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Sample records for retinal vessel abnormalities

  1. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  2. Automated measurement of retinal blood vessel tortuosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vinayak; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2010-03-01

    Abnormalities in the vascular pattern of the retina are associated with retinal diseases and are also risk factors for systemic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. The three-dimensional retinal vascular pattern is mostly formed congenitally, but is then modified over life, in response to aging, vessel wall dystrophies and long term changes in blood flow and pressure. A characteristic of the vascular pattern that is appreciated by clinicians is vascular tortuosity, i.e. how curved or kinked a blood vessel, either vein or artery, appears along its course. We developed a new quantitative metric for vascular tortuosity, based on the vessel's angle of curvature, length of the curved vessel over its chord length (arc to chord ratio), number of curvature sign changes, and combined these into a unidimensional metric, Tortuosity Index (TI). In comparison to other published methods this method can estimate appropriate TI for vessels with constant curvature sign and vessels with equal arc to chord ratios, as well. We applied this method to a dataset of 15 digital fundus images of 8 patients with Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and to the other publically available dataset of 60 fundus images of normal cases and patients with hypertensive retinopathy, of which the arterial and venous tortuosities have also been graded by masked experts (ophthalmologists). The method produced exactly the same rank-ordered list of vessel tortuosity (TI) values as obtained by averaging the tortuosity grading given by 3 ophthalmologists for FSHD dataset and a list of TI values with high ranking correlation with the ophthalmologist's grading for the other dataset. Our results show that TI has potential to detect and evaluate abnormal retinal vascular structure in early diagnosis and prognosis of retinopathies.

  3. Improvement of retinal blood vessel detection using morphological component analysis.

    PubMed

    Imani, Elaheh; Javidi, Malihe; Pourreza, Hamid-Reza

    2015-03-01

    Detection and quantitative measurement of variations in the retinal blood vessels can help diagnose several diseases including diabetic retinopathy. Intrinsic characteristics of abnormal retinal images make blood vessel detection difficult. The major problem with traditional vessel segmentation algorithms is producing false positive vessels in the presence of diabetic retinopathy lesions. To overcome this problem, a novel scheme for extracting retinal blood vessels based on morphological component analysis (MCA) algorithm is presented in this paper. MCA was developed based on sparse representation of signals. This algorithm assumes that each signal is a linear combination of several morphologically distinct components. In the proposed method, the MCA algorithm with appropriate transforms is adopted to separate vessels and lesions from each other. Afterwards, the Morlet Wavelet Transform is applied to enhance the retinal vessels. The final vessel map is obtained by adaptive thresholding. The performance of the proposed method is measured on the publicly available DRIVE and STARE datasets and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. An accuracy of 0.9523 and 0.9590 has been respectively achieved on the DRIVE and STARE datasets, which are not only greater than most methods, but are also superior to the second human observer's performance. The results show that the proposed method can achieve improved detection in abnormal retinal images and decrease false positive vessels in pathological regions compared to other methods. Also, the robustness of the method in the presence of noise is shown via experimental result. PMID:25697986

  4. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: β-thalassemia major, β-TI: β-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  5. Texton-based segmentation of retinal vessels.

    PubMed

    Adjeroh, Donald A; Kandaswamy, Umasankar; Odom, J Vernon

    2007-05-01

    With improvements in fundus imaging technology and the increasing use of digital images in screening and diagnosis, the issue of automated analysis of retinal images is gaining more serious attention. We consider the problem of retinal vessel segmentation, a key issue in automated analysis of digital fundus images. We propose a texture-based vessel segmentation algorithm based on the notion of textons. Using a weak statistical learning approach, we construct textons for retinal vasculature by designing filters that are specifically tuned to the structural and photometric properties of retinal vessels. We evaluate the performance of the proposed approach using a standard database of retinal images. On the DRIVE data set, the proposed method produced an average performance of 0.9568 specificity at 0.7346 sensitivity. This compares well with the best-published results on the data set 0.9773 specificity at 0.7194 sensitivity [Proc. SPIE5370, 648 (2004)]. PMID:17429484

  6. Texton-based segmentation of retinal vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjeroh, Donald A.; Kandaswamy, Umasankar; Odom, J. Vernon

    2007-05-01

    With improvements in fundus imaging technology and the increasing use of digital images in screening and diagnosis, the issue of automated analysis of retinal images is gaining more serious attention. We consider the problem of retinal vessel segmentation, a key issue in automated analysis of digital fundus images. We propose a texture-based vessel segmentation algorithm based on the notion of textons. Using a weak statistical learning approach, we construct textons for retinal vasculature by designing filters that are specifically tuned to the structural and photometric properties of retinal vessels. We evaluate the performance of the proposed approach using a standard database of retinal images. On the DRIVE data set, the proposed method produced an average performance of 0.9568 specificity at 0.7346 sensitivity. This compares well with the best-published results on the data set 0.9773 specificity at 0.7194 sensitivity [Proc. SPIE5370, 648 (2004)].

  7. Four-wavelength retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Jonathan Jensen

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation documents the design and construction of a four-wavelength retinal vessel oximeter, the Eye Oximeter (EOX). The EOX scans low-powered laser beams (at 629, 678, 821 and 899 nm) into the eye and across a targeted retinal vessel to measure the transmittance of the blood within the vessel. From the transmittance measurements, the oxygen saturation of the blood within the vessel is computed. Retinal vessel oxygen saturation has been suggested as a useful parameter for monitoring a wide range of conditions including occult blood loss and a variety of ophthalmic diseases. An artificial eye that simulates the geometry of a human retinal vessel was constructed and used to calibrate the EOX saturation measurement. A number of different oximetry equations were developed and tested. From measurements made on whole human blood in the artificial eye, an oximetry equation that places a linear wavelength dependance on the scattering losses (3% decrease from 629 to 899 nm) is found to best calibrate the EOX oxygen saturation measurement. This calibration also requires that an adjustment be made to the absorption coefficient of hemoglobin at 629 nm that has been reported in the literature. More than 4,000 measurements were made in the eyes of three human subjects during the development of the EOX. Applying the oximetry equation developed through the in vitro experiments to human data, the average human retinal venous oxygen saturation is estimated to be 0.63 +/- 0.07 and the average human retinal arterial oxygen saturation is 0.99 +/- 0.03. Furthermore, measurements made away from the optic disk resulted in a larger variance in the calculated saturation when compared to measurements made on the optic disk. A series of EOX experiments using anesthetized swine helped to verify the sensitivity of the EOX measurement of oxygen saturation. It is found that the calibration in swine differed from the calibration in the artificial eye. An empirical calibration from the

  8. Unsupervised Retinal Vessel Segmentation Using Combined Filters.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Wendeson S; Teixeira, Joyce Vitor; Ren, Tsang Ing; Cavalcanti, George D C; Sijbers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Image segmentation of retinal blood vessels is a process that can help to predict and diagnose cardiovascular related diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, which are known to affect the retinal blood vessels' appearance. This work proposes an unsupervised method for the segmentation of retinal vessels images using a combined matched filter, Frangi's filter and Gabor Wavelet filter to enhance the images. The combination of these three filters in order to improve the segmentation is the main motivation of this work. We investigate two approaches to perform the filter combination: weighted mean and median ranking. Segmentation methods are tested after the vessel enhancement. Enhanced images with median ranking are segmented using a simple threshold criterion. Two segmentation procedures are applied when considering enhanced retinal images using the weighted mean approach. The first method is based on deformable models and the second uses fuzzy C-means for the image segmentation. The procedure is evaluated using two public image databases, Drive and Stare. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods perform well for vessel segmentation in comparison with state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26919587

  9. Detection of retinal blood vessel changes in multiple sclerosis with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Motl, Robert W.; Moss, Heather E.; Pula, John H.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Although retinal vasculitis is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), it is not known if MS is associated with quantitative abnormalities in retinal blood vessels (BVs). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is suitable for examining the integrity of the anterior visual pathways in MS. In this paper we have compared the size and number of retinal blood vessels in patients with MS, with and without a history of optic neuritis (ON), and control subjects from the cross-sectional retinal images from OCT. Blood vessel diameter (BVD), blood vessel number (BVN), and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) were extracted from OCT images collected from around the optic nerves of 129 eyes (24 control, 24 MS + ON, 81 MS-ON) of 71 subjects. Associations between blood vessel metrics, MS diagnosis, MS disability, ON, and RNFLT were evaluated using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. MS eyes had a lower total BVD and BVN than control eyes. The effect was more pronounced with increased MS disability, and persisted in multivariate models adjusting for RNFLT and ON history. Twenty-nine percent (29%) of MS subjects had fewer retinal blood vessels than all control subjects. MS diagnosis, disability, and ON history were not associated with average blood vessel size. The relationship between MS and lower total BVD/BVN is not accounted for by RNFLT or ON. Further study is needed to determine the relationship between OCT blood vessel metrics and qualitative retinal blood vessel abnormalities in MS. PMID:27375947

  10. Detection of retinal blood vessel changes in multiple sclerosis with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Nolan, Ryan M; Shelton, Ryan L; Pilutti, Lara A; Motl, Robert W; Moss, Heather E; Pula, John H; Boppart, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    Although retinal vasculitis is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), it is not known if MS is associated with quantitative abnormalities in retinal blood vessels (BVs). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is suitable for examining the integrity of the anterior visual pathways in MS. In this paper we have compared the size and number of retinal blood vessels in patients with MS, with and without a history of optic neuritis (ON), and control subjects from the cross-sectional retinal images from OCT. Blood vessel diameter (BVD), blood vessel number (BVN), and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) were extracted from OCT images collected from around the optic nerves of 129 eyes (24 control, 24 MS + ON, 81 MS-ON) of 71 subjects. Associations between blood vessel metrics, MS diagnosis, MS disability, ON, and RNFLT were evaluated using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. MS eyes had a lower total BVD and BVN than control eyes. The effect was more pronounced with increased MS disability, and persisted in multivariate models adjusting for RNFLT and ON history. Twenty-nine percent (29%) of MS subjects had fewer retinal blood vessels than all control subjects. MS diagnosis, disability, and ON history were not associated with average blood vessel size. The relationship between MS and lower total BVD/BVN is not accounted for by RNFLT or ON. Further study is needed to determine the relationship between OCT blood vessel metrics and qualitative retinal blood vessel abnormalities in MS. PMID:27375947

  11. Unsupervised Retinal Vessel Segmentation Using Combined Filters

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Wendeson S.; Teixeira, Joyce Vitor; Ren, Tsang Ing; Cavalcanti, George D. C.; Sijbers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Image segmentation of retinal blood vessels is a process that can help to predict and diagnose cardiovascular related diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, which are known to affect the retinal blood vessels’ appearance. This work proposes an unsupervised method for the segmentation of retinal vessels images using a combined matched filter, Frangi’s filter and Gabor Wavelet filter to enhance the images. The combination of these three filters in order to improve the segmentation is the main motivation of this work. We investigate two approaches to perform the filter combination: weighted mean and median ranking. Segmentation methods are tested after the vessel enhancement. Enhanced images with median ranking are segmented using a simple threshold criterion. Two segmentation procedures are applied when considering enhanced retinal images using the weighted mean approach. The first method is based on deformable models and the second uses fuzzy C-means for the image segmentation. The procedure is evaluated using two public image databases, Drive and Stare. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods perform well for vessel segmentation in comparison with state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26919587

  12. Automated retinal vessel type classification in color fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Barriga, S.; Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Bauman, W.; Soliz, P.

    2013-02-01

    Automated retinal vessel type classification is an essential first step toward machine-based quantitative measurement of various vessel topological parameters and identifying vessel abnormalities and alternations in cardiovascular disease risk analysis. This paper presents a new and accurate automatic artery and vein classification method developed for arteriolar-to-venular width ratio (AVR) and artery and vein tortuosity measurements in regions of interest (ROI) of 1.5 and 2.5 optic disc diameters from the disc center, respectively. This method includes illumination normalization, automatic optic disc detection and retinal vessel segmentation, feature extraction, and a partial least squares (PLS) classification. Normalized multi-color information, color variation, and multi-scale morphological features are extracted on each vessel segment. We trained the algorithm on a set of 51 color fundus images using manually marked arteries and veins. We tested the proposed method in a previously unseen test data set consisting of 42 images. We obtained an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 93.7% in the ROI of AVR measurement and 91.5% of AUC in the ROI of tortuosity measurement. The proposed AV classification method has the potential to assist automatic cardiovascular disease early detection and risk analysis.

  13. Abnormality detection in retinal images using ant colony optimization and artificial neural networks - biomed 2010.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Ganesan; Ramakrishnan, Swaminathan

    2010-01-01

    Optic disc and retinal vasculature are important anatomical structures in the retina of the eye and any changes observed in these structures provide vital information on severity of various diseases. Digital retinal images are shown to provide a meaningful way of documenting and assessing some of the key elements inside the eye including the optic nerve and the tiny retinal blood vessels. In this work, an attempt has been made to detect and differentiate abnormalities of the retina using Digital image processing together with Optimization based segmentation and Artificial Neural Network methods. The retinal fundus images were recorded using standard protocols. Ant Colony Optimization is employed to extract the most significant objects namely the optic disc and blood vessel. The features related to these objects are obtained and corresponding indices are also derived. Further, these features are subjected to classification using Radial Basis Function Neural Networks and compared with conventional training algorithms. Results show that the Ant Colony Optimization is efficient in extracting useful information from retinal images. The features derived are effective for classification of normal and abnormal images using Radial basis function networks compared to other methods. As Optic disc and blood vessels are significant markers of abnormality in retinal images, the method proposed appears to be useful for mass screening. In this paper, the objectives of the study, methodology and significant observations are presented. PMID:20467104

  14. The entoptic view of the retinal vessels.

    PubMed

    Mark, Harry H

    2014-05-01

    The first time the retinal vessels were seen in man in vivo was reported in 1819 by Purkinje as an entoptic view. This was understood to show the shadow of the vessels, an interpretation objected to in 1834 by Brewster. Müller in 1855 (Über die entoptische wahrnehmung der netzhautgefässe, insbesondere als beweismittel für die lichtperception durch die nach hinten gelegenen netzhautelemente, Stahel, Würzburg) used the phenomenon to deduce the location of the photoreceptive layer of the retina, and his conclusion is accepted as true today. Because the phenomenon has some characteristics of an afterimage, it touches on the question of what is subjective and what is objective physical reality. It was recently used clinically to measure potential visual acuity and in the diagnoses of diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration. PMID:23890291

  15. Microvascular Abnormality in Schizophrenia as Shown by Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Madeline H.; Shalev, Idan; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Kapur, Shitij; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Wong, Tien; Belsky, Daniel W.; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie

    2013-01-01

    Objective Retinal and cerebral microvessels are structurally and functionally homologous, but, unlike cerebral microvessels, retinal microvessels can be noninvasively measured in vivo via retinal imaging. Here we test the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality and evaluate the utility of retinal imaging as a tool for future schizophrenia research. Methods Participants were members of the Dunedin Study, a population-representative cohort followed from birth with 95% retention. Study members underwent retinal imaging at age 38 years. We assessed retinal arteriolar and venular caliber for all members of the cohort, including individuals who developed schizophrenia. Results Study members who developed schizophrenia were distinguished by wider retinal venules, suggesting microvascular abnormality reflective of insufficient brain oxygen supply. Analyses that controlled for confounding health conditions suggested that wider retinal venules are not simply an artifact of co-occurring health problems in schizophrenia patients. Wider venules were also associated with a dimensional measure of adult psychosis symptoms and with psychosis symptoms reported in childhood. Conclusions Findings provide initial support for the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality. Moreover, results suggest that the same vascular mechanisms underlie subthreshold symptoms and clinical disorder and that these associations may begin early in life. These findings highlight the promise of retinal imaging as a tool for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:24030514

  16. Vessel Delineation in Retinal Images using Leung-Malik filters and Two Levels Hierarchical Learning

    PubMed Central

    Varnousfaderani, Ehsan S; Yousefi, Siamak; Bowd, Christopher; Belghith, Akram; Goldbaum, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Blood vessel segmentation is important for the analysis of ocular fundus images for diseases affecting vessel caliber, occlusion, leakage, inflammation, and proliferation. We introduce a novel supervised method to evaluate performance of Leung-Malik filters in delineating vessels. First, feature vectors are extracted for every pixel with respect to the response of Leung-Malik filters on green channel retinal images in different orientations and scales. A two level hierarchical learning framework is proposed to segment vessels in retinal images with confounding disease abnormalities. In the first level, three expert classifiers are trained to delineate 1) vessels, 2) background, and 3) retinal pathologies including abnormal pathologies such as lesions and anatomical structures such as optic disc. In the second level, a new classifier is trained to detect vessels and non-vessel pixels based on results of the expert classifiers. Qualitative evaluation shows the effectiveness of the proposed expert classifiers in modeling retinal pathologies. Quantitative results on two standard datasets STARE (AUC = 0.971, Acc=0.927) and DRIVE (AUC = 0.955, Acc =0.903) are comparable with other state-of-the-art vessel segmentation methods. PMID:26958253

  17. Vessel Segmentation in Retinal Images Using Multi-scale Line Operator and K-Means Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Saffarzadeh, Vahid Mohammadi; Osareh, Alireza; Shadgar, Bita

    2014-01-01

    Detecting blood vessels is a vital task in retinal image analysis. The task is more challenging with the presence of bright and dark lesions in retinal images. Here, a method is proposed to detect vessels in both normal and abnormal retinal fundus images based on their linear features. First, the negative impact of bright lesions is reduced by using K-means segmentation in a perceptive space. Then, a multi-scale line operator is utilized to detect vessels while ignoring some of the dark lesions, which have intensity structures different from the line-shaped vessels in the retina. The proposed algorithm is tested on two publicly available STARE and DRIVE databases. The performance of the method is measured by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and the segmentation accuracy. The proposed method achieves 0.9483 and 0.9387 localization accuracy against STARE and DRIVE respectively. PMID:24761376

  18. [Unusual retinal abnormality: retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy].

    PubMed

    Errera, M-H; Dupas, B; Man, H; Gualino, V; Gaudric, A; Massin, P

    2011-03-01

    A diet restricted to rice and boiled fruit and vegetables leads to vitamin C deficiency. We describe the third case, to our knowledge, of retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy. Reduced bilateral visual acuity in a 50-year-old patient was associated with macrocytic anemia, denutrition, and cutaneous ecchymoses. Oral vitamin C treatment provided subjective clinical improvement and regression of the retinal hemorrhages on fundus examination, with no side effects. Vitamin C plays an important role in collagen stability in vascular and bone walls. PMID:21392843

  19. Vasodilator effect of nicorandil on retinal blood vessels in rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Naoto; Saito, Maki; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Kametaka, Sokichi; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2007-07-01

    We examined the effect of nicorandil on retinal blood vessels in rats in vivo. Male Wistar rats (8 to 10 weeks old) were anaesthetised with thiobutabarbital (120 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Fundus images were captured with a digital camera that was equipped with a special objective lens. Diameters of retinal blood vessels were measured with a personal computer. Nicorandil (1-300 microg kg(-1) min(-1), intravenous [i.v.]) increased diameters of retinal blood vessels and decreased systemic blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner. Both responses to nicorandil were attenuated by glibenclamide (20 mg/kg, i.v.), an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent K(+) (K(ATP)) channel blocker. On the other hand, indomethacin (5 mg/kg, i.v.), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, attenuated the vasodilation of retinal blood vessels, but not depressor response, to nicorandil and sodium nitroprusside. Pinacidil (1-300 microg kg(-1) min(-1), i.v.), a K(ATP) channel opener, also dilated retinal blood vessels and decreased systemic blood pressure. The responses to pinacidil were prevented by glibenclamide, but not by indomethacin. The vasodilation of retinal arteriole, but not depressor response, to sodium nitroprusside (1-30 microg kg(-1) min(-1), i.v.), a nitric oxide donor, was attenuated by indomethacin. These results suggest that nicorandil dilates retinal blood vessels through opening of K(ATP) channels and production of prostaglandins that are probably generated by nitric oxide. PMID:17525845

  20. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and retinal vessel calibers in children with thalassemia minor

    PubMed Central

    Acer, Semra; Balcı, Yasemin I; Pekel, Gökhan; Ongun, Tuğba T; Polat, Aziz; Çetin, Ebru N; Yağcı, Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, subfoveal choroidal thickness, and retinal vessel caliber measurements in children with thalassemia minor. Methods: In this cross-sectional and comparative study, 30 thalassemia minor patients and 36 controls were included. Heidelberg spectral domain optical coherence tomography was used for peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, subfoveal choroidal thickness, and retinal vessel caliber measurements. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and subfoveal choroidal thickness between the two groups (p > 0.05). There was no correlation between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and hemoglobin values. Both the arterioral and venular calibers were higher in thalassemia minor group (p < 0.05). Conclusion: There is increased retinal arterioral and venular calibers in children with thalassemia minor compared with controls. PMID:27540484

  1. Comprehensive automatic assessment of retinal vascular abnormalities for computer-assisted retinopathy grading.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vinayak; Agurto, Carla; VanNess, Richard; Nemeth, Sheila; Soliz, Peter; Barriga, Simon

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important signs of systemic disease that presents on the retina is vascular abnormalities such as in hypertensive retinopathy. Manual analysis of fundus images by human readers is qualitative and lacks in accuracy, consistency and repeatability. Present semi-automatic methods for vascular evaluation are reported to increase accuracy and reduce reader variability, but require extensive reader interaction; thus limiting the software-aided efficiency. Automation thus holds a twofold promise. First, decrease variability while increasing accuracy, and second, increasing the efficiency. In this paper we propose fully automated software as a second reader system for comprehensive assessment of retinal vasculature; which aids the readers in the quantitative characterization of vessel abnormalities in fundus images. This system provides the reader with objective measures of vascular morphology such as tortuosity, branching angles, as well as highlights of areas with abnormalities such as artery-venous nicking, copper and silver wiring, and retinal emboli; in order for the reader to make a final screening decision. To test the efficacy of our system, we evaluated the change in performance of a newly certified retinal reader when grading a set of 40 color fundus images with and without the assistance of the software. The results demonstrated an improvement in reader's performance with the software assistance, in terms of accuracy of detection of vessel abnormalities, determination of retinopathy, and reading time. This system enables the reader in making computer-assisted vasculature assessment with high accuracy and consistency, at a reduced reading time. PMID:25571442

  2. Leveraging Multiscale Hessian-Based Enhancement With a Novel Exudate Inpainting Technique for Retinal Vessel Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Annunziata, Roberto; Garzelli, Andrea; Ballerini, Lucia; Mecocci, Alessandro; Trucco, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    Accurate vessel detection in retinal images is an important and difficult task. Detection is made more challenging in pathological images with the presence of exudates and other abnormalities. In this paper, we present a new unsupervised vessel segmentation approach to address this problem. A novel inpainting filter, called neighborhood estimator before filling, is proposed to inpaint exudates in a way that nearby false positives are significantly reduced during vessel enhancement. Retinal vascular enhancement is achieved with a multiple-scale Hessian approach. Experimental results show that the proposed vessel segmentation method outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms reported in the recent literature, both visually and in terms of quantitative measurements, with overall mean accuracy of 95.62% on the STARE dataset and 95.81% on the HRF dataset. PMID:26054078

  3. Automated spectroscopic imaging of oxygen saturation in human retinal vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, D.; Sueda, S.; Matsuoka, N.; Yoshinaga, Y.; Enaida, H.; Okada, T.; Ishibashi, T.

    2009-02-01

    A new automatic visualization procedure for the oxygen saturation imaging from multi-spectral imaging of human retinal vessels has been proposed. Two-wavelength retinal fundus images at 545 and 560 nm, which were oxygen insensitive and oxygen sensitive, respectively, were captured by CCD cameras simultaneously through a beam splitter and interference filters. We applied a morphological processing technique to presume a distribution of incident light including the vessel parts and an optical density (OD) image of each wavelength image. And the OD ratio (OD560/OD545) image was calculated as a relative indicator of oxygen saturation. Furthermore, processing of line convergence index filter was adopted to identify the retinal vessels. Clear difference between retinal arteries and veins was observed in the automated imaging method. In addition, the decrease of oxygen saturation in the retinal artery without breathing could be monitored by the ODR. This method is possible to be applied to real-time monitoring for oxygen saturation of retinal vessels.

  4. Segmentation of Retinal Blood Vessels Based on Cake Filter

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xi-Rong; Ge, Xin; She, Li-Huang; Zhang, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels is significant to diagnosis and evaluation of ocular diseases like glaucoma and systemic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. The retinal blood vessel segmentation for small and low contrast vessels is still a challenging problem. To solve this problem, a new method based on cake filter is proposed. Firstly, a quadrature filter band called cake filter band is made up in Fourier field. Then the real component fusion is used to separate the blood vessel from the background. Finally, the blood vessel network is got by a self-adaption threshold. The experiments implemented on the STARE database indicate that the new method has a better performance than the traditional ones on the small vessels extraction, average accuracy rate, and true and false positive rate. PMID:26636095

  5. Photochemical Thrombosis Of Retinal And Choroidal Vessels Using Rose Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mary Lou; Winward, Kirk; Watson, Brant D.; Hernandez, Eleut

    1989-09-01

    Rose bengal is an effective photosensitizing agent which interacts with argon green light to induce photochemical thrombosis of irradiated vessels. We used focal, low energy irradiation to occlude retinal and choroidal vessels in both albino and pigmented rabbits. Immediately after intravenous injection of rose bengal at concentrations of 10 and 20 mg/kg, irradiation was performed via a slit lamp-delivered argon green laser (514.5 nm) with the aid of fundus contact lens. In 11 eyes, arteries were treated with 50-100 interrupted bursts of 75u spot size at 0.2 sec and 40-100 mW (9 retinal vessels for 1-12 days and variable closure of the surrounding capillaris. Eight eyes were treated with continuous irradiation 2-5 minutes at 7.5-40 mW, 75u spot size (35 retinal and choroidal vessels, serous elevation of the retina, and disc neovascularization. In eight eyes choroidal vessels were irradiated with 10-20 mW, 15-60 sec, 500u spot size (31 retinal edema at 24 hours and permanent closure of choroidal vessels. There was minimal damage to surrounding tissue. Control eyes in all three groups irradiated utilizing the same parameters, but without rose bengal, demonstrated no evidence of thermal injury.

  6. A function for quality evaluation of retinal vessel segmentations.

    PubMed

    Gegúndez-Arias, Manuel Emilio; Aquino, Arturo; Bravo, José Manuel; Marín, Diego

    2012-02-01

    Retinal blood vessel assessment plays an important role in the diagnosis of ophthalmic pathologies. The use of digital images for this purpose enables the application of a computerized approach and has fostered the development of multiple methods for automated vascular tree segmentation. Metrics based on contingency tables for binary classification have been widely used for evaluating the performance of these algorithms. Metrics from this family are based on the measurement of a success or failure rate in the detected pixels, obtained by means of pixel-to-pixel comparison between the automated segmentation and a manually-labeled reference image. Therefore, vessel pixels are not considered as a part of a vascular structure with specific features. This paper contributes a function for the evaluation of global quality in retinal vessel segmentations. This function is based on the characterization of vascular structures as connected segments with measurable area and length. Thus, its design is meant to be sensitive to anatomical vascularity features. Comparison of results between the proposed function and other general quality evaluation functions shows that this proposal renders a high matching degree with human quality perception. Therefore, it can be used to enhance quality evaluation in retinal vessel segmentations, supplementing the existing functions. On the other hand, from a general point of view, the applied concept of measuring descriptive properties may be used to design specialized functions aimed at segmentation quality evaluation in other complex structures. PMID:21926018

  7. Retinal microvascular abnormalities and subclinical magnetic resonance imaging brain infarct: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ning; Mosley, Thomas; Islam, Amirul; Kawasaki, Ryo; Sharrett, A. Richey; Klein, Ronald; Coker, Laura H.; Knopman, David S.; Shibata, Dean K.; Catellier, Diane

    2010-01-01

    ratio 2.12; 95% confidence interval: 1.18–3.81) and progression (odds ratio 2.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.00–5.88). In conclusion, retinal microvascular abnormalities are associated with emergence of subclinical magnetic resonance imaging brain infarcts and white matter lesions, independent of shared risk factors. Retinal vascular imaging may offer a non-invasive tool to investigate the pathogenesis and natural history of cerebral small-vessel disease. PMID:20519327

  8. Automatic classification of retinal vessels into arteries and veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, Meindert; van Ginneken, Bram; Abràmoff, Michael D.

    2009-02-01

    Separating the retinal vascular tree into arteries and veins is important for quantifying vessel changes that preferentially affect either the veins or the arteries. For example the ratio of arterial to venous diameter, the retinal a/v ratio, is well established to be predictive of stroke and other cardiovascular events in adults, as well as the staging of retinopathy of prematurity in premature infants. This work presents a supervised, automatic method that can determine whether a vessel is an artery or a vein based on intensity and derivative information. After thinning of the vessel segmentation, vessel crossing and bifurcation points are removed leaving a set of vessel segments containing centerline pixels. A set of features is extracted from each centerline pixel and using these each is assigned a soft label indicating the likelihood that it is part of a vein. As all centerline pixels in a connected segment should be the same type we average the soft labels and assign this average label to each centerline pixel in the segment. We train and test the algorithm using the data (40 color fundus photographs) from the DRIVE database1 with an enhanced reference standard. In the enhanced reference standard a fellowship trained retinal specialist (MDA) labeled all vessels for which it was possible to visually determine whether it was a vein or an artery. After applying the proposed method to the 20 images of the DRIVE test set we obtained an area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.88 for correctly assigning centerline pixels to either the vein or artery classes.

  9. A Morphological Hessian Based Approach for Retinal Blood Vessels Segmentation and Denoising Using Region Based Otsu Thresholding.

    PubMed

    BahadarKhan, Khan; A Khaliq, Amir; Shahid, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) harm retinal blood vessels in the eye causing visual deficiency. The appearance and structure of blood vessels in retinal images play an essential part in the diagnoses of an eye sicknesses. We proposed a less computational unsupervised automated technique with promising results for detection of retinal vasculature by using morphological hessian based approach and region based Otsu thresholding. Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE) and morphological filters have been used for enhancement and to remove low frequency noise or geometrical objects, respectively. The hessian matrix and eigenvalues approach used has been in a modified form at two different scales to extract wide and thin vessel enhanced images separately. Otsu thresholding has been further applied in a novel way to classify vessel and non-vessel pixels from both enhanced images. Finally, postprocessing steps has been used to eliminate the unwanted region/segment, non-vessel pixels, disease abnormalities and noise, to obtain a final segmented image. The proposed technique has been analyzed on the openly accessible DRIVE (Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction) and STARE (STructured Analysis of the REtina) databases along with the ground truth data that has been precisely marked by the experts. PMID:27441646

  10. A Morphological Hessian Based Approach for Retinal Blood Vessels Segmentation and Denoising Using Region Based Otsu Thresholding

    PubMed Central

    BahadarKhan, Khan; A Khaliq, Amir; Shahid, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) harm retinal blood vessels in the eye causing visual deficiency. The appearance and structure of blood vessels in retinal images play an essential part in the diagnoses of an eye sicknesses. We proposed a less computational unsupervised automated technique with promising results for detection of retinal vasculature by using morphological hessian based approach and region based Otsu thresholding. Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE) and morphological filters have been used for enhancement and to remove low frequency noise or geometrical objects, respectively. The hessian matrix and eigenvalues approach used has been in a modified form at two different scales to extract wide and thin vessel enhanced images separately. Otsu thresholding has been further applied in a novel way to classify vessel and non-vessel pixels from both enhanced images. Finally, postprocessing steps has been used to eliminate the unwanted region/segment, non-vessel pixels, disease abnormalities and noise, to obtain a final segmented image. The proposed technique has been analyzed on the openly accessible DRIVE (Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction) and STARE (STructured Analysis of the REtina) databases along with the ground truth data that has been precisely marked by the experts. PMID:27441646

  11. Fractal analysis reveals reduced complexity of retinal vessels in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Michele; Falco, Teresa; Frontali, Marina; Romano, Silvia; Bagnato, Francesca; Orzi, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) affects mainly small cerebral arteries and leads to disability and dementia. The relationship between clinical expression of the disease and progression of the microvessel pathology is, however, uncertain as we lack tools for imaging brain vessels in vivo. Ophthalmoscopy is regarded as a window into the cerebral microcirculation. In this study we carried out an ophthalmoscopic examination in subjects with CADASIL. Specifically, we performed fractal analysis of digital retinal photographs. Data are expressed as mean fractal dimension (mean-D), a parameter that reflects complexity of the retinal vessel branching. Ten subjects with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CADASIL and 10 sex and age-matched control subjects were enrolled. Fractal analysis of retinal digital images was performed by means of a computer-based program, and the data expressed as mean-D. Brain MRI lesion volume in FLAIR and T1-weighted images was assessed using MIPAV software. Paired t-test was used to disclose differences in mean-D between CADASIL and control groups. Spearman rank analysis was performed to evaluate potential associations between mean-D values and both disease duration and disease severity, the latter expressed as brain MRI lesion volumes, in the subjects with CADASIL. The results showed that mean-D value of patients (1.42±0.05; mean±SD) was lower than control (1.50±0.04; p = 0.002). Mean-D did not correlate with disease duration nor with MRI lesion volumes of the subjects with CADASIL. The findings suggest that fractal analysis is a sensitive tool to assess changes of retinal vessel branching, likely reflecting early brain microvessel alterations, in CADASIL patients. PMID:21556373

  12. Retinal vessel enhancement based on multi-scale top-hat transformation and histogram fitting stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Miao; Zhao, Yu-qian; Wang, Xiao-hong; Dai, Pei-shan

    2014-06-01

    Retinal vessels play an important role in the diagnostic procedure of retinopathy. A new retinal vessel enhancement method is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the optimal bright and dim image features of an original retinal image are extracted by a multi-scale top-hat transformation. Then, the retinal image is enhanced preliminarily by adding the optimal bright image features and removing the optimal dim image features. Finally, the preliminarily enhanced image is further processed by linear stretching with histogram Gaussian curve fitting. The experiments results on the DRIVE and STARE databases show that the proposed method improves the contrast and enhances the details of the retinal vessels effectively.

  13. Wavelength dependence of the apparent diameter of retinal blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Park, Robert; Twietmeyer, Karen; Chipman, Russell; Beaudry, Neil; Salyer, David

    2005-04-01

    Imaging of retinal blood vessels may assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and hypertension. However, close examination reveals that the contrast and apparent diameter of vessels are dependent on the wavelength of the illuminating light. In this study multispectral images of large arteries and veins within enucleated swine eyes are obtained with a modified fundus camera by use of intravitreal illumination. The diameters of selected vessels are measured as a function of wavelength by cross-sectional analysis. A fixed scale with spectrally independent dimension is placed above the retina to isolate the chromatic effects of the imaging system and eye. Significant apparent differences between arterial and venous diameters are found, with larger diameters observed at shorter wavelengths. These differences are due primarily to spectral absorption in the cylindrical blood column. PMID:15813519

  14. Novel algorithm by low complexity filter on retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostampour, Samad

    2011-10-01

    This article shows a new method to detect blood vessels in the retina by digital images. Retinal vessel segmentation is important for detection of side effect of diabetic disease, because diabetes can form new capillaries which are very brittle. The research has been done in two phases: preprocessing and processing. Preprocessing phase consists to apply a new filter that produces a suitable output. It shows vessels in dark color on white background and make a good difference between vessels and background. The complexity is very low and extra images are eliminated. The second phase is processing and used the method is called Bayesian. It is a built-in in supervision classification method. This method uses of mean and variance of intensity of pixels for calculate of probability. Finally Pixels of image are divided into two classes: vessels and background. Used images are related to the DRIVE database. After performing this operation, the calculation gives 95 percent of efficiency average. The method also was performed from an external sample DRIVE database which has retinopathy, and perfect result was obtained

  15. Study of retinal vessel oxygen saturation in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lei-Lei; Dong, Yan-Min; Zong, Yao; Zheng, Qi-Shan; Fu, Yue; Yuan, Yong-Guang; Huang, Xia; Qian, Garrett; Gao, Qian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore how oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels is altered in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). METHODS Fifty BRVO eyes were divided into ischemic (n=26) and non-ischemic (n=24) groups, based on fundus fluorescein angiography. Healthy individuals (n=52 and n=48, respectively) were also recruited as controls for the two groups. The mean oxygen saturations of the occluded vessels and central vessels were measured by oximetry in the BRVO and control groups. RESULTS In the ischemic BRVO group, the occluded arterioles oxygen saturation (SaO2-A, 106.0%±14.3%), instead of the occluded venule oxygen saturation (SaO2-V, 60.8%±9.4%), showed increases when compared with those in the same quadrant vessels (SaO2-A, 86.1%±16.5%) in the contralateral eyes (P<0.05). The oxygen saturations of the central vessels showed similar trends with those of the occluded vessels. In the non-ischemic BRVO group, the occluded and central SaO2-V and SaO2-A showed no significant changes. In both the ischemic and non-ischemic BRVOs, the central SaO2-A was significantly increased when compared to healthy individuals. CONCLUSION Obvious changes in the occluded and central SaO2-A were found in the ischemic BRVO group, indicating that disorders of oxygen metabolism in the arterioles may participate in the pathogenesis of ischemic BRVO. PMID:26949618

  16. A novel retinal vessel extraction algorithm based on matched filtering and gradient vector flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Xia, Mingliang; Xuan, Li

    2013-10-01

    The microvasculature network of retina plays an important role in the study and diagnosis of retinal diseases (age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy for example). Although it is possible to noninvasively acquire high-resolution retinal images with modern retinal imaging technologies, non-uniform illumination, the low contrast of thin vessels and the background noises all make it difficult for diagnosis. In this paper, we introduce a novel retinal vessel extraction algorithm based on gradient vector flow and matched filtering to segment retinal vessels with different likelihood. Firstly, we use isotropic Gaussian kernel and adaptive histogram equalization to smooth and enhance the retinal images respectively. Secondly, a multi-scale matched filtering method is adopted to extract the retinal vessels. Then, the gradient vector flow algorithm is introduced to locate the edge of the retinal vessels. Finally, we combine the results of matched filtering method and gradient vector flow algorithm to extract the vessels at different likelihood levels. The experiments demonstrate that our algorithm is efficient and the intensities of vessel images exactly represent the likelihood of the vessels.

  17. Vasodilator Effects of Elcatonin, a Synthetic Eel Calcitonin, on Retinal Blood Vessels in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asami; Suzawa, Hironori; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of elcatonin, a synthetic derivative of eel calcitonin, on rat retinal blood vessels, and to determine how diabetes affects the retinal vascular responses. Ocular fundus images were captured with an original high-resolution digital fundus camera in vivo. The retinal vascular responses were evaluated by measuring the diameter of retinal blood vessels contained in the digital images. Both systemic blood pressure and heart rate were continuously recorded. Elcatonin increased the diameter of retinal blood vessels but decreased mean blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner, whereas it had no significant effect on heart rate. A diminished retinal vasodilator response and significant pressor response to elcatonin were observed in rats injected intravenously with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor. Intravitreal injection of indomethacin, a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, and SQ22536, an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, markedly attenuated the vasodilator effects of elcatonin on retinal blood vessels. The retinal vasodilator responses to elcatonin were unaffected 2 weeks after the induction of diabetes by a combination of streptozotocin treatment and D-glucose feeding. These results suggest that elcatonin dilates rat retinal blood vessels via NO- and COX-dependent mechanisms and that the adenylyl cyclase-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate system plays a major role in the vasodilator mechanisms. The retinal vasodilatory effects of elcatonin seem to be preserved at early stages of diabetes. PMID:26424018

  18. Vasodilator effects of flunarizine on retinal blood vessels in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masahiro; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intravenous administration of flunarizine on the diameter of retinal blood vessels and blood pressure in anesthetized rats and to compare the effects of this antagonist with those of nicardipine and nifedipine. Retinal vascular images were captured with a fundus camera system for small animals and the diameter of retinal blood vessels contained in the images was measured using image-processing softwares on a personal computer. Blood pressure was continuously measured. Flunarizine [1-30 microg/kg, intravenously (i.v.)] dose-dependently increased the diameter of retinal blood vessels without significantly changing systemic blood pressure. Nicardipine (1-30 microg/kg, i.v.) increased the retinal blood vessel diameter but decreased blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner. Nifedipine (10-100 microg/kg, i.v.) failed to dilate the retinal blood vessels, although it produced comparable depressor responses as those to nicardipine. These results suggest that flunarizine selectively acts on the retinal blood vessels rather than on the peripheral resistance vessels. Flunarizine could therefore be considered as a candidate for therapeutic drugs to treat diseases associated with disorders of retinal circulation without severe cardiovascular side-effects. PMID:19952431

  19. A semi-automated computer tool for the analysis of retinal vessel diameter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Euvrard, Guillaume; Genevois, Olivier; Rivals, Isabelle; Massin, Pascale; Collet, Amélie; Sahel, José-Alain; Paques, Michel

    2013-06-01

    Retinal vessels are directly accessible to clinical observation. This has numerous potential interests for medical investigations. Using the Retinal Vessel Analyzer, a dedicated eye fundus camera enabling dynamic, video-rate recording of micrometric changes of the diameter of retinal vessels, we developed a semi-automated computer tool that extracts the heart beat rate and pulse amplitude values from the records. The extracted data enabled us to show that there is a decreasing relationship between heart beat rate and pulse amplitude of arteries and veins. Such an approach will facilitate the modeling of hemodynamic interactions in small vessels. PMID:23566397

  20. Blood vessel classification into arteries and veins in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondermann, Claudia; Kondermann, Daniel; Yan, Michelle

    2007-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is expected to increase dramatically in coming years; already today it accounts for a major proportion of the health care budget in many countries. Diabetic Retinopathy (DR), a micro vascular complication very often seen in diabetes patients, is the most common cause of visual loss in working age population of developed countries today. Since the possibility of slowing or even stopping the progress of this disease depends on the early detection of DR, an automatic analysis of fundus images would be of great help to the ophthalmologist due to the small size of the symptoms and the large number of patients. An important symptom for DR are abnormally wide veins leading to an unusually low ratio of the average diameter of arteries to veins (AVR). There are also other diseases like high blood pressure or diseases of the pancreas with one symptom being an abnormal AVR value. To determine it, a classification of vessels as arteries or veins is indispensable. As to our knowledge despite the importance there have only been two approaches to vessel classification yet. Therefore we propose an improved method. We compare two feature extraction methods and two classification methods based on support vector machines and neural networks. Given a hand-segmentation of vessels our approach achieves 95.32% correctly classified vessel pixels. This value decreases by 10% on average, if the result of a segmentation algorithm is used as basis for the classification.

  1. Bietti crystalline retinal dystrophy with subfoveal neurosensory detachment and congenital tortuosity of retinal vessels: case report.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Tapas Ranjan; Kesarwani, Siddharth; Jalali, Subhadra

    2011-06-01

    A 34-year-old man presented with reduction and distortion of vision in both the eyes. The best-corrected vision was 20/20 parts, N6 in either eye. The external and slit lamp examination of both the eyes was unremarkable. The fundus examination showed multiple intraretinal crystalline deposits at the posterior pole, extending up to midperiphery, tortuous retinal blood vessels with S-shaped deflections, and absent foveal reflex in both the eyes. There were no corneal crystals, and the color vision was defective in both the eyes. Fundus autofluorescence and fundus fluorescein angiogram (FFA) were suggestive of geographic areas of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choriocapillary (CC) loss. OCT revealed subfoveal neurosensory detachment. Flash ERG and EOG were normal except for a slight decrease in amplitude and delay in latency of pattern ERG waveforms. The Humphrey's visual field showed paracentral scotoma with reduction in the amplitude of waveforms from the corresponding area in the multifocal ERG in both the eyes. Systemic evaluation for crystalline retinopathy was unremarkable. He was diagnosed to be a case of Bietti crystalline retinopathy (local/regional variant). The subfoveal neurosensory detachment could represent early RPE dysfunction caused by these crystals and could account for the mild visual disturbance in both the eyes. Retinal vascular tortuosity and neurosensory detachment seen in this case is the first time to be reported in literature. PMID:21611771

  2. Automatic identification of vessel crossovers in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, L.; Barreira, N.; Penedo, M. G.; Cancela, B.

    2015-02-01

    Crossovers and bifurcations are interest points of the retinal vascular tree useful to diagnose diseases. Specifically, detecting these interest points and identifying which of them are crossings will give us the opportunity to search for arteriovenous nicking, this is, an alteration of the vessel tree where an artery is crossed by a vein and the former compresses the later. These formations are a clear indicative of hypertension, among other medical problems. There are several studies that have attempted to define an accurate and reliable method to detect and classify these relevant points. In this article, we propose a new method to identify crossovers. Our approach is based on segmenting the vascular tree and analyzing the surrounding area of each interest point. The minimal path between vessel points in this area is computed in order to identify the connected vessel segments and, as a result, to distinguish between bifurcations and crossovers. Our method was tested using retinographies from public databases DRIVE and VICAVR, obtaining an accuracy of 90%.

  3. A boosted optimal linear learner for retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, E.; Grisan, E.

    2014-03-01

    Ocular fundus images provide important information about retinal degeneration, which may be related to acute pathologies or to early signs of systemic diseases. An automatic and quantitative assessment of vessel morphological features, such as diameters and tortuosity, can improve clinical diagnosis and evaluation of retinopathy. At variance with available methods, we propose a data-driven approach, in which the system learns a set of optimal discriminative convolution kernels (linear learner). The set is progressively built based on an ADA-boost sample weighting scheme, providing seamless integration between linear learner estimation and classification. In order to capture the vessel appearance changes at different scales, the kernels are estimated on a pyramidal decomposition of the training samples. The set is employed as a rotating bank of matched filters, whose response is used by the boosted linear classifier to provide a classification of each image pixel into the two classes of interest (vessel/background). We tested the approach fundus images available from the DRIVE dataset. We show that the segmentation performance yields an accuracy of 0.94.

  4. Automated detection and classification of major retinal vessels for determination of diameter ratio of arteries and veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Hatanaka, Yuji; Iwase, Tatsuhiko; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    Abnormalities of retinal vasculatures can indicate health conditions in the body, such as the high blood pressure and diabetes. Providing automatically determined width ratio of arteries and veins (A/V ratio) on retinal fundus images may help physicians in the diagnosis of hypertensive retinopathy, which may cause blindness. The purpose of this study was to detect major retinal vessels and classify them into arteries and veins for the determination of A/V ratio. Images used in this study were obtained from DRIVE database, which consists of 20 cases each for training and testing vessel detection algorithms. Starting with the reference standard of vasculature segmentation provided in the database, major arteries and veins each in the upper and lower temporal regions were manually selected for establishing the gold standard. We applied the black top-hat transformation and double-ring filter to detect retinal blood vessels. From the extracted vessels, large vessels extending from the optic disc to temporal regions were selected as target vessels for calculation of A/V ratio. Image features were extracted from the vessel segments from quarter-disc to one disc diameter from the edge of optic discs. The target segments in the training cases were classified into arteries and veins by using the linear discriminant analysis, and the selected parameters were applied to those in the test cases. Out of 40 pairs, 30 pairs (75%) of arteries and veins in the 20 test cases were correctly classified. The result can be used for the automated calculation of A/V ratio.

  5. Nitric oxide dilates rat retinal blood vessels by cyclooxygenase-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Naoto; Mori, Asami; Hasebe, Masami; Hoshino, Maya; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2009-10-01

    It has been suggested that nitric oxide (NO) stimulates the cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent mechanisms in the ocular vasculature; however, the importance of the pathway in regulating retinal circulation in vivo remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the role of COX-dependent mechanisms in NO-induced vasodilation of retinal blood vessels in thiobutabarbital-anesthetized rats with and without neuronal blockade (tetrodotoxin treatment). Fundus images were captured with a digital camera that was equipped with a special objective lens. The retinal vascular response was assessed by measuring changes in diameter of the retinal blood vessel. The localization of COX and soluble guanylyl cyclase in rat retina was examined using immunohistochemistry. The NO donors (sodium nitroprusside and NOR3) increased the diameter of the retinal blood vessels but decreased systemic blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of rats with indomethacin, a nonselective COX inhibitor, or SC-560, a selective COX-1 inhibitor, markedly attenuated the vasodilation of retinal arterioles, but not the depressor response, to the NO donors. However, both the vascular responses to NO donors were unaffected by the selective COX-2 inhibitors NS-398 and nimesulide. Indomethacin did not change the retinal vascular and depressor responses to hydralazine, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-guanosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (a membrane-permeable cGMP analog) and 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (a membrane-permeable cAMP analog). Treatment with SQ 22536, an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, but not ODQ, a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, significantly attenuated the NOR3-induced vasodilation of retinal arterioles. The COX-1 immunoreactivity was found in retinal blood vessels. The retinal blood vessel was faintly stained for soluble guanylyl cyclase, although the apparent immunoreactivities on mesenteric and choroidal blood vessels were observed. These results suggest

  6. Abnormal Retinal Development in the Btrc Null Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Baguma-Nibasheka, Mark; Kablar, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Previous microarray analysis revealed beta-transducin repeat containing (Btrc) down-regulation in the retina of mouse embryos specifically lacking cholinergic amacrine cells (CACs) as a result of the absence of skeletal musculature and fetal ocular movements. To investigate the role of Btrc in the determination of retinal cell fate, the present study examined retinal morphology in Btrc−/− mouse fetuses. The Btrc−/− retina showed a normal number of cell layers and number of cells per layer with normal cell proliferation and apoptosis. However, there was a complete absence of CACs and a decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing amacrine cells. The population of other amacrine cell subtypes was normal, whereas that of the precursor cells was decreased. There was also a reduction in the number of retinal ganglion cells, whereas their progenitors were increased. These findings suggest a role for Btrc in regulating the eventual ratio of resulting differentiated retinal cell types. PMID:19705444

  7. Retinal Vascular Abnormalities in NEMO-Deficient Mice: An Animal Model for Incontinentia Pigmenti

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Stephen F.; McLeod, D. Scott; Otsuji, T.; Goldberg, Morton F.; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with incontinentia pigmenti (IP) have a mutation in the nuclear factor-kappa-β essential modulator (NEMO) gene, and mice with a targeted deletion of NEMO exhibit skin pathology remarkably similar to the human disease. This study characterizes the retinal vascular abnormalities of NEMO-deficient mice, and compares this phenotype to known features of human IP. Nineteen heterozygous NEMO-deficient female mice, ages ranging from post-natal day 8 (P-8) through 6.5 months of life, were studied. Eyes were sectioned and stained either whole or as retinal flat mounts after incubation for enzyme histochemical demonstration of ADPase, which labels the vasculature. With maturation, retinal arteriolar abnormalities became evident at 3 months of age. Global assessment of the retinal vasculature with ADPase staining showed increased arteriolar tortuosity. Microscopic examination of sections of ADPase-incubated retinas revealed arteriolar luminal narrowing due to endothelial cell hypertrophy and increased basement membrane deposition. Venous morphology was normal. This study characterized the histological retinal phenotype of heterozygous NEMO-deficient female mice. Most striking were retinal arteriolar abnormalities, including luminal narrowing, endothelial cell hypertrophy, and basement membrane thickening. Retinal flat mounts revealed arteriolar tortuosity without evidence of vaso-occlusion or neovascularization. PMID:19068214

  8. An efficient algorithm for measurement of retinal vessel diameter from fundus images based on directional filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin

    2011-02-01

    Automatic measurement of vessels from fundus images is a crucial step for assessing vessel anomalies in ophthalmological community, where the change in retinal vessel diameters is believed to be indicative of the risk level of diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, a new retinal vessel diameter measurement method by combining vessel orientation estimation and filter response is proposed. Its interesting characteristics include: (1) different from the methods that only fit the vessel profiles, the proposed method extracts more stable and accurate vessel diameter by casting this problem as a maximal response problem of a variation of Gabor filter; (2) the proposed method can directly and efficiently estimate the vessel's orientation, which is usually captured by time-consuming multi-orientation fitting techniques in many existing methods. Experimental results shows that the proposed method both retains the computational simplicity and achieves stable and accurate estimation results.

  9. An ensemble classification-based approach applied to retinal blood vessel segmentation.

    PubMed

    Fraz, Muhammad Moazam; Remagnino, Paolo; Hoppe, Andreas; Uyyanonvara, Bunyarit; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Owen, Christopher G; Barman, Sarah A

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a new supervised method for segmentation of blood vessels in retinal photographs. This method uses an ensemble system of bagged and boosted decision trees and utilizes a feature vector based on the orientation analysis of gradient vector field, morphological transformation, line strength measures, and Gabor filter responses. The feature vector encodes information to handle the healthy as well as the pathological retinal image. The method is evaluated on the publicly available DRIVE and STARE databases, frequently used for this purpose and also on a new public retinal vessel reference dataset CHASE_DB1 which is a subset of retinal images of multiethnic children from the Child Heart and Health Study in England (CHASE) dataset. The performance of the ensemble system is evaluated in detail and the incurred accuracy, speed, robustness, and simplicity make the algorithm a suitable tool for automated retinal image analysis. PMID:22736688

  10. Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities and Risk of Renal Failure in Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yip, WanFen; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Teo, Boon Wee; Tay, Wan Ting; Ikram, M. Kamran; Tai, E. Shyong; Chow, Khuan Yew; Wong, Tien Y.; Cheung, Carol Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinal microvascular signs may provide insights into the structure and function of small vessels that are associated with renal disease. We examined the relationship of retinal microvascular signs with both prevalent and incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a multi-ethnic Asian population. Methods A total of 5763 subjects (aged ≥40 years) from two prospective population-based studies (the Singapore Malay Eye Study and the Singapore Prospective Study) were included for the current analysis. Retinopathy was graded using the modified Airlie House classification system. Retinal vascular parameters were measured using computer-assisted programs to quantify the retinal vessel widths (arteriolar and venular caliber) and retinal vascular network (fractal dimension). Data on ESRD was obtained by record linkage with the ESRD cases registered by National Registry of Diseases Office, Singapore. Multi-variable adjusted regression analyses were performed to assess the associations of baseline retinal vascular parameters and prevalent and incident ESRD. Results At baseline, 21(0.36%) persons had prevalent ESRD. During a median follow-up of 4.3 years, 33 (0.57%) subjects developed ESRD. In our analyses, retinopathy was associated with prevalent ESRD (multi-variable adjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–8.05) and incident ESRD (multi-variable adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.51, 95%CI: 1.14–5.54). This association was largely seen in person with diabetes (HR, 2.60, 95%CI: 1.01–6.66) and not present in persons without diabetes (HR, 1.65, 95%CI: 0.14–18.98). Retinal arteriolar caliber, retinal venular caliber and retinal vascular fractal dimension were not associated with ESRD. Conclusion Retinopathy signs in persons with diabetes are related to an increased risk of ESRD; however, other microvascular changes in the retina are not associated with ESRD. PMID:25658337

  11. Vasodilator effects of ibudilast on retinal blood vessels in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masahiro; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2009-11-01

    Ibudilast (3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo[1,5-alpha]pyridine) is clinically used as a cerebral vasodilator in Japan. However, the effects of ibudilast on retinal blood vessels have not been fully examined. The aim of this study, therefore, was to examine the effects of ibudilast on retinal blood vessels in rats in vivo. Male Wistar rats (8 to 10 weeks old) were anesthetized with thiobutabarbital (120 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)). Retinal vascular images were captured with a fundus camera system for small animals, and the diameter of retinal blood vessels was measured. Ibudilast (0.1 and 1 mg/kg, intravenously (i.v.)) elicited a sustained increase in the diameter of retinal blood vessels and heart rate without altering systemic blood pressure. The effects of ibudilast were significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (5 mg/kg, i.p.). These results suggest that ibudilast dilates retinal blood vessels through cyclooxygenase-dependent mechanisms in rats in vivo. PMID:19881310

  12. Automated method for the identification and analysis of vascular tree structures in retinal vessel network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vinayak S.; Garvin, Mona K.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2011-03-01

    Structural analysis of retinal vessel network has so far served in the diagnosis of retinopathies and systemic diseases. The retinopathies are known to affect the morphologic properties of retinal vessels such as course, shape, caliber, and tortuosity. Whether the arteries and the veins respond to these changes together or in tandem has always been a topic of discussion. However the diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity have been diagnosed with the morphologic changes specific either to arteries or to veins. Thus a method describing the separation of retinal vessel trees imaged in a two dimensional color fundus image may assist in artery-vein classification and quantitative assessment of morphologic changes particular to arteries or veins. We propose a method based on mathematical morphology and graph search to identify and label the retinal vessel trees, which provides a structural mapping of vessel network in terms of each individual primary vessel, its branches and spatial positions of branching and cross-over points. The method was evaluated on a dataset of 15 fundus images resulting into an accuracy of 92.87 % correctly assigned vessel pixels when compared with the manual labeling of separated vessel trees. Accordingly, the structural mapping method performs well and we are currently investigating its potential in evaluating the characteristic properties specific to arteries or veins.

  13. Intravenously administered phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors dilate retinal blood vessels in rats.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Tomoyo; Mori, Asami; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we examined effects of intravenously administered inhibitors of phosphodiesterase 4 (rolipram and 4-(3-butoxy-4-methoxybenzyl)-2-imidazolidinone (Ro-20-1724)) and non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (theophylline) on diameter of retinal blood vessel and fundus (retinal/choroidal) blood flow in rats. Male Wistar rats (8- to 10-week-old) were treated with tetrodotoxin (50 microg/kg, i.v.) to eliminate any nerve activity and prevent the eye movement under artificial ventilation. Methoxamine was used to maintain adequate systemic circulation. Ocular fundus images were captured with an original high-resolution digital fundus camera for small animals. Diameters of retinal blood vessels contained in the digital images were measured using image-processing softwares on a personal computer. Fundus blood flow was measured using a laser Doppler flow meter. Both rolipram (0.01-10 microg/kg/min, i.v.) and Ro-20-1724 (0.01-10 microg/kg/min, i.v.) increased diameters of retinal blood vessels in a dose-dependent manner without significant effect on systemic blood pressure, heart rate and fundus blood flow. The effects of phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors on retinal arterioles were greater than those on retinal venules. Similarly, theophylline (0.1-10 mg/kg/min, i.v.) dilated retinal blood vessels, whereas it decreased blood pressure and increased heart rate markedly. These results suggest that phosphodiesterase 4 contributes to maintenance of retinal vascular tone. Inhibitors of phosphodiesterase 4 could be considered as a candidate for therapeutic drugs to treat diseases associated with disorders of retinal circulation without severe cardiovascular side-effects. PMID:19027003

  14. Retinal vessel extraction by means of motion contrast, matched filter and combined corner-edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Xia, Mingliang; Xuan, Li

    2014-05-01

    The microvasculature network of retina plays an important role in understanding of the retinal function and diagnosis of many diseases. Although it is possible to noninvasively acquire diffraction-limited resolution retinal images at microscopic cellular level, noises and other structures still make it difficult for diagnosis. In this paper, a new vessel extraction method is introduced. First, we use motion contrast method to trace the motion of the blood components and get the main vessel contour. Second, an improved matched filter method is applied to extract the vessel contour while the single-side edges are eliminated. Then, the combined corner/edge detector is adopted to eliminate the elongated fragments caused by the motion artifacts. Finally, we use mathematical morphology method to dilate the edges of vessels acquired in last step and obtain the exact contour of the vessels. The contrast of the vessels is significantly enhanced and the noises as well as other structures are effectively eliminated.

  15. Changes in retinal vessels related to varicocele: a pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Coşkun, M; Ilhan, N; Elbeyli, A; Rifaioğlu, M M; Inci, M; Davran, R; Tuzcu, E A; Yarbağ, A; Davarci, M; Gökçe, A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether retinal vasculature changes had occurred (retinal artery diameter, retinal vein diameter and artery/vein ratio) in patients with varicocele. This pilot study included 50 healthy subjects with any eye disease apart from slight refractive errors and 55 patients with varicocele. Retinal arteriolar and venular diameters were measured and summarised as central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE) and central retinal venular equivalent (CRVE). Retinal microvascular diameters and the arteriolar-to-venular ratio (AVR) were assessed with a digital retinal camera. All measurements and calculations were performed using a computer-based program. The mean CRAE value was 151.8 ± 3.6 μm in the study group and 150.4 ± 4.5 μm in the control group. Mean CRVE value was 209.4 ± 5.9 μm in the study group and 200.1 ± 8.7 μm in the control group. AVR was found 0.72 ± 0.02 in the study group and 0.75 ± 0.03 in the control group. There were significant differences between groups in terms of CRVE and AVR. There were no significant differences between groups in terms of CRAE. The results of this study showed that the patients with varicocele showed significant changes on retinal vascular diameter. PMID:26314401

  16. Evaluation of Retinal Vessel Morphology in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hidding, Ute; Keserü, Matthias; Keserü, Diana; Hassenstein, Andrea; Stemplewitz, Birthe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The retina has been found affected in Parkinson’s disease (PD). It is unclear if this is due to neurodegeneration of local dopamine-dependent retinal cells, a result of central nervous degeneration including the optic nerve or retinal small vessel disease. This study aimed to detect changes of the retinal vasculature in PD patients compared to controls. Methods We examined 49 PD patients and 49 age- and sex-matched healthy controls by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with a circular scan centred at the optic disc. Vessels within the retinal nerve fibre layer were identified by an automated algorithm and thereafter manually labelled as artery or vein. Layer segmentation, vessel lumen and direct surrounding tissue were marked automatically with a grey value and the contrast between both values in relation to the surrounding tissue was calculated. The differences in these grey value ratios among subjects were determined and used as an indicator for differences in vessel morphology. Furthermore, the diameters of the veins and arteries were measured and then compared between the groups. Results The contrast of retinal veins was significantly lower in PD patients compared to controls, which indicates changes in vessel morphology in PD. The contrast of arteries was not significantly different. Disease duration, disease stage according to Hoehn and Yahr or age did not influence the grey value ratios in PD patients. Vessel diameter in either veins or arteries did not differ between subject groups. The contrast of retinal veins contralateral to the clinically predominant and first affected side was significantly lower compared to the ipsilateral side. Conclusion Our data show a potential difference of the retinal vasculature in PD patients compared to controls. Vascular changes in the retina of PD patients might contribute to vision-related complaints in PD. PMID:27525728

  17. Automated artery-venous classification of retinal blood vessels based on structural mapping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vinayak S.; Garvin, Mona K.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2012-03-01

    Retinal blood vessels show morphologic modifications in response to various retinopathies. However, the specific responses exhibited by arteries and veins may provide a precise diagnostic information, i.e., a diabetic retinopathy may be detected more accurately with the venous dilatation instead of average vessel dilatation. In order to analyze the vessel type specific morphologic modifications, the classification of a vessel network into arteries and veins is required. We previously described a method for identification and separation of retinal vessel trees; i.e. structural mapping. Therefore, we propose the artery-venous classification based on structural mapping and identification of color properties prominent to the vessel types. The mean and standard deviation of each of green channel intensity and hue channel intensity are analyzed in a region of interest around each centerline pixel of a vessel. Using the vector of color properties extracted from each centerline pixel, it is classified into one of the two clusters (artery and vein), obtained by the fuzzy-C-means clustering. According to the proportion of clustered centerline pixels in a particular vessel, and utilizing the artery-venous crossing property of retinal vessels, each vessel is assigned a label of an artery or a vein. The classification results are compared with the manually annotated ground truth (gold standard). We applied the proposed method to a dataset of 15 retinal color fundus images resulting in an accuracy of 88.28% correctly classified vessel pixels. The automated classification results match well with the gold standard suggesting its potential in artery-venous classification and the respective morphology analysis.

