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Sample records for retinitis pigmentosa rp15

  1. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of ...

  2. X-linked dominant cone-rod degeneration: Linkage mapping of a new locus for retinitis pigmentosa (RP15) to Xp22.13-p22.11

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.E.; Sullivan, L.S.; Daiger, S.P.

    1995-07-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the name given to a heterogeneous group of hereditary retinal degenerations characterized by progressive visual field loss, pigmentary changes of the retina, abnormal electroretinograms, and, frequently, night blindness. In this study, we investigated a family with dominant cone-rod degeneration, a variant form of retinitis pigmentosa. We used microsatellite markers to test for linkage to the disease locus and exluded all mapped autosomal loci. However, a marker from the short arm of the X chromosome, DXS989, showed 0% recombination to the disease locus, with a maximum lod (log-odds) score of 3.3. On the basis of this marker, the odds favoring X-linked dominant versus autosomal dominant inheritance are > 10{sup 5}:1. Haplotype analysis using an additional nine microsatellite markers places the disease locus in the Xp22.13-p22.11 region and excludes other X-linked disease loci causing retinal degeneration. The clinical expression of the retinal degeneration is consistent with X-linked dominant inheritance with milder, variable effects of Lyonization affecting expression in females. On the basis of these data we propose that this family has a novel form of dominant, X-linked cone-rod degeneration with the gene symbol {open_quotes}RP15{close_quotes}. 17 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  4. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retinitis pigmentosa retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of related eye disorders that ...

  5. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Education Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa includes a number of inherited diseases which usually result in blindness. The disease is progressive in nature and begins with the deterioration of cells in the eye responsible for peripheral vision. As the condition worsens there is a gradual loss of peripheral vision and night blindness. Proper educational planning requires…

  6. Molecular genetics of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Farber, D. B.; Heckenlively, J. R.; Sparkes, R. S.; Bateman, J. B.

    1991-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a model for the study of genetic diseases. Its genetic heterogeneity is reflected in the different forms of inheritance (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked) and, in a few families, in the presence of mutations in the visual pigment rhodopsin. Clinical and molecular genetic studies of these disorders are discussed. Animal models of retinal degeneration have been investigated for many years with the hope of gaining insight into the cause of photoreceptor cell death. Recently, the genes responsible for two of these animal disorders, the rds and rd mouse genes, have been isolated and characterized. The retinal degeneration of the rd mouse is presented in detail. The possible involvement of human analogues of these mouse genes in human retinal diseases is being investigated. Images PMID:1771877

  7. Retinitis pigmentosa in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J; Bartmann, L; Ramesar, R; Beighton, P

    1993-11-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal disorders which are a common cause of genetic blindness. The relative frequencies of the different forms of RP in South Africa, as determined from the register at the DNA banking centre for RP at the Department of Human Genetics, University of Cape Town, are presented and discussed. Of the 125 families analysed, 29 (23%) showed autosomal dominant, 33 (27%) autosomal recessive and 3 (3%) X-linked inheritance. In 10 families the pedigree data were insufficient to allow accurate genetic subtyping and a further 50 patients were sporadic without a family history of RP or other syndromic features which would allow categorization. PMID:8313621

  8. Low Vision Rehabilitation of Retinitis Pigmentosa. Practice Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rundquist, John

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a rod-cone dystrophy, commonly genetic in nature. Approximately 60-80% of those with retinitis pigmentosa inherit it by an autosomal recessive transmission (Brilliant, 1999). There have been some reported cases with no known family history. The symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa are decreased acuity, photophobia, night…

  9. A Psychophysical Test for Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Thomas R; Mancini, Michael

    A new test designed to detect an hereditary eye disease called retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is described. This condition is revealed by pigmentation in the retina, but early diagnosis is difficult because the symptoms are subtle, and since it is genetically recessive it frequently occurs in families with no history of early blindness. In many cases…

  10. The Retinitis Pigmentosa Student: Selected Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Franklin N.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic features of RP (retinitis pigmentosa-an untreatable conditions usually resulting in night blindness) are discussed and functioning considerations in the classroom (including the use of protective devices and mobility aids) are noted. Classroom modifications such as darklined paper and black pens are suggested. (CL)

  11. Case report: retinitis pigmentosa following cytotoxic chemotherapy in Usher's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, P; Wellemeyer, M L; Burton, G V

    1992-05-01

    Ocular toxicity is an uncommon complication of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Retinitis pigmentosa complicating cancer chemotherapy has not been reported. A patient with probable Usher's syndrome (congenital sensorineural deafness) had apparent acceleration of retinitis pigmentosa with blindness following cytotoxic chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Retinitis pigmentosa, a feature of Usher's syndrome, usually develops as a slowly progressive process. The rapid acceleration of retinopathy following tumor therapy suggests a possible relationship to the cytotoxic chemotherapy. Lymphocytes and fibroblasts from patients with Usher's syndrome are hypersensitive to the x-ray type of DNA-damaging agents. The DNA-damaging effects of chemotherapy may have accelerated the progression of retinitis pigmentosa in this patient. PMID:1580321

  12. Halting progressive neurodegeneration in advanced retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Susanne F.; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Duong, Jimmy K.; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Wei-Pu; Bonet-Ponce, Luis; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary retinal degenerative diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), are characterized by the progressive loss of rod photoreceptors followed by loss of cones. While retinal gene therapy clinical trials demonstrated temporary improvement in visual function, this approach has yet to achieve sustained functional and anatomical rescue after disease onset in patients. The lack of sustained benefit could be due to insufficient transduction efficiency of viral vectors (“too little”) and/or because the disease is too advanced (“too late”) at the time therapy is initiated. Here, we tested the latter hypothesis and developed a mouse RP model that permits restoration of the mutant gene in all diseased photoreceptor cells, thereby ensuring sufficient transduction efficiency. We then treated mice at early, mid, or late disease stages. At all 3 time points, degeneration was halted and function was rescued for at least 1 year. Not only do our results demonstrate that gene therapy effectively preserves function after the onset of degeneration, our study also demonstrates that there is a broad therapeutic time window. Moreover, these results suggest that RP patients are treatable, despite most being diagnosed after substantial photoreceptor loss, and that gene therapy research must focus on improving transduction efficiency to maximize clinical impact. PMID:26301813

  13. A Qualitative Self-Study of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fourie, Robert James

    2007-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a retinal degenerative disease causing progressive blindness. Most research on RP is biomedical, and mostly from an observer perspective, therefore poorly reflecting the lived experience of having RP. Accordingly, the researcher conducted a retrospective qualitative self-study, to analyze reflections on his own…

  14. Eye Motility Alterations in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Galeoto, Giovanni; Fratipietro, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated a sample of individuals with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with the aim of assessing the presence or absence of ocular motility (OM) disorders. Materials and Methods. We included 23 out of the 25 individuals from the sample (9 females and 14 males) with an average visual acuity of 6/10. Results. The cover test about the vertical deviation in near distance showed an r/l in 3.45% and an l/r in 6.9%. The assessment of OM showed that 39.1% of the sample had a severe hyperfunction of the IO of the right eye and a severe hyperfunction (34.5%) of the SO of the left eye; 21.8% had a moderate hypofunction of right SO with a moderate percentage of hypofunction of 17.5% for the SO of the left eye; 30.5%, however, showed a serious hypofunction of the SR of both eyes; 21.7% of the sample showed a hyperfunction in both eyes of the IR. Conclusion. This alteration, however, is not attributable to either a high refractive defect (medium-low myopia: −1 diopter ±3 SD) or to a severely impaired binocular vision (visual acuity, motor fusion, and stereopsis are normal or within a range of values commonly accepted). Therefore, the disorders of OM lead to a genetic origin. PMID:26124957

  15. On the heredity of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Jay, M.

    1982-01-01

    The aims of this study are: (1) to determine the frequencies of the various genetic forms of retinitis pigmentosa; and (2) to perform segregation analysis on autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked families. The families studied consisted of 2 series of patients at Moorfields Eye Hospital: (1) 426 families seen in the Genetic Clinic; and (2) 289 families seen in the Electrodiagnostic Department. Comparison between the 2 series identified biases of ascertainment, and it was estimated that the combined series included 53% of simplex cases and a minimum of 15% of X-linked families. Segregation analysis of the Genetic Clinic series showed good agreement with expectation in autosomal dominant and X-linked families, but indicated that no more than 70% of all simplex cases were autosomal recessive. The rest of the simplex cases were mildly affected and may represent fresh autosomal dominant mutations, autosomal dominant transmission with reduced penetrance, the heterozygous state of X-linked disease in some of the females, and phenocopies. PMID:7093178

  16. A case of CRB1-negative Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Sarao, Valentina; Veritti, Daniele; Prosperi, Raffaele; Pignatto, Silvia; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a heterogeneous group of ocular diseases that causes progressive degeneration of the photoreceptor cells mainly affecting the rods of the peripheral retina. The association between retinitis pigmentosa and exudative retinopathy was first described in 1956 and has been called "Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa." Mutations in the Crumbs homolog 1 (CRB1) gene have been reported as a risk factor for developing Coats-like changes in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. We report the case of a 15-year-old girl affected by CRB1 gene-negative retinitis pigmentosa and Coats-like exudative vasculopathy who was successfully treated with laser photocoagulation. PMID:23871396

  17. Evidence for further genetic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar-Singh, R.; Kenna, P.F.; Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, P. )

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the possible involvement of further genetic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa using a previously unreported large Irish family with the disease. We have utilized polymorphic microsatellite markers to exclude the disease gene segregating in this family from 3q, 6p, and the pericentric region of 8, that is, each of the three chromosomal regions to which adRP loci are known to map. Hence, we provide definitive evidence for the involvement of a fourth locus in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Detection of Retinitis Pigmentosa by Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Jeong; Lee, Hyunho; Cho, Joon Hyong; Cho, Young Ho; Kim, Chul-Ki; Lee, Taik Jin; Lee, Seok; Park, Ki Ho; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Lee, Hyuk-jae; Jun, Seong Chan; Kim, Jae Hun

    2014-01-01

    Differential interference contrast microscopy is designed to image unstained and transparent specimens by enhancing the contrast resulting from the Nomarski prism-effected optical path difference. Retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common inherited retinal diseases, is characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptors. In this study, Differential interference contrast microscopy was evaluated as a new and simple application for observation of the retinal photoreceptor layer and retinitis pigmentosa diagnostics and monitoring. Retinal tissues of Royal College of Surgeons rats and retinal-degeneration mice, both well-established animal models for the disease, were prepared as flatmounts and histological sections representing different elapsed times since the occurrence of the disease. Under the microscopy, the retinal flatmounts showed that the mosaic pattern of the photoreceptor layer was irregular and partly collapsed at the early stage of retinitis pigmentosa, and, by the advanced stage, amorphous. The histological sections, similarly, showed thinning of the photoreceptor layer at the early stage and loss of the outer nuclear layer by the advanced stage. To count and compare the number of photoreceptors in the normal and early-retinitis pigmentosa-stage tissues, an automated cell-counting program designed with MATLAB, a numerical computing language, using a morphological reconstruction method, was applied to the differential interference contrast microscopic images. The number of cells significantly decreased, on average, from 282 to 143 cells for the Royal College of Surgeons rats and from 255 to 170 for the retinal-degeneration mouse. We successfully demonstrated the potential of the differential interference contrast microscopy technique’s application to the diagnosis and monitoring of RP. PMID:24810005

  19. Sildenafil alters retinal function in mouse carriers of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Nivison-Smith, Lisa; Zhu, Yuan; Whatham, Andrew; Bui, Bang V; Fletcher, Erica L; Acosta, Monica L; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra, has been reported to cause transient visual disturbance from inhibition of phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE6), a key enzyme in the visual phototransduction pathway. This study investigated the effects of sildenafil on the rd1(+/-) mouse, a model for carriers of Retinitis Pigmentosa which exhibit normal vision but may have a lower threshold for cellular stress caused by sildenafil due to a heterozygous mutation in PDE6. Sildenafil caused a dose-dependent decrease in electroretinogram (ERG) responses of normal mice which mostly recovered two days post administration. In contrast, rd1(+/-) mice exhibited a significantly reduced photoreceptor and a supernormal bipolar cell response to sildenafil within 1 h of treatment. Carrier mice retinae took two weeks to return to baseline levels suggesting sildenafil has direct effects on both the inner and outer retina and these effects differ significantly between normal and carrier mice. Anatomically, an increase in expression of the early apoptotic marker, cytochrome C in rd1(+/-) mice indicated that the effects of sildenafil on visual function may lead to degeneration. The results of this study are significant considering approximately 1 in 50 people are likely to be carriers of recessive traits leading to retinal degeneration. PMID:25239397

  20. Targeting the Proteostasis Network in Rhodopsin Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, David A; Cheetham, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin are one of the most common causes of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Misfolding of rhodopsin can result in disruptions in cellular protein homeostasis, or proteostasis. There is currently no available treatment for RP. In this review, we discuss the different approaches currently being investigated for treatment of rhodopsin RP, focusing on the potential of manipulation of the proteostasis network as a therapeutic approach to combat retinal degeneration. PMID:26427449

  1. Workplace-Based Management of Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herse, Peter; Yapp, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the workplace-based accommodations that allowed a 45-year-old Southeast Asian woman with a moderate hearing deficit, who was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, to continue to perform her duties as a checkout operator. Emphasizes the importance of conducting workplace evaluations before providers offer advice on vocational matters. (CR)

  2. Politics and Human Welfare: Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients in South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKendrick, B. W.; Leketi, M.

    1990-01-01

    The study found that apartheid impacted the sociopsychological and physical circumstances of 12 African and 11 White people with retinitis pigmentosa in South Africa. Findings are discussed in terms of onset of condition, effects on subjects' lives, knowledge of social services, and needs unmet by existing services. (JDD)

  3. Successful Vocational Rehabilitation of Clients with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taheri-Araghi, M.; Hendren, G.

    1994-01-01

    Statistical analysis of 10 personal (client) variables and four program variables related to 76 people who became blind from retinitis pigmentosa revealed that 6 variables predicted clients' rehabilitation outcomes: age, gender, race, work status, amount of case-service money spent on the client's behalf, and number of changes in career objectives…

  4. X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa in an American family

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.E.; Daiger, S.P.; Blanton, S.H.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a genetically heterogeneous disease with autosomal dominant (adRP), autosomal recessive and X-linked forms. At least 3 forms of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa have been reported: RP2 which maps to Xp11.4-p 11.23, RP3 which maps to Xp21.1 and RP6, which maps to Xp21.3-p21.1. The X-linked forms of retinitis pigmentosa are generally considered to be recessive as female carriers are not affected or are much less affected than males. Here we report a five generation American family with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa in which both males and females are significantly affected. The disease locus in this family appears to be distinct from RP2 and RP3. The American family (UTAD054) presents with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa. The family appeared to fit an autosomal dominant pattern; however, linkage testing excluded all known adRP loci. Absence of male-to-male transmission in the pedigree suggested the possibility of X-linked dominant inheritance. Thus we tested six microsatellite markers that map to Xp (DXS987, DXS989, DXS993, DXS999, DXS1003 and DXS1110). Of these, DXS989 showed tight linkage with one allele (199) showing a 100% concordance with disease status. The odds favoring an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance in this family, versus autosomal dominant, are 10{sup 5}:1. In addition, recombinations for DXS999, and dXS1110, the two markers flanking DXS989, were observed in affected individuals. These data map the disease locus in this family to a 9 mb region on the X chromosome between Xp22.11 and Xp21.41. In addition, the recombinant individuals exclude close linkage to RP2 and RP3. The observance of high penetrance in females indicates that this family has X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We suggest that this mode of inheritance should be considered in other families with dominant retinitis pigmentosa but an absence of male-to-male transmission.

  5. Psychological and Educational Recommendations for Working with Young People with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chacón-López, Helena; López-Justicia, Maria D.; Vervloed, Mathijs P. J.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the consequences of Retinitis Pigmentosa, a retinal degenerative disease with progressive reduction of the visual field, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and night blindness. Retinitis Pigmentosa is addressed from both a psychological and an educational standpoint, focusing on the impact on learning, emotional well-being,…

  6. Severe manifestations in carrier females in X linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Souied, E; Segues, B; Ghazi, I; Rozet, J M; Chatelin, S; Gerber, S; Perrault, I; Michel-Awad, A; Briard, M L; Plessis, G; Dufier, J L; Munnich, A; Kaplan, J

    1997-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of progressive hereditary disorders of the retina in which various modes of inheritance have been described. Here, we report on X linked RP in nine families with constant and severe expression in carrier females. In our series, however, the phenotype was milder and delayed in carrier females compared to hemizygous males. This form of X linked RP could be regarded therefore as partially dominant. The disease gene maps to chromosome Xp2.1 in the genetic interval encompassing the RP3 locus (Zmax=13.71 at the DXS1100 locus). Single strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequence analysis of the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene, which accounts for RP3, failed to detect any mutation in our families. Future advances in the identification of X linked RP genes will hopefully help to elucidate the molecular basis of this X linked dominant RP. Images PMID:9350809

  7. ADIPOR1 Is Mutated in Syndromic Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingchu; Eblimit, Aiden; Wang, Jing; Li, Jianli; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Li; Wang, Xia; Xiao, Ningna; Li, Yumei; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Lewis, Richard A; Chen, Rui

    2016-03-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder. Despite the numerous genes associated with RP already identified, the genetic basis remains unknown in a substantial number of patients and families. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing to investigate the molecular basis of a syndromic RP case that cannot be solved by mutations in known disease-causing genes. After applying a series of variant filtering strategies, we identified an apparently homozygous frameshift mutation, c.31delC (p.Q11Rfs*24) in the ADIPOR1 gene. The reported phenotypes of Adipor1-null mice contain retinal dystrophy, obesity, and behavioral abnormalities, which highly mimic those in the syndromic RP patient. We further confirmed ADIPOR1 retina expression by immunohistochemistry. Our results established ADIPOR1 as a novel disease-causing gene for syndromic RP and highlight the importance of fatty acid transport in the retina. PMID:26662040

  8. Retinal Prosthesis System for Advanced Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetic disorders that involves the breakdown and loss of photoreceptors in the retina, resulting in progressive retinal degeneration and eventual blindness. The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System is the only currently available surgical implantable device approved by Health Canada. It has been shown to improve visual function in patients with severe visual loss from advanced retinitis pigmentosa. The objective of this analysis was to examine the clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, budget impact, and safety of the Argus II system in improving visual function, as well as exploring patient experiences with the system. Methods We performed a systematic search of the literature for studies examining the effects of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa, and appraised the evidence according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria, focusing on visual function, functional outcomes, quality of life, and adverse events. We developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of the Argus II system compared with standard care over a 10-year time horizon. We also conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. We used a qualitative design and an interview methodology to examine patients’ lived experience, and we used a modified grounded theory methodology to analyze information from interviews. Transcripts were coded, and themes were compared against one another. Results One multicentre international study and one single-centre study were included in the clinical review. In both studies, patients showed improved visual function with the Argus II system. However, the sight-threatening surgical complication rate was substantial. In the base-case analysis, the Argus II system was cost-effective compared with standard care only if willingness-to-pay was more than $207,616 per quality-adjusted life

  9. Nonallelic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with incomplete penetrance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P.

    1994-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of retinal diseases in which photoreceptor cells throughout the retina degenerate. Although there is considerable genetic heterogeneity (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked forms exist), there is a possibility that some clinically defined subtypes of the disease may be the result of mutations at the same locus. One possible clinically defined subtype is that of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) with incomplete penetrance. Whereas in most families with ADRP, carriers can be clearly identified because of visual loss, ophthalmological findings, or abnormal electroretinograms (ERGs), in occasional families some obligate carriers are asymptomatic and have normal or nearly normal ERGs even late in life. A recent paper reported the mapping of the diseases locus in one pedigree (designated adRP7) with ADRP with incomplete penetrance to chromosome 7p. To test the idea that ADRP with incomplete penetrance may be genetically homogeneous, we have evaluated whether a different family with incomplete penetrance also has a disease gene linked to the same region. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Mistrafficking of prenylated proteins causes retinitis pigmentosa 2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Houbin; Hanke-Gogokhia, Christin; Jiang, Li; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Pu; Gerstner, Cecilia D.; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Yang, Zhenglin; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The retinitis pigmentosa 2 polypeptide (RP2) functions as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for ARL3 (Arf-like protein 3), a small GTPase. ARL3 is an effector of phosphodiesterase 6 Δ (PDE6D), a prenyl-binding protein and chaperone of prenylated protein in photoreceptors. Mutations in the human RP2 gene cause X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) and cone-rod dystrophy (XL-CORD). To study mechanisms causing XLRP, we generated an RP2 knockout mouse. The Rp2h−/− mice exhibited a slowly progressing rod-cone dystrophy simulating the human disease. Rp2h−/− scotopic a-wave and photopic b-wave amplitudes declined at 1 mo of age and continued to decline over the next 6 mo. Prenylated PDE6 subunits and G-protein coupled receptor kinase 1 (GRK1) were unable to traffic effectively to the Rp2h−/− outer segments. Mechanistically, absence of RP2 GAP activity increases ARL3-GTP levels, forcing PDE6D to assume a predominantly “closed” conformation that impedes binding of lipids. Lack of interaction disrupts trafficking of PDE6 and GRK1 to their destination, the photoreceptor outer segments. We propose that hyperactivity of ARL3-GTP in RP2 knockout mice and human patients with RP2 null alleles leads to XLRP resembling recessive rod-cone dystrophy.—Zhang, H., Hanke-Gogokhia, C., Jiang, L., Li, X., Wang, P., Gerstner, C. D., Frederick, J. M., Yang, Z., Baehr, W. Mistrafficking of prenylated proteins causes retinitis pigmentosa 2. PMID:25422369

  11. A Family of Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis and Atypical Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Zanwar, Vinay; Mohite, Ashok; Surude, Ravindra; Rathi, Pravin; Balasubramani, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a rare cause of portal hypertension and esophageal varices in children. We report cases of siblings with biopsy proven congenital hepatic fibrosis and with atypical retinitis pigmentosa. They presented with repeated episodes of jaundice along with progressive decrease of vision in night. They had hepatosplenomegaly and portal hypertension with esophageal varices. One of the siblings had a large regenerating nodule replacing the entire right lobe of the liver and other one developed repeated hematemesis. This constellation of diagnosis belongs to the ciliopathy group of disorders. The spectrum of ciliopathy disorders has been evolving, and it varies from mild to severe manifestations. PMID:26918098

  12. A Family of Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis and Atypical Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Sunil; Zanwar, Vinay; Mohite, Ashok; Surude, Ravindra; Rathi, Pravin; Balasubramani, Meenakshi

    2015-11-01

    Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a rare cause of portal hypertension and esophageal varices in children. We report cases of siblings with biopsy proven congenital hepatic fibrosis and with atypical retinitis pigmentosa. They presented with repeated episodes of jaundice along with progressive decrease of vision in night. They had hepatosplenomegaly and portal hypertension with esophageal varices. One of the siblings had a large regenerating nodule replacing the entire right lobe of the liver and other one developed repeated hematemesis. This constellation of diagnosis belongs to the ciliopathy group of disorders. The spectrum of ciliopathy disorders has been evolving, and it varies from mild to severe manifestations. PMID:26918098

  13. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectors for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.

  14. Two-Step Reactivation of Dormant Cones in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Lee, Sang Joon; Scott, Patrick A.; Lu, Xiaoqin; Emery, Douglas; Liu, Yongqin; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, Michael R.; Ross, Jason W.; Kaplan, Henry J.; Dean, Douglas C.

    2016-01-01

    Most Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) mutations arise in rod photoreceptor genes, leading to diminished peripheral and nightime vision. Using a pig model of autosomal-dominant RP, we show glucose becomes sequestered in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and thus is not transported to photoreceptors. The resulting starvation for glucose metabolites impairs synthesis of cone visual pigment -rich outer segments (OS), and then their mitochondrial-rich inner segments dissociate. Loss of these functional structures diminishes cone-dependent high-resolution central vision, which is utilized for most daily tasks. By transplanting wild-type rods, to restore glucose transport, or directly replacing glucose in the subretinal space, to bypass its retention in the RPE, we can regenerate cone functional structures, reactivating the dormant cells. Beyond providing metabolic building blocks for cone functional structures, we show glucose induces thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) to regulate Akt signaling, thereby shunting metabolites toward aerobic glucose metabolism and regenerating cone OS synthesis. PMID:27050517

  15. Two-Step Reactivation of Dormant Cones in Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lee, Sang Joon; Scott, Patrick A; Lu, Xiaoqin; Emery, Douglas; Liu, Yongqin; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, Michael R; Ross, Jason W; Kaplan, Henry J; Dean, Douglas C

    2016-04-12

    Most retinitis pigmentosa (RP) mutations arise in rod photoreceptor genes, leading to diminished peripheral and nighttime vision. Using a pig model of autosomal-dominant RP, we show glucose becomes sequestered in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and, thus, is not transported to photoreceptors. The resulting starvation for glucose metabolites impairs synthesis of cone visual pigment-rich outer segments (OSs), and then their mitochondrial-rich inner segments dissociate. Loss of these functional structures diminishes cone-dependent high-resolution central vision, which is utilized for most daily tasks. By transplanting wild-type rods, to restore glucose transport, or directly replacing glucose in the subretinal space, to bypass its retention in the RPE, we can regenerate cone functional structures, reactivating the dormant cells. Beyond providing metabolic building blocks for cone functional structures, we show glucose induces thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) to regulate Akt signaling, thereby shunting metabolites toward aerobic glucose metabolism and regenerating cone OS synthesis. PMID:27050517

  16. Personalized therapeutic strategies for patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Andrew; Li, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) encompasses many different hereditary retinal degenerations that are caused by a vast array of different gene mutations and have highly variable disease presentations and severities. This heterogeneity poses a significant therapeutic challenge, although an answer may eventually be found through two recent innovations: induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas genome editing. Areas covered This review discusses the wide-ranging applications of iPSCs and CRISPR–including disease modelling, diagnostics and therapeutics – with an ultimate view towards understanding how these two technologies can come together to address disease heterogeneity and orphan genes in a novel personalized medicine platform. An extensive literature search was conducted in PubMed and Google Scholar, with a particular focus on high-impact research published within the last 1 – 2 years and centered broadly on the subjects of retinal gene therapy, iPSC-derived outer retina cells, stem cell transplantation and CRISPR/Cas gene editing. Expert opinion For the retinal pigment epithelium, autologous transplantation of gene-corrected grafts derived from iPSCs may well be technically feasible in the near future. Photoreceptor transplantation faces more significant unresolved technical challenges but remains an achievable, if more distant, goal given the rapid pace of advancements in the field. PMID:25613576

  17. Genomic DNA nanoparticles rescue rhodopsin-associated retinitis pigmentosa phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zongchao; Banworth, Marcellus J.; Makkia, Rasha; Conley, Shannon M.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.; Cooper, Mark J.; Naash, Muna I.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the rhodopsin gene cause retinal degeneration and clinical phenotypes including retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and congenital stationary night blindness. Effective gene therapies have been difficult to develop, however, because generating precise levels of rhodopsin expression is critical; overexpression causes toxicity, and underexpression would result in incomplete rescue. Current gene delivery strategies routinely use cDNA-based vectors for gene targeting; however, inclusion of noncoding components of genomic DNA (gDNA) such as introns may help promote more endogenous regulation of gene expression. Here we test the hypothesis that inclusion of genomic sequences from the rhodopsin gene can improve the efficacy of rhodopsin gene therapy in the rhodopsin knockout (RKO) mouse model of RP. We utilize our compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs), which have the ability to transfer larger and more complex genetic constructs, to deliver murine rhodopsin cDNA or gDNA. We show functional and structural improvements in RKO eyes for up to 8 months after NP-mediated gDNA but not cDNA delivery. Importantly, in addition to improvements in rod function, we observe significant preservation of cone function at time points when cones in the RKO model are degenerated. These results suggest that inclusion of native expression elements, such as introns, can significantly enhance gene expression and therapeutic efficacy and may become an essential option in the array of available gene delivery tools.— Han, Z., Banworth, M. J., Makkia, R., Conley, S. M., Al-Ubaidi, M. R., Cooper, M. J., Naash, M. I. Genomic DNA nanoparticles rescue rhodopsin-associated retinitis pigmentosa phenotype. PMID:25713057

  18. Genetic linkage studies in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.C.; Teague, P.W.; Barber, A.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a severe retinal dystrophy characterized by night blindness, progressive constriction of the visual fields and loss of central vision in the fourth or fifth decades. The frequency of this form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) varies in different populations. Mutations within the rhodopsin, cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase-{beta} subunit and cGMP-gated channel genes have been reported in some arRP families. The genetic loci responsible for the majority of cases have yet to be identified. Genetic heterogeneity is likely to be extensive. In order to minimize the amount of genetic heterogenity, a set of arRP families was ascertained within the South-Central Sardinian population, in which 81% of families with a known mode of inheritance show an autosomal recessive form of RP. The Sardinian population is an ethnic {open_quotes}outlier{close_quotes}, having remained relatively isolated from mainland and other cultures. Genetic linkage data has been obtained in a set of 11 Sardinian arRP kindreds containing 26 affected members. Under the assumption of genetic homogeneity, no evidence of linkage was found in the arRP kindreds using 195 markers, which excluded 62% of the genome (Z<-2). Positive lod scores were obtained with D14S80 which showed no recombination in a subset of 5 families. Heterogeneity testing using D14S80 and arRP showed no significant evidence of heterogeneity (p=0.18) but evidence of linkage ({chi}{sup 2}=3.64, p=0.028). We are currently screening the neural retina-specific leucine zipper gene (NRL) in 14q11 for mutations as a candidate locus.

  19. Bifurcation analysis of a photoreceptor interaction model for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Erika T.; Radulescu, Anca; Wirkus, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is the term used to describe a diverse set of degenerative eye diseases affecting the photoreceptors (rods and cones) in the retina. This work builds on an existing mathematical model of RP that focused on the interaction of the rods and cones. We non-dimensionalize the model and examine the stability of the equilibria. We then numerically investigate other stable modes that are present in the system for various parameter values and relate these modes to the original problem. Our results show that stable modes exist for a wider range of parameter values than the stability of the equilibrium solutions alone, suggesting that additional approaches to preventing cone death may exist.

  20. Retinitis pigmentosa and allied conditions today: a paradigm of translational research

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Monogenic human retinal dystrophies are a group of disorders characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptor cells leading to visual handicap. Retinitis pigmentosa is a type of retinal dystrophy where degeneration of rod photoreceptors occurs at the early stages. At present, there are no available effective therapies to maintain or improve vision in patients affected with retinitis pigmentosa, but post-genomic studies are allowing the development of potential therapeutic approaches. This review summarizes current knowledge on genes that have been identified to be responsible for retinitis pigmentosa, the involvement of these genes in the different forms of the disorder, the role of the proteins encoded by these genes in retinal function, the utility of genotyping, and current efforts to develop novel therapies. PMID:20519033

  1. The Role of the Endothelin System in the Vascular Dysregulation Involved in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Francesco Saverio; Bonifazzi, Claudio; Perri, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a clinical and genetic group of inherited retinal disorders characterized by alterations of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium leading to a progressive concentric visual field restriction, which may bring about severe central vision impairment. Haemodynamic studies in patients with retinitis pigmentosa have demonstrated ocular blood flow abnormalities both in retina-choroidal and in retroocular vascular system. Moreover, several investigations have studied the augmentation of endothelin-1 plasma levels systemically in the body and locally in the eye. This might account for vasoconstriction and ischemia, typical in vascular dysregulation syndrome, which can be considered an important factor of reduction of the ocular blood flow in subjects affected by retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:26613048

  2. Genomic DNA nanoparticles rescue rhodopsin-associated retinitis pigmentosa phenotype.

    PubMed

    Han, Zongchao; Banworth, Marcellus J; Makkia, Rasha; Conley, Shannon M; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R; Cooper, Mark J; Naash, Muna I

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in the rhodopsin gene cause retinal degeneration and clinical phenotypes including retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and congenital stationary night blindness. Effective gene therapies have been difficult to develop, however, because generating precise levels of rhodopsin expression is critical; overexpression causes toxicity, and underexpression would result in incomplete rescue. Current gene delivery strategies routinely use cDNA-based vectors for gene targeting; however, inclusion of noncoding components of genomic DNA (gDNA) such as introns may help promote more endogenous regulation of gene expression. Here we test the hypothesis that inclusion of genomic sequences from the rhodopsin gene can improve the efficacy of rhodopsin gene therapy in the rhodopsin knockout (RKO) mouse model of RP. We utilize our compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs), which have the ability to transfer larger and more complex genetic constructs, to deliver murine rhodopsin cDNA or gDNA. We show functional and structural improvements in RKO eyes for up to 8 months after NP-mediated gDNA but not cDNA delivery. Importantly, in addition to improvements in rod function, we observe significant preservation of cone function at time points when cones in the RKO model are degenerated. These results suggest that inclusion of native expression elements, such as introns, can significantly enhance gene expression and therapeutic efficacy and may become an essential option in the array of available gene delivery tools. PMID:25713057

  3. Pharmacological approaches to retinitis pigmentosa: A laboratory perspective.

    PubMed

    Guadagni, Viviana; Novelli, Elena; Piano, Ilaria; Gargini, Claudia; Strettoi, Enrica

    2015-09-01

    Retinal photoreceptors are highly specialized and performing neurons. Their cellular architecture is exquisitely designed to host a high concentration of molecules involved in light capture, phototransduction, electric and chemical signaling, membrane and molecular turnover, light and dark adaption, network activities etc. Such high efficiency and molecular complexity require a great metabolic demand, altogether conferring to photoreceptors particular susceptibility to external and internal insults, whose occurrence usually precipitate into degeneration of these cells and blindness. In Retinitis Pigmentosa, an impressive number of mutations in genes expressed in the retina and coding for a large varieties of proteins leads to the progressive death of photoreceptors and blindness. Recent advances in molecular tools have greatly facilitated the identification of the underlying genetics and molecular bases of RP leading to the successful implementation of gene therapy for some types of mutations, with visual restoration in human patients. Yet, genetic heterogeneity of RP makes mutation-independent approaches highly desirable, although many obstacles pave the way to general strategies for treating this complex disease, which remains orphan. The review will focus on treatments for RP based on pharmacological tools, choosing, among the many ongoing studies, approaches which rely on strong experimental evidence or rationale. For perspective treatments, new concepts are foreseen to emerge from basic studies elucidating the pathways connecting the primary mutations to photoreceptor death, possibly revealing common molecular targets for drug intervention. PMID:26113212

  4. Novel mutations in PDE6B causing human retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lu-Lu; Han, Ru-Yi; Yang, Fa-Yu; Yu, Xin-Ping; Xu, Jin-Ling; Min, Qing-Jie; Tian, Jie; Ge, Xiang-Lian; Zheng, Si-Si; Lin, Ye-Wen; Zheng, Yi-Han; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify the genetic defects of a Chinese patient with sporadic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). METHODS Ophthalmologic examinations were performed on the sporadic RP patient, 144 genes associated with retinal diseases were scanned with capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) approach. Two heterozygous mutations in PDE6B were confirmed in the pedigree by Sanger sequencing subsequently. The carrier frequency of PDE6B mutations of reported PDE6B mutations based on the available two public exome databases (1000 Genomes Project and ESP6500 Genomes Project) and one in-house exome database was investigated. RESULTS We identified compound heterozygosity of two novel nonsense mutations c.1133G>A (p.W378X) and c.2395C>T (p.R799X) in PDE6B, one reported causative gene for RP. Neither of the two mutations in our study was presented in three exome databases. Two mutations (p.R74C and p.T604I) in PDE6B have relatively high frequencies in the ESP6500 and in-house databases, respectively, while no common dominant mutation in each of the database or across all databases. CONCLUSION We demonstrates that compound heterozygosity of two novel nonsense mutations in PDE6B could lead to RP. These results collectively point to enormous potential of next-generation sequencing in determining the genetic etiology of RP and how various mutations in PDE6B contribute to the genetic heterogeneity of RP. PMID:27588261

  5. Therapeutic Margins in a Novel Preclinical Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Richard J.; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wert, Katherine J.; Sancho-Pelluz, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The third-most common cause of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is due to defective cGMP phosphodiesterase-6 (PDE6). Previous work using viral gene therapy on PDE6-mutant mouse models demonstrated photoreceptors can be rescued if administered before degeneration. However, whether visual function can be rescued after degeneration onset has not been addressed. This is a clinically important question, as newly diagnosed patients exhibit considerable loss of rods and cones in their peripheral retinas. We have generated and characterized a tamoxifen inducible Cre-loxP rescue allele, Pde6bStop, which allows us to temporally correct PDE6-deficiency. Whereas untreated mutants exhibit degeneration, activation of Cre-loxP recombination in early embryogenesis produced stable long-term rescue. Reversal at later time-points showed partial long-term or short-lived rescue. Our results suggest stable restoration of retinal function by gene therapy can be achieved if a sufficient number of rods are treated. Because patients are generally diagnosed after extensive loss of rods, the success of clinical trials may depend on identifying patients as early as possible to maximize the number of treatable rods. PMID:23946405

