Science.gov

Sample records for retirement plans self-reported

  1. The Retirement Planning Specialty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Helen

    2002-01-01

    Workplace changes and increased longevity have heightened the need for retirement planning specialists. Specialists are beginning to focus more holistically on life planning and addressing the challenges of technology and the needs of low-income adults. (Contains 15 references.) (SK)

  2. Planning Your Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC.

    This guidebook on retirement planning helps potential retirees by raising important issues in such areas as changing roles and relationships, health and fitness, meaningful use of time, working options, financial and estate planning, and housing and lifestyle. The first section, on attitude and role adjustments, discusses support systems, changing…

  3. Planning Your Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC.

    This guidebook raises important issues for older workers to think about in planning for retirement. Sections of the book explore such areas as the following: changing roles and relationships; health and fitness; meaningful use of time, with a sampler of activities from which one may choose; working options, including a brief description of a…

  4. Retirement Planning Revisited: Retirement Plans Must Be Reviewed Periodically.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knopf, Winfield G.

    1994-01-01

    A number of economic and social factors suggest that this is an appropriate time for colleges and universities to review employee retirement plans. Information that employees should have for retirement planning is reviewed, and basic principles for institutions to use in selecting a pension company are outlined. (MSE)

  5. The Myth of Employee Planning for Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Malcolm H.

    1975-01-01

    A survey of male hourly-wage earners indicates employees face serious problems in planning for income security in retirement. Retirement preparation programs that supply information and technical planning expertise are needed to assist employees in realistic retirement planning. (EA)

  6. Retirement Planning with a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merikangas, Marilyn

    1983-01-01

    Points out that retirement planning seminars often are designed to impart the economic and pragmatic aspects while neglecting feelings that accompany this and other major life transitions. Indicates that consideration must be given to the social and psychological implications of retirement. (JOW)

  7. Retirement Planning the Easy Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl D.

    1996-01-01

    Options available to college faculty for planning their retirement benefits are described, including defined benefit plans, defined contribution plans, and methods for customizing a pension plan. Data for 1993 on American households owning interest-earning assets (passbook savings, money market deposit accounts, certificates of deposit, checking…

  8. Aging in Sweden, Part 1: Retirement Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skoglund, John

    1980-01-01

    Explores the relationship between retirement planning and demographic and attitudinal factors. One-third of the sample had planned for retirement. Planning was more common among males and high-status individuals. (Author)

  9. Plan Now to Prepare for Your Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersten, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    For teachers, in particular, the importance of early retirement investing has never been more critical. The reality is that, decades from now, when teachers arrive at retirement age, their current state teacher retirement plan may have changed substantially. As a result, they do not want to reach retirement and regret that they never considered…

  10. The Current State of Retirement Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Helen

    1989-01-01

    The author (1) identifies groups involved in retirement planning, (2) describes recent accomplishments within the field, (3) recommends ways to address unmet needs, and (4) identifies emerging trends. Trends in retirement planning include early retirement, differentiation between married and single prospective retirees, and competition for…

  11. Did the Great Recession influence retirement plans?

    PubMed

    Szinovacz, Maximiliane E; Davey, Adam; Martin, Lauren

    2015-04-01

    The recent recession constitutes one of the macro forces that may have influenced workers' retirement plans. We evaluate a multilevel model that addresses the influence of macro-, meso-, and micro-level factors on retirement plans, changes in these plans, and expected retirement age. Using data from Waves 8 and 9 of the Health and Retirement Study (N=2,618), we find that individuals with defined benefit plans are more prone to change toward plans to stop work before the stock market declined, whereas the opposite trend holds for those without pensions. Debts, ability to reduce work hours, and firm unionization also influenced retirement plans. Findings suggest retirement planning education may be particularly important for workers without defined pensions, especially in times of economic volatility. PMID:25651572

  12. An Introduction to NCOA's Retirement Planning Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Edmund W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the National Council on the Aging (NCOA)-Industry Consortium Retirement Planning Program, which consists of eight modules corresponding to eight major areas of retirement planning: life-style planning, financial planning, new careers, leisure time, health, interpersonal relationships, living arrangements, and community services. (SK)

  13. Retirement Planning Strategies for Midlife Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Judy; Nickols, Sharon Y.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses factors that influence women in their daily living (economic and demographic factors, feelings about mathematics ability, risk taking, and locus of control), retirement planning concerns of midlife women, retirement planning strategies and the role of educators in this planning, and social-psychological strategies. (CT)

  14. Retirement Plan Consortium Structures for K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevin, John

    2012-01-01

    As school districts continue to seek administrative efficiencies and cost reductions in the wake of severe budget pressures, the resources they devote to creating or expanding retirement plan consortia is increasing. Understanding how to structure a retirement plan consortium is paramount to successfully achieving the many objectives of…

  15. Retirement Plans of Instructional Faculty and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronister, Jay L.; Baldwin, Roger G.

    1996-01-01

    This analysis of the retirement plans of college and university faculty and staff used data from the 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty. It first determined the proportion of faculty who are age 55 or older by institutional type, discipline, gender, and minority/nonminority status and then analyzed their retirement plans using the same…

  16. Are You Planning and Saving for Retirement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakoboski, Paul

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, TIAA-CREF sponsored its first-ever "Retirement Confidence Survey of College and University Faculty" to discover the answer to this question: How well are faculty members taking advantage of employer-sponsored pension plans and saving for retirement? An additional objective of the project was to compare the survey's findings for higher…

  17. Youth Individual Development Accounts: Retirement Planning Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shobe, Marcia A.; Sturm, Stephanie L.

    2007-01-01

    Given the growing interest in a privatized Social Security system and the lack of adequate retirement planning among many people in the United States, many households are often ill prepared for retirement. The outlook for low-income populations is even bleaker because they are often not privy to the same financial education and asset-building…

  18. Planning for Retirement with a Tax-Sheltered Mutual Fund.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnee, Edward J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Greater attention has been focused on the role that employer-sponsored retirement plans and individual savings must play in ensuring retirement income security. Alternative tax retirement planning opportunities currently available to college personnel are explored. (MLW)

  19. Mythbusters: The Case for Retirement Income in DC Plans.

    PubMed

    Austin, Ron; Shepherd, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Myths persist about retirement income solutions in defined contribution (DC) plans. The authors put six common myths to the test: (1) that few plans offer a retirement income option, (2) that retirement is solely a product decision, (3) that retirement income options lack fiduciary clarity, (4) that it's difficult to implement a retirement income option, (5) that retirement income options can be viewed similarly to an asset class and (6) that retirement solutions are too difficult to communicate to participants. They explain why some chatter on the topic of retirement income solutions in DC plans is unfounded. PMID:27017796

  20. Life Planning: Preparing for Transitions and Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuss, Elizabeth; Schroeder, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Long-range career planning is difficult in the student affairs profession because of the lack of clearly defined career tracks and inherent job insecurities. The authors present and discuss strategies for planning for retirement and other late career options. (Author)

  1. Retirement plans, personal saving, and saving adequacy.

    PubMed

    Yakoboski, P

    2000-03-01

    This Issue Brief addresses three questions raised by recent trends in personal saving: How are national savings measured and what is the meaning of the trends in measured personal saving rates, given what is included and what is not included in those measures? What is the effect of retirement saving programs--in particular, 401(k) plans and individual retirement accounts (IRAs)--on personal saving levels? What are the implications of existing saving behavior for the retirement income security of today's workers? The National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA), the most commonly referenced gauge of personal saving, is a widely misunderstood measure. One could argue that a complete measure of saving would include increases in wealth through capital gains, but NIPA does not factor accrued and realized capital gains on stocks and other assets into the saving rate. By one measure, accounting for capital gains results in an aggregate personal saving rate of 33 percent--more than double the rate of four decades ago. A major policy question is the impact of tax-qualified retirement saving plans (i.e., IRAs and 401(k) plans) on personal saving rates. Empirical analysis of this issue is extremely challenging and findings have been contradictory. These programs now represent an enormous store of retirement-earmarked wealth in tax-deferred vehicles: Combined, such tax-deferred retirement accounts currently have assets of about $4 trillion. Ninety percent of IRA contributions are now the result of "rollovers" as employees leave employer plans, like 401(k) plans. While leakage from the system remains a challenge, the majority of the assets in the system can be expected to be available to fund workers' retirements. One could argue that, from a retirement income security perspective, workers in general are better off because IRA and 401(k) programs exist. Surely, many of the dollars in these programs would have been saved even without the programs; but they would not necessarily

  2. Retirement plan funding: how has legislation affected it?

    PubMed

    Smith, D

    1988-10-01

    Because of the changes in tax laws, accounting guidelines, and economic conditions, the "shelf life" of many retirement plans has expired. Financial managers need to examine the effects these changes have had on retirement plan funding, especially the effects the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 has produced. By using an evaluation method that examines the basic issues involved in retirement plan funding, financial managers can determine whether or not their retirement programs can continue to meet hospital objectives. This is the last article in a series on retirement plans. The first article in this series discussed the issues that affect the design of retirement plans. PMID:10302737

  3. 76 FR 4244 - Hybrid Retirement Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BG36 Hybrid Retirement Plans Correction In rule document 2010-25941 beginning on page 64123 in the issue of Tuesday, October 19, 2010, make the...

  4. 75 FR 81456 - Hybrid Retirement Plans; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... were published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, October 19, 2010 (75 FR 64123) providing guidance relating to certain provisions of the Internal Revenue Code that apply to hybrid defined benefit pension... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BG36 Hybrid Retirement Plans; Correction AGENCY:...

  5. A Single Person's Guide to Retirement Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC.

    This single person's retirement guide begins with an introduction that addresses the challenges of single living, the high dividends that planning pays, and the importance of attitude. Section II explores the changing roles and relationships in one's life, including aging parents, adult children, and a personal support network. Section III focuses…

  6. Extending the Integrated Model of Retirement Adjustment: Incorporating Mastery and Retirement Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Tarryn; Earl, Joanne K.; Muratore, Alexa M.

    2010-01-01

    Extending earlier research, this study explores individual (e.g. demographic and health characteristics), psychosocial (e.g. mastery and planning) and organizational factors (e.g. conditions of workforce exit) influencing retirement adjustment. Survey data were collected from 570 semi-retired and retired men and women aged 45 years and older.…

  7. New Tax Law Impairs Plans to Encourage Early Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    1987-01-01

    New federal tax law requiring employees to pay taxes on a large sum of money at one time rather than over the course of retirement makes college retirement "buyout plans" no longer feasible and hampers colleges' efforts to thin faculty ranks after the uncapping of the mandatory retirement age. (MSE)

  8. The evolution of Japanese employer-sponsored retirement plans.

    PubMed

    Rajnes, David

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the development of Japanese voluntary employer-sponsored retirement plans with an emphasis on recent trends. Until 2001, companies in Japan offered retirement benefits as lump-sum severance payments and/or benefits from one of two types of defined benefit (DB) pension plans. One type of DB plan was based on the occupational pension model used in the United States before the adoption of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA), but lacked the funding, vesting, and other protective features contained in ERISA. The other type of DB plan allowed companies to opt out of the earnings-related portion of social security, commonly referred to as "contracting out." Landmark laws passed in 2001 introduced a new generation of occupational retirement plans to employers and employees. One law increased funding requirements and enhanced employee protections for employer-sponsored DB plans, while a second law introduced defined contribution (DC) plans for several reasons, chiefly to increase retirement savings and help boost Japanese financial markets. These laws complemented earlier changes in the tax code and financial accounting standards already affecting employer-sponsored retirement plans. As a result, new retirement plan designs will replace most prereform era company retirement plans by 2012. In 2001, the experience of 401(k) plans in the United States, where 42 million participants had accumulated more than $1.8 trillion in assets over 20 years, attracted considerable attention among Japanese lawmakers finalizing provisions of the DC pension law. Even with government support and encouragement from the financial services industry, Japanese companies have not adopted these new DC plans in large numbers. As a result, occupational retirement plans in Japan have remained predominantly DB-a surprising development in light of the shift in a number of countries from DB to DC plans observed in recent decades. However, recent proposals to

  9. Is pre-retirement planning always good? An exploratory study of retirement adjustment among Hong Kong Chinese retirees.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Dannii Y

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of four types of pre-retirement planning activities (financial, health, social life, and psychological planning) on retirement adjustment were investigated in a sample of Chinese retirees residing in Hong Kong. This study consisted of two phases of data collection, pre-retirement and post-retirement phases. Pre-retirement planning behaviors and psychological health (including attitudes toward retirement, adjustment to retirement, anxiety toward retirement, psychological well-being (PWB), and psychological distress) six months before and after retirement were measured. The final sample consisted of 90 Hong Kong Chinese retirees. Compared with the pre-retirement phase, retirees exhibited more positive attitudes toward retirement and better adjustment after they had actually retired, whereas their level of anxiety and psychological distress remained low over time. Pre-retirement planning was found to be predictive of changes in psychological health, though its impact was not always positive depending on the type of planning activities. In particular, greater psychological planning was associated with positive attitudes toward retirement and better PWB, whereas more social life planning activities were associated with greater psychological distress. In addition to financial and health planning, psychological planning activities should also be prompted to facilitate a smooth adjustment to retirement. PMID:23072256

  10. Pre-Retirement Rehearsal Project: A Bibliography of Pre-Retirement Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellenberg, Donna

    This bibliography cites title, source/publisher, availability, and cost for information and materials on various aspects of pre-retirement planning. Materials may be specifically for the elderly/retired person or of general interest. Bibliographies and periodicals are included. These materials and information are listed under twenty-three…

  11. Financial Planning for Retirement: An Imperative for Baby Boomer Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, J. Conrad, Jr.; Kilpatrick, Beverly B.

    1998-01-01

    Many women fail to plan for retirement due to economic constraints, interrupted career paths, lower earnings, gender bias, gender-role socialization, self-esteem, role definition, locus of control, or risk tolerance. Retirement education must address women's specific issues regarding financial planning. (SK)

  12. Focus Your Future: A Woman's Guide to Retirement Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC.

    This guidebook addresses retirement planning for midlife women. Section 1 presents the woman an opportunity to assess herself today in terms of the roles she plays in various aspects of her life and in her relationships with others. It asks her to consider some of her plans, dreams, and things she would like to do in an ideal retirement situation.…

  13. Status of Individuals' Planning to Prepare for Retirement in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunay, Gulay; Bener, Ozgun

    2008-01-01

    This research was conducted in Ankara province for the purpose of examining the status of planning in preparation for retirement as an individual and as a family of individuals who show differences in educational level. Individuals who lived in Ankara province, who were 3 years from retirement according to age limit, and who had social security…

  14. An Argument for Early Retirement Incentive Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baenen, Leonard B.; Ernest, Robert C.

    1982-01-01

    Early retirement incentive programs are discussed as a humanitarian way of reducing payroll costs and rewarding long-tenured employees. The incentives to be considered, program communication, and problems found in incentive programs are addressed. (Author/MLF)

  15. Incorporating Employee Heterogeneity into Default Rules for Retirement Plan Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Manchester, Colleen Flaherty

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of incorporating heterogeneity into default rules by examining the choice between retirement plans at a firm that transitioned from a defined benefit (DB) to a defined contribution (DC) plan. The default plan for existing employees varied discontinuously depending on their age. Employing regression discontinuity techniques,…

  16. Paying for Retirement: Sex Differences in Inclusion in Employer-Provided Retirement Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines sex differences among Baby Boom workers in the likelihood of coverage by an employer-provided retirement plan. Design and Methods: This study used a sample of Baby Boom workers drawn from the 2009 Current Population Survey. Independent variables were selected to replicate as closely as possible those in two 1995…

  17. DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLANS, DEFINED BENEFIT PLANS, AND THE ACCUMULATION OF RETIREMENT WEALTH.

    PubMed

    Poterba, James; Rauh, Joshua; Venti, Steven; Wise, David

    2007-11-01

    The private pension structure in the United States, once dominated by defined benefit (DB) plans, is currently divided between defined contribution (DC) and DB plans. Wealth accumulation in DC plans depends on the participant's contribution behavior and on financial market returns, while accumulation in DB plans is sensitive to a participant's labor market experience and to plan parameters. This paper simulates the distribution of retirement wealth under representative DB and DC plans. It uses data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to explore how asset returns, earnings histories, and retirement plan characteristics contribute to the variation in retirement wealth outcomes. We simulate DC plan accumulation by randomly assigning individuals a share of wages that they and their employer contribute to the plan. We consider several possible asset allocation strategies, with asset returns drawn from the historical return distribution. Our DB plan simulations draw earnings histories from the HRS, and randomly assign each individual a pension plan drawn from a sample of large private and public defined benefit plans. The simulations yield distributions of both DC and DB wealth at retirement. Average retirement wealth accruals under current DC plans exceed average accruals under private sector DB plans, although DC plans are also more likely to generate very low retirement wealth outcomes. The comparison of current DC plans with more generous public sector DB plans is less definitive, because public sector DB plans are more generous on average than their private sector counterparts. PMID:21057597

  18. An Experimental Comparison of Retirement Planning Intervention Seminars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, Douglas A.; Mowen, John C.; Jacobs-Lawson, Joy M.

    2003-01-01

    After 1 year, the efficacy of three retirement seminars (financial planning information, n=30; financial goal-setting, n=25; combined information and goal-setting, n=25) was measured. Compared to those of 26 controls, goal clarity, planning, and savings practices of seminar participants were most changed. Strongest impact was on those in combined…

  19. Career-Related Variables and Planned Retirement Age: An Extension of Beehr's Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gary A.

    1999-01-01

    A study of 172 older workers found that career commitment and occupational-goal attainment play a central role in planned retirement age. Age and retirement-income satisfaction had the most significant relationship to planned retirement age. Job satisfaction was not strongly related to retirement intentions. (SK)

  20. Plan now to make your retirement active, productive.

    PubMed

    Schlepp, S

    1989-12-01

    In his book Planning to the Years Ahead, Lester I. Tenney, PhD, professor emeritus at Arizona State University, Tempe, links Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs to retirement planning. According to Maslow, economic and security needs can be achieved through a family environment (eg, food clothing, shelter), and social acceptance, self-worth, and self-satisfaction can be achieved from social interaction, work, or leisure activities. After the basic needs of food, clothing, and shelter have been achieved, people are able to move to the next level of achieving safety and security. The level of dependency that people have on satisfying these needs through work will determine how well they are at adapting to retirement. The more people depend on work alone, the harder will be the adjustment; people who are less dependent on work will find retirement easier to accept. PMID:2619297

  1. Comparison of self-reported and biomedical data on hypertension and diabetes: findings from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS)

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We examined the level of agreement between biomedical and self-reported measurements of hypertension and diabetes in a Chinese national community sample, and explored associations of the agreement and possible contextual effects among provinces and geographic regions in China. Design Secondary analysis of a cohort sample. Setting and participants Community samples were drawn from the national baseline survey of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS, 2011–2012) through multistage probability sampling, which included households with members 45 years of age or above with a total sample size of 17 708 individuals. Outcome measures Sensitivity, specificity and κ were used as measurements of agreements or validity; variance of validity measures among provinces and communities was estimated using random-effects models. Results Self-reports for hypertension and diabetes showed high specificity (96.3% and 98.3%, respectively) but low sensitivity (56.3% and 61.5%, respectively). Agreement between self-reported data and biomedical measurements was moderate for both hypertension (κ 0.57) and diabetes (κ 0.65), with respondents who were older, of higher socioeconomic status, better educated and who had hospital admissions in the past 12 months showing stronger agreements than their counterparts. Large and significant variations in the sensitivity among provinces for hypertension, and among communities for both hypertension and diabetes, could neither be attributed to the effects of respondents’ characteristics nor to the contextual effects of city–village differences. Conclusions As a considerable number of people in the overall sample were unaware of their conditions, self-reports will lead to an underestimation of the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes. However, in more developed communities or provinces, self-reported data can be a reliable estimate of the prevalence of the two conditions. Further investigations of

  2. Pre-Retirement Planning: A Necessary Dress Rehearsal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Mary Elizabeth

    Studies seem to indicate that preparation for retirement is the key to its success. Planning includes these basic ingredients: (1) maintaining regular health habits; (2) role flexibility--the retiree needs a healthy self image not bound to the self-as-worker; (3) activity that is constructive and personally meaningful; and (4) continuance of…

  3. The $500,000 Quest. Common-Sense Retirement Planning for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Ione D.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the need for retirement planning and offers suggestions for building a nest egg. Suggests that pensions are not sufficient and that other investments are crucial to ensure a comfortable retirement. Includes resources and a plan for saving. (JOW)

  4. Report on Nisei Retirement Planning Conference (San Francisco, Calif. November 19-21, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Japanese American Citizens League, San Francisco, CA.

    This document presents a report on the Nisei Retirement Planning Conference. First, a history of the organization of the conference is provided. Then, a series of working papers on the Nisei and retirement are given. These papers address issues such as the following: 1) retirement as a national concern, 2) general retirement issues (physical…

  5. An Introduction to Cost-of-Living Adjustments in Public Retirement Plans: Details Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Penelope R.; Jennings, William P.; Phillips, G. Michael

    2016-01-01

    While financial planning students are expected to be able to understand client retirement plans, subtle differences in cost-of-living adjustments can have major impact on the success of client retirement plans. This teaching note compares the cost-of-living adjustments in the largest government sponsored retirement systems and a hypothetical…

  6. Information architecture: Standards adoption and retirement process service action plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this Service Action Plan is to announce, as well as provide, a high-level outline of a new Departmental process for the adoption and retirement of information technology standards. This process supports the implementation of a Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture. This plan was prepared with the Department of Energy information technology standards customers and stakeholders in mind. The process described in this plan will be serviced primarily by staff from the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Information Management with assistance from designated program and site Information Technology Standards Points of Contact. We welcome any comments regarding this new Departmental process and encourage the proposal of information technology standards for adoption or retirement.

  7. Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carp, Frances M., Ed.

    This comprehensive look at retirement as a transitional life stage was instituted by the Federal Government in order to initiate theory building in this much neglected area. Conferences participated in by experts were held at intervals so as to maximize interactive thinking. Following this give and take, participants formulated theoretical models…

  8. 75 FR 64123 - Hybrid Retirement Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ...This document contains final regulations providing guidance relating to certain provisions of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) that apply to hybrid defined benefit pension plans. These regulations provide guidance on changes made by the Pension Protection Act of 2006, as amended by the Worker, Retiree, and Employer Recovery Act of 2008. These regulations affect sponsors, administrators,......

  9. Conflict, Pre-Retirement Planning, and Mental and Physical Health Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benner, Larry; And Others

    In both industry and government, the current response to the problems of retirement is the development of programs for pre-retirement counseling and planning. A group of older workers who were offered a comprehensive retirement planning program by their company was examined to determine reasons for both attendance and non-attendance in the…

  10. Replacement Ratio Projections in Defined Contribution Retirement Plans: Time, Salary Growth, Investment Return, and Real Income.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Michael; King, Francis P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a method of projecting inflation-adjusted (real) retirement benefit replacement ratios for defined contribution retirement plans such as TIAA-CREF (Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association--College Retirement Equities Fund). The illustrated ratios are comparable to the ratios in defined benefit plans that result…

  11. The Process of Retirement Planning Scale (PRePS): Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noone, Jack H.; Stephens, Christine; Alpass, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    Although a substantial proportion of the western population is approaching retirement age, little is known about how they are preparing for the future. Much attention has been paid to the consumption of educational material and retirement wealth in the present literature, but the process of retirement planning has been ignored. S. L. Friedman and…

  12. Employees' Intentions to Retire Early: A Case of Planned Behavior and Anticipated Work Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dam, Karen; van der Vorst, Janine D. M.; van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the early retirement intentions of 346 older Dutch employees by extending the theory of planned behavior with anticipated work conditions. The results showed that employees who felt a pressure from their spouse to retire early had a strong intention to leave the work force before the official retirement age, that is 65.…

  13. Goal Clarity and Financial Planning Activities as Determinants of Retirement Savings Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stawski, Robert S.; Hershey, Douglas A.; Jacobs-Lawson, Joy M.

    2007-01-01

    Retirement counselors, financial service professionals, and retirement intervention specialists routinely emphasize the importance of developing clear goals for the future; however, few empirical studies have focused on the benefits of retirement goal setting. In the present study, the extent to which goal clarity and financial planning activities…

  14. Legacy system retirement plan for HANDI 2000 business management system

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.E.

    1998-09-29

    documentation baseline rather than to ensure the ability to reestablish an operational production system. The remainder of this document describes the planning for the removal of the identified systems from service at Hanford, The retirement requirements, planning schedules and costs are covered in the body of the document.

  15. 26 CFR 301.6057-1 - Employee retirement benefit plans; identification of participant with deferred vested retirement...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... church plan described in section 414 (d) or (e). (4) Filing requirements. Information relating to the... benefit need not be a nonforfeitable benefit within the meaning of section 411(a) for the filing... subject to filing requirement. The term “employee retirement benefit plan” means a plan to which...

  16. [A Program to Prepare Older Workers for Retirement and Interest Community Groups in Pre-Retirement Planning.] Second Annual Report, September 1, 1968 to August 31, 1969. Drake University Pre-Retirement Planning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake Univ., Des Moines, IA. Pre-Retirement Planning Center.

    The project was designed to develop, and evaluate the effectiveness of a pre-retirement planning program. The project, in its second year of operation, has had 575 participants who attended a seven-week series of programs covering the topics of employment after retirement, estate planning, company fringe benefits, continuing education,…

  17. Using Proactivity, Time Discounting, and the Theory of Planned Behavior to Identify Predictors of Retirement Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Barbara; Loe, David; Hesketh, Beryl

    2012-01-01

    This study developed and tested a model to identify the predictors of retirement planning based on an extension of the theory of planned behavior ([TPB], Ajzen, 1991) that included individual differences in proactivity and time discounting. The results showed that personal attitudes, sense of control, social influence, and stable traits have a…

  18. The King Pre-Retirement Checklist: Assessing Differences in Pre-Retirement Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zitzow, Darryl; King, Donald N.

    In an effort to assess the retirement preparedness of Midwestern populations above the age of 28, the King Pre-Retirement Checklist was administered to a sampling of 458 persons randomly selected and proportionally stratified by geographic location and community size. Factors examined were financial, social, family cohesion, mobility/health,…

  19. Retirement Financial Planning and the RN: An Integrative Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Keele, Shanna; Alpert, Patricia T

    2015-10-01

    This integrative literature review examined the current research on RN retirement. The review identified 3 critical gaps in knowledge: (a) minimal knowledge regarding the economic impact on RN retirement, (b) incomplete information regarding the demographics of RN retirement, and (c) a scarcity of prospective longitudinal RN workforce studies. Future research must address these gaps to better address RN workforce sustainability. PMID:26426132

  20. Planning for Retirement Security: What Helps or Hinders Women in the Middle Years?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Judy Sheaks; Nickols, Sharon Y.

    1988-01-01

    A study examined the retirement planning of women between 40 and 55 years of age within the framework of family resource management. Personal characteristics inhibiting retirement planning were fear of financial risk, lack of perceived personal control, unwillingness to take risks, lack of belief in control of one's own life, and math anxiety.…

  1. 76 FR 6112 - Federal Benefit Payments Under Certain District of Columbia Retirement Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... under the retirement plans for District of Columbia teachers, police officers, and firefighters. See 75 FR 71047. ] The original comment period closed on January 21, 2011. By letter dated January 14, 2011... June 30, 1997, under the retirement plans for District of Columbia teachers, police officers,...

  2. Antecedents and Consequences of Retirement Planning and Decision-Making: A Meta-Analysis and Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topa, Gabriela; Moriano, Juan Antonio; Depolo, Marco; Alcover, Carlos-Maria; Morales, J. Francisco

    2009-01-01

    In this study, meta-analytic procedures were used to examine the relationships between retirement planning, retirement decision and their antecedent and consequences. Our review of the literature generated 341 independent samples obtained from 99 primary studies with 188,222 participants. A small effect size (ES) for antecedents of retirement…

  3. Knowing When to Retire: The First Step towards Financial Planning in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kock, Tan Hoe; Yoong, Folk Jee

    2011-01-01

    This article draws upon expected retirement age cohorts as a main determinant to financial planning preparation in Malaysia. The return rate was 55% from 600 questionnaires distributed. Five hypotheses were analyzed using hierarchical and stepwise regression analysis. The results revealed that expected retirement age cohort variables made…

  4. Expanding the Investment Options in an Employer's Retirement Plan: A Success Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, Suzanne; Barker, Paul D.

    1986-01-01

    The American Council on Education's 2-year process of investigation, study, and selection that resulted in the council's movement from TIAA/CREF as its only available retirement plan, to a total of 15 retirement options offered by two insured annuity companies and two mutual fund companies is described. (MLW)

  5. Retirement and wealth.

    PubMed

    Gustman, A L; Steinmeier, T L

    of benefits from deferred claiming in their measure of the gain to deferring retirement. On the one hand, early retirees are seen not to defer benefit acceptance despite the actuarial advantage. On the other hand, later retirees are said to defer their retirement in order to gain the advantage of deferring benefit acceptance. Our empirical analysis is based on data from the first four waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a longitudinal survey of 12,652 respondents from 7,607 households with at least one respondent who was born from 1931 to 1941. Our analysis also uses linked pension and Social Security data together with respondents' records from the HRS. We also evaluate a number of specific features of retirement models and suggest improvements. We develop a measure of the future value of pensions and Social Security--the premium value--that is not subject to a problem plaguing other measures in that it handles the accrual of benefits under defined contribution plans very well. We also introduce a new definition of retirement status that blends information on objective hours worked with subjective self-reports of retirement status. Our findings also explore the effects of Social Security incentives on partial retirement and consider the importance of incorporating partial retirement in any study of the relation of Social Security to retirement behavior. PMID:12428511

  6. 75 FR 81543 - Additional Rules Regarding Hybrid Retirement Plans; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ...) that was published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, October 19, 2010 (75 FR 64197) providing... publication of the notice of proposed rulemaking (REG-132554-08), which was the subject of FR Doc. 2010-25942... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BI16 Additional Rules Regarding Hybrid Retirement...

  7. Self-reported change in quality of life with retirement and later cognitive decline: prospective data from the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Vercambre, Marie-Noël; Okereke, Olivia I.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Grodstein, Francine; Kang, Jae H.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether a positive transition into retirement may be associated with later cognitive ageing, we included a subset of 4,926 Nurses’ Health Study participants who retired from work at ages 60–69, then provided a subjective assessment of the change in overall quality of life (QOL) with retirement. Subsequently (range: 1 month to 4.7 years later), when all were aged 70+ years, they completed a baseline telephone cognitive battery evaluating global cognition, episodic memory and executive function. They had up to three follow-up cognitive assessments. Controlling for various occupational factors before retirement and socioeconomic, lifestyle, and health-related factors as of the baseline cognitive assessment, we used generalized linear models for repeated measures to estimate mean differences in rates of cognitive decline across categories of QOL transition at retirement: “worse”, “same” or “better”. Over a median 6 years of follow-up, the global cognitive score change was −0.123 on average. Compared with women who reported no change in QOL at retirement (31%), women who reported improvement (61%) showed a significantly slower rate of cognitive decline (difference= +0.011 95% CI =0.004, 0.019). This mean difference was equivalent to that observed between women who were 2 years apart in age. No significant differences in cognitive decline rates were observed for the women who reported worsened QOL (8%). Secondary analyses to address possible reverse causation showed robust associations. A positive transition into retirement was associated with better maintenance of cognitive function over time in aging women. These findings need to be replicated in other populations. PMID:27060944

  8. Self-Reported Change in Quality of Life with Retirement and Later Cognitive Decline: Prospective Data from the Nurses' Health Study.

    PubMed

    Vercambre, Marie-Noël; Okereke, Olivia I; Kawachi, Ichiro; Grodstein, Francine; Kang, Jae H

    2016-04-01

    To investigate whether a positive transition into retirement may be associated with later cognitive aging, we included a subset of 4,926 Nurses' Health Study participants who retired from work at ages 60-69, then provided a subjective assessment of the change in overall quality of life (QOL) with retirement. Subsequently (range: 1 month to 4.7 years later), when all were aged 70+ years, they completed a baseline telephone cognitive battery evaluating global cognition, episodic memory, and executive function. They had up to three follow-up cognitive assessments. Controlling for various occupational factors before retirement and socioeconomic, lifestyle, and health-related factors as of the baseline cognitive assessment, we used generalized linear models for repeated measures to estimate mean differences in rates of cognitive decline across categories of QOL transition at retirement: "worse", "same", or "better". Over a median 6 years of follow-up, the global cognitive score change was -0.123 on average. Compared with women who reported no change in QOL at retirement (31%), women who reported improvement (61%) showed a significantly slower rate of cognitive decline (difference = +0.011 95% CI = 0.004, 0.019). This mean difference was equivalent to that observed between women who were 2 years apart in age. No significant differences in cognitive decline rates were observed for the women who reported worsened QOL (8%). Secondary analyses to address possible reverse causation showed robust associations. A positive transition into retirement was associated with better maintenance of cognitive function over time in aging women. These findings need to be replicated in other populations. PMID:27060944

  9. A Guide to Planning Your Retirement Finances. A Report by the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Retirement Income and Employment of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This committee print provides workers with a general overview of the steps involved in planning retirement income and encourages them to start laying down concrete financial plans now for their retirement years. It begins by outlining a framework for planning retirement finances. These specific steps are discussed: gathering information on current…

  10. Which Teachers Choose a Defined Contribution Pension Plan? Evidence from the Florida Retirement System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chingos, Matthew M.; West, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2002, public school teachers in Florida have been permitted to choose between a defined benefit (DB) and a defined contribution (DC) retirement plan. We exploit this unique policy environment to study new teachers' revealed preferences over pension plan structures. Roughly 30 percent of teachers hired between 2003 and 2008 selected the DC…

  11. Post-Retirement Benefit Increases and the Adequacy of Benefits in State Pension Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strate, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Examines post-retirement benefit increases in 76 large state pension plans and the impact of such increases on the purchasing power and adequacy of pension benefits. Although nearly all plans increased benefits for retirees, increases were much less than needed to maintain the purchasing power of pension benefits. (Author/JAC)

  12. 26 CFR 1.408-8 - Distribution requirements for individual retirement plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Distribution requirements for individual... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408-8 Distribution requirements for individual retirement plans. The following...