  18. Retinal Vessel Segmentation: An Efficient Graph Cut Approach with Retinex and Local Phase

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yitian; Liu, Yonghuai; Wu, Xiangqian; Harding, Simon P.; Zheng, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    Our application concerns the automated detection of vessels in retinal images to improve understanding of the disease mechanism, diagnosis and treatment of retinal and a number of systemic diseases. We propose a new framework for segmenting retinal vasculatures with much improved accuracy and efficiency. The proposed framework consists of three technical components: Retinex-based image inhomogeneity correction, local phase-based vessel enhancement and graph cut-based active contour segmentation. These procedures are applied in the following order. Underpinned by the Retinex theory, the inhomogeneity correction step aims to address challenges presented by the image intensity inhomogeneities, and the relatively low contrast of thin vessels compared to the background. The local phase enhancement technique is employed to enhance vessels for its superiority in preserving the vessel edges. The graph cut-based active contour method is used for its efficiency and effectiveness in segmenting the vessels from the enhanced images using the local phase filter. We have demonstrated its performance by applying it to four public retinal image datasets (3 datasets of color fundus photography and 1 of fluorescein angiography). Statistical analysis demonstrates that each component of the framework can provide the level of performance expected. The proposed framework is compared with widely used unsupervised and supervised methods, showing that the overall framework outperforms its competitors. For example, the achieved sensitivity (0:744), specificity (0:978) and accuracy (0:953) for the DRIVE dataset are very close to those of the manual annotations obtained by the second observer. PMID:25830353

  19. Associations between Depression and Anxiety Symptoms with Retinal Vessel Caliber in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Madeline H.; Gillespie, Nathan A.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Hickie, Ian B.; Lu, Yi; MacGregor, Stuart; Medland, Sarah E.; Sun, Cong; Wong, Tien Y.; Wright, Margie; Zhu, Gu; Martin, Nicholas G.; Mackey, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous longitudinal studies suggest that depression and anxiety are associated with risk for cardiovascular disease. The aim of the present study was to test whether an association between depression and anxiety symptoms and retinal vessel caliber, an indicator of subclinical cardiovascular risk, is apparent as early as adolescence and young adulthood. Methods Participants were 865 adolescents and young adults who participated in the Brisbane Longitudinal Twin Study and the Twin Eye Study in Tasmania. Participants completed the Somatic and Psychological Health Report (SPHERE), including assessments of depression/anxiety and somatic symptom subscales, when they were M=16.5 years, and they underwent retinal imaging M=2.5 years later (range=2 years before to 7 years after the depression/anxiety assessment). Retinal vessel caliber was assessed using computer software. Results: Depression and anxiety symptoms were associated with wider retinal arteriolar caliber in this sample of adolescents and young adults (β=0.09, p=.016), even after adjusting for other cardiovascular risk factors (β=0.08, p=.025). Multiple regression analyses revealed that affective symptoms of depression/anxiety were associated with retinal vessel caliber independently of somatic symptoms. Conclusions Depression and anxiety symptoms are associated with measurable signs in the retinal microvasculature in early life, suggesting that pathological microvascular mechanisms may be operative in the association between depression and anxiety with cardiovascular disease starting as early as adolescence. PMID:25373892

  20. Beta-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation of retinal blood vessels is reduced in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Taisuke; Sato, Ayumi; Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of epinephrine and dopamine on retinal blood vessels in streptozotocin (STZ, 80 mg/kg, i.p.)-treated rats and age-matched control rats to determine whether diabetes mellitus alters the retinal vascular responses to circulating catecholamines. Experiments were performed 6-8 weeks after treatment with STZ or the vehicle. The fundus images were captured with the digital fundus camera system for small animals we developed and diameters of retinal blood vessels contained in the digital images were measured. Epinephrine increased the diameters of retinal blood vessels, but the vasodilator responses were reduced in diabetic rats. Dopamine produced a biphasic retinal vascular response with an initial vasoconstriction followed by a vasodilation. The vasoconstrictor effects of dopamine on retinal arterioles were enhanced in diabetic rats, whereas the difference between the two groups was abolished by treatment with propranolol. The vasodilator effect of isoproterenol, but not of the activator of adenylyl cyclase colforsin, on retinal blood vessels was reduced in diabetic rats. No difference in vasoconstriction of retinal blood vessels to phenylephrine between non-diabetic and diabetic rats was observed. The vasodilator responses of retinal blood vessels to 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium, a ganglionic nicotinic receptor agonist, were also attenuated in diabetic rats. These results suggest that diabetes mellitus alters the retinal vascular responses to circulating catecholamines and the impairment of vasodilator responses mediated by beta-adrenoceptors contributes to the alteration. PMID:18585480

  1. Light adaptation does not prevent early retinal abnormalities in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Joanna; Burian, Michael A.; Newman, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    The aetiology of diabetic retinopathy (DR), the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, remains controversial. One hypothesis holds that retinal hypoxia, exacerbated by the high O2 consumption of rod photoreceptors in the dark, is a primary cause of DR. Based on this prediction we investigated whether early retinal abnormalities in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats are alleviated by preventing the rods from dark adapting. Diabetic rats and their non-diabetic littermates were housed in a 12:12 hour light-dim light photocycle (30 lux during the day and 3 lux at night). Progression of early retinal abnormalities in diabetic rats was assessed by monitoring the ERG b-wave and oscillatory potentials, Müller cell reactive gliosis, and neuronal cell death, as assayed by TUNEL staining and retinal thickness at 6 and 12 weeks after diabetes induction. Maintaining diabetic animals in a dim-adapting light did not slow the progression of these neuronal and glial changes when compared to diabetic rats maintained in a standard 12:12 hour light-dark photocycle (30 lux during the day and 0 lux at night). Our results indicate that neuronal and glial abnormalities in early stages of diabetes are not exacerbated by rod photoreceptor O2 consumption in the dark. PMID:26852722

  2. Interactive retinal vessel centreline extraction and boundary delineation using anisotropic fast marching and intensities consistency.

    PubMed

    Da Chen; Cohen, Laurent D

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new interactive retinal vessels extraction method with anisotropic fast marching (AFM) based on the observation that one vessel may have the property of local intensities consistency. Our goal is to extract both the centrelines and boundaries between two given points. The proposed method consists of two stages: the first stage aims to finding the vessel centrelines using AFM and local intensities consistency roughly, while the second stage is to refine the centrelines from the previous stage using constrained Riemannian metric based AFM, and get the boundaries of the vessels simultaneously. Experiments show that results of our method outperform the classical minimal path method [1]. PMID:26737257

  3. Retinal Vessel Caliber and Lifelong Neuropsychological Functioning: An Investigative Tool for Cognitive Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Idan; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Wong, Tien Y.; Meier, Madeline H.; Houts, Renate M.; Ding, Jie; Cheung, Carol YL; Ikram, M. Kamram; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie

    2013-01-01

    Why do more intelligent people live healthier and longer lives? One possibility is that intelligence tests assess health of the brain, but psychological science has lacked technology to evaluate this hypothesis. Digital retinal imaging, a new non-invasive method to visualize microcirculation in the eye, may reflect vascular conditions in the brain. We studied the association between retinal vessel caliber and neuropsychological functioning in the representative Dunedin birth cohort. Wider venular caliber was associated with poorer neuropsychological functioning at midlife, independent of potentially confounding factors. This association was not limited to any specific test domain, and extended to informant-reports of cognitive difficulties in everyday life. Moreover, wider venular caliber was associated with lower childhood IQ tested 25 years earlier. The finding indicates that retinal venular caliber may be an indicator of neuropsychological health years before dementing diseases’ onset, and suggests digital retinal imaging as an investigative tool for psychological science. PMID:23678508

  4. Adaptive Thresholding Technique for Retinal Vessel Segmentation Based on GLCM-Energy Information

    PubMed Central

    Mapayi, Temitope; Viriri, Serestina; Tapamo, Jules-Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Although retinal vessel segmentation has been extensively researched, a robust and time efficient segmentation method is highly needed. This paper presents a local adaptive thresholding technique based on gray level cooccurrence matrix- (GLCM-) energy information for retinal vessel segmentation. Different thresholds were computed using GLCM-energy information. An experimental evaluation on DRIVE database using the grayscale intensity and Green Channel of the retinal image demonstrates the high performance of the proposed local adaptive thresholding technique. The maximum average accuracy rates of 0.9511 and 0.9510 with maximum average sensitivity rates of 0.7650 and 0.7641 were achieved on DRIVE and STARE databases, respectively. When compared to the widely previously used techniques on the databases, the proposed adaptive thresholding technique is time efficient with a higher average sensitivity and average accuracy rates in the same range of very good specificity. PMID:25802550

  5. Laser Cyclophotocoagulation Enhances the Regulative Capacity of Retinal Vessels in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Kremmer, Stephan; Anastassiou, Gerasimos; Schallenberg, Maurice; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; W, Vilser; J, Michael Selbach

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of laser surgical IOP reduction by means of transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (CPC) on retinal blood flow parameters in glaucoma patients using Dynamic Vessel Analysis (DVA). Materials and Methodology: 26 patients (average age: 70 years) with a long history of primary open angle glaucoma underwent CPC. The effect on the reactive capacity of retinal vessels was assessed before and 6-8 weeks after CPC by means of the Dynamic Vessel Analyzer (DVA) using flicker light provocation. Results: In our group of POAG patients, IOP was significantly reduced about approximately 20% by CPC while systemic blood pressure and heart rate were not changed. The most obvious differences between the pre- and postoperative DVA measurements could be observed in the maximal dilation of the retinal arteries which increased from 0.75 % (+/- 0.6) to 3.17 % (+/- 0.5) with an average increase of 2.4 % (p<0.01). In addition, the ability of the arteries for constriction improved significantly (p<0.05) while the dynamic responses of the veins and the initial baseline values (MU) of the vessel diameters did not change. Conclusions: Our results of DVA measurements after an IOP-lowering laser surgical intervention (CPC) reveal a significant recovery of the regulative capacity of retinal arteries in glaucoma patients that has up to now neither been properly documented nor appreciated. Future studies with long-term follow-up must determine the clinical importance of these findings for the treatment of glaucoma patients. PMID:25067978

  6. Rotation invariant eigenvessels and auto-context for retinal vessel detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montuoro, Alessio; Simader, Christian; Langs, Georg; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Retinal vessels are one of the few anatomical landmarks that are clearly visible in various imaging modalities of the eye. As they are also relatively invariant to disease progression, retinal vessel segmentation allows cross-modal and temporal registration enabling exact diagnosing for various eye diseases like diabetic retinopathy, hypertensive retinopathy or age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Due to the clinical significance of retinal vessels many different approaches for segmentation have been published in the literature. In contrast to other segmentation approaches our method is not specifically tailored to the task of retinal vessel segmentation. Instead we utilize a more general image classification approach and show that this can achieve comparable results. In the proposed method we utilize the concepts of eigenfaces and auto-context. Eigenfaces have been described quite extensively in the literature and their performance is well known. They are however quite sensitive to translation and rotation. The former was addressed by computing the eigenvessels in local image windows of different scales, the latter by estimating and correcting the local orientation. Auto-context aims to incorporate automatically generated context information into the training phase of classification approaches. It has been shown to improve the performance of spinal cord segmentation4 and 3D brain image segmentation. The proposed method achieves an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of Az = 0.941 on the DRIVE data set, being comparable to current state-of-the-art approaches.

  7. Validation of the automatic image analyser to assess retinal vessel calibre (ALTAIR): a prospective study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ortiz, Luis; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Recio-Rodríguez, Jose I; Maderuelo-Fernández, Jose A; Chamoso-Santos, Pablo; Rodríguez-González, Sara; de Paz-Santana, Juan F; Merchan-Cifuentes, Miguel A; Corchado-Rodríguez, Juan M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The fundus examination is a non-invasive evaluation of the microcirculation of the retina. The aim of the present study is to develop and validate (reliability and validity) the ALTAIR software platform (Automatic image analyser to assess retinal vessel calibre) in order to analyse its utility in different clinical environments. Methods and analysis A cross-sectional study in the first phase and a prospective observational study in the second with 4 years of follow-up. The study will be performed in a primary care centre and will include 386 participants. The main measurements will include carotid intima-media thickness, pulse wave velocity by Sphygmocor, cardio-ankle vascular index through the VASERA VS-1500, cardiac evaluation by a digital ECG and renal injury by microalbuminuria and glomerular filtration. The retinal vascular evaluation will be performed using a TOPCON TRCNW200 non-mydriatic retinal camera to obtain digital images of the retina, and the developed software (ALTAIR) will be used to automatically calculate the calibre of the retinal vessels, the vascularised area and the branching pattern. For software validation, the intraobserver and interobserver reliability, the concurrent validity of the vascular structure and function, as well as the association between the estimated retinal parameters and the evolution or onset of new lesions in the target organs or cardiovascular diseases will be examined. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the clinical research ethics committee of the healthcare area of Salamanca. All study participants will sign an informed consent to agree to participate in the study in compliance with the Declaration of Helsinki and the WHO standards for observational studies. Validation of this tool will provide greater reliability to the analysis of retinal vessels by decreasing the intervention of the observer and will result in increased validity through the use of additional information, especially

  8. 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels in spectral-domain OCT volumes of the optic nerve head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels can provide important information for detecting and tracking retinal vascular diseases including diabetic retinopathy, arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Many studies on 2-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from a variety of medical images have been performed. However, 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes, which is capable of providing geometrically accurate vessel models, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously studied. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a method that can automatically detect 3-D retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain OCT scans centered on the optic nerve head (ONH). The proposed method utilized a fast multiscale 3-D graph search to segment retinal surfaces as well as a triangular mesh-based 3-D graph search to detect retinal blood vessels. An experiment on 30 ONH-centered OCT scans (15 right eye scans and 15 left eye scans) from 15 subjects was performed, and the mean unsigned error in 3-D of the computer segmentations compared with the independent standard obtained from a retinal specialist was 3.4 +/- 2.5 voxels (0.10 +/- 0.07 mm).

  9. Tracing retinal blood vessels by matrix-forest theorem of directed graphs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li; De, Jaydeep; Zhang, Xiaowei; Lin, Feng; Li, Huiqi

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to trace retinal blood vessel trees in fundus images. This task is far from being trivial as the crossover of vessels are commonly encountered in image-based vessel networks. Meanwhile it is often crucial to separate the vessel tree structures in applications such as diabetic retinopathy analysis. In this work, a novel directed graph based approach is proposed to cast the task as label propagation over directed graphs, such that the graph is to be partitioned into disjoint sub-graphs, or equivalently, each of the vessel trees is traced and separated from the rest of the vessel network. Then the tracing problem is addressed by making novel usage of the matrix-forest theorem in algebraic graph theory. Empirical experiments on synthetic as well as publicly available fundus image datasets demonstrate the applicability of our approach. PMID:25333171

  10. Quantification of blood vessel calibre in retinal images of multi-ethnic school children using a model based approach.

    PubMed

    Fraz, M M; Remagnino, P; Hoppe, A; Rudnicka, A R; Owen, C G; Whincup, P H; Barman, S A

    2013-01-01

    Changes and variation in retinal vessel width are related to vascular risk factors and prospectively related to cardiovascular disease in later life. Hence, assessment of vessel width may be a useful physio-marker and potential predictor of cardiovascular status. However, measurement of vessel calibre from retinal images is a challenging process to automate. This paper proposes an automated system to measure vessel calibre in retinal images, which is demonstrated in images of multi-ethnic school children. The diameter measurement is based on the detection of the centreline pixels from a vessel probability map image, determining the vessel orientation at these pixels, extracting the vessel segments and later using a two-dimensional model, which is optimized to fit various types of intensity profiles of vessel segments. The width is then estimated from parameters of the optimized model. The method is also quantitatively analyzed using monochromatic representations of different colour spaces. The algorithm is evaluated on a recently introduced public database CHASE_DB1, which is a subset of retinal images of multi-ethnic children from the Child Heart and Health Study in England (CHASE) dataset. Moreover, the precise estimation of retinal vascular widths is critical for epidemiologists to identify the risk factors. This work also introduces an interactive software tool for epidemiologists, with which retinal vessel calibre can be precisely marked. PMID:23410507

  11. Automated identification of retinal vessels using a multiscale directional contrast quantification (MDCQ) strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Yi; Zhang, Xinyuan; Wang, Ningli E-mail: puj@upmc.edu; Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Zheng, Bin; Pu, Jiantao E-mail: puj@upmc.edu

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: A novel algorithm is presented to automatically identify the retinal vessels depicted in color fundus photographs. Methods: The proposed algorithm quantifies the contrast of each pixel in retinal images at multiple scales and fuses the resulting consequent contrast images in a progressive manner by leveraging their spatial difference and continuity. The multiscale strategy is to deal with the variety of retinal vessels in width, intensity, resolution, and orientation; and the progressive fusion is to combine consequent images and meanwhile avoid a sudden fusion of image noise and/or artifacts in space. To quantitatively assess the performance of the algorithm, we tested it on three publicly available databases, namely, DRIVE, STARE, and HRF. The agreement between the computer results and the manual delineation in these databases were quantified by computing their overlapping in both area and length (centerline). The measures include sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Results: For the DRIVE database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels in area and length were around 90% and 70%, respectively, the accuracy in pixel classification was around 99%, and the precisions in terms of both area and length were around 94%. For the STARE database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels were around 90% in area and 70% in length, and the accuracy in pixel classification was around 97%. For the HRF database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels were around 92% in area and 83% in length for the healthy subgroup, around 92% in area and 75% in length for the glaucomatous subgroup, around 91% in area and 73% in length for the diabetic retinopathy subgroup. For all three subgroups, the accuracy was around 98%. Conclusions: The experimental results demonstrate that the developed algorithm is capable of identifying retinal vessels depicted in color fundus photographs in a relatively reliable manner.

  12. Automated identification of retinal vessels using a multiscale directional contrast quantification (MDCQ) strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Yi; Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Zhang, Xinyuan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Ningli; Pu, Jiantao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A novel algorithm is presented to automatically identify the retinal vessels depicted in color fundus photographs. Methods: The proposed algorithm quantifies the contrast of each pixel in retinal images at multiple scales and fuses the resulting consequent contrast images in a progressive manner by leveraging their spatial difference and continuity. The multiscale strategy is to deal with the variety of retinal vessels in width, intensity, resolution, and orientation; and the progressive fusion is to combine consequent images and meanwhile avoid a sudden fusion of image noise and/or artifacts in space. To quantitatively assess the performance of the algorithm, we tested it on three publicly available databases, namely, DRIVE, STARE, and HRF. The agreement between the computer results and the manual delineation in these databases were quantified by computing their overlapping in both area and length (centerline). The measures include sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Results: For the DRIVE database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels in area and length were around 90% and 70%, respectively, the accuracy in pixel classification was around 99%, and the precisions in terms of both area and length were around 94%. For the STARE database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels were around 90% in area and 70% in length, and the accuracy in pixel classification was around 97%. For the HRF database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels were around 92% in area and 83% in length for the healthy subgroup, around 92% in area and 75% in length for the glaucomatous subgroup, around 91% in area and 73% in length for the diabetic retinopathy subgroup. For all three subgroups, the accuracy was around 98%. Conclusions: The experimental results demonstrate that the developed algorithm is capable of identifying retinal vessels depicted in color fundus photographs in a relatively reliable manner. PMID:25186416

  13. Automated three-dimensional choroidal vessel segmentation of 3D 1060 nm OCT retinal data

    PubMed Central

    Kajić, Vedran; Esmaeelpour, Marieh; Glittenberg, Carl; Kraus, Martin F.; Honegger, Joachim; Othara, Richu; Binder, Susanne; Fujimoto, James G.; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    A fully automated, robust vessel segmentation algorithm has been developed for choroidal OCT, employing multiscale 3D edge filtering and projection of “probability cones” to determine the vessel “core”, even in the tomograms with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Based on the ideal vessel response after registration and multiscale filtering, with computed depth related SNR, the vessel core estimate is dilated to quantify the full vessel diameter. As a consequence, various statistics can be computed using the 3D choroidal vessel information, such as ratios of inner (smaller) to outer (larger) choroidal vessels or the absolute/relative volume of choroid vessels. Choroidal vessel quantification can be displayed in various forms, focused and averaged within a special region of interest, or analyzed as the function of image depth. In this way, the proposed algorithm enables unique visualization of choroidal watershed zones, as well as the vessel size reduction when investigating the choroid from the sclera towards the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that an automatic choroidal vessel segmentation algorithm is successfully applied to 1060 nm 3D OCT of healthy and diseased eyes. PMID:23304653

  14. C-reactive protein and chitinase 3-like protein 1 as biomarkers of spatial redistribution of retinal blood vessels on digital retinal photography in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cekić, Sonja; Cvetković, Tatjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Jovanović, Predrag; Pešić, Milica; Babić, Gordana Stanković; Milenković, Svetislav; Risimić, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) in blood samples with morpohometric parameters of retinal blood vessels in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Blood laboratory examination of 90 patients included the measurement of glycemia, HbA1C, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides and CRP. Levels of YKL-40 were detected and measured in serum by ELISA (Micro VueYKL-40 EIA Kit, Quidel Corporation, San Diego, USA). YKL-40 correlated positively with diameter and negatively with number of retinal blood vessels. The average number of the blood vessels per retinal zone was significantly higher in the group of patients with mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy than in the group with severe form in the optic disc and all five retinal zones. The average outer diameter of the evaluated retinal zones and optic disc vessels was significantly higher in the group with severe compared to the group with mild diabetic retinopathy. Morphological analysis of the retinal vessels on digital fundus photography and correlation with YKL-40 may be valuable for the follow-up of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25172979

  15. Retinal vessel extraction using Lattice Neural Networks with Dendritic Processing.

    PubMed

    Vega, Roberto; Sanchez-Ante, Gildardo; Falcon-Morales, Luis E; Sossa, Humberto; Guevara, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Retinal images can be used to detect and follow up several important chronic diseases. The classification of retinal images requires an experienced ophthalmologist. This has been a bottleneck to implement routine screenings performed by general physicians. It has been proposed to create automated systems that can perform such task with little intervention from humans, with partial success. In this work, we report advances in such endeavor, by using a Lattice Neural Network with Dendritic Processing (LNNDP). We report results using several metrics, and compare against well known methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Multilayer Perceptrons (MLP). Our proposal shows better performance than other approaches reported in the literature. An additional advantage is that unlike those other tools, LNNDP requires no parameters, and it automatically constructs its structure to solve a particular problem. The proposed methodology requires four steps: (1) Pre-processing, (2) Feature computation, (3) Classification and (4) Post-processing. The Hotelling T(2) control chart was used to reduce the dimensionality of the feature vector, from 7 that were used before to 5 in this work. The experiments were run on images of DRIVE and STARE databases. The results show that on average, F1-Score is better in LNNDP, compared with SVM and MLP implementations. Same improvement is observed for MCC and the accuracy. PMID:25589415

  16. Retinal Vessel Analysis (RVA) in the Context of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - A Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Miriam; Clusmann, Hans; Fuest, Matthias; Mueller, Marguerite; Brockmann, Marc Alexander; Vilser, Walthard; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Hoellig, Anke; Seiz, Marcel; Thomé, Claudius; Kotliar, Konstantin; Schubert, Gerrit Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background Timely detection of impending delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is essential to improve outcome, but poses a diagnostic challenge. Retinal vessels as an embryological part of the intracranial vasculature are easily accessible for analysis and may hold the key to a new and non-invasive monitoring technique. This investigation aims to determine the feasibility of standardized retinal vessel analysis (RVA) in the context of SAH. Methods In a prospective pilot study, we performed RVA in six patients awake and cooperative with SAH in the acute phase (day 2–14) and eight patients at the time of follow-up (mean 4.6±1.7months after SAH), and included 33 age-matched healthy controls. Data was acquired using a manoeuvrable Dynamic Vessel Analyzer (Imedos Systems UG, Jena) for examination of retinal vessel dimension and neurovascular coupling. Results Image quality was satisfactory in the majority of cases (93.3%). In the acute phase after SAH, retinal arteries were significantly dilated when compared to the control group (124.2±4.3MU vs 110.9±11.4MU, p<0.01), a difference that persisted to a lesser extent in the later stage of the disease (122.7±17.2MU, p<0.05). Testing for neurovascular coupling showed a trend towards impaired primary vasodilation and secondary vasoconstriction (p = 0.08, p = 0.09 resp.) initially and partial recovery at the time of follow-up, indicating a relative improvement in a time-dependent fashion. Conclusion RVA is technically feasible in patients with SAH and can detect fluctuations in vessel diameter and autoregulation even in less severely affected patients. Preliminary data suggests potential for RVA as a new and non-invasive tool for advanced SAH monitoring, but clinical relevance and prognostic value will have to be determined in a larger cohort. PMID:27388619

  17. Multimodal Retinal Vessel Segmentation from Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and Fundus Photography

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhihong; Niemeijer, Meindert; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.

    2014-01-01

    Segmenting retinal vessels in optic nerve head (ONH) centered spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volumes is particularly challenging due to the projected neural canal opening (NCO) and relatively low visibility in the ONH center. Color fundus photographs provide a relatively high vessel contrast in the region inside the NCO, but have not been previously used to aid the SD-OCT vessel segmentation process. Thus, in this paper, we present two approaches for the segmentation of retinal vessels in SD-OCT volumes that each take advantage of complimentary information from fundus photographs. In the first approach (referred to as the registered-fundus vessel segmentation approach), vessels are first segmented on the fundus photograph directly (using a k-NN pixel classifier) and this vessel segmentation result is mapped to the SD-OCT volume through the registration of the fundus photograph to the SD-OCT volume. In the second approach (referred to as the multimodal vessel segmentation approach), after fundus-to-SD-OCT registration, vessels are simultaneously segmented with a k-NN classifier using features from both modalities. Three-dimensional structural information from the intraretinal layers and neural canal opening obtained through graph-theoretic segmentation approaches of the SD-OCT volume are used in combination with Gaussian filter banks and Gabor wavelets to generate the features. The approach is trained on 15 and tested on 19 randomly chosen independent image pairs of SD-OCT volumes and fundus images from 34 subjects with glaucoma. Based on a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the present registered-fundus and multimodal vessel segmentation approaches [area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85 and 0.89, respectively] both perform significantly better than the two previous OCT-based approaches (AUC of 0.78 and 0.83, p < 0.05). The multimodal approach overall performs significantly better than the other three approaches (p < 0

  18. Pharmacological evidence for the presence of functional beta(3)-adrenoceptors in rat retinal blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asami; Miwa, Tomoyo; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether stimulation of beta(3)-adrenoceptors dilates rat retinal blood vessels and how diabetes affects the vasodilator responses. Images of ocular fundus were captured with an original high-resolution digital fundus camera in vivo. The retinal vascular responses were evaluated by measuring diameter of retinal blood vessels contained in the digital images. Both systemic blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were continuously recorded. The beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonist CL316243 (0.3-10 microg/kg/min, i.v.) increased diameter of retinal arterioles (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 31% increase) and decreased mean blood pressure (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 21% decrease) in a dose-dependent manner. CL316243 produced a small but significant increase in HR (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 9% increase). Both SR59230A (1 mg/kg, i.v.) and L-748337 (50 microg/kg, i.v.), beta(3)-adrenoceptor antagonists, significantly prevented CL316243-induced retinal vasodilator responses. Similar observations were made with another beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonist, BRL37344. The beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol also increased diameter of retinal arterioles (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 43% increase), whereas the drug produced greater decrease in blood pressure (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 46% decrease) and increase in HR (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 16% increase), compared with beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonists. The retinal vasodilator responses to CL316243 and BRL37344 observed under blockade of beta(1)/beta(2)-adrenoceptors with propranolol (2 mg/kg, i.v. bolus followed by 100 microg/kg/min infusion) were unaffected 2 weeks after induction of diabetes by the combination of streptozotocin treatment and D: -glucose feeding. On the other hand, the vasodilator responses to salbutamol of retinal arterioles were significantly reduced in diabetic rats. These results suggest that stimulation of beta(3)-adrenoceptors causes the vasodilation of retinal arterioles in vivo and the vasodilator responses are

  19. Apoptosis regulates endothelial cell number and capillary vessel diameter but not vessel regression during retinal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma C; Koenig, Monica N; Grant, Zoe L; Whitehead, Lachlan; Trounson, Evelyn; Dewson, Grant; Coultas, Leigh

    2016-08-15

    The growth of hierarchical blood vessel networks occurs by angiogenesis. During this process, new vessel growth is accompanied by the removal of redundant vessel segments by selective vessel regression ('pruning') and a reduction in endothelial cell (EC) density in order to establish an efficient, hierarchical network. EC apoptosis has long been recognised for its association with angiogenesis, but its contribution to this process has remained unclear. We generated mice in which EC apoptosis was blocked by tissue-specific deletion of the apoptosis effector proteins BAK and BAX. Using the retina as a model, we found that apoptosis made a minor contribution to the efficiency of capillary regression around arteries where apoptosis was most concentrated, but was otherwise dispensable for vessel pruning. Instead, apoptosis was necessary for the removal of non-perfused vessel segments and the reduction in EC density that occurs during vessel maturation. In the absence of apoptosis, increased EC density resulted in an increase in the diameter of capillaries, but not arteries or veins. Our findings show that apoptosis does not influence the number of vessels generated during angiogenesis. Rather it removes non-perfused vessel segments and regulates EC number during vessel maturation, which has vessel-specific consequences for vessel diameter. PMID:27471260

  20. A Cross-Modality Learning Approach for Vessel Segmentation in Retinal Images.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaoliang; Feng, Bowei; Xie, LinPei; Liang, Ping; Zhang, Huisheng; Wang, Tianfu

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new supervised method for vessel segmentation in retinal images. This method remolds the task of segmentation as a problem of cross-modality data transformation from retinal image to vessel map. A wide and deep neural network with strong induction ability is proposed to model the transformation, and an efficient training strategy is presented. Instead of a single label of the center pixel, the network can output the label map of all pixels for a given image patch. Our approach outperforms reported state-of-the-art methods in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. The result of cross-training evaluation indicates its robustness to the training set. The approach needs no artificially designed feature and no preprocessing step, reducing the impact of subjective factors. The proposed method has the potential for application in image diagnosis of ophthalmologic diseases, and it may provide a new, general, high-performance computing framework for image segmentation. PMID:26208306

  1. Automated detection of kinks from blood vessels for optic cup segmentation in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D. W. K.; Liu, J.; Lim, J. H.; Li, H.; Wong, T. Y.

    2009-02-01

    The accurate localization of the optic cup in retinal images is important to assess the cup to disc ratio (CDR) for glaucoma screening and management. Glaucoma is physiologically assessed by the increased excavation of the optic cup within the optic nerve head, also known as the optic disc. The CDR is thus an important indicator of risk and severity of glaucoma. In this paper, we propose a method of determining the cup boundary using non-stereographic retinal images by the automatic detection of a morphological feature within the optic disc known as kinks. Kinks are defined as the bendings of small vessels as they traverse from the disc to the cup, providing physiological validation for the cup boundary. To detect kinks, localized patches are first generated from a preliminary cup boundary obtained via level set. Features obtained using edge detection and wavelet transform are combined using a statistical approach rule to identify likely vessel edges. The kinks are then obtained automatically by analyzing the detected vessel edges for angular changes, and these kinks are subsequently used to obtain the cup boundary. A set of retinal images from the Singapore Eye Research Institute was obtained to assess the performance of the method, with each image being clinically graded for the CDR. From experiments, when kinks were used, the error on the CDR was reduced to less than 0.1 CDR units relative to the clinical CDR, which is within the intra-observer variability of 0.2 CDR units.

  2. Retinal vessel segmentation using multi-scale textons derived from keypoints.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Fisher, Mark; Wang, Wenjia

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a retinal vessel segmentation algorithm which uses a texton dictionary to classify vessel/non-vessel pixels. However, in contrast to previous work where filter parameters are learnt from manually labelled image pixels our filter parameters are derived from a smaller set of image features that we call keypoints. A Gabor filter bank, parameterised empirically by ROC analysis, is used to extract keypoints representing significant scale specific vessel features using an approach inspired by the SIFT algorithm. We first determine keypoints using a validation set and then derive seeds from these points to initialise a k-means clustering algorithm which builds a texton dictionary from another training set. During testing we use a simple 1-NN classifier to identify vessel/non-vessel pixels and evaluate our system using the DRIVE database. We achieve average values of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 78.12%, 96.68% and 95.05%, respectively. We find that clusters of filter responses from keypoints are more robust than those derived from hand-labelled pixels. This, in turn yields textons more representative of vessel/non-vessel classes and mitigates problems arising due to intra and inter-observer variability. PMID:26265241

  3. The active transport of fluorescein by the retinal vessels and the retina

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Vaz, J. G.; Maurice, D. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The movement of fluorescein across the retinal surface of the rabbit's eye was estimated by measuring the concentration gradient of the dye in the vitreous body. These measurements were made in vivo by means of a slit-lamp fluorophotometer, or were taken from frozen sections of enucleated eyes. 2. In the normal eye, fluorescein does not pass from the blood to the vitreous body across any part of the retina. When injected into the vitreous body it passes rapidly out across the entire retinal surface, even against a very large concentration gradient. 3. A variety of metabolic and competitive inhibitors, effective in blocking organic anion transport in the kidney and liver, tend to abolish this unidirectional movement of fluorescein across the retina. 4. The region occupied by the retinal vessels is more sensitive to inhibition than other areas of the retina. Occlusion of the vessels by diathermy prevents the exchange of fluorescein in this region. 5. It appears, then, that there is an active transport of organic anions out of the vitreous body, both by the retinal capillaries and by the retina itself. The latter system is probably located in the pigment epithelium and seems to be carried forward to the rear surface of the iris. 6. Since the walls of the retinal vessels of the rabbit are freely in contact with the vitreous body, the active transport must take place across the capillary endothelial cells themselves. These vessels have structural and permeability characteristics found only in the central nervous system and it is to be presumed that the anion transport system is shared by the capillaries of the brain. 7. The function of the transport in the retina may be to protect the nervous tissue from toxic materials by preventing their entry from the blood or by removing products of metabolism conjugated as organic anions. Alternatively, the mechanism may be concerned in maintaining the normal adhesion of the retina to the choroid, since retinal detachment was

  4. Association of body composition and blood pressure categories with retinal vessel diameters in primary school children.

    PubMed

    Imhof, Katharina; Zahner, Lukas; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Hanssen, Henner

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in retinal vessel diameters have been shown to be predictive of cardiovascular risk in adults and children. The aim of our study was to examine the association of body composition and blood pressure (BP) categories with retinal vessel diameters in school children. We examined anthropometric parameters, BP and retinal arteriolar (CRAE) and venular (CRVE) diameters as well as the arteriolar-to-venular diameter ratio (AVR) in 391 children (age: 7.3, s.d. 0.4). Differences between the lowest and highest BP quartiles indicated that higher systolic and diastolic BP were associated with narrower CRAE (P<0.001 for both). Children in the highest weight quartile had narrower CRAE compared with the lowest quartile (P=0.05). In the regression analysis, systolic and diastolic BP were associated with arteriolar narrowing (-0.4 measuring units (mu) per mm Hg, 95% confidence interval: [-0.6; -0.3] and -0.6 mu per mm Hg [-0.7; -0.4], respectively; P<0.001 for both). An independent association was found for diastolic BP only. Compared with normotensives (NT; 74.4% of cohort), arteriolar narrowing was already seen in children categorized as pre-hypertensive (PHT) (11.5% of cohort), which was similar to HT children (14.1% of cohort) (NT: mean 207.2 [205.6; 208.7] mu; PHT: 201.7 [197.8; 205.7] mu; HT: 199.7 [196.2; 203.3] mu; P=0.01 for PHT vs. NT and P<0.001 for HT vs. NT in systolic BP). Our results suggest that systolic and diastolic BP are main determinants of retinal arteriolar diameters; and therefore, microvascular health in young children. Pre-hypertension seems to be associated with retinal microvascular alterations early in life. PMID:26763853

  5. New algorithm for detecting smaller retinal blood vessels in fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeAnder, Robert; Bidari, Praveen I.; Mohammed, Tauseef A.; Das, Moumita; Umbaugh, Scott E.

    2010-03-01

    About 4.1 million Americans suffer from diabetic retinopathy. To help automatically diagnose various stages of the disease, a new blood-vessel-segmentation algorithm based on spatial high-pass filtering was developed to automatically segment blood vessels, including the smaller ones, with low noise. Methods: Image database: Forty, 584 x 565-pixel images were collected from the DRIVE image database. Preprocessing: Green-band extraction was used to obtain better contrast, which facilitated better visualization of retinal blood vessels. A spatial highpass filter of mask-size 11 was applied. A histogram stretch was performed to enhance contrast. A median filter was applied to mitigate noise. At this point, the gray-scale image was converted to a binary image using a binary thresholding operation. Then, a NOT operation was performed by gray-level value inversion between 0 and 255. Postprocessing: The resulting image was AND-ed with its corresponding ring mask to remove the outer-ring (lens-edge) artifact. At this point, the above algorithm steps had extracted most of the major and minor vessels, with some intersections and bifurcations missing. Vessel segments were reintegrated using the Hough transform. Results: After applying the Hough transform, both the average peak SNR and the RMS error improved by 10%. Pratt's Figure of Merit (PFM) was decreased by 6%. Those averages were better than [1] by 10-30%. Conclusions: The new algorithm successfully preserved the details of smaller blood vessels and should prove successful as a segmentation step for automatically identifying diseases that affect retinal blood vessels.

  6. Retinal Vessel Oxygen Saturation during 100% Oxygen Breathing in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Olafsdottir, Olof Birna; Eliasdottir, Thorunn Scheving; Kristjansdottir, Jona Valgerdur; Hardarson, Sveinn Hakon; Stefánsson, Einar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To detect how systemic hyperoxia affects oxygen saturation in retinal arterioles and venules in healthy individuals. Methods Retinal vessel oxygen saturation was measured in 30 healthy individuals with a spectrophotometric retinal oximeter (Oxymap T1). Oximetry was performed during breathing of room air, 100% oxygen (10 minutes, 6L/min) and then again room air (10 minutes recovery). Results Mean oxygen saturation rises modestly in retinal arterioles during 100% oxygen breathing (94.5%±3.8 vs. 92.0%±3.7% at baseline, p<0.0001) and dramatically in retinal venules (76.2%±8.0% vs. 51.3%±5.6%, p<0.0001). The arteriovenous difference decreased during 100% oxygen breathing (18.3%±9.0% vs. 40.7%±5.7%, p<0.0001). The mean diameter of arterioles decreased during 100% oxygen breathing compared to baseline (9.7±1.4 pixels vs. 10.3±1.3 pixels, p<0.0001) and the same applies to the mean venular diameter (11.4±1.2 pixels vs. 13.3±1.5 pixels, p<0.0001). Conclusions Breathing 100% oxygen increases oxygen saturation in retinal arterioles and more so in venules and constricts them compared to baseline levels. The dramatic increase in oxygen saturation in venules reflects oxygen flow from the choroid and the unusual vascular anatomy and oxygen physiology of the eye. PMID:26042732

  7. Relation of Blood Pressure to Retinal Vessel Diameter in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Zinman, Bernard; Gardiner, Robert; Suissa, Samy; Sinaiko, Alan R.; Donnelly, Sandra M.; Goodyer, Paul; Strand, Trudy; Mauer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship of blood pressure (BP) and use of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) to retinal vessel diameter in normotensive, normoalbuminuric persons with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Participants Persons with T1DM and gradable fundus photographs both at baseline (n=147) and 5-year follow-up (n=124). Methods Clinic and 24-hour ambulatory BPs (ABP) were measured. Retinal arteriolar and venular diameters were measured using a computer-assisted technique. Individual arteriolar and venular measurements were combined into summary indices that reflect the average retinal arteriolar (central retinal arteriolar equivalent [CRAE]) and venular (central retinal venular equivalent [CRVE]) diameter of an eye, respectively. Main Outcome Measures CRAE and CRVE. Results While controlling for age, study site, glycosylated hemoglobin and ambulatory pulse rate, daytime ambulatory systolic (-0.29 μm effect per 1mmHg, P=.02) and daytime ambulatory diastolic (-0.44 μm effect per 1mmHg, P=.04), nighttime ambulatory systolic (-0.27 μm effect per 1mmHg, P=.03), and 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP (-0.31 μm effect per 1mmHg, P=.03) were cross-sectionally associated with a smaller CRAE. While controlling for age, study site, glycosylated hemoglobin, ambulatory pulse rate and baseline CRAE, no BP measure was associated with a change in CRAE or CRVE over 5 years of follow-up. Treatment with losartan or enalapril was not associated with a statistically significant change in CRAE or CRVE. Conclusions ACEI or ARB therapy does not affect retinal arteriolar or venular diameter in normotensive persons with T1DM. PMID:20142543

  8. Automatic retinal vessel classification using a Least Square-Support Vector Machine in VAMPIRE.

    PubMed

    Relan, D; MacGillivray, T; Ballerini, L; Trucco, E

    2014-01-01

    It is important to classify retinal blood vessels into arterioles and venules for computerised analysis of the vasculature and to aid discovery of disease biomarkers. For instance, zone B is the standardised region of a retinal image utilised for the measurement of the arteriole to venule width ratio (AVR), a parameter indicative of microvascular health and systemic disease. We introduce a Least Square-Support Vector Machine (LS-SVM) classifier for the first time (to the best of our knowledge) to label automatically arterioles and venules. We use only 4 image features and consider vessels inside zone B (802 vessels from 70 fundus camera images) and in an extended zone (1,207 vessels, 70 fundus camera images). We achieve an accuracy of 94.88% and 93.96% in zone B and the extended zone, respectively, with a training set of 10 images and a testing set of 60 images. With a smaller training set of only 5 images and the same testing set we achieve an accuracy of 94.16% and 93.95%, respectively. This experiment was repeated five times by randomly choosing 10 and 5 images for the training set. Mean classification accuracy are close to the above mentioned result. We conclude that the performance of our system is very promising and outperforms most recently reported systems. Our approach requires smaller training data sets compared to others but still results in a similar or higher classification rate. PMID:25569917

  9. Accurate estimation of retinal vessel width using bagged decision trees and an extended multiresolution Hermite model.

    PubMed

    Lupaşcu, Carmen Alina; Tegolo, Domenico; Trucco, Emanuele

    2013-12-01

    We present an algorithm estimating the width of retinal vessels in fundus camera images. The algorithm uses a novel parametric surface model of the cross-sectional intensities of vessels, and ensembles of bagged decision trees to estimate the local width from the parameters of the best-fit surface. We report comparative tests with REVIEW, currently the public database of reference for retinal width estimation, containing 16 images with 193 annotated vessel segments and 5066 profile points annotated manually by three independent experts. Comparative tests are reported also with our own set of 378 vessel widths selected sparsely in 38 images from the Tayside Scotland diabetic retinopathy screening programme and annotated manually by two clinicians. We obtain considerably better accuracies compared to leading methods in REVIEW tests and in Tayside tests. An important advantage of our method is its stability (success rate, i.e., meaningful measurement returned, of 100% on all REVIEW data sets and on the Tayside data set) compared to a variety of methods from the literature. We also find that results depend crucially on testing data and conditions, and discuss criteria for selecting a training set yielding optimal accuracy. PMID:24001930

  10. A Novel Curvature-Based Algorithm for Automatic Grading of Retinal Blood Vessel Tortuosity.

    PubMed

    Aghamohamadian-Sharbaf, Masoud; Pourreza, Hamid Reza; Banaee, Touka

    2016-03-01

    Tortuosity of retinal blood vessels is an important symptom of diabetic retinopathy or retinopathy of prematurity. In this paper, we propose an automatic image-based method for measuring single vessel and vessel network tortuosity of these vessels. Simplicity of the algorithm, low-computational burden, and an excellent matching to the clinically perceived tortuosity are the important features of the proposed algorithm. To measure tortuosity, we use curvature which is an indicator of local inflection of a curve. For curvature calculation, template disk method is a common choice and has been utilized in most of the state of the art. However, we show that this method does not possess linearity against curvature and by proposing two modifications, we improve the method. We use the basic and the modified methods to measure tortuosity on a publicly available data bank and two data banks of our own. While interpreting the results, we pursue three goals. First, to show that our algorithm is more efficient to implement than the state of the art. Second, to show that our method possesses an excellent correlation with subjective results (0.94 correlation for vessel tortuosity, 0.95 correlation for vessel network tortuosity in diabetic retinopathy, and 0.7 correlation for vessel network tortuosity in retinopathy of prematurity). Third, to show that the tortuosity perceived by an expert and curvature possess a nonlinear relation. PMID:25622332

  11. Compensation for retinal vessel density reduces the variation of circumpapillary RNFL in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ivania; Weber, Stephanie; Holzer, Stephan; Fischer, Georg; Vass, Clemens; Resch, Hemma

    2015-01-01

    This work intends to assess circumpapillary retinal vessel density (RVD) at a 3.46 mm diameter circle and correlate it with circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measured with Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography. Furthermore, it aims to evaluate the reduction of intersubject variability of RNFL when considering RVD as a source of information for RNFL distribution. For that, 106 healthy subjects underwent circumpapillary RNFL measurement. Using the scanning laser ophthalmoscope fundus image, thickness and position of retinal vessels were assessed and integrated in a 256-sector RVD profile. The relationship between local RVD value and local RNFL thickness was modeled by linear regression. RNFL was then compensated for RVD variation by regression formulas. A strong statistically significant intrasubject correlation was found for all subjects between RVD and RNFL profiles (mean R = 0.769). In the intersubject regression analysis, 247 of 256 RNFL sectors showed a statistically significant positive correlation with RVD (mean R = 0.423). RVD compensation of RNFL resulted in a relative reduction of up to 20% of the intersubject variance. In conclusion, RVD in a 3.46 mm circle has a clinically relevant influence on the RNFL distribution. RVD may be used to develop more individualized normative values for RNFL measurement, which might improve early diagnosis of glaucoma. PMID:25786232

  12. Retinal Thickness Measured by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Eyes without Retinal Abnormalities: the Beaver Dam Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Chelsea E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Meuer, Stacy M.; Swift, Maria K.; Chandler, Charles S.; Huang, Yijun; Gangaputra, Sapna; Pak, Jeong W.; Danis, Ronald P.; Klein, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine relationships of age, sex, and systemic and ocular conditions with retinal thickness measured by spectral-domain ocular coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in participants without retinal disease. Design Longitudinal study. Methods Setting Population-based cohort. Study Population Persons aged 43-86 years living in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin in 1988-1990. Observation Procedures Retinal thickness was measured via SD-OCT at the Beaver Dam Eye Study examination in 2008-2010. Retinal disease was determined by ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, or SD-OCT. Main Outcome Measures Retinal thickness from the inner limiting membrane to Bruch's membrane. Results The retina was thickest in the inner circle (mean 334.5 μm) and thinnest in the center subfield (285.4 μm). Mean retinal thickness decreased with age in the inner circle (P<0.0001) and outer circle (P<0.0001). Adjusting for age, eyes in men had thicker retinas than eyes in women in the center subfield (P<0.001) and inner circle (P<0.001). Sex, axial length/corneal curvature ratio, and peak expiratory flow rate were associated with center subfield thickness. Sex and peak expiratory flow rate were associated with retinal thickness in the inner circle. Alcohol consumption, age, axial length/corneal curvature ratio, cataract surgery, ocular perfusion pressure, and peak expiratory flow rate were associated with retinal thickness in the outer circle. Conclusions This study provides data for retinal thickness measures in eyes of individuals aged 63 years and older without retinal disease. This information may be useful for clinical trials involving the effects of interventions on retinal thickness and for comparisons with specific retinal diseases affecting the macula. PMID:25461295

  13. Automatic retinal vessel segmentation based on active contours method in Doppler spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenzhong; Liu, Tan; Song, Wei; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Hao F.

    2013-01-01

    We achieved fast and automatic retinal vessel segmentation by employing the active contours method in Doppler spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In a typical OCT B-scan image, we first extracted the phase variations between adjacent A-lines and removed bulk motion. Then we set the initial contour as the boundary of the whole image and iterated until all of the segmented vessel contours became stabilized. Using a typical office computer, the whole segmentation took no more than 50 s, making real-time retinal vessel segmentation possible. We tested the active contours method segmentation in both controlled phantom and in vivo rodent eye images.

  14. Characterization of human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tălu, Stefan; Vlăduţiu, Cristina; Lupaşcu, Carmen A.

    2015-01-01

    AIM To characterize the human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal geometry and lacunarity parameters. METHODS Multifractal analysis using a box counting algorithm was carried out for a set of 12 segmented and skeletonized human retinal images, corresponding to both normal (6 images) and amblyopia states of the retina (6 images). RESULTS It was found that the microvascular geometry of the human retina network represents geometrical multifractals, characterized through subsets of regions having different scaling properties that are not evident in the fractal analysis. Multifractal analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a higher average of the generalized dimensions (Dq) for q=0, 1, 2 indicating a higher degree of the tree-dimensional complexity associated with the human retinal microvasculature network whereas images of healthy subjects show a lower value of generalized dimensions indicating normal complexity of biostructure. On the other hand, the lacunarity analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a lower average of the lacunarity parameter Λ than the corresponding values for normal images (segmented and skeletonized versions). CONCLUSION The multifractal and lacunarity analysis may be used as a non-invasive predictive complementary tool to distinguish amblyopic subjects from healthy subjects and hence this technique could be used for an early diagnosis of patients with amblyopia. PMID:26558216

  15. Analysis by NASA's VESGEN Software of Retinal Blood Vessels Before and After 70-Day Bed Rest: A Retrospective Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghunandan, Sneha; Vyas, Ruchi J.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Taibbi, Giovanni; Zanello, Susana B.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Significant risks for visual impairment associated with increased intracranial pressure (VIIP) are incurred by microgravity spaceflight, especially long-duration missions. Impairments include decreased near visual acuity, posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, optic disc edema and cotton wool spots. We hypothesize that microgravity-induced fluid shifts result in pathological changes within the retinal blood vessels that precede development of visual and other ocular impairments. Potential contributions of retinal vascular remodeling to VIIP etiology are therefore being investigated by NASAs innovative VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software for two studies: (1) head-down tilt in human subjects before and after 70 days of bed rest, and (2) U.S. crew members before and after ISS missions. VESGEN analysis in previous research supported by the US National Institutes of Health identified surprising new opportunities to regenerate retinal vessels during early-stage, potentially reversible progression of the visually impairing and blinding disease, diabetic retinopathy.

  16. A quantum mechanics-based algorithm for vessel segmentation in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssry, Akram; El-Rafei, Ahmed; Elramly, Salwa

    2016-03-01

    Blood vessel segmentation is an important step in retinal image analysis. It is one of the steps required for computer-aided detection of ophthalmic diseases. In this paper, a novel quantum mechanics-based algorithm for retinal vessel segmentation is presented. The algorithm consists of three major steps. The first step is the preprocessing of the images to prepare the images for further processing. The second step is feature extraction where a set of four features is generated at each image pixel. These features are then combined using a nonlinear transformation for dimensionality reduction. The final step is applying a recently proposed quantum mechanics-based framework for image processing. In this step, pixels are mapped to quantum systems that are allowed to evolve from an initial state to a final state governed by Schrödinger's equation. The evolution is controlled by the Hamiltonian operator which is a function of the extracted features at each pixel. A measurement step is consequently performed to determine whether the pixel belongs to vessel or non-vessel classes. Many functional forms of the Hamiltonian are proposed, and the best performing form was selected. The algorithm is tested on the publicly available DRIVE database. The average results for sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy are 80.29, 97.34, and 95.83 %, respectively. These results are compared to some recently published techniques showing the superior performance of the proposed method. Finally, the implementation of the algorithm on a quantum computer and the challenges facing this implementation are introduced.

  17. A quantum mechanics-based algorithm for vessel segmentation in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssry, Akram; El-Rafei, Ahmed; Elramly, Salwa

    2016-06-01

    Blood vessel segmentation is an important step in retinal image analysis. It is one of the steps required for computer-aided detection of ophthalmic diseases. In this paper, a novel quantum mechanics-based algorithm for retinal vessel segmentation is presented. The algorithm consists of three major steps. The first step is the preprocessing of the images to prepare the images for further processing. The second step is feature extraction where a set of four features is generated at each image pixel. These features are then combined using a nonlinear transformation for dimensionality reduction. The final step is applying a recently proposed quantum mechanics-based framework for image processing. In this step, pixels are mapped to quantum systems that are allowed to evolve from an initial state to a final state governed by Schrödinger's equation. The evolution is controlled by the Hamiltonian operator which is a function of the extracted features at each pixel. A measurement step is consequently performed to determine whether the pixel belongs to vessel or non-vessel classes. Many functional forms of the Hamiltonian are proposed, and the best performing form was selected. The algorithm is tested on the publicly available DRIVE database. The average results for sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy are 80.29, 97.34, and 95.83 %, respectively. These results are compared to some recently published techniques showing the superior performance of the proposed method. Finally, the implementation of the algorithm on a quantum computer and the challenges facing this implementation are introduced.

  18. Selective Stimulation of Penumbral Cones Reveals Perception in the Shadow of Retinal Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Spitschan, Manuel; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.; Brainard, David H.

    2015-01-01

    In 1819, Johann Purkinje described how a moving light source that displaces the shadow of the retinal blood vessels to adjacent cones can produce the entopic percept of a branching tree. Here, we describe a novel method for producing a similar percept. We used a device that mixes 56 narrowband primaries under computer control, in conjunction with the method of silent substitution, to present observers with a spectral modulation that selectively targeted penumbral cones in the shadow of the retinal blood vessels. Such a modulation elicits a clear Purkinje-tree percept. We show that the percept is specific to penumbral L and M cone stimulation and is not produced by selective penumbral S cone stimulation. The Purkinje-tree percept was strongest at 16 Hz and fell off at lower (8 Hz) and higher (32 Hz) temporal frequencies. Selective stimulation of open-field cones that are not in shadow, with penumbral cones silenced, also produced the percept, but it was not seen when penumbral and open-field cones were modulated together. This indicates the need for spatial contrast between penumbral and open-field cones to create the Purkinje-tree percept. Our observation provides a new means for studying the response of retinally stabilized images and demonstrates that penumbral cones can support spatial vision. Further, the result illustrates a way in which silent substitution techniques can fail to be silent. We show that inadvertent penumbral cone stimulation can accompany melanopsin-directed modulations that are designed only to silence open-field cones. This in turn can result in visual responses that might be mistaken as melanopsin-driven. PMID:25897842

  19. Improved automated optic cup segmentation based on detection of blood vessel bends in retinal fundus images.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yuji; Nagahata, Yuuki; Muramatsu, Chisako; Okumura, Susumu; Ogohara, Kazunori; Sawada, Akira; Ishida, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of permanent blindness. Retinal imaging is useful for early detection of glaucoma. In order to evaluate the presence of glaucoma, ophthalmologists may determine the cup and disc areas and diagnose glaucoma using a vertical optic cup-to-disc (C/D) ratio and a rim-to-disc (R/D) ratio. Previously we proposed a method to determine cup edge by analyzing a vertical profile of pixel values, but this method provided a cup edge smaller than that of an ophthalmologist. This paper describes an improved method using the locations of the blood vessel bends. The blood vessels were detected by a concentration feature determined from the density gradient. The blood vessel bends were detected by tracking the blood vessels from the disc edge to the primary cup edge, which was determined by our previous method. Lastly, the vertical C/D ratio and the R/D ratio were calculated. Using forty-four images, including 32 glaucoma images, the AUCs of both the vertical C/D ratio and R/D ratio by this proposed method were 0.966 and 0.936, respectively. PMID:25569913

  20. Segmentation of retinal vessels by means of directional response vector similarity and region growing.

    PubMed

    Lázár, István; Hajdu, András

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a novel retinal vessel segmentation method. Opposed to the general approach in similar directional methods, where only the maximal or summed responses of a pixel are used, here, the directional responses of a pixel are considered as a vector. The segmentation method is a unique region growing procedure which combines a hysteresis thresholding scheme with the response vector similarity of adjacent pixels. A vessel score map is constructed as the combination of the statistical measures of the response vectors and its local maxima to provide the seeds for the region growing procedure. A nearest neighbor classifier based on a rotation invariant response vector similarity measure is used to filter the seed points. Many techniques in the literature that capture the Gaussian-like cross-section of vessels suffer from the drawback of giving false high responses to the steep intensity transitions at the boundary of the optic disc and bright lesions. To overcome this issue, we also propose a symmetry constrained multiscale matched filtering technique. The proposed vessel segmentation method has been tested on three publicly available image sets, where its performance proved to be competitive with the state-of-the-art and comparable to the accuracy of a human observer, as well. PMID:26432200

  1. A new imaging technique for retinal vessel oximetry: principles and first clinical results in patients with retinal arterial occlusion and diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, M.; Riemer, T.; Vilser, W.; Gehlert, S.; Schweitzer, D.

    2009-02-01

    The oxygen saturation of blood inside retinal vessels is an essential measure for the estimation of oxygen supply to the tissue as well as its oxygen consumption. In the current approach, the blood oxygenation is measured by a dual-wavelength technique. Using a fundus camera, equipped with a special dual wavelength transmission filter and a color CCD camera, two monochromatic fundus images at 548 nm and 610 nm were recorded simultaneously. The optical densities of retinal vessels for both wavelengths and their ratio, which is known to be proportional to the oxygen saturation, were calculated. From a health control population, mean arterial and venous oxygen saturations were measured of 98+/-10.1% and 65+/-11.7% with reproducibility of 2.52% and 3.25% respectively. In 10 patients with arterial occlusion, a reduction of the arterial oxygen saturation to 78 +/-17% (mean +/- standard deviation, branch arterial occlusion) and 91+/-11% (central arterial occlusion) respectively was found in the occluded vessel. After 5 days on pentoxifilin therapy, the arterial saturation increased to an average of 93+/-12% or 103 +/-6% respectively. In 70 eyes of 42 patients suffering from diabetic retinopathy, an increase of the venous oxygen saturation with the severity of the retinopathy was found (mild nonproliferative retinopathy: 68.4+/-8.2%, moderate non-proliferative retinopathy: 70.5+/-6.8%, severe non-proliferative retinopathy: 72.4+/-7.6%, proliferative retinopathy 75.7+/-8.3%) due to vessel shunting and diabetic changes of the permeability of vessel walls. These first clinical results demonstrate the ability of an accurate measurement of retinal vessel oxygenation with a very simple setup just requiring a special filter in the illumination path of a fundus camera and dedicated software.

  2. Novel non-contact retina camera for the rat and its application to dynamic retinal vessel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Link, Dietmar; Strohmaier, Clemens; Seifert, Bernd U.; Riemer, Thomas; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Haueisen, Jens; Vilser, Walthard

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel non-invasive and non-contact system for reflex-free retinal imaging and dynamic retinal vessel analysis in the rat. Theoretical analysis was performed prior to development of the new optical design, taking into account the optical properties of the rat eye and its specific illumination and imaging requirements. A novel optical model of the rat eye was developed for use with standard optical design software, facilitating both sequential and non-sequential modes. A retinal camera for the rat was constructed using standard optical and mechanical components. The addition of a customized illumination unit and existing standard software enabled dynamic vessel analysis. Seven-minute in-vivo vessel diameter recordings performed on 9 Brown-Norway rats showed stable readings. On average, the coefficient of variation was (1.1 ± 0.19) % for the arteries and (0.6 ± 0.08) % for the veins. The slope of the linear regression analysis was (0.56 ± 0.26) % for the arteries and (0.15 ± 0.27) % for the veins. In conclusion, the device can be used in basic studies of retinal vessel behavior. PMID:22076270

  3. Novel non-contact retina camera for the rat and its application to dynamic retinal vessel analysis.

    PubMed

    Link, Dietmar; Strohmaier, Clemens; Seifert, Bernd U; Riemer, Thomas; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Haueisen, Jens; Vilser, Walthard

    2011-11-01

    We present a novel non-invasive and non-contact system for reflex-free retinal imaging and dynamic retinal vessel analysis in the rat. Theoretical analysis was performed prior to development of the new optical design, taking into account the optical properties of the rat eye and its specific illumination and imaging requirements. A novel optical model of the rat eye was developed for use with standard optical design software, facilitating both sequential and non-sequential modes. A retinal camera for the rat was constructed using standard optical and mechanical components. The addition of a customized illumination unit and existing standard software enabled dynamic vessel analysis. Seven-minute in-vivo vessel diameter recordings performed on 9 Brown-Norway rats showed stable readings. On average, the coefficient of variation was (1.1 ± 0.19) % for the arteries and (0.6 ± 0.08) % for the veins. The slope of the linear regression analysis was (0.56 ± 0.26) % for the arteries and (0.15 ± 0.27) % for the veins. In conclusion, the device can be used in basic studies of retinal vessel behavior. PMID:22076270

  4. Normal and abnormal retinal projections following the crush of one optic nerve in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Springer, A D

    1981-06-10

    Optic nerve regeneration was examined with [3H]proline radioautography in fish that had one nerve crushed. Fibers had not yet grown beyond the crush site at 2 days post-crush (PC) and were at the optic chiasm by 4-5 days PC. By 6 days PC the fibers had reinnervated the rostral pole of the contralateral tectum, the lateral geniculate nucleus and area pretectalis dorsalis and ventralis. Area preopticus, nucleus opticus dorsolateralis and nucleus opticus commissurae posterior were partially reinnervated by 8 days PC. At this time numerous abnormal targets were labeled, including nucleus rotundus, nucleus isthmi, cerebellum, pituitary gland and ipsilateral optic tectum. Optic fibers also entered the posterior, intertectal and horizontal commissures, as well as tractus rotundus, the tectocerebellar, tectobulbar and mesencephalocerebellar tracts. In addition, fibers with the contralateral optic tectum were not restricted to their usual laminae. They were distributed from the superficial edge of the tectum to the ventricle. At 32 days PC only the normal retinal projections were evident, and all of the anomalous projections had disappeared. The anomalous projections may have either retracted or degenerated or become undetectable with radioautography. PMID:7263949

  5. Genetic determinants of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Yolanda; Cederlund, Maria L; Cottell, David C; Bill, Brent R; Ekker, Stephen C; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Weinstein, Brant M; Hyde, David R; Vihtelic, Thomas S; Kennedy, Breandan N

    2007-01-01

    Background The retinal vasculature is a capillary network of blood vessels that nourishes the inner retina of most mammals. Developmental abnormalities or microvascular complications in the retinal vasculature result in severe human eye diseases that lead to blindness. To exploit the advantages of zebrafish for genetic, developmental and pharmacological studies of retinal vasculature, we characterised the intraocular vasculature in zebrafish. Results We show a detailed morphological and developmental analysis of the retinal blood supply in zebrafish. Similar to the transient hyaloid vasculature in mammalian embryos, vessels are first found attached to the zebrafish lens at 2.5 days post fertilisation. These vessels progressively lose contact with the lens and by 30 days post fertilisation adhere to the inner limiting membrane of the juvenile retina. Ultrastructure analysis shows these vessels to exhibit distinctive hallmarks of mammalian retinal vasculature. For example, smooth muscle actin-expressing pericytes are ensheathed by the basal lamina of the blood vessel, and vesicle vacuolar organelles (VVO), subcellular mediators of vessel-retinal nourishment, are present. Finally, we identify 9 genes with cell membrane, extracellular matrix and unknown identity that are necessary for zebrafish hyaloid and retinal vasculature development. Conclusion Zebrafish have a retinal blood supply with a characteristic developmental and adult morphology. Abnormalities of these intraocular vessels are easily observed, enabling application of genetic and chemical approaches in zebrafish to identify molecular regulators of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in development and disease. PMID:17937808

  6. The Relationship of Retinal Vessel Diameters and Fractal Dimensions with Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaowei; Yuan, Yin; Gao, Zhonghai; Chen, Falin

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the correlation between quantitative retinal vascular parameters such as central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE) and retinal vascular fractal dimension (D(f)), and cardiovascular risk factors in the Chinese Han population residing in the in islands of southeast China. Methodology/Principle Findings In this cross-sectional study, fundus photographs were collected and semi-automated analysis software was used to analyze retinal vessel diameters and fractal dimensions. Cardiovascular risk factors such as relevant medical history, blood pressure (BP), lipids, and blood glucose data were collected. Subjects had a mean age of 51.9±12.0 years and included 812 (37.4%) males and 1,357 (62.6%) females. Of the subjects, 726 (33.5%) were overweight, 226 (10.4%) were obese, 272 (12.5%) had diabetes, 738 (34.0%) had hypertension, and 1,156 (53.3%) had metabolic syndrome. After controlling for the effects of potential confounders, multivariate analyses found that age (β = 0.06, P = 0.008), sex (β = 1.33, P = 0.015), mean arterial blood pressure (β = −0.12, P<0.001), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (β = −0.22, P = 0.008), and CRVE (β = 0.23, P<0.001) were significantly associated with CRAE. Age (β = −0.0012, P<0.001), BP classification (prehypertension: β = −0.0075, P = 0.014; hypertension: β = −0.0131, P = 0.002), and hypertension history (β = −0.0007, P = 0.009) were significantly associated with D(f). Conclusions/Significance D(f) exhibits a stronger association with BP than CRAE. Thus, D(f) may become a useful indicator of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25188273

  7. Retinal Blood Vessel Distribution Correlates With the Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Profile as Measured With GDx VCC and ECC

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Hemma; Pereira, Ivania; Weber, Stephanie; Holzer, Stephan; Fischer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Aim of the present study was to evaluate whether there is a correlation between retinal blood vessel density (RVD) and the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness profile. Methods: RNFL thickness of 106 healthy subjects was measured using scanning laser polarimetry, GDx variable corneal compensation (VCC), and GDx enhanced corneal compensation (ECC). A proprietary software was developed in MATLAB to measure the peripapillary retinal vessels using scanning laser ophthalmoscopy fundus images, centered on the optic disc measured by Cirrus spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The individual retinal vessel positions and thickness values were integrated in a 64-sector RVD profile and intrasubject and intersubject correlations were calculated. Results: The mean R value±SD for intrasubject correlation between RVD and RNFL thickness measured with GDx VCC and GDx ECC was 0.714±0.157 and 0.629±0.140, with 105 of 106 subjects presenting significant correlations. In the intersubject linear regression analysis for GDx VCC, 33 of 64 (52%) sectors presented a significant Pearson correlation coefficient between RNFL thickness and RVD values, with a mean R value of 0.187±0.135 (P<0.05). Conclusions: Peripapillary RNFL thickness profiles correlate with the RVD over 50% of the sectors and might explain up to 26% of the interindividual variance of the peripapillary RNFL thickness values as measured with GDx VCC. To our opinion, taking into account RVD might reduce interindividual variation in peripapillary RNFL thickness profiles measured with scanning laser polarimetry. PMID:25719231

  8. Automated Detection of Vessel Abnormalities on Fluorescein Angiogram in Malarial Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yitian; MacCormick, Ian J. C.; Parry, David G.; Beare, Nicholas A. V.; Harding, Simon P.; Zheng, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    The detection and assessment of intravascular filling defects is important, because they may represent a process central to cerebral malaria pathogenesis: neurovascular sequestration. We have developed and validated a framework that can automatically detect intravascular filling defects in fluorescein angiogram images. It first employs a state-of-the-art segmentation approach to extract the vessels from images and then divide them into individual segments by geometrical analysis. A feature vector based on the intensity and shape of saliency maps is generated to represent the level of abnormality of each vessel segment. An AdaBoost classifier with weighted cost coefficient is trained to classify the vessel segments into normal and abnormal categories. To demonstrate its effectiveness, we apply this framework to 6,358 vessel segments in images from 10 patients with malarial retinopathy. The test sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and area under curve (AUC) are 74.7%, 73.5%, 74.1% and 74.2% respectively when compared to the reference standard of human expert manual annotations. This performance is comparable to the agreement that we find between human observers of intravascular filling defects. Our method will be a powerful new tool for studying malarial retinopathy. PMID:26053690

  9. In-vivo imaging of blood flow in human retinal vessels using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    1999-04-01

    Quantification of retinal blood flow may lead to a better understanding of the progression and treatment of several ocular disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age- related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Current techniques, such as fluorescein angiography and laser Doppler velocimetry are limited, failing to provide sufficient information to the clinician. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT) is a novel technique using coherent heterodyne detection for simultaneous cross- sectional imaging of tissue microstructure and blood flow. This technique is capable of high spatial and velocity resolution imaging in highly scattering media. We implemented CDOCT for retinal blood flow mapping in human subjects. No dilation of the pupil was necessary. CDOCT is demonstrated for determining bidirectional flow in sub- 100micrometers diameter vessels in the retina. Additionally, we calculated Doppler broadening using the variance of depth- resolved spectra to identify regions with large velocity gradients within the Xenopus heart. This technique may be useful in quantifying local tissue perfusion in highly vascular retinal tissue.

