significant reduction in RIBEYE-immunoreactive synapse density while OFF RGCs showed a significant reduction in the gephyrin-immmunoreactive synapse density. Distribution patterns of both synaptic markers across the dendritic trees of RGCs were unchanged. The change in synaptic inputs to RGCs was associated with a reduction in the number of immunolabeled rod bipolar and ON cone bipolar cells. These results suggest that functional changes reported in ganglion cells during retinal degeneration could be attributed to loss of synaptic inputs. PMID:27132232

  19. Connexin43 in retinal injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; Zhang, Jie; Acosta, Monica L; Rupenthal, Ilva D; Green, Colin R

    2016-03-01

    Gap junctions are specialized cell-to-cell contacts that allow the direct transfer of small molecules between cells. A single gap junction channel consists of two hemichannels, or connexons, each of which is composed of six connexin protein subunits. Connexin43 is the most ubiquitously expressed isoform of the connexin family and in the retina it is prevalent in astrocytes, Müller cells, microglia, retinal pigment epithelium and endothelial cells. Prior to docking with a neighboring cell, Connexin43 hemichannels have a low open probability as open channels constitute a large, relatively non-specific membrane pore. However, with injury and disease Connexin43 upregulation and hemichannel opening has been implicated in all aspects of secondary damage, especially glial cell activation, edema and loss of vascular integrity, leading to neuronal death. We here review gap junctions and their roles in the retina, and then focus in on Connexin43 gap junction channels in injury and disease. In particular, the effect of pathological opening of gap junction hemichannels is described, and hemichannel mediated loss of vascular integrity explained. This latter phenomenon underlies retinal pigment epithelium loss and is a common feature in several retinal diseases. Finally, Connexin43 channel roles in a number of retinal diseases including macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy are considered, along with results from related animal models. A final section describes gap junction channel modulation and the ocular delivery of potential therapeutic molecules. PMID:26432657

  20. a Review of Retinal Prosthesis Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kien, Tran Trung; Maul, Tomas; Bargiela, Andrzej

    Age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa are two of the most common diseases that cause degeneration in the outer retina, which can lead to several visual impairments up to blindness. Vision restoration is an important goal for which several different research approaches are currently being pursued. We are concerned with restoration via retinal prosthetic devices. Prostheses can be implemented intraocularly and extraocularly, which leads to different categories of devices. Cortical Prostheses and Optic Nerve Prostheses are examples of extraocular solutions while Epiretinal Prostheses and Subretinal Prostheses are examples of intraocular solutions. Some of the prostheses that are successfully implanted and tested in animals as well as humans can restore basic visual functions but still have limitations. This paper will give an overview of the current state of art of Retinal Prostheses and compare the advantages and limitations of each type. The purpose of this review is thus to summarize the current technologies and approaches used in developing Retinal Prostheses and therefore to lay a foundation for future designs and research directions.

  1. Nanoengineering of therapeutics for retinal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gahlaut, Nivriti; Suarez, Sandra; Uddin, Md Imam; Gordon, Andrew Y; Evans, Stephanie M; Jayagopal, Ashwath

    2015-09-01

    Retinal vascular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, neovascular age related macular degeneration, and retinal vein occlusion, are leading causes of blindness in the Western world. These diseases share several common disease mechanisms, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, hypoxia, and inflammation, which provide opportunities for common therapeutic strategies. Treatment of these diseases using laser therapy, anti-VEGF injections, and/or steroids has significantly improved clinical outcomes. However, these strategies do not address the underlying root causes of pathology, and may have deleterious side effects. Furthermore, many patients continue to progress toward legal blindness despite receiving regular therapy. Nanomedicine, the engineering of therapeutics at the 1-100 nm scale, is a promising approach for improving clinical management of retinal vascular diseases. Nanomedicine-based technologies have the potential to revolutionize the treatment of ophthalmology, through enabling sustained release of drugs over several months, reducing side effects due to specific targeting of dysfunctional cells, and interfacing with currently "undruggable" targets. We will discuss emerging nanomedicine-based applications for the treatment of complications associated with retinal vascular diseases, including angiogenesis and inflammation. PMID:26022642

  2. Retinal Oscillations Carry Visual Information to Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Koepsell, Kilian; Wang, Xin; Vaingankar, Vishal; Wei, Yichun; Wang, Qingbo; Rathbun, Daniel L.; Usrey, W. Martin; Hirsch, Judith A.; Sommer, Friedrich T.

    2009-01-01

    Thalamic relay cells fire action potentials that transmit information from retina to cortex. The amount of information that spike trains encode is usually estimated from the precision of spike timing with respect to the stimulus. Sensory input, however, is only one factor that influences neural activity. For example, intrinsic dynamics, such as oscillations of networks of neurons, also modulate firing pattern. Here, we asked if retinal oscillations might help to convey information to neurons downstream. Specifically, we made whole-cell recordings from relay cells to reveal retinal inputs (EPSPs) and thalamic outputs (spikes) and then analyzed these events with information theory. Our results show that thalamic spike trains operate as two multiplexed channels. One channel, which occupies a low frequency band (<30 Hz), is encoded by average firing rate with respect to the stimulus and carries information about local changes in the visual field over time. The other operates in the gamma frequency band (40–80 Hz) and is encoded by spike timing relative to retinal oscillations. At times, the second channel conveyed even more information than the first. Because retinal oscillations involve extensive networks of ganglion cells, it is likely that the second channel transmits information about global features of the visual scene. PMID:19404487

  3. Retinal pigment epithelial hamartoma--unusual manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, P. R.; Walsh, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    Hamartoma of the retinal pigment epithelium is an uncommon tumour of young adults. We have seen 2 patients with this clinical diagnosis, both with unusual manifestations. In one patient growth of the tumour was observed over a 5-year period. In the second patient arterial-arterial anastomoses were detected at a site distal to the tumour. Images PMID:6722077

  4. Retinal Imaging Techniques for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening.

    PubMed

    Goh, James Kang Hao; Cheung, Carol Y; Sim, Shaun Sebastian; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-03-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, demand for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening platforms is steeply increasing. Early detection and treatment of DR are key public health interventions that can greatly reduce the likelihood of vision loss. Current DR screening programs typically employ retinal fundus photography, which relies on skilled readers for manual DR assessment. However, this is labor-intensive and suffers from inconsistency across sites. Hence, there has been a recent proliferation of automated retinal image analysis software that may potentially alleviate this burden cost-effectively. Furthermore, current screening programs based on 2-dimensional fundus photography do not effectively screen for diabetic macular edema (DME). Optical coherence tomography is becoming increasingly recognized as the reference standard for DME assessment and can potentially provide a cost-effective solution for improving DME detection in large-scale DR screening programs. Current screening techniques are also unable to image the peripheral retina and require pharmacological pupil dilation; ultra-widefield imaging and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, which address these drawbacks, possess great potential. In this review, we summarize the current DR screening methods using various retinal imaging techniques, and also outline future possibilities. Advances in retinal imaging techniques can potentially transform the management of patients with diabetes, providing savings in health care costs and resources. PMID:26830491

