Science.gov

Sample records for retort pouches

  1. Energy and process substitution in the frozen-food industry: geothermal energy and the retortable pouch

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.W.; Hanemann, W.M.; Eckhouse, K.

    1981-12-01

    An assessment is made of the possibilities of using geothermal energy and an aseptic retortable pouch in the food processing industry. The focus of the study is on the production of frozen broccoli in the Imperial Valley, California. Background information on the current status of the frozen food industry, the nature of geothermal energy as a potential substitute for conventional fossil fuels, and the engineering details of the retortable pouch process are covered. The analytical methodology by which the energy and process substitution were evaluated is described. A four-way comparison of the economics of the frozen product versus the pouched product and conventional fossil fuels versus geothermal energy was performed. A sensitivity analysis for the energy substitution was made and results are given. Results are summarized. (MCW)

  2. Optimization of process conditions for Rohu fish in curry medium in retortable pouches using instrumental and sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Ranendra K; Dhar, Bahni; Roy, Deepayan; Saha, Apurba

    2015-09-01

    'Kalia', a popular preparation of Rohu fish, packed in four-layered laminated retort pouch was processed in a steam/air mixture over-pressure retort at 121.1 °C to three different F 0 values of 7, 8 and 9 min. Time-temperature data were collected during heat processing using an Ellab Sterilization Monitoring System. Texture profile such as hardness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness decreased as the F 0 value increased. The L* values decreased whereas a* and b* values increased with increasing F 0 value. Based on the commercial sterility, sensory evaluation, colour and texture profile analysis, F 0 value of 8 min and cook value of 66 min, with a total process time of 41.7 min at 121.1 °C was found satisfactory for the preparation of Rohu fish curry (Kalia) in retort pouches. PMID:26344980

  3. Effect of different binders on the physico-chemical, textural, histological, and sensory qualities of retort pouched buffalo meat nuggets.

    PubMed

    Devadason, I Prince; Anjaneyulu, A S R; Babji, Y

    2010-01-01

    The functional properties of 4 binders, namely corn starch, wheat semolina, wheat flour, and tapioca starches, were evaluated to improve the quality of buffalo meat nuggets processed in retort pouches at F(0) 12.13. Incorporation of corn starch in buffalo meat nuggets produced more stable emulsion than other binders used. Product yield, drip loss, and pH did not vary significantly between the products with different binders. Shear force value was significantly higher for product with corn starch (0.42 +/- 0.0 Kg/cm(3)) followed by refined wheat flour (0.36 +/- 0.010 Kg/cm(3)), tapioca starch (0.32 +/- 0.010 Kg/cm(3)), and wheat semolina (0.32 +/- 0.010 Kg/cm(3)). Type of binder used had no significant effect on frying loss, moisture, and protein content of the product. However, fat content was higher in products with corn starch when compared to products with other binders. Texture profile indicated that products made with corn starch (22.17 +/- 2.55 N) and refined wheat flour (21.50 +/- 0.75 N) contributed firmer texture to the product. Corn starch contributed greater chewiness (83.8 +/- 12.51) to the products resulting in higher sensory scores for texture and overall acceptability. Products containing corn starch showed higher sensory scores for all attributes in comparison to products with other binders. Panelists preferred products containing different binders in the order of corn starch (7.23 +/- 0.09) > refined wheat flour (6.48 +/- 0.13) > tapioca starch (6.45 +/- 0.14) > wheat semolina (6.35 +/- 0.13) based on sensory scores. Histological studies indicated that products with corn starch showed dense protein matrix, uniform fat globules, and less number of vacuoles when compared to products made with other binders. The results indicated that corn flour is the better cereal binder for developing buffalo meat nuggets when compared to all other binders based on physico-chemical and sensory attributes. PMID:20492199

  4. RETORT. Oil Shale Retorting Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eyberger, L.R.

    1992-02-26

    RETORT is a one-dimensional mathematical model for simulating the chemical and physical processes involved in the vertical retorting of a fixed or moving rubbled bed of oil shale. The model includes those processes believed to have the most important effects in either the hot-gas retorting mode or the forward combustion retorting mode. The physical processes are: axial convective transport of heat and mass, axial thermal dispersion, axial pressure drop, gas-solid heat transfer, intraparticle thermal conductivity, water evaporation and condensation, wall heat loss, and movement of shale countercurrent to flow of gas. The chemical reactions within the shale particles are: release of bound water, pyrolysis of kerogen, coking of oil, pyrolysis of char, decomposition of carbonate minerals, and gasification of residual organic carbon with CO2, H2O, and O2. The chemical reactions in the bulk-gas stream are: combustion and cracking of oil vapor, combustion of H2, CH4, CHx, and CO, and the water-gas shift. The RETORT model is meant to simulate adiabatic laboratory retorts and in situ retorts that have been prepared with fairly uniform lateral distribution of shale particle sizes, void volume, and permeability. The model`s main role is to calculate, as a function of time and axial location in the retort, the flow rate of the bulk-gas stream and the composition and temperature of both the fluid stream and the shale particles.

  5. RETORT. Oil Shale Retorting Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, R.L.

    1992-02-26

    RETORT is a one-dimensional mathematical model for simulating the chemical and physical processes involved in the vertical retorting of a fixed or moving rubbled bed of oil shale. The model includes those processes believed to have the most important effects in either the hot-gas retorting mode or the forward combustion retorting mode. The physical processes are: axial convective transport of heat and mass, axial thermal dispersion, axial pressure drop, gas-solid heat transfer, intraparticle thermal conductivity, water evaporation and condensation, wall heat loss, and movement of shale countercurrent to flow of gas. The chemical reactions within the shale particles are: release of bound water, pyrolysis of kerogen, coking of oil, pyrolysis of char, decomposition of carbonate minerals, and gasification of residual organic carbon with CO2, H2O, and O2. The chemical reactions in the bulk-gas stream are: combustion and cracking of oil vapor, combustion of H2, CH4, CHx, and CO, and the water- gas shift. The RETORT model is meant to simulate adiabatic laboratory retorts and in situ retorts that have been prepared with fairly uniform lateral distribution of shale particle sizes, void volume, and permeability. The model`s main role is to calculate, as a function of time and axial location in the retort, the flow rate of the bulk-gas stream and the composition and temperature of both the fluid stream and the shale particles.

  6. RETORT ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Loomis, C.C.; Ash, W.J.

    1957-11-26

    An improved retort assembly useful in the thermal reduction of volatilizable metals such as magnesium and calcium is described. In this process a high vacuum is maintained in the retort, however the retort must be heated to very high temperatures while at the same time the unloading end must bo cooled to condense the metal vapors, therefore the retention of the vacuum is frequently difficult due to the thermal stresses involved. This apparatus provides an extended condenser sleeve enclosed by the retort cover which forms the vacuum seal. Therefore, the seal is cooled by the fluid in the condenser sleeve and the extreme thermal stresses found in previous designs together with the deterioration of the sealing gasket caused by the high temperatures are avoided.

  7. Retort process modelling for Indian traditional foods.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, S V; Lele, S S

    2014-11-01

    Indian traditional staple and snack food is typically a heterogeneous recipe that incorporates varieties of vegetables, lentils and other ingredients. Modelling the retorting process of multilayer pouch packed Indian food was achieved using lumped-parameter approach. A unified model is proposed to estimate cold point temperature. Initial process conditions, retort temperature and % solid content were the significantly affecting independent variables. A model was developed using combination of vegetable solids and water, which was then validated using four traditional Indian vegetarian products: Pulav (steamed rice with vegetables), Sambar (south Indian style curry containing mixed vegetables and lentils), Gajar Halawa (carrot based sweet product) and Upama (wheat based snack product). The predicted and experimental values of temperature profile matched with ±10 % error which is a good match considering the food was a multi component system. Thus the model will be useful as a tool to reduce number of trials required to optimize retorting of various Indian traditional vegetarian foods. PMID:26396305

  8. The Study of Heat Penetration of Kimchi Soup on Stationary and Rotary Retorts

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Il; Park, Eun-Ji; Cheon, Hee Soon; Chung, Myong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the heat-penetration characteristics using stationary and rotary retorts to manufacture Kimchi soup. Both heat-penetration tests and computer simulation based on mathematical modeling were performed. The sterility was measured at five different positions in the pouch. The results revealed only a small deviation of F0 among the different positions, and the rate of heat transfer was increased by rotation of the retort. The thermal processing of retort-pouched Kimchi soup was analyzed mathematically using a finite-element model, and optimum models for predicting the time course of the temperature and F0 were developed. The mathematical models could accurately predict the actual heat penetration of retort-pouched Kimchi soup. The average deviation of the temperature between the experimental and mathematical predicted model was 2.46% (R2=0.975). The changes in nodal temperature and F0 caused by microbial inactivation in the finite-element model predicted using the NISA program were very similar to that of the experimental data of for the retorted Kimchi soup during sterilization with rotary retorts. The correlation coefficient between the simulation using the NISA program and the experimental data was very high, at 99%. PMID:25866751

  9. Changing your ostomy pouch

    MedlinePlus

    The bathroom is a good place to change your pouch. Empty your used pouch into the toilet first, if it needs emptying. Gather your supplies. If you have a 2-piece pouch, be sure you have the special ...

  10. Solar retorting of oil shale

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, David W.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for retorting oil shale using solar radiation. Oil shale is introduced into a first retorting chamber having a solar focus zone. There the oil shale is exposed to solar radiation and rapidly brought to a predetermined retorting temperature. Once the shale has reached this temperature, it is removed from the solar focus zone and transferred to a second retorting chamber where it is heated. In a second chamber, the oil shale is maintained at the retorting temperature, without direct exposure to solar radiation, until the retorting is complete.

  11. Oil shale retort apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Adam A.; Mast, Earl L.; Greaves, Melvin J.

    1990-01-01

    A retorting apparatus including a vertical kiln and a plurality of tubes for delivering rock to the top of the kiln and removal of processed rock from the bottom of the kiln so that the rock descends through the kiln as a moving bed. Distributors are provided for delivering gas to the kiln to effect heating of the rock and to disturb the rock particles during their descent. The distributors are constructed and disposed to deliver gas uniformly to the kiln and to withstand and overcome adverse conditions resulting from heat and from the descending rock. The rock delivery tubes are geometrically sized, spaced and positioned so as to deliver the shale uniformly into the kiln and form symmetrically disposed generally vertical paths, or "rock chimneys", through the descending shale which offer least resistance to upward flow of gas. When retorting oil shale, a delineated collection chamber near the top of the kiln collects gas and entrained oil mist rising through the kiln.

  12. WATER COOLED RETORT COVER

    DOEpatents

    Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

    1962-05-01

    A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

  13. Pharyngeal pouch carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saunders, M W; Murty, G E; Bradely, P J

    1993-02-01

    Malignant change occurs in 0.3-10% of pharyngeal pouches, with longstanding pouches most at risk. Contrast radiology and endoscopy can detect large and medium sized tumors but are inadequate for small lesions and carcinoma in situ. Expectant treatment and conservative surgery fail to provide an excised pouch for histological analysis and small lesions may be missed. Consequently, careful consideration must be given to radical excision, particularly if the pouch has been longstanding. The role of radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery remains unproven. PMID:8482256

  14. Water mist injection in oil shale retorting

    DOEpatents

    Galloway, T.R.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Burnham, A.K.

    1980-07-30

    Water mist is utilized to control the maximum temperature in an oil shale retort during processing. A mist of water droplets is generated and entrained in the combustion supporting gas flowing into the retort in order to distribute the liquid water droplets throughout the retort. The water droplets are vaporized in the retort in order to provide an efficient coolant for temperature control.

  15. Preparation and storage stability of retort processed Chettinad chicken.

    PubMed

    Rajan, S; Kulkarni, V V; Chandirasekaran, V

    2014-01-01

    Chettinad chicken was prepared using boneless meat derived from spent hen and boiler breeder packed in retort pouches (250 g) and processed in retort at the product temperature of 121.1 °C and the corresponding F0 value of 5.2. The product was stored at ambient temperature (35 ± 2 °C) up to 180 days. The sensory scores for texture of the Chettinad chicken prepared from spent hen and broiler breeder meat decreased significantly however the scores were rated very acceptable even on 180th day. The thiobarbituric acid (TBA), tyrosine values and acid value increased gradually during storage but E. coli, Salmonella spp, Clostridium spp, Staphylococci spp, Streptococci spp, yeast and mould could not be detected during the entire storage period. The cost of production of Chettinad chicken (250 g) prepared from spent hen meat and broiler breeder meat was Rs.37 and Rs.50, respectively. It was concluded that the retort processed Chettinad chicken prepared from spent hen and broiler breeder meat can be safely stored up to 180 days at ambient temperature. PMID:24426066

  16. Oil shale retort apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, A.A.; Mast, E.L.; Greaves, M.J.

    1990-08-14

    A retorting apparatus is described including a vertical kiln and a plurality of tubes for delivering rock to the top of the kiln and removal of processed rock from the bottom of the kiln so that the rock descends through the kiln as a moving bed. Distributors are provided for delivering gas to the kiln to effect heating of the rock and to disturb the rock particles during their descent. The distributors are constructed and disposed to deliver gas uniformly to the kiln and to withstand and overcome adverse conditions resulting from heat and from the descending rock. The rock delivery tubes are geometrically sized, spaced and positioned so as to deliver the shale uniformly into the kiln and form symmetrically disposed generally vertical paths, or rock chimneys'', through the descending shale which offer least resistance to upward flow of gas. When retorting oil shale, a delineated collection chamber near the top of the kiln collects gas and entrained oil mist rising through the kiln. 29 figs.

  17. Changing your ostomy pouch

    MedlinePlus

    American College of Surgeons, Division of Education. Ostomy skills: Emptying and changing the pouch. Available at: www. ... Perry AG, Potter PA, Ostendorf W. Clinical Nursing Skills and Techniques . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  18. Apparatus for oil shale retorting

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Arthur E.; Braun, Robert L.; Mallon, Richard G.; Walton, Otis R.

    1986-01-01

    A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

  19. Effects of MIS retorting on groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, N.E.

    1983-04-01

    Occidental Petroleum Corporation has conducted field tests on the modified-in-situ (MIS) oil shale retorting technology for a number of years at its Logan Wash site near De Beque, Colorado. A total of 8 major retorts have been burned, the last three of which were commercial sized. Concurrent with process development research, a significant program was undertaken to study the effects of the MIS technology on the environment. Groundwater was examined before, during and after the major retorting experiments by means of an extensive monitoring network. This network was comprised of monitoring wells at various distances from the retorting operation. Both alluvial wells and deep bedrock wells were examined. Water quality in local seeps and springs was also monitored. Almost eighty chemical and physical parameters of the water samples have been examined. Analyses of these data have shown no contamination of the groundwaters by the MIS retorts. The quality of water exiting MIS retorts during and after the retorting period has also been followed. Data from Retorts 1 through 6 show that the species mobilized by retorting are rapidly removed, and concentrations of chemicals in ''leachate'' from the retorts quickly approach the same range of values as seen in natural groundwaters. Statistical analyses have been made of both the retort waters and the groundwaters. Based on the results of these analyses a list of key variables has been identified whose measurement is most likely to identify contamination problems.

  20. 4. VIEW OF AREA EXCAVATED FOR ACCESS TO MERCURY RETORT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF AREA EXCAVATED FOR ACCESS TO MERCURY RETORT. VIEW SOUTH FROM RETORT. (OCTOBER, 1995) - McCormick Group Mine, Mercury Retort, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  1. Process for oil shale retorting

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.; Kunchal, S. Kumar

    1981-10-27

    Particulate oil shale is subjected to a pyrolysis with a hot, non-oxygenous gas in a pyrolysis vessel, with the products of the pyrolysis of the shale contained kerogen being withdrawn as an entrained mist of shale oil droplets in a gas for a separation of the liquid from the gas. Hot retorted shale withdrawn from the pyrolysis vessel is treated in a separate container with an oxygenous gas so as to provide combustion of residual carbon retained on the shale, producing a high temperature gas for the production of some steam and for heating the non-oxygenous gas used in the oil shale retorting process in the first vessel. The net energy recovery includes essentially complete recovery of the organic hydrocarbon material in the oil shale as a liquid shale oil, a high BTU gas, and high temperature steam.

  2. Cyclone oil shale retorting concept. [Use it all retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Harak, A.E.; Little, W.E.; Faulders, C.R.

    1984-04-01

    A new concept for above-ground retorting of oil shale was disclosed by A.E. Harak in US Patent No. 4,340,463, dated July 20, 1982, and assigned to the US Department of Energy. This patent titled System for Utilizing Oil Shale Fines, describes a process wherein oil shale fines of one-half inch diameter and less are pyrolyzed in an entrained-flow reactor using hot gas from a cyclone combustor. Spent shale and supplemental fuel are burned at slagging conditions in this combustor. Because of fines utilization, the designation Use It All Retorting Process (UIARP) has been adopted. A preliminary process engineering design of the UIARP, analytical tests on six samples of raw oil shale, and a preliminary technical and economic evaluation of the process were performed. The results of these investigations are summarized in this report. The patent description is included. It was concluded that such changes as deleting air preheating in the slag quench and replacing the condenser with a quench-oil scrubber are recognized as being essential. The addition of an entrained flow raw shale preheater ahead of the cyclone retort is probably required, but final acceptance is felt to be contingent on some verification that adequate reaction time cannot be obtained with only the cyclone, or possibly some other twin-cyclone configuration. Sufficient raw shale preheating could probably be done more simply in another manner, perhaps in a screw conveyor shale transporting system. Results of the technical and economic evaluations of Jacobs Engineering indicate that further investigation of the UIARP is definitely worthwhile. The projected capital and operating costs are competitive with costs of other processes as long as electric power generation and sales are part of the processing facility.