  10. Evidence of Flicker-Induced Functional Hyperaemia in the Smallest Vessels of the Human Retinal Blood Supply.

    PubMed

    Duan, Angelina; Bedggood, Phillip A; Bui, Bang V; Metha, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    Regional changes in blood flow are initiated within neural tissue to help fuel local differences in neural activity. Classically, this response was thought to arise only in larger arterioles and venules. However, recently, it has been proposed that a) the smallest vessels of the circulation make a comparable contribution, and b) the response should be localised intermittently along such vessels, due to the known distribution of contractile mural cells. To assess these hypotheses in human neural tissue in vivo, we imaged the retinal microvasculature (diameters 3-28 μm) non-invasively, using adaptive optics, before and after delivery of focal (360 μm) patches of flickering visible light. Our results demonstrated a definite average response in 35% of all vessel segments analysed. In these responding vessels, the magnitude of proportional dilation (mean ± SEM for pre-capillary arterioles 13 ± 5%, capillaries 31 ± 8%, and post-capillary venules 10 ± 3%) is generally far greater than the magnitudes we and others have measured in the larger retinal vessels, supporting proposition a) above. The dilations observed in venules were unexpected based on previous animal work, and may be attributed either to differences in stimulus or species. Response heterogeneity across the network was high; responses were also heterogeneous along individual vessels (45% of vessel segments showed demonstrable locality in their response). These observations support proposition b) above. We also observed a definite average constriction across 7% of vessel segments (mean ± SEM constriction for capillaries -16 ± 3.2%, and post-capillary venules -18 ± 12%), which paints a picture of dynamic redistribution of flow throughout the smallest vessel networks in the retina in response to local, stimulus-driven metabolic demand. PMID:27617960

  11. Effects of two different doses of intravitreal bevacizumab on subfoveal choroidal thickness and retinal vessel diameter in branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jongyeop; Lee, Seungwoo; Son, Yengwoo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of two different doses of intravitreal bevacizumab on subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFChT) and retinal vessel diameter in patients with branch retinal vein occlusion. METHODS An interventional, restrospective study of 41 eyes of 41 patients who had completed 12mo of follow-up, divided into group 1 (1.25 mg of bevacizumab, 21 eyes of 21 patients) and group 2 (2.5 mg of bevacizumab, 20 eyes of 21 patients). Complete ophthalmic examination, fluorescein angiography, enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography and measurement of retinal vessel diameter with IVAN software were performed at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS The SFChT changed from 279.1 (165-431) µm at baseline to 277.0 (149-413) µm at 12mo in group 1 (P=0.086), and from 301.4 (212-483) µm to 300.3 (199-514) µm in group 2 (P=0.076). The central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE) changed from 128.8±11.2 µm at baseline to 134.5±8.4 µm at 12mo in group 1, and from 134.6±9.0 µm to 131.4±12.7 µm in group 2 (P=0.767). The central retinal venular equivalent (CRVE) changed from 204.1±24.4 µm at baseline to 196.3±28.2 µm at 12mo in group 1, and from 205.8±16.3 µm to 194.8±18.2 µm in group 2 (P=0.019). The mean central macular thickness (P<0.05) and average best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA; P<0.05) improved in both groups CONCLUSION Changes in the SFChT are not statistically significant and not different according to the doses of bevacizumab. The CRAE did not show significant change, however, the CRVE showed significant decrease regardless of the dose. PMID:27500108

  12. Acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) deficiency leads to abnormal microglia behavior and disturbed retinal function

    SciTech Connect

    Dannhausen, Katharina; Karlstetter, Marcus; Caramoy, Albert; Volz, Cornelia; Jägle, Herbert; Liebisch, Gerhard; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Langmann, Thomas

    2015-08-21

    Mutations in the acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) coding gene sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1) cause Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) type A and B. Sphingomyelin storage in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system cause hepatosplenomegaly and severe neurodegeneration in the brain of NPD patients. However, the effects of aSMase deficiency on retinal structure and microglial behavior have not been addressed in detail yet. Here, we demonstrate that retinas of aSMase{sup −/−} mice did not display overt neuronal degeneration but showed significantly reduced scotopic and photopic responses in electroretinography. In vivo fundus imaging of aSMase{sup −/−} mice showed many hyperreflective spots and staining for the retinal microglia marker Iba1 revealed massive proliferation of retinal microglia that had significantly enlarged somata. Nile red staining detected prominent phospholipid inclusions in microglia and lipid analysis showed significantly increased sphingomyelin levels in retinas of aSMase{sup −/−} mice. In conclusion, the aSMase-deficient mouse is the first example in which microglial lipid inclusions are directly related to a loss of retinal function. - Highlights: • aSMase-deficient mice show impaired retinal function and reactive microgliosis. • aSMase-deficient microglia express pro-inflammatory transcripts. • aSMase-deficient microglia proliferate and have increased cell body size. • In vivo imaging shows hyperreflective spots in the fundus of aSMase-deficient mice. • aSMase-deficient microglia accumulate sphingolipid-rich intracellular deposits.

  13. A multi-scale tensor voting approach for small retinal vessel segmentation in high resolution fundus images.

    PubMed

    Christodoulidis, Argyrios; Hurtut, Thomas; Tahar, Houssem Ben; Cheriet, Farida

    2016-09-01

    Segmenting the retinal vessels from fundus images is a prerequisite for many CAD systems for the automatic detection of diabetic retinopathy lesions. So far, research efforts have concentrated mainly on the accurate localization of the large to medium diameter vessels. However, failure to detect the smallest vessels at the segmentation step can lead to false positive lesion detection counts in a subsequent lesion analysis stage. In this study, a new hybrid method for the segmentation of the smallest vessels is proposed. Line detection and perceptual organization techniques are combined in a multi-scale scheme. Small vessels are reconstructed from the perceptual-based approach via tracking and pixel painting. The segmentation was validated in a high resolution fundus image database including healthy and diabetic subjects using pixel-based as well as perceptual-based measures. The proposed method achieves 85.06% sensitivity rate, while the original multi-scale line detection method achieves 81.06% sensitivity rate for the corresponding images (p<0.05). The improvement in the sensitivity rate for the database is 6.47% when only the smallest vessels are considered (p<0.05). For the perceptual-based measure, the proposed method improves the detection of the vasculature by 7.8% against the original multi-scale line detection method (p<0.05). PMID:27341026

  14. Inter-eye comparison of retinal oximetry and vessel caliber between eyes with asymmetrical glaucoma severity in different glaucoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Clarissa Shu Ming; Lee, Yi Fang; Ong, Charles; Yap, Zhu Li; Tsai, Andrew; Mohla, Aditi; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Aung, Tin; Perera, Shamira A

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare retinal vessel oxygenation and vessel caliber in primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG), primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), normal-tension glaucoma (NTG), and normal controls, as well as between eyes of asymmetrical glaucoma severity. Methods This was a prospective, cross-sectional study. The 159 subjects (PACG, n=39; POAG, n=41; NTG, n=41; normal controls, n=38) underwent retinal oxygen saturation measurements using the Oxymap T1 Retinal Oximeter, optical coherence tomography, and Humphrey visual field testing. Retinal oxygen saturation and vessel diameter were compared between the glaucoma groups and normal controls, as well as between eyes of asymmetrical glaucoma severity. Kruskal–Wallis test was performed for comparison among different subtypes of glaucoma. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the inter-eye differences. Results Compared to normal controls, arteriolar oxygen saturation was increased in PACG eyes (P=0.048) but not in POAG or NTG eyes. There were no significant differences in oxygen saturation in venules or arteriovenous (AV) difference in all three glaucoma groups. Venular diameter was significantly reduced in all glaucoma groups compared to normal controls (P<0.001), but no such change was observed in arteriolar diameter (P=0.10). When comparing between eyes of asymmetrical glaucoma severity, arteriolar oxygen saturation (P=0.03) and AV difference (P=0.04) were significantly higher, while arteriolar diameter was significantly lower (P=0.001) in the worse eye in PACG group. There were no significant differences in oximetric parameters or vessel calibers between the worse and the better eyes in POAG and NTG groups. Conclusion Eyes with PACG showed increased arteriolar oxygen saturation and increased AV difference. This was not observed in POAG and NTG eyes. Arteriolar diameter in PACG and venular diameter in all three glaucoma groups were reduced. The difference observed in PACG eyes may be due to an increased

  15. PEDF-Deficient Mice Exhibit an Enhanced Rate of Retinal Vascular Expansion and are More Sensitive to Hyperoxia-Mediated Vessel Obliteration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiong; Wang, Shoujian; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2008-01-01

    Pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) is an endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis. However, its physiological role during vascular development and neovascularization remains elusive. Here we investigated the role of PEDF in normal postnatal vascularization of retina and retinal neovascularization during oxygen-induced ischemic retinopathy (OIR) using PEDF-deficient (PEDFminus;/minus;) mice. The β-galactosidase staining of eye sections from PEDFminus;/minus; mice confirmed the expression pattern of endogenous PEDF previously reported in mouse retina. However, strongest staining was observed in the retinal outer plexiform layer. Retinal trypsin digests indicated that the ratio of endothelial cells (EC) to pericytes (PC) was significantly higher in PEDFminus;/minus; mice compared to wild type (PEDF+/+) mice at postnatal day 21 (P21). This was mainly attributed to increased number of EC in the absence of PEDF. There was no significant difference in the number of PC. We observed increased rate of proliferation in retinal vasculature of PEDFminus;/minus; mice, which was somewhat compensated for by an increase in the rate of apoptosis. Staining of the retinal wholemounts and eye frozen sections indicated postnatal retinal vascularization expansion occurred at a faster rate in the absence of PEDF, and was more prominent at early time points (prior to P21). The retinal vascularization in PEDF+/+ mice reaches that of PEDFminus;/minus; mice such that no significant difference in vascular densities was observed by P42. Lack of PEDF had minimal effect on the regression of hyaloid vasculature and VEGF levels. PEDFminus;/minus; mice also exhibited enhanced sensitivity to hyperoxia-mediated vessel obliteration during OIR compared to PEDF+/+ mice despite higher levels of VEGF. However, there was no significant difference in the degree of retinal neovascularization. Our studies indicate that PEDF is an important modulator of early postnatal retinal vascularization and in its

  16. A self-calibrating approach for the segmentation of retinal vessels by template matching and contour reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kovács, György; Hajdu, András

    2016-04-01

    The automated processing of retinal images is a widely researched area in medical image analysis. Screening systems based on the automated and accurate recognition of retinopathies enable the earlier diagnosis of diseases like diabetic retinopathy, hypertension and their complications. The segmentation of the vascular system is a crucial task in the field: on the one hand, the accurate extraction of the vessel pixels aids the detection of other anatomical parts (like the optic disc Hoover and Goldbaum, 2003) and lesions (like microaneurysms Sopharak et al., 2013); on the other hand, the geometrical features of the vascular system and their temporal changes are shown to be related to diseases, like the vessel tortuosity to Fabry disease Sodi et al., 2013 and the arteriolar-to-venus (A/V) ratio to hypertension (Pakter et al., 2005). In this study, a novel technique based on template matching and contour reconstruction is proposed for the segmentation of the vasculature. In the template matching step generalized Gabor function based templates are used to extract the center lines of vessels. Then, the intensity characteristics of vessel contours measured in training databases are reconstructed. The method was trained and tested on two publicly available databases, DRIVE and STARE; and reached an average accuracy of 0.9494 and 0.9610, respectively. We have also carried out cross-database tests and found that the accuracy scores are higher than that of any previous technique trained and tested on the same database. PMID:26766207

  17. Retinal Vessel Caliber, Choroidal Thickness and Ocular Pulse Amplitude Measurements in Essential Thrombocythemia

    PubMed Central

    Pekel, Gökhan; Doğu, Mehmet Hilmi; Sarı, Hakan Ismail; Acer, Semra; Kasikci, Alper; Yagci, Ramazan; Çetin, Ebru Nevin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The choroid and retina receive most of the blood that enter to the eye, and this uptake may be affected by essential thrombocythemia (ET) in which thrombosis and hemorrhage is common. This study compares choroidal thickness, retinal vascular caliber, and ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) measurements between patients with ET and healthy adults. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven patients with ET and 37 age-sex-matched healthy adults were recruited in this cross-sectional and comparative study. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography was used to measure the subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) and retinal vascular caliber measurements. The Pascal dynamic contour tonometer was used for OPA and intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of measurements between the groups. Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis was used to detect correlations between the variables. A P < 0.05 was statistically significant. Results: SFCT, OPA, and IOP measurements were not statistically significant differences between the study group and the control group (P > 0.05, all comparisons). Blood platelet counts were not associated with choroidal thickness, OPA, and IOP (P > 0.05). Retinal arteriolar and venular calibers were statistically, significantly thicker in healthy controls when compared to the study group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results indicate that choroidal thickness and pulsatile blood flow are not significantly affected in ET and under high blood platelet counts. Retinal arteriolar and venular calibers are thinner in ET when compared to age-sex matched healthy controls. PMID:26957845

  18. Nampt/PBEF/visfatin serum levels: a new biomarker for retinal blood vessel occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Kaja, Simon; Shah, Anna A; Haji, Shamim A; Patel, Krishna B; Naumchuk, Yuliya; Zabaneh, Alexander; Gerdes, Bryan C; Kunjukunju, Nancy; Sabates, Nelson R; Cassell, Michael A; Lord, Ron K; Pikey, Kevin P; Poulose, Abraham; Koulen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to quantify serum levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt/pre-B-Cell colony-enhancing factor 1/visfatin) in subjects with a history of retinal vascular occlusions (RVOs), disease conditions characterized by pronounced ischemia, and metabolic energy deficits. A case–control study of 18 subjects with a history of RVO as well as six healthy volunteers is presented. Serum Nampt levels were quantified using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Serum Nampt levels were 79% lower in patients with a history of RVO compared with that in healthy volunteers (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference among the types of RVOs, specifically branch retinal vein occlusions (n=7), central retinal vein occlusions (n=5), hemiretinal vein occlusions (n=3), and central retinal artery occlusions (n=3; P=0.69). Further studies are needed to establish the temporal kinetics of Nampt expression and to determine whether Nampt may represent a novel biomarker to identify at-risk populations, or whether it is a druggable target with the potential to ameliorate the long-term complications associated with the condition, ie, macular edema, macular ischemia, neovascularization, and permanent loss of vision. PMID:25897200

  19. Mice deficient of glutamatergic signaling from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells exhibit abnormal circadian photoentrainment.

    PubMed

    Purrier, Nicole; Engeland, William C; Kofuji, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Several aspects of behavior and physiology, such as sleep and wakefulness, blood pressure, body temperature, and hormone secretion exhibit daily oscillations known as circadian rhythms. These circadian rhythms are orchestrated by an intrinsic biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus which is adjusted to the daily environmental cycles of day and night by the process of photoentrainment. In mammals, the neuronal signal for photoentrainment arises from a small subset of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) that send a direct projection to the SCN. ipRGCs also mediate other non-image-forming (NIF) visual responses such as negative masking of locomotor activity by light, and the pupillary light reflex (PLR) via co-release of neurotransmitters glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) from their synaptic terminals. The relative contribution of each neurotransmitter system for the circadian photoentrainment and other NIF visual responses is still unresolved. We investigated the role of glutamatergic neurotransmission for circadian photoentrainment and NIF behaviors by selective ablation of ipRGC glutamatergic synaptic transmission in mice. Mutant mice displayed delayed re-entrainment to a 6 h phase shift (advance or delay) in the light cycle and incomplete photoentrainment in a symmetrical skeleton photoperiod regimen (1 h light pulses between 11 h dark periods). Circadian rhythmicity in constant darkness also was reduced in some mutant mice. Other NIF responses such as the PLR and negative masking responses to light were also partially attenuated. Overall, these results suggest that glutamate from ipRGCs drives circadian photoentrainment and negative masking responses to light. PMID:25357191

  20. Dual beam Doppler FD-OCT system with integrated Dynamic Vessel Analyzer and rotatable beams to measure total retinal blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Werkmeister, René M.; Gröschl, Martin; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-03-01

    We present a method capable of measuring the total retinal blood flow in arteries and veins based on dual beam Fourierdomain Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with a fundus camera based Dynamic Vessel Analyzer. Incorporating a Dynamic vessel analyzer into the system not only gives a live image of the fundus - it also allows determining the vessels' diameter precisely during the OCT measurement, which is necessary for the determination of the blood flow. While dual beam systems with fixed detection plane allow only vessels with certain orientations to be measured, the detection plane of our system can be rotated by 90°. This ensures that the blood's velocity can be measured in all vessels around the optic nerve head. The results of the total blood flow measurements are in the same range as previously published data. Additionally, the high degree of conformity between the measured venous and arterial flow corroborated the system's validity. For larger vessels, the logarithmic values of vessel diameter and blood flow were found to be related linearly with a regression coefficient of around 3, which is in accordance with Murray's law. For smaller vessels (diameter below 60 μm), the values diverge from the linear dependence. The high sensitivity and the good agreement with published data suggest a high potential for examining the retinal blood flow in patients with ocular diseases.

  1. Differential Diagnosis of Retinal Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M.; Herbort, Carl P.; Tabbara, Khalid F.

    2009-01-01

    Retinal vaculitis is a sight-threatening inflammatory eye condition that involves the retinal vessels. Detection of retinal vasculitis is made clinically, and confirmed with the help of fundus fluorescein angiography. Active vascular disease is characterized by exudates around retinal vessels resulting in white sheathing or cuffing of the affected vessels. In this review, a practical approach to the diagnosis of retinal vasculitis is discussed based on ophthalmoscopic and fundus fluorescein angiographic findings. PMID:20404987

  2. Ocular Pulse Amplitude and Retinal Vessel Caliber Changes after Intravitreal Dexamethasone Implant

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ihsan; Perente, Irfan; Kesim, Cem; Saracoglu, Basak; Yazici, Ahmet Taylan; Taskapili, Muhittin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate possible changes in ocular pulse amplitude (OPA), retinal arteriole caliber (RAC), and retinal venule caliber (RVC), following the intravitreal injection of dexamethasone implants (DIs). Methods: Thirty-four eyes of 34 patients with macular edema were included. All participants received a full ophthalmologic examination at baseline. RAC and RVC were measured via optical coherence tomography; OPA and intraocular pressure (IOP) were measured via dynamic contour tonometry at baseline, month 1, and month 3. Statistical analysis was performed for before-after comparison of OPA, IOP, RAC, and RVC measurements. Results: The mean OPA (in order to baseline, month 1, month 3) was 2.8 ± 0.8, 2.9 ± 1.0, 2.9 ± 0.9. The mean IOP was 16.8 ± 2.9, 17.3 ± 2.7, 18.4 ± 2.9 mmHg. The mean RAC was 97.8 ± 9.2, 97.2 ± 9.0, 97.6 ± 9.4. The mean RVC was 124.4 ± 8.2, 124.8 ± 8.8, 123.8 ± 8.2. There were no statistically significant changes in RAC (P = 0.688), RVC (P = 0.714), OPA (P = 0.348), and IOP (P = 0.115). There was also no correlation between RAC and OPA (r = 0.12, P = 0.62) or RVC and OPA (r = 0.16, P = 0.68) at the last visit. Conclusion: The intravitreal injection of DI does not significantly affect RAC, RVC, or OPA, which indicates that the treatment does not alter overall retinal-choroidal vasculature or hemodynamics.

  3. Anterior Lamina Cribrosa Surface Depth in Open-Angle Glaucoma: Relationship with the Position of the Central Retinal Vessel Trunk

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Baek-Lok; Kim, Hyunjoong; Girard, Michaël J. A.; Mari, Jean Martial; Kim, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the factors influencing the anterior lamina cribrosa (LC) surface depth (LCD) in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG), focusing on the association between LCD and the position of the central retinal vessel trunk (CRVT) at the anterior LC surface. Methods Optic nerve heads of 205 OAG eyes were scanned using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). After processing the images using adaptive compensation, the LCD was determined from 11 horizontal B-scan images that divided the optic disc vertically into 12 equal parts. Eyes were divided into two groups (central or peripheral) according to where the CRVT exits from the anterior LC surface. The influence of CRVT position on LCD was evaluated, taking into account age, gender, untreated intraocular pressure (IOP), IOP at optic-disc scanning, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, visual-field mean deviation, central corneal thickness, and axial length. Results Patients in the peripheral CRVT group were younger and more myopic, and had a larger mean LCD and thinner global RNFL than those in the central CRVT group (all P≤0.023). On multivariate analysis, the peripheral CRVT location was significantly associated with a larger LCD (P = 0.002), together with the significant association of younger age (P<0.001), higher untreated IOP (P = 0.010), and thinner RNFL (P = 0.003) on the larger LCD. Conclusion In OAG, CRVT location was an independent factor influencing the LCD, together with age, untreated IOP, and global RNFL thickness. The data indicate that the CRVT may contribute to the resistance of the LC against deformation. A longitudinal prospective observation is required to clarify this relationship. PMID:27355646

  4. Homonymous Hemianopic Hyporeflective Retinal Abnormality on Infrared Confocal Scanning Laser Photography: A Novel Sign of Optic Tract Lesion.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mario L R; Araújo, Rafael B; Suzuki, Ana C F; Cunha, Leonardo P; Preti, Rony C

    2016-03-01

    Infrared confocal scanning laser photography of a patient with long-standing optic tract lesion revealed a homonymous hemianopic hyporeflective image contralateral to the visual field defect. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed thinning of the retinal nerve fiber and retinal ganglion cell layer and thickening of the inner nuclear layer (with microcystic degeneration) in the macular area, matching the infrared image. Hyporeflective image on infrared laser photography is associated with retinal degeneration secondary to anterior visual pathway disease and, when located in homonymous hemianopic retinas, may represent a new sign of an optic tract lesion. PMID:26172159

  5. Retinal vascular image analysis as a potential screening tool for cerebrovascular disease: a rationale based on homology between cerebral and retinal microvasculatures

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Niall; Aslam, Tariq; MacGillivray, Thomas; Pattie, Alison; Deary, Ian J; Dhillon, Baljean

    2005-01-01

    The retinal and cerebral microvasculatures share many morphological and physiological properties. Assessment of the cerebral microvasculature requires highly specialized and expensive techniques. The potential for using non-invasive clinical assessment of the retinal microvasculature as a marker of the state of the cerebrovasculature offers clear advantages, owing to the ease with which the retinal vasculature can be directly visualized in vivo and photographed due to its essential two-dimensional nature. The use of retinal digital image analysis is becoming increasingly common, and offers new techniques to analyse different aspects of retinal vascular topography, including retinal vascular widths, geometrical attributes at vessel bifurcations and vessel tracking. Being predominantly automated and objective, these techniques offer an exciting opportunity to study the potential to identify retinal microvascular abnormalities as markers of cerebrovascular pathology. In this review, we describe the anatomical and physiological homology between the retinal and cerebral microvasculatures. We review the evidence that retinal microvascular changes occur in cerebrovascular disease and review current retinal image analysis tools that may allow us to use different aspects of the retinal microvasculature as potential markers for the state of the cerebral microvasculature. PMID:15817102

  6. The association of socio-economic factors with physical fitness and activity behaviours, spinal posture and retinal vessel parameters in first graders in urban Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Imhof, Katharina; Faude, Oliver; Donath, Lars; Bean-Eisenhut, Salome; Hanssen, Henner; Zahner, Lukas

    2016-07-01

    Socio-economic status during childhood has been shown to be a strong predictor of adult health outcome. Therefore, we examined associations of parental educational level, household income and migrant background with physical fitness, spinal flexibility, spinal posture as well as retinal vessel diameters in children of an urban Swiss region. A total of 358 first graders of the Swiss canton Basel-Stadt (age: 7.3, SD: 0.4) were examined. Physical fitness (20 m shuttle run test, 20 m sprint, jumping sidewards and balancing backwards), spinal flexibility and spinal posture (MediMouse(®), Idiag, Fehraltdorf, Switzerland) and retinal microcirculation (Static Retinal Vessel Analyzer, Imedos Systems UG, Jena, Germany) were assessed. Parental education, household income, migrant background and activity behaviour were evaluated with a questionnaire. Parental education was associated with child aerobic fitness (P = 0.03) and screen time (P < 0.001). Household income was associated with jumping sidewards (P = 0.009), balancing backwards (P = 0.03) and sports club participation (P = 0.02). Migrant background was associated with BMI (P = 0.001), body fat (P = 0.03), aerobic fitness (P = 0.007), time spent playing outdoors (P < 0.001) and screen time (P < 0.001). For spinal flexibility and retinal vessel diameter, no associations were found (0.06 < P < 0.8). Low parental education, low household income and a migrant background are associated with poor physical fitness, higher BMI and body fat percentage and low-activity behaviour. PMID:26548899

  7. Assessing blood vessel abnormality via extracting scattering coefficients from OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, David; Andersen, Claus B.; Frosz, Michael H.; Thrane, Lars; Hansen, Peter R.; Jorgensen, Thomas M.; Andersen, Peter E.

    2003-10-01

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the industrialized world. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution intravascular imaging technology with a potential for in vivo plaque characterization. Although structural remodeling of the arterial vessel wall during plaque development can change tissue optical scattering properties, very limited evidence is available on the exact optical scattering properties of plaques. The scattering coefficient, μs, and the anisotropy factor, g, can be derived from OCT images by fitting a theoretical model to individual depth-scans. The aim of the current study was to use this method to examine by OCT the scattering properties of human arteries with different stages of atherosclerotic lesion development. Methods: Normal (n=4), lipid-rich (n=4), and fibrous (n=3) aortic blocks as classified by parallel histopathologic examination were obtained within 24 hours of death and imaged by OCT. The intima was located in the OCT images, and then further split into 115 blocks (41 normal, 40 lipid-rich, and 34 fibrous) of adjacent OCT depth-scans transversely spanning ~200-300 μm. Scattering signals from each block were averaged and fit to the theoretical model. From these fittings, μs and g were extracted. Results and Discussion: The optical scattering properties of normal aortic intima were quite different from lipid-rich and fibrous lesions, respectively. We discovered that the normal intima was generally highly forward scattering, i.e., with 0.917vessels were much less so. Furthermore, normal vessels usually had 15<μs<39 mm-1, whereas lipid-rich blocks had μs<15mm-1. Fibrous blocks displayed large variations in μs, reflecting a histopathology with varying amounts of collagen, lipids, and elastin. Based on our findings, we defined a criteria of μs and g for normal intimas, using the above values of μs and g as cutoffs. Our "normal" criteria

  8. Structural and Functional Abnormalities of Retinal Ganglion Cells Measured In Vivo at the Onset of Optic Nerve Head Surface Change in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brad; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Cull, Grant A.; Reynaud, Juan; Wang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To compare peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT), RNFL retardance, and retinal function at the onset of optic nerve head (ONH) surface topography change in experimental glaucoma (EG). Methods. Thirty-three rhesus macaques had three or more weekly baseline measurements in both eyes of ONH surface topography, peripapillary RNFLT, RNFL retardance, and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). Laser photocoagulation was then applied to the trabecular meshwork of one eye to induce chronic elevation of IOP and weekly recordings continued alternating between ONH surface topography and RNFLT during one week and RNFL retardance and mfERG the next week. Data were pooled for the group at the onset of ONH surface topography change in each EG eye, which was defined as the first date when either the mean position of the disc (MPD) fell below the 95% confidence limit of each eye's individual baseline range and/or when the topographic change analysis (TCA) map was subjectively judged as having demonstrated change, whichever came first. Analysis of variance with post hoc tests corrected for multiple comparisons were used to assess parameter changes. Results. At onset of ONH surface topography change, there was no significant difference for RNFLT versus baseline or fellow control eyes. RNFL retardance and mfERG were significantly reduced in the recordings just prior (median of 9 days) to ONH onset (P < 0.01) and had progressed significantly (P < 0.001) an average of 17 days later (median of 7 days after ONH onset). RNFLT did not exhibit significant thinning until 15 days after onset of ONH surface topography change (P < 0.001). Conclusions. These results support the hypothesis that during the course of glaucomatous neurodegeneration, axonal cytoskeletal and retinal ganglion cell functional abnormalities exist before thinning of peripapillary RNFL axon bundles begins. PMID:22589428

  9. Branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sadaf; Mirza, Sajid Ali; Shokh, Ishrat

    2008-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusions (RVO) are the second commonest sight threatening vascular disorder. Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) are the two basic types of vein occlusion. Branch retinal vein occlusion is three times more common than central retinal vein occlusion and- second only to diabetic retinopathy as the most common retinal vascular cause of visual loss. The origin of branch retinal vein occlusion undoubtedly includes both systemic factors such as hypertension and local anatomic factors such as arteriovenous crossings. Branch retinal vein occlusion causes a painless decrease in vision, resulting in misty or distorted vision. Current treatment options don't address the underlying aetiology of branch retinal vein occlusion. Instead they focus on treating sequelae of the occluded venous branch, such as macular oedema, vitreous haemorrhage and traction retinal detachment from neovascularization. Evidences suggest that the pathogenesis of various types of retinal vein occlusion, like many other ocular vascular occlusive disorders, is a multifactorial process and there is no single magic bullet that causes retinal vein occlusion. A comprehensive management of patients with retinal vascular occlusions is necessary to correct associated diseases or predisposing abnormalities that could lead to local recurrences or systemic event. Along with a review of the literature, a practical approach for the management of retinal vascular occlusions is required, which requires collaboration between the ophthalmologist and other physicians: general practitioner, cardiologist, internist etc. as appropriate according to each case. PMID:19385476

  10. The Location of The Inferior and Superior Temporal Blood Vessels and Inter-Individual Variability of The Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Donald C.; Salant, Jennifer A.; Arthur, Stella N.; Ritch, Robert; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine if adjusting for blood vessel location can decrease the inter-subject variability of retinal nerve fiber (RNFL) thickness measured with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Subjects and Methods One eye of 50 individuals with normal vision was tested with OCT and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP). The SLP and OCT RNFL thickness profiles were determined for a peripapillary circle 3.4 mm in diameter. The midpoints between the superior temporal vein and artery (STva) and the inferior temporal vein and artery (ITva) were determined at the location where the vessels cross the 3.4 mm circle. The average OCT and SLP RNFL thicknesses for quadrants and arcuate sectors of the lower and upper optic disc were obtained before and after adjusting for blood vessel location. This adjustment was done by shifting the RNFL profiles based upon the locations of the STva and ITva relative to the mean locations of all 50 individuals. Results Blood vessel locations ranged over 39° (STva) and 33° (ITva) for the 50 eyes. The location of the leading edge of the OCT and SLP profiles was correlated with the location of the blood vessels for both the superior [r=0.72 (OCT) and 0.72(SLP)] and inferior [r=0.34 and 0.43] temporal vessels. However, the variability in the OCT and SLP thickness measurements showed little change due to shifting. After shifting, the difference in the coefficient of variation ranged from −2.1% (shifted less variable) to +1.7% (unshifted less variable). Conclusion The shape of the OCT and SLP RNFL profiles varied systematically with the location of the superior and inferior superior veins and arteries. However, adjusting for the location of these major temporal blood vessels did not decrease the variability for measures of OCT or SLP RNFL thickness. PMID:19661824

  11. Low bone density and abnormal bone turnover in patients with atherosclerosis of peripheral vessels.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, P; Signorelli, S S; Riccobene, S; Celotta, G; Di Pino, L; La Malfa, T; Fiore, C E

    2004-05-01

    Patients with vascular calcifications often have low bone mineral density (BMD), but it is still uncertain if osteoporosis and peripheral vascular disease (VD) are interrelated and linked by a common pathomechanism. Moreover, data on bone turnover in patients with advanced atherosclerosis are lacking. We measured BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS), as well as the serum levels of osteocalcin (OC), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and its ligand RANKL, and the urinary concentration of the C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CrossLaps), in 36 patient (20 male and 16 female) with serious atherosclerotic involvement of the carotid and/or femoral artery to investigate the underlying mechanism of vascular and osseous disorders. Thirty age-matched and gender matched healthy individuals served as controls. After adjustment for age, BMD was significantly reduced at the lumbar spine in 23/36 (63%) patients (mean T score -1.71+/-1.42) and at the proximal femur in 34/36 (93%) patients (neck mean T score -2.5+/-0.88). Ten patients (27%) had abnormal QUS parameters. Gender and diabetes had no effect on the relationship between vascular calcification and bone density at any site measured. VD subjects had OC and BAP serum levels lower than controls (13.3+/-3.1 vs 27.7+/-3.3 ng/ml, P<0.01, and 8.4+/-2.3 vs 12.5+/-1.4 microg/l, P<0.01, respectively). Urinary CrossLaps excretion was not significantly different in patients with VD and in controls (257.9+/-138.9 vs 272.2+/-79.4 micro g/mmol Cr, respectively). Serum OPG and RANKL levels were similar in patients and in controls (3.5+/-1.07 vs 3.4+/-1.05 pmol/l, and 0.37+/-0.07 vs 0.36+/-0.06 pmol/l, respectively). We proved high occurrence of osteoporosis in VD, with evidence of age and gender independence. Negative bone remodelling balance would be a consequence of reduced bone formation, with no apparent increased activation of the OPG-RANKL system

  12. Critical Endothelial Regulation by LRP5 during Retinal Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Li, Qing; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Hokama, Madoka; Sardi, Sylvia H.; Nagao, Masashi; Warman, Matthew L.; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities in the eye are the leading cause of many forms of inherited and acquired human blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt-binding co-receptor LRP5 leads to aberrant ocular vascularization and loss of vision in genetic disorders such as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. The canonical Wnt-β-catenin pathway is known to regulate retinal vascular development. However, it is unclear what precise role LPR5 plays in this process. Here, we show that loss of LRP5 function in mice causes retinal hypovascularization during development as well as retinal neovascularization in adulthood with disorganized and leaky vessels. Using a highly specific Flk1-CreBreier line for vascular endothelial cells, together with several genetic models, we demonstrate that loss of endothelium-derived LRP5 recapitulates the retinal vascular defects in Lrp5-/- mice. In addition, restoring LRP5 function only in endothelial cells in Lrp5-/- mice rescues their retinal vascular abnormalities. Furthermore, we show that retinal vascularization is regulated by LRP5 in a dosage dependent manner and does not depend on LRP6. Our study provides the first direct evidence that endothelium-derived LRP5 is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its critical role in the development and maintenance of retinal vasculature. PMID:27031698

  13. Critical Endothelial Regulation by LRP5 during Retinal Vascular Development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Li, Qing; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Hokama, Madoka; Sardi, Sylvia H; Nagao, Masashi; Warman, Matthew L; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2016-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities in the eye are the leading cause of many forms of inherited and acquired human blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt-binding co-receptor LRP5 leads to aberrant ocular vascularization and loss of vision in genetic disorders such as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. The canonical Wnt-β-catenin pathway is known to regulate retinal vascular development. However, it is unclear what precise role LPR5 plays in this process. Here, we show that loss of LRP5 function in mice causes retinal hypovascularization during development as well as retinal neovascularization in adulthood with disorganized and leaky vessels. Using a highly specific Flk1-CreBreier line for vascular endothelial cells, together with several genetic models, we demonstrate that loss of endothelium-derived LRP5 recapitulates the retinal vascular defects in Lrp5-/- mice. In addition, restoring LRP5 function only in endothelial cells in Lrp5-/- mice rescues their retinal vascular abnormalities. Furthermore, we show that retinal vascularization is regulated by LRP5 in a dosage dependent manner and does not depend on LRP6. Our study provides the first direct evidence that endothelium-derived LRP5 is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its critical role in the development and maintenance of retinal vasculature. PMID:27031698

  14. Iterative Vessel Segmentation of Fundus Images.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Koozekanani, Dara D; Parhi, Keshab K

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a novel unsupervised iterative blood vessel segmentation algorithm using fundus images. First, a vessel enhanced image is generated by tophat reconstruction of the negative green plane image. An initial estimate of the segmented vasculature is extracted by global thresholding the vessel enhanced image. Next, new vessel pixels are identified iteratively by adaptive thresholding of the residual image generated by masking out the existing segmented vessel estimate from the vessel enhanced image. The new vessel pixels are, then, region grown into the existing vessel, thereby resulting in an iterative enhancement of the segmented vessel structure. As the iterations progress, the number of false edge pixels identified as new vessel pixels increases compared to the number of actual vessel pixels. A key contribution of this paper is a novel stopping criterion that terminates the iterative process leading to higher vessel segmentation accuracy. This iterative algorithm is robust to the rate of new vessel pixel addition since it achieves 93.2-95.35% vessel segmentation accuracy with 0.9577-0.9638 area under ROC curve (AUC) on abnormal retinal images from the STARE dataset. The proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and consistent in vessel segmentation performance for retinal images with variations due to pathology, uneven illumination, pigmentation, and fields of view since it achieves a vessel segmentation accuracy of about 95% in an average time of 2.45, 3.95, and 8 s on images from three public datasets DRIVE, STARE, and CHASE_DB1, respectively. Additionally, the proposed algorithm has more than 90% segmentation accuracy for segmenting peripapillary blood vessels in the images from the DRIVE and CHASE_DB1 datasets. PMID:25700436

  15. A Case of Abnormal Lymphatic-Like Differentiation and Endothelial Progenitor Cell Activation in Neovascularization Associated with Hemi-Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Loukovaara, Sirpa; Gucciardo, Erika; Repo, Pauliina; Lohi, Jouko; Salven, Petri; Lehti, Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pathological vascular differentiation in retinal vein occlusion (RVO)-related neovessel formation remains poorly characterized. The role of intraocular lymphatic-like differentiation or endothelial progenitor cell activity has not been studied in this disease. Methods Vitrectomy was performed in an eye with hemi-RVO; the neovessel membrane located at the optic nerve head was removed and subjected to immunohistochemistry. Characterization of the neovascular tissue was performed using hematoxylin and eosin, α-smooth muscle actin, and the pan-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion molecule CD31. The expression of lymphatic EC markers was studied by lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE-1), podoplanin (PDPN), and prospero-related homeobox protein 1 (Prox-1). Potential vascular stem/progenitor cells were identified by active cellular proliferation (Ki67) and expression of the stem cell marker CD117. Results The specimen contained blood vessels lined by ECs and surrounded by pericytes. Immunoreactivity for LYVE-1 and Prox-1 was detected, with Prox-1 being more widely expressed in the active Ki67-positive lumen-lining cells. PDPN expression was instead found in the cells residing in the extravascular tissue. Expression of the stem cell markers CD117 and Ki67 suggested vascular endothelial progenitor cell activity. Conclusions Intraocular lymphatic-like differentiation coupled with progenitor cell activation may be involved in the pathology of neovessel formation in ischemia-induced human hemi-RVO. PMID:26327908

  16. [A Case of Ruptured Peripheral Cerebral Aneurysm at Abnormal Vessels Associated with Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis:Similarity to Moyamoya Disease].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hajime; Kohno, Kanehisa; Tanaka, Hideo; Fukumoto, Shinya; Ichikawa, Haruhisa; Onoue, Shinji; Fumoto, Noriyuki; Ozaki, Saya; Maeda, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of ruptured peripheral cerebral aneurysm at abnormal vessels associated with severe stenosis at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). A 66-year-old woman was admitted at our hospital with headache on foot. Computed tomography (CT) showed intracerebral hemorrhage in the left fronto-basal area. Three-dimensional-CT and conventional angiogram revealed abnormal vessels, which were similar to those seen in moyamoya disease, with a small enhancement close to the hematoma. On day 11, subsequent cerebral angiogram demonstrated an aneurysm at the peripheral portion of an abnormal vessel arising from the left A2. On day 17, soon after the diagnosis of the ruptured aneurysm was made (while still at the subacute stage), we operated on the aneurysm. Superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA anastomosis was also performed to preserve cerebral blood flow and reduce hemodynamic stress. Several days after the operation, she had transient aphasia due to hyperperfusion of the MCA territory, but eventually recovered with no neurological deficit at discharge. Follow-up study revealed revascularization from the branches of the external carotid artery as well as the STA. On admission, we initially thought that this patient had abnormal vessels associated with arteriosclerotic MCA stenosis. However, the postoperative clinical course as well as the histopathological specimens of both the abnormal artery with the aneurysm and the STA revealed similar findings to those of moyamoya disease. Although this case did not satisfy the criteria for moyamoya disease, it is conceivable that a single arterial occlusive lesion associated with moyamoya-like vessels might develop in the same mechanism with that of moyamoya disease. PMID:27056872

  17. Hybrid Features and Mediods Classification based Robust Segmentation of Blood Vessels.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Amna; Akram, M Usman; Khalid, Shehzad; Waheed, Zahra; Khan, Muazzam A; Shaukat, Arslan

    2015-10-01

    Retinal blood vessels are the source to provide oxygen and nutrition to retina and any change in the normal structure may lead to different retinal abnormalities. Automated detection of vascular structure is very important while designing a computer aided diagnostic system for retinal diseases. Most popular methods for vessel segmentation are based on matched filters and Gabor wavelets which give good response against blood vessels. One major drawback in these techniques is that they also give strong response for lesion (exudates, hemorrhages) boundaries which give rise to false vessels. These false vessels may lead to incorrect detection of vascular changes. In this paper, we propose a new hybrid feature set along with new classification technique for accurate detection of blood vessels. The main motivation is to lower the false positives especially from retinal images with severe disease level. A novel region based hybrid feature set is presented for proper discrimination between true and false vessels. A new modified m-mediods based classification is also presented which uses most discriminating features to categorize vessel regions into true and false vessels. The evaluation of proposed system is done thoroughly on publicly available databases along with a locally gathered database with images of advanced level of retinal diseases. The results demonstrate the validity of the proposed system as compared to existing state of the art techniques. PMID:26306876

  18. Amyloid beta deposition and phosphorylated tau accumulation are key features in aged choroidal vessels in the complement factor H knock out model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Aboelnour, Asmaa; Kam, Jaimie Hoh; Elnasharty, M A; Sayed-Ahmed, Ahmed; Jeffery, Glen

    2016-06-01

    Extra-cellular deposition including amyloid beta (Aβ) is a feature of retinal ageing. It has been documented for Bruch's membrane (BM) where Aβ is elevated in complement factor H knockout mice (Cfh(-/-)) proposed as a model for age related macular degeneration. However, arterial deposition in choroidal vessels prior to perfusion across BM has not been examined. Aβ is associated with tau phosphorylation and these are linked in blood vessels in Alzheimers Disease where they can drive perivascular pathology. Here we ask if Aβ, tau and phosphorylated tau are features of ageing in choroidal vessels in 12 month C57 BL/6 and Cfh(-/-) mice, using immune staining and Western blot analysis. Greater levels of Aβ and phosphorylated tau are found in choroidal vessels in Cfh(-/-) mice. Western blot revealed a 40% increase in Aβ in Cfh(-/-) over C57 BL/6 mice. Aβ deposits coat around 55% of the luminal wall in Cfh(-/-) compared to only about 40% in C57 BL/6. Total tau was similar in both groups, but phosphorylated tau increased by >100% in Cfh(-/-) compared to C57 BL/6 and covered >75% of the luminal wall compared to 50% in C57 BL/6. Hence, phosphorylated tau is a marked choroidal feature in this mouse model. Aβ deposition was clumped in Cfh(-/-) mice and likely to influence blood flow dynamics. Disturbed flow is associated with atherogenesis and may be related to the accumulation of membrane attack complex recently identified between choroidal vessels in those at high risk of macular degeneration due to complement factor H polymorphisms. PMID:27181225

  19. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of ...

  20. Deep neural network and random forest hybrid architecture for learning to detect retinal vessels in fundus images.

    PubMed

    Maji, Debapriya; Santara, Anirban; Ghosh, Sambuddha; Sheet, Debdoot; Mitra, Pabitra

    2015-08-01

    Vision impairment due to pathological damage of the retina can largely be prevented through periodic screening using fundus color imaging. However the challenge with large-scale screening is the inability to exhaustively detect fine blood vessels crucial to disease diagnosis. In this work we present a computational imaging framework using deep and ensemble learning based hybrid architecture for reliable detection of blood vessels in fundus color images. A deep neural network (DNN) is used for unsupervised learning of vesselness dictionaries using sparse trained denoising auto-encoders (DAE), followed by supervised learning of the DNN response using a random forest for detecting vessels in color fundus images. In experimental evaluation with the DRIVE database, we achieve the objective of vessel detection with max. avg. accuracy of 0.9327 and area under ROC curve of 0.9195. PMID:26736930

  1. Automatic arteriovenous crossing phenomenon detection on retinal fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Yuji; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    Arteriolosclerosis is one cause of acquired blindness. Retinal fundus image examination is useful for early detection of arteriolosclerosis. In order to diagnose the presence of arteriolosclerosis, the physicians find the silver-wire arteries, the copper-wire arteries and arteriovenous crossing phenomenon on retinal fundus images. The focus of this study was to develop the automated detection method of the arteriovenous crossing phenomenon on the retinal images. The blood vessel regions were detected by using a double ring filter, and the crossing sections of artery and vein were detected by using a ring filter. The center of that ring was an interest point, and that point was determined as a crossing section when there were over four blood vessel segments on that ring. And two blood vessels gone through on the ring were classified into artery and vein by using the pixel values on red and blue component image. Finally, V2-to-V1 ratio was measured for recognition of abnormalities. V1 was the venous diameter far from the blood vessel crossing section, and V2 was the venous diameter near from the blood vessel crossing section. The crossing section with V2-to-V1 ratio over 0.8 was experimentally determined as abnormality. Twenty four images, including 27 abnormalities and 54 normal crossing sections, were used for preliminary evaluation of the proposed method. The proposed method was detected 73% of crossing sections when the 2.8 sections per image were mis-detected. And, 59% of abnormalities were detected by measurement of V1-to-V2 ratio when the 1.7 sections per image were mis-detected.

  2. Assessment of oxygen saturation in retinal vessels of normal subjects and diabetic patients with and without retinopathy using Flow Oximetry System

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A.; Annam, Rachel E.; Sepah, Yasir J.; Luu, Long; Bittencourt, Millena G.; Jang, Hyun S.; Lemaillet, Paul; Munoz, Beatriz; Duncan, Donald D.; West, Sheila; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess oxygen saturation (StO2) in retinal vessels of normal subjects and diabetic patients with and without retinopathy using the modified version of the Flow Oximetry System (FOS) and a novel assessment software. Methods The FOS and novel assessment software were used to determine StO2 levels in arteries and veins located between 1 and 2 mm from the margin of the optic disc and in the macular area. Results Eighteen normal subjects, 15 diabetics without diabetic retinopathy (DM no DR), and 11 with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) were included in final analysis. The mean [± standard deviation (SD)] StO2 in retinal arteries was 96.9%±3.8% in normal subjects; 97.4%±3.7% in DM no DR; and 98.4%±2.0% in NPDR. The mean venous StO2 was 57.5%±6.8% in normal subjects; 57.4%±7.5% in DM no DR; and 51.8%±6.8% in NPDR. The mean arterial and venous StO2 across the three groups were not statistically different (P=0.498 and P=0.071, respectively). The arterio-venous differences between the three study groups, however, were found to be statistically significant (P=0.015). Pairwise comparisons have demonstrated significant differences when comparing the A-V difference in the NPDR group to either normal subjects (P=0.02) or diabetic patients without DR (P=0.04). Conclusions The arterio-venous difference was greater, and statistically significant, in patients with NPDR when compared to normal subjects and to patients with diabetes and no retinopathy. The mean venous StO2 was lower, but not statistically significant, in NPDR compared with diabetics without retinopathy and with normal subjects. PMID:25694958

  3. Retinal vasculature classification using novel multifractal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Ward, W. O. C.; Duan, Jinming; Auer, D. P.; Gowland, Penny; Bai, L.

    2015-11-01

    Retinal blood vessels have been implicated in a large number of diseases including diabetic retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases, which cause damages to retinal blood vessels. The availability of retinal vessel imaging provides an excellent opportunity for monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, and automatic analysis of retinal vessels will help with the processes. However, state of the art vascular analysis methods such as counting the number of branches or measuring the curvature and diameter of individual vessels are unsuitable for the microvasculature. There has been published research using fractal analysis to calculate fractal dimensions of retinal blood vessels, but so far there has been no systematic research extracting discriminant features from retinal vessels for classifications. This paper introduces new methods for feature extraction from multifractal spectra of retinal vessels for classification. Two publicly available retinal vascular image databases are used for the experiments, and the proposed methods have produced accuracies of 85.5% and 77% for classification of healthy and diabetic retinal vasculatures. Experiments show that classification with multiple fractal features produces better rates compared with methods using a single fractal dimension value. In addition to this, experiments also show that classification accuracy can be affected by the accuracy of vessel segmentation algorithms.

  4. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-10-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%;. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats.

  5. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, René M; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats. PMID:25321400

  6. The retinal ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Adams, N A; Awadein, Ahmed; Toma, Hassanain S

    2007-09-01

    While the functions of many of the proteins located in or associated with the photoreceptor cilia are poorly understood, disruption of the function of these proteins may result in a wide variety of phenotypes ranging from isolated retinal degeneration to more pleiotropic phenotypes. Systemic findings include neurosensory hearing loss, developmental delay, situs-inversus, infertility, disorders of limb and digit development, obesity, kidney disease, liver disease, and respiratory disease. The concept of "retinal ciliopathies" brings to attention the importance of further molecular analysis of this organelle as well as provides a potential common target for therapies for these disorders. The retinal ciliopathies include retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, cone-dystrophy, cone-rod dystrophy, Leber congenital amaurosis, as well as retinal degenerations associated with Usher syndrome, primary ciliary dyskinesia, Senior-Loken syndrome, Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Laurence-Moon syndrome, McKusick-Kaufman syndrome, and Biemond syndrome. Mutations for these disorders have been found in retinitis pigmentosa-1 (RP1), retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR), retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein (RPGR-IP), as well as the Usher, Bardet-Biedl, and nephronophthisis genes. Other systemic disorders associated with retinal degenerations that may also involve ciliary abnormalities include: Alstrom, Edwards-Sethi, Ellis-van Creveld, Jeune, Meckel-Gruber, Orofaciodigital Type 9, and Gurrieri syndromes. Understanding these conditions as ciliopathies may help the ophthalmologist to recognize associations between seemingly unrelated diseases and have a high degree of suspicion that a systemic finding may be present. PMID:17896309

  7. A Constitutively Active Gαi3 Protein Corrects the Abnormal Retinal Pigment Epithelium Phenotype of Oa1−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Young, Alejandra; Wang, Ying; Ahmedli, Novruz B.; Jiang, Meisheng; Farber, Debora B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Ocular Albinism type 1 (OA1) is a disease caused by mutations in the OA1 gene and characterized by the presence of macromelanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) as well as abnormal crossing of the optic axons at the optic chiasm. We showed in our previous studies in mice that Oa1 activates specifically Gαi3 in its signaling pathway and thus, hypothesized that a constitutively active Gαi3 in the RPE of Oa1−/− mice might keep on the Oa1 signaling cascade and prevent the formation of macromelanosomes. To test this hypothesis, we have generated transgenic mice that carry the constitutively active Gαi3 (Q204L) protein in the RPE of Oa1−/− mice and are now reporting the effects that the transgene produced on the Oa1−/− RPE phenotype. Methods Transgenic mice carrying RPE-specific expression of the constitutively active Gαi3 (Q204L) were generated by injecting fertilized eggs of Oa1−/− females with a lentivirus containing the Gαi3 (Q204L) cDNA. PCR, Southern blots, Western blots and confocal microscopy were used to confirm the presence of the transgene in the RPE of positive transgenic mice. Morphometrical analyses were performed using electron microscopy to compare the size and number of melanosomes per RPE area in putative Oa1−/−, Gαi3 (Q204L) transgenic mice with those of wild-type NCrl and Oa1−/− mice. Results We found a correlation between the presence of the constitutively active Gαi3 (Q204L) transgene and the rescue of the normal phenotype of RPE melanosomes in Oa1−/−, Gαi3 (Q204L) mice. These mice have higher density of melanosomes per RPE area and a larger number of small melanosomes than Oa1−/− mice, and their RPE phenotype is similar to that of wild-type mice. Conclusions Our results show that a constitutively active Gαi3 protein can by-pass the lack of Oa1 protein in Oa1−/− mice and consequently rescue the RPE melanosomal phenotype. PMID:24098784

  8. Short-term treatment with VEGF receptor inhibitors induces retinopathy of prematurity-like abnormal vascular growth in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ayuki; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Mori, Asami; Ushikubo, Hiroko; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio

    2016-02-01

    Retinal arterial tortuosity and venous dilation are hallmarks of plus disease, which is a severe form of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). In this study, we examined whether short-term interruption of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signals leads to the formation of severe ROP-like abnormal retinal blood vessels. Neonatal rats were treated subcutaneously with the VEGF receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors, KRN633 (1, 5, or 10 mg/kg) or axitinib (10 mg/kg), on postnatal day (P) 7 and P8. The retinal vasculatures were examined on P9, P14, or P21 in retinal whole-mounts stained with an endothelial cell marker. Prevention of vascular growth and regression of some preformed capillaries were observed on P9 in retinas of rats treated with KRN633. However, on P14 and P21, density of capillaries, tortuosity index of arterioles, and diameter of veins significantly increased in KRN633-treated rats, compared to vehicle (0.5% methylcellulose)-treated animals. Similar observations were made with axitinib-treated rats. Expressions of VEGF and VEGFR-2 were enhanced on P14 in KRN633-treated rat retinas. The second round of KRN633 treatment on P11 and P12 completely blocked abnormal retinal vascular growth on P14, but thereafter induced ROP-like abnormal retinal blood vessels by P21. These results suggest that an interruption of normal retinal vascular development in neonatal rats as a result of short-term VEGFR inhibition causes severe ROP-like abnormal retinal vascular growth in a VEGF-dependent manner. Rats treated postnatally with VEGFR inhibitors could serve as an animal model for studying the mechanisms underlying the development of plus disease. PMID:26500193

  9. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Beach, James

    2014-01-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry. PMID:25237591

  10. EphrinB2 controls vessel pruning through STAT1-JNK3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Salvucci, Ombretta; Ohnuki, Hidetaka; Maric, Dragan; Hou, Xu; Li, Xuri; Yoon, Sung Ok; Segarra, Marta; Eberhart, Charles G.; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Tosato, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis produces primitive vascular networks that need pruning to yield hierarchically organized and functional vessels. Despite the critical importance of vessel pruning to vessel patterning and function, the mechanisms regulating this process are not clear. Here we show that EphrinB2, a well-known player in angiogenesis, is an essential regulator of endothelial cell death and vessel pruning. This regulation depends upon phosphotyrosine-EphrinB2 signaling repressing JNK3 activity via STAT1. JNK3 activation causes endothelial cell death. In the absence of JNK3, hyaloid vessel physiological pruning is impaired, associated with abnormal persistence of hyaloid vessels, defective retinal vasculature and microphthalmia. This syndrome closely resembles human persistent hyperplastic primary vitreus (PHPV), attributed to failed involution of hyaloid vessels. Our results provide evidence that EphrinB2/STAT1/JNK3 signaling is essential for vessel pruning, and that defects in this pathway may contribute to PHPV. PMID:25807892

  11. Cytomegalovirus retinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to prevent its return. Alternative Names Cytomegalovirus retinitis Images Eye CMV retinitis CMV (cytomegalovirus) References Crumpacker CS. ... 5. Read More Antibody HIV/AIDS Immune response Retinal detachment Systemic WBC count Update Date 12/10/ ...

  12. Cannabinoid and lipid-mediated vasorelaxation in retinal microvasculature.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, Jessica; Dong, Alex; Straiker, Alex; Zhu, Jiequan; Howlett, Susan E; Bagher, Amina; Denovan-Wright, Eileen; Yu, Dao-Yi; Kelly, Melanie E M

    2014-07-15

    The endocannabinoid system plays a role in regulation of vasoactivity in the peripheral vasculature; however, little is known about its role in regulation of the CNS microvasculature. This study investigated the pharmacology of cannabinoids and cannabimimetic lipids in the retinal microvasculature, a CNS vascular bed that is autoregulated. Vessel diameter (edge detector) and calcium transients (fura-2) were recorded from segments of retinal microvasculature isolated from adult, male Fischer 344 rats. Results showed that abnormal cannabidiol (Abn-CBD), an agonist at the putative endothelial cannabinoid receptor, CBe, inhibited endothelin 1 (ET-1) induced vasoconstriction in retinal arterioles. These actions of Abn-CBD were independent of CB1/CB2 receptors and were not mediated by agonists for GPR55 or affected by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition. However, the vasorelaxant effects of Abn-CBD were abolished when the endothelium was removed and were inhibited by the small Ca(2+)-sensitive K channel (SKCa) blocker, apamin. The effects of the endogenous endocannabinoid metabolite, N-arachidonyl glycine (NAGly), a putative agonist for GPR18, were virtually identical to those of Abn-CBD. GPR18 mRNA and protein were present in the retina, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that GPR18 was localized to the endothelium of retinal vessels. These findings demonstrate that Abn-CBD and NAGly inhibit ET-1 induced vasoconstriction in retinal arterioles by an endothelium-dependent signaling mechanism that involves SKCa channels. The endothelial localization of GPR18 suggests that GPR18 could contribute to cannabinoid and lipid-mediated retinal vasoactivity. PMID:24751709

  13. Characterization of a Spontaneous Retinal Neovascular Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Eiichi; Sweigard, Harry; Husain, Deeba; Olivares, Ana M.; Chang, Bo; Smith, Kaylee E.; Birsner, Amy E.; D’Amato, Robert J.; Michaud, Norman A.; Han, Yinan; Vavvas, Demetrios G.; Miller, Joan W.; Haider, Neena B.; Connor, Kip M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vision loss due to vascular disease of the retina is a leading cause of blindness in the world. Retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) is a subgroup of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), whereby abnormal blood vessels develop in the retina leading to debilitating vision loss and eventual blindness. The novel mouse strain, neoretinal vascularization 2 (NRV2), shows spontaneous fundus changes associated with abnormal neovascularization. The purpose of this study is to characterize the induction of pathologic angiogenesis in this mouse model. Methods The NRV2 mice were examined from postnatal day 12 (p12) to 3 months. The phenotypic changes within the retina were evaluated by fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analysis. The pathological neovascularization was imaged by confocal microscopy and reconstructed using three-dimensional image analysis software. Results We found that NRV2 mice develop multifocal retinal depigmentation in the posterior fundus. Depigmented lesions developed vascular leakage observed by fluorescein angiography. The spontaneous angiogenesis arose from the retinal vascular plexus at postnatal day (p)15 and extended toward retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By three months of age, histological analysis revealed encapsulation of the neovascular lesion by the RPE in the photoreceptor cell layer and subretinal space. Conclusions The NRV2 mouse strain develops early neovascular lesions within the retina, which grow downward towards the RPE beginning at p15. This retinal neovascularization model mimics early stages of human retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) and will likely be a useful in elucidating targeted therapeutics for patients with ocular neovascular disease. PMID:25188381

  14. Color Doppler imaging of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Galina; Kato, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Color Doppler imaging (CDI) is a widely used method for evaluating ocular circulation that has been used in a number of studies on retinal diseases. CDI assesses blood velocity parameters by using ultrasound waves. In ophthalmology, these assessments are mainly performed on the retrobulbar blood vessels: the ophthalmic, the central retinal, and the short posterior ciliary arteries. In this review, we discuss CDI use for the assessment of retinal diseases classified into the following: vascular diseases, degenerations, dystrophies, and detachment. The retinal vascular diseases that have been investigated by CDI include diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusions, retinal artery occlusions, ocular ischemic conditions, and retinopathy of prematurity. Degenerations and dystrophies included in this review are age-related macular degeneration, myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. CDI has been used for the differential diagnosis of retinal detachment, as well as the evaluation of retrobulbar circulation in this condition. CDI is valuable for research and is a potentially useful diagnostic tool in the clinical setting. PMID:20385332

  15. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  16. SOCS3 in retinal neurons and glial cells suppresses VEGF signaling to prevent pathological neovascular growth

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Ju, Meihua; Lin, Zhiqiang; Fredrick, Thomas W.; Evans, Lucy P.; Tian, Katherine T.; Saba, Nicholas J.; Morss, Peyton C.; Pu, William T.; Chen, Jing; Stahl, Andreas; Joyal, Jean-Sébastien; Smith, Lois E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons and glial cells in the retina contribute to neovascularization, or the formation of abnormal new blood vessels, in proliferative retinopathy, a condition that can lead to vision loss or blindness. We identified a mechanism by which suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) in neurons and glial cells prevents neovascularization. We found that Socs3 expression was increased in the retinal ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers after oxygen-induced retinopathy. Mice with Socs3 deficiency in neuronal and glial cells had substantially reduced vaso-obliterated retinal areas and increased pathological retinal neovascularization in response to oxygen-induced retinopathy, suggesting that loss of neuronal/glial SOCS3 increased both retinal vascular regrowth and pathological neovascularization. Furthermore, retinal expression of Vegfa (which encodes vascular endothelial growth factor A) was higher in these mice than in Socs3 flox/flox controls, indicating that neuronal and glial Socs3 suppressed Vegfa expression during pathological conditions. Lack of neuronal and glial SOCS3 resulted in greater phosphorylation and activation of STAT3, which led to increased expression of its gene target Vegfa, and increased endothelial cell proliferation. In summary, SOCS3 in neurons and glial cells inhibited the STAT3-mediated secretion of VEGF from these cells, which suppresses endothelial cell activation, resulting in decreased endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. These results suggest that neuronal and glial cell SOCS3 limits pathological retinal angiogenesis by suppressing VEGF signaling. PMID:26396267

  17. Interconnection between brain and retinal neurodegenerations.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    The eye is a special sensory organ, which is basically an extension of the brain. Both are derived from neural tube and consist of neurons. Therefore, diseases of both the brain and eye should have some similarity. Neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia in the world. Amyloid deposition in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal region is the basic pathology in AD. But along with it, there are various changes that take place in the eye, i.e., abnormal pupillary reaction, decreased vision, decreased contrast sensitivity, visual field changes, loss of retinal ganglionic cells and retinal fiber layer, peripapillary atrophy, increased cup-disk ratio, retinal thinning, tortuosity of blood vessels, and deposition of Aβ-like substance in the retina. And these changes are present in the early part of the disease when only mild cognitive impairment is there. As the brain is covered by a hard bony skull which makes it difficult to directly visualize the changes occurring in the brain at molecular levels, finer details of disease progression are not available with us. But the eye is the window of the brain; with advanced modern techniques, we can directly visualize the changes in the retina at a very fine level. Therefore, by depicting neurodegenerative changes in the eye, we can diagnose and manage AD at very early stages. Along with it, retinal neurodegenerations like glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) are the major cause of loss of vision, and still, there are no effective treatment modalities for these blinding conditions. So if we can understand its pathogenesis and progression by correlating with brain neurodegenerations, we can come up with a better therapy for glaucoma and ARMD. PMID:24826919

  18. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by phospholipase C-β3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung Min; Baek, Seung Hoon; Kim, Young Hwan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, Sun Ja; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae; Bae, Sun Sik

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis has an essential role in many pathophysiologies. Here, we show that phospholipase C-β3 (PLC-β3) isoform regulates endothelial cell function and retinal angiogenesis. Silencing of PLC-β3 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) significantly delayed proliferation, migration and capillary-like tube formation. In addition, mice lacking PLC-β3 showed impaired retinal angiogenesis with delayed endothelial proliferation, reduced endothelial cell activation, abnormal vessel formation and hemorrhage. Finally, tumor formation was significantly reduced in mice lacking PLC-β3 and showed irregular size and shape of blood vessels. These results suggest that regulation of endothelial function by PLC-β3 may contribute to angiogenesis. PMID:27311705

  19. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by phospholipase C-β3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung Min; Baek, Seung Hoon; Kim, Young Hwan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, Sun Ja; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae; Bae, Sun Sik

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis has an essential role in many pathophysiologies. Here, we show that phospholipase C-β3 (PLC-β3) isoform regulates endothelial cell function and retinal angiogenesis. Silencing of PLC-β3 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) significantly delayed proliferation, migration and capillary-like tube formation. In addition, mice lacking PLC-β3 showed impaired retinal angiogenesis with delayed endothelial proliferation, reduced endothelial cell activation, abnormal vessel formation and hemorrhage. Finally, tumor formation was significantly reduced in mice lacking PLC-β3 and showed irregular size and shape of blood vessels. These results suggest that regulation of endothelial function by PLC-β3 may contribute to angiogenesis. PMID:27311705

  20. Acquired retinal folds in the cat.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, A D

    1976-06-01

    Retinal folds were found in 5 cats. The apparent cause of the folding was varied: in 1 cat the folds appeared after a localized retinal detachment; in 2 cats the condition accompanied other intraocular abnormalities associated with feline infectious peritonitis; 1 cat had active keratitis, and the retinal changes were thought to have been injury related; and 1 cat, bilaterally affected, had chronic glomerulonephritis. PMID:945253

  1. Posterior ocular abnormalities after irradiation for retinoblastoma: a histopathological study.

    PubMed Central

    Egbert, P R; Fajardo, L F; Donaldson, S S; Moazed, K

    1980-01-01

    Radiation-induced ocular lesions in the posterior eye and orbit were investigated in 33 surgical specimens of patients with retinoblastoma. The eyes were obtained from children 7 months to 6 years of age. Seventeen eyes were irradiated; 16 eyes had not received irradiation and served as controls. The majority of the irradiated eyes were treated with 6000 rads of external beam radiation. They were removed at a mean of 23 months after radiotherapy. All specimens were examined simultaneously by 2 observers without knowledge of treatment and analysed for the presence or absence of 15 lesions. The most consistent lesions in the irradiated eyes were abnormalities of the retinal vessels (11 of 17 eyes) and striking changes in the ciliary arteries (13 of 17 eyes). The retinal vessels showed thickening of the wall, often caused by deposition of fibrillary material, sometimes with fibrin deposits. The most consistent lesion was myointimal proliferation with narrowing of the ciliary arteries. Lesions of the central retinal artery were less common but occurred only in irradiated patients. Images PMID:7426587

  2. Retinal blood flow measurement by using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Fabritius, Tapio; Miura, Masahiro; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2008-02-01

    Quantification of the three-dimensional (3D) retinal vessel structure and blood flow is demonstrated. 3D blood flow distribution is obtained by Doppler optical coherence angiography (D-OCA). Vessel parameters, i.e. diameter, orientation, and position, are determined in an en face vessel image. The Doppler angle is estimated as the angle between the retinal vessel and the incident probing beam in representative cross-sectional flow image which extracted from the 3D flow distribution according to the vessel parameters. Blood flow velocity and volume rate can be quantified with these vessel parameters. The retinal blood flow velocity and volume rate are measured in the retinal vessels around the optic nerve head.