  5. Prospectives for Gene Therapy of Retinal Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Thumann, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Retinal degenerations encompass a large number of diseases in which the retina and associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells progressively degenerate leading to severe visual disorders or blindness. Retinal degenerations can be divided into two groups, a group in which the defect has been linked to a specific gene and a second group that has a complex etiology that includes environmental and genetic influences. The first group encompasses a number of relatively rare diseases with the most prevalent being Retinitis pigmentosa that affects approximately 1 million individuals worldwide. Attempts have been made to correct the defective gene by transfecting the appropriate cells with the wild-type gene and while these attempts have been successful in animal models, human gene therapy for these inherited retinal degenerations has only begun recently and the results are promising. To the second group belong glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). These retinal degenerations have a genetic component since they occur more often in families with affected probands but they are also linked to environmental factors, specifically elevated intraocular pressure, age and high blood sugar levels respectively. The economic and medical impact of these three diseases can be assessed by the number of individuals affected; AMD affects over 30 million, DR over 40 million and glaucoma over 65 million individuals worldwide. The basic defect in these diseases appears to be the relative lack of a neurogenic environment; the neovascularization that often accompanies these diseases has suggested that a decrease in pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), at least in part, may be responsible for the neurodegeneration since PEDF is not only an effective neurogenic and neuroprotective agent but also a potent inhibitor of neovascularization. In the last few years inhibitors of vascularization, especially antibodies against vascular endothelial cell

  6. The D0 upgrade trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Eno, S.

    1994-09-01

    The current trigger system for the D0 detector at Fermilab`s Tevatron will need to be upgraded when the Min Injector is installed and the Tevatron can operate at luminosities exceeding 10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and with a crossing time of 132 ns. We report on preliminary designs for upgrades to the trigger system for the Main Injector era.

  7. Cytomegalovirus retinitis after central retinal vein occlusion in a patient on systemic immunosuppression: does venooclusive disease predispose to cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients already at risk?

    PubMed Central

    Welling, John D; Tarabishy, Ahmad B; Christoforidis, John B

    2012-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis remains the most common opportunistic ocular infection in immunocompromised patients. Patients with immunocompromising diseases, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, inherited immunodeficiency states, malignancies, and those on systemic immunosuppressive therapy, are known to be at risk. Recently, it has been suggested that patients undergoing intravitreal injection of immunosuppressive agents may also be predisposed. One previous case report speculated that there may be an additional risk for CMV retinitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with venoocclusive disease. This case study presents a case of CMV retinitis following central retinal vein occlusion in a patient on systemic immunosuppressants. PMID:22570539

  8. Dye-Free Porcine Model of Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion: A Suitable Approach for Retinal Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen Cehofski, Lasse; Kruse, Anders; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Stensballe, Allan; Honoré, Bent; Vorum, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Branch retinal vein occlusion induces complex biological processes in the retina that are generated by a multitude of interacting proteins. These proteins and their posttranslational modifications can effectively be studied using modern proteomic techniques. However, no method for studying large-scale protein changes following branch retinal vein occlusion has been available until now. Obtainment of retinal tissue exposed to branch retinal vein occlusion is only available through experimental animal models. Traditional models of experimental branch retinal vein occlusion require the use of Rose Bengal dye combined with argon laser photocoagulation. The use of Rose Bengal dye is problematic in proteomic studies as the dye can induce multiple protein modifications when irradiated. This paper presents a novel technique for proteomic analysis of porcine retinal tissue with branch retinal vein occlusion combining a dye-free experimental model with label-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry based proteomics. PMID:26064675

  9. Adaptation to steady light by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Michael Tri Hoang; Yau, King-Wai

    2013-04-30

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are recently discovered photoreceptors in the mammalian eye. These photoreceptors mediate primarily nonimage visual functions, such as pupillary light reflex and circadian photoentrainment, which are generally expected to respond to the absolute light intensity. The classical rod and cone photoreceptors, on the other hand, mediate image vision by signaling contrast, accomplished by adaptation to light. Experiments by others have indicated that the ipRGCs do, in fact, light-adapt. We found the same but, in addition, have now quantified this light adaptation for the M1 ipRGC subtype. Interestingly, in incremental-flash-on-background experiments, the ipRGC's receptor current showed a flash sensitivity that adapted in background light according to the Weber-Fechner relation, well known to describe the adaptation behavior of rods and cones. Part of this light adaptation by ipRGCs appeared to be triggered by a Ca(2+) influx, in that the flash response elicited in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) showed a normal rising phase but a slower decay phase, resulting in longer time to peak and higher sensitivity. There is, additionally, a prominent Ca(2+)-independent component of light adaptation not typically seen in rods and cones or in invertebrate rhabdomeric photoreceptors. PMID:23589882

  10. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis: implant fabrication and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lele; Mathieson, K.; Kamins, T. I.; Loudin, J. D.; Galambos, L.; Goetz, G.; Sher, A.; Mandel, Y.; Huie, P.; Lavinsky, D.; Harris, J. S.; Palanker, D. V.

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and test a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis for restoring sight to patients blinded by degenerative retinal diseases. A silicon photodiode array for subretinal stimulation has been fabricated by a silicon-integrated-circuit/MEMS process. Each pixel in the two-dimensional array contains three series-connected photodiodes, which photovoltaically convert pulsed near-infrared light into bi-phasic current to stimulate nearby retinal neurons without wired power connections. The device thickness is chosen to be 30 µm to absorb a significant portion of light while still being thin enough for subretinal implantation. Active and return electrodes confine current near each pixel and are sputter coated with iridium oxide to enhance charge injection levels and provide a stable neural interface. Pixels are separated by 5 µm wide trenches to electrically isolate them and to allow nutrient diffusion through the device. Three sizes of pixels (280, 140 and 70 µm) with active electrodes of 80, 40 and 20 µm diameter were fabricated. The turn-on voltages of the one-diode, two-series-connected diode and three-series-connected diode structures are approximately 0.6, 1.2 and 1.8 V, respectively. The measured photo-responsivity per diode at 880 nm wavelength is ˜0.36 A W-1, at zero voltage bias and scales with the exposed silicon area. For all three pixel sizes, the reverse-bias dark current is sufficiently low (<100 pA) for our application. Pixels of all three sizes reliably elicit retinal responses at safe near-infrared light irradiances, with good acceptance of the photodiode array in the subretinal space. The fabricated device delivers efficient retinal stimulation at safe near-infrared light irradiances without any wired power connections, which greatly simplifies the implantation procedure. Presence of the return electrodes in each pixel helps to localize the current, and thereby improves resolution.