  6. Therapeutic margins in a novel preclinical model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Davis, Richard J; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wert, Katherine J; Sancho-Pelluz, Javier; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Tsang, Stephen H

    2013-08-14

    The third-most common cause of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is due to defective cGMP phosphodiesterase-6 (PDE6). Previous work using viral gene therapy on PDE6-mutant mouse models demonstrated photoreceptors can be rescued if administered before degeneration. However, whether visual function can be rescued after degeneration onset has not been addressed. This is a clinically important question, as newly diagnosed patients exhibit considerable loss of rods and cones in their peripheral retinas. We have generated and characterized a tamoxifen inducible Cre-loxP rescue allele, Pde6b(Stop), which allows us to temporally correct PDE6-deficiency. Whereas untreated mutants exhibit degeneration, activation of Cre-loxP recombination in early embryogenesis produced stable long-term rescue. Reversal at later time-points showed partial long-term or short-lived rescue. Our results suggest stable restoration of retinal function by gene therapy can be achieved if a sufficient number of rods are treated. Because patients are generally diagnosed after extensive loss of rods, the success of clinical trials may depend on identifying patients as early as possible to maximize the number of treatable rods. PMID:23946405

  7. Mutations in POMGNT1 cause non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingchu; Yamada, Takeyuki; Sun, Zixi; Eblimit, Aiden; Lopez, Irma; Wang, Feng; Manya, Hiroshi; Xu, Shan; Zhao, Li; Li, Yumei; Kimchi, Adva; Sharon, Dror; Sui, Ruifang; Endo, Tamao; Koenekoop, Robert K; Chen, Rui

    2016-04-15

    A growing number of human diseases have been linked to defects in protein glycosylation that affects a wide range of organs. Among them, O-mannosylation is an unusual type of protein glycosylation that is largely restricted to the muscular and nerve system. Consistently, mutations in genes involved in the O-mannosylation pathway result in infantile-onset, severe developmental defects involving skeleton muscle, brain and eye, such as the muscle-eye-brain disease (MIM no. 253280). However, the functional importance of O-mannosylation in these tissues at later stages remains largely unknown. In our study, we have identified recessive mutations inPOMGNT1, which encodes an essential component in O-mannosylation pathway, in three unrelated families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), but without extraocular involvement. Enzymatic assay of these mutant alleles demonstrate that they greatly reduce the POMGNT1 enzymatic activity and are likely to be hypomorphic. Immunohistochemistry shows that POMGNT1 is specifically expressed in photoreceptor basal body. Taken together, our work identifies a novel disease-causing gene for RP and indicates that proper protein O-mannosylation is not only essential for early organ development, but also important for maintaining survival and function of the highly specialized retinal cells at later stages. PMID:26908613

  8. The Role of Fundus Autofluorescence in Late-Onset Retinitis Pigmentosa (LORP) Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tamara J.; Hwang, John C.; Chen, Royce W. S.; Lima, Luiz H.; Wang, Nan-Kai; Tosi, Joaquin; Freund, K. Bailey; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the utility and characteristics of fundus autofluorescence in late-onset retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Observational case series. Patients diagnosed with late-onset retinitis pigmentosa were identified retrospectively in an institutional setting. Twelve eyes of six patients were identified and medical records were reviewed. Results All patients presented with slowly progressive peripheral field loss and initial clinical examination revealed only subtle retinal changes. There was a notable lack of intraretinal pigment migration in all patients. Five out of six patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain to rule out intracranial processes and all were referred from another ophthalmologist for further evaluation. Fundus autofluorescence was ultimately employed in all patients and revealed more extensive retinal pathology than initially appreciated on clinical examination. Fundus autofluorescence directed the workup toward a retinal etiology in all cases and led to the eventual diagnosis of late-onset retinitis pigmentosa through electroretinogram testing. Conclusion Fundus autofluorescence may be a more sensitive marker for retinal pathology than stereo fundus biomicroscopy alone in late-onset retinitis pigmentosa. Early use of fundus autofluorescence imaging in the evaluation of patients with subtle retinal lesions and complaints of peripheral field loss may be an effective strategy for timely and cost-efficient diagnosis. PMID:23899229

  9. Thermal Stability of Rhodopsin and Progression of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Monica Yun; Liu, Jian; Mehrotra, Devi; Liu, Yuting; Guo, Ying; Baldera-Aguayo, Pedro A.; Mooney, Victoria L.; Nour, Adel M.; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Over 100 point mutations in the rhodopsin gene have been associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a family of inherited visual disorders. Among these, we focused on characterizing the S186W mutation. We compared the thermal properties of the S186W mutant with another RP-causing mutant, D190N, and with WT rhodopsin. To assess thermal stability, we measured the rate of two thermal reactions contributing to the thermal decay of rhodopsin as follows: thermal isomerization of 11-cis-retinal and hydrolysis of the protonated Schiff base linkage between the 11-cis-retinal chromophore and opsin protein. We used UV-visible spectroscopy and HPLC to examine the kinetics of these reactions at 37 and 55 °C for WT and mutant rhodopsin purified from HEK293 cells. Compared with WT rhodopsin and the D190N mutant, the S186W mutation dramatically increases the rates of both thermal isomerization and dark state hydrolysis of the Schiff base by 1–2 orders of magnitude. The results suggest that the S186W mutant thermally destabilizes rhodopsin by disrupting a hydrogen bond network at the receptor's active site. The decrease in the thermal stability of dark state rhodopsin is likely to be associated with higher levels of dark noise that undermine the sensitivity of rhodopsin, potentially accounting for night blindness in the early stages of RP. Further studies of the thermal stability of additional pathogenic rhodopsin mutations in conjunction with clinical studies are expected to provide insight into the molecular mechanism of RP and test the correlation between rhodopsin's thermal stability and RP progression in patients. PMID:23625926

  10. Macular pigment optical density is related to serum lutein in retinitis pigmentosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To determine whether macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is related to the degree of cystoid macular edema (CME) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods: We measured MPOD with heterochromatic flicker photometry and central foveal retinal thickness with optical coherence tomography...

  11. Heterogeneity analysis in 40 X-linked retinitis pigmentosa families

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, P.W.; Aldred, M.A.; Dempster, M.; Harrison, C.; Carothers, A.D.; Hardwick, L.J.; Evans, H.J.; Wright, A.F.; Strain, L.; Brock, D.J.H. )

    1994-07-01

    Analysis of genetic heterogeneity in 40 kindreds with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), with 20 polymorphic markers, showed that significant heterogeneity is present (P=.001) and that 56% of kindreds are of RP3 type and that 26% are of RP2 type. The location of the RP3 locus was found to be 0.4 cM distal to OTC in the Xp21.1 region, and that of the RP2 locus was 6.5 cM proximal to DXS7 in Xp11.2-p11.3. Bayesian probabilities of linkage to RP2, RP3, or to neither locus were calculated. This showed that 20 of 40 kindreds could be assigned to one or the other locus, with a probability >.70 (14 kindreds with RP3 and 6 kindreds with RP2 disease). A further three kindreds were found to be unlinked to either locus, with a probability >.8. The remaining 17 kindreds could not be classified unambiguously. This highlights the difficulty of classifying families in the presence of genetic heterogeneity, where two loci are separated by an estimated 16 cM. 34 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. Peripheral absolute threshold spectral sensitivity in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Massof, R W; Johnson, M A; Finkelstein, D

    1981-01-01

    Dark-adapted spectral sensitivities were measured in the peripheral retinas of 38 patients diagnosed as having typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and in 3 normal volunteers. The patients included those having autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance patterns. Results were analysed by comparisons with the CIE standard scotopic spectral visibility function and with Judd's modification of the photopic spectral visibility function, with consideration of contributions from changes in spectral transmission of preretinal media. The data show 3 general patterns. One group of patients had absolute threshold spectral sensitivities that were fit by Judd's photopic visibility curve. Absolute threshold spectral sensitivities for a second group of patients were fit by a normal scotopic spectral visibility curve. The third group of patients had absolute threshold spectral sensitivities that were fit by a combination of scotopic and photopic spectral visibility curves. The autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes of inheritance were represented in each group of patients. These data indicate that RP patients have normal rod and/or cone spectral sensitivities, and support the subclassification of patients described previously by Massof and Finkelstein. PMID:7459312

  13. Alterations to retinal architecture prior to photoreceptor loss in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Roche, Sarah L; Wyse-Jackson, Alice C; Byrne, Ashleigh M; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Cotter, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are essential tools in the pursuit to understand fully what cell types and processes underlie the degeneration observed in RP. Knowledge of these processes is required if we are to develop successful therapies to treat this currently incurable disease. We have used the rd10 mouse model of RP to study retinal morphology prior to photoreceptor loss, using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy on cryosections, since little is known about how the mutation affects the retina during this period. We report novel findings that the mutation in the rd10 mouse results in retinal abnormalities earlier than was previously thought. Defects in rod and cone outer segments, bipolar cells, amacrine cells and photoreceptor synapses were apparent in the retina during early stages of postnatal retinal development and prior to the loss of photoreceptors. Additionally, we observed a dramatic response of glial cells during this period. Microglia responded as early as postnatal day (P) 5; ?13 days before any photoreceptor loss is detected with Müller glia and astrocytes exhibiting changes from P10 and P15 respectively. Overall, these findings present pathological aspects to the postnatal development of the rd10 retina, contributing significantly to our understanding of disease onset and progression in the rd10 mouse and provide a valuable resource for the study of retinal dystrophies. PMID:27160072

  14. Effect of Purified Murine NGF on Isolated Photoreceptors of a Rodent Developing Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Maria Luisa; Balzamino, Bijorn Omar; Petrocchi Passeri, Pamela; Micera, Alessandra; Aloe, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    A number of different studies have shown that neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) support the survival of retinal ganglion neurons during a variety if insults. Recently, we have reported that that eye NGF administration can protect also photoreceptor degeneration in a mice and rat with inherited retinitis pigmentosa. However, the evidence that NGF acts directly on photoreceptors and that other retinal cells mediate the NGF effect could not be excluded. In the present study we have isolated retinal cells from rats with inherited retinitis pigmentosa (RP) during the post-natal stage of photoreceptor degenerative. In presence of NGF, these cells are characterized by enhanced expression of NGF-receptors and rhodopsin, the specific marker of photoreceptor and better cell survival, as well as neuritis outgrowth. Together these observations support the hypothesis that NGF that NGF acts directly on photoreceptors survival and prevents photoreceptor degeneration as previously suggested by in vivo studies. PMID:25897972

  15. The Self-Concept of Spanish Young Adults with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Justicia, Maria Dolores; Cordoba, Inmaculada Nieto

    2006-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disease of the retina that causes the severe impairment of visual functioning similar to low vision, leading, in many cases, to blindness. Because the construct of self-concept plays a key role in personality, this study was designed to measure self-concept in a group of young adults with RP. The…

  16. Subjective Perception of Visual Distortions or Scotomas in Individuals with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittich, Walter; Watanabe, Donald H.; Kapusta, Michael A.; Overbury, Olga

    2011-01-01

    It is often assumed that persons who develop ocular disease have some form of visual experience that makes them aware of their deficits. However, in the case of peripheral field loss or decreasing vision in dim lighting, as in retinitis pigmentosa, for example, symptoms are more obscure and may not be as easily identified by the persons who have…

  17. Clinical trial of lutein in patients with retinitis pigmentosa receiving vitamin A treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We sought to determine whether lutein supplementation will slow visual function decline in patients with retinitis pigmentosa receiving vitamin A. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, double-masked trial of 225 nonsmoking patients, aged 18 to 60 years, evaluated over a 4-year interval. Patients received ...

  18. Connecting Research on Retinitis Pigmentosa to the Practice of Orientation and Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geruschat, Duane R.; Turano, Kathleen A.

    2002-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) causes restriction of the visual field, progressive vision loss, and night blindness. This article presents an overview of the most common problems in orientation and mobility (O&M) for individuals with RP, appropriate interventions, vision science discoveries related to RP, and the impact of RP on functional visual…

  19. AAV Mediated GDNF Secretion From Retinal Glia Slows Down Retinal Degeneration in a Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D; Guerin, Karen I; Hoffmann, Natalie V; Visel, Meike; Klimczak, Ryan R; Schaffer, David V; Flannery, John G

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in over 80 identified genes can induce apoptosis in photoreceptors, resulting in blindness with a prevalence of 1 in 3,000 individuals. This broad genetic heterogeneity of disease impacting a wide range of photoreceptor functions renders the design of gene-specific therapies for photoreceptor degeneration impractical and necessitates the development of mutation-independent treatments to slow photoreceptor cell death. One promising strategy for photoreceptor neuroprotection is neurotrophin secretion from Müller cells, the primary retinal glia. Müller glia are excellent targets for secreting neurotrophins as they span the entire tissue, ensheath all neuronal populations, are numerous, and persist through retinal degeneration. We previously engineered an adeno-associated virus (AAV) variant (ShH10) capable of efficient and selective glial cell transduction through intravitreal injection. ShH10-mediated glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) secretion from glia, generates high GDNF levels in treated retinas, leading to sustained functional rescue for over 5 months. This GDNF secretion from glia following intravitreal vector administration is a safe and effective means to slow the progression of retinal degeneration in a rat model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and shows significant promise as a gene therapy to treat human retinal degenerations. These findings also demonstrate for the first time that glia-mediated secretion of neurotrophins is a promising treatment that may be applicable to other neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:21522134

  20. Local signaling from a retinal prosthetic in a rodent retinitis pigmentosa model in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransen, James W.; Pangeni, Gobinda; Pardue, Machelle T.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. In clinical trials, retinitis pigmentosa patients implanted with a retinal prosthetic device show enhanced spatial vision, including the ability to read large text and navigate. New prosthetics aim to increase spatial resolution by decreasing pixel/electrode size and limiting current spread. To examine spatial resolution of a new prosthetic design, we characterized and compared two photovoltaic array (PVA) designs and their interaction with the retina after subretinal implantation in transgenic S334ter line 3 rats (Tg S334ter-3). Approach. PVAs were implanted subretinally at two stages of degeneration and assessed in vivo using extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus (SC). Several aspects of this interaction were evaluated by varying duration, irradiance and position of a near infrared laser focused on the PVA. These characteristics included: activation threshold, response linearity, SC signal topography and spatial localization. The major design difference between the two PVA designs is the inclusion of local current returns in the newer design. Main results. When tested in vivo, PVA-evoked response thresholds were independent of pixel/electrode size, but differ between the new and old PVA designs. Response thresholds were independent of implantation age and duration (⩽7.5 months). For both prosthesis designs, threshold intensities were within established safety limits. PVA-evoked responses require inner retina synaptic transmission and do not directly activate retinal ganglion cells. The new PVA design evokes local retinal activation, which is not found with the older PVA design that lacks local current returns. Significance. Our study provides in vivo evidence that prosthetics make functional contacts with the inner nuclear layer at several stages of degeneration. The new PVA design enhances local activation within the retina and SC. Together these results predict that the new design can potentially harness the inherent processing within

  1. LOCAL SIGNALING FROM A RETINAL PROSTHETIC IN A RODENT RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA MODEL IN VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Fransen, James W.; Pangeni, Gobinda; Pardue, Machelle T.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In clinical trials, retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients implanted with a retinal prosthetic device show enhanced spatial vision, including the ability to read large text and navigate. New prosthetics aim to increase spatial resolution by decreasing pixel/electrode size and limiting current spread. To examine spatial resolution of a new prosthetic design, we characterized and compared two photovoltaic array (PVA) designs and their interaction with the retina after subretinal implantation in transgenic S334ter line 3 rats (Tg S334ter-3). Approach PVAs were implanted subretinally at two stages of degeneration and assessed in vivo using extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus (SC). Several aspects of this interaction were evaluated by varying duration, irradiance and position of a near infrared (NIR) laser focused on the PVA. These characteristics included: activation threshold, response linearity, SC signal topography and spatial localization. The major design difference between the two PVA designs is the inclusion of local current returns in the newer design. Main Results When tested in vivo, PVA-evoked response thresholds were independent of pixel/electrode size, but differ between the new and old PVA designs. Response thresholds were independent of implantation age and duration (≤ 7.5 months). For both prosthesis designs, threshold intensities were within established safety limits. PVA-evoked responses require inner retina synaptic transmission and do not directly activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The new PVA design evokes local retinal activation, which is not found with the older PVA design that lacks local current returns. Significance Our study provides in vivo evidence that prosthetics make functional contacts with the inner nuclear layer at several stages of degeneration. The new PVA design enhances local activation within the retina and SC. Together these results predict that the new design can potentially harness the inherent

  2. Radial fundus autofluorescence in the periphery in patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Ken; Oishi, Maho; Oishi, Akio; Morooka, Satoshi; Sugahara, Masako; Gotoh, Norimoto; Kurimoto, Masafumi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the peripheral autofluorescence images and clinical features of patients with retinal dystrophy who showed radial fundus autofluorescence (FAF) at the posterior pole. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed pooled wide-field FAF images of 711 patients with retinal dystrophy and 56 family members. Results Eleven eyes of seven women exhibited radial FAF at the posterior pole. Wide-field FAF showed extension of the radial pattern to the periphery in all eyes except one. One woman showed radial hyper-FAF only in the periphery, not at the posterior pole. These eight individuals were X-linked retinitis pigmentosa patients or carriers. The tapetal-like reflex was not observed in their color fundus photographs. The peripheral visual field showed wedge-shaped restriction in some individuals. Conclusion Wide-field FAF imaging can depict radial FAF not only at the posterior pole but also in the periphery in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carriers. The authors therefore agree with previous reports that radial FAF may be a hallmark of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:26316687

  3. Post-Cataract Surgery Visual Disturbance in a Retinitis Pigmentosa Patient with Asteroid Hyalosis

    PubMed Central

    Jingami, Yoko; Otani, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Makiyama, Yukiko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2011-01-01

    A patient with retinitis pigmentosa showed visual disturbances following successful cataract surgery. He had a dense asteroid hyalosis in the eye before cataract surgery. After the surgery he noticed that his vision became worse. The visual disturbance was explained as being caused by the progression of retinal degeneration. Although the electroretinogram was non-recordable, the degeneration of macular area appeared relatively small. We considered that dense asteroid hyalosis was responsible for his visual disturbances, and pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was performed to remove the asteroid hyalosis. After the PPV, rapid improvement of his visual acuity was observed. Cataract surgery may affect the status of asteroid hyalosis and cause rapid visual loss. PPV should be considered for retinitis pigmentosa patients with dense asteroid hyalosis, especially when a large decrease in visual acuity is noted shortly after cataract surgery. PMID:21941506

  4. Automated segmentation of outer retinal layers in macular OCT images of patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Reisman, Charles A.; Chan, Kinpui; Ramachandran, Rithambara; Raza, Ali; Hood, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    To provide a tool for quantifying the effects of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) seen on spectral domain optical coherence tomography images, an automated layer segmentation algorithm was developed. This algorithm, based on dual-gradient information and a shortest path search strategy, delineates the inner limiting membrane and three outer retinal boundaries in optical coherence tomography images from RP patients. In addition, an automated inner segment (IS)/outer segment (OS) contour detection method based on the segmentation results is proposed to quantify the locus of points at which the OS thickness goes to zero in a 3D volume scan. The segmentation algorithm and the IS/OS contour were validated with manual segmentation data. The segmentation and IS/OS contour results on repeated measures showed good within-day repeatability, while the results on data acquired on average 22.5 months afterward demonstrated a possible means to follow disease progression. In particular, the automatically generated IS/OS contour provided a possible objective structural marker for RP progression. PMID:21991543

  5. Retinitis Pigmentosa with EYS Mutations Is the Most Prevalent Inherited Retinal Dystrophy in Japanese Populations

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yuuki; Maeda, Akiko; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Ishigami, Chie; Kosugi, Shinji; Mandai, Michiko; Kurimoto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Masayo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain information about disease prevalence and to identify the responsible genes for inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) in Japanese populations. Clinical and molecular evaluations were performed on 349 patients with IRD. For segregation analyses, 63 of their family members were employed. Bioinformatics data from 1,208 Japanese individuals were used as controls. Molecular diagnosis was obtained by direct sequencing in a stepwise fashion utilizing one or two panels of 15 and 27 genes for retinitis pigmentosa patients. If a specific clinical diagnosis was suspected, direct sequencing of disease-specific genes, that is, ABCA4 for Stargardt disease, was conducted. Limited availability of intrafamily information and decreasing family size hampered identifying inherited patterns. Differential disease profiles with lower prevalence of Stargardt disease from European and North American populations were obtained. We found 205 sequence variants in 159 of 349 probands with an identification rate of 45.6%. This study found 43 novel sequence variants. In silico analysis suggests that 20 of 25 novel missense variants are pathogenic. EYS mutations had the highest prevalence at 23.5%. c.4957_4958insA and c.8868C>A were the two major EYS mutations identified in this cohort. EYS mutations are the most prevalent among Japanese patients with IRD. PMID:26161267

  6. A recombination outside the BB deletion refines the location of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa locus RP3

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, R.; Bingham, E.; Forsythe, P.; McHenry, C.

    1996-07-01

    Genetic loci for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) have been mapped between Xp11.22 and Xp22.13 (RP2, RP3, RP6, and RP15). The RP3 gene, which is responsible for the predominant form of XLRP in most Caucasian populations, has been localized to Xp21.1 by linkage analysis and the map positions of chromosomal deletions associated with the disease. Previous linkage studies have suggested that RP3 is flanked by the markers DXS1110 (distal) and OTC (proximal). Patient BB was though to have RP because of a lesion at the RP3 locus, in addition to chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), mild mental retardation, and the McLeod phenotype. This patient carried a deletion extending {approximately}3 Mb from DMD in Xp21.3 to Xp21.1, with the proximal breakpoint located {approximately}40 kb centromeric to DXS1110. The RP3 gene, therefore, is believed to reside between DXS1110 and the proximal breakpoint of the BB deletion. In order to refine the location of RP3 and to ascertain patients with RP3, we have been analyzing several XLRP families for linkage to Xp markers. Linkage analysis in an American family of 27 individuals demonstrates segregation of XLRP with markers in Xp21.1, consistent with the RP3 subtype. One affected male shows a recombination event proximal to DXS1110. Additional markers within the DXS1110-OTC interval show that the crossover is between two novel polymorphic markers, DXS8349 and M6, both of which are present in BB DNA and lie centromeric to the proximal breakpoint. This recombination places the XLRP mutation in this family outside the BB deletion and redefines the location of RP3. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. A recombination outside the BB deletion refines the location of the X linked retinitis pigmentosa locus RP3.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, R.; Bingham, E.; Forsythe, P.; McHenry, C.; Aita, V.; Navia, B. A.; Dry, K.; Segal, M.; Devoto, M.; Bruns, G.; Wright, A. F.; Ott, J.; Sieving, P. A.; Swaroop, A.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic loci for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) have been mapped between Xp11.22 and Xp22.13 (RP2, RP3, RP6, and RP15). The RP3 gene, which is responsible for the predominant form of XLRP in most Caucasian populations, has been localized to Xp21.1 by linkage analysis and the map positions of chromosomal deletions associated with the disease. Previous linkage studies have suggested that RP3 is flanked by the markers DXS1110 (distal) and OTC (proximal). Patient BB was thought to have RP because of a lesion at the RP3 locus, in addition to chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), mild mental retardation, and the McLeod phenotype. This patient carried a deletion extending approximately 3 Mb from DMD in Xp21.3 to Xp21.1, with the proximal breakpoint located approximately 40 kb centromeric to DXS1110. The RP3 gene, therefore, is believed to reside between DXS1110 and the proximal breakpoint of the BB deletion. In order to refine the location of RP3 and to ascertain patients with RP3, we have been analyzing several XLRP families for linkage to Xp markers. Linkage analysis in an American family of 27 individuals demonstrates segregation of XLRP with markers in Xp21.1, consistent with the RP3 subtype. One affected mate shows a recombination event proximal to DXS1110. Additional markers within the DXS1110-OTC interval show that the crossover is between two novel polymorphic markers, DXS8349 and M6, both of which are present in BB DNA and lie centromeric to the proximal breakpoint. This recombination places the XLRP mutation in this family outside the BB deletion and redefines the location of RP3. PMID:8659520

  8. Early structural anomalies observed by high-resolution imaging in two related cases of autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Pyo; Lee, Winston; Bae, Eun Jin; Greenstein, Vivianne; Sin, Bum Ho; Chang, Stanley; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the use of adaptive-optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) to investigate RHO, D190N autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa in two siblings (11 and 16 years old, respectively). Each patient exhibited distinct hyperautofluorescence patterns in which the outer borders corresponded to inner segment ellipsoid band disruption. Areas within the hyperautofluorescence patterns exhibited normal photoreceptor outer segments and retinal pigment epithelium. However, AO-SLO imaging revealed noticeable spacing irregularities in the cone mosaic. AO-SLO allows researchers to characterize retinal structural abnormalities with precision so that early structural changes in retinitis pigmentosa can be identified and reconciled with genetic findings. PMID:25215869

  9. [The nurse's work in the application of ozone therapy in retinitis pigmentosa. January-May 1996].

    PubMed

    Guerra Veranes, X; Limonta Nápoles, Y; Contrera Hechavarría, I; Freyre Luque, R; Martínez Blanco, C

    1998-01-01

    A descriptive and prospective study of 73 patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa, who were attended at the Provincial Center of Retinitis Pigmentosa, in Santiago de Cuba, from January to May, 1996, was conducted aimed at emphasizing the nurse's role in the application of ozonotherapy. There are different ways to administer this gast: autohemotherapy, intramuscular, artrectal insufflation. The information obtained was manually processed and percentage was used as a summary measure. The predominance of young and male patients is among the main results. Most of the patients were in stage II and III of the disease, and the rectal administration of ozone was the most used. This last aspect shows the significance of the nurse-patient relationship, which contributed decisively to the acceptance of rectal administration that was rejected by a great number of patients. PMID:9934231

  10. Astrocytes and Müller Cell Alterations During Retinal Degeneration in a Transgenic Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Campello, Laura; Pinilla, Isabel; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa includes a group of progressive retinal degenerative diseases that affect the structure and function of photoreceptors. Secondarily to the loss of photoreceptors, there is a reduction in retinal vascularization, which seems to influence the cellular degenerative process. Retinal macroglial cells, astrocytes, and Müller cells provide support for retinal neurons and are fundamental for maintaining normal retinal function. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of macroglial changes during retinal degeneration in P23H rats. Methods: Homozygous P23H line-3 rats aged from P18 to 18 months were used to study the evolution of the disease, and SD rats were used as controls. Immunolabeling with antibodies against GFAP, vimentin, and transducin were used to visualize macroglial cells and cone photoreceptors. Results: In P23H rats, increased GFAP labeling in Müller cells was observed as an early indicator of retinal gliosis. At 4 and 12 months of age, the apical processes of Müller cells in P23H rats clustered in firework-like structures, which were associated with ring-like shaped areas of cone degeneration in the outer nuclear layer. These structures were not observed at 16 months of age. The number of astrocytes was higher in P23H rats than in the SD matched controls at 4 and 12 months of age, supporting the idea of astrocyte proliferation. As the disease progressed, astrocytes exhibited a deteriorated morphology and marked hypertrophy. The increase in the complexity of the astrocytic processes correlated with greater connexin 43 expression and higher density of connexin 43 immunoreactive puncta within the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of P23H vs. SD rat retinas. Conclusions: In the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa, the loss of photoreceptors triggers major changes in the number and morphology of glial cells affecting the inner retina. PMID:26733810

  11. Retinitis pigmentosa with concomitant essential iris atrophy and glaucoma – case report

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Sérgio Henrique Sampaio; Barreto, Aline Sá; Buscacio, Eduardo Scaldini; Shinzato, Elke; Patrão, Lia Florim; de Oliveira Silva, Mauro Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a young patient with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), essential iris atrophy, and glaucoma. Case report This report presents a case of a 22-year-old female patient with unilateral glaucoma, increased intraocular pressure, increased cup–disc ratio, iris atrophy, peripheral anterior synechiae, and bilateral RP. Discussion The patient presented glaucoma due to the iridocorneal endothelial syndrome, despite low age. RP is a bilateral disorder that may be associated with angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:26648683

  12. Rapid anterior capsular contraction after phacoemulsification surgery in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jin-Poi, Tan; Shatriah, Ismail; Khairy-Shamel, Sonny Teo; Zunaina, Embong

    2013-01-01

    A decrease in the anterior capsule opening after cataract surgery has been observed in eyes with weakened lens zonules. It commonly occurs in diabetes mellitus, uveitis, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, high myopia, and elderly patients. Herein, we report the case of a middle-aged man with advanced retinitis pigmentosa who developed a rapid contraction of the anterior capsule after an uneventful phacoemulsification surgery that resulted in severe visual loss during the early postoperative period. PMID:23674886

  13. Rapid anterior capsular contraction after phacoemulsification surgery in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Jin-Poi, Tan; Shatriah, Ismail; Khairy-Shamel, Sonny Teo; Zunaina, Embong

    2013-01-01

    A decrease in the anterior capsule opening after cataract surgery has been observed in eyes with weakened lens zonules. It commonly occurs in diabetes mellitus, uveitis, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, high myopia, and elderly patients. Herein, we report the case of a middle-aged man with advanced retinitis pigmentosa who developed a rapid contraction of the anterior capsule after an uneventful phacoemulsification surgery that resulted in severe visual loss during the early postoperative period. PMID:23674886

  14. Emotional Health of People with Visual Impairment Caused by Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Keziah; Baranian, Mohammad; Timmis, Matthew; Pardhan, Shahina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To understand the emotional difficulties associated with living with the ocular condition Retinitis Pigmentosa, and to examine the functioning of a self-report instrument used to assess this construct. Methods The difficulty of goals and tasks in the emotional health domain of the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory were rated by 166 people with Retinitis Pigmentosa in a cross-sectional study. Demographic factors were also assessed. Results Responses to the 23 emotional health tasks were Rasch analysed and could be used to form either one 20 item overview scale with some multidimensionality, or three unidimensional subscales addressing feelings (4 items), communicating visual loss (5 items) and fatigue (7 items). The most difficult individual tasks related to communicating visual loss to other people, and dealing with feelings such as frustration, anxiety and stress. The use of mobility aids and female gender were associated with increased difficulty with emotional health, explaining 19% of the variance in the overview scale. Conclusions The emotional health domain of the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory is a valid tool to assess emotional difficulties arising from visual loss. Interventions to aid people with Retinitis Pigmentosa deal with emotional difficulties should particularly address communicating vision loss effectively to others and coping with negative feelings. PMID:26713624

  15. Choroidal thickness profile in Retinitis Pigmentosa – Correlation with outer retinal structures

    PubMed Central

    Chhablani, Jay; Jonnadula, Ganesh Babu; Srinivasa Rao, P.; Venkata, Amarnath; Jalali, Subhadra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the choroidal thickness (CT) of subjects with Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) with age-matched healthy subjects and to correlate the visual acuity with retinal parameters including central macular thickness (CMT), inner segment/outer segment junction (IS/OS junction) integrity, external limiting membrane (ELM) integrity and choroidal thickness in subjects with RP. Methods Eighty-eight eyes (69 patients) with typical RP and 188 eyes of 104 healthy subjects were enrolled between September 2012 and January 2013. All subjects underwent a comprehensive ocular examination including choroidal imaging using enhanced depth imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Outcome measures were CT difference between RP and age-matched healthy subjects; and correlation of various factors such CMT, IS/OS junction integrity, ELM integrity, and CT with visual acuity. Results Among RP subjects, mean age was 31.39 ± 13.4 years with a mean BCVA of 0.99 ± 0.94 logMAR. Mean spherical equivalent was −0.6 ± 1.6D. Mean CMT was 148.48 ± 119 μm. Mean subfoveal CT was 296.9 ± 72 μm. Mean IS/OS and ELM integrity was 42.2 ± 46.6% and 43.75 ± 45.7%, respectively. The mean age was 40.0 ± 13.5 years with a mean spherical equivalent of 0.18 ± 0.6D for the normal age-matched healthy group. Mean subfoveal CT was 283.1 ± 47.8 μm. CT at various locations in patients of various ages in the RP group did not show any statistical significant difference (P = ≫0.05) in comparison with age-matched healthy subjects. On multivariate regression, ELM percentage integrity had the strongest association with best corrected visual acuity, followed by IS/OS junction percentage integrity. Subfoveal choroidal thickness had very weak correlation with visual acuity as well other retinal parameters. There was a significant difference in the outer retinal structure integrity (p = 0.002) and CMT (p = 0.02) between the eyes with good (⩾20/200) and

  16. Wide-Field Fundus Autofluorescence for Retinitis Pigmentosa and Cone/Cone-Rod Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Akio; Oishi, Maho; Ogino, Ken; Morooka, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa and cone/cone-rod dystrophy are inherited retinal diseases characterized by the progressive loss of rod and/or cone photoreceptors. To evaluate the status of rod/cone photoreceptors and visual function, visual acuity and visual field tests, electroretinogram, and optical coherence tomography are typically used. In addition to these examinations, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) has recently garnered attention. FAF visualizes the intrinsic fluorescent material in the retina, which is mainly lipofuscin contained within the retinal pigment epithelium. While conventional devices offer limited viewing angles in FAF, the recently developed Optos machine enables recording of wide-field FAF. With wide-field analysis, an association between abnormal FAF areas and visual function was demonstrated in retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy. In addition, the presence of "patchy" hypoautofluorescent areas was found to be correlated with symptom duration. Although physicians should be cautious when interpreting wide-field FAF results because the peripheral parts of the image are magnified significantly, this examination method provides previously unavailable information. PMID:26427426

  17. Screening for mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gannon, A.M.; Daiger, S.P.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin account for approximately 30% of all cases of autosomal dominant retinits pigmentosa (adRP) and mutations in peripherin/RDS account for an additional 5% of cases. Also, mutations in rhodopsin can cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and mutations in peripherin/RDS can cause dominant macular degeneration. Most disease-causing mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS are unique to one family or, at most, to a few families within a limited geographic region, though a few mutations are found in multiple, unrelated families. To further determine the spectrum of genetic variation in these genes, we screened DNA samples from 134 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa for mutations in both rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS using SSCP followed by genomic sequencing. Of the 134 patients, 86 were from families with apparent adRP and 48 were either isolated cases or were from families with an equivocal mode of inheritance. Among these patients we found 14 distinct rhodopsin mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. Eleven of these mutations were found in one individual or one family only, whereas the Pro23His mutation was found in 14 {open_quotes}unrelated{close_quotes}individuals. The splice-site mutation produces dominant disease though with highly variable expression. Among the remaining patients were found 6 distinct peripherin/RDS mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. These mutations were also found in one patient or family only, except the Gly266Asp mutation which was found in two unrelated patients. These results confirm the expected frequency and broad spectrum of mutations causing adRP.