  3. Preliminary Study on Retinal Vascular and Oxygen-related Changes after Long-term Silicone Oil and Foldable Capsular Vitreous Body Tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Yuan, Yongguang; Zong, Yao; Huang, Zhen; Mai, Shuyi; Li, Yujie; Qian, Xiaobing; Liu, Yaqin; Gao, Qianying

    2014-01-01

    Silicone oil has been the only long-term vitreous substitute used in the treatment of retinal detachment since 1962 by Cibis. Nevertheless, its effects on retinal vascular morphology and oxygen supply to the retina are ambiguous in current research. We previously invented a foldable capsular vitreous body (FCVB) to use as a new vitreous substitute in the treatment of severe retinal detachment, but its effects on the retinal vessel were unknown. Therefore, in this study, a standard three-port pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was performed on the right eye of each rabbit and then silicone oil and FCVB were injected into the vitreous cavity as vitreous substitutes. After 180 days of retention, the retinal vascular morphology did not display any distinct abnormalities, and hypoxia-induced factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) did not vary markedly during the observation period in silicone oil tamponade- and FCVB-implanted eyes. This study may suggest that silicone oil and FCVB tamponade in rabbit eyes did not cause retinal vascular pathologic changes or retinal hypoxia for 180 days. PMID:24920425

  4. Interrelationships between the Retinal Neuroglia and Vasculature in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For years, diabetic retinopathy has been defined based on vascular lesions, and neural abnormalities were not regarded as important. This review summarizes evidence that the neural retina has important effects on the retinal vasculature under normal conditions, and the interaction between the retinal neuroglial cells and vascular function is altered in diabetes. Importantly, new evidence raises a possibility that abnormalities within retinal neuroglial cells (notably photoreceptors) might actually be causing or initiating the vascular disease in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25003068

  5. Flicker-induced retinal vasodilatation is not dependent on complement factor H polymorphism in healthy young subjects

    PubMed Central

    Told, Reinhard; Palkovits, Stefan; Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Napora, Katarzyna J; Werkmeister, René M; Haslacher, Helmuth; Frantal, Sophie; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Schmetterer, Leopold; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The complement factor H (CFH) tyrosine 402 histidine (Y402H, rs1061170) variant is known to be significantly associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Whether this genetic variant may impact retinal blood flow regulation is largely unknown. This study investigated whether flicker-induced vasodilation, an indicator for the coupling between neural activity and blood flow, is altered in subjects carrying the rs1061170 risk allele. Methods One hundred healthy subjects (aged between 18 and 45 years) were included in this study. Retinal blood flow regulation was tested by assessing retinal vessel calibres in response to stimulation with diffuse flicker light. Retinal vascular flicker responses were determined with a Dynamic Vessel Analyzer (DVA). In addition, genotyping for rs1061170 was performed. Results Eighteen subjects were homozygous for the risk allele C, 50 were homozygous for the ancestral allele T, and 31 subjects were heterozygous (CT). One subject had to be excluded from data evaluation, as no genetic analysis could be performed due to technical difficulties. Baseline diameters of retinal arteries (p = 0.39) and veins (p = 0.64) were comparable between the three groups. Flicker-induced vasodilation in both retinal arteries (p = 0.38) and retinal veins (p = 0.62) was also comparable between the three studied groups. Conclusions Our data indicate that homozygous healthy young carriers of the C risk allele at rs1061170 do not show abnormal flicker-induced vasodilation in the retina. This suggests that the high-risk genetic variant of CFH polymorphism does not impact neuro-vascular coupling in healthy subjects. PMID:24863099

  6. Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated from the laboratory to the clinical over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives. Improved mobility and object detection are some of the more notable findings from the clinical trials. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. This paper reviews the recent clinical trials, highlights technology breakthroughs that will contribute to next generation of retinal prostheses. PMID:24710817

  7. Foveomacular retinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kuming, B S

    1986-01-01

    A group of patients is described who developed the clinical features of foveomacular retinitis. No causative factors were isolated, and all patients strongly denied any type of sun gazing. It is possible that there is a group of patients who have the features of foveomacular retinitis but have not had any direct exposure to the sun. These patients would then constitute a primary type of foveomacular retinitis, as opposed to a secondary type which has a known cause and is synonymous with solar retinopathy. Images PMID:3790482

  8. Role of retinal vascular endothelial cells in development of CMV retinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, N A; Zhang, J; Ishimoto, S

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is known to occur in association with retinal microangiopathy in individuals with marked immunodeficiency, glial cells are believed to be the initial target cells in the development of retinitis. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that CMV gains access to the retinal glia because of altered vascular permeability. In an attempt to address the hypothesis, we studied 30 autopsy eyes of AIDS patients with systemic CMV infection, with or without clinically apparent CMV retinitis. METHODS: The autopsy eyes were processed in three ways. First, dual immunohistochemical studies were done by using anti-CMV antibodies for immediate early, early, and late antigens. The retinal cell types infected with the virus were then determined by using anti-GFAP, anti-VonWillebrand's factor, neuronal specific enolase, and leukocyte marker CD68. Second, selected eyes were processed for in situ hybridization with DNA probe specific to CMV. Third, an eye with clinically apparent CMV retinitis was submitted for electron microscopic examination. RESULTS: At the site of retinal necrosis in those eyes with a clinical diagnosis of CMV retinitis, the immunohistochemical, in situ hybridization, and ultrastructural examinations revealed that CMV was present primarily in the Müller cells and in perivascular glial cells. Adjacent to these infected cells, focal areas of positive staining for CMV antigen were seen in the glial cells, neuronal cells, and retinal pigment epithelial cells. At these sites most of the retinal capillaries were devoid of endothelial cells. Few vessels located at the advancing margin of retinal necrosis showed the presence of viral proteins in the endothelial cells. CONCLUSIONS: The present results indicate that retinal vascular endothelial cells could be the initial target in the development of viral retinitis, with subsequent spread of the infection to perivascular glia, Müller cells, and other retinal cells, including the

  9. Retinal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision Diabetic eye disease Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is ... children. Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula Macular hole - ...

  10. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... immediately. Treatment How is retinal detachment treated? Small holes and tears are treated with laser surgery or ... laser surgery tiny burns are made around the hole to “weld” the retina back into place. Cryopexy ...

  11. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  12. Detection of neovascularization in retinal images using multivariate m-Mediods based classifier.

    PubMed

    Usman Akram, M; Khalid, Shehzad; Tariq, Anam; Younus Javed, M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a progressive eye disease and one of the leading causes of blindness all over the world. New blood vessels (neovascularization) start growing at advance stage of diabetic retinopathy known as proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Early and accurate detection of proliferative diabetic retinopathy is very important and crucial for protection of patient's vision. Automated systems for detection of proliferative diabetic retinopathy should identify between normal and abnormal vessels present in digital retinal image. In this paper, we proposed a new method for detection of abnormal blood vessels and grading of proliferative diabetic retinopathy using multivariate m-Mediods based classifier. The system extracts the vascular pattern and optic disc using a multilayered thresholding technique and Hough transform respectively. It grades the fundus image in different categories of proliferative diabetic retinopathy using classification and optic disc coordinates. The proposed method is evaluated using publicly available retinal image databases and results show that the proposed system detects and grades proliferative diabetic retinopathy with high accuracy. PMID:23916066

  13. Laser speckle analysis of retinal vascular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Neganova, Anastasiia Y; Postnov, Dmitry D; Jacobsen, Jens Christian B.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Studies of vascular responses are usually performed on isolated vessels or on single vessels in vivo. This allows for precise measurements of diameter or blood flow. However, dynamical responses of the whole microvascular network are difficult to access experimentally. We suggest to use full-field laser speckle imaging to evaluate vascular responses of the retinal network. Image segmentation and vessel recognition algorithms together with response mapping allow us to analyze diameter changes and blood flow responses in the intact retinal network upon systemic administration of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II, the vasodilator acetylcholine or on the changing level of anesthesia in in vivo rat preparations.

  14. Serial evaluation of retinal vascular changes in infants treated with intravitreal bevacizumab for aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity in zone I.

    PubMed

    Padhi, T R; Das, T; Rath, S; Pradhan, L; Sutar, S; Panda, K G; Modi, R; Jalali, S

    2016-03-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the serial changes in retinal vasculature in infants treated with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) for aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (APROP) in zone I.MethodsRetrospective analysis of serial changes in retinal vasculature after IVB in the seven eyes of four babies with APROP in zone I.ResultsThe initial regression, following IVB, was dramatic with reduction in vessel caliber and marked thinning and invisibility of the bridging shunts. Resurgent vascular development was very slow radially though there was continued abnormal vascular growth circumferentially. Common findings in all eyes were tangled vasculature and fine saw-toothed shunts. The variable findings were (1) new closely packed multilayered bridging shunts, long arching mature looking vessels, and finally a ridge at the periphery (n=3 eyes) at 52 weeks of postmenstrual age (PMA); (2) status quo at the stage of saw-toothed shunt and ridge in both eyes for a long time (n=2 eyes); and (3) multiple retinal hemorrhages within the vascularized retina and thick preretinal hemorrhage overlying the saw-toothed shunts and ridge that persisted for another 3 weeks and regressed 2 weeks after laser (n=1). The eyes that received bevacizumab alone (3) did not show any abnormal vascularization at 56 weeks of PMA or beyond.ConclusionsThe retinal vascularization following IVB was different than normal in terms of its time, speed, and morphology; few of these changes are first to be reported in the literature (Medline search) and warrants further studies. PMID:26584796

  15. Sulfur Mustard Exposure and Non-Ischemic Central Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Shoeibi, Nasser; Balali-Mood, Mahdi; Abrishami, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    A 41-year-old man was referred with a complaint of visual loss in his left eye and his best corrected visual acuity was 20/80. Slit lamp examination showed arborizing conjunctival vessels and dry eye. Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography revealed a non-ischemic central retinal vein occlusion. Cardiovascular, rheumatologic, and hematologic work up showed no abnormal findings. An ascertained history of exposure to sulfur mustard during the Iran-Iraq war was documented in his medical history. Four sessions of intravitreal bevacizumab injections were done as needed. After two-year follow-up, visual acuity in his left eye improved to 20/25 and macular edema was resolved without any need for further interventions. We conclude that sulfur mustard gas exposure may be considered as a predisposing factor for central retinal vein occlusion, as was found in our patient (an Iranian war veteran) by excluding all yet known etiologies and predisposing factors. PMID:26722147

  16. Retinal artery-vein caliber grading using color fundus imaging.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Alauddin; Kawasaki, Ryo; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Ramamohanarao, Kotagiri; Wong, Tien Yin

    2013-07-01

    Recent research suggests that retinal vessel caliber (or cross-sectional width) measured from retinal photographs is an important feature for predicting cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). One of the most utilized measures is to quantify retinal arteriolar and venular caliber as the Central Retinal Artery Equivalent (CRAE) and Central Retinal Vein Equivalent (CRVE). However, current computer tools utilize manual or semi-automatic grading methods to estimate CRAE and CRVE. These methods involve a significant amount of grader's time and can add a significant level of inaccuracy due to repetitive nature of grading and intragrader distances. An automatic and time efficient grading of the vessel caliber with highly repeatable measurement is essential, but is technically challenging due to a substantial variation of the retinal blood vessels' properties. In this paper, we propose a new technique to measure the retinal vessel caliber, which is an "edge-based" vessel tracking method. We measured CRAE and CRVE from each of the vessel types. We achieve very high accuracy (average 96.23%) for each of the cross-sectional width measurement compared to manually graded width. For overall vessel caliber measurement accuracy of CRAE and CRVE, we compared the results with an existing semi-automatic method which showed high correlation of 0.85 and 0.92, respectively. The intra-grader reproducibility of our method was high, with the correlation coefficient of 0.881 for CRAE and 0.875 for CRVE. PMID:23535181

  17. Evaluation and management of pediatric rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wenick, Adam S.; Barañano, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric rhegmatogenous retinal detachments are rare, accounting for less than ten percent of all rhegmatogenous retinal detachments. While most retinal detachments in the adult population are related to posterior vitreous detachment, pediatric retinal detachment are often related to trauma or an underlying congenital abnormalities or genetic syndrome. The anatomy of pediatric eyes, the often late presentation of the disease, and the high incidence of bilateral pathology in children all pose significant challenges in the management of these patients. We discuss the epidemiology of pediatric rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, review the genetic syndromes associated with a high incidence of retinal detachment, and examine other common causes of retinal detachment in this age group. We then outline an approach to evaluation and management and describe the expected outcomes of repair of retinal detachment in the pediatric population. PMID:23961003

  18. N -methyl- N -nitrosourea-induced retinal degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Shi-Liang; Hu, Dan-Ping; Xing, Yi-Qiao; Shen, Yin

    2014-04-01

    Mouse retinal degeneration models have been investigated for many years in the hope of understanding the mechanism of photoreceptor cell death. N -methyl- N -nitrosourea (MNU) has been previously shown to induce outer retinal degeneration in mice. After MNU was intraperitoneally injected in C57/BL mice, we observed a gradual decrease in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness associated with photoreceptor outer segment loss, bipolar cell dendritic retraction and reactive gliosis. Reactive gliosis was confirmed by increased GFAP protein levels. More serious damage to the central retina as opposed to the peripheral retina was found in the MNU-induced retinal degeneration model. Retinal ganglion cells (RGC) appear to be spared for at least two months after MNU treatment. Following retinal vessel labelling, we observed vascular complexes in the distal vessels, indicating retinal vessel damage. In the remnant retinal photoreceptor of the MNU-treated mouse, concentrated colouring nuclei were detected by electron microscopy, together with the loss of mitochondria and displaced remnant synaptic ribbons in the photoreceptor. We also observed decreased mitochondrial protein levels and increased amounts of nitrosylation/nitration in the photoreceptors. The mechanism of MNU-induced apoptosis may result from oxidative stress or the loss of retinal blood supply. MNU-induced mouse retinal degeneration in the outer retina is a useful animal model for photoreceptor degeneration diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). PMID:24509257

  19. Longitudinal live imaging of retinal α-synuclein::GFP deposits in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's Disease/Dementia with Lewy Bodies.

    PubMed

    Price, Diana L; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Overk, Cassia; Spencer, Brian; Duong-Polk, Karen X; Bonhaus, Douglas; Lindsey, James; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal α-synuclein (α-syn) accumulation in the CNS may underlie neuronal cell and synaptic dysfunction leading to motor and cognitive deficits in synucleinopathies including Parkinson's disease (PD) and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). Multiple groups demonstrated α-syn accumulation in CNS accessory structures, including the eyes and olfactory terminals, as well as in peripheral organs of Parkinsonian patients. Retinal imaging studies of mice overexpressing fused α-syn::GFP were conducted to evaluate the presence and progression of retinal pathology in a PD/DLB transgenic mouse model. Bright-field image retinal maps and fluorescent images were acquired at 1-month intervals for 3 months. Retinal imaging revealed the accumulation of GFP-tagged α-syn in retinal ganglion cell layer and in the edges of arterial blood vessels in the transgenic mice. Double labeling studies confirmed that the α-syn::GFP-positive cells were retinal ganglion cells containing α-syn. Accumulation of α-syn persisted in the same cells and increased with age. Accumulation of α-syn::GFP was reduced by immunization with single chain antibodies against α-syn. In conclusion, longitudinal live imaging of the retina in the PDGF-α-syn::GFP mice might represent a useful, non-invasive tool to monitor the fate of α-syn accumulation in the CNS and to evaluate the therapeutic effects of compounds targeting α-syn. PMID:27389831

  20. Longitudinal live imaging of retinal α-synuclein::GFP deposits in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson’s Disease/Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Price, Diana L.; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Overk, Cassia; Spencer, Brian; Duong-Polk, Karen X.; Bonhaus, Douglas; Lindsey, James; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal α-synuclein (α-syn) accumulation in the CNS may underlie neuronal cell and synaptic dysfunction leading to motor and cognitive deficits in synucleinopathies including Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). Multiple groups demonstrated α-syn accumulation in CNS accessory structures, including the eyes and olfactory terminals, as well as in peripheral organs of Parkinsonian patients. Retinal imaging studies of mice overexpressing fused α-syn::GFP were conducted to evaluate the presence and progression of retinal pathology in a PD/DLB transgenic mouse model. Bright-field image retinal maps and fluorescent images were acquired at 1-month intervals for 3 months. Retinal imaging revealed the accumulation of GFP-tagged α-syn in retinal ganglion cell layer and in the edges of arterial blood vessels in the transgenic mice. Double labeling studies confirmed that the α-syn::GFP-positive cells were retinal ganglion cells containing α-syn. Accumulation of α-syn persisted in the same cells and increased with age. Accumulation of α-syn::GFP was reduced by immunization with single chain antibodies against α-syn. In conclusion, longitudinal live imaging of the retina in the PDGF-α-syn::GFP mice might represent a useful, non-invasive tool to monitor the fate of α-syn accumulation in the CNS and to evaluate the therapeutic effects of compounds targeting α-syn. PMID:27389831

  1. Retinal oximeter for the blue-green oximetry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Sieluzycka, Katarzyna B.; Hendryx, Jennifer K.; Ririe, Tyson J.; Deluca, Lawrence; Chipman, Russell A.

    2011-10-01

    Retinal oximetry offers potential for noninvasive assessment of central venous oxyhemoglobin saturation (SO2) via the retinal vessels but requires a calibrated accuracy of +/-3% saturation in order to be clinically useful. Prior oximeter designs have been hampered by poor saturation calibration accuracy. We demonstrate that the blue-green oximetry (BGO) technique can provide accuracy within +/-3% in swine when multiply scattered light from blood within a retinal vessel is isolated. A noninvasive on-axis scanning retinal oximeter (ROx-3) is constructed that generates a multiwavelength image in the range required for BGO. A field stop in the detection pathway is used in conjunction with an anticonfocal bisecting wire to remove specular vessel reflections and isolate multiply backscattered light from the blood column within a retinal vessel. This design is tested on an enucleated swine eye vessel and a retinal vein in a human volunteer with retinal SO2 measurements of ~1 and ~65%, respectively. These saturations, calculated using the calibration line from earlier work, are internally consistent with a standard error of the mean of +/-2% SO2. The absolute measures are well within the expected saturation range for the site (-1 and 63%). This is the first demonstration of noninvasive on-axis BGO retinal oximetry.

  2. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eui Seok; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. PMID:25667739

  3. Retinal pigment epithelium in incontinentia pigmenti.

    PubMed

    Mensheha-Manhart, O; Rodrigues, M M; Shields, J A; Shannon, G M; Mirabelli, R P

    1975-04-01

    An 18-month-old white girl with incontinentia pigmenti presented clinically with leukokoria of the right eye. B-scan ultrasound demonstrated a retrolental mass consistent with a detached retina. Histologic examination of the skin revealed changes compatible with the intermediate verrucous phase of the disease. Microscopic examination of the right eye showed retinal detachment and nodular proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium. The nodules contained macrophages laden with melanin and lipofuscin. An unusually large amount of lipofuscin was present for a child of this age. The basic pigmentary abnormality may affect the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in changes in the overlying neurosensory retina that may lead to the retinal dysplasia or retinal detachemnt often associated with this condition. PMID:1119517

  4. Doppler optical coherence tomography of retinal circulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ou; Wang, Yimin; Konduru, Ranjith K; Zhang, Xinbo; Sadda, SriniVas R; Huang, David

    2012-01-01

    Noncontact retinal blood flow measurements are performed with a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using a circumpapillary double circular scan (CDCS) that scans around the optic nerve head at 3.40 mm and 3.75 mm diameters. The double concentric circles are performed 6 times consecutively over 2 sec. The CDCS scan is saved with Doppler shift information from which flow can be calculated. The standard clinical protocol calls for 3 CDCS scans made with the OCT beam passing through the superonasal edge of the pupil and 3 CDCS scan through the inferonal pupil. This double-angle protocol ensures that acceptable Doppler angle is obtained on each retinal branch vessel in at least 1 scan. The CDCS scan data, a 3-dimensional volumetric OCT scan of the optic disc scan, and a color photograph of the optic disc are used together to obtain retinal blood flow measurement on an eye. We have developed a blood flow measurement software called "Doppler optical coherence tomography of retinal circulation" (DOCTORC). This semi-automated software is used to measure total retinal blood flow, vessel cross section area, and average blood velocity. The flow of each vessel is calculated from the Doppler shift in the vessel cross-sectional area and the Doppler angle between the vessel and the OCT beam. Total retinal blood flow measurement is summed from the veins around the optic disc. The results obtained at our Doppler OCT reading center showed good reproducibility between graders and methods (<10%). Total retinal blood flow could be useful in the management of glaucoma, other retinal diseases, and retinal diseases. In glaucoma patients, OCT retinal blood flow measurement was highly correlated with visual field loss (R(2)>0.57 with visual field pattern deviation). Doppler OCT is a new method to perform rapid, noncontact, and repeatable measurement of total retinal blood flow using widely available Fourier-domain OCT instrumentation. This new technology may improve the

  5. Retinal detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the first symptoms of new flashes of light and floaters. ... diabetes. See your eye care specialist once a year. You may need more frequent visits if you have risk factors for retinal detachment. Be alert to symptoms of new flashes of light and floaters.

  6. Automated retinal robotic laser system.

    PubMed

    Barrett, S F; Wright, C H; Jerath, M R; Lewis, R S; Dillard, B C; Rylander, H G; Welch, A J

    1995-01-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas and the USAF Academy have worked toward the development of a retinal robotic laser system. The overall goal of this ongoing project is to precisely place and control the depth of laser lesions for the treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. Separate low speed prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion depth using lesion reflectance feedback parameters and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Both subsystems have been successfully demonstrated in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser. Recent efforts have concentrated on combining the two subsystems into a single prototype capable of simultaneously controlling both lesion depth and placement. We have designated this combined system CALOSOS for Computer Aided Laser Optics System for Ophthalmic Surgery. Following the dual-use concept, this system is being adapted for clinical use as a retinal treatment system as well as a research tool for military laser-tissue interaction studies. PMID:7654990

  7. An Unusual Case of Extensive Lattice Degeneration and Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Saurabh Kumar; Basaiawmoit, Jennifer V.

    2016-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is not infrequently encountered on a dilated retinal examination and many of them do not need any intervention. We report a case of atypical lattice degeneration variant with peripheral retinal detachment. An asymptomatic 35-year-old lady with minimal refractive error was found to have extensive lattice degeneration, peripheral retinal detachment and fibrotic changes peripherally with elevation of retinal vessels on dilated retinal examination. There were also areas of white without pressure, chorioretinal scarring and retinal breaks. All the changes were limited to beyond the equator but were found to span 360 degrees. She was treated with barrage laser all around to prevent extension of the retinal detachment posteriorly. She remained stable till her latest follow-up two years after the barrage laser. This case is reported for its rarity with a discussion of the probable differential diagnoses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such findings in lattice degeneration.

  8. Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Mar. 01, 2016 How does a detached or torn retina affect your vision? If a retinal tear is occurring, you may ...

  9. 3D Reconstruction of the Retinal Arterial Tree Using Subject-Specific Fundus Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Wood, N. B.; Xu, X. Y.; Witt, N.; Hughes, A. D.; Samcg, Thom

    Systemic diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, are associated with changes in the retinal microvasculature. Although a number of studies have been performed on the quantitative assessment of the geometrical patterns of the retinal vasculature, previous work has been confined to 2 dimensional (2D) analyses. In this paper, we present an approach to obtain a 3D reconstruction of the retinal arteries from a pair of 2D retinal images acquired in vivo. A simple essential matrix based self-calibration approach was employed for the "fundus camera-eye" system. Vessel segmentation was performed using a semi-automatic approach and correspondence between points from different images was calculated. The results of 3D reconstruction show the centreline of retinal vessels and their 3D curvature clearly. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the retinal vessels is feasible and may be useful in future studies of the retinal vasculature in disease.

  10. A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase10 (ADAM10) Regulates NOTCH Signaling during Early Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Joseph A.; Ronchetti, Adam; Sidjanin, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 and ADAM17 are two closely related members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of membrane-bound sheddases, which proteolytically cleave surface membrane proteins. Both ADAM10 and ADAM17 have been implicated in the proteolytic cleavage of NOTCH receptors and as such regulators of NOTCH signaling. During retinal development, NOTCH signaling facilitates retinal neurogenesis by maintaining progenitor cells in a proliferative state and by mediating retinal cell fates. However, the roles of ADAM10 and ADAM17 in the retina are not well defined. In this study, we set out to clarify the roles of ADAM10 and ADAM17 during early retinal development. The retinal phenotype of conditionally abated Adam17 retinae (Adam17 CKO) did not differ from the controls whereas conditionally ablated Adam10 retinae (Adam10 CKO) exhibited abnormal morphogenesis characterized by the formation of rosettes and a loss of retinal laminae phenotypically similar to morphological abnormalities identified in mice with retinal NOTCH signaling deficiency. Additionally, Adam10 CKO retinae exhibited abnormal neurogenesis characterized by fewer proliferating progenitor cells and greater differentiation of early photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, constitutive activation of the NOTCH1-intracellular domain (N1-ICD) rescued Adam10 CKO abnormal neurogenesis, as well as abnormal retinal morphology by maintaining retinal cells in the progenitor state. Collectively these findings provide in vivo genetic evidence that ADAM10, and not ADAM17, is indispensable for proper retinal development as a regulator of NOTCH signaling. PMID:27224017

  11. Quantitative television fluoroangiography - the optical measurement of dye concentrations and estimation of retinal blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, M.; Thomas, A.L. Jr.

    1985-06-01

    The development of a system for the measurement of dye concentrations from single retinal vessels during retinal fluorescein angiography is presented and discussed. The system uses a fundus camera modified for TV viewing. Video gating techniques define the areas of the retina to be studied, and video peak detection yields dye concentrations from retinal vessels. The time course of dye concentration is presented and blood flow into the retina is estimated by a time of transit technique.

  12. A dynamic opto-physiological model to effectively interpret retinal microvascular circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Harnani; Hu, Sijung; Dwyer, Vincent M.

    2015-03-01

    The demand of non-invasive ocular screening is rapidly growing due to an increase of age related eye diseases worldwide. An indeed in-depth understanding of optical properties is required to elucidate nature of retinal tissue. The research aims to investigate an effective biomedical engineering approach to allow process region of interests (ROIs) in eyes to reveal physiological status. A dynamic opto-physiological model (DOPM) representing retinal microvascular circulation underlying a diffusion approximation to solve radiative transport theorem (RTT) has being developed to interpret patho-physiological phenomena. DOPM is being applied in imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) to extract PPG signals from a series of 2D matrix images to access blood perfusion and oxygen saturation distributions. A variation of microvascular circulation could be mapped for an effectively diagnostic screening. The work presents mathematical modelling based ten layers of ocular tissue tested with four set of controlled parameters demontrated detection ratio between normal tissue damage or abnormal tissue and significant change of AC signal amplitude in these tissues. The result shows signicant change of AC signal amplitude in abnormal tissue. The preliminary results show extractable PPG signals from eye fundus video; experimented at five ROIs: whole fundus, optical disk, main vein vessel, lesion area and affected area. The outcome shows optical disk region gave a better performance compared to whole fundus region and main vein vessel. The robustness, miniaturization and artefact reduction capability of DOPM to discriminate oxygenation levels in retina could offer a new insight to access retinal patho-physiological status.

  13. Accuracy of retinal oximetry: a Monte Carlo investigation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhong; Jiao, Shuliang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) level is believed to be associated with the pathophysiology of several leading blinding diseases. Methods to properly measure retinal sO2 have been investigated for decades; however, the accuracy of retinal oximetry is still considered to be limited. The Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport in retina to examine how the accuracy of retinal oximetry is affected by local parameters is discussed. Fundus photography was simulated in a multilayer retinal model, in which a single vessel segment with 0.7  sO2 was embedded, at six optical wavelengths. Then, 200 million photons were traced in each simulation to ensure statistically stable results. The optical reflectance and energy deposit were recorded to measure sO2 using both the reflection method (existing retinal oximetry) and a new absorption method, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM). By varying the vessel diameter and melanin concentration in the retinal pigment epithelium, the relative error of sO2 measurement in the reflection method increased with increasing vessel diameter and melanin concentration; in comparison, the sO2 measurement was insensitive to these two parameters in PAOM. The results suggest that PAOM potentially can be a more accurate tool in quantifying retinal sO2. PMID:23733019

  14. Accuracy of retinal oximetry: a Monte Carlo investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenzhong; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2013-06-01

    Retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) level is believed to be associated with the pathophysiology of several leading blinding diseases. Methods to properly measure retinal sO have been investigated for decades; however, the accuracy of retinal oximetry is still considered to be limited. The Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport in retina to examine how the accuracy of retinal oximetry is affected by local parameters is discussed. Fundus photography was simulated in a multilayer retinal model, in which a single vessel segment with 0.7 sO2 was embedded, at six optical wavelengths. Then, 200 million photons were traced in each simulation to ensure statistically stable results. The optical reflectance and energy deposit were recorded to measure sO using both the reflection method (existing retinal oximetry) and a new absorption method, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM). By varying the vessel diameter and melanin concentration in the retinal pigment epithelium, the relative error of sO measurement in the reflection method increased with increasing vessel diameter and melanin concentration; in comparison, the sO measurement was insensitive to these two parameters in PAOM. The results suggest that PAOM potentially can be a more accurate tool in quantifying retinal sO.

  15. Retinal microvascular network attenuation in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael A.; McGowan, Amy J.; Cardwell, Chris R.; Cheung, Carol Y.; Craig, David; Passmore, Peter; Silvestri, Giuliana; Maxwell, Alexander P.; McKay, Gareth J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral small-vessel disease has been implicated in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The retinal microvasculature enables the noninvasive visualization and evaluation of the systemic microcirculation. We evaluated retinal microvascular parameters in a case-control study of AD patients and cognitively normal controls. Methods Retinal images were computationally analyzed and quantitative retinal parameters (caliber, fractal dimension, tortuosity, and bifurcation) measured. Regression models were used to compute odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) for AD with adjustment for confounders. Results Retinal images were available in 213 AD participants and 294 cognitively normal controls. Persons with lower venular fractal dimension (OR per standard deviation [SD] increase, 0.77 [CI: 0.62–0.97]) and lower arteriolar tortuosity (OR per SD increase, 0.78 [CI: 0.63–0.97]) were more likely to have AD after appropriate adjustment. Discussion Patients with AD have a sparser retinal microvascular network and retinal microvascular variation may represent similar pathophysiological events within the cerebral microvasculature of patients with AD. PMID:26634224

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, K. V.; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases. PMID:27195091

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chalam, K V; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases. PMID:27195091

  18. Electroretinographic effects of retinal dragging and retinal folds in eyes with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yaguchi, Yukari; Katagiri, Satoshi; Fukushima, Yoko; Yokoi, Tadashi; Nishina, Sachiko; Kondo, Mineo; Azuma, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the retinal function of retinal dragging (Rdrag) and radial retinal folds (Rfolds) in eyes with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) using full-field electroretinography (ERG). Seventeen eyes of nine patients with FEVR who had Rdrag or Rfolds were retrospectively studied. Eyes were classified into four groups according to the severity of the retinal alterations: Group 1, without Rdrag or Rfolds (5 eyes); Group 2, with Rdrag (4 eyes); Group 3, with Rfolds (6 eyes); and Group 4, with Rfolds in which all major retinal vessels were involved (2 eyes). The amplitudes of all ERG components and the implicit times of the photopic a- and b-waves and 30-Hz flicker responses were decreased or prolonged as the severity of the retinal alterations increased (P < 0.01). The photopic negative response was most severely affected and nearly undetectable in all eyes in Groups 3 and 4, although the other ERG components were detectable in all eyes in Group 3 and one eye in Group 4. These results suggest the decrease of retinal functions was correlated with the degree of severity of Rdrag and Rfolds in eyes with FEVR. In addition, the function of the retinal ganglion cells appears to be more severely affected compared with the others. PMID:27456314

  19. Acute Variations in Retinal Vascular Oxygen Content in a Rabbit Model of Retinal Venous Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Saati, Saloomeh; Martin, Gabriel; Chader, Gerald; Humayun, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study the variation in intravascular oxygen saturation (oximetry) during an acute retinal vein occlusion (RVO) using hyperspectral computed tomographic spectroscopy based oximetry measurements. Methods Thirty rabbits were dilated and anesthetized for experiments. Baseline oximetry measurements were made using a custom-made hyperspectral computed tomographic imaging spectrometer coupled to a fundus camera. RVO were induced using argon green laser following an intravenous injection of Rose Bengal. RVO induction was confirmed by fluorescein angiography. Retinal oximetry measurements were repeated in arterial and venous branches one hour after RVO induction and up to 4 weeks afterwards. Comparison of retinal oximetry before and after vein occlusion was made using the Student T-test. Results One hour after RVO induction, we observed statistically significant reductions in the intravascular oxygen saturation in temporal retinal arteries (85.1±6.1% vs. 80.6±6.6%; p<0.0001) and veins (71.4±5.5% vs. 64.0±4.7%; p<0.0001). This decrease was reversible in animals that spontaneously recannulated the vein occlusion. There were no statistically significant differences in oxygen saturation in the nasal control arteries and veins before and after temporal vein RVO induction. Conclusions We demonstrate, for the first time, acute changes in the intravascular oxygen content of retinal vessels 1 hour after RVO. These changes are reversible upon spontaneous recannulation of retinal vessels. This study demonstrates that hyperspectral computer tomographic spectroscopy based oximetry can detect physiological variations in intravascular retinal oxygen saturation. The study also provides the first qualitative and quantitative evidence of the variation in retinal vascular oxygen content directly attributable to an acute retinal vein occlusion. PMID:23185567

  20. Relation of retinal blood flow and retinal oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker

    PubMed Central

    Palkovits, Stefan; Lasta, Michael; Told, Reinhard; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral and retinal blood flow are dependent on local neuronal activity. Several studies quantified the increase in cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during activity. In the present study we investigated the relation between changes in retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker and the influence of breathing gas mixtures with different fractions of O2 (FiO2; 100% 15% and 12%). Twenty-four healthy subjects were included. Retinal blood flow was studied by combining measurement of vessel diameters using the Dynamic Vessel Analyser with measurements of blood velocity using laser Doppler velocimetry. Oxygen saturation was measured using spectroscopic reflectometry and oxygen extraction was calculated. Flicker stimulation increased retinal blood flow (57.7 ± 17.8%) and oxygen extraction (34.6 ± 24.1%; p < 0.001 each). During 100% oxygen breathing the response of retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction was increased (p < 0.01 each). By contrast, breathing gas mixtures with 12% and 15% FiO2 did not alter flicker–induced retinal haemodynamic changes. The present study indicates that at a comparable increase in blood flow the increase in oxygen extraction in the retina is larger than in the brain. During systemic hyperoxia the blood flow and oxygen extraction responses to neural stimulation are augmented. The underlying mechanism is unknown. PMID:26672758

  1. Relation of retinal blood flow and retinal oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Stefan; Lasta, Michael; Told, Reinhard; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral and retinal blood flow are dependent on local neuronal activity. Several studies quantified the increase in cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during activity. In the present study we investigated the relation between changes in retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker and the influence of breathing gas mixtures with different fractions of O2 (FiO2; 100% 15% and 12%). Twenty-four healthy subjects were included. Retinal blood flow was studied by combining measurement of vessel diameters using the Dynamic Vessel Analyser with measurements of blood velocity using laser Doppler velocimetry. Oxygen saturation was measured using spectroscopic reflectometry and oxygen extraction was calculated. Flicker stimulation increased retinal blood flow (57.7 ± 17.8%) and oxygen extraction (34.6 ± 24.1%; p < 0.001 each). During 100% oxygen breathing the response of retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction was increased (p < 0.01 each). By contrast, breathing gas mixtures with 12% and 15% FiO2 did not alter flicker-induced retinal haemodynamic changes. The present study indicates that at a comparable increase in blood flow the increase in oxygen extraction in the retina is larger than in the brain. During systemic hyperoxia the blood flow and oxygen extraction responses to neural stimulation are augmented. The underlying mechanism is unknown. PMID:26672758

  2. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Role of retinal metabolism in methanol-induced retinal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, C.D. |; Lee, E.W.; Terzo, T.S.; Louis-Ferdinand, R.T.

    1995-08-01

    Methanol is a toxicant that causes systemic and ocular toxicity after acute exposure. The folate-reduced (FR) rat is an excellent animal model that mimics characteristic human methanol toxic responses. The present study examines the role of the methanol metabolites formaldehyde and formate in the initiation of methanol-induced retinal toxicity. After a single oral dose of 3.0 g/kg methanol, blood methanol concentrations were not significantly different in FR rats compared with folate-sufficient (FS) (control) rats. However, FR rats treated with 3.0 g/kg methanol displayed elevated blood (14.6 mM) and vitreous humor (19.5 mM) formate levels and abnormal electroretinograms (loss of b-wave) 48 h postdose. FR rats pretreated with disulfiram (DSF) prior to 3.0 g/kg methanol treatment failed to display these symptoms. Formaldehyde was not detected in blood or vitreous humor with or without DSF treatment, suggesting that formate is the toxic metabolite in methanol-induced retinal toxicity. Additionally, creating a blood formate profile (14.2 mM at 48 h) similar to that observed in methanol-treated rats by iv infusion of pH-buffered formate does not alter the electroretinogram as is observed with methanol treatment. These data suggest that intraretinal metabolism of methanol is necessary for the formate-mediated initiation of methanol-induced retinal toxicity. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Pericytes Derived from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Protect against Retinal Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Thomas A.; Clabough, Erin B. D.; Kao, David S.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Durham, Jennifer T.; Zotter, Brendan C.; Seaman, Scott A.; Cronk, Stephen M.; Rakoczy, Elizabeth P.; Katz, Adam J.; Herman, Ira M.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Yates, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Retinal vasculopathies, including diabetic retinopathy (DR), threaten the vision of over 100 million people. Retinal pericytes are critical for microvascular control, supporting retinal endothelial cells via direct contact and paracrine mechanisms. With pericyte death or loss, endothelial dysfunction ensues, resulting in hypoxic insult, pathologic angiogenesis, and ultimately blindness. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) differentiate into pericytes, suggesting they may be useful as a protective and regenerative cellular therapy for retinal vascular disease. In this study, we examine the ability of ASCs to differentiate into pericytes that can stabilize retinal vessels in multiple pre-clinical models of retinal vasculopathy. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that ASCs express pericyte-specific markers in vitro. When injected intravitreally into the murine eye subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), ASCs were capable of migrating to and integrating with the retinal vasculature. Integrated ASCs maintained marker expression and pericyte-like morphology in vivo for at least 2 months. ASCs injected after OIR vessel destabilization and ablation enhanced vessel regrowth (16% reduction in avascular area). ASCs injected intravitreally before OIR vessel destabilization prevented retinal capillary dropout (53% reduction). Treatment of ASCs with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) enhanced hASC pericyte function, in a manner similar to native retinal pericytes, with increased marker expression of smooth muscle actin, cellular contractility, endothelial stabilization, and microvascular protection in OIR. Finally, injected ASCs prevented capillary loss in the diabetic retinopathic Akimba mouse (79% reduction 2 months after injection). Conclusions/Significance ASC-derived pericytes can integrate with retinal vasculature, adopting both pericyte morphology and marker expression, and provide functional vascular protection in multiple murine models of

  5. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  6. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  7. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  8. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  9. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  10. Computer-aided retinal photocoagulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H.; Jerath, Maya R.; Lewis, R. Stephen; Dillard, Bryan C.; Rylander, Henry G.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1996-01-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Biomedical Engineering Laser Laboratory and the U.S. Air Force Academy's Department of Electrical Engineering are developing a computer-assisted prototype retinal photocoagulation system. The project goal is to rapidly and precisely automatically place laser lesions in the retina for the treatment of disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears while dynamically controlling the extent of the lesion. Separate prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion parameters (diameter or depth) using lesion reflectance feedback and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Successful subsystem testing results in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser are presented. A prototype integrated system design to simultaneously control lesion parameters and placement at clinically significant speeds is provided.

  11. Genetic pediatric retinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Say, Emil Anthony T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary pediatric retinal diseases are a diverse group of disorders with pathologies affecting different cellular structures or retinal development. Many can mimic typical pediatric retinal disease such as retinopathy of prematurity, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema. Multisystem involvement is frequently seen in hereditary pediatric retinal disease. A thorough history coupled with a good physical examination can oftentimes lead the ophthalmologist or pediatrician to the correct genetic test and correct diagnosis. In some instances, evaluation of parents or siblings may be required to determine familial involvement when the history is inconclusive or insufficient and clinical suspicion is high.

  12. Retinal Oximetry in a Healthy Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yuki; Shimazaki, Takeru; Kobayashi, Nobuko; Miyoshi, Yukiko; Ono, Aoi; Kobayashi, Mamoru; Shiragami, Chieko; Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Tsujikawa, Akitaka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To establish the normative database of retinal oximetry using Oxymap T1 in a healthy Japanese population, and study the reproducibility of the measurements in Japanese. Methods We measured oxygen saturation in the major retinal vessels with Oxymap T1 in 252 eyes of 252 healthy Japanese subjects. Fundus images acquired using Oxymap T1 were processed using built-in Oxymap Analyzer software. Reproducibility of retinal oximetry was investigated using 20 eyes of 20 healthy subjects. Results The mean retinal oxygen saturation of 4 quadrants in healthy Japanese was 97.0 ± 6.9% in arteries and 52.8 ± 8.3% in veins. The mean arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation was 44.2 ± 9.2%. Both arterial and venous oxygen saturation were significantly lower in the temporal side of the retina, especially in the temporal-inferior vessels. However, the arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation was limited in the 4 quadrants. Interphotograph, intervisit, and interevaluator intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.936–0.979, 0.809–0.837, and 0.732–0.947, respectively. In the major retinal arteries, oxygen saturation increased with age (r = 0.18, p<0.01), at a rate of 0.67% per 10 years. However, venous oxygen saturation showed no correlation with age. Conclusions This study provides the normative database for the Japanese population. The arterial saturation value appears to be higher than other previous studies. Mean retinal oximetry in 4 quadrants with Oxymap T1 has high reproducibility. PMID:27434373

  13. Classification of left and right eye retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ngan Meng; Liu, Jiang; Wong, Damon W. K.; Zhang, Zhuo; Lu, Shijian; Lim, Joo Hwee; Li, Huiqi; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-03-01

    Retinal image analysis is used by clinicians to diagnose and identify, if any, pathologies present in a patient's eye. The developments and applications of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems in medical imaging have been rapidly increasing over the years. In this paper, we propose a system to classify left and right eye retinal images automatically. This paper describes our two-pronged approach to classify left and right retinal images by using the position of the central retinal vessel within the optic disc, and by the location of the macula with respect to the optic nerve head. We present a framework to automatically identify the locations of the key anatomical structures of the eye- macula, optic disc, central retinal vessels within the optic disc and the ISNT regions. A SVM model for left and right eye retinal image classification is trained based on the features from the detection and segmentation. An advantage of this is that other image processing algorithms can be focused on regions where diseases or pathologies and more likely to occur, thereby increasing the efficiency and accuracy of the retinal CAD system/pathology detection. We have tested our system on 102 retinal images, consisting of 51 left and right images each and achieved and accuracy of 94.1176%. The high experimental accuracy and robustness of this system demonstrates that there is potential for this system to be integrated and applied with other retinal CAD system, such as ARGALI, for a priori information in automatic mass screening and diagnosis of retinal diseases.

  14. High speed optical holography of retinal blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzari, M.; Simonutti, M.; Degardin, J.; Sahel, J.-A.; Fink, M.; Paques, M.; Atlan, M.

    2016-08-01

    We performed non-invasive video imaging of retinal blood flow in a pigmented rat by holographic interferometry of near-infrared laser light backscattered by retinal tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam sampled at a frame rate of 39 kHz with a high throughput camera. Local Doppler contrasts emerged from the envelopes of short-time Fourier transforms and the phase of autocorrelation functions of holograms rendered by Fresnel transformation. This approach permitted imaging of blood flow in large retinal vessels (30 microns diameter) over 400 by 400 pixels with a spatial resolution of 8 microns and a temporal resolution of 6.5 ms.

  15. Visible-light optical coherence tomography for retinal oximetry.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Wei, Qing; Liu, Wenzhong; Backman, Vadim; Zhang, Hao F

    2013-06-01

    We applied a visible-light spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) for in vivo retinal oximetry. To extract hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO(2)) in individual retinal vessels, we established a comprehensive analytical model to describe optical absorption, optical scattering, and blood cell packing factor in the whole blood and fit the acquired vis-OCT signals from the bottom of each imaged vessel. We found that averaged sO(2) values in arterial and venous bloods were 95% and 72%, respectively. PMID:23722747

  16. Retinal arteriolar occlusions due to cytomegalovirus retinitis in elderly patients without HIV

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Five of 7 (71%) elderly immunocompetent patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis had retinal arteriolar occlusions versus 2 of 8 (25%) elderly immunocompromised patients and 1 of 19 (5%) younger HIV-infected patients. Compared to HIV-infected patients, elderly patients were more likely to have occlusive events, neovascularization or hemorrhage, and underlying vasculopathy. The purpose of this study is to report the novel finding of extensive retinal arteriolar occlusions and neovascularization in immunocompetent patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis. This is a retrospective observational cohort study of cytomegalovirus retinitis (CMVR) in a university setting. Seven patients were elderly but not immunocompromised, 8 were elderly and iatrogenically immunocompromised, and 16 were HIV-infected. All patients underwent polymerase chain reaction testing of intraocular fluid. Primary outcome measure was visual acuity. Secondary outcome measures were vascular occlusions, ischemic complications, and response to treatment. Results Mean age was 73, 70, and 41 years for immunocompetent, immunocompromised, and HIV-infected patients, respectively. Diabetes and vascular disease were common in the elderly. Vision loss to less than 5/200 occurred in 50% of the immunocompetent elderly patients, and 17% of CMV eyes in immunocompromised and HIV patients. Occlusion of the entire retinal vasculature occurred in 4/7 (57%) of immunocompetent patients despite lack of Zone I involvement, and rubeosis occurred in three, disc neovascularization in one, and vitreous hemorrhage in two patients. Vascular occlusive events were less common in immunocompromised patients and rare in the HIV-infected. Conclusions CMVR in non-HIV-infected elderly patients is associated with retinal arteriolar occlusions. An intact host immune response may increase damage to retinal vessels. Prompt diagnosis may avert catastrophic vision loss. PMID:23514532

  17. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung Min; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae; Bae, Sun Sik

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis plays an essential role in embryo development, tissue repair, inflammatory diseases, and tumor growth. In the present study, we showed that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) regulates retinal angiogenesis. Mice that lack eNOS showed growth retardation, and retinal vessel development was significantly delayed. In addition, the number of tip cells and filopodia length were significantly reduced in mice lacking eNOS. Retinal endothelial cell proliferation was significantly blocked in mice lacking eNOS, and EMG-2-induced endothelial cell sprouting was significantly reduced in aortic vessels isolated from eNOS-deficient mice. Finally, pericyte recruitment to endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cell coverage to blood vessels were attenuated in mice lacking eNOS. Taken together, we suggest that the endothelial cell function and blood vessel maturation are regulated by eNOS during retinal angiogenesis. PMID:27610040

  18. Regulation of retinal angiogenesis by endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung Min; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Dong Hyung; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an essential role in embryo development, tissue repair, inflammatory diseases, and tumor growth. In the present study, we showed that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) regulates retinal angiogenesis. Mice that lack eNOS showed growth retardation, and retinal vessel development was significantly delayed. In addition, the number of tip cells and filopodia length were significantly reduced in mice lacking eNOS. Retinal endothelial cell proliferation was significantly blocked in mice lacking eNOS, and EMG-2-induced endothelial cell sprouting was significantly reduced in aortic vessels isolated from eNOS-deficient mice. Finally, pericyte recruitment to endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cell coverage to blood vessels were attenuated in mice lacking eNOS. Taken together, we suggest that the endothelial cell function and blood vessel maturation are regulated by eNOS during retinal angiogenesis. PMID:27610040

  19. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retinitis pigmentosa retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of related eye disorders that ...

  20. Summarising the retinal vascular calibres in healthy, diabetic and diabetic retinopathy eyes.

    PubMed

    Leontidis, Georgios; Al-Diri, Bashir; Hunter, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Retinal vessel calibre has been found to be an important biomarker of several retinal diseases, including diabetic retinopathy (DR). Quantifying the retinal vessel calibres is an important step for estimating the central retinal artery and vein equivalents. In this study, an alternative method to the already established branching coefficient (BC) is proposed for summarising the vessel calibres in retinal junctions. This new method combines the mean diameter ratio with an alternative to Murray׳s cube law exponent, derived by the fractal dimension,experimentally, and the branch exponent of cerebral vessels, as has been suggested in previous studies with blood flow modelling. For the above calculations, retinal images from healthy, diabetic and DR subjects were used. In addition, the above method was compared with the BC and was also applied to the evaluation of arteriovenous ratio as a biomarker of progression from diabetes to DR in four consecutive years, i.e. three/two/one years before the onset of DR and the first year of DR. Moreover, the retinal arteries and veins around the optic nerve head were also evaluated. The new approach quantifies the vessels more accurately. The decrease in terms of the mean absolute percentage error was between 0.24% and 0.49%, extending at the same time the quantification beyond healthy subjects. PMID:27017067

  1. Impaired Retinal Vasodilator Responses in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Mary E.J.; Slocomb, Julia E.; Shivkumar, Vikram; Smith, Bruce; Quillen, David; Gabbay, Robert A.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Bettermann, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In diabetes, endothelial dysfunction and subsequent structural damage to blood vessels can lead to heart attacks, retinopathy and strokes. However, it is unclear whether prediabetic subjects exhibit microvascular dysfunction indicating early stages of arteriosclerosis and vascular risk. The purpose of this study was to examine whether retinal reactivity may be impaired early in the hyperglycemic continuum and may be associated with markers of inflammation. Methods Individuals with prediabetes (n = 22), type 2 diabetes (n = 25) and healthy age and body composition matched controls (n = 19) were studied. We used the Dynamic Vessel Analyzer to assess retinal vasoreactivity (percent change in vessel diameter) during a flickering light stimulation. Fasting highly sensitive c-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a marker of inflammation, was measured in blood plasma. Results Prediabetic and diabetic individuals had attenuated peak vasodilator and relative amplitude changes in retinal vein diameters to the flickering light stimulus compared to healthy controls (peak dilation: prediabetic subjects 3.3 ± 1.8 %, diabetic subjects 3.3 ± 2.1% controls 5.6 ± 2.6%, p = .001; relative amplitude: prediabetic subjects 4.3 ± 2.2%, diabetic subjects 5.0 ± 2.6% and control subjects 7.2 ± 3.2%, p = .003). Similar findings were observed in retinal arteries. Levels of hs-CRP were not associated with either retinal vessel response parameters. Conclusion Retinal reactivity was impaired in prediabetic and type 2 diabetic individuals in parallel with reduced insulin sensitivity but not associated with levels of hs-CRP. Retinal vasoreactivity measurements may be a sensitive tool to assess early vascular risk. PMID:23742315

  2. Plasma Kallikrein Mediates Retinal Vascular Dysfunction and Induces Retinal Thickening in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Clermont, Allen; Chilcote, Tamie J.; Kita, Takeshi; Liu, Jia; Riva, Priscilla; Sinha, Sukanto; Feener, Edward P.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Plasma kallikrein (PK) has been identified in vitreous fluid obtained from individuals with diabetic retinopathy and has been implicated in contributing to retinal vascular dysfunction. In this report, we examined the effects of PK on retinal vascular functions and thickness in diabetic rats. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We investigated the effects of a selective PK inhibitor, ASP-440, and C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), the primary physiological inhibitor of PK, on retinal vascular permeability (RVP) and hemodynamics in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. The effect of intravitreal PK injection on retinal thickness was examined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography. RESULTS Systemic continuous administration of ASP-440 for 4 weeks initiated at the time of diabetes onset inhibited RVP by 42% (P = 0.013) and 83% (P < 0.001) at doses of 0.25 and 0.6 mg/kg per day, respectively. Administration of ASP-440 initiated 2 weeks after the onset of diabetes ameliorated both RVP and retinal blood flow abnormalities in diabetic rats measured at 4 weeks’ diabetes duration. Intravitreal injection of C1-INH similarly decreased impaired RVP in rats with 2 weeks’ diabetes duration. Intravitreal injection of PK increased both acute RVP and sustained focal RVP (24 h postinjection) to a greater extent in diabetic rats compared with nondiabetic control rats. Intravitreal injection of PK increased retinal thickness compared with baseline to a greater extent (P = 0.017) in diabetic rats (from 193 ± 10 μm to 223 ± 13 μm) compared with nondiabetic rats (from 182 ± 8 μm to 193 ± 9 μm). CONCLUSIONS These results show that PK contributes to retinal vascular dysfunctions in diabetic rats and that the combination of diabetes and intravitreal injection of PK in rats induces retinal thickening. PMID:21444925

  3. Retinal Changes in an ATP-Induced Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Aplin, Felix P.; Vessey, Kirstan A.; Luu, Chi D.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fletcher, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    In rodents and felines, intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been shown to induce photoreceptor death providing a tractable model of retinal degeneration in these species. This study investigated the long term effects of photoreceptor loss in an ATP induced feline model of retinal degeneration. Six normal sighted felines were unilaterally blinded using intravitreal ATP injections and assessed using electroretinography (ERG) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). At 30 h (n = 3) or 12 weeks (n = 3) post-injection, the animals were euthanized and the eyes enucleated. Retinae were sectioned and labeled using immunohistochemistry for markers of cell death, neural remodeling and gliosis. Ongoing cell death and retinal degeneration was observed in the outer retina at both 30 h and 12 weeks following unilateral ATP injection. Markers of mid to late-stage retinal remodeling such as cell displacement and aberrant neurite growth were observed in the inner retina at 12 weeks post-injection. Ganglion cells appeared to remain intact in ATP injected eyes. Müller cell gliosis was observed throughout the inner and outer retina, in some parts completely enveloping and/or displacing the surviving neural tissue. Our data suggests that the ATP injected feline retina continues to undergo progressive retinal degeneration and exhibits abnormalities consistent with a description of retinal remodeling commonly seen in other models of retinal degeneration. These findings validate the use of intravitreal ATP injection in feline as a large animal model of retinal degeneration which may aid in development of therapies aiming to restore visual function after photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:27199678

  4. Stimulation of prostanoid IP and EP(2) receptors dilates retinal arterioles and increases retinal and choroidal blood flow in rats.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Narita, Masami; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2007-09-10

    We examined the effects of vasodilatory prostaglandins (prostacyclin and prostaglandin E(2)) and selective agonists for prostanoid EP(2) and EP(4) receptor on the diameters of retinal blood vessels and fundus (retinal/choroidal) blood flow in rats. Male Wistar rats (8- to 10-week-old) were treated with tetrodotoxin (50 microg/kg, i.v.) to eliminate any nerve activity and prevent movement of the eye and infused with a mixture solution of norepinephrine and epinephrine (1:9) to maintain adequate systemic circulation under artificial ventilation. Fundus images were captured with a digital camera that was equipped with the special objective lens for small animals, and the diameters of retinal arterioles and venules were measured on a personal computer. Fundus blood flow was estimated using a laser Doppler flowmetry. Intravenous infusions of prostacyclin and prostaglandin E(2) dilated retinal blood vessels, increased fundus blood flow and decreased systemic blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of vasodilatory prostaglandins on retinal arterioles were greater than those on retinal venules. Similarly, a prostanoid EP(2) receptor agonist (ONO-AE1-259-01) dilated retinal blood vessels, and increased fundus blood flow and decreased systemic blood pressure. However, a prostanoid EP(4) receptor agonist (ONO-AE1-329) failed to increase fundus blood flow, despite its comparable depressor response with those to vasodilatory prostaglandins and the prostanoid EP(2) receptor agonist. The responses to forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, were very similar to those to prostacyclin and the prostanoid EP(2) receptor agonist. These results suggest that prostacyclin and prostaglandin E(2) act as vasodilators in retinal and choroidal circulation, and prostanoid IP and EP(2) receptors play an important role in the regulation of ocular hemodynamics in rats. PMID:17628525

  5. Lack of Acid Sphingomyelinase Induces Age-Related Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bill X.; Fan, Jie; Boyer, Nicholas P.; Jenkins, Russell W.; Koutalos, Yiannis; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) cause Niemann–Pick diseases type A and B, which are fatal inherited lipid lysosomal storage diseases, characterized with visceral organ abnormalities and neurodegeneration. However, the effects of suppressing retinal ASMase expression are not understood. The goal of this study was to determine if the disruption of ASMase expression impacts the retinal structure and function in the mouse, and begin to investigate the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities. Methods Acid sphingomyelinase knockout (ASMase KO) mice were utilized to study the roles of this sphingolipid metabolizing enzyme in the retina. Electroretinogram and morphometric analysis were used to assess the retinal function and structure at various ages. Sphingolipid profile was determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Western blots evaluated the level of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Results When compared to control animals, ASMase KO mice exhibited significant age-dependent reduction in ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes. Associated with these functional deficits, morphometric analysis revealed progressive thinning of retinal layers; however, the most prominent degeneration was observed in the photoreceptor and outer nuclear layer. Additional analyses of ASMase KO mice revealed early reduction in ERG c-wave amplitudes and increased lipofuscin accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Sphingolipid analyses showed abnormal accumulation of sphingomyelin and sphingosine in ASMase KO retinas. Western blot analyses showed a higher level of the autophagosome marker LC3-II. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that ASMase is necessary for the maintenance of normal retinal structure and function. The early outer retinal dysfunction, outer segment degeneration, accumulation of lipofuscin and autophagosome markers provide evidence that disruption of lysosomal function contributes to the age-dependent retinal degeneration exhibited by

  6. Visible-light OCT to quantify retinal oxygen metabolism (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao F.; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Wenzhong; Soetikno, Brian T.

    2016-03-01

    We explored, both numerically and experimentally, whether OCT can be a good candidate to accurately measure retinal oxygen metabolism. We first used statistical methods to numerically simulate photon transport in the retina to mimic OCT working under different spectral ranges. Then we analyze accuracy of OCT oximetry subject to parameter variations such as vessel size, pigmentation, and oxygenation. We further developed an experimental OCT system based on the spectral range identified by our simulation work. We applied the newly developed OCT to measure both retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) and retinal retinal flow. After obtaining the retinal sO2 and blood velocity, we further measured retinal vessel diameter and calculated the retinal oxygen metabolism rate (MRO2). To test the capability of our OCT, we imaged wild-type Long-Evans rats ventilated with both normal air and air mixtures with various oxygen concentrations. Our simulation suggested that OCT working within visible spectral range is able to provide accurate measurement of retinal MRO2 using inverse Fourier transform spectral reconstruction. We called this newly developed technology vis-OCT, and showed that vis-OCT was able to measure the sO2 value in every single major retinal vessel around the optical disk as well as in micro retinal vessels. When breathing normal air, the averaged sO2 in arterial and venous blood in Long-Evans rats was measured to be 95% and 72%, respectively. When we challenge the rats using air mixtures with different oxygen concentrations, vis-OCT measurement followed analytical models of retinal oxygen diffusion and pulse oximeter well.