  13. 26 CFR 1.408-7 - Reports on distributions from individual retirement plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reports on distributions from individual... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408-7 Reports on distributions from individual retirement plans. (a) Requirement of report....

  14. 26 CFR 1.408-8 - Distribution requirements for individual retirement plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Distribution requirements for individual... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408-8 Distribution requirements for individual retirement plans. The following questions...

  15. 26 CFR 1.408-7 - Reports on distributions from individual retirement plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reports on distributions from individual... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408-7 Reports on distributions from individual retirement plans. (a) Requirement...

  16. Convergence of long-term care planning and retirement planning at the work place.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ajith

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing expectation that the private-sector should provide needed solutions to pressing problems in long-term care. Long-term care insurance has figured prominently in recent discussions. Within the long-term care insurance market, the potential of the employer in making such insurance available to employees has been discussed extensively. This paper traces the increasing convergence of retirement planning and long-term care planning at the work place. The long-term care insurance market has come a long way, and the employer-sponsored segment of the market has recorded the highest rate of growth in recent times. Furthermore, the employer-sponsored market is beginning to diversify. Low take-up rates still remain a problem. Recent rapid growth of the market coupled with the federal government's involvement as an employer offering long-term care insurance is bound to expand the market further. PMID:15148046

  17. 31 CFR 10.4 - Eligibility for enrollment as enrolled agent or enrolled retirement plan agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eligibility for enrollment as enrolled agent or enrolled retirement plan agent. 10.4 Section 10.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Rules Governing...

  18. Retirement Planning and Counseling: Issues and Challenges for Teachers in Public Schools in the Sekondi Circuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kwesi Nkum; Aggrey, Ellen Aba Munkua

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore retirement planning, challenges, and counseling among teachers of public schools in the Sekondi Circuit in the Western Region, Ghana. A sample of 50 teachers was selected through convenience sampling. Only teachers who expressed interest in participating in the study were sampled. The main instrument for…

  19. 75 FR 64197 - Additional Rules Regarding Hybrid Retirement Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... Plan No. 4 of 1978 (43 FR 47713), the Secretary of the Treasury has interpretive jurisdiction over the... April 11, 1988 (53 FR 11876), as part of a package of regulations that also included proposed... cross-testing rules applicable to cash balance plans (67 FR 76123). The 2002 proposed regulations...

  20. Satisfaction With Work-Life Balance and the Career and Retirement Plans of US Oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Shanafelt, Tait D.; Raymond, Marilyn; Kosty, Michael; Satele, Daniel; Horn, Leora; Pippen, John; Chu, Quyen; Chew, Helen; Clark, William Benton; Hanley, Amy E.; Sloan, Jeff; Gradishar, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate satisfaction with work-life balance (WLB) and career plans of US oncologists. Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology conducted a survey of US oncologists evaluating satisfaction with WLB and career plans between October 2012 and March 2013. The sample included equal numbers of men and women from all career stages. Results Of 2,998 oncologists contacted, 1,490 (49.7%) returned surveys. From 1,117 oncologists (37.3% of overall sample) completing full-length surveys, we evaluated satisfaction with WLB and career plans among the 1,058 who were not yet retired. The proportion of oncologists satisfied with WLB (n = 345; 33.4%) ranked lower than that reported for all other medical specialties in a recent national study. Regarding career plans, 270 oncologists (26.5%) reported a moderate or higher likelihood of reducing their clinical work hours in the next 12 months, 351 (34.3%) indicated a moderate or higher likelihood of leaving their current position within 24 months, and 273 (28.5%) planned to retire before 65 years of age. Multivariable analyses found women oncologists (odds ratio [OR], 0.458; P < .001) and those who devoted greater time to patient care (OR for each additional hour, 0.977; P < .001) were less likely to be satisfied with WLB. Satisfaction with WLB and burnout were the strongest predictors of intent to reduce clinical work hours and leave current position on multivariable analysis. Conclusion Satisfaction with WLB among US oncologists seems lower than for other medical specialties. Dissatisfaction with WLB shows a strong relationship with plans to reduce hours and leave current practice. Given the pending US oncologist shortage, additional studies exploring interactions among WLB, burnout, and career satisfaction and their impact on career and retirement plans are warranted. PMID:24616305

  1. The Self-Reported Impact of Graduate Program Completion on the Careers and Plans of Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahy, Patrick J.; Spencer, Bob; Halinski, Tara

    2008-01-01

    The Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University, commenced a survey of all graduates of its two programs, the master of distance education (MDE) degree, and the graduate diploma (GD) in technology, in late 2006. Alumni were asked how program completion had affected their careers, and their plans for the future. A total of 84 graduates…

  2. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(2)-1 - Payments under employers' plans on account of retirement, sickness or accident disability...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... retirement, sickness or accident disability, medical or hospitalization expenses, or death. 31.3306(b)(2)-1... Payments under employers' plans on account of retirement, sickness or accident disability, medical or... dependents), on account of: (1) An employee's retirement, (2) Sickness or accident disability of an...

  3. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(2)-1 - Payments under employers' plans on account of retirement, sickness or accident disability...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... retirement, sickness or accident disability, medical or hospitalization expenses, or death. 31.3306(b)(2)-1... Payments under employers' plans on account of retirement, sickness or accident disability, medical or... dependents), on account of: (1) An employee's retirement, (2) Sickness or accident disability of an...

  4. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(2)-1 - Payments under employers' plans on account of retirement, sickness or accident disability...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... retirement, sickness or accident disability, medical or hospitalization expenses, or death. 31.3306(b)(2)-1... Payments under employers' plans on account of retirement, sickness or accident disability, medical or... dependents), on account of: (1) An employee's retirement, (2) Sickness or accident disability of an...

  5. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(2)-1 - Payments under employers' plans on account of retirement, sickness or accident disability...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... retirement, sickness or accident disability, medical or hospitalization expenses, or death. 31.3306(b)(2)-1... Payments under employers' plans on account of retirement, sickness or accident disability, medical or... dependents), on account of: (1) An employee's retirement, (2) Sickness or accident disability of an...

  6. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(2)-1 - Payments under employers' plans on account of retirement, sickness or accident disability...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... retirement, sickness or accident disability, medical or hospitalization expenses, or death. 31.3306(b)(2)-1... Payments under employers' plans on account of retirement, sickness or accident disability, medical or... dependents), on account of: (1) An employee's retirement, (2) Sickness or accident disability of an...

  7. Predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students using an augmented Theory of Planned Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rajah-Kanagasabai, Camilla J.; Roberts, Lynne D.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior model, augmented by descriptive norms and justifications, for predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students. A convenience sample of 205 research active Western Australian university students (47 male, 158 female, ages 18–53 years, M = 22, SD = 4.78) completed an online survey. There was a low level of engagement in research misconduct, with approximately one in seven students reporting data fabrication and one in eight data falsification. Path analysis and model testing in LISREL supported a parsimonious two step mediation model, providing good fit to the data. After controlling for social desirability, the effect of attitudes, subjective norms, descriptive norms and perceived behavioral control on student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices was mediated by justifications and then intention. This revised augmented model accounted for a substantial 40.8% of the variance in student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices, demonstrating its predictive utility. The model can be used to target interventions aimed at reducing student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices. PMID:25983709

  8. 'Lavender retirement': a questionnaire survey of lesbian, gay and bisexual people's accommodation plans for old age.

    PubMed

    Neville, Stephen; Henrickson, Mark

    2010-12-01

    A global increase in older people will also mean an increase in the numbers of lesbian, gay and bisexual people requiring residential support. All health practitioners working with older people need to be aware of the existence of older lesbian, gay and bisexual people in order to provide health care that is appropriate. This study describes lesbian, gay and bisexual people's accommodation plans for old age through a cross-sectional quantitative survey design. Participants were recruited through mainstream and lesbian, gay and bisexual media and venues. A total of 2269 participants completed the 133-item survey. When asked about what accommodation plans they had for their older years lesbian, gay and bisexual people identified that they were least likely to choose living in a retirement community/facility. However, if unable to live independently the majority of respondents identified they would prefer to live in a retirement facility that specifically catered for people who did not identify as heterosexual. This study has found that the residential support sector needs to be prepared to provide a health service that is person-centred, free from discriminatory practices and meets the needs of all health consumers regardless of sexual orientation. PMID:21129111

  9. Factors Associated with Seeking and Using Professional Retirement-Planning Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, So-hyun; Grable, John E.

    2001-01-01

    Results of an analysis of the 1998 Retirement Confidence Survey (n=711) showed that women who had higher incomes, exhibited better financial behaviors, had more positive attitudes toward retirement, and exhibited a higher level of risk tolerance were more likely to seek professional help when making retirement decisions. (Contains 49 references.)…

  10. 31 CFR 10.4 - Eligibility to become an enrolled agent, enrolled retirement plan agent, or registered tax return...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... under the provisions of this part. (b) Enrollment as a retirement plan agent upon examination. The... any practitioner under the provisions of this part. (c) Designation as a registered tax return... practitioner under the provisions of this part. (d) Enrollment of former Internal Revenue......

  11. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(10)-1 - Payments under certain employers' plans after retirement, disability, or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Payments under certain employers' plans after retirement, disability, or death. 31.3306(b)(10)-1 Section 31.3306(b)(10)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION...

  12. 26 CFR 31.3121(a)(13)-1 - Payments under certain employers' plans after retirement, disability, or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Payments under certain employers' plans after retirement, disability, or death. 31.3121(a)(13)-1 Section 31.3121(a)(13)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION...

  13. 31 CFR 10.6 - Term and renewal of status as an enrolled agent, enrolled retirement plan agent, or registered...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... See 26 CFR part 300. (7) Forms. Forms required for renewal may be obtained by sending a written... Revenue Service will publish in the Internal Revenue Bulletin (see 26 CFR 601.601(d)(2)(ii)(b)) and on the... Revenue Code and effective tax administration. (ii) Enrolled retirement plan agents. To qualify...

  14. 26 CFR 301.6652-3 - Failure to file information with respect to employee retirement benefit plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure to file information with respect to employee retirement benefit plan. 301.6652-3 Section 301.6652-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Additions to the Tax, Additional Amounts,...

  15. 31 CFR 10.5 - Application to become an enrolled agent, enrolled retirement plan agent, or registered tax return...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Application to become an enrolled agent, enrolled retirement plan agent, or registered tax return preparer. 10.5 Section 10.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Rules Governing Authority to Practice §...

  16. Individual account retirement plans: an analysis of the 2007 survey of consumer finances, with market adjustments to June 2009.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Craig

    2009-08-01

    LATEST SCF DATA: This Issue Brief assesses the current status of Americans' savings for retirement by examining the incidence of individual account plans among families, as well as the average amount of assets accumulated in these accounts. The 2007 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF), the Federal Reserve Board's triennial survey of wealth, is the basis for this study, as it is a leading source of data on Americans' wealth, provides detailed information on retirement plan incidence and account balances among families, and is the latest available. ACCOUNTING FOR THE ECONOMIC DOWNTURN: While 2007 SCF is the most comprehensive and current survey of Americans' finances, its timing was unfortunate due to the significant downturn in the economy in 2008 just after the survey was released. To account for that change, this analysis provides estimates of the changes in asset values from the end of 2007 to mid-June 2009 for individual account plan balances. The account balances of the defined contribution plans and IRAs are adjusted based on the asset allocation reported within the plans by using equity market returns and bond market returns from January 1, 2008, to June 19, 2009. MEDIAN ASSET LEVELS FOR DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLANS: Among all families with a defined contribution plan in 2007, the median (mid-point) plan balance was $31,800, up 16 percent from 2004. According to EBRI estimates, this dropped 16.4 percent (to $26,578) from year-end 2007 to mid-June 2009. Losses were higher for families with more than $100,000 a year in income (down 22 percent) or having a net worth in the top 10 percent (down 28 percent). MEDIAN ASSET LEVELS FOR IRA/KEOGH PLANS: Among all families with an IRA/Keogh plan, the median value of their plan was $34,000 in 2007, up 3 percent from 2004. EBRI estimates this median value dropped 15 percent (to $28,955) from year-end 2007 to mid-June 2009. LESS THAN HALF OF ALL FAMILIES HAVE A RETIREMENT PLAN THROUGH A CURRENT JOB: In 2007, 40.6 percent of

  17. Ah, Retirement! Hmm, Retirement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Jack O.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the disadvantages of compulsory retirement at age 65 for senior business executives and suggests several possible ways companies can make good use of the experience and expertise of retirement-age executives. (Available from Business Horizons, School of Business, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47401; $2.50, single copy) (JG)

  18. Putting off Tomorrow to Do What You Want Today: Planning for Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gary A.; Rau, Barbara L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we note that in the coming years, a larger number of people will be experiencing retirement for a longer period of time than ever before and that despite this fact, many will find themselves unprepared for this stage of their lives. We review the literature on retirement preparation, structuring our review around the key questions…

  19. Knowledge capture and the retirement of the director of finance: succession planning in the San Mateo County Human Services Agency.

    PubMed

    Winship, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Concern over the impending retirement of several top-level managers led a county agency to engage in efforts aimed at more efficient succession management. Administrators developed plans to prevent the loss of invaluable knowledge and wisdom accompanying retirement of experienced agency leaders. The agency's Director of Finance (DoF) was one of the first key figures projected to retire, and a succession plan was implemented to transfer his knowledge for use after his departure. The knowledge transfer process involved three stages, including: (1) employing the DoF as teacher, having him develop curricula and conduct trainings; (2) engaging the DoF as mentor, allowing an existing staff member and the DoF's successor to shadow and be coached by the DoF; and (3) developing a knowledge management system that could be used after the DoF departed. This case study describes the knowledge transfer process and experiences shared by the DoF and this agency. PMID:22409615

  20. Preparing for asset retirement.

    PubMed

    Luecke, Randall W; Reinstein, Alan

    2003-04-01

    Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 143 requires organizations to recognize a liability for an asset retirement obligation when it is incurred--even if that occurs far in advance of the asset's planned retirement. For example, organizations must recognize future costs associated with medical equipment disposal that carries hazardous material legal obligations. PMID:12735191

  1. Retirement Plan Participation in an Era of Change: The Case of a Rural Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Elizabeth A.; Bokemeier, Janet L.; Loveridge, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Individual savings are critical for retirement as government and employer-based provisions fade or become less secure. Rural communities are vulnerable given their higher proportion of elderly and more who rely on Social Security. Using a telephone survey of working-age residents in Michigan's rural Upper Peninsula, this research investigates…

  2. Pre-Retirement Rehearsal Project: Money to Retire On.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellenberg, Donna

    This sixth in a series of six packages of instructional materials developed by the Pre-Retirement Rehearsal Project contains a student's pre-retirement booklet specifically intended for adults with limited reading ability and teacher's guide, which consider financial planning for retirement, including such topics as types of income, Social…

  3. Retirement Preparation: Growing Corporate Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aging and Work: A Journal on Age, Work and Retirement, 1980

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the nation's largest corporations on their attitudes toward retirement and older workers revealed a heightened awareness of inflation's effect on retirees and of the need for retirement planning programs. Though few such programs presently exist, interest in employer-employee cooperation in retirement preparation is rising. (SK)

  4. Retirement: The Challenge of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, E. Michael, Ed.

    Intended for persons in their 50s and 60s who are seriously thinking about retirement and younger people who want to learn about aging and retirement, this book was developed as a companion piece to the training program offered to business and nonprofit organizations by the University of Southern Maine retirement planning team. Most of the…

  5. Retirement Resources Inventory: Construction, Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cindy S. Y.; Earl, Joanne K.

    2012-01-01

    The scientific investigation of the relationship between resources and retirement well-being is impeded by the lack of proper measurement of resources. This study reports on the development of an inventory that assesses resources relevant to retirement well-being. The 35-item Retirement Resources Inventory (RRI) is a self-report measure consisting…

  6. Disability retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Eligibility for disability retirement is discussed. General guidelines and a few standards are given. Usually the same basic medical principles apply to the evaluation of claims for disability retirement as apply to determining medical suitability for initial employment.

  7. Retirement and Other Departure Plans of Instructional Faculty and Staff in Higher Education Institutions. 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF-93). Statistical Analysis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronister, Jay L.; Baldwin, Roger G.; Conley, Valerie M.

    This study examined retirement and other departure plans of full- and part-time faculty and staff in higher education institutions using data from the 1988 and 1993 National Studies of Postsecondary Faculty. Among the study's findings were: 22 percent of full-time and 38 percent of part-time faculty planned to leave their current position within…

  8. Spend Now or Spend Later: The Role of a Business Education and Critical Thinking Skills in Increasing Retirement Plan Saving Rates for New, Young Enrollees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arling, Priscilla A.; Kirby, Jill; Saajasto, Kegan

    2015-01-01

    For college graduates entering the workforce, contributing to an employer-sponsored 401(k) retirement plan can be an important way of saving for the future. However, contribution rates for young people in these plans are far below recommended percentages, leading to concerns about future financial stability for these individuals. Prior work has…

  9. Retiring Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnell, Eileen, Ed.; Lodge, Caroline, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Retiring Lives" presents fourteen personal real life stories from people at various stages of retiring. Each author recounts their own story about retiring, bringing together many aspects of the experiences: the social, psychological and practical. These inspirational and illustrated stories will encourage the reader to hold up these experiences…

  10. Validity of the World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener in a representative sample of health plan members.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Ronald C; Adler, Lenard A; Gruber, Michael J; Sarawate, Chaitanya A; Spencer, Thomas; Van Brunt, David L

    2007-01-01

    The validity of the six-question World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener was assessed in a sample of subscribers to a large health plan in the US. A convenience subsample of 668 subscribers was administered the ASRS Screener twice to assess test-retest reliability and then a third time in conjunction with a clinical interviewer for DSM-IV adult ADHD. The data were weighted to adjust for discrepancies between the sample and the population on socio-demographics and past medical claims. Internal consistency reliability of the continuous ASRS Screener was in the range 0.63-0.72 and test-retest reliability (Pearson correlations) in the range 0.58-0.77. A four-category version The ASRS Screener had strong concordance with clinician diagnoses, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.90. The brevity and ability to discriminate DSM-IV cases from non-cases make the six-question ASRS Screener attractive for use both in community epidemiological surveys and in clinical outreach and case-finding initiatives. PMID:17623385

  11. Hearing Impairment and Retirement

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Mary E; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Pinto, Alex; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Dalton, Dayna S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many factors influence the decision to retire including age, insurance and pension availability along with physical and mental health. Hearing impairment may be one such factor. PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the 15 year retirement rate among subjects with and without hearing impairment. RESEARCH DESIGN Prospective, population-based study STUDY SAMPLE Subjects were participants in the Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS), a longitudinal investigation of age-related hearing loss. Participants who were working full- or part-time in 1993–1995 were included (n=1410, mean age=57.8 years). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS Data from four EHLS phases (1993–1995, 1998–2000, 2003–2005, and 2009–2010) were analyzed in 2010–2012. Hearing impairment was defined as a pure tone threshold average (at 0.5,1,2 and 4 kHz) greater than 25 dB HL in the worse ear. Employment status was determined at each of the four phases. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the cumulative incidence of retirement were calculated and Cox discrete-time modeling was used to determine the effect of hearing impairment on the rate of retirement. RESULTS The cumulative incidence of retirement was significantly (p < 0.02) higher in those with a hearing impairment (77%) compared to those without a hearing impairment (74%). After adjustment for age, gender, self-reported health, and history of chronic disease, there was no significant difference in the rate of retirement between those with and without a hearing impairment (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0.9, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.7, 1.1). Similar results were observed when hearing aid users were excluded, when hearing impairment was based on the better ear thresholds, and when analyses were restricted to those less than 65 years of age and working full-time at baseline. Participants with a hearing impairment were less likely to state that the main reason for retirement was that the time seemed right. CONCLUSIONS Hearing impairment

  12. Aging and Financial Planning for Retirement: Interdisciplinary Influences Viewed through a Cross-Cultural Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, Douglas A.; Henkens, Kene; van Dalen, Hendrik P.

    2010-01-01

    Current theoretical models support the existence of interactions between the individual and socio-environmental forces when it comes to the formation and enactment of life plans (Friedman & Scholnick, 1997; Shanahan & Elder, 2002). In this investigation, we examine the social, economic, and psychological forces that impact financial planning for…

  13. 12 CFR 330.14 - Retirement and other employee benefit plan accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Tax Regulations (26 CFR 20.2031-7) or any similar present worth or life expectancy tables as may be...-contingent interest of each plan participant, provided the rules in § 330.5 are satisfied. Deposits eligible... the amount of $250,000 for the non-contingent interest of each plan participant, provided the rules...

  14. 78 FR 53704 - Employee Retirement Benefit Plan Returns Required on Magnetic Media

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... (71 FR 41359) requiring electronic filing of the Form 5500 and Form 5500-SF for plans covered by Title... published a final rule in the Federal Register (72 FR 64710) postponing the effective date of the electronic... Magnetic Media AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of proposed...

  15. Working Women, Marriage, and Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapkoff, Shelley; Fierst, Edith

    Women are at a disadvantage under both Social Security and private employee pension plans because the retirement systems were set up at a time when most women were non-working spouses of employed men, a condition that no longer exists. Today women workers, divorcees, and widows of retirees often find themselves with inadequate retirement benefits…

  16. Retirement effects on health in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Norma B.; Zamarro, Gema

    2013-01-01

    What are the health impacts of retirement? As talk of raising retirement ages in pensions and social security schemes continues around the world, it is important to know both the costs and benefits for the individual, as well as the governments’ budgets. In this paper we use the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) dataset to address this question in a multi-country setting. We use country-specific early and full retirement ages as instruments for retirement behavior. These statutory retirement ages clearly induce retirement, but are not related to an individual’s health. Exploiting the discontinuities in retirement behavior across countries, we find significant evidence that retirement has a health-preserving effect on overall general health. Our estimates indicate that retirement leads to a 35 percent decrease in the probability of reporting to be in fair, bad, or very bad health, and an almost one standard deviation improvement in the health index. While the self-reported health seems to be a temporary impact, the health index indicates there are long-lasting health differences. PMID:21183235

  17. An Evaluation of the "Treatment Integrity Planning Protocol" and Two Schedules of Treatment Integrity Self-Report: Impact on Implementation and Report Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagermoser Sanetti, Lisa M.; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    The evidence-based practice movement has focused on identifying, disseminating, and promoting the adoption of evidence-based interventions. Despite advances in this movement, numerous barriers, such as the lack of treatment integrity assessment methods, remain as challenges in implementation. Accurate teacher self-report could be an efficient…

  18. Reaching Out in Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghezzi, Patti

    2007-01-01

    This article reports that across the country, retired superintendents are finding fulfillment as mentors, either formally or informally, spontaneously or planned. Some are paid, but most are volunteers who remember their first year running a school district and want to ease the transition for others. Some want to focus on leadership development.…

  19. Early Retirement: The Cost to Canadian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson, Anne L.

    A study examined effects of early retirement plans (ERP) at Canadian Universities. In response to current conditions within Canadian universities and a Canadian Supreme Court decision upholding mandatory retirement requirements, many universities have sought to encourage faculty retirement through ERPs. In order to study the cost of such programs,…

  20. Retirement Can Be Golden for Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a 2014 Gallup poll. Ding said the average retirement age in Australia is just over 63 years. "I think it is important to plan for retired life with a positive mindset," she said. "Some people get anxious about retirement because they may lose a sense of purpose." ...

  1. Changing Retirement Age: Ups and Downs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiatrowski, William J.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, legislative changes, new types of retirement plans, and increases in life expectancy have led to differences in retirement ages. More older adults continue to work. The traditional model of social security, savings, and employer retirement benefits is changing. (Contains 31 notes and references.) (SK)

  2. Psychosocial Implications of Women and Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Explores retirement and women, many of whom are economically insecure when they retire. Argues that, because of prevailing myth among women that they will be cared for in old age and fear of aging, women often do not aggressively plan for retirement. Contends that women's movement should begin to advocate for women's preparation for realities of…

  3. HEALTH AND RETIREMENT STUDY (HRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    HRS is a national panel study based on biennial interviews. The study provides a portrait of an aging America's physical and mental health, insurance coverage, financial status, family support systems, labor market status, and retirement planning.

  4. A Three-Phase Model of Retirement Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Daniel C.; Beehr, Terry A.

    2011-01-01

    The present article organizes prominent theories about retirement decision making around three different types of thinking about retirement: imagining the possibility of retirement, assessing when it is time to let go of long-held jobs, and putting concrete plans for retirement into action at present. It also highlights important directions for…

  5. The Retirement Equity Act, Survivor Benefits Protections, and Public Employee Retirement Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebig, Phoebe S.

    The Retirement Equity Act (REA) sets out requirements for joint and survivor annuity coverage for married individuals who participate in federally regulated retirement plans. REA-mandated provisions do not apply to state and local government retirement systems. Because state and local government employees constitute a significant part of the work…

  6. Eliminating Mandatory Retirement: Effects on Retirement Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Karen C.; Hansen, W. Lee

    1989-01-01

    Uncapping the mandatory retirement age is unlikely to alter retirement age by much, but it will lead to substantially higher pensions for faculty members who continue to work. Institutions must monitor retirement-age behavior in order to restructure pension and other benefits appropriately to meet income and retirement objectives. (Author/MSE)

  7. Heterogeneity in spending change at retirement

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Michael D.; Rohwedder, Susann

    2014-01-01

    The simple one-good model of life-cycle consumption requires that consumption be continuous over retirement; yet prior research based on partial measures of consumption or on synthetic panels indicates that spending drops at retirement, a result that has been called the retirement-consumption puzzle. Using panel data on total spending, nondurable spending and food spending, we find that spending declines at small rates at retirement, rates that could be explained by mechanisms such as the cessation of work-related expenses, unexpected retirement due to a health shock or by the substitution of time for spending. We find substantial heterogeneity in spending change at retirement: in the upper half of the wealth distribution spending increased. In the low-wealth population where spending did decline at higher rates, the main explanation for the decline appears to be early retirement due to poor health, possibly augmented by a short planning horizon by a minority of the population. PMID:24524026

  8. Retaining nursing faculty beyond retirement age.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Marvel L; Cook, Linda; Salmeron, Lois; Burton, Denise

    2010-01-01

    The number of nursing faculty planning to retire by 2020 is alarming. To develop strategies for retaining faculty, researchers asked: What factors influence the decision by nursing faculty to stay in the workforce past retirement age? What barriers could be removed that would encourage faculty to stay longer? Using Giorgi's analysis method, findings from 6 faculty teaching past retirement age revealed key meaning units and grand themes that match Maslow's Hierarchy of Inborn Needs. PMID:20548182

  9. Transition to Retirement Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iams, Howard M.

    Many retired persons return to work, to some extent, following their retirement. Data from the 1982 New Beneficiary Survey (NBS) of 4,212 women and 5,307 men were examined to determine the employment of retired-worker beneficiaries who were working 18-30 months after first receiving retired-worker benefits. According to the NBS data, over…

  10. Financing Retirement: Rural and Urban Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Joan R.; Makela, Carole J.

    Current income and anticipated income are important considerations in people's preretirement planning for when and where to retire. Community characteristics, suitable and affordable housing, utility costs, and natural resources may be weighed when decisions about where and when to retire are under consideration. If pre-retirees are to carry out…

  11. The Future of Retirement in Canadian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    There is a strong movement toward legal abolition of fixed-age retirement in Canada. Several factors justify the existing practice, but these arguments are unlikely to prevail, and institutions should consider administrative measures such as facilitation of early retirement, modified benefit plans, and more systematic faculty assessment throughout…

  12. The Retirement Problem: A Positive Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AGB Reports, 1978

    1978-01-01

    A TIAA-CREF task force reports that there are steps an institution can take in dealing with the new mandatory retirement laws (not before age 70). They include preretirement counseling, provision of "Sweeteners," severance plans, a phased retirement program, and a continuing relationship with the college for retirees. (Author/LBH)

  13. Retirement and relevant contemplation.

    PubMed

    Khan, H U; Latif, S A

    2010-01-01

    Retirement literally means withdrawing from the service. The retirement age varies from country to country, generally between 55 and 70 years. There are many effects of retirement upon retirees. The physical and mental health may be disrupted or decline or may remain unaffected. Early retirement have an increased mortality than those who retired lately. Mandatory retirement is applicable to certain occupation like military personnel and airline pilot. Life after retirement from service may have many options like retired community, charities, tourism, and care for grand children or devote to a hobby or sports. The responsibilities of the Government, family and society are the key for the betterment of retired persons. Staying healthy, maintaining social support, spiritual life, good finance and making daily routine prevent stress after retirement. PMID:20046191

  14. Retirement and its consequences for women's health in Australia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the health consequences of retirement is important, as many developed countries have already started raising state pension eligibility age, with the intention to induce postponed retirement. This paper estimates the causal effect of retirement on the health outcomes of older women in Australia, utilising the exogenous variation in retirement induced by the change in age eligibility for the Australian Age Pension. Using a sample of 19,185 observations for 3771 women from waves 2001-2011 of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey, we show that retirement status has positive and significant effects on women's self-reported health, physical and mental health outcomes. We also find that longer time spent in retirement confers clear additional health benefits. We show that retirement affects physical and mental health in diverse ways and that the estimated positive health effects of retirement are coincidental with increased post-retirement physical activity and reduced smoking. Our finding that retirement can improve health suggests that the welfare losses from working life prolongation policies will be larger than currently though when we include the cost of the foregone health improvements. PMID:27423068

  15. Patterns of Work and Retirement for a New Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Robert L.; Quinn, Joseph F.

    2002-01-01

    The average retirement age for men shifted from 70 in 1950 to 65 in 1970 to 62 in 1985. Whether the trend toward early retirement has ended depends on interpretation of changes in the last 2 decades, including elimination of mandatory retirement, modifications in social security and pension plans, and increased longevity. (Contains 18 references.)…

  16. Uncovered: Social Security, Retirement Uncertainty, and 1 Million Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Leslie; Aldeman, Chad

    2014-01-01

    Retirement savings are often described as a three-legged stool: Social Security, employer retirement plans, and personal savings. For many American workers, Social Security is the most consistent portion of the three-legged model, providing a solid plank of retirement savings. But nationwide, more than 1 million teachers--about 40 percent of all…

  17. 26 CFR 1.408-3 - Individual retirement annuities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408-3 Individual retirement annuities. (a) In general. An individual retirement annuity is an annuity contract or endowment contract... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individual retirement annuities. 1.408-3...

  18. 26 CFR 1.408-3 - Individual retirement annuities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408-3 Individual retirement annuities. (a) In general. An individual retirement annuity is an annuity contract or endowment... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Individual retirement annuities. 1.408-3...

  19. EXPLORATION OF SIMULATION AS A RETIREMENT EDUCATION TECHNIQUE. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOOCOCK, SARANE SPENCE; SPRAGUE, NORMAN

    A PILOT PROJECT EXPLORED THE ADAPTATION OF SIMULATION TECHNIQUES TO FOUR RETIREMENT PROBLEMS--FINANCIAL POSITION, PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT (HOUSING CHOICES), HEALTH, AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT (PLANNING AND GAINING SKILLS BEFORE RETIREMENT). A PRELIMINARY MODEL OF A GAME IN RETIREMENT FINANCE PRESENTS PLAYERS WITH THREE INVESTMENT SITUATIONS--SAVINGS…

  20. 26 CFR 1.401-14 - Inclusion of medical benefits for retired employees in qualified pension or annuity plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... employees in qualified pension or annuity plans. 1.401-14 Section 1.401-14 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit... qualified pension or annuity plans. (a) Introduction. Under section 401(h) a qualified pension or...

  1. 26 CFR 1.401-14 - Inclusion of medical benefits for retired employees in qualified pension or annuity plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... employees in qualified pension or annuity plans. 1.401-14 Section 1.401-14 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension... qualified pension or annuity plans. (a) Introduction. Under section 401(h) a qualified pension or...

  2. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(10)-1 - Payments under certain employers' plans after retirement, disability, or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pursuant to an incentive compensation plan which also provides for the making of other types of payments... earned. A's employer has established an incentive compensation plan for a class of his employees, including A, providing for the payment of deferred compensation on termination of employment,...

  3. 26 CFR 31.3121(a)(13)-1 - Payments under certain employers' plans after retirement, disability, or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... excluded from “wages” even if made pursuant to an incentive compensation plan which also provides for the... the month for which the salary is earned. A's employer has established an incentive compensation plan for a class of his employees, including A, providing for the payment of deferred compensation...

  4. Retirement and the Evolution of Pension Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedberg, Leora; Webb, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    A comparative analysis of defined benefit pension plans that were more common before 1980s and the defined contribution plans is presented. It is observed that defined benefit pension plans offered age related incentives thereby encouraging people to retire earlier. In contrast, defined contribution plans encourage people to continue with jobs…

  5. The Case Against Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Berlie J.

    1976-01-01

    For those who accept retirement as we now know it in America, the system awaits with all its entrapments. For those who are against retirement, there are many attractive alternatives worth the struggle of swimming upstream. (Author)

  6. Career and Retirement Theories: Relevance for Older Workers Across Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Megan C.; Foley, Pamela F.; Cotter, Elizabeth W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews selected career development theories as well as theories specifically focused on retirement, with an emphasis on their application to retirement decisions and vocational behavior in multicultural populations. Theories are evaluated based on whether: (a) retirement was considered a stage of working life, (b) work satisfaction, motivation, and other work variables at retirement age were addressed, (c) work choices at retirement age were included, and (d) cultural and other minority status issues were either directly considered in the work/retirement decision or if the model could be reasonably applied to retirement across cultures. We provide specific recommendations for research and practice with the aim of helping practitioners and scholars conceptualize the current concerns older adults face in their working lives and during retirement planning. PMID:26101455

  7. The Effects of Defined Benefit Pension Incentives and Working Conditions on Teacher Retirement Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furgeson, Joshua; Strauss, Robert P.; Vogt, William B.