  18. CNTF Gene Therapy Confers Lifelong Neuroprotection in a Mouse Model of Human Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Barnard, Alun R; Singh, Mandeep S; Martin, Chris; Lee, Edward J; Davies, Wayne I L; MacLaren, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    The long-term outcome of neuroprotection as a therapeutic strategy for preventing cell death in neurodegenerative disorders remains unknown, primarily due to slow disease progression and the inherent difficulty of assessing neuronal survival in vivo. Employing a murine model of retinal disease, we demonstrate that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) confers life-long protection against photoreceptor degeneration. Repetitive retinal imaging allowed the survival of intrinsically fluorescent cone photoreceptors to be quantified in vivo. Imaging of the visual cortex and assessment of visually-evoked behavioral responses demonstrated that surviving cones retain function and signal correctly to the brain. The mechanisms underlying CNTF-mediated neuroprotection were explored through transcriptome analysis, revealing widespread upregulation of proteolysis inhibitors, which may prevent cellular/extracellular matrix degradation and complement activation in neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide insights into potential novel therapeutic avenues for diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for which CNTF has been evaluated unsuccessfully in clinical trials. PMID:25896245

  19. Next-generation sequencing-based molecular diagnosis of 35 Hispanic retinitis pigmentosa probands

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Xu, Mingchu; Verriotto, Jennifer D.; Li, Yumei; Wang, Hui; Gan, Lin; Lam, Byron L.; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal diseases. The prevalence of RP and the mutation spectrum vary across populations. Hispanic people account for approximately 17% of the United States population, and the genetic etiologies of RP of this ethnic group still remain not well defined. Utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS), we screened mutations in known retinal disease-causing genes in an RP cohort of 35 unrelated Hispanic probands from the Miami area. We achieved a solving rate of 66% and identified 15 novel putative pathogenic mutations, including a frequent founder mutation disrupting PRPF31 splicing. Our data show that the mutation spectrum of Hispanic RP receives a significant impact from disease-causing alleles of Spanish origin and may also contain population-specific alleles. PMID:27596865

  20. Next-generation sequencing-based molecular diagnosis of 35 Hispanic retinitis pigmentosa probands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Xu, Mingchu; Verriotto, Jennifer D; Li, Yumei; Wang, Hui; Gan, Lin; Lam, Byron L; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal diseases. The prevalence of RP and the mutation spectrum vary across populations. Hispanic people account for approximately 17% of the United States population, and the genetic etiologies of RP of this ethnic group still remain not well defined. Utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS), we screened mutations in known retinal disease-causing genes in an RP cohort of 35 unrelated Hispanic probands from the Miami area. We achieved a solving rate of 66% and identified 15 novel putative pathogenic mutations, including a frequent founder mutation disrupting PRPF31 splicing. Our data show that the mutation spectrum of Hispanic RP receives a significant impact from disease-causing alleles of Spanish origin and may also contain population-specific alleles. PMID:27596865

  1. Transplantation of Reprogrammed Embryonic Stem Cells Improves Visual Function in a Mouse Model for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan-Kai; Tosi, Joaquin; Kasanuki, Jennifer Mie; Chou, Chai Lin; Kong, Jian; Parmalee, Nancy; Wert, Katherine J.; Allikmets, Rando; Lai, Chi-Chun; Chien, Chung-Liang; Nagasaki, Takayuki; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2010-01-01

    Background To study whether C57BL/6J-Tyrc−2j/J (C2J) mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate into retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and then restore retinal function in a model for retinitis pigmentosa: Rpe65rd12/Rpe65rd12 C57BL6 mice. Methods Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-labeled C2J ES cells were induced to differentiate into RPE-like structures on PA6 feeders. RPE-specific markers are expressed from differentiated cells in vitro. After differentiation, ES cell-derived RPE-like cells were transplanted into the subretinal space of postnatal day 5 Rpe65rd12/Rpe65rd12 mice. Live imaging of YFP-labeled C2J ES cells demonstrated survival of the graft. Electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed on transplanted mice to evaluate the functional outcome of transplantation. Results RPE-like cells derived from ES cells sequentially express multiple RPE-specific markers. After transplantation, YFP-labeled cells can be tracked with live imaging for as long as 7 months. Although more than half of the mice were complicated with retinal detachments or tumor development, one fourth of the mice showed increased electroretinogram responses in the transplanted eyes. Rpe65rd12/Rpe65rd12 mice transplanted with RPE-like cells showed significant visual recovery during a 7-month period, whereas those injected with saline, PA6 feeders, or undifferentiated ES cells showed no rescue. Conclusions ES cells can differentiate, morphologically, and functionally, into RPE-like cells. Based on these findings, differentiated ES cells have the potential for the development of new therapeutic approaches for RPE-specific diseases such as certain forms of retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration. Nevertheless, stringent control of retinal detachment and teratoma development will be necessary before initiation of treatment trials. PMID:20164818

  2. Heading perception in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li; Peli, Eli; Warren, William H.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated whether retinis pigmentosa (RP) patients with residual visual field of < 100 degrees could perceive heading from optic flow. METHODS: Four RP patients and four age-matched normally sighted control subjects viewed displays simulating an observer walking over a ground. In experiment 1, subjects viewed either the entire display with free fixation (full-field condition) or through an aperture with a fixation point at the center (aperture condition). In experiment 2, patients viewed displays of different durations. RESULTS: RP patients' performance was comparable to that of the age-matched control subjects: heading judgment was better in the full-field condition than in the aperture condition. Increasing display duration from 0.5 s to 1 s improved patients' heading performance, but giving them more time (3 s) to gather more visual information did not consistently further improve their performance. CONCLUSIONS: RP patients use active scanning eye movements to compensate for their visual field loss in heading perception; they might be able to gather sufficient optic flow information for heading perception in about 1 s.

  3. Optical imaging of oxidative stress in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in rodent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanian, Zahra; Maleki, Sepideh; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Eells, Janis T.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-02-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), which increases during retinal degenerative disorders, contributes to photoreceptor cell loss. The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in the metabolic state of the eye tissue in rodent models of retinitis pigmentosa by using the cryofluorescence imaging technique. The mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH and FADH2 are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels using optical techniques. The NADH redox ratio (RR), which is the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores (NADH/FAD), was used as a quantitative diagnostic marker. The NADH RR was examined in an established rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the P23H rat, and compared to that of control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and P23H NIR treated rats. Our results demonstrated 24% decrease in the mean NADH RR of the eyes from P23H transgenic rats compared to normal rats and 20% increase in the mean NADH RR of the eyes from the P23H NIR treated rats compared to P23H non-treated rats.

  4. Low-dose-rate, low-dose irradiation delays neurodegeneration in a model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Otani, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Guo, Congrong; Oishi, Akio; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-01-01

    The existence of radiation hormesis is controversial. Several stimulatory effects of low-dose (LD) radiation have been reported to date; however, the effects on neural tissue or neurodegeneration remain unknown. Here, we show that LD radiation has a neuroprotective effect in mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa, a hereditary, progressive neurodegenerative disease that leads to blindness. Various LD radiation doses were administered to the eyes in a retinal degeneration mouse model, and their pathological and physiological effects were analyzed. LD gamma radiation in a low-dose-rate (LDR) condition rescues photoreceptor cell apoptosis both morphologically and functionally. The greatest effect was observed in a condition using 650 mGy irradiation and a 26 mGy/minute dose rate. Multiple rounds of irradiation strengthened this neuroprotective effect. A characteristic up-regulation (563%) of antioxidative gene peroxiredoxin-2 (Prdx2) in the LDR-LD-irradiated retina was observed compared to the sham-treated control retina. Silencing the Prdx2 using small-interfering RNA administration reduced the LDR-LD rescue effect on the photoreceptors. Our results demonstrate for the first time that LDR-LD irradiation has a biological effect in neural cells of living animals. The results support that radiation exhibits hormesis, and this effect may be applied as a novel therapeutic concept for retinitis pigmentosa and for other progressive neurodegenerative diseases regardless of the mechanism of degeneration involved. PMID:22074737

  5. Carnosic acid slows photoreceptor degeneration in the Pde6brd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kai; Tarchick, Matthew J.; Yu, Xiaoshan; Beight, Craig; Bu, Ping; Yu, Minzhong

    2016-01-01

    The photoreceptor cell death associated with the various genetic forms of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is currently untreatable and leads to partial or complete vision loss. Carnosic acid (CA) upregulates endogenous antioxidant enzymes and has proven neuroprotective in studies of neurodegenerative models affecting the brain. In this study, we examined the potential effect of CA on photoreceptor death in the Pde6brd10 mouse model of RP. Our data shows that CA provided morphological and functional preservation of photoreceptors. CA appears to exert its neuroprotective effects through inhibition of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26961159

  6. Digenic retinitis pigmentosa due to mutations at the unlinked peripherin/RDS and ROM1 loci

    SciTech Connect

    Kajiwara, K.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P. )

    1994-06-10

    In spite of recent advances in identifying genes causing monogenic human disease, very little is known about the genes involved in polygenic disease. Three families were identified with mutations in the unlinked photoreceptor-specific genes ROM 1 and peripherin/RDS, in which only double heterozygotes develop retinitis pigmentosa (RP). These findings indicate that the allelic and nonallelic heterogeneity known to be a feature of monogenic RP is complicated further by interactions between unlinked mutations causing digenic RP. Recognition of the inheritance pattern exemplified by these three families might facilitate the identification of other examples of digenic inheritance in human disease.

  7. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa mapping to chromosome 7p exhibits variable expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, R Y; Fitzke, F W; Moore, A T; Jay, M; Inglehearn, C; Arden, G B; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C

    1995-01-01

    The genetic locus causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) has recently been mapped in a large English family to chromosome 7p. Eight affected members of this family were studied electrophysiologically and psychophysically with dark adapted static threshold perimetry and dark adaptometry. The phenotypes observed fell into three categories: minimally affected with no symptoms, and normal (or near normal) electrophysiology and psychophysics; moderately affected with mild symptoms, abnormal electroretinograms, and equal loss of rod and cone function in affected areas of the retina; and severely affected with extinguished electroretinograms and barely detectable dark adapted static threshold sensitivities. The mutation in the gene on 7p causing adRP in this family causes regional retinal dysfunction with greatly variable expressivity ranging from normal to profoundly abnormal in a manner not explained by age. PMID:7880785

  8. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with apparent incomplete penetrance: a clinical, electrophysiological, psychophysical, and molecular genetic study.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, A T; Fitzke, F; Jay, M; Arden, G B; Inglehearn, C F; Keen, T J; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C

    1993-01-01

    Twenty five symptomatic individuals and six asymptomatic obligate gene carriers from four families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) showing apparent incomplete penetrance have been studied. Symptomatic individuals from three families showed early onset of night blindness, non-recordable rod electroretinograms, and marked elevation of both rod and cone thresholds in all subjects tested. In the fourth family, there was more variation in the age of onset of night blindness and some symptomatic individuals showed well preserved rod and cone function in some retinal areas. All asymptomatic individuals tested had evidence of mild abnormalities of rod and cone function, indicating that these families show marked variation in expressivity rather than true non-penetrance of the adRP gene. No mutations of the rhodopsin or RDS genes were found in these families and the precise genetic mutation(s) remain to be identified. PMID:8025041

  9. Fine genetic mapping of a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 6p21

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, Yin Y.; Banerjee, P.; Knowles, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    The inherited retinal degenerations known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) can be caused by mutations at many different loci and can be inherited as an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked recessive trait. Two forms of autosomal recessive (arRP) have been reported to cosegregate with mutations in the rhodopsin gene and the beta-subunit of rod phosphodiesterase on chromosome 4p. Genetic linkage has been reported on chromosomes 6p and 1q. In a large Dominican family, we reported an arRp gene near the region of the peripherin/RDS gene. Four recombinations were detected between the disease locus and an intragenic marker derived from peripherin/RDS. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Variant haploinsufficiency and phenotypic non-penetrance in PRPF31-associated retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Rose, A M; Bhattacharya, S S

    2016-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogenous group of inherited disorders, characterized by death of the retinal photoreceptor cells, leading to progressive visual impairment. One form of RP is caused by mutations in the ubiquitously expressed splicing factor, PRPF31, this form being known as RP11. An intriguing feature of RP11 is the presence of non-penetrance, which has been observed in the majority of PRPF31 mutation-carrying families. In contrast to variable expressivity, which is highly pervasive, true non-penetrance is a very rare phenomenon in Mendelian disorders. In this article, the molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic non-penetrance in RP11 are explored. It is an elegant example of how our understanding of monogenic disorders has evolved from studying only the disease gene, to considering a mutation on the genetic background of the individual - the logical evolution in this genomic era. PMID:26853529

  11. Inherent Instability of the Retinitis Pigmentosa P23H Mutant Opsin*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Jastrzebska, Beata; Cao, Pengxiu; Zhang, Jianye; Wang, Benlian; Sun, Wenyu; Yuan, Yiyuan; Feng, Zhaoyang; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The P23H opsin mutation is the most common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Even though the pathobiology of the resulting retinal degeneration has been characterized in several animal models, its complex molecular mechanism is not well understood. Here, we expressed P23H bovine rod opsin in the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans. Expression was low due to enhanced protein degradation. The mutant opsin was glycosylated, but the polysaccharide size differed from that of the normal protein. Although P23H opsin aggregated in the nervous system of C. elegans, the pharmacological chaperone 9-cis-retinal stabilized it during biogenesis, producing a variant of rhodopsin called P23H isorhodopsin. In vitro, P23H isorhodopsin folded correctly, formed the appropriate disulfide bond, could be photoactivated but with reduced sensitivity, and underwent Meta II decay at a rate similar to wild type isorhodopsin. In worm neurons, P23H isorhodopsin initiated phototransduction by coupling with the endogenous Gi/o signaling cascade that induced loss of locomotion. Using pharmacological interventions affecting protein synthesis and degradation, we showed that the chromophore could be incorporated either during or after mutant protein translation. However, regeneration of P23H isorhodopsin with chromophore was significantly slower than that of wild type isorhodopsin. This effect, combined with the inherent instability of P23H rhodopsin, could lead to the structural cellular changes and photoreceptor death found in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. These results also suggest that slow regeneration of P23H rhodopsin could prevent endogenous chromophore-mediated stabilization of rhodopsin in the retina. PMID:24515108

  12. A novel start codon mutation of the MERTK gene in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Jinda, Worapoj; Poungvarin, Naravat; Taylor, Todd D.; Suzuki, Yutaka; Thongnoppakhun, Wanna; Limwongse, Chanin; Lertrit, Patcharee; Suriyaphol, Prapat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited retinal degenerations characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptor cells and RPE functions. More than 70 causative genes are known to be responsible for RP. This study aimed to identify the causative gene in a patient from a consanguineous family with childhood-onset severe retinal dystrophy. Methods To identify the defective gene, whole exome sequencing was performed. Candidate causative variants were selected and validated using Sanger sequencing. Segregation analysis of the causative gene was performed in additional family members. To verify that the mutation has an effect on protein synthesis, an expression vector containing the first ten amino acids of the mutant protein fused with the DsRed2 fluorescent protein was constructed and transfected into HEK293T cells. Expression of the fusion protein in the transfected cells was measured using fluorescence microscopy. Results By filtering against public variant databases, a novel homozygous missense mutation (c.3G>A) localized in the start codon of the MERTK gene was detected as a potentially pathogenic mutation for autosomal recessive RP. The c.3G>A mutation cosegregated with the disease phenotype in the family. No expression of the first ten amino acids of the MerTK mutant fused with the DsRed2 fluorescent protein was detected in HEK293T cells, indicating that the mutation affects the translation initiation site of the gene that may lead to loss of function of the MerTK signaling pathway. Conclusions We report a novel missense mutation (c.3G>A, p.0?) in the MERTK gene that causes severe vision impairment in a patient. Taken together with previous reports, our results expand the spectrum of MERTK mutations and extend our understanding of the role of the MerTK protein in the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:27122965

  13. Novel deletions involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Gema; Jaijo, Teresa; Aparisi, Maria J.; Larrieu, Lise; Faugère, Valérie; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Millán, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present work was to identify and characterize large rearrangements involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. Methods The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique combined with a customized array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was applied to 40 unrelated patients previously screened for point mutations in the USH2A gene in which none or only one pathologic mutation was identified. Results We detected six large deletions involving USH2A in six out of the 40 cases studied. Three of the patients were homozygous for the deletion, and the remaining three were compound heterozygous with a previously identified USH2A point mutation. In five of these cases, the patients displayed Usher type 2, and the remaining case displayed nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. The exact breakpoint junctions of the deletions found in USH2A in four of these cases were characterized. Conclusions Our study highlights the need to develop improved efficient strategies of mutation screening based upon next generation sequencing (NGS) that reduce cost, time, and complexity and allow simultaneous identification of all types of disease-causing mutations in diagnostic procedures. PMID:25352746

  14. Genetic analysis of a kindred with X-linked mental handicap and retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Aldred, M.A.; Dry, K.L.; Hardwick, L.J.; Teague, P.W.; Lester, D.H.; Brown, J.; Spowart, G.; Carothers, A.D.; Wright, A.F.; Knight-Jones, E.B.

    1994-11-01

    A kindred is described in which X-linked nonspecific mental handicap segregates together with retinitis pigmentosa. Carrier females are mentally normal but may show signs of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carrier state and become symptomatic in their later years. Analysis of polymorphic DNA markers at nine loci on the short arm of the X chromosome shows that no crossing-over occurs between the disease and Xp11 markers DXS255, TIMP, DXS426, MAOA, and DXS228. The 90% confidence limits show that the locus is in the Xp21-q21 region. Haplotype analysis is consistent with the causal gene being located proximal to the Xp21 loci DXS538 and 5{prime}-dystrophin on the short arm of the X chromosome. The posterior probability of linkage to the RP2 region of the X chromosome short arm (Xp11.4-p11.23) is .727, suggesting the possibility of a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome. No cytogenetic abnormality has been identified. 33 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Mutation spectrum of the rhodopsin gene among patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Dryja, T.P.; Han, L.B.; Cowley, G.S.; McGee, T.L.; Berson, E.L. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors searched for point mutations in every exon of the rhodopsin gene in 150 patients from separate families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Including the 4 mutations the authors reported previously, they found a total of 17 different mutations that correlate with the disease. Each of these mutations is a single-base substitution corresponding to a single amino acid substitution. Based on current models for the structure of rhodopsin, 3 of the 17 mutant amino acids are normally located on the cytoplasmic side of the protein, 6 in transmembrane domains, and 8 on the intradiscal side. Forty-three of the 150 patients (29%) carry 1 of these mutations, and no patient has more than 1 mutation. In every family with a mutation so far analyzed, the mutation cosegregates with the disease. They found one instance of a mutation in an affected patient that was absent in both unaffected parents (i.e., a new germ-line mutation), indicating that some isolate cases of retinitis pigmentosa carry a mutation of the rhodopsin gene.

  16. Genetic Analysis of a Kindred With X-linked Mental Handicap and Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, M. A.; Dry, K. L.; Knight-Jones, E. B.; Hardwick, L. J.; Teague, P. W.; Lester, D. H.; Brown, J.; Spowart, G.; Carothers, A. D.; Raeburn, J. A.; Bird, A. C.; Fielder, A. R.; Wright, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    A kindred is described in which X-linked nonspecific mental handicap segregates together with retinitis pigmentosa. Carrier females are mentally normal but may show signs of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carrier state and become symptomatic in their later years. Analysis of polymorphic DNA markers at nine loci on the short arm of the X chromosome shows that no crossing-over occurs between the disease and Xp11 markers DXS255, TIMP, DXS426, MAOA, and DXS228. The 90% confidence limits show that the locus is in the Xp21-q21 region. Haplotype analysis is consistent with the causal gene being located proximal to the Xp21 loci DXS538 and 5'-dystrophin on the short arm of the X chromosome. The posterior probability of linkage to the RP2 region of the X chromosome short arm (Xp11.4-p11.23) is .727, suggesting the possibility of a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome. No cytogenetic abnormality has been identified. PMID:7977353

  17. A Dominant Mutation in Hexokinase 1 (HK1) Causes Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lori S.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Bowne, Sara J.; Lang, Steven; Blanton, Susan H.; Cadena, Elizabeth; Avery, Cheryl E.; Lewis, Richard A.; Webb-Jones, Kaylie; Wheaton, Dianna H.; Birch, David G.; Coussa, Razck; Ren, Huanan; Lopez, Irma; Chakarova, Christina; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Garcia, Charles A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Weinstock, George M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To identify the cause of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in UTAD003, a large, six-generation Louisiana family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Methods. A series of strategies, including candidate gene screening, linkage exclusion, genome-wide linkage mapping, and whole-exome next-generation sequencing, was used to identify a mutation in a novel disease gene on chromosome 10q22.1. Probands from an additional 404 retinal degeneration families were subsequently screened for mutations in this gene. Results. Exome sequencing in UTAD003 led to identification of a single, novel coding variant (c.2539G>A, p.Glu847Lys) in hexokinase 1 (HK1) present in all affected individuals and absent from normal controls. One affected family member carries two copies of the mutation and has an unusually severe form of disease, consistent with homozygosity for this mutation. Screening of additional adRP probands identified four other families (American, Canadian, and Sicilian) with the same mutation and a similar range of phenotypes. The families share a rare 450-kilobase haplotype containing the mutation, suggesting a founder mutation among otherwise unrelated families. Conclusions. We identified an HK1 mutation in five adRP families. Hexokinase 1 catalyzes phosphorylation of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate. HK1 is expressed in retina, with two abundant isoforms expressed at similar levels. The Glu847Lys mutation is located at a highly conserved position in the protein, outside the catalytic domains. We hypothesize that the effect of this mutation is limited to the retina, as no systemic abnormalities in glycolysis were detected. Prevalence of the HK1 mutation in our cohort of RP families is 1%. PMID:25190649

  18. Identification of a nuclear localization signal in the retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP26 protein, ceramide kinase-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Yuichi; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki . E-mail: yigarash@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp

    2006-05-12

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. A mutation in a new ceramide kinase (CERK) homologous gene, named CERK-like protein (CERKL), was found to cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP26). Here, we show a point mutation of one of two putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences inhibited the nuclear localization of the protein. Furthermore, the tetra-GFP-tagged NLS, which cannot passively enter the nucleus, was observed not only in the nucleus but also in the nucleolus. Our results provide First evidence of the active nuclear import of CERKL and suggest that the identified NLS might be responsible for nucleolar retention of the protein. As recent studies have shown other RP-related proteins are localized in the nucleus or the nucleolus, our identification of NLS in CERKL suggests that CERKL likely plays important roles for retinal functions in the nucleus and the nucleolus.

  19. A Case Report of Vogt's Limbal Girdle and Retinitis Pigmentosa in a Thirteen-Year-Old Boy: A Rare and Unusual Association

    PubMed Central

    Vignesh, A.P.; Srinivasan, Renuka; Karanth, Swathi; Vijitha, Sai

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe a rare case of Vogt's limbal girdle in a boy with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods A 13-year-old boy from India presented to us with progressive diminution of vision and nyctalopia for 5 years. On examination, he had the characteristic features of retinitis pigmentosa with the fundus showing disc pallor, bony spicules and arteriolar attenuation. His anterior segment examination showed Vogt's limbal girdle in both eyes. Results Vogt's limbal girdle is a corneal degeneration usually seen in elderly individuals. This is the first time it is seen in association with retinitis pigmentosa. It has also never been reported at such a young age. Conclusion We report a rare case where Vogt's limbal girdle was observed in a 13-year-old boy with retinitis pigmentosa. This gives further insight into the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26483674

  20. Optical imaging of mitochondrial redox state in rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ghanian, Zahra; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Schmitt, Heather; Eells, Janis; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Oxidative stress (OS) and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to photoreceptor cell loss in retinal degenerative disorders. The metabolic state of the retina in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) was investigated using a cryo-fluorescence imaging technique. The mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels using optical techniques. The cryo-fluorescence redox imaging technique provides a quantitative assessment of the metabolism. More specifically, the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores (NADH/FAD), the NADH redox ratio (RR), is a marker of the metabolic state of the tissue. The NADH RR and retinal function were examined in an established rodent model of RP, the P23H rat compared to that of nondystrophic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The NADH RR mean values were 1.11±0.03 in the SD normal and 0.841±0.01 in the P23H retina, indicating increased OS in the P23H retina. Electroretinographic data revealed a significant reduction in photoreceptor function in P23H animals compared to SD nozrmal rats. Thus, cryo-fluorescence redox imaging was used as a quantitative marker of OS in eyes from transgenic rats and demonstrated that alterations in the oxidative state of eyes occur during the early stages of RP. PMID:23291617

  1. Precision Medicine: Genetic Repair of Retinitis Pigmentosa in Patient-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bassuk, Alexander G.; Zheng, Andrew; Li, Yao; Tsang, Stephen H.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from patient fibroblasts could potentially be used as a source of autologous cells for transplantation in retinal disease. Patient-derived iPSCs, however, would still harbor disease-causing mutations. To generate healthy patient-derived cells, mutations might be repaired with new gene-editing technology based on the bacterial system of clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9, thereby yielding grafts that require no patient immunosuppression. We tested whether CRISPR/Cas9 could be used in patient-specific iPSCs to precisely repair an RPGR point mutation that causes X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). Fibroblasts cultured from a skin-punch biopsy of an XLRP patient were transduced to produce iPSCs carrying the patient’s c.3070G > T mutation. The iPSCs were transduced with CRISPR guide RNAs, Cas9 endonuclease, and a donor homology template. Despite the gene’s repetitive and GC-rich sequences, 13% of RPGR gene copies showed mutation correction and conversion to the wild-type allele. This is the first report using CRISPR to correct a pathogenic mutation in iPSCs derived from a patient with photoreceptor degeneration. This important proof-of-concept finding supports the development of personalized iPSC-based transplantation therapies for retinal disease. PMID:26814166

  2. CNTF gene therapy confers lifelong neuroprotection in a mouse model of human retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Daniel M.; Barnard, Alun R.; Singh, Mandeep S.; Martin, Chris; Lee, Edward; Davies, Wayne I.L.; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The long-term outcome of neuroprotection as a therapeutic strategy for preventing cell death in neurodegenerative disorders remains unknown, primarily due to slow disease progression and the inherent difficulty of assessing neuronal survival in vivo. Employing a murine model of retinal disease, we demonstrate that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) confers life-long protection against photoreceptor degeneration. Repetitive retinal imaging allowed the survival of intrinsically fluorescent cone photoreceptors to be quantified in vivo. Imaging of the visual cortex and assessment of visually-evoked behavioural responses demonstrated that surviving cones retain function and signal correctly to the brain. The mechanisms underlying CNTF-mediated neuroprotection were explored through transcriptome analysis, revealing widespread up-regulation of proteolysis inhibitors, which may prevent cellular/extracellular matrix degradation and complement activation in neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide insights into potential novel therapeutic avenues for diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for which CNTF has been evaluated unsuccessfully in clinical trials. PMID:25896245

  3. Optical imaging of mitochondrial redox state in rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Sepideh; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Ghanian, Zahra; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Schmitt, Heather; Eells, Janis; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to photoreceptor cell loss in retinal degenerative disorders. The metabolic state of the retina in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) was investigated using a cryo-fluorescence imaging technique. The mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels using optical techniques. The cryo-fluorescence redox imaging technique provides a quantitative assessment of the metabolism. More specifically, the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores (NADH/FAD), the NADH redox ratio (RR), is a marker of the metabolic state of the tissue. The NADH RR and retinal function were examined in an established rodent model of RP, the P23H rat compared to that of nondystrophic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The NADH RR mean values were 1.11±0.03 in the SD normal and 0.841±0.01 in the P23H retina, indicating increased OS in the P23H retina. Electroretinographic data revealed a significant reduction in photoreceptor function in P23H animals compared to SD nozrmal rats. Thus, cryo-fluorescence redox imaging was used as a quantitative marker of OS in eyes from transgenic rats and demonstrated that alterations in the oxidative state of eyes occur during the early stages of RP.

  4. A Missense Mutation in HK1 Leads to Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Yandong; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Li; Lyubasyuk, Vera; Wang, Keqing; Xu, Mingchu; Li, Yumei; Wu, Frances; Wen, Cindy; Bernstein, Paul S.; Lin, Danni; Zhu, Susanna; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with over 60 causative genes known to date. Nevertheless, approximately 40% of RP cases remain genetically unsolved, suggesting that many novel disease-causing genes are yet to be identified. In this study, we aimed to identify the causative mutation for a large autosomal dominant RP (adRP) family with negative results from known retinal disease gene screening. Methods. Linkage analysis followed by whole-exome sequencing was performed. Stringent variant filtering and prioritization was carried out to identify the causative mutation. Results. Linkage analysis identified a minimal disease region of 8 Mb on chromosome 10 with a peak parametric logarithm (base 10) of odds (LOD) score of 3.500. Further whole-exome sequencing identified a heterozygous missense mutation (NM_000188.2:c.2539G>A, p.E847K) in hexokinase 1 (HK1) that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Biochemical assays showed that the E847K mutation does not affect hexokinase enzymatic activity or the protein stability, suggesting that the mutation may impact other uncharacterized function or result in a gain of function of HK1. Conclusions. Here, we identified HK1 as a novel causative gene for adRP. This is the first report that associates the glucose metabolic pathway with human retinal degenerative disease, suggesting a potential new disease mechanism. PMID:25316723

  5. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C > T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses. PMID:26794436

  6. Localization of a new autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa gene on chromosome 17p screeningof candidate genes

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J.; Goliath, R.; Shugart, Y.Y.

    1994-09-01

    A new gene locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) on 17p has been identified in a large South African (SA) family consisting of 28 living affected individuals in 4 successive generations. This is the first ADRP gene to be reported from SA. The human recoverin (RCVN) gene, which codes for a retinal-specific protein important in recovery to the dark state after visual excitation, has been mapped to 17p13.1 and was considered as a prime candidate gene for the disorder in this family. Mutation screening (using 8 different electrophoretic conditions to resolve heteroduplexes and SSCPs) did not produce any evidence of RCVN being involved in the pathogenesis of ADRP in this SA family. In addition, a mobility shift detected within exon 1 of the RCVN gene did not track with the ADRP phenotype. RP patients from 77 SA families and 30 normal individuals are being examined to establish the frequency of this polymorphism in the SA population. Highly polymorphic markers from 17p13 are now being sought in order to establish the minimum region containing this novel ADRP-SA gene. Two additional recently described retinal-expressed cDNAs, guanylyl cyclase and pigment epithelium-derived factor, which map to 17p13.1, will be tested for tight linkage to ADRP-SA.

  7. Human iPSC derived disease model of MERTK-associated retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Lukovic, Dunja; Artero Castro, Ana; Delgado, Ana Belen Garcia; Bernal, María de los Angeles Martín; Luna Pelaez, Noelia; Díez Lloret, Andrea; Perez Espejo, Rocío; Kamenarova, Kunka; Fernández Sánchez, Laura; Cuenca, Nicolás; Cortón, Marta; Avila Fernandez, Almudena; Sorkio, Anni; Skottman, Heli; Ayuso, Carmen; Erceg, Slaven; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) represents a genetically heterogeneous group of retinal dystrophies affecting mainly the rod photoreceptors and in some instances also the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells of the retina. Clinical symptoms and disease progression leading to moderate to severe loss of vision are well established and despite significant progress in the identification of causative genes, the disease pathology remains unclear. Lack of this understanding has so far hindered development of effective therapies. Here we report successful generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from skin fibroblasts of a patient harboring a novel Ser331Cysfs*5 mutation in the MERTK gene. The patient was diagnosed with an early onset and severe form of autosomal recessive RP (arRP). Upon differentiation of these iPSC towards RPE, patient-specific RPE cells exhibited defective phagocytosis, a characteristic phenotype of MERTK deficiency observed in human patients and animal models. Thus we have created a faithful cellular model of arRP incorporating the human genetic background which will allow us to investigate in detail the disease mechanism, explore screening of a variety of therapeutic compounds/reagents and design either combined cell and gene- based therapies or independent approaches. PMID:26263531

  8. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C > T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses. PMID:26794436

  9. A profile of transcriptomic changes in the rd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Uren, Philip J.; Lee, Justine T.; Doroudchi, M. Mehdi; Smith, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a photoreceptor disease that affects approximately 100,000 people in the United States. Treatment options are limited, and the prognosis for most patients is progressive vision loss. Unfortunately, understanding of the molecular underpinnings of RP initiation and progression is still limited. However, the development of animal models of RP, coupled with high-throughput sequencing, has provided an opportunity to study the underlying cellular and molecular changes in this disease. Methods Using RNA-Seq, we present the first retinal transcriptome analysis of the rd10 murine model of retinal degeneration. Results Our data confirm the loss of rod-specific transcripts and the increased relative expression of Müller-specific transcripts, emphasizing the important role of reactive gliosis and innate immune activation in RP. Moreover, we report substantial changes in relative isoform usage among neuronal differentiation and morphogenesis genes, including a marked shift to shorter transcripts. Conclusions Our analyses implicate remodeling of the inner retina and possible Müller cell dedifferentiation. PMID:25489233

  10. Acute unilateral vision loss with optic disc oedema in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Patil-Chhablani, Preeti; Tyagi, Mudit; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Narayanan, Raja

    2015-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented with acute vision loss and was found to have disc oedema and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). She presented with a history of acute, painless vision loss in her left eye over a period of 10 days. Her best-corrected visual acuity was 20/50, N6 in the right eye (OD) and 20/160, N6 in the left eye (OS). She was found to have a swollen optic disc and the examination of her fundus showed changes suggestive of RP. The diagnosis of RP was confirmed by electroretinogram, and after ruling out demyelinating changes in the central nervous system and other possible infectious causes of papillitis, she was treated with intravenous steroids followed by a course of oral steroid therapy. Following treatment, her visual acuity improved to 20/60. Acute vision loss may occur in patients with RP and prompt steroid therapy may result in partial visual recovery. PMID:26240107

  11. Retinitis pigmentosa, ataxia, and mental retardation associated with mitochondrial DNA mutation in an Italian family.

    PubMed Central

    Puddu, P; Barboni, P; Mantovani, V; Montagna, P; Cerullo, A; Bragliani, M; Molinotti, C; Caramazza, R

    1993-01-01

    An Italian pedigree including two sisters and their mother affected by a neuro-ophthalmic disease characterised by retinitis pigmentosa, ataxia, and psychomotor retardation is reported. Molecular analysis of mitochondrial DNA showed the presence of heteroplasmic 8993 point mutation in the subunit 6 of the ATPase gene. The clinical features and genetic findings in this family were comparable with those recently described in an English family. The mitochondrial DNA analysis of the family showed a correlation between the amount of mutated DNA and the disease severity in the probands, and indicated the presence of a threshold amount of mutated genome inducing ophthalmic defects. Moreover, the comparative analysis of blood, hairs, muscle, and urinary tract epithelia of two probands revealed an essentially similar distribution of mutated and wild type mitochondrial genomes. Our results suggest that the 8993 mitochondrial DNA mutation characterises a disease with similar clinical features in different populations. Images PMID:8435424

  12. Molecular analysis and genetic mapping of the rhodopsin gene in families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Bunge, S.; Wedemann, H.; Samanns, C.; Horn, M.; Schwinger, E.; Gal, A. ); David, D. ); Terwilliger, D.J.; Ott, J. ); Born, L.I. van den )

    1993-07-01

    Eighty-eight patients/families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) were screened for rhodopsin mutations. Direct sequencing revealed 13 different mutations in a total of 14 (i.e., 16%) unrelated patients. Five of these mutations (T4K, Q28H, R135G, F220C, and C222R) have not been reported so far. In addition, multipoint linkage analysis was performed on two large families with autosomal dominant RP due to rhodopsin mutations by using five DNA probes from 3q21-q24. No tight linkage was found between the rhodopsin locus (RHO) and D3S47 ([theta][sub max] = 0.08). By six-point analysis, RHO was localized in the region between D3S21 and D3S47, with a maximum lod score of 13.447 directly at D3S20. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. A YAC contig spanning the dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus (RP9) on chromosome 7p

    SciTech Connect

    Keen, T.J.; Inglehearn, C.F.; Patel, R.J.; Peacock, R.E.

    1995-08-10

    The dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus RP9 has previously been localized to 7p13-p15, in the interval D7S526-D7S484. We now report refinement of the locus to the interval D7S795-D7S484 and YAC contig of approximately 4.8 Mb spanning this region and extending both distally and proximally from it. The contig was constructed by STS content mapping and physically orders 29 STSs in 28 YAC clones. The order of polymorphic markers in the contig is consistent with a genetic map that has been assembled using haplotype data from the CEPH pedigrees. This contig will provide a primary resource for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and for the identification of the defective gene causing this form of adRP. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Spectrum of rhodopsin gene mutations in Chinese patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guoxing; Xie, Shipeng; Feng, Na; Yuan, Zhifeng; Zhang, Minglian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was to analyze the spectrum and frequency of rhodopsin gene (RHO) mutations in Chinese patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Patients were given physical examinations, and blood samples were collected for DNA extraction. The RHO mutations were screened with direct sequencing. Results Eight heterozygous nucleotide changes were detected in eight of 300 probands with RP, including six novel mutations and two known mutations. p.R21C, p.C110S, p.G182V, p.C187G, c.409–426delGTGGTGGTGTGTAAGCCC, and p.P347L were found in six autosomal dominant families. p.T92I and p.Y178C were found in two isolated cases. Conclusions The results reveal the spectrum and frequency of RHO mutations in Chinese patients with different forms of RP and demonstrate that RHO mutations account for a high proportion of autosomal dominant RP (adRP) cases. PMID:25221422

  15. Further screening of the rhodopsin gene in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Vaithinathan, R.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P. )

    1994-05-15

    Here the authors report 8 novel mutations and 8 previously reported mutations found from further analysis of the rhodopsin gene in a large set of additional patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Leukocyte DNA was purified from 122 unrelated patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa who were not included in previous analyses. The coding region and splice donor and acceptor sites of the rhodopsin gene were screened for mutations using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct genomic sequencing. They found 29 patients with varient bands that were due to mutations. Sequence analysis showed that 20 cases each had 1 of 9 previously published mutations: Pro23His, Thr58Arg, Gly89Asp, Pro171Leu, Glu181Lys, Pro347Leu, Phe45Leu, Arg135Trp, and Lys296Glu. In 9 other cases, they found 8 novel mutations. One was a 3-bp deletion (Cys264-del), and the rest were point mutations resulting in an altered amino acid: Gly51Arg (GGC [yields] CGC), Cys110Tyr (TCG [yields] TAC), Gly114Asp (GGC [yields] GAC), Ala164Glu (GCG [yields] GAG), Pro171Ser (CCA [yields] TCA), Val345Leu (GTG [yields] CTG), and Pro347Gln (CCG [yields] CAG). Each of these novel mutations was found in only one family except for Gly51Arg, which was found in two. In every family tested, the mutation cosegregated with the disease. However, in pedigree D865 only one affected member was available for analysis. About two-thirds of the mutations affect amino acids in transmembrane domains, yet only one-half of opsin's residues are in these regions. One-third of the mutations alter residues in the extracellular/intradiscal space, which includes only 25% of the protein.