  11. Retinal and Choroidal Folds in Papilledema

    PubMed Central

    Sibony, Patrick A.; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Feldon, Steven E.; Wang, Jui-Kai; Garvin, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the frequency, patterns, associations, and biomechanical implications of retinal and choroidal folds in papilledema due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Methods Retinal and choroidal folds were studied in patients enrolled in the IIH Treatment Trial using fundus photography (n = 165 study eyes) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT; n = 125). We examined the association between folds and peripapillary shape, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, disc volume, Frisén grade, acuity, perimetric mean deviation, intraocular pressure, intracranial pressure, and refractive error. Results We identified three types of folds in IIH patients with papilledema: peripapillary wrinkles (PPW), retinal folds (RF), and choroidal folds (CF). Frequency, with photos, was 26%, 19%, and 1%, respectively; SD-OCT frequency was 46%, 47%, and 10%. At least one type of fold was present in 41% of patients with photos and 73% with SD-OCT. Spectral-domain OCT was more sensitive. Structural parameters related to the severity of papilledema were associated with PPW and RF, whereas anterior deformation of the peripapillary RPE/basement membrane layer was associated with CF and RF. Folds were not associated with vision loss at baseline. Conclusions Folds in papilledema are biomechanical signs of stress/strain on the optic nerve head and load-bearing structures induced by intracranial hypertension. Folds are best imaged with SD-OCT. The patterns of retinal and choroidal folds are the products of a complex interplay between the degree of papilledema and anterior deformation of the load-bearing structures (sclera and possibly the lamina cribrosa), both modulated by structural geometry and material properties of the optic nerve head. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:26335066

  12. Retinal image quality, reading and myopia.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael J; Buehren, Tobias; Iskander, D Robert

    2006-01-01

    Analysis was undertaken of the retinal image characteristics of the best-spectacle corrected eyes of progressing myopes (n = 20, mean age = 22 years; mean spherical equivalent = -3.84 D) and a control group of emmetropes (n = 20, mean age = 23 years; mean spherical equivalent = 0.00 D) before and after a 2h reading task. Retinal image quality was calculated based upon wavefront measurements taken with a Hartmann-Shack sensor with fixation on both a far (5.5 m) and near (individual reading distance) target. The visual Strehl ratio based on the optical transfer function (VSOTF) was significantly worse for the myopes prior to reading for both the far (p = 0.01) and near (p = 0.03) conditions. The myopic group showed significant reductions in various aspects of retinal image quality compared with the emmetropes, involving components of the modulation transfer function, phase transfer function and point spread function, often along the vertical meridian of the eye. The depth of focus of the myopes (0.54 D) was larger (p = 0.02) than the emmetropes (0.42 D) and the distribution of refractive power (away from optimal sphero-cylinder) was greater in the myopic eyes (variance of distributions p < 0.05). We found evidence that the lead and lag of accommodation are influenced by the higher order aberrations of the eye (e.g. significant correlations between lead/lag and the peak of the visual Strehl ratio based on the MTF). This could indicate that the higher accommodation lags seen in myopes are providing optimized retinal image characteristics. The interaction between low and high order aberrations of the eye play a significant role in reducing the retinal image quality of myopic eyes compared with emmetropes. PMID:15913701

  13. Temporally tuned neuronal differentiation supports the functional remodeling of a neuronal network in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Veverytsa, Lyubov; Allan, Douglas W

    2012-03-27

    During insect metamorphosis, neuronal networks undergo extensive remodeling by restructuring their connectivity and recruiting newborn neurons from postembryonic lineages. The neuronal network that directs the essential behavior, ecdysis, generates a distinct behavioral sequence at each developmental transition. Larval ecdysis replaces the cuticle between larval stages, and pupal ecdysis externalizes and expands the head and appendages to their adult position. However, the network changes that support these differences are unknown. Crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) neurons and the peptide hormones they secrete are critical for ecdysis; their targeted ablation alters larval ecdysis progression and results in a failure of pupal ecdysis. In this study, we demonstrate that the CCAP neuron network is remodeled immediately before pupal ecdysis by the emergence of 12 late CCAP neurons. All 12 are CCAP efferents that exit the central nervous system. Importantly, these late CCAP neurons were found to be entirely sufficient for wild-type pupal ecdysis, even after targeted ablation of all other 42 CCAP neurons. Our evidence indicates that late CCAP neurons are derived from early, likely embryonic, lineages. However, they do not differentiate to express their peptide hormone battery, nor do they project an axon via lateral nerve trunks until pupariation, both of which are believed to be critical for the function of CCAP efferent neurons in ecdysis. Further analysis implicated ecdysone signaling via ecdysone receptors A/B1 and the nuclear receptor ftz-f1 as the differentiation trigger. These results demonstrate the utility of temporally tuned neuronal differentiation as a hard-wired developmental mechanism to remodel a neuronal network to generate a scheduled change in behavior. PMID:22393011

  14. Retinal Prosthesis System for Advanced Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetic disorders that involves the breakdown and loss of photoreceptors in the retina, resulting in progressive retinal degeneration and eventual blindness. The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System is the only currently available surgical implantable device approved by Health Canada. It has been shown to improve visual function in patients with severe visual loss from advanced retinitis pigmentosa. The objective of this analysis was to examine the clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, budget impact, and safety of the Argus II system in improving visual function, as well as exploring patient experiences with the system. Methods We performed a systematic search of the literature for studies examining the effects of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa, and appraised the evidence according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria, focusing on visual function, functional outcomes, quality of life, and adverse events. We developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of the Argus II system compared with standard care over a 10-year time horizon. We also conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. We used a qualitative design and an interview methodology to examine patients’ lived experience, and we used a modified grounded theory methodology to analyze information from interviews. Transcripts were coded, and themes were compared against one another. Results One multicentre international study and one single-centre study were included in the clinical review. In both studies, patients showed improved visual function with the Argus II system. However, the sight-threatening surgical complication rate was substantial. In the base-case analysis, the Argus II system was cost-effective compared with standard care only if willingness-to-pay was more than $207,616 per quality-adjusted life

  15. The Redox State of Transglutaminase 2 Controls Arterial Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    van den Akker, Jeroen; VanBavel, Ed; van Geel, Remon; Matlung, Hanke L.; Guvenc Tuna, Bilge; Janssen, George M. C.; van Veelen, Peter A.; Boelens, Wilbert C.; De Mey, Jo G. R.; Bakker, Erik N. T. P.