  3. Crohn's Disease of the Ileoanal Pouch.

    PubMed

    Lightner, Amy L; Pemberton, John H; Loftus, Edward J

    2016-06-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) of the pouch is an increasingly recognized diagnosis after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. This post-ileal pouch-anal anastomosis diagnosis in conjunction with pouchitis remains the leading reason for pouch excision. Unfortunately, CD of the pouch remains a difficult diagnosis with lack of a uniform definition largely because of its similarity to common postoperative pouch complications, including pouchitis, abscess formation, or stricture at the anastomosis. Once diagnosed, treatment algorithms largely include multimodal therapy including biologics. This review focuses on the definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment for CD of the pouch, a postoperative de novo diagnosis of CD. PMID:27057684

  4. Method for retorting oil shale

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer-Yu; Lui, A.P.

    1985-08-16

    The recovery of oil from oil shale is provided in a fluidized bed by using a fluidizing medium of a binary mixture of carbon dioxide and 5 steam. The mixture with a steam concentration in the range of about 20 to 75 volume percent steam provides an increase in oil yield over that achievable by using a fluidizing gas of carbon dioxide or steam alone when the mixture contains higher steam concentrations. The operating parameters for the fluidized bed retorted are essentially the same as those utilized with other gaseous fluidizing mediums with the significant gain being in the oil yield recovered which is attributable solely to the use of the binary mixture of carbon dioxide and steam. 2 figs.

  5. POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNICAL MANUAL: MODIFIED 'IN SITU' OIL SHALE RETORTING COMBINED WITH LURGI SURFACE RETORTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oil shale PCTM for Modified In Situ Oil Shale Retorting combined with Lurgi Surface Retorting addresses the application of this combination of technologies to the development of oil shale resources in the western United States. This manual describes the combined plant using L...

  6. 3. VIEW EAST OF TAILINGS OF MERCURY RETORT. SCOOP FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW EAST OF TAILINGS OF MERCURY RETORT. SCOOP FOR EXTRACTING MERCURY VISIBLE IN CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH. (OCTOBER, 1995) - McCormick Group Mine, Mercury Retort, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  7. Oil shale retorting in the first commercial plants

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Three commercial projects based on oil shale mining and surface retorting are reviewed. In Colorado, Exxon and Tosco are partners in the construction of a plant which will utilize TOSCO II retorts. Nearby, Union Oil Company is constructing the first module of a large complex using its own process. Each project is described briefly, the several retorting processes are discussed, and the rationale for the retort selection in each case is considered. 8 refs.

  8. Oil shale retorting and combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Pitrolo, Augustine A.; Mei, Joseph S.; Shang, Jerry Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the extraction of energy values from l shale containing considerable concentrations of calcium carbonate in an efficient manner. The volatiles are separated from the oil shale in a retorting zone of a fluidized bed where the temperature and the concentration of oxygen are maintained at sufficiently low levels so that the volatiles are extracted from the oil shale with minimal combustion of the volatiles and with minimal calcination of the calcium carbonate. These gaseous volatiles and the calcium carbonate flow from the retorting zone into a freeboard combustion zone where the volatiles are burned in the presence of excess air. In this zone the calcination of the calcium carbonate occurs but at the expense of less BTU's than would be required by the calcination reaction in the event both the retorting and combustion steps took place simultaneously. The heat values in the products of combustion are satisfactorily recovered in a suitable heat exchange system.

  9. LOGAN WASH FIELD TREATABILITY STUDIES OF WASTEWATERS FROM OIL SHALE RETORTING PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatability studies were conducted on retort water and gas condensate wastewater from modified in-situ oil shale retorts to evaluate the effectiveness of selected treatment technologies for removing organic and inorganic contaminants. At retorts operated by Occidental Oil Shale,...

  10. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  11. A suprasellar subarachnoid pouch; aetiological considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Binitie, O; Williams, B; Case, C P

    1984-01-01

    A child with hydrocephalus treated by a valved shunt was reinvestigated after developing a shunt infection. A pouch was discovered invaginating the floor of the third ventricle and filling slowly with CSF from the region of the interpeduncular cistern. Histology and mechanisms of this pouch formation are discussed. Images PMID:6502163

  12. Hydraulic calculations for a modified in-situ retort

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, W.G.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains brief descriptions of a numerical model and the aquifer-retort system used to investigate hydraulics in the vicinity of a modified in-situ retort. The model is used to analyze several cases involving different physical and geohydrological parameters, and possible applications of the model to in-situ oil shale recovery are discussed.

  13. Combuston method of oil shale retorting

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., John B.; Reeves, Adam A.

    1977-08-16

    A gravity flow, vertical bed of crushed oil shale having a two level injection of air and a three level injection of non-oxygenous gas and an internal combustion of at least residual carbon on the retorted shale. The injection of air and gas is carefully controlled in relation to the mass flow rate of the shale to control the temperature of pyrolysis zone, producing a maximum conversion of the organic content of the shale to a liquid shale oil. The parameters of the operation provides an economical and highly efficient shale oil production.

  14. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    SciTech Connect

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  15. Characterization of in situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Thomas F.; Moore, Dennis F.

    1984-01-01

    Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

  16. Fluid outlet at the bottom of an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Hutchins, Ned M.

    1984-01-01

    Formation is excavated from within the boundaries of a retort site in formation containing oil shale for forming at least one retort level void extending horizontally across the retort site, leaving at least one remaining zone of unfragmented formation within the retort site. A production level drift is excavated below the retort level void, leaving a lower zone of unfragmented formation between the retort level void and the production level drift. A plurality of raises are formed between the production level drift and the retort level void for providing product withdrawal passages distributed generally uniformly across the horizontal cross section of the retort level void. The product withdrawal passages are backfilled with a permeable mass of particles. Explosive placed within the remaining zone of unfragmented formation above the retort level void is detonated for explosively expanding formation within the retort site toward at least the retort level void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale within the boundaries of the retort site. During retorting operations products of retorting are conducted from the fragmented mass in the retort through the product withdrawal passages to the production level void. The products are withdrawn from the production level void.

  17. 2. AERIAL VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. THE RETORT HOUSE IS LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. AERIAL VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. THE RETORT HOUSE IS LOCATED DIRECTLY BEHIND THE GABLED PORTION OF OF THE 1859 FACADE ADDITION. THE COAL STORAGE FACILITY/BOILER HOUSE IS TO THE RIGHT OF THE RETORT HOUSE. THE OFFICES ARE IN THE THE THREE STORY BUILDING ON THE CORNER, TO THE RIGHT OF THE 1859 FACADE. - Buffalo Gas Light Company, 249 West Genesee Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  18. Microbial colonization of retorted shale in field and laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.E.; McNair, V.M.; Li, S.W.; Garland, T.R.; Wildung, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    The microbial colonization of retorted shale was measured in field lysimeters and laboratory with retorted shale obtained from an above-ground retort operating in the direct heating mode. In field lysimeter studies, total aerobic heterotrophic bacterial colony forming units (cfu), as measured by a selective plating medium in surface horizons of retorted shale and adjacent soils, were similar (3.3 x 10/sup 6/ and 2.7 x 10/sup 6/ bacterial cfu/g dry weight) two months after disposal. However, unlike the soil that exhibited a diverse community, the retorted shale was dominated by a single Micrococcus species that composed 30% of the total bacterial community. After one and two years, the total aerobic heterotrophic bacterial cfu in the retorted shale and soil were again similar; however, no bacterium dominated either community. A core sample from the field lysimeter indicated microbial colonization to a depth of 150 cm after one year. An increased ratio of anaerobic to aerobic heterotrophic bacterial cfu in the deepest sample (120 to 150 cm) implied the development of anaerobic conditions. In the laboratory, aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were shown capable of using, as the sole source of carbon, retorted shale in liquid cultures. Of the added nutritional amendments, PO/sub 4//sup -3/, NO/sub 3//sup -/ and SO/sub 4//sup -2/, only phosphate markedly altered the colonization of retorted shale in liquid culture; shortening the lag phase of colonization from less than three to seven weeks to less than one week and leading to a greater aerobic heterotrophic population over the incubation interval. The addition of phosphate also led to a aerobic heterotrophic bacterial community composed entirely of Micrococcus species.

  19. Models of Inflammation: Carrageenan Air Pouch.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Djane B; Vasko, Michael R; Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2016-01-01

    The subcutaneous air pouch is an in vivo model that can be used to study the components of acute and chronic inflammation, the resolution of the inflammatory response, the oxidative stress response, and potential therapeutic targets for treating inflammation. Injection of irritants into an air pouch in rats or mice induces an inflammatory response that can be quantified by the volume of exudate produced, the infiltration of cells, and the release of inflammatory mediators. The model presented in this unit has been extensively used to identify potential anti-inflammatory drugs. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26995549

  20. Local regulation of postprandial motor responses in ileal pouches

    PubMed Central

    Mularczyk, A; Contessini-Avesan..., E; Cesana, B; Bianchi, P; Basilisco, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Local mechanisms are involved in the postprandial regulation of ileal tone in healthy subjects, but whether these mechanisms affect the postprandial tonic response of ileal pouches has not yet been investigated.
AIMS—To study the effect of a meal on pouch tone and phasic motor activity in patients with gut continuity or ileostomy and, in the latter group, the effect of a pouch perfusion with chyme or saline.
PATIENTS—Twenty patients with ileal pouches: 10 with gut continuity and 10 with ileostomy.
METHODS—Pouch tone and the frequency of phasic volume events were recorded with a barostat under fasting and postprandial conditions and after perfusion of the isolated pouch with chyme or saline.
RESULTS—The meal increased pouch tone and the frequency of phasic volume events in the patients with gut continuity, but not in those with ileostomy. Pouch perfusion with chyme induced a greater increase in pouch tone than saline.
CONCLUSIONS—The meal stimulated pouch tone and phasic motor activity. These effects were at least partially related to local pouch stimulation by intraluminal contents.


Keywords: ileal pouches; postprandial motor responses; ileal tone; ileostomy; motor activity; barostat PMID:10486368

  1. Method for closing a drift between adjacent in situ oil shale retorts

    DOEpatents

    Hines, Alex E.

    1984-01-01

    A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

  2. 31 CFR 560.521 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Commerce under the Export Administration Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 through 774). ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Iran, or the exportation from the United States to Iran, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation, reexportation, sale,...

  3. 31 CFR 560.521 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Commerce under the Export Administration Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 et seq.). ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Iran, or the exportation from the United States to Iran, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation, reexportation, sale,...

  4. 31 CFR 560.521 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Commerce under the Export Administration Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 through 774). ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Iran, or the exportation from the United States to Iran, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation, reexportation, sale,...

  5. 31 CFR 560.521 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Commerce under the Export Administration Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 et seq.). ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Iran, or the exportation from the United States to Iran, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation, reexportation, sale,...

  6. 31 CFR 560.521 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Commerce under the Export Administration Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 et seq.). ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Iran, or the exportation from the United States to Iran, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation, reexportation, sale,...

  7. 31 CFR 538.516 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... under the Export Administration Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 et seq.). ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Sudan, or the exportation from the United States to Sudan, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation or...

  8. 31 CFR 538.516 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... under the Export Administration Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 et seq.). ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Sudan, or the exportation from the United States to Sudan, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation or...

  9. 31 CFR 538.516 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... under the Export Administration Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 et seq.). ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Sudan, or the exportation from the United States to Sudan, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation or...

  10. 31 CFR 538.516 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... under the Export Administration Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 et seq.). ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Sudan, or the exportation from the United States to Sudan, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation or...

  11. 31 CFR 538.516 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... under the Export Administration Regulations (15 CFR parts 730 et seq.). ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Sudan, or the exportation from the United States to Sudan, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation or...

  12. Characterization of Commercial Li-ion Cells in Pouch Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The li-ion pouch design cells exhibit similar behavior under off-nominal conditions as those in metal cans that do not have the internal safety devices. Safety should be well characterized before batteries are designed. Some of the li-ion pouch cell designs studied in this program reacted most violently to overcharge conditions at the medium rates but were tolerant to overcharge at very low rates. Some pouch cell designs have higher tolerance to vacuum exposures than some others. A comparison of the pouch material itself does not show a correlation between this tolerance and the number of layers or composition of the pouch indicating that this is a property of the electrode stack design inside the pouch. Reduced pressure (8 to 10 psi) test environments show that the extent of capacity degradation under reduced pressure environments is much less than that observed under vacuum conditions. Lithium-ion Pouch format cells are not necessarily true polymer cells.

  13. MERCURY MASS DISTRIBUTION DURING LABORATORY AND SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total mercury mass in oil shale retort offgas was quantified in a series of laboratory retorting experiments and in a simulated modified in-situ (MIS) retorting experiment. Accurate quantitative determinations of offgas Hg mass were made possible by the use of a continuous on-lin...

  14. Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    The burn of Retort 17 was terminated December 10. Retort 18 was ignited November 12. Retort 17 produced 510 bbl during the quarter for the total of 3,775 bbl, while Retort 18 produced 1,187 bbl. The shale oil was analyzed. Environmental studies were done.

  15. In-situ laser retorting of oil shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, H. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Oil shale formations are retorted in situ and gaseous hydrocarbon products are recovered by drilling two or more wells into an oil shale formation underneath the surface of the ground. A high energy laser beam is directed into the well and fractures the region of the shale formation. A compressed gas is forced into the well that supports combustion in the flame front ignited by the laser beam, thereby retorting the oil shale. Gaseous hydrocarbon products which permeate through the fractured region are recovered from one of the wells that were not exposed to the laser system.

  16. Solitary Pouch Ulcer: A New Clinical Entity?

    PubMed

    Pricolo, Victor E

    2016-07-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a well-known clinical entity, likely secondary to a defecatory dysfunction. In patients who have undergone restorative proctocolectomy with ileoanal reservoir, it is conceivable that a similar pathophysiology may lead to "solitary pouch ulcer," but such a syndrome has not been reported to date. This article reports 2 such cases and clinical success with lasting symptomatic relief through local therapy and behavior modification rather than anti-inflammatory. PMID:26859123

  17. Method of design for vertical oil shale retorting vessels and retorting therewith

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Adam A.

    1978-01-03

    A method of designing the gas flow parameters of a vertical shaft oil shale retorting vessel involves determining the proportion of gas introduced in the bottom of the vessel and into intermediate levels in the vessel to provide for lateral distribution of gas across the vessel cross section, providing mixing with the uprising gas, and determining the limiting velocity of the gas through each nozzle. The total quantity of gas necessary for oil shale treatment in the vessel may be determined and the proportion to be injected into each level is then determined based on the velocity relation of the orifice velocity and its feeder manifold gas velocity. A limitation is placed on the velocity of gas issuing from an orifice by the nature of the solid being treated, usually physical tests of gas velocity impinging the solid.