  16. Pathogenic mutations in TULP1 responsible for retinitis pigmentosa identified in consanguineous familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Inayat; Kabir, Firoz; Iqbal, Muhammad; Gottsch, Clare Brooks S.; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify pathogenic mutations responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in consanguineous familial cases. Methods Seven large familial cases with multiple individuals diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa were included in the study. Affected individuals in these families underwent ophthalmic examinations to document the symptoms and confirm the initial diagnosis. Blood samples were collected from all participating members, and genomic DNA was extracted. An exclusion analysis with microsatellite markers spanning the TULP1 locus on chromosome 6p was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons along with the exon–intron boundaries of TULP1 were sequenced bidirectionally. We constructed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype for the four familial cases harboring the K489R allele and estimated the likelihood of a founder effect. Results The ophthalmic examinations of the affected individuals in these familial cases were suggestive of RP. Exclusion analyses confirmed linkage to chromosome 6p harboring TULP1 with positive two-point LOD scores. Subsequent Sanger sequencing identified the single base pair substitution in exon14, c.1466A>G (p.K489R), in four families. Additionally, we identified a two-base deletion in exon 4, c.286_287delGA (p.E96Gfs77*); a homozygous splice site variant in intron 14, c.1495+4A>C; and a novel missense variation in exon 15, c.1561C>T (p.P521S). All mutations segregated with the disease phenotype in the respective families and were absent in ethnically matched control chromosomes. Haplotype analysis suggested (p<10−6) that affected individuals inherited the causal mutation from a common ancestor. Conclusions Pathogenic mutations in TULP1 are responsible for the RP phenotype in seven familial cases with a common ancestral mutation responsible for the disease phenotype in four of the seven families. PMID:27440997

  17. Missense mutation (E150K) of rhodopsin in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, U.; Oehlmann, R.; Gal, A.

    1994-09-01

    Missense or nonsense mutations of the rhodopsin gene have been implied in the pathogenesis of at least 3 different traits; autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). For the latter, a single patient has been reported with a nonsense mutation at codon 249 on both alleles. Heterozygous carriers of missense mutations of rhodopsin develop either adRP or CSNB depending on the particular amino acid substitution. Four of the 9 siblings from a consanguineous marriage in southern India were reported the have arRP. Mutational screening and sequencing of the rhodopsin gene revealed a G-to-A transition of the first nucleotide at codon 150 in exon II, which alters glutamate to lysine. The E150K mutation was present in the 4 patients in homozygous form, whereas the parents and 2 of the siblings were heterozygotes. Two-point analysis produced a Zmax=3.46 at theta=0.00. Two unaffected siblings who are heterozygotes for the E150K mutation underwent a thorough ophthalmological and psychophysical examination. No clinical abnormalities were found although these individuals were over forty, whereas the onset of RP in their affected siblings was in the second decade. Collectively, both the genetic and clinical findings strongly suggest that the E150K mutation of rhodopsin is recessive in this family. Glu150 forms part of the CD cytoplasmic loop of rhodopsin, which has been implicated in the binding and activation of transducin. We speculate that E150K leads to RP because the mutant protein may be incapable of activating transducin. It is tempting to speculate that, in addition to mutations in the genes for rhodopsin and the {beta}-subunit of PDE, mutations in the genes for transducin may also result in arRP.

  18. Retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... including the use of DHA, which is an omega-3 fatty acid. Other treatments, such as microchip implants ... counseling and testing may help determine whether your children are at risk for this disease.

  19. Retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    RP; Vision loss - RP; Night vision loss - RP; Rod Cone dystrophy; Peripheral vision loss - RP ... by several genetic defects. The cells controlling night vision (rods) are most likely to be affected. However, ...

  20. The Relationship of Central Foveal Thickness to Urinary Iodine Concentration in Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients with or without Cystoid Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Michael A.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Harper, Shyana; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Hart, Lois; Rosner, Bernard; Berson, Eliot L.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Current treatments for cystoid macular edema in retinitis pigmentosa are not always effective, may lead to adverse side effects, and may not restore loss of visual acuity. The present research lays the rationale for evaluating whether an iodine supplement could reduce cystoid macular edema in retinitis pigmentosa. Objective To determine whether central foveal thickness in the presence of cystoid macular edema is related to dietary iodine intake inferred from urinary iodine concentration in non-smoking adults with retinitis pigmentosa. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Institutional referral center. Participants Non-smoking adult patients with retinitis pigmentosa (n = 212, ages 18 to 69 years) with a visual acuity ≥ 20/200 in at least one eye. Main outcome measure The relationship of log central foveal thickness measured by optical coherence tomography to urinary iodine concentration measured from multiple spot samples and represented as a 3-level classification variable (< 100 μg/L, 100 μg/L - 199 μg/L, and ≥ 200 μg/L), assigning greater weight to patients with more reliable urinary iodine concentration estimates. Results Analyses were limited to 199 patients after excluding 11 patients who failed to return urine samples for measuring urinary iodine concentration and 2 outliers for urinary iodine concentration. Thirty-six percent of these patients had cystoid macular edema in one or both eyes. Although log central foveal thickness was inversely related to urinary iodine concentration based on all patients (p = 0.02), regression of log central foveal thickness on urinary iodine concentration separately for patients with and without cystoid macular edema showed a strong inverse significant relationship for the former group (p < 0.001) and no significant relationship for the latter group as tested (p = 0.66). In contrast, we found no significant association between cystoid macular edema prevalence and urinary iodine concentration based on the

  1. Unfolded protein response-induced dysregulation of calcium homeostasis promotes retinal degeneration in rat models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, V; Kotla, P; Strang, C; Gorbatyuk, M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) in rats is closely associated with a persistently activated unfolded protein response (UPR). If unchecked, the UPR might trigger apoptosis, leading to photoreceptor death. One of the UPR-activated cellular signaling culminating in apoptotic photoreceptor cell death is linked to an increase in intracellular Ca2+. Therefore, we validated whether ADRP retinas experience a cytosolic Ca2+ overload, and whether sustained UPR in the wild-type retina could promote retinal degeneration through Ca2+-mediated calpain activation. We performed an ex vivo experiment to measure intracellular Ca2+ in ADRP retinas as well as to detect the expression levels of proteins that act as Ca2+ sensors. In separate experiments with the subretinal injection of tunicamycin (UPR inducer) and a mixture of calcium ionophore (A231278) and thapsigargin (SERCA2b inhibitor) we assessed the consequences of a sustained UPR activation and increased intracellular Ca2+ in the wild-type retina, respectively, by performing scotopic ERG, histological, and western blot analyses. Results of the study revealed that induced UPR in the retina activates calpain-mediated signaling, and increased intracellular Ca2+ is capable of promoting retinal degeneration. A significant decline in ERG amplitudes at 6 weeks post treatment was associated with photoreceptor cell loss that occurred through calpain-activated CDK5-pJNK-Csp3/7 pathway. Similar calpain activation was found in ADRP rat retinas. A twofold increase in intracellular Ca2+ and up- and downregulations of ER membrane-associated Ca2+-regulated IP3R channels and SERCA2b transporters were detected. Therefore, sustained UPR activation in the ADRP rat retinas could promote retinal degeneration through increased intracellular Ca2+ and calpain-mediated apoptosis.

  2. Unfolded protein response-induced dysregulation of calcium homeostasis promotes retinal degeneration in rat models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, V; Kotla, P; Strang, C; Gorbatyuk, M

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) in rats is closely associated with a persistently activated unfolded protein response (UPR). If unchecked, the UPR might trigger apoptosis, leading to photoreceptor death. One of the UPR-activated cellular signaling culminating in apoptotic photoreceptor cell death is linked to an increase in intracellular Ca2+. Therefore, we validated whether ADRP retinas experience a cytosolic Ca2+ overload, and whether sustained UPR in the wild-type retina could promote retinal degeneration through Ca2+-mediated calpain activation. We performed an ex vivo experiment to measure intracellular Ca2+ in ADRP retinas as well as to detect the expression levels of proteins that act as Ca2+ sensors. In separate experiments with the subretinal injection of tunicamycin (UPR inducer) and a mixture of calcium ionophore (A231278) and thapsigargin (SERCA2b inhibitor) we assessed the consequences of a sustained UPR activation and increased intracellular Ca2+ in the wild-type retina, respectively, by performing scotopic ERG, histological, and western blot analyses. Results of the study revealed that induced UPR in the retina activates calpain-mediated signaling, and increased intracellular Ca2+ is capable of promoting retinal degeneration. A significant decline in ERG amplitudes at 6 weeks post treatment was associated with photoreceptor cell loss that occurred through calpain-activated CDK5-pJNK-Csp3/7 pathway. Similar calpain activation was found in ADRP rat retinas. A twofold increase in intracellular Ca2+ and up- and downregulations of ER membrane-associated Ca2+-regulated IP3R channels and SERCA2b transporters were detected. Therefore, sustained UPR activation in the ADRP rat retinas could promote retinal degeneration through increased intracellular Ca2+ and calpain-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26844699

  3. Screening for mutations in RPGR and RP2 genes in Jordanian families with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Haddad, M F; Khabour, O F; Abuzaideh, K A Y; Shihadeh, W

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease causing progressive degeneration of retinal photoreceptor cells. X-linked RP (XLRP), in which photoreceptor degeneration begins in early childhood and complete blindness often occurs by the fourth decade of life, constitutes the most severe form of this disease. Two genes commonly associated with XLRP have previously been cloned: retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) and retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2). We sought to identify mutations in these genes in Jordanian families suffering from this disease. Five unrelated Jordanian families with confirmed XLRP were screened for such mutations using direct sequencing. Three mutations were identified in the ORF15 exon of RPGR. The silent g.ORF15+470G>A substitution and the g.ORF15+1822insA insertion in the 3ꞌ-untranslated region were found in both normal and affected male family members at comparable frequencies, and thus were considered normal variants. The third mutation, g.ORF15+588G>A, in which alanine is substituted by threonine, was found in all affected men and one unaffected man in the two families harboring this variant. Thus, this mutation may be pathogenic, but with incomplete penetrance. No RP2 mutations were found among the examined families. Mutation screening of RP patients is essential to understand the mechanism behind this disease and develop treatments. A complete family history is required to identify its inheritance pattern and provide genetic counseling for patients and their families. PMID:27323122

  4. A Large Animal Model for CNGB1 Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Paige A.; Ekenstedt, Kari J.; Occelli, Laurence M.; Frattaroli, Anton V.; Bartoe, Joshua T.; Venta, Patrick J.; Petersen-Jones, Simon M.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies in dogs are invaluable models of human disease. Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is the canine equivalent of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Similar to RP, PRA is a genetically heterogenous condition. We investigated PRA in the Papillon breed of dog using homozygosity mapping and haplotype construction of single nucleotide polymorphisms within a small family group to identify potential positional candidate genes. Based on the phenotypic similarities between the PRA-affected Papillons, mouse models and human patients, CNGB1 was selected as the most promising positional candidate gene. CNGB1 was sequenced and a complex mutation consisting of the combination of a one basepair deletion and a 6 basepair insertion was identified in exon 26 (c.2387delA;2389_2390insAGCTAC) leading to a frameshift and premature stop codon. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of pre-degenerate retinal sections from a young affected dog showed absence of labeling using a C-terminal CNGB1 antibody. Whereas an antibody directed against the N-terminus of the protein, which also recognizes the glutamic acid rich proteins arising from alternative splicing of the CNGB1 transcript (upstream of the premature stop codon), labeled rod outer segments. CNGB1 combines with CNGA1 to form the rod cyclic nucleotide gated channel and previous studies have shown the requirement of CNGB1 for normal targeting of CNGA1 to the rod outer segment. In keeping with these previous observations, IHC showed a lack of detectable CNGA1 protein in the rod outer segments of the affected dog. A population study did not identify the CNGB1 mutation in PRA-affected dogs in other breeds and documented that the CNGB1 mutation accounts for ∼70% of cases of Papillon PRA in our PRA-affected canine DNA bank. CNGB1 mutations are one cause of autosomal recessive RP making the CNGB1 mutant dog a valuable large animal model of the condition. PMID:23977260

  5. Homozygosity Mapping in Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa in South Indian Families

    PubMed Central

    Srilekha, Sundaramurthy; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Srikrupa, Natarajan N.; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Meenakshi, Swaminathan; Sen, Parveen; Kapur, Suman; Soumittra, Nagasamy

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are retinal degenerative diseases which cause severe retinal dystrophy affecting the photoreceptors. LCA is predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and contributes to 5% of all retinal dystrophies; whereas RP is inherited by all the Mendelian pattern of inheritance and both are leading causes of visual impairment in children and young adults. Homozygosity mapping is an efficient strategy for mapping both known and novel disease loci in recessive conditions, especially in a consanguineous mating, exploiting the fact that the regions adjacent to the disease locus will also be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. Here we have studied eleven consanguineous LCA and one autosomal recessive RP (arRP) south Indian families to know the prevalence of mutations in known genes and also to know the involvement of novel loci, if any. Complete ophthalmic examination was done for all the affected individuals including electroretinogram, fundus photograph, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 250K HMA GeneChip on eleven LCA families followed by screening of candidate gene(s) in the homozygous block identified mutations in ten families; AIPL1 – 3 families, RPE65- 2 families, GUCY2D, CRB1, RDH12, IQCB1 and SPATA7 in one family each, respectively. Six of the ten (60%) mutations identified are novel. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K HMA GeneChip on the arRP family identified a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK. The mutations segregated within the family and was absent in 200 control chromosomes screened. In one of the eleven LCA families, the causative gene/mutation was not identified but many homozygous blocks were noted indicating that a possible novel locus/gene might be involved. The genotype and phenotype features, especially the fundus changes for AIPL1, RPE65, CRB1, RDH12 genes were as reported earlier. PMID:26147992

  6. A population survey of retinitis pigmentosa and allied disorders in Denmark. Completeness of registration and quality of data.

    PubMed

    Haim, M; Holm, N V; Rosenberg, T

    1992-04-01

    The aim of this study was a complete survey of all patients in Denmark with a diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa. The study was performed during the period 1986-1989 and included all persons living in Denmark from 1850 to 1989. We describe the methods of registration from medical and non-medical sources, based on defined criteria. The inclusion criteria were fulfilled by 1890 persons, 1056 males and 834 females. Evaluation of this 'Danish Retinitis Pigmentosa Register' demonstrates an overall completeness of about 80%, increasing from 40% for birth cohorts before 1911 to 90% for patients born since 1981. Concerning diagnostic confidence, 73% of the probands were characterized as certain, 16% as probable, and 11% as possible. Non-systemic cases comprised 61% of all probands and 31% had systemic disease, the rest being unclassified with respect to systemic involvement. The material is considered very suitable for epidemiological treatment and continuous clinical and genetic investigations. PMID:1609564

  7. X-linked retinitis pigmentosa: Report of a large kindred with loss of central vision and preserved peripheral function

    SciTech Connect

    Shastry, B.S.; Trese, M.T.

    1995-11-20

    X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) is the most severe form of the inherited forms of retinitis pigmentosa and is clinically variable and genetically heterogeneous. It affects one in 20,000 live births. The affected individuals manifest degeneration of the peripheral retina during the first two decades of life on the basis of night blindness. Central vision usually is preserved until age 50, when the disease advances, affecting central vision and ultimately leading to complete loss of sight. Linkage analysis has shown two loci with a possibility of a third locus on the human X chromosome. The genetic abnormality that causes XLRP is not known at present. Here we describe a large kindred which manifests central loss of field with the preservation of peripheral vision. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  8. A partial structural and functional rescue of a retinitis pigmentosa model with compacted DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xue; Nash, Zack; Conley, Shannon M; Fliesler, Steven J; Cooper, Mark J; Naash, Muna I

    2009-01-01

    Previously we have shown that compacted DNA nanoparticles can drive high levels of transgene expression after subretinal injection in the mouse eye. Here we delivered compacted DNA nanoparticles containing a therapeutic gene to the retinas of a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. Nanoparticles containing the wild-type retinal degeneration slow (Rds) gene were injected into the subretinal space of rds(+/-) mice on postnatal day 5. Gene expression was sustained for up to four months at levels up to four times higher than in controls injected with saline or naked DNA. The nanoparticles were taken up into virtually all photoreceptors and mediated significant structural and biochemical rescue of the disease without histological or functional evidence of toxicity. Electroretinogram recordings showed that nanoparticle-mediated gene transfer restored cone function to a near-normal level in contrast to transfer of naked plasmid DNA. Rod function was also improved. These findings demonstrate that compacted DNA nanoparticles represent a viable option for development of gene-based interventions for ocular diseases and obviate major barriers commonly encountered with non-viral based therapies. PMID:19390689

  9. Mutation Screening of Multiple Genes in Spanish Patients with Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa by Targeted Resequencing

    PubMed Central

    González-del Pozo, María; Borrego, Salud; Barragán, Isabel; Pieras, Juan I.; Santoyo, Javier; Matamala, Nerea; Naranjo, Belén; Dopazo, Joaquín; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterised ultimately by the loss of photoreceptor cells. RP is the leading cause of visual loss in individuals younger than 60 years, with a prevalence of about 1 in 4000. The molecular genetic diagnosis of autosomal recessive RP (arRP) is challenging due to the large genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Traditional methods for sequencing arRP genes are often laborious and not easily available and a screening technique that enables the rapid detection of the genetic cause would be very helpful in the clinical practice. The goal of this study was to develop and apply microarray-based resequencing technology capable of detecting both known and novel mutations on a single high-throughput platform. Hence, the coding regions and exon/intron boundaries of 16 arRP genes were resequenced using microarrays in 102 Spanish patients with clinical diagnosis of arRP. All the detected variations were confirmed by direct sequencing and potential pathogenicity was assessed by functional predictions and frequency in controls. For validation purposes 4 positive controls for variants consisting of previously identified changes were hybridized on the array. As a result of the screening, we detected 44 variants, of which 15 are very likely pathogenic detected in 14 arRP families (14%). Finally, the design of this array can easily be transformed in an equivalent diagnostic system based on targeted enrichment followed by next generation sequencing. PMID:22164218

  10. Mutation Spectrum of EYS in Spanish Patients with Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Barragán, Isabel; Borrego, Salud; Pieras, Juan Ignacio; Pozo, María González-del; Santoyo, Javier; Ayuso, Carmen; Baiget, Montserrat; Millan, José M; Mena, Marcela; El-Aziz, Mai M Abd; Audo, Isabelle; Zeitz, Christina; Littink, Karin W; Dopazo, Joaquín; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterised ultimately by the loss of photoreceptor cells. We have recently identified a new gene (EYS) encoding an ortholog of Drosophila spacemaker (spam) as a commonly mutated gene in autosomal recessive RP. In the present study, we report the identification of 73 sequence variations in EYS, of which 28 are novel. Of these, 42.9% (12/28) are very likely pathogenic, 17.9% (5/28) are possibly pathogenic, whereas 39.3% (11/28) are SNPs. In addition, we have detected 3 pathogenic changes previously reported in other populations. We are also presenting the characterisation of EYS homologues in different species, and a detailed analysis of the EYS domains, with the identification of an interesting novel feature: a putative coiled-coil domain. Majority of the mutations in the arRP patients have been found within the domain structures of EYS. The minimum observed prevalence of distinct EYS mutations in our group of patients is of 15.9% (15/94), confirming a major involvement of EYS in the pathogenesis of arRP in the Spanish population. Along with the detection of three recurrent mutations in Caucasian population, our hypothesis of EYS being the first prevalent gene in arRP has been reinforced in the present study. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21069908

  11. Suppression of microglial activation is neuroprotective in a mouse model of human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Xiao, Jia; Wang, Ke; So, Kwok-Fai; Tipoe, George L; Lin, Bin

    2014-06-11

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a photoreceptor-degenerative disease caused by various mutations and is characterized by death of rod photoreceptor cell followed by gradual death of cone photoreceptors. The molecular mechanisms that lead to rod and cone death are not yet fully understood. Neuroinflammation contributes to the progression of many chronic neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains to be determined how microglia contribute to photoreceptor disruption in RP. In this study, we explored the role of microglia as a contributor to photoreceptor degeneration in the rd10 mouse model of RP. First, we demonstrated that microglia activation was an early alteration in RP retinas. Inhibition of microglia activation by minocycline reduced photoreceptor apoptosis and significantly improved retinal structure and function and visual behavior in rd10 mice. Second, we identified that minocycline exerted its neuroprotective effects through both anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Third, we found that Cx3cr1 deficiency dysregulated microglia activation and subsequently resulted in increased photoreceptor vulnerability in rd10 mice, suggesting that the Cx3cl1/Cx3cr1 signaling pathway might protect against microglia neurotoxicity. We concluded that suppression of neuroinflammatory responses could be a potential treatment strategy aimed at improving photoreceptor survival in human RP. PMID:24920619

  12. A new autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa locus maps on chromosome 2q31-q33.

    PubMed Central

    Bayés, M; Goldaracena, B; Martínez-Mir, A; Iragui-Madoz, M I; Solans, T; Chivelet, P; Bussaglia, E; Ramos-Arroyo, M A; Baiget, M; Vilageliu, L; Balcells, S; Gonzàlez-Duarte, R; Grinberg, D

    1998-01-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease. To date, mutations in four members of the phototransduction cascade have been implicated in ARRP. Additionally, linkage of the disease to three loci on 1p, 1q, and 6p has been described. However, the majority of cases are still uncharacterised. We have performed linkage analysis in a large nuclear ARRP family with five affected sibs. After exclusion of several regions of the genome known to contain loci for retinal dystrophies, a genomic search for linkage to ARRP was undertaken. Positive lod scores were obtained with markers on 2q31-q33 (Zmax at theta = 0.00 of 4.03, 4.12, and 4.12 at D2S364, D2S118, and D2S389, respectively) defining an interval of about 7 cM for this new ARRP locus, between D2S148 and D2S161. Forty-four out of 47 additional ARRP families, tested with markers on 2q32, failed to show linkage, providing evidence of further genetic heterogeneity. Images PMID:9507394

  13. Interpretation of Flood-Illuminated Adaptive Optics Images in Subjects with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Gale, Michael J; Feng, Shu; Titus, Hope E; Smith, Travis B; Pennesi, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate features on flood-illuminated adaptive optics (AO) images with color fundus, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We imaged 39 subjects diagnosed with RP using the rtx1™ flood-illuminated AO camera from Imagine Eyes (Orsay, France). We observed a correlation between hyper-autofluoresence changes on FAF, disruption of the interdigitation zone (IZ) on SD-OCT and loss of reflective cone profiles on AO. Four main patterns of cone-reflectivity were seen on AO: presumed healthy cone mosaics, hypo-reflective blurred cone-like structures, higher frequency disorganized hyper-reflective spots, and lower frequency hypo-reflective spots. These regions were correlated to progressive phases of cone photoreceptor degeneration observed using SD-OCT and FAF. These results help provide interpretation of en face images obtained by flood-illuminated AO in subjects with RP. However, significant ambiguity remains as to what truly constitutes a cone, especially in areas of degeneration. With further refinements in technology, flood illuminated AO imaging has the potential to provide rapid, standardized, longitudinal and lower cost imaging in patients with retinal degeneration. PMID:26427424

  14. Anthocyanin can arrest the cone photoreceptor degeneration and act as a novel treatment for retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ye; Chen, Tao; Yang, Guo-Qing; Peng, Guang-Hua; Yan, Zhong-Jun; Huang, Yi-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of heterogeneous inherited retinal diseases that is characterized by primary death rod photoreceptors and the secondary loss of cones. The degeneration of cones causes gradual constriction of visual fields, leaving the central islands that are eventually snuffed out. Studies indicate that the hyperoxia causes oxidative damage in the retina and contributes to the cone death of RP. Moreover, abundant reactive oxidative species (ROS) which are generated in cones may result in mitochondria membrane depolarization, which has been ascribed a central role in the apoptotic process and has been proposed to act as a forward feeding loop for the activation of downstream cascades. Anthocyanin is a potent antioxidant which has been evidenced to be able to counteract oxidative damages, scavenge surplus ROS, and rectify abnormities in the apoptotic cascade. Taken together with its ability to attenuate inflammation which also contributes to the etiology of RP, it is reasonable to hypothesize that the anthocyanin could act as a novel therapeutic strategy to retard or prevent cone degeneration in RP retinas, particularly if the treatment is timed appropriately and delivered efficiently. Future pharmacological investigations will identify the anthocyanin as an effective candidate for PR therapy and refinements of that knowledge would ignite the hope of restoring the visual function in RP patients. PMID:26949626

  15. Mutation spectrum of EYS in Spanish patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Barragán, Isabel; Borrego, Salud; Pieras, Juan Ignacio; González-del Pozo, María; Santoyo, Javier; Ayuso, Carmen; Baiget, Montserrat; Millan, José M; Mena, Marcela; Abd El-Aziz, Mai M; Audo, Isabelle; Zeitz, Christina; Littink, Karin W; Dopazo, Joaquín; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2010-11-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterised ultimately by the loss of photoreceptor cells. We have recently identified a new gene(EYS) encoding an ortholog of Drosophila space maker (spam) as a commonly mutated gene in autosomal recessive RP. In the present study, we report the identification of 73 sequence variations in EYS, of which 28 are novel. Of these, 42.9% (12/28) are very likely pathogenic, 17.9% (5/28)are possibly pathogenic, whereas 39.3% (11/28) are SNPs. In addition, we have detected 3 pathogenic changes previously reported in other populations. We are also presenting the characterisation of EYS homologues in different species, and a detailed analysis of the EYS domains, with the identification of an interesting novel feature: a putative coiled-coil domain.Majority of the mutations in the arRP patients have been found within the domain structures of EYS. The minimum observed prevalence of distinct EYS mutations in our group of patients is of 15.9% (15/94), confirming a major involvement of EYS in the pathogenesis of arRP in the Spanish population. Along with the detection of three recurrent mutations in Caucasian population, our hypothesis of EYS being the first prevalent gene in arRP has been reinforced in the present study. PMID:21069908

  16. NGS-based Molecular diagnosis of 105 eyeGENE® probands with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Zhongqi; Bowles, Kristen; Goetz, Kerry; Scholl, Hendrik P. N.; Wang, Feng; Wang, Xinjing; Xu, Shan; Wang, Keqing; Wang, Hui; Chen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The National Ophthalmic Disease Genotyping and Phenotyping Network (eyeGENE®) was established in an effort to facilitate basic and clinical research of human inherited eye disease. In order to provide high quality genetic testing to eyeGENE®’s enrolled patients which potentially aids clinical diagnosis and disease treatment, we carried out a pilot study and performed Next-generation sequencing (NGS) based molecular diagnosis for 105 Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) patients randomly selected from the network. A custom capture panel was designed, which incorporated 195 known retinal disease genes, including 61 known RP genes. As a result, disease-causing mutations were identified in 52 out of 105 probands (solving rate of 49.5%). A total of 82 mutations were identified, and 48 of them were novel. Interestingly, for three probands the molecular diagnosis was inconsistent with the initial clinical diagnosis, while for five probands the molecular information suggested a different inheritance model other than that assigned by the physician. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that NGS target sequencing is efficient and sufficiently precise for molecular diagnosis of a highly heterogeneous patient cohort from eyeGENE®. PMID:26667666

  17. Use of Hydrogen as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy Against Photoreceptor Degeneration in Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ye; Geng, Lei; Wang, Liqiang; Xu, Weiwei; Qin, Limin; Peng, Guanghua; Huang, Yi Fei; Yang, Ji xue

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by progressive photoreceptor apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as critical initiators of the photoreceptor apoptosis in RP. Photoreceptor survival in RP mutants will not only require the inhibition of effectors of apoptotic machinery, but also the elimination of the initiating upstream signals, such as ROS. These cytotoxic ROS should be neutralized by the antioxidant defense system, otherwise they would interact with the macromolecules essential for photoreceptor survival. Hydrogen is a promising gaseous agent that has come to the forefront of therapeutic research over the last few years. It has been verified that hydrogen is capable of neutralizing the cytotoxic ROS selectively, rectifying abnormities in the apoptotic cascades, and attenuating the related inflammatory response. Hydrogen is so mild that it does not disturb the metabolic oxidation-reduction reactions or disrupt the physiologic ROS involved in cell signaling. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that hydrogen might be an effective therapeutic agent to slow or prevent photoreceptor degeneration in RP retinas. It is a logical step to test hydrogen for therapeutic use in multiple RP animal models, and ultimately in human RP patients. PMID:26952558

  18. Panel-based NGS Reveals Novel Pathogenic Mutations in Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Carro, Raquel; Corton, Marta; Sánchez-Navarro, Iker; Zurita, Olga; Sanchez-Bolivar, Noelia; Sánchez-Alcudia, Rocío; Lelieveld, Stefan H.; Aller, Elena; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel Angel; López-Molina, Mª Isabel; Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Gilissen, Christian; Millan, Jose M; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Ayuso, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited progressive retinal dystrophies (RD) characterized by photoreceptor degeneration. RP is highly heterogeneous both clinically and genetically, which complicates the identification of causative genes and mutations. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been demonstrated to be an effective strategy for the detection of mutations in RP. In our study, an in-house gene panel comprising 75 known RP genes was used to analyze a cohort of 47 unrelated Spanish families pre-classified as autosomal recessive or isolated RP. Disease-causing mutations were found in 27 out of 47 cases achieving a mutation detection rate of 57.4%. In total, 33 pathogenic mutations were identified, 20 of which were novel mutations (60.6%). Furthermore, not only single nucleotide variations but also copy-number variations, including three large deletions in the USH2A and EYS genes, were identified. Finally seven out of 27 families, displaying mutations in the ABCA4, RP1, RP2 and USH2A genes, could be genetically or clinically reclassified. These results demonstrate the potential of our panel-based NGS strategy in RP diagnosis. PMID:26806561

  19. Microincision Vitrectomy Surgery in Vitreomacular Traction Syndrome of Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vingolo, Enzo Maria; Gerace, Emanuele; Valente, Stefano; Spadea, Leopoldo; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate long-term retinal changes after microincision pars plana vitrectomy surgery (MIVS) and internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling outcome in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients affected by vitreomacular traction syndrome (VMT) with higher vitreous surface adhesion or coexisting epiretinal membrane (ERM). Methods. Eight RP patients suffering from VMT were evaluated by means of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), anterior and posterior binocular examination, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), MP-1 microperimetry (MP-1), and full-field electroretinogram (ERG), before MIVS and ILM peeling and during the 36-month follow-up. Patients were hospitalized for two days after the surgery. Surgical procedure was performed following this schedule: surgical removal of crystalline lens (MICS), MIVS with 23-gauge sutureless system trocars, core vitreous body removal, and balanced-sterile-salin-solution- (BSS-) air-gas (SF6) exchange. Results. All patients presented visual acuity (VA) increase after MIVS. None of the patients developed ocular hypertension or vitreomacular adhesions during the 3-year follow-up. MP-1 bivariate contour ellipse area (BCEA) was reduced in its dimensions and improved in all patients demonstrating a better fixation. Conclusions. MIVS could be the gold standard therapy in RP patients with VMT and higher vitreous surface adhesion or coexisting ERM if medical therapy is not applicable or not effective. PMID:25009817

  20. Erythropoietin Slows Photoreceptor Cell Death in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kasmala, Lorraine; Bond, Wesley S.; de Lucas Cerrillo, Ana M.; Wynn, Kristi; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To test the efficacy of systemic gene delivery of a mutant form of erythropoietin (EPO-R76E) that has attenuated erythropoietic activity, in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Ten-day old mice carrying one copy of human rhodopsin with the P23H mutation and both copies of wild-type mouse rhodopsin (hP23H RHO+/-,mRHO+/+) were injected into the quadriceps with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) carrying either enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or EpoR76E. Visual function (electroretinogram) and retina structure (optical coherence tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry) were assessed at 7 and 12 months of age. Results The outer nuclear layer thickness decreased over time at a slower rate in rAAV.EpoR76E treated as compared to the rAAV.eGFP injected mice. There was a statistically significant preservation of the electroretinogram at 7, but not 12 months of age. Conclusions Systemic EPO-R76E slows death of the photoreceptors and vision loss in hP23H RHO+/-,mRHO+/+ mice. Treatment with EPO-R76E may widen the therapeutic window for retinal degeneration patients by increasing the number of viable cells. Future studies might investigate if co-treatment with EPO-R76E and gene replacement therapy is more effective than gene replacement therapy alone. PMID:27299810

  1. [Possible role of altered levels of plasma docosahexaenoic acid in the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Simonelli, F; Milone, A; Iura, A; Picardi, C; La Banca, A M; Cotticelli, L; Rinaldi, E

    1990-09-01

    Plasma samples obtained from Retinitis Pigmentosa (R.P.) patients and controls were assayed for docosahexaenoic acid (DXA), the major fatty acid in photoreceptor cells, in order to evaluate the possibility that abnormalities in PUFA metabolism could be involved in R.P. pathogenesis. Our preliminary results show levels of plasma DXA in dominantly inherited R.P. lower than in the recessive forms and controls. PMID:2149985

  2. Linkage and clinical characterization of families with the RP10 (chromosome 7q) form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.A.; Humphries, P.; McGuire, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a set of degenerative retinal diseases characterized by night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, often followed by loss of central vision. Genetically heterogeneous, retinitis pigmentosa has been found in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked forms. For autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), 6 loci have been mapped: rhodopsin on chromosome 3q, peripherin/RDS on 6p, RP9 on 7p, RP10 on 7q, RP1 on 8q, and RP11 on 19q. Jordan et al. first reported linkage to 7q in a Spanish family with early onset disease. Recently, McGuire et al. reported the existence of a second, unrelated family of American descent with adRP that maps to the same region of 7q. The second family also has classical, diffuse retinitis pigmentosa though with later onset. The finding of two unrelated families that map to this region suggests that RP10 may account for a significant fraction of retinitis pigmentosa cases. Combining data from both families localizes the disease gene to 7q31.1-q35. In the Spanish family a Z{sub max} of 7.2 at 0% recombination was found with the marker D7S480 and affected individuals recombinant for D7S486 and D7S650 flank the disease. The American family showed a Z{sub max} of 5.3 at 0% recombination wtih the marker D7S514 and there are affected individuals recombinant for the markers D7S522, D7S677 and D7S486, and one affected individual recombinant for D7S530. Together, these data place the disease locus between D7S522 and D7S650. In addition, blue cone pigment, which maps to 7q31.3-q32, was excluded as a candidate gene in both families by linkage testing using intragenic polymorphisms and mutation screening.