    2006-01-01

    The retirement behavior of Pennsylvania public school teachers in 1997-98 and 1998-99, a period when state early retirement incentives were temporarily increased, is modeled using a choice framework that emphasizes both pecuniary and nonpecuniary factors of the retirement decision under a defined benefit retirement plan. We find each to have large…

  8. What is your savings personality? The 1998 Retirement Confidence Survey.

    PubMed

    Yakoboski, P; Ostuw, P; Hicks, J

    1998-08-01

    This Issue Brief presents the findings of the 1998 Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS). The survey tracks Americans' retirement planning and saving behavior and their confidence regarding various aspects of their retirement. It also categorizes workers and retirees into six distinct groups, based on their very different views on retirement, retirement planning, and saving. The six personality types identified in the RCS are Deniers (10 percent of the population), Strugglers (9 percent), Impulsives (20 percent), Cautious Savers (21 percent), Planners (23 percent), and Retiring Savers (17 percent). The survey shows that working Americans have become more focused on retirement; 45 percent have tried to determine how much they need to save before they retire, up from 32 percent in 1996. Americans' growing attention to their retirement has not increased their retirement income confidence. Since 1993, the portion of working Americans who are very confident that they will have enough money to live comfortably throughout retirement has consistently ranged from 20 percent to 25 percent. Sixty-three percent of Americans have begun to save for retirement. Fifty-five percent of those not saving for retirement say it is reasonably possible for them to save $20 per week (over $1,000 per year). In addition, 57 percent of workers who have begun to save say that it is reasonably possible for them to save an additional $20 per week. The findings demonstrate the continuing need for broad-based educational efforts designed to make retirement savings a priority for individuals. The good news is the evidence that education can have a real impact at the individual level. For the first time the 1998 RCS examined retirement planning, saving, and attitudes across ethnic groups (African-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, Asian-Americans, and whites). African-Americans are the least confident that they will have enough money to live comfortably in retirement. African-Americans and Hispanic

  9. 26 CFR 1.405-3 - Taxation of retirement bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxation of retirement bonds. 1.405-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.405-3 Taxation of retirement..., profit-sharing, or stock bonus plan, employer contributions on behalf of his common-law employees under...

  10. Setting the Record Straight: Retirement Security for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The landscape of public education retirement plans is in an upheaval. A variety of economic, demographic, and political factors make it increasingly difficult for defined-benefit pension plans alone to provide educators with an adequate retirement. As a result, for the nearly seven million educators in America's public primary and secondary…

  11. Effect of the Web-Based Intervention MyPlan 1.0 on Self-Reported Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Adults Who Visit General Practice: A Quasi-Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Crombez, Geert; Van der Mispel, Celien; Verloigne, Maite; Van Stappen, Vicky; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    Background Web-based interventions typically have small intervention effects on adults’ health behavior because they primarily target processes leading to an intention to change leaving individuals in an intention-behavior gap, they often occur without contact with health care providers, and a limited amount of feedback is provided only at the beginning of these interventions, but not further on in the behavior change process. Therefore, we developed a Web-based intervention (“MyPlan 1.0”) to promote healthy behavior in adults. The intervention was based on a self-regulation perspective that also targets postintentional processes and guides individuals during all phases of behavior change. Objective The study investigated the effectiveness of MyPlan1.0 on fruit and vegetable intake of Flemish adults visiting general practice (3 groups: control group, intervention group recruited by researchers, and intervention group recruited and guided by general practitioners [GPs]). Second, it examined whether there was a larger intervention effect for the intervention group guided by GPs compared to the intervention group recruited by researchers. Methods Adults (≥18 years) were recruited in 19 Flemish general practices. In each general practice, patients were systematically allocated by a researcher either for the intervention group (researchers’ intervention group) or the waiting-list control group that received general advice. In a third group, the GP recruited adults for the intervention (GPs intervention group). The two intervention groups filled in evaluation questionnaires and received MyPlan 1.0 for a behavior of choice (fruit, vegetable, or physical activity). The waiting-list control group filled in the evaluation questionnaires and received only general information. Self-reported fruit and vegetable intake were assessed at baseline (T0), 1 week (T1), and 1 month (T2) postbaseline. Three-level (general practice, adults, time) linear regression models were

  12. Post Retirement: Is There Life after Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb-Lupo, Anita

    1992-01-01

    Issues concerning college faculty/staff retirement and coping with changes in lifestyle are discussed, including financial planning, psychological adjustment, relocating vs. maintaining current housing, planning for travel, health care, health and life insurance needs, maintenance of an acceptable standard of living, protecting resources against…

  13. Senior academic physicians and retirement considerations.

    PubMed

    Moss, Arthur J; Greenberg, Henry; Dwyer, Edward M; Klein, Helmut; Ryan, Daniel; Francis, Charles; Marcus, Frank; Eberly, Shirley; Benhorin, Jesaia; Bodenheimer, Monty; Brown, Mary; Case, Robert; Gillespie, John; Goldstein, Robert; Haigney, Mark; Krone, Ronald; Lichstein, Edgar; Locati, Emanuela; Oakes, David; Thomsen, Poul Erik Bloch; Zareba, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of academic senior physicians are approaching their potential retirement in good health with accumulated clinical and research experience that can be a valuable asset to an academic institution. Considering the need to let the next generation ascend to leadership roles, when and how should a medical career be brought to a close? We explore the roles for academic medical faculty as they move into their senior years and approach various retirement options. The individual and institutional considerations require a frank dialogue among the interested parties to optimize the benefits while minimizing the risks for both. In the United States there is no fixed age for retirement as there is in Europe, but European physicians are initiating changes. What is certain is that careful planning, innovative thinking, and the incorporation of new patterns of medical practice are all part of this complex transition and timing of senior academic physicians into retirement. PMID:23621971

  14. Advice from working women with retired partners.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Eileen L; Adorno, Gail

    2016-01-01

    in the 21st century, as more women are employed full-time and couples increasingly share egalitarian values, more women continue employment after their partners have voluntarily retired. However, we know very little about the experiences of this growing population of women. We asked working women with retired partners to share their advice for other women who may face this developmental transition. Open-ended responses from 97 women were analyzed to identify pertinent issues and themes. Four primary content areas were identified: time management, division of household labor, financial planning, and communication. Communication between partners was both a topic of concern as well as the solution suggested to resolve conflicts or differences that may arise when women live with a retired partner. It is expected that future changes in the workforce and improvements in the gender balance within relationships will continue to impact experiences for working women with retired partners. PMID:26933760

  15. Faculty Emeriti: Retirement Reframed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Seth Matthew

    2010-01-01

    With the graying of the professoriate continuing and the massive number of baby boomers entering retirement age, universities and college administrations need to adequately prepare for retirement. This is beginning to cause some staffing shortages in the faculty pipeline as well as the loss of institutional history and professional knowledge.…

  16. Early Retirement Payoff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D.; Lovenheim, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    As public budgets have grown tighter over the past decade, states and school districts have sought ways to control the growth of spending. One increasingly common strategy employed to rein in costs is to offer experienced teachers with high salaries financial incentives to retire early. Although early retirement incentive (ERI) programs have been…

  17. Ways We Retire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Wendi A.

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the retired faculty members from different types of institutions around the country that were interviewed to find out how well their preparations for retirement are serving them now. Like other state employees in California, faculty members at public institutions participate in the California Public Employees' Retirement…

  18. University of North Carolina Lets Professors Ease Their Way into Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the University of North Carolina's "phased-retirement" plan, which lets professors formally ease their way into retirement. The challenges of personnel planning in the North Carolina system, made tougher when higher education was stripped of a mandatory retirement age 14 years ago, have lessened because the program has…

  19. Tax reform options: promoting retirement security.

    PubMed

    VanDerhei, Jack

    2011-11-01

    TAX PROPOSALS: Currently, the combination of worker and employer contributions in a defined contribution plan is capped by the federal tax code at the lesser of $49,000 per year or 100 percent of a worker's compensation (participants over age 50 can make additional "catch-up" contributions). As part of the effort to lower the federal deficit and reduce federal "tax expenditures," two major reform proposals have surfaced that would change current tax policy toward retirement savings: A plan that would end the existing tax deductions for 401(k) contributions and replace them with a flat-rate refundable credit that serves as a matching contribution into a retirement savings account. The so-called "20/20 cap," included by the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform in their December 2010 report, "The Moment of Truth," which would limit the sum of employer and worker annual contributions to the lower of $20,000 or 20 percent of income, the so-called "20/20 cap." IMPACT OF PERMANENTLY MODIFYING THE EXCLUSION OF EMPLOYEE CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RETIREMENT SAVINGS PLANS FROM TAXABLE INCOME: If the current exclusion of worker contributions for retirement savings plans were ended in 2012 and the total match remains constant, the average reductions in 401(k) accounts at Social Security normal retirement age would range from a low of 11.2 percent for workers currently ages 26-35 in the highest-income groups, to a high of 24.2 percent for workers in that age range in the lowest-income group. IMPACT OF "20/20 CAP": Earlier EBRI analysis of enacting the 20/20 cap starting in 2012 showed it would, as expected, most affect those with high income. However, EBRI also found the cap would cause a significant reduction in retirement savings by the lowest-income workers as well, and younger cohorts would experience larger reductions given their increased exposure to the proposal. IMPORTANCE OF EMPLOYER-SPONSORED RETIREMENT PLANS AND AUTO-ENROLLMENT: A key factor in future

  20. Recession and Expected Retirement Age: Another Look at the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Szinovacz, Maximiliane E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This article expands on earlier analyses that assessed whether the recent recession influenced retirement expectations. Design and Methods: Acknowledging that planning for retirement is a complex process influenced by personal preferences, resources, economic factors, institutional policies, and social norms, we test more comprehensive models than those used in previous studies, using data from the 2006 and 2008 waves (Waves 8 and 9) of the Health and Retirement Study. Results: Our results confirm that economic changes impinge on retirement expectations, but they also show stronger influences of other factors such as debts and the work environment. Implications: As the baby boom cohorts approach retirement age, it will be important to better understand how workers consider macro factors such as the state of the economy and firm-level factors and personal finances when planning for retirement. PMID:23448961

  1. 26 CFR 1.409-1 - Retirement bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR 346.1(c). (ii) If a retirement bond is redeemed after the close of the taxable year in which the... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retirement bonds. 1.409-1 Section 1.409-1...) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.409-1 Retirement bonds. (a) In...

  2. Self-Report Measures of Family Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes and compares two self-report measures of family competence: the Family Awareness Scales (FAS) (Green and Kolevzon, late 1970s) and the Self-Report Family Inventory (SFI) (Beavers, 1983). Discusses reliability and validity. Their focus on the "insider" (family member) is different from the traditional examination of family competence from…

  3. Predictors of Self-Report of Heart Failure in a Population-Based Survey of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gure, Tanya R.; McCammon, Ryan J.; Cigolle, Christine T.; Koelling, Todd M.; Blaum, Caroline S.; Langa, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little research has been conducted on the predictors of the self-report or patient awareness of HF in a population-based survey. Objective: 1) test agreement between Medicare administrative and Health and Retirement Study (HRS) survey data and 2) determine predictors associated with self-report of HF, using a validated Medicare claims algorithm as the reference standard. We hypothesized that those who self-reported HF were more likely to have a higher number of HF-related claims. Methods and Results Secondary data analysis was conducted using the 2004 wave of the HRS linked to 2002-04 Medicare claims (n=5,573 respondents ≥ 67 years old). Concordance between self-report of HF in the HRS and Medicare claims was calculated. Logistic regression was performed to identify predictors associated with self-report HF. HF prevalence by self-report was 4.6%. Self-report of HF and claims agreement was 87% (k=0.34). The presence of >1 HF inpatient claim was associated with greater odds of self-report (OR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.23-3.00). Greater odds of self-reporting HF was also associated with ≥ 4 HF claims (OR: 2.74; 95% CI: 1.36-5.52). Blacks and Hispanics were least likely to self-report HF compared to whites (blacks, OR: 0.28; 95% CI: 0.14-0.55; Hispanics: OR 0.30; 95% CI: 0.11-0.83) in the final model. Conclusions Self-report of HF is an insensitive method for accurately identifying HF cases, especially in those with less severe disease and who are non-white. There may be limited awareness of HF among older minority patients despite having clinical encounters with during which HF is coded as a diagnosis. PMID:22592753

  4. The 2012 Retirement Confidence Survey: job insecurity, debt weigh on retirement confidence, savings.

    PubMed

    Helman, Ruth; Copeland, Craig; VanDerhei, Jack

    2012-03-01

    Americans' confidence in their ability to retire comfortably is stagnant at historically low levels. Just 14 percent are very confident they will have enough money to live comfortably in retirement (statistically equivalent to the low of 13 percent measured in 2011 and 2009). Employment insecurity looms large: Forty-two percent identify job uncertainty as the most pressing financial issue facing most Americans today. Worker confidence about having enough money to pay for medical expenses and long-term care expenses in retirement remains well below their confidence levels for paying basic expenses. Many workers report they have virtually no savings and investments. In total, 60 percent of workers report that the total value of their household's savings and investments, excluding the value of their primary home and any defined benefit plans, is less than $25,000. Twenty-five percent of workers in the 2012 Retirement Confidence Survey say the age at which they expect to retire has changed in the past year. In 1991, 11 percent of workers said they expected to retire after age 65, and by 2012 that has grown to 37 percent. Regardless of those retirement age expectations, and consistent with prior RCS findings, half of current retirees surveyed say they left the work force unexpectedly due to health problems, disability, or changes at their employer, such as downsizing or closure. Those already in retirement tend to express higher levels of confidence than current workers about several key financial aspects of retirement. Retirees report they are significantly more reliant on Social Security as a major source of their retirement income than current workers expect to be. Although 56 percent of workers expect to receive benefits from a defined benefit plan in retirement, only 33 percent report that they and/or their spouse currently have such a benefit with a current or previous employer. More than half of workers (56 percent) report they and/or their spouse have not tried

  5. 78 FR 33911 - Phased Retirement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ...The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is proposing to implement phased retirement, a new human resources tool that allows full-time employees to work a part-time schedule while beginning to draw retirement benefits. Section 100121 of the ``Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act,'' or ``MAP-21,'' authorizes phased retirement under the Civil Service Retirement System and the......

  6. 26 CFR 1.408-2 - Individual retirement accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Individual retirement accounts. 1.408-2 Section 1.408-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408-2 Individual retirement accounts. (a) In general....

  7. Early Retirement Is Not the Cat's Meow. The Endpaper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Wayne S.

    1982-01-01

    Early retirement plans are perceived as being beneficial to school staff and financially advantageous to schools. Four out of the five assumptions on which these perceptions are based are incorrect. The one correct assumption is that early retirement will make affirmative action programs move ahead more rapidly. The incorrect assumptions are: (1)…

  8. Job Modification as an Alternative to Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shkop, Yitzchak M.; Shkop, Esther M.

    1982-01-01

    In a recent survey, most managers and blue-collar workers indicated that the availability of job modifications would alter their retirement plans. Such an alternative can alleviate some job-related problems of older workers and permit an organization to capitalize fully upon these employees' skills. (SK)

  9. California Teacher Retirement: Perception, Satisfaction, and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Justin L.

    2012-01-01

    Concerns over fiscal and personal appropriateness for public retirement pensions have become prevalent within conversations throughout the United States. However, with some important exceptions (e.g., DeArmond and Goldhaber, 2010) limited research has focused upon perceptions of teachers who receive these pension plans. As such, the purpose of…

  10. NEA Retirement and Benefits Forum: Selected Proceedings (Clearwater Beach, Florida, October 18-21, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Research Div.

    The National Education Association (NEA) Retirement and Benefits Forum is an annual event where leaders, lobbyists, researchers, and trustees of retirement and health and welfare plans meet to learn about and discuss current and future retirement and benefits issues. This report of the 1990 forum contains 10 selected papers and a welcoming speech…

  11. Does retirement age impact mortality?

    PubMed

    Hernaes, Erik; Markussen, Simen; Piggott, John; Vestad, Ola L

    2013-05-01

    The relationship between retirement and mortality is studied with a unique administrative data set covering the full population of Norway. A series of retirement policy changes in Norway reduced the retirement age for a group of workers but not for others. Difference-in-differences estimation based on monthly birth cohorts and treatment group status show that the early retirement programme significantly reduced the retirement age; this holds true also when we account for programme substitution, for example into the disability pension. Instrumental variables estimation results show no effect on mortality of retirement age; neither do estimation results from a hazard rate model. PMID:23542020

  12. Health and Retirement: Do Changes in Health Affect Retirement Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarry, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Health plays a vital role in the decision making process of retirement for an employee. The changes in retirement expectations are driven to a much greater degree by change in health rather than change in income or wealth.

  13. To Retire or Not to Retire? That Is the Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    During the 1960s, there was extensive hiring of college and university faculty members. This large group of professors are now at or nearing retirement age. Concerns about the economy, the availability of good health insurance, increased life expectancy, and removal of mandatory retirement laws may influence decisions about when to retire.…

  14. Views of Retirement by Active and Retired Protestant Ministers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Barbara; Brewer, Earl D. C.

    The Protestant ministers' occupational characteristics affect their retirement experience. Unlike most retirees, Protestant ministers tend to experience residential and church moves. A national study was conducted to examine the effects of retirement experienced by retired ministers and anticipated by active ministers of the Presbyterian Church in…

  15. Java Tool Retirement

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... 08:00 am EDT Event Impact:  The ASDC Java Order Tool was officially retired on Wednesday, May 14, 2014.  The HTML Order Tool and additional options are available from our Order Data Page .  Please update all bookmarks.     ...

  16. The Trend toward Retirement Jobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buddy, Juanita Warren

    2008-01-01

    Many library media specialists are deciding to return to the workplace after retiring from full-time employment. This article focuses on general information about the trend of retirees acquiring retirement jobs, how and why retired library media specialists return to work, their perceptions of challenges facing library media programs, and advice…

  17. Projection of retirement adequacy using wealth-need ratio: A case study in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaudin, Ros Idayuwati; Ismail, Noriszura; Isa, Zaidi

    2015-02-01

    Adequacy of retirement income is very important to maintain a comfortable living standard during retirement. Under a life cycle model, assets are mainly accumulated during an individual's work life to finance consumption after retirement. A generally accepted goal of retirement planning is to provide enough income during retirement to prevent the level of living from dropping much below the pre-retirement level. Retirement wealth can be defined as adequate if the total retirement income is equal or greater than the desired total retirement consumption (or needs). In this study, retirement adequacy is projected using the Malaysian Household Income Survey (HIS) 2009 data which is based on 5881 sample of households and contains information on income, demographic and socioeconomic status of each household. Besides the projection of retirement adequacy, a regression of the ratio of projected wealth to needs (or wealth-needs ratio) is performed to investigate the demographic and socioeconomic determinants of retirement adequacy in Malaysia. The results show that 69% of households in Malaysia are adequately prepared for retirement.

  18. Gender-Stratified Models to Examine the Relationship Between Financial Hardship and Self-Reported Oral Health for Older US Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Tucker-Seeley, Reginald

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the relationship between financial hardship and self-reported oral health for older men and women. Methods. We focused on adults in the 2008 Health and Retirement Study (n = 1359). The predictor variables were 4 financial hardship indicators. We used Poisson regression models to estimate the prevalence ratio of poor self-reported oral health. Results. In the non–gender-stratified model, number of financial hardships was not significantly associated with self-reported oral health. Food insecurity was associated with a 12% greater prevalence of poor self-reported oral health (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04, 1.21). In the gender-stratified models, women with 3 or more financial hardships had a 24% greater prevalence of poor self-reported oral health than women with zero (95% CI = 1.09, 1.40). Number of hardships was not associated with self-reported oral health for men. For men, skipping medications was associated with 50% lower prevalence of poor self-reported oral health (95% CI = 0.32, 0.76). Conclusions. Number of financial hardships was differentially associated with self-reported oral health for older men and women. Most financial hardship indicators affected both genders similarly. Future interventions to improve vulnerable older adults’ oral health should account for gender-based heterogeneity in financial hardship experiences. PMID:23327271

  19. Depressive symptoms and concussions in aging retired NFL players.

    PubMed

    Didehbani, Nyaz; Munro Cullum, C; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Conover, Heather; Hart, John

    2013-08-01

    We examined the relationship between a remote history of concussions with current symptoms of depression in retired professional athletes. Thirty retired National Football League (NFL) athletes with a history of concussion and 29 age- and IQ-matched controls without a history of concussion were recruited. We found a significant correlation between the number of lifetime concussions and depressive symptom severity using the Beck Depression Inventory II. Upon investigating a three-factor model of depressive symptoms (affective, cognitive, and somatic; Buckley et al., 2001) from the BDI-II, the cognitive factor was the only factor that was significantly related to concussions. In general, NFL players endorsed more symptoms of depression on all three Buckley factors compared with matched controls. Findings suggest that the number of self-reported concussions may be related to later depressive symptomology (particularly cognitive symptoms of depression). PMID:23644673

  20. Retirement as Meaningful: Positive Retirement Stereotypes Associated with Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Reuben; Allore, Heather G.; Monin, Joan K.; Levy, Becca R.

    2016-01-01

    Studies examining the association between retirement and health have produced mixed results. This may be due to previous studies treating retirement as merely a change in job status rather than a transition associated with stereotypes or societal beliefs (e.g., retirement is a time of mental decline or retirement is a time of growth). To examine whether these stereotypes are associated with health, we studied retirement stereotypes and survival over a 23-year period among 1,011 older adults. As predicted by stereotype embodiment theory, it was found that positive stereotypes about physical health during retirement showed a survival advantage of 4.5 years (hazard ratio = 0.88, p = .022) and positive stereotypes about mental health during retirement tended to show a survival advantage of 2.5 years (hazard ratio = 0.87, p = .034). Models adjusted for relevant covariates such as age, gender, race, employment status, functional health, and self-rated health. These results suggest that retirement preparation could benefit from considering retirement stereotypes. PMID:27346893

  1. Eliminating invalid self-report survey data.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, S B; Jason, L A; Schoeny, M; Curie, C J; Townsend, S M

    2001-08-01

    A sample of 6,370 students in Grades 6 to 8 completed a questionnaire on their attitudes and use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. A subsample showed questionable data based on three criteria: missing responses, invalid responses, and inconsistent responses. Analysis indicated that this subsample was significantly different from the main group on demographic variables and self-reported life-time tobacco use. Results support efforts to identify and eliminate invalid data. PMID:11729537

  2. Optimal Retirement with Increasing Longevity*

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, David E.; Canning, David; Moore, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We develop an optimizing life-cycle model of retirement with perfect capital markets. We show that longer healthy life expectancy usually leads to later retirement, but with an elasticity less than unity. We calibrate our model using data from the US and find that, over the last century, the effect of rising incomes, which promote early retirement, has dominated the effect of rising lifespans. Our model predicts continuing declines in the optimal retirement age, despite rising life expectancy, provided the rate of real wage growth remains as high as in the last century. PMID:24954970

  3. What causes EBRI retirement readiness ratings to vary: results from the 2014 Retirement Security Projection Model.

    PubMed

    VanDerhei, Jack

    2014-02-01

    RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY IMPROVED SLIGHTLY IN 2013: Due to the increase in financial market and housing values during 2013, the probability that Baby Boomers and Generation Xers would NOT run short of money in retirement increases between 0.5 and 1.6 percentage points, based on the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) Retirement Readiness Ratings (RRRs). ELIGIBILITY FOR PARTICIPATION IN AN EMPLOYER-SPONSORED DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN REMAINS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTORS FOR RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY: RRR values double for Gen Xers in the lowest-income quartile when comparing those with 20 or more years of future eligibility with those with no years of future eligibility, while those in the middle income quartiles experience increases in RRR values by 27.1-30.3 percentage points. FUTURE SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS MAKE A HUGE DIFFERENCE FOR THE RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY OF SOME HOUSEHOLDS, ESPECIALLY GEN XERS IN THE LOWEST-INCOME QUARTILE: If Social Security benefits are subject to proportionate decreases beginning in 2033 (according to the values in Figure 8), the RRR values for those households will drop by more than 50 percent: from 20.9 percent to 10.3 percent. LONGEVITY RISK AND STOCHASTIC HEALTH CARE RISK ARE ASSOCIATED WITH HUGE VARIATIONS IN RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY: For both of these factors, a comparison between the most "risky" quartile with the least risky quartile shows a spread of approximately 30 percentage points for the lowest income range, approximately 25 to 40 percentage points for the highest income range, and even larger spreads for those in the middle income ranges. A GREAT DEAL OF THE VARIABILITY IN RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY COULD BE MITIGATED BY APPROPRIATE RISK-MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES AT OR NEAR RETIREMENT AGE: For example, the annuitization of a portion of the defined contribution and IRA balances may substantially increase the probability of not running short of money in retirement. Moreover, a well-functioning market in long

  4. Another Challenge. Age 70 Retirement in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Hans H.; And Others

    Changes in higher education employee benefit plans brought about by the extension of the mandatory retirement age to 70 are the focus of the monograph. Chapter one summarizes the volume and presents some major recommendations that institutions may find helpful in benefit and personnel planning. Chapter two sketches the meaning of the new law (1978…

  5. Emotional Problems in Retirement and What Can Be Done.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradford, Leland P.

    1979-01-01

    Gives recommendations for both long-range preparation and last-minute preretirement planning. Methods are being developed that can alert those facing retirement to the emotional difficulties they may face and help them plan ways of coping with problems. Difficulties include sense of belonging, socialization problems, achievement problems and…

  6. Impression Management and Self-Report among Violent Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Jeremy F.; Kroner, Daryl G.

    2006-01-01

    Offenders are assumed by many to employ socially desirable responding (SDR) response styles when completing self-report measures. Contrary to expectations, prior research has shown that accounting for SDR in self-report measures of antisocial constructs does not improve the relationship with outcome. Despite this, many self-report measures…

  7. Three streams, one river: a coordinated approach to financing retirement.

    PubMed

    Etheredge, L

    1999-01-01

    A national retirement policy that coordinates Medicare, Social Security, and private pension reforms could make substantial progress in dealing with problems related to the baby-boom generation's retirement. Such a policy should include (1) better-designed work incentives for older persons--for example, a $10,000 "retirement bonus" option, paid by Social Security and Medicare, for each year of delayed retirement; (2) allowing workers without employer-sponsored pensions to use Social Security's payroll contribution system to invest in pension accounts; (3) expansion of private long-term care insurance by allowing pension-plan assets to be used for paying premiums; and (4) placing a higher priority on financing for basic Medicare and Social Security benefits than on taxpayer-financed subsidies of far more generous pension benefits. PMID:9926647

  8. Retirement Patterns and Income Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasang, Anette Eva

    2012-01-01

    How do social policies shape life courses, and which consequences do different life course patterns hold for individuals? This article engages the example of retirement in Germany and Britain to analyze life course patterns and their consequences for income inequality. Sequence analysis is used to measure retirement trajectories. The liberal…

  9. Retirement as a Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Phil; Ford, Geoff; Hodkinson, Heather; Hawthorn, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    This article draws upon a major qualitative empirical research investigation in Great Britain to explore the relationships between retirement and learning. Though retirement is frequently viewed as an event leading to a life stage, our data show that it can perhaps be best understood as a lengthy process. This process begins well before actual…

  10. The Gift Package of Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draayer, Donald R.

    2007-01-01

    The hunger for significance in life never ends. What changes in one's retirement is how one fills that need. For most school administrators, introspection and investigation into possibilities for post-retirement years begin prior to one's resignation; however, the intensity of thought, feeling, and deliberation moves to a much higher plane once…

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-07-31

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the 92-Acre Area, the southeast quadrant of the Radioactive Waste Management Site, located in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 92-Acre Area includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 92-Acre Area, which includes CAU 111. The result of the DQO process was that the 92-Acre Area is sufficiently characterized to provide the input data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) without the collection of additional data. The DQOs are included as Appendix A of this document. This CADD/CAP identifies and provides the rationale for the recommended CAA for the 92-Acre Area, provides the plan for implementing the CAA, and details the post-closure plan. When approved, this CADD/CAP will supersede the existing Pit 3 (P03) Closure Plan, which was developed in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities.' This document will also serve as the Closure Plan and the Post-Closure Plan, which are required by 40 CFR 265, for the 92-Acre Area. After closure activities are complete, a request for the modification of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit that governs waste management activities at the NTS will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to incorporate the requirements for post-closure monitoring. Four CAAs, ranging from No Further Action to Clean Closure, were evaluated for the 92-Acre Area. The CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. Based on the evaluation of the data used to develop the conceptual site model; a review of past, current, and future operations at the site; and the detailed and comparative analysis of the

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-11-22

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the 92-Acre Area, the southeast quadrant of the Radioactive Waste Management Site, located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The 92-Acre Area includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 92-Acre Area, which includes CAU 111. The result of the DQO process was that the 92-Acre Area is sufficiently characterized to provide the input data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) without the collection of additional data. The DQOs are included as Appendix A of this document. This CADD/CAP identifies and provides the rationale for the recommended CAA for the 92-Acre Area, provides the plan for implementing the CAA, and details the post-closure plan. When approved, this CADD/CAP will supersede the existing Pit 3 (P03) Closure Plan, which was developed in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities.' This document will also serve as the Closure Plan and the Post-Closure Plan, which are required by 40 CFR 265, for the 92-Acre Area. After closure activities are complete, a request for the modification of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit that governs waste management activities at the NNSS will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to incorporate the requirements for post-closure monitoring. Four CAAs, ranging from No Further Action to Clean Closure, were evaluated for the 92-Acre Area. The CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. Based on the evaluation of the data used to develop the conceptual site model; a review of past, current, and future operations at the site; and the detailed and comparative

  13. Accuracy of Professional Self-Reports: Medical Student Self-Report and the Scoring of Professional Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter Lagha, Regina Anne

    2014-01-01

    Self-report is currently used as an indicator of professional practice in a variety of fields, including medicine and education. Important to consider, therefore, is the ability of self-report to accurately capture professional practice. This study investigated how well professionals' self-reports of behavior agreed with an expert observer's…

  14. Psychological Aspects of Retirement

    PubMed Central

    Harris, David J.

    1983-01-01

    Retirement is a normal phenomenon which is not a crisis for most people. However, those who have previously had difficulty coping with major life events may be expected to experience difficulties at this time of life. Some will experience mild symptoms of anxiety, as part of an adjustment reaction to late life. A minority will suffer a significant depressive reaction. In most of these cases, however, other significant life events and factors will have triggered breakdown. In the milder cases psychotherapy is the main treatment of choice, either individually or conjointly with the spouse. Antidepressant drugs and other physical treatments may have a part to play in some cases. Imagesp529-a PMID:21283348

  15. Validity of Self-Reported Running Distance.

    PubMed

    Dideriksen, Mette; Soegaard, Cristina; Nielsen, Rasmus O

    2016-06-01

    Dideriksen, M, Soegaard, C, and Nielsen, RO. Validity of self-reported running distance. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1592-1596, 2016-It is unclear whether there is a difference between subjective evaluation and objective global positioning systems (GPS) measurement of running distance. The purpose of this study was to investigate if such difference exists. A total of 100 participants (51% men; median age, 41.5; body mass, 78.1 kg ±13.8 SD) completed a run of free choice, then subjectively reported the distance in kilometer (km). This information was subsequently compared with the distance derived from a nondifferential GPS watch using paired t-tests and Bland-Altman's 95% limits of agreement. No significant difference was found between the mean paired differences between subjective evaluations and GPS measurements (1.86%, 95% confidence interval = -1.53%; 5.25%, p = 0.96). The Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement revealed considerable variation (lower limit = -28% and upper limit = 40%). Such variation exceeds the clinical error range of 10%. In conclusion, the mean running distance (km) is similar between self-reporting and GPS measurements. However, researchers should consider using GPS measurements in favor of subjective reporting of running distance because of considerable variation on an individual level. PMID:26479023

  16. 20 CFR 404.1088 - Retirement payment to retired partners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... financial obligations to you (in his or her capacity as a partner) except to make the retirement payments... set out in 26 CFR 1.1402(a)-(17) and the conditions in paragraph (b) of this section are met....

  17. 20 CFR 404.1088 - Retirement payment to retired partners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... set out in 26 CFR 1.1402(a)-(17) and the conditions in paragraph (b) of this section are met. The... partner in the DEF partnership, retired from the partnership as of December 31, 1976. The taxable year...