  18. Granuloma pouch assay for mutagenicity testing.

    PubMed

    Maier, P

    1980-11-01

    The Granuloma Pouch Assay (GPA) is an animal model in which mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of a testcompound can be detected in rapidly dividing fibroblasts of a granulation tissue in adult male rats. Growth of this tissue was initiated with a small amount of croton oil at the inside wall of a subcutaneous air pouch on the back of the animals. The test compound can be injected either into the pouch (local) or administered by systemic routes. Alkali labile DNA-lesions, chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, point mutations and tumor development in situ were determined. The comparison of mutation frequencies after local and systemic administration of testcompounds, provide an estimation of the pharmacokinetic characteristics and the mutagenic potency of the chemical. The local application route allows the detection of locally active mutagens and of compounds which require activation by P-448 dependent mono-oxygenases. Liver mediated proximate metabolites are detectable when they are transformed into ultimate carcinogens in extrahepatic cells whereas chemicals with a strong organ specific activity are not. PMID:7235991

  19. Heat penetration characteristics and physico-chemical properties of in-pouch processed dairy dessert (kheer).

    PubMed

    Jha, Alok; Patel, A A; Gopal, T K Srinivasa; Ravishankar, C N

    2014-10-01

    Kheer, a traditional milk product of South East Asia, containing cooked rice grains in a creamy sweetened concentrated milk, has no large-scale production due to its poor shelf life. Shelf-life was improved by development of a process based on in-pouch thermal processing employing a rotary retort. Product development included optimization of rice-to-milk solids ratio (0.18-0.52) and total milk solids levels (16-26 %) to simulate the conventional product in taste, appearance and textural attributes. Various Fo values (12.4-14.8) were examined with regard to product quality. While the TBA value tended to increase (0.073-0.081) the reflectance value (35.3-43.4) declined with increasing Fo. The pH of the product (6.04-6.10) showed a slight tendency to increase with Fo. Sensorily, the product was found to be acceptable for a period of 150 days at 37 °C. PMID:25328196

  20. 1. Distant view shows Engine Room Building behind cranes. Retort ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view shows Engine Room Building behind cranes. Retort rings in foreground were once located in Engine Room Building. See photo WA-131-A-2. Building on left is Machine Shop. Boiler Building is in front of stack. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, Engine Room Building, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  1. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS RETORT USED FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS RETORT USED FOR FLASHING MERCURY OFF OF GOLD TO CREATE SOFT INGOTS CALLED "SPONGES." AT RIGHT ARE SAFES FOR STORING 22-POUND SPONGES WORTH OVER $60,000 EACH, CA. 1985. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  2. 4. STRAIGHT ON VIEW OF CASTIRON RETORTS AT TOP OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. STRAIGHT ON VIEW OF CAST-IRON RETORTS AT TOP OF FURNACE SHOWING PORTION OF HOT BLAST STOVE AND TURNED HEAD. - Nassawango Iron Furnace, Furnace Road, 1.2 miles west of Maryland Route 12, Snow Hill, Worcester County, MD

  3. Why do central arachnoid pouches expand?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Bernard; Guthkelch, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    Three cases of progressive hydrocephalus, two occurring in infants and one in a 12 year old girl who also exhibited precocious puberty, were found to be associated with large arachnoid pouches originating within the posterior fossa. The pathogenesis of such cysts is discussed with special reference to the possibility that their progressive distension results from CSF pulsations of venous origin. Both a direct method of treatment (opening the cyst into the adjacent subarachnoid space) and an indirect one (insertion of a ventriculo-atrial shunt) have been used with success. Images PMID:4548436

  4. Guttural pouch mycosis in a 6-month-old filly

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Abstract A 6-month-old filly was presented with unilateral epistaxis. Based on clinical signs, endoscopic examination, and postmortem examination, guttural pouch mycosis was diagnosed. The young age of the filly and the fact that this was the 2nd diagnosis of guttural pouch mycosis on this farm was unusual. PMID:16604984

  5. Pouch Method for the Isolation and Enumeration of Clostridia

    PubMed Central

    Bladel, B. O.; Greenberg, Richard A.

    1965-01-01

    An anaerobic film-pouch method has been developed for the isolation and enumeration of clostridia. Fabrication of the pouch is described. Counts of spore suspensions of Putrefactive Anaerobe 3679 and of Clostridium botulinum strains 41-B and 33-A in pouches were compared with those obtained by anaerobic-jar and agar-deep techniques. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in favor of the pouch over the tube and anaerobic-jar methods. Tests performed with C. welchii, both in spore suspension and added to chicken pot pie in culture form, also demonstrated the pouch to be at least as proficient as the other, more cumbersome, techniques. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:14325895

  6. Santosh PGI pouch: A new innovation in urinary diversion

    PubMed Central

    Devana, Sudheer Kumar; Sharma, Aditya Prakash; Singh, Shrawan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To know the feasibility and outcome of the Santosh PGI pouch as a new innovative technique of continent cutaneous diversion (CCD) following cystectomy. Material and methods Twelve patients (eleven with carcinoma of the bladder and one with an exstrophy of the bladder) underwent CCD using the Santosh PGI pouch after cystectomy. A 50-cm segment of terminal ileum was isolated 15-20 cm proximal to the ileocecal junction. The ileal segment was folded into the form of an ‘S’ configuration. On the antimesenteric border three longitudinal incisions were performed of about 7 cm in length. The terminal 8 cm portion of the distal part of the pouch was used for creating the intussuscepted nipple valve. Demucosalization of the interior of the nipple, fixing the nipple valve with the serosa of the pouch wall and wrapping of the catheterizable channel with a pouch wall for providing continence was done. The uretero-pouch anastomosis was done using the serosal lined tunnel technique. The catheterizable channel was brought out through the right rectus muscle. Results Median follow-up of the patients was 13.5 months. No significant complications were noted in the pouch reconstruction. Duration of the pouch reconstruction was around 75-110 min. Postoperatively, one patient had a UTI and another had paralytic ileus on the follow-up. All patients were doing regular CIC with acceptable continence of up to 400 ml. No ureteroileal anastomotic stricture or difficulty in catheterizing the pouch was seen. Conclusions The Santosh PGI pouch, which is a type of CCD, is technically feasible, easy to reconstruct with acceptable continence and offers minimal morbidity. PMID:26251752

  7. Methods for minimizing plastic flow of oil shale during in situ retorting

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Arthur E.; Mallon, Richard G.

    1978-01-01

    In an in situ oil shale retorting process, plastic flow of hot rubblized oil shale is minimized by injecting carbon dioxide and water into spent shale above the retorting zone. These gases react chemically with the mineral constituents of the spent shale to form a cement-like material which binds the individual shale particles together and bonds the consolidated mass to the wall of the retort. This relieves the weight burden borne by the hot shale below the retorting zone and thereby minimizes plastic flow in the hot shale. At least a portion of the required carbon dioxide and water can be supplied by recycled product gases.

  8. Anaerobic biological treatment of in-situ retort water

    SciTech Connect

    Ossio, E.; Fox, P.

    1980-03-01

    Anaerobic fermentation was successfully used in a laboratory-scale batch digester to remove soluble organics from retort water. Required pretreatment includes reduction of ammonia levels to 360 mg-N/l, pH adjustment to 7.0, sulfide control, and the addition of the nutrients, calcium, magnesium, and phoshorus. If the prescribed pretreatment is used, BOD/sub 5/ and COD removal efficiencies of 89 to 90% and 65 to 70% are achieved, respectively.

  9. Process for the retorting of hydrocarbon-containing solids

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J.C.; Gaiao, U.; Novicki, R.E.

    1987-11-17

    This patent describes a process for the retorting of hydrocarbon-containing solids, characterized in that it comprises the following steps: (a) contacting the solid particles with superheated steam; (b) transporting, in an upward direction, the mixture obtained in the previous step, at a gas velocity close to the critical impact velocity, through a vertical multi-tube reactor, immersed in a vertical furnace, held at a temperature in the range from 800/sup 0/ to 1000/sup 0/C; (c) heating the obtained mixture to the solids' pyrolysis temperature, by means of the heat generated by the burning of fuel inside the vertical furnace and supplied to the mixture through the walls of the reactor; (d) removing the products from the reactor, separating the solid phase from the retorting products, by forcing the products to pass through primary and secondary separators; (e) removing the gaseous phase from the retorting products exiting the secondary separator thus effecting a second separation stage, for the obtaining of fuel gas and oil the process further characterized in that spaced static devices are provided within the multi-tube reactor tube, so as to cause the solid particles to come close to the walls of the reactor, as a consequence of the superheated steam flow redistribution in order to increase heat transfer between the vertical furnace and the reactor walls.

  10. Embryo oxygenation in pipefish brood pouches: novel insights.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Ines Braga; Ahnesjö, Ingrid; Kvarnemo, Charlotta

    2015-06-01

    The pipefish brood pouch presents a unique mode of parental care that enables males to protect, osmoregulate, nourish and oxygenate the developing young. Using a very fine O2 probe, we assessed the extent to which males of the broad-nosed pipefish (Syngnathus typhle) oxygenate the developing embryos and are able to maintain pouch fluid O2 levels when brooding in normoxia (100% O2 saturation) and hypoxia (40% O2 saturation) for 24 days. In both treatments, pouch fluid O2 saturation levels were lower compared with the surrounding water and decreased throughout the brooding period, reflecting greater offspring demand for O2 during development and/or decreasing paternal ability to provide O2 to the embryos. Male condition (hepatosomatic index) was negatively affected by hypoxia. Larger males had higher pouch fluid O2 saturation levels compared with smaller males, and levels were higher in the bottom section of the pouch compared with other sections. Embryo size was positively correlated with O2 availability, irrespective of their position in the pouch. Two important conclusions can be drawn from our findings. First, our results highlight a potential limitation to brooding within the pouch and dismiss the notion of closed brood pouches as well-oxygenated structures promoting the evolution of larger eggs in syngnathids. Second, we provide direct evidence that paternal care improves with male size in this species. This finding offers an explanation for the documented strong female preference for larger partners because, in terms of oxygenation, the brood pouch can restrict embryo growth. PMID:26041030

  11. Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, July, August, September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, K.B.

    1984-01-01

    Retort No. 27 was ignited using a new procedure and 47 days of operation were completed in the quarter. For retort No. 28 air injection and off gas piping and manifolding was completed along with the installation of electrical and instrumentation wiring. The off gas processing plant for the two retorts was completed and an initial shakedown run made.

  12. Brazing retort manifold design concept may minimize air contamination and enhance uniform gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppe, E. P.

    1966-01-01

    Brazing retort manifold minimizes air contamination, prevents gas entrapment during purging, and provides uniform gas flow into the retort bell. The manifold is easily cleaned and turbulence within the bell is minimized because all manifold construction lies outside the main enclosure.

  13. Effects of retorting factors on combustion properties of shale char. 3. Distribution of residual organic matters.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiangxin; Jiang, Xiumin; Cui, Zhigang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Junwei

    2010-03-15

    Shale char, formed in retort furnaces of oil shale, is classified as a dangerous waste containing several toxic compounds. In order to retort oil shale to produce shale oil as well as treat shale char efficiently and in an environmentally friendly way, a novel kind of comprehensive utilization system was developed to use oil shale for shale oil production, electricity generation (shale char fired) and the extensive application of oil shale ash. For exploring the combustion properties of shale char further, in this paper organic matters within shale chars obtained under different retorting conditions were extracted and identified using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. Subsequently, the effects of retorting factors, including retorting temperature, residence time, particle size and heating rate, were analyzed in detail. As a result, a retorting condition with a retorting temperature of 460-490 degrees C, residence time of <40 min and a middle particle size was recommended for both keeping nitrogenous organic matters and aromatic hydrocarbons in shale char and improving the yield and quality of shale oil. In addition, shale char obtained under such retorting condition can also be treated efficiently using a circulating fluidized bed technology with fractional combustion. PMID:19896769

  14. 30 CFR 57.22401 - Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines). 57... METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Underground Retorts §...

  15. Characterization and treatment of by-product waters from selected oil shale retorting tests

    SciTech Connect

    Nordin, J.S.; Poulson, R.; Niss, N.; Laya, C.

    1987-12-01

    Oil shale retorting by-product waters from four surface retorting pilot tests and three simulated modified in situ retorting pilot tests were characterized for inorganic and organic chemical constituents. Eastern and western US shales were retorted for the tests. Ammonium bicarbonate, ammonium thiosulfate, various pyridines, and phenolic species were among the principal contaminants in the retort by-product water. The water also contains total dissolved solids up to 7000 ppM. When steam was used as a source of heat for oil shale retorting, the condensate that formed diluted the concentrations of contaminants, especially mineral dissolved solids, in the by-product water. The combined water treatment steps of hot-gas stripping followed by wet air oxidation at 600/degree/F (315/degree/C) and 2000 psi for 30 minutes removed 99% of the total organic carbon in the retort by-product water, producing a colorless and almost odor-free water. In one treatment test, the total organic carbon (TOC) was reduced from 3400 mg/L to less than 20 mg/L, with the 20 mg/L TOC remaining consisting of low molecular weight carboxylic acids. Only a partial TOC reduction occurred, with various alkylpyridines remaining as residuals when the retort waters were subjected to wet air oxidation as the only treatment step. Electrocoagulation as an initial water treatment step removed less than 30% of the TOC. 10 refs., 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. OXIDES OF NITROGEN/AMMONIA CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL SHALE RETORT EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The retorting of oil shale yields several undesirable pollutants. The nitrogen in the shale and the reducing conditions under which the retorting is carried out results in the formation of sizeable amounts of ammonia in the gas stream. If not removed, the ammonia will make a sign...

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF GEOKINETICS' IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING TECHNOLOGY: FIELD AND ANALYTICAL DATA APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air emissions and water effluents from true in-situ oil shale retorting were physically, chemically and biologically characterized by sampling of Geokinetics Retort No. 17, a pilot-scale unit which produced 30 barrels of crude shale oil per day during testing from July 16 to July...

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF GEOKINETICS' IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air emissions and water effluents from true in-situ oil shale retorting were physically, chemically and biologically characterized by sampling of Geokinetics Retort No. 17, a pilot-scale unit which produced 30 barrels of crude shale oil per day during testing from July 16 to July...

  19. Estimation of retorted phosphor powder from spent fluorescent lamps by thermal process.

    PubMed

    Park, Hun-Su; Rhee, Seung-Whee

    2016-04-01

    The degree of thermal stabilization of phosphor powder from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs) manufactured by three companies (A, B, C) was estimated by examining mercury content in phosphor powder with retorting time, retorting temperature and rotational speed of drum. Mercury content of phosphor powders from spent fluorescent lamps manufactured by A, B and C companies as samples in thermal experiments was 4031mg/kg, 3522mg/kg and 3172mg/kg, respectively. In the thermal experiments, the optimal conditions for retorting time, retorting temperature, and rotational speed were determined at 6h, 400°C, and 2.0rpm, respectively. With thermal processing at the optimal conditions, mercury content of all samples for retorted phosphor powder was less than 3.0mg/kg, while efficiency of thermal process to control mercury content was higher than 99.9%. Leaching tests such as Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Korea Extraction Test (KET) were subsequently carried out to verify if retorted phosphor powder is hazardous waste. Leaching concentrations of mercury for all samples of retorted phosphor powder were satisfied with regulatory levels in both leaching tests. Hence, retorted phosphor powders at the optimal conditions are considered to be non-hazardous wastes. PMID:26882866

  20. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF WEATHERING ON A 50-YEAR OLD RETORTED OIL-SHALE WASTE PILE, RULISON EXPERIMENTAL RETORT, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Dean, Walter E.; Ackerman, Daniel J.

    1985-01-01

    An oil-shale mine and experimental retort were operated near Rulison, Colorado by the U. S. Bureau of Mines from 1926 to 1929. Samples from seven drill cores from a retorted oil-shale waste pile were analyzed to determine 1) the chemical and mineral composition of the retorted oil shale and 2) variations in the composition that could be attributed to weathering. Unweathered, freshly-mined samples of oil shale from the Mahogany zone of the Green River Formation and slope wash collected away from the waste pile were also analyzed for comparison. The waste pile is composed of oil shale retorted under either low-temperature (400-500 degree C) or high-temperature (750 degree C) conditions. The results of the analyses show that the spent shale within the waste pile contains higher concentrations of most elements relative to unretorted oil shale.

  1. Occurrence and structure of epipharyngeal pouches in bears (Ursidae)

    PubMed Central

    WEISSENGRUBER, G. E.; FORSTENPOINTNER, G.; KÜBBER-HEISS, A.; RIEDELBERGER, K.; SCHWAMMER, H.; GANZBERGER, K.

    2001-01-01

    The infrequent mention of epipharyngeal pouches occurring in some species of bears indicates the scarcity of morphological and functional knowledge about these structures. In order to provide precise morphological data on the structure of these remarkable formations and to verify their taxonomic utility, the pharyngeal regions of 1 spectacled bear and 3 brown bears were examined. All these individuals possessed epipharyngeal pouches, which are tubular, blind-ending outpouchings of the caudodorsal pharyngeal wall equipped with respiratory epithelium and a thick layer of elastic fibres. While the spectacled bear and Ursus arctos syriacus possessed a single pouch on the caudodorsal wall of the nasopharynx, in Ursus arctos and Ursus arctos beringianus 2 unequally sized pouches were present. Two additional sacs of smaller size, representing outpouchings of the lateral pharyngeal wall, occurred in the spectacled bear. These findings prove epipharyngeal pouches to be constant and unique morphological features of the family Ursidae, the anatomical features suggesting involvement in the respiratory system most probably in important aspects of ursid phonation. This is the first description of epipharyngeal pouches in the spectacled bear. PMID:11322723

  2. Determination of polar organic solutes in oil-shale retort water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Noyes, T.I.; Stuber, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of analytical methods were used to quantitatively determine polar organic solutes in process retort water and a gas-condensate retort water produced in a modified in situ oil-shale retort. Specific compounds accounting for 50% of the dissolved organic carbon were identified in both retort waters. In the process water, 42% of the dissolved organic carbon consisted of a homologous series of fatty acids from C2 to C10. Dissolved organic carbon percentages for other identified compound classes were as follows: aliphatic dicarboxylic acids, 1.4%; phenols, 2.2%; hydroxypyridines, 1.1%; aliphatic amides, 1.2%. In the gas-condensate retort water, aromatic amines were most abundant at 19.3% of the dissolved organic carbon, followed by phenols (17.8%), nitriles (4.3%), aliphatic alcohols (3.5%), aliphatic ketones (2.4%), and lactones (1.3%). Steam-volatile organic solutes were enriched in the gas-condensate retort water, whereas nonvolatile acids and polyfunctional neutral compounds were predominant organic constituents of the process retort water.