  7. Relationship between target organ damage and blood pressure, retinal vessel calibre, oxidative stress and polymorphisms in VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes in patients with hypertension: a case–control study protocol (LOD-Hipertensión)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A; Gonzalez-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Recio-Rodríguez, José I; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Perretta-Tejedor, Nuria; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Target organ damage (TOD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The study objectives were to analyse the relationship of TOD to blood pressure, size of retinal arteries and veins, oxidative stress and different polymorphisms in the VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes in participants with hypertension. Methods and analysis A case–control study to analyse the relationship between clinical, biochemical and genetic parameters and presence of cardiac, vascular and renal TOD in 486 patients with hypertension. Participants with TOD will be considered as cases, and those without TOD will be enrolled as controls. This will be a collaborative study conducted by the groups of Primary Care, Cardiovascular and Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases of the Instituto de Investigación Biomédica of Salamanca (IBSAL). Assessment of cardiac, renal and vascular TOD. Measurement of peripheral and central blood pressure, size of eye fundus arteries and veins, and oxidative stress, and polymorphisms in the VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes. Ethics and dissemination The study will be conducted after approval is obtained from the Ethics Committee of Hospital Clínico Universitario of Salamanca. All study participants will sign an informed consent to agree to participate in the study, and another consent to agree on the genetic study, in compliance with the Declaration of Helsinki and the WHO standards for observational studies. The results of this study will allow for an understanding of the relationship of the different TODs with blood pressure, retinal artery and vein diameters, oxidative stress and polymorphisms in VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes. Trial registration number Clinical Trials. gov Identifier: NCT02022618. PMID:24699462

  8. βA3/A1-crystallin in astroglial cells regulates retinal vascular remodeling during development

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Debasish; Klise, Andrew; Sergeev, Yuri; Hose, Stacey; Bhutto, Imran A.; Hackler, Laszlo; Malpic-llanos, Tanya; Samtani, Sonia; Grebe, Rhonda; Goldberg, Morton F.; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding; Nath, Avindra; Zack, Donald J.; Fariss, Robert N.; McLeod, D. Scott; Sundin, Olof; Broman, Karl W.; Lutty, Gerard A.; Zigler, J. Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is a complex process critical to development of the mature vascular system. Astrocytes are known to be indispensable for initial formation of the retinal vasculature; our studies with the Nuc1 rat provide novel evidence that these cells are also essential in the retinal vascular remodeling process. Nuc1 is a spontaneous mutation in the Sprague–Dawley rat originally characterized by nuclear cataracts in the heterozygote and microphthalmia in the homozygote. We report here that the Nuc1 allele results from mutation of the βA3/A1-crystallin gene, which in the neural retina is expressed only in astrocytes. We demonstrate striking structural abnormalities in Nuc1 astrocytes with profound effects on the organization of intermediate filaments. While vessels form in the Nuc1 retina, the subsequent remodeling process required to provide a mature vascular network is deficient. Our data implicate βA3/A1-crystallin as an important regulatory factor mediating vascular patterning and remodeling in the retina. PMID:17931883

  9. Detection and classification of retinal lesions for grading of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Usman Akram, M; Khalid, Shehzad; Tariq, Anam; Khan, Shoab A; Azam, Farooque

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is an eye abnormality in which the human retina is affected due to an increasing amount of insulin in blood. The early detection and diagnosis of DR is vital to save the vision of diabetes patients. The early signs of DR which appear on the surface of the retina are microaneurysms, haemorrhages, and exudates. In this paper, we propose a system consisting of a novel hybrid classifier for the detection of retinal lesions. The proposed system consists of preprocessing, extraction of candidate lesions, feature set formulation, and classification. In preprocessing, the system eliminates background pixels and extracts the blood vessels and optic disc from the digital retinal image. The candidate lesion detection phase extracts, using filter banks, all regions which may possibly have any type of lesion. A feature set based on different descriptors, such as shape, intensity, and statistics, is formulated for each possible candidate region: this further helps in classifying that region. This paper presents an extension of the m-Mediods based modeling approach, and combines it with a Gaussian Mixture Model in an ensemble to form a hybrid classifier to improve the accuracy of the classification. The proposed system is assessed using standard fundus image databases with the help of performance parameters, such as, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and the Receiver Operating Characteristics curves for statistical analysis. PMID:24480176

  10. Interactive retinal blood flow analysis of the macular region.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Somfai, Gábor Márk; Campagnoli, Thalmon R; Smiddy, William E; Debuc, Delia Cabrera

    2016-03-01

    The study of retinal hemodynamics plays an important role to understand the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy. In this work, we developed an interactive retinal analysis tool to quantitatively measure the blood flow velocity (BFV) and blood flow rate (BFR) in the macular region using the Retinal Function Imager (RFI). By employing a high definition stroboscopic fundus camera, the RFI device is able to assess retinal blood flow characteristics in vivo. However, the measurements of BFV using a user-guided vessel segmentation tool may induce significant inter-observer differences and BFR is not provided in the built-in software. In this work, we have developed an interactive tool to assess the retinal BFV and BFR in the macular region. Optical coherence tomography data was registered with the RFI image to locate the fovea accurately. The boundaries of the vessels were delineated on a motion contrast enhanced image and BFV was computed by maximizing the cross-correlation of pixel intensities in a ratio video. Furthermore, we were able to calculate the BFR in absolute values (μl/s). Experiments were conducted on 122 vessels from 5 healthy and 5 mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) subjects. The Pearson's correlation of the vessel diameter measurements between our method and manual labeling on 40 vessels was 0.984. The intraclass correlation (ICC) of BFV between our proposed method and built-in software was 0.924 and 0.830 for vessels from healthy and NPDR subjects, respectively. The coefficient of variation between repeated sessions was reduced significantly from 22.5% to 15.9% in our proposed method (p<0.001). PMID:26569349

  11. Functional imaging using the retinal function imager: direct imaging of blood velocity, achieving fluorescein angiography-like images without any contrast agent, qualitative oximetry, and functional metabolic signals.

    PubMed

    Izhaky, David; Nelson, Darin A; Burgansky-Eliash, Zvia; Grinvald, Amiram

    2009-07-01

    The Retinal Function Imager (RFI; Optical Imaging, Rehovot, Israel) is a unique, noninvasive multiparameter functional imaging instrument that directly measures hemodynamic parameters such as retinal blood-flow velocity, oximetric state, and metabolic responses to photic activation. In addition, it allows capillary perfusion mapping without any contrast agent. These parameters of retinal function are degraded by retinal abnormalities. This review delineates the development of these parameters and demonstrates their clinical applicability for noninvasive detection of retinal function in several modalities. The results suggest multiple clinical applications for early diagnosis of retinal diseases and possible critical guidance of their treatment. PMID:19763751

  12. VANISHING RETINAL DETACHMENT

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe a case of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in the setting of chronic kidney disease that exhibited complete retinal reattachment after serial hemodialysis. Methods: Retrospective case report. Results: A 58-year-old woman with acute vision loss was found to have a macula-involving rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Due to chronic kidney disease, she continued with routinely scheduled hemodialysis for 1 week until surgical clearance was obtained. Preoperative examination revealed complete reattachment of the retina with a persistent retinal tear. Barrier laser was applied to the tear and the retina remained attached until the most recent follow-up 8 months later. The workup of alternate etiologies was unrevealing. Conclusion: This case describes a temporal association between hemodialysis and resolution of subretinal fluid due to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. A potential causal linkage is suggested based on shifting fluid dynamics associated with hemodialysis. A shift in treatment paradigm is not advised. PMID:26352323

  13. Automated retinal image quality assessment on the UK Biobank dataset for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Welikala, R A; Fraz, M M; Foster, P J; Whincup, P H; Rudnicka, A R; Owen, C G; Strachan, D P; Barman, S A

    2016-04-01

    Morphological changes in the retinal vascular network are associated with future risk of many systemic and vascular diseases. However, uncertainty over the presence and nature of some of these associations exists. Analysis of data from large population based studies will help to resolve these uncertainties. The QUARTZ (QUantitative Analysis of Retinal vessel Topology and siZe) retinal image analysis system allows automated processing of large numbers of retinal images. However, an image quality assessment module is needed to achieve full automation. In this paper, we propose such an algorithm, which uses the segmented vessel map to determine the suitability of retinal images for use in the creation of vessel morphometric data suitable for epidemiological studies. This includes an effective 3-dimensional feature set and support vector machine classification. A random subset of 800 retinal images from UK Biobank (a large prospective study of 500,000 middle aged adults; where 68,151 underwent retinal imaging) was used to examine the performance of the image quality algorithm. The algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 95.33% and a specificity of 91.13% for the detection of inadequate images. The strong performance of this image quality algorithm will make rapid automated analysis of vascular morphometry feasible on the entire UK Biobank dataset (and other large retinal datasets), with minimal operator involvement, and at low cost. PMID:26894596

  14. [Vision engineering--photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses: Okayama University model].

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiko

    2007-04-01

    Patients with retinitis pigmentosa lose photoreceptor cells by genetic abnormalities and hence become blind. Neurons such as bipolar cells and ganglion cells still remain alive even in the retina of these patients, and ganglion cells send axons to the brain as the optic nerve. The replacement of dead photoreceptor cells with something artificial is the basic concept of retinal prostheses. The remaining retinal neurons can be stimulated by either electric current or electric potential. Photodiode array and electrode array are two main ways to stimulate retinal neurons as retinal prostheses. These retinal prostheses have problems such as low sensitivity and requiring outer electric sources (batteries). To overcome the problems, we are developing photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses which absorb light and convert photon energy to electric potentials. The prototype, photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, could generate intracellular calcium elevation in photoreceptor-lacking retinal tissues and also in cultured retinal neurons. The photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses are thin and soft, and therefore, a sheet of the film in a large size, corresponding to wide visual field, can be inserted into the vitreous and then to the subretinal space through a small opening by rolling up the film. After the production control and the quality control have been established, clinical trials of the photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses would be planned in concordance with the Drugs and Medical Devices Law to prove the safety and the efficacy. PMID:17447519

  15. Measurement of retinal physiology using functional Fourier domain OCT concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitgeb, R. A.; Bachmann, A. H.; Villiger, M.; Michaely, R.; Blatter, C.; Lasser, T.; Pache, C.; Pircher, M.

    2007-02-01

    Fourier Domain OCT proved to be an outstanding tool for measuring 3D retinal structures with high sensitivity, resolution, and speed. We extended the FDOCT concept towards functional imaging by analyzing the spectroscopic tissue properties, polarization contrast and Doppler velocity imaging. Differential spectral contrast FDOCT allows optical staining of retinal tomograms and to contrast tissue of high pigmentation such as the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The latter shows strong correlation if compared to polarization sensitive OCT images. First implementations of Doppler FDOCT systems demonstrated the capability of measuring in-vivo retinal blood flow profiles and pulsatility. We developed a new concept of Doppler FDOCT that allows measuring also large flow velocities typically close to the optic nerve head. Studies of retinal perfusion based on Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) demonstrated the high sensitivity of blood flow to external stimuli. We performed first experiments of studying retinal perfusion in response to flicker stimulation. An increase in vessel diameter by 11% and of flow velocity by 49% was measured. We believe that a multi-modal functional imaging concept is of high value for an accurate and early diagnosis and understanding of retinal pathologies and pathogenesis.

  16. In vivo imaging of retinal hemodynamics with OCT angiography and Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shenghai; Shen, Meixiao; Zhu, Dexi; Chen, Qi; Shi, Ce; Chen, Zhongping; Lu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Retinal hemodynamics is important for early diagnosis and precise monitoring in retinal vascular diseases. We propose a novel method for measuring absolute retinal blood flow in vivo using the combined techniques of optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography and Doppler OCT. Doppler values can be corrected by Doppler angles extracted from OCT angiography images. A three-dimensional (3D) segmentation algorithm based on dynamic programming was developed to extract the 3D boundaries of optic disc vessels, and Doppler angles were calculated from 3D vessel geometry. The accuracy of blood flow from the Doppler OCT was validated using a flow phantom. The feasibility of the method was tested on a subject in vivo. The pulsatile retinal blood flow and the parameters for retinal hemodynamics were successfully obtained. PMID:26977370

  17. Alterations to retinal architecture prior to photoreceptor loss in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Roche, Sarah L; Wyse-Jackson, Alice C; Byrne, Ashleigh M; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Cotter, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are essential tools in the pursuit to understand fully what cell types and processes underlie the degeneration observed in RP. Knowledge of these processes is required if we are to develop successful therapies to treat this currently incurable disease. We have used the rd10 mouse model of RP to study retinal morphology prior to photoreceptor loss, using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy on cryosections, since little is known about how the mutation affects the retina during this period. We report novel findings that the mutation in the rd10 mouse results in retinal abnormalities earlier than was previously thought. Defects in rod and cone outer segments, bipolar cells, amacrine cells and photoreceptor synapses were apparent in the retina during early stages of postnatal retinal development and prior to the loss of photoreceptors. Additionally, we observed a dramatic response of glial cells during this period. Microglia responded as early as postnatal day (P) 5; ?13 days before any photoreceptor loss is detected with Müller glia and astrocytes exhibiting changes from P10 and P15 respectively. Overall, these findings present pathological aspects to the postnatal development of the rd10 retina, contributing significantly to our understanding of disease onset and progression in the rd10 mouse and provide a valuable resource for the study of retinal dystrophies. PMID:27160072

  18. Restoration of Retinal Structure and Function after Selective Photocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bryan W.; Huie, Philip; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Leung, Loh-Shan S.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Beier, Corinne; Marc, Robert E.; Palanker, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    CNS neurons change their connectivity to accommodate a changing environment, form memories, or respond to injury. Plasticity in the adult mammalian retina after injury or disease was thought to be limited to restructuring resulting in abnormal retinal anatomy and function. Here we report that neurons in the mammalian retina change their connectivity and restore normal retinal anatomy and function after injury. Patches of photoreceptors in the rabbit retina were destroyed by selective laser photocoagulation, leaving retinal inner neurons (bipolar, amacrine, horizontal, ganglion cells) intact. Photoreceptors located outside of the damaged zone migrated to make new functional connections with deafferented bipolar cells located inside the lesion. The new connections restored ON and OFF responses in deafferented ganglion cells. This finding extends the previously perceived limits of restorative plasticity in the adult retina and allows for new approaches to retinal laser therapy free of current detrimental side effects such as scotomata and scarring. PMID:23595739

  19. LACK OF PROTEIN-TYROSINE SULFATION DISRUPTS PHOTORECEPTOR OUTER SEGMENT MORPHOGENESIS, RETINAL FUNCTION AND RETINAL ANATOMY

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, David M.; Murray, Anne R.; Kanan, Yogita; Arbogast, Kelsey L.; Hamilton, Robert A.; Fliesler, Steven J.; Burns, Marie E.; Moore, Kevin L.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the role(s) of protein-tyrosine sulfation in the retina, we examined retinal function and structure in mice lacking tyrosylprotein sulfotransferases (TPST) 1 and 2. Tpst double knockout (DKO; Tpst1−/−/Tpst2−/−) retinas had drastically reduced electroretinographic responses, although their photoreceptors exhibited normal responses in single cell recordings. These retinas appeared normal histologically; however, the rod photoreceptors had ultrastructurally abnormal outer segments, with membrane evulsions into the extracellular space, irregular disc membrane spacing, and expanded intradiscal space. Photoreceptor synaptic terminals were disorganized in Tpst DKO retinas, but established ultrastructurally normal synapses, as did bipolar and amacrine cells; however, the morphology and organization of neuronal processes in the inner retina were abnormal. These results indicate that protein-tyrosine sulfation is essential for proper outer segment morphogenesis and synaptic function, but is not critical for overall retinal structure or synapse formation, and may serve broader functions in neuronal development and maintenance. PMID:21039965

  20. Preliminary investigation of multispectral retinal tissue oximetry mapping using a hyperspectral retinal camera.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Michèle; Sylvestre, Jean-Philippe; Jafari, Reza; Kulasekara, Susith; Rose, Kalpana; Trussart, Rachel; Arbour, Jean Daniel; Hudson, Chris; Lesage, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Oximetry measurement of principal retinal vessels represents a first step towards understanding retinal metabolism, but the technique could be significantly enhanced by spectral imaging of the fundus outside of main vessels. In this study, a recently developed Hyperspectral Retinal Camera was used to measure relative oximetric (SatO2) and total hemoglobin (HbT) maps of the retina, outside of large vessels, in healthy volunteers at baseline (N = 7) and during systemic hypoxia (N = 11), as well as in patients with glaucoma (N = 2). Images of the retina, on a field of view of ∼30°, were acquired between 500 and 600 nm with 2 and 5 nm steps, in under 3 s. The reflectance spectrum from each pixel was fitted to a model having oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin as the main absorbers and scattering modeled by a power law, yielding estimates of relative SatO2 and HbT over the fundus. Average optic nerve head (ONH) saturation over 8 eyes was 68 ± 5%. During systemic hypoxia, mean ONH saturation decreased by 12.5% on average. Upon further development and validation, the relative SatO2 and HbT maps of microvasculature obtained with this imaging system could ultimately contribute to the diagnostic and management of diseases affecting the ONH and retina. PMID:27060375

  1. CERKL Knockdown Causes Retinal Degeneration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Marina; Burguera, Demian; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2013-01-01

    The human CERKL gene is responsible for common and severe forms of retinal dystrophies. Despite intense in vitro studies at the molecular and cellular level and in vivo analyses of the retina of murine knockout models, CERKL function remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to approach the developmental and functional features of cerkl in Danio rerio within an Evo-Devo framework. We show that gene expression increases from early developmental stages until the formation of the retina in the optic cup. Unlike the high mRNA-CERKL isoform multiplicity shown in mammals, the moderate transcriptional complexity in fish facilitates phenotypic studies derived from gene silencing. Moreover, of relevance to pathogenicity, teleost CERKL shares the two main human protein isoforms. Morpholino injection has been used to generate a cerkl knockdown zebrafish model. The morphant phenotype results in abnormal eye development with lamination defects, failure to develop photoreceptor outer segments, increased apoptosis of retinal cells and small eyes. Our data support that zebrafish Cerkl does not interfere with proliferation and neural differentiation during early developmental stages but is relevant for survival and protection of the retinal tissue. Overall, we propose that this zebrafish model is a powerful tool to unveil CERKL contribution to human retinal degeneration. PMID:23671706

  2. Unilateral Ischemic Maculopathy Associated with Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in Patients with AIDS: Optical Coherence Tomography Findings.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, J Fernando; Garcia, Reinaldo A; Arevalo, Fernando A; Fernandez, Carlos F

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical and optical coherence tomography (OCT) characteristics of ischemic maculopathy in two patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Two patients with AIDS and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis developed ischemic maculopathy. Both patients presented with central visual loss and active granular CMV retinitis. The presence of opacification of the superficial retina in the macular area and intraretinal edema suggested the diagnosis. Fluorescein angiography changes were similar in the two cases with enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and late staining of juxtafoveal vessels. OCT changes were suggestive of retinal ischemia: Increased reflectivity from the inner retinal layer and decreased backscattering from the retinal photoreceptors due to fluid and retinal edema. Ischemic maculopathy may cause a severe and permanent decrease in vision in AIDS patients. Fluorescein angiography and OCT should be considered in any patient with AIDS and unexplained visual loss. The mechanism of ischemic maculopathy may be multifactorial. PMID:27051496

  3. Unilateral Ischemic Maculopathy Associated with Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in Patients with AIDS: Optical Coherence Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, J. Fernando; Garcia, Reinaldo A.; Arevalo, Fernando A.; Fernandez, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical and optical coherence tomography (OCT) characteristics of ischemic maculopathy in two patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Two patients with AIDS and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis developed ischemic maculopathy. Both patients presented with central visual loss and active granular CMV retinitis. The presence of opacification of the superficial retina in the macular area and intraretinal edema suggested the diagnosis. Fluorescein angiography changes were similar in the two cases with enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and late staining of juxtafoveal vessels. OCT changes were suggestive of retinal ischemia: Increased reflectivity from the inner retinal layer and decreased backscattering from the retinal photoreceptors due to fluid and retinal edema. Ischemic maculopathy may cause a severe and permanent decrease in vision in AIDS patients. Fluorescein angiography and OCT should be considered in any patient with AIDS and unexplained visual loss. The mechanism of ischemic maculopathy may be multifactorial. PMID:27051496

  4. Retinal vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Otani, Atsushi; Friedlander, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the potential use of stem cells for therapeutic angiogenesis in the treatment of retinal diseases. We demonstrate that the clinical utility of these EPC may be not limited in the treatment of ischemic retinal diseases but may also have application for the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders and for a form of cell-based gene therapy. One of the greatest potential benefits of bone marrow derived EPC therapy is the possible use of autologous grafts. Nonetheless, potential toxicities and unregulated cell growth will need to be carefully evaluated before this approach is brought to the clinics. PMID:15804843

  5. Automated construction of arterial and venous trees in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiao; Abràmoff, Michael D; Garvin, Mona K

    2015-10-01

    While many approaches exist to segment retinal vessels in fundus photographs, only a limited number focus on the construction and disambiguation of arterial and venous trees. Previous approaches are local and/or greedy in nature, making them susceptible to errors or limiting their applicability to large vessels. We propose a more global framework to generate arteriovenous trees in retinal images, given a vessel segmentation. In particular, our approach consists of three stages. The first stage is to generate an overconnected vessel network, named the vessel potential connectivity map (VPCM), consisting of vessel segments and the potential connectivity between them. The second stage is to disambiguate the VPCM into multiple anatomical trees, using a graph-based metaheuristic algorithm. The third stage is to classify these trees into arterial or venous (A/V) trees. We evaluated our approach with a ground truth built based on a public database, showing a pixel-wise classification accuracy of 88.15% using a manual vessel segmentation as input, and 86.11% using an automatic vessel segmentation as input. PMID:26636114

  6. Ridge-based retinal image registration algorithm involving OCT fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Gregori, Giovanni; Knighton, Robert W.; Lujan, Brandon J.; Rosenfeld, Philip J.; Lam, Byron L.

    2011-03-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm for retinal image registration involving OCT fundus images (OFIs). The first application of the algorithm is to register OFIs with color fundus photographs; such registration between multimodal retinal images can help correlate features across imaging modalities, which is important for both clinical and research purposes. The second application is to perform the montage of several OFIs, which allows us to construct 3D OCT images over a large field of view out of separate OCT datasets. We use blood vessel ridges as registration features. The brute force search and an Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm are employed for image pair registration. Global alignment to minimize the distance between matching pixel pairs is used to obtain the montage of OFIs. Quality of OFIs is the big limitation factor of the registration algorithm. In the first experiment, the effect of manual OFI enhancement on registration was evaluated for the affine model on 11 image pairs from diseased eyes. The average root mean square error (RMSE) decreases from 58 μm to 40 μm. This indicates that the registration algorithm is robust to manual enhancement. In the second experiment for the montage of OFIs, the algorithm was tested on 6 sets from healthy eyes and 6 sets from diseased eyes, each set having 8 partially overlapping SD-OCT images. Visual evaluation showed that the montage performance was acceptable for normal cases, and not good for abnormal cases due to low visibility of blood vessels. The average RMSE for a typical montage case from a healthy eye is 2.3 pixels (69 μm).

  7. The development of blood-retinal barrier during the interaction of astrocytes with vascular wall cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huanling; Wang, Tianshi; Deng, Jiexin; Liu, Ding; Li, Xiaofei; Deng, Jinbo

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are intimately involved in the formation and development of retinal vessels. Astrocyte dysfunction is a major cause of blood-retinal barrier injury and other retinal vascular diseases. In this study, the development of the retinal vascular system and the formation of the blood-retinal barrier in mice were investigated using immunofluorescence staining, gelatin-ink perfusion, and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the retinal vascular system of mice develops from the optic disc after birth, and radiates out gradually to cover the entire retina, taking the papilla optica as the center. First, the superficial vasculature is formed on the inner retinal layer; then, the vasculature extends into the inner and outer edges of the retinal inner nuclear layer, forming the deep vasculature that is parallel to the superficial vasculature. The blood-retinal barrier is mainly composed of endothelium, basal lamina and the end-feet of astrocytes, which become mature during mouse development. Initially, the naive endothelial cells were immature with few organelles and many microvilli. The basal lamina was uniform in thickness, and the glial end-feet surrounded the outer basal lamina incompletely. In the end, the blood-retinal barrier matures with smooth endothelia connected through tight junctions, relatively thin and even basal lamina, and relatively thin glial cell end-feet. These findings indicate that the development of the vasculature in the retina follows the rules of “center to periphery” and “superficial layer to deep layers”. Its development and maturation are spatially and temporally consistent with the functional performance of retinal neurons and photosensitivity. The blood-retinal barrier gradually becomes mature via the process of interactions between astrocytes and blood vessel cells. PMID:25206758

  8. Neuroprotective Effects of Low-Dose Statins in the Retinal Ultrastructure of Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    de Hoz, Rosa; Salazar, Juan J; Ramírez, Ana I; Rojas, Blanca; Gallego, Beatriz I.; Triviño, Alberto; Tejerina, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the pleiotropic effects to statins, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative retinal changes in hypercholesterolemic rabbits after a low-dosage statin treatment. For this purpose, New Zealand rabbits were split into three groups: control (G0; n = 10), fed a standard diet; hypercholesterolemic (G1; n = 8), fed a 0.5% cholesterol-enriched diet for 8 months; and statins (G2; n = 8), fed a 0.5% cholesterol-enriched diet for 8 months, together with the administration of statin (pravastatin or fluvastatin sodium) at a dose of 2 mg / kg / day each diet. The retinas were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry (glial fibrillary acidic protein). The retinal thickness of nuclear and plexiform layers were quantified in semi-thin sections. The results revealed that the low-statin-treated rabbits in comparison with the hypercholesterolemic group showed: i) a more preserved structure in all retinal layers; ii) a significant reduction in retinal thickness; iii) a decrease in cell death in the nuclear-and ganglion-cell layers; iv) a reduction of hydropic degeneration in the plexiform and nerve-fiber layers; v) a preservation of astrocytes and of the retinal area occupied by them; and vi) a better-preserved retinal vascular structure. Our findings indicate that low doses of statins can prevent retinal degeneration, acting on retinal macroglia, neurons and retinal vessels, despite that hypercholesterolemia remained unchanged. Thus, the pleiotropic effects of the statins may help safeguard the retinal ultrastructure. PMID:27144842

  9. Retinal vein occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Berrocal MH, Rodriguez FJ, et al. Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group (PACORES). Comparison of two doses ... retinal vein occlusion: results from the Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group at 6 months of follow- ...

  10. [Acute retinal necrosis].

    PubMed

    Lucke, K; Reinking, U; el-Hifnawi, E; Dennin, R H; Laqua, H

    1988-12-01

    The authors report on three patients with acute retinal necrosis who were treated with the virostatic agent Acyclovir and who underwent vitreoretinal surgery with silicone oil filling for total retinal detachment. In two eyes the retina was reattached, but useful vision was only preserved in one patient. Titers from blood and the vitreous, as well as microscopic findings in retinal biopsies, support the view that the necrosis is caused by a herpes simplex virus infection. After therapy with Acyclovir was instituted no further progression on the necrosis was observed. However, the development of retinal detachment could not be prevented. Early diagnosis and antiviral therapy are essential to improve the otherwise poor prognosis in this rare syndrome. PMID:3221657

  11. Retinal detachment in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Poole, T A; Obstbaum, S A

    1979-07-01

    In a series of cataract patients excluding myopic individuals, under age 60 years, and cases in which vitreous loss occurred, retinal detachment was no less frequent after intracapsular cataract extraction and Sputnik iris supported lenses than in controls. Both groups were followed up for a minimum of two years. The detachments predominantly occurred from retinal breaks in areas of the retina that looked normal preoperatively. PMID:464014

  12. Giant retinal tears.

    PubMed

    Shunmugam, Manoharan; Ang, Ghee Soon; Lois, Noemi

    2014-01-01

    A giant retinal tear (GRT) is a full-thickness neurosensory retinal break that extends circumferentially around the retina for three or more clock hours in the presence of a posteriorly detached vitreous. Its incidence in large population-based studies has been estimated as 1.5% of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments, with a significant male preponderance, and bilaterality in 12.8%. Most GRTs are idiopathic, with trauma, hereditary vitreoretinopathies and high myopia each being causative in decreasing frequency. The vast majority of GRTs are currently managed with a pars plana vitrectomy; the use of adjunctive circumferential scleral buckling is debated, but no studies have shown a clear anatomical or visual advantage with its use. Similarly, silicone oil tamponade does not influence long-term outcomes when compared with gas. Primary and final retinal reattachment rates are achieved in 88% and 95% of patients, respectively. Even when the retina remains attached, however, visual recovery may be limited. Furthermore, fellow eyes of patients with a GRT are at higher risk of developing retinal tears and retinal detachment. Prophylactic treatment under these circumstances may be considered but there is no firm evidence of its efficacy at the present time. PMID:24138895

  13. β-catenin is essential for lamination but not neurogenesis in mouse retinal development

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xueyao; Sun, Hongxia; Klein, William H.; Mu, Xiuqian

    2007-01-01

    During vertebrate retinal development, the seven retinal cell types differentiate sequentially from a single population of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) and organize themselves into a distinct laminar structure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether β-catenin, which functions both as a nuclear effector for the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and as a regulator of cell adhesion, is required for retinal neurogenesis or lamination. We used the Cre-loxP system to either eliminate β-catenin or to express a constitutively active form during retinal neurogenesis. Eliminating β-catenin did not affect cell differentiation, but did result in the loss of the radial arrangement of RPCs and caused abnormal migration of differentiated neurons. As a result, the laminar structure was massively disrupted in β-catenin-null retinas, although all retinal cell types still formed. In contrast to other neural tissues, eliminating β-catenin did not significantly reduce the proliferation rate of RPCs; likewise, activating β-catenin ectopically in RPCs did not result in overproliferation, but loss of neural retinal identity. These results indicate that β-catenin is essential during retinal neurogenesis as a regulator of cell adhesion but not as a nuclear effector of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. The results further imply that retinal lamination and retinal cell differentiation are genetically separable processes. PMID:16959241

  14. Amyloidosis in Retinal Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Masuzzo, Ambra; Dinet, Virginie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Mascarelli, Frederic; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the central nervous system, the retina may reflect both physiological processes and abnormalities related to pathologies that affect the brain. Amyloidosis due to the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) was initially regarded as a specific and exclusive characteristic of neurodegenerative alterations seen in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. More recently, it was discovered that amyloidosis-related alterations, similar to those seen in the brain of Alzheimer's patients, also occur in the retina. Remarkably, these alterations were identified not only in primary retinal pathologies, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, but also in the retinas of Alzheimer's patients. In this review, we first briefly discuss the biogenesis of Aβ, a peptide involved in amyloidosis. We then discuss some pathological aspects (synaptic dysfunction, mitochondrial failure, glial activation, and vascular abnormalities) related to the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. We finally highlight common features shared by AD, AMD, and glaucoma in the context of Aβ amyloidosis and further discuss why the retina, due to the transparency of the eye, can be considered as a "window" to the brain. PMID:27551275

  15. Amyloidosis in Retinal Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Masuzzo, Ambra; Dinet, Virginie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Mascarelli, Frederic; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the central nervous system, the retina may reflect both physiological processes and abnormalities related to pathologies that affect the brain. Amyloidosis due to the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) was initially regarded as a specific and exclusive characteristic of neurodegenerative alterations seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. More recently, it was discovered that amyloidosis-related alterations, similar to those seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients, also occur in the retina. Remarkably, these alterations were identified not only in primary retinal pathologies, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, but also in the retinas of Alzheimer’s patients. In this review, we first briefly discuss the biogenesis of Aβ, a peptide involved in amyloidosis. We then discuss some pathological aspects (synaptic dysfunction, mitochondrial failure, glial activation, and vascular abnormalities) related to the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. We finally highlight common features shared by AD, AMD, and glaucoma in the context of Aβ amyloidosis and further discuss why the retina, due to the transparency of the eye, can be considered as a “window” to the brain. PMID:27551275

  16. An approach to locate optic disc in retinal images with pathological changes.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li; Li, Huiqi

    2016-01-01

    Automatic optic disc (OD) detection is an essential step for screening of eye diseases. An OD localization method is proposed in this paper, which aims to locate OD robustly in retinal image with pathological changes. There are mainly three steps in this approach: region-of-interest (ROI) detection, candidate pixel detection, and confidence score calculation. The features of vessel direction, intensity, OD edges, and size of bright regions were extracted and employed in the proposed OD locating approach. Compared with the OD locating method based on vessel direction only, the proposed method could handle the following cases better: OD partially appears in retinal image, retinal vessels are not obvious in retinal image, or there are bright lesions in retinal images. Four public databases with total 340 retinal images were tested to evaluate the performance of our method. The proposed method can achieve an accuracy of 100%, 95.8%, 99.2%, 97.8% for DRIVE database, STARE database, DIARETDB0 database, DIARETDB1 database respectively. Comparison studies showed that the proposed approach is especially robust in the retinal images with diseases. PMID:26650403

  17. Prevalent misconceptions about acute retinal vascular occlusive disorders.

    PubMed

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2005-07-01

    occlusion; (xix) branch retinal vein occlusion can cause neovascular glaucoma; (xx) in eyes with CRAO, the artery is usually not completely occluded; (xxi) CRAO is always either embolic or thrombotic in origin; (xxii) amaurosis fugax is always due to retinal ischemia secondary to transient retinal arterial embolism; (xxiii) asymptomatic plaque(s) in retinal arteries do not require a detailed evaluation; (xxiv) retinal function can improve even when acute retinal ischemia due to CRAO has lasted for 20h or more; (xxv) CRAO, like ischemic CRVO, can result in development of ocular neovascularization; (xxvi) panretinal photocoagulation is needed for "disc neovascularization" in CRAO; (xxvii) fibrinolytic agents are the treatment of choice in CRAO; (xxviii) there is no chance of an eye with retinal arterial occlusion having spontaneous visual improvement; (xxix) absence of any abnormality on Doppler evaluation of the carotid artery or echography of the heart always rules out those sites as the source of embolism; and (xxx) absence of an embolus in the retinal artery means the occlusion was not caused by an embolus. The major cause of all these misconceptions is the lack of a proper understanding of basic scientific facts related to the various diseases. The objective of this paper is to discuss these misconceptions, based on these scientific facts, to clarify the understanding of these blinding disorders, and to place their management on a rational, scientific basis. PMID:15845346

  18. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids. PMID:27511757

  19. Multimodal registration of retinal images using self organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Matsopoulos, George K; Asvestas, Pantelis A; Mouravliansky, Nikolaos A; Delibasis, Konstantinos K

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, an automatic method for registering multimodal retinal images is presented. The method consists of three steps: the vessel centerline detection and extraction of bifurcation points only in the reference image, the automatic correspondence of bifurcation points in the two images using a novel implementation of the self organizing maps and the extraction of the parameters of the affine transform using the previously obtained correspondences. The proposed registration algorithm was tested on 24 multimodal retinal pairs and the obtained results show an advantageous performance in terms of accuracy with respect to the manual registration. PMID:15575412

  20. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  1. The use of retinal photography in non-ophthalmic settings and its potential for neurology

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Mario A.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Background Ocular fundus examination is an important element of the neurological examination. However, direct ophthalmoscopy is difficult to perform without pupillary dilation and requires extensive practice to accurately recognize optic nerve and retinal abnormalities. Recent studies have suggested that digital retinal photography can replace direct ophthalmoscopy in many settings. Review Summary Ocular fundus imaging is routinely used to document and monitor disease progression in ophthalmology. Advances in optical technology have made it easier to obtain high-quality retinal imaging, even without pupillary dilation. Retinal photography has a high sensitivity, specificity, and inter-/intra-examination agreement compared to in-person ophthalmologist examination, suggesting that photographs can be used in lieu of ophthalmoscopy in many clinical situations. Non-mydriatic retinal photography has recently gained relevance as a helpful tool for diagnosing neuro-ophthalmologic disorders in the emergency department. Additionally, several population-based studies have used retinal imaging to relate ophthalmic abnormalities to the risk of hypertension, renal dysfunction, cardiovascular mortality, subclinical and clinical stroke, and cognitive impairment. The possibility of telemedical consultation offered by digital retinal photography has already increased access to timely and accurate subspecialty care, particularly for underserved areas. Conclusion Retinal photography (even without pupillary dilation) has become increasingly available to medical fields outside of ophthalmology, allowing for faster and more accurate diagnosis of various ocular, neurologic and systemic disorders. The potential for telemedicine may provide the additional benefits of improving access to appropriate urgent consultation in both clinical and research settings. PMID:23114666

  2. Mouse Slc9a8 Mutants Exhibit Retinal Defects Due to Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jadeja, Shalini; Barnard, Alun R.; McKie, Lisa; Cross, Sally H.; White, Jacqueline K.; Robertson, Morag; Budd, Peter S.; MacLaren, Robert E.; Jackson, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. As part of a large scale systematic screen to determine the effects of gene knockout mutations in mice, a retinal phenotype was found in mice lacking the Slc9a8 gene, encoding the sodium/hydrogen ion exchange protein NHE8. We aimed to characterize the mutant phenotype and the role of sodium/hydrogen ion exchange in retinal function. Methods. Detailed histology characterized the pathological consequences of Slc9a8 mutation, and retinal function was assessed by electroretinography (ERG). A conditional allele was used to identify the cells in which NHE8 function is critical for retinal function, and mutant cells analyzed for the effect of the mutation on endosomes. Results. Histology of mutant retinas reveals a separation of photoreceptors from the RPE and infiltration by macrophages. There is a small reduction in photoreceptor length and a mislocalization of visual pigments. The ERG testing reveals a deficit in rod and cone pathway function. The RPE shows abnormal morphology, and mutation of Slc9a8 in only RPE cells recapitulates the mutant phenotype. The NHE8 protein localizes to endosomes, and mutant cells have much smaller recycling endosomes. Conclusions. The NHE8 protein is required in the RPE to maintain correct regulation of endosomal volume and/or pH which is essential for the cellular integrity and subsequent function of RPE. PMID:25736793

  3. Usher syndrome: hearing loss, retinal degeneration and associated abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Pranav; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH), clinically and genetically heterogeneous, is the leading genetic cause of combined hearing and vision loss. USH is classified into three types, based on the hearing and vestibular symptoms observed in patients. Sixteen loci have been reported to be involved in the occurrence of USH and atypical USH. Among them, twelve have been identified as causative genes and one as a modifier gene. Studies on the proteins encoded by these USH genes suggest that USH proteins interact among one another and function in multiprotein complexes in vivo. Although their exact functions remain enigmatic in the retina, USH proteins are required for the development, maintenance and function of hair bundles, which are the primary mechanosensitive structure of inner ear hair cells. Despite the unavailability of a cure, progress has been made to develop effective treatments for this disease. In this review, we focus on the most recent discoveries in the field with an emphasis on USH genes, protein complexes and functions in various tissues as well as progress toward therapeutic development for USH. PMID:25481835

  4. Cone photopigment bleaching abnormalities in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elsner, A E; Burns, S A; Lobes, L A; Doft, B H

    1987-04-01

    We have used a color-matching technique to obtain estimates of the optical density of cone photopigments as a function of retinal illuminance in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We found that the half-bleach illuminance of some patients is abnormally high. That is, it takes more light to bleach an equivalent amount of photopigment in these patients. Since low illuminance color matches for these patients are normal, this implies that these patients have normal amounts of photopigment, but the photopigment is not bleaching normally. This result clearly points to abnormalities in the outer retina of these diabetic patients. The most likely causes of this abnormality are either decreases in the ability of the cones to absorb light, or an increased rate of regeneration of the cone photopigments. PMID:3557875

  5. Enhancing retinal images by nonlinear registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodij, G.; Ribak, E. N.; Glanc, M.; Chenegros, G.

    2015-05-01

    Being able to image the human retina in high resolution opens a new era in many important fields, such as pharmacological research for retinal diseases, researches in human cognition, nervous system, metabolism and blood stream, to name a few. In this paper, we propose to share the knowledge acquired in the fields of optics and imaging in solar astrophysics in order to improve the retinal imaging in the perspective to perform a medical diagnosis. The main purpose would be to assist health care practitioners by enhancing the spatial resolution of the retinal images and increase the level of confidence of the abnormal feature detection. We apply a nonlinear registration method using local correlation tracking to increase the field of view and follow structure evolutions using correlation techniques borrowed from solar astronomy technique expertise. Another purpose is to define the tracer of movements after analyzing local correlations to follow the proper motions of an image from one moment to another, such as changes in optical flows that would be of high interest in a medical diagnosis.

  6. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  7. Targeting iron-mediated retinal degeneration by local delivery of transferrin.

    PubMed

    Picard, Emilie; Le Rouzic, Quentin; Oudar, Antonin; Berdugo, Marianne; El Sanharawi, Mohamed; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Naud, Marie-Christine; Jonet, Laurent; Latour, Chloé; Klein, Christophe; Galiacy, Stéphane; Malecaze, François; Coppin, Hélène; Roth, Marie-Paule; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Courtois, Yves; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2015-12-01

    Iron is essential for retinal function but contributes to oxidative stress-mediated degeneration. Iron retinal homeostasis is highly regulated and transferrin (Tf), a potent iron chelator, is endogenously secreted by retinal cells. In this study, therapeutic potential of a local Tf delivery was evaluated in animal models of retinal degeneration. After intravitreal injection, Tf spread rapidly within the retina and accumulated in photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium, before reaching the blood circulation. Tf injected in the vitreous prior and, to a lesser extent, after light-induced retinal degeneration, efficiently protected the retina histology and function. We found an association between Tf treatment and the modulation of iron homeostasis resulting in a decrease of iron content and oxidative stress marker. The immunomodulation function of Tf could be seen through a reduction in macrophage/microglial activation as well as modulated inflammation responses. In a mouse model of hemochromatosis, Tf had the capacity to clear abnormal iron accumulation from retinas. And in the slow P23H rat model of retinal degeneration, a sustained release of Tf in the vitreous via non-viral gene therapy efficently slowed-down the photoreceptors death and preserved their function. These results clearly demonstrate the synergistic neuroprotective roles of Tf against retinal degeneration and allow identify Tf as an innovative and not toxic therapy for retinal diseases associated with oxidative stress. PMID:26454080

  8. High speed optical holography of retinal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Pellizzari, M; Simonutti, M; Degardin, J; Sahel, J-A; Fink, M; Paques, M; Atlan, M

    2016-08-01

    We performed noninvasive video imaging of retinal blood flow in a pigmented rat by holographic interferometry of near-infrared laser light backscattered by retinal tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam sampled at a frame rate of 39 kHz with a high throughput camera. Local Doppler contrasts emerged from the envelopes of short-time Fourier transforms and the phase of autocorrelation functions of holograms rendered by Fresnel transformation. This approach permitted imaging of blood flow in large retinal vessels (∼30 microns diameter) over 400×400  pixels with a spatial resolution of ∼8 microns and a temporal resolution of ∼6.5  ms. PMID:27472604

  9. Early structural anomalies observed by high-resolution imaging in two related cases of autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Pyo; Lee, Winston; Bae, Eun Jin; Greenstein, Vivianne; Sin, Bum Ho; Chang, Stanley; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the use of adaptive-optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) to investigate RHO, D190N autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa in two siblings (11 and 16 years old, respectively). Each patient exhibited distinct hyperautofluorescence patterns in which the outer borders corresponded to inner segment ellipsoid band disruption. Areas within the hyperautofluorescence patterns exhibited normal photoreceptor outer segments and retinal pigment epithelium. However, AO-SLO imaging revealed noticeable spacing irregularities in the cone mosaic. AO-SLO allows researchers to characterize retinal structural abnormalities with precision so that early structural changes in retinitis pigmentosa can be identified and reconciled with genetic findings. PMID:25215869

  10. In vivo retinal optical coherence tomography at 1040 nm - enhanced penetration into the choroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterhuber, Angelika; Povazay, B.; Hermann, B.; Sattmann, H.; Chavez-Pirson, A.; Drexler, W.

    2005-05-01

    For the first time in vivo retinal imaging has been performed with a new compact, low noise Yb-based ASE source operating in the 1 μm range (NP Photonics, λc = 1040 nm, Δλ = 50 nm, Pout = 30 mW) at the dispersion minimum of water with ~7 μm axial resolution. OCT tomograms acquired at 800 nm are compared to those achieved at 1040 nm showing about 200 μm deeper penetration into the choroid below the retinal pigment epithelium. Retinal OCT at longer wavelengths significantly improves the visualization of the retinal pigment epithelium/choriocapillaris/choroids interface and superficial choroidal layers as well as reduces the scattering through turbid media and therefore might provide a better diagnosis tool for early stages of retinal pathologies such as age related macular degeneration which is accompanied by choroidal neovascularization, i.e., extensive growth of new blood vessels in the choroid and retina.

  11. Developing retinal biomarkers of neurological disease: an analytical perspective

    PubMed Central

    MacCormick, Ian JC; Czanner, Gabriela; Faragher, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The inaccessibility of the brain poses a problem for neuroscience. Scientists have traditionally responded by developing biomarkers for brain physiology and disease. The retina is an attractive source of biomarkers since it shares many features with the brain. Some even describe the retina as a ‘window’ to the brain, implying that retinal signs are analogous to brain disease features. However, new analytical methods are needed to show whether or not retinal signs really are equivalent to brain abnormalities, since this requires greater evidence than direct associations between retina and brain. We, therefore propose a new way to think about, and test, how clearly one might see the brain through the retinal window, using cerebral malaria as a case study. PMID:26174843

  12. ADIPOR1 Is Mutated in Syndromic Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingchu; Eblimit, Aiden; Wang, Jing; Li, Jianli; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Li; Wang, Xia; Xiao, Ningna; Li, Yumei; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Lewis, Richard A; Chen, Rui

    2016-03-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder. Despite the numerous genes associated with RP already identified, the genetic basis remains unknown in a substantial number of patients and families. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing to investigate the molecular basis of a syndromic RP case that cannot be solved by mutations in known disease-causing genes. After applying a series of variant filtering strategies, we identified an apparently homozygous frameshift mutation, c.31delC (p.Q11Rfs*24) in the ADIPOR1 gene. The reported phenotypes of Adipor1-null mice contain retinal dystrophy, obesity, and behavioral abnormalities, which highly mimic those in the syndromic RP patient. We further confirmed ADIPOR1 retina expression by immunohistochemistry. Our results established ADIPOR1 as a novel disease-causing gene for syndromic RP and highlight the importance of fatty acid transport in the retina. PMID:26662040

  13. Influence of Latanoprost on Retinal Microcirculation in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Kremmer, S; Iliadou, M; Anastassiou, G; Schallenberg, M; Vilser, W; Steuhl, K.P; Selbach, J.M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : To test whether latanoprost has an influence on ocular haemodynamics, considering the general reputation of prostaglandins which is frequently associated with vasoconstriction. The effect of latanoprost on the retinal blood supply of treatment-naïve glaucoma patients was tested. Materials and Methodology : 13 patients (7 male, 6 female) who had just recently been diagnosed with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) were treated with latanoprost (0.005%). The average age of our study group was 63.8 years (+/- 2.9 years). The drug’s effect on retinal autoregulation was assessed by flicker test using the Dynamic Vessel Analyzer (DVA). Examinations took place before initializing treatment, after 4 weeks and once again after 4 to 6 months. Results : In our group of POAG patients, the IOP under treatment was significantly reduced about 25%. No intraindividual differences in systemic blood pressure and heart rate were observed. In DVA measurements of glaucoma patients, the maximum flicker dilation of the arteries was significantly lower than reported for healthy volunteers. Beyond that, POAG patients did not show significant differences in vessel diameters, peak amplitudes as well as maximum dilations of retinal arteries and veins before and under treatment with latanoprost (0.005%). Conclusion : Latanoprost markedly lowered the IOP but it did not exert a significant effect on retinal haemodynamics. There was neither a tendency towards vasoconstriction nor towards vasodilation. Sustaining reperfusion damage after topical latanoprost therapy thus seems to be highly unlikely. Further studies must show if sole IOP lowering or a dual positive effect – IOP lowering and improvement of retinal vessel autoregulation – have a more positive impact on the long term follow-up of glaucoma patients. PMID:25317217

  14. The Role of the Endothelin System in the Vascular Dysregulation Involved in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Francesco Saverio; Bonifazzi, Claudio; Perri, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a clinical and genetic group of inherited retinal disorders characterized by alterations of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium leading to a progressive concentric visual field restriction, which may bring about severe central vision impairment. Haemodynamic studies in patients with retinitis pigmentosa have demonstrated ocular blood flow abnormalities both in retina-choroidal and in retroocular vascular system. Moreover, several investigations have studied the augmentation of endothelin-1 plasma levels systemically in the body and locally in the eye. This might account for vasoconstriction and ischemia, typical in vascular dysregulation syndrome, which can be considered an important factor of reduction of the ocular blood flow in subjects affected by retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:26613048

  15. Combined study on the causes of strabismus after the retinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J M; Wright, K W

    1994-12-01

    Extraocular muscle imbalance and diplopia after retina surgery have been previously reported, but the etiology is still controversial. In order to better understand the cause of strabismus after retinal surgery, the authors retrospectively studied 30 patients with persistent strabismus following retinal surgery and combined the result about seven patients of strabismus after retinal surgery in the previous report. Results showed multiple etiologies for the strabismus. Causes of strabismus included fat adherence syndrome (14 patients), non-specific restrictive adhesion (11), displacement of superior oblique tendon (2), scleral explant interfering with ocular motility (1), lost or slipped muscle with adhesion (2), sensory strabismus (2), macular pucker causing ectopic fovea (2), and previous strabismus before the retinal surgery (3). Knowledge of the varieties of abnormalities that can cause strabismus and diplopia will help both the retina and strabismus surgeon prevent and treat strabismus after retinal surgery. PMID:7853737

  16. Bio-medical imaging: Localization of main structures in retinal fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basit, A.; Egerton, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Retinal fundus images have three main structures, the optic disk, fovea and blood vessels. By examining fundus images, an ophthalmologist can diagnose various clinical disorders of the eye and the body, typically indicated by changes in the diameter, area, branching angles and tortuosity of the three ma in retinal structures. Knowledge of the optic disk position is an important diagnostic index fo r many diseases related to the retina. In this paper, localization of optic disc is discussed. Optic disk detection is based on morphological operationsand smoothing filters. Blood vessels are extracted using the green component of a colour retinal image with the help of a median filter. Maximum intensity values are validated with blood vessels to localize the optic disk location. The proposed method has shown significant improvements in results.

  17. Autoantibodies against retinal proteins in paraneoplastic and autoimmune retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adamus, Grazyna; Ren, Gaoying; Weleber, Richard G

    2004-01-01

    Background Autoimmune retinal degeneration may occur in patients who present with sudden or, less commonly, subacute loss of vision of retinal origin, associated with an abnormal ERG, through the action of autoantibodies against retinal proteins. Often the patients are initially diagnosed with or suspected of having a paraneoplastic retinopathy (PR), such as cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR). However, there is limited information on the occurrence, the specificity of autoantibodies in these patients, and their association with clinical symptoms. Methods Sera were obtained from 193 retinopathy patients who presented with clinical symptoms resembling PR or autoimmune retinopathy (AR), including sudden painless loss of vision, typically associated with visual field defects and photopsias, and abnormal rod and/or cone responses on the electroretinogram (ERG). Sera were tested for the presence of anti-retinal autoantibodies by Western blot analysis using proteins extracted from human retina and by immunohistochemistry. Autoantibody titers against recoverin and enolase were measured by ELISA. Results We identified a higher prevalence of anti-retinal autoantibodies in retinopathy patients. Ninety-one patients' sera (47.1%) showed autoantibodies of various specificities with a higher incidence of antibodies present in retinopathy patients diagnosed with cancer (33/52; 63.5%; p = 0.009) than in retinopathy patients without cancer (58/141; 41.1%). The average age of PR patients was 62.0 years, and that of AR patients was 55.9 years. Autoantibodies against recoverin (p23) were only present in the sera of PR patients, autoantibodies against unknown p35 were more common in patients with AR, while anti-enolase (anti-p46) autoantibodies were nearly equally distributed in the sera of patients with PR and those with AR. In the seropositive patients, the autoantibodies persisted over a long period of time – from months to years. A rebound in anti-recoverin autoantibody titer was

  18. Betacellulin Induces Increased Retinal Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Anand-Apte, Bela; Ebrahem, Quteba; Cutler, Alecia; Farage, Eric; Sugimoto, Masahiko; Hollyfield, Joe; Folkman, Judah

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetic maculopathy, the leading cause of vision loss in patients with type 2 diabetes, is characterized by hyper-permeability of retinal blood vessels with subsequent formation of macular edema and hard exudates. The degree of hyperglycemia and duration of diabetes have been suggested to be good predictors of retinal complications. Intervention studies have determined that while intensive treatment of diabetes reduced the development of proliferative diabetic retinopathy it was associated with a two to three-fold increased risk of severe hypoglycemia. Thus we hypothesized the need to identify downstream glycemic targets, which induce retinal vascular permeability that could be targeted therapeutically without the additional risks associated with intensive treatment of the hyperglycemia. Betacellulin is a 32 kD member of the epidermal growth factor family with mitogenic properties for the retinal pigment epithelial cells. This led us to hypothesize a role for betacellulin in the retinal vascular complications associated with diabetes. Methods and Findings In this study, using a mouse model of diabetes, we demonstrate that diabetic mice have accentuated retinal vascular permeability with a concomitant increased expression of a cleaved soluble form of betacellulin (s-Btc) in the retina. Intravitreal injection of soluble betacellulin induced retinal vascular permeability in normoglycemic and hyperglycemic mice. Western blot analysis of retinas from patients with diabetic retinopathy showed an increase in the active soluble form of betacellulin. In addition, an increase in the levels of A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-10 which plays a role in the cleavage of betacellulin was seen in the retinas of diabetic mice and humans. Conclusions These results suggest that excessive amounts of betacellulin in the retina may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic macular edema. PMID:20976146

  19. Response of Retinal Blood Flow to Systemic Hyperoxia as Measured with Dual-Beam Bidirectional Doppler Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Gröschl, Martin; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2012-01-01

    Purpose There is a long-standing interest in the study of retinal blood flow in humans. In the recent years techniques have been established to measure retinal perfusion based on optical coherence tomography (OCT). In the present study we used a technique called dual-beam bidirectional Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) to characterize the effects of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood flow. These data were compared to data obtained with a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). Methods 10 healthy subjects were studied on 2 study days. On one study day the effect of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood velocities was studied using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT. On the second study day the effect of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood velocities was assessed by laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Retinal vessel diameters were measured on both study days using a commercially available Dynamic Vessel Analyzer. Retinal blood flow was calculated based on retinal vessel diameters and red blood cell velocity. Results As expected, breathing of pure oxygen induced a pronounced reduction in retinal vessel diameters, retinal blood velocities and retinal blood flow on both study days (p<0.001). Blood velocity data correlated well between the two methods applied under both baseline as well as under hyperoxic conditions (r = 0.98 and r = 0.75, respectively). Data as obtained with OCT were, however, slightly higher. Conclusion A good correlation was found between red blood cell velocity as measured with dual-beam bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT and red blood cell velocity assessed by the laser Doppler method. Dual-beam bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT is a promising approach for studying retinal blood velocities in vivo. PMID:23029289

  20. The Retinal Disease Screening Study: Prospective Comparison of Nonmydriatic Fundus Photography and Optical Coherence Tomography for Detection of Retinal Irregularities

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Yanling; Heussen, Florian M.; Keane, Pearse A.; Sadda, SriniVas R.; Walsh, Alexander C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the sensitivity of volume scanning with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to nonmydriatic color fundus photography (FP) for the detection of retinal irregularities in asymptomatic populations. Methods. Asymptomatic subjects without known ocular disease were recruited over a 6-month period. For each eye, two undilated 45° fundus images and four undilated volume OCT image sets covering the macula and optic nerve were obtained. Color images were evaluated for irregularities both inside and outside the area covered by OCT. OCT image sets were evaluated for internal limiting membrane irregularities, abnormal retinal thickness, hyper/hyporeflective features, and photoreceptor/retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) irregularities. Detection sensitivities were compared and false-negative cases were analyzed. Results. A total of 284 eyes (144 subjects) were included, with a mean age of 38.1 years (range 18–77). Among 253 eyes (135 subjects) with gradable images from both FP and OCTs, the detection sensitivities for OCT were higher (96.2% infield and 85.7% in full field) than for FP (19.9% infield and 43.8% in full field) for all irregularities evaluated in the study (including epiretinal irregularities, abnormal retinal thickness, intraretinal hyperreflective/hyporeflective features, and photoreceptor/RPE irregularities). Overall, the presence of definite irregularities on either fundus imaging or OCT by eye in this asymptomatic population was 42.6% (121/284), with 39.4% (112/284) of eyes having RPE irregularities such as drusen. Conclusions. For detection of a variety of retinal irregularities evaluated in the current study, volume OCT scanning was more sensitive than nonmydriatic retinal photography in our asymptomatic individuals. OCT detected clinically relevant disease features, such as subretinal fluid, that were missed by FP, and had a lower ungradable image rate. It is likely that OCT will be added to photography screening in the near future for

  1. The Characteristics of Peripapillary Retinal Perfusion by Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Tessellated Fundus Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangmei; Zhu, Li; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the peripapillary and perifoveal retinal perfusions of young healthy eyes with a tessellated fundus using optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography. Methods Thirty-five Chinese subjects with a tessellated fundus and 35 subjects without a tessellated fundus from a population-based cross-sectional study in Shanghai were included. All participants underwent OCT angiography. The flow index and vessel density were examined in the peripapillary and perifoveal retinal areas, and their relationships with other ocular parameters were analyzed. Results In the peripapillary area, the eyes with a tessellated fundus had a lower retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) flow index (0.055 ± 0.009 vs. 0.061 ± 0.007, P = 0.006), RNFL vessel density (61.8 ± 7.3 vs. 65.9 ± 5.2, P = 0.010), retinal flow index (0.086 ± 0.010 vs. 0.092 ± 0.008, P = 0.012), and retinal vessel density (83.7 ± 5.0 vs. 86.4 ± 3.7, P = 0.018) than the control eyes, and the difference remained significant even after adjustments were made for gender and RNFL thickness. No difference was found in the perifoveal area. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that the retinal flow index and vessel density in the peripapillary area were significantly correlated with the tessellated fundus diagnosis (flow index: β = -0.006, P = 0.005; vessel density: β = -2.597, P = 0.006), gender (flow index: β = 0.005, P = 0.019; vessel density: β = 3.129, P = 0.002) and RNFL thickness (flow index: β = 0.000, P = 0.002; vessel density: β = 0.190, P = 0.002). The RNFL flow index and vessel density were significantly associated with the tessellated fundus diagnosis (flow index: β = -0.005, P = 0.005; vessel density: β = -3.572, P = 0.008) and the thickness of RNFL (flow index: β = 0.001, P < 0.001; vessel density: β = 0.421, P < 0.001). Conclusions Eyes with tessellated fundus with a relative decreased peripapillary retinal perfusion compared with eyes without a tessellated fundus were

  2. Overexpression of Pax6 results in microphthalmia, retinal dysplasia and defective retinal ganglion cell axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Martine; Pratt, Thomas; Liu, Min; Jeffery, Glen; Price, David J

    2008-01-01

    Background The transcription factor Pax6 is expressed by many cell types in the developing eye. Eyes do not form in homozygous loss-of-function mouse mutants (Pax6Sey/Sey) and are abnormally small in Pax6Sey/+ mutants. Eyes are also abnormally small in PAX77 mice expressing multiple copies of human PAX6 in addition to endogenous Pax6; protein sequences are identical in the two species. The developmental events that lead to microphthalmia in PAX77 mice are not well-characterised, so it is not clear whether over- and under-expression of Pax6/PAX6 cause microphthalmia through similar mechanisms. Here, we examined the consequences of over-expression for the eye and its axonal connections. Results Eyes form in PAX77+/+ embryos but subsequently degenerate. At E12.5, we found no abnormalities in ocular morphology, retinal cell cycle parameters and the incidence of retinal cell death. From E14.5 on, we observed malformations of the optic disc. From E16.5 into postnatal life there is progressively more severe retinal dysplasia and microphthalmia. Analyses of patterns of gene expression indicated that PAX77+/+ retinae produce a normal range of cell types, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). At E14.5 and E16.5, quantitative RT-PCR with probes for a range of molecules associated with retinal development showed only one significant change: a slight reduction in levels of mRNA encoding the secreted morphogen Shh at E16.5. At E16.5, tract-tracing with carbocyanine dyes in PAX77+/+ embryos revealed errors in intraretinal navigation by RGC axons, a decrease in the number of RGC axons reaching the thalamus and an increase in the proportion of ipsilateral projections among those RGC axons that do reach the thalamus. A survey of embryos with different Pax6/PAX6 gene dosage (Pax6Sey/+, Pax6+/+, PAX77+ and PAX77+/+) showed that (1) the total number of RGC axons projected by the retina and (2) the proportions that are sorted into the ipsilateral and contralateral optic tracts at the

  3. Mitogen-activated protein kinases in the porcine retinal arteries and neuroretina following retinal ischemia-reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gesslein, Bodil; Håkansson, Gisela; Carpio, Ronald; Gustafsson, Lotta; Perez, Maria-Thereza

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to examine changes in the expression of intracellular signal-transduction pathways, specifically mitogen-activated protein kinases, following retinal ischemia-reperfusion. Methods Retinal ischemia was induced by elevating the intraocular pressure in porcine eyes, followed by 5, 12, or 20 h of reperfusion. The results were compared to those of the sham- operated fellow eye. The retinal arteries and neuroretina were isolated separately and examined. Tissue morphology and DNA fragmentation were studied using histology. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), p38, c-junNH2-terminal kinases (JNK), and c-jun protein and mRNA expression were examined using immunofluorescence staining, western blot, and real-time PCR techniques. Results Pyknotic cell nuclei, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells, and glial fibrillary acidic protein mRNA expression were increased in ischemia, suggesting injury. Phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein levels were increased in the neuroretina following ischemia, while mRNA levels were unaltered. p38 protein and mRNA levels were not affected by ischemia. Immunofluorescence staining for phosphorylated p38 was especially intense in the retinal blood vessels, while only weak in the neuroretina. Phosphorylated JNK protein and mRNA were slightly decreased in ischemia. Phosphorylated c-jun protein and mRNA levels were higher in the neuroretina after ischemia-reperfusion. Conclusions Retinal ischemia-reperfusion alters expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases, particularly ERK1/2, in the neuroretina and retinal arteries. The development of pharmacological treatment targeting these intracellular transduction pathways may prevent injury to the eye following retinal circulatory failure. PMID:20300568

  4. Retinal imaging with adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in unexplained central ring scotoma.

    PubMed

    Joeres, Sandra; Jones, Steven M; Chen, Diana C; Silva, Dennis; Olivier, Scot; Fawzi, Amani; Castellarin, Alessandro; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2008-04-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy allows for noninvasive, in vivo visualization of retinal abnormalities at a cellular level. We herein describe for the first time, to our knowledge, the utility of high-resolution retinal imaging in studying the photoreceptor mosaic in an otherwise unexplained visual disturbance. Imaging of the cone mosaic was performed in a 64-year-old man with a unilateral ringlike paracentral distortion that could not be explained using common clinical imaging instruments. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy findings revealed a parafoveal circular abnormality of the cone mosaic approximately 3 degrees in diameter that corresponded to the ring of visual disturbance. Visualization of the cone mosaic with adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy can reveal photoreceptor damage that may not be detectable with standard imaging devices. Optical axial sectioning of the retina may help in identifying and localizing abnormalities within the retinal layers. PMID:18413527

  5. An adaptive-optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope for imaging murine retinal microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, Clemens; Biss, David P.; Tajouri, Nadja; Jakobs, Tatjana C.; Lin, Charles P.

    2010-02-01

    In vivo retinal imaging is an outstanding tool to observe biological processes unfold in real-time. The ability to image microstructure in vivo can greatly enhance our understanding of function in retinal microanatomy under normal conditions and in disease. Transgenic mice are frequently used for mouse models of retinal diseases. However, commercially available retinal imaging instruments lack the optical resolution and spectral flexibility necessary to visualize detail comprehensively. We developed an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) specifically for mouse eyes. Our SLO is a sensor-less adaptive optics system (no Shack Hartmann sensor) that employs a stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm to modulate a deformable mirror, ultimately aiming to correct wavefront aberrations by optimizing confocal image sharpness. The resulting resolution allows detailed observation of retinal microstructure. The AO-SLO can resolve retinal microglia and their moving processes, demonstrating that microglia processes are highly motile, constantly probing their immediate environment. Similarly, retinal ganglion cells are imaged along with their axons and sprouting dendrites. Retinal blood vessels are imaged both using evans blue fluorescence and backscattering contrast.