  18. The new world of retirement income security in America.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Joseph F; Cahill, Kevin E

    2016-01-01

    We have entered a new world of retirement income security in America, with older individuals more exposed to market risk and more vulnerable to financial insecurity than prior generations. This reflects an evolution that has altered the historical vision of a financially secure retirement supported by Social Security, a defined-benefit pension plan, and individual savings. Today, 2 of these 3 retirement income sources-pensions and savings-are absent or of modest importance for many older Americans. Retirement income security now often requires earnings from continued work later in life, which exacerbates the economic vulnerability of certain segments of the population, including persons with disabilities, the oldest-old, single women, and individuals with intermittent work histories. Because of the unprecedented aging of our society, further changes to the retirement income landscape are inevitable, but policymakers do have options to help protect the financial stability of older Americans. We can begin by promoting savings at all (especially younger) ages and by removing barriers that discourage work later in life. For individuals already on the cusp of retirement, more needs to be done to educate the public about the value of delaying the receipt of Social Security benefits. Inaction now could mean a return to the days when old age and poverty were closely linked. The negative repercussions of this would extend well beyond traditional economic measures, as physical and mental health outcomes are closely tied to financial security. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27159439

  19. The neoliberal political economy and erosion of retirement security.

    PubMed

    Polivka, Larry; Luo, Baozhen

    2015-04-01

    The origins and trajectory of the crisis in the United States retirement security system have slowly become part of the discussion about the social, political, and economic impacts of population aging. Private sources of retirement security have weakened significantly since 1980 as employers have converted defined benefits precisions to defined contribution plans. The Center for Retirement Research (CRR) now estimates that over half of boomer generation retirees will not receive 70-80% of their wages while working. This erosion of the private retirement security system will likely increase reliance on the public system, mainly Social Security and Medicare. These programs, however, have increasingly become the targets of critics who claim that they are not financially sustainable in their current form and must be significantly modified. This article will focus on an analysis of these trends in the erosion of the United States retirement security system and their connection to changes in the United States political economy as neoliberal, promarket ideology, and policies (low taxes, reduced spending, and deregulation) have become dominant in the private and public sectors. The neoliberal priority on reducing labor costs and achieving maximum shareholder value has created an environment inimical to maintain the traditional system of pension and health care benefits in both the private and public sectors. This article explores the implications of these neoliberal trends in the United States economy for the future of retirement security. PMID:26035594

  20. Predictors of Perceptions of Involuntary Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szinovacz, Maximiliane E.; Davey, Adam

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Retirement is often treated as a voluntary transition, yet selected circumstances can restrict choice in retirement decision processes. We investigated conditions under which retirees perceive their retirement as "forced" rather than "wanted." Methods: Analyses relied on Waves 1-4 of the Health and Retirement Survey (N = 1,160; 572 men…

  1. 5 CFR 842.212 - Deferred retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... this section, an employee or Member who has not attained the minimum retirement age, and who, after... following the date on which the individual attains the minimum retirement age or, if later, (ii) A date the... retirement age, and is reemployed before filing an application for retirement based on that separation,...

  2. Back to School for Retired Baby Boomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumgardner, Stan

    2009-01-01

    Across the nation, schools increasingly are tapping into a vast resource pool--retired educators. The potential effects of the retirement boom--baby boomers reaching retirement age--have been well documented. An April 2009 "New York Times" article estimates that by 2013, more than one-third of the nation's 3.2 million teachers could retire. One…

  3. Does Stock Market Performance Influence Retirement Intentions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Shoven, John B.; Slavov, Sita Nataraj

    2012-01-01

    Media reports predicted that the stock market decline in October 2008 would cause changes in retirement intentions, due to declines in retirement assets. We use panel data from the Health and Retirement Study to investigate the relationship between stock market performance and retirement intentions during 1998-2008, a period that includes the…

  4. Metaphors for Retirement: Unshackled from Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargent, Leisa D.; Bataille, Christine D.; Vough, Heather C.; Lee, Mary Dean

    2011-01-01

    This study uses metaphor analysis to examine the meanings of retirement for a group of 35 retired Canadian executives and managers. Our analysis identified eight metaphors relating to the meanings of retirement. The findings provide us with a range of insights into the experience of retirement, from loss of purpose and identity to liberation from…

  5. From the Vantage of Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veatch, Jeannette

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four areas of reading instruction that the author (a retired distinguished educator) believes have been neglected or misunderstood: Sylvia Ashton-Warner's Key Vocabulary, the Alphabetic Principle, transmogrification of spoken to written language, and individualized reading. (SR)

  6. Preparing for Time after Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernau, C.

    1983-01-01

    One important area of activities for which retiring workers could be prepared is undoubtedly that which lies in the field of social services in which trade unions everywhere are increasingly engaged. (SSH)

  7. Transition to Retirement: Effect of Participation in Preretirement Education in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunbameru, Olakunle A.; Asa, Sola

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of preretirement education on the retirement transition plans of workers in Nigeria. The sample includes preretirees of Wema Bank PLC and the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority who participated in preretirement education workshops. The study shows that a majority of workers would prefer to retire at the normal…

  8. 26 CFR 1.408-6 - Disclosure statements for individual retirement arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disclosure statements for individual retirement... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408-6 Disclosure statements for individual retirement arrangements. (a) In general—(1)...

  9. Can Anyone Afford to Retire in an Age of Inflation? AIR Forum 1981 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Hans H.

    The adequacy of pension plans for persons retiring from colleges and universities is considered. Data are presented showing that people who retired in the late 1960s and early 1970s from higher education institutions at ages 65 and 68 spent most of their working lives earning less than $10,000 a year. The phenomenon of low pensions in an age of…

  10. Retiring the central executive.

    PubMed

    Logie, Robert H

    2016-10-01

    Reasoning, problem solving, comprehension, learning and retrieval, inhibition, switching, updating, or multitasking are often referred to as higher cognition, thought to require control processes or the use of a central executive. However, the concept of an executive controller begs the question of what is controlling the controller and so on, leading to an infinite hierarchy of executives or "homunculi". In what is now a QJEP citation classic, Baddeley [Baddeley, A. D. (1996). Exploring the central executive. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 49A, 5-28] referred to the concept of a central executive in cognition as a "conceptual ragbag" that acted as a placeholder umbrella term for aspects of cognition that are complex, were poorly understood at the time, and most likely involve several different cognitive functions working in concert. He suggested that with systematic empirical research, advances in understanding might progress sufficiently to allow the executive concept to be "sacked". This article offers an overview of the 1996 article and of some subsequent systematic research and argues that after two decades of research, there is sufficient advance in understanding to suggest that executive control might arise from the interaction among multiple different functions in cognition that use different, but overlapping, brain networks. The article concludes that the central executive concept might now be offered a dignified retirement. PMID:26821744

  11. Promoting and maintaining physical activity in the transition to retirement: a systematic review of interventions for adults around retirement age.

    PubMed

    Baxter, S; Johnson, M; Payne, N; Buckley-Woods, H; Blank, L; Hock, E; Daley, A; Taylor, A; Pavey, T; Mountain, G; Goyder, E

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that transition points in life, such as the approach towards, and early years of retirement present key opportunities for interventions to improve the health of the population. Research has also highlighted inequalities in health status in the retired population and in response to interventions which should be addressed. We aimed to conduct a systematic review to synthesise international evidence on the types and effectiveness of interventions to increase physical activity among people around the time of retirement. A systematic review of literature was carried out between February 2014 and April 2015. Searches were not limited by language or location, but were restricted by date to studies published from 1990 onwards. Methods for identification of relevant studies included electronic database searching, reference list checking, and citation searching. Systematic search of the literature identified 104 papers which described study populations as being older adults. However, we found only one paper which specifically referred to their participants as being around the time of retirement. The intervention approaches for older adults encompassed: training of health care professionals; counselling and advice giving; group sessions; individual training sessions; in-home exercise programmes; in-home computer-delivered programmes; in-home telephone support; in-home diet and exercise programmes; and community-wide initiatives. The majority of papers reported some intervention effect, with evidence of positive outcomes for all types of programmes. A wide range of different measures were used to evaluate effectiveness, many were self-reported and few studies included evaluation of sedentary time. While the retirement transition is considered a significant point of life change, little research has been conducted to assess whether physical activity interventions at this time may be effective in promoting or maintaining activity, or reducing health

  12. 5 CFR 1653.2 - Qualifying retirement benefits court orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ORDERS AND LEGAL PROCESSES AFFECTING THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN ACCOUNTS Retirement Benefits Court Orders § 1653... or conflicting language used elsewhere could cause the order to be rejected. Example (1). ORDERED: is... account of as of . Note: The following optional language can be used in conjunction with any of the...

  13. 77 FR 3172 - Compensation, Retirement Programs, and Related Benefits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ...The Farm Credit Administration (FCA, us, we, or our) proposes to amend our regulations related to Farm Credit System (System) bank and association disclosures to shareholders and investors. The proposed rule would require reporting of supplemental retirement plans, a discussion of the link between senior officer compensation and performance, and timely and transparent reporting to shareholders......

  14. Self-report may underestimate trauma intrusions.

    PubMed

    Takarangi, Melanie K T; Strange, Deryn; Lindsay, D Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Research examining maladaptive responses to trauma routinely relies on spontaneous self-report to index intrusive thoughts, which assumes people accurately recognize and report their intrusive thoughts. However, "mind-wandering" research reveals people are not always meta-aware of their thought content: they often fail to notice shifts in their attention. In two experiments, we exposed subjects to trauma films, then instructed them to report intrusive thoughts during an unrelated reading task. Intermittently, we asked whether they were thinking about the trauma. As expected, subjects often spontaneously reported intrusive thoughts. However, they were also "caught" engaging in unreported trauma-oriented thoughts. The presence and frequency of intermittent probes did not influence self-caught intrusions. Both self-caught and probe-caught intrusions were related to an existing tendency toward intrusive cognition, film-related distress, and thought suppression attempts. Our data suggest people may lack meta-awareness of trauma-related thoughts, which has implications for theory, research and treatment relating to trauma-related psychopathology. PMID:24993526

  15. Self-reported vaccination in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos; Borda, Miguel German; Arciniegas, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of vaccination in older adults within the city of Bogotá and to estimate the association with sociodemographic and health factors. Methods: This is a secondary data analysis from the SABE-Bogotá Study, a cross-sectional population-based study that included a total of 2,000 persons aged 60 years. Weighted percentages for self-reported vaccination [influenza, pneumococcal, tetanus] were determined. The association between vaccination and covariates was evaluate by logistic regression models. Results: A total of 73.0% of respondents received influenza, 57.8% pneumococcal and 47.6% tetanus vaccine. Factors independently associated with vaccination included: 1- age (65-74 years had higher odds of receiving vaccinations, compared to 60-64 years); 2- socioeconomic status (SES) (higher SES had lower odds of having influenza and pneumococcal vaccines, compared to those with lower SES); 3- health insurance (those with contributive or subsidized health insurance had higher odds (between 3 and 5 times higher) of having vaccinations, compared to those with no insurance); 4- older adults with better functional status (greater Lawton scores) had increased odds for all vaccinations; 5- older adults with higher comorbidity had increased odds for influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. Conclusion: Vaccination campaigns should be strengthened to increase vaccination coverage, especially in the group more reticent to vaccination or vulnerable to reach it such as the disabled elder. PMID:27226661

  16. Validity of College Self-Reported Gains at Diverse Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of self-reported gains to assess college student learning and development, these measures may not be valid indicators of student growth in most circumstances. However, some evidence suggests that self-reported gains may assess student outcomes more accurately at certain types of colleges and universities. This study used…

  17. Independence of Performance and Self-Report Measures of Distractibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulhus, Delroy L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes a study using self-report measures of students' responses to auditory and visual stimuli to measure distractibility in task performance among 224 Canadian undergraduates. Findings show the absence of any link between self-reported distractibility and actual performance. Study shows correlations between personality type and…

  18. A Self-Report Measure of Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Donald

    2005-01-01

    There are multiple approaches to measuring physical activity. Among these are direct observation, electronic monitoring, direct and indirect calorimetry, and self-report instruments. Self-report instruments are the most practical and cost effective option for use with a large group. In a study by Motl, Dishman, Dowda, and Pate (2004), two groups…

  19. Validity of Self-Reports in Three Populations of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobell, Linda C.; Sobell, Mark B.

    1978-01-01

    Examined whether population type and question type differentially affected validity of alcoholics' self-reports. Alcoholics gave highly valid self-reports. Question type differentially affected the validity of subjects' interview answers, as fewer invalid answers were given to demographic questions. Population type did not significantly affect…

  20. Improving Accuracy of Sleep Self-Reports through Correspondence Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Peter, Claire C.; Montgomery-Downs, Hawley E.; Massullo, Joel P.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep insufficiency is a major public health concern, yet the accuracy of self-reported sleep measures is often poor. Self-report may be useful when direct measurement of nonverbal behavior is impossible, infeasible, or undesirable, as it may be with sleep measurement. We used feedback and positive reinforcement within a small-n multiple-baseline…

  1. Construct Validity of Self-Reported Metacognitive Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Jean-Louis; Karabenick, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite their significant contributions to research on self-regulated learning, those favoring online and trace approaches have questioned the use of self-report to assess learners' use of learning strategies. An important rejoinder to such criticisms consists of examining the validity of self-report items. The present study was designed to assess…

  2. Introduction to Special Issue: The Retirement Career Phase across Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Megan C.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, older workers in the United States remain in the workforce beyond retirement age, meaning the term “retirement” might include at least some form of workforce participation. Although the proportions of women and individuals from racial and ethnic minority groups working past the age of 65 has significantly increased (Wegman & McGee, 2004); few scholars have examined the retirement career phase from a multicultural perspective. This special issue will critically review vocational literature as well as provide specific recommendations for research and practice with the aim of helping scholars and practitioners conceptualize the current concerns older adults across cultures (e.g., women and racial/ethnic minorities, among others) face during retirement planning. PMID:26101454

  3. 26 CFR 1.105-6 - Special rules for employees retired before January 27, 1975.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... conditions of his employer's plan, because of personal injuries or sickness; (3) At the time of the employee... to retire on account of personal injuries or sickness alone, are sufficient for purposes of...

  4. 26 CFR 1.105-6 - Special rules for employees retired before January 27, 1975.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... conditions of his employer's plan, because of personal injuries or sickness; (3) At the time of the employee... to retire on account of personal injuries or sickness alone, are sufficient for purposes of...

  5. Voluntary Early Retirement Is a Painless Way to Prune Your Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    The steps necessary to establish most voluntary early retirement incentive plans include establishing a variable-rate incentive, a minimum qualifying salary, a minimum qualifying age, and a method of payment. (Author/IRT)

  6. Health Information Search and Retirement Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Nicholas A.; Sages, Ronald A.; Fernatt, Frederick R.; Nabeshima, George G.; Grable, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research has found a relationship between the health habits of individuals and their financial well-being. Little research has been conducted, however, to explore the nature of the health-wealth connection. The purpose of this study was to explore and test the association of physical health behaviors, namely exercise and diet, and health…

  7. Teacher Pension Incentives, Retirement Behavior, and Potential for Reform in Arkansas. Conference Paper 2009-10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costrell, Robert M.; McGee, Josh B.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the Arkansas Teacher Retirement System (ATRS) pension plan and an empirical investigation of the behavioral response to that plan, as well as to a possible reform plan. We begin by describing the plan parameters and discussing the incentives these parameters create. We then estimate the effect of pension…

  8. Retirement Headaches Take Root

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    For years, the St. Louis school district has experienced the convergence of two trend lines school superintendents hope never to see: rising employee-pension costs and falling student enrollment. Despite years of fully funding its share of the teacher-pension plan, the proportion of the St. Louis district's budget tied up in paying benefits for…

  9. Trends in Ambulatory Self-Report: The Role of Momentary Experience in Psychosomatic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Tamlin S.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we review the differences between momentary, retrospective, and trait self-report techniques and discuss the unique role that ambulatory reports of momentary experience play in psychosomatic medicine. Following a brief historical review of self-report techniques, we discuss the latest perspective which links ambulatory self-reports to a qualitatively different conscious self – the ‘experiencing self’– which is functionally and neuroanatomically different from the ‘remembering’ and ‘believing’ selves measured through retrospective and trait questionnaires. The experiencing self functions to navigate current environments and is relatively more tied to the salience network and corporeal information from the body that regulates autonomic processes. As evidence, we review research showing that experiences measured through ambulatory assessment have stronger associations with cardiovascular reactivity, cortisol response, immune system function, and threat/reward biomarkers compared to memories or beliefs. By contrast, memories and beliefs play important roles in decision making and long-term planning, but they are less tied to bodily processes and more tied to default/long-term memory networks, which minimizes their sensitivity for certain research questions. We conclude with specific recommendations for using self-report questionnaires in psychosomatic medicine and suggest that intensive ambulatory assessment of experiences may provide greater sensitivity for connecting psychological with biological processes. PMID:22582330

  10. The 2009 Retirement Confidence Survey: economy drives confidence to record lows; many looking to work longer.

    PubMed

    Helman, Ruth; Copeland, Craig; VanDerhei, Jack

    2009-04-01

    RECORD LOW CONFIDENCE LEVELS: Workers who say they are very confident about having enough money for a comfortable retirement this year hit the lowest level in 2009 (13 percent) since the Retirement Confidence Survey started asking the question in 1993, continuing a two-year decline. Retirees also posted a new low in confidence about having a financially secure retirement, with only 20 percent now saying they are very confident (down from 41 percent in 2007). THE ECONOMY, INFLATION, COST OF LIVING ARE THE BIG CONCERNS: Not surprisingly, workers overall who have lost confidence over the past year about affording a comfortable retirement most often cite the recent economic uncertainty, inflation, and the cost of living as primary factors. In addition, certain negative experiences, such as job loss or a pay cut, loss of retirement savings, or an increase in debt, almost always contribute to loss of confidence among those who experience them. RETIREMENT EXPECTATIONS DELAYED: Workers apparently expect to work longer because of the economic downturn: 28 percent of workers in the 2009 RCS say the age at which they expect to retire has changed in the past year. Of those, the vast majority (89 percent) say that they have postponed retirement with the intention of increasing their financial security. Nevertheless, the median (mid-point) worker expects to retire at age 65, with 21 percent planning to push on into their 70s. The median retiree actually retired at age 62, and 47 percent of retirees say they retired sooner than planned. WORKING IN RETIREMENT: More workers are also planning to supplement their income in retirement by working for pay. The percentage of workers planning to work after they retire has increased to 72 percent in 2009 (up from 66 percent in 2007). This compares with 34 percent of retirees who report they actually worked for pay at some time during their retirement. GREATER WORRY ABOUT BASIC AND HEALTH EXPENSES: Workers who say they very confident in

  11. Timing of Retirement: Including a Delay Discounting Perspective in Retirement Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bidewell, John; Griffin, Barbara; Hesketh, Beryl

    2006-01-01

    This research examined the influence of delay and anticipated health and enjoyment on the amount of retirement savings sacrificed for early retirement. In addition to testing and supporting predictions that willingness to sacrifice retirement savings would be less with shorter delays to retirement, greater anticipated health, and greater…

  12. Early and Late Retirement Exits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brougham, Ruby R.; Walsh, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The current study proposes that personal need fulfillment (relatedness, generativity, identity, growth, and finances) predicts early and late retirement intentions. The personal needs of 160 full-time older employees were measured by personal goals, job satisfactions, job characteristics, and intrinsic motivation. Results suggest that the personal…

  13. Retirement: An Ego Alien View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Helen

    1977-01-01

    Since knowledge of ego development can be used in professional work, a needed classification of attitudes toward the work ethic is advanced. A radical departure from our retirement policy towards those over 65 years of age requires additional competence on the part of counselors in the field of aging. (Author)

  14. Retirement: When, Why, and How?

    PubMed Central

    Beck, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Retirement from a career in Colon and Rectal Surgery is usually a personal decision. The details of when, why, and how are individually specific and are shaped by life experience, desires, personal and family commitments, as well as financial considerations. PMID:22654572

  15. Alternative Approaches to Retirement Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, John C.

    It has been proposed that the same type of aptitude and ability tests required for initial job entry be used to indicate whether an individual can continue to perform effectively in that job. A review of the nature of such tests indicates that they would be inappropriate for use in retirement decisions. A proficiency test of the kind used at the…

  16. Phased Retirement: The European Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swank, Constance

    This report provides United States corporate and union policymakers with practical information on one alternative work pattern for older employees--phased retirement--from European colleagues who already have implemented or negotiated specific phasing programs. An introduction provides details on the collection of information from companies in…

  17. The Issue of Mandatory Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Harold L.

    1978-01-01

    The emerging issue will center on costs to the total economy of early retirement for a growing population whose life expectancy is continuing to rise. Available from The American Academy of Political and Social Science, 3937 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104; $18.00 annually. (Author/IRT)

  18. An Evaluation of Mandatory Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givens, Harrison, Jr.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues raised by mandatory retirement, the meaning of the new law, the law's specifics, and the uncertainties still ahead. Available from the The American Academy of Political and Social Science, 3937 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104; $18.00 annually. (Author)

  19. Reconceptualizing Retirement for Black Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Rose C.

    1987-01-01

    Examined subsample of nonworking older Black Americans (N=295) from the National Survey of Black Americans sample. Found four factors contributed significantly to respondents' unretired-retired status: indistinct line between lifetime and old age work patterns, view that occasional work is necessary, income from other than private pensions, and…

  20. Role of Health Literacy in Self-Reported Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Catherine L.; Appleton, Sarah L.; Black, Julie; Hoon, Elizabeth; Rudd, Rima E.; Adams, Robert J.; Gill, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Self-report of musculoskeletal conditions is often used to estimate population prevalence and to determine disease burden and influence policy. However, self-report of certain musculoskeletal conditions is frequently inaccurate, suggesting inadequate communication to the patient of their diagnosis. The aim of this study is to determine the association between functional health literacy (FHL) and self-reported musculoskeletal conditions in a representative population survey. FHL was measured using Newest Vital Sign in 2824 randomly selected adults. Participants also self-reported medically diagnosed arthritis, gout, and osteoporosis. Multiple logistic regression was adjusted for age and sex. The prevalence of self-reported arthritis, gout, and osteoporosis was 25.2%, 4.9%, and 5.6%, respectively. The prevalence of those at risk for inadequate FHL was 24.0% and high likelihood of inadequate FHL was 21.0%. However, over 50% of respondents with arthritis or gout had at risk/inadequate FHL, increasing to 70% of those self-reporting osteoporosis. After adjustment for age and sex, respondents in the arthritis subgroup of “don't know” and self-reported osteoporosis were significantly more likely to have inadequate FHL than the general population. This study indicates a substantial burden of low health literacy amongst people with musculoskeletal disease. This has implications for provider-patient communication, individual healthcare, population estimates of musculoskeletal disease, and impact of public health messages. PMID:26357571

  1. Validation of Self-Reported Anthropometrics in Female College Freshmen

    PubMed Central

    LEONE, RYAN J.; MORGAN, AMY L.; LUDY, MARY-JON

    2016-01-01

    Most investigations concerning the validity of self-reported anthropometrics focus on weight, height, and body mass index. This study extends those investigations by exploring the impact of self-reporting bias on the disease risk indicators of waist circumference and body fat percentage. Female college freshmen (n=128) self-reported weight and height, then underwent measurements for weight, height, waist circumference, and body fat percentage. Self-reporting bias was defined as self-reported minus directly-assessed anthropometric value. Despite no differences in self-reported versus directly-assessed weight or height for the total group, students with high waist circumference and excess fat under-reported their weight by 2.3±4.4 lb (p<0.05). Self-reporting bias was negatively correlated with waist circumference (r=−0.362; p<0.001) and body fat percentage (r=−0.317; p<0.001). Although many female college freshmen accurately represent their weight, those with excess fat and waist circumference under-reported their weight. This may lead to missed opportunities for risk identification, prevention, and intervention. PMID:27293506

  2. The Ever-Changing Meanings of Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVittie, Chris; Goodall, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Shultz and Wang (April 2011) drew attention to the ways in which understandings of retirement have changed over time, both in terms of the place of retirement in the lives of individuals and in terms of how retirement can no longer usefully be taken to comprise a single defining event. As the authors pointed out, psychological research has…

  3. Psychological Effects of the Transition to Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Psychological effects of disengagement from a work life and the transition to retirement are discussed. These effects include partial identity disruption, decision paralysis, diminished self trust, experience of a post retirement void, the search for meaningful engagement in society, development of a retirement/life structure, the confluence of…

  4. Women's Caregiving Careers and Retirement Financial Insecurity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orel, Nancy A.; Landry-Meyer, Laura; Spence, Maria A. S.

    2007-01-01

    Providing the essential care for children and aged relatives has immediate and long-term financial consequences for women, particularly financial insecurity in retirement. Women's caregiving careers are examined in relationship to the impact on retirement. The need for career and retirement education and counseling aimed at women who assume…

  5. 5 CFR 842.206 - Involuntary retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Involuntary retirement. 842.206 Section... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Eligibility § 842.206 Involuntary retirement... separates from the service involuntarily after completing 25 years of service, or after becoming age 50...

  6. Learning to Work No Longer: Exploring "Retirement"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore learning for and through retirement from the workplace. Design/methodology/approach: First, "retirement" is considered in the light of the existing literature, demonstrating a complex concept. The paper describes the research project from which a theme of retirement as a learning process has…

  7. 78 FR 68981 - Electronic Retirement Processing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ...The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is adopting its proposed regulations applicable to electronic benefits processing under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), the Federal Employees' Retirement System (FERS), the Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI), the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB), and the Retired Federal Employee Health Benefits (RFEHB) Programs. These......

  8. What Do Self-Reported, Objective, Measures of Health Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael; Stabile, Mark; Deri, Chatherine

    2004-01-01

    Many researchers consider survey reports of the incidence of chronic conditions to be more objective than self-assessed measures of global well being. The hypothesis was evaluated by attempting to validate the ''objective, self reported'' measures of health.

  9. Validation of self-reported periodontal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Blicher, B; Joshipura, K; Eke, P

    2005-10-01

    Self-report is an efficient and accepted means of assessing many population characteristics, risk factors, and diseases, but has rarely been used for periodontal disease (chronic periodontitis). The availability of valid self-reported measures of periodontal disease would facilitate epidemiologic studies on a much larger scale, allow for integration of new studies of periodontal disease within large ongoing studies, and facilitate lower-cost population surveillance of periodontitis. Several studies have been conducted to validate self-reported measures for periodontal disease, but results have been inconsistent. In this report, we conducted a systematic review of the validation studies. We reviewed the 16 studies that assessed the validity of self-reported periodontal and gingivitis measures against clinical gold standards. Seven of the studies included self-reported measures specific to gingivitis, four included measures only for periodontitis, and five included both gingivitis and periodontal measures. Three of the studies used a self-assessment method where they provided the patient with a detailed manual for performing a self-exam. The remaining 13 studies asked participants to self-report symptoms, presence of periodontal disease itself, or their recollection of a dental health professional diagnosing them or providing treatment for periodontal disease. The review indicates that some measures showed promise, but results varied across populations and self-reported measures. One example of a good measure is, "Has any dentist/hygienist told you that you have deep pockets?", which had a sensitivity of 55%, a specificity of 90%, positive predictive value of 77%, and negative predictive value of 75% against clinical pocket depth. Higher validity could be potentially obtained by the use of combinations of several self-reported questions and other predictors of periodontal disease. PMID:16183785

  10. Self-reported measures for surveillance of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Eke, P I; Dye, B A; Wei, L; Slade, G D; Thornton-Evans, G O; Beck, J D; Taylor, G W; Borgnakke, W S; Page, R C; Genco, R J

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of self-reported measures in predicting periodontitis in a representative US adult population, based on 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data. Self-reported gum health and treatment history, loose teeth, bone loss around teeth, tooth not looking right, and use of dental floss and mouthwash were obtained during in-home interviews and validated against full-mouth clinically assessed periodontitis in 3,743 US adults 30 years and older. All self-reported measures (> 95% item response rates) were associated with periodontitis, and bivariate correlations between responses to these questions were weak, indicating low redundancy. In multivariable logistic regression modeling, the combined effects of demographic measures and responses to 5 self-reported questions in predicting periodontitis of mild or greater severity were 85% sensitive and 58% specific and produced an 'area under the receiver operator characteristic curve' (AUROCC) of 0.81. Four questions were 95% sensitive and 30% specific, with an AUROCC of 0.82 in predicting prevalence of clinical attachment loss ≥ 3 mm at one or more sites. In conclusion, self-reported measures performed well in predicting periodontitis in US adults. Where preferred clinically based surveillance is unattainable, locally adapted variations of these self-reported measures may be a promising alternative for surveillance of periodontitis. PMID:24065636

  11. Social and Physical Environmental Correlates of Adults’ Weekend Sitting Time and Moderating Effects of Retirement Status and Physical Health

    PubMed Central

    Van Holle, Veerle; McNaughton, Sarah A.; Teychenne, Megan; Timperio, Anna; Van Dyck, Delfien; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Salmon, Jo

    2014-01-01

    Emerging research suggests that prolonged sedentary behaviour (SB) is detrimental to health. Changes in SB patterns are likely to occur during particular life stages, for example at retirement age (55–65-year-old). Evidence on socio-ecological SB correlates is scarce and inconsistent in this age group. Moreover, the influence of socio-ecological correlates may vary depending on health and retirement status. This study examined social and environment correlates of overall weekend day sitting among adults at or approaching retirement age, and moderating effects of perceived physical health and retirement status. Baseline data from the Wellbeing, Eating and Exercise for a Long Life study in 2839 Australian adults (55–65-year-old) were analysed. Participants self-reported proximal social factors, neighbourhood social and physical environment, physical health and retirement status. MLwiN multilevel regression analyses were conducted. In the multivariable model, only social support from friends/colleagues to discourage sitting (B = −0.891; p = 0.036) was associated with overall weekend day sitting. No moderation of retirement status, nor physical health were found in the multivariable results. Results from this study suggest the importance of social factors in relation to weekend day sitting among 55–65-year-old adults. Health promotion initiatives in this age group should pay special attention to enhancing social interaction opportunities. Moreover, findings suggest that SB-specific correlates may need to be examined in future research. PMID:25243886

  12. The Men's Program: does it impact college men's self-reported bystander efficacy and willingness to intervene?

    PubMed

    Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Foubert, John D; Brasfield, Hope M; Hill, Brent; Shelley-Tremblay, Shannon

    2011-06-01

    This study considered whether a rape prevention program could reduce men's rape myth acceptance, enhance the perceived effectiveness of college men's bystander behavior, and increase men's willingness to intervene as bystanders in potentially dangerous situations. As predicted, college men who experienced The Men's Program significantly increased their self-reported willingness to help as a bystander and their perceived bystander efficacy in comparison to college men who experienced the comparison condition. Men's Program participants also significantly decreased their self-reported rape myth acceptance in comparison with comparison condition participants. The college policy and rape prevention program planning implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21571743

  13. Australian baby boomers face retirement during the global financial crisis.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Hal; Wells, Yvonne; O'Loughlin, Kate; Heese, Karla

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the impact in Australia of the global financial crisis on the baby boom cohort approaching later life. Data from national focus groups of people aged 50 to 64 years (N = 73), conducted in late 2008, found widespread but variable concern and uncertainty concerning work and retirement plans and experiences. A national survey (N = 1,009) of those aged 50 to 64 years in mid-2009 reported lower levels of financial satisfaction compared with other life domains; many planned to postpone retirement. Findings are interpreted in the context of policies and markets that differed significantly from those in the United States, notwithstanding the global nature of the financial crisis. PMID:23837628

  14. Assessing quality of life of self-reported rheumatic patients.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro L; Gonçalves, Sónia P; Ferreira, Lara N; Pereira, Luis N; Antunes, Patrícia; Gouveia, Nélia; Rodrigues, Ana; Canhão, Helena; Branco, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with self-reported rheumatic diseases (RD), to classify self-reported rheumatic patients in groups according to their health state and to explore the associations between health status and sociodemographic variables. Data came from the Portuguese Epidemiologic study of the RD. A sample of the Portuguese population aged 18 or more (n = 10,661) stratified by region and locality dimension was interviewed by trained interviewers and answered a standardized questionnaire that included the SF-36v1, the EQ-5D-3L, medical history, identification of potential rheumatic diseases, sociodemographic characteristics, among others. Descriptive statistics and parametric tests were used to compare HRQoL of respondents with and without RD. Comparisons with normative data from the Portuguese population were also carried out. A cluster analysis was used to classify respondents into homogeneous groups. Regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with HRQoL. Respondents with self-reported RD assigned a lower self-perception to their health status. The burden of disease was observed mainly in physical function, role physical and bodily pain. The EQ-5D-3L dimensions show similar results: the intensity of problems is significantly more evident in respondents with self-reported RD. HRQoL of respondents with self-reported RD is related to sociodemographic variables and is significantly lower when compared with the Portuguese population. Four clusters of homogeneous respondents with self-reported RD were formed and characterized according to a number of variables. Factors associated with HRQoL were identified. In conclusion, suffering from a self-reported RD has a significant impact on self-perceived health status and on the quality of life. PMID:27378230

  15. Effect of Retirement on Alcohol Consumption: Longitudinal Evidence from the French Gazel Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zins, Marie; Guéguen, Alice; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Leclerc, Annette; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerlund, Hugo; Ferrie, Jane E.; Goldberg, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effect of retirement on alcohol consumption. The objectives were to examine changes in alcohol consumption following retirement, and whether these patterns differ by gender and socioeconomic status. Methods and Findings We assessed alcohol consumption annually from 5 years before to 5 years after retirement among 10,023 men and 2,361 women of the French Gazel study. Data were analyzed separately for men and women, using repeated-measures logistic regression analysis with generalized estimating equations. Five years prior to retirement, the prevalence of heavy drinking was about 16% among men, and not patterned by socioeconomic status. Among women, this prevalence was 19.5% in managers, 14.7% in intermediate occupations, and 12.8% in clerical workers. Around retirement, the estimated prevalence of heavy drinking increased in both sexes. In men, this increase was 3.1 percentage points for managers, 3.2 in intermediate occupations, 4.6 in clerical workers, and 1.3 in manual workers. In women, this increase was 6.6 percentage points among managers, 4.3 in intermediate occupations, and 3.3 among clerical workers. In men the increase around retirement was followed by a decrease over the following four years, not significant among manual workers; among women such a decrease was also observed in the non-managerial occupations. It is difficult to assess the extent to which the results observed in this cohort would hold for other working populations, other conditions of employment, or in other cultural settings. A plausible explanation for the increase in heavy drinking around retirement could be that increased leisure time after retirement provides more opportunities for drinking, and not having to work during the day after may decrease constraints on drinking. Conclusions Our findings of increased consumption around retirement suggest that information about negative effects of alcohol consumption should be included in pre-retirement

  16. Self-Reported Hearing in the Last Two Years of Life Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexander K.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Miao, Yinghui; Boscardin, W. John; Wallhagen, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic data on the prevalence of hearing loss near death is lacking. Objectives To assess the prevalence and correlates of self-reported hearing loss during the last two years of life. Design Observational cohort study. Setting The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a longitudinal nationally representative cohort of adults age >50 (2000 to 2013). Participants Older adults Measurements The HRS interview closest to death was used (mean 12.2 months prior to death). Participants rated their hearing (excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor), and if they used hearing aids. We describe the prevalence and correlates of fair/poor ratings adjusted for age and gender. Results Of 5,895 participants (mean age at death 78 years, 53% women, 20% non-white), overall, 32% rated their hearing as fair/poor (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 31–34%), but 60% (95% CI 57–64%) of the 7% of participants that used hearing aids rated hearing as fair/poor. The prevalence of fair/poor hearing was highest among participants interviewed closest to death (29% 19–24 months prior to death, 36% 1–6 months prior to death, p for trend = 0.01). Correlates of fair/poor hearing during the last two years of life included: age at death (age 50–59 22%, 60–69 21%, 70–79 26%, 80–89 38%, ≥90 50%), gender (men 35%, women 30%), ethnicity (Latino 42%, white 33%), wealth (lowest quartile 38%, highest quartile 27%), history of heart disease (yes 38%, no 27%), dependence in activities of daily living (yes 42%, no 26%), difficulty taking medications (yes 46%, no 29%), and probable dementia (yes 44%, no cognitive impairment 24%). Conclusion Self-reported hearing loss increases during the last two years of life and is associated with physical and social vulnerability. PMID:27341383

  17. Reconceptualizing retirement: A status-based approach.

    PubMed

    Hershenson, David B

    2016-08-01

    The one thing on which essentially all retirement scholars agree is that there is no generally accepted definition of the term "retirement." Hence, it is not surprising that a plethora of competing models of the stages of retirement has been generated. To cut this Gordian knot, this paper proposes that the concept of statuses, which are not necessarily mutually exclusive or sequential, replace the idea of stages. Statuses better reflect observed human behavior and are more open to multicultural application, thus facilitating retirement research and clinical practice. The retirement statuses proposed here, which can exist in any combination or sequence, are retrenchment, exploration, try-out, involvement, reconsideration, and exiting (forming the acronym RETIRE). PMID:27531447

  18. Self-reported ability assessment in rock climbing.

    PubMed

    Draper, Nick; Dickson, Tabitha; Blackwell, Gavin; Fryer, Simon; Priestley, Sefton; Winter, David; Ellis, Greg

    2011-05-01

    Level of ability within rock climbing is generally expressed in terms of a "best ascent", rated using various grading systems within the sport. The most common method of obtaining this information is via self-report. The aim of this study was to examine the validity of self-reported climbing grades. Twenty-nine competitive rock climbers (17 males, 12 females) were first asked to report their current (defined as within the last 12 months) best on-sight lead ascent grade (Aus/NZ). The participants then climbed a specifically designed indoor route, under on-sight conditions (one attempt, no route practice or preview), to obtain an assessed grade. The route increased in difficulty, and was such that the distance achieved by the climber corresponded to a particular grade. The mean (±standard deviation) self-reported and assessed grade was 22.6 ± 3.4 and 22.0 ± 3.0 (Aus/NZ) respectively. Despite slight over- and underestimations in males and females respectively, there was no statistically significant difference between self-reported and assessed on-sight climbing grades. The results of this study suggest that self-reported climbing grades provide a valid and accurate reflection of climbing ability. PMID:21491325

  19. 5 CFR 838.611 - Identifying the retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... retirement system, such as military retired pay, Foreign Service retirement benefits or Central Intelligence... §§ 838.303(b)(1) and 838.502(b)(1). (c) A court order affecting military retired pay, even when military retired pay has been waived for inclusion in CSRS annuities, does not award a former spouse a portion...