  3. Comparison of naturally occurring shale bitumen asphaltene and retorted shale oil asphaltene

    SciTech Connect

    Shue, F.F.; Yen, T.F.

    1980-01-01

    Asphaltene is ubiquitously present in both the natural occurring bitumen and the retorted shale oil. Very few cases for the comparison of asphaltene properties are available in the literature. In this research, a comparison of the shale bitumen asphaltene and the retorted shale oil asphaltene was undertaken to investigate structural changes during thermal cracking. This was accomplished by means of elemental chemical analysis, infrared spectra, proton nmr spectra, and carbon-13 spectra of the bitumen asphaltenes and asphaltenes derived from shale oil retorted at 425 and 500/sup 0/C. Elemental analysis indicated that asphaltenes derived from retorted shale oils have smaller H/C ratio and smaller oxygen and sulfur contents, but greater nitrogen content than that derived from shale bitumen. Infrared spectra revealed that the retorted shale oil asphaltenes have greater pyrrolic N-H and hydrogen bonded O-H or N-H absorption than the shale bitumen asphaltene. Retorted shale oil asphaltenes have relatively higher aromaticity, lower degree of substitution of the aromatic sheet, and shorter alkyl substituents, which indicated that the main reactions in the retorting process are carbon-carbon bond fission and intramolecular aromatization.

  4. Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis: Points of controversy.

    PubMed

    Trigui, A; Frikha, F; Rejab, H; Ben Ameur, H; Triki, H; Ben Amar, M; Mzali, R

    2014-09-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis has become the most commonly used procedure for elective treatment of patients with ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis. Since its original description, the procedure has been modified in order to obtain optimal functional results with low morbidity and mortality, and yet provide a cure for the disease. In this review of the literature of restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, we discuss these technical modifications, limiting our discussion to the current points of controversy. The current "hot topics" for debate are: indications for ileal pouch-anal or ileo-rectal anastomosis, indications for pouch surgery in the elderly, indeterminate colitis and Crohn's disease, the place of the laparoscopic approach, transanal mucosectomy with hand-sewn anastomosis vs. the double-stapled technique, the use of diverting ileostomy and the issue of the best route for delivery of pregnant women. Longer follow-up of patients and increased knowledge and experience with pouch surgery, coupled with ongoing prospective evaluation of the procedure are required to settle these issues. PMID:24999229

  5. [Dorso-ventral continuous irrigation using the Incise Pouch].

    PubMed

    Dittrich, K; Kriwanek, S; Armbruster, C

    1993-01-01

    Dorso-ventral lavage procedures in the treatment of abdominal sepsis are often complicated by technical and nursing problems. With the help of the Incise Pouch, which consists of an adhesive foil with a plastic bag around it, we have succeeded in solving the main problems of the dorso-ventral lavage procedure. (1) All the lavage solution is collected in the bag and drawn into a vacuum pump. The suction drains are placed directly in the bag. This enables us to measure the lavage solution exactly. (2) There is no leakage of liquid into the bed, so that the patient remains dry. (3) The danger of intestinal fistulas or intraabdominal bleeding caused by suction drains is eliminated (by putting them into the bag of the Incise Pouch). If reexploration of the abdominal cavity ("on demand" or planned) is done, the Incise Pouch remains in position. This method makes early diagnosis and treatment of postoperative complications possible. PMID:8326812

  6. In situ oil shale retort with a generally T-shaped vertical cross section

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1981-01-01

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale and has a production level drift in communication with a lower portion of the fragmented mass for withdrawing liquid and gaseous products of retorting during retorting of oil shale in the fragmented mass. The principal portion of the fragmented mass is spaced vertically above a lower production level portion having a generally T-shaped vertical cross section. The lower portion of the fragmented mass has a horizontal cross sectional area smaller than the horizontal cross sectional area of the upper principal portion of the fragmented mass above the production level.

  7. 77 FR 25206 - Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Underground Retorts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... Safety and Health Administration Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Underground Retorts AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION: Request for public comments. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent...

  8. Ileo-anal pouch procedure: experience in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lau, P W; Boey, J; Lorentz, T G

    1991-11-01

    The ileo-anal pouch procedure is now a well-established method for dealing with ulcerative colitis and familial polyposis in many centres in the West. Experience in the Chinese population is not well documented, mainly due to the rarity of inflammatory bowel disease. This report documents the experience of a university teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Despite being a small series, the low complication rates and good functional results show that the pelvic pouch procedure has now evolved to a stage where it can be performed safely even in centres with infrequent experience. PMID:1661110

  9. The Hamster Buccal Pouch Model of Oral Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagini, Siddavaram; Kowshik, Jaganathan

    2016-01-01

    The hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model is one of the most well-characterized animal tumor models used as a prelude to investigate multistage oral carcinogenesis and to assess the efficacy of chemointervention. Hamster buccal pouch carcinomas induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) show extensive similarities to human oral squamous cell carcinomas. The HBP model offers a number of advantages including a simple and predictable tumor induction procedure, easy accessibility for examination and follow-up of lesions, and reproducibility. This model can be used to test both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27246045

  10. Raman/FTIR spectroscopy of oil shale retort gases

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J H; Monaco, S B; Sanborn, R H; Hirschfeld, T B; Taylor, J R

    1982-08-01

    A Raman facility was assembled in order to aid in the evaluation of the feasibility of using Raman or FTIR spectroscopy for analyzing gas mixtures of interest in oil shale. Applications considered in oil shale research included both retort monitoring and laboratory kinetic studies. Both techniques gave limits of detection between 10 and 1000 ppM for ten representative pertinent gases. Both techniques are inferior as a general analytical technique for oil shale gas analysis in comparison with mass spectroscopy, which had detection limits between 1 and 50 ppM for the same gases. The conclusion of the feasibility study was to recommend that mass spectroscopic techniques be used for analyzing gases of interest to oil shale.

  11. Application of biomass pyrolytic polygeneration technology using retort reactors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiping; Liu, Biao; Chen, Yingquan; Chen, Wei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Hanping

    2016-01-01

    To introduce application status and illustrate the good utilisation potential of biomass pyrolytic polygeneration using retort reactors, the properties of major products and the economic viability of commercial factories were investigated. The capacity of one factory was about 3000t of biomass per year, which was converted into 1000t of charcoal, 950,000Nm(3) of biogas, 270t of woody tar, and 950t of woody vinegar. Charcoal and fuel gas had LHV of 31MJ/kg and 12MJ/m(3), respectively, indicating their potential for use as commercial fuels. The woody tar was rich in phenols, while woody vinegar contained large quantities of water and acetic acid. The economic analysis showed that the factory using this technology could be profitable, and the initial investment could be recouped over the factory lifetime. This technology offered a promising means of converting abundant agricultural biomass into high-value products. PMID:26476166

  12. The superior mesenteric artery. The critical factor in the pouch pull-through procedure.

    PubMed

    Smith, L; Friend, W G; Medwell, S J

    1984-11-01

    The critical factor in ileal pouch pull-through operations is the length of the superior mesenteric artery. The pouch must reach the dentate line and have adequate blood supply. A series of cadaver and morgue studies were performed to evaluate the two most popular pouches of the "J" and "S" configurations. The "S" pouch generally reaches 2 to 4 cm more caudad than the "J" pouch. If necessary, however, the "J" pouch can be lengthened 2 to 4 cm by cutting the branch vessel under tension to the pouch, sparing vessels to either side and the marginal arcade. The "S" pouch procedure always sacrifices the ileocecal artery, but the "J" pouch procedure does not necessarily do so. The greatest caudad reach is available when the ileum is cut flush with the cecum. To verify a rule of thumb for reaching the dentate line with the pouch, the length of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) origin to the inferior margin of the symphysis pubis and the SMA to dentate line were compared. If the tip of the pouch or conduit reached 6 cm below the symphysis pubis, all pouches reached the dentate line. PMID:6499610

  13. Nitrogen and carbon oxides chemistry in the HRS retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.G.

    1993-11-12

    The HRS Oil Shale Retort process consists of a pyrolysis section which converts kerogen of the shale to liquid and gaseous products, and a combustion section which burns residual carbon on the shale to heat the process. Average gas concentrations of selected gas phase species were determined from data measured at several placed on the combustion system of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycled-Solids Retort Pilot Plant for representative rich and lean shale runs. The data was measured on-line and in real time by on-line meters (CO{sub 2}, CO, O{sub 2}), mass spectrometry (CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NO, CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and Ar), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, NO, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and HCN). For both the rich and leans shale runs, the Lift-Pipe Combustor (LFT) exhibited gas concentrations (sampled at the exit of the LFT) indicative of incomplete combustion and oxidation; the Delayed-Fall Combustor (DFC) exhibited gas concentrations (sampled at the annulus and the exit of the DFC) indicative of much more complete combustion and oxidation. The Fluidized-Bed Combustor exhibited gas concentrations which were controlled to a large extent by the injection atmosphere of the FBC. High levels of nitrogen oxides and low levels of CO were detected when full air injection was used, while high levels of CO and low levels of nitrogen-oxides were detected with partial N{sub 2} injection. Sequential sampling limitations and nitrogen balances are also discussed.

  14. Method for attenuating seismic shock from detonating explosive in an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Studebaker, Irving G.; Hefelfinger, Richard

    1980-01-01

    In situ oil shale retorts are formed in formation containing oil shale by excavating at least one void in each retort site. Explosive is placed in a remaining portion of unfragmented formation within each retort site adjacent such a void, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for explosively expanding formation within the retort site toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. This produces a large explosion which generates seismic shock waves traveling outwardly from the blast site through the underground formation. Sensitive equipment which could be damaged by seismic shock traveling to it straight through unfragmented formation is shielded from such an explosion by placing such equipment in the shadow of a fragmented mass in an in situ retort formed prior to the explosion. The fragmented mass attenuates the velocity and magnitude of seismic shock waves traveling toward such sensitive equipment prior to the shock wave reaching the vicinity of such equipment.

  15. Investigation of the Geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1980-05-01

    Retort No. 18 produced 3479 barrels of oil during the quarter for a total of 4528 barrels to date. Chromatographic analyses of Retort No. 18 shale oil by the GKI analytical laboratory indicated variation in the oil from the wells near the air-in end and from the air-out end of the retort. Shale oil has been blended with Altamont crude (the Roosevelt refinery's normal feedstock); the distillation, API gravity, pour point, flash point, Naptha and Cat Gas were not affected by the shale oil. The diesel off the crude unit changed from water white to yellow, however, and a fine grayish-brown precipitate formed. Re-entry drilling was performed on Retorts No. 21, No. 22, and No. 23 during the quarter; tracer tests were run by Sandia Laboratories on Retorts No. 19, No. 21, No. 22, and No. 23. Blasthole drilling began on Retort No. 25.

  16. 21 CFR 876.5900 - Ostomy pouch and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... attached to the patient's skin by an adhesive material and that is intended for use as a receptacle for... generic type of device and its accessories includes the ostomy pouch, ostomy adhesive, the disposable... bag, ostomy drainage bag with adhesive, stomal bag, ostomy protector, and the ostomy size...

  17. 21 CFR 876.5900 - Ostomy pouch and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... attached to the patient's skin by an adhesive material and that is intended for use as a receptacle for... generic type of device and its accessories includes the ostomy pouch, ostomy adhesive, the disposable... bag, ostomy drainage bag with adhesive, stomal bag, ostomy protector, and the ostomy size...

  18. Long Upper Pouch in Esophageal Atresia: A Rare Variant

    PubMed Central

    Yhoshu, Enono; Mahajan, Jai Kumar; Dash, Vedarth

    2016-01-01

    The earliest clinical sign of esophageal atresia (EA) is excessive salivation and the diagnosis is made by failure to pass an infant feeding tube (IFT) into the stomach. The diagnostic errors may occur due to presence of an unusually long upper pouch, when the IFT seems to pass into the stomach. We describe one such case and review the relevant literature. PMID:26793598

  19. 21 CFR 876.5900 - Ostomy pouch and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... attached to the patient's skin by an adhesive material and that is intended for use as a receptacle for... generic type of device and its accessories includes the ostomy pouch, ostomy adhesive, the disposable... bag, ostomy drainage bag with adhesive, stomal bag, ostomy protector, and the ostomy size...

  20. 21 CFR 876.5900 - Ostomy pouch and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... attached to the patient's skin by an adhesive material and that is intended for use as a receptacle for... generic type of device and its accessories includes the ostomy pouch, ostomy adhesive, the disposable... bag, ostomy drainage bag with adhesive, stomal bag, ostomy protector, and the ostomy size...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5900 - Ostomy pouch and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... attached to the patient's skin by an adhesive material and that is intended for use as a receptacle for... generic type of device and its accessories includes the ostomy pouch, ostomy adhesive, the disposable... bag, ostomy drainage bag with adhesive, stomal bag, ostomy protector, and the ostomy size...

  2. Microbiological shelf life of pasteurized milk in bottle and pouch.

    PubMed

    Petrus, R R; Loiola, C G; Oliveira, C A F

    2010-01-01

    Shelf life of pasteurized milk in Brazil ranges from 3 to 8 d, mainly due to poor cold chain conditions that prevail throughout the country and subject the product to repeated and/or severe temperature abuse. This study evaluated the influence of storage temperature on the microbiological stability of homogenized whole pasteurized milk (75 degrees C/15 s) packaged in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) bottle and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) pouch, both monolayer materials pigmented with titanium dioxide (TiO(2)). The storage temperatures investigated were 2, 4, 9, 14, and 16 degrees C. Microbiological evaluation was based on mesophilic and psychrotrophic counts with 7 log CFU/mL and 6 log CFU/mL, respectively, set as upper limits of acceptability for maintaining the quality of milk. The microbiological stability for pasteurized milk packaged in HDPE bottle and stored at 2, 4, 9, 14, and 16 degrees C was estimated at 43, 36, 8, 5, and 3 d, respectively. For milk samples packaged in LDPE pouch, shelf life was estimated at 37, 35, 7, 3, and 2 d, respectively. The determination of Q(10) and z values demonstrated that storage temperature has a greater influence on microbiological shelf life of pasteurized milk packaged in LDPE pouch compared to HDPE bottle. Based on the results of this study, HDPE bottle was better for storing pasteurized milk as compared to LDPE pouch. PMID:20492183

  3. Using Giant African Pouched Rats ("Cricetomys Gambianus") to Detect Landmines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart J.; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie W.; Sully, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Within the past decade, giant pouched rats have been used successfully to detect landmines. This manuscript summarizes how these rats are trained and used operationally. The information provided is intended to be of practical value toward strengthening best practices in using "Cricetomys" for humanitarian purposes while simultaneously ensuring the…

  4. Improving Growth of Calibrachoa x Hybrida (Cerv.) in Hanging Pouches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unique growing containers and non-traditional types of plant presentation applications can cause new production problems for growers. This study was conducted to evaluate the growth of a popular new container plant, Calibrachoa, produced in hanging flower pouches using different growing media compo...

  5. Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, April, May, June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1980-08-01

    The Retort No. 18 burn was terminated on May 11, 1980. A total of 5547 barrels of shale oil or 46 percent of in-place resource was recovered from the retort. The EPA-DOE/LETC post-burn core sampling program is underway on Retort No. 16. Eleven core holes (of 18 planned) have been completed to date. Preliminary results indicate excellent core recovery has been achieved. Recovery of 702 ft of core was accomplished. The Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit application was submitted to the EPA regional office in Denver for review by EPA and Utah air quality officials. The application for an Underground Injection Control (UIC) permit to authorize GKI to inject retort wastewater into the Mesa Verde Formation is being processed by the State of Utah. A hearing before the Board of Oil, Gas and Mining is scheduled in Salt Lake City, Utah, for July 22, 1980. Re-entry drilling on Retort No. 24 is progressing and placement of surface equipment is underway. Retort No. 25 blasthole drilling was completed and blast preparations are ongoing. Retort No. 25 will be blasted on July 18, 1980. The retort will be similar to Retort No. 24, with improvements in blasthole loading and detonation. US Patent No. 4,205,610 was assigned to GKI for a shale oil recovery process. Rocky Mountain Energy Company (RME) is evaluating oil shale holdings in Wyoming for application of the GKI process there.

  6. Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, October, November, December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, K.B.

    1984-03-01

    Retort No. 27 was ignited on August 11, 1983 and by December 31 had completed 139 days of operation and produced 11,420 barrels of oil. Retort No. 28 was ignited on October 18, 1983 and on December 31 had completed 74 days of operation and produced 5,285 barrels of oil. The off-gas processing plants for the two retorts was completed and put through a shakedown run. Concentration levels of H/sub 2/S and NH/sub 3/ in the retort off gas did not warrant plant operation in the fourth quarter. Environmental studies are reported.

  7. Trace element mineral transformations associated with hydration and recarbonation of retorted oil shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essington, M. E.