  3. De Novo Occurrence of a Variant in ARL3 and Apparent Autosomal Dominant Transmission of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Samuel P.; Clark, Michael J.; Martinez, Ariadna; Garcia, Sarah; Abelazeem, Amira A.; Matynia, Anna; Parikh, Sachin; Sullivan, Lori S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Daiger, Stephen P.; Gorin, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa is a phenotype with diverse genetic causes. Due to this genetic heterogeneity, genome-wide identification and analysis of protein-altering DNA variants by exome sequencing is a powerful tool for novel variant and disease gene discovery. In this study, exome sequencing analysis was used to search for potentially causal DNA variants in a two-generation pedigree with apparent dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Variant identification and analysis of three affected members (mother and two affected offspring) was performed via exome sequencing. Parental samples of the index case were used to establish inheritance. Follow-up testing of 94 additional retinitis pigmentosa pedigrees was performed via retrospective analysis or Sanger sequencing. Results and Conclusions A total of 136 high quality coding variants in 123 genes were identified which are consistent with autosomal dominant disease. Of these, one of the strongest genetic and functional candidates is a c.269A>G (p.Tyr90Cys) variant in ARL3. Follow-up testing established that this variant occurred de novo in the index case. No additional putative causal variants in ARL3 were identified in the follow-up cohort, suggesting that if ARL3 variants can cause adRP it is an extremely rare phenomenon. PMID:26964041

  4. Alterations in glutamate cysteine ligase content in the retina of two retinitis pigmentosa animal models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vallejo, Violeta; Benlloch-Navarro, Soledad; Trachsel-Moncho, Laura; López-Pedrajas, Rosa; Almansa, Inmaculada; Romero, Francisco Javier; Miranda, María

    2016-07-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) comprises a group of rare genetic retinal disorders in which one of several different mutations induces photoreceptor death. Oxidative stress and glutathione (GSH) alterations may be related to the pathogenesis of RP. GSH has been shown to be present in high concentrations in the retina. In addition, the retina has the capability to synthesize GSH. In this study, we tested whether the two subunits of glutamate cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis, and the concentrations of retinal GSH, oxidized glutathione (GSSG), cysteine (Cys) and glutamate are altered in the retina of two different RP mice models. Retinas from C3H and rd1 mice at different postnatal days (P7, P11, P15, P19, P21 and P28) and from C57BL/6 and rd10 mice at P21 were obtained. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the protein content of catalytic and modulatory subunits from glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC and GCLM, respectively). In another set of experiments, control and rd1 mice were administered buthinine sulfoximine, a glutathione synthase inhibitor, or paraquat. GSH, GSSG, glutamate and Cys concentrations were determined, by HPLC. A decrease in retinal GCLC content was observed in C3H and rd1 mice with age, nevertheless, there was an increase in retinal GCLC in rd1 mice compared to control retinas at P19. No modifications in GCLM content with age and no difference between GCLM content in rd1 and control retinas were observed. The GSH concentration decreased in the rd1 retinas compared with control ones at P15, it increased at P19, and was again similar at P21 and P28. No changes in GSSG concentration in control retinas with age were observed; the GSSG levels in rd1 retinas were similar from P7 to P19 and then increased significantly at P21 and P28. Glutamate concentration was increased in the rd1 retinas compared to control mice from P7 to P15 and were comparable at P21 and P28. The Cys concentrations was measured in control and rd1

  5. Clinical presentation and visual status of retinitis pigmentosa patients: a multicenter study in southwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onakpoya, Oluwatoyin Helen; Adeoti, Caroline Olufunlayo; Oluleye, Tunji Sunday; Ajayi, Iyiade Adeseye; Majengbasan, Timothy; Olorundare, Olayemi Kolawole

    2016-01-01

    Background To review the visual status and clinical presentation of patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methodology Multicenter, retrospective, and analytical review was conducted of the visual status and clinical characteristics of patients with RP at first presentation from January 2007 to December 2011. Main outcome measure was the World Health Organization’s visual status classification in relation to sex and age at presentation. Data analysis by SPSS (version 15) and statistical significance was assumed at P<0.05. Results One hundred and ninety-two eyes of 96 patients with mean age of 39.08±18.5 years and mode of 25 years constituted the study population; 55 (57.3%) were males and 41 (42.7%) females. Loss of vision 67 (69.8%) and night blindness 56 (58.3%) were the leading symptoms. Twenty-one (21.9%) patients had a positive family history, with RP present in their siblings 15 (71.4%), grandparents 11 (52.3%), and parents 4 (19.4%). Forty (41.7%) were blind at presentation and 23 (24%) were visually impaired. Blindness in six (15%) patients was secondary to glaucoma. Retinal vascular narrowing and retinal pigmentary changes of varying severity were present in all patients. Thirty-five (36.5%) had maculopathy, 36 (37.5%) refractive error, 19 (20%) lenticular opacities, and eleven (11.5%) had glaucoma. RP was typical in 85 patients (88.5%). Older patients had higher rates of blindness at presentation (P=0.005); blindness and visual impairment rate at presentation were higher in males than females (P=0.029). Conclusion Clinical presentation with advanced diseases, higher blindness rate in older patients, sex-related difference in blindness/visual impairment rates, as well as high glaucoma blindness in RP patients requires urgent attention in southwestern Nigeria. PMID:27601870

  6. Retinitis pigmentosa: impact of different Pde6a point mutations on the disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Jiao, Kangwei; Buena-Atienza, Elena; Sahaboglu, Ayse; Trifunović, Dragana; Balendran, Sukirthini; Koepfli, Tanja; Mühlfriedel, Regine; Schön, Christian; Biel, Martin; Heckmann, Angelique; Beck, Susanne C; Michalakis, Stylianos; Wissinger, Bernd; Seeliger, Mathias W; Paquet-Durand, François

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the PDE6A gene can cause rod photoreceptors degeneration and the blinding disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP). While a number of pathogenic PDE6A mutations have been described, little is known about their impact on compound heterozygous situations and potential interactions of different disease-causing alleles. Here, we used a novel mouse model for the Pde6a R562W mutation in combination with an existing line carrying the V685M mutation to generate compound heterozygous Pde6a V685M/R562W animals, exactly homologous to a case of human RP. We compared the progression of photoreceptor degeneration in these compound heterozygous mice with the homozygous V685M and R562W mutants, and additionally with the D670G line that is known for a relatively mild phenotype. We investigated PDE6A expression, cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate accumulation, calpain and caspase activity, in vivo retinal function and morphology, as well as photoreceptor cell death and survival. This analysis confirms the severity of different Pde6a mutations and indicates that compound heterozygous mutants behave like intermediates of the respective homozygous situations. Specifically, the severity of the four different Pde6a situations may be categorized by the pace of photoreceptor degeneration: V685M (fastest) > V685M/R562W > R562W > D670G (slowest). While calpain activity was strongly increased in all four mutants, caspase activity was not. This points to the execution of non-apoptotic cell death and may lead to the identification of new targets for therapeutic interventions. For individual RP patients, our study may help to predict time-courses for Pde6a-related retinal degeneration and thereby facilitate the definition of a window-of-opportunity for clinical interventions. PMID:26188004

  7. Distilling a Visual Network of Retinitis Pigmentosa Gene-Protein Interactions to Uncover New Disease Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Boloc, Daniel; Castillo-Lara, Sergio; Marfany, Gemma; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser; Abril, Josep F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a highly heterogeneous genetic visual disorder with more than 70 known causative genes, some of them shared with other non-syndromic retinal dystrophies (e.g. Leber congenital amaurosis, LCA). The identification of RP genes has increased steadily during the last decade, and the 30% of the cases that still remain unassigned will soon decrease after the advent of exome/genome sequencing. A considerable amount of genetic and functional data on single RD genes and mutations has been gathered, but a comprehensive view of the RP genes and their interacting partners is still very fragmentary. This is the main gap that needs to be filled in order to understand how mutations relate to progressive blinding disorders and devise effective therapies. Methodology We have built an RP-specific network (RPGeNet) by merging data from different sources: high-throughput data from BioGRID and STRING databases, manually curated data for interactions retrieved from iHOP, as well as interactions filtered out by syntactical parsing from up-to-date abstracts and full-text papers related to the RP research field. The paths emerging when known RP genes were used as baits over the whole interactome have been analysed, and the minimal number of connections among the RP genes and their close neighbors were distilled in order to simplify the search space. Conclusions In contrast to the analysis of single isolated genes, finding the networks linking disease genes renders powerful etiopathological insights. We here provide an interactive interface, RPGeNet, for the molecular biologist to explore the network centered on the non-syndromic and syndromic RP and LCA causative genes. By integrating tissue-specific expression levels and phenotypic data on top of that network, a more comprehensive biological view will highlight key molecular players of retinal degeneration and unveil new RP disease candidates. PMID:26267445

  8. Contrast visual acuity in patients with retinitis pigmentosa assessed by a contrast sensitivity tester

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Maho; Nakamura, Hajime; Hangai, Masanori; Oishi, Akio; Otani, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess contrast visual acuity (CVA) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and compare the result with standard visual acuity (VA), retinal thickness, status of inner segment/outer segment junction, and central visual field. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine eyes of 39 patients with RP and 39 eyes of 39 healthy individuals were studied. To see the difference in CVA between RP patients and normal controls, only subjects with standard VA of 1.0 (20/20) or better were included. This was a cross-sectional study. CVA in various light conditions was measured with CAT-2000 and was compared between patients and controls. CVA of patients was further analyzed for association with other parameters including foveal retinal thickness, outer nuclear layer thickness, the status of inner segment/outer segment junction measured with optical coherence tomography (OCT), and visual field mean deviation (MD) measured with Humphrey field analyzer 10-2 program. Results: CVA impairment was evident in RP patients compared to controls (P < 0.01, in all measurement conditions). Multivariate analysis showed association of logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) with CVAs in several conditions. None of the OCT measurements was associated with CVA. When patients were divided into three groups based on MD, the most advanced group (MD worse than or equal to –20 dB) showed impairment of mesopic CVA (P < 0.05, under mesopic condition of 100% without glare, with glare, and 25% without glare). Conclusion: CVA impairment was confirmed in RP patients, especially in advanced cases. CVA measured with CAT-2000 may be a useful tool for assessing foveal function in RP patients. PMID:23202395

  9. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-01-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (RhoS334) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of RhoS334, which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function. PMID:26666451

  10. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-03-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (Rho(S334)) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of Rho(S334), which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function. PMID:26666451

  11. Hypomorphic mutations in TRNT1 cause retinitis pigmentosa with erythrocytic microcytosis.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Adam P; Whitmore, S Scott; Barnes, Jenna; Sharma, Tasneem P; Westfall, Trudi A; Scott, C Anthony; Weed, Matthew C; Wiley, Jill S; Wiley, Luke A; Johnston, Rebecca M; Schnieders, Michael J; Lentz, Steven R; Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F; Scheetz, Todd E; Stone, Edwin M; Slusarski, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a highly heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by degeneration of the retinal photoreceptor cells and progressive loss of vision. While hundreds of mutations in more than 100 genes have been reported to cause RP, discovering the causative mutations in many patients remains a significant challenge. Exome sequencing in an individual affected with non-syndromic RP revealed two plausibly disease-causing variants in TRNT1, a gene encoding a nucleotidyltransferase critical for tRNA processing. A total of 727 additional unrelated individuals with molecularly uncharacterized RP were completely screened for TRNT1 coding sequence variants, and a second family was identified with two members who exhibited a phenotype that was remarkably similar to the index patient. Inactivating mutations in TRNT1 have been previously shown to cause a severe congenital syndrome of sideroblastic anemia, B-cell immunodeficiency, recurrent fevers and developmental delay (SIFD). Complete blood counts of all three of our patients revealed red blood cell microcytosis and anisocytosis with only mild anemia. Characterization of TRNT1 in patient-derived cell lines revealed reduced but detectable TRNT1 protein, consistent with partial function. Suppression of trnt1 expression in zebrafish recapitulated several features of the human SIFD syndrome, including anemia and sensory organ defects. When levels of trnt1 were titrated, visual dysfunction was found in the absence of other phenotypes. The visual defects in the trnt1-knockdown zebrafish were ameliorated by the addition of exogenous human TRNT1 RNA. Our findings indicate that hypomorphic TRNT1 mutations can cause a recessive disease that is almost entirely limited to the retina. PMID:26494905

  12. Loss of function mutations in RP1 are responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Firoz; Ullah, Inayat; Ali, Shahbaz; Gottsch, Alexander D.H.; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to identify causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in consanguineous families. Methods Large consanguineous families were ascertained from the Punjab province of Pakistan. An ophthalmic examination consisting of a fundus evaluation and electroretinography (ERG) was completed, and small aliquots of blood were collected from all participating individuals. Genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells, and a genome-wide linkage or a locus-specific exclusion analysis was completed with polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs). Two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated, and all coding exons and exon–intron boundaries of RP1 were sequenced to identify the causal mutation. Results The ophthalmic examination showed that affected individuals in all families manifest cardinal symptoms of RP. Genome-wide scans localized the disease phenotype to chromosome 8q, a region harboring RP1, a gene previously implicated in the pathogenesis of RP. Sanger sequencing identified a homozygous single base deletion in exon 4: c.3697delT (p.S1233Pfs22*), a single base substitution in intron 3: c.787+1G>A (p.I263Nfs8*), a 2 bp duplication in exon 2: c.551_552dupTA (p.Q185Yfs4*) and an 11,117 bp deletion that removes all three coding exons of RP1. These variations segregated with the disease phenotype within the respective families and were not present in ethnically matched control samples. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that these mutations in RP1 are responsible for the retinal phenotype in affected individuals of all four consanguineous families. PMID:27307693

  13. Mutations in FLVCR1 Cause Posterior Column Ataxia and Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M.; Elemento, Olivier; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Schierberl, Kathryn C.; Xiang, Jenny Z.; Putorti, Maria L.; Berciano, José; Poulin, Chantal; Brais, Bernard; Michaelides, Michel; Weleber, Richard G.; Higgins, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The study of inherited retinal diseases has advanced our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in sensory neural signaling. Dysfunction of two specific sensory modalities, vision and proprioception, characterizes the phenotype of the rare, autosomal-recessive disorder posterior column ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (PCARP). Using targeted DNA capture and high-throughput sequencing, we analyzed the entire 4.2 Mb candidate sequence on chromosome 1q32 to find the gene mutated in PCARP in a single family. Employing comprehensive bioinformatic analysis and filtering, we identified a single-nucleotide coding variant in the feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular receptor 1 (FLVCR1), a gene encoding a heme-transporter protein. Sanger sequencing confirmed the FLVCR1 mutation in this family and identified different homozygous missense mutations located within the protein's transmembrane channel segment in two other unrelated families with PCARP. To determine whether the selective pathologic features of PCARP correlated with FLVCR1 expression, we examined wild-type mouse Flvcr1 mRNA levels in the posterior column of the spinal cord and the retina via quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR. The Flvcr1 mRNA levels were most abundant in the retina, followed by the posterior column of the spinal cord and other brain regions. These results suggest that aberrant FLVCR1 causes a selective degeneration of a subpopulation of neurons in the retina and the posterior columns of the spinal cord via dysregulation of heme or iron homeostasis. This finding broadens the molecular basis of sensory neural signaling to include common mechanisms that involve proprioception and vision. PMID:21070897

  14. The Artificial Silicon Retina in Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients (An American Ophthalmological Association Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Alan Y.; Bittner, Ava K.; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In a published pilot study, a light-activated microphotodiode-array chip, the artificial silicon retina (ASR), was implanted subretinally in 6 retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients for up to 18 months. The ASR electrically induced retinal neurotrophic rescue of visual acuity, contrast, and color perception and raised several questions: (1) Would neurotrophic effects develop and persist in additionally implanted RP patients? (2) Could vision in these patients be reliably assessed? (3) Would the ASR be tolerated and function for extended periods? Methods: Four additional RP patients were implanted and observed along with the 6 pilot patients. Of the 10 patients, 6 had vision levels that allowed for more standardized testing and were followed up for 7+ years utilizing ETDRS charts and a 4-alternative forced choice (AFC) Chow grating acuity test (CGAT). A 10-AFC Chow color test (CCT) extended the range of color vision testing. Histologic examination of the eyes of one patient, who died of an unrelated event, was performed. Results: The ASR was well tolerated, and improvement and/or slowing of vision loss occurred in all 6 patients. CGAT extended low vision acuity testing by logMAR 0.6. CCT expanded the range of color vision testing and correlated well with PV-16 (r = 0.77). An ASR recovered from a patient 5 years after implantation showed minor disruption and excellent electrical function. Conclusion: ASR-implanted RP patients experienced prolonged neurotrophic rescue of vision. CGAT and CCT extended the range of acuity and color vision testing in low vision patients. ASR implantation may improve and prolong vision in RP patients. PMID:21212852

  15. A new locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on the short arm of chromosome 17.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J; Goliath, R; Beighton, P; Ramesar, R

    1994-06-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous retinopathies, some of which have been shown to result from mutations in two different known retinal genes, rhodopsin (3q) and peripherin-rds (6p). Three additional anonymous loci at 7p, 7q and pericentric 8 have been implicated by linkage studies. There are still, however, a few families in which all known loci have been excluded. In this report we present data indicating a location, on the short arm of chromosome 17, for the autosomal dominant RP (ADRP) locus in a large South African (SA) family of British ancestry. Positive two-point lod scores have been obtained for nine markers (D17S938, Z = 5.43; D17S796, Z = 4.82; D17S849, Z = 3.6; D17S786, Z = 3.55; TP53, Z = 3.55; D17S578, Z = 3.29; D17S960, Z = 3.16; D17S926, Z = 1.51; D17S804, Z = 0.47 all at theta = 0.10 except D17S804 and D17S926, theta = 0.20). These data provide definitive evidence for the localization of an ADRP gene on chromosome 17p. The human recoverin gene has been localized to 17p13.1 and was consequently a prime candidate for ADRP in the family studied. However, mutation screening of the three exons of this gene failed to produce any evidence of recoverin being the gene involved in the pathogenesis of ADRP in this SA family. PMID:7951236

  16. A YAC contig encompassing the chromosome 7p locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.F.; Keen, T.J.; Ratel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited retinal degeneration characterized by night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, often leading to complete blindness. The autosomal dominant form (adRP) maps to at least six different loci, including the rhodopsin and peripherin/Rds genes and four loci identified only by linkage analysis on chromosomes 7p, 7q, 8cen and 19q. The 7p locus was reported by this laboratory in a large English family, with a lod score of 16.5. Several new genetic markers have been tested in the family and this locus has now been refined to an interval of approximately 1 cM between markers D7S795 and D7S484 in the 7p13-15 region. In order to clone the gene for adRP, we have used microsatellites and STSs from the region to identify over 80 YACs, from four different libraries, which map to this interval. End clones from key YACs were isolated for the generation of additional STSs. Eleven microsatellite markers between D7S435 (distal) and D7S484 (proximal) have been ordered by a combination of both physical and genetic mapping. In this way we have now obtained a YAC contig spanning approximately 3 megabases of chromosome 7p within which the adRP gene must lie. One gene (aquaporin) and one chromosome 7 brain EST have been placed on the contig but both map distal to the region of interest. Sixteen other ESTs and three further known 7p genes mapping in the region have been excluded. We are now attempting to build a cosmid contig in the defined interval and identify further expressed sequences from both YACs and cosmids to test as candidates for the adRP gene.

  17. Clinical and Rehabilitative Management of Retinitis Pigmentosa: Up-to-Date

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Sato, Giovanni; De Nadai, Katia; Romano, Mario R; Binotto, Andrea; Costagliola, Ciro

    2011-01-01

    The term retinitis pigmentosa (RP) indicates a heterogeneous group of genetic rare ocular diseases in which either rods or cones are prevalently damaged. RP represents the most common hereditary cause of blindness in people from 20 to 60 years old. In general, the different RP forms consist of progressive photo-receptorial neuro-degenerations, which are characterized by variable visual disabilities and considerable socio-sanitary burden. Sometimes, RP patients do not become visually impaired or legally blind until their 40-50 years of age and/or maintain a quite acceptable sight for all their life. Other individuals with RP become completely blind very early or in middle childhood. Although there is no treatment that can effectively cure RP, in some case-series the disease’s progression seems to be reducible by specific preventive approaches. In the most part of RP patients, the quality of vision can be considerably increased by means of nanometer-controlled filters. In the present review, the main aspects of the routine clinical and rehabilitative managements for RP patients are described, particularly focusing on the importance of specific referral Centers to practice a real multidisciplinary governance of these dramatic diseases. PMID:22131870

  18. Molecular genetic study of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in Lithuanian patients.

    PubMed

    Kucinskas, V; Payne, A M; Ambrasiene, D; Jurgelevicius, V; Steponaviciūte, D; Arciuliene, J V; Daktaraviciene, E; Bhattacharya, S

    1999-03-01

    Lithuanian patients with visual problems were clinically examined for retinitis pigmentosa (RP). A total of 33 unrelated families with autosomal dominant RP (adRP) were identified. Screening for mutations in the rhodopsin (RHO) and peripherin/RDS (RDS) genes was performed using DNA heteroduplex analysis. Direct DNA sequencing in the cases of heteroduplex formation showed the presence of the following mutations and polymorphisms in 14 adRP patients: RHO gene - Lys248Arg (1 case), and Pro347Leu (2 cases); RDS gene - Glu304Gln (12 cases), Lys310Arg (5 cases), and Gly338Asp (12 cases). The presence of these mutations (except Lys248Arg in the RHO gene) was confirmed by relevant restriction enzyme digestion. The frequency of the RDS gene mutations Glu304Gln and Gly338Asp was estimated to be 36.4%, while mutation Lys310Arg was less frequent (15.2%). These 3 RDS gene mutations appear to be polypeptide polymorphisms not related to adRP. PMID:10077725

  19. Further refinement of the location for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 7p (RP9).

    PubMed Central

    Inglehearn, C. F.; Keen, T. J.; al-Maghtheh, M.; Gregory, C. Y.; Jay, M. R.; Moore, A. T.; Bird, A. C.; Bhattacharya, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    A form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) mapping to chromosome 7p was recently reported by this laboratory, in a single large family from southeastern England. Further sampling of the family and the use a number of genetic markers from 7p have facilitated the construction of a series of multipoint linkage maps of the region with the most likely disease gene location. From this and haplotype data, the locus can now be placed between the markers D7S484 and D7S526, in an interval estimated to be 1.6-4 cM. Genetic distances between the markers previously reported to be linked to this region and those described in the recent whole-genome poly-CA map were estimated from data in this and other families. These data should assist in the construction of a physical map of the region and will help to identify candidate genes for the 7p adRP locus. PMID:8128965

  20. Bimodal expressivity in dominant retinitis pigmentosa genetically linked to chromosome 19q.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, K; al-Maghtheh, M; Fitzke, F W; Moore, A T; Jay, M; Inglehearn, C F; Arden, G B; Bird, A C

    1995-01-01

    A clinical, psychophysical, and electrophysiologic study was undertaken of two autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa pedigrees with a genetic mutation assigned to chromosome 19q by linkage analysis. Members with the abnormal haplotype were either symptomatic with adolescent onset nyctalopia, restricted visual fields, and non-detectable electroretinographic responses by 30 years of age, or asymptomatic with normal fundus appearance and minimal or no psychophysical or electroretinographic abnormalities. There was no correlation in the severity in parents and their offspring. Pedigree analysis suggested that although the offspring of parents with the genetic mutation were at 50% risk of having the genetic defect, the risk of being symptomatic during a working lifetime was only 31%. Such bimodal phenotypic expressivity in these particular pedigrees may be explained by a second, allelic genetic influence and may be a phenomenon unique to this genetic locus. Genetic counselling in families expressing this phenotype can only be based on haplotype analysis since clinical investigations, even in the most elderly, would not preclude the presence of the mutant gene. PMID:7488604

  1. Whole-Exome Sequencing Links a Variant in DHDDS to Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Züchner, Stephan; Dallman, Julia; Wen, Rong; Beecham, Gary; Naj, Adam; Farooq, Amjad; Kohli, Martin A.; Whitehead, Patrice L.; Hulme, William; Konidari, Ioanna; Edwards, Yvonne J.K.; Cai, Guiqing; Peter, Inga; Seo, David; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Blanton, Susan; Young, Juan; Alfonso, Eduardo; Vance, Jeffery M.; Lam, Byron L.; Peričak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, mutations in genes causing Mendelian disease will be supported by individual and small families only; however, exome sequencing studies have thus far focused on syndromic phenotypes characterized by low locus heterogeneity. In contrast, retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is caused by >50 known genes, which still explain only half of the clinical cases. In a single, one-generation, nonsyndromic RP family, we have identified a gene, dehydrodolichol diphosphate synthase (DHDDS), demonstrating the power of combining whole-exome sequencing with rapid in vivo studies. DHDDS is a highly conserved essential enzyme for dolichol synthesis, permitting global N-linked glycosylation. Zebrafish studies showed virtually identical photoreceptor defects as observed with N-linked glycosylation-interfering mutations in the light-sensing protein rhodopsin. The identified Lys42Glu variant likely arose from an ancestral founder, because eight of the nine identified alleles in 27,174 control chromosomes were of confirmed Ashkenazi Jewish ethnicity. These findings demonstrate the power of exome sequencing linked to functional studies when faced with challenging study designs and, importantly, link RP to the pathways of N-linked glycosylation, which promise new avenues for therapeutic interventions. PMID:21295283

  2. Coping strategies to manage stress related to vision loss and fluctuations in retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Ava K.; Edwards, Lori; George, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Background Vision loss in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a slowly progressive and inexorable threat to patients’ independence. It is not surprising that RP patients, many of whom are young when diagnosed, are at high risk for stress related to their vision loss. To address these issues, eye care providers need to be aware of what coping strategies RP patients use to successfully manage their vision loss. Methods We held focus groups with eight legally blind RP patients to help us better understand how they cope with the stress that is generated from their progressive vision loss and fluctuations in vision. Focus group sessions were audiotaped and resulting notes were coded using conventional qualitative analytic techniques. Results Two themes were identified: 1) “kicking and screaming” captured the ways in which RP patients fight to maintain their independence in the face of worsening vision; and 2) “there are so many worse things” describes how RP patients keep their vision loss in perspective. These RP patients demonstrated high levels of resiliency. In particular, they often used humor as a coping mechanism. Conclusions Understanding the ways in which RP patients manage their gradual, impending vision loss may lead to improved quality of care for this patient population. PMID:20591747

  3. Retinitis Pigmentosa Treatment with Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Peng, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Current management of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) includes an attempt at slowing down the degenerative process through therapies that use either Western or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Novel therapies in Western medicine (WM) include use of tailor-made gene therapy, transplantation of stem cells, or neuroprotection treatment. TCM treatment includes two major approaches. These are orally applied herbal decoctions and acupuncture. In fact, all TCM treatments are based on the differentiation of a symptom-complex, which is the characteristic essence of TCM. Thus, diagnosed RP may be treated via the liver, the kidney, and the spleen. The principle behind these treatments is to invigorate the blood and brighten the eyes by toning up the liver and the kidney. Also treatments to cope with deficiencies in the two concepts that are unique and fundamental to TCM are considered: Qi or “vital energy” and Yin and Yang or the harmony of all the opposite elements and forces that make up existence. In particular, the Qi deficiency that results from blood stasis is addressed in these treatments. This paper also puts forward the existing problems and the prospect of the future development on integrating TCM with WM. PMID:26124961

  4. Further refinement of the location for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 7p (RP9)

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.F.; Keen, T.J.; Al-Maghtheh, M.; Gregory, C.Y.; Bhattacharya, S.S.; Jay, M.R.; Moore, A.T.; Bird, A.C. )

    1994-04-01

    A form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) mapping to chromosome 7p was recently reported by this laboratory, in a single large family from southeastern England. Further sampling of the family and the use a number of genetic markers from 7p have facilitated the construction of a series of multipoint linkage maps of the region with the most likely disease gene location. From this and haplotype data, the locus can now be placed between the markers D7S484 and D7S526, in an interval estimated to be 1.6-4 cM. Genetic distances between the markers previously reported to be linked to this region and those described in the recent whole-genome poly-CA map were estimated from data in this and other families. These data should assist in the construction of a physical map of the region and will help to identify candidate genes for the 7p adRP locus. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Localizing multiple X chromosome-linked retinitis pigmentosa loci using multilocus homogeneity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, J.; Terwilliger, J.D. ); Bhattacharya, S. ); Chen, J.D.; Denton, J.; Donald, J. ); Dubay, C.; Litt, M.; Weleber, R.G. ); Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, P. ); Fishman, G.A.; Wong, F. ); Frey, D.; Maechler, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Multilocus linkage analysis of 62 family pedigrees with X chromosome-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) was undertaken to determine the presence of possible multiple disease loci and to reliability estimate their map location. Multilocus homogeneity tests furnish convincing evidence for the presence of two XLRP loci, the likelihood ratio being 6.4 {times} 10{sup 9}:1 in a favor of two versus a single XLRP locus and gave accurate estimates for their map location. In 60-75% of the families, location of an XLRP gene was estimated at 1 centimorgan distal to OTC, and in 25-40% of the families, an XLRP locus was located halfway between DXS14 (p58-1) and DXZ1 (Xcen), with an estimated recombination fraction of 25% between the two XLRP loci. There is also good evidence for third XLRP locus, midway between DXS28 (C7) and DXS164 (pERT87), supported by a likelihood ratio of 293:1 for three versus two XLRP loci.

  6. Evaluation of the arrestin gene in patients with retinitis pigmentosa or an allied disease

    SciTech Connect

    DeStefano, D.J.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P.

    1994-09-01

    Arrestin, also called 48K protein or S-antigen, plays a role in deactivating rhodopsin, the photosensitive, seven-helix, G-protein receptor found in rod photoreceptors. In Drosophila, null mutations in arrestin genes cause a light-dependent photoreceptor degeneration. It is possible that a comparable photoreceptor degeneration in humans is caused by defects in the rod arrestin gene. In order to evaluate this possibility, we are characterizing the human arrestin locus on chromosome 2q. We screened a genomic library (5 million plaques) using an arrestin cDNA clone. Sixty-eight hybridizing clones were identified; portions of 7 clones were sequenced to determine the intron sequence flanking the exons. We are using SSCP analysis and direct genomic sequencing to screen the entire coding region, splice donor and acceptor sites, and the promoter region of the arrestin gene in 188 patients with autosomal dominant and 104 patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. We have already obtained flanking intron sequences necessary for SSCP analysis for 13 of 16 exons. So far, we have identified 4 silent base changes at codons 67 (TGC-to-TGT), 107 (CTG-to-CTC), 163 (GCC-to-GCT), and 288 (CTG-to-TGT), all with allele frequencies at 1% or less. Several other variant bands detected by SSCP analysis are currently being sequenced.

  7. Towards isolation of the gene for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP3)

    SciTech Connect

    Dry, K.L.; Aldred, M.A.; Hardwick, L.J.

    1994-09-01

    Until recently the region of interest containing the gene for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP3) was thought to lie between CYBB (Xp21.1) and the proximal end of the deletion in patient BB (JBBprox). This region was thought to span 100-150 kb. Here we present new mapping data to show that the distance between the 5{prime} (most proximal) end of CYBB and JBBprox is only 50 kb. Recently Roux et al. (1994) have described the isolation of a gene within this region but this showed no disease-associated changes. Further evidence from mapping the deletion in patient NF (who suffered from McLead`s syndrome and CGD but not RP) and from linkage analysis of our RP3 families with a new dinucleotide repeat suggests that the gene must extend proximally from JBBprox. In order to extend the region of search we have constructed a YAC contig spanning 800 kb to OTC. We are continuing our search for the RP3 gene using a variety of strategies including exon trapping and cDNA enrichment as well as direct screening of cDNA libraries with subclones from this region.

  8. Functional Cone Rescue by RdCVF Protein in a Dominant Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Danan, Aude; Simonutti, Manuel; Fontaine, Valérie; Clerin, Emmanuelle; Picaud, Serge; Léveillard, Thierry; Sahel, José-Alain

    2009-01-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a majority of causative mutations affect genes solely expressed in rods; however, cone degeneration inevitably follows rod cell loss. Following transplantation and in vitro studies, we demonstrated the role of photoreceptor cell paracrine interactions and identified a Rod-derived Cone Viability Factor (RdCVF), which increases cone survival. In order to establish the clinical relevance of such mechanism, we assessed the functional benefit afforded by the injection of this factor in a frequent type of rhodopsin mutation, the P23H rat. In this model of autosomal dominant RP, RdCVF expression decreases in parallel with primary rod degeneration, which is followed by cone loss. RdCVF protein injections induced an increase in cone cell number and, more important, a further increase in the corresponding electroretinogram (ERG). These results indicate that RdCVF can not only rescue cones but also preserve significantly their function. Interestingly, the higher amplitude of the functional versus the survival effect of RdCVF on cones indicates that RdCVF is acting more directly on cone function. The demonstration at the functional level of the therapeutic potential of RdCVF in the most frequent of dominant RP mutations paves the way toward the use of RdCVF for preserving central vision in many RP patients. PMID:19277021

  9. Continued use of dorzolamide for the treatment of cystoid macular oedema in patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Gerald A; Apushkin, Marsha A

    2007-01-01

    Aim To determine the value of a topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitor for extended treatment of cystoid macular oedema (CME) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Method Eight patients with RP and foveal cystic‐appearing lesions observed on fundus examination and by optical coherence tomography (OCT) testing were treated with a topical form of carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Results Foveal cystic‐like spaces were documented by OCT testing in all eight patients before treatment. All patients had a significant reduction in their foveal thickness (FT) and foveal zone thickness (FZT) in at least one eye after using 2% dorzolamide three times a day for 1 or 2 months. Six patients had an improvement in both eyes. After an additional 6–13 months of the same treatment regimen, out of six patients who had a sustained reduction in FT and FZT in at least one eye, four had this reduction in both eyes. While they were still taking Trusopt, a recurrence (rebound) of CME in both eyes was observed in two patients, whereas one patient had a sustained improvement in one eye and rebound of CME in the other eye. Out of 8 patients, 3 showed an improvement in their visual acuity by ⩾7 letters, in at least one eye, on Snellen acuity charts, which was determined as clinically significant. Conclusion Results from this study suggest that patients with RP could potentially sustain a beneficial effect from continued treatment with a topical form of carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. PMID:17215269

  10. Mutations in the PDE6B gene in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Danciger, M.; Blaney, J.; Gao, Y.Q.; Zhao, D.Y.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied 24 small families with presumed autosomal recessive inheritance of retinitis pigmentosa by a combination of haplotype analysis and exon screening. Initial analysis of the families was made with a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism adjacent to the gene for rod cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE6B). This was followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and single-strand conformation polymorphism electrophoresis (SSCPE) of the 22 exons and a portion of the 5{prime} untranslated region of the PDE6B gene in the probands of each family in which the PDE6B locus could not be ruled out from segregating with disease. Two probands were found with compound heterozygous mutations: Gly576Asp and His620(1-bp del) mutations were present in one proband, and a Lys706X null mutation and an AG to AT splice acceptor site mutation in intron 2 were present in the other. Only the affecteds of each of the two families carried both corresponding mutations. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. [Role of Heat Shock Protein 70 in Retinitis Pigmentosa and a Novel Strategy for Treatment].

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Yoshiki; Furukawa, Ayako

    2015-12-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited disorders involving the photoreceptors of the retina and can lead to visual loss. There has been tremendous progress in the delineation of the biochemical and molecular basis of RP. Reactive oxygen species, calcium-calpain activation, and lipid peroxidation are known to be involved in the initiation of photoreceptor cell death, but the precise mechanisms of this process remain unknown. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) has been shown to function as a chaperone molecule that protects cells against environmental and physiological stresses. However, there are a few reports showing the role of HSP70 in photoreceptor cell death. Recently, we found that the production of 4-hydroxy-2-noneral caused the calpain-dependent cleavage of carbonylated HSP70 prior to photoreceptor cell death in RP model mice. Furthermore, HSP70 inducers, such as valproic acid and geranylgeranylacetone attenuated photoreceptor cell death. HSP70 inducers may be considered as candidate therapeutic agents for RP. PMID:26618767

  12. The Stiles-Crawford Effect: spot-size ratio departure in retinitis pigmentosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Nachieketa K.; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2016-04-01

    The Stiles-Crawford effect of the first kind is the retina's compensative response to loss of luminance efficiency for oblique stimulation manifested as the spot-size ratio departure from the perfect power coupling for a normal human eye. In a retinitis pigmentosa eye (RP), the normal cone photoreceptor morphology is affected due to foveal cone loss and disrupted cone mosaic spatial arrangement with reduction in directional sensitivity. We show that the flattened Stiles-Crawford function (SCF) in a RP eye is due to a different spot-size ratio departure profile, that is, for the same loss of luminance efficiency, a RP eye has a smaller departure from perfect power coupling compared to a normal eye. Again, the difference in spot-size ratio departure increases from the centre towards the periphery, having zero value for axial entry and maximum value for maximum peripheral entry indicating dispersal of photoreceptor alignment which prevents the retina to go for a bigger compensative response as it lacks both in number and appropriate cone morphology to tackle the loss of luminance efficiency for oblique stimulation. The slope of departure profile also testifies to the flattened SCF for a RP eye. Moreover, the discrepancy in spot-size ratio departure between a normal and a RP eye is shown to have a direct bearing on the Stiles-Crawford diminution of visibility.