  20. Signal-detection properties of verbal self-reports.

    PubMed Central

    Critchfield, T S

    1993-01-01

    The bias (B'H) and discriminability (A') of college students' self-reports about choices made in a delayed identity matching-to-sample task were studied as a function of characteristics of the response about which they reported. Each matching-to-sample trial consisted of two, three, or four simultaneously presented sample stimuli, a 1-s retention interval, and two, three, or four comparison stimuli. One sample stimulus was always reproduced among the comparisons, and choice of the matching comparison in less than 800 ms produced points worth chances in a drawing for money. After each choice, subjects pressed either a "yes" or a "no" button to answer a computer-generated query about whether the choice met the point contingency. The number of sample and comparison stimuli was manipulated across experimental conditions. Rates of successful matching-to-sample choices were negatively correlated with the number of matching-to-sample stimuli, regardless of whether samples or comparisons were manipulated. As in previous studies, subjects exhibited a pronounced bias for reporting successful responses. Self-report bias tended to become less pronounced as matching-to-sample success became less frequent, an outcome consistent with signal-frequency effects in psychophysical research. The bias was also resistant to change, suggesting influences other than signal frequency that remain to be identified. Self-report discriminability tended to decrease with the number of sample stimuli and increase with the number of comparison stimuli, an effect not attributable to differential effects of the two manipulations on matching-to-sample performance. Overall, bias and discriminability indices revealed effects that were not evident in self-report accuracy scores. The results indicate that analyses based on signal-detection theory can improve the description of correspondence between self-reports and their referents and thus contribute to the identification of environmental sources of

  1. Managing Your TIAA-CREF Retirement Accounts. Investment Strategies To Maximize Retirement Income.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodall, Leonard E.; Corney, William J.

    This book offers investment strategies for participants in the primary retirement organization for universities and nonprofit organizations, the Teachers Insurance and Annuity-College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF). The investment principles outlined also apply to retirement funds offered by other investment companies. The book's scope…

  2. Coping strategies during and after spaceflight: Data from retired cosmonauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suedfeld, Peter; Brcic, Jelena; Johnson, Phyllis J.; Gushin, Vadim

    2015-05-01

    Coping is a dynamic physiological and psychological process in response to perceived environmental stress that functions to restore physiological homeostasis and reduce negative affect [1]. Thematic content analysis was employed for references to 13 well-established coping strategies in interviews with 20 retired long-duration male cosmonauts. As in previous research with other space samples [2,3] the retired cosmonauts mentioned Problem-Oriented strategies more frequently than Emotion-Oriented ones. In the present sample, Seeking Social Support, Planful Problem Solving and Endurance/Obedience/Effort were the top three most mentioned coping strategies. Cosmonauts who had spent more than a year in space, compared to those who had spent less than a year, mentioned using Planful Problem Solving more as they recalled their career and retirement. Examining changes over time, spaceflight had a positive effect on Accepting Responsibility. Endurance/Obedience/Effort steadily decreased over time, while we found an inverted-U pattern for Distancing and Self-Control. Additional results in relation to other astronaut samples and the relationship between coping and post-flight growth are discussed.

  3. A Retirement and A Reservation: A Retrospective Autobiography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sok K

    2012-01-01

    A retirement is a rite of passage that requires careful planning, because it forces a retiree to make a shift in the paradigm in life. For 37 years, I was a healing professional, a breadwinner, and a working spouse. I am now a jobless loner, an inactive pensioner, and a homebound spouse. In this retrospective autobiography, I suggest a few points to help my younger colleagues to better their upcoming retirement: professional, financial, social, and familial. To overcome Erikson's identity crisis, I volunteered to be a wounded healer at Warm Springs Indian Reservation. My volunteer medical service at Warm Springs Indian Reservation was a good antidote to creatively overcome my postretirement blues. PMID:22745621

  4. Sustainability Literacy of Older People in Retirement Villages

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bo; Zuo, Jian; Skitmore, Martin; Buys, Laurie; Hu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    With many developed countries experiencing the aging of the population, older people play a large role in contributing to environmental problems but also to environmental solutions. The purpose of this research is to understand the awareness and behavior of current older people living in retirement villages towards sustainability development. To achieve this, a sustainability literacy survey was conducted with 65 older residents of a private retirement village located 10 Km outside the Brisbane, Australia's central business district (CBD). Most of residents recognized the importance of environment protection and would like to lead a more environmentally friendly lifestyle. In addition, the majority were willing to pay higher prices for a living environment with sustainable features. The importance of positive social communications was emphasized with most residents having established good relationships with others in the village. The findings provide an important insight into consumer perspectives regarding the sustainable features that should and can be incorporated into the village planning and development. PMID:25587448

  5. Teacher Pension Incentives, Retirement Behavior, and Potential for Reform in Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costrell, Robert M.; McGee, Josh B.

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyze the Arkansas teacher pension plan and empirically gauge the behavioral response to incentives embedded in that plan and to possible reforms. The pattern of pension wealth accrual creates sharp incentives to work until eligible for early or normal retirement, often in one's early fifties, and to separate shortly thereafter. We…

  6. Proposal for an Early Retirement Incentive Program at Mercer County Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Arthur E.

    A project was undertaken to evaluate existing models of early retirement incentive programs (ERIPs) and recommend an ERIP for New Jersey's Mercer County Community College (MCCC). The following categories of ERIPs were reviewed: state plans for New York and Minnesota; K-12 school districts plans at the Castro Valley Unified School District and 48…

  7. 29 CFR Appendix D to Part 4044 - Tables Used To Determine Expected Retirement Age

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tables Used To Determine Expected Retirement Age D Appendix D to Part 4044 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS ALLOCATION OF ASSETS IN SINGLE-EMPLOYER PLANS Pt. 4044, App. D Appendix D to...

  8. 29 CFR Appendix D to Part 4044 - Tables Used To Determine Expected Retirement Age

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tables Used To Determine Expected Retirement Age D Appendix D to Part 4044 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS ALLOCATION OF ASSETS IN SINGLE-EMPLOYER PLANS Pt. 4044, App. D Appendix D to...

  9. 29 CFR Appendix D to Part 4044 - Tables Used To Determine Expected Retirement Age

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tables Used To Determine Expected Retirement Age D Appendix D to Part 4044 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS ALLOCATION OF ASSETS IN SINGLE-EMPLOYER PLANS Pt. 4044, App. D Appendix D to...

  10. 29 CFR Appendix D to Part 4044 - Tables Used To Determine Expected Retirement Age

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tables Used To Determine Expected Retirement Age D Appendix D to Part 4044 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS ALLOCATION OF ASSETS IN SINGLE-EMPLOYER PLANS Pt. 4044, App. D Appendix D to...

  11. 75 FR 35919 - Investment Company Advertising: Target Date Retirement Fund Names and Marketing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... Lifetime Income Options for Participants and Beneficiaries in Retirement Plans, 75 FR 5253, 5253-54 (Feb. 2...\\ See Default Investment Alternatives Under Participant Directed Individual Account Plans, 72 FR 60452...-280. \\20\\ See QDIA Adopting Release, supra note 19, 72 FR at 60452- 53. As an alternative to a...

  12. 77 FR 37349 - Amendment of Prohibited Payment Option Under Single-Employer Defined Benefit Plan of Plan Sponsor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ...This document contains proposed regulations that would provide guidance under the anti-cutback rules of section 411(d)(6) of the Internal Revenue Code, which generally prohibit plan amendments eliminating or reducing accrued benefits, early retirement benefits, retirement-type subsidies, and optional forms of benefit under qualified retirement plans. These proposed regulations would provide an......

  13. [Socio-hygienic rationale for the preparation for retirement (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sacuk, N N; Panina, N V

    1981-01-01

    The objective of the study made within the framework of bilateral cooperation between the Institute of Gerontology of the Academy of Medical Sciences, Kiev and the GDR Research Project of Social Gerontology was to provide a scientific basis for the health-promoting and rational way of life of elderly persons of pre-retirement and retirement age. 1,500 Kiev citizens of pre-retirement or retirement age were examined and/or interviewed. Like similar investigations conducted in the GDR, the Soviet findings showed a highly significant correlation to exist between health education, healthy living. Knowledge about one's health and health-promoting behavior. The poorest results were obtained for unskilled or semi-skilled production workers, both male and female. They had the highest proportion in advanced degenerative diseases. The persons investigated were best informed about the positive influence of exercise, a balanced diet, periodic medical check-ups and home visits by doctors. The effectiveness of health education and health propaganda was calculated by means of efficiency indices. Generally speaking, the relation between knowledge and action is still inadequate. This applies primarily to preventive measure by the individual and to the organization of his daily regime (indices just over 50%). The indices related to diet and exercise were higher (71 and 72%, respectively). Adverse psychological factors included a lack of concrete plans for retirement age, a rather passive mode of life and dissatisfaction with the situation during pre-retirement and retirement age. An active approach to old age proved much more favourable, including satisfaction with one's life and with the present situation. A significant correlation was found to exist between a non-rational way of life, morbidity and multi-morbidity. The results of the study will be used to make recommendations regarding to the preparation for old age, especially for the transitional period between pre-retirement and

  14. Work and Family Characteristics as Predictors of Early Retirement in Married Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Kubicek, Bettina; Korunka, Christian; Hoonakker, Peter; Raymo, James M.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents an integrative model of early retirement using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. The model extends prior work by incorporating work-family conflict to capture the interaction between the work and family domains and by assuming proximal and distal predictors of early retirement. More precisely, the model suggests that family and job demands and resources predict family-to-work and work-to-family conflict, respectively. All of these factors are presumed to have only indirect effects on retirement timing via the intervening effect of quality of life measures, that is, marital satisfaction, job satisfaction and health. The authors assume that these three factors constitute predictors of early retirement in addition to socioeconomic status and the availability of a pension plan and health insurance. The model was tested with structural equation modeling techniques, and the results were supportive. Therefore, the proposed model offers a general framework for the integration of previous research findings. PMID:21430790

  15. Work and Family Characteristics as Predictors of Early Retirement in Married Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Kubicek, Bettina; Korunka, Christian; Hoonakker, Peter; Raymo, James M

    2010-01-01

    This study presents an integrative model of early retirement using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. The model extends prior work by incorporating work-family conflict to capture the interaction between the work and family domains and by assuming proximal and distal predictors of early retirement. More precisely, the model suggests that family and job demands and resources predict family-to-work and work-to-family conflict, respectively. All of these factors are presumed to have only indirect effects on retirement timing via the intervening effect of quality of life measures, that is, marital satisfaction, job satisfaction and health. The authors assume that these three factors constitute predictors of early retirement in addition to socioeconomic status and the availability of a pension plan and health insurance. The model was tested with structural equation modeling techniques, and the results were supportive. Therefore, the proposed model offers a general framework for the integration of previous research findings. PMID:21430790

  16. Older Workers and Bridge Employment: Redefining Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Lorene B.; Brott, Pamelia E.

    2005-01-01

    The authors present a qualitative study that explored the transition experiences of older workers who retired from long-term careers and who were working in bridge jobs (i.e., transitional work between career employment and retirement). Using grounded theory methodology, the authors interviewed 24 older workers to learn why they decided to pursue…

  17. 78 FR 14233 - Electronic Retirement Processing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Regulations, by updating the regulations previously published at 72 FR 73573 (December 28, 2007). OPM is... OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Part 850 RIN 3206-AM45 Electronic Retirement Processing AGENCY: Office... electronic recordkeeping and automated retirement processing improvements being deployed by OPM,...

  18. Leisure and the Retired Professor: Occupation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Lorraine; Kolarik, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the leisure activities of retired professors, whose activity patterns in retirement may be different from those of other occupational groups because of their lifetime commitment to work. This interview study uses both quantitative and qualitative data to investigate: (a) the leisure and professional activities of…

  19. 22 CFR 20.4 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 20.4 Section 20.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN FORMER SPOUSES § 20.4 Retirement benefits. (a) Type of benefits. (1) A former spouse who meets the qualification requirements of § 20.3 is entitled...

  20. 20 CFR 633.306 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 633.306 Section 633.306 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.306 Retirement benefits. No...

  1. Retirement Systems of the American Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, W. William

    The descriptive-analytical detail of this study provides confirmation of the generality that, if teachers continue with the profession long enough, they will retire with allowance payments close to or even below poverty levels. The research reviews most aspects of teacher retirement including: (1) historical and philosophical background; (2)…

  2. 20 CFR 404.1050 - Retirement payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or annuities) on account of your retirement for age are not excluded from wages unless— (a) The... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retirement payments. 404.1050 Section 404.1050 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND...

  3. Retirement Policy. Overview. ERIC Digest No. 38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkfield, Patricia Worthy

    While the Federal Government has been involved in the care of the elderly since the depression, a comprehensive and unified national retirement policy has never been established. Federal programs for the aged have avoided cutbacks, but adaptations in present retirement policy are required to meet the needs of young and old alike. Although public…

  4. Socioeconomic Determinants of Early Retirement in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, P. Lynn; Wanner, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    This study attempts to determine the main socioeconomic factors influencing the decision to retire before age 65 among Canadian men and women. The study concludes that early retirees tend to be single men and married women employed by others who are better educated and whose nonearned income is higher than those who retire at a later age.…

  5. Creating a therapeutic milieu in retirement communities.

    PubMed

    Bekhet, Abir; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

    2011-01-01

    Elderly persons' relocation to retirement communities is a stressful event that requires person-milieu adjustment. Research has shown differences in relocation adjustment for elders residing in different retirement communities. A secondary analysis used findings from a study of relocated elders in order to determine whether certain therapeutic factors were lacking in retirement communities where elders had difficulty in adjusting. Study participants were 104 elders who relocated to six retirement communities in Northeast Ohio. This study analyzed qualitative data from the researchers' observations and field notes and narratives obtained from the elders who participated in the original study. The analysis focused on data that described the environmental characteristics of retirement communities where elders reported less successful adjustment. These environmental characteristics were evaluated for consistency with the characteristics of Shives' therapeutic milieu. Most retirement communities in the study did not fulfill all eight dimensions of a therapeutic milieu as defined by Shives. For example, individualized treatment programs were lacking in most of the retirement communities and the activities offered were not based on individual assessment and did not contribute to personal growth. The findings point to the need to create a more therapeutic milieu in retirement communities in order to facilitate successful readjustment for relocated elders. PMID:21574846

  6. 22 CFR 20.4 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 20.4 Section 20.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN FORMER SPOUSES § 20.4 Retirement benefits. (a) Type of benefits. (1) A former spouse who meets the qualification requirements of § 20.3 is entitled...

  7. 22 CFR 20.4 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 20.4 Section 20.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN FORMER SPOUSES § 20.4 Retirement benefits. (a) Type of benefits. (1) A former spouse who meets the qualification requirements of § 20.3 is entitled...

  8. 20 CFR 633.306 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 633.306 Section 633.306 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.306 Retirement benefits. No...

  9. 22 CFR 20.4 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 20.4 Section 20.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN FORMER SPOUSES § 20.4 Retirement benefits. (a) Type of benefits. (1) A former spouse who meets the qualification requirements of § 20.3 is entitled...

  10. 22 CFR 20.4 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 20.4 Section 20.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN FORMER SPOUSES § 20.4 Retirement benefits. (a) Type of benefits. (1) A former spouse who meets the qualification requirements of § 20.3 is entitled...

  11. 20 CFR 633.306 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 633.306 Section 633.306 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.306 Retirement benefits. No...

  12. Retired, on Campus, and at Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Jerry; Bram, Leslie

    2003-01-01

    Describes the retirement community supported by the University of Florida in Gainesville. The Oak Hammock facility is to be an integrated community in which retirees are active participants in the university campus community. The various university colleges will play different roles in the retirement community, whether in health care or…

  13. Second Wind: Handbook for Happy Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Philip J.

    Reflecting 10 years of actual retirement experience, the author attempts to prove that older people can live interesting dynamic lives right to the last moment. The book, with its conversational, step-by-step style, has been written for anybody over 50. It presents retirement as a "stepping out" rather than a "stepping down"; the solid realities…

  14. Pedagogical, Psychological, and Literary Applications of Self-Report Inventories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matlak, Richard E.; Kerber, Kenneth W.

    To determine whether self-report psychological inventories could be used to better understand characters in literature, a psychology instructor and an English instructor arranged their courses so that they both focused on interpersonal relationships. The psychology course emphasized research on attraction, romantic love, and interpersonal…

  15. A Procedure for Increasing Self-Reported Daydreaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Steven R.; Cundiff, Gary

    1980-01-01

    Coed undergraduates were assigned to three groups: a talk about daydreaming emphasizing its adaptive qualities, attention control, or a no treatment control. Results suggested that providing undergraduates with positive information about daydreaming leads to an increased frequency of self-reported daydreaming. (Author)

  16. Self-Report and Psychophysiological Responses to Fear Appeals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonana, Juan R.; Gonzalez-Javier, Francisca; Espin-Lopez, Laura; Gomez-Amor, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the relationship between self-report and psychophysiological responses to fear appeals and behavioral changes elicited by these. Ninety-two subjects watched one of four messages that varied in level of threat (high vs. low) and efficacy (high vs. low). Concomitantly, psychophysiological measures (heart rate and…

  17. The Self-Report Family Inventory: An Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich, Kristopher M.; Selig, James P.; Trahan, Don P., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers explored the factor structure of the Self-Report Family Inventory with a sample of heterosexual parents who have a son or daughter who self-identifies as lesbian, gay, or bisexual. Results suggest that a two-factor solution is appropriate. Research and clinical implications are offered. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)

  18. A Self-Report Measure of Touching Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Nicola S.; And Others

    Because touching is an important and often studied construct, and there is need for a valid self-report measure of touching behavior, a measure of touching behaviors was developed. Touching behaviors to be reported were: brief touch on the arm or shoulder, handshake, hug, hand holding, kiss on the cheek, and kiss on the lips. Persons identified as…

  19. Children's Bullying Experiences Expressed through Drawings and Self-Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreou, Eleni; Bonoti, Fotini

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, studies assessing children's experiences of bullying and victimization have focused on the use of questionnaires and peer-nominations. The present study aimed to investigate this phenomenon by using two complementary assessment tools, namely self-reported questionnaires and children's drawings. The sample consisted of 448 boys and…

  20. Cognitive Abilities Relate to Self-Reported Hearing Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zekveld, Adriana A.; George, Erwin L. J.; Houtgast, Tammo; Kramer, Sophia E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this explorative study, the authors investigated the relationship between auditory and cognitive abilities and self-reported hearing disability. Method: Thirty-two adults with mild to moderate hearing loss completed the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap (AIADH; Kramer, Kapteyn, Festen, & Tobi, 1996) and…

  1. Am I dyslexic? Parental self-report of literacy difficulties.

    PubMed

    Leavett, Ruth; Nash, Hannah M; Snowling, Margaret J

    2014-11-01

    In the absence of criteria for the diagnosis of dyslexia, considerable weight is given to self-report, in particular in studies of children at family risk of dyslexia. The present paper uses secondary data from a previous study to compare parents who self-report as dyslexic and those who do not, in relation to objectively determined levels of ability. In general, adults are more likely to self-report as 'dyslexic' if they have poorer reading and spelling skills and also if there is a discrepancy between IQ and measured literacy. However, parents of higher social status who have mild literacy difficulties are more likely to self-report as dyslexic than parents who have weaker literacy skills but are less socially advantaged. Together the findings suggest that the judgement as to whether or not a parent considers themselves 'dyslexic' is made relative to others in the same social sphere. Those who are socially disadvantaged may, in turn, be less likely to seek support for their children. PMID:25185509

  2. Accuracy of self-reported smoking cessation during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    TONG, VAN T.; ALTHABE, FERNANDO; ALEMÁN, ALICIA; JOHNSON, CAROLYN C.; DIETZ, PATRICIA M.; BERRUETA, MABEL; MORELLO, PAOLA; COLOMAR, MERCEDES; BUEKENS, PIERRE; SOSNOFF, CONNIE S.; FARR, SHERRY L.; MAZZONI, AGUSTINA; CIGANDA, ALVARO; BECÚ, ANA; GONZALEZ, MARIA G. BITTAR; LLAMBI, LAURA; GIBBONS, LUZ; SMITH, RUBEN A.; BELIZÁN, JOSÉ M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of bias of self-reported smoking cessation during pregnancy is reported in high-income countries but not elsewhere. We sought to evaluate self-reported smoking cessation during pregnancy using biochemical verification and to compare characteristics of women with and without biochemically confirmed cessation in Argentina and Uruguay. In a cross-sectional study from October 2011 to May 2012, women who attended one of 21 prenatal clinics and delivered at selected hospitals in Buenos Aires, Argentina and Montevideo, Uruguay, were surveyed about their smoking cessation during pregnancy. We tested saliva collected from women <12 h after delivery for cotinine to evaluate self-reported smoking cessation during pregnancy. Overall, 10.0% (44/441) of women who self-reported smoking cessation during pregnancy had biochemical evidence of continued smoking. Women who reported quitting later in pregnancy had a higher percentage of nondisclosure (17.2%) than women who reported quitting when learning of their pregnancy (6.4%). PMID:25350478

  3. Children's Self-Reported Effects of Stimulant Medication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Stephanie L.; Frankenberger, William; Fuhrer, Richard; Snider, Vicki

    2000-01-01

    A study determined self-reported positive and negative physical, academic, and social effects of stimulant medication on 86 secondary students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Students reported the medication helped them pay attention, earn better grades, and improve their behavior but were unsure if it helped them on tests or on…

  4. Anxiety Self Report (ASR (1,2,3,4,). X

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Jane S.

    The Anxiety Self Report (ASR 1,2,3,4) is provided, followed by information about the report. The ASR is discussed as to its development, description, response bias, scoring procedures, reliability, stability, validity, and correlation between the ASR and the Manifest Anxiety Scale. (For related documents, see TM 002 928, 929.) (DB)

  5. Validating a Children's Self-Report Plate Waste Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrestal, Sarah G.; Issel, L. Michele; Kviz, Frederick J.; Chávez, Noel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The National School Lunch Program is well situated to address the vulnerability of lower income children at increased risk for both under and overnutrition. Evidence suggests, however, that a significant amount of food served in the program goes uneaten. One way to monitor this problem is through children's self-reported plate…

  6. Overestimation Bias in Self-Reported SAT Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Richard E.; Stull, Andrew T.; Campbell, Julie; Almeroth, Kevin; Bimber, Bruce; Chun, Dorothy; Knight, Allan

    2007-01-01

    The authors analyzed self-reported SAT scores and actual SAT scores for five different samples of college students (N = 650). Students overestimated their actual SAT scores by an average of 25 points (SD = 81, d = 0.31), with 10% under-reporting, 51% reporting accurately, and 39% over-reporting, indicating a systematic bias towards over-reporting.…

  7. Self-Report Measure of Financial Exploitation of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Kendon J.; Iris, Madelyn; Ridings, John W.; Langley, Kate; Wilber, Kathleen H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to improve the measurement of financial exploitation (FE) by testing psychometric properties of the older adult financial exploitation measure (OAFEM), a client self-report instrument. Design and Methods: Rasch item response theory and traditional validation approaches were used. Questionnaires were administered by…

  8. Personality, Organizational Orientations and Self-Reported Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamber, David; Castka, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To identify competencies connecting personality, organizational orientations and self-reported learning outcomes (as measured by concise Likert-type scales), for individuals who are learning for their organizations. Design/methodology/approach: Five concise factor scales were constructed to represent aspects of personality. Three further…

  9. Psychiatric Diagnoses of Self-Reported Child Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinwiddie, Stephen H.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.

    1993-01-01

    Subjects who self-reported episodes of abusing a child were compared to those without a history of child battery. It was concluded that self-identified child abusers have increased lifetime rates of antisocial personality disorder, alcoholism, and depression. (DB)

  10. How Senior Psychodynamic Psychiatrists Regard Retirement.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Douglas H; Stine, John

    2016-01-01

    The variety of personal experiences and attitudes about professional work among psychodynamic psychiatrists who have attained retirement age are explored through semi-structured interviews. Of 21 members of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry interviewed, 6 report fulltime engagement in professional activity, 10 partial reduction, and 5 full retirement from practice. Through direct quotations from the respondents' interviews several matters are considered including the concept of retirement, structural changes in practice, health concerns, dream experience, spirituality and matters of legacy, how others have influenced attitudes toward continued work, and how fears of retirement are manifest among those currently in practice. Among the conclusions is the suggestion that the sense of self-regard and personal satisfaction of those who do retire is far greater than anticipated by those still in active practice. PMID:27200463

  11. Assessing the accuracy of self-reported self-talk

    PubMed Central

    Brinthaupt, Thomas M.; Benson, Scott A.; Kang, Minsoo; Moore, Zaver D.

    2015-01-01

    As with most kinds of inner experience, it is difficult to assess actual self-talk frequency beyond self-reports, given the often hidden and subjective nature of the phenomenon. The Self-Talk Scale (STS; Brinthaupt et al., 2009) is a self-report measure of self-talk frequency that has been shown to possess acceptable reliability and validity. However, no research using the STS has examined the accuracy of respondents’ self-reports. In the present paper, we report a series of studies directly examining the measurement of self-talk frequency and functions using the STS. The studies examine ways to validate self-reported self-talk by (1) comparing STS responses from 6 weeks earlier to recent experiences that might precipitate self-talk, (2) using experience sampling methods to determine whether STS scores are related to recent reports of self-talk over a period of a week, and (3) comparing self-reported STS scores to those provided by a significant other who rated the target on the STS. Results showed that (1) overall self-talk scores, particularly self-critical and self-reinforcing self-talk, were significantly related to reports of context-specific self-talk; (2) high STS scorers reported talking to themselves significantly more often during recent events compared to low STS scorers, and, contrary to expectations, (3) friends reported less agreement than strangers in their self-other self-talk ratings. Implications of the results for the validity of the STS and for measuring self-talk are presented. PMID:25999887

  12. Self-reported halitosis and associated demographic and behavioral factors.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Fernanda Carpes; Kauer, Bruno; Wagner, Tassiane Panta; Daudt, Luciana Dondonis; Haas, Alex Nogueira

    2016-01-01

    Halitosis is still poorly studied in young adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of self-reported halitosis and associate it with demographic and behavioral factors in young adult dental students. This cross-sectional study was designed as a census of students enrolled in three initial and three final semesters of a dental course in a Brazilian public university. Of 284 eligible students, 257 (90.5%) completed a self-administered questionnaire. Self-reported halitosis was the primary study outcome, and was assessed with the question "do you feel you have bad breath?". Data on age, gender, frequency of tooth brushing and interproximal cleaning, tongue cleaning, mouth rinse use and dry mouth were collected using the questionnaire, and were considered independent variables. Of the students surveyed, 26.5% reported as never, 51.7% as rarely, 21.4% as sometimes, and 0.4% as always feeling they had halitosis. Morning halitosis was reported by 90.6% of those who reported halitosis. In the final multiple model, last semester students had a 55% lower chance of reporting halitosis, compared with students from the first semesters [odds ratio (OR) 0.46; 95%CI 0.24-0.89]. Women had a 2.57fold higher chance of reporting halitosis (OR = 2.57; 95%CI 1.12-5.93). Dry mouth increased the chance of self-reported halitosis 3.95-fold, compared with absence of dry mouth (OR = 3.95; 95%CI 2.03-7.68). It can be concluded that self-reports of halitosis were low among dental students, but may represent an important complaint. Gender, dry mouth and level of college education of the dentist were factors significantly associated with self-reported halitosis. PMID:27556677

  13. Retired Matches Among Male Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Breznik, Kristijan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effect of characteristics of various games and players on the proportion of retired tennis matches in the Open Era of tennis. The data included over 420,000 matches played among 17,553 tennis players in the period from 1968 to the end of 2010. The influence of the surface type was clearly confirmed, with the proportion of retired matches being higher on hard and clay courts compared to grass and carpet surfaces. Similarly, more retired matches were observed in outdoor venues than in indoor ones. The impact of other variables, tournament types, rounds at which the game was played and both players' ranks, is more ambiguous. Our interpretation of the obtained results is presented in the paper. Network analytic methods were applied to extract players with the most retired matches in their careers. Eventually, we defined a group of top tennis players and gave a more precise insight into retired matches in that group. Correspondence analysis was used to visually display the two-mode network of top players and the proportion of retired matches by surface type. Key pointsThe proportion of retired matches among professional tennis players has been increasing recently.Clay and hard courts are the most risky surfaces in relation to retired matches, particularly if the match is played at an outdoor venue.The difference in rankings of both players is proportional to the number/proportion of retired matches in professional tennis.Network analytic techniques could serve as an effective method to ascertain (a) group(s) of tennis players with the highest number of retired matches played among them. PMID:24149200

  14. Personal Financial Planning: Failure to Plan Properly May Have Dire Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbloom, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    Effective personal financial planning results in sound decisions in the areas of insurance, accumulating capital, retirement planning, and tax planning. Appropriate financial planning concerns everyone--regardless of his or her stage in life. (MLW)

  15. Changes in use of time, activity patterns, and health and wellbeing across retirement: design and methods of the life after work study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Retirement is a major life transition during which people restructure everyday activities; however little is known about this. The primary aim of the Life After Work study is to comprehensively measure changes in time use and patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, and its associations with health and wellbeing, across the retirement transition. Methods/Design A target sample of 120 participants aged 50 years and over will be recruited in two Australian state capital cities, Adelaide and Brisbane. Participants will undertake a battery of assessments approximately 3 months prior to retirement, and 3, 6 and 12 months post-retirement. Measures will include self-reported use of time (using the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults), objectively assessed physical activity and sedentary behaviour (using Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers), self-reported health and well-being (using a battery of questionnaires including the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), Australian Unity Personal Well-being Index (AUPWI), Depression Anxiety Stress Scales 21 (DASS21), Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale, UCLA Loneliness Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale), retirement circumstances and socio-demographic characteristics, objectively assessed anthropometric measures (height, weight and waist circumference), and resting blood pressure. Multivariate mixed models will be used to examine changes in use of time, health and well-being across retirement. Discussion The results will provide important new information that will inform the development of lifestyle and policy interventions to address and improve health and well-being in retirement. PMID:24112244

  16. International retirement migration in Europe.

    PubMed

    King, R; Warnes, A M; Williams, A M

    1998-06-01

    "This paper presents a review and prospectus of international retirement migration (IRM), dealing mainly with European evidence but also referring to some analogous trends in North America. The paper is in three main parts. It first makes the case for regarding IRM as a significant aspect of population geography and of migration studies; in certain areas of Mediterranean Europe, IRM also has effects on regional economic geography. The second section of the paper discusses some of the early findings from a comparative study of British elderly residents in Tuscany, Malta, the Costa del Sol and the Algarve.... The final part of the article offers further reflections on why IRM is important--for the individual migrants themselves, for the host communities, and for public policy." PMID:12348629

  17. 29 CFR 2520.101-3 - Notice of blackout periods under individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... your retirement planning, as well as your overall financial plan. 3. The blackout period for the plan... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME...-participant retirement plan” within the meaning of paragraph (d)(3) of this section. (3)...