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the influence of hydration and recarbonation on the solidphase distribution of trace elements in retorted oil shale. The oil shale samples were retorted by the Paraho direct heating process and equilibrated with deionized—distilled water under controlled carbon dioxide conditions. A sequential extraction technique was then used to fractionate trace elements into soluble, KNO3-extractable (easily exchangeable), H2O-extractable (easily adsorbed), NaOh-extractable (organic), EDTA-extractable (carbonate), HNO3-extractable (sulfide), and residual (nonextractable silicate) phases. The chemical fractions present in retorted oil shale and hydrated and recarbonated retorted oil shale were compared to identify trace element mineralogical changes that may occur in retorted oil shale disposal environments. Trace elements examined in this study were found to reside predominantly in the HNO3-extractable and residual fractions. Hydration of retorted oil shale resulted in a shift in the majority of trace elements from residual to extractable forms. Cobalt, nickel, and zinc extractabilities were not significantly influenced by hydration, whereas antimony increased in the residual fraction. Subjecting retorted oil shale to atmospheric (0.033%) and 10% CO2(g) levels over a nine-month equilibration period resulted in partial and full recarbonation, respectively. As the influence of recarbonation increased, trace elements reverted to residual forms. Vanadium, choromium, copper, zinc, antimony, and molybdenum in the 10% CO2(g) recarbonated material were more resistant to sequential extraction than in retorted oil shale, whereas strontium, barium, and manganese were less resistant to sequential extraction. The extractabilities of cobalt, nickel, and lead were not affected by recarbonation. Recarbonation did not result in a predicted increase in EDTA-extractable trace elements. In general, the amounts of trace elements extracted by EDTA (and

  8. Postburn lithology and mineralogy at Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company's Tract C-a retort 1, Rio Blanco County, Colorado. [Core samples from near the in-situ retort

    SciTech Connect

    Trudell, L.G.; Mason, G.M.; Fahy, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    An investigation was conducted to provide basic data on some of the characteristics of a modified in situ (MIS) oil shale retort after processing. Samples of retort contents and overburden were obtained from three core holes drilled into Rio Blanco's Tract C-a retort 1 in the western part of the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado. The retort operation had been completed nearly four years before the coring, and the cavity and mine workings had been flooded by groundwater for almost one year. Cores were characterized by lithologic description, x-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy. Drilling and logging records indicate as much as 35 to 40 feet of roof rock has collapsed into the retort since the burn was terminated. A water-filled attic cavity 46 to 62 feet high exists at the top of the retort. One core hole penetrated 377 feet of rubble in the retort and floor rock with numerous fractures below the retort. Most of the material recovered from the retort consisted of highly altered, fused and vesicular rock. Lesser amounts of carbonized, oxidized and moderately heated-altered oil shale were recovered from the upper and lower parts. Raw shale roof fall at the top and unretorted oil shale rubble at the bottom are also present. Thermal alteration has produced high-temperature silicate minerals from the original mixtures of carbonate and silicate minerals in the raw oil shale. Adequate material was recovered from the retort contents to provide valuable data on the lithologic, mineralogic, and physical characteristics of the MIS retort. 19 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

  9. Characterization of the Gut-Associated Microbiome in Inflammatory Pouch Complications Following Ileal Pouch-Anal Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Andrea D.; Knox, Natalie; Kabakchiev, Boyko; Milgrom, Raquel; Kirsch, Richard; Cohen, Zane; McLeod, Robin S.; Guttman, David S.; Krause, Denis O.; Silverberg, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory complications following ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative colitis (UC) are common and thought to arise through mechanisms similar to de novo onset inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether specific organisms in the tissue-associated microbiota are associated with inflammatory pouch complications. Methods Patients having previously undergone IPAA were recruited from Mount Sinai Hospital. Clinical and demographic information were collected and a pouchoscopy with biopsy of both the pouch and afferent limb was performed. Patients were classified based on post-surgical phenotype into four outcome groups: familial adenomatous polyposis controls (FAP), no pouchitis, pouchitis, and Crohn’s disease-like (CDL). Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA V1-V3 hypervariable region, and quantitative PCR for bacteria of interest, were used to identify organisms present in the afferent limb and pouch. Associations with outcomes were evaluated using exact and non-parametric tests of significance. Results Analysis at the phylum level indicated that Bacteroidetes were detected significantly less frequently (P<0.0001) in the inflammatory outcome groups (pouchitis and CDL) compared to both FAP and no pouchitis. Conversely, Proteobacteria were detected more frequently in the inflammatory groups (P=0.01). At the genus level, organisms associated with outcome were detected less frequently among the inflammatory groups compared to those without inflammation. Several of these organisms, including Bacteroides (P<0.0001), Parabacteroides (P≤2.2x10-3), Blautia (P≤3.0x10-3) and Sutterella (P≤2.5x10-3), were associated with outcome in both the pouch and afferent limb. These associations remained significant even following adjustment for antibiotic use, smoking, country of birth and gender. Individuals with quiescent disease receiving antibiotic therapy displayed similar reductions in these organisms as those with active

  10. Selective dissolution and characterization of trace elements in hydrated and recarbonated retorted oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Essington, M.E.; Sorini, S.S.

    1986-09-01

    A laboratory study was conducted at the Western Research Institute to evaluate the influence of hydration and recarbonation on the solid phase distribution of trace elements in retorted oil shale. The oil shale samples were retorted by the Paraho direct heating process and equilibrated in the laboratory under controlled carbon dioxide conditions. A sequential extraction technique was then used to fractionate trace elements into soluble, KNO/sub 3/-extractable, H/sub 2/O-extractable, NaOH-extractable, EDTA-extractable, HNO/sub 3/-extractable, and residual (nonextractable) phases. This procedure is purported to identify trace elements that reside in the soluble, easily exchangeable, adsorbed, organic, carbonate, sulfide, and silicate phases, respectively. The chemical fractions present in retorted oil shale and hydrated and recarbonated retorted oil shale are compared to identify trace element mineralogical changes that may occur in retorted oil shale disposal environments. The trace elements examined in this study included barium, cobalt, chromium, copper, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, strontium, vanadium, and zinc. The extractabilities of the major elements - aluminum, calcium, iron, magnesium, and silicon - were also examined to provide evidence of solid phase elemental associations with trace elements. A significant result of this study is that the mineralogical residencies of trace elements in retorted oil shale were altered in response to hydration and recarbonation. Thus, the behavior of trace elements in retorted oil shale disposal environments may not be adequately predicted through the application of extraction procedures that assess potential trace element leachability. The results of this study also justify the further characterization of trace element selective extractabilities using procedures that partition trace elements residing in the HNO/sub 3/-extractable and residual fractions. 21 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Novel isolated cecal pouch model for endoscopic observation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Koshino, Kurodo; Kanai, Nobuo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To create a new rat model for drug administration, cell transplantation, and endoscopic examination for the treatment of intestinal diseases. METHODS: F344/NJc l-rnu/rnu rats (10-wk-old males, 350-400 g) were used in this study. The rats were anesthetized via 2% isoflurane inhalation. The rat’s cecum was isolated from the intestines, and a pouch was created. The remainder of the intestines was rejoined to create an anastomosis. The “side-to-side” anastomosis (SSA) technique initially involves the creation of a 2-cm longitudinal incision into each intestinal wall. To create an anastomosis along the ileal and colonic walls, both intestines were cut, and a continuous suture procedure was performed that included all layers of both intestines. The serous membrane was sutured along the edge and on the anterior wall of the anastomosis. The “end-to-end” anastomosis (EEA) technique was compared with the SSA technique. In the EEA technique, the frontal surfaces of both cut intestinal lumens were joined together by continuous sutures. Additional sutures were made at the serosa. After the anastomotic intestine was successfully constructed, the two intestinal lumens that were cut at the isolated cecum were managed. In addition, one luminal side of the pouch remained open to create an artificial anus on the dorsum as a passage for the residual substances in the pouch. Finally, small animal endoscopy was used to observe the inside of the pouch. RESULTS: In this animal model, mucus and feces are excreted through the reconstructed passage. Accordingly, the cecal pouch mucosa was not obstructed or contaminated by feces, thus facilitating observations of the luminal surface of the intestine. The endoscopic observation of the cecal pouch provided clear visualization given the absence of feces. The membrane surface of the cecum was clearly observed. Two methods of creating an anastomotic intestine, the “SSA” and “EEA” techniques, were compared with regard to

  12. Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day, HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. Over the last three years, from June 1991 to June 1993, we completed a series of runs (H10--H27) using the 4-TPD pilot plant to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the HRS process and answer key scale-up questions. With our CRADA partners, we seek to further develop the HRS technology, maintain and enhance the knowledge base gained over the past two decades through research and development by Government and industry and determine the follow on steps needed to advance the technology towards commercialization. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

  13. A plan for hydrologic investigations of in situ, oil-shale retorting near Rock Springs, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glover, Kent C.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Larson, L.R.; Wallace, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The recovery of shale oil by the in-situ retort process may cause hydrologic impacts, the most significant being ground-water contamination and possible transport of contaminants into surrounding areas. Although these impacts are site-specific, many of the techniques used to investigate each retort operation commonly will be the same. The U.S. Geological Survey has begun a study of hydrologic impacts in the area of an in-situ retort near Rock Springs, Wyoming, as a means of refining and demonstrating these techniques. Geological investigations include determining the areal extent and thickness of aquifers. Emphasis will be placed on determining lithologic variations from geophysical logging. Hydrologic investigations include mapping of potentiometric surfaces, determining rates of ground-water discharge, and estimating aquifer properties by analytical techniques. Water-quality investigations include monitoring solute migration from the retort site and evaluating sampling techniques by standard statistical procedures. A ground-water-flow and solute-transport model will be developed to predict future movement of the water plume away from the retort. (USGS)

  14. Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting – A Systems Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D. Mattson; Larry Hull; Kara Cafferty

    2012-12-01

    A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the Powersim Studio 9™ software package. Three phases of an insitu retort were consider; a construction phase primarily accounts for water needed for drilling and water produced during dewatering, an operation phase includes the production of water from the retorting process, and a remediation phase water to remove heat and solutes from the subsurface as well as return the ground surface to its natural state. Throughout these three phases, the water is consumed and produced. Consumption is account for through the drill process, dust control, returning the ground water to its initial level and make up water losses during the remedial flushing of the retort zone. Production of water is through the dewatering of the retort zone, and during chemical pyrolysis reaction of the kerogen conversion. The major water consumption was during the remediation of the insitu retorting zone.

  15. Dietary habits after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Chartrand-Lefebvre, C; Heppell, J; Davignon, I; Dubé, S; Pomp, A

    1990-04-01

    Dietary habits of patients who had undergone ileal pouch-anal anastomosis were assessed and correlated with bowel function. Twenty-four well-adapted patients (11 women, 13 men; mean age 32 years) voluntarily entered the study 30 +/- 4 months after closure of the diverting ileostomy. A standardized questionnaire on 108 food items and a 3-day food journal were used in the assessment. Twenty-one patients had no difficulty in selecting an appropriate diet. Caloric intake was adequate. Specific symptoms associated with several foods were as follows: increased stool frequency (beer, spirits, chinese food), decreased stool consistency (beer, wine, fried fish), perianal irritation (spicy foods), undigested particles (grapefruit, lettuce), odours (eggs). Pasta and bananas were associated with increased stool consistency. The authors believe that these observations may help in dietary counselling after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. PMID:2268807

  16. The Kock pouch reconsidered: an alternative surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Alison; Williams, Julia; Woodhouse, Fran

    2014-09-24

    The psychological impact stoma surgery can have on an individual is well documented within the literature ( White and Hunt, 1997 ; Borwell, 2009 ; Williams, 2005 ; Brown, 2005 ). For many years, surgeons have explored and developed innovations in surgical techniques, in particular restorative procedures with a view of preventing permanent stoma formation; ileal anal pouch (IAP) now being the surgical procedure of choice for treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). However, high morbidity rates are associated with pouch longevity ( Castillo et al 2005 ; Nessar and Wu, 2012 ) and once removed can lead to a high-output ileostomy with risks of electrolyte imbalance and malabsorption. This then creates the dilemma of whether the Kock pouch (KP) should be offered as a surgical option. This article offers a historical perspective of the KP and its place in the surgical management of UC and FAP. This article also presents results from a recent audit funded by the Ileostomy Association (IA), highlighting how patients manage their KP and the importance of maintaining bowel control and being free of an incontinent stoma as a means of coming to terms with their condition. PMID:25251313

  17. A Portable Analyzer for Pouch-Actuated, Immunoassay Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael G.; Hart, Robert W.; Chen, Dafeng; Qiu, Jing; Kientz, Terry; Fiene, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    2011-01-01

    A portable, small footprint, light, general purpose analyzer (processor) to control the flow in immunoassay cassettes and to facilitate the detection of test results is described. The durable analyzer accepts disposable cassettes that contain pouches and reaction chambers for various unit operations such as hydration of dry reagents, stirring, and incubation. The analyzer includes individually controlled, linear actuators to compress the pouches in the cassette, which facilitates the pumping and mixing of sample and reagents, and to close diaphragm-based valves for flow control. The same types of actuators are used to compress pouches and actuate valves. The analyzer also houses a compact OEM scanner/reader to excite fluorescence and detect emission from labels. The analyzer is hydraulically isolated from the cassette, reducing the possibility of cross-contamination. The analyzer facilitates programmable, automated execution of a sequence of operations such as pumping and valving in a timely fashion, reducing the level of expertise required from the operator and the possibility for errors. The analyzer’s design is modular and expandable to accommodate cassettes of various complexities and additional functionalities. In this paper, the utility of the analyzer has been demonstrated with the execution of a simple, consecutive, lateral flow assay of a model biological system and the test results were detected with up converting phosphor labels that are excited at infrared frequencies and emit in the visible spectrum. PMID:22125359

  18. Reconstruction with Jejunal Pouch after Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Munekage, Eri; Munekage, Masaya; Maeda, Hiromichi; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Michiya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The construction of a gastric substitute pouch after gastrectomy for gastric cancer has been proposed to help ameliorate postprandial symptoms and nutritional performance. Adequate reconstruction after gastrectomy is an important issue, because postoperative patient quality of life (QOL) primarily depends on the reconstruction method. To this end, jejunal pouch (JP) reconstructions were developed to improve the patient's eating capacity and QOL by creating large reservoirs with improved reflux barriers to prevent esophagitis and residual gastritis. It is important that such reconstructions also preserve blood and extrinsic neural integrity for maintaining pouch function, because JP motility is associated directly with QOL. Some problems remain to be resolved with the JP reconstructions method including gastrointestinal motility, which plays a major role in food transfer, digestion, and absorption of nutrients. Further studies including basic research and larger prospective randomized control trials are also needed to obtain definitive results. With persistent innovations in surgical techniques, JP after gastrectomy could become a safe and preferable reconstructive modality to improve patient QOL after gastrectomy. PMID:27305882

  19. Evaluation of physical-chemical and biological treatment of shale oil retort water

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, B.W.; Mason, M.J.; Spencer, R.R.; Wong, A.L.; Wakamiya, W.

    1982-09-01

    Bench scale studies were conducted to evaluate conventional physical-chemical and biological treatment processes for removal of pollutants from retort water produced by in situ shale oil recovery methods. Prior to undertaking these studies, very little information had been reported on treatment of retort water. A treatment process train patterned after that generally used throughout the petroleum refining industry was envisioned for application to retort water. The treatment train would consist of processes for removing suspended matter, ammonia, biodegradable organics, and nonbiodegradable or refractory organics. The treatment processes evaluated include anaerobic digestion and activated sludge for removal of biodegradable organics and other oxidizable substances; activated carbon adsorption for removal of nonbiodegradable organics; steam stripping for ammonia removal; and chemical coagulation, sedimentation and filtration for removal of suspended matter. Preliminary cost estimates are provided.

  20. Method for forming an in situ oil shale retort with horizontal free faces

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.; Fernandes, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    A method for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in an in situ oil shale retort is provided. A horizontally extending void is excavated in unfragmented formation containing oil shale and a zone of unfragmented formation is left adjacent the void. An array of explosive charges is formed in the zone of unfragmented formation. The array of explosive charges comprises rows of central explosive charges surrounded by a band of outer explosive charges which are adjacent side boundaries of the retort being formed. The powder factor of each outer explosive charge is made about equal to the powder factor of each central explosive charge. The explosive charges are detonated for explosively expanding the zone of unfragmented formation toward the void for forming the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles having a reasonably uniformly distributed void fraction in the in situ oil shale retort.

  1. Preparation of grout for stabilization of abandoned in-situ oil shale retorts. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Mallon, R.G.

    1979-12-07

    A process is described for the preparation of grout from burned shale by treating the burned shale in steam at approximately 700/sup 0/C to maximize the production of the materials alite and larnite. Oil shale removed to the surface during the preparation of an in-situ retort is first retorted on the surface and then the carbon is burned off, leaving burned shale. The burned shale is treated in steam at approximately 700/sup 0/C for about 70 minutes. The treated shale is then ground and mixed with water to produce a grout which is pumped into an abandoned, processed in-situ retort, flowing into the void spaces and then bonding up to form a rigid, solidified mass which prevents surface subsidence and leaching of the spent shale by ground water.