  6. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  7. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  8. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  9. [News in Retinal Imaging].

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, R; Schmidl, D; Garhöfer, G; Schmetterer, L

    2015-09-01

    New developments in retinal imaging have revolutionised ophthalmology in recent years. In particular, optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides highly resolved and well reproducible images and has rung in a new era in ophthalmological imaging. The technology was introduced in the early 1990 s, and has rapidly developed. There have been improvements in resolution, sensitivity and processing speed. There have also been developments in functional processing. OCT angiography is the first application in routine clinical work. PMID:26372783

  10. Detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defects on retinal fundus images for early diagnosis of glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Sawada, Akira; Hatanaka, Yuji; Hara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer defect (NFLD) is a major sign of glaucoma, which is the second leading cause of blindness in the world. Early detection of NFLDs is critical for improved prognosis of this progressive, blinding disease. We have investigated a computerized scheme for detection of NFLDs on retinal fundus images. In this study, 162 images, including 81 images with 99 NFLDs, were used. After major blood vessels were removed, the images were transformed so that the curved paths of retinal nerves become approximately straight on the basis of ellipses, and the Gabor filters were applied for enhancement of NFLDs. Bandlike regions darker than the surrounding pixels were detected as candidates of NFLDs. For each candidate, image features were determined and the likelihood of a true NFLD was determined by using the linear discriminant analysis and an artificial neural network (ANN). The sensitivity for detecting the NFLDs was 91% at 1.0 false positive per image by using the ANN. The proposed computerized system for the detection of NFLDs can be useful to physicians in the diagnosis of glaucoma in a mass screening.

  11. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  12. Retinal Thickening and Photoreceptor Loss in HIV Eyes without Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Arcinue, Cheryl A.; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; El-Emam, Sharif Y.; Ma, Feiyan; Doede, Aubrey; Sharpsten, Lucie; Gomez, Maria Laura; Freeman, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the presence of structural changes in HIV retinae (i.e., photoreceptor density and retinal thickness in the macula) compared with age-matched HIV-negative controls. Methods Cohort of patients with known HIV under CART (combination Antiretroviral Therapy) treatment were examined with a flood-illuminated retinal AO camera to assess the cone photoreceptor mosaic and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to assess retinal layers and retinal thickness. Results Twenty-four eyes of 12 patients (n = 6 HIV-positive and 6 HIV-negative) were imaged with the adaptive optics camera. In each of the regions of interest studied (nasal, temporal, superior, inferior), the HIV group had significantly less mean cone photoreceptor density compared with age-matched controls (difference range, 4,308–6,872 cones/mm2). A different subset of forty eyes of 20 patients (n = 10 HIV-positive and 10 HIV-negative) was included in the retinal thickness measurements and retinal layer segmentation with the SD-OCT. We observed significant thickening in HIV positive eyes in the total retinal thickness at the foveal center, and in each of the three horizontal B-scans (through the macular center, superior, and inferior to the fovea). We also noted that the inner retina (combined thickness from ILM through RNFL to GCL layer) was also significantly thickened in all the different locations scanned compared with HIV-negative controls. Conclusion Our present study shows that the cone photoreceptor density is significantly reduced in HIV retinae compared with age-matched controls. HIV retinae also have increased macular retinal thickness that may be caused by inner retinal edema secondary to retinovascular disease in HIV. The interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE, as well as possible low-grade ocular inflammation causing diffuse inner retinal edema, may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV-positive patients without overt retinitis. PMID:26244973

  13. [Application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Retinal oximeter is a new machine which has been used in the diagnose, treatment and research of several ophthalmic diseases for recent years. It allows ophthalmologists to gain retinal oxygen saturation directly. Therefore, retinal oximeter might be useful for ophthalmologists to understand ophthalmic diseases more deeper and clarify the impact of ischemia on retinal function. It has been reported in the literatures that retinal oximeter has potentially useful diagnostic and therapeutic indications in various eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein and artery occlusion, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, et al. In this thesis, the application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology is reviewed. PMID:26850588

  14. Age-related rarefaction in retinal vasculature is not linear.

    PubMed

    Azemin, M Z Che; Ab Hamid, F; Aminuddin, A; Wang, J J; Kawasaki, R; Kumar, D K

    2013-10-24

    The fractal dimension is a global measure of complexity and is useful for quantifying anatomical structures, including the retinal vascular network. A previous study found a linear declining trend with aging on the retinal vascular fractal dimension (DF); however, it was limited to the older population (49 years and older). This study aimed to investigate the possible models of the fractal dimension changes from young to old subjects (10 to 73 years). A total of 215 right-eye retinal samples, including those of 119 (55%) women and 96 (45%) men, were selected. The retinal vessels were segmented using computer-assisted software, and non-vessel fragments were deleted. The fractal dimension was measured based on the log-log plot of the number of grids versus the size. The retinal vascular Df was analyzed to determine changes with increasing age. Finally, the data were fitted to three polynomial models. All three models are statistically significant (Linear: R(2) = 0.1270, 213 d.f., p<0.001, Quadratic: R(2) = 0.1536, 212 d.f., p<0.001, Cubic: R(2) = 0.1529, 211 d.f., p<0.001). The quadratic regression is significantly better than the linear regression (p<0.001); however, the increase in R(2) from the quadratic model to the cubic model is not significant (p=0.97). These results suggest that the decreasing trend of the fractal dimension associated with aging is better explained by the quadratic model than by the linear and cubic models in a sample with a broader age spectrum. PMID:24512773

  15. Vasodilation of retinal arterioles induced by activation of BKCa channels is attenuated in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asami; Suzuki, Sachi; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2011-11-01

    The large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channels modulate the retinal vascular tone, but question of whether the impairment of the channel function contributes to abnormalities of retinal circulation has not yet been completely elucidated. The purpose of this study was to examine effects of diabetes on the vasodilation induced by activation of BK(Ca) channels. Male Wistar rats were treated with streptozotocin and experiments were performed 2 weeks later. The streptozotocin-treated animals were given drinking water containing 5% d-glucose to shorten the term in the development of retinal vascular dysfunction. The retinal vascular responses were assessed by measuring diameter of retinal arterioles in the fundus images that were captured with an original fundus camera system. In non-diabetic rats, vasodilator effects of acetylcholine on retinal arterioles were significantly reduced by iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of BK(Ca) channels. However, the inhibitory effect of iberiotoxin was not observed in diabetic rats, and the responses to the BK(Ca) channel opener BMS-191011 were almost completely abolished. The retinal vasodilator response to acetylcholine, possibly an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated response, observed after treatment with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and indomethacin was markedly reduced in diabetic rats. The responses to pinacidil, an opener of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, were unchanged. These results suggest that the retinal vasodilator response mediated through mechanisms involving activation of BK(Ca) channels is diminished at the early stage of diabetes in rats. The impairment of BK(Ca) channel function may contribute to abnormal retinal hemodynamics in diabetes and consequently play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:21871885

  16. Retinal Failure in Diabetes: a Feature of Retinal Sensory Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ellyn J; Gardner, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Physiologic adaptations mediate normal responses to short-term and long-term stresses to ensure organ function. Organ failure results if adaptive responses fail to resolve persistent stresses or maladaptive reactions develop. The retinal neurovascular unit likewise undergoes adaptive responses to diabetes resulting in a retinal sensory neuropathy analogous to other sensory neuropathies. Vision-threatening diabetic retinal neuropathy results from unremitting metabolic and inflammatory stresses, leading to macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, states of "retinal failure." Current regulatory strategies focus primarily on the retinal failure stages, but new diagnostic modalities and understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy may facilitate earlier treatment to maintain vision in persons with diabetes. PMID:26458378

  17. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  18. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  19. The Unfolded Protein Response in Retinal Vascular Diseases: Implications and Therapeutic Potential Beyond Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sarah X.; Ma, Jacey H.; Bhatta, Maulasri; Fliesler, Steven J.; Wang, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex, step-wise process of new vessel formation that is involved in both normal embryonic development as well as postnatal pathological processes, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Aberrant blood vessel growth, also known as neovascularization, in the retina and the choroid is a major cause of vision loss in severe eye diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, retinopathy of prematurity, and central and branch retinal vein occlusion. Yet, retinal neovascularization is causally and dynamically associated with vasodegeneration, ischemia, and vascular remodeling in retinal tissues. Understanding the mechanisms of retinal neovascularization is an urgent unmet need for developing new treatments for these devastating diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests a vital role for the unfolded protein response (UPR) in regulation of angiogenesis, in part through coordinating the secretion of pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as VEGF, and modulating endothelial cell survival and activity. Herein, we summarize current research in the context of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and UPR signaling in retinal angiogenesis and vascular remodeling, highlighting potential implications of targeting these stress response pathways in the prevention and treatment of retinal vascular diseases that result in visual deficits and blindness. PMID:25529848

  20. Optical microangiography of retina and choroid and measurement of total retinal blood flow in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Yin, Xin; Dziennis, Suzan; Wietecha, Tomasz; Hudkins, Kelly L.; Alpers, Charles E.; Wang, Ruikang K

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel application of optical microangiography (OMAG) imaging technique for visualization of depth-resolved vascular network within retina and choroid as well as measurement of total retinal blood flow in mice. A fast speed spectral domain OCT imaging system at 820nm with a line scan rate of 140 kHz was developed to image the posterior segment of eyes in mice. By applying an OMAG algorithm to extract the moving blood flow signals out of the background tissue, we are able to provide true capillary level imaging of the retinal and choroidal vasculature. The microvascular patterns within different retinal layers are presented. An en face Doppler OCT approach [Srinivasan et al., Opt Express 18, 2477 (2010)] was adopted for retinal blood flow measurement. The flow is calculated by integrating the axial blood flow velocity over the vessel area measured in an en face plane without knowing the blood vessel angle. Total retinal blood flow can be measured from both retinal arteries and veins. The results indicate that OMAG has the potential for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the microcirculation in posterior eye compartments in mouse models of retinopathy and neovascularization. PMID:23162733

  1. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cell loss in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross‐Cisneros, Fred N.; Koronyo, Yosef; Hannibal, Jens; Gallassi, Roberto; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Sambati, Luisa; Pan, Billy X.; Tozer, Kevin R.; Barboni, Piero; Provini, Federica; Avanzini, Pietro; Carbonelli, Michele; Pelosi, Annalisa; Chui, Helena; Liguori, Rocco; Baruzzi, Agostino; Koronyo‐Hamaoui, Maya; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Melanopsin retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) are photoreceptors driving circadian photoentrainment, and circadian dysfunction characterizes Alzheimer disease (AD). We investigated mRGCs in AD, hypothesizing that they contribute to circadian dysfunction. Methods We assessed retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in 21 mild‐moderate AD patients, and in a subgroup of 16 we evaluated rest–activity circadian rhythm by actigraphy. We studied postmortem mRGCs by immunohistochemistry in retinas, and axons in optic nerve cross‐sections of 14 neuropathologically confirmed AD patients. We coimmunostained for retinal amyloid β (Aβ) deposition and melanopsin to locate mRGCs. All AD cohorts were compared with age‐matched controls. Results We demonstrated an age‐related optic neuropathy in AD by OCT, with a significant reduction of RNFL thickness (p = 0.038), more evident in the superior quadrant (p = 0.006). Axonal loss was confirmed in postmortem AD optic nerves. Abnormal circadian function characterized only a subgroup of AD patients. Sleep efficiency was significantly reduced in AD patients (p = 0.001). We also found a significant loss of mRGCs in postmortem AD retinal specimens (p = 0.003) across all ages and abnormal mRGC dendritic morphology and size (p = 0.003). In flat‐mounted AD retinas, Aβ accumulation was remarkably evident inside and around mRGCs. Interpretation We show variable degrees of rest–activity circadian dysfunction in AD patients. We also demonstrate age‐related loss of optic nerve axons and specifically mRGC loss and pathology in postmortem AD retinal specimens, associated with Aβ deposition. These results all support the concept that mRGC degeneration is a contributor to circadian rhythm dysfunction in AD. ANN NEUROL 2016;79:90–109 PMID:26505992

  2. Intrachoroidal Neovascularization in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schwesinger, Catherine; Yee, Charles; Rohan, Richard M.; Joussen, Antonia M.; Fernandez, Antonio; Meyer, Tobias N.; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Ma, Joseph J. K.; Redmond, T. Michael; Liu, Suyan; Adamis, Anthony P.; D’Amato, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration is a frequent and poorly treatable cause of vision loss in elderly Caucasians. This choroidal neovascularization has been associated with the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In current animal models choroidal neovascularization is induced by subretinal injection of growth factors or vectors encoding growth factors such as VEGF, or by disruption of the Bruch’s membrane/retinal pigment epithelium complex with laser treatment. We wished to establish a transgenic murine model of age-related macular degeneration, in which the overexpression of VEGF by the retinal pigment epithelium induces choroidal neovascularization. A construct consisting of a tissue-specific murine retinal pigment epithelium promoter (RPE65 promoter) coupled to murine VEGF164 cDNA with a rabbit β-globin-3′ UTR was introduced into the genome of albino mice. Transgene mRNA was expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium at all ages peaking at 4 months. The expression of VEGF protein was increased in both the retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. An increase of intravascular adherent leukocytes and vessel leakage was observed. Histopathology revealed intrachoroidal neovascularization that did not penetrate through an intact Bruch’s membrane. These results support the hypothesis that additional insults to the integrity of Bruch’s membrane are required to induce growth of choroidal vessels into the subretinal space as seen in age-related macular degeneration. This model may be useful to screen for inhibitors of choroidal vessel growth. PMID:11238064

  3. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  4. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  5. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:21743764

  6. Quantitative analysis of retinal OCT.

    PubMed

    Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Clinical acceptance of 3-D OCT retinal imaging brought rapid development of quantitative 3-D analysis of retinal layers, vasculature, retinal lesions as well as facilitated new research in retinal diseases. One of the cornerstones of many such analyses is segmentation and thickness quantification of retinal layers and the choroid, with an inherently 3-D simultaneous multi-layer LOGISMOS (Layered Optimal Graph Image Segmentation for Multiple Objects and Surfaces) segmentation approach being extremely well suited for the task. Once retinal layers are segmented, regional thickness, brightness, or texture-based indices of individual layers can be easily determined and thus contribute to our understanding of retinal or optic nerve head (ONH) disease processes and can be employed for determination of disease status, treatment responses, visual function, etc. Out of many applications, examples provided in this paper focus on image-guided therapy and outcome prediction in age-related macular degeneration and on assessing visual function from retinal layer structure in glaucoma. PMID:27503080

  7. Increased Oxidative and Nitrative Stress Accelerates Aging of the Retinal Vasculature in the Diabetic Retina

    PubMed Central

    Lamoke, Folami; Shaw, Sean; Yuan, Jianghe; Ananth, Sudha; Duncan, Michael; Martin, Pamela; Bartoli, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced retinal oxidative and nitrative stress can accelerate vascular cell aging, which may lead to vascular dysfunction as seen in diabetes. There is no information on whether this may contribute to the progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR). In this study, we have assessed the occurrence of senescence-associated markers in retinas of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats at 8 and 12 weeks of hyperglycemia as compared to normoglycemic aging (12 and 14 months) and adult (4.5 months) rat retinas. We have found that in the diabetic retinas there was an up-regulation of senescence-associated markers SA-β-Gal, p16INK4a and miR34a, which correlated with decreased expression of SIRT1, a target of miR34a. Expression of senescence-associated factors primarily found in retinal microvasculature of diabetic rats exceeded levels measured in adult and aging rat retinas. In aging rats, retinal expression of senescence associated-factors was mainly localized at the level of the retinal pigmented epithelium and only minimally in the retinal microvasculature. The expression of oxidative/nitrative stress markers such as 4-hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine was more pronounced in the retinal vasculature of diabetic rats as compared to normoglycemic aging and adult rat retinas. Treatments of STZ-rats with the anti-nitrating drug FeTPPS (10mg/Kg/day) significantly reduced the appearance of senescence markers in the retinal microvasculature. Our results demonstrate that hyperglycemia accelerates retinal microvascular cell aging whereas physiological aging affects primarily cells of the retinal pigmented epithelium. In conclusion, hyperglycemia-induced retinal vessel dysfunction and DR progression involve vascular cell senescence due to increased oxidative/nitrative stress. PMID:26466127

  8. Vasodilator effects of adenosine on retinal arterioles in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Taisuke; Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2008-02-01

    Adenosine is a potent vasodilator of retinal blood vessels and is implicated to be a major regulator of retinal blood flow during metabolic stress, but little is known about the impact of diabetes on the role of adenosine in regulation of retinal hemodynamics. Therefore, we examined how diabetes affects adenosine-induced vasodilation of retinal arterioles. Male Wistar rats were treated with streptozotocin (80 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), and experiments were performed 6-8 weeks later. Rats were treated with tetrodotoxin (50 microg/kg, intravenously [i.v.]) to eliminate any nerve activity and prevent movement of the eye and infused with methoxamine continuously to maintain adequate systemic circulation. Fundus images were captured with a digital camera that was equipped with a special objective lens, and diameters of retinal arterioles were measured. Adenosine increased diameters of retinal arterioles and decreased systemic blood pressure. These responses were significantly attenuated by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (30 mg/kg, i.v.) and the adenosine triphosphate-dependent K+ (K(ATP)) channel blocker glibenclamide (20 mg/kg, i.v.). The depressor responses to adenosine were reduced in diabetic rats, whereas diabetes did not alter vasodilation of retinal arterioles to adenosine. In contrast, both depressor response and vasodilation of retinal arteriole to acetylcholine were reduced in diabetic rats. The retinal vasodilator responses to adenosine and acetylcholine observed in diabetic rats were diminished by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. There were no differences in the responses to pinacidil, a K(ATP) channel opener, between the diabetic and nondiabetic rats. These results suggest that both the activation of nitric oxide synthase and opening of K(ATP) channels contribute to the vasodilator effects of adenosine in rats in vivo. However, diabetes has no significant impact on the vasodilation mediated by these mechanisms in

  9. Adenosine triphosphate-induced photoreceptor death and retinal remodeling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vessey, Kirstan A; Greferath, Ursula; Aplin, Felix P; Jobling, Andrew I; Phipps, Joanna A; Ho, Tracy; De Iongh, Robbert U; Fletcher, Erica L

    2014-01-01

    Many common causes of blindness involve the death of retinal photoreceptors, followed by progressive inner retinal cell remodeling. For an inducible model of retinal degeneration to be useful, it must recapitulate these changes. Intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has recently been found to induce acute photoreceptor death. The aim of this study was to characterize the chronic effects of ATP on retinal integrity. Five-week-old, dark agouti rats were administered 50 mM ATP into the vitreous of one eye and saline into the other. Vision was assessed using the electroretinogram and optokinetic response and retinal morphology investigated via histology. ATP caused significant loss of visual function within 1 day and loss of 50% of the photoreceptors within 1 week. At 3 months, 80% of photoreceptor nuclei were lost, and total photoreceptor loss occurred by 6 months. The degeneration and remodeling were similar to those found in heritable retinal dystrophies and age-related macular degeneration and included inner retinal neuronal loss, migration, and formation of new synapses; Müller cell gliosis, migration, and scarring; blood vessel loss; and retinal pigment epithelium migration. In addition, extreme degeneration and remodeling events, such as neuronal and glial migration outside the neural retina and proliferative changes in glial cells, were observed. These extreme changes were also observed in the 2-year-old P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat model of retinitis pigmentosa. This ATP-induced model of retinal degeneration may provide a valuable tool for developing pharmaceutical therapies or for testing electronic implants aimed at restoring vision. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2928–2950, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24639102

  10. Pattern of blood vessels in eyes with coloboma

    PubMed Central

    Lingam, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Background: Choroidal coloboma, especially with optic disc involvement affects the blood vessel (BV) pattern in the fundus. Aim: The aim of this study was to report the observations on the pattern of retinal BVs in eyes with fundus coloboma. Design: Retrospective observational study. Materials and Methods: Twenty four eyes of 19 patients with fundus coloboma and the disc involvement in the coloboma was classified according to a previous publication. Results: Four varieties of BVs were identified in the area of coloboma - BVs that were continuous with those arising from the optic disc; vessels emanating from the floor of coloboma whose continuity with central retinal artery or its branches could be indirectly established; and those emanating from the floor of coloboma whose continuity with central retinal artery could not be established. In addition, extraocular BVs were visible through the thinned sclera. The retinal BVs often traversed the coloboma to reach the normal retina. The disc itself was found to be small and had no physiological cup (if not colobomatous). Conclusions: One should be aware of the major BVs transgressing the coloboma while performing relaxing cuts in the intercalary membrane, during the surgery for retinal detachments in eyes with coloboma. Physiological cup is usually absent (when the disc is not colobomatous). Hence, any cupping in such eyes should be viewed with suspicion. PMID:24413826

  11. Retinal oximetry with a multiaperture camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Lompado, Art; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2010-02-01

    Oxygen saturation measurements in the retina is an essential measurement in monitoring eye health of diabetic patient. In this paper, preliminary result of oxygen saturation measurements for a healthy patient retina is presented. The retinal oximeter used is based on a regular fundus camera to which was added an optimized optical train designed to perform aperture division whereas a filter array help select the requested wavelengths. Hence, nine equivalent wavelength-dependent sub-images are taken in a snapshot which helps minimizing the effects of eye movements. The setup is calibrated by using a set of reflectance calibration phantoms and a lookuptable (LUT) is computed. An inverse model based on the LUT is presented to extract the optical properties of a patient fundus and further estimate the oxygen saturation in a retina vessel.

  12. Retinal toxicity of chloroquine hydrochloride administered by intraperitoneal injection.

    PubMed

    Gaynes, Bruce Ira; Torczynski, Elise; Varro, Zoltan; Grostern, Richard; Perlman, Jay

    2008-10-01

    Chloroquine is quinolone derivative known to exert dose-related retinal toxicity, albeit in a variable manner. It is thought that variability in the presentation of chloroquine retinopathy may be the result of perturbations in drug bioavailability subsequent to oral ingestion. In order to better understand the ramifications of bioavailability on the development of retinal injury subsequent to chloroquine use, this study investigated the relationship between retinal injury and chloroquine administration via intraperitoneal rather than oral administration. Four-week-old C57/6J mice underwent daily intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg kg(-1) chloroquine hydrochloride for a total of 62 days. Following treatment, tissue was fixed in preparation for analysis by light and transmission electron microscopy. Treated animals demonstrated marked abnormality of the outer retinal layers described as complete loss of the outer plexiform layer as well as photoreceptors and photoreceptor nuclei. The retinal pigmented epithelium demonstrated focal atrophy, loss of nuclei and pigment irregularity. Findings in the inner retina were notable for the loss of Müller cells and the presence of membranous cytoplasmic bodies. Retinae of control animals were entirely normal. In contrast to previous studies in the murine model examining chloroquine retinopathy subsequent to oral administration, this study suggests that intraperitoneal chloroquine administration facilitates retinal toxicity, presumably due to heightened drug absorption and bioavailability. It is posited that an increased rate of drug accumulation within the retina leads to an enhanced lysosomotrophic drug effect due to inability of the lysosome to compensate for chloroquine-induced elevation in pH through re-acidification of the intra-lysosomal content. PMID:18484088

  13. [Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells].

    PubMed

    Skorkovská, K; Skorkovská, Š

    2015-06-01

    Recently discovered intrinsically photosensitive melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells contribute to circadian photoentrainment and pupillary constriction; recent works have also brought new evidence for their accessory role in the visual system in humans. Pupil light reaction driven by individual photoreceptors can be isolated by means of the so called chromatic pupillography. The use of chromatic stimuli to elicit different pupillary responses may become an objective clinical pupil test in the detection of retinal diseases and in assessing new therapeutic approaches particularly in hereditary retinal degenerations like retinitis pigmentosa. In advanced stages of disease, the pupil light reaction is even more sensitive than standard electroretinography for detecting residual levels of photoreceptor activity. This review summarizes current knowledge on intrinsically photosensitive retinal cells and highlights its possible implications for clinical practice. PMID:26201360

  14. Retinal connectivity and primate vision

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barry B.; Martin, Paul R.; Grünert, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    The general principles of retinal organization are now well known. It may seem surprising that retinal organization in the primate, which has a complex visual behavioral repertoire, appears relatively simple. In this review, we primarily consider retinal structure and function in primate species. Photoreceptor distribution and connectivity are considered as are connectivity in the outer and inner retina. One key issue is the specificity of retinal connections; we suggest that the retina shows connectional specificity but this is seldom complete, and we consider here the functional consequences of imprecise wiring. Finally, we consider how retinal systems can be linked to psychophysical descriptions of different channels, chromatic and luminance, which are proposed to exist in the primate visual system. PMID:20826226

  15. Retinal connectivity and primate vision.

    PubMed

    Lee, Barry B; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2010-11-01

    The general principles of retinal organization are now well known. It may seem surprising that retinal organization in the primate, which has a complex visual behavioral repertoire, appears relatively simple. In this review, we primarily consider retinal structure and function in primate species. Photoreceptor distribution and connectivity are considered as are connectivity in the outer and inner retina. One key issue is the specificity of retinal connections; we suggest that the retina shows connectional specificity but this is seldom complete, and we consider here the functional consequences of imprecise wiring. Finally, we consider how retinal systems can be linked to psychophysical descriptions of different channels, chromatic and luminance, which are proposed to exist in the primate visual system. PMID:20826226

  16. Multimodal Assessment of Microscopic Morphology and Retinal Function in Patients With Geographic Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Panorgias, Athanasios; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Capps, Arlie G.; Hunter, Allan A.; Morse, Lawrence S.; Werner, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To correlate retinal function and visual sensitivity with retinal morphology revealed by ultrahigh-resolution imaging with adaptive optics–optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT), on patients with geographic atrophy. Methods. Five eyes from five subjects were tested (four with geographic atrophy [66.3 ± 6.4 years, mean ± 1 SD] and one normal [61 years]). Photopic and scotopic multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs) were recorded. Visual fields were assessed with microperimetry (mP) combined with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope for high-resolution confocal retinal fundus imaging. The eye tracker of the microperimeter identified the preferred retinal locus that was then used as a reference for precise targeting of areas for advanced retinal imaging. Images were obtained with purpose-built, in-house, ultrahigh resolution AO-OCT. Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and color fundus (CF) photographs were also acquired. Results. The AO-OCT imaging provided detailed cross-sectional structural representation of the retina. Up to 12 retinal layers were identified in the normal subject while many severe retinal abnormalities (i.e., calcified drusen, drusenoid pigment epithelium detachment, outer retinal tubulation) were identified in the retinae of the GA patients. The functional tests showed preservation of sensitivities, although somewhat compromised, at the border of the GA. Conclusions. The images provided here advance our knowledge of the morphology of retinal layers in GA patients. While there was a strong correlation between altered retinal structure and reduction in visual function, there were a number of examples in which the photoreceptor inner/outer segment (IS/OS) junctions lost reflectivity at the margins of GA, while visual function was still demonstrated. This was shown to be due to changes in photoreceptor orientation near the GA border. PMID:23696601

  17. [Multifocal Vitelliform Retinal Lesion].

    PubMed

    Streicher, T; Špirková, J; Ilavská, M

    2015-06-01

    The authors present retrospective follow up of patient with bilateral multifocal vitelliform retinal lesion during the 18 years period. At this time, spontaneous improvement of objective picture on retina and subjective visual troubles was observed. It is probable, that this case is a part of the same symptom complex as a variant of Best´s hereditary disease. This conclusion was based on initial stadium of phenotypical expressivity and additional evaluations. The course and outcomes of visual functions were different. The hereditary transmission was not confirmed. PMID:26201364

  18. Associations between Retinal Markers of Microvascular Disease and Cognitive Impairment in Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Amiel, Stephanie; Kohli, Reena; Crosby-Nwaobi, Roxanne

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate associations between retinal microvascular changes and cognitive impairment in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus. Design Case control study. Setting A primary care cohort with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods For this analysis, we compared 69 cases with lowest decile scores (for the cohort) on the Modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status and 68 controls randomly selected from the remainder of the cohort. Retinal images were rated and the following measures compared between cases and controls: retinal vessel calibre, arterio-venous ratio, retinal fractal dimension, and simple and curvature retinal vessel tortuosity. Results Total and venular (but not arteriolar) simple retinal vessel tortuosity levels were significantly higher in cases than controls (t = 2.45, p = 0.015; t = 2.53, p = 0.013 respectively). The associations persisted after adjustment for demographic factors, retinopathy, neuropathy, obesity and blood pressure. There were no other significant differences between cases and controls in retinal measures. Conclusions A novel association was found between higher venular tortuosity and cognitive impairment in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus. This might be accounted for by factors such as hypoxia, thrombus formation, increased vasoendothelial growth factor release and inflammation affecting both the visible retinal and the unobserved cerebral microvasculature. PMID:26771382

  19. The peptidomimetic Vasotide targets two retinal VEGF receptors and reduces pathological angiogenesis in murine and nonhuman primate models of retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, Richard L.; Li, Jianxue; Lawrence, Matthew; Hu, Wenzheng; Musso, Gary F.; Giordano, Ricardo J.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-01-01

    Blood vessel growth from preexisting vessels (angiogenesis) underlies many severe diseases including major blinding retinal diseases such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and aged macular degeneration (AMD). This observation has driven development of antibody inhibitors that block a central factor in AMD, named vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), from binding to its receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2. However, some patients are insensitive to current anti-VEGF drugs or develop resistance, and the required repeated intravitreal injection of these large molecules is costly and clinically problematic. Here, we have evaluated a small cyclic retro-inverted peptidomimetic, D(Cys-Leu-Pro-Arg-Cys), abbreviated as D(CLPRC), and hereafter named Vasotide, that inhibits retinal angiogenesis by binding selectively to the VEGF receptors, VEGFR-1 and Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1). Delivery of Vasotide in eye drops or via intraperitoneal injection in a laser-induced monkey model of human wet AMD, a mouse genetic knockout model of the AMD subtype called retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP), and a mouse oxygen-induced model of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) markedly decreased retinal angiogenesis in all three animal models. This prototype drug candidate is a promising new dual receptor inhibitor of the VEGF ligand with potential for translation into safer, less invasive applications to combat pathological angiogenesis in retinal disorders. PMID:26468327

  20. Is the peripapillary retinal perfusion related to myopia in healthy eyes? A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolei; Kong, Xiangmei; Jiang, Chunhui; Li, Mengwei; Yu, Jian; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the peripapillary and parafoveal perfusion of young, healthy myopic subjects with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography. Design A prospective comparative study was conducted from December 2014 to January 2015. Setting Participants recruited from a population-based study performed by the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital of Fudan University in Shanghai. Participants A total of 78 Chinese normal subjects (78 eyes) with different refraction were included. Myopia was divided into 4 groups on the basis of the refractive status: 20 eyes with emmetropia (mean spherical equivalent (MSE) 0.50D to −0.50D), 20 eyes with mild myopia (MSE −0.75D to −2.75D), 20 eyes with moderate myopia (MSE −3.00D to −5.75D), and 18 eyes with high myopia (MSE≤−6.00D). Main outcome measures Peripapillary and parafoveal retinal and choroidal perfusion parameters and their relationships with axial length (AL) and retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness were analysed. Results Significant differences were found for the retinal flow index and vessel density in the peripapillary area among the 4 groups, but not in the parafoveal area. The high myopia group had the lowest peripapillary retinal flow index and vessel density. In addition, there was a negative correlation (β=−0.002, p=0.047) between the AL and peripapillary retinal flow index and a positive correlation between RNFL thickness and the peripapillary retinal perfusion parameters (flow index: β=0.001, p=0.006; vessel density: β=0.350, p=0.002) even after adjustment for other variables. Conclusions Highly myopic eyes have a decreased peripapillary retinal perfusion compared with emmetropic eyes. Such vascular features might increase the susceptibility to vascular-related eye diseases. PMID:26969645

  1. Characterization of a Mouse Model of Hyperglycemia and Retinal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Rakoczy, Elizabeth P.; Rahman, Ireni S. Ali; Binz, Nicolette; Li, Cai-Rui; Vagaja, Nermina N.; de Pinho, Marisa; Lai, Chooi-May

    2010-01-01

    One of the limitations of research into diabetic retinopathy is the lack of suitable animal models. To study how the two important factors—hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial growth factor—interact in diabetic retinopathy, the Akimba mouse (Ins2AkitaVEGF+/−) was generated by crossing the Akita mouse (Ins2Akita) with the Kimba mouse (VEGF+/+). C57Bl/6 and the parental and Akimba mouse lines were characterized by biometric measurements, histology, immunohistochemistry, and Spectralis Heidelberg retinal angiography and optical coherence tomography. The Akimba line not only retained the characteristics of the parental strains, such as developing hyperglycemia and retinal neovascularization, but developed higher blood glucose levels at a younger age and had worse kidney-body weight ratios than the Akita line. With aging, the Akimba line demonstrated enhanced photoreceptor cell loss, thinning of the retina, and more severe retinal vascular pathology, including more severe capillary nonperfusion, vessel constriction, beading, neovascularization, fibroses, and edema, compared with the Kimba line. The vascular changes were associated with major histocompatibility complex class II+ cellular staining throughout the retina. Together, these observations suggest that hyperglycemia resulted in higher prevalences of edema and exacerbated the vascular endothelial growth factor-driven neovascular and retinal changes in the Akimba line. Thus, the Akimba line could become a useful model for studying the interplay between hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial growth factor and for testing treatment strategies for potentially blinding complications, such as edema. PMID:20829433

  2. Color Doppler imaging of the retrobulbar vessels in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Walasik-Szemplińska, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by elevated blood glucose level due to impaired insulin secretion and activity. Chronic hyperglycemia leads to functional disorders of numerous organs and to their damage. Vascular lesions belong to the most common late complications of diabetes. Microangiopathic lesions can be found in the eyeball, kidneys and nervous system. Macroangiopathy is associated with coronary and peripheral vessels. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common microangiopathic complication characterized by closure of slight retinal blood vessels and their permeability. Despite intensive research, the pathomechanism that leads to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy is not fully understood. The examinations used in assessing diabetic retinopathy usually involve imaging of the vessels in the eyeball and the retina. Therefore, the examinations include: fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography of the retina, B-mode ultrasound imaging, perimetry and digital retinal photography. There are many papers that discuss the correlations between retrobulbar circulation alterations and progression of diabetic retinopathy based on Doppler sonography. Color Doppler imaging is a non-invasive method enabling measurements of blood flow velocities in small vessels of the eyeball. The most frequently assessed vessels include: the ophthalmic artery, which is the first branch of the internal carotid artery, as well as the central retinal vein and artery, and the posterior ciliary arteries. The analysis of hemodynamic alterations in the retrobulbar vessels may deliver important information concerning circulation in diabetes and help to answer the question whether there is a relation between the progression of diabetic retinopathy and the changes observed in blood flow in the vessels of the eyeball. This paper presents the overview of literature regarding studies on blood flow in the vessels of the eyeball in patients with diabetic

  3. Association between Retinal Arteriolar and Venule Calibre with Prevalent Heart Failure: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Mitchell, Paul; Liew, Gerald; Plant, Adam J.; Wang, Sarah B.; Au, Cheryl; Chiha, Joseph; Kovoor, Pramesh; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Burlutsky, George; Gopinath, Bamini

    2015-01-01

    Background There is evidence to suggest that microvascular disease, particularly diabetic retinopathy, plays a role in the pathogenesis of HF. However, whether changes in retinal vessel calibre predicts HF is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of retinal microvascular structure with prevalent heart failure (HF). Methods The Australian Heart Eye Study (AHES) is a cross-sectional study that surveyed 1680 participants who presented to a tertiary referral hospital for the evaluation of potential coronary artery disease by coronary angiography. Retinal vessel calibre was graded using retinal photography and participants’ self-reported echocardiography-confirmed HF was obtained via an extensive medical questionnaire. Results There were 107 participants (8.1%) with prevalent self-reported HF. Persons with wider retinal arteriolar calibre (comparing highest versus lowest tertile or reference) were more likely to have prevalent HF (OR 3.5; 95% CI, 1.7–7.2) when adjusted for age and sex. After further adjustment for body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, triglycerides and estimated glomerular filtration rate, this association remained significant (OR 4.5; 95% CI, 2.0–9.8). After further stratification, this association remained significant among participants with diabetes (OR 10.3; 95% CI, 2.7–39.3) but not in those without diabetes (OR 2.7; 95% CI, 0.9–7.5). The strength of this association was not dependent on the length of history of diabetes, or retinopathy status. There was no significant association between retinal venular calibre and prevalence of HF. Conclusions Wider retinal arteriolar diameter was significantly and independently associated with prevalent HF in participants of a cross-sectional study. This association was significant stronger among participants with diabetes compared to without diabetes. No association was found between retinal venule calibre with prevalent HF. PMID:26659133

  4. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  5. Novel Strategies for the Improvement of Stem Cells' Transplantation in Degenerative Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nicoară, Simona Delia; Șușman, Sergiu; Tudoran, Oana; Bărbos, Otilia; Cherecheș, Gabriela; Aștilean, Simion; Potara, Monica; Sorițău, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no cure for the permanent vision loss caused by degenerative retinal diseases. One of the novel therapeutic strategies aims at the development of stem cells (SCs) based neuroprotective and regenerative medicine. The main sources of SCs for the treatment of retinal diseases are the embryo, the bone marrow, the region of neuronal genesis, and the eye. The success of transplantation depends on the origin of cells, the route of administration, the local microenvironment, and the proper combinative formula of growth factors. The feasibility of SCs based therapies for degenerative retinal diseases was proved in the preclinical setting. However, their translation into the clinical realm is limited by various factors: the immunogenicity of the cells, the stability of the cell phenotype, the predilection of SCs to form tumors in situ, the abnormality of the microenvironment, and the association of a synaptic rewiring. To improve SCs based therapies, nanotechnology offers a smart delivery system for biomolecules, such as growth factors for SCs implantation and differentiation into retinal progenitors. This review explores the main advances in the field of retinal transplantology and applications of nanotechnology in the treatment of retinal diseases, discusses the challenges, and suggests new therapeutic approaches in retinal transplantation. PMID:27293444

  6. Biology and therapy of inherited retinal degenerative disease: insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Veleri, Shobi; Lazar, Csilla H.; Chang, Bo; Sieving, Paul A.; Banin, Eyal; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration associated with the dysfunction or death of photoreceptors is a major cause of incurable vision loss. Tremendous progress has been made over the last two decades in discovering genes and genetic defects that lead to retinal diseases. The primary focus has now shifted to uncovering disease mechanisms and designing treatment strategies, especially inspired by the successful application of gene therapy in some forms of congenital blindness in humans. Both spontaneous and laboratory-generated mouse mutants have been valuable for providing fundamental insights into normal retinal development and for deciphering disease pathology. Here, we provide a review of mouse models of human retinal degeneration, with a primary focus on diseases affecting photoreceptor function. We also describe models associated with retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction or synaptic abnormalities. Furthermore, we highlight the crucial role of mouse models in elucidating retinal and photoreceptor biology in health and disease, and in the assessment of novel therapeutic modalities, including gene- and stem-cell-based therapies, for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:25650393

  7. Outer Retinal Structure Following Closed Globe Blunt Ocular Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Flatter, John A.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubow, Michael J.; Pinhas, Alexander; Singh, Ravi S.; Kapur, Rashmi; Shah, Nishit; Walsh, Ryan D.; Hong, Sang H.; Weinberg, David V.; Stepien, Kimberly E.; Wirostko, William J.; Robison, Scott; Dubra, Alfredo; Rosen, Richard B.; Connor, Thomas B.; Carroll, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate outer retinal structural abnormalities in patients with visual deficits following closed globe blunt ocular trauma (cgBOT). Methods Nine subjects with visual complaints following cgBOT were examined between 1 month post-trauma and 6 years post-trauma. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to assess outer retinal architecture, while adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) was used to analyze photoreceptor mosaic integrity. Results Visual deficits ranged from central scotomas to decreased visual acuity. SD-OCT defects included focal foveal photoreceptor lesions, variable attenuation of the interdigitation zone, and mottling of the outer segment band, with one subject having normal outer retinal structure. AOSLO revealed disruption of the photoreceptor mosaic in all subjects, variably manifesting as foveal focal discontinuities, perifoveal hyporeflective cones, and paracentral regions of selective cone loss. Conclusions We observe persistent outer retinal disruption in subjects with visual complaints following cgBOT, albeit to a variable degree. AOSLO imaging allows assessment of photoreceptor structure at a level of detail not resolvable using SD-OCT or other current clinical imaging tools. Multimodal imaging appears useful for revealing the cause of visual complaints in patients following cgBOT. Future studies are needed to better understand how photoreceptor structure changes longitudinally in response to various trauma. PMID:24752010

  8. Regulation of retinal oxygen metabolism in humans during graded hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Schmidl, Doreen; Boltz, Agnes; Napora, Katarzyna J; Lasta, Michael; Kaya, Semira; Werkmeister, René M; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-11-15

    Animal experiments indicate that the inner retina keeps its oxygen extraction constant despite systemic hypoxia. For the human retina no such data exist. In the present study we hypothesized that systemic hypoxia does not alter inner retinal oxygen extraction. To test this hypothesis we included 30 healthy male and female subjects aged between 18 and 35 years. All subjects were studied at baseline and during breathing 12% O₂ in 88% N₂ as well as breathing 15% O₂ in 85% N₂. Oxygen saturation in a retinal artery (SO₂art) and an adjacent retinal vein (SO₂vein) were measured using spectroscopic fundus reflectometry. Measurements of retinal venous blood velocity using bidirectional laser Doppler velocimetry and retinal venous diameters using a Retinal Vessel Analyzer (RVA) were combined to calculate retinal blood flow. Oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressure were measured from earlobe arterialized capillary blood. Retinal blood flow was increased by 43.0 ± 23.2% (P < 0.001) and 30.0 ± 20.9% (P < 0.001) during 12% and 15% O₂ breathing, respectively. SO₂art as well as SO₂vein decreased during both 12% O₂ breathing (SO₂art: -11.2 ± 4.3%, P < 0.001; SO₂vein: -3.9 ± 8.5%, P = 0.012) and 15% O₂ breathing (SO₂art: -7.9 ± 3.6%, P < 0.001; SO₂vein: -4.0 ± 7.0%, P = 0.010). The arteriovenous oxygen difference decreased during both breathing periods (12% O2: -28.9 ± 18.7%; 15% O₂: -19.1 ± 16.7%, P < 0.001 each). Calculated oxygen extraction did, however, not change during our experiments (12% O₂: -2.8 ± 18.9%, P = 0.65; 15% O₂: 2.4 ± 15.8%, P = 0.26). Our results indicate that in healthy humans, oxygen extraction of the inner retina remains constant during systemic hypoxia. PMID:25217648

  9. PIMASERTIB AND SEROUS RETINAL DETACHMENTS

    PubMed Central

    AlAli, Alaa; Bushehri, Ahmad; Park, Jonathan C.; Krema, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of multifocal serous retinal detachments associated with pimasertib. Methods: The authors report a 26-year-old patient who developed bilateral multifocal serous retinal detachments appearing 2 days after starting pimasertib (as part of a clinical trial investigating its use in low-grade metastatic ovarian cancer) and rapidly resolving 3 days after stopping it. Conclusion: The mechanism of MEK inhibitor induced visual toxicity remains unclear. The pathophysiology of multifocal serous retinal detachments as a complication of pimasertib is still poorly understood. PMID:26444523

  10. Reduction in Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emberti Gialloreti, Leonardo; Pardini, Matteo; Benassi, Francesca; Marciano, Sara; Amore, Mario; Mutolo, Maria Giulia; Porfirio, Maria Cristina; Curatolo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the use of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) evaluation as an easy-to-use, reproducible, proxy-measure of brain structural abnormalities. Here, we evaluated RNFL thickness in a group of subjects with high functioning autism (HFA) or with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to its potential as a tool to study autism…

  11. Imaging of retinal vasculature using adaptive optics SLO/OCT

    PubMed Central

    Felberer, Franz; Rechenmacher, Matthias; Haindl, Richard; Baumann, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Pircher, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We use our previously developed adaptive optics (AO) scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO)/ optical coherence tomography (OCT) instrument to investigate its capability for imaging retinal vasculature. The system records SLO and OCT images simultaneously with a pixel to pixel correspondence which allows a direct comparison between those imaging modalities. Different field of views ranging from 0.8°x0.8° up to 4°x4° are supported by the instrument. In addition a dynamic focus scheme was developed for the AO-SLO/OCT system in order to maintain the high transverse resolution throughout imaging depth. The active axial eye tracking that is implemented in the OCT channel allows time resolved measurements of the retinal vasculature in the en-face imaging plane. Vessel walls and structures that we believe correspond to individual erythrocytes could be visualized with the system. PMID:25909024

  12. Retinal Oximetry with Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Vehmeijer, Wouter B.; Magnusdottir, Vigdis; Eliasdottir, Thorunn S.; Hardarson, Sveinn Hakon; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; Stefánsson, Einar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dual wavelength retinal oximetry has been developed for adults, but is not available for infants. Retinal oximetry may provide insight into the pathophysiology of oxygen-mediated diseases like retinopathy of prematurity. More insight in the oxygen metabolism of the retina in infants may provide valuable clues for better understanding and subsequent prevention or treatment of the disease. The measurements of oxygen saturation are obtained with two fundus images simultaneously captured in two different wavelengths of light. The comparison in light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin can be used to estimate the oxygen saturation within the retinal vessels by means of a software algorithm. This study aims to make retinal oximetry available for neonates. The first step towards estimating retinal oxygen saturation is determining the optical density ratio. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to image healthy newborn infants with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope and determine the optical density ratio for retinal oximetry analysis. Methods Images of the retina of full-term healthy infants were obtained with an SLO, Optomap 200Tx (Optos), with two laser wavelengths (532nm and 633nm). The infant lay face down on the lower arm of the parent, while the parent supported the chest and chin with one hand, and stabilized the back with the other hand. No mydriatics or eyelid specula were used during this study. The images were analyzed with modified Oxymap Analyzer software for calculation of the Optical Density Ratio (ODR) and vessel width. The ODR is inversely and approximately linearly related to the oxygen saturation. Measurements were included from the superotemporal vessel pair. A paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results Fifty-nine infants, (58% female), were included with mean gestational age of 40 ± 1.3 weeks (mean ± SD) and mean post-natal age of 16 ± 4.8 days. A total of 28 images were selected for retinal oximetry analysis

  13. Simulataneous occlusion of the central retinal artery and vein.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R D

    1979-01-01

    Combined CRAO/CRVO in our patients occurred with rapid visual loss, usually over a few hours, associated with evidence of inflammation and/or cellular infiltration of the retrobulbar portion of the optic nerve. The ophthalmoscopic appearance was characteristic, with papilledema and hemorrhages of various types in the posterior pole. The retina also showed ischemic changes, with a milky-white color and cherry-red macula. Fluorescein angiography, when possible, showed no retinal vascular flow, and normal choroidal flow. After six to eight weeks, optic atrophy was evident and the retinal vessels were markedly narrowed or obliterated. The macula showed typical cystic changes. Neovascularization often developed, leading to neovascular glaucoma as the end result. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 7 C FIGURE 8 A FIGURE 8 B PMID:583535

  14. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography ofPeripapillary Retinal Blood Flow Response to Hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Pechauer, Alex D.; Jia, Yali; Liu, Liang; Gao, Simon S.; Jiang, Chunhui; Huang, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To measure the change in peripapillary retinal blood flow in response to hyperoxia by using optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography. Methods. One eye of each healthy human participants (six) was scanned with a commercial high-speed (70 kHz) spectral OCT. Scans were captured twice after 10-minute exposures to normal breathing (baseline) and hyperoxia. Blood flow was detected by the split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm. Peripapillary retinal blood flow index and vessel density were calculated from en face maximum projections of the retinal layers. The experiment was performed on 2 separate days for each participant. Coefficient of variation (CV) was used to measure within-day repeatability and between-day reproducibility. Paired t-tests were used to compare means of baseline and hyperoxic peripapillary retinal blood flow. Results. A decrease of 8.87% ± 3.09% (mean ± standard deviation) in flow index and 2.61% ± 1.50% in vessel density was observed under hyperoxia. The within-day repeatability CV of baseline measurements was 5.75% for flow index and 1.67% for vessel density. The between-day reproducibility CV for baseline flow index and vessel density was 11.1% and 1.14%, respectively. The between-day reproducibility of the hyperoxic response was 3.71% and 1.67% for flow index and vessel density, respectively. Conclusions. Optical coherence tomography angiography with SSADA was able to detect a decrease in peripapillary retinal blood flow in response to hyperoxia. The response was larger than the variability of baseline measurements. The magnitude of an individual's hyperoxic response was highly variable between days. Thus, reliable assessment may require averaging multiple measurements. PMID:26024111

  15. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  16. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  17. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  18. Building retinal connectomes.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W; Lauritzen, J Scott; Watt, Carl B; Anderson, James R

    2012-08-01

    Understanding vertebrate vision depends on knowing, in part, the complete network graph of at least one representative retina. Acquiring such graphs is the business of synaptic connectomics, emerging as a practical technology due to improvements in electron imaging platform control, management software for large-scale datasets, and availability of data storage. The optimal strategy for building complete connectomes uses transmission electron imaging with 2 nm or better resolution, molecular tags for cell identification, open-access data volumes for navigation, and annotation with open-source tools to build 3D cell libraries, complete network diagrams and connectivity databases. The first forays into retinal connectomics have shown that even nominally well-studied cells have much richer connection graphs than expected. PMID:22498714

  19. Krogh cylinders in retinal development, panretinal hypoperfusion and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    McLeod, David

    2010-12-01

    The volume of cells that a length of capillary supplies with O(2) is called a Krogh cylinder. This geometric 'tissue unit' was named after the Danish zoophysiologist and Nobel laureate August Krogh who made important discoveries in the fields of external and internal respiration in the first half of the last century. Krogh's ideas concerning tissue O(2) distribution can be extrapolated to retinal oxygenation by larger vessels (including arterioles, arteries and even veins) and by vessel groups within higher-order 'microvascular units' (including the choroid). During retinal development, for example, the difference in pO(2) levels within arteries and capillaries determines Krogh cylinders of different radius and establishes the periarterial capillary-free zone of His. The O(2) supply to the venous end of a tissue unit may be compromised during periods of reduced perfusion, increased O(2) consumption or hypoxaemia, resulting in an 'anoxic corner' of the Krogh cylinder. A funnel of hypometabolic (and therefore hypoxia-tolerant) cells will likely intervene between the necrotic cells and unaffected cells located closer to the O(2) source. Macular perivenular whitening heralds anoxic corners and/or hypoxic funnels owing to hypoperfusion within second-order microvascular units. In eyes with extensive retinal capillary closure from diabetes, Krogh cylinders surround the medium-sized arteries and veins that form arteriovenous shunts while traversing the midperipheral retina. These isolated tissue units incorporate an outer sheath of hypoxic cells within which vascular endothelial growth factor is upregulated. This 'angiogenic sheath' expands following retinal detachment; it corresponds to the hypoxia-tolerant funnel within capillary-based tissue units and to the cerebral penumbra after stroke. PMID:20064121

  20. Nutrition and retinal degenerations.

    PubMed

    Berson, E L

    2000-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the understanding and management of degenerative diseases of the retina involving photoreceptors. Nutritional approaches to treatment have proved successful in the case of the common forms of retinitis pigmentosa (supplementation with vitamin A), Bassen-Kornzweig disease (supplementation with vitamins A, E, and K), gyrate atrophy (low-protein, low-arginine diet and/or supplementation with vitamin B6), and Refsum disease (low-phytol, low-phytanic acid diet). The night blindness associated with Sorsby fundus dystrophy can be reversed over the short term with vitamin A. A significant trend for decreased risk for advanced or exudative ARMD has been reported among those whose diets contain a higher content of carotenoids, such as spinach and collard greens. A randomized trial is in progress to determine whether beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E as well as trace minerals, particularly zinc, will modify the course of ARMD. The difficulties that patients with retinal degenerations face as a result of their diminishing vision, sometimes over decades, cannot be underestimated. Nutritional therapy has proved effective in modifying the course of a number of these conditions; the therapeutic benefit of nutritional modification in diseases that have a genetic basis is of particular interest. Further research is warranted to determine the mechanisms by which these treatments provide their benefit as well as to identify other conditions that may yield to nutritional intervention. Risk-factor analyses of well-defined populations followed over time with food-frequency questionnaires in conjunction with careful assessments of visual function may reveal other dietary constituents that can modify the course of degenerative diseases of the retina. PMID:11064860

  1. Molecular genetics of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Farber, D. B.; Heckenlively, J. R.; Sparkes, R. S.; Bateman, J. B.

    1991-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a model for the study of genetic diseases. Its genetic heterogeneity is reflected in the different forms of inheritance (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked) and, in a few families, in the presence of mutations in the visual pigment rhodopsin. Clinical and molecular genetic studies of these disorders are discussed. Animal models of retinal degeneration have been investigated for many years with the hope of gaining insight into the cause of photoreceptor cell death. Recently, the genes responsible for two of these animal disorders, the rds and rd mouse genes, have been isolated and characterized. The retinal degeneration of the rd mouse is presented in detail. The possible involvement of human analogues of these mouse genes in human retinal diseases is being investigated. Images PMID:1771877

  2. Involvement of All-trans-retinal in Acute Light-induced Retinopathy of Mice*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akiko; Maeda, Tadao; Golczak, Marcin; Chou, Steven; Desai, Amar; Hoppel, Charles L.; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to bright light can cause visual dysfunction and retinal photoreceptor damage in humans and experimental animals, but the mechanism(s) remain unclear. We investigated whether the retinoid cycle (i.e. the series of biochemical reactions required for vision through continuous generation of 11-cis-retinal and clearance of all-trans-retinal, respectively) might be involved. Previously, we reported that mice lacking two enzymes responsible for clearing all-trans-retinal, namely photoreceptor-specific ABCA4 (ATP-binding cassette transporter 4) and RDH8 (retinol dehydrogenase 8), manifested retinal abnormalities exacerbated by light and associated with accumulation of diretinoid-pyridinium-ethanolamine (A2E), a condensation product of all-trans-retinal and a surrogate marker for toxic retinoids. Now we show that these mice develop an acute, light-induced retinopathy. However, cross-breeding these animals with lecithin:retinol acyltransferase knock-out mice lacking retinoids within the eye produced progeny that did not exhibit such light-induced retinopathy until gavaged with the artificial chromophore, 9-cis-retinal. No significant ocular accumulation of A2E occurred under these conditions. These results indicate that this acute light-induced retinopathy requires the presence of free all-trans-retinal and not, as generally believed, A2E or other retinoid condensation products. Evidence is presented that the mechanism of toxicity may include plasma membrane permeability and mitochondrial poisoning that lead to caspase activation and mitochondria-associated cell death. These findings further understanding of the mechanisms involved in light-induced retinal degeneration. PMID:19304658

  3. Transplanting Retinal Cells using Bucky Paper for Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David J.; Cinke, Martin; Meyyappan, Meyya; Fishman, Harvey; Leng, Ted; Huie, Philip; Bilbao, Kalayaan

    2004-01-01

    A novel treatment for retinal degenerative disorders involving transplantation of cells into the eye is currently under development at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University School of Medicine. The technique uses bucky paper as a support material for retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells, and/or stem cells. This technology is envisioned as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of blindness in persons over age 65 in Western nations. Additionally, patients with other retinal degenerative disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa, may be treated by this strategy. Bucky paper is a mesh of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), as shown in Figure 1, that can be made from any of the commercial sources of CNTs. Bucky paper is biocompatible and capable of supporting the growth of biological cells. Because bucky paper is highly porous, nutrients, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and waste can readily diffuse through it. The thickness, density, and porosity of bucky paper can be tailored in manufacturing. For transplantation of cells into the retina, bucky paper serves simultaneously as a substrate for cell growth and as a barrier for new blood vessel formation, which can be a problem in the exudative type of macular degeneration. Bucky paper is easily handled during surgical implantation into the eye. Through appropriate choice of manufacturing processes, bucky paper can be made relatively rigid yet able to conform to the retina when the bucky paper is implanted. Bucky paper offers a distinct advantage over other materials that have been investigated for retinal cell transplantation - lens capsule and Descemet's membrane - which are difficult to handle during surgery because they are flimsy and do not stay flat.

  4. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Fluorescently Labeled Red Blood Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Tess E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood flow is a useful indicator of the metabolic state of the retina. However, accurate measurement of retinal blood flow is difficult to achieve in practice. Most existing optical techniques used for measuring blood flow require complex assumptions and calculations. We describe here a simple and direct method for calculating absolute blood flow in vessels of all sizes in the rat retina. The method relies on ultrafast confocal line scans to track the passage of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (fRBCs). The accuracy of the blood flow measurements was verified by (1) comparing blood flow calculated independently using either flux or velocity combined with diameter measurements, (2) measuring total retinal blood flow in arterioles and venules, (3) measuring blood flow at vessel branch points, and (4) measuring changes in blood flow in response to hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenge. Confocal line scans oriented parallel and diagonal to vessels were used to compute fRBC velocity and to examine velocity profiles across the width of vessels. We demonstrate that these methods provide accurate measures of absolute blood flow and velocity in retinal vessels of all sizes. PMID:26082942

  5. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  6. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  8. General pathophysiology in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Wert, Katherine J; Lin, Jonathan H; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    Retinal degeneration, including that seen in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common form of neural degenerative disease in the world. There is great genetic and allelic heterogeneity of the various retinal dystrophies. Classifications of these diseases can be ambiguous, as there are similar clinical presentations in retinal degenerations arising from different genetic mechanisms. As would be expected, alterations in the activity of the phototransduction cascade, such as changes affecting the renewal and shedding of the photoreceptor OS, visual transduction, and/or retinol metabolism have a great impact on the health of the retina. Mutations within any of the molecules responsible for these visual processes cause several types of retinal and retinal pigment epithelium degenerative diseases. Apoptosis has been implicated in the rod cell loss seen in a mouse model of RP, but the precise mechanisms that connect the activation of these pathways to the loss of phosphodiesterase (PDE6β) function has yet to be defined. Additionally, the activation of apoptosis by CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), after activation of the unfolded protein response pathway, may be responsible for cell death, although the mechanism remains unknown. However, the mechanisms of cell death after loss of function of PDE6, which is a commonly studied mammalian model in research, may be generalizable to loss of function of different key proteins involved in the phototransduction cascade. PMID:24732759

  9. General Pathophysiology in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Lin, Jonathan H.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration, including that seen in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common form of neural degenerative disease in the world. There is great genetic and allelic heterogeneity of the various retinal dystrophies. Classifications of these diseases can be ambiguous, as there are similar clinical presentations in retinal degenerations arising from different genetic mechanisms. As would be expected, alterations in the activity of the phototransduction cascade, such as changes affecting the renewal and shedding of the photoreceptor OS, visual transduction, and/ or retinol metabolism have a great impact on the health of the retina. Mutations within any of the molecules responsible for these visual processes cause several types of retinal and retinal pigment epithelium degenerative diseases. Apoptosis has been implicated in the rod cell loss seen in a mouse model of RP, but the precise mechanisms that connect the activation of these pathways to the loss of phosphodiesterase (PDE6β) function has yet to be defined. Additionally, the activation of apoptosis by CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), after activation of the unfolded protein response pathway, may be responsible for cell death, although the mechanism remains unknown. However, the mechanisms of cell death after loss of function of PDE6, which is a commonly studied mammalian model in research, may be generalizable to loss of function of different key proteins involved in the phototransduction cascade. PMID:24732759

  10. The mechanics of retinal detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; Siegel, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We present a model of the mechanical and fluid forces associated with exudative retinal detachments where the retinal photoreceptor cells separate typically from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By computing the total fluid volume flow arising from transretinal, vascular, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) pump currents, we determine the conditions under which the subretinal fluid pressure exceeds the maximum yield stress holding the retina and RPE together, giving rise to an irreversible, extended retinal delamination. We also investigate localized, blister-like retinal detachments by balancing mechanical tension in the retina with both the retina-RPE adhesion energy and the hydraulic pressure jump across the retina. For detachments induced by traction forces, we find a critical radius beyond which the blister is unstable to growth. Growth of a detached blister can also be driven by inflamed tissue within which e.g., the hydraulic conductivities of the retina or choroid increase, the RPE pumps fail, or the adhesion properties change. We determine the parameter regimes in which the blister either becomes unstable to growth, remains stable and finite-sized, or shrinks, allowing possible healing. This work supported by the Army Research Office through grant 58386MA

  11. Cytomegalovirus retinitis mimicking intraocular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gooi, Patrick; Farmer, James; Hurley, Bernard; Brodbaker, Elliott

    2008-12-01

    We present a case of an unusual retinal infiltrate requiring retinal biopsy for definitive diagnosis. A 62-year-old man with treated lymphoma presented with decreased vision in the right eye associated with a white retinal lesion, which extended inferonasally from an edematous disc. Intraocular lymphoma was considered as a diagnosis; thus, the patient was managed with vitrectomy and retinal biopsy. Cytological analysis of the vitreous aspirate could not rule out a lymphoproliferative disorder. The microbial analysis was negative. Histology of the lesion showed extensive necrosis and large cells with prominent nucleoli. To rule out lymphoma, a battery of immunostains was performed and all were negative. However the limited amount of tissue was exhausted in the process. Subsequently, a hematoxylin and eosin (H/E) slide was destained, on which a CMV immunostain was performed. This revealed positivity in the nuclei and intranuclear inclusions within the large atypical cells. A diagnosis of CMV retinitis was made. Retinal biopsy may provide a definitive diagnosis and direct patient care toward intravenous gancyclovir in the case of CMV or toward radiation and chemotherapy for intraocular lymphoma. When faced with a limited amount of tissue, destaining regular H/E slides is a possible avenue to performing additional immunohistochemical studies. PMID:19668455

  12. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, René M; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  13. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  14. Hypoxia-Induced Retinal Neovascularization in Zebrafish Embryos: A Potential Model of Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Alex; Hsi, Brian; Lee, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Yau-Hung; Wang, I-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity, formerly known as a retrolental fibroplasia, is a leading cause of infantile blindness worldwide. Retinopathy of prematurity is caused by the failure of central retinal vessels to reach the retinal periphery, creating a nonperfused peripheral retina, resulting in retinal hypoxia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, vitreoretinal fibrosis, and loss of vision. We established a potential retinopathy of prematurity model by using a green fluorescent vascular endothelium zebrafish transgenic line treated with cobalt chloride (a hypoxia-inducing agent), followed by GS4012 (a vascular endothelial growth factor inducer) at 24 hours postfertilization, and observed that the number of vascular branches and sprouts significantly increased in the central retinal vascular trunks 2–4 days after treatment. We created an angiography method by using tetramethylrhodamine dextran, which exhibited severe vascular leakage through the vessel wall into the surrounding retinal tissues. The quantification of mRNA extracted from the heads of the larvae by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a twofold increase in vegfaa and vegfr2 expression compared with the control group, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in the hypoxic condition. In addition, we demonstrated that the hypoxic insult could be effectively rescued by several antivascular endothelial growth factor agents such as SU5416, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab. In conclusion, we provide a simple, highly reproducible, and clinically relevant retinopathy of prematurity model based on zebrafish embryos; this model may serve as a useful platform for clarifying the mechanisms of human retinopathy of prematurity and its progression. PMID:25978439

  15. Recent Clinical Applications of Laser Speckle Flowgraphy in Eyes with Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kunikata, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Retinal diseases related to ischemia, such as diabetic retinopathy, are the main cause of blindness worldwide. However, the pathogenesis of these diseases remains unclear, as does the time course of associated changes in ocular blood flow. Laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), which uses the laser speckle phenomenon to detect and quantify ocular circulation, is a promising candidate for a noninvasive method to measure ocular blood flow in living eyes. A recently developed LSFG measurement parameter, mean blur rate (MBR), can serve as a quantitative and reproducible index of retinal blood cell velocity. Mean blur rate can be used in the study of retinal diseases to evaluate microcirculation in the retinal vessels, choroid, and optic nerve head. In addition to overall MBR (MA), LSFG measurements of optic nerve head microcirculation can be divided into vessel-area MBR (MV) and tissue-area MBR (MT). Absolute values for MT have been shown to be linearly correlated with capillary blood flow, regardless of fundus pigmentation. Recently, there has been an increasing number of reports on the clinical applications of LSFG in retinal disease. PMID:26649761

  16. Hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization in zebrafish embryos: a potential model of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Ching; Chang, Chao-Yuan; Kao, Alex; Hsi, Brian; Lee, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Yau-Hung; Wang, I-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity, formerly known as a retrolental fibroplasia, is a leading cause of infantile blindness worldwide. Retinopathy of prematurity is caused by the failure of central retinal vessels to reach the retinal periphery, creating a nonperfused peripheral retina, resulting in retinal hypoxia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, vitreoretinal fibrosis, and loss of vision. We established a potential retinopathy of prematurity model by using a green fluorescent vascular endothelium zebrafish transgenic line treated with cobalt chloride (a hypoxia-inducing agent), followed by GS4012 (a vascular endothelial growth factor inducer) at 24 hours postfertilization, and observed that the number of vascular branches and sprouts significantly increased in the central retinal vascular trunks 2-4 days after treatment. We created an angiography method by using tetramethylrhodamine dextran, which exhibited severe vascular leakage through the vessel wall into the surrounding retinal tissues. The quantification of mRNA extracted from the heads of the larvae by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a twofold increase in vegfaa and vegfr2 expression compared with the control group, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in the hypoxic condition. In addition, we demonstrated that the hypoxic insult could be effectively rescued by several antivascular endothelial growth factor agents such as SU5416, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab. In conclusion, we provide a simple, highly reproducible, and clinically relevant retinopathy of prematurity model based on zebrafish embryos; this model may serve as a useful platform for clarifying the mechanisms of human retinopathy of prematurity and its progression. PMID:25978439

  17. Portable, low-priced retinal imager for eye disease screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, Peter; Nemeth, Sheila; VanNess, Richard; Barriga, E. S.; Zamora, Gilberto

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a portable, low-priced, easy to use non-mydriatic retinal camera for eye disease screening in underserved urban and rural locations. Existing portable retinal imagers do not meet the requirements of a low-cost camera with sufficient technical capabilities (field of view, image quality, portability, battery power, and ease-of-use) to be distributed widely to low volume clinics, such as the offices of single primary care physicians serving rural communities or other economically stressed healthcare facilities. Our approach for Smart i-Rx is based primarily on a significant departure from current generations of desktop and hand-held commercial retinal cameras as well as those under development. Our techniques include: 1) Exclusive use of off-the-shelf components; 2) Integration of retinal imaging device into low-cost, high utility camera mount and chin rest; 3) Unique optical and illumination designed for small form factor; and 4) Exploitation of autofocus technology built into present digital SLR recreational cameras; and 5) Integration of a polarization technique to avoid the corneal reflex. In a prospective study, 41 out of 44 diabetics were imaged successfully. No imaging was attempted on three of the subjects due to noticeably small pupils (less than 2mm). The images were of sufficient quality to detect abnormalities related to diabetic retinopathy, such as microaneurysms and exudates. These images were compared with ones taken non-mydriatically with a Canon CR-1 Mark II camera. No cases identified as having DR by expert retinal graders were missed in the Smart i-Rx images.