  18. 29 CFR 2520.101-3 - Notice of blackout periods under individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... your retirement planning, as well as your overall financial plan. 3. The blackout period for the plan... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME...-participant retirement plan” within the meaning of paragraph (d)(3) of this section. (3)...

  19. Early retirement and mortality in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kühntopf, Stephan; Tivig, Thusnelda

    2012-02-01

    Differences in mortality by retirement age have an important impact on the financing of pension insurance, yet no clear-cut results for Germany exist so far. We calculate mortality rates by retirement age from microdata on all German old-age pensioners and 1.84 million deceases. The life expectancies and survival probabilities at age 65 are estimated for population subgroups according to creditable periods because of disease and pension income. Early-retired men who reach the age of 65 years live significantly longer the later early retirement occurs; the life expectancy at age 65 ranges from 13 to 17.8 years. For each retirement age, mortality of men is higher the more periods of disease are credited in the pension insurance system. For a given length of credited periods of disease, mortality of early retirees decreases with the retirement age. 'Healthy worker selection effects' operating in the labour market may contribute to these results. The 'work longer, live longer'-result is found for each pension income quintile, which resolves the J-curve pattern found in the literature. The mortality of female old-age pensioners varies little with retirement age. PMID:22350223

  20. An overview of the Railroad Retirement program.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    In the 1930s, amidst concern about the ability of existing pension programs to provide former railroad workers with adequate assistance in old age, Congress established a national Railroad Retirement system. This system is primarily administered by the Railroad Retirement Board (RRB), which is an independent federal agency charged with providing benefits to eligible employees of the railroad industry and their families. Today, the Railroad Retirement program is closely tied to the far better-known Social Security program, and although the Railroad Retirement program and Social Security share a number of common elements, key differences also exist between the two in areas such as funding and benefit structure. This article aims to increase awareness and understanding of the Railroad Retirement program and its relationship with Social Security by examining the parallel development of these two retirement programs while illuminating areas where the two diverge. The history of the Railroad Retirement program, the benefits provided by the program, and RRB's financial operations are reviewed, using elements of the Social Security system as points of reference. PMID:19102137

  1. Cohort Profile: the Health and Retirement Study (HRS)

    PubMed Central

    Sonnega, Amanda; Faul, Jessica D; Ofstedal, Mary Beth; Langa, Kenneth M; Phillips, John WR; Weir, David R

    2014-01-01

    The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a nationally representative longitudinal survey of more than 37 000 individuals over age 50 in 23 000 households in the USA. The survey, which has been fielded every 2 years since 1992, was established to provide a national resource for data on the changing health and economic circumstances associated with ageing at both individual and population levels. Its multidisciplinary approach is focused on four broad topics—income and wealth; health, cognition and use of healthcare services; work and retirement; and family connections. HRS data are also linked at the individual level to administrative records from Social Security and Medicare, Veteran’s Administration, the National Death Index and employer-provided pension plan information. Since 2006, data collection has expanded to include biomarkers and genetics as well as much greater depth in psychology and social context. This blend of economic, health and psychosocial information provides unprecedented potential to study increasingly complex questions about ageing and retirement. The HRS has been a leading force for rapid release of data while simultaneously protecting the confidentiality of respondents. Three categories of data—public, sensitive and restricted—can be accessed through procedures described on the HRS website (hrsonline.isr.umich.edu). PMID:24671021

  2. The impact of a retirement savings account cap.

    PubMed

    VanDerhei, Jack

    2013-08-01

    This Issue Brief provides an initial analysis of the potential financial impact on private-sector retirement benefits of the retirement savings account cap included in the Obama administration's FY 2014 budget proposal. It finds that although a very small percentage of current 401(k) participants with IRA accounts have combined balances sufficient to be immediately affected by the proposed limit, over time (and depending on the applicable discount rates, whether a defined benefit pension is involved, and the size of the 401(k) plan) the impact could be much greater. Simulation results for 401(k) participants assuming no defined benefit accruals and no job turnover show that more than 1 in 10 current 401(k) participants are likely to hit the proposed limit sometime prior to age 65, even at the current historically low discount rate of 4 percent. When the simulation is rerun with discount rate assumptions closer to historical averages, the percentage of 401(k) participants likely to be affected by these proposed limits increases substantially: For example, with an 8 percent discount rate, more than 20 percent of the 401(k) participants are simulated to reach the limit prior to retirement. When the impact of stylized, defined benefit account assumptions are added to the analysis, the percentage of 401(k) participants simulated to reach the proposed limits increases even more: In fact, for 401(k) participants assumed to be covered by a 2 percent, three-year, final-average plan with a subsidized early retirement at 62, nearly a third are assumed to be affected by the proposed limit at an 8 percent discount rate. Additional analysis is performed for small plans (those with less than 100 participants) to assess the potential impact of eventual plan terminations if an when the owners and/or key decision makers of the firms reach the cap threshold. Depending on plan size, this may involve as few as 18 percent of the firms (at a 4 percent discount rate) to as many as 75

  3. Are Your Employees Retirement-Ready?

    PubMed

    Vorchheiner, Alan H; Zaleta, Cynthia O

    2016-01-01

    Much of the discussion on the decumulation phase of retirement savings has focused on the lack of any lifetime annuities. But there is a whole range of options sponsors can employ to facilitate the generation of retirement income and bolster financial wellness. As U.S. employers show no sign of substantially increasing spending on compensation or benefits, it is imperative that human resources professionals help employees--particularly the retiring baby boomers--to maximize what they have saved. This article presents five first-step ideas toward achieving that goal. PMID:27017793

  4. Self-Reported bruxism and associated factors in Israeli adolescents.

    PubMed

    Emodi Perlman, A; Lobbezoo, F; Zar, A; Friedman Rubin, P; van Selms, M K A; Winocur, E

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about the epidemiological characteristics of sleep and awake bruxism (SB and AB) in adolescents. The aims of the study were: to assess the prevalence rates of self-reported SB and AB in Israeli adolescents; to determine the associations between SB/AB and several demographical, exogenous and psychosocial factors in Israeli adolescents; and to investigate the possible concordance between SB and AB. The study made use of a questionnaire. The study population included 1000 students from different high schools in the centre of Israel. Prevalence of self-reported SB and AB in the Israeli adolescents studied was 9·2% and 19·2%, respectively. No gender difference was found regarding the prevalence of SB and AB. Multiple variable regression analysis revealed that the following predicting variables were related to SB: temporomandibular joint sounds (P = 0·002) and feeling stressed (P = 0·001). The following predicting variables were related to AB: age (P = 0·018), temporomandibular joint sounds (P = 0·002), oro-facial pain (P = 0·006), and feeling stressed (P = 0·002) or sad (P = 0·006). A significant association was found between SB and AB; that is, an individual reporting SB had a higher probability of reporting AB compared with an individual who did not report SB (odds ratio = 5·099). Chewing gum was the most common parafunction reported by adolescents. The results of this study demonstrate that self-reports of AB and SB are common in the Israeli adolescents population studied and are not related to gender. The significant correlation found between SB and AB may be a confounding bias that affects proper diagnosis of bruxism through self-reported questionnaires only. PMID:26968152

  5. Monitoring Athletes Through Self-Report: Factors Influencing Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Anna E.; Main, Luana C.; Gastin, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring athletic preparation facilitates the evaluation and adjustment of practices to optimize performance outcomes. Self-report measures such as questionnaires and diaries are suggested to be a simple and cost-effective approach to monitoring an athlete’s response to training, however their efficacy is dependent on how they are implemented and used. This study sought to identify the perceived factors influencing the implementation of athlete self-report measures (ASRM) in elite sport settings. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with athletes, coaches and sports science and medicine staff at a national sporting institute (n = 30). Interviewees represented 20 different sports programs and had varying experience with ASRM. Purported factors influencing the implementation of ASRM related to the measure itself (e.g., accessibility, timing of completion), and the social environment (e.g., buy-in, reinforcement). Social environmental factors included individual, inter-personal and organizational levels which is consistent with a social ecological framework. An adaptation of this framework was combined with the factors associated with the measure to illustrate the inter-relations and influence upon compliance, data accuracy and athletic outcomes. To improve implementation of ASRM and ultimately athletic outcomes, a multi-factorial and multi-level approach is needed. Key points Effective implementation of a self-report measure for monitoring athletes requires a multi-factorial and multi-level approach which addresses the particular measure used and the surrounding social environment. A well-designed self-report measure should obtain quality data with minimal burden on athletes and staff. A supportive social environment involves buy-in and coordination of all parties, at both an individual and organization level. PMID:25729301

  6. Correction for faking in self-report personality tests.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Lennart

    2015-10-01

    Faking is a common problem in testing with self-report personality tests, especially in high-stakes situations. A possible way to correct for it is statistical control on the basis of social desirability scales. Two such scales were developed and applied in the present paper. It was stressed that the statistical models of faking need to be adapted to different properties of the personality scales, since such scales correlate with faking to different extents. In four empirical studies of self-report personality tests, correction for faking was investigated. One of the studies was experimental, and asked participants to fake or to be honest. In the other studies, job or school applicants were investigated. It was found that the approach to correct for effects of faking in self-report personality tests advocated in the paper removed a large share of the effects, about 90%. It was found in one study that faking varied as a function of degree of how important the consequences of test results could be expected to be, more high-stakes situations being associated with more faking. The latter finding is incompatible with the claim that social desirability scales measure a general personality trait. It is concluded that faking can be measured and that correction for faking, based on such measures, can be expected to remove about 90% of its effects. PMID:26043667

  7. Black tea improves attention and self-reported alertness.

    PubMed

    De Bruin, E A; Rowson, M J; Van Buren, L; Rycroft, J A; Owen, G N

    2011-04-01

    Tea has previously been demonstrated to better help sustain alertness throughout the day in open-label studies. We investigated whether tea improves attention and self-reported alertness in two double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover studies. Participants received black tea (made from commercially available tea bags) in one condition and placebo tea (hot water with food colours and flavours) similar in taste and appearance to real tea in the other condition. Attention was measured objectively with attention tests (the switch task and the intersensory-attention test) and subjectively with a self-report questionnaire (Bond-Lader visual analogue scales). In both studies, black tea significantly enhanced accuracy on the switch task (study 1 p<.002, study 2 p=.007) and self-reported alertness on the Bond-Lader questionnaire (study 1 p<.001, study 2 p=.021). The first study also demonstrated better auditory (p<.001) and visual (p=.030) intersensory attention after black tea compared to placebo. Simulation of theanine and caffeine plasma time-concentration curves indicated higher levels in the first study compared to the second, which supports the finding that tea effects on attention were strongest in the first study. Being the second most widely consumed beverage in the world after water, tea is a relevant contributor to our daily cognitive functioning. PMID:21172396

  8. Self-reported intolerance of uncertainty and behavioural decisions.

    PubMed

    Carleton, R Nicholas; Duranceau, Sophie; Shulman, Elizabeth P; Zerff, Marissa; Gonzales, Josh; Mishra, Sandeep

    2016-06-01

    Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) appears to be a robust transdiagnostic risk factor related to anxiety and depression. Most transdiagnostic IU research has used the self-report Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale-Short Form; however, there is comparatively little research exploring presumed behavioral correlates of IU. The current study was designed to assess relationships between self-reported IU and decisions in uncertainty-based behavioral tasks (specifically, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task, the Risky Gains Task, and the Modified Iowa Gambling Task). Participants comprised compensated community members (n = 108; 69% women) and undergraduates (n = 98; 78% women). Community member compensation was not contingent on performance, but undergraduate compensation was partially contingent on performance. Results replicated prior research, with both samples producing small (r = .19) to moderate (r = -.29) correlations (ps < .05) between self-reported IU and outcome variables from each of the behavioral tasks. The relationships were larger in the undergraduate sample, likely due to the compensation incentive. In general, the results suggest that increasing IU is associated with increasingly risk adverse behaviors; however, the relationship appears complex and in need of substantial additional research to understand how clinically-significant IU would impact pathology-related behaviours. PMID:26788617

  9. Text mining a self-report back-translation.

    PubMed

    Blanch, Angel; Aluja, Anton

    2016-06-01

    There are several recommendations about the routine to undertake when back translating self-report instruments in cross-cultural research. However, text mining methods have been generally ignored within this field. This work describes a text mining innovative application useful to adapt a personality questionnaire to 12 different languages. The method is divided in 3 different stages, a descriptive analysis of the available back-translated instrument versions, a dissimilarity assessment between the source language instrument and the 12 back-translations, and an item assessment of item meaning equivalence. The suggested method contributes to improve the back-translation process of self-report instruments for cross-cultural research in 2 significant intertwined ways. First, it defines a systematic approach to the back translation issue, allowing for a more orderly and informed evaluation concerning the equivalence of different versions of the same instrument in different languages. Second, it provides more accurate instrument back-translations, which has direct implications for the reliability and validity of the instrument's test scores when used in different cultures/languages. In addition, this procedure can be extended to the back-translation of self-reports measuring psychological constructs in clinical assessment. Future research works could refine the suggested methodology and use additional available text mining tools. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26302100

  10. Work and Nonwork Predictors of Employees' Retirement Ages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beehr, Terry A.; Glazer, Sharon; Nielson, Norma L.; Farmer, Suzanne J.

    2000-01-01

    Three analyses of data from 197 older employees and their spouses identified work and nonwork factors influencing age of retirement. Finances predicted retirement but health and gender did not. Being tired of working and expecting to work for pay after retirement predicted earlier retirement. (SK)

  11. Attitudes toward Retirement and Preretirement Education Among Nigerian Bank Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunbameru, Olakunle; Bamiwuye, Sina

    2004-01-01

    Retirement is viewed as a passage that can result in psychological, physiological, and economic problems among some retirees. Adequate preparation for retirement through preretirement education, as practiced in the Western-European societies, has been found to ease transition into retirement and adjustment in retirement. Preretirement education is…

  12. Attitudes toward Retirement and Preretirement Education among Nigerian Bank Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunbameru, Olakunle A.; Bamiwuye, Sina

    2004-01-01

    Retirement is viewed as a passage that can result in psychological, physiological, and economic problems among some retirees. Adequate preparation for retirement through preretirement education, as practiced in the Western-European societies, has been found to ease transition into retirement and adjustment in retirement. Preretirement education is…

  13. 5 CFR 838.911 - Identifying the retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Identification of Benefits § 838.911 Identifying the retirement system... military retired pay, Foreign Service retirement benefits and Central Intelligence Agency retirement.... Such a court order satisfies the requirements of § 838.804(b)(1). (c) A court order affecting...

  14. 5 CFR 838.911 - Identifying the retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Identification of Benefits § 838.911 Identifying the retirement system... military retired pay, Foreign Service retirement benefits and Central Intelligence Agency retirement.... Such a court order satisfies the requirements of § 838.804(b)(1). (c) A court order affecting...

  15. 5 CFR 838.911 - Identifying the retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Identification of Benefits § 838.911 Identifying the retirement system... military retired pay, Foreign Service retirement benefits and Central Intelligence Agency retirement.... Such a court order satisfies the requirements of § 838.804(b)(1). (c) A court order affecting...

  16. 5 CFR 838.911 - Identifying the retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Identification of Benefits § 838.911 Identifying the retirement system... military retired pay, Foreign Service retirement benefits and Central Intelligence Agency retirement.... Such a court order satisfies the requirements of § 838.804(b)(1). (c) A court order affecting...

  17. 5 CFR 831.1207 - Withdrawal of disability retirement applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Withdrawal of disability retirement...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1207 Withdrawal of disability retirement applications. (a) OPM will honor, without question, an applicant's request to...

  18. 5 CFR 831.1204 - Filing disability retirement applications: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Filing disability retirement applications...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1204 Filing disability... application for disability retirement is timely only if it is filed with the employing agency before...

  19. 5 CFR 831.1204 - Filing disability retirement applications: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Filing disability retirement applications...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1204 Filing disability... application for disability retirement is timely only if it is filed with the employing agency before...

  20. 5 CFR 831.1207 - Withdrawal of disability retirement applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Withdrawal of disability retirement...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1207 Withdrawal of disability retirement applications. (a) OPM will honor, without question, an applicant's request to...

  1. 5 CFR 831.1207 - Withdrawal of disability retirement applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Withdrawal of disability retirement...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1207 Withdrawal of disability retirement applications. (a) OPM will honor, without question, an applicant's request to...

  2. 5 CFR 831.1204 - Filing disability retirement applications: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Filing disability retirement applications...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1204 Filing disability... application for disability retirement is timely only if it is filed with the employing agency before...

  3. 5 CFR 831.1204 - Filing disability retirement applications: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Filing disability retirement applications...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1204 Filing disability... application for disability retirement is timely only if it is filed with the employing agency before...

  4. 5 CFR 831.1207 - Withdrawal of disability retirement applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Withdrawal of disability retirement...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1207 Withdrawal of disability retirement applications. (a) OPM will honor, without question, an applicant's request to...

  5. Psychological Perspectives on the Changing Nature of Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Kenneth S.; Wang, Mo

    2011-01-01

    The concept and the process of retirement are rapidly evolving. As a result, psychologists are in a unique position to understand and explain the dynamics behind the changing face of retirement. We begin this article with a brief overview of the history of retirement and then note the various definitions used when studying retirement. We then…

  6. 20 CFR 221.2 - Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. 221.2 Section 221.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT JURISDICTION DETERMINATIONS § 221.2 Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. (a) Life cases. The Board...

  7. 20 CFR 221.2 - Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. 221.2 Section 221.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT JURISDICTION DETERMINATIONS § 221.2 Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. (a) Life cases. The Board...

  8. 20 CFR 221.2 - Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. 221.2 Section 221.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT JURISDICTION DETERMINATIONS § 221.2 Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. (a) Life cases. The Board...

  9. 20 CFR 221.2 - Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. 221.2 Section 221.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT JURISDICTION DETERMINATIONS § 221.2 Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. (a) Life cases. The Board...

  10. 20 CFR 221.2 - Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. 221.2 Section 221.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT JURISDICTION DETERMINATIONS § 221.2 Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. (a) Life cases. The Board...

  11. 5 CFR 831.1204 - Filing disability retirement applications: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing disability retirement applications...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1204 Filing disability... application for disability retirement is timely only if it is filed with the employing agency before...

  12. 5 CFR 831.1207 - Withdrawal of disability retirement applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Withdrawal of disability retirement...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1207 Withdrawal of disability retirement applications. (a) OPM will honor, without question, an applicant's request to...

  13. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Retired Reserve for members of the Retired Reserve. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2010-08-01

    This interim final rule establishes requirements and procedures for implementation of TRICARE Retired Reserve. This interim final rule addresses provisions of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (NDAA-10). The purpose of this interim final rule is to establish the TRICARE Retired Reserve program that implements section 705 of the NDAA-10. Section 705 allows members of the Retired Reserve who are qualified for non-regular retirement, but are not yet 60 years of age, to qualify to purchase medical coverage equivalent to the TRICARE Standard (and Extra) benefit unless that member is either enrolled in, or is eligible to enroll in, a health benefit plan under Chapter 89 of Title 5, United States Code, as well as certain survivors. The amount of the premium that qualified members pay to purchase these benefits will represent the full cost as determined on an appropriate actuarial basis for coverage under the TRICARE Standard (and Extra) benefit including the cost of the program administration. There will be one premium for member-only coverage and a separate premium for member and family coverage. The rules and procedures otherwise outlined in Part 199 of 32 CFR relating to the operation and administration of the TRICARE Standard and Extra programs including the required cost-shares, deductibles and catastrophic caps for retired members and their dependents will apply to this program. The rule is being published as an interim final rule with comment period in order to comply with statutory effective dates. PMID:20690232

  14. CHALLENGES POSED BY RETIRED RUSSIAN NUCLEAR SUBMARINES

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, Dieter; Kroken, Ingjerd; Latyshev, Eduard; Griffith, Andrew

    2003-02-27

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the challenges posed by retired Russian nuclear submarines, review current U.S. and International efforts and provide an assessment of the success of these efforts.

  15. Retirement Can Be Golden for Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... machine: "I am out enjoying my retirement." Rachel Johnson is a professor of nutrition at the University ... to spend time being more physically active," said Johnson, who is also chair of the American Heart ...

  16. Preparation à la retraite - Preparing for retirement

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Retirement implies an important change from a working environment to a new lifestyle. Every individual copes with this transition in his own way. In this video, registered already a few years ago, Dr. Sartorius from WHO addresses some of his colleagues close to retirement and explains what situations they can expect to encounter. We make this video available to CERN personnel to stimulate their own thinking on the subject.

  17. Mediation of Effects of a Theory-Based Behavioral Intervention on Self-Reported Physical Activity in South African Men

    PubMed Central

    Jemmott, John B.; Stephens, Alisa; O’Leary, Ann; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet; Teitelman, Anne; Ngwane, Zolani; Mtose, Xoliswa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Increasing physical activity is an important public-health goal worldwide, but there are few published mediation analyses of physical-activity interventions in low-to-middle-income countries like South Africa undergoing a health transition involving markedly increased mortality from non-communicable diseases. This article reports secondary analyses on the mediation of a theory-of-planned-behavior-based behavioral intervention that increased self-reported physical activity in a trial with 1,181 men in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Method Twenty-two matched-pairs of neighborhoods were randomly selected. Within pairs, neighborhoods were randomized to a health-promotion intervention or an attention-matched control intervention with baseline, immediate-post, and 6- and 12-month post-intervention assessments. Theory-of-planned-behavior constructs measured immediately post-intervention were tested as potential mediators of the primary outcome, self-reported physical activity averaged over the 6- and 12-month post-intervention assessments, using a product-of-coefficients approach in a generalized-estimating-equations framework. Data were collected in 2007–2010. Results Attitude, subjective norm, self-efficacy, and intention were significant mediators of intervention-induced increases in self-reported physical activity. The descriptive norm, not affected by the intervention, was not a mediator, but predicted increased self-reported physical activity. Conclusion The results suggest that interventions targeting theory-of-planned-behavior constructs may contribute to efforts to increase physical activity to reduce the burden of non-communicable diseases among South African men. PMID:25565482

  18. The impact of self-reported exposure to whole-body-vibrations on the risk of disability pension among men: a 15 year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Whole-body-vibrations are often associated with adverse health effect but the long term effects are less known. This study investigates the association between occupational exposures to whole-body vibrations, and subsequent transition to disability pension. Methods A total of 4215 male employees were followed up for subsequent disability pension retirement. Exposure to whole-body-vibration was self-reported while new cases of disability pension were retrieved from a national register. Results The hazard ratio (HR) for disability pension retirement among men exposed to whole-body-vibrations was 1.61 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-2.40) after adjustment for age, smoking habits, BMI, physical job demands and awkward work postures. In our model, with the available explanatory variables, 5.6% of the male disability pension cases were attributable to whole-body-vibrations. Conclusions Exposure to whole-body-vibrations predicts subsequent disability pension retirement. Continued reduction of whole-body-vibrations may reduce the number of new cases of disability pension. PMID:20525268

  19. Self-Reported Inattention in Early Adolescence in a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Laura L.; Connolly, Jennifer; Toplak, Maggie E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Inattention is typically associated with ADHD, but less research has been done to examine the correlates of self-reported inattention in youth in a community sample. Method: Associations among self-reported inattention, parent-reported inattention, and self-reported psychopathology in children aged 10 to 11 years are examined.…

  20. Predicting Drug Use at Electronic Music Dance Events: Self-Reports and Biological Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert A.; Miller, Brenda A.; Holder, Harold D.

    2009-01-01

    Most information on the prevalence of drug use comes from self-report surveys. The sensitivity of such information is cause for concern about the accuracy of self-report measures. In this study, self-reported drug use in the last 48 hr is compared to results from biological assays of saliva samples from 371 young adults entering clubs. The…

  1. Factors Influencing Agreement between Self-Reports and Biological Measures of Smoking among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolcini, M. Margaret; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reviews 28 studies comparing adolescent self-report of smoking with biological indicators. Identifies four factors limiting agreement: biases in self-report due to limitations of biological measures; limitations of self-report measures; social desirability; and analytic and statistical issues. Concludes that, with optimal measurement, self-report…

  2. The Effect of Dietary Supplements on the Quality of Life of Retired Professional Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Sinnott, Robert A.; Maddela, Rolando L.; Bae, Sejong; Best, Talitha

    2013-01-01

    Professional football players may experience negative health consequences when they retire such as chronic pain, cognitive problems as well as other consequences of sports-related injuries. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine the effects of dietary supplementation with multiple nutrients on the quality of life of retired football players. Fifteen retired players received daily supplementation of fish oil with cholecalciferol, antioxidants, natural vitamins and minerals, polysaccharides and phytosterol-amino acid complex for 6 months. Using an open-labeled repeated measures design, volunteers completed self-report assessment measures at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months. Outcome measures were CDC HRQOL-4, WHOQOL-BREF, POMS, MFQ and pain self-assessment. General health rating improvement on CDC HRQOL-4 from month 1 was sustained to month 6 (p<0.0001). Mental health days improved at 6 months (p<0.05). WHOQOL-BREF showed increased health satisfaction at all measurement points (p<0.05) and the Physical and Psychological Domain Scores at 6 months (p<0.05). MFQ General Rating of Memory improved at 3 and 6 months (p<0.05). Vigor scale in POMS was significant at 3 months (p<0.05). Decreased pain was noted only for the elbow at month 1 and the knee at month 3 (p<0.05). No adverse events were reported. Results of this study offer preliminary insight into using dietary supplements to support and optimize quality of life in retired football players. Further research using a placebo-controlled design is needed to characterize the potential benefit to physical and psychological well-being of multiple dietary supplementations for this cohort. PMID:23445692

  3. The effect of dietary supplements on the quality of life of retired professional football players.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, Robert; Maddela, Rolando Lorenzo; Bae, Sejong; Best, Talitha

    2013-03-01

    Professional football players may experience negative health consequences when they retire such as chronic pain, cognitive problems as well as other consequences of sports-related injuries. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine the effects of dietary supplementation with multiple nutrients on the quality of life of retired football players. Fifteen retired players received daily supplementation of fish oil with cholecalciferol, antioxidants, natural vitamins and minerals, polysaccharides and phytosterol-amino acid complex for 6 months. Using an open-labeled repeated measures design, volunteers completed self-report assessment measures at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months. Outcome measures were CDC HRQOL-4, WHOQOL-BREF, POMS, MFQ and pain self-assessment. General health rating improvement on CDC HRQOL-4 from month 1 was sustained to month 6 (p<0.0001). Mental health days improved at 6 months (p<0.05). WHOQOL-BREF showed increased health satisfaction at all measurement points (p<0.05) and the Physical and Psychological Domain Scores at 6 months (p<0.05). MFQ General Rating of Memory improved at 3 and 6 months (p<0.05). Vigor scale in POMS was significant at 3 months (p<0.05). Decreased pain was noted only for the elbow at month 1 and the knee at month 3 (p<0.05). No adverse events were reported. Results of this study offer preliminary insight into using dietary supplements to support and optimize quality of life in retired football players. Further research using a placebo-controlled design is needed to characterize the potential benefit to physical and psychological well-being of multiple dietary supplementations for this cohort. PMID:23445692

  4. Challenges in Evaluating Relationships Between Quantitative Data (Carbon Dioxide) and Qualitative Data (Self-Reported Visual Changes)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendez, C. M.; Foy, M.; Mason, S.; Wear, M. L.; Meyers, V.; Law, J.; Alexander, D.; Van Baalen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the nuances in clinical data is critical in developing a successful data analysis plan. Carbon dioxide (CO2) data are collected on board the International Space Station (ISS) in a continuous stream. Clinical data on ISS are primarily collected via conversations between individual crewmembers and NASA Flight Surgeons during weekly Private Medical Conferences (PMC). Law, et.al, 20141 demonstrated a statistically significant association between weekly average CO2 levels on ISS and self-reported headaches over the reporting period from March 14, 2001 to May 31, 2012. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the evaluation of a possible association between visual changes and CO2 levels on ISS and to discuss challenges in developing an appropriate analysis plan. METHODS & PRELIMINARY RESULTS: A first analysis was conducted following the same study design as the published work on CO2 and self-reported headaches1; substituting self-reported changes in visual acuity in place of self-reported headaches. The analysis demonstrated no statistically significant association between visual impairment characterized by vision symptoms self-reported during PMCs and ISS average CO2 levels over ISS missions. Closer review of the PMC records showed that vision outcomes are not well-documented in terms of clinical severity, timing of onset, or timing of resolution, perhaps due to the incipient nature of vision changes. Vision has been monitored in ISS crewmembers, pre- and post-flight, using standard optometry evaluations. In-flight visual assessments were limited early in the ISS program, primarily consisting of self-perceived changes reported by crewmembers. Recently, on-orbit capabilities have greatly improved. Vision data ranges from self-reported post-flight changes in visual acuity, pre- to postflight changes identified during fundoscopic examination, and in-flight progression measured by advanced on-orbit clinical imaging capabilities at predetermined testing

  5. 76 FR 17762 - Regulations Governing the Performance of Actuarial Services Under the Employee Retirement Income...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ...This document contains final regulations under section 3042 of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) relating to the enrollment of actuaries. These regulations update the eligibility requirements for performing actuarial services for ERISA-covered employee pension benefit plans, including the continuing professional education requirements, and the standards for performing......

  6. Charting a New Course to Retirement: How Charter Schools Handle Teacher Pensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olberg, Amanda; Podgursky, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    In the wake of the economic downturn that began in 2008, public schools face serious and seemingly long-term fiscal challenges. Rising pension costs are a particular concern for school districts, whose dollars help prop up state retirement plans that often have substantial unfunded liabilities. Yet public school districts have no alternatives;…

  7. Retirement Savings Advice for Teachers: Just for Teachers Website Launched by Securities and Exchange Commission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Securities and Exchange Commission has launched a "Just for Teachers" section on its Web site to assist public school teachers in grades K-12 evaluate and select appropriate investments for employer-sponsored 403(b) retirement savings plans and other savings vehicles. The functions of this site are briefly described in this article.

  8. SCORE/ACE Counselor Handbook. Service Corps of Retired Executives. Active Corps of Executives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsverk, Arvel; And Others

    This counselor handbook is intended to help Service Corps of Retired Executives/Active Corps of Executives (SCORE/ACE) counselors to plan and conduct counseling services more effectively. Included in the introductory section are an overview of the SCORE/ACE counseling program, a discussion of what the counselor does, directions for completing…

  9. 26 CFR 1.408-4 - Treatment of distributions from individual retirement arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treatment of distributions from individual... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408-4 Treatment of distributions from individual retirement arrangements. (a)...

  10. 26 CFR 1.408-4 - Treatment of distributions from individual retirement arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment of distributions from individual... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408-4 Treatment of distributions from individual retirement arrangements. (a) General...