  2. Preparation of grout for stabilization of abandoned in-situ oil shale retorts

    DOEpatents

    Mallon, Richard G.

    1982-01-01

    A process for the preparation of grout from burned shale by treating the burned shale in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. to maximize the production of the materials alite and larnite. Oil shale removed to the surface during the preparation of an in-situ retort is first retorted on the surface and then the carbon is burned off, leaving burned shale. The burned shale is treated in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. for about 70 minutes. The treated shale is then ground and mixed with water to produce a grout which is pumped into an abandoned, processed in-situ retort, flowing into the void spaces and then bonding up to form a rigid, solidified mass which prevents surface subsidence and leaching of the spent shale by ground water.

  3. Mercury isotope fractionation during ore retorting in the Almadén mining district, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John E.; Pribil, Michael J.; Higueras, Pablo L.

    2013-01-01

    Almadén, Spain, is the world's largest mercury (Hg) mining district, which has produced over 250,000 metric tons of Hg representing about 30% of the historical Hg produced worldwide. The objective of this study was to measure Hg isotopic compositions of cinnabar ore, mine waste calcine (retorted ore), elemental Hg (Hg0(L)), and elemental Hg gas (Hg0(g)), to evaluate potential Hg isotopic fractionation. Almadén cinnabar ore δ202Hg varied from − 0.92 to 0.15‰ (mean of − 0.56‰, σ = 0.35‰, n = 7), whereas calcine was isotopically heavier and δ202Hg ranged from − 0.03‰ to 1.01‰ (mean of 0.43‰, σ = 0.44‰, n = 8). The average δ202Hg enrichment of 0.99‰ between cinnabar ore and calcines generated during ore retorting indicated Hg isotopic mass dependent fractionation (MDF). Mass independent fractionation (MIF) was not observed in any of the samples in this study. Laboratory retorting experiments of cinnabar also were carried out to evaluate Hg isotopic fractionation of products generated during retorting such as calcine, Hg0(L), and Hg0(g). Calcine and Hg0(L) generated during these retorting experiments showed an enrichment in δ202Hg of as much as 1.90‰ and 0.67‰, respectively, compared to the original cinnabar ore. The δ202Hg for Hg0(g) generated during the retorting experiments was as much as 1.16‰ isotopically lighter compared to cinnabar, thus, when cinnabar ore was roasted, the resultant calcines formed were isotopically heavier, whereas the Hg0(g) generated was isotopically lighter in Hg isotopes.

  4. Investigation of the Geokinetics horizontal in situ oil-shale-retorting process. Fourth annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1981-03-01

    The Geokinetics in situ shale oil project is a cooperative venture between Geokinetics Inc. and the US Department of Energy. The objective is to develop a true in situ process for recovering shale oil using a fire front moving in a horizontal direction. The project is being conducted at a field site, Kamp Kerogen, located 70 miles south of Vernal, Utah. This Fourth Annual Report covers work completed during the calendar year 1980. During 1980 one full-size retort was blasted. Two retorts, blasted the previous year, were burned. A total of 4891 barrels of oil was produced during the year.

  5. Long-term followup of the Kock and Indiana pouch procedures.

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Kawakita, M; Terachi, T; Oishi, K; Okada, Y; Takeuchi, H; Yoshida, O

    1993-07-01

    Between 1984 and 1991, 115 consecutive patients underwent cutaneous continent urinary diversion comprising 76 Kock and 39 Indiana pouch procedures. The 2 different forms of achieving continent urinary diversion were subsequently compared in a long-term followup that evaluated complications, including pouch function and the need for revisions. In the Kock pouch group there were 14 (18.4%) early postoperative complications (3 months), which required 4 subsequent reoperations (5.3%). The Indiana pouch group had a similar incidence of early complications (17.9%) but there were no reservoir related problems. The long-term study group comprised 68 Kock and 37 Indiana pouch patients who were observed for 12 months or longer (mean followup 53 and 34 months, respectively). Of 9 efferent nipple valve malfunctions observed in the Kock pouch group 5 required surgical revision. Of 16 complications related to afferent limb function 15 were caused by the use of polyester fiber fabric for the anchoring collar and 8 of these 15 complications required surgical revision. The first 2 Indiana pouch patients had pouch deformities due to incomplete detubularization of the cecum that required surgical repair. Overall, surgical revisions, including minor repairs, were performed on 15 Kock pouch patients (22.1%) and 4 Indiana pouch patients (10.8%). Both forms of the procedure preserved continence to a satisfactory degree. Urinary tract stones developed in 18 patients (26.5%) from the Kock pouch group, usually on the exposed staples or the eroded, nonabsorbable collar used to construct the nipple valves. Stone formation was rare (5.4%) in the Indiana pouch group. The incidence of ureteral implantation stricture was low in both procedures. There was no significant difference in the incidence of bacteriuria between the 2 methods of urinary diversion. These data demonstrate that the Kock pouch and Indiana pouch procedures can be accomplished with the same early postoperative complication rate

  6. Safety and Long-Term Performance of Lithium-ion Pouch Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have the highest energy density of the batteries available in the commercial market today. Although most lithium-ion cell designs use a metal can design, this has changed significantly in recent years. Cell designs are offered in the pouch format as they offer better volumetric and gravimetric energy densities and in some cases, higher tolerance to abuse or off-nominal conditions. In the past decade, several state-of-the-art lithium-ion pouch cell designs have been tested. The pouch cell designs have become more robust in the past two years but there are still a few issues that need to be looked into for optimization. The pouch cells seem to have a tendency to swell when left in storage under ambient conditions. The cells also swell under overvoltage and undervoltage conditions. A significant issue that has been observed is the swelling of the cells under a vacuum condition which could lead to deformation of the cell pouch after this exposure. This last factor would be very critical in the use of these cell designs for space applications as vacuum exposure is used to check for cell and battery leaks before it is flown into space. In rare cases, corrosion of the aluminum layer of the pouches has been observed in stored cells. Pouch material analysis has been carried out in an effort to understand the strength of the pouches and determine if this is a factor in the corrosion as well as unsafe condition of the cells as deformation of the inner layers of the pouch could occur when the cells swell under the various conditions described above. Pouch materials are typically aluminized plastic, made up of a layer of Al sandwiched between one or more layers of polymeric material. Deformations or cell manufacturing processes could lead to a compromise of the inner polymeric layer/s of the pouch leading to the corrosion of the Al layer in the aluminized pouch material. The safety of the pouch cell designs has been determined for cells from various

  7. POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNICAL MANUAL: LURGI OIL SHALE RETORTING WITH OPEN PIT MINING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lurgi oil shale PCTM addresses the Lurgi retorting technology, developed by Lurgi Kohle and Mineralotechnik GmbH, West Germany, in the manner in which this technology may be applied to the oil shales of the western United States. This manual proceeds through a description of ...

  8. Documentation of INL’s In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D Mattson; Larry Hull

    2012-12-01

    A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the Powersim Studio 9™ software package. Three phases of an in situ retort were consider; a construction phase primarily accounts for water needed for drilling and water produced during dewatering, an operation phase includes the production of water from the retorting process, and a remediation phase water to remove heat and solutes from the subsurface as well as return the ground surface to its natural state. Throughout these three phases, the water is consumed and produced. Consumption is account for through the drill process, dust control, returning the ground water to its initial level and make up water losses during the remedial flushing of the retort zone. Production of water is through the dewatering of the retort zone, and during chemical pyrolysis reaction of the kerogen conversion. The document discusses each of the three phases used in the model.

  9. Application of a cold flow model in testing the feasiblity of an oil shale retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, M.W.; Tatterson, D.F.; Vasalos, I.A.

    1985-01-01

    An oil shale fluid bed process successfully tested in 1.5 ton/day pilot plant in Amoco Research Center is discussed. Emphasis is given on information showing the application of cold flow unit results in the interpretation of retort product yields.

  10. 30 CFR 57.22401 - Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reignition following a shutdown; and (5) Details of area monitoring and alarm systems for hazardous gases and... combustible gases and oxygen in retort off-gases during start-up and during burning; levels at which... blowers, and provisions for switching promptly from one power source to the other; and (2) An alarm...

  11. 30 CFR 57.22401 - Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reignition following a shutdown; and (5) Details of area monitoring and alarm systems for hazardous gases and... combustible gases and oxygen in retort off-gases during start-up and during burning; levels at which... blowers, and provisions for switching promptly from one power source to the other; and (2) An alarm...

  12. 30 CFR 57.22401 - Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reignition following a shutdown; and (5) Details of area monitoring and alarm systems for hazardous gases and... combustible gases and oxygen in retort off-gases during start-up and during burning; levels at which... blowers, and provisions for switching promptly from one power source to the other; and (2) An alarm...

  13. 30 CFR 57.22401 - Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reignition following a shutdown; and (5) Details of area monitoring and alarm systems for hazardous gases and... combustible gases and oxygen in retort off-gases during start-up and during burning; levels at which... blowers, and provisions for switching promptly from one power source to the other; and (2) An alarm...

  14. MONITORING GROUNDWATER QUALITY: THE IMPACT OF IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the initial phase of a research program which will develop a planning methodology for the design and implementation of cost-effective groundwater quality monitoring programs for modified in-situ (MIS) oil shale retorting. This initial phase includes (1) a rev...

  15. ALKALINE SCRUBBING OF IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT OFFGAS AT GEOKINETICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the use of EPA's mobile wet scrubber on a 200-acfm slipstream of Geokinetics' retort offgas to investigate the H2S removal efficiency and selectivity (percent H2S removal/percent CO2 removal) as a function of liquid/gas contact time, alkaline solution OH(minus...

  16. Investigation of tracer and steam tests on the Western Research Institute 150-ton retort

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.F.; Moore, D.F.; Merriam, N.W.; Covell, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    Gas tracer and steam front velocities in addition to flow model calculations are used to characterize rubble bed structure in an oil shale retort. The gas tracer method is shown to have superior resolution to the steam front method in detecting rubble bed variations. The tracer method is potentially less expensive. Recommendations for further research are made.

  17. Mercury retorting of calcine waste, contaminated soils and railroad ballast at the Idaho National Egineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cotten, G.B.; Rothermel, J.S.; Sherwood, J.; Heath, S.A.; Lo, T.Y.R.

    1996-02-28

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been involved in nuclear reactor research and development for over 40 years. One of the earliest major projects involved the development of a nuclear powered aircraft engine, a long-term venture which used mercury as a shielding medium. Over the course of several years, a significant amount of mercury was spilled along the railroad tracks where the test engines were transported and stored. In addition, experiments with volume reduction of waste through a calcine process employing mercury as a catalyst resulted in mercury contaminated calcine waste. Both the calcine and Test Area North wastes have been identified in Department of Energy Action Memorandums to be retorted, thereby separating the mercury from the various contaminated media. Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company awarded the Mercury Retort contract to ETAS Corporation and assigned Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. to manage the treatment field activities. The mercury retort process entails a mobile unit which consists of four trailer-mounted subsystems requiring electricity, propane, and a water supply. This mobile system demonstrates an effective strategy for retorting waste and generating minimal secondary waste.

  18. Characterization of retorted oil shale and application to a model of leachate generation and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, W.F.; Feerer, J.L.; Morelli, P.J.; Peterson, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    A characterization of the porous media properties of spent oil shale is presented. Mercury porosimetry, BET nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was performed on unconsolidated powders, consolidated chunks, and compacted powder pellets of oil shale retorted in the TOSCO, Paraho, and Lawrence Livermore experimental retorts. All results indicated that retorted oil shale has a unimodal pore size distribution. Mean pore sizes ranged from 5.0 microns for powders to 1.0 micron for compacted powder pellets to 0.5 microns for consolidated chunks. Surface area porosity, and permeability data are also presented. Dispersion and capacitance of leachate flowing through retorted TOSCO oil shale were measured using a sucrose tracer and a specially designed leaching column. Tracer breakout curves were best simulated using a three-parameter capacitance model which assumes leachate flow characterized by flowing fraction, dead space volume, and mass transfer between main channel flow and dead space volume. Two types of generation models were investigated in a mathematical simulation of the leaching experiment. These were an equilibrium model based on the Langmuir approach and a general power-law model based on surface concentration of a given leachate species. Equilibrium isotherms were generated using shaker experiments. Rate coefficients were approximated by a small differential column which was run at shorter residence times. Leachate concentrations were best simulated by the power-law model.

  19. FUGITIVE DUST AT THE PARAHO OIL SHALE DEMONSTRATION RETORT AND MINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fugitive dust sampling program was conducted at Anvil Points, Colorado, site of the Paraho mining and oil shale retorting operations. High-volume samplers were used extensively for fugitive dust collection, and 175 total suspended particulate calculations are reported for measu...

  20. FRONT ELEVATION OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS 2.5 BY 4FOOT RETORT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT ELEVATION OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS 2.5 BY 4-FOOT RETORT, USED TO FLASH MERCURY FROM GOLD. MERCURY VAPOR THEN CONDENSED ON INSIDE OF HOOD AND WAS COLLECTED FOR REUSE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  1. Method for explosive expansion toward horizontal free faces for forming an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1980-01-01

    Formation is excavated from within a retort site in formation containing oil shale for forming a plurality of vertically spaced apart voids extending horizontally across different levels of the retort site, leaving a separate zone of unfragmented formation between each pair of adjacent voids. Explosive is placed in each zone, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for forming an in situ retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. The same amount of formation is explosively expanded upwardly and downwardly toward each void. A horizontal void excavated at a production level has a smaller horizontal cross-sectional area than a void excavated at a lower level of the retort site immediately above the production level void. Explosive in a first group of vertical blast holes is detonated for explosively expanding formation downwardly toward the lower void, and explosive in a second group of vertical blast holes is detonated in the same round for explosively expanding formation upwardly toward the lower void and downwardly toward the production level void for forming a generally T-shaped bottom of the fragmented mass.

  2. PROCESSING IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT OFFGAS WITH A STRETFORD PLANT AT GEOKINETICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the use of EPA's transportable Stretford process pilot plant on a 700-acfm slipstream of in-situ shale oil retort offgas to investigate H2S removal efficiency and process compatibility. This was the fourth application of the pilot plant which had demonstrated ...

  3. ASSESSMENT OF OIL SHALE RETORT WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND CONTROL TECHNOLOGY: PHASES I AND II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oil shale retorting is a synthetic fuel production technology on the verge of commercialization in the United States. In order to ensure that the emerging oil shale industry will have minimal adverse effects upon surface and/or groundwater where recoverable reserves of oil shale ...

  4. CONTROL OF SULFUR EMISSIONS FROM OIL SHALE RETORTING USING SPENT SHALE ABSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an investigation of the environmental advantages/disadvantages of absorbing SO2 onto combusted retorted oil shale. The objective of the program was to obtain more information in support of Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permitting decisions on ...

  5. GROUND WATER--MINERALOGY RELATIONSHIP FOR 'IN SITU' OIL SHALE RETORTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potential ground water problems associated with Modified In Situ (MIS) oil shale retorting need to be examined in order to minimize or mitigate possible invasion of spent shale leachates into ground water systems in actively mined or mined and abandoned sites. This background rep...

  6. Occupational-health study at the Geokinetics true in-situ oil-shale retorting facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, K.M.; Rom, W.N.; Grier, R.S.; Tillery, M.I.; Voelz, G.L.; Ettinger, H.J.; Wheat, L.D.

    1983-07-01

    An occupational health study was conducted during the burn of the first commercial-size retort employing the Geokinetics, Inc., horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. The study consisted of field industrial hygiene surveys and sampling, and medical evaluation of workers and spouses living at the facility. Industrial hygiene surveys and sampling were conducted during early, middle, and late phases of the 9-month burn of the retort. An attempt was made to sample areas of expected maximum concentrations in order to characterize air contaminants near process units or areas, rather than to sample actual employee exposures. Samples were collected for analysis of dust and a number of selected gases and vapors in air, and limited monitoring was conducted for noise. Limited dust monitoring was also conducted during the drilling of blastholes for another retort. Medical evaluations consisted of medical history, physical examination, pulmonary ventilation function tests, chest x ray, and blood and urine tests (including chromosome evaluations and Ames testing of urine). 30 references.