    2011-01-01

    While inward remodeling of small arteries in response to low blood flow, hypertension, and chronic vasoconstriction depends on type 2 transglutaminase (TG2), the mechanisms of action have remained unresolved. We studied the regulation of TG2 activity, its (sub) cellular localization, substrates, and its specific mode of action during small artery inward remodeling. We found that inward remodeling of isolated mouse mesenteric arteries by exogenous TG2 required the presence of a reducing agent. The effect of TG2 depended on its cross-linking activity, as indicated by the lack of effect of mutant TG2. The cell-permeable reducing agent DTT, but not the cell-impermeable reducing agent TCEP, induced translocation of endogenous TG2 and high membrane-bound transglutaminase activity. This coincided with inward remodeling, characterized by a stiffening of the artery. The remodeling could be inhibited by a TG2 inhibitor and by the nitric oxide donor, SNAP. Using a pull-down assay and mass spectrometry, 21 proteins were identified as TG2 cross-linking substrates, including fibronectin, collagen and nidogen. Inward remodeling induced by low blood flow was associated with the upregulation of several anti-oxidant proteins, notably glutathione-S-transferase, and selenoprotein P. In conclusion, these results show that a reduced state induces smooth muscle membrane-bound TG2 activity. Inward remodeling results from the cross-linking of vicinal matrix proteins, causing a stiffening of the arterial wall. PMID:21901120

  16. Structural remodeling of bacteriophage T4 and host membranes during infection initiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Margolin, William; Molineux, Ian J; Liu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The first stages of productive bacteriophage infections of bacterial host cells require efficient adsorption to the cell surface followed by ejection of phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. To achieve this goal, a phage virion must undergo significant structural remodeling. For phage T4, the most obvious change is the contraction of its tail. Here, we use skinny E. coli minicells as a host, along with cryo-electron tomography and mutant phage virions, to visualize key structural intermediates during initiation of T4 infection. We show for the first time that most long tail fibers are folded back against the tail sheath until irreversible adsorption, a feature compatible with the virion randomly walking across the cell surface to find an optimal site for infection. Our data confirm that tail contraction is triggered by structural changes in the baseplate, as intermediates were found with remodeled baseplates and extended tails. After contraction, the tail tube penetrates the host cell periplasm, pausing while it degrades the peptidoglycan layer. Penetration into the host cytoplasm is accompanied by a dramatic local outward curvature of the cytoplasmic membrane as it fuses with the phage tail tip. The baseplate hub protein gp27 and/or the ejected tape measure protein gp29 likely form the transmembrane channel for viral DNA passage into the cell cytoplasm. Building on the wealth of prior biochemical and structural information, this work provides new molecular insights into the mechanistic pathway of T4 phage infection. PMID:26283379

  17. Structural remodeling of bacteriophage T4 and host membranes during infection initiation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Margolin, William; Molineux, Ian J.; Liu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The first stages of productive bacteriophage infections of bacterial host cells require efficient adsorption to the cell surface followed by ejection of phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. To achieve this goal, a phage virion must undergo significant structural remodeling. For phage T4, the most obvious change is the contraction of its tail. Here, we use skinny E. coli minicells as a host, along with cryo-electron tomography and mutant phage virions, to visualize key structural intermediates during initiation of T4 infection. We show for the first time that most long tail fibers are folded back against the tail sheath until irreversible adsorption, a feature compatible with the virion randomly walking across the cell surface to find an optimal site for infection. Our data confirm that tail contraction is triggered by structural changes in the baseplate, as intermediates were found with remodeled baseplates and extended tails. After contraction, the tail tube penetrates the host cell periplasm, pausing while it degrades the peptidoglycan layer. Penetration into the host cytoplasm is accompanied by a dramatic local outward curvature of the cytoplasmic membrane as it fuses with the phage tail tip. The baseplate hub protein gp27 and/or the ejected tape measure protein gp29 likely form the transmembrane channel for viral DNA passage into the cell cytoplasm. Building on the wealth of prior biochemical and structural information, this work provides new molecular insights into the mechanistic pathway of T4 phage infection. PMID:26283379

  18. Chromatin remodeling system, cancer stem-like attractors, and cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Moriguchi, Hisashi

    2011-11-01

    The cancer cell attractors theory provides a next-generation understanding of carcinogenesis and natural explanation of punctuated clonal expansions of tumor progression. The impressive notion of atavism of cancer is now updated but more evidence is awaited. Besides, the mechanisms that the ectopic expression of some germline genes result in somatic tumors such as melanoma and brain tumors are emerging but are not well understood. Cancer could be triggered by cells undergoing abnormal cell attractor transitions, and may be reversible with "cyto-education". From mammals to model organisms like Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, the versatile Mi-2β/nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation complexes along with their functionally related chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs), i.e., the dREAM/Myb-MuvB complex and Polycomb group complex are likely master regulators of cell attractors. The trajectory that benign cells switch to cancerous could be the reverse of navigation of embryonic cells converging from a series of intermediate transcriptional states to a final adult state, which is supported by gene expression dynamics inspector assays and some cross-species genetic evidence. The involvement of CRCs in locking cancer attractors may help find the recipes of perturbing genes to achieve successful reprogramming such that the reprogrammed cancer cell function in the same way as the normal cells. PMID:21909785

  19. Remodeling of intermediate metabolism in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum under nitrogen stress.

    PubMed

    Levitan, Orly; Dinamarca, Jorge; Zelzion, Ehud; Lun, Desmond S; Guerra, L Tiago; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Joomi; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Falkowski, Paul G

    2015-01-13

    Diatoms are unicellular algae that accumulate significant amounts of triacylglycerols as storage lipids when their growth is limited by nutrients. Using biochemical, physiological, bioinformatics, and reverse genetic approaches, we analyzed how the flux of carbon into lipids is influenced by nitrogen stress in a model diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Our results reveal that the accumulation of lipids is a consequence of remodeling of intermediate metabolism, especially reactions in the tricarboxylic acid and the urea cycles. Specifically, approximately one-half of the cellular proteins are cannibalized; whereas the nitrogen is scavenged by the urea and glutamine synthetase/glutamine 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase pathways and redirected to the de novo synthesis of nitrogen assimilation machinery, simultaneously, the photobiological flux of carbon and reductants is used to synthesize lipids. To further examine how nitrogen stress triggers the remodeling process, we knocked down the gene encoding for nitrate reductase, a key enzyme required for the assimilation of nitrate. The strain exhibits 40-50% of the mRNA copy numbers, protein content, and enzymatic activity of the wild type, concomitant with a 43% increase in cellular lipid content. We suggest a negative feedback sensor that couples photosynthetic carbon fixation to lipid biosynthesis and is regulated by the nitrogen assimilation pathway. This metabolic feedback enables diatoms to rapidly respond to fluctuations in environmental nitrogen availability. PMID:25548193

  20. Remodeling of intermediate metabolism in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum under nitrogen stress