  13. Is There Excess Oxidative Stress and Damage in Eyes of Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa?

    PubMed

    Campochiaro, Peter A; Strauss, Rupert W; Lu, Lili; Hafiz, Gulnar; Wolfson, Yulia; Shah, Syed M; Sophie, Raafay; Mir, Tahreem A; Scholl, Hendrik P

    2015-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of diseases in which a mutation in one of the large variety of genes causes death of rod photoreceptors. After rods die, cone photoreceptors gradually die resulting in constriction of visual fields and eventual blindness in many patients. Studies in animal models of RP have demonstrated that oxidative damage is a major contributor to cone cell death. In this study, we extended those findings to patients with RP, because compared to control patients, those with RP showed significant reduction in the reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio in aqueous humor and a significant increase in aqueous protein carbonyl content. In contrast, there was no significant decrease in the serum GSH/GSSG ratio or increase in carbonyl content of serum proteins. These data indicate that patients with RP have ocular oxidative stress and damage in the absence of manifestations of systemic oxidative stress and/or damage indicating that demonstrations of oxidative damage-induced cone cell death in animal models of RP may translate to human RP. These observations lead to the hypothesis that potent antioxidants will promote cone survival and function in patients with RP and that the aqueous GSH/GSSG ratio and carbonyl content on proteins may provide useful biomarkers. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 643-648. PMID:25820114

  14. Is There Excess Oxidative Stress and Damage in Eyes of Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa?

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Rupert W.; Lu, Lili; Hafiz, Gulnar; Wolfson, Yulia; Shah, Syed M.; Sophie, Raafay; Mir, Tahreem A.; Scholl, Hendrik P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of diseases in which a mutation in one of the large variety of genes causes death of rod photoreceptors. After rods die, cone photoreceptors gradually die resulting in constriction of visual fields and eventual blindness in many patients. Studies in animal models of RP have demonstrated that oxidative damage is a major contributor to cone cell death. In this study, we extended those findings to patients with RP, because compared to control patients, those with RP showed significant reduction in the reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio in aqueous humor and a significant increase in aqueous protein carbonyl content. In contrast, there was no significant decrease in the serum GSH/GSSG ratio or increase in carbonyl content of serum proteins. These data indicate that patients with RP have ocular oxidative stress and damage in the absence of manifestations of systemic oxidative stress and/or damage indicating that demonstrations of oxidative damage-induced cone cell death in animal models of RP may translate to human RP. These observations lead to the hypothesis that potent antioxidants will promote cone survival and function in patients with RP and that the aqueous GSH/GSSG ratio and carbonyl content on proteins may provide useful biomarkers. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 643–648. PMID:25820114

  15. Fine localization of the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 17p

    SciTech Connect

    Goliath, R.; Janssens, P.; Beighton, P.

    1995-10-01

    The term {open_quotes}retintis pigmentosa{close_quotes} (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerative disorders. Clinical manifestations include night-blindness, with variable age of onset, followed by constriction of the visual field that may progress to total loss of sight in later life. Previous studies have shown that RP is caused by mutations within different genes and may be inherited as an X-linked recessive (XLRRP), autosomal recessive (ARRP), or autosomal dominant (ADRP) trait. The AD form of this group of conditions has been found to be caused by mutations within the rhodopsin gene in some families and the peripherin/RDS gene in others. In addition, some ADRP families have been found to be linked to anonymous markers on 8cen, 7p, 7q,19q, and, more recently, 17p. The ADRP gene locus on the short arm of chromosome 17 was identified in a large South African family (ADRP-SA) of British origin. The phenotypic expression of the disorder, which has been described elsewhere is consistent in the pedigree with an early onset of disease symptoms. In all affected subjects in the family, onset of symptoms commenced before the age of 10 years. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Activated mTORC1 promotes long-term cone survival in retinitis pigmentosa mice

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Aditya; Ma, Shan; Le, Yun Z.; Hall, Michael N.; Rüegg, Markus A.; Punzo, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited photoreceptor degenerative disorder that results in blindness. The disease is often caused by mutations in genes that are specific to rod photoreceptors; however, blindness results from the secondary loss of cones by a still unknown mechanism. Here, we demonstrated that the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is required to slow the progression of cone death during disease and that constitutive activation of mTORC1 in cones is sufficient to maintain cone function and promote long-term cone survival. Activation of mTORC1 in cones enhanced glucose uptake, retention, and utilization, leading to increased levels of the key metabolite NADPH. Moreover, cone death was delayed in the absence of the NADPH-sensitive cell death protease caspase 2, supporting the contribution of reduced NADPH in promoting cone death. Constitutive activation of mTORC1 preserved cones in 2 mouse models of RP, suggesting that the secondary loss of cones is caused mainly by metabolic deficits and is independent of a specific rod-associated mutation. Together, the results of this study address a longstanding question in the field and suggest that activating mTORC1 in cones has therapeutic potential to prolong vision in RP. PMID:25798619

  17. A Gene Mutated in Nephronophthisis and Retinitis Pigmentosa Encodes a Novel Protein, Nephroretinin, Conserved in Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Edgar; Hoefele, Julia; Ruf, Rainer; Mueller, Adelheid M.; Hiller, Karl S.; Wolf, Matthias T. F.; Schuermann, Maria J.; Becker, Achim; Birkenhäger, Ralf; Sudbrak, Ralf; Hennies, Hans C.; Nürnberg, Peter; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2002-01-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) comprises a group of autosomal recessive cystic kidney diseases, which constitute the most frequent genetic cause for end-stage renal failure in children and young adults. The most prominent histologic feature of NPHP consists of development of renal fibrosis, which, in chronic renal failure of any origin, represents the pathogenic event correlated most strongly to loss of renal function. Four gene loci for NPHP have been mapped to chromosomes 2q13 (NPHP1), 9q22 (NPHP2), 3q22 (NPHP3), and 1p36 (NPHP4). At all four loci, linkage has also been demonstrated in families with the association of NPHP and retinitis pigmentosa, known as “Senior-Løken syndrome” (SLS). Identification of the gene for NPHP type 1 had revealed nephrocystin as a novel docking protein, providing new insights into mechanisms of cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling. We here report identification of the gene (NPHP4) causing NPHP type 4, by use of high-resolution haplotype analysis and by demonstration of nine likely loss-of-function mutations in six affected families. NPHP4 encodes a novel protein, nephroretinin, that is conserved in evolution—for example, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In addition, we demonstrate two loss-of-function mutations of NPHP4 in patients from two families with SLS. Thus, we have identified a novel gene with critical roles in renal tissue architecture and ophthalmic function. PMID:12205563

  18. Pharmacological Chaperone-mediated in Vivo Folding and Stabilization of the P23H-opsin Mutant Associated with Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa*

    PubMed Central

    Imanishi, Yoshikazu; Zhu, Li; Filipek, Sławomir; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kaushal, Shalesh

    2006-01-01

    Protein conformational disorders, which include certain types of retinitis pigmentosa, are a set of inherited human diseases in which mutant proteins are misfolded and often aggregated. Many opsin mutants associated with retinitis pigmentosa, the most common being P23H, are misfolded and retained within the cell. Here, we describe a pharmacological chaperone, 11-cis-7-ring retinal, that quantitatively induces the in vivo folding of P23H-opsin. The rescued protein forms pigment, acquires mature glycosylation, and is transported to the cell surface. Additionally, we determined the temperature stability of the rescued protein as well as the reactivity of the retinal-opsin Schiff base to hydroxylamine. Our study unveils novel properties of P23H-opsin and its interaction with the chromophore. These properties suggest that 11-cis-7-ring retinal may be a useful therapeutic agent for the rescue of P23H-opsin and the prevention of retinal degeneration. PMID:12566452

  19. Suppression and replacement gene therapy for autosomal dominant disease in a murine model of dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Millington-Ward, Sophia; Chadderton, Naomi; O'Reilly, Mary; Palfi, Arpad; Goldmann, Tobias; Kilty, Claire; Humphries, Marian; Wolfrum, Uwe; Bennett, Jean; Humphries, Peter; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane

    2011-04-01

    For dominantly inherited disorders development of gene therapies, targeting the primary genetic lesion has been impeded by mutational heterogeneity. An example is rhodopsin-linked autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with over 150 mutations in the rhodopsin gene. Validation of a mutation-independent suppression and replacement gene therapy for this disorder has been undertaken. The therapy provides a means of correcting the genetic defect in a mutation-independent manner thereby circumventing the mutational diversity. Separate adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors were used to deliver an RNA interference (RNAi)-based rhodopsin suppressor and a codon-modified rhodopsin replacement gene resistant to suppression due to nucleotide alterations at degenerate positions over the RNAi target site. Viruses were subretinally coinjected into P347S mice, a model of dominant rhodopsin-linked retinitis pigmentosa. Benefit in retinal function and structure detected by electroretinography (ERG) and histology, respectively, was observed for at least 5 months. Notably, the photoreceptor cell layer, absent in 5-month-old untreated retinas, contained 3-4 layers of nuclei, whereas photoreceptor ultrastructure, assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) improved significantly. The study provides compelling evidence that codelivered suppression and replacement is beneficial, representing a significant step toward the clinic. Additionally, dual-vector delivery of combined therapeutics represents an exciting approach, which is potentially applicable to other inherited disorders. PMID:21224835

  20. Premature termination codons in PRPF31 cause retinitis pigmentosa via haploinsufficiency due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Rio Frio, Thomas; Wade, Nicholas M.; Ransijn, Adriana; Berson, Eliot L.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Rivolta, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the gene encoding the mRNA splicing factor PRPF31 cause retinitis pigmentosa, a hereditary form of retinal degeneration. Most of these mutations are characterized by DNA changes that lead to premature termination codons. We investigated 6 different PRPF31 mutations, represented by single-base substitutions or microdeletions, in cell lines derived from 9 patients with dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Five of these mutations lead to premature termination codons, and 1 leads to the skipping of exon 2. Allele-specific measurement of PRPF31 transcripts revealed a strong reduction in the expression of mutant alleles. As a consequence, total PRPF31 protein abundance was decreased, and no truncated proteins were detected. Subnuclear localization of the full-length PRPF31 that was present remained unaffected. Blocking nonsense-mediated mRNA decay significantly restored the amount of mutant PRPF31 mRNA but did not restore the synthesis of mutant proteins, even in conjunction with inhibitors of protein degradation pathways. Our results indicate that most PRPF31 mutations ultimately result in null alleles through the activation of surveillance mechanisms that inactivate mutant mRNA and, possibly, proteins. Furthermore, these data provide compelling evidence that the pathogenic effect of PRPF31 mutations is likely due to haploinsufficiency rather than to gain of function. PMID:18317597

  1. Identification of recurrent and novel mutations in TULP1 in Pakistani families with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ajmal, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Micheal, Shazia; Ahmed, Waqas; Shah, Ashfa; Venselaar, Hanka; Bokhari, Habib; Azam, Aisha; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Collin, Rob W.J.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Qamar, Raheel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To identify the genetic defects underlying retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in Pakistani families. Methods Genome-wide high-density single-nucleotide-polymorphism microarray analysis was performed using the DNA of nine affected individuals from two large families with multiple consanguineous marriages. Data were analyzed to identify homozygous regions that are shared by affected sibs in each family. Sanger sequencing was performed for genes previously implicated in autosomal recessive RP and allied retinal dystrophies that resided in the identified homozygous regions. Probands from both families underwent fundus examination and electroretinogram measurements. Results The tubby-like protein 1 gene (TULP1) was present in the largest homozygous region in both families. Sequence analysis identified a previously reported mutation (c.1138A>G; p.Thr380Ala) in one family and a novel pathogenic variant (c.1445G>A; p.Arg482Gln) in the other family. Both variants were found to be present in a homozygous state in all affected individuals, were heterozygous present in the unaffected parents, and heterozygous present or absent in normal individuals. Affected individuals of both families showed an early-onset form of RP. Conclusions Homozygosity mapping, combined with candidate-gene analysis, successfully identified genetic defects in TULP1 in two large Pakistani families with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:22665969

  2. Whole-exome Sequencing Analysis Identifies Mutations in the EYS Gene in Retinitis Pigmentosa in the Indian Population.

    PubMed

    Di, Yanan; Huang, Lulin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Li, Shujin; Kim, Ramasamy; Ballav Saikia, Bibhuti; Qu, Chao; Zhu, Xiong; Zhou, Yu; Jiang, Zhilin; Zhang, Lin; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Dingding; Li, Yuanfen; Zhang, Houbin; Yin, Yibing; Lu, Fang; Zhu, Xianjun; Yang, Zhenglin

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a rare heterogeneous genetic retinal dystrophy disease, and despite years of research, known genetic mutations can explain only approximately 60% of RP cases. We sought to identify the underlying genetic mutations in a cohort of fourteen Indian autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) families and 100 Indian sporadic RP cases. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on the probands of the arRP families and sporadic RP patients, and direct Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the causal mutations identified by WES. We found that the mutations of EYS are likely pathogenic mutations in two arRP families and eight sporadic patients. Specifically, we found a novel pair of compound heterozygous mutations and a novel homozygous mutation in two separate arRP families, and found two novel heterozygous mutations in two sporadic RP patients, whereas we found six novel homozygous mutations in six sporadic RP patients. Of these, one was a frameshift mutation, two were stop-gain mutations, one was a splicing mutation, and the others were missense mutations. In conclusion, our findings expand the spectrum of EYS mutations in RP in the Indian population and provide further support for the role of EYS in the pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis of RP. PMID:26787102

  3. Whole-exome Sequencing Analysis Identifies Mutations in the EYS Gene in Retinitis Pigmentosa in the Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Di, Yanan; Huang, Lulin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Li, Shujin; Kim, Ramasamy; Ballav Saikia, Bibhuti; Qu, Chao; Zhu, Xiong; Zhou, Yu; Jiang, Zhilin; Zhang, Lin; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Dingding; Li, Yuanfen; Zhang, Houbin; Yin, Yibing; Lu, Fang; Zhu, Xianjun; Yang, Zhenglin

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a rare heterogeneous genetic retinal dystrophy disease, and despite years of research, known genetic mutations can explain only approximately 60% of RP cases. We sought to identify the underlying genetic mutations in a cohort of fourteen Indian autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) families and 100 Indian sporadic RP cases. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on the probands of the arRP families and sporadic RP patients, and direct Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the causal mutations identified by WES. We found that the mutations of EYS are likely pathogenic mutations in two arRP families and eight sporadic patients. Specifically, we found a novel pair of compound heterozygous mutations and a novel homozygous mutation in two separate arRP families, and found two novel heterozygous mutations in two sporadic RP patients, whereas we found six novel homozygous mutations in six sporadic RP patients. Of these, one was a frameshift mutation, two were stop-gain mutations, one was a splicing mutation, and the others were missense mutations. In conclusion, our findings expand the spectrum of EYS mutations in RP in the Indian population and provide further support for the role of EYS in the pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis of RP. PMID:26787102

  4. Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa with Early Macular Affectation Caused by Premature Truncation in PROM1

    PubMed Central

    Permanyer, Jon; Navarro, Rafael; Friedman, James; Pomares, Esther; Castro-Navarro, Joaquín; Marfany, Gemma; Swaroop, Anand

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To identify the genetic basis of a large consanguineous Spanish pedigree affected with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) with premature macular atrophy and myopia. Methods. After a high-throughput cosegregation gene chip was used to exclude all known RP and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) candidates, genome-wide screening and linkage analysis were performed. Direct mutational screening identified the pathogenic mutation, and primers were designed to obtain the RT-PCR products for isoform characterization. Results. Mutational analysis detected a novel homozygous PROM1 mutation, c.869delG in exon 8 cosegregating with the disease. This variant causes a frameshift that introduces a premature stop codon, producing truncation of approximately two-thirds of the protein. Analysis of PROM1 expression in the lymphocytes of patients, carriers, and control subjects revealed an aberrant transcript that is degraded by the nonsense-mediated decay pathway, suggesting that the disease is caused by the absence of the PROM1 protein. Three (s2, s11 and s12) of the seven alternatively spliced isoforms reported in humans, accounted for 98% of the transcripts in the retina. Given that these three contained exon 8, no PROM1 isoform is expected in the affected retinas. Conclusions. A remarkable clinical finding in the affected family is early macular atrophy with concentric spared areas. The authors propose that the hallmark of PROM1 truncating mutations is early and severe progressive degeneration of both rods and cones and highlight this gene as a candidate of choice to prioritize in the molecular genetic study of patients with noncanonical clinical peripheral and macular affectation. PMID:20042663

  5. Reliability of a Manual Procedure for Marking the EZ Endpoint Location in Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Rithambara; X. Cai, Cindy; Lee, Dongwon; C. Epstein, Benjamin; Locke, Kirsten G.; G. Birch, David; C. Hood, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We developed and evaluated a training procedure for marking the endpoints of the ellipsoid zone (EZ), also known as the inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) border, on frequency domain optical coherence tomography (fdOCT) scans from patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods A manual for marking EZ endpoints was developed and used to train 2 inexperienced graders. After training, an experienced grader and the 2 trained graders marked the endpoints on fdOCT horizontal line scans through the macula from 45 patients with RP. They marked the endpoints on these same scans again 1 month later. Results Intragrader agreement was excellent. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.99, the average difference of endpoint locations (19.6 μm) was close to 0 μm, and the 95% limits were between −284 and 323 μm, approximately ±1.1°. Intergrader agreement also was excellent. The ICC values were 0.98 (time 1) and 0.97 (time 2), the average difference among graders was close to zero, and the 95% limits of these differences was less than 350 μm, approximately 1.2°, for both test times. Conclusions While automated algorithms are becoming increasingly accurate, EZ endpoints still have to be verified manually and corrected when necessary. With training, the inter- and intragrader agreement of manually marked endpoints is excellent. Translational Relevance For clinical studies, the EZ endpoints can be marked by hand if a training procedure, including a manual, is used. The endpoint confidence intervals, well under ±2.0°, are considerably smaller than the 6° spacing for the typically used static visual field. PMID:27226930

  6. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa: no evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity on 3q.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar-Singh, R; Wang, H; Humphries, P; Farrar, G J

    1993-01-01

    Since the initial report of linkage of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) to the long arm of chromosome 3, several mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin, which also maps to 3q, have been reported in adRP pedigrees. However, there has been some discussion as to the possibility of a second adRP locus on 3q. This suggestion has important diagnostic and research implications and must raise doubts about the usefulness of linked markers for reliable diagnosis of RP patients. In order to address this issue we have performed an admixture test (A-test) on 10 D3S47-linked adRP pedigrees and have found a likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity of 4.90. We performed a second A-test, combining the data from all families with known rhodopsin mutations. In this test we obtained a reduced likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity, of 1.0. On the basis of these statistical analyses we have found no significant support for two adRP loci on chromosome 3q. Furthermore, using 40 CEPH families, we have localized the rhodopsin gene to the D3S47-D3S20 interval, with a maximum lod score (Zm) of 20 and have found that the order qter-D3S47-rhodopsin-D3S20-cen is significantly more likely than any other order. In addition, we have mapped (Zm = 30) the microsatellite marker D3S621 relative to other loci in this region of the genome. PMID:8430695

  7. Prevalence of Mutations in eyeGENE Probands With a Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lori S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Reeves, Melissa J.; Blain, Delphine; Goetz, Kerry; NDifor, Vida; Vitez, Sally; Wang, Xinjing; Tumminia, Santa J.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To screen samples from patients with presumed autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) for mutations in 12 disease genes as a contribution to the research and treatment goals of the National Ophthalmic Disease Genotyping and Phenotyping Network (eyeGENE). Methods. DNA samples were obtained from eyeGENE. A total of 170 probands with an intake diagnosis of adRP were tested through enrollment in eyeGENE. The 10 most common genes causing adRP (IMPDH1, KLHL7, NR2E3, PRPF3/RP18, PRPF31/RP11, PRPF8/RP13, PRPH2/RDS, RHO, RP1, and TOPORS) were chosen for PCR-based dideoxy sequencing, along with the two X-linked RP genes, RPGR and RP2. RHO, PRPH2, PRPF31, RPGR, and RP2 were completely sequenced, while only mutation hotspots in the other genes were analyzed. Results. Disease-causing mutations were identified in 52% of the probands. The frequencies of disease-causing mutations in the 12 genes were consistent with previous studies. Conclusions. The Laboratory for Molecular Diagnosis of Inherited Eye Disease at the University of Texas in Houston has thus far received DNA samples from 170 families with a diagnosis of adRP from the eyeGENE Network. Disease-causing mutations in autosomal genes were identified in 48% (81/170) of these families while mutations in X-linked genes accounted for an additional 4% (7/170). Of the 55 distinct mutations detected, 19 (33%) have not been previously reported. All diagnostic results were returned by eyeGENE to participating patients via their referring clinician. These genotyped samples along with their corresponding phenotypic information are also available to researchers who may request access to them for further study of these ophthalmic disorders. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00378742.) PMID:23950152

  8. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa: No evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity on 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar-Singh, R.; He Wang; Humphries, P.; Farrar, G.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Since the initial report of linkage of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) to the long arm of chromosome 3, several mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin, which also maps to 3q, have been reported in adRP pedigrees. However, there has been some discussion as to the possibility of a second adRP locus on 3q. This suggestion has important diagnostic and research implications and must raise doubts about the usefulness of linked markers for reliable diagnosis of RP patients. In order to address this issue the authors have performed an admixture test (A-test) on 10 D3S47-linked adRP pedigrees and have found a likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity of 4.90. They performed a second A-test, combining the data from all families with known rhodopsin mutations. In this test they obtained a reduced likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity, of 1.0. On the basis of these statistical analyses they have found no significant support for two adRP loci on chromosome 3q. Furthermore, using 40 CEPH families, they have localized the rhodopsin gene to the D3S47-D3S20 interval, with a maximum lod score (Z[sub m]) of 20 and have found that the order qter-D3S47-rhodopsin-D3S20-cen is significantly more likely than any other order. In addition, they have mapped (Z[sub m] = 30) the microsatellite marker D3S621 relative to other loci in this region of the genome. 27 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Molecular genetics of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa: Progress towards cloning the RP3 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, R.; Yan, D.; McHenry, C.

    1994-09-01

    Our goal is to identify the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) gene RP3. The location of RP3 is genetically delimited to a region of 1 Mb, distal to DXS140, CYBB and tctex-1-like gene and proximal to the gene OTC. It is currently thought that RP3 is within 40 kb of the proximal deletion breakpoint of a patient BB. However, a more proximal location of the gene, closer to OTC, is not ruled out. We initiated the isolation of the genomic region between DXS140 to OTC in YACs. One of the clones from DXS140 region (55B) is 460 kb and spans about 200 kb at each side of BB patient`s proximal breakpoint. It contains CYBB, tctex-1-like genes and two additional CpG islands. The 55B clone has been covered by cosmid and phage subclones. Another YAC clone from the OTC region (OTCC) spans about 1 Mb and contains at least 5 CpG islands. In situ hybridization performed with OTCC showed its location in Xp21; however, several derivative cosmids map to chromosome 7, indicating that it is a chimeric YAC. No overlap is evident between 55B and OTCC. We have isolated the YAC end-sequences and isolation of clones to close the gap is in progress. Cosmids are being used for screening eye tissue cDNA libraries, mainly from retina. Screening is done by hybridization to replica filters or by cDNA enrichment methods. Several cDNA clones have been isolated and are being characterized. Exon-amplification is also being used with the cosmids and phages. Genetic analysis is being performed to determine RP3 patients from clinically indistinguishable RP2, located in Xp11.23-p11.4, and to reduce the genetic distance of current flanking markers. For this we are analyzing a number of XLRP families with established markers in the region and with new microsatellites.

  10. Evidence against a second autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus close to rhodopsin on chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.; Bhattacharya, S. ); Farrar, J.; Humphries, P. ); Denton, M. ); Gal, A. )

    1993-08-01

    In 1989 McWilliam et al. reported close linkage of the autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) locus to chromosome 3q marker D3S47 in a large Irish pedigree (McWilliam et al 1989). Subsequent studies confirmed linkage in two other adRP families (Lester et al 1990; Olsson et al. 1990). Shortly afterward, utations in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, mapping to 3q21-24, were implicated in disease causation, and it is now known that around one-third of adRP results from such mutations (Dryja et al. 1991; Sung et al. 1991; Inglchearn et al. 1992a). At that time, sequencing studies had failed to find rhodopsin mutations in the three families first linked to 3q. Several adRP families in which rhodopsin mutations had been found gave lod scores that, when pooled, had a peak of 4.47 at a theta of .12 (Inglehearn et al. 1992b). The apparent lack of mutations in families TCDM1, adRP3, and 20 together with the linkage data in these and the proved RHO-RP families, led to speculation that two adRP loci existed on chromosome 3q (Olsson et al. 1990; Inglehearn et al. 1992b). However this situation has been reversed by more recent analysis, since rhodopsin mutations have now been found in all three families. There is therefore no longer any evidence to support the hypothesis that a second adRP locus exists close to rhodopsin on chromosome 3q.

  11. Efficacy of valproic acid for retinitis pigmentosa patients: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Iraha, Satoshi; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Ota, Sachiko; Sunagawa, Genshiro A; Mandai, Michiko; Tanihara, Hidenobu; Takahashi, Masayo; Kurimoto, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy and safety of valproic acid (VPA) use in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Patients and methods This was a prospective, interventional, noncomparative case study. In total, 29 eyes from 29 patients with RP whose best-corrected visual acuities (BCVAs) in logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) ranged from 1.0 to 0.16 with visual fields (VFs) of ≤10° (measured using Goldmann perimeter with I4) were recruited. The patients received oral supplementation with 400 mg of VPA daily for 6 months and were followed for an additional 6 months. BCVAs, VFs (measured with the Humphrey field analyzer central 10-2 program), and subjective questionnaires were examined before, during, and after the cessation of VPA supplementation. Results The changes in BCVA and VF showed statistically significant differences during the internal use of VPA, compared with after cessation (P=0.001). With VPA intake, BCVA in logMAR significantly improved from baseline to 6 months (P=0.006). The mean deviation value of the VF significantly improved from baseline to 1 month (P=0.001), 3 months (P=0.004), and 6 months (P=0.004). These efficacies, however, were reversed to the baseline levels after the cessation of VPA intake. There were no significant relations between the mean blood VPA concentrations of each patient and the changes in BCVA and VF. During the internal use of VPA, 15 of 29 patients answered “easier to see”, whereas blurred vision was registered in 21 of 29 patients on cessation. No systemic drug-related adverse events were observed. Conclusion While in use, oral intake of VPA indicated a short-term benefit to patients with RP. It is necessary to examine the effect of a longer VPA supplementation in a controlled study design. PMID:27536054

  12. The efficacy of microarray screening for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    van Huet, Ramon A. C.; Pierrache, Laurence H.M.; Meester-Smoor, Magda A.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B.; de Wijs, Ilse J.; Collin, Rob W. J.; Hoefsloot, Lies H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of multiple versions of a commercially available arrayed primer extension (APEX) microarray chip for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). Methods We included 250 probands suspected of arRP who were genetically analyzed with the APEX microarray between January 2008 and November 2013. The mode of inheritance had to be autosomal recessive according to the pedigree (including isolated cases). If the microarray identified a heterozygous mutation, we performed Sanger sequencing of exons and exon–intron boundaries of that specific gene. The efficacy of this microarray chip with the additional Sanger sequencing approach was determined by the percentage of patients that received a molecular diagnosis. We also collected data from genetic tests other than the APEX analysis for arRP to provide a detailed description of the molecular diagnoses in our study cohort. Results The APEX microarray chip for arRP identified the molecular diagnosis in 21 (8.5%) of the patients in our cohort. Additional Sanger sequencing yielded a second mutation in 17 patients (6.8%), thereby establishing the molecular diagnosis. In total, 38 patients (15.2%) received a molecular diagnosis after analysis using the microarray and additional Sanger sequencing approach. Further genetic analyses after a negative result of the arRP microarray (n = 107) resulted in a molecular diagnosis of arRP (n = 23), autosomal dominant RP (n = 5), X-linked RP (n = 2), and choroideremia (n = 1). Conclusions The efficacy of the commercially available APEX microarray chips for arRP appears to be low, most likely caused by the limitations of this technique and the genetic and allelic heterogeneity of RP. Diagnostic yields up to 40% have been reported for next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques that, as expected, thereby outperform targeted APEX analysis. PMID:25999674

  13. Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutations in Bad Response to Refrigeration 2 (Brr2) Impair ATPase and Helicase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, Sarah; Guthrie, Christine

    2016-06-01

    Brr2 is an RNA-dependent ATPase required to unwind the U4/U6 snRNA duplex during spliceosome assembly. Mutations within the ratchet helix of the Brr2 RNA binding channel result in a form of degenerative human blindness known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The biochemical consequences of these mutations on Brr2's RNA binding, helicase, and ATPase activity have not yet been characterized. Therefore, we identified the largest construct of Brr2 that is soluble in vitro, which truncates the first 247 amino acids of the N terminus (Δ247-Brr2), to characterize the effects of the RP mutations on Brr2 activity. The Δ247-Brr2 RP mutants exhibit a gradient of severity of weakened RNA binding, reduced helicase activity, and reduced ATPase activity compared with wild type Δ247-Brr2. The globular C-terminal Jab1/Mpn1-like domain of Prp8 increases the ability of Δ247-Brr2 to bind the U4/U6 snRNA duplex at high pH and increases Δ247-Brr2's RNA-dependent ATPase activity and the extent of RNA unwinding. However, this domain of Prp8 does not differentially affect the Δ247-Brr2 RP mutants compared with the wild type Δ247-Brr2. When stimulated by Prp8, wild type Δ247-Brr2 is able to unwind long stable duplexes in vitro, and even the RP mutants capable of binding RNA with tight affinity are incapable of fully unwinding short duplex RNAs. Our data suggest that the RP mutations within the ratchet helix impair Brr2 translocation through RNA helices. PMID:27072132

  14. Nonsense mutation in MERTK causes autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in a consanguineous Pakistani family

    PubMed Central

    Shahzadi, Amber; Riazuddin, S Amer; Ali, Shahbaz; Li, David; Khan, Shaheen N; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Sieving, Paul A; Hejtmancik, J Fielding; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2012-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is one of the most common ophthalmic disorders affecting one in approximately 5000 people worldwide. A nuclear family was recruited from the Punjab province of Pakistan to study the genetic basis of autosomal recessive RP. Methods All affected individuals underwent a thorough ophthalmic examination and the disease was characterised based upon results for fundus photographs and electroretinogram recordings. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leucocytes. Exclusion studies were performed with short tandem repeat (STR) markers flanking reported autosomal recessive RP loci. Haplotypes were constructed and results were statistically evaluated. Results The results of exclusion analyses suggested that family PKRP173 was linked to chromosome 2q harbouring mer tyrosine kinase protooncogene (MERTK), a gene previously associated with autosomal recessive RP. Additional STR markers refined the critical interval and placed it in a 13.4 cM (17 Mb) region flanked by D2S293 proximally and D2S347 distally. Significant logarithm of odds (LOD) scores of 3.2, 3.25 and 3.18 at θ=0 were obtained with markers D2S1896, D2S2269 and D2S160. Sequencing of the coding exons of MERTK identified a mutation, c.718G→T in exon 4, which results in a premature termination of p.E240X that segregates with the disease phenotype in the family. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that the nonsense mutation in MERTK, leading to premature termination of the protein, is responsible for RP phenotype in the affected individuals of the Pakistani family. PMID:20538656

  15. Efficient In Silico Identification of a Common Insertion in the MAK Gene which Causes Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bujakowska, Kinga M.; White, Joseph; Place, Emily; Consugar, Mark; Comander, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Background Next generation sequencing (NGS) offers a rapid and comprehensive method of screening for mutations associated with retinitis pigmentosa and related disorders. However, certain sequence alterations such as large insertions or deletions may remain undetected using standard NGS pipelines. One such mutation is a recently-identified Alu insertion into the Male Germ Cell-Associated Kinase (MAK) gene, which is missed by standard NGS-based variant callers. Here, we developed an in silico method of searching NGS raw sequence reads to detect this mutation, without the need to recalculate sequence alignments or to screen every sample by PCR. Methods The Linux program grep was used to search for a 23 bp “probe” sequence containing the known junction sequence of the insert. A corresponding search was performed with the wildtype sequence. The matching reads were counted and further compared to the known sequences of the full wildtype and mutant genomic loci. (See https://github.com/MEEIBioinformaticsCenter/grepsearch.) Results In a test sample set consisting of eleven previously published homozygous mutants, detection of the MAK-Alu insertion was validated with 100% sensitivity and specificity. As a discovery cohort, raw NGS reads from 1,847 samples (including custom and whole exome selective capture) were searched in ~1 hour on a local computer cluster, yielding an additional five samples with MAK-Alu insertions and solving two previously unsolved pedigrees. Of these, one patient was homozygous for the insertion, one compound heterozygous with a missense change on the other allele (c. 46G>A; p.Gly16Arg), and three were heterozygous carriers. Conclusions Using the MAK-Alu grep program proved to be a rapid and effective method of finding a known, disease-causing Alu insertion in a large cohort of patients with NGS data. This simple approach avoids wet-lab assays or computationally expensive algorithms, and could also be used for other known disease

  16. Prp8 retinitis pigmentosa mutants cause defects in the transition between the catalytic steps of splicing.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Megan; Guthrie, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing must occur with high fidelity and efficiency for proper gene expression. The spliceosome uses DExD/H box helicases to promote on-pathway interactions while simultaneously minimizing errors. Prp8 and Snu114, an EF2-like GTPase, regulate the activity of the Brr2 helicase, promoting RNA unwinding by Brr2 at appropriate points in the splicing cycle and repressing it at others. Mutations linked to retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a disease that causes blindness in humans, map to the Brr2 regulatory region of Prp8. Previous in vitro studies of homologous mutations inSaccharomyces cerevisiaeshow that Prp8-RP mutants cause defects in spliceosome activation. Here we show that a subset of RP mutations in Prp8 also causes defects in the transition between the first and second catalytic steps of splicing. Though Prp8-RP mutants do not cause defects in splicing fidelity, they result in an overall decrease in splicing efficiency. Furthermore, genetic analyses link Snu114 GTP/GDP occupancy to Prp8-dependent regulation of Brr2. Our results implicate the transition between the first and second catalytic steps as a critical place in the splicing cycle where Prp8-RP mutants influence splicing efficiency. The location of the Prp8-RP mutants, at the "hinge" that links the Prp8 Jab1-MPN regulatory "tail" to the globular portion of the domain, suggests that these Prp8-RP mutants inhibit regulated movement of the Prp8 Jab1/MPN domain into the Brr2 RNA binding channel to transiently inhibit Brr2. Therefore, in Prp8-linked RP, disease likely results not only from defects in spliceosome assembly and activation, but also because of defects in splicing catalysis. PMID:26968627

  17. Efficacy of Column Scatter Plots for Presenting Retinitis Pigmentosa Phenotypes in a Japanese Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Ken; Oishi, Akio; Oishi, Maho; Gotoh, Norimoto; Morooka, Satoshi; Sugahara, Masako; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Miyata, Manabu; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the efficacy of column scatter plots to describe genotype–phenotype correlations in a Japanese cohort with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Clinical records of 121 patients with RP with identified causative mutations were reviewed. Visual acuity, central and peripheral visual fields, electroretinography (ERG), lens status, and measurements of optical coherence tomography were evaluated according to causative genes using column scatter plots. Values for three common genes (EYS, USH2A, and RHO) were compared statistically. Results All patients with PDE6B, PRPH2, and RPGR mutations, those 55 years old or younger with RP1L1 and USH2A mutations, and those 45 years old or younger with EYS and RHO mutations retained visual acuity of at least 0.1. All patients with RPGR mutations showed at least −20 dB mean deviation. Goldmann perimeter measures of 4/6 patients with RHO mutations showed remaining peripheral visual fields. Dark-adapted 0.01 and 3.0 ERGs were extinguished for most genes. Half of the patients with RHO RP maintained cone responses in light-adapted 3.0 and 3.0 flicker ERG. All patients with PRPH2, those 55 years old or younger with USH2A and RP1L1, and those 45 years old or younger with PDE6B and EYS mutations maintained subfoveal ellipsoid zones. No differences were identified between EYS and USH2A or RHO and USH2A. Conclusions Column scatter plots enabled comparisons of the associated severities and illustration of the ophthalmological measurements for every RP causative gene. Translational Relevance Analysis of mutations in specific genes may be helpful for determining visual prognoses in the clinical setting. PMID:26966640

  18. Response to Drs. Shastry and Trese: Phenotype-genotype correlations in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.; Munnich, A.