  7. Impact of overall and particle surface heat transfer coefficients on thermal process optimization in rotary retorts.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R; Abakarov, A; Almonacid, S; Teixeira, A

    2008-10-01

    This study attempts to examine the significance of recent research that has focused on efforts to estimate values for global and surface heat transfer coefficients under forced convection heating induced by end-over-end rotation in retorting of canned peas in brine. The study confirms the accuracy of regression analysis used to predict values for heat transfer coefficients as a function of rotating speed and headspace, and uses them to predict values over a range of process conditions, which make up the search domain for process optimization. These coefficients were used in a convective heat transfer model to establish a range of lethality-equivalent retort temperature-time processes for various conditions of retort temperature, rotating speed, and headspace. Then, they were coupled with quality factor kinetics to predict the final volume average and surface quality retention resulting from each process and to find the optimal thermal process conditions for canned fresh green peas. Results showed that maximum quality retention (surface and volume average retention) was achieved with the shortest possible process time (made possible with highest retort temperature), and reached the similar level in all cases with small difference between surface and volume average quality retention. The highest heat transfer coefficients (associated with maximum rotating speed and headspace) showed a 10% reduction in process time over that required with minimum rotating speed and headspace. The study concludes with a discussion of the significance of these findings and degree to which they were expected. PMID:19019110

  8. The hamster cheek pouch model for field cancerization studies.

    PubMed

    Monti-Hughes, Andrea; Aromando, Romina F; Pérez, Miguel A; Schwint, Amanda E; Itoiz, Maria E

    2015-02-01

    External carcinogens, such as tobacco and alcohol, induce molecular changes in large areas of oral mucosa, which increase the risk of malignant transformation. This condition, known as 'field cancerization', can be detected in biopsy specimens using histochemical techniques, even before histological alterations are identified. The efficacy of these histochemical techniques as biomarkers of early cancerization must be demonstrated in appropriate models. The hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model, universally employed in biological studies and in studies for the prevention and treatment of oral cancer, is also an excellent model of field cancerization. The carcinogen is applied in solution to the surface of the mucosa and induces alterations that recapitulate the stages of cancerization in human oral mucosa. We have demonstrated that the following can be used for the early detection of cancerized tissue: silver staining of nucleolar organizer regions; the Feulgen reaction to stain DNA followed by ploidy analysis; immunohistochemical analysis of fibroblast growth factor-2, immunohistochemical labeling of proliferating cells to demonstrate an increase of epithelial cell proliferation in the absence of inflammation; and changes in markers of angiogenesis (i.e. those indicating vascular endothelial growth factor activity, endothelial cell proliferation and vascular density). The hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer was also proposed and validated by our group for boron neutron capture therapy studies for the treatment of oral cancer. Clinical trials of this novel treatment modality have been performed and are underway for certain tumor types and localizations. Having demonstrated the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy to control tumors in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model, we adapted the model for the long-term study of field cancerized tissue. We demonstrated the inhibitory effect of boron neutron capture therapy on tumor development in field

  9. Determining the locus of a processing zone in an in situ oil shale retort by sound monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Elkington, W. Brice

    1978-01-01

    The locus of a processing zone advancing through a fragmented permeable mass of particles in an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is determined by monitoring for sound produced in the retort, preferably by monitoring for sound at at least two locations in a plane substantially normal to the direction of advancement of the processing zone. Monitoring can be effected by placing a sound transducer in a well extending through the formation adjacent the retort and/or in the fragmented mass such as in a well extending into the fragmented mass.

  10. Tunguska, 1908: the gas pouch and soil fluidization hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistor, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Siberian taiga explosion of 30 June 1908 remains one of the great mysteries of the 20th century: millions of trees put down over an area of 2200 km2 without trace of a crater or meteorite fragments. Hundred years of failed searches have followed, resulting in as many flawed hypothesis which could not offer satisfactory explanations: meteorite, comet, UFO, etc. In the author's opinion, the cause is that the energy the explorers looked for was simply not there! The author's hypothesis is that a meteoroid encountered a gas pouch in the atmosphere, producing a devastating explosion, its effects being amplified by soil fluidization.

  11. Hermetic packaging of drugs: optimized sealing of foil pouches.

    PubMed

    Auslander, D E; Gilbert, S G

    1976-07-01

    Factors affecting the sealing of foil packages were studied in the sealing of foil packages were studied in three laboratories. The relationship of sealing temperature (with machine speed and pressure kept constant) to the incidence of defective packages was determined. The maximum acceptable limit for defective pouches was 1%. Three tests were employed to detect defects: vacuum-dye, seal strength, and pressurized ammonia vapor. Only the last was sensitive enough to determine the optimum sealing conditions. This test also was capable of detecting leakage sites. Replacement of the cellophane layer of the foil laminate with polyvinylidene chloride-coated polyester improved the barrier properties of the package. PMID:957113

  12. New treatment for ileal pouch-anal or coloanal anastomotic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Benoist, S; Panis, Y; Berdah, S; Hautefeuille, P; Valleur, P

    1998-07-01

    Persistent anastomotic stricture following ileal pouch-anal or coloanal anastomoses can be treated by transanal resection using a stapler or a more complex procedure, such as transanal pouch advancement with neoanastomosis. We propose an easier and faster technique, which does not require any particular device. Its long-term functional results are satisfactory in most patients. PMID:9678384

  13. Motility of the jejunum after proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anastomosis.

    PubMed Central

    Chaussade, S; Merite, F; Hautefeuille, M; Valleur, P; Hautefeuille, P; Couturier, D

    1989-01-01

    Proctocolectomy with ileal pouch anastomosis could modify motility of the small intestine through two mechanisms: obstruction or bacterial overgrowth. Motility of the jejunum was measured in 11 patients with ileoanal anastomosis six (n = 6), or 12 (n = 5) months after closure of the loop ileostomy. Manometric recording from the jejunum were made during fasting (four hours) and after a liquid meal (one hour). These findings were compared with those of six healthy volunteers. Motor events were classified as follows: migrating motor complex (MMC), propagated contractions, or discrete clustered contractions. All patients were investigated for bacterial overgrowth (D-glucose breath test). Only two patients had bacterial overgrowth. The frequency of MMC remained unchanged after ileo-anal anastomosis (2.83 (0.37)/four hours) compared with normal volunteers (2.81 (0.29)/four hours). During fasting, four patients had numerous propagated contractions in the jejunum. This condition was associated in two with bacterial overgrowth and in two with intubation of the reservoir. Discrete clustered contractions were found in the seven patients studied postprandially (7.6 (2.5)/h), but not in volunteers. These seven patients emptied their pouch spontaneously and bacterial overgrowth was found in only one. As this motility pattern was previously described in partial small intestinal obstruction, it is postulated that discrete clustered contractions could be the consequence of a functional obstruction as a result of anastomosis of the small intestine to the high pressure zone of the anal sphincters. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2707637

  14. Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier

    DOEpatents

    Burton, III, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

  15. Method and apparatus for igniting an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Burton, Robert S.; Rundberg, Sten I.; Vaughn, James V.; Williams, Thomas P.; Benson, Gregory C.

    1981-01-01

    A technique is provided for igniting an in situ oil shale retort having an open void space over the top of a fragmented mass of particles in the retort. A conduit is extended into the void space through a hole in overlying unfragmented formation and has an open end above the top surface of the fragmented mass. A primary air pipe having an open end above the open end of the conduit and a liquid atomizing fuel nozzle in the primary air pipe above the open end of the primary air pipe are centered in the conduit. Fuel is introduced through the nozzle, primary air through the pipe, and secondary air is introduced through the conduit for vortical flow past the open end of the primary air pipe. The resultant fuel and air mixture is ignited for combustion within the conduit and the resultant heated ignition gas impinges on the fragmented mass for heating oil shale to an ignition temperature.

  16. Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, R.S.

    1982-02-16

    A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

  17. Congenital pouch colon in girls: Genitourinary abnormalities and their management

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Rajiv; Khan, Niyaz Ahmed; Shah, Shalu; Pant, Nitin; Gupta, Amit; Choudhury, Subhasis Roy; Debnath, Pinaki Ranjan; Puri, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To discuss the assessment and management of genitourinary (GU) tract abnormalities in 21 girls with Types I-III congenital pouch colon (CPC), studied over a period of 10 years. Materials and Methods: Assessment included clinical and radiological assessment, examination under anesthesia (EUA), endoscopy of the lower GU tract, and evaluation of the surgical findings, operative procedures for the GU anomalies, and the results of management. Results: Initial examination of the external genitalia showed a “clover-leaf” appearance (n = 6) and a single perineal opening (n = 6). In 9 patients, the openings of the urethra and double vagina were seen, of which a vestibular fistula was seen in 5 and an anterior perineal fistula in 1. Seventeen patients (81%) had urinary incontinence (UI) - partial in 10, and complete in 7. Renal function tests, X-ray sacrum, and abdominal US were normal in all patients. Micturating cystourethrogram (n = 9) showed a wide, bladder neck incompetence (BNI) with reduced bladder capacity in seven patients. EUA and endoscopy revealed a septate vagina in all patients and the urethral opening at a “high” position (n = 14) or at a relatively normal or “low” position (n = 7). In 8 patients, the intervaginal septum was thick and fleshy. Endoscopy showed a short, wide urethra, an open incompetent bladder neck, poorly developed trigone, and reduced bladder capacity in the patients with UI. The fistula from the colonic pouch opened in the proximal urethra (n = 4), high in the vestibule (n = 3), low in the vestibule (n = 8), perineum just posterior to the vestibule (n = 1), and undetermined (n = 5). Vaginoscopy (n = 8) showed normal cervices in all and cervical mucus in 4 patients. The subtypes of CPC were Type I CPC (n = 4), Type II CPC (n = 16), and Type III CPC (n = 1). All 21 patients had uterus didelphys. In four patients with UI, during tubular colorraphy, a segment of the colonic pouch was preserved for later bladder augmentation if

  18. Effect of DMSO and DMBA hamster pouch carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Hidalgo, F.; Miller, E.G.; Binnie, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    The penetration of mucosal surfaces by chemical carcinogens is required for tumor induction. The effectiveness of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a carrier for carcinogen is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine what effect DMSO would have on the 9,10-dimethyl- 1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced carcinogenesis in the hamster cheek pouch. Thirty Syrian golden hamsters were divided into two groups: the control group received a topical application of 0.5% DMBA in mineral oil three times per week for 16 weeks, while the experimental group received a topical application of DMSO previous to each DMBA application. At autopsy, both groups had developed tumors, the tumor ratio of control to experimental was 3.5:1.9 and the average size of tumors was 2.2 to 1.9 mm sq. The results suggest that DMSO interfered with the usual DMBA induction mechanism.

  19. A Novel Lithium-ion Laminated Pouch Cell Tested For Performance And Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith A.; Inoue, Takefumi

    2006-01-01

    A new Li-ion 4.0 Ah pouch cell from GS Yuasa has been tested to determine its performance and safety. The cell is of a laminate pouch design with liquid electrolyte. The rate, thermal and vacuum performance capabilities have been tested to determine the optimum parameters. Under vacuum conditions, the cells were cycled under restrained and unrestrained configurations. The burst pressure of the laminate pouch was also determined. The overcharge, overdischarge into reversal and external short circuit safety tests were also performed to determine the cell s tolerance to abuse. Key Words: Li-ion, safety, vacuum test, abuse, COTS batteries, rate capability

  20. INTEGRATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS WITH IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson; Michael G. McKellar; Lee O. Nelson

    2011-05-01

    This paper evaluates the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to an in situ oil shale retort operation producing 7950 m3/D (50,000 bbl/day). The large amount of heat required to pyrolyze the oil shale and produce oil would typically be provided by combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be delivered by an HTGR. Two cases were considered: a base case which includes no nuclear integration, and an HTGR-integrated case.

  1. Application of a cold flow model in testing the feasibility of an oil shale retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Vasalos, I.A.; Tatterson, D.F.; Furlong, M.W.; Kowalski, T.L.; So, B.Y.C. )

    1992-06-01

    An oil shale fluid bed process was successfully tested in a 1.5 tons/day retort. A pilot plant previously used for catalytic cracking studies was modified for this purpose. The successful conversion of the existing pilot plant to a retort and the remarkably smooth startup and operation were attributed to the concurrent construction and operation of a full-scale cold flow model to test the design of solid feeders and a unique injector/mixer. Operation of the cold flow model over the range of anticipated pilot plant operating conditions provided pressure drop and solids hold data for the mixer. The process was based on rapid heating of small oil shale particles with a hot heat carrier. key to the process was the design of a mixer, of proprietary geometry, which effects rapid interparticle heat transfer, substantial retorting of oil shale, and rapid removal of the hydrocarbon vapors. Several tests were carried out showing that shale oil yields up to 110% of Fisher assay are feasible by using this unique process scheme. In this paper, data are presented showing the application of cold flow results in the interpretation of pilot plant data such as gas and liquid yields.

  2. Method for rubblizing an oil shale deposit for in situ retorting

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Arthur E.

    1977-01-01

    A method for rubblizing an oil shale deposit that has been formed in alternate horizontal layers of rich and lean shale, including the steps of driving a horizontal tunnel along the lower edge of a rich shale layer of the deposit, sublevel caving by fan drilling and blasting of both rich and lean overlying shale layers at the distal end of the tunnel to rubblize the layers, removing a substantial amount of the accessible rubblized rich shale to permit the overlying rubblized lean shale to drop to tunnel floor level to form a column of lean shale, performing additional sublevel caving of rich and lean shale towards the proximate end of the tunnel, removal of a substantial amount of the additionally rubblized rich shale to allow the overlying rubblized lean shale to drop to tunnel floor level to form another column of rubblized lean shale, similarly performing additional steps of sublevel caving and removal of rich rubble to form additional columns of lean shale rubble in the rich shale rubble in the tunnel, and driving additional horizontal tunnels in the deposit and similarly rubblizing the overlying layers of rich and lean shale and forming columns of rubblized lean shale in the rich, thereby forming an in situ oil shale retort having zones of lean shale that remain permeable to hot retorting fluids in the presence of high rubble pile pressures and high retorting temperatures.

  3. Withdrawal of gases and liquids from an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, Martin M.

    1982-01-01

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed within a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. A production level drift extends below the fragmented mass, leaving a lower sill pillar of unfragmented formation between the production level drift and the fragmented mass. During retorting operations, liquid and gaseous products are recovered from a lower portion of the fragmented mass. A liquid outlet line extends from a lower portion of the fragmented mass through the lower sill pillar for conducting liquid products to a sump in the production level drift. Gaseous products are withdrawn from the fragmented mass through a plurality of gas outlet lines distributed across a horizontal cross-section of a lower portion of the fragmented mass. The gas outlet lines extend from the fragmented mass through the lower sill pillar and into the production level drift. The gas outlet lines are connected to a gas withdrawal manifold in the production level drift, and gaseous products are withdrawn from the manifold separately from withdrawal of liquid products from the sump in the production level drift.

  4. Modeling study of carbonate decomposition in LLNL`s 4TU pilot oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1994-10-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) 4 tonne-per-day oil shale Pilot Retort (4TU-Pilot) has been modeled to study the degree of carbonate decomposition occurring in the process. The modeling uses a simplified version of the processes occurring in the retort to allow parametric studies to be performed. The primary focus of the work is on the sensitivity of computed carbonate decomposition to the assumed manner in which solid material leaves the retort. It was found that for a variety of assumptions about solid passage and evolution within the process the computed carbonate decomposition varied by only a few percent. It was also determined that using available kinetic expressions based on literature data led to a consistent underestimate of the carbonate decomposition, from 12--17% low on an absolute basis and on a relative basis as much as a factor of seven times too low. A simplified kinetic expression based on limited data from laboratory experiments on the same shale as used in the 4TU-Pilot run was also employed and found to match the pilot results fairly well.

  5. Solubility, mobility and plant uptake of toxic elements in retorted oil shales as affected by recarbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop a method of lowering the alkalinity of retorted shales and of reducing the solubility of toxic elements. The solubility relationships and mineral transformations associated with recarbonation of retorted shales were evaluated by determining the solubilities of different elements and by using X-ray diffraction analysis. An accurate method of measuring carbonate activity in shale extracts was developed. This method consisted of acidifying shale extracts with concentrated HCI. The evolved CO/sub 2/(g) was trapped in NaOH and titrated to pH 8.5. A computer speciation model was developed to calculate the equilibrium activities of different ions and the CO/sub 2/(g) partial pressure. Recarbonation dissolved silicates, restored the carbonate deficit, and lowered pH to near 8.5 when equilibrium with CaCO/sub 3/ and CO/sub 2/(g) partial pressure of approximately 10/sup -4.65/ atm. was attained. Furthermore, recarbonation decreased the solubilities of F, Ba, Cr, Sr, and Mo and lowered their concentrations in shale leachates, showing that recarbonation of spent shales can retard the movement of toxic elements into the groundwater. Tall wheatgrass (Agropyron elongatum) seeds placed in Lurgi shale without soil cover failed to germinate. On recarbonated Lurgi shale, plants grew normally without soil cover and accumulated normal levels of As, Se, Ba, B, Cu, Cd, Sr, and Ti. The results suggest that recarbonated retorted shales can be revegetated directly without a soil cover

  6. Gastric Pouch After Simple or Radical Cystectomy for Benign and Malignant Bladder Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shamsa, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a controversy regarding the use of gastric pouch for benign and malignant bladder diseases. Objectives: The aim of this retrospective study was to report our experience, mostly on gastric neobladder (not gastrocystoplasty) for benign and malignant bladder diseases, its complications, outcomes and follow-up results. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective case series, we described our experience on seven gastric pouches (2 gastrocystoplasty and 5 gastric neobladders). Results: Postoperative complications were rare. Continence was defined as bladder capacity over 400 mL. Their follow-up period ranged from five months up to writing the article. One of the studied cases is still alive and awaiting renal transplantation. Conclusions: Gastric pouch is a suitable segment for bladder cystoplasty and neobladder. Continence is mostly related to the capacity of pouch. PMID:25738108

  7. Subsequent Adenomas of Ileal Pouch and Anorectal Segment after Prophylactic Surgery for Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    M'Koma, A.E.; Herline, A.J.; Adunyah, S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomally dominant disease characterized by the early development of colorectal adenomas and carcinoma in untreated patients. Patients with FAP may develop rectal cancer at their initial presentation (primary) or after prophylactic surgery (secondary). Controversies exist regarding which surgical procedure represents the best first-line treatment. The options for FAP are ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) or a restorative proctocolectomy (RPC) with either a handsewn or a stapled ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA), with or without mucosectomy. The purpose of these surgeries is to stop progression to an adenoma-cancer sequence by eradicating the colon, a disease prone organ. Unfortunately, these surgical procedures, which excise the entire colon and rectum while maintaining transanal fecal continence, do not guarantee that patients still won't develop adenomas. Based on the available literature, we therefore reviewed reported incidences of pouch-related adenomas that occurred post prophylactic surgery for FAP. The review consists of a collection of case, descriptive, prospective and retrospective reports. Objectives To provide available data on the natural history of subsequent adenomas after prophylactic surgery (by type) for FAP. Methods A review was conducted of existing case, descriptive, prospective and retrospective reports for patients undergoing prophylactic surgery for FAP (1975 – August, 2013). In each case, the adenomas were clearly diagnosed in one of the following: the ileal pouch mucosa (above the ileorectal anastomosis), within the anorectal segment (ARS) below the ileorectal anastomosis, or in the afferent ileal loop. Results A total of 515 (36%) patients with pouch-related adenomas have been reported. Two hundred and eleven (211) patients had adenomas in the ileal pouch mucosa, 295 had them in the ARS and in 9 were in the afferent ileal loop. Patients with pouch adenomas without dysplasia or cancer were

  8. [Gangrenous pyoderma and enterocutaneous fistulas after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis].