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Orly; Dinamarca, Jorge; Zelzion, Ehud; Lun, Desmond S.; Guerra, L. Tiago; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Joomi; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae that accumulate significant amounts of triacylglycerols as storage lipids when their growth is limited by nutrients. Using biochemical, physiological, bioinformatics, and reverse genetic approaches, we analyzed how the flux of carbon into lipids is influenced by nitrogen stress in a model diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Our results reveal that the accumulation of lipids is a consequence of remodeling of intermediate metabolism, especially reactions in the tricarboxylic acid and the urea cycles. Specifically, approximately one-half of the cellular proteins are cannibalized; whereas the nitrogen is scavenged by the urea and glutamine synthetase/glutamine 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase pathways and redirected to the de novo synthesis of nitrogen assimilation machinery, simultaneously, the photobiological flux of carbon and reductants is used to synthesize lipids. To further examine how nitrogen stress triggers the remodeling process, we knocked down the gene encoding for nitrate reductase, a key enzyme required for the assimilation of nitrate. The strain exhibits 40–50% of the mRNA copy numbers, protein content, and enzymatic activity of the wild type, concomitant with a 43% increase in cellular lipid content. We suggest a negative feedback sensor that couples photosynthetic carbon fixation to lipid biosynthesis and is regulated by the nitrogen assimilation pathway. This metabolic feedback enables diatoms to rapidly respond to fluctuations in environmental nitrogen availability. PMID:25548193

  1. The Chromatin Remodeling Complex Chd4/NuRD Controls Striated Muscle Identity and Metabolic Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Del Arco, Pablo; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Yunes-Leites, Paula Sofia; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Zeini, Miriam; Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; Sreenivasan, Krishnamoorthy; Jiménez-Alcázar, Miguel; Segalés, Jessica; López-Maderuelo, Dolores; Ornés, Beatriz; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; D'Amato, Gaetano; Enshell-Seijffers, David; Morgan, Bruce; Georgopoulos, Katia; Islam, Abul B M M K; Braun, Thomas; de la Pompa, José Luis; Kim, Johnny; Enriquez, José A; Ballestar, Esteban; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2016-05-10

    Heart muscle maintains blood circulation, while skeletal muscle powers skeletal movement. Despite having similar myofibrilar sarcomeric structures, these striated muscles differentially express specific sarcomere components to meet their distinct contractile requirements. The mechanism responsible is still unclear. We show here that preservation of the identity of the two striated muscle types depends on epigenetic repression of the alternate lineage gene program by the chromatin remodeling complex Chd4/NuRD. Loss of Chd4 in the heart triggers aberrant expression of the skeletal muscle program, causing severe cardiomyopathy and sudden death. Conversely, genetic depletion of Chd4 in skeletal muscle causes inappropriate expression of cardiac genes and myopathy. In both striated tissues, mitochondrial function was also dependent on the Chd4/NuRD complex. We conclude that an epigenetic mechanism controls cardiac and skeletal muscle structural and metabolic identities and that loss of this regulation leads to hybrid striated muscle tissues incompatible with life. PMID:27166947

  2. CYFIP1 Coordinates mRNA Translation and Cytoskeleton Remodeling to Ensure Proper Dendritic Spine Formation

    PubMed Central

    De Rubeis, Silvia; Pasciuto, Emanuela; Li, Ka Wan; Fernández, Esperanza; Di Marino, Daniele; Buzzi, Andrea; Ostroff, Linnaea E.; Klann, Eric; Zwartkruis, Fried J.T.; Komiyama, Noboru H.; Grant, Seth G.N.; Poujol, Christel; Choquet, Daniel; Achsel, Tilmann; Posthuma, Danielle; Smit, August B.; Bagni, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Summary The CYFIP1/SRA1 gene is located in a chromosomal region linked to various neurological disorders, including intellectual disability, autism, and schizophrenia. CYFIP1 plays a dual role in two apparently unrelated processes, inhibiting local protein synthesis and favoring actin remodeling. Here, we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-driven synaptic signaling releases CYFIP1 from the translational inhibitory complex, triggering translation of target mRNAs and shifting CYFIP1 into the WAVE regulatory complex. Active Rac1 alters the CYFIP1 conformation, as demonstrated by intramolecular FRET, and is key in changing the equilibrium of the two complexes. CYFIP1 thus orchestrates the two molecular cascades, protein translation and actin polymerization, each of which is necessary for correct spine morphology in neurons. The CYFIP1 interactome reveals many interactors associated with brain disorders, opening new perspectives to define regulatory pathways shared by neurological disabilities characterized by spine dysmorphogenesis. PMID:24050404

  3. The multifactorial nature of microRNAs in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Welten, S M J; Goossens, E A C; Quax, P H A; Nossent, A Y

    2016-05-01

    Vascular remodelling is a multifactorial process that involves both adaptive and maladaptive changes of the vessel wall through, among others, cell proliferation and migration, but also apoptosis and necrosis of the various cell types in the vessel wall. Vascular remodelling can be beneficial, e.g. during neovascularization after ischaemia, as well as pathological, e.g. during atherosclerosis and aneurysm formation. In recent years, it has become clear that microRNAs are able to target many genes that are involved in vascular remodelling processes and either can promote or inhibit structural changes of the vessel wall. Since many different processes of vascular remodelling are regulated by similar mechanisms and factors, both positive and negative vascular remodelling can be affected by the same microRNAs. A large number of microRNAs has been linked to various aspects of vascular remodelling and indeed, several of these microRNAs regulate multiple vascular remodelling processes, including both the adaptive processes angiogenesis and arteriogenesis as well as maladaptive processes of atherosclerosis, restenosis and aneurysm formation. Here, we discuss the multifactorial role of microRNAs and microRNA clusters that were reported to play a role in multiple forms of vascular remodelling and are clearly linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The microRNAs reviewed are miR-126, miR-155 and the microRNA gene clusters 17-92, 23/24/27, 143/145 and 14q32. Understanding the contribution of these microRNAs to the entire spectrum of vascular remodelling processes is important, especially as these microRNAs may have great potential as therapeutic targets for treatment of various CVDs. PMID:26912672

  4. Intratracheal Bleomycin Causes Airway Remodeling and Airflow Obstruction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Degryse, Amber L.; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Jones, Brittany R.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Lee, Jae Woo; Loyd, James E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Lawson, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In addition to parenchymal fibrosis, fibrotic remodeling of the distal airways has been reported in interstitial lung diseases. Mechanisms of airway wall remodeling, which occurs in a variety of chronic lung diseases, are not well defined and current animal models are limited. Methods We quantified airway remodeling in lung sections from subjects with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and controls. To investigate intratracheal bleomycin as a potential animal model for fibrotic airway remodeling, we evaluated lungs from C57BL/6 mice after bleomycin treatment by histologic scoring for fibrosis and peribronchial inflammation, morphometric evaluation of subepithelial connective tissue volume density, TUNEL assay, and immunohistochemistry for transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), TGFβ2, and the fibroblast marker S100A4. Lung mechanics were determined at 3 weeks post-bleomycin. Results IPF lungs had small airway remodeling with increased bronchial wall thickness compared to controls. Similarly, bleomycin treated mice developed dose-dependent airway wall inflammation and fibrosis and greater airflow resistance after high dose bleomycin. Increased TUNEL+ bronchial epithelial cells and peribronchial inflammation were noted by 1 week, and expression of TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 and accumulation of S100A4+ fibroblasts correlated with airway remodeling in a bleomycin dose-dependent fashion. Conclusions IPF is characterized by small airway remodeling in addition to parenchymal fibrosis, a pattern also seen with intratracheal bleomycin. Bronchial remodeling from intratracheal bleomycin follows a cascade of events including epithelial cell injury, airway inflammation, pro-fibrotic cytokine expression, fibroblast accumulation, and peribronchial fibrosis. Thus, this model can be utilized to investigate mechanisms of airway remodeling. PMID:22394287

  5. Remodeling of Endogenous Mammary Epithelium by Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A.; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R.; Habte, Frezghi G.; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R.; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L.; Clarke, Michael F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-01-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  6. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  7. TRPV4 regulates calcium homeostasis, cytoskeletal remodeling, conventional outflow and intraocular pressure in the mammalian eye.