  11. Hair testing and self-report of cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Vignali, Claudia; Stramesi, Cristiana; Vecchio, Micol; Groppi, Angelo

    2012-02-10

    Hair analysis is a useful tool in both clinical and forensic fields: it allows information about drugs of abuse (DOA) consumption to be obtained. However, in spite of analytical results, sometimes patients continue to deny using drugs or, on the contrary, insist on describing themselves as severe drug addicts; indeed there are often considerable difficulties in getting truthful statements about the real amount of drugs used. In this study we have tried to compare cocaine concentration in hair samples with self-reported drug intake. We enrolled 113 subjects (61 Africans, 52 Caucasians) who had been recently sent to jail. They were asked to tell about their use of illicit drugs during the last three months and then submitted to hair analysis. Hair segments (3 cm) were analyzed by GC-MS for amphetamines, cocaine and opiates. Useful data was obtained from 82 subjects, separated into two main groups on account of ethnic origin (African or Caucasian) and divided further into daily, weekly and monthly users. The results showed qualitative results and self-reported consumption to be in good agreement, although the correlation between frequency of consumption and concentration in hair revealed sometimes higher concentrations in contrast with the admission of low consumption. There was a definite separation between occasional and daily use (especially in Caucasian people), while concentrations found where weekly use was reported were more variable. Concentrations of cocaine measured in Africans' hair were much higher than in Caucasians'. Even if this study is exclusively based on self-report, it provides some interesting information in order to differentiate the frequency of consumption, and especially underlines the great importance of ethnic bias on hair analysis. PMID:21645979

  12. Structure and correlates of self-reported empathy in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Horan, William P; Reise, Steven P; Kern, Robert S; Lee, Junghee; Penn, David L; Green, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Research on empathy in schizophrenia has relied on dated self-report scales that do not conform to contemporary social neuroscience models of empathy. The current study evaluated the structure and correlates of the recently-developed Questionnaire of Cognitive and Affective Empathy (QCAE) in schizophrenia. This measure, whose structure and validity was established in healthy individuals, includes separate scales to assess the two main components of empathy: Cognitive Empathy (assessed by two subscales) and Affective Empathy (assessed by three subscales). Stable outpatients with schizophrenia (n = 145) and healthy individuals (n = 45) completed the QCAE, alternative measures of empathy, and assessments of clinical symptoms, neurocognition, and functional outcome. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses provided consistent support for a two-factor solution in the schizophrenia group, justifying the use of separate cognitive and affective empathy scales in this population. However, one of the three Affective Empathy subscales was not psychometrically sound and was excluded from further analyses. Patients reported significantly lower Cognitive Empathy but higher Affective Empathy than controls. Among patients, the QCAE scales showed significant correlations with an alternative self-report empathy scale, but not with performance on an empathic accuracy task. The QCAE Cognitive Empathy subscales also showed significant, though modest, correlations with negative symptoms and functional outcome. These findings indicate that structure of self-reported empathy is similar in people with schizophrenia and healthy subjects, and can be meaningfully compared between groups. They also contribute to emerging evidence that some aspects of empathy may be intact or hyper-responsive in schizophrenia. PMID:25985922

  13. Consistency of Self-Reported Sexual Behavior in Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Deven T.; Morris, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Accurate data on sexual behavior have become increasingly important for demographers and epidemiologists, but self-reported data are widely regarded as unreliable. We examined the consistency in the number of sexual partners reported by participants in seven population-based surveys of adults in the U.S. Differences between studies were quite modest and much smaller than those associated with demographic attributes. Surprisingly, the mode of survey administration did not appear to influence disclosure when the questions were similar. We conclude that there is more consistency in sexual partnership reporting than is commonly believed. PMID:19588240

  14. Scientists’ Perceptions of Organizational Justice and Self-Reported Misbehaviors

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Brian C.; Anderson, Melissa S.; Crain, A. Lauren; De Vries, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    policymakers concerned about maintaining the integrity of science have recently expanded their attention from a focus on misbehaving individuals to characteristics of the environments in which scientists work. Little empirical evidence exists about the role of organizational justice in promoting or hindering scientific integrity. Our findings indicate that when scientists believe they are being treated unfairly they are more likely to behave in ways that compromise the integrity of science. Perceived violations of distributive and procedural justice were positively associated with self-reports of misbehavior among scientists. PMID:16810337

  15. Interoceptive Sensitivity and Self-Reports of Emotional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Quigley, Karen S.; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Aronson, Keith R.

    2005-01-01

    People differ in the extent to which they emphasize feelings of activation or deactivation in their verbal reports of experienced emotion, termed arousal focus (AF). Two multimethod studies indicate that AF is linked to heightened interoceptive sensitivity (as measured by performance on a heartbeat detection task). People who were more sensitive to their heartbeats emphasized feelings of activation and deactivation when reporting their experiences of emotion over time more than did those who were less sensitive. This relationship was not accounted for by several other variables, including simple language effects. Implications for the role of interoception in experienced emotion and the validity of self-reported emotion are discussed. PMID:15535779

  16. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Retired Reserve. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-12-31

    TRICARE Retired Reserve (TRR) is a premium-based TRICARE health plan available for purchase worldwide by qualified members of the Retired Reserve and by qualified survivors of TRR members. This final rule responds to public comments received to an interim final rule that was published in the Federal Register on August 6, 2010 (75 FR 47452-47457). That rule established requirements and procedures to implement the TRR program in fulfillment of section 705 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (NDAA-10) (Pub. L. 111-84). This final rule also revises requirements and procedures as indicated. PMID:25562893

  17. Personality and self-reported delinquency: a longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Heaven, P C

    1996-09-01

    This study assessed the personality factors associated with self-reported delinquency. Respondents were 282 14-year-olds who were traced for follow-up 2 years later. The follow-up success rate was more than 80%. In line with previous work which has adopted a trait personality perspective to understanding antisocial and delinquent behaviours, it was predicted that psychoticism, extroversion, and low self-esteem as measured at Time 1 would be significant predictors of self-reported delinquency at Time 2. However, the results of structural equation modelling suggested that the three personality variables explained just over 16% of the variance of delinquency at Time 1, but only 6.61% of the variance of delinquency at Time 2. Alone, psychoticism explained 15.3% of the variance of delinquency at Time 1, but only 4.36% of the variance of delinquency at Time 2. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed and some suggestions for future research are made. PMID:8894956

  18. Priming Effects of Self-Reported Drinking and Religiosity

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Lindsey M.; Neighbors, Clayton; Foster, Dawn W.

    2013-01-01

    Research has revealed negative associations between religiosity and alcohol consumption. Given these associations, the aim of the current research was to evaluate whether the order of assessing each construct might affect subsequent reports of the other. The present research provided an experimental evaluation of response biases of self-reported religiosity and alcohol consumption based on order of assessment. Participants (N = 301 undergraduate students) completed an online survey. Based on random assignment, religiosity was assessed either before or after questions regarding recent alcohol consumption. Social desirability bias was also measured. Results revealed a priming effect such that participants who answered questions about their religiosity prior to their alcohol consumption reported fewer drinks on their peak drinking occasions, drinking less on typical occasions, and drinking less frequently, even when controlling for social desirability and for the significant negative associations between their own religiosity and drinking. In contrast, assessment order was not significantly associated with religiosity. Results indicate priming religion results in reporting lower, but potentially more accurate, levels of health risk behaviors and that these effects are not simply the result of socially desirable responding. Results are interpreted utilizing several social–cognitive theories and suggest that retrospective self-reports of drinking may be more malleable than self-descriptions of religiosity. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:23528191

  19. Trends in self-reported spontaneous abortions: 1970-2000.

    PubMed

    Lang, Kevin; Nuevo-Chiquero, Ana

    2012-08-01

    Little is known about how the miscarriage rate has changed over the past few decades in the United States. Data from Cycles IV to VI of the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) were used to examine trends from 1970 to 2000. After accounting for abortion availability and the characteristics of pregnant women, the rate of reported miscarriages increased by about 1.0% per year. This upward trend is strongest in the first seven weeks and absent after 12 weeks of pregnancy. African American and Hispanic women report lower rates of early miscarriage than do whites. The probability of reporting a miscarriage rises by about 5% per year of completed schooling. The upward trend, especially in early miscarriages, suggests awareness of pregnancy rather than prenatal care to be a key factor in explaining the evolution of self-reported miscarriages. Any beneficial effects of prenatal care on early miscarriage are obscured by this factor. Differences in adoption of early-awareness technology, such as home pregnancy tests, should be taken into account when analyzing results from self-reports or clinical trials relying on awareness of pregnancy in its early weeks. PMID:22718315

  20. The Economics of Aging: A Need for Pre-Retirement Planning. Hearing before the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session (Jefferson City and Clinton, MO).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document contains prepared statements and witness testimony from the Congressional hearing on the economics of aging and preretirement planning. Prepared statements are given by Representatives Skelton and Daub. Topics which are discussed include the population affected, needs of the elderly, and government role. Witness testimony is given by…

  1. Early Retirement Incentives and Student Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    Early retirement incentives (ERIs) are increasingly prevalent in education as districts seek to close budget gaps by replacing expensive experienced teachers with lower-cost newer teachers. Combined with the aging of the teacher workforce, these ERIs are likely to change the composition of teachers dramatically in the coming years. We use exogenous variation from an ERI program in Illinois in the mid-1990s to provide the first evidence in the literature of the effects of large-scale teacher retirements on student achievement. We find the program did not reduce test scores; likely, it increased them, with positive effects most pronounced in lower-SES schools. PMID:25436038

  2. Self-Reported Executive Functioning in Everyday Life in Parkinson's Disease after Three Months of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Uyen Ha Gia; Andersson, Stein; Toft, Mathias; Pripp, Are Hugo; Konglund, Ane Eidahl; Dietrichs, Espen; Malt, Ulrik Fredrik; Skogseid, Inger Marie; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit Hebolt; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Studies on the effect of subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on executive functioning in Parkinson's disease (PD) are still controversial. In this study we compared self-reported daily executive functioning in PD patients before and after three months of STN-DBS. We also examined whether executive functioning in everyday life was associated with motor symptoms, apathy, and psychiatric symptoms. Method. 40 PD patients were examined with the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version (BRIEF-A), the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R), and the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES-S). Results. PD patients reported significant improvement in daily life executive functioning after 3 months of STN-DBS. Anxiety scores significantly declined, while other psychiatric symptoms remained unchanged. The improvement of self-reported executive functioning did not correlate with motor improvement after STN-DBS. Apathy scores remained unchanged after surgery. Only preoperative depressed mood had predictive value to the improvement of executive function and appears to prevent potentially favorable outcomes from STN-DBS on some aspects of executive function. Conclusion. PD patients being screened for STN-DBS surgery should be evaluated with regard to self-reported executive functioning. Depressive symptoms in presurgical PD patients should be treated. Complementary information about daily life executive functioning in PD patients might enhance further treatment planning of STN-DBS. PMID:26167329

  3. Choosing a Retirement Community: Ask These 10 Physical Activity Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Choosing a Retirement Community Ask These 10 Physical Activity Questions As you visit potential retirement communities, consider their physical activity offerings. If you’ ...

  4. Mandatory Retirement at 70: Separating Substance from Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pati, Gopal C.; Jacobs, Randall C.

    1979-01-01

    Examines the conflict over mandatory retirement and the implications the Mandatory Retirement Act will have for personnel directors who will need to formulate new decision rules for the treatment and handling of older workers. (IRT)

  5. Images of Retirement: Finding the Purpose and the Passion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savishinsky, Joel

    2001-01-01

    Compares cultural stereotypes and images of retirement with the life choices of actual adults. Finds that centrality of purpose and a sense of passion are basic to these adults' image of life in retirement. (SK)

  6. Contributions of Social Desirability to Self-Reported Ageism.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Katie E; Allen, Priscilla D; Denver, Jenny Y; Holland, Kayla R

    2015-09-01

    The authors examined the role of social desirability in 445 participants' responses to self-reported measures of ageism across two studies. In Study 1, college students and community adults completed the Relating to Older People Evaluation (ROPE) and a short form of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (M-C SDS). Study 2 was a conceptual replication that included the Fraboni Scale of Ageism (FSA). Correlation analyses confirmed a small but significant relationship between scores on the positive ageist items and the social desirability scale in both studies. Ageist attitudes were correlated with negative ageist behaviors in Study 2. Implications for current views on ageism and strategies for reducing ageist attitudes and behaviors in everyday life are discussed. PMID:24652882

  7. Self-reported sleep disturbances in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor sleep quality (SQ) and daytime sleepiness (DS) are common in renal transplant (RTx) recipients; however, related data are rare. This study describes the prevalence and frequency of self-reported sleep disturbances in RTx recipients. Methods This cross-sectional study included 249 RTx recipients transplanted at three Swiss transplant centers. All had reported poor SQ and / or DS in a previous study. With the Survey of Sleep (SOS) self-report questionnaire, we screened for sleep and health habits, sleep history, main sleep problems and sleep-related disturbances. To determine a basis for preliminary sleep diagnoses according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD), 164 subjects were interviewed (48 in person, 116 via telephone and 85 refused). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data and to determine the frequencies and prevalences of specific sleep disorders. Results The sample had a mean age of 59.1 ± 11.6 years (60.2% male); mean time since Tx was 11.1 ± 7.0 years. The most frequent sleep problem was difficulty staying asleep (49.4%), followed by problems falling asleep (32.1%). The most prevalent sleep disturbance was the need to urinate (62.9%), and 27% reported reduced daytime functionality. Interview data showed that most suffered from the first ICSD category: insomnias. Conclusion Though often disregarded in RTx recipients, sleep is an essential factor of wellbeing. Our findings show high prevalences and incidences of insomnias, with negative impacts on daytime functionality. This indicates a need for further research on the clinical consequences of sleep disturbances and the benefits of insomnia treatment in RTx recipients. PMID:24112372

  8. Distribution and Correlates of Self-Reported Crimes of Trust

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Scott; Morris, Robert G.; Gerber, Jurg; Covey, Herbert C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the distribution and correlates of a special class of property crimes, crimes of trust, using longitudinal and cross sectional self-report data from a national sample. We begin by defining crimes of trust and consider their conceptual relationship to “conventional” property crimes, which we here characterize as crimes of stealth, and to white collar crimes, which are defined in terms of the social status of the perpetrators. Crimes of trust are here defined as property crimes that typically involve deliberate contact with the victim or, where there is more than one victim, with at least one or more victims, in which there is typically more of a focus on concealing the fact that a crime has been committed than on concealing the identity of the perpetrator (as is the case in crimes of stealth), without regard to the socioeconomic status of the perpetrator (thus including but not limited to white collar crimes). The focus here is on crimes of trust committed by individuals (as opposed to corporate crime). We first examine their distribution by sociodemographic characteristics, then examine the correlation of crimes of trust with other types of illegal behavior, using data from the National Youth Survey Family Study, including (1) longitudinal self-report data from a nationally representative panel of individuals who were 11–18 years old in 1976–77 and who were followed through early middle age (ages 36–44) in 2002–2003, plus (2) cross-sectional data on these individuals plus their parents, spouses, and children age 11 and older in 2002–2003 (total age range 11–88). The results suggest that crimes of trust have a different age-crime curve from conventional crimes, and that they are not as strongly correlated with problem substance use, gender, and other socioeconomic indicators as conventional crimes. PMID:22347761

  9. SELF-REPORTED DRUG ALLERGIES IN SURGICAL POPULATION IN SERBIA.

    PubMed

    Velicković, Jelena; Palibrk, Ivan; Miljković, Bojana; Velicković, Dejan; Jovanović, Bojan; Bumbasirević, Vesna; Djukanović, Marija; Sljukić, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    History of drug allergy is of major concern during perioperative period. Medical records usually lack documents confirming the stated allergy. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of self-reported drug allergies and their characteristics in adult Serbian surgical population, and to analyze their influence on drug prescription during perioperative period. The study enrolled patients scheduled for general surgery during a one-year period at a tertiary care hospital. They were questioned using a structured questionnaire about the existence of drug allergy and its nature. Medical records were examined after discharge to assess medical prescription during hospitalization. Of 1126 patients evaluated during the study period, 434 (38.5%) reported a total of 635 drug reactions. The most common allergy claim was to antibiotics (68%), nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (16.4%) and iodine (3.9%). Women, urban residents and herbal drug consumers were more likely to state an allergy. The majority of reported reactions were cutaneous (72%) and respiratory (34%), while anaphylaxis was reported by 3.2% of patients. Only 38 (8.7%) patients had previously undergone any allergology testing. Retrospective chart review revealed that 26 (6%) patients were administered the drug to which they had reported allergic reaction in the past, with no adverse effects. Drug allergies are frequently self-reported in surgical population in Serbia, which is in contrast to a very low rate of explored and documented allergies. In order not to deny an effective treatment or postpone a surgery, health care practitioners should pay more attention to an accurate classification of adverse drug reactions. PMID:27017725

  10. Body Awareness: Construct and Self-Report Measures

    PubMed Central

    Mehling, Wolf E.; Gopisetty, Viranjini; Daubenmier, Jennifer; Price, Cynthia J.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Stewart, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Heightened body awareness can be adaptive and maladaptive. Improving body awareness has been suggested as an approach for treating patients with conditions such as chronic pain, obesity and post-traumatic stress disorder. We assessed the psychometric quality of selected self-report measures and examined their items for underlying definitions of the construct. Data sources PubMed, PsychINFO, HaPI, Embase, Digital Dissertations Database. Review methods Abstracts were screened; potentially relevant instruments were obtained and systematically reviewed. Instruments were excluded if they exclusively measured anxiety, covered emotions without related physical sensations, used observer ratings only, or were unobtainable. We restricted our study to the proprioceptive and interoceptive channels of body awareness. The psychometric properties of each scale were rated using a structured evaluation according to the method of McDowell. Following a working definition of the multi-dimensional construct, an inter-disciplinary team systematically examined the items of existing body awareness instruments, identified the dimensions queried and used an iterative qualitative process to refine the dimensions of the construct. Results From 1,825 abstracts, 39 instruments were screened. 12 were included for psychometric evaluation. Only two were rated as high standard for reliability, four for validity. Four domains of body awareness with 11 sub-domains emerged. Neither a single nor a compilation of several instruments covered all dimensions. Key domains that might potentially differentiate adaptive and maladaptive aspects of body awareness were missing in the reviewed instruments. Conclusion Existing self-report instruments do not address important domains of the construct of body awareness, are unable to discern between adaptive and maladaptive aspects of body awareness, or exhibit other psychometric limitations. Restricting the construct to its proprio- and interoceptive

  11. Does Retiree Health Insurance Encourage Early Retirement?*

    PubMed Central

    Nyce, Steven; Schieber, Sylvester J.; Shoven, John B.; Slavov, Sita Nataraj; Wise, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The strong link between health insurance and employment in the United States may cause workers to delay retirement until they become eligible for Medicare at age 65. However, some employers extend health insurance benefits to their retirees, and individuals who are eligible for such retiree health benefits need not wait until age 65 to retire with group health coverage. We investigate the impact of retiree health insurance on early retirement using employee-level data from 54 diverse firms that are clients of Towers Watson, a leading benefits consulting firm. We find that retiree health coverage has its strongest effects at ages 62 through 64. Coverage that includes an employer contribution is associated with a 6.3 percentage point (36.2 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 62, a 7.7 percentage point (48.8 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 63, and a 5.5 percentage point (38.0 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 64. Conditional on working at age 57, such coverage reduces the expected retirement age by almost three months and reduces the total number of person-years worked between ages 58 and 64 by 5.6 percent. PMID:24039312

  12. Does Retiree Health Insurance Encourage Early Retirement?

    PubMed

    Nyce, Steven; Schieber, Sylvester J; Shoven, John B; Slavov, Sita Nataraj; Wise, David A

    2013-08-01

    The strong link between health insurance and employment in the United States may cause workers to delay retirement until they become eligible for Medicare at age 65. However, some employers extend health insurance benefits to their retirees, and individuals who are eligible for such retiree health benefits need not wait until age 65 to retire with group health coverage. We investigate the impact of retiree health insurance on early retirement using employee-level data from 54 diverse firms that are clients of Towers Watson, a leading benefits consulting firm. We find that retiree health coverage has its strongest effects at ages 62 through 64. Coverage that includes an employer contribution is associated with a 6.3 percentage point (36.2 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 62, a 7.7 percentage point (48.8 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 63, and a 5.5 percentage point (38.0 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 64. Conditional on working at age 57, such coverage reduces the expected retirement age by almost three months and reduces the total number of person-years worked between ages 58 and 64 by 5.6 percent. PMID:24039312

  13. Transition to Old Age (Transition to Retirement).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Simon

    Several conceptualizations and definitions of retirement have been proposed. One of them--the three-stage transition process--can be illustrated from studies in Israel: (1) leaving the old role; (2) going through the act of formal separation; and (3) adjusting to the new situation and role. Today's higher rate of survival into later years means…

  14. Diversification: Midland/Odessa Health & Retirement Endeavor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skipper, P. K.

    In reaction to the economic risks associated with an over reliance on oil and gas exports, residents of the Midland/Odessa area of Texas began seeking diversification options for the local economy and, in 1986, formed the Midland/Odessa Health and Retirement Endeavor (MOHRE). This non-profit corporation was formed to examine the feasibility of…

  15. Retired Chemists Teach Grade School Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Retired chemists in Delaware have become involved in volunteer program to teach science to elementary and secondary students. A description of the program is provided. Also provided are descriptions of five lessons developed for the program. One of the lessons deals with birthday candles. (JN)

  16. The Anguish of a Retired Librarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Donna W.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author relates her difficult adjustment to regular routine when she retired as a middle school librarian for over three decades. She recalls one incident in which she patrolled a beach after seeing women slathering on suntan oil and turning the pages of library books, leaving fingerprints on each page. She also tells of…

  17. [Adapting physical activities for an active retirement].

    PubMed

    Renaudie, François

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of doing adapted physical exercise for elderly people have been proven. For more than thirty years, the French Federation for an Active Retirement has been striving to help people age well by proposing multiple activities to remain in good health after the age of 50. Doctors, activity leaders and federal instructors are attentive to each individual's capacities. PMID:27449307

  18. Occupational influences on retirement, disability, and death.

    PubMed

    Hayward, M D; Grady, W R; Hardy, M A; Sommers, D

    1989-08-01

    This research examines the alternative mechanisms by which occupations influence the nature and timing of older men's labor force withdrawal. We specifically assess the extent to which occupational factors operate directly and indirectly on exiting events and whether occupations constrain traditional determinants of labor force participation. Based on a discrete-time hazard modeling approach, the results substantiate that the occupational task activities--substantive complexity and physical demands--are key elements of the work environment that are evaluated against nonwork alternatives. In the case of retirement, these aspects of occupational attractiveness function as a dominant and direct force in retirement decision making. With regard to disability, the occupational attribute of substantive complexity operates as an indirect advantage (through higher wages) by reducing the risk of disability. Indicators of career continuity also influence retirement among older workers. Finally, the results suggest that financial characteristics and health problems are central to the distribution of older workers across the alternative destination statuses of retirement, disability, and death. PMID:2529146

  19. Retirement Age Declines Again in 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gendell, Murray

    2001-01-01

    The average retirement age continued to decline in the 1990s after having leveled off during the preceding 10-15 years. The resumption of the decline is attributed largely to a rise in the labor force participation rate of older men and women between the mid-1980s and 2000. (Author/JOW)

  20. Wisdom in a Learning in Retirement Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farquhar, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Seven men and women with an average age of 77 were interviewed regarding the role of wisdom in their experience of attending a Learning in Retirement Institute (LRI) in southern Ontario, Canada. A finding is that for wisdom gains to be an outcome of LRI education, older adult students need outward expression of their acquired learnings. A…

  1. A Research Study of Retirement Preparation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Frances G.; And Others

    A five-year study was undertaken to investigate the relative effectiveness of pre-retirement education (PRE) programs. Project staff identified for study three methodologies (the lecture series, the discussion group, and the "facilitated interaction" model) and four contexts for sponsor-settings (the employer, the education, the community agency,…

  2. 77 FR 66149 - Retirement of FASTforward Technology

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-02

    ... proposed rule in the Federal Register (77 FR 53830) to retire FASTforward technology. We received no formal... FASTforward Technology AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Postal Service will revise... terminate the use of FASTforward TM technology as a Move Update option for commercial First-Class...

  3. The Cornell Staff Retirement Incentive Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Kenneth T.; Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Hallock, Kevin F.; Seeber, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate potential determinants of enrollment in an early retirement incentive program for non-tenure-track employees at a large university. Using administrative records on the eligible, population of employees not covered by collective bargaining agreements, historical employee count and layoff data by budget units, and public information on…

  4. Teacher Retirement Systems: Research Findings. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janet S.; Podgursky, Michael J.; Costrell, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    This policy brief summarizes findings presented at a February 2009 research conference on teacher retirement systems hosted by the National Center on Performance Incentives (NCPI) at Vanderbilt University's Peabody College. The 2009 conference was the second in a series of NCPI events focusing on findings from recent research on issues related to…

  5. New Wrinkles on Retirement: Program Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Robert P.; Thorson, James A.

    The program notes were prepared to accompany the television series "New Wrinkles on Retirement." The eight units in the series are: facing inflation, which covers the decreasing value of the dollar, transportation costs, medical expenses, cutting expenses, family budgeting, investments, and places to live; vigor regained, which covers exercise and…

  6. Employment, Retirement, and Morale Among Older Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaslow, Philip

    1976-01-01

    This study constitutes an effort to apply to females the role-theoretical orientation to work and retirement in old age which has often been applied to men. Cross-sectional data are used to test the hypothesis that older working women have better morale than those not working. Results are discussed. (Author)

  7. Positive and negative recency effects in retirement savings decisions.

    PubMed

    Rieskamp, Jörg

    2006-12-01

    Retirement savings decisions can be influenced by the fund composition of the retirement savings plan. In 2 experiments, strong composition effects were observed, with a larger percentage of resources being invested in stock funds when more stock than bond funds were offered. Although participants changed their allocations repeatedly, the opportunity to learn did not alter the composition effects. Learning processes led to positive and negative recency effects as well, providing evidence that allocations were strongly influenced by the recent performance of the different allocation options. Two learning models were tested to explain these learning processes. The first, a local adaptation learning model, assumes that people change their behavior on the basis of recent experience, whereas the second, a reinforcement learning model, assumes that decisions are made on the basis of the totality of accumulated experience. The local adaptation model was more accurate in predicting allocation decisions, in explaining positive and negative recency effects, and in showing why composition effects are not overcome by learning. PMID:17154772

  8. Caregivers' Retirement Congruency: A Case for Caregiver Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humble, Aine M.; Keefe, Janice M.; Auton, Greg M.

    2012-01-01

    Using the concept of "retirement congruency" (RC), which takes into account greater variation in retirement decisions (low, moderate, or high RC) than a dichotomous conceptualization (forced versus chosen), multinomial logistic regression was conducted on a sample of caregivers from the 2002 Canadian General Social Survey who were retired from…

  9. 32 CFR 199.25 - TRICARE Retired Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... TRICARE Retired Reserve is geographically applicable to the same extent as specified in 32 CFR 199.1(b)(1... ASD (HA), provisions of 32 CFR part 199 apply to TRICARE Retired Reserve. (B) Certain special programs established in 32 CFR part 199 are not available to members covered under TRICARE Retired Reserve....

  10. 32 CFR 199.25 - TRICARE Retired Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... TRICARE Retired Reserve is geographically applicable to the same extent as specified in 32 CFR 199.1(b)(1... ASD (HA), provisions of 32 CFR part 199 apply to TRICARE Retired Reserve. (B) Certain special programs established in 32 CFR part 199 are not available to members covered under TRICARE Retired Reserve....

  11. 32 CFR 199.25 - TRICARE Retired Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... TRICARE Retired Reserve is geographically applicable to the same extent as specified in 32 CFR 199.1(b)(1... ASD (HA), provisions of 32 CFR part 199 apply to TRICARE Retired Reserve. (B) Certain special programs established in 32 CFR part 199 are not available to members covered under TRICARE Retired Reserve....

  12. 18 CFR 346.3 - Asset retirement obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Asset retirement obligations. 346.3 Section 346.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... seeking recovery of the asset retirement costs in rates, must remove all asset retirement...

  13. 18 CFR 154.315 - Asset retirement obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Asset retirement obligations. 154.315 Section 154.315 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... seeking recovery of the asset retirement costs in rates, must remove all asset retirement...

  14. 40 CFR 60.4105 - Retired unit exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Electric Steam Generating Units Hg Budget Trading Program General Provisions § 60.4105 Retired unit exemption. (a)(1) Any Hg Budget unit that is permanently retired shall be exempt from the Hg Budget Trading... section shall become effective the day on which the Hg Budget unit is permanently retired. Within 30...

  15. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  16. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  17. Survey of Changes in Faculty Retirement Policies 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, Valerie Martin

    2007-01-01

    The Committee on Retirement of the American Association of University Professors initiated its first retirement policies survey in 2000 to address a lack of reliable and systematically collected information on retirement policies and practices across U.S. institutions of higher education. At the end of the 1990s, there was a sense that…

  18. Beyond Health and Wealth: Predictors of Women's Retirement Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Christine A.; Balaswamy, Shantha

    2009-01-01

    Despite empirical support for the positive effects of health and wealth on retirement satisfaction, alternative variables also play a key role in helping to shape women's assessment of retirement. In the present study, we explore personal and psychosocial predictors of women's retirement satisfaction while controlling for financial security and…

  19. 18 CFR 367.22 - Accounting for asset retirement obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accounting for asset... GAS ACT General Instructions § 367.22 Accounting for asset retirement obligations. (a) An asset retirement obligation represents a liability for the legal obligation associated with the retirement of...

  20. Back to Work: Expectations and Realizations of Work after Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestas, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes a puzzling aspect of retirement behavior known as "unretirement." Nearly 50 percent of retirees follow a nontraditional retirement path that involves partial retirement or unretirement, and at least 26 percent of retirees later unretire. I explore two possible explanations: (1) unretirement transitions result from failures in…

  1. 20 CFR 404.409 - What is full retirement age?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is full retirement age? 404.409 Section... INSURANCE (1950- ) Deductions; Reductions; and Nonpayments of Benefits § 404.409 What is full retirement age? Full retirement age is the age at which you may receive unreduced old-age, wife's, husband's,...

  2. The New Meaning of Retirement. ERIC Digest No. 217.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, David

    The 21st century may become known as the era of lifelong learning and lifelong working. Retirement, the end stage of a linear working life, may be replaced with a learning, working, leisure, working, learning life cycle. Forced retirements and early retirement incentives have contributed to the decline of expertise in the workplace. Inflation,…

  3. Disconnected Expectations: Staff, Family, and Supported Employee Perspectives about Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigby, Christine; Wilson, Nathan J.; Balandin, Susan; Stancliffe, Roger J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Australia has few policies to support the transition of older people with intellectual disability from employment to retirement. This study aimed to identify the possibilities and barriers to retirement for older employees in supported employment services. Method: Five distinct participant groups discussed retirement in 6 separate…

  4. The Information Seeking and Use Behaviors of Retired Investors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the information seeking and use behaviors of a group of US retired or near-retirement investors from everyday life information seeking and serious leisure perspectives. Although primarily qualitative, it also collects and analyzes quantitative data to describe retired investors' information preferences and use.…

  5. Older Workers, Retirement and the Need for Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blyton, Paul

    1984-01-01

    This literature review presents viewpoints on retirement expressed in four books: "Capitalism and the Construction of Old Age," (Chris Phillipson); "Work and Retirement," (Stanley Parker); "Work or Retirement?" (B. Casey, G. Bruche); "The Ageing Worker," (M. Doering, S.R. Rhodes, M. Schuster). (JB)

  6. 5 CFR 831.1203 - Basic requirements for disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Basic requirements for disability...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1203 Basic requirements for disability retirement. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the following conditions...

  7. 5 CFR 831.1203 - Basic requirements for disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Basic requirements for disability...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1203 Basic requirements for disability retirement. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the following conditions...

  8. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48... disability retirement. An election filed on or after August 13, 1968 is not effective if the member dies within 30 days following retirement from a disability of 100 per centum (under the standard schedule...

  9. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48... disability retirement. An election filed on or after August 13, 1968 is not effective if the member dies within 30 days following retirement from a disability of 100 per centum (under the standard schedule...

  10. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48... disability retirement. An election filed on or after August 13, 1968 is not effective if the member dies within 30 days following retirement from a disability of 100 per centum (under the standard schedule...

  11. 5 CFR 831.1203 - Basic requirements for disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Basic requirements for disability...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1203 Basic requirements for disability retirement. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the following conditions...

  12. 5 CFR 831.1203 - Basic requirements for disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Basic requirements for disability...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1203 Basic requirements for disability retirement. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the following conditions...

  13. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48... disability retirement. An election filed on or after August 13, 1968 is not effective if the member dies within 30 days following retirement from a disability of 100 per centum (under the standard schedule...

  14. 42 CFR 421.212 - Railroad Retirement Board contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Railroad Retirement Board contracts. 421.212... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE CONTRACTING Carriers § 421.212 Railroad Retirement Board contracts. In accordance with this subpart C, the Railroad Retirement Board contracts with DMEPOS...

  15. 42 CFR 421.212 - Railroad Retirement Board contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Railroad Retirement Board contracts. 421.212... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE CONTRACTING Carriers § 421.212 Railroad Retirement Board contracts. In accordance with this subpart C, the Railroad Retirement Board contracts...

  16. 20 CFR 404.1077 - Individuals under railroad retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Individuals under railroad retirement system... Self-Employment § 404.1077 Individuals under railroad retirement system. If you are an employee or... business. Your services are covered under the railroad retirement system. Self-Employment Income...

  17. 42 CFR 421.212 - Railroad Retirement Board contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Railroad Retirement Board contracts. 421.212... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE CONTRACTING Carriers § 421.212 Railroad Retirement Board contracts. In accordance with this subpart C, the Railroad Retirement Board contracts...

  18. 20 CFR 404.1077 - Individuals under railroad retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Individuals under railroad retirement system... Self-Employment § 404.1077 Individuals under railroad retirement system. If you are an employee or... business. Your services are covered under the railroad retirement system. Self-Employment Income...

  19. 42 CFR 421.212 - Railroad Retirement Board contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Railroad Retirement Board contracts. 421.212... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE CONTRACTING Carriers § 421.212 Railroad Retirement Board contracts. In accordance with this subpart C, the Railroad Retirement Board contracts...

  20. 42 CFR 421.212 - Railroad Retirement Board contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Railroad Retirement Board contracts. 421.212... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE CONTRACTING Carriers § 421.212 Railroad Retirement Board contracts. In accordance with this subpart C, the Railroad Retirement Board contracts with DMEPOS...

  1. 42 CFR 408.42 - Deduction from railroad retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Deduction from railroad retirement benefits. 408.42... § 408.42 Deduction from railroad retirement benefits. (a) Responsibility for deductions. If an enrollee is entitled to railroad retirement benefits, his or her SMI premiums are deducted from those...

  2. 20 CFR 404.1077 - Individuals under railroad retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individuals under railroad retirement system... Self-Employment § 404.1077 Individuals under railroad retirement system. If you are an employee or... business. Your services are covered under the railroad retirement system. Self-Employment Income...

  3. 42 CFR 408.42 - Deduction from railroad retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Deduction from railroad retirement benefits. 408.42... § 408.42 Deduction from railroad retirement benefits. (a) Responsibility for deductions. If an enrollee is entitled to railroad retirement benefits, his or her SMI premiums are deducted from those...