    1996-11-11

    Shastry and Trese recently reported on a large kindred with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) characterized by a loss of central vision and preserved peripheral function. In their report, the disease had an early onset with severe myopia and a loss of central vision, while night blindness occurred later. Genetic analysis suggested that the disease was linked to the RP2 locus, and the authors raised the question of whether other cases linked to RP2 could display a similar loss of central vision. Three years ago, we reported on 4 large XLRP pedigrees with a very early onset with severe myopia and early loss of visual acuity, while in 5 other families the disease started later with night blindness. We showed that the first clinical form was linked to RP2, while the second was linked to RP3. Thus, the major difference between the two forms concerns the initial symptom, information which can be obtained from the parents and patients after careful questioning. By contrast, in adult life, no difference in either severity of disease or aspect of the fundus was observed in our series, regardless of the clinical subtype of XLRP. Some months later, Jacobson et al. reported on a pedigree with an RP2 genotype, and their data support the notion that in XLRP of RP2 type 1, cone dysfunction takes place first, and as the disease advances both rods and cones are affected. We were very happy, therefore, to read that the study of Shastry and Trese fully confirmed our previous findings. 3 refs.

  19. Molecular Genetics of FAM161A in North American Patients with Early-Onset Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Shyana; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a hereditary disease that leads to the progressive degeneration of retinal photoreceptor cells and to blindness. It is caused by mutations in several distinct genes, including the ciliary gene FAM161A, which is associated with a recessive form of this disorder. Recent investigations have revealed that defects in FAM161A represent a rather prevalent cause of hereditary blindness in Israel and the Palestinian territories, whereas they seem to be rarely present within patients from Germany. Genetic or clinical data are currently not available for other countries. In this work, we screened a cohort of patients with recessive RP from North America to determine the frequency of FAM161A mutations in this ethnically-mixed population and to assess the phenotype of positive cases. Out of 273 unrelated patients, only 3 subjects had defects in FAM161A. A fourth positive patient, the sister of one of these index cases, was also identified following pedigree analysis. They were all homozygous for the p.T452Sfx3 mutation, which was previously reported as a founder DNA variant in the Israeli and Palestinian populations. Analysis of cultured lymphoblasts from patients revealed that mutant FAM161A transcripts were actively degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Electroretinographic testing showed 30 Hz cone flicker responses in the range of 0.10 to 0.60 microvolts in all cases at their first visit (age 12 to 23) (lower norm  =  50 μV) and of 0.06 to 0.32 microvolts at their most recent examination (age 27 to 43), revealing an early-onset of this progressive disease. Our data indicate that mutations in FAM161A are responsible for 1% of recessive RP cases in North America, similar to the prevalence detected in Germany and unlike the data from Israel and the Palestinian territories. We also show that, at the molecular level, the disease is likely caused by FAM161A protein deficiency. PMID:24651477

  20. Mutation Independent Rescue of a Novel Mouse Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, David L.; Cashman, Siobhan M.; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the leading cause of inherited blindness in the developed world, affecting approximately 1 in 3,000 individuals. While there is currently no cure for RP, the genetic pathology has been well established. In this study we developed a novel mouse model of RP (huRhoP347S) expressing a pathogenic human rhodopsin gene with a Pro347Ser mutation on a rhodopsin knockout background. These mice undergo severe retinal degeneration at one month of age. In contrast to prior studies, this model was administered a gene therapy treatment at 19 days post natal. We evaluated several self-complementary adeno-associated virus serotypes for photoreceptor tropism including scAAV2/2, scAAV2/5, scAAV2/6.2 and scAAV2/9, and found that scAAV2/9 transduced photoreceptors with greater efficiency and expression than other vectors. We engineered a scAAV2/9 vector to contain a microRNA sequence specifically targeting the human rhodopsin gene and demonstrated its ability to silence rhodopsin by 60.2 ± 8.2% in vitro. In addition, we constructed a scAAV2/9 vector to contain a replacement “codon-modified” rhodopsin transgene (RhoR2) that was resistant to degradation by the microRNA. We found that delivery of the RhoR2 by scAAV2/9 is capable of restoring vision to rhodopsin knockout mice, and rescuing our novel transgenic huRhoP347S mouse model of dominant RP. Average a-wave responses of RhoR2-injected eyes were 1.8-fold higher than those of control-injected eyes. We found that delivery of the microRNA and replacement rhodopsin in a 1:2 ratio produced an average ERG a-wave response of 17.4 ± 2.9 μV compared to 6.5 ± 2.8 μV for eyes injected with negative control virus. PMID:22809998

  1. Repair of Rhodopsin mRNA by Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-Splicing: A New Approach for Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission. PMID:25619725

  2. Repair of rhodopsin mRNA by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing: a new approach for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission. PMID:25619725

  3. A Pro23His Mutation Alters Prenatal Rod Photoreceptor Morphology in a Transgenic Swine Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Patrick A.; Fernandez de Castro, Juan P.; Kaplan, Henry J.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Functional studies have detected deficits in retinal signaling in asymptomatic children from families with inherited autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Whether retinal abnormalities are present earlier during gestation or shortly after birth in a subset of children with autosomal dominant RP is unknown and no appropriate animal RP model possessing visual function at birth has been available to examine this possibility. In a recently developed transgenic P23H (TgP23H) rhodopsin swine model of RP, we tracked changes in pre- and early postnatal retinal morphology, as well as early postnatal retinal function. Methods. Domestic swine inseminated with semen from a TgP23H miniswine founder produced TgP23H hybrid and wild type (Wt) littermates. Outer retinal morphology was assessed at light and electron microscopic levels between embryonic (E) and postnatal (P) day E85 to P3. Retinal function was evaluated using the full field electroretinogram at P3. Results. Embryonic TgP23H rod photoreceptors are malformed and their rhodopsin expression pattern is abnormal. Consistent with morphological abnormalities, rod-driven function is absent at P3. In contrast, TgP23H and Wt cone photoreceptor morphology (E85–P3) and cone-driven retinal function (P3) are similar. Conclusions. Prenatal expression of mutant rhodopsin alters the normal morphological and functional development of rod photoreceptors in TgP23H swine embryos. Despite this significant change, cone photoreceptors are unaffected. Human infants with similarly aggressive RP might never have rod vision, although cone vision would be unaffected. Such aggressive forms of RP in preverbal children would require early intervention to delay or prevent functional blindness. PMID:24618321

  4. Identification of a novel nonsense mutation in RP1 that causes autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in an Indonesian family

    PubMed Central

    Siemiatkowska, Anna M.; Astuti, Galuh D.N.; Arimadyo, Kentar; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Faradz, Sultana M.H.; Cremers, Frans P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify the underlying molecular genetic defect in an Indonesian family with three affected individuals who had received a diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Clinical evaluation of the family members included measuring visual acuity and fundoscopy, and assessing visual field and color vision. Genomic DNA of the three affected individuals was analyzed with Illumina 700k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, and homozygous regions were identified using PLINK software. Mutation analysis was performed with sequence analysis of the retinitis pigmentosa 1 (RP1) gene that resided in one of the homozygous regions. The frequency of the identified mutation in the Indonesian population was determined with TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results A novel homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 4 of the RP1 gene, c.1012C>T (p.R338*), was identified in the proband and her two affected sisters. Unaffected family members either carried two wild-type alleles or were heterozygous carriers of the mutation. The mutation was not present in 184 Indonesian control samples. Conclusions Most of the previously reported RP1 mutations are inherited in an autosomal dominant mode, and appear to cluster in exon 4. Here, we identified a novel homozygous p.R338* mutation in exon 4 of RP1, and speculate on the mutational mechanisms of different RP1 mutations underlying dominant and recessive RP. PMID:23077400

  5. A Short N-terminal Domain of HDAC4 Preserves Photoreceptors and Restores Visual Function in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xinzheng; Wang, Shao-Bin; Xu, Hongping; Ribic, Adema; Mohns, Ethan J.; Zhou, Yu; Zhu, Xianjun; Biederer, Thomas; Crair, Michael C.; Chen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a leading cause of inherited blindness, with no effective treatment currently available. Mutations primarily in genes expressed in rod photoreceptors lead to early rod death, followed by a slower phase of cone photoreceptor death. Rd1 mice provide an invaluable animal model to evaluate therapies for the disease. We previously reported that overexpression of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) prolongs rod survival in rd1 mice. Here we report a key role of a short N-terminal domain of HDAC4 in photoreceptor protection. Expression of this domain suppresses multiple cell death pathways in photoreceptor degeneration, and preserves even more rd1 rods than the full length HDAC4 protein. Expression of a short N-terminal domain of HDAC4 in transgenic mice carrying the rd1 mutation also prolongs the survival of cone photoreceptors, and partially restores visual function. Our results may facilitate the design of a small protein therapy for some forms of retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:26272629

  6. Mutation analysis of pre-mRNA splicing genes in Chinese families with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xinyuan; Chen, Xue; Liu, Xiaoxing; Gao, Xiang; Kang, Xiaoli; Xu, Qihua; Chen, Xuejuan; Zhao, Kanxing; Zhang, Xiumei; Chu, Qiaomei; Wang, Xiuying

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Seven genes involved in precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) splicing have been implicated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). We sought to detect mutations in all seven genes in Chinese families with RP, to characterize the relevant phenotypes, and to evaluate the prevalence of mutations in splicing genes in patients with adRP. Methods Six unrelated families from our adRP cohort (42 families) and two additional families with RP with uncertain inheritance mode were clinically characterized in the present study. Targeted sequence capture with next-generation massively parallel sequencing (NGS) was performed to screen mutations in 189 genes including all seven pre-mRNA splicing genes associated with adRP. Variants detected with NGS were filtered with bioinformatics analyses, validated with Sanger sequencing, and prioritized with pathogenicity analysis. Results Mutations in pre-mRNA splicing genes were identified in three individual families including one novel frameshift mutation in PRPF31 (p.Leu366fs*1) and two known mutations in SNRNP200 (p.Arg681His and p.Ser1087Leu). The patients carrying SNRNP200 p.R681H showed rapid disease progression, and the family carrying p.S1087L presented earlier onset ages and more severe phenotypes compared to another previously reported family with p.S1087L. In five other families, we identified mutations in other RP-related genes, including RP1 p. Ser781* (novel), RP2 p.Gln65* (novel) and p.Ile137del (novel), IMPDH1 p.Asp311Asn (recurrent), and RHO p.Pro347Leu (recurrent). Conclusions Mutations in splicing genes identified in the present and our previous study account for 9.5% in our adRP cohort, indicating the important role of pre-mRNA splicing deficiency in the etiology of adRP. Mutations in the same splicing gene, or even the same mutation, could correlate with different phenotypic severities, complicating the genotype–phenotype correlation and clinical prognosis. PMID:24940031

  7. Gene therapy provides long-term visual function in a pre-clinical model of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Davis, Richard J.; Sancho-Pelluz, Javier; Nishina, Patsy M.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 36 000 cases of simplex and familial retinitis pigmentosa (RP) worldwide are caused by a loss in phosphodiesterase (PDE6) function. In the preclinical Pde6αnmf363 mouse model of this disease, defects in the α-subunit of PDE6 result in a progressive loss of photoreceptors and neuronal function. We hypothesized that increasing PDE6α levels using an AAV2/8 gene therapy vector could improve photoreceptor survival and retinal function. We utilized a vector with the cell-type-specific rhodopsin (RHO) promoter: AAV2/8(Y733F)-Rho-Pde6α, to transduce Pde6αnmf363 retinas and monitored its effects over a 6-month period (a quarter of the mouse lifespan). We found that a single injection enhanced survival of photoreceptors and improved retinal function. At 6 months of age, the treated eyes retained photoreceptor cell bodies, while there were no detectable photoreceptors remaining in the untreated eyes. More importantly, the treated eyes demonstrated functional visual responses even after the untreated eyes had lost all vision. Despite focal rescue of the retinal structure adjacent to the injection site, global functional rescue of the entire retina was observed. These results suggest that RP due to PDE6α deficiency in humans, in addition to PDE6β deficiency, is also likely to be treatable by gene therapy. PMID:23108158

  8. Gene therapy provides long-term visual function in a pre-clinical model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Wert, Katherine J; Davis, Richard J; Sancho-Pelluz, Javier; Nishina, Patsy M; Tsang, Stephen H

    2013-02-01

    Approximately 36 000 cases of simplex and familial retinitis pigmentosa (RP) worldwide are caused by a loss in phosphodiesterase (PDE6) function. In the preclinical Pde6α(nmf363) mouse model of this disease, defects in the α-subunit of PDE6 result in a progressive loss of photoreceptors and neuronal function. We hypothesized that increasing PDE6α levels using an AAV2/8 gene therapy vector could improve photoreceptor survival and retinal function. We utilized a vector with the cell-type-specific rhodopsin (RHO) promoter: AAV2/8(Y733F)-Rho-Pde6α, to transduce Pde6α(nmf363) retinas and monitored its effects over a 6-month period (a quarter of the mouse lifespan). We found that a single injection enhanced survival of photoreceptors and improved retinal function. At 6 months of age, the treated eyes retained photoreceptor cell bodies, while there were no detectable photoreceptors remaining in the untreated eyes. More importantly, the treated eyes demonstrated functional visual responses even after the untreated eyes had lost all vision. Despite focal rescue of the retinal structure adjacent to the injection site, global functional rescue of the entire retina was observed. These results suggest that RP due to PDE6α deficiency in humans, in addition to PDE6β deficiency, is also likely to be treatable by gene therapy. PMID:23108158

  9. Comprehensive molecular diagnosis of 179 Leber congenital amaurosis and juvenile retinitis pigmentosa patients by targeted next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Wang, Hui; Sun, Vincent; Tuan, Han-Fang; Keser, Vafa; Wang, Keqing; Ren, Huanan; Lopez, Irma; Zaneveld, Jacques E; Siddiqui, Sorath; Bowles, Stephanie; Khan, Ayesha; Salvo, Jason; Jacobson, Samuel G; Iannaccone, Alessandro; Wang, Feng; Birch, David; Heckenlively, John R; Fishman, Gerald A; Traboulsi, Elias I; Li, Yumei; Wheaton, Dianna; Koenekoop, Robert K; Chen, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Background Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are inherited retinal diseases that cause early onset severe visual impairment. An accurate molecular diagnosis can refine the clinical diagnosis and allow gene specific treatments. Methods We developed a capture panel that enriches the exonic DNA of 163 known retinal disease genes. Using this panel, we performed targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) for a large cohort of 179 unrelated and prescreened patients with the clinical diagnosis of LCA or juvenile RP. Systematic NGS data analysis, Sanger sequencing validation, and segregation analysis were utilised to identify the pathogenic mutations. Patients were revisited to examine the potential phenotypic ambiguity at the time of initial diagnosis. Results Pathogenic mutations for 72 patients (40%) were identified, including 45 novel mutations. Of these 72 patients, 58 carried mutations in known LCA or juvenile RP genes and exhibited corresponding phenotypes, while 14 carried mutations in retinal disease genes that were not consistent with their initial clinical diagnosis. We revisited patients in the latter case and found that homozygous mutations in PRPH2 can cause LCA/juvenile RP. Guided by the molecular diagnosis, we reclassified the clinical diagnosis in two patients. Conclusions We have identified a novel gene and a large number of novel mutations that are associated with LCA/juvenile RP. Our results highlight the importance of molecular diagnosis as an integral part of clinical diagnosis. PMID:23847139

  10. Application of Whole Exome Sequencing in Six Families with an Initial Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Liu, Yichuan; March, Michael; Pellegrino, Renata; Golhar, Ryan; Corton, Marta; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; López-Molina, Maria Isabel; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Guo, Yiran; Tian, Lifeng; Liu, Xuanzhu; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Jianguo; Keating, Brendan; Xu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the genetics underlying dominant forms of inherited retinal dystrophies using whole exome sequencing (WES) in six families extensively screened for known mutations or genes. Thirty-eight individuals were subjected to WES. Causative variants were searched among single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertion/deletion variants (indels) and whenever no potential candidate emerged, copy number variant (CNV) analysis was performed. Variants or regions harboring a candidate variant were prioritized and segregation of the variant with the disease was further assessed using Sanger sequencing in case of SNVs and indels, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) for CNVs. SNV and indel analysis led to the identification of a previously reported mutation in PRPH2. Two additional mutations linked to different forms of retinal dystrophies were identified in two families: a known frameshift deletion in RPGR, a gene responsible for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and p.Ser163Arg in C1QTNF5 associated with Late-Onset Retinal Degeneration. A novel heterozygous deletion spanning the entire region of PRPF31 was also identified in the affected members of a fourth family, which was confirmed with qPCR. This study allowed the identification of the genetic cause of the retinal dystrophy and the establishment of a correct diagnosis in four families, including a large heterozygous deletion in PRPF31, typically considered one of the pitfalls of this method. Since all findings in this study are restricted to known genes, we propose that targeted sequencing using gene-panel is an optimal first approach for the genetic screening and that once known genetic causes are ruled out, WES might be used to uncover new genes involved in inherited retinal dystrophies. PMID:26197217

  11. Identical Mutation in a Novel Retinal Gene Causes Progressive Rod-Cone Degeneration (prcd) in Dogs and Retinitis Pigmentosa in Man

    PubMed Central

    Zangerl, Barbara; Goldstein, Orly; Philp, Alisdair R.; Lindauer, Sarah J.P.; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Mullins, Robert F.; Graphodatsky, Alexander S.; Ripoll, Daniel; Felix, Jeanette S.; Stone, Edwin M.; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive rod-cone degeneration (prcd) is a late-onset, autosomal recessive photoreceptor degeneration of dogs, and a homolog for some forms of human retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Previously, the disease relevant interval was reduced to a 106 Kb region on CFA9, and a common phenotype-specific haplotype was identified in all affected dogs from several different breeds, and breed varieties. Screening of a canine retinal EST library identified partial cDNAs for novel candidate genes in the disease relevant interval. The complete cDNA of one of these, PRCD, was cloned in dog, human and mouse. The gene codes for a 54 amino acid (aa) protein in dog and human, and 53 aa protein in the mouse; the first 24 aa, coded for by exon 1, are highly conserved in 14 vertebrate species. A homozygous mutation (TGC → TAC) in the second codon shows complete concordance with the disorder in 18 different dog breeds/breed varieties tested. The same homozygous mutation was identified in a human patient from Bangladesh with autosomal recessive (ar) RP. Expression studies support the predominant expression of this gene in the retina, with equal expression in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), photoreceptors and ganglion cell layers. This study provides strong evidence that a mutation in the novel gene, PRCD, is the cause of autosomal recessive retinal degeneration in both dogs and man. PMID:16938425

  12. Animals deficient in C2Orf71, an autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa-associated locus, develop severe early-onset retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kevany, Brian M; Zhang, Ning; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-05-01

    Genetic mapping was recently used to identify the underlying cause for a previously uncharacterized cohort of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa cases. Genetic mapping of affected individuals resulted in the identification of an uncharacterized gene, C2Orf71, as the causative locus. However, initial homology searches failed to reveal similarities to any previously characterized protein or domain. To address this issue, we characterized the mouse homolog, BC027072. Immunohistochemistry with a custom polyclonal antibody showed staining localized to the inner segments (IS) of photoreceptor cells, as well as the outer segments (OS) of cone cells. A knockout mouse line (BC(-/-)) was generated and demonstrated that loss of this gene results in a severe, early-onset retinal degeneration. Histology and electron microscopy (EM) revealed disorganized OS as early as 3 weeks with complete loss by 24 weeks of age. EM micrographs displayed packets of cellular material containing OS discs or IS organelles in the OS region and abnormal retinal pigmented epithelium cells. Analyses of retinoids and rhodopsin levels showed <20% in BC(-/-) versus wild-type mice early in development. Electroretinograms demonstrated that affected mice were virtually non-responsive to light by 8 weeks of age. Lastly, RNAseq analysis of ocular gene expression in BC(-/-) mice revealed clues to the causes of the progressive retinal degenerations. Although its function remains unknown, this protein appears essential for normal OS development/maintenance and vision in humans and mice. RNAseq data are available in the GEO database under accession: GSE63810. PMID:25616964

  13. The search for mutations in the gene for the beta subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB) in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Riess, O.; Weber, B.; Hayden, M.R. ); Noerremoelle, A. ); Musarella, M.A. )

    1992-10-01

    The finding of a mutation in the beta subunit of the cyclic GMP (cGMP) phosphodiesterase gene causing retinal degeneration in mice (the Pdeb gene) prompted a search for disease-causing mutations in the human phosphodiesterase gene (PDEB gene) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. All 22 exons including 196 bp of the 5[prime] region of the PDEB gene have been assessed for mutations by using single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis in 14 patients from 13 unrelated families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP). No disease-causing mutations were found in this group of affected individuals of seven different ancestries. However, a frequent intronic and two exonic polymorphisms (Leu[sup 489][yields]Gln and Gly[sup 842][yields]Gly) were identified. Segregation analysis using these polymorphic sites excludes linkage of ARRP to the PDEB gene in a family with two affected children. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Characterization of macular structure and function in two Swedish families with genetically identified autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Abdulridha-Aboud, Wissam; Kjellström, Ulrika; Andréasson, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the phenotype in two families with genetically identified autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) focusing on macular structure and function. Methods Clinical data were collected at the Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University, Sweden, for affected and unaffected family members from two pedigrees with adRP. Examinations included optical coherence tomography (OCT), full-field electroretinography (ffERG), and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). Molecular genetic screening was performed for known mutations associated with adRP. Results The mode of inheritance was autosomal dominant in both families. The members of the family with a mutation in the PRPF31 (p.IVS6+1G>T) gene had clinical features characteristic of RP, with severely reduced retinal rod and cone function. The degree of deterioration correlated well with increasing age. The mfERG showed only centrally preserved macular function that correlated well with retinal thinning on OCT. The family with a mutation in the RHO (p.R135W) gene had an extreme intrafamilial variability of the phenotype, with more severe disease in the younger generations. OCT showed pathology, but the degree of morphological changes was not correlated with age or with the mfERG results. The mother, with a de novo mutation in the RHO (p.R135W) gene, had a normal ffERG, and her retinal degeneration was detected merely with the reduced mfERG. Conclusions These two families demonstrate the extreme inter- and intrafamilial variability in the clinical phenotype of adRP. This is the first Swedish report of the clinical phenotype associated with a mutation in the PRPF31 (p.IVS6+1G>T) gene. Our results indicate that methods for assessment of the central retinal structure and function may improve the detection and characterization of the RP phenotype. PMID:27212874

  15. Loss of HCN1 enhances disease progression in mouse models of CNG channel-linked retinitis pigmentosa and achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Schön, Christian; Asteriti, Sabrina; Koch, Susanne; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Herms, Jochen; Seeliger, Mathias W; Cangiano, Lorenzo; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-03-15

    Most inherited blinding diseases are characterized by compromised retinal function and progressive degeneration of photoreceptors. However, the factors that affect the life span of photoreceptors in such degenerative retinal diseases are rather poorly understood. Here, we explore the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (HCN1) in this context. HCN1 is known to adjust retinal function under mesopic conditions, and although it is expressed at high levels in rod and cone photoreceptor inner segments, no association with any retinal disorder has yet been found. We investigated the effects of an additional genetic deletion of HCN1 on the function and survival of photoreceptors in a mouse model of CNGB1-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We found that the absence of HCN1 in Cngb1 knockout (KO) mice exacerbated photoreceptor degeneration. The deleterious effect was reduced by expression of HCN1 using a viral vector. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of HCN1 also enhanced rod degeneration in Cngb1 KO mice. Patch-clamp recordings revealed that the membrane potentials of Cngb1 KO and Cngb1/Hcn1 double-KO rods were both significantly depolarized. We also found evidence for altered calcium homeostasis and increased activation of the protease calpain in Cngb1/Hcn1 double-KO mice. Finally, the deletion of HCN1 also exacerbated degeneration of cone photoreceptors in a mouse model of CNGA3-linked achromatopsia. Our results identify HCN1 as a major modifier of photoreceptor degeneration and suggest that pharmacological inhibition of HCN channels may enhance disease progression in RP and achromatopsia patients. PMID:26740549

  16. Correlation of Outer Nuclear Layer Thickness With Cone Density Values in Patients With Retinitis Pigmentosa and Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Menghini, Moreno; Lujan, Brandon J.; Zayit-Soudry, Shiri; Syed, Reema; Porco, Travis C.; Bayabo, Kristine; Carroll, Joseph; Roorda, Austin; Duncan, Jacque L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We studied the correlation between outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness and cone density in normal eyes and eyes with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scans were acquired using a displaced pupil entry position of the scanning beam to distinguish Henle's fiber layer from the ONL in 20 normal eyes (10 subjects) and 12 eyes with RP (7 patients). Cone photoreceptors were imaged using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. The ONL thickness and cone density were measured at 0.5° intervals along the horizontal meridian through the fovea nasally and temporally. The ONL thickness and cone density were correlated using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient r. Results. Cone densities averaged over the central 6° were lower in eyes with RP than normal, but showed high variability in both groups. The ONL thickness and cone density were significantly correlated when all retinal eccentricities were combined (r = 0.74); the correlation for regions within 0.5° to 1.5° eccentricity was stronger (r = 0.67) than between 1.5° and 3.0° eccentricity (r = 0.23). Although cone densities were lower between 0.5° and 1.5° in eyes with RP, ONL thickness measures at identical retinal locations were similar in the two groups (P = 0.31), and interindividual variation was high for ONL and cone density measures. Although ONL thickness and retinal eccentricity were important predictors of cone density, eccentricity was over 3 times more important. Conclusions. The ONL thickness and cone density were correlated in normal eyes and eyes with RP, but both were strongly correlated with retinal eccentricity, precluding estimation of cone density from ONL thickness. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00254605.) PMID:25515570

  17. Rhodopsin F45L Allele Does Not Cause Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa in a Large Caucasian Family

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Andrea L.; Carroll, Joseph; Fishman, Gerald A.; Sauer, Alexandra; Sharp, Dianne; Summerfelt, Phyllis; Williams, Vesper; Dubis, Adam M.; Kohl, Susanne; Wong, Fulton

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To ascertain the potential pathogenicity of a retinitis pigmentosa (RP)-causing RHO F45L allele in a family affected by congenital achromatopsia (ACHM). Methods Case series/observational study that included two patients with ACHM and 24 extended family members. Molecular genetic analysis was performed to identify RHO F45L carrier status in the family and a control population. An adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to image the photoreceptor mosaic and assess rod and cone structure. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to examine retinal lamination. Comprehensive clinical testing included acuity, color vision, and dilated fundus examination. Electroretinography was used to assess rod and cone function. Results Five carriers of the RHO F45L allele alone (24–80 years) and three carriers in combination with a heterozygous CNGA3 mutant allele (10–64 years) were all free of the classic symptoms and signs of RP. In heterozygous carriers of both mutations, SD-OCT showed normal retinal thickness and intact outer retinal layers; rod and cone densities were within normal limits on AOSLO. The phenotype in two individuals affected with ACHM and harboring the RHO F45L allele was indistinguishable from that previously reported for ACHM. Conclusions The RHO F45L allele is not pathogenic in this large family; hence, the two ACHM patients would unlikely develop RP in the future. Translational Relevance The combined approach of comprehensive molecular analysis of individual genomes and noninvasive cellular resolution retinal imaging enhances the current repertoire of clinical diagnostic tools, giving a substantial impetus to personalized medicine. PMID:24049715

  18. Rhodopsin mutations in a Scottish retinitis pigmentosa population, including a novel splice site mutation in intron four.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, C; Converse, C A; Hammer, H M; Osborne, A; Haites, N E

    1994-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to a group of disorders, both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, that primarily affect the photoreceptor function of the eye. Mutations in the genes encoding for rhodopsin, RDS-peripherin, or the beta subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase enzyme can be responsible for the phenotype. In this study the rhodopsin gene has been screened for mutations in a panel of RP individuals and five different sequence changes have been detected to date in three dominantly inherited and two unclassified families. One of these, a base substitution in the 3'UTR, has not yet been confirmed as disease specific, while three missense substitutions have previously been reported and are likely to be responsible for the phenotype. The fifth change, a base substitution at the intron 4 acceptor splice site, represents a novel mutation and is assumed to be the causative mutation. Images PMID:7819178

  19. Whole exome sequencing identifies a novel NRL mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meng; Zhang, Su; Liu, Chunjie; Qin, Yayun; Archacki, Stephen; Jin, Ling; Wang, Yong; Liu, Fei; Chen, Jiaxiang; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jiuxiang; Huang, Mi; Liao, Shengjie; Tang, Zhaohui; Guo, An Yuan; Liu, Mugen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genetic basis and its relationship to the clinical manifestations in a four generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Ophthalmologic examinations including fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence imaging, fundus fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and a best-corrected visual acuity test were performed to define the clinical features of the patients. We extracted the genomic DNA from peripheral blood samples. The proband’s genomic DNA was submitted to the whole exome sequencing. Results Whole exome sequencing and the subsequent data analysis detected six candidate mutations in the proband of this pedigree. The novel c.146 C>T mutation in NRL was found to be the only mutation that co-segregated with the disease in this pedigree. This mutation resulted in a substitution of proline by a leucine at position 49 of NRL protein (p.P49L). Most importantly, the proline residue at position 49 of NRL is highly conserved from zebrafish to humans. The c.146 C>T mutation was not observed in 200 control individuals. What’s more, we performed the luciferase activity assay to prove that this mutation we detected alters the NRL protein function. Conclusions The c.146 C>T mutation in NRL gene causes autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa for this family. Our finding not only expands the mutation spectrum of NRL, but also demonstrates that whole-exome sequencing is a powerful strategy to detect causative genes and mutations in RP patients. This technique may provide a precise diagnosis for rare heterogeneous monogenic disorders such as RP. PMID:27081294

  20. Mutation analysis in 129 genes associated with other forms of retinal dystrophy in 157 families with retinitis pigmentosa based on exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Guan, Liping; Xiao, Xueshan; Zhang, Jianguo; Li, Shiqiang; Jiang, Hui; Jia, Xiaoyun; Yang, Jianhua; Guo, Xiangming; Yin, Ye; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in 60 known genes were previously identified by exome sequencing in 79 of 157 families with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This study analyzed variants in 129 genes associated with other forms of hereditary retinal dystrophy in the same cohort. Methods Apart from the 73 genes previously analyzed, a further 129 genes responsible for other forms of hereditary retinal dystrophy were selected based on RetNet. Variants in the 129 genes determined by whole exome sequencing were selected and filtered by bioinformatics analysis. Candidate variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and validated by analysis of available family members and controls. Results A total of 90 candidate variants were present in the 129 genes. Sanger sequencing confirmed 83 of the 90 variants. Analysis of family members and controls excluded 76 of these 83 variants. The remaining seven variants were considered to be potential pathogenic mutations; these were c.899A>G, c.1814C>G, and c.2107C>T in BBS2; c.1073C>T and c.1669C>T in INPP5E; and c.3582C>G and c.5704–5C>G in CACNA1F. Six of these seven mutations were novel. The mutations were detected in five unrelated patients without a family history, including three patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in BBS2 and INPP5E, and two patients with hemizygous mutations in CACNA1F. None of the patients had mutations in the genes associated with autosome dominant retinal dystrophy. Conclusions Only a small portion of patients with RP, about 3% (5/157), had causative mutations in the 129 genes associated with other forms of hereditary retinal dystrophy. PMID:25999675

  1. A novel mutation of the RP1 gene (Lys778ter) associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, K; Jacobi, F K; Tippmann, S; Schmid, R; Zrenner, E; Wissinger, B; Apfelstedt-Sylla, E

    2002-01-01

    Background: Besides the three known genes (RHO, RDS/Peripherin, NRL) involved in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), a fourth gene, RP1, has been recently identified. Initial reports suggest that mutations in the RP1 gene are the second most frequent cause of adRP. The clinical findings were described in a family with adRP and a novel mutation in the RP1 gene. Method: Index patients from 15 independent families with adRP in which RHO mutations had been excluded in previous examinations were screened for mutations in the RP1 gene by means of direct DNA sequencing. Evaluation of the RP1 phenotype in patients included funduscopy, kinetic perimetry, dark adapted final threshold test, standard electroretinography and, in one case, multifocal electroretinography. Results: One novel nonsense mutation (Lys778ter) in one of these 15 patients was detected. Cosegregation of the mutation with the disease phenotype could be established in the index patient's family. The phenotype comprises variable expression of clinical disease probably including one case of incomplete penetrance, a onset of symptoms beginning in adulthood, and evidence of regionally varying retinal function loss. Conclusion: The Lys778ter mutation localises inside the critical region harbouring all mutations described so far. The ophthalmic findings support previous observations that variation of disease expression appears as a typical feature of the RP1 phenotype. PMID:11864893

  2. Necrotic enlargement of cone photoreceptor cells and the release of high-mobility group box-1 in retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Y; Ikeda, Y; Nakatake, S; Tachibana, T; Fujiwara, K; Yoshida, N; Notomi, S; Nakao, S; Hisatomi, T; Miller, J W; Vavvas, DG; Sonoda, KH; Ishibashi, T

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerations resulting form rod and cone photoreceptor cell death. The rod cell death due to deleterious genetic mutations has been shown to occur mainly through apoptosis, whereas the mechanisms and features of the secondary cone cell death have not been fully elucidated. Our previous study showed that the cone cell death in rd10 mice, an animal model of RP, involves necrotic features and is partly mediated by the receptor interacting protein kinase. However, the relevancy of necrotic cone cell death in human RP patients remains unknown. In the present study, we showed that dying cone cells in rd10 mice exhibited cellular enlargement, along with necrotic changes such as cellular swelling and mitochondrial rupture. In human eyes, live imaging of cone cells by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy revealed significantly increased percentages of enlarged cone cells in the RP patients compared with the control subjects. The vitreous of the RP patients contained significantly higher levels of high-mobility group box-1, which is released extracellularly associated with necrotic cell death. These findings suggest that necrotic enlargement of cone cells is involved in the process of cone degeneration, and that necrosis may be a novel target to prevent or delay the loss of cone-mediated central vision in RP. PMID:27551484

  3. Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials on Safety and Efficacy of Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Treatments for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Sacchetti, Marta; Mantelli, Flavio; Merlo, Daniela; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Several treatments have been proposed to slow down progression of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a hereditary retinal degenerative condition leading to severe visual impairment. The aim of this study is to systematically review data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating safety and efficacy of medical interventions for the treatment of RP. Methods. Randomized clinical trials on medical treatments for syndromic and nonsyndromic RP published up to December 2014 were included in the review. Visual acuity, visual field, electroretinogram, and adverse events were used as outcome measures. Results. The 19 RCTs included in this systematic review included trials on hyperbaric oxygen delivery, topical brimonidine tartrate, vitamins, docosahexaenoic acid, gangliosides, lutein, oral nilvadipine, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and valproic acid. All treatments proved safe but did not show significant benefit on visual function. Long term supplementation with vitamin A showed a significantly slower decline rate in electroretinogram amplitude. Conclusions. Although all medical treatments for RP appear safe, evidence emerging from RCTs is limited since they do not present comparable results suitable for quantitative statistical analysis. The limited number of RCTs, the poor clinical results, and the heterogeneity among studies negatively influence the strength of recommendations for the long term management of RP patients. PMID:26339504

  4. A Splice-Site Mutation in a Retina-Specific Exon of BBS8 Causes Nonsyndromic Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Riazuddin, S. Amer; Iqbal, Muhammad; Wang, Yue; Masuda, Tomohiro; Chen, Yuhng; Bowne, Sara; Sullivan, Lori S.; Waseem, Naushin H.; Bhattacharya, Shomi; Daiger, Stephen P.; Zhang, Kang; Khan, Shaheen N.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding; Sieving, Paul A.; Zack, Donald J.; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is an important mechanism for providing spatiotemporal protein diversity. Here we show that an in-frame splice mutation in BBS8, one of the genes involved in pleiotropic Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), is sufficient to cause nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). A genome-wide scan of a consanguineous RP pedigree mapped the trait to a 5.6 Mb region; subsequent systematic sequencing of candidate transcripts identified a homozygous splice-site mutation in a previously unknown BBS8 exon. The allele segregated with the disorder, was absent from controls, was completely invariant across evolution, and was predicted to lead to the elimination of a 10 amino acid sequence from the protein. Subsequent studies showed the exon to be expressed exclusively in the retina and enriched significantly in the photoreceptor layer. Importantly, we found this exon to represent the major BBS8 mRNA species in the mammalian photoreceptor, suggesting that the encoded 10 amino acids play a pivotal role in the function of BBS8 in this organ. Understanding the role of this additional sequence might therefore inform the mechanism of retinal degeneration in patients with syndromic BBS or other related ciliopathies. PMID:20451172

  5. Mutations in the pre-mRNA splicing factor gene PRPC8 in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP13).

    PubMed

    McKie, A B; McHale, J C; Keen, T J; Tarttelin, E E; Goliath, R; van Lith-Verhoeven, J J; Greenberg, J; Ramesar, R S; Hoyng, C B; Cremers, F P; Mackey, D A; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C; Markham, A F; Inglehearn, C F

    2001-07-15

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of the peripheral retina leading to night blindness and loss of visual fields. With an incidence of approximately 1 in 4000, RP can be inherited in X-linked, autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive modes. The RP13 locus for autosomal dominant RP (adRP) was placed on chromosome 17p13.3 by linkage mapping in a large South African adRP family. Using a positional cloning and candidate gene strategy, we have identified seven different missense mutations in the splicing factor gene PRPC8 in adRP families. Three of the mutations cosegregate within three RP13 linked families including the original large South African pedigree, and four additional mutations have been identified in other unrelated adRP families. The seven mutations are clustered within a 14 codon stretch within the last exon of this large 7 kb transcript. The altered amino acid residues at the C-terminus exhibit a high degree of conservation across species as diverse as humans, Arabidopsis and trypanosome, suggesting that some functional significance is associated with this part of the protein. These mutations in this ubiquitous and highly conserved splicing factor offer compelling evidence for a novel pathway to retinal degeneration. PMID:11468273

  6. A historical perspective on the early treatment of night blindness and the use of dubious and unproven treatment strategies for patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Gerald A

    2013-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a form of inherited night blindness. Over decades, various dubious treatment strategies that lacked sufficient theoretically sound underpinnings were explored. Initially they were enthusiastically promoted and subsequently discredited. It is apparent that many were predicated on the erroneous assumption that the primary cause of RP was related to impairment of the retinal circulation. Herein, several of these strategies are reviewed and critiqued. Reasons why clinicians may have been deceived into overzealous interpretations of their treatment methods are explored. The examples disclosed should serve as a note of caution for current investigators to guard against self-deception when exploring newly developed treatment strategies. PMID:23911150

  7. Mislocalization and Degradation of Human P23H-Rhodopsin-GFP in a Knockin Mouse Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Price, Brandee A.; Sandoval, Ivette M.; Chan, Fung; Simons, David L.; Wu, Samuel M.; Wensel, Theodore G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To engineer a knockin mouse model that can be used to monitor the effects of treatments on degradation and mislocalization of proline-to-histidine change at codon 23 (P23H) rhodopsin, a common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). The goal was to introduce a gene that expressed rhodopsin at low levels to avoid rapid retinal degeneration, and with a readily visible tag to make it easy to distinguish from wild type rhodopsin. Methods. One copy of the endogenous mouse rhodopsin gene was replaced with a mutant human rhodopsin gene that encodes P23H-rhodopsin fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) at its C terminus. The gene includes a LoxP site in the sequence corresponding to the 5′-untranslated region, which greatly reduces translation efficiency. Characterized are the resulting heterozygous and homozygous P23H-hRho-GFP mouse lines for mRNA and protein expression, P23H-rhodopsin localization in rod cells, effects on visual function, and retinal degeneration. Results. The retinas of heterozygous P23H-hRho-GFP mice are morphologically and functionally very similar to those of wild type mice, and they display little cell death over time. P23H-hRho-GFP mice transcribe the knockin gene as efficiently as the endogenous mouse allele, but they contain much less of the protein product than do knockin mice expressing nonmutant hRho-GFP, indicating that substantial degradation of P23H-rRho-GFP occurs in mouse rod cells. The remaining P23H-hRho-GFP mislocalizes to the inner segment and outer nuclear layer, with only approximately 20% in rod outer segments. Conclusions. P23H-hRho-GFP mice provide a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of potential therapies for ADRP that influence the levels or localization of P23H-rhodopsin. PMID:22110080

  8. Naturally occurring rhodopsin mutation in the dog causes retinal dysfunction and degeneration mimicking human dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kijas, James W.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Pianta, Michael J.; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Miller, Brian J.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Acland, Gregory M.