    PubMed

    Ryskamp, Daniel A; Frye, Amber M; Phuong, Tam T T; Yarishkin, Oleg; Jo, Andrew O; Xu, Yong; Lakk, Monika; Iuso, Anthony; Redmon, Sarah N; Ambati, Balamurali; Hageman, Gregory; Prestwich, Glenn D; Torrejon, Karen Y; Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An intractable challenge in glaucoma treatment has been to identify druggable targets within the conventional aqueous humor outflow pathway, which is thought to be regulated/dysregulated by elusive mechanosensitive protein(s). Here, biochemical and functional analyses localized the putative mechanosensitive cation channel TRPV4 to the plasma membrane of primary and immortalized human TM (hTM) cells, and to human and mouse TM tissue. Selective TRPV4 agonists and substrate stretch evoked TRPV4-dependent cation/Ca(2+) influx, thickening of F-actin stress fibers and reinforcement of focal adhesion contacts. TRPV4 inhibition enhanced the outflow facility and lowered perfusate pressure in biomimetic TM scaffolds populated with primary hTM cells. Systemic delivery, intraocular injection or topical application of putative TRPV4 antagonist prodrug analogs lowered IOP in glaucomatous mouse eyes and protected retinal neurons from IOP-induced death. Together, these findings indicate that TRPV4 channels function as a critical component of mechanosensitive, Ca(2+)-signaling machinery within the TM, and that TRPV4-dependent cytoskeletal remodeling regulates TM stiffness and outflow. Thus, TRPV4 is a potential IOP sensor within the conventional outflow pathway and a novel target for treating ocular hypertension. PMID:27510430

  8. TRPV4 regulates calcium homeostasis, cytoskeletal remodeling, conventional outflow and intraocular pressure in the mammalian eye

    PubMed Central

    Ryskamp, Daniel A.; Frye, Amber M.; Phuong, Tam T. T.; Yarishkin, Oleg; Jo, Andrew O.; Xu, Yong; Lakk, Monika; Iuso, Anthony; Redmon, Sarah N.; Ambati, Balamurali; Hageman, Gregory; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Torrejon, Karen Y.; Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An intractable challenge in glaucoma treatment has been to identify druggable targets within the conventional aqueous humor outflow pathway, which is thought to be regulated/dysregulated by elusive mechanosensitive protein(s). Here, biochemical and functional analyses localized the putative mechanosensitive cation channel TRPV4 to the plasma membrane of primary and immortalized human TM (hTM) cells, and to human and mouse TM tissue. Selective TRPV4 agonists and substrate stretch evoked TRPV4-dependent cation/Ca2+ influx, thickening of F-actin stress fibers and reinforcement of focal adhesion contacts. TRPV4 inhibition enhanced the outflow facility and lowered perfusate pressure in biomimetic TM scaffolds populated with primary hTM cells. Systemic delivery, intraocular injection or topical application of putative TRPV4 antagonist prodrug analogs lowered IOP in glaucomatous mouse eyes and protected retinal neurons from IOP-induced death. Together, these findings indicate that TRPV4 channels function as a critical component of mechanosensitive, Ca2+-signaling machinery within the TM, and that TRPV4-dependent cytoskeletal remodeling regulates TM stiffness and outflow. Thus, TRPV4 is a potential IOP sensor within the conventional outflow pathway and a novel target for treating ocular hypertension. PMID:27510430

  9. Limited ATF4 Expression in Degenerating Retinas with Ongoing ER Stress Promotes Photoreceptor Survival in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bhootada, Yogesh; Kotla, Pravallika; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Gorbatyuk, Oleg; Bebok, Zsuzsanna; Athar, Mohammad; Gorbatyuk, Marina

    2016-01-01

    T17M rhodopsin expression in rod photoreceptors leads to severe retinal degeneration and is associated with the activation of ER stress related Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signaling. Here, we show a novel role of a UPR transcription factor, ATF4, in photoreceptor cellular pathology. We demonstrated a pro-death role for ATF4 overexpression during autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Based on our results in ATF4 knockout mice and adeno-associated viral (AAV) delivery of ATF4 to the retina, we validated a novel therapeutic approach targeting ATF4 over the course of retinal degeneration. In T17M rhodopsin retinas, we observed ATF4 overexpression concomitantly with reduction of p62 and elevation of p53 levels. These molecular alterations, together with increased CHOP and caspase-3/7 activity, possibly contributed to the mechanism of photoreceptor cell loss. Conversely, ATF4 knockdown retarded retinal degeneration in 1-month-old T17M Rhodopsin mice and promoted photoreceptor survival, as measured by scotopic and photopic ERGs and photoreceptor nuclei row counts. Similarly, ATF4 knockdown also markedly delayed retinal degeneration in 3-month-old ADRP animals. This delay was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in UPR signaling, the launching of anti-oxidant defense, initiation of autophagy, and improvement of rhodopsin biosynthesis which together perhaps combat the cellular stress associated with T17M rhodopsin. Our data indicate that augmented ATF4 signals during retinal degeneration plays a cytotoxic role by triggering photoreceptor cell death. Future ADRP therapy regulating ATF4 expression can be developed to treat retinal degenerative disorders associated with activated UPR. PMID:27144303

  10. Limited ATF4 Expression in Degenerating Retinas with Ongoing ER Stress Promotes Photoreceptor Survival in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bhootada, Yogesh; Kotla, Pravallika; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Gorbatyuk, Oleg; Bebok, Zsuzsanna; Athar, Mohammad; Gorbatyuk, Marina