  4. 42 CFR 408.42 - Deduction from railroad retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deduction from railroad retirement benefits. 408.42... § 408.42 Deduction from railroad retirement benefits. (a) Responsibility for deductions. If an enrollee is entitled to railroad retirement benefits, his or her SMI premiums are deducted from those...

  5. 42 CFR 408.42 - Deduction from railroad retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Deduction from railroad retirement benefits. 408.42... § 408.42 Deduction from railroad retirement benefits. (a) Responsibility for deductions. If an enrollee is entitled to railroad retirement benefits, his or her SMI premiums are deducted from those...

  6. 42 CFR 408.42 - Deduction from railroad retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Deduction from railroad retirement benefits. 408.42... § 408.42 Deduction from railroad retirement benefits. (a) Responsibility for deductions. If an enrollee is entitled to railroad retirement benefits, his or her SMI premiums are deducted from those...

  7. 20 CFR 404.1077 - Individuals under railroad retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Individuals under railroad retirement system... Self-Employment § 404.1077 Individuals under railroad retirement system. If you are an employee or... business. Your services are covered under the railroad retirement system. Self-Employment Income...

  8. 20 CFR 404.1077 - Individuals under railroad retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Individuals under railroad retirement system... Self-Employment § 404.1077 Individuals under railroad retirement system. If you are an employee or... business. Your services are covered under the railroad retirement system. Self-Employment Income...

  9. 76 FR 32241 - Civil Service Retirement System; Present Value Factors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ...The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is providing notice of adjusted present value factors applicable to retirees under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) who elect to provide survivor annuity benefits to a spouse based on post-retirement marriage and to retiring employees who elect the alternative form of annuity, owe certain redeposits based on refunds of contributions for......

  10. Superintendent Retirement in a Reform State: Rhetoric and Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyland, Lori; Ellis, John

    2015-01-01

    Indiana recently gained status as a national leader in educational reform. At the same time, a record number of superintendents retired, with 62 retirements in 2012 and 2013, representing 21% of superintendents in the state. The purpose of this study was to explore factors influencing superintendents' decisions to retire during this time.…

  11. 5 CFR 831.1203 - Basic requirements for disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basic requirements for disability...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1203 Basic requirements for disability retirement. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the following conditions...

  12. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48... disability retirement. An election filed on or after August 13, 1968 is not effective if the member dies within 30 days following retirement from a disability of 100 per centum (under the standard schedule...

  13. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  14. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  15. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  16. A Longitudinal Study of Work After Retirement: Examining Predictors of Bridge Employment, Continued Career Employment, and Retirement.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Misty M; Beehr, Terry A; Lepisto, Lawrence R

    2016-09-01

    Older employees are increasingly accepting bridge employment, which occurs when older workers take employment for pay after they retire from their main career. This study examined predictors of workers' decisions to engage in bridge employment versus full retirement and career employment. A national sample of 482 older people in the United States was surveyed regarding various work-related and nonwork related predictors of retirement decisions, and their retirement status was measured 5 years later. In bivariate analyses, both work-related variables (career goal achievement and experienced pressure to retire) and nonwork-related variables (psychological distress and traditional gender role orientation) predicted taking bridge employment, but in multinomial logistic regression, only nonwork variables had unique effects. Few predictors differentiated the bridge employed and fully retired groups. Nonwork variables were salient in making the decision to retire, and bridge employment may be conceptually more similar to full retirement than to career employment. PMID:27284203

  17. 26 CFR 1.401(a)-1 - Post-ERISA qualified plans and qualified trusts; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... normal retirement age (subject to paragraph (b)(2) of this section). A plan does not fail to satisfy this... age—(i) General rule. The normal retirement age under a plan must be an age that is not earlier than the earliest age that is reasonably representative of the typical retirement age for the industry...

  18. Individual Public Transportation Accessibility is Positively Associated with Self-Reported Active Commuting

    PubMed Central

    Djurhuus, Sune; Hansen, Henning Sten; Aadahl, Mette; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background: Active commuters have lower risk of chronic disease. Understanding which of the, to some extent, modifiable characteristics of public transportation that facilitate its use is thus important in a public health perspective. The aim of the study was to examine the association between individual public transportation accessibility and self-reported active commuting, and whether the associations varied with commute distance, age, and gender. Methods: Twenty-eight thousand nine hundred twenty-eight commuters in The Capital Region of Denmark reported self-reported time spent either walking or cycling to work or study each day and the distance to work or study. Data were obtained from the Danish National Health Survey collected in February to April 2010. Individual accessibility by public transportation was calculated using a multi-modal network in a GIS. Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the association between accessibility, expressed as access area, and being an active commuter. Results: Public transport accessibility area based on all stops within walking and cycling distance was positively associated with being an active commuter. Distance to work, age, and gender modified the associations. Residing within 10 km commute distance and in areas of high accessibility was associated with being an active commuter and meeting the recommendations of physical activity. For the respondents above 29 years, individual public transportation accessibility was positively associated with being an active commuter. Women having high accessibility had significantly higher odds of being an active commuter compared to having a low accessibility. For men, the associations were insignificant. Conclusion: This study extends the knowledge about the driving forces of using public transportation for commuting by examining the individual public transportation accessibility. Findings suggest that transportation accessibility supports active commuting and planning

  19. Planning for Retirement: How to Prepare and Present a Pre-Retirement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Univ., Amherst. Labor Relations and Research Center.

    The history of the labor unions has been a history of men helping their fellows. Preretirement counseling and guidance is clearly an area where the labor unions could continue their heritage of collective self-help. The retiree faces new problems in Social Security and Medicare, health and nutrition, financial and legal adjustments, time and…

  20. The Influence of the Early Retirement Process on Satisfaction with Early Retirement and Psychological Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potocnik, Kristina; Tordera, Nuria; Peiro, Jose Maria

    2010-01-01

    The present study explores the influence of the early retirement process on adjustment to early retirement, taking into account the roles of individual characteristics and social context in this process. We proposed a systematic model integrating perceived ability to continue working, organizational pressures toward early retirement and group…

  1. Retirement Satisfaction for Retirees and Their Spouses: Do Gender and the Retirement Decision-Making Process Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Deborah B.; Moen, Phyllis

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates factors related to retirees' and their spouses' individual and joint retirement satisfaction using decision-making theory and a life course perspective. The sample includes 421 retired respondents (ages 50 to 72) and spouses from the Cornell Retirement and Well-Being Study. Although 77% of retirees report retirement…

  2. When Is Violence Planned?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felson, Richard B.; Massoglia, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We examine what types of violent offenses tend to be planned using self-report data from a nationally representative sample of state and federal inmates. We find mixed support for the idea that predatory offenses are more likely to be planned than dispute-related offenses. As expected, robbery offenders are much more likely to report that they…

  3. Alternate measures of replacement rates for social security benefits and retirement income.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Andrew G; Springstead, Glenn R

    2008-01-01

    Discussions of retirement planning and Social Security policy often focus on replacement rates, which represent retirement income or Social Security benefits relative to preretirement earnings. Replacement rates are a rule of thumb designed to simplify the process of smoothing consumption over individuals' lifetimes. Despite their widespread use, however, there is no common means of measuring replacement rates. Various measures of preretirement earnings mean that the denominators used in replacement rate calculations are often inconsistent and can lead to confusion. Whether a given replacement rate represents an adequate retirement income depends on whether the denominator in the replacement rate calculation is an appropriate measure of preretirement earnings. This article illustrates replacement rates using four measures of preretirement earnings: final earnings; the constant income payable from the present value (PV) of lifetime earnings (PV payment); the wage-indexed average of all earnings prior to claiming Social Security benefits; and the inflation-adjusted average of all earnings prior to claiming Social Security benefits (consumer price index (CPI) average). The article then measures replacement rates against a sample of the Social Security beneficiary population using the Social Security Administration's Modeling Income in the Near Term (MINT) microsimulation model. Replacement rates are shown based on Social Security benefits alone, to indicate the adequacy of the current benefit structure, as well as on total retirement income including defined benefit pensions and financial assets, to indicate total preparedness for retirement. The results show that replacement rates can vary considerably based on the definition of preretirement earnings used and whether replacement rates are measured on an individual or a shared basis. For current new retirees, replacement rates based on all sources of retirement income seem strong by most measures and are projected to

  4. Pensions and Retirement Among Black Union Army Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Dora L.

    2010-01-01

    I examine the effects of an unearned income transfer on the retirement rates and living arrangements of black Union Army veterans. I find that blacks were more than twice as responsive as whites to income transfers in their retirement decisions and 6 to 8 times as responsive in their choice of independent living arrangements. My findings have implications for understanding racial differences in rates of retirement and independent living at the beginning of the twentieth century, the rise in retirement prior to 1930, and the subsequent convergence in black-white retirement rates and living arrangements. PMID:21179379

  5. How did the recession of 2007-2009 affect the wealth and retirement of the near retirement age population in the Health and Retirement Study?

    PubMed

    Gustman, Alan L; Steinmeier, Thomas L; Tabatabai, Nahid

    2012-01-01

    This article uses household wealth and labor market data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to investigate how the recent "Great Recession" has affected the wealth and retirement of those approaching retirement age as the recession began, a potentially vulnerable population. The retirement wealth of people aged 53-58 in 2006 declined by a relatively modest 2.8 percent by 2010. Relative losses were greatest among those with the highest wealth when the recession began. Most of the loss in wealth is due to a declining net value of housing, but several factors may provide this cohort with time to recover its housing losses. Although unemployment rose during the Great Recession, that increase was not mirrored by flows out of full-time work or partial retirement. To date, the retirement behavior of the Early Boomer cohort does not differ much from that of older cohorts at comparable ages. PMID:23397745

  6. How Accurate are Self-Reports? An Analysis of Self-Reported Healthcare Utilization and Absence When Compared to Administrative Data

    PubMed Central

    Short, Meghan E.; Pei, Xiaofei; Tabrizi, Maryam J.; Ozminkowski, Ronald J.; Gibson, Teresa B.; DeJoy, Dave M.; Wilson, Mark G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the accuracy of self-reported healthcare utilization and absence reported on health risk assessments (HRAs) against administrative claims and human resource records. Methods Self-reported values of healthcare utilization and absenteeism were analyzed for concordance to administrative claims values. Percent agreement, Pearson’s correlations, and multivariate logistic regression models examined the level of agreement and characteristics of participants with concordance. Results Self-report and administrative data showed greater concordance for monthly compared to yearly healthcare utilization metrics. Percent agreement ranged from 30 to 99% with annual doctor visits having the lowest percent agreement. Younger people, males, those with higher education, and healthier individuals more accurately reported their healthcare utilization and absenteeism. Conclusions Self-reported healthcare utilization and absenteeism may be used as a proxy when medical claims and administrative data are unavailable, particularly for shorter recall periods. PMID:19528832

  7. Developing a Self-Reported Physical Fitness Survey

    PubMed Central

    Keith, NiCole R.; Stump, Timothy E.; Clark, Daniel O.

    2012-01-01

    Physical fitness measures indicate health status and could be used to improve management of overall health. Purpose To describe the development of a Self-Reported Fitness (SRFit) survey intended to estimate fitness in adults aged ≥40 years across four domains; 1) muscular strength and endurance, 2) cardiovascular fitness, 3) flexibility, and 4) body composition. Methods SRFit items were developed from the previously validated Rikli and Jones Senior Fitness Test battery of physical tests. Face-to-face participant interviews were used to refine SRFit item wording. Data from a pilot administration of the SRFit survey were used to guide further revisions of SRFit items. The Senior Fitness Test battery was used to evaluate the four fitness domains. The BodPod was used to measure body composition. Height, weight, and resting blood pressure were measured and the revised SRFit survey was administered to 108 participants. Results Forty-five percent of the participants were female and 37% reported being Black or in the “other” race category. Mean age was 53.5±8.0 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 30.6±8.8 kg/m2. SRFit summary score means (SD) and correlations found between summary score means (SD) and fitness test scores were: Upper body strength m=12.8 (2.4), r=0.59, p<0.001; lower body strength m=12.6 (2.6), r=0.68, p<0.001; upper body flexibility left-side m=12.3 (2.8), r=0.47, p<0.001; right-side m=12.4 (2.8), r=0.67, p<0.001; lower body flexibility m=17.4 (3.8), r = 0.55, p<0.001; cardiovascular endurance m=12.9 (2.6), r=0.66, p<0.001; BMI m=7.7 (2.23), r=0.79, p<0.001; and percent body fat m=7.7 (2.2), r=0.78, p<0.001. Conclusion SRFit survey items in each fitness domain were correlated with analogous Senior Fitness Test items indicating that participants could accurately use the SRFit survey to self-report physical fitness. PMID:22297807

  8. Online Self-Reporting of Pencil-and-Paper Homework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawick, Matthew L.

    2010-02-01

    Physics teachers are most effective when their students are active learners who think and participate in every class. This extends beyond the classroom too: ideally, students would tackle challenging questions and exercises after every class—not just before the exam or the night before the weekly homework is due. Just-in-Time-Teaching2 was developed to encourage this by having students submit daily homework online; their answers can be quickly graded (by hand) and then used as a springboard for class discussions that day. More recently, online homework services have become available that can automate the grading process and provide instantaneous feedback to students. Unfortunately in both of these cases, the range of possible questions is limited to what can be easily answered via computer. But while pencil and paper is still an easier medium for expressing diagrams and equations, daily collection of paper homework is cumbersome and does not allow same-day feedback. This paper describes a hybrid strategy in which students solve what may be "standard" pencil-and-paper homework problems, and then use a simple online form to self-report their degree of success.

  9. Are reconstructed self-reports of drinking reliable?

    PubMed

    Grant, K A; Arciniega, L T; Tonigan, J S; Miller, W R; Meyers, R J

    1997-05-01

    When follow-up interviews are missed, researchers sometimes try to reconstruct the data that would have been obtained by asking clients to recall the missed interval when they are interviewed at a later point. Are such data reliable? The reliability of remote reconstruction was estimated by asking 57 participants in a clinical trial to recall their drinking for the 12-month follow-up interval when interviewed, on average, 33 weeks later. These reports were obtained after delays averaging 231 days. These reconstructed reports were compared with the same clients' self-reports obtained during the 12-month interview. Reconstructed data were found to be reasonably accurate estimates of clients' reports at the time of original interview on global alcohol use variables including percentage of drinking days and total volume of consumption. No systematic bias was found for over-reporting or under-reporting at the point of reconstruction. However, on some variables (e.g. total drinks consumed), clients on average reported more drinking at the reconstruction period than during the initial interview. Discrepancies between initial and reconstructed reports were found to be unrelated to the length of delay in the second interview or to client characteristics. PMID:9219382

  10. Self-reported stress and reproductive health of female lawyers.

    PubMed

    Schenker, M B; Eaton, M; Green, R; Samuels, S

    1997-06-01

    We studied the prevalence and relationship of stress and working conditions with adverse reproductive outcomes in a cohort of female US law-school alumnae. A total of 584 female lawyers (74% response), aged 25 to 63, responded to a mailed questionnaire. Job hours per week was a strong predictor of job stress. In a logistic regression analysis, women working > 45 hours/week were five times as likely to report high stress as those working < 35 hours/week. Marriage and length of time on the job showed a small inverse association with stress. Women who worked more than 45 hours/week during their first trimester of pregnancy were more likely to report high stress at work during pregnancy. After being adjusted for confounding factors, weekly job hours during the first trimester of pregnancy showed a strong independent association with spontaneous abortion risk (odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 6.6). Seven or more alcohol drinks/week was also independently associated with spontaneous abortion risk (OR, 4.8; 95% CI, 1.5 to 18.1). Self-reported stress during pregnancy was positively but not statistically significantly associated with spontaneous abortion (OR, 1.4; 95% CI 0.8 to 2.3). PMID:9211214

  11. Case identification of depression with self-report questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, Thomas; Zimmerman, Mark

    2002-01-31

    Many self-report measures that are used to identify cases of depression are symptom severity measures that are adopted for diagnostic purposes by use of cutoff scores. A troublesome problem with this approach is that optimal cutoff scores often vary across studies, which increases the difficulty of cross-study comparisons. This study evaluated the performance of a DSM-IV based depression screening scale, the Diagnostic Inventory for Depression. We compared the diagnostic performance of two different approaches to scoring the DID: a cutoff scoring approach and a standardized DSM-IV symptom-summation algorithm. Clinical diagnosis based on a semi-structured interview was the standard of comparison. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that a DID cutoff score performed comparably to the DID algorithmic approach in identifying cases. This finding is in contrast to prior research which suggested that algorithmic approaches might improve test performance over the cutoff score approach. The manner by which a user might choose the appropriate scale-scoring method for case identification is discussed. PMID:11850051

  12. Self-reported health of residents of the Mississippi Delta.

    PubMed

    2004-11-01

    The rural Lower Mississippi Delta of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi has a large economically and socially disadvantaged population at high risk for health problems. Their health status is poorly understood as they are not well represented in national health surveys. A random-digit-dialing telephone survey was conducted in 2000, with 2,236 respondents representing residents of 36 counties along the Mississippi River. Self-reported chronic conditions, health status, and obesity (derived from weight and height) were compared with the nationally representative Continuing Survey of Food Intake of Individuals. High cholesterol, diabetes, and hypertension were significantly higher than in the national sample. Obesity was strikingly higher in Delta children (27.9% versus 16.2%) of all ages and in Delta adults (33.9% versus 17.3%). Controlling for age, income, and gender, African Americans were at particular risk for obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. A public health crisis appears to exist in the Delta given the high prevalence health problems. PMID:15531821

  13. Self-reported sexually transmitted infections among female university students

    PubMed Central

    Tiblom Ehrsson, Ylva; Stenhammar, Christina; Rosenblad, Andreas; Åkerud, Helena; Larsson, Margareta; Tydén, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate the occurrence of self-reported sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and associated factors among female university students requesting contraceptive counselling. Material and methods Cross-sectional study. Female university students (n = 353) completed a waiting-room questionnaire in connection with contraceptive counselling at a Student Health Centre in Uppsala, Sweden. Results Ninety-three (26.3%) female students had experienced an STI. The three most frequently reported STIs were chlamydia trachomatis, condyloma, and genital herpes. The experience of an STI was significantly associated with the total number of sexual partners (OR 1.060, 95% CI 1.030–1.091, P < 0.001), being heterosexual (OR 4.640, 95% CI 1.321–16.290, P = 0.017), having experienced an abortion (OR 2.744, 95% CI 1.112–6.771, P = 0.028), not being HPV-vaccinated (OR 2.696, 95% CI 1.473–4.935, P = 0.001), and having had intercourse on first night without using a condom (OR 2.375, 95% CI 1.182–4.771, P = 0.015). Conclusions Contraceptive counselling should also include information about primary and secondary prevention of STI, such as the importance of correct use of a condom and STI testing, to prevent a further spread of STIs. PMID:26489857

  14. The properties of self-report research measures: beyond psychometrics.

    PubMed

    Blount, Claire; Evans, Chris; Birch, Sarah; Warren, Fiona; Norton, Kingsley

    2002-06-01

    Self-report measures pertinent for personality disorder are widely used and many are available. Their relative merits are usually assessed on nomothetic psychometrics and acceptability to users is neglected. We report reactions of lay, patient and professional groups to the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire (PDQ-IV); Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-III); the Borderline Syndrome Index (BSI); Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSE) and the Social Functioning Questionnaire (SFQ). These were sent to 148 professionals, ex-patients and lay people for comment. Thirty-six per cent were returned. Pattern-coding by three raters revealed problematic themes across all measures, including inappropriate length, vague items and language, cultural assumptions and slang, state-bias and response-set. Measures can be depressing and upsetting for some participants (both patients and non-patients), hence administration of measures should be sensitive. Treatment may make people more self-aware, which may compromise validity for outcome research. This evaluation raises issues and concerns, which are missed in traditional psychometric evaluation. PMID:12396761

  15. Leadership: validation of a self-report scale.

    PubMed

    Dussault, Marc; Frenette, Eric; Fernet, Claude

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to propose and test the factor structure of a new self-report questionnaire on leadership. A sample of 373 school principals in the Province of Quebec, Canada completed the initial 46-item version of the questionnaire. In order to obtain a questionnaire of minimal length, a four-step procedure was retained. First, items analysis was performed using Classical Test Theory. Second, Rasch analysis was used to identify non-fitting or overlapping items. Third, a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using structural equation modelling was performed on the 21 remaining items to verify the factor structure of the scale. Results show that the model with a single third-order dimension (leadership), two second-order dimensions (transactional and transformational leadership), and one first-order dimension (laissez-faire leadership) provides a good fit to the data. Finally, invariance of factor structure was assessed with a second sample of 222 vice-principals in the Province of Quebec, Canada. This model is in agreement with the theoretical model developed by Bass (1985), upon which the questionnaire is based. PMID:23833872

  16. Self-Reported Versus Objectively Assessed Exercise Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ed; Holthaus, Katy; Vogtle, Laura K.; Sword, David; Breland, Hazel L.; Kamen, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We examined agreement of data between self-reported and objectively assessed exercise adherence among women with systemic lupus erythematosus. METHOD. Eleven participants completed weekly exercise logs on date and duration of exercise during a 10-wk Wii Fit™ home-based program. Afterward, exercise data from the log were compared with those recorded in the Wii console. RESULTS. Of the paired data, the mean duration of exercise recorded in the Wii was 29.5 min and that recorded in the log was 33.3 min. The composite intraclass correlation for exercise duration between exercise log and the Wii Fit was 0.4. The 95% limits of agreement indicated large between-subjects variability. CONCLUSION. Exercise logs exhibit a marginally acceptable agreement with Wii estimation of exercise duration at a group level. However, caution should be applied when using the exercise log as a measure of a person’s exercise behavior because of the tendency to overreport. PMID:23791324

  17. New Faculty Orientation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triton Coll., River Grove, IL.

    This report provides an overview of Triton College's (Illinois) New Faculty Orientation Plan, which was developed in light of the large number of retirements and new hires expected by the year 2000. The purpose of the plan is to assist newly hired instructors to move productively into their professional roles and to become actively involved in the…

  18. Land Retirement as a Habitat Restoration Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, P. N.; Wallender, W. W.

    2007-12-01

    Use of intensive irrigation in arid and semi-arid areas usually leads to gradual salination of the soil leading to crop yield decline. The salination problem is mitigated by applying irrigation in excess of crop requirements, which leaches the excess salt load to the groundwater. Insufficient natural or man made drainage to dispose off this saline recharge to the groundwater leads to a gradual rise in the water table and eventual encroachment upon the root zone. This may ultimately make the land unfit for any economically productive activity. The abandoned land may even lead to desertification with adverse environmental consequences. In drainage basins with no surface outflow (sometimes called closed basins), land retirement has been proposed as a management tool to address this problem. Land retirement essentially entails intentionally discontinuing irrigation of selected farmlands with the expectation that the shallow water table beneath those lands should drop and the root zone salinity level should decrease. In the San Joaquin Valley of California, intensive irrigation in conjunction with a shallow underlying layer of clay, known as the Corcoran clay layer and absence of a drainage system caused the root zone to become highly saline and the shallow water table to rise. Land retirement would remove from production those farmlands contributing the poorest quality subsurface drain water. Based on numerical models results, it was expected that with land retirement of substantial irrigated lands with poor drainage characteristics, beneath which lies shallow groundwater with high salt load, the shallow water table beneath those lands should drop. A part of the retired lands could also be used for wildlife habitat. A potential negative side of the land retirement option that has to be considered is that in certain enabling evapotranspiration, soil and water table conditions, water will be drawn upwards and evaporated, leaving a deposit of salts on the surface and in

  19. 29 CFR 2520.104b-4 - Alternative methods of compliance for furnishing the summary plan description and summaries of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... summary plan description and summaries of material modifications of a pension plan to a retired... modifications of a pension plan to a retired participant, a separated participant with vested benefits, and a... pension benefit plan— (a) Summary plan descriptions. A plan administrator will be deemed to satisfy...

  20. [Retirement and the obligations of the future].

    PubMed

    Picot, J

    1982-01-01

    Retirement, when funds are transferred to the nonworking elderly regardless of their physical condition, is a modern invention not without problems. The ever earlier withdrawal from the labor force of large numbers of persons, an increasing proportion of whom are in robust health, creates a problem of providing something to do for people who may not have the means of amusing themselves adequately and who do not have many family responsibilities in an age of shrinking families. Another question involves the cost to the working population of maintaining the growing numbers condemned to retirement. French households obtained 32.4% of their financial resources through transfer payments in 1980, up from 25.1% in 1970. Since 1979 the growth of household income has been due completely to transfer payments and not at all to salaries. 42% of transfer payments are pension benefits. Only about 10% of the increase in pensions thus far is due to aging of the population; the 2 major causes are the improvement of pensions and the declining rate of activity that transforms workers into retirees. From 1968-79, the activity rate of those aged 60-64 declined from 63.9% to 43.7% among men and from 35.3% to 23.9% among women. The requirements for supplemental financing of retirement benefits when the full weight of the pension reforms is felt will depend on the behavior of the economy and the ability to absorb more workers, and on the numbers of workers who choose early retirement, which will probably be large. Present tendencies toward an increasing role for transfer payments in household income can only increase, leading to the very difficult question of what the future will hold for the income levels of the active population. PMID:12265266

  1. Collegiate Swimmers: Sex Differences in Self-Reports and Indices of Physiological Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gackenbach, Jayne

    1982-01-01

    Psychological and physiological stress indices were taken from collegiate swimmers of both sexes. Later a scale of self-reported masculinity and femininity was administered. Males had higher systolic blood pressure but lower self-reported anxiety and hostility with the stress of competition. Differences in relative masculinity/femininity allow…

  2. Self-Reported versus Professionally Assessed Functional Limitations in Community-Dwelling Very Old Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson, Gunilla; Haak, Maria; Nygren, Carita; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between self-reported and professionally assessed functional limitations in community-dwelling very old individuals. In total, 306 single-living adults aged 81-90 years were included in this cross-sectional study. The main outcome measure was the presence and absence of self-reported and…

  3. Congruence of Self-Reported Medications with Pharmacy Prescription Records in Low-Income Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caskie, Grace I. L.; Willis, Sherry L.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the congruence of self-reported medications with computerized pharmacy records. Design and Methods: Pharmacy records and self-reported medications were obtained for 294 members of a state pharmaceutical assistance program who also participated in ACTIVE, a clinical trial on cognitive training in nondemented elderly…

  4. Adolescent Suicidal Behavior and Popular Self-Report Instruments of Depression, Social Desirability, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, David K.; Meyer, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    College students (n=150) completed Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire and self-report inventories of depression, hopelessness, social desirability, and anxiety. Found significant correlations between self-report instruments and suicidal behaviors. Findings may be a result of the fact that anxiety and depression are often found together in clinical…

  5. Examining Systematic Errors in Predictors of College Student Self-Reported Gains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    College student self-reported gains are used frequently in institutional research and in general research on college outcomes (Gonyea, 2005). These self-report measures serve not only to identify experiences and programs associated with student growth but also to draw comparisons across colleges and universities. The vast majority of institutions…

  6. The 20-item prosopagnosia index (PI20): a self-report instrument for identifying developmental prosopagnosia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Punit; Gaule, Anne; Sowden, Sophie; Bird, Geoffrey; Cook, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Self-report plays a key role in the identification of developmental prosopagnosia (DP), providing complementary evidence to computer-based tests of face recognition ability, aiding interpretation of scores. However, the lack of standardized self-report instruments has contributed to heterogeneous reporting standards for self-report evidence in DP research. The lack of standardization prevents comparison across samples and limits investigation of the relationship between objective tests of face processing and self-report measures. To address these issues, this paper introduces the PI20; a 20-item self-report measure for quantifying prosopagnosic traits. The new instrument successfully distinguishes suspected prosopagnosics from typically developed adults. Strong correlations were also observed between PI20 scores and performance on objective tests of familiar and unfamiliar face recognition ability, confirming that people have the necessary insight into their own face recognition ability required by a self-report instrument. Importantly, PI20 scores did not correlate with recognition of non-face objects, indicating that the instrument measures face recognition, and not a general perceptual impairment. These results suggest that the PI20 can play a valuable role in identifying DP. A freely available self-report instrument will permit more effective description of self-report diagnostic evidence, thereby facilitating greater comparison of prosopagnosic samples, and more reliable classification. PMID:26543567

  7. Investigating the Comparability of a Self-Report Measure of Childhood Bullying across Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konishi, Chiaki; Hymel, Shelley; Zumbo, Bruno D.; Li, Zhen; Taki, Mitsuru; Slee, Phillip; Pepler, Debra; Sim, Hee-og; Craig, Wendy; Swearer, Susan; Kwak, Keumjoo

    2009-01-01

    Responding to international concerns regarding childhood bullying and a need to identify a common bullying measure, this study examines the comparability of children's self-reports of bullying across five countries. The Pacific-Rim Bullying Measure, a self-report measure of students' experiences with six different types of bullying behaviour and…

  8. Gender Differences in Self-Reported Symptomatology and Working Memory in College Students with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kercood, Suneeta; Lineweaver, Tara T.; Kugler, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in self-reported symptomatology and working memory (visuospatial and auditory) in college students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Forty-seven college students with ADHD and 44 non-affected control participants completed two self-report questionnaires and six tests…

  9. Family Influences on Self-Reported Delinquency among High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peiser, Nadine C.; Heaven, Patrick C. L.

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes the effect of certain family processes on adolescents' self-reported delinquency and investigates whether self-esteem and locus of control mediate these effects. Results indicate that parental discipline style predicts self-reported delinquency. Also, a link between positive family relations and high self-esteem among males emerged. (RJM)

  10. Validity of Self-Reports of Delinquency and Socio-Emotional Functioning among Youth on Probation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashel, Mary Louise

    Study examined the validity of self-reported delinquency and socio-emotional functioning of 48 court-probated juveniles. In summary, the youth acknowledged involvement in more delinquent activities than were reported by their parents or noted in probation records. Adolescent self-report may play a critical role in the identification of effective…

  11. The Challenge of Measuring Epistemic Beliefs: An Analysis of Three Self-Report Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBacker, Teresa K.; Crowson, H. Michael; Beesley, Andrea D.; Thoma, Stephen J.; Hestevold, Nita L.

    2008-01-01

    Epistemic beliefs are notoriously difficult to measure with self-report instruments. In this study, the authors used large samples to assess the factor structure and internal consistency of 3 self-report measures of domain-general epistemic beliefs to draw conclusions about the trustworthiness of findings reported in the literature. College…

  12. Recommendations to improve the accuracy of estimates of physical activity derived from self report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessment of physical activity using self-report has the potential for measurement error that can lead to incorrect inferences about physical activity behaviors and bias study results. To provide recommendations to improve the accuracy of physical activity derived from self report. We provide an ov...

  13. Self-Report Measures of Parent-Adolescent Attachment and Separation-Individuation: A Selective Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Frederick G.; Gover, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews and critiques three self-report measures of parent-adolescent attachment (Parental Bonding Instrument, Parental Attachment Questionnaire, Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment) and three self-report measures of parent-adolescent separation-individuation (Psychological Separation Inventory, Personal Authority in the Family System…

  14. Self-Reported Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnier-Dykstra, Laura M.; Pinchevsky, Gillian M.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; Arria, Amelia M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Report the distribution of scores from the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) and estimate the prevalence of self-reported attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms as compared to clinical diagnoses. Participants: Participants were 1,080 college students, divided into 3 groups: (1) no ADHD diagnosis (n = 972), (2)…

  15. Accuracy of Self-Reported SAT and ACT Test Scores: Implications for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, James S.; Gonyea, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Because it is often impractical or impossible to obtain school transcripts or records on subjects, many researchers rely on college students to accurately self-report their academic record as part of their data collection procedures. The purpose of this study is to investigate the validity and reliability of student self-reported academic…

  16. Validation of Self-Report on Smoking among University Students in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chung Yul; Shin, Sunmi; Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Hong, Yoon Mi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To validate the self-reported smoking status of Korean university students. Methods: Subjects included 322 Korean university in Korea, who participated in an annual health screening. Data on smoking were collected through a self-reported questionnaire and urine test. The data were analyzed by the McNemar test. Results: In the…

  17. Agreement between Parent- and Self-Reports of Algerian Adolescents' Behavioral and Emotional Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petot, Djaouida; Rescorla, Leslie; Petot, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined agreement between scores obtained from self-reports of behavioral and emotional problems obtained from 513 Algerian adolescents on the Youth Self-Report (YSR) with scores obtained from reports provided by their parents on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). The correlations between self- and parent-report were larger…

  18. Usefulness of Self-Report Instruments in Assessing Men Accused of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfritz, Laura E.; Stanford, Matthew S.; Conklin, Sarah M.; Greve, Kevin W.; Villemarette-Pittman, Nicole R.; Houston, Rebecca J.

    2006-01-01

    Clinical assessment of domestic violence has traditionally relied on self-report methods of data collection, using structured interviews and lengthy questionnaires such as the MMPI-2. However, in certain situations such as court-ordered domestic violence evaluations, information obtained through self-report methods may be tainted because of…

  19. Self-reports of Psychological Distress in Connection with Various Degrees of Visual Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Jon S.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between degree of visual impairment and the self-reports of psychological distress by 167 Icelanders (ages 18-69) and 100 between the ages of 70-97, who were blind or had low vision. The study found that self-reports of psychological distress and perceptions of unhappiness varied significantly with the degree…

  20. Correction Equations to Adjust Self-Reported Height and Weight for Obesity Estimates among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozumdar, Arupendra; Liguori, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to generate correction equations for self-reported height and weight quartiles and to test the accuracy of the body mass index (BMI) classification based on corrected self-reported height and weight among 739 male and 434 female college students. The BMIqc (from height and weight quartile-specific, corrected…