    PubMed

    Fadrique, Alfonso García; Ferrer, Francisco Villalba; Esteban, Marcos Bruna; Vila, José Vicente Roig

    2007-05-01

    We describe the medical-surgical management of a patient with a complex inflammatory bowel disease who developed 2 acute episodes of pyoderma gangrenosum and enterocutaneous fistulas after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis. The rarity of this postsurgical complication is emphasized. A good response to topical tacrolimus was achieved in cutaneous wounds. A less favorable response to infliximab was achieved in the abdominal fistulas, requiring surgical excision of the pouch. PMID:17498458

  9. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum attenuates the severity of pouchitis in a rat model of ileal J pouch-anal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Atila, Koray; Terzi, Cem; Canda, Aras Emre; Akhisaroglu, Serpil Tanriverdi; Avci, Hatice Sanli; Sarioglu, Sulen; Oktay, Gulgun; Gulay, Zeynep

    2009-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of treatment with partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) using a rat model of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis and pouchitis. In the J pouch groups, tissue myeloperoxidase activities were significantly higher than native myeloperoxidase activities (P = 0.020; P = 0.015; P = 0.004, respectively). A statistically significant difference in total histological score was detected in the J pouch + 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) group, compared to the J pouch control and the J pouch + 5% DSS + PHGG groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). There was a significant overgrowth of aerobes and anaerobes in the J pouch + 5% DSS group. This study demonstrated that rectal administration of PHGG attenuates the severity of pouchitis in a rat model. In conclusion, PHGG may be an additional therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pouchitis. PMID:18594969

  10. Experimental modal analysis of lithium-ion pouch cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, James Michael; Marco, James

    2015-07-01

    If future electric and hybrid electric vehicle batteries are to be designed such that the impact of vibration induced resonance is minimized, engineers tasked with the design of the vehicle's energy storage system must have a rigorous understanding of key system attributes such as the natural frequencies of the cell, the level of damping present and the mode shapes induced within the battery under mechanical load. This paper describes the underpinning theory and experimental method employed when using the impulse excitation technique to quantify the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a commercially available 25 Ah Nickel Manganese Cobalt Oxide (NMC) Laminate Pouch Cell. Experimental results are presented for fifteen cells at five different values of state of charge (SOC). The results indicate that irrespective of the energy content within the cell, the same four modes of vibration (torsion and bending) exist within a frequency range of 191 Hz-360 Hz. This is above the frequency range (0-150 Hz) typically associated with road-induced vibration. The results also indicate that the cell's natural frequencies of vibration and damping do not vary with changing values of SOC.

  11. Characterization of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product streams of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory 6-kg retort

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, K.B.; Evans, J.C.; Sklarew, D.S.; Girvin, D.C.; Nelson, C.L.; Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Sanders, R.W.

    1985-12-01

    The objective of this program is to determine how retorting process parameters affect the partitioning of Hg, As, Se, and Cd from raw oil shale to spent shale, shale oil, retort water, and offgas. For each of the elements, the objective of this study is to (1) determine the distribution coefficients for each product stream; (2) identify the chemical forms in water, gas, and oil streams, with particular emphasis on inorganic or organometallic species known to be or suspected of being carcinogenic, toxic, or otherwise harmful; (3) investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for mobilization into each product stream for toxic or labile chemical forms identified in item 2 are mobilized into each product stream; and (4) the effect of retorting rate, maximum retorting temperature, and retorting atmosphere on items 1 and 3. A Green River shale from Colorado and a New Albany shale from Kentucky were heated at 1 to 2/sup 0/C/min and at 10/sup 0/C/min to maximum temperatures of 500 and 750/sup 0/C under a nitrogen sweep gas. The product streams were analyzed using a variety of methods including Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy, microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, instrumental neutron activation analysis, high-pressure liquid and silica gel column chromatography, and mercury cold vapor atomic absorption. The results obtained using these analytical methods indicate that the distribution of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product stream is a function of oil shale type, heating rates, and maximum retorting temperatures. 11 refs., 27 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Intraepithelial lymphocytosis is a frequent finding in biopsies from ileal pouch-anal anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, David F; Walsh, Joanna C; Tyler, Andrea D; Ben-Bassat, Ofer; Silverberg, Mark S; Riddell, Robert H; Kirsch, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Following restorative proctocolectomy with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, the small bowel mucosa undergoes several specific histologic adaptions, which may be unrelated to the underlying disease or symptoms of pouchitis. An increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) has not been described as part of this spectrum. Mucosal biopsies of the ileal pouch and afferent limb of 230 patients (mean age: 45.7y [18.3-74.7], gender [female/male]: 117/113) with a functioning ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (mean time since ileostomy closure: 10.8months) and associated clinically annotated outcome data were assessed for IELs/100 enterocytes. Forty-two patients (18.3%) showed an increase in IELs (≥20 IELs/100 enterocytes [range 20-39]), in pouch and/or afferent limb biopsies. Intraepithelial lymphocytosis was more commonly observed in afferent limb compared to pouch biopsies (18.8% vs 8.3%; P = .42) and in familial adenomatous polyposis compared to ulcerative colitis patients (16% vs 8%; P = 0.36), but neither difference reached statistical significance. No cases with increased IELs displayed severe villous blunting. Increased IELs were not significantly associated with age, sex, ethnicity, smoking history, time since ileostomy, use of antibiotics, biologic agents, anti-diarrheal agents or probiotics, C-reactive protein levels or differential white cell count. None of the 42 patients with increased IELs had positive celiac serology (anti-human tissue transglutaminase IgA [ELISA] with corresponding total serum IgA). Intraepithelial lymphocytosis in pouch biopsies may represent a subclinical response to an altered bacterial microenvironment. Pathologists should be aware that intraepithelial lymphocytosis is part of the spectrum of changes in pouch biopsies, and only rarely is due to celiac disease. PMID:27063473

  13. A Foilized Polyethylene Pouch for the Prevention of Transmission of HIV from Mother to Child

    PubMed Central

    Malkin, Robert; Howard, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Many children become HIV+ due to mother-to-child transmission, a risk that can be largely eliminated if infants ingest antiretroviral (ARV) medications immediately after birth. As most mothers in Africa deliver at home, the ARV must be provided at their last antenatal visit, sometimes months before birth. No current drug delivery system allows the mother to store the medication at home long enough to be effective. We propose a preserving, foilized, polyethylene pouch to be pre-dosed and sealed by a pharmacist for later delivery to the newborn. Pouches were filled with 0.6 ml of Nevirapine (NVP). Thirty-three pouches were immediately studied to measure the impact of medication handling (oxygen, light, filling and sealing the pouches). The remaining samples were stored for up to one year at three storage conditions (25°C/60%RH, 30°C/65%RH, and 40°C/75%RH). Every two months, moisture loss, preservative concentration, impurity concentrations and NVP concentration were measured. Flora and fauna challenges were conducted. The pouch nearly eliminated moisture loss: pouches lost less than 0.7% of their weight over twelve months. As expected, exposing the medication to light, oxygen, and handling significantly affected the sacrificial preservative concentrations (Propyl paraben dropped 38%, Methyl paraben dropped 12% at time point zero). However, after the initial time point, preservative levels were stable in the package over twelve months under all storage conditions (4.1% average concentration drop), leaving sufficient preservatives to protect the medication. The concentration of NVP changed an average of only 1.3% over all storage conditions and times points (maximum 1.4%). We conclude that the foilized polyethylene pouch can preserve NVP, and perhaps other ARV’s, for up to one year. PMID:23028405

  14. True in situ oil shale retorting experiment at Rock Springs site 12

    SciTech Connect

    Long, A. Jr.; Merriam, N.W.; Virgona, J.E.; Parrish, R.L.

    1980-05-01

    A true in situ oil shale fracturing and retorting experiment was conducted near Rock Springs, Wyoming in 1977, 1978, and 1979. A 20-foot (6.1 m) thick zone of oil shale located 200 feet (61 m) below surface was hydraulically and explosively fractured. The fractured oil shale was extensively evaluated using flow tests, TV logging, caliper logging, downhole flow logging, core samples, and tracer tests. Attempts to conduct true in situ retorting tests in portions of the pattern with less than 5 percent void space as measured by caliper logs and less than 1 percent active void space measured by tracer test were curtailed when air could not be injected at desired rates. It is thought the fractures plugged as a result of thermal swelling of the oil shale. Air was injected at programmed rates in an area with 10 percent void measured by caliper log and 1.4 pecent active void measured by tracer test. A burn front was propagated in a narrow path moving away from the location of the production well. The vertical sweep of the burn front was measured at less than 4 feet (1.3 m). The burn front could not be sustained beyond 10 days without use of supplemental fuel. The authors recommend a minimum of 5 percent well-distributed void for attempts to retort 20 gpt (81 L/m ton) oil shale in confined beds. A void space of 5 percent may be roughly equivalent to 5 to 10 percent measured by caliper log and 1.4 percent or more by tracer test.

  15. Leachate migration from an in-situ oil-shale retort near Rock Springs, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glover, Kent C.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogeologic factors influencing leachate movement from an in-situ oil-shale retort near Rock Springs, Wyoming, were investigated through models of ground-water flow and solute transport. Leachate, indicated by the conservative ion thiocyanate, has been observed ? mile downgradient from the retort. The contaminated aquifer is part of the Green River Formation and consists of thin, permeable layers of tuff and sandstone interbedded with oil shale. Most solute migration has occurred in an 8-foot sandstone at the top of the aquifer. Ground-water flow in the study area is complexly three dimensional and is characterized by large vertical variations in hydraulic head. The solute-transport model was used to predict the concentration of thiocyanate at a point where ground water discharges to the land surface. Leachate with peak concentrations of thiocyanate--45 milligrams per liter or approximately one-half the initial concentration of retort water--was estimated to reach the discharge area during January 1985. This report describes many of th3 advantages, as well as the problems, of site-specific studies. Data such as the distribution of thin, permeable beds or fractures might introduce an unmanageable degree of complexity to basin-wide studies but can be incorporated readily into site-specific models. Solute migration in the study area occurs primarily in thin, permeable beds rather than in oil-shale strata. Because of this behavior, leachate traveled far greater distances than might otherwise have been expected. The detail possible in site-specific models permits more accurate prediction of solute transport than is possible with basin-wide models. A major problem in site-specific studies is identifying model boundaries that permit the accurate estimation of aquifer properties. If the quantity of water flowing through a study area cannot be determined prior to modeling, the hydraulic conductivity and ground-water velocity will be poorly estimated.

  16. Leachate migration from an in situ oil-shale retort near Rock Springs, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glover, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    Geohydrologic factors influencing leachate movement from an in situ oil shale retort near Rock Springs, Wyoming, were investigated by developing models of groundwater flow and solute transport. Leachate, indicated by the conservative ion thiocyanate, has been observed 1/2 mi downgradient from the retort. The contaminated aquifer is part of the Green River Formation and consists of thin, permeable layers of tuff and sandstone interbedded with oil shale. Most solute migration has occurred in an 8-ft sandstone at the top of the aquifer. Groundwater flow in the study area is complexly 3-D and is characterized by large vertical variations in hydraulic head. The solute transport model was used to predict the concentration of thiocyanate at a point where groundwater discharges to the land surface. Leachates with peak concentrations of thiocyanate--45 mg/L or approximately one-half the initial concentration of retort water--were estimated to reach the discharge area during January 1985. Advantages as well as the problems of site specific studies are described. Data such as the distribution of thin permeable beds or fractures may introduce an unmanageable degree of complexity to basin-wide studies but can be incorporated readily in site specific models. Solute migration in the study area primarily occurs in thin permeable beds rather than in oil shale strata. Because of this behavior, leachate traveled far greater distances than might otherwise have been expected. The detail possible in site specific models permits more accurate prediction of solute transport than is possible with basin-wide models. A major problem in site specific studies is identifying model boundaries that permit the accurate estimation of aquifer properties. If the quantity of water flowing through a study area cannot be determined prior to modeling, the hydraulic conductivity and groundwater velocity will be estimated poorly. (Author 's abstract)

  17. Process for oil shale retorting using gravity-driven solids flow and solid-solid heat exchange

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, A.E.; Braun, R.L.; Mallon, R.G.; Walton, O.R.

    1983-09-21

    A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus are disclosed in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

  18. Process for oil shale retorting using gravity-driven solids flow and solid-solid heat exchange

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Arthur E.; Braun, Robert L.; Mallon, Richard G.; Walton, Otis R.

    1986-01-01

    A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

  19. Reiterative expression of pax1 directs pharyngeal pouch segmentation in medaka.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazunori; Inohaya, Keiji; Mise, Takeshi; Kudo, Akira; Takada, Shinji; Wada, Hiroshi

    2016-05-15

    A striking characteristic of vertebrate development is the pharyngeal arches, which are a series of bulges on the lateral surface of the head of vertebrate embryos. Although each pharyngeal arch is segmented by the reiterative formation of endodermal outpocketings called pharyngeal pouches, the molecular network underlying the reiterative pattern remains unclear. Here, we show that pax1 plays crucial roles in pouch segmentation in medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos. Importantly, pax1 expression in the endoderm prefigures the location of the next pouch before the cells bud from the epithelium. TALEN-generated pax1 mutants did not form pharyngeal pouches posterior to the second arch. Segmental expression of tbx1 and fgf3, which play essential roles in pouch development, was almost non-existent in the pharyngeal endoderm of pax1 mutants, with disturbance of the reiterative pattern of pax1 expression. These results suggest that pax1 plays a key role in generating the primary pattern for segmentation in the pharyngeal endoderm by regulating tbx1 and fgf3 expression. Our findings illustrate the crucial roles of pax1 in vertebrate pharyngeal segmentation and provide insights into the evolutionary origin of the deuterostome gill slit. PMID:27034424

  20. The transmissions of antibodies across the gut of pouch-young marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, M.

    1971-01-01

    The transmission of antibodies across the gut of suckling pouch-young was investigated in three species of marsupials (Setonix brachyurus, Macropus eugenii and Trichosurus vulpecula) from Australia. Mother Setonix, immunized against Salmonella adelaide flagella and Bacteriophage Φ × 174, transmitted the antibodies in milk to their young. In sucrose density gradient runs, the antibody activity in milk whey and in serum of pouch-young, of Setonix and Macropus was found to be in the 7S region only; antibody in the 11S and 19S regions was not detected. Chromatographic preparations of IgM antibodies were fed to pouch-young Setonix which were later bled and their serum titrated for anti-S. adelaide agglutinins and antiphage Φ × 174 activity. The IgM antibodies were not transmitted across the gut in detectable amounts. Antibodies were present in the blood of pouch-young Setonix within 15–60 minutes of gavage (feeding by stomach tube) of immune serum. In Setonix the capacity to absorb antibodies in the intestine was lost at an age between 170 and 200 days and in Trichosurus it was lost at an age between 98 and 145 days. At these ages the pouch-young were able to leave the marsupium for varying lengths of time. Antibodies did not traverse the rumen wall in a young Setonix whose rumen was isolated from the intestine with ligatures before immune serum was gavaged. PMID:5115612

  1. Bmp signaling mediates endoderm pouch morphogenesis by regulating Fgf signaling in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lovely, C Ben; Swartz, Mary E; McCarthy, Neil; Norrie, Jacqueline L; Eberhart, Johann K