    2016-01-01

    T17M rhodopsin expression in rod photoreceptors leads to severe retinal degeneration and is associated with the activation of ER stress related Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signaling. Here, we show a novel role of a UPR transcription factor, ATF4, in photoreceptor cellular pathology. We demonstrated a pro-death role for ATF4 overexpression during autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Based on our results in ATF4 knockout mice and adeno-associated viral (AAV) delivery of ATF4 to the retina, we validated a novel therapeutic approach targeting ATF4 over the course of retinal degeneration. In T17M rhodopsin retinas, we observed ATF4 overexpression concomitantly with reduction of p62 and elevation of p53 levels. These molecular alterations, together with increased CHOP and caspase-3/7 activity, possibly contributed to the mechanism of photoreceptor cell loss. Conversely, ATF4 knockdown retarded retinal degeneration in 1-month-old T17M Rhodopsin mice and promoted photoreceptor survival, as measured by scotopic and photopic ERGs and photoreceptor nuclei row counts. Similarly, ATF4 knockdown also markedly delayed retinal degeneration in 3-month-old ADRP animals. This delay was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in UPR signaling, the launching of anti-oxidant defense, initiation of autophagy, and improvement of rhodopsin biosynthesis which together perhaps combat the cellular stress associated with T17M rhodopsin. Our data indicate that augmented ATF4 signals during retinal degeneration plays a cytotoxic role by triggering photoreceptor cell death. Future ADRP therapy regulating ATF4 expression can be developed to treat retinal degenerative disorders associated with activated UPR. PMID:27144303

  11. Examination of postmortem retinal folds: A non-invasive study.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Toru; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Ohtani, Maki; Mimasaka, Sohtaro

    2015-02-01

    The postmortem retinal fold has been previously documented, but its mechanism of formation is not known. All previous studies of the fold involved invasive techniques and the postmortem ocular fundus has yet to be non-invasively examined. Our study used the non-invasive techniques of monocular indirect ophthalmoscopy and ocular echography to examine 79 postmortem eyes of 42 bodies. We examined whether the postmortem retinal fold was associated with postmortem time, position, and/or age. Age was significantly associated with postmortem retinal fold formation (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.013), which led us to examine the effect of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) on retinal folds. The absence of a PVD was statistically associated with the presence of a retinal fold (Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Interestingly, the presence of a PVD was also significantly correlated with retinal fold height (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.0001). Therefore, we hypothesized that retinal folds result from postmortem vitreoretinal traction caused by eyeball flaccidity. We also believe that the loss of retinochoroidal hydrostatic pressure plays a role. It is important that forensic pathologists not confuse a postmortem retinal fold with traumatic retinal detachment or perimacular retinal folds caused by child abuse. When child abuse is suspected, forensic pathologists should perform enucleation and a subsequent histological examination for confirmation. PMID:25623189

  12. N -methyl- N -nitrosourea-induced retinal degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Shi-Liang; Hu, Dan-Ping; Xing, Yi-Qiao; Shen, Yin

    2014-04-01

    Mouse retinal degeneration models have been investigated for many years in the hope of understanding the mechanism of photoreceptor cell death. N -methyl- N -nitrosourea (MNU) has been previously shown to induce outer retinal degeneration in mice. After MNU was intraperitoneally injected in C57/BL mice, we observed a gradual decrease in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness associated with photoreceptor outer segment loss, bipolar cell dendritic retraction and reactive gliosis. Reactive gliosis was confirmed by increased GFAP protein levels. More serious damage to the central retina as opposed to the peripheral retina was found in the MNU-induced retinal degeneration model. Retinal ganglion cells (RGC) appear to be spared for at least two months after MNU treatment. Following retinal vessel labelling, we observed vascular complexes in the distal vessels, indicating retinal vessel damage. In the remnant retinal photoreceptor of the MNU-treated mouse, concentrated colouring nuclei were detected by electron microscopy, together with the loss of mitochondria and displaced remnant synaptic ribbons in the photoreceptor. We also observed decreased mitochondrial protein levels and increased amounts of nitrosylation/nitration in the photoreceptors. The mechanism of MNU-induced apoptosis may result from oxidative stress or the loss of retinal blood supply. MNU-induced mouse retinal degeneration in the outer retina is a useful animal model for photoreceptor degeneration diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). PMID:24509257

  13. Clinical Features of Newly Diagnosed Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Ausayakhun, Somsanguan; Keenan, Jeremy D; Ausayakhun, Sakarin; Jirawison, Choeng; Khouri, Claire M; Skalet, Alison H; Heiden, David; Holland, Gary N; Margolis, Todd P

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the clinical manifestations of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in northern Thailand. Design Prospective, observational cross-sectional study. Methods We recorded characteristics of 52 consecutive patients newly diagnosed with CMV retinitis at a tertiary university-based medical center in northern Thailand. Indirect ophthalmoscopy by experienced ophthalmologists was supplemented with fundus photography to determine the proportion of eyes with various clinical features of CMV retinitis. Results Of the 52 patients with CMV retinitis, 55.8% were female. All were HIV-positive. The vast majority (90.4%) had started antiretroviral therapy. CMV retinitis was bilateral in 46.2% of patients. Bilateral visual acuity worse than 20/60 was observed in 23.1% of patients. Of 76 eyes with CMV retinitis, 61.8% had zone I disease and 21.6% had lesions involving the fovea. Lesions larger than 25% of the retinal area were observed in 57.5% of affected eyes. CMV retinitis lesions commonly had marked or severe border opacity (47.4% of eyes). Vitreous haze was often present (46.1% of eyes). Visual impairment was more common in eyes with larger retinitis lesions. Retinitis lesion size, used as a proxy for duration of disease, was associated with fulminant appearance (OR 1.24 [1.01 – 1.51]), and marked or severe border opacity (OR 1.36 [1.11 – 1.67]). Based on lesion size, retinitis preceded antiretroviral treatment in each patient. Conclusions Patients presenting to a tertiary medical center in northern Thailand have advanced CMV retinitis, possibly due to delayed diagnosis. Earlier screening and treatment of CMV retinitis may limit progression of disease and prevent visual impairment in this population. PMID:22265148

  14. Lymphoid Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Development and Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are sites that facilitate cell-cell interactions required for generating adaptive immune responses. Nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to play a critical role in SLO function, organization, and tissue homeostasis. The stromal microenvironment undergoes profound remodeling to support immune responses. However, chronic inflammatory conditions can promote uncontrolled stromal cell activation and aberrant tissue remodeling including fibrosis, thus leading to tissue damage. Despite recent advancements, the origin and role of mesenchymal stromal cells involved in SLO development and remodeling remain unclear. PMID:27190524

  15. Cardiac Remodeling: Concepts, Clinical Impact, Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Pharmacologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is defined as a group of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes that manifest clinically as changes in size, mass, geometry and function of the heart after injury. The process results in poor prognosis because of its association with ventricular dysfunction and malignant arrhythmias. Here, we discuss the concepts and clinical implications of cardiac remodeling, and the pathophysiological role of different factors, including cell death, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, collagen, contractile proteins, calcium transport, geometry and neurohormonal activation. Finally, the article describes the pharmacological treatment of cardiac remodeling, which can be divided into three different stages of strategies: consolidated, promising and potential strategies. PMID:26647721