  18. Functional and behavioral metrics for evaluating laser retinal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Martinsen, Gary L.; Garza, Thomas; Grado, Andres; Morin, Juan; Brown, Araceli; Stolarski, David; Cain, Clarence

    2006-02-01

    The use of lasers by both the military and civilian community is rapidly expanding. Thus, the potential for and severity of laser eye injury and retinal damage is increasing. Sensitive and accurate methods to evaluate and follow laser retinal damage are needed. The multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) has the potential to meet these criteria. In this study, the mfERG was used to evaluate changes to retinal function following laser exposure. Landolt C contrast acuity was also measured in the six behaviorally trained Rhesus monkeys. The monkeys then received Nd:YAG laser lesions (1064 nm, 9 ns pulse width) in each eye. One eye received a single foveal lesion of approximately 0.13 mJ total intraocular exposure (TIE) and the other received six parafoveal lesions which varied in TIE from 0.13 to 4 mJ. mfERGs and behavioral data were collected both pre- and post-exposure. mfERGs were recorded using stimuli that contained 103, 241, and 509 hexagons. Landolt C contrast acuity was measured with five sizes of Landolt C (0.33 to 11.15 cycles/degree) of varying contrast. mfERG response densities were sensitive to the functional retinal changes caused by the laser insult. In general, larger lesions showed greater mfERG abnormalities than smaller laser lesions. Deficits in contrast acuity were found to be more severe in the eyes with foveal injuries. Although the mfERG and contrast acuity assess different areas of the visual system, both are sensitive to laser-induced retinal damage and may be complementary tests for laser eye injury triage.

  19. Alterations of Retinal Vasculature in Cystathionine–β-Synthase Heterozygous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Amany; Markand, Shanu; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Mayo, Jamie N.; Reynolds, Jason; Bearden, Shawn E.; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2015-01-01

    Mild to moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is prevalent in humans and is implicated in neurovascular diseases, including recently in certain retinal diseases. Herein, we used hyperhomocysteinemic mice deficient in the Cbs gene encoding cystathionine–β-synthase (Cbs+/−) to evaluate retinal vascular integrity. The Cbs+/+ (wild type) and Cbs+/− (heterozygous) mice (aged 16 to 52 weeks) were subjected to fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography to assess vasculature in vivo. Retinas harvested for cryosectioning or flat mount preparations were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy to detect blood vessels (isolectin-B4), angiogenesis [anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and anti-CD105], gliosis [anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)], pericytes (anti-neural/glial antigen 2), blood-retinal barrier [anti–zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) and anti-occludin], and hypoxia [anti–pimonidazole hydrochloride (Hypoxyprobe-1)]. Levels of VEGF, GFAP, ZO-1, and occludin were determined by immunoblotting. Results of these analyses showed a mild vascular phenotype in young mice, which progressed with age. Fluorescein angiography revealed progressive neovascularization and vascular leakage in Cbs+/− mice; optical coherence tomography confirmed new vessels in the vitreous by 1 year. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated vascular patterns consistent with ischemia, including a capillary-free zone centrally and new vessels with capillary tufts midperipherally in older mice. This was associated with increased VEGF, CD105, and GFAP and decreased ZO-1/occludin levels in the Cbs+/− retinas. Retinal vein occlusion was observed in some Cbs+/− mouse retinas. We conclude that mild to moderate elevation of homocysteine in Cbs+/− mice is accompanied by progressive alterations in retinal vasculature characterized by ischemia, neovascularization, incompetent blood-retinal barrier, and vascular occlusion. PMID:25016930

  20. Acute and Chronic Hyperglycemia Elicit JIP1/JNK-Mediated Endothelial Vasodilator Dysfunction of Retinal Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Travis W.; Xu, Wenjuan; Xu, Xin; Kuo, Lih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hyperglycemia, a hallmark of diabetes mellitus, is associated with retinal inflammation and impairment of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO)–mediated dilation of retinal arterioles. However, molecular mechanisms involved in this diminished endothelial vasodilator function remain unclear. We examined whether inflammatory stress-activated kinases, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, contribute to retinal arteriolar dysfunction during exposure to acute and chronic hyperglycemia. Methods Retinal arterioles were isolated from streptozocin-induced diabetic pigs (2 weeks; chronic hyperglycemia, 471 ± 23 mg/dL) or age-matched control pigs (euglycemia, 79 ± 5 mg/dL), and then cannulated and pressurized for vasoreactivity study. For acute hyperglycemia study, vessels from nondiabetic pigs were exposed intraluminally to high glucose (25 mM ≈ 450 mg/dL) for 2 hours, and normal glucose (5 mM ≈ 90 mg/dL) served as the control. Results Endothelium-dependent vasodilation to bradykinin was reduced in a similar manner after exposure to acute or chronic hyperglycemia. Administration of NO synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) nearly abolished vasodilations either in control (euglycemia and normal glucose) or hyperglycemic (acute and chronic) vessels. Treatment of either acute or chronic hyperglycemic vessels with JNK inhibitor SP600125 or JNK-interacting protein-1 (JIP1) inhibitor BI-78D3, but not p38 inhibitor SB203580, preserved bradykinin-induced dilation in an L-NAME–sensitive manner. By contrast, endothelium-independent vasodilation to sodium nitroprusside was unaffected by acute or chronic hyperglycemia. Conclusions Activation of JIP1/JNK signaling in retinal arterioles during exposure to acute or chronic hyperglycemia leads to selective impairment of endothelium-dependent NO-mediated dilation. Therapeutic targeting of the vascular JNK pathway may improve retinal endothelial vasodilator function during early diabetes. PMID

  1. Parental history of hypertension is associated with narrower retinal arteriolar caliber in young girls.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Bamini; Baur, Louise A; Hardy, Louise L; Wang, Jie Jin; Teber, Erdahl; Wong, Tien Y; Mitchell, Paul

    2011-09-01

    We aimed to assess the associations between parental history of hypertension and indicators of cardiovascular risk (retinal vessel diameter, presence of obesity, and elevated blood pressure) in prepubertal children. There were 1739 (77.7% of those eligible) 6-year-old students (863 girls and 876 boys) who were examined from a random cluster sample of 34 Sydney schools. Parents completed questionnaires about their medical conditions, including whether they have/had hypertension. Retinal images were taken with a digital fundus camera, and retinal vessel caliber was quantified using computer software. Anthropometric (height, weight, percentage of body fat, and body mass index) and blood pressure measures were collected. There were 160 children (9.2%) with a positive parental history of hypertension (either biological mother and/or father). Children with a positive versus negative parental history of hypertension had significantly higher body mass index (16.8 versus 16.5 kg/m(2); P=0.04) and systolic blood pressure (101.3 versus 99.8 mm Hg; P=0.01). Girls with positive versus negative parental history of hypertension had significantly higher diastolic blood pressure (≈3.1 mm Hg; P=0.01) and narrower retinal arteriolar caliber (≈4.3 μm; P=0.0004). Positive parental history of hypertension was not associated with mean retinal vascular caliber among boys. We show that a positive parental history of hypertension in healthy prepubertal girls, but not boys, is associated with narrower retinal arteriolar vessels, likely conveying a predisposition to develop hypertension later in life. These findings may indicate the need for cardiovascular disease prevention measures starting early in life among offspring of hypertensive parents. PMID:21768527

  2. Retinal Microvascular Signs and Risk of Stroke: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Ryo; Xie, Jing; Cheung, Ning; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara EK; Cotch, Mary Frances; Sharrett, A Richey; Shea, Steven; Wong, Tien Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Small vessel disease contributes to the pathophysiology of stroke, and retinal microvascular signs have been linked to risk of stroke. We examined the relationship of retinal signs with incident stroke in a multi-ethnic cohort. Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is a prospective cohort study that enrolled participants without clinical cardiovascular diseases from six United States communities between 2000–02. Of the participants, 4,849 (71.2%) had fundus photography performed in 2002–04. Retinopathy and retinal vessel caliber were assessed from retinal images. Stroke risk factors including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and coronary artery calcium (CAC) were measured using standardized protocols. Incident stroke was confirmed from medical record review and death certificates. Results After 6 years of follow-up, there were 62 incident strokes. Narrower retinal arteriolar caliber was associated with increased risk of stroke after adjusting for conventional cardiovascular risk factors (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR] 2.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.34–5.95, p=0.006; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 3.01, 95% CI 1.29–6.99, p=0.011). Retinopathy in persons without diabetes was associated with increased risk of stroke (adjusted IRR 2.96, 95% CI 1.50–5.84, p=0.002; adjusted HR 3.07, 95%CI 1.17–8.09, p=0.023). These associations remained significant after adjusting for hsCRP, carotid IMT or CAC. Conclusions Narrower retinal arteriolar caliber and retinopathy in non-diabetic persons were associated with increased risk of stroke in this relatively healthy multi-ethnic cohort independent of traditional risk factors and measures of atherosclerosis. The association between narrower retinal arteriolar caliber and stroke warrants further investigation. PMID:23111439

  3. Bone marrow-derived cells are differentially involved in pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, He; Otani, Atsushi; Oishi, Akio; Yodoi, Yuko; Kameda, Takanori; Kojima, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2010-01-08

    Purpose: Bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to play roles in angiogenesis. Although these cells have been shown to promote angiogenesis, it is not yet clear whether these cells affect all types of angiogenesis. This study investigated the involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in pathological and physiological angiogenesis in the murine retina. Materials and methods: The oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model was used as a retinal angiogenesis model in newborn mice. To block the influence of bone marrow-derived cells, the mice were irradiated with a 4-Gy dose of radiation from a {sup 137}Cs source. Irradiation was performed in four different conditions with radio dense 2-cm thick lead disks; (1) H group, the head were covered with these discs to protect the eyes from radiation; (2) A group, all of the body was covered with these discs; (3) N group, mice were completely unshielded; (4) C group, mice were put in the irradiator but were not irradiated. On P17, the retinal areas showing pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis were measured and compared to the retinas of nonirradiated mice. Results: Although irradiation induced leukocyte depletion, it did not affect the number of other cell types or body weight. Retinal nonperfusion areas were significantly larger in irradiated mice than in control mice (P < 0.05), indicating that physiological angiogenesis was impaired. However, the formation of tuft-like angiogenesis processes was more prominent in the irradiated mice (P < 0.05), indicating that pathological angiogenesis was intact. Conclusions: Bone marrow-derived cells seem to be differentially involved in the formation of physiological and pathological retinal vessels. Pathological angiogenesis in the murine retina does not require functional bone marrow-derived cells, but these cells are important for the formation of physiological vessels. Our results add a new insight into the pathology of retinal angiogenesis and bolster the hypothesis that

  4. Protection of Retinal Ganglion Cells and Retinal Vasculature by Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharides in a Mouse Model of Acute Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Xue-Song; Feng, Qian; Lo, Amy Cheuk Yin; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Lin, Bin; Chung, Sookja Kim; So, Kwok-Fai

    2012-01-01

    Acute ocular hypertension (AOH) is a condition found in acute glaucoma. The purpose of this study is to investigate the protective effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) and its protective mechanisms in the AOH insult. LBP has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effect in the chronic ocular hypertension (COH) experiments. AOH mouse model was induced in unilateral eye for one hour by introducing 90 mmHg ocular pressure. The animal was fed with LBP solution (1 mg/kg) or vehicle daily from 7 days before the AOH insult till sacrifice at either day 4 or day 7 post insult. The neuroprotective effects of LBP on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and blood-retinal-barrier (BRB) were evaluated. In control AOH retina, loss of RGCs, thinning of IRL thickness, increased IgG leakage, broken tight junctions, and decreased density of retinal blood vessels were observed. However, in LBP-treated AOH retina, there was less loss of RGCs with thinning of IRL thickness, IgG leakage, more continued structure of tight junctions associated with higher level of occludin protein and the recovery of the blood vessel density when compared with vehicle-treated AOH retina. Moreover, we found that LBP provides neuroprotection by down-regulating RAGE, ET-1, Aβ and AGE in the retina, as well as their related signaling pathways, which was related to inhibiting vascular damages and the neuronal degeneration in AOH insults. The present study suggests that LBP could prevent damage to RGCs from AOH-induced ischemic injury; furthermore, through its effects on blood vessel protection, LBP would also be a potential treatment for vascular-related retinopathy. PMID:23094016

  5. Ablation of Kcnj10 expression in retinal explants revealed pivotal roles for Kcnj10 in the proliferation and development of Müller glia

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Eisuke; Baba, Yukihiro; Iwagawa, Toshiro; Kuribayashi, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Yujin; Murakami, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We previously found that Kcnj10, an inwardly-rectifying potassium channel, is a gene expressed in c-kit-positive retinal progenitor cells on P1. The shRNA-mediated screening of the functions of the genes for retinal development in retinal explant culture suggested a role for Kcnj10 in the differentiation of 23Müller glia. In the present study, we extended the work and focused on analyzing the role of Kcnj10 in retinal development. Methods shRNA-mediated downregulation of Kcnj10 in retinal explants and the in vivo mouse retina at the P1 stage was performed. Differentiation and proliferation of the retina were examined with immunohistochemistry. The effect of barium (Ba2+) treatment, which inhibits potassium currents by blocking potassium channels, on retinal development was examined. Results When Kcnj10 was downregulated at E18, cellular proliferation and morphological differentiation were perturbed; in particular, a decreased number of Müller glial cells with abnormal morphological maturation was observed. The overexpression of Kcnj10 in retinal progenitors did not result in gross abnormality during retinal development, but rescued the abnormal differentiation induced with sh-Kcnj10. The presence of Ba2+ in the retinal explant medium led to a phenotype similar to that seen with sh-Kcnj10. Ba2+ exerts an effect mainly during late retinal development, and sh-Kcnj10 in the P1 retina affected Müller glia maturation, suggesting that Kcnj10 plays a pivotal role in the maturation of retinal cell subsets. A previous study of Kcnj10-knockout mice showed no obvious abnormality in retinal differentiation, especially of Müller glia. We examined the effects of the downregulation of Kcnj10 with in vivo electroporation of sh-Kcnj10 in the P1 retina. Retinal differentiation was perturbed, as seen following the in vitro downregulation of Kcnj10, suggesting that compensatory gene expression and/or signaling occurred in the Kcnj10-knockout mice in the retina, leading to

  6. Trabeculectomy Improves Vessel Response Measured by Dynamic Vessel Analysis (DVA) in Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    J, Michael Selbach; Schallenberg, Maurice; Kramer, Sebastian; Anastassiou, Gerasimos; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Vilser, Walthard; Kremmer, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : To determine the effects of surgical IOP reduction (trabeculectomy) on retinal blood flow parameters in glaucoma patients using Dynamic Vessel Analysis (DVA). Methods : 26 eyes of 26 patients with progressive primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) despite maximal topical therapy were examined before and after trabeculectomy. The responses of the retinal vessels to flickering light provocation were measured with DVA the day before surgery and 4 to 6 weeks after trabeculectomy. Between 3 and 4 weeks before surgery all local therapies were stopped and a systemic therapy with acetazolamide and conservative free topic steroidal eye drops was started. Results : In 19 patients (73%), an inadequate response to the flicker stimulation was measured preoperatively. In these patients, the maximum dilation of arteries and veins was reduced significantly as compared to healthy eyes. In this group, the maximum dilation of the arteries following the flicker provocation improved from 1.4% before to 3.8% following trabeculectomy (p<0.01). In retinal veins, this parameter increased from 3.1% to 4.6% (p<0.05). In the 7 patients whose arterial and venous reactions to flickering light provocation preoperatively did not differ from healthy eyes, there was no significant change after surgery. The initial baseline values of arteries and veins (MU) did not deviate significantly in both groups. Conclusion : POAG patients with progressive disease and impaired vascular regulation profit from IOP lowering trabeculectomy concerning vascular reactivity and dilative reserve, indicating a possible improvement of retinal perfusion following effective IOP control. Future studies with long-term follow-up must determine the clinical importance of these findings for the treatment of glaucoma patients. PMID:25352934

  7. A Pro23His Mutation Alters Prenatal Rod Photoreceptor Morphology in a Transgenic Swine Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Patrick A.; Fernandez de Castro, Juan P.; Kaplan, Henry J.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Functional studies have detected deficits in retinal signaling in asymptomatic children from families with inherited autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Whether retinal abnormalities are present earlier during gestation or shortly after birth in a subset of children with autosomal dominant RP is unknown and no appropriate animal RP model possessing visual function at birth has been available to examine this possibility. In a recently developed transgenic P23H (TgP23H) rhodopsin swine model of RP, we tracked changes in pre- and early postnatal retinal morphology, as well as early postnatal retinal function. Methods. Domestic swine inseminated with semen from a TgP23H miniswine founder produced TgP23H hybrid and wild type (Wt) littermates. Outer retinal morphology was assessed at light and electron microscopic levels between embryonic (E) and postnatal (P) day E85 to P3. Retinal function was evaluated using the full field electroretinogram at P3. Results. Embryonic TgP23H rod photoreceptors are malformed and their rhodopsin expression pattern is abnormal. Consistent with morphological abnormalities, rod-driven function is absent at P3. In contrast, TgP23H and Wt cone photoreceptor morphology (E85–P3) and cone-driven retinal function (P3) are similar. Conclusions. Prenatal expression of mutant rhodopsin alters the normal morphological and functional development of rod photoreceptors in TgP23H swine embryos. Despite this significant change, cone photoreceptors are unaffected. Human infants with similarly aggressive RP might never have rod vision, although cone vision would be unaffected. Such aggressive forms of RP in preverbal children would require early intervention to delay or prevent functional blindness. PMID:24618321

  8. Retinal pigment epithelial detachments and tears, and progressive retinal degeneration in light chain deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Spielberg, Leigh H; Heckenlively, John R; Leys, Anita M

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose Light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) is a rare condition characterised by deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains (LCs) in tissues, resulting in varying degrees of organ dysfunction. This study reports the characteristic clinical ocular findings seen in advanced LCDD upon development of ocular fundus changes. This is the first report to describe this entity in vivo in a series of patients. Methods A case series of ocular fundus changes in three patients with kidney biopsy-proven LCDD. All patients underwent best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) exam, perimetry, colour fundus photography and fluorescein angiography; two patients underwent indocyanine green angiography, optical coherence tomography, ultrasound and electroretinography; and one patient underwent fundus autofluorescence. Results Three patients, 53–60 years old at initial presentation, were studied. All three presented with night blindness, poor dark adaptation, metamorphopsia and visual loss. Examination revealed serous and serohaemorrhagic detachments, multiple retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tears, diffuse RPE degeneration and progressive fibrotic changes. Neither choroidal neovascularisation nor other vascular abnormalities were present. Final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from 20/40 to 20/300. Conclusions Progressive LC deposition in the fundus seems to damage RPE pump function with flow disturbance between choroid and retina. This pathogenesis can explain the evolution to RPE detachments and subsequent rips and progressive retinal malfunction. PMID:23385633

  9. Requirement of Smad4 from Ocular Surface Ectoderm for Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wang, Shusheng; Anderson, Chastain; Zhao, Fangkun; Qin, Yu; Wu, Di; Wu, Xinwei; Liu, Jia; He, Xuefei; Zhao, Jiangyue; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Microphthalmia is characterized by abnormally small eyes and usually retinal dysplasia, accounting for up to 11% of the blindness in children. Right now there is no effective treatment for the disease, and the underlying mechanisms, especially how retinal dysplasia develops from microphthalmia and whether it depends on the signals from lens ectoderm are still unclear. Mutations in genes of the TGF-β superfamily have been noted in patients with microphthalmia. Using conditional knockout mice, here we address the question that whether ocular surface ectoderm-derived Smad4 modulates retinal development. We found that loss of Smad4 specifically on surface lens ectoderm leads to microphthalmia and dysplasia of retina. Retinal dysplasia in the knockout mice is caused by the delayed or failed differentiation and apoptosis of retinal cells. Microarray analyses revealed that members of Hedgehog and Wnt signaling pathways are affected in the knockout retinas, suggesting that ocular surface ectoderm-derived Smad4 can regulate Hedgehog and Wnt signaling in the retina. Our studies suggest that defective of ocular surface ectoderm may affect retinal development. PMID:27494603

  10. Vitreous hemorrhage secondary to retinal vasculopathy in a patient with dyskeratosis congenita.

    PubMed

    Finzi, Alessandro; Morara, Mariachiara; Pichi, Francesco; Veronese, Chiara; Ciardella, Antonio P

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to report a case of vitreous hemorrhage secondary to retinal vasculitis in a patient with dyskeratosis congenita. A 16-year-old white male was referred to the Ophthalmology Clinic due to deterioration of vision in his left eye. Medical history was significant for dyskeratosis congenita associated with thrombocytopenia. General physical examination revealed reticular pigmentation on the upper half of the chest, vertical ridges and splitting of finger nails, and oral mucosal leukoplakia. Ophthalmological examination of the anterior segment was unremarkable. Retinal examination revealed vitreous hemorrhage in the left eye veiling the retinal details. A possible history of trauma was denied. Fundus examination of the right eye showed retinal vascular sheathing with a few dot and blot retinal hemorrhages. Fluorescein angiography revealed extensive areas of non-perfusion beyond the equator in the right eye, later treated with scatter laser photocoagulation. We performed a 23-gauge vitrectomy with endolaser treatment of the new vascularization areas in the left eye. After 6 months, best-corrected visual acuity in the right and left eye was 20/20 and 20/25, respectively. Rather than being confined to anterior segment abnormalities like conjunctivitis, blepharitis and nasolacrimal duct obstruction which are reported in the literature, dyskeratosis congenita can cause significant visual loss due to retinal vasculitis and vitreous hemorrhage. Therefore physicians and ophthalmologists should be aware of this possibility and prompt diagnosis and treatment could prevent further visual loss in such patients. PMID:24114504

  11. Automated vessel shadow segmentation of fovea-centered spectral-domain images from multiple OCT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high reso- lution, three-dimensional (3D) cross sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma.1 Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment requires a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using different scanning devices, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, the use of OCT imaging devices from different vendors, combined with patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation, potentially leading to incorrect patient diagnosis or treatment analysis. Image registration can be used to precisely compare disease states by registering differing 3D scans to one another. In order to align 3D scans from different time- points and vendors using registration, landmarks are required, the most obvious being the retinal vasculature. Presented here is a fully automated cross-vendor method to acquire retina vessel locations for OCT registration from fovea centred 3D SD-OCT scans based on vessel shadows. Noise filtered OCT scans are flattened based on vendor retinal layer segmentation, to extract the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer of the retina. Voxel based layer profile analysis and k-means clustering is used to extract candidate vessel shadow regions from the RPE layer. In conjunction, the extracted RPE layers are combined to generate a projection image featuring all candidate vessel shadows. Image processing methods for vessel segmentation of the OCT constructed projection image are then applied to optimize the accuracy of OCT vessel shadow segmentation through the removal of false positive shadow regions such as those caused by exudates and cysts. Validation of segmented vessel shadows uses

  12. Retinal AO OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Miller, Donald T.

    The last two decades have witnessed extraordinary advances in optical technology to image noninvasively and at high resolution the posterior segment of the eye. Two of the most impactful technological advancements over this period have arguably been optical coherence tomography (OCT) and adaptive optics (AO). The strengths of these technologies complement each other and when combined have been shown to provide unprecedented, micron-scale resolution (<3 μm) in all three dimensions and sensitivity to image the cellular retina in the living eye. This powerful extension of OCT, that is AO-OCT, is the focus of this chapter. It presents key aspects of designing and implementing AO-OCT systems. Particular attention is devoted to the relevant optical properties of the eye that ultimately define these systems, AO componentry and operation tailored for ophthalmic use, and of course use of the latest technologies and methods in OCT for ocular imaging. It surveys the wide range of AO-OCT designs that have been developed for retinal imaging, with AO integrated into every major OCT design configuration. Finally, it reviews the scientific and clinical studies reported to date that show the exciting potential of AO-OCT to image the microscopic retina and fundus in ways not previously possible with other noninvasive methods and a look to future developments in this rapidly growing field.

  13. Temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Baade, Alexander; Birngruber, Reginald; Roider, Johann; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Retinal photocoagulation lacks objective dosage in clinical use, thus the commonly applied lesions are too deep and strong, associated with pain reception and the risk of visual field defects and induction of choroidal neovascularisations. Optoacoustics allows real-time non-invasive temperature measurement in the fundus during photocoagulation by applying short probe laser pulses additionally to the treatment radiation, which excite the emission of ultrasonic waves. Due to the temperature dependence of the Grüneisen parameter, the amplitudes of the ultrasonic waves can be used to derive the temperature of the absorbing tissue. By measuring the temperatures in real-time and automatically controlling the irradiation by feedback to the treatment laser, the strength of the lesions can be defined. Different characteristic functions for the time and temperature dependent lesion sizes were used as rating curves for the treatment laser, stopping the irradiation automatically after a desired lesion size is achieved. The automatically produced lesion sizes are widely independent of the adjusted treatment laser power and individual absorption. This study was performed on anaesthetized rabbits and is a step towards a clinical trial with automatically controlled photocoagulation.

  14. Automated Detection of Ocular Alignment with Binocular Retinal Birefringence Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, David G.; Shah, Ankoor S.; Sau, Soma; Nassif, Deborah; Guyton, David L.

    2003-06-01

    We previously developed a retinal birefringence scanning (RBS) device to detect eye fixation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a new binocular RBS (BRBS) instrument can detect simultaneous fixation of both eyes. Control (nonmyopic and myopic) and strabismic subjects were studied by use of BRBS at a fixation distance of 45 cm. Binocularity (the percentage of measurements with bilateral fixation) was determined from the BRBS output. All nonstrabismic subjects with good quality signals had binocularity >75%. Binocularity averaged 5% in four subjects with strabismus (range of 0 -20%). BRBS may potentially be used to screen individuals for abnormal eye alignment.

  15. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  16. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  17. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  18. Cerebro-retinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts due to recessive mutations in the CTC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Bisserbe, A; Tertian, G; Buffet, C; Turhan, A; Lambotte, O; Nasser, G; Alvin, P; Tardieu, M; Riant, F; Bergametti, F; Tournier-Lasserve, E; Denier, C

    2015-05-01

    Cerebro-retinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC) or Coats plus syndrome is a pleiotropic disorder affecting the eyes, brain, bone and gastrointestinal tract. Its primary pathogenesis involves small vessel obliterative microangiopathy. Recently, autosomal recessively inherited mutations in CTC1 have been reported in CRMCC patients. We herein report an adolescent referred to our hospital following new seizures in a context of an undefined multisystem disorder. Cerebral imaging disclosed asymmetrical leukopathy, intracranial calcifications and cysts. In addition, he presented other typical CRMCC features i.e. a history of intrauterine growth retardation, skeletal demineralization and osteopenia, bilateral exudative vitreo-retinopathy reminiscent of Coats disease, recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhages secondary to watermelon stomach and variceal bleeding of the esophagus due to idiopathic portal hypertension and telangiectatic and angiodysplasic changes in the small intestine and colon, and anemia due to recurrent bleeding and bone marrow abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with Coats plus syndrome. CTC1 gene screening confirmed the diagnosis with the identification of heterozygous deleterious mutations. CRMCC due to CTC1 mutations has a broad clinical expressivity. Our case report illustrates the main possible associated phenotypes and their complications, demonstrating the need for a careful etiological search in order to initiate appropriate therapeutic and preventive measures. PMID:25843205

  19. Photon Echoes from Retinal Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Philip James Maddigan

    This thesis focuses on the ultrafast isomerization reaction of retinal in both rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin, examples of sensory and energy transduction proteins that exploit the same photoactive chromophore for two very different functions. In bacteriorhodopsin, retinal isomerizes from an all-trans to 13-cis conformation as the primary event in light- driven proton pumping. In the visual pigment rhodopsin, the retinal chromophore isomerizes from an 11-cis to all-trans geometry as the primary step leading to our sense of vision. This diversity of function for nominally identical systems raises the question as to just how optimized are these proteins to arrive at such drastically different functions? Previous work has employed transient absorption spectroscopy to probe retinal protein photochemistry, but many of the relevant electronic and nuclear dynamics of isomerization are masked by inhomogeneous broadening effects and strong spectral overlap between reactant and photoproduct states. This work exploits the unique properties of two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy to deconvolve inhomogeneous broadening and spectral overlap effects and fully reveal the dynamics that direct retinal isomerization in proteins. In bacteriorhodopsin, vibrational coupling to the reaction coordinate results in a surface crossing event prior to the conventional conical intersection associated with isomerization to the J intermediate. In rhodopsin, however, a similarly early vibrationally-mediated barrier crossing event is observed, resulting in spectral signals consistent with the known photoproduct state appearing an order of magnitude faster than determined from conventional transient absorption measurements. The competing overlapping spectral signals that obscured the initial dynamics when probed with transient absorption spectroscopy are now clearly resolved with two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy. These experiments illustrate the critical role of the protein in directing

  20. Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Documentation of Transsynaptic Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Pasol, Joshua; Lam, Byron L; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-08-01

    Patients with post-geniculate neurologic disease and corresponding visual field loss may have ophthalmologic abnormalities detectable by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), presumably by transsynaptic retrograde retinal degeneration. Here, three such patients (ages 13 years through 75 years) illustrate thinning of the macula and ganglion cell complex corresponding to zones of visual field loss. Thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer is not notable in these patients. SD-OCT may be a useful technique in diagnosing and following patients with post-geniculate neurologic disease. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:768-772.]. PMID:27548455

  1. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Cerebral Gray Matter Volume Is Independent of Retinal Vascular Architecture and Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moran, C.; Tapp, R. J.; Hughes, A. D.; Magnussen, C. G.; Blizzard, L.; Phan, T. G.; Beare, R.; Witt, N.; Venn, A.; Münch, G.; Amaratunge, B. C.; Srikanth, V.

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether small vessel disease underlies the relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and brain atrophy. We aimed to study whether retinal vascular architecture, as a proxy for cerebral small vessel disease, may modify or mediate the associations of T2DM with brain volumes. In this cross-sectional study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans and retinal photographs in 451 people with and without T2DM, we measured brain volumes, geometric measures of retinal vascular architecture, clinical retinopathy, and MRI cerebrovascular lesions. There were 270 people with (mean age 67.3 years) and 181 without T2DM (mean age 72.9 years). T2DM was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.008). T2DM was associated with greater arteriolar diameter (p = 0.03) and optimality ratio (p = 0.04), but these associations were attenuated by adjustments for age and sex. Only optimality ratio was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.03). The inclusion of retinal measures in regression models did not attenuate the association of T2DM with gray matter volume. The association of T2DM with lower gray matter volume was independent of retinal vascular architecture and clinical retinopathy. Retinal vascular measures or retinopathy may not be sufficiently sensitive to confirm a microvascular basis for T2DM-related brain atrophy. PMID:27314049

  2. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Cerebral Gray Matter Volume Is Independent of Retinal Vascular Architecture and Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Moran, C; Tapp, R J; Hughes, A D; Magnussen, C G; Blizzard, L; Phan, T G; Beare, R; Witt, N; Venn, A; Münch, G; Amaratunge, B C; Srikanth, V

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether small vessel disease underlies the relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and brain atrophy. We aimed to study whether retinal vascular architecture, as a proxy for cerebral small vessel disease, may modify or mediate the associations of T2DM with brain volumes. In this cross-sectional study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans and retinal photographs in 451 people with and without T2DM, we measured brain volumes, geometric measures of retinal vascular architecture, clinical retinopathy, and MRI cerebrovascular lesions. There were 270 people with (mean age 67.3 years) and 181 without T2DM (mean age 72.9 years). T2DM was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.008). T2DM was associated with greater arteriolar diameter (p = 0.03) and optimality ratio (p = 0.04), but these associations were attenuated by adjustments for age and sex. Only optimality ratio was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.03). The inclusion of retinal measures in regression models did not attenuate the association of T2DM with gray matter volume. The association of T2DM with lower gray matter volume was independent of retinal vascular architecture and clinical retinopathy. Retinal vascular measures or retinopathy may not be sufficiently sensitive to confirm a microvascular basis for T2DM-related brain atrophy. PMID:27314049

  3. Neuroglobin Protection in Retinal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anita S.Y.; Saraswathy, Sindhu; Rehak, Matus; Ueki, Mari

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a vertebrate globin that is predominantly expressed in the retina and brain. To explore the role of Ngb in retinal neuroprotection during ischemia reperfusion (IR), the authors examined the effect of Ngb overexpression in the retina in vivo by using Ngb-transgenic (Ngb-Tg) mice. Methods. Retinal IR was induced in Ngb overexpressing Ngb-Tg mice and wild type (WT) mice by cannulating the anterior chamber and transiently elevating the IOP for 60 minutes. After Day 7 of reperfusion, the authors evaluated Ngb mRNA and protein expression in nonischemic control as well as ischemic mice and its effect on retinal histology, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and apoptosis, using morphometry and immunohistochemistry, quantitative PCR analysis and Western blot techniques. Results. Ngb-Tg mice without ischemia overexpress Ngb mRNA 11.3-fold (SE ± 0.457, P < 0.05) higher than WT control mice, and this overexpression of Ngb protein was localized to the mitochondria of the ganglion cells, outer and inner plexiform layers, and photoreceptor inner segments. This overexpression of Ngb is associated with decreased mitochondrial DNA damage in Ngb-Tg mice with IR in comparison with WT. Ngb-Tg mice with IR also revealed significant preservation of retinal thickness, significantly less activated caspase 3 protein expression, and apoptosis in comparison with WT mice. Conclusions. Neuroglobin overexpression plays a neuroprotective role against retinal ischemia reperfusion injury due to decreasing of mitochondrial oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis. PMID:22167093

  4. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  5. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  6. Transcorneal Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Retinal Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-03

    Retinitis Pigmentosa; Macula Off; Primary Open Angle Glaucoma; Hereditary Macular Degeneration; Treated Retina Detachment; Retinal Artery Occlusion; Retinal Vein Occlusion; Non-Arthritic-Anterior-Ischemic Optic-Neuropathy; Hereditary Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy; Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration; Ischemic Macula Edema

  7. Retinal isomer composition in some bacteriorhodopsin mutants under light and dark adaptation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L.; Yang, D.; El-Sayed, M.A.; Lanyi, J.K.

    1995-06-15

    The isomeric composition of retinal was measured in a number of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) mutants (D85N, D212N, R82A, Y185F, and D115N) under various conditions, using a rapid retinal extraction technique followed by HPLC analysis. Besides the 13-cis and the all-trans retinal isomers observed in wild type (wt) bR under physiological conditions, the 11-cis and 9-cis retinal isomers were observed in variable but minor amounts in the bR mutants. In addition, the values of the equilibrium constant at two temperatures and the enthalpy change for the all-trans to 13-cis isomerization process in the dark-adapted state of D212N, D85N, deionized blue bR, and wt bR were determined. We find that perturbation of the retinal cavity (pocket) by residue replacement changes the relative thermal stability of the different retinal isomers, allowing for thermal-and/or photoisomerization of the retinal chromophore along C{sub 9}-C{sub 10} and C{sub 11}-C{sub 12} bonds to moderately compete with the isomerization around the C{sub 13}-C{sub 14} bond. The bR mutants expressed in Halobacterium salinarium studied in the present work showed normal 13-cis to all-trans light adaptation, in contrast with abnormal all-trans to 13-cis light adaptation observed for D212E, D212A, and D212N expressed in Escherichia coli, suggesting an influence of the purple membrane lattice and/or the lipids on the stability of the different retinal isomers within the protein. 38 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Unilateral, recurrent exudative retinal detachment in association with pansinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Osman Saatci, Ali; Ozbek Soylemezoglu, Zeynep; Barut Selver, Ozlem; Cenk Ecevit, M.; Ada, Emel

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To report a patient with unilateral exudative retinal detachment due to pansinusitis. Methods: Case report. Results: A 65-year-old woman with a two-month history of blurred vision, red eye and lid swelling in her left eye was referred to us. Her best-corrected visual acuity was 20/20 in the right eye and 20/200 in the left. Conjunctival vessels were engorged in the OS. Funduscopy revealed a 360° exudative detachment in OS and computerized tomography (CT) imaging revealed pansinusitis. Systemic antibiotic treatment was employed and exudative detachment regressed. However, exudative detachment remitted as soon as antibiotic treatment ceased. Finally she underwent sinus surgery and decompression of the orbita. Her visual acuity improved to 20/100 just two days after the surgery, stabilized at 20/30 and no further recurrences occured during the follow-up of 10 months. Conclusion: Since exudative retinal detachment usually accompanies systemic inflammatory or neoplastic diseases, systemic screening and collaboration with other disciplines are mandatory. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a case that developed exudative retinal detachment due to pansinusitis and only recovered after decompression surgery.

  9. Oligochitosan polyplexes as carriers for retinal gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Puras, G; Zarate, J; Díaz-Tahoces, A; Avilés-Trigueros, Marcelino; Fernández, E; Pedraz, J L

    2013-01-23

    Non-viral gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of retinal diseases. However, the lack of an efficient carrier hampers the implementation of this therapy. In this study, we evaluated low molecular weight ultrapure oligochitosans for the delivery of the pCMS-EGFP plasmid into the rat retina cells after subretinal and intravitreal administrations. Polyplexes were technologically characterized. Resulting polyplexes based on ultrapure oligochitosans were slightly spherical, protected the plasmid against enzymatic digestion, and their charge and size values ranged from 8 to 14 millivolts and from 150 to 69 nm respectively depending on the N/P ratio. In HEK-293 cultured cells, transfection efficiency significantly increased from 12% to 30% when pH decreased from 7.4 to 7.1 (data normalized to Lipofectamine™ 2000). However, no significant transfection was detected in ARPE-19 cultured cells. Subretinal administrations transfected mainly the pigmented cells of the retinal pigment epithelium and the light sensitive photoreceptor cells, whereas intravitreal injections transfected cells in the ganglion cell layer, blood vessels in the inner layers of the retina and photoreceptors. These results support the potential use of oligochitosans for delivering genetic material into retinal cells in vivo. PMID:23201002

  10. A dominant mutation in MAPKAPK3, an actor of p38 signaling pathway, causes a new retinal dystrophy involving Bruch's membrane and retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Isabelle; Lenaers, Guy; Bocquet, Béatrice; Baudoin, Corinne; Piro-Megy, Camille; Cubizolle, Aurélie; Quilès, Mélanie; Jean-Charles, Albert; Cohen, Salomon Yves; Merle, Harold; Gaudric, Alain; Labesse, Gilles; Manes, Gaël; Péquignot, Marie; Cazevieille, Chantal; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Fichard, Agnès; Ronkina, Natalia; Arthur, Simon J; Gaestel, Matthias; Hamel, Christian P

    2016-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically heterogeneous with significant number of cases remaining genetically unresolved. We studied a large family from the West Indies islands with a peculiar retinal disease, the Martinique crinkled retinal pigment epitheliopathy that begins around the age of 30 with retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane changes resembling a dry desert land and ends with a retinitis pigmentosa. Whole-exome sequencing identified a heterozygous c.518T>C (p.Leu173Pro) mutation in MAPKAPK3 that segregates with the disease in 14 affected and 28 unaffected siblings from three generations. This unknown variant is predicted to be damaging by bioinformatic predictive tools and the mutated protein to be non-functional by crystal structure analysis. MAPKAPK3 is a serine/threonine protein kinase of the p38 signaling pathway that is activated by a variety of stress stimuli and is implicated in cellular responses and gene regulation. In contrast to other tissues, MAPKAPK3 is highly expressed in the RPE, suggesting a crucial role for retinal physiology. Expression of the mutated allele in HEK cells revealed a mislocalization of the protein in the cytoplasm, leading to cytoskeleton alteration and cytodieresis inhibition. In Mapkapk3-/- mice, Bruch's membrane is irregular with both abnormal thickened and thinned portions. In conclusion, we identified the first pathogenic mutation in MAPKAPK3 associated with a retinal disease. These findings shed new lights on Bruch's membrane/RPE pathophysiology and will open studies of this signaling pathway in diseases with RPE and Bruch's membrane alterations, such as age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26744326

  11. A Graph-Theoretical Approach for Tracing Filamentary Structures in Neuronal and Retinal Images.

    PubMed

    De, Jaydeep; Cheng, Li; Zhang, Xiaowei; Lin, Feng; Li, Huiqi; Ong, Kok Haur; Yu, Weimiao; Yu, Yuanhong; Ahmed, Sohail

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is about tracing filamentary structures in both neuronal and retinal images. It is often crucial to identify single neurons in neuronal networks, or separate vessel tree structures in retinal blood vessel networks, in applications such as drug screening for neurological disorders or computer-aided diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy. Both tasks are challenging as the same bottleneck issue of filament crossovers is commonly encountered, which essentially hinders the ability of existing systems to conduct large-scale drug screening or practical clinical usage. To address the filament crossovers' problem, a two-step graph-theoretical approach is proposed in this paper. The first step focuses on segmenting filamentary pixels out of the background. This produces a filament segmentation map used as input for the second step, where they are further separated into disjointed filaments. Key to our approach is the idea that the problem can be reformulated as label propagation over directed graphs, such that the graph is to be partitioned into disjoint sub-graphs, or equivalently, each of the neurons (vessel trees) is separated from the rest of the neuronal (vessel) network. This enables us to make the interesting connection between the tracing problem and the digraph matrix-forest theorem in algebraic graph theory for the first time. Empirical experiments on neuronal and retinal image datasets demonstrate the superior performance of our approach over existing methods. PMID:26316029

  12. Intravenously administered gold nanoparticles pass through the blood-retinal barrier depending on the particle size, and induce no retinal toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Myung Hun; Yu, Young Suk

    2009-12-01

    The retina maintains homeostasis through the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). Although it is ideal to deliver the drug to the retina via systemic administration, it is still challenging due to the BRB strictly regulating permeation from blood to the retina. Herein, we demonstrated that intravenously administered gold nanoparticles could pass through the BRB and are distributed in all retinal layers without cytotoxicity. After intravenous injection of gold nanoparticles into C57BL/6 mice, 100 nm nanoparticles were not detected in the retina whereas 20 nm nanoparticles passed through the BRB and were distributed in all retinal layers. 20 nm nanoparticles in the retina were observed in neurons (75 ± 5%), endothelial cells (17 ± 6%) and peri-endothelial glial cells (8 ± 3%), where nanoparticles were bound on the membrane. In the retina, cells containing nanoparticles did not show any structural abnormality and increase of cell death compared to cells without nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles never affected the viability of retinal endothelial cells, astrocytes and retinoblastoma cells. Furthermore, gold nanoparticles never led to any change in expression of representative biological molecules including zonula occludens-1 and glut-1 in retinal endothelial cells, neurofilaments in differentiated retinoblastoma cells and glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes. Therefore, our data suggests that small gold nanoparticles (20 nm) could be an alternative for drug delivery across the BRB, which could be safely applied in vivo.

  13. Clinical Trials in Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Seanna R.; Finn, Avni; Papakostas, Thanos D.; Eliott, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Research development is burgeoning for genetic and cellular therapy for retinal dystrophies. These dystrophies are the focus of many research efforts due to the unique biology and accessibility of the eye, the transformative advances in ocular imaging technology that allows for in vivo monitoring, and the potential benefit people would gain from success in the field – the gift of renewed sight. Progress in the field has revealed the immense complexity of retinal dystrophies and the challenges faced by researchers in the development of this technology. This study reviews the current trials and advancements in genetic and cellular therapy in the treatment of retinal dystrophies and also discusses the current and potential future challenges. PMID:26957839

  14. Retinal spot size with wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Eilert, Brent; Druessel, Jeffrey J.; Payne, Dale J.; Phillips, Shana L.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1997-06-01

    We have made an indirect in-vivo determination of spot size focusing in the rhesus monkey model. Measurement of the laser induced breakdown threshold both in-vitro and in-vivo allow correlation and assignment of a spot size after focusing through the living eye. We discuss and analyze the results and show how trends in minimum visible lesion data should be assessed in light of chromatic aberration. National laser safety standards are based on minimal visual lesion (MVL) threshold studies in different animal models. The energy required for a retinal lesion depends upon may parameters including wavelength and retinal spot size. We attempt to explain trends in reported MVL threshold studies using a model of the eye which allows calculation of changes in retinal spot size due to chromatic aberration.

  15. Exploring the retinal connectome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James R.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Shaw, Margaret V.; Yang, Jia-Hui; DeMill, David; Lauritzen, James S.; Lin, Yanhua; Rapp, Kevin D.; Mastronarde, David; Koshevoy, Pavel; Grimm, Bradley; Tasdizen, Tolga; Whitaker, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A connectome is a comprehensive description of synaptic connectivity for a neural domain. Our goal was to produce a connectome data set for the inner plexiform layer of the mammalian retina. This paper describes our first retinal connectome, validates the method, and provides key initial findings. Methods We acquired and assembled a 16.5 terabyte connectome data set RC1 for the rabbit retina at ≈2 nm resolution using automated transmission electron microscope imaging, automated mosaicking, and automated volume registration. RC1 represents a column of tissue 0.25 mm in diameter, spanning the inner nuclear, inner plexiform, and ganglion cell layers. To enhance ultrastructural tracing, we included molecular markers for 4-aminobutyrate (GABA), glutamate, glycine, taurine, glutamine, and the in vivo activity marker, 1-amino-4-guanidobutane. This enabled us to distinguish GABAergic and glycinergic amacrine cells; to identify ON bipolar cells coupled to glycinergic cells; and to discriminate different kinds of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells based on their molecular signatures and activity. The data set was explored and annotated with Viking, our multiuser navigation tool. Annotations were exported to additional applications to render cells, visualize network graphs, and query the database. Results Exploration of RC1 showed that the 2 nm resolution readily recapitulated well known connections and revealed several new features of retinal organization: (1) The well known AII amacrine cell pathway displayed more complexity than previously reported, with no less than 17 distinct signaling modes, including ribbon synapse inputs from OFF bipolar cells, wide-field ON cone bipolar cells and rod bipolar cells, and extensive input from cone-pathway amacrine cells. (2) The axons of most cone bipolar cells formed a distinct signal integration compartment, with ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses targeting diverse cell types. Both ON and OFF bipolar cells receive

  16. Optically deviated focusing method based high-speed SD-OCT for in vivo retinal clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Park, Kibeom; Kim, Pilun; Oh, Jaeryung; Kim, Seong-Woo; Kim, Kwangtae; Kim, Beop-Min; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to provide accurately focused, high-resolution in vivo human retinal depth images using an optically deviated focusing method with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system. The proposed method was applied to increase the retinal diagnosing speed of patients with various values of retinal distances (i.e., the distance between the crystalline eye lens and the retina). The increased diagnosing speed was facilitated through an optical modification in the OCT sample arm configuration. Moreover, the optical path length matching process was compensated using the proposed optically deviated focusing method. The developed system was mounted on a bench-top cradle to overcome the motion artifacts. Further, we demonstrated the capability of the system by carrying out in vivo retinal imaging experiments. The clinical trials confirmed that the system was effective in diagnosing normal and abnormal retinal layers as several retinal abnormalities were identified using non-averaged single-shot OCT images, which demonstrate the feasibility of the method for clinical applications.

  17. Retinal Image Quality During Accommodation

    PubMed Central

    López-Gil, N.; Martin, J.; Liu, T.; Bradley, A.; Díaz-Muñoz, D.; Thibos, L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We asked if retinal image quality is maximum during accommodation, or sub-optimal due to accommodative error, when subjects perform an acuity task. Methods Subjects viewed a monochromatic (552nm), high-contrast letter target placed at various viewing distances. Wavefront aberrations of the accommodating eye were measured near the endpoint of an acuity staircase paradigm. Refractive state, defined as the optimum target vergence for maximising retinal image quality, was computed by through-focus wavefront analysis to find the power of the virtual correcting lens that maximizes visual Strehl ratio. Results Despite changes in ocular aberrations and pupil size during binocular viewing, retinal image quality and visual acuity typically remain high for all target vergences. When accommodative errors lead to sub-optimal retinal image quality, acuity and measured image quality both decline. However, the effect of accommodation errors of on visual acuity are mitigated by pupillary constriction associated with accommodation and binocular convergence and also to binocular summation of dissimilar retinal image blur. Under monocular viewing conditions some subjects displayed significant accommodative lag that reduced visual performance, an effect that was exacerbated by pharmacological dilation of the pupil. Conclusions Spurious measurement of accommodative error can be avoided when the image quality metric used to determine refractive state is compatible with the focusing criteria used by the visual system to control accommodation. Real focusing errors of the accommodating eye do not necessarily produce a reliably measurable loss of image quality or clinically significant loss of visual performance, probably because of increased depth-of-focus due to pupil constriction. When retinal image quality is close to maximum achievable (given the eye’s higher-order aberrations), acuity is also near maximum. A combination of accommodative lag, reduced image quality, and reduced

  18. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  19. New Wrinkles in Retinal Densitometry

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Benjamin D.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinal densitometry provides objective information about retinal function. But, a number of factors, including retinal reflectance changes that are not directly related to photopigment depletion, complicate its interpretation. We explore these factors and suggest a method to minimize their impact. Methods. An adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to measure changes in photoreceptor reflectance in monkeys before and after photopigment bleaching with 514-nm light. Reflectance measurements at 514 nm and 794 nm were recorded simultaneously. Several methods of normalization to extract the apparent optical density of the photopigment were compared. Results. We identified stimulus-related fluctuations in 794-nm reflectance that are not associated with photopigment absorptance and occur in both rods and cones. These changes had a magnitude approaching those associated directly with pigment depletion, precluding the use of infrared reflectance for normalization. We used a spatial normalization method instead, which avoided the fluctuations in the near infrared, as well as a confocal AOSLO designed to minimize light from layers other than the receptors. However, these methods produced a surprisingly low estimate of the apparent rhodopsin density (animal 1: 0.073 ± 0.006, animal 2: 0.032 ± 0.003). Conclusions. These results confirm earlier observations that changes in photopigment absorption are not the only source of retinal reflectance change during dark adaptation. It appears that the stray light that has historically reduced the apparent density of cone photopigment in retinal densitometry arises predominantly from layers near the photoreceptors themselves. Despite these complications, this method provides a valuable, objective measure of retinal function. PMID:25316726

  20. Nonallelic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with incomplete penetrance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P.

    1994-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of retinal diseases in which photoreceptor cells throughout the retina degenerate. Although there is considerable genetic heterogeneity (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked forms exist), there is a possibility that some clinically defined subtypes of the disease may be the result of mutations at the same locus. One possible clinically defined subtype is that of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) with incomplete penetrance. Whereas in most families with ADRP, carriers can be clearly identified because of visual loss, ophthalmological findings, or abnormal electroretinograms (ERGs), in occasional families some obligate carriers are asymptomatic and have normal or nearly normal ERGs even late in life. A recent paper reported the mapping of the diseases locus in one pedigree (designated adRP7) with ADRP with incomplete penetrance to chromosome 7p. To test the idea that ADRP with incomplete penetrance may be genetically homogeneous, we have evaluated whether a different family with incomplete penetrance also has a disease gene linked to the same region. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Differential Light-induced Responses in Sectorial Inherited Retinal Degeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Eva; Cordomí, Arnau; Aguilà, Mònica; Srinivasan, Sundaramoorthy; Dong, Xiaoyun; Moore, Anthony T.; Webster, Andrew R.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Garriga, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous inherited degenerative retinopathies caused by abnormalities of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium in the retina leading to progressive sight loss. Rhodopsin is the prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor located in the vertebrate retina and is responsible for dim light vision. Here, novel M39R and N55K variants were identified as causing an intriguing sector phenotype of RP in affected patients, with selective degeneration in the inferior retina. To gain insights into the molecular aspects associated with this sector RP phenotype, whose molecular mechanism remains elusive, the mutations were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis, expressed in heterologous systems, and studied by biochemical, spectroscopic, and functional assays. M39R and N55K opsins had variable degrees of chromophore regeneration when compared with WT opsin but showed no gross structural misfolding or altered trafficking. M39R showed a faster rate for transducin activation than WT rhodopsin with a faster metarhodopsinII decay, whereas N55K presented a reduced activation rate and an altered photobleaching pattern. N55K also showed an altered retinal release from the opsin binding pocket upon light exposure, affecting its optimal functional response. Our data suggest that these sector RP mutations cause different protein phenotypes that may be related to their different clinical progression. Overall, these findings illuminate the molecular mechanisms of sector RP associated with rhodopsin mutations. PMID:25359768

  2. Molecular characterization of retinal stem cells and their niches in adult zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Pamela A; Barthel, Linda K; Bernardos, Rebecca L; Perkowski, John J

    2006-01-01

    Background The persistence in adult teleost fish of retinal stem cells that exhibit all of the features of true 'adult stem cells' – self-renewal, multipotency, and the capacity to respond to injury by mitotic activation with the ability to regenerate differentiated tissues – has been known for several decades. However, the specialized cellular and molecular characteristics of these adult retinal stem cells and the microenvironmental niches that support their maintenance in the differentiated retina and regulate their activity during growth and regeneration have not yet been elucidated. Results Our data show that the zebrafish retina has two kinds of specialized niches that sustain retinal stem cells: 1) a neuroepithelial germinal zone at the interface between neural retina and ciliary epithelium, called the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), a continuous annulus around the retinal circumference, and 2) the microenvironment around some Müller glia in the differentiated retina. In the uninjured retina, scattered Müller glia (more frequently those in peripheral retina) are associated with clusters of proliferating retinal progenitors that are restricted to the rod photoreceptor lineage, but following injury, the Müller-associated retinal progenitors can function as multipotent retinal stem cells to regenerate other types of retinal neurons. The CMZ has several features in common with the neurogenic niches in the adult mammalian brain, including access to the apical epithelial surface and a close association with blood vessels. Müller glia in the teleost retina have a complex response to local injury that includes some features of reactive gliosis (up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP, and re-entry into the cell cycle) together with dedifferentiation and re-acquisition of phenotypic and molecular characteristics of multipotent retinal progenitors in the CMZ (diffuse distribution of N-cadherin, activation of Notch-Delta signaling, and expression of

  3. Quantitative optical coherence tomography angiography of vascular abnormalities in the living human eye.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yali; Bailey, Steven T; Hwang, Thomas S; McClintic, Scott M; Gao, Simon S; Pennesi, Mark E; Flaxel, Christina J; Lauer, Andreas K; Wilson, David J; Hornegger, Joachim; Fujimoto, James G; Huang, David

    2015-05-01

    Retinal vascular diseases are important causes of vision loss. A detailed evaluation of the vascular abnormalities facilitates diagnosis and treatment in these diseases. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography using the highly efficient split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography algorithm offers an alternative to conventional dye-based retinal angiography. OCT angiography has several advantages, including 3D visualization of retinal and choroidal circulations (including the choriocapillaris) and avoidance of dye injection-related complications. Results from six illustrative cases are reported. In diabetic retinopathy, OCT angiography can detect neovascularization and quantify ischemia. In age-related macular degeneration, choroidal neovascularization can be observed without the obscuration of details caused by dye leakage in conventional angiography. Choriocapillaris dysfunction can be detected in the nonneovascular form of the disease, furthering our understanding of pathogenesis. In choroideremia, OCT's ability to show choroidal and retinal vascular dysfunction separately may be valuable in predicting progression and assessing treatment response. OCT angiography shows promise as a noninvasive alternative to dye-based angiography for highly detailed, in vivo, 3D, quantitative evaluation of retinal vascular abnormalities. PMID:25897021

  4. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) in hereditary retinal degenerations: Layer-by-layer analyses in normal and diseased retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yijun

    OCT is a new technique for non-invasive, non-contact, cross-sectional imaging of biological tissues with micrometer longitudinal resolution. As it applies to the field of ophthalmology, OCT can delineate retinal sublayers based on their backscattering characteristics, and permit quantitative measurement of the structure of retina in vivo. This dissertation intended to clarify the basis of the OCT signals and whether this procedure has potential for diagnosis and monitoring of human retinal degenerative diseases. Key to this goal are quantitation of OCT signal features and accurate, layer-by-layer correlation of these features with underlying retinal microanatomy. In normal and degenerate avian and swine retinas, OCT signal features were quantified using custom computer programs, and were correlated with cryosections of unfixed retinas obtained at the same retinal location. The results suggested a definable and quantifiable relationship between OCT signal components and retinal microanatomy. The correlation in the outer retina indicated that the OCT posterior highly reflective band, or the outer- retina-choroid complex (ORCC), is attributable to the photoreceptor layer, RPE, and anterior choroid. Further evidence of OCT signal origin was provided by the rd chicken and the rhodopsin P347L mutant transgenic swine. In these animals where photoreceptors had degenerated, OCT abnormalities were observed at the level of and vitreal to the ORCC, consistent with the hypothesis that photoreceptors contribute to the ORCC. Studies of quantitative OCT analysis in man were also performed. In selected hereditary retinal degenerative diseases in which there was regional difference in retinal function, frequently observed OCT abnormalities that were associated with visual dysfunction were reduced OCT thickness, reduced ORCC thickness, increased reflectivity posterior to ORCC, and abnormal OCT signal lamination. These preliminary results suggested that OCT abnormalities at the level

  5. Improving the blind restoration of retinal images by means of point-spread-function estimation assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrugo, Andrés. G.; Millán, María. S.; Å orel, Michal; Kotera, Jan; Å roubek, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Retinal images often suffer from blurring which hinders disease diagnosis and progression assessment. The restoration of the images is carried out by means of blind deconvolution, but the success of the restoration depends on the correct estimation of the point-spread-function (PSF) that blurred the image. The restoration can be space-invariant or space-variant. Because a retinal image has regions without texture or sharp edges, the blind PSF estimation may fail. In this paper we propose a strategy for the correct assessment of PSF estimation in retinal images for restoration by means of space-invariant or space-invariant blind deconvolution. Our method is based on a decomposition in Zernike coefficients of the estimated PSFs to identify valid PSFs. This significantly improves the quality of the image restoration revealed by the increased visibility of small details like small blood vessels and by the lack of restoration artifacts.

  6. Retinal Image Quality Assessment for Spaceflight-Induced Vision Impairment Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Amanda Cadao; Raghunandan, Sneha; Vyas, Ruchi; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Taibbi, Giovanni; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Grant, Maria; Chalam, Kakarla; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Long-term exposure to space microgravity poses significant risks for visual impairment. Evidence suggests such vision changes are linked to cephalad fluid shifts, prompting a need to directly quantify microgravity-induced retinal vascular changes. The quality of retinal images used for such vascular remodeling analysis, however, is dependent on imaging methodology. For our exploratory study, we hypothesized that retinal images captured using fluorescein imaging methodologies would be of higher quality in comparison to images captured without fluorescein. A semi-automated image quality assessment was developed using Vessel Generation Analysis (VESGEN) software and MATLAB® image analysis toolboxes. An analysis of ten images found that the fluorescein imaging modality provided a 36% increase in overall image quality (two-tailed p=0.089) in comparison to nonfluorescein imaging techniques.