    2002-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by light and initiates the transduction cascade leading to night (rod) vision. Naturally occurring pathogenic rhodopsin (RHO) mutations have been previously identified only in humans and are a common cause of dominantly inherited blindness from retinal degeneration. We identified English Mastiff dogs with a naturally occurring dominant retinal degeneration and determined the cause to be a point mutation in the RHO gene (Thr4Arg). Dogs with this mutant allele manifest a retinal phenotype that closely mimics that in humans with RHO mutations. The phenotypic features shared by dog and man include a dramatically slowed time course of recovery of rod photoreceptor function after light exposure and a distinctive topographic pattern to the retinal degeneration. The canine disease offers opportunities to explore the basis of prolonged photoreceptor recovery after light in RHO mutations and determine whether there are links between the dysfunction and apoptotic retinal cell death. The RHO mutant dog also becomes the large animal needed for preclinical trials of therapies for a major subset of human retinopathies. PMID:11972042

  9. The synthetic progestin norgestrel acts to increase LIF levels in the rd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Ashleigh M.; Roche, Sarah L.; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M.; Jackson, Alice C. Wyse

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Retinal degenerative conditions affect thousands of people worldwide. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is among the most common, but it is currently incurable. It is characterized by the progressive death of photoreceptor cells, eventually leading to blindness. Neurotrophic factors play an important role in such retinopathies, and much research has been performed on their use as treatments. Our group previously demonstrated the ability of the synthetic progestin norgestrel to rescue photoreceptors from cell death, the mechanism of which is believed to include upregulation of the neurotrophic factor basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the protection provided by norgestrel is likely to be mediated by other neurotrophins. Methods: The 661W photoreceptor cells and retinal explants from P30 to P40 wild-type (wt) C57BL/6 mice were treated with norgestrel over time. Homozygous rd10/rd10 mice that mimic the human form of RP were fed either a control or a norgestrel-containing diet. Changes in neurotrophic factor expression in response to norgestrel were detected with real-time PCR, western blotting, or immunofluorescence staining. Using specific siRNA, leukemia inhibitory factor (Lif) expression was knocked down in 661W photoreceptor cells that were stressed by serum starvation. Cells were treated with norgestrel followed by measurement of cell viability with (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium) (MTS) assay. Results: LIF, a potent neuroprotective cytokine, was found to be upregulated in response to norgestrel in vitro and in vivo. Upregulation of LIF in degenerating rd10 retinas coincided with preservation of the photoreceptor layer. We also found LIF was necessary for the norgestrel-mediated rescue of stressed photoreceptor cells from cell death in vitro. Conclusions: LIF was upregulated in response to norgestrel in all models studied and is necessary

  10. Identification of a Novel Gene on 10q22.1 Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP)

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lori S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Blanton, Susan H.; Wheaton, Dianna K.; Avery, Cheryl E.; Cadena, Elizabeth D.; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Weinstock, George M.; Lewis, Richard A.; Birch, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome linkage mapping identified a region on chromosome 10q21.3–q22.1 with a maximum LOD score of 3.0 at 0 % recombination in a six-generation family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). All known adRP genes and X-linked RP genes were excluded in the family by a combination of methods. Whole-exome next-generation sequencing revealed a missense mutation in hexokinase 1, HK1 c.2539G > A, p.Glu847Lys, tracking with disease in all affected family members. One severely-affected male is homozygous for this region by linkage analysis and has two copies of the mutation. No other potential mutations were detected in the linkage region nor were any candidates identified elsewhere in the genome. Subsequent testing detected the same mutation in four additional, unrelated adRP families, for a total of five mutations in 404 probands tested (1.2 %). Of the five families, three are from the Acadian population in Louisiana, one is French Canadian and one is Sicilian. Haplotype analysis of the affected chromosome in each family and the homozygous individual revealed a rare, shared haplotype of 450 kb, suggesting an ancient founder mutation. HK1 is a widely-expressed gene, with multiple, abundant retinal transcripts, coding for hexokinase 1. Hexokinase catalyzes phosphorylation of glucose to glusose-6-phospate, the first step in glycolysis. The Glu847Lys mutation is in a highly-conserved site, outside of the active site or known functional sites. PMID:26427411

  11. Identification of a Novel Gene on 10q22.1 Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP).

    PubMed

    Daiger, Stephen P; Sullivan, Lori S; Bowne, Sara J; Koboldt, Daniel C; Blanton, Susan H; Wheaton, Dianna K; Avery, Cheryl E; Cadena, Elizabeth D; Koenekoop, Robert K; Fulton, Robert S; Wilson, Richard K; Weinstock, George M; Lewis, Richard A; Birch, David G

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome linkage mapping identified a region on chromosome 10q21.3-q22.1 with a maximum LOD score of 3.0 at 0 % recombination in a six-generation family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). All known adRP genes and X-linked RP genes were excluded in the family by a combination of methods. Whole-exome next-generation sequencing revealed a missense mutation in hexokinase 1, HK1 c.2539G > A, p.Glu847Lys, tracking with disease in all affected family members. One severely-affected male is homozygous for this region by linkage analysis and has two copies of the mutation. No other potential mutations were detected in the linkage region nor were any candidates identified elsewhere in the genome. Subsequent testing detected the same mutation in four additional, unrelated adRP families, for a total of five mutations in 404 probands tested (1.2 %). Of the five families, three are from the Acadian population in Louisiana, one is French Canadian and one is Sicilian. Haplotype analysis of the affected chromosome in each family and the homozygous individual revealed a rare, shared haplotype of 450 kb, suggesting an ancient founder mutation. HK1 is a widely-expressed gene, with multiple, abundant retinal transcripts, coding for hexokinase 1. Hexokinase catalyzes phosphorylation of glucose to glusose-6-phospate, the first step in glycolysis. The Glu847Lys mutation is in a highly-conserved site, outside of the active site or known functional sites. PMID:26427411

  12. Towards an assistive peripheral visual prosthesis for long-term treatment of retinitis pigmentosa: evaluating mobility performance in immersive simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapf, Marc Patrick H.; Boon, Mei-Ying; Matteucci, Paul B.; Lovell, Nigel H.; Suaning, Gregg J.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. The prospective efficacy of a future peripheral retinal prosthesis complementing residual vision to raise mobility performance in non-end stage retinitis pigmentosa (RP) was evaluated using simulated prosthetic vision (SPV). Approach. Normally sighted volunteers were fitted with a wide-angle head-mounted display and carried out mobility tasks in photorealistic virtual pedestrian scenarios. Circumvention of low-lying obstacles, path following, and navigating around static and moving pedestrians were performed either with central simulated residual vision of 10° alone or enhanced by assistive SPV in the lower and lateral peripheral visual field (VF). Three layouts of assistive vision corresponding to hypothetical electrode array layouts were compared, emphasizing higher visual acuity, a wider visual angle, or eccentricity-dependent acuity across an intermediate angle. Movement speed, task time, distance walked and collisions with the environment were analysed as performance measures. Main results. Circumvention of low-lying obstacles was improved with all tested configurations of assistive SPV. Higher-acuity assistive vision allowed for greatest improvement in walking speeds—14% above that of plain residual vision, while only wide-angle and eccentricity-dependent vision significantly reduced the number of collisions—both by 21%. Navigating around pedestrians, there were significant reductions in collisions with static pedestrians by 33% and task time by 7.7% with the higher-acuity layout. Following a path, higher-acuity assistive vision increased walking speed by 9%, and decreased collisions with stationary cars by 18%. Significance. The ability of assistive peripheral prosthetic vision to improve mobility performance in persons with constricted VFs has been demonstrated. In a prospective peripheral visual prosthesis, electrode array designs need to be carefully tailored to the scope of tasks in which a device aims to assist. We posit that maximum

  13. Targeted Next-generation Sequencing Reveals Novel EYS Mutations in Chinese Families with Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Liu, Xiaoxing; Sheng, Xunlun; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Xiumei; Li, Zili; Li, Huiping; Liu, Yani; Rong, Weining; Zhao, Kanxing; Zhao, Chen

    2015-01-01

    EYS mutations demonstrate great genotypic and phenotypic varieties, and are one of the major causes for patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP). Here, we aim to determine the genetic lesions with phenotypic correlations in two Chinese families with ARRP. Medical histories and ophthalmic documentations were obtained from all participants from the two pedigrees. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) on 189 genes was performed to screen for RP causative mutations in the two families. Two biallelic mutations in EYS, p.[R164*];[C2139Y] and p.[W2640*];[F2954S], were identified in the two families, respectively. EYS p.R164* and p.F2954S are novel alleles associated with RP, while p.C2139Y and p.W2640* are known mutations. Crystal structure modeling on the protein eyes shut homolog encoded by the EYS gene revealed abnormal hydrogen bonds generated by p.C2139Y and p.F2954S, which would likely affect the solubility and cause significant structural changes of the two mutated proteins. In conclusion, our study expands the genotypic spectrums for EYS mutations, and may provide novel insights into the relevant pathogenesis for RP. We also demonstrate targeted NGS approach as a valuable tool for genetic diagnosis. PMID:25753737

  14. Artificial vision by direct optic nerve electrode (AV-DONE) implantation in a blind patient with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hirokazu; Kamei, Motohiro; Fujikado, Takashi; Yonezawa, Eiji; Ozawa, Motoki; Cecilia-Gonzalez, Carmen; Ustariz-Gonzalez, Orlando; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Tano, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of artificial vision by using a direct optic nerve electrode (AV-DONE) in a blind patient with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This device, comprising three wire electrodes (0.05 mm in diameter), was implanted into the optic disc of a patient with RP with no light perception vision and the device was left implanted. Six months later, visual sensations were elicited by electrical stimulation through each electrode and the thresholds for the phosphene perception elicited by pulses of 0.25-ms duration/phase and a pulse frequency of 320 Hz were 30, 5, and 70 microA for each electrode. The phosphenes, which ranged in size from that of a match head to an apple, were round, oval, or linear, primarily yellow, and focally distributed. The area of the phosphenes changed when the electrical stimulation was supplied from different electrodes. No complications arose during the follow-up period. Localized visual sensations were produced in a blind patient with advanced RP, suggesting that our system could lead to the development of a useful visual prosthesis system. PMID:19894096

  15. Transcriptional regulation of PRPF31 gene expression by MSR1 repeat elements causes incomplete penetrance in retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Anna M.; Shah, Amna Z.; Venturini, Giulia; Krishna, Abhay; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rivolta, Carlo; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2016-01-01

    PRPF31-associated retinitis pigmentosa presents a fascinating enigma: some mutation carriers are blind, while others are asymptomatic. We identify the major molecular cause of this incomplete penetrance through three cardinal features: (1) there is population variation in the number (3 or 4) of a minisatellite repeat element (MSR1) adjacent to the PRPF31 core promoter; (2) in vitro, 3-copies of the MSR1 element can repress gene transcription by 50 to 115-fold; (3) the higher-expressing 4-copy allele is not observed among symptomatic PRPF31 mutation carriers and correlates with the rate of asymptomatic carriers in different populations. Thus, a linked transcriptional modifier decreases PRPF31 gene expression that leads to haploinsufficiency. This result, taken with other identified risk alleles, allows precise genetic counseling for the first time. We also demonstrate that across the human genome, the presence of MSR1 repeats in the promoters or first introns of genes is associated with greater population variability in gene expression indicating that copy number variation of MSR1s is a generic controller of gene expression and promises to provide new insights into our understanding of gene expression regulation. PMID:26781568

  16. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Domain of Splicing Factor Prp8 Carrying Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,L.; Shen, J.; Guarnieri, M.; Heroux, A.; Yang, K.; Zhao, R.

    2007-01-01

    Prp8 is a critical pre-mRNA splicing factor. Prp8 is proposed to help form and stabilize the spliceosome catalytic core and to be an important regulator of spliceosome activation. Mutations in human Prp8 (hPrp8) cause a severe form of the genetic disorder retinitis pigmentosa, RP13. Understanding the molecular mechanism of Prp8's function in pre-mRNA splicing and RP13 has been hindered by its large size (over 2000 amino acids) and remarkably low-sequence similarity with other proteins. Here we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain (the last 273 residues) of Caenorhabditis elegans Prp8 (cPrp8). The core of the C-terminal domain is an / structure that forms the MPN (Mpr1, Pad1 N-terminal) fold but without Zn{sup 2+} coordination. We propose that the C-terminal domain is a protein interaction domain instead of a Zn{sup 2+}-dependent metalloenzyme as proposed for some MPN proteins. Mapping of RP13 mutants on the Prp8 structure suggests that these residues constitute a binding surface between Prp8 and other partner(s), and the disruption of this interaction provides a plausible molecular mechanism for RP13.

  17. Novel compound heterozygous mutation in the CNGA1 gene underlie autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Qu, Ling-Hui; Hou, Bao-Ke; Xu, Hai-Wei; Meng, Xiao-Hong; Pang, Chi-Pui; Yin, Zheng-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) describes a group of inherited retinopathies that are characterized by the progressive degeneration of photoreceptor neurons, which causes night blindness, a reduction in the peripheral visual field and decreased visual acuity. More than 50 RP-related genes have been identified. In the present study, we analysed a Chinese family with autosomal recessive RP. We identified a compound heterozygous mutation, c.265delC and c.1537G>A, in CNGA1 using targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) of RP-causing genes. The mutations were validated in the family members by Sanger sequencing. The mutations co-segregated with the RP phenotype and were absent from ethnically-matched control chromosomes. The mutant (mut) CNGA1 p.(G513R) protein caused by the mis-sense novel mutation c.1537G>A was expressed in vitro. The mut CNGA1 p.(G513R) protein was largely retained inside the cell rather than being targeted to the plasma membrane, suggesting the absence of cGMP-gated cation channels in the plasma membrane would be deleterious to rod photoreceptors, leading lead to RP. PMID:26802146

  18. Transcriptional regulation of PRPF31 gene expression by MSR1 repeat elements causes incomplete penetrance in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Rose, Anna M; Shah, Amna Z; Venturini, Giulia; Krishna, Abhay; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rivolta, Carlo; Bhattacharya, Shomi S

    2016-01-01

    PRPF31-associated retinitis pigmentosa presents a fascinating enigma: some mutation carriers are blind, while others are asymptomatic. We identify the major molecular cause of this incomplete penetrance through three cardinal features: (1) there is population variation in the number (3 or 4) of a minisatellite repeat element (MSR1) adjacent to the PRPF31 core promoter; (2) in vitro, 3-copies of the MSR1 element can repress gene transcription by 50 to 115-fold; (3) the higher-expressing 4-copy allele is not observed among symptomatic PRPF31 mutation carriers and correlates with the rate of asymptomatic carriers in different populations. Thus, a linked transcriptional modifier decreases PRPF31 gene expression that leads to haploinsufficiency. This result, taken with other identified risk alleles, allows precise genetic counseling for the first time. We also demonstrate that across the human genome, the presence of MSR1 repeats in the promoters or first introns of genes is associated with greater population variability in gene expression indicating that copy number variation of MSR1s is a generic controller of gene expression and promises to provide new insights into our understanding of gene expression regulation. PMID:26781568

  19. A new family linked to the RP13 locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on distal 17p.

    PubMed

    Tarttelin, E E; Plant, C; Weissenbach, J; Bird, A C; Bhattacharya, S S; Inglehearn, C F

    1996-06-01

    A form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) mapping to chromosome 17p has been reported in a single large South African family. We now report a new family with severe early onset ADRP which maps to 17p. Linkage and haplotype analysis in this family places the ADRP locus in the 5 cM interval between markers AFMc024za5 and D17S1845, confirming the data obtained in the South African family. The discovery of a second 17p linked family may imply that this is one of the more common loci for dominant RP. In addition, the confirmation of an RP diagnosis at this locus is of interest since loci for a dominant cone dystrophy and Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA1) have recently been linked to the same markers. While the cone dystrophy locus may be allelic with RP, our data and that of Goliath et al show that distinct genes are responsible for dominant RP and Leber's congenital amaurosis on chromosome 17p. PMID:8782056

  20. Unusual presentation: pulmonary hemosiderosis with celiac disease and retinitis pigmentosa in a child.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Ozlem; Keskin, Mehmet; Guler, Elif; Tutar, Ediz; Saygili, Oguzhan; Kucukosmanoglu, Ercan; Kor, Yilmaz; Celik, Haydar; Coskun, Enes

    2011-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare disease characterized by anemia, hemoptysis and recurrent alveolar hemorrhage. The combination of IPH and celiac disease (CD) is extremely rare. We report a 9-year-old boy with Lane-Hamilton syndrome, co-occurrence of pulmonary hemosiderosis with CD. This presentation is unique presentation because he has also retinal pigmentation. PMID:21337729

  1. Nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa is highly prevalent in the Jerusalem region with a high frequency of founder mutations

    PubMed Central

    Banin, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common inherited retinal degeneration, and prevalence of the disease has been reported in populations of American and European origin with a relatively low consanguinity rate. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of nonsyndromic RP in the Jerusalem region, which has a population of about 1 million individuals with a high rate of consanguinity. Methods The patients’ clinical data included eye exam findings (visual acuity, anterior segment, and funduscopy) as well as electroretinographic (ERG) testing results under scotopic and photopic conditions. Mutation analysis on a subgroup of patients was performed mainly with candidate gene analysis and homozygosity mapping. Results We evaluated the medical records of patients with degenerative retinal diseases residing in the Jerusalem region who were examined over the past 20 years in a large tertiary medical center. A total of 453 individuals affected with nonsyndromic RP were diagnosed at our center, according to funduscopic findings and ERG testing. Based on the estimated population size of 945,000 individuals who reside in the vicinity of Jerusalem, the prevalence of nonsyndromic RP in this region is 1:2,086. The prevalence of RP was higher among Arab Muslims (1:1,798) compared to Jews (1:2,230), mainly due to consanguineous marriages that are more common in the Arab Muslim population. To identify the genetic causes of RP in our cohort, we recruited 383 patients from 183 different families for genetic analysis: 70 with autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance, 15 with autosomal dominant, 86 isolate cases, and 12 with an X-linked inheritance pattern. In 64 (35%) of the families, we identified the genetic cause of the disease, and we revised the inheritance pattern of 20 isolate cases to the AR pattern; 49% of the families in our cohort had AR inheritance. Interestingly, in 42 (66%) of the genetically identified families, the cause of disease was a founder

  2. WDR19: An ancient, retrograde, intraflagellar ciliary protein is mutated in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and in Senior-Loken syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Coussa, RG; Otto, EA; Gee, H-Y; Arthurs, P; Ren, H; Lopez, I; Keser, V; Fu, Q; Faingold, R; Khan, A; Schwartzentruber, J; Majewski, J; Hildebrandtand, F; Koenekoop, RK

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disease that causes blindness. Our purpose was to identify the causal gene, describe the phenotype and delineate the mutation spectrum in a consanguineous Quebec arRP family. We performed Arrayed Primer Extension (APEX) technology to exclude ~500 arRP mutations in ~20 genes. Homozygosity mapping [single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping] identified 10 novel significant homozygous regions. We performed next generation sequencing and whole exome capture. Sanger sequencing provided cosegregation. We screened another 150 retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and 200 patients with Senior-Løken Syndrome (SLS). We identified a novel missense mutation in WDR19, c.2129T>C which lead to a p.Leu710Ser. We found the same mutation in a second Quebec arRP family. Interestingly, two of seven affected members of the original family developed ‘sub-clinical’ renal cysts. We hypothesized that more severe WDR19 mutations may lead to severe ciliopathies and found seven WDR19 mutations in five SLS families. We identified a new gene for both arRP and SLS. WDR19 is a ciliary protein associated with the intraflagellar transport machinery. We are currently investigating the full extent of the mutation spectrum. Our findings are crucial in expanding the understanding of childhood blindness and identifying new genes. PMID:23683095

  3. Essential and synergistic roles of RP1 and RP1L1 in rod photoreceptor axoneme and retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Liu, Jiewu; Gao, Jiangang; LeNoue, Sean; Wang, Changguan; Kaminoh, Jack; Bowne, Sara J.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Daiger, Stephen P.; Zhang, Kang; Fitzgerald, Malinda E.C.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Zuo, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa 1 (RP1) is a common inherited retinopathy with variable onset and severity. The RP1 gene encodes a photoreceptor-specific, microtubule-associated ciliary protein containing the doublecortin (DCX) domain. Here we show that another photoreceptor-specific Rp1-like protein (Rp1L1) in mice is also localized to the axoneme of outer segments (OS) and connecting cilia in rod photoreceptors, overlapping with Rp1. Rp1L1−/− mice display scattered OS disorganization, reduced electroretinogram amplitudes, and progressive photoreceptor degeneration, less severe and slower than in Rp1−/− mice. In single rods of Rp1L1−/−, photosensitivity is reduced, similar to that of Rp1−/−. While individual heterozygotes are normal, double heterozygotes of Rp1 and Rp1L1 exhibit abnormal OS morphology and reduced single rod photosensitivity and dark currents. The electroretinogram amplitudes of double heterozygotes are more reduced than those of individual heterozygotes combined. In support, Rp1L1 interacts with Rp1 in transfected cells and in retina pull-down experiments. Interestingly, phototransduction kinetics are normal in single rods and whole retinas of individual or double Rp1 and Rp1L1 mutant mice. Together, Rp1 and Rp1L1 play essential and synergistic roles in affecting photosensitivity and OS morphogenesis of rod photoreceptors. Our findings suggest that mutations in RP1L1 could underlie retinopathy or modify RP1 disease expression in humans. PMID:19657028

  4. Silencing of Tuberin Enhances Photoreceptor Survival and Function in a Preclinical Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Stephen H.; Chan, Lawrence; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Yang, Jin; Tosi, Joaquin; Wert, Katherine J.; Davis, Richard J.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the functional consequences of silencing of tuberin, an inhibitor of the mTOR signaling pathway, in a preclinical model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in order to test the hypothesis that insufficient induction of the protein kinase B (PKB)-regulated tuberin/mTOR self-survival pathway initiates apoptosis. Methods: In an unbiased genome-scale approach, kinase peptide substrate arrays were used to analyze self-survival pathways at the onset of photoreceptor degeneration. The mutant Pde6bH620Q/Pde6bH620Q at P14 and P18 photoreceptor outer segment (OS) lysates were labeled with P-ATP and hybridized to an array of 1,164 different synthetic peptide substrates. At this stage, OS of Pde6bH620Q/Pde6bH620Q rods are morphologically normal. In vitro kinase assays and immunohistochemistry were used to validate phosphorylation. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) gene silencing was used to validate tuberin’s role in regulating survival. Results: At the onset of degeneration, 162 peptides were differentially phosphorylated. Protein kinases A, G, C (AGC kinases), and B exhibited increased activity in both peptide array and in vitro kinase assays. Immunohistochemical data confirmed altered phosphorylation patterns for phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1), ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6), and tuberin. Tuberin gene silencing rescued photoreceptors from degeneration. Conclusions: Phosphorylation of tuberin and RPS6 is due to the upregulated activity of PKB. PKB/tuberin cell growth/survival signaling is activated before the onset of degeneration. Substrates of the AGC kinases in the PKB/tuberin pathway are phosphorylated to promote cell survival. Knockdown of tuberin, the inhibitor of the mTOR pathway, increased photoreceptor survival and function in a preclinical model of RP. PMID:25646031

  5. Splice-site mutations identified in PDE6A responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous Pakistani families

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid Y.; Ali, Shahbaz; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to localize and identify causal mutations associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in consanguineous familial cases of Pakistani origin. Methods Ophthalmic examinations that included funduscopy and electroretinography (ERG) were performed to confirm the affectation status. Blood samples were collected from all participating individuals, and genomic DNA was extracted. A genome-wide scan was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. Sanger sequencing was performed to identify the causative variants. Subsequently, we performed whole exome sequencing to rule out the possibility of a second causal variant within the linkage interval. Sequence conservation was performed with alignment analyses of PDE6A orthologs, and in silico splicing analysis was completed with Human Splicing Finder version 2.4.1. Results A large multigenerational consanguineous family diagnosed with early-onset RP was ascertained. An ophthalmic clinical examination consisting of fundus photography and electroretinography confirmed the diagnosis of RP. A genome-wide scan was performed, and suggestive two-point LOD scores were observed with markers on chromosome 5q. Haplotype analyses identified the region; however, the region did not segregate with the disease phenotype in the family. Subsequently, we performed a second genome-wide scan that excluded the entire genome except the chromosome 5q region harboring PDE6A. Next-generation whole exome sequencing identified a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 16: c.2028–1G>A, which was completely conserved in PDE6A orthologs and was absent in ethnically matched 350 control chromosomes, the 1000 Genomes database, and the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project. Subsequently, we investigated our entire cohort of RP familial cases and identified a second family who harbored a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 10: c.1408–2A>G. In silico analysis suggested that these

  6. The retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP2 protein exhibits exonuclease activity and translocates to the nucleus in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Qiu Junzhuan; Cai Sheng; Chen Yuan; Cheetham, Michael E.; Shen Binghui; Pfeifer, Gerd P. . E-mail: gpfeifer@coh.org

    2006-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. Mutations in the RP2 gene are linked to the second most frequent form of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. RP2 is a plasma membrane-associated protein of unknown function. The N-terminal domain of RP2 shares amino acid sequence similarity to the tubulin-specific chaperone protein co-factor C. The C-terminus consists of a domain with similarity to nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDKs). Human NDK1, in addition to its role in providing nucleoside triphosphates, has recently been described as a 3' to 5' exonuclease. Here, we show that RP2 is a DNA-binding protein that exhibits exonuclease activity, with a preference for single-stranded or nicked DNA substrates that occur as intermediates of base excision repair pathways. Furthermore, we show that RP2 undergoes re-localization into the nucleus upon treatment of cells with DNA damaging agents inducing oxidative stress, most notably solar simulated light and UVA radiation. The data suggest that RP2 may have previously unrecognized roles as a DNA damage response factor and 3' to 5' exonuclease.

  7. Limited ATF4 Expression in Degenerating Retinas with Ongoing ER Stress Promotes Photoreceptor Survival in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bhootada, Yogesh; Kotla, Pravallika; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Gorbatyuk, Oleg; Bebok, Zsuzsanna; Athar, Mohammad; Gorbatyuk, Marina

    2016-01-01

    T17M rhodopsin expression in rod photoreceptors leads to severe retinal degeneration and is associated with the activation of ER stress related Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signaling. Here, we show a novel role of a UPR transcription factor, ATF4, in photoreceptor cellular pathology. We demonstrated a pro-death role for ATF4 overexpression during autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Based on our results in ATF4 knockout mice and adeno-associated viral (AAV) delivery of ATF4 to the retina, we validated a novel therapeutic approach targeting ATF4 over the course of retinal degeneration. In T17M rhodopsin retinas, we observed ATF4 overexpression concomitantly with reduction of p62 and elevation of p53 levels. These molecular alterations, together with increased CHOP and caspase-3/7 activity, possibly contributed to the mechanism of photoreceptor cell loss. Conversely, ATF4 knockdown retarded retinal degeneration in 1-month-old T17M Rhodopsin mice and promoted photoreceptor survival, as measured by scotopic and photopic ERGs and photoreceptor nuclei row counts. Similarly, ATF4 knockdown also markedly delayed retinal degeneration in 3-month-old ADRP animals. This delay was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in UPR signaling, the launching of anti-oxidant defense, initiation of autophagy, and improvement of rhodopsin biosynthesis which together perhaps combat the cellular stress associated with T17M rhodopsin. Our data indicate that augmented ATF4 signals during retinal degeneration plays a cytotoxic role by triggering photoreceptor cell death. Future ADRP therapy regulating ATF4 expression can be developed to treat retinal degenerative disorders associated with activated UPR. PMID:27144303

  8. Limited ATF4 Expression in Degenerating Retinas with Ongoing ER Stress Promotes Photoreceptor Survival in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bhootada, Yogesh; Kotla, Pravallika; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Gorbatyuk, Oleg; Bebok, Zsuzsanna; Athar, Mohammad; Gorbatyuk, Marina

    2016-01-01

    T17M rhodopsin expression in rod photoreceptors leads to severe retinal degeneration and is associated with the activation of ER stress related Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signaling. Here, we show a novel role of a UPR transcription factor, ATF4, in photoreceptor cellular pathology. We demonstrated a pro-death role for ATF4 overexpression during autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Based on our results in ATF4 knockout mice and adeno-associated viral (AAV) delivery of ATF4 to the retina, we validated a novel therapeutic approach targeting ATF4 over the course of retinal degeneration. In T17M rhodopsin retinas, we observed ATF4 overexpression concomitantly with reduction of p62 and elevation of p53 levels. These molecular alterations, together with increased CHOP and caspase-3/7 activity, possibly contributed to the mechanism of photoreceptor cell loss. Conversely, ATF4 knockdown retarded retinal degeneration in 1-month-old T17M Rhodopsin mice and promoted photoreceptor survival, as measured by scotopic and photopic ERGs and photoreceptor nuclei row counts. Similarly, ATF4 knockdown also markedly delayed retinal degeneration in 3-month-old ADRP animals. This delay was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in UPR signaling, the launching of anti-oxidant defense, initiation of autophagy, and improvement of rhodopsin biosynthesis which together perhaps combat the cellular stress associated with T17M rhodopsin. Our data indicate that augmented ATF4 signals during retinal degeneration plays a cytotoxic role by triggering photoreceptor cell death. Future ADRP therapy regulating ATF4 expression can be developed to treat retinal degenerative disorders associated with activated UPR. PMID:27144303

  9. Increased Risk of Acute Angle Closure in Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yu-Chieh; Liu, Chia-Jen; Hwang, De-Kuang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Catherine J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and acute angle closure during a 15-year follow-up period. Methods Using the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, we identified 382 RP patients based on the diagnostic code of RP (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) 362.74) made during 1996–2010, excluding subjects under age of 20 years at diagnosis or subjects undergoing lens extraction before the index date. The control group included 3820 randomly selected non-RP subjects matched with the RP patients in age, gender and the index date of diagnosis. The incidence of acute angle closure during the study period was observed based on an ICD-9-CM code of 365.22. Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test was used to determine the odds ratio (OR) of having acute angle closure in RP patients. Results The mean age at the diagnosis of RP was 51.1years (standard deviation [SD] 16.7). Acute angle closure occurred in 5 RP patients (1.3%) and in 15 controls (0.4%). The mean age with the acute angle closure was 53.3 years (SD 8.0) in RP patients and 64.6 years (SD 8.4) in controls (P = 0.015). After adjusting for age, gender and comorbid disorders, RP patients had 3.64-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.29–10.25, P<0.001) greater odds of having acute angle closure. After stratification for gender and age, the risk of acute angle closure in RP was higher in patients under age of 60 years (adjusted OR 11.84; 95% CI, 2.84–49.48) and male patients (adjusted OR 19.36; 95% CI, 3.43–109.40)(both P = 0.001). Conclusions RP patients had increased risk of acute angle closure than controls. Contrary to the fact that angle closure disease is more prevalent in elderly females in general population, acute angle closure attack occurred earlier in life and the risk was higher in males among RP patients. PMID:25222486

  10. Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with homozygous rhodopsin mutation E150K and non-coding cis-regulatory variants in CRX-binding regions of SAMD7

    PubMed Central

    Van Schil, Kristof; Karlstetter, Marcus; Aslanidis, Alexander; Dannhausen, Katharina; Azam, Maleeha; Qamar, Raheel; Leroy, Bart P.; Depasse, Fanny; Langmann, Thomas; De Baere, Elfride

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to unravel the molecular pathogenesis of an unusual retinitis pigmentosa (RP) phenotype observed in a Turkish consanguineous family. Homozygosity mapping revealed two candidate genes, SAMD7 and RHO. A homozygous RHO mutation c.448G > A, p.E150K was found in two affected siblings, while no coding SAMD7 mutations were identified. Interestingly, four non-coding homozygous variants were found in two SAMD7 genomic regions relevant for binding of the retinal transcription factor CRX (CRX-bound regions, CBRs) in these affected siblings. Three variants are located in a promoter CBR termed CBR1, while the fourth is located more downstream in CBR2. Transcriptional activity of these variants was assessed by luciferase assays and electroporation of mouse retinal explants with reporter constructs of wild-type and variant SAMD7 CBRs. The combined CBR2/CBR1 variant construct showed significantly decreased SAMD7 reporter activity compared to the wild-type sequence, suggesting a cis-regulatory effect on SAMD7 expression. As Samd7 is a recently identified Crx-regulated transcriptional repressor in retina, we hypothesize that these SAMD7 variants might contribute to the retinal phenotype observed here, characterized by unusual, recognizable pigment deposits, differing from the classic spicular intraretinal pigmentation observed in other individuals homozygous for p.E150K, and typically associated with RP in general. PMID:26887858