  16. Lymphoid Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Development and Tissue Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Luca; Brendolan, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are sites that facilitate cell-cell interactions required for generating adaptive immune responses. Nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to play a critical role in SLO function, organization, and tissue homeostasis. The stromal microenvironment undergoes profound remodeling to support immune responses. However, chronic inflammatory conditions can promote uncontrolled stromal cell activation and aberrant tissue remodeling including fibrosis, thus leading to tissue damage. Despite recent advancements, the origin and role of mesenchymal stromal cells involved in SLO development and remodeling remain unclear. PMID:27190524

  17. Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Feigl, Beatrix; Zele, Andrew J

    2014-08-01

    Melanopsin-containing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are a class of photoreceptors with established roles in non-image-forming processes. Their contributions to image-forming vision may include the estimation of brightness. Animal models have been central for understanding the physiological mechanisms of ipRGC function and there is evidence of conservation of function across species. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells can be divided into five ganglion cell subtypes that show morphological and functional diversity. Research in humans has established that ipRGCs signal environmental irradiance to entrain the central body clock to the solar day for regulating circadian processes and sleep. In addition, ipRGCs mediate the pupil light reflex (PLR), making the PLR a readily accessible behavioral marker of ipRGC activity. Less is known about ipRGC function in retinal and optic nerve disease, with emerging research providing insight into their function in diabetes, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, and hereditary optic neuropathy. We briefly review the anatomical distributions, projections, and basic physiological mechanisms of ipRGCs and their proposed and known functions in animals and humans with and without eye disease. We introduce a paradigm for differentiating inner and outer retinal inputs to the pupillary control pathway in retinal disease and apply this paradigm to patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In these cases of patients with AMD, we provide the initial evidence that ipRGC function is altered and that the dysfunction is more pronounced in advanced disease. Our perspective is that with refined pupillometry paradigms, the PLR can be extended to AMD assessment as a tool for the measurement of inner and outer retinal dysfunction. PMID:24879087

  18. The role of retinal and extra-retinal photostimulation in reproductive activity in broiler breeder hens.

    PubMed

    Mobarkey, N; Avital, N; Heiblum, R; Rozenboim, I

    2010-05-01

    Photostimulation of retinal photoreceptors, which are sensitive to green light, appears to inhibit reproductive activity in birds, whereas photostimulation of extra-retinal photoreceptors, which are sensitive to red light, accelerates it. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of either retinal or extra-retinal photostimulation on reproductive activities of broiler breeder hens. At 23 wk of age, Cobb hens (N=135) were divided into 9 rooms with individual cages (n=15). At 24 wk of age, 3 rooms were photostimulated (14L:10D) with white light (Control, n=45). Six rooms had 2 parallel lighting systems, red (660 nm) and green (560 nm), which were both on during 6 out of 14 h of the light period. Then, in 3 of these rooms, the green light was turned off and hens were exposed to a total of 14 h of red light (Red, n=45), and in the other 3, the red light was turned off and green lighting continued for a total of 14 h (Green, n=45). The Green group had reduced egg production; reduced plasma concentrations of ovarian steroids; reduced luteinizing hormone (LH)-beta, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and prolactin mRNA expression; and greater retinal green opsin mRNA expression (P < or = 0.05). The Red group had greater egg production; greater gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) and red opsin gene expression in the hypothalamus; and lesser green opsin gene expression in the retina (P < or = 0.05). We suggest that selective photostimulation of extra-retinal photostimulation as opposed to retinal photostimulation is a key factor in the determination of successful reproduction of broiler breeder hens. PMID:20022445

  19. Inner retinal change in a novel rd1-FTL mouse model of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Greferath, Ursula; Anderson, Emily E.; Jobling, Andrew I.; Vessey, Kirstan A.; Martinez, Gemma; de Iongh, Robb U.; Kalloniatis, Michael; Fletcher, Erica L.

    2015-01-01

    While photoreceptor loss is the most devastating result of inherited retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa, inner retinal neurons also undergo significant alteration. Detailing these changes has become important as many vision restorative therapies target the remaining neurons. In this study, the rd1-Fos-Tau-LacZ (rd1-FTL) mouse model was used to explore inner retinal change at a late stage of retinal degeneration, after the loss of photoreceptor nuclei. The rd1-FTL model carries a mutation in the phosphodiesterase gene, Pde6b, and an axonally targeted transgenic beta galactosidase reporter system under the control of the c-fos promoter. Retinae of transgenic rd1-FTL mice and control FTL animals aged 2–12 months were processed for indirect fluorescence immunocytochemistry. At 2 months of age, a time when the majority of photoreceptor nuclei are lost, there was negligible c-fos reporter (FTL) expression, however, from 4 months, reporter expression was observed to increase within subpopulations of amacrine and ganglion cells within the central retina. These areas of inner retinal FTL expression coincided with regions that contained aberrant Müller cells. Specifically, these cells exhibited reduced glutamine synthetase and Kir4.1 immunolabelling, whilst showing evidence of proliferative gliosis (increased cyclinD1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression). These changes were limited to distinct regions where cone photoreceptor terminals were absent. Overall, these results highlight that distinct areas of the rd1-FTL central retina undergo significant glial alterations after cone photoreceptor loss. These areas coincide with up-regulation of the c-fos reporter in the inner retina, which may represent a change in neuronal function/plasticity. The rd1-FTL mouse is a useful model system to probe changes that occur in the inner retina at later stages of retinal degeneration. PMID:26283925

  20. Breakdown of blood. Retinal barrier in RCS rats with inherited retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Essner, E; Pino, R M; Griewski, R A

    1980-11-01

    A breakdown in the blood-retinal barrier to certain proteins is described in mutant RCS rats with inherited retinal degeneration. Intravenously injected microperoxidase and horseradish peroxidase are extravasated from the outer (but not inner) retinal capillaries of these rats, at approximately 11 weeks of age and older. The number of affected capillaries increases with the age of the animals and progression of the retinal dystrophy until virtually all capillaries in the outer retina become permeable to these tracers. In such capillaries, enzyme reaction product is demonstrable in a greater proportion of luminal vesicles and in the majority of abluminal vesicles. Reaction product is also localized in cytoplasmic vacuoles, the basal laminae of endothelial cells and pericytes, and the perivascular spaces. The increased permeability of outer retinal capillaries in RCS rats appears to be due to an increase in transendothelial vesicular transport of the probe molecules. There was no evidence that either tracer permeated the interendothelial junctions or entered the basal laminae by reflux from the perivascular spaces. It is suggested that factors originating from the degenerated photoreceptor cells may play a role in stimulating the vesicular transport observed in permeable capillaries. In contrast to these findings, the outer retinal capillaries of RCS rats were not permeable to hemoglobin, catalase, or ferritin, regardless of the age of the animal or the degree of retinal degeneration. Since the vesicles that form at the luminal front are covered by a diaphragm, it is possible that this structure prevents entry of these larger proteins into the endothelial vesicle, even in capillaries that are demonstrably permeable to the smaller tracers. PMID:7421123