  7. L-Citrulline dilates rat retinal arterioles via nitric oxide- and prostaglandin-dependent pathways in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asami; Morita, Masahiko; Morishita, Koji; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2015-04-01

    L-Citrulline is an effective precursor of L-arginine produced by the L-citrulline/L-arginine cycle, and it exerts beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system by supporting enhanced nitric oxide (NO) production. NO dilates retinal blood vessels via the cyclooxygenase-mediated pathway. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of L-citrulline on retinal circulation and to investigate the potential involvement of NO and prostaglandins in L-citrulline-induced responses in rats. L-Citrulline (10-300 μg kg(-1) min(-1), i.v.) increased the diameter of retinal arterioles without significantly changing mean blood pressure, heart rate, and fundus blood flow. The vasodilator response of retinal arterioles to l-citrulline was significantly diminished following treatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (30 mg/kg, i.v.), an NO synthase inhibitor, or indomethacin (5 mg/kg, i.v.), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. In addition, α-methyl-dl-aspartic acid (147 mg/kg, i.v.), an inhibitor of argininosuccinate synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme for the recycling of l-citrulline to l-arginine, diminished the L-citrulline-induced retinal vasodilation. These results suggest that both NO- and prostaglandin-dependent pathways contribute to the L-citrulline-induced vasodilation of rat retinal arterioles. The L-citrulline/L-arginine recycling pathway may have more importance in regulating vascular tone in retinal blood vessels than in peripheral resistance vessels. PMID:25953269

  8. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  9. Evaluation of the Retinal Vasculature in Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease in an Elderly Population of Irish Nuns

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Amy; Silvestri, Giuliana; Moore, Evelyn; Silvestri, Vittorio; Patterson, Christopher C.; Maxwell, Alexander P.; McKay, Gareth J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hypertension are global public health problems associated with considerable morbidity, premature mortality and attendant healthcare costs. Previous studies have highlighted that non-invasive examination of the retinal microcirculation can detect microvascular pathology that is associated with systemic disorders of the circulatory system such as hypertension. We examined the associations between retinal vessel caliber (RVC) and fractal dimension (DF), with both hypertension and CKD in elderly Irish nuns. Methods Data from 1233 participants in the cross-sectional observational Irish Nun Eye Study (INES) were assessed from digital photographs with a standardized protocol using computer-assisted software. Multivariate regression analyses were used to assess associations with hypertension and CKD, with adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), refraction, fellow eye RVC, smoking, alcohol consumption, ischemic heart disease (IHD), cerebrovascular accident (CVA), diabetes and medication use. Results In total, 1122 (91%) participants (mean age: 76.3 [range: 56–100] years) had gradable retinal images of sufficient quality for blood vessel assessment. Hypertension was significantly associated with a narrower central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE) in a fully adjusted analysis (P = 0.002; effect size = -2.16 μm; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: -3.51, -0.81 μm). No significant associations between other retinal vascular parameters and hypertension or between any retinal vascular parameters and CKD were found. Conclusions Individuals with hypertension have significantly narrower retinal arterioles which may afford an earlier opportunity for tailored prevention and treatment options to optimize the structure and function of the microvasculature, providing additional clinical utility. No significant associations between retinal vascular parameters and CKD were detected. PMID:26327531

  10. In vivo response of the rat's retinal pigment epithelium to azide at advanced stages of hereditary retinal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Noell, W K

    1993-01-01

    Electrophysiological properties of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) were studied in the rat with hereditary retinal dystrophy (rdy). Transocular potential changes evoked by intravenous bolus injections of azide and thiocyanate (SCN-) are the only available indication of RPE state when degeneration of rods is in progress. Also determined were age-dependent decrease in retinal DNA content and in counts of cones that survive after degeneration of rods. The azide response in the pigmented and albino rdy rat was already reduced at the earliest age tested (60 d) and continued to decrease till the age of 2 years. The SCN-response was similarly affected but seemed to decline faster than the azide response. The azide/SCN- response ratio was significantly increased in albino mutants, especially around the age of 400 d. At the age of 10 months and later, the azide and SCN- responses became slower than those of normals. A prolonged exposure of 1,200 1x light to dystrophic rats older than 110 did not affect the azide and SCN- responses whereas the same exposure abolishes the responses of normal rats and of the dystrophic rats at early stages. In rdy rats, the electrophysiological changes were considered to correlate with structural changes of the junctional RPE complex and with abnormal membrane enzyme distribution discovered by others. These RPE changes may contribute to the decreasing cone cell number after rod cell disappearance. PMID:8230852

  11. Prevalence and predictors of cytomegalovirus retinitis in HIV-infected patients with low CD4 lymphocyte counts in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Colby, Donn J; Vo, Diem Qh; Teoh, Stephen C; Tam, Nguyen T; Liem, Nguyen T; Lu, Doanh; Nguyen, Thi T; Cosimi, Lisa; Pollack, Todd; Libman, Howard

    2014-06-01

    We describe the results of a study to determine the prevalence and characteristics of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis among HIV-infected patients in Vietnam. We conducted a cross-sectional prospective study of patients with CD4 lymphocyte count ≤100 cells/mm(3)recruited from public HIV clinics. The diagnosis was made by a trained ophthalmologist using slit lamp biomicroscopy and corroborated on fundus photography. A total of 201 patients were screened. The median age was 32 years, 77% were men, median CD4 count was 47 cells/mm(3), and 62% were on antiretroviral treatment. Prevalence of CMV retinitis was 7% (14/201, 95% CI 4-11%). CMV retinitis was not associated with age, gender, injection drug use, CD4 count, WHO clinical stage, or antiretroviral treatment status. Blurring of vision and reduced visual acuity <20/40 were associated with CMV retinitis, but only 29% of patients with the diagnosis reported blurry vision and only 64% had abnormal vision. On multivariate analysis, the sole predictor for CMV retinitis was decreased visual acuity (OR 22.8,p < 0.001). In Ho Chi Minh City, CMV retinitis was found in 7% of HIV-infected patients with low CD4. HIV-infected patients with a CD4 count <100/mm(3)or who develop blurring of vision in Vietnam should be screened for CMV retinitis. PMID:24327723

  12. Mapping the 3D Connectivity of the Rat Inner Retinal Vascular Network Using OCT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Leahy, Conor; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Weiner, Geoffrey; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) graphing based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography for characterization of the inner retinal vascular architecture and determination of its topologic principles. Methods Rat eyes (N = 3) were imaged with a 1300-nm spectral/Fourier domain OCT microscope. A topologic model of the inner retinal vascular network was obtained from OCT angiography data using a combination of automated and manually-guided image processing techniques. Using a resistive network model, with experimentally-quantified flow in major retinal vessels near the optic nerve head as boundary conditions, theoretical changes in the distribution of flow induced by vessel dilations were inferred. Results A topologically-representative 3D vectorized graph of the inner retinal vasculature, derived from OCT angiography data, is presented. The laminar and compartmental connectivity of the vasculature are characterized. In contrast to sparse connectivity between the superficial vitreal vasculature and capillary plexuses of the inner retina, connectivity between the two capillary plexus layers is dense. Simulated dilation of single arterioles is shown to produce both localized and lamina-specific changes in blood flow, while dilation of capillaries in a given retinal vascular layer is shown to lead to increased total flow in that layer. Conclusions Our graphing and modeling data suggest that vascular architecture enables both local and lamina-specific control of blood flow in the inner retina. The imaging, graph analysis, and modeling approach presented here will help provide a detailed characterization of vascular changes in a variety of retinal diseases, both in experimental preclinical models and human subjects. PMID:26325417

  13. Suppression and retinal correspondence in intermittent exotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J; Record, C D

    1986-01-01

    Suppression scotomas and retinal projection (retinal correspondence) were measured in six intermittent exotropes during deviation. Measurements used red-green anaglyph stimuli presented on a black background which could be varied from 3.4 minutes of arc to 3 degrees 24'. Results showed non-suppression of all points between the fovea and the diplopia point. Harmonious anomalous retinal correspondence was usually observed. Two subjects had spontaneous changes from anomalous retinal correspondence to normal retinal correspondence without a concurrent change in ocular position. Conventional testing resulted in more variable results in regard to retinal correspondence and suppression, suggesting that non-suppression and anomalous retinal correspondence occur when black backgrounds are used for testing. PMID:3756124

  14. Homonymous Ganglion Cell Layer Thinning After Isolated Occipital Lesion: Macular OCT Demonstrates Transsynaptic Retrograde Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Meier, Paolo G; Maeder, Philippe; Kardon, Randy H; Borruat, François-Xavier

    2015-06-01

    A 48-year-old man was examined 24 months after medial and surgical treatment of an isolated well-circumscribed right occipital lobe abscess. An asymptomatic residual left homonymous inferior scotoma was present. Fundus examination revealed temporal pallor of both optic discs, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed mild temporal loss of retinal nerve fiber layer in both eyes. No relative afferent pupillary defect was present. Assessment of the retinal ganglion cell layer demonstrated homonymous thinning in a pattern corresponding to the homonymous visual field loss. There were no abnormalities of the lateral geniculate nuclei or optic tracts on review of the initial brain computed tomography and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. We believe our patient showed evidence of transsynaptic retrograde degeneration after an isolated right occipital lobe lesion, and the homonymous neuronal loss was detected on OCT by assessing the retinal ganglion cell layer. PMID:25285723

  15. VESSELS IN SOME ASLEPIADCEAE

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Anita; Kshetrapal, S.

    1990-01-01

    In the present investigation vessels of 16 species of family Asclepiadaceae have been studied. Through a lot of variation exists in the size and shape of vessels, number of perforation plates and intravascular thickening of walls in the taxa, the vessels in asclepiadaceae are found highly specified. PMID:22557694

  16. Feature-based pairwise retinal image registration by radial distortion correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangyeol; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2007-03-01

    Fundus camera imaging is widely used to document disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration. Multiple retinal images can be combined together through a procedure known as mosaicing to form an image with a larger field of view. Mosaicing typically requires multiple pairwise registrations of partially overlapped images. We describe a new method for pairwise retinal image registration. The proposed method is unique in that the radial distortion due to image acquisition is corrected prior to the geometric transformation. Vessel lines are detected using the Hessian operator and are used as input features to the registration. Since the overlapping region is typically small in a retinal image pair, only a few correspondences are available, thus limiting the applicable model to an afine transform at best. To recover the distortion due to curved-surface of retina and lens optics, a combined approach of an afine model with a radial distortion correction is proposed. The parameters of the image acquisition and radial distortion models are estimated during an optimization step that uses Powell's method driven by the vessel line distance. Experimental results using 20 pairs of green channel images acquired from three subjects with a fundus camera confirmed that the afine model with distortion correction could register retinal image pairs to within 1.88+/-0.35 pixels accuracy (mean +/- standard deviation) assessed by vessel line error, which is 17% better than the afine-only approach. Because the proposed method needs only two correspondences, it can be applied to obtain good registration accuracy even in the case of small overlap between retinal image pairs.

  17. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Education Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa includes a number of inherited diseases which usually result in blindness. The disease is progressive in nature and begins with the deterioration of cells in the eye responsible for peripheral vision. As the condition worsens there is a gradual loss of peripheral vision and night blindness. Proper educational planning requires…

  18. Identification and characterization of a novel retinal isoform of dystrophin

    SciTech Connect

    D`Souza, V.N.; Sigesmund, D.A.; Man, N.

    1994-09-01

    We have shown that dystrophin is required for normal function of the retina as measured by electroretinography (ERG). In these studies a genotype/phenotype correlation was found in which DMD/BMD patients with deletions in the central to distal region of the gene had abnormal ERGs, while patients with deletions in the 5{prime} end of the gene had a mild or normal retinal phenotype. A similar correlation was also observed in the mouse in which the mdx mouse having a mutation in exon 23 had a normal retinal phenotype, whereas the mdx{sup Cv3} mouse (mutation in intron 65) had an abnormal phenotype. Molecular analysis of both human and mouse retina indicated that at least two isoforms of dystrophin are expressed in the retina and localize to the outer plexiform layer, the synaptic junction between the photoreceptors, the bipolar cells, and the horizontal cells. Using a panel of monoclonal dystrophin antisera to analyze mdx mouse retina which does not contain full length dystrophin antisera, we showed that a shorter dystrophin isoform (approximately 260 kDa) was present and contained part of the rod, the cysteine-rich and C-terminal domains. The 5{prime} end of the transcript giving rise to this isoform was characterized and cloned using 5{prime}RACE. Sequence analysis indicated that this transcript contained a novel exon 1 consisting of 240 nucleotides and coded for a unique N-terminus of 13 amino acids. This isoform is distinct from the DP116 dystrophin isoform identified in peripheral nerve. From the functional analysis of DMD patients and dystrophic mice we conclude that this 260 kDa dystrophin isoform is required for normal retinal electrophysiology.

  19. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Hosenpud, J.D.; Montanaro, A.; Hart, M.V.; Haines, J.E.; Specht, H.D.; Bennett, R.M.; Kloster, F.E.

    1984-08-01

    Accelerated coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in young patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is well documented; however, the prevalence of coronary involvement is unknown. Accordingly, 26 patients with systemic lupus were selected irrespective of previous cardiac history to undergo exercise thallium-201 cardiac scintigraphy. Segmental perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of the 26 studies (38.5 percent). Five patients had reversible defects suggesting ischemia, four patients had persistent defects consistent with scar, and one patient had both reversible and persistent defects in two areas. There was no correlation between positive thallium results and duration of disease, amount of corticosteroid treatment, major organ system involvement or age. Only a history of pericarditis appeared to be associated with positive thallium-201 results (p less than 0.05). It is concluded that segmental myocardial perfusion abnormalities are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Whether this reflects large-vessel coronary disease or small-vessel abnormalities remains to be determined.

  20. Retinal and vitreal neovascularization in retinopathy of prematurity. A scanning electron microscopic study in the kitten.

    PubMed

    Yoneya, S; Tso, M O

    1991-12-01

    The angioarchitecture of vitreal and retinal neovascularizations produced experimentally in the eyes of kittens aged 2 to 9 weeks was studied with scanning electron microscopy. Various forms of new retinal and vitreal vessels were observed depending on topographic locations. Intraretinal neovascularization was observed at the retinal periphery as it grew toward the avascular zone in forms of short vascular buds, aneurysmal outgrowths, and neovascular loops. Posterior or to this frond of neovascularization, intertwining intraretinal telangiectasia was observed. At the posterior pole, capillaries with microaneurysms extended posteriorly toward the deeper layers of the retina from the vascular trunks at the nerve fiber layer. Vitreal neovascularization broke through the internal limiting membrane and exhibited aneurysmal outgrowths, clusters of glomerular swellings, and sinusoidal vascular channels. At the optic disc, vitreous neovascularization took the form of aneurysmal outgrowths and long vascular buds. Vitreal neovascularization showed different characteristics from the intraretinal neovascularization. We hypothesize that the topographic variation of the angioarchitecture of retinal and vitreal neovascularizations depends on the maturity of the vessels and might be related to the hemodynamics at each site. PMID:1726774

  1. Monte Carlo investigation on quantifying the retinal pigment epithelium melanin concentration by photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-10-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) melanin plays an important role in maintaining normal visual functions. A decrease in the RPE melanin concentration with aging is believed to be associated with several blinding diseases, including age-related macular degeneration. Quantifying the RPE melanin noninvasively is therefore important in evaluating the retinal health and aging conditions. Photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM), as an optical absorption-based imaging technology, can potentially be applied to measure variations in the RPE melanin if the relationship between the detected photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitudes and the RPE melanin concentrations can be established. In this work, we tested the feasibility of using PA signals from retinal blood vessels as references to measure RPE melanin variation using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The influences from PAOM axial resolution, the depth and diameter of the retinal blood vessel, and the RPE thickness were examined. We proposed a calibration scheme by relating detected PA signals to the RPE melanin concentrations, and we found that the scheme is robust to these tested parameters. This study suggests that PAOM has the capability of quantitatively measuring the RPE melanin in vivo.

  2. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cell loss and circadian dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    FENG, RUIQI; LI, LIJUAN; YU, HAIYAN; LIU, MIN; ZHAO, WEI

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease affects 27 million individuals and is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. The pathology of Alzheimer's disease is primarily due to the β-amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles. These deposits exist largely in the cerebral blood vessels, but have also been shown to exist in retinal vessels. A new class of cells that were recently identified, known as melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs), are involved in the non-image forming functions of the eye. These functions include circadian activities such as temperature rhythms, melatonin release and rest-activity cycles. Circadian dysfunction has been investigated in many cases of Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we outline the current accepted Alzheimer's disease pathology, the role of mRCGs in optic neuropathies and the role of mRCGs, leading to circadian dysfunction, in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26935586

  3. Research on the liquid crystal adaptive optics system for human retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Tong, Shoufeng; Song, Yansong; Zhao, Xin

    2013-12-01

    The blood vessels only in Human eye retinal can be observed directly. Many diseases that are not obvious in their early symptom can be diagnosed through observing the changes of distal micro blood vessel. In order to obtain the high resolution human retinal images,an adaptive optical system for correcting the aberration of the human eye was designed by using the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and the Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator(LCLSM) .For a subject eye with 8m-1 (8D)myopia, the wavefront error is reduced to 0.084 λ PV and 0.12 λRMS after adaptive optics(AO) correction ,which has reached diffraction limit.The results show that the LCLSM based AO system has the ability of correcting the aberration of the human eye efficiently,and making the blurred photoreceptor cell to clearly image on a CCD camera.

  4. Microvasculature and incident atrioventricular conduction abnormalities in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    PubMed

    Chacko, Billy G; Edwards, Matthew S; Sharrett, A Richey; Qureshi, Waqas T; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Herrington, David M; Soliman, Elsayed Z

    2015-10-01

    Abnormalities of the microvasculature are linked to major cardiac events, but their role in the development of atrioventricular conduction abnormalities (AVCA) is unknown. We examined the association between central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE), a measure of the microvasculature, and incident AVCA. This analysis included 3975 participants free of AVCA at baseline from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Incident AVCA was defined as a composite of new heart rate-adjusted PR interval ⩾ 200 ms (first-degree AV block) and advanced block (second-degree or complete AV block) detected from the MESA exam 5 electrocardiogram (ECG). CRAE was measured from retinal photographs at exam 2. Both ECGs and retinal photographs were collected using standardized methods and read and graded at central core labs. Incident AVCA were present in 7.4% (n=290) of the participants, of which 94% were first-degree AV block. Incident AVCA were increasingly more common in participants with narrower CRAE (4.6% in Q4, 6.4% in Q3, 7.0% in Q2 and 10.8% in Q1, p-value for trend < 0.0001). The socio-demographic and cardiovascular disease risk-adjusted odds of incident AVCA in the Q1 group (the group with the narrowest retinal arteriolar diameter) was nearly twice the odds in the Q4 group (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.15-2.51). This association remained significant after adjustment for major ECG abnormalities and incident cardiovascular disease (Q1 vs Q4, OR: 1.65, 95% CI: 1.01-2.71). In conclusion, narrower retinal arteriolar caliber is associated with development of new AV conduction abnormalities. PMID:25999364

  5. CAPILLARY NETWORK ANOMALIES IN BRANCH RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION ON OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Savastano, Maria Cristina; Lumbroso, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the foveal microvasculature features in eyes with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) using optical coherence tomography angiography based on split spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography technology. Methods: A total of 10 BRVO eyes (mean age 64.2 ± 8.02 range between 52 years and 76 years) were evaluated by optical coherence tomography angiography (XR-Avanti; Optovue). The macular angiography scan protocol covered a 3 mm × 3 mm area. The focus of angiography analysis were two retinal layers: superficial vascular network and deep vascular network. The following vascular morphological congestion parameters were assessed in the vein occlusion area in both the superficial and deep networks: foveal avascular zone enlargement, capillary non-perfusion occurrence, microvascular abnormalities appearance, and vascular congestion signs. Image analyses were performed by 2 masked observers and interobserver agreement of image analyses was 0.90 (κ = 0.225, P < 0.01). Results: In both superficial and deep network of BRVO, a decrease in capillary density with foveal avascular zone enlargement, capillary non-perfusion occurrence, and microvascular abnormalities appearance was observed (P < 0.01). The deep network showed the main vascular congestion at the boundary between healthy and nonperfused retina. Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography angiography in BRVO allows to detect foveal avascular zone enlargement, capillary nonperfusion, microvascular abnormalities, and vascular congestion signs both in the superficial and deep capillary network in all eyes. Optical coherence tomography angiography technology is a potential clinical tool for BRVO diagnosis and follow-up, providing stratigraphic vascular details that have not been previously observed by standard fluorescein angiography. The normal retinal vascular nets and areas of nonperfusion and congestion can be identified at various retinal levels. Optical coherence tomography angiography provides

  6. Role of β3-adrenoceptors in regulation of retinal vascular tone in rats.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asami; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of β(3)-adrenoceptors in the action of endogenous catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline) on rat retinal arterioles in vivo. Using an original high-resolution digital fundus camera, the rat ocular fundus images were captured. The diameter of retinal arterioles contained in the images was measured. Both systemic blood pressure and heart rate were recorded continuously. Adrenaline (0.3-5.0 μg/kg/min, i.v.) increased the diameter of retinal arterioles, mean blood pressure and heart rate in a dose-dependent manner. Under blockade of β(1)/β(2)-adrenoceptors with propranolol (2 mg/kg, i.v. bolus followed by 100 μg/kg/min infusion), adrenaline decreased the diameter of retinal arterioles. Similar observation was made under treatment with the β(3)-adrenoceptor antagonist L-748337 (50 μg/kg, i.v.). The pressor response to adrenaline was enhanced by propranolol, but not by L-748337. The positive chronotropic action of adrenaline was markedly prevented by propranolol, whereas it was unaffected by L-748337. Noradrenaline (0.03-1.0 μg/kg/min, i.v.) decreased the diameter of retinal arterioles but increased the mean blood pressure and heart rate. The effects of noradrenaline on retinal arteriolar diameter and blood pressure were unaffected by propranolol or L-748337. The positive chronotropic action of noradrenaline was almost completely abolished by propranolol. These results suggest that β(3)-adrenoceptors play crucial roles in vasodilator responses to adrenaline of retinal arterioles but have minor or no effect on noradrenaline-induced responses. The results also indicate that the functional role of β(3)-adrenoceptors may be more important than that in peripheral resistance vessels. PMID:21901314

  7. Zingiber officinale attenuates retinal microvascular changes in diabetic rats via anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dongare, Shirish; Mathur, Rajani; Saxena, Rohit; Mathur, Sandeep; Agarwal, Renu; Nag, Tapas C.; Srivastava, Sushma; Kumar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of long-standing diabetes. Several complex interconnecting biochemical pathways are activated in response to hyperglycemia. These pathways culminate into proinflammatory and angiogenic effects that bring about structural and functional damage to the retinal vasculature. Since Zingiber officinale (ginger) is known for its anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties, we investigated the effects of its extract standardized to 5% 6-gingerol, the major active constituent of ginger, in attenuating retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Methods Diabetic rats were treated orally with the vehicle or the ginger extract (75 mg/kg/day) over a period of 24 weeks along with regular monitoring of bodyweight and blood glucose and weekly fundus photography. At the end of the 24-week treatment, the retinas were isolated for histopathological examination under a light microscope, transmission electron microscopy, and determination of the retinal tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Results Oral administration of the ginger extract resulted in significant reduction of hyperglycemia, the diameter of the retinal vessels, and vascular basement membrane thickness. Improvement in the architecture of the retinal vasculature was associated with significantly reduced expression of NF-κB and reduced activity of TNF-α and VEGF in the retinal tissue in the ginger extract–treated group compared to the vehicle-treated group. Conclusions The current study showed that ginger extract containing 5% of 6-gingerol attenuates the retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes through anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic actions. Although precise molecular targets remain to be determined, 6-gingerol seems to be a potential candidate for further investigation. PMID:27293376

  8. Fzd4 Haploinsufficiency Delays Retinal Revascularization in the Mouse Model of Oxygen Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Godfrey; Nejat, Sara; Kelly, Melanie E.; McMaster, Christopher R.; Robitaille, Johane M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes that code for components of the Norrin-FZD4 ligand-receptor complex cause the inherited childhood blinding disorder familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR). Statistical evidence from studies of patients at risk for the acquired disease retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) suggest that rare polymorphisms in these same genes increase the risk of developing severe ROP, implying that decreased Norrin-FZD4 activity predisposes patients to more severe ROP. To test this hypothesis, we measured the development and recovery of retinopathy in wild type and Fzd4 heterozygous mice in the absence or presence of ocular ischemic retinopathy (OIR) treatment. Avascular and total retinal vascular areas and patterning were determined, and vessel number and caliber were quantified. In room air, there was a small delay in retinal vascularization in Fzd4 heterozygous mice that resolved as mice reached maturity suggestive of a slight defect in retinal vascular development. Subsequent to OIR treatment there was no difference between wild type and Fzd4 heterozygous mice in the vaso-obliterated area following exposure to high oxygen. Importantly, after return of Fzd4 heterozygous mice to room air subsequent to OIR treatment, there was a substantial delay in retinal revascularization of the avascular area surrounding the optic nerve, as well as delayed vascularization toward the periphery of the retina. Our study demonstrates that a small decrease in Norrin-Fzd4 dependent retinal vascular development lengthens the period during which complications from OIR could occur. PMID:27489958

  9. Case report of optic disc drusen with simultaneous peripapillary subretinal hemorrhage and central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Law, David Zhiwei; Yang, Francine Pei Lin; Teoh, Stephen Charn Beng

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old Chinese gentleman presented with right eye floaters and photopsia over one week. His visual acuities were 20/20 bilaterally. Posterior segment examination showed a right eye swollen optic disc and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) associated with an area of subretinal hemorrhage adjacent to the optic disc. Fundus fluorescein (FA) and indocyanine green angiographies (ICGA) of the right eye did not demonstrate choroidal neovascularization (CNV), polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), or retinal ischemia. Ultrasound B-scan revealed optic disc drusen (ODD). In view of good vision and absence of CNV, he was managed conservatively with spontaneous resolution after two months. Commonly, ODD may directly compress and mechanically rupture subretinal vessels at the optic disc, resulting in peripapillary subretinal hemorrhage, as was likely the case in our patient. Mechanical impairment of peripapillary circulation also results in retinal ischemia and may trigger the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and/or polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), leading to subretinal haemorrhage. Compromise in central venous outflow with increased retinal central venous pressure from the direct mechanical effects of enlarging ODD results in central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). Patients with subretinal hemorrhage and CRVO from ODD should be monitored closely for the development of potentially sight-threatening complications. PMID:25544921

  10. Evaluation of Ultrasound-Assisted Thrombolysis Using Custom Liposomes in a Model of Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Walid F.; Patel, Hitenkumar; Grant, Edward G.; Diniz, Bruno; Chader, Gerald J.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To study the potential efficacy of ultrasound (US) assisted by custom liposome (CLP) destruction as an innovative thrombolytic tool for the treatment of retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Methods. Experimental RVO was induced in the right eyes of 40 rabbits using laser photothrombosis; the US experiment took place 48 hours later. Rabbits were randomly divided into four equal groups: US+CLP group, US+saline group, CLP+sham US group, and no treatment group. The latter three groups acted as controls. Fundus fluorescein angiography and Doppler US were used to evaluate retinal blood flow. Results. CLP-assisted US thrombolysis resulted in restoration of flow in seven rabbits (70%). None of the control groups showed significant restoration of retinal venous blood flow. Conclusions. US-assisted thrombolysis using liposomes resulted in a statistically significant reperfusion of retinal vessels in the rabbit experimental model of RVO. This approach might be promising in the treatment of RVO in humans. Further studies are needed to evaluate this approach in patients with RVO. Ultrasound assisted thrombolysis can be an innovative tool in management of retinal vein occlusion. PMID:22969076

  11. Activation of Bone Marrow-Derived Microglia Promotes Photoreceptor Survival in Inherited Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Manabu; Otani, Atsushi; Oishi, Akio; Kojima, Hiroshi; Yodoi, Yuko; Kameda, Takanori; Nakamura, Hajime; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2008-01-01

    The role of microglia in neurodegeneration is controversial, although microglial activation in the retina has been shown to provide an early response against infection, injury, ischemia, and degeneration. Here we show that endogenous bone marrow (BM)-derived microglia play a protective role in vascular and neural degeneration in the retinitis pigmentosa model of inherited retinal degeneration. BM-derived cells were recruited to the degenerating retina where they differentiated into microglia and subsequently localized to the degenerating vessels and neurons. Inhibition of stromal-derived factor-1 in the retina reduced the number of BM-derived microglia and accelerated the rate of neurovascular degeneration. Systemic depletion of myeloid progenitors also accelerated the degenerative process. Conversely, activation of BM-derived myeloid progenitors by systemic administration of both granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and erythropoietin resulted in the deceleration of retinal degeneration and the promotion of cone cell survival. These data indicate that BM-derived microglia may play a protective role in retinitis pigmentosa. Functional activation of BM-derived myeloid progenitors by cytokine therapy may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of inherited retinal degeneration and other neurodegenerative diseases, regardless of the underlying genetic defect. PMID:18483210

  12. Inner retinal oxygen metabolism in the 50/10 oxygen-induced retinopathy model

    PubMed Central

    Soetikno, Brian T.; Yi, Ji; Shah, Ronil; Liu, Wenzhong; Purta, Patryk; Zhang, Hao F.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) represents a major cause of childhood vision loss worldwide. The 50/10 oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model mimics the findings of ROP, including peripheral vascular attenuation and neovascularization. The oxygen metabolism of the inner retina has not been previously explored in this model. Using visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we measured the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin and blood flow within inner retinal vessels, enabling us to compute the inner retinal oxygen delivery (irDO2) and metabolic rate of oxygen (irMRO2). We compared these measurements between age-matched room-air controls and rats with 50/10 OIR on postnatal day 18. To account for a 61% decrease in the irDO2 in the OIR group, we found an overall statistically significant decrease in retinal vascular density affecting the superficial and deep retinal vascular capillary networks in rats with OIR compared to controls. Furthermore, matching the reduced irDO2, we found a 59% decrease in irMRO2, which we correlated with a statistically significant reduction in retinal thickness in the OIR group, suggesting that the decreased irMRO2 was due to decreased neuronal oxygen utilization. By exploring these biological and metabolic changes in great detail, our study provides an improved understanding of the pathophysiology of OIR model. PMID:26576731

  13. Attenuation of nitric oxide- and prostaglandin-independent vasodilation of retinal arterioles induced by acetylcholine in streptozotocin-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Taisuke; Kaneko, Yoshiko; Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    Diabetes alters retinal hemodynamics, but little is known about the impact of diabetes on the role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in the regulation of retinal circulation. Therefore, we examined how diabetes affects the nitric oxide- and prostaglandin-independent vasodilation of retinal arterioles induced by acetylcholine. Male Wistar rats were treated with streptozotocin (80 mg/kg, i.p.) and experiments were performed 6-8 weeks later. Under artificial ventilation, rats were treated with tetrodotoxin (100 microg/kg, i.v.) to eliminate any nerve activity and prevent movement of the eye. Methoxamine was used to maintain adequate systemic circulation. Fundus images were captured by a digital camera that was equipped with a special objective lens. The vasodilator responses of retinal arterioles were assessed by measuring changes in diameters of the vessels. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and the age-matched controls, acetylcholine increased diameters of retinal arterioles in a dose-dependent manner. The vasodilator responses to acetylcholine in diabetic rats were smaller than those in control rats. The nitric oxide- and prostaglandin-independent vasodilation of retinal arterioles observed under treatment with combination of N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (30 mg/kg, i.v.) and indomethacin (5 mg/kg, i.v.) were also attenuated by diabetes. Diabetes did not alter the dilator responses of retinal arterioles to sodium nitroprusside and forskolin. These results suggest that diabetes impairs EDHF-mediated vasodilation of retinal arterioles induced by acetylcholine. The impaired EDHF-mediated vasodilation may contribute to alteration of retinal hemodynamics in diabetes. PMID:17079193

  14. Feature Extraction Of Retinal Images Interfaced With A Rule-Based Expert System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishag, Na seem; Connell, Kevin; Bolton, John

    1988-12-01

    Feature vectors are automatically extracted from a library of digital retinal images after considerable image processing. Main features extracted are location of optic disc, cup-to-disc ratio using Hough transform techniques and histogram and binary enhancement algorithms, and blood vessel locations. These feature vectors are used to form a relational data base of the images. Relational operations are then used to extract pertinent information from the data base to form replies to queries from the rule-based expert system.

  15. Fatp1 Deficiency Affects Retinal Light Response and Dark Adaptation, and Induces Age-Related Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Chekroud, Karim; Guillou, Laurent; Grégoire, Stephane; Ducharme, Gilles; Brun, Emilie; Cazevieille, Chantal; Bretillon, Lionel; Hamel, Christian P.

    2012-01-01

    FATP1 is involved in lipid transport into cells and in intracellular lipid metabolism. We showed previously that this protein interacts with and inhibits the limiting-step isomerase of the visual cycle RPE65. Here, we aimed to analyze the effect of Fatp1-deficiency in vivo on the visual cycle, structure and function, and on retinal aging. Among the Fatp family members, we observed that only Fatp1 and 4 are expressed in the control retina, in both the neuroretina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In the neuroretina, Fatp1 is mostly expressed in photoreceptors. In young adult Fatp1−/− mice, Fatp4 expression was unchanged in retinal pigment epithelium and reduced two-fold in the neuroretina as compared to Fatp1+/+ mice. The Fatp1−/− mice had a preserved retinal structure but a decreased electroretinogram response to light. These mice also displayed a delayed recovery of the b-wave amplitude after bleaching, however, visual cycle speed was unchanged, and both retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors presented the same fatty acid pattern compared to controls. In 2 year-old Fatp1−/− mice, transmission electron microscopy studies showed specific abnormalities in the retinas comprising choroid vascularization anomalies and thickening of the Bruch membrane with material deposits, and sometimes local disorganization of the photoreceptor outer segments. These anomalies lead us to speculate that the absence of FATP1 accelerates the aging process. PMID:23166839

  16. Optical coherence tomography and electrophysiology of retinal and visual pathways in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Litwin, Tomasz; Szulborski, Kamil; Członkowska, Anna

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated correlations between positive findings of changes on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and selected morphological and electrophysiological parameters of the retinal and visual systems in Wilson's disease. Fifty-eight Wilson's disease symptomatic patients were divided according to whether they displayed brain changes on MRI (positive, n = 39; negative, n = 19). All participants and healthy control group (n = 30), underwent retinal optical coherence tomography to assess the thickness of macula and the total retinal nerve fiber layer. Visual evoked potentials were measured and electroretinography was performed. Macular and retinal nerve fibers were thinner in participants with changes on MRI than in participants without changes. Electrophysiological parameters were markedly different in the MRI positive group compared with the negative group and 30 healthy controls; however, some abnormalities were evident in cases without visible brain pathology. Morphological and electrophysiological changes of retinal and visual pathways are associated with MRI visualized brain injury in Wilson's disease and may be useful for detecting the degree of neurodegeneration. PMID:26686677

  17. Sustained intraocular VEGF neutralization results in retinal neurodegeneration in the Ins2Akita diabetic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hombrebueno, Jose R.; Ali, Imran HA.; Xu, Heping; Chen, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have become a mainstream therapy for the management of diabetic macular oedema. The treatment involves monthly repeated intravitreal injections of VEGF inhibitors. VEGF is an important growth factor for many retinal cells, including different types of neurons. In this study, we investigated the adverse effect of multiple intravitreal anti-VEGF injections (200 ng/μl/eye anti-mouse VEGF164, once every 2 weeks totalling 5–6 injections) to retinal neurons in Ins2Akita diabetic mice. Funduscopic examination revealed the development of cotton wool spot-like lesions in anti-VEGF treated Ins2Akita mice after 5 injections. Histological investigation showed focal swellings of retinal nerve fibres with neurofilament disruption. Furthermore, anti-VEGF-treated Ins2Akita mice exhibited impaired electroretinographic responses, characterized by reduced scotopic a- and b-wave and oscillatory potentials. Immunofluorescent staining revealed impairment of photoreceptors, disruptions of synaptic structures and loss of amacrine and retinal ganglion cells in anti-VEGF treated Ins2Akita mice. Anti-VEGF-treated WT mice also presented mild amacrine and ganglion cell death, but no overt abnormalities in photoreceptors and synaptic structures. At the vascular level, exacerbated albumin leakage was observed in anti-VEGF injected diabetic mice. Our results suggest that sustained intraocular VEGF neutralization induces retinal neurodegeneration and vascular damage in the diabetic eye. PMID:26671074

  18. Myosin7a Deficiency Results in Reduced Retinal Activity Which Is Improved by Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Colella, Pasqualina; Sommella, Andrea; Marrocco, Elena; Di Vicino, Umberto; Polishchuk, Elena; Garrido, Marina Garcia; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Polishchuk, Roman; Auricchio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in MYO7A cause autosomal recessive Usher syndrome type IB (USH1B), one of the most frequent conditions that combine severe congenital hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa. A promising therapeutic strategy for retinitis pigmentosa is gene therapy, however its pre-clinical development is limited by the mild retinal phenotype of the shaker1 (sh1−/−) murine model of USH1B which lacks both retinal functional abnormalities and degeneration. Here we report a significant, early-onset delay of sh1−/− photoreceptor ability to recover from light desensitization as well as a progressive reduction of both b-wave electroretinogram amplitude and light sensitivity, in the absence of significant loss of photoreceptors up to 12 months of age. We additionally show that subretinal delivery to the sh1−/− retina of AAV vectors encoding the large MYO7A protein results in significant improvement of sh1−/− photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium ultrastructural anomalies which is associated with improvement of recovery from light desensitization. These findings provide new tools to evaluate the efficacy of experimental therapies for USH1B. In addition, although AAV vectors expressing large genes might have limited clinical applications due to their genome heterogeneity, our data show that AAV-mediated MYO7A gene transfer to the sh1−/− retina is effective. PMID:23991031

  19. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa mapping to chromosome 7p exhibits variable expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, R Y; Fitzke, F W; Moore, A T; Jay, M; Inglehearn, C; Arden, G B; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C

    1995-01-01

    The genetic locus causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) has recently been mapped in a large English family to chromosome 7p. Eight affected members of this family were studied electrophysiologically and psychophysically with dark adapted static threshold perimetry and dark adaptometry. The phenotypes observed fell into three categories: minimally affected with no symptoms, and normal (or near normal) electrophysiology and psychophysics; moderately affected with mild symptoms, abnormal electroretinograms, and equal loss of rod and cone function in affected areas of the retina; and severely affected with extinguished electroretinograms and barely detectable dark adapted static threshold sensitivities. The mutation in the gene on 7p causing adRP in this family causes regional retinal dysfunction with greatly variable expressivity ranging from normal to profoundly abnormal in a manner not explained by age. PMID:7880785

  20. Retinal blood flow indices in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Yung, C W; Harris, A; Massicotte, S; Chioran, G; Krombach, G; Danis, R; Wolf, S

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: Abnormal blood flow dynamics are believed to contribute to the development of retinal microvascular disease in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this study, the scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) was used, combined with fluorescein angiography, to measure retinal blood flow indices in HIV seropositive patients. METHODS: Arteriovenous passage time (AVP) and perifoveal capillary blood flow velocity (CFV) were measured in 23 HIV infected patients and 23 control subjects with SLO fluorescein angiography. RESULTS: No significant difference in AVP was found between the two groups. However, CFV was significantly reduced in HIV infected patients (p = 0.013). CONCLUSION: Patients infected with HIV show abnormal haemodynamics at the level of the perifoveal capillaries. PMID:8949717

  1. Three-dimensional segmentation and reconstruction of the retinal vasculature from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, Pedro; Rodrigues, Pedro; Celorico, Dirce; Serranho, Pedro; Bernardes, Rui

    2015-01-01

    We reconstruct the three-dimensional shape and location of the retinal vascular network from commercial spectral-domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) data. The two-dimensional location of retinal vascular network on the eye fundus is obtained through support vector machines classification of properly defined fundus images from OCT data, taking advantage of the fact that on standard SD-OCT, the incident light beam is absorbed by hemoglobin, creating a shadow on the OCT signal below each perfused vessel. The depth-wise location of the vessel is obtained as the beginning of the shadow. The classification of crossovers and bifurcations within the vascular network is also addressed. We illustrate the feasibility of the method in terms of vessel caliber estimation and the accuracy of bifurcations and crossovers classification.

  2. High quality optical microangiography of ocular microcirculation and measurement of total retinal blood flow in mouse eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Yin, Xin; Dziennis, Suzan; Alpers, Charles E.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2013-03-01

    Visualization and measurement of retinal blood flow (RBF) is important to the diagnosis and management of different eye diseases, including diabetic retinopathy. Optical microangiography (OMAG) is developed for generating 3D dynamic microcirculation image and later refined into ultra-high sensitive OMAG (UHS-OMAG) for true capillary vessels imaging. Here, we present the application of OMAG imaging technique for visualization of depth-resolved vascular network within retina and choroid as well as measurement of total retinal blood flow in mice. A fast speed spectral domain OCT imaging system at 820nm with a line scan rate of 140 kHz was developed to image mouse posterior eye. By applying UHS-OMAG scanning protocol and processing algorithm, we achieved true capillary level imaging of retina and choroid vasculature in mouse eye. The vascular pattern within different retinal layers and choroid was presented. An en face Doppler OCT approach [1] without knowing Doppler angle was adopted for the measurement of total retinal blood flow. The axial blood flow velocity is measured in an en face plane by raster scanning and the flow is calculated by integrating over the vessel area of the central retinal artery.

  3. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. PMID:25903257

  4. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  5. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  6. Current perspectives of herpesviral retinitis and choroiditis.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, H N; Priya, K; Biswas, J

    2004-10-01

    Vision-threatening viral retinitis are primarily caused by members of the herpesvirus family. The biology and molecular characterization of herpesviruses, clinical presentations of retinopathies, pathology and pathogenesis including the host responses, epidemiology and the laboratory methods of aetiological diagnosis of these diseases are described. Clinical syndromes are acute retinal necrosis (ARN), progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN), cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis, multifocal choroiditis and serpiginous choroiditis besides other viral retinopathies. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) retinitis is more common in immunocompetent persons while varicella zoster virus (VZV) affects both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients equally. CMV retinitis is most common among patients with AIDS. The currently employed laboratory methods of antigen detection, virus isolation and antibody detection by enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) have low sensitivity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has increased the value of diagnosis due to its high clinical sensitivity and absolute specificity in detection of herpesviruses in intraocular specimens. PMID:16295367

  7. Gene Therapy for Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Samiy, Nasrollah

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has a growing research potential particularly in the field of ophthalmic and retinal diseases owing to three main characteristics of the eye; accessibility in terms of injections and surgical interventions, its immune-privileged status facilitating the accommodation to the antigenicity of a viral vector, and tight blood-ocular barriers which save other organs from unwanted contamination. Gene therapy has tremendous potential for different ocular diseases. In fact, the perspective of gene therapy in the field of eye research does not confine to exclusive monogenic ophthalmic problems and it has the potential to include gene based pharmacotherapies for non-monogenic problems such as age related macular disease and diabetic retinopathy. The present article has focused on how gene transfer into the eye has been developed and used to treat retinal disorders with no available therapy at present. PMID:25709778

  8. Retinitis pigmentosa in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J; Bartmann, L; Ramesar, R; Beighton, P

    1993-11-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal disorders which are a common cause of genetic blindness. The relative frequencies of the different forms of RP in South Africa, as determined from the register at the DNA banking centre for RP at the Department of Human Genetics, University of Cape Town, are presented and discussed. Of the 125 families analysed, 29 (23%) showed autosomal dominant, 33 (27%) autosomal recessive and 3 (3%) X-linked inheritance. In 10 families the pedigree data were insufficient to allow accurate genetic subtyping and a further 50 patients were sporadic without a family history of RP or other syndromic features which would allow categorization. PMID:8313621

  9. Retinal vein occlusion: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Rosangela; Torres Gimeno, Ana; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Bandello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a pathology noted for more than 150 years. Although a lot has been written on the matter, it is still a frequent condition with multifactorial etiopathogenesis with many unclear aspects. The RVO pathogenesis has varied systemic and local implications that make it difficult to elaborate treatment guidelines. The management of the patient with RVO is very complex and a multidisciplinary approach is required in order to identify and correct the associated risk factors. Laser therapy remains the gold standard in RVO, but only modest functional improvement has been shown in branch retinal occlusion forms. Multicenter studies of intravitreal drugs present them as an option to combine with laser. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids and sustained-release implants are the future weapons to stop disease progression and get a better visual outcome. Consequently, it is useful to clarify some aspects of the pathology that allow a better patient management. PMID:20938213

  10. Operational challenges of retinal prostheses.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Erich W; Fink, Wolfgang; Wilke, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Two computational models for research on retinal implants are presented. In the first model, the electric field produced by a multi-electrode array in a uniform retina is calculated. It is shown how cross talk of activated electrodes and the resulting bunching of field lines in monopole and dipole activation prevent high resolution imaging with retinal implants. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how sequential stimulation and multipolar stimulation may overcome this limitation. In the second model a target volume, i.e., a probe cylinder approximating a bipolar cell, in the retina is chosen, and the passive Heaviside cable equation is solved inside this target volume to calculate the depolarization of the cell membrane. The depolarization as a function of time indicates that shorter signals stimulate better as long as the current does not change sign during stimulation of the retina, i.e., mono-phasic stimulation. Both computational models are equally applicable to epiretinal, subretinal, and suprachoroidal vision implants. PMID:25443535

  11. Pressure vessel bottle mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A mounting assembly for mounting a composite pressure vessel to a vehicle includes a saddle having a curved surface extending between two pillars for receiving the vessel. The saddle also has flanged portions which can be bolted to the vehicle. Each of the pillars has hole in which is mounted the shaft portion of an attachment member. A resilient member is disposed between each of the shaft portions and the holes and loaded by a tightening nut. External to the holes, each of the attachment members has a head portion to which a steel band is attached. The steel band circumscribes the vessel and translates the load on the springs into a clamping force on the vessel. As the vessel expands and contracts, the resilient members expand and contract so that the clamping force applied by the band to the vessel remains constant.

  12. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  13. Adaptive Optics-Assisted Identification of Preferential Erythrocyte Aggregate Pathways in the Human Retinal Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Arichika, Shigeta; Uji, Akihito; Ooto, Sotaro; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize human parafoveal blood flow using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO). Methods In 5 normal subjects, erythrocyte aggregate distributions were analyzed on 3 different days. Erythrocyte aggregates were described as a “dark tail” in AO-SLO. The characteristics of the pathways with dark tail flow in the parafovea were measured. Additionally, the tendency for dark tail flow before and after bifurcations was analyzed to study the blood flow in detail. Results Average velocity in parent vessels with dark tail flow was 1.30±0.27 mm/s. Average velocity in daughter vessels with dark tail flow was 1.12±0.25 mm/s, and the average velocity of plasma gaps in daughter vessels without dark tail flow was 0.64±0.11 mm/s. Downstream from the bifurcations, the velocity in vessels with dark tail flow was higher than that in those without it (p<0.001), and the branching angles of vessels with dark tail flow were smaller than those of vessels without it (p<0.001). Conclusions Images from the AO-SLO noninvasively revealed pathways with and without dark tail flow in the human parafovea. Pathways with dark tail flow in the daughter vessels generally had faster flow and smaller bifurcation angles than daughter vessels without dark tail flow. Thus, AO-SLO is an instructive tool for analyzing retinal microcirculatory hemodynamics. PMID:24586959

  14. Automated placement of retinal laser lesions in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Jerath, Maya R.; Lewis, R. Stephen, II; Dillard, Bryan C.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1995-03-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Biomedical Engineering Laser Laboratory investigating the medical applications of lasers have worked toward the development of a retinal robotic laser system. The overall goal of the ongoing project is to precisely place and control the depth of laser lesions for the treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. Researchers at the USAF Academy's Department of Electrical Engineering and the Optical Radiation Division of Armstrong Laboratory have also become involved with this research due to similar related interests. Separate low speed prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion depth using lesion reflectance feedback parameters and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Both subsystems have been successfully demonstrated in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser. Work is ongoing to build a prototype system to simultaneously control lesion depth and placement. Following the dual-use concept, this system is being adapted for clinical use as a retinal treatment system as well as a research tool for military laser-tissue interaction studies. Specifically, the system is being adapted for use with an ultra-short pulse laser system at Armstrong Laboratory and Frank J. Seiler Research Laboratory to study the effects of ultra-short laser pulses on the human retina. The instrumentation aspects of the prototype subsystems were presented at SPIE Conference 1877 in January 1993. Since then our efforts have concentrated on combining the lesion depth control subsystem and the lesion placement subsystem into a single prototype capable of simultaneously controlling both parameters. We have designated this combined system CALOSOS for Computer Aided Laser Optics System for Ophthalmic Surgery. We have also investigated methods to improve system response time. Use of high speed nonstandard frame rate CCD cameras and high speed frame

  15. IGFBP3 suppresses retinopathy through suppression of oxygen-induced vessel loss and promotion of vascular regrowth

    PubMed Central

    Lofqvist, Chatarina; Chen, Jing; Connor, Kip M.; Smith, Alexandra C. H.; Aderman, Christopher M.; Liu, Nan; Pintar, John E.; Ludwig, Thomas; Hellstrom, Ann; Smith, Lois E. H.

    2007-01-01

    Vessel loss precipitates many diseases. In particular, vessel loss resulting in hypoxia induces retinal neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy and in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), major causes of blindness. Here we define insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP3) as a new modulator of vascular survival and regrowth in oxygen-induced retinopathy. In IGFBP3-deficient mice, there was a dose-dependent increase in oxygen-induced retinal vessel loss. Subsequent to oxygen-induced retinal vessel loss, Igfbp3−/− mice had a 31% decrease in retinal vessel regrowth versus controls after returning to room air. No difference in serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) levels was observed among groups. Wild-type mice treated with exogenous IGFBP3 had a significant increase in vessel regrowth. This correlated with a 30% increase in endothelial progenitor cells in the retina at postnatal day 15, indicating that IGFBP3 could be serving as a progenitor cell chemoattractant. In a prospective clinical study, we measured IGFBP3 (and IGF1) plasma levels weekly and examined retinas in all premature infants born at gestational ages <32 weeks at high risk for ROP. The mean level of IGFBP3 at 30–35 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) for infants with proliferative ROP (ROP stages 3>, n = 13) was 802 μg/liter, and for infants with no ROP (ROP stage 0, n = 38) the mean level was 974 μg/liter (P < 0.03). These results suggest that IGFBP3, acting independently of IGF1, helps to prevent oxygen-induced vessel loss and to promote vascular regrowth after vascular destruction in vivo in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in less retinal neovascularization. PMID:17567756

  16. Comparison of subjective and objective methods to determine the retinal arterio-venous ratio using fundus photography

    PubMed Central

    Heitmar, Rebekka; Kalitzeos, Angelos A.; Patel, Sunni R.; Prabhu-Das, Diana; Cubbidge, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the inter and intra observer variability of subjective grading of the retinal arterio-venous ratio (AVR) using a visual grading and to compare the subjectively derived grades to an objective method using a semi-automated computer program. Methods Following intraocular pressure and blood pressure measurements all subjects underwent dilated fundus photography. 86 monochromatic retinal images with the optic nerve head centred (52 healthy volunteers) were obtained using a Zeiss FF450+ fundus camera. Arterio-venous ratios (AVR), central retinal artery equivalent (CRAE) and central retinal vein equivalent (CRVE) were calculated on three separate occasions by one single observer semi-automatically using the software VesselMap (ImedosSystems, Jena, Germany). Following the automated grading, three examiners graded the AVR visually on three separate occasions in order to assess their agreement. Results Reproducibility of the semi-automatic parameters was excellent (ICCs: 0.97 (CRAE); 0.985 (CRVE) and 0.952 (AVR)). However, visual grading of AVR showed inter grader differences as well as discrepancies between subjectively derived and objectively calculated AVR (all p < 0.000001). Conclusion Grader education and experience leads to inter-grader differences but more importantly, subjective grading is not capable to pick up subtle differences across healthy individuals and does not represent true AVR when compared with an objective assessment method. Technology advancements mean we no longer rely on opthalmoscopic evaluation but can capture and store fundus images with retinal cameras, enabling us to measure vessel calibre more accurately compared to visual estimation; hence it should be integrated in optometric practise for improved accuracy and reliability of clinical assessments of retinal vessel calibres. PMID:26386537

  17. Angiographic results of retinal-retinal anastomosis and retinal-choroidal anastomosis after treatments in eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masaaki; Iida, Tomohiro; Kano, Mariko; Itagaki, Kanako

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the angiographic results of retinal-retinal anastomosis (RRA) and retinal-choroidal anastomosis (RCA) for eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) after treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab injections as monotherapy or intravitreal bevacizumab combined with photodynamic therapy. Methods In this interventional, consecutive case series, we retrospectively reviewed five naïve eyes from four patients (mean age 80 years) treated with three consecutive monthly intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 mL) injections as initial treatment, and followed up for at least 3 months. In cases with over 3 months of follow-up and having recurrence of RAP or leakage by fluorescein angiography, retreatment was performed with a single intravitreal bevacizumab injection and photodynamic therapy. Results Indocyanine green angiography showed RRA in three eyes with subretinal neovascularization and RCA in two eyes with choroidal neovascularization at baseline. At 3 months after baseline (month 3), neither the RRA nor RCA was occluded in any eye on indocyanine green angiography. Retreatment with intravitreal bevacizumab plus photodynamic therapy was performed in three eyes at months 3 (persistent leakage on fluorescein angiography), 6, and 7 (recurrence of RAP lesion), which achieved obvious occlusion of the RRA and RCA. Mean best-corrected visual acuity improved from 0.13 to 0.21 at month 3 (P = 0.066). No complications or systemic adverse events were noted. Conclusion Although intravitreal bevacizumab for RAP was effective in improving visual acuity during short-term follow-up, intravitreal bevacizumab could not achieve complete occlusion of RRA and RCA, which could lead to recurrence of a RAP lesion and exudation. Retreatment with intravitreal bevacizumab plus photodynamic therapy ultimately achieved complete occlusion of the RRA and RCA. PMID:22969283

  18. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  19. Retinal pathways influence temporal niche

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Susan E.; Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Hillson, Holly; Menaker, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In mammals, light input from the retina entrains central circadian oscillators located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). The phase of circadian activity rhythms with respect to the external light:dark cycle is reversed in diurnal and nocturnal species, although the phase of SCN rhythms relative to the light cycle remains unchanged. Neural mechanisms downstream from the SCN are therefore believed to determine diurnality or nocturnality. Here, we report a switch from nocturnal to diurnal entrainment of circadian activity rhythms in double-knockout mice lacking the inner-retinal photopigment melanopsin (OPN4) and RPE65, a key protein used in retinal chromophore recycling. These mice retained only a small amount of rod function. The change in entrainment phase of Rpe65−/−;Opn4−/− mice was accompanied by a reversal of the rhythm of clock gene expression in the SCN and a reversal in acute masking effects of both light and darkness on activity, suggesting that the nocturnal to diurnal switch is due to a change in the neural response to light upstream from the SCN. A switch from nocturnal to diurnal activity rhythms was also found in wild-type mice transferred from standard intensity light:dark cycles to light:dark cycles in which the intensity of the light phase was reduced to scotopic levels. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which changes in retinal input can mediate acute temporal-niche switching. PMID:18695249

  20. Mechanisms of Normal and Abnormal Endometrial Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of coagulation, is enhanced in decidualized human endometrial stromal cells (HESC) during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. Progesterone also augments a second HESC hemostatic factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In contrast, progestins inhibit HESC matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, 3 and 9 expression to stabilize endometrial stromal and vascular extracellular matrix. Through these mechanisms decidualized endometrium is rendered both hemostatic and resistant to excess trophoblast invasion in the mid-luteal phase and throughout gestation to prevent hemorrhage and accreta. In non-fertile cycles, progesterone withdrawal results in decreased HESC TF and PAI-expression and increased MMP activity and inflammatory cytokine production promoting the controlled hemorrhage of menstruation and related tissue sloughing. In contrast to these well ordered biochemical processes, unpredictable endometrial bleeding associated with anovulation reflects absence of progestational effects on TF, PAI-1 and MMP activity as well as unrestrained angiogenesis rendering the endometrium non-hemostatic, proteolytic and highly vascular. Abnormal bleeding associated with long-term progestin-only contraceptives results not from impaired hemostasis but from unrestrained angiogenesis leading to large fragile endometrial vessels. This abnormal angiogenesis reflects progestational inhibition of endometrial blood flow promoting local hypoxia and generation of reactive oxygen species that increase production of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in HESCs and Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in endometrial endothelial cells while decreasing HESC expression of angiostatic, Ang-1. The resulting vessel fragility promotes bleeding. Aberrant angiogenesis also underlies abnormal bleeding associated with myomas and endometrial polyps however there are gaps in our understanding of this pathology. PMID:21499503

  1. Retinal Cell Degeneration in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Masayuki; Aoki, Hitomi; Hirata, Akihiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Green, Paul G.; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of various retinal cell degeneration models in animal induced by chemicals (N-methyl-d-aspartate- and CoCl2-induced), autoimmune (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis), mechanical stress (optic nerve crush-induced, light-induced) and ischemia (transient retinal ischemia-induced). The target regions, pathology and proposed mechanism of each model are described in a comparative fashion. Animal models of retinal cell degeneration provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of the disease, and will facilitate the development of novel effective therapeutic drugs to treat retinal cell damage. PMID:26784179

  2. Retinal Effects Of Blue Light Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, William T.; Mueller, Harold A.; Ruffolo, J. J.

    1980-10-01

    Recent research has shown that blue light exposure is an important factor in certain types of retinal injury. The mammalian ocular media transmits the spectral band 400-1400 nm to the retina. The short wavelengths (400-550 nm) produce a photochemical or actinic type of damage, while the longer wavelengths (550-1400 nm) produce thermal damage. Distinction between the two types of retinal damage are discussed briefly and the importance of the blue light effect for solar retinitis and eclipse blindness is emphasized. The significance of blue light retinal injury is summarized for various environmental and occupational exposures.

  3. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Hoz, Rosa; Rojas, Blanca; Ramírez, Ana I.; Salazar, Juan J.; Gallego, Beatriz I.; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia) provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies. PMID:27294114

  4. [Novel mechanism for retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Suzuma, Kiyoshi

    2015-03-01

    I. A new therapeutic target for diabetic retinopathy. Recent reports state that succinate may be an independent retinal angiogenic factor. We evaluated concentrations in vitreous from proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and found that succinate increased significantly in PDR. Interestingly, levels of succinate from bevacizumab-pre-injected PDR were normal, suggesting that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) had a positive feedback mechanism for succinate since succinate was previously reported to induce VEGF. II. A new understanding of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). We evaluated retinal blood flow velocity with laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG) made in Japan, and found that cases in which both macular edema and retinal blood flow velocity improved after anti-VEGF therapy had better prognosis. In ischemic CRVO at final visit, mean retinal blood velocity was less than 50% of fellow eyes after 1st anti-VEGF therapy, suggesting that those cases might have poor prognosis. LSFG is useful for evaluation and decision in CRVO treatment. III. From exploration for mechanism in retinal vascular diseases to re-vascularization therapy. The standard treatment for retinal non-perfusion area is scatter laser photocoagulation, which is both invasive of the peripheral retina and may prove destructive. Re-vascularization is an ideal strategy for treatment of retinal non-perfusion area. To develop a new methods for re-vascularization in retinal non-perfusion area, we have designed experiments using a retina without vasculature differentiated from induced pluripotent stem(iPS) cells. PMID:25854111

  5. Retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, M; Suzuma, K; Inaba, I; Ogura, Y; Yoneda, K; Okamoto, H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis, one of the most common forms of dermatitis in Japan, has markedly increased in Japan in the past 10 years. To clarify pathogenic mechanisms of retinal detachment in such cases, we retrospectively studied clinical characteristics of retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis. METHODS: We examined the records of 80 patients (89 eyes) who had retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis. The patients were classified into three groups according to lens status: group A, eyes with clear lenses (40 eyes); group B, eyes with cataract (38 eyes), and group C, aphakic or pseudophakic eyes (11 eyes). RESULTS: No significant differences were noted in the ratio of males to females, age distribution, refractive error, or characteristic of retinal detachment among the three groups. The types of retinal breaks, however, were different in eyes with and without lens changes. While atrophic holes were dominant in group A, retinal dialysis was mainly seen in groups B and C. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that anterior vitreoretinal traction may play an important role in the pathogenesis of retinal breaks in eyes with atopic cataract and that the same pathological process may affect the formation of cataract and tractional retinal breaks in patients with atopic dermatitis. PMID:8664234

  6. NCSX Vacuum Vessel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, M. E.; Brown, T.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Malinowski, F.; Reiersen, W.; Sutton, L.; Goranson, P.; Nelson, B.; Cole, M.; Manuel, M.; McCorkle, D.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this experiment is to develop a device which has the steady state properties of a traditional stellarator along with the high performance characteristics of a tokamak. A key element of this device is its highly shaped Inconel 625 vacuum vessel. This paper describes the manufacturing of the vessel. The vessel is being fabricated by Major Tool and Machine, Inc. (MTM) in three identical 120º vessel segments, corresponding to the three NCSX field periods, in order to accommodate assembly of the device. The port extensions are welded on, leak checked, cut off within 1" of the vessel surface at MTM and then reattached at PPPL, to accommodate assembly of the close-fitting modular coils that surround the vessel. The 120º vessel segments are formed by welding two 60º segments together. Each 60º segment is fabricated by welding ten press-formed panels together over a collapsible welding fixture which is needed to precisely position the panels. The vessel is joined at assembly by welding via custom machined 8" (20.3 cm) wide spacer "spool pieces." The vessel must have a total leak rate less than 5 X 10-6 t-l/s, magnetic permeability less than 1.02μ, and its contours must be within 0.188" (4.76 mm). It is scheduled for completion in January 2006.

  7. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  8. Animals deficient in C2Orf71, an autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa-associated locus, develop severe early-onset retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kevany, Brian M; Zhang, Ning; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-05-01

    Genetic mapping was recently used to identify the underlying cause for a previously uncharacterized cohort of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa cases. Genetic mapping of affected individuals resulted in the identification of an uncharacterized gene, C2Orf71, as the causative locus. However, initial homology searches failed to reveal similarities to any previously characterized protein or domain. To address this issue, we characterized the mouse homolog, BC027072. Immunohistochemistry with a custom polyclonal antibody showed staining localized to the inner segments (IS) of photoreceptor cells, as well as the outer segments (OS) of cone cells. A knockout mouse line (BC(-/-)) was generated and demonstrated that loss of this gene results in a severe, early-onset retinal degeneration. Histology and electron microscopy (EM) revealed disorganized OS as early as 3 weeks with complete loss by 24 weeks of age. EM micrographs displayed packets of cellular material containing OS discs or IS organelles in the OS region and abnormal retinal pigmented epithelium cells. Analyses of retinoids and rhodopsin levels showed <20% in BC(-/-) versus wild-type mice early in development. Electroretinograms demonstrated that affected mice were virtually non-responsive to light by 8 weeks of age. Lastly, RNAseq analysis of ocular gene expression in BC(-/-) mice revealed clues to the causes of the progressive retinal degenerations. Although its function remains unknown, this protein appears essential for normal OS development/maintenance and vision in humans and mice. RNAseq data are available in the GEO database under accession: GSE63810. PMID:25616964

  9. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  11. The Hippo Pathway Controls a Switch between Retinal Progenitor Cell Proliferation and Photoreceptor Cell Differentiation in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Asaoka, Yoichi; Hata, Shoji; Namae, Misako; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The precise regulation of numbers and types of neurons through control of cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation is an essential aspect of neurogenesis. The Hippo signaling pathway has recently been identified as playing a crucial role in promoting cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation in multiple types of stem cells, including in retinal progenitor cells. When Hippo signaling is activated, the core Mst1/2 kinases activate the Lats1/2 kinases, which in turn phosphorylate and inhibit the transcriptional cofactor Yap. During mouse retinogenesis, overexpression of Yap prolongs progenitor cell proliferation, whereas inhibition of Yap decreases this proliferation and promotes retinal cell differentiation. However, to date, it remains unknown how the Hippo pathway affects the differentiation of distinct neuronal cell types such as photoreceptor cells. In this study, we investigated whether Hippo signaling regulates retinogenesis during early zebrafish development. Knockdown of zebrafish mst2 induced early embryonic defects, including altered retinal pigmentation and morphogenesis. Similar abnormal retinal phenotypes were observed in zebrafish embryos injected with a constitutively active form of yap [(yap (5SA)]. Loss of Yap’s TEAD-binding domain, two WW domains, or transcription activation domain attenuated the retinal abnormalities induced by yap (5SA), indicating that all of these domains contribute to normal retinal development. Remarkably, yap (5SA)-expressing zebrafish embryos displayed decreased expression of transcription factors such as otx5 and crx, which orchestrate photoreceptor cell differentiation by activating the expression of rhodopsin and other photoreceptor cell genes. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Rx1 is a novel interacting partner of Yap that regulates photoreceptor cell differentiation. Our results suggest that Yap suppresses the differentiation of photoreceptor cells from retinal progenitor cells by repressing Rx1

  12. The Time Course of Deafness and Retinal Degeneration in a Kunming Mouse Model for Usher Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lu; Zhang, Lei; Qi, Lin-Song; Liu, Wei; An, Jing; Wang, Bin; Xue, Jun-Hui; Zhang, Zuo-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive diseases characterized by congenital deafness and retinitis pigmentosa. In a mouse model for Usher syndrome, KMush/ush, discovered in our laboratory, we measured the phenotypes, characterized the architecture and morphology of the retina, and quantified the level of expression of pde6b and ush2a between postnatal (P) days 7, and 56. Electroretinograms and auditory brainstem response were used to measure visual and auditory phenotypes. Fundus photography and light microscopy were used to measure the architecture and morphology of the retina. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the expression levels of mRNA. KMush/ush mice had low amplitudes and no obvious waveforms of Electroretinograms after P14 compared with controls. Thresholds of auditory brainstem response in our model were higher than those of controls after P14. By P21, the retinal vessels of KMush/ush mice were attenuated and their optic discs had a waxy pallor. The retinas of KMush/ush mice atrophied and the choroidal vessels were clearly visible. Notably, the architecture of each retinal layer was not different as compared with control mice at P7, while the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and other retinal layers of KMush/ush mice were attenuated significantly between P14 and P21. ONL cells were barely seen in KMush/ush mice at P56. As compared with control mice, the expression of pde6b and ush2a in KMush/ush mice declined significantly after P7. This study is a first step toward characterizing the progression of disease in our mouse model. Future studies using this model may provide insights about the etiology of the disease and the relationships between genotypes and phenotypes providing a valuable resource that could contribute to the foundation of knowledge necessary to develop therapies to prevent the retinal degeneration in patients with Usher Syndrome. PMID:27186975

  13. Absolute Retinal Blood Flow Measurement With a Dual-Beam Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Cuixia; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Hao F.; Puliafito, Carmen A.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To test the capability of a novel dual-beam Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique for simultaneous in vivo measurement of the Doppler angle and, thus, the absolute retinal blood velocity and the retinal flow rate, without the influence of motion artifacts. Methods. A novel dual-beam Doppler spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) was developed. The two probing beams are separated with a controllable distance along an arbitrary direction, both of which are controlled by two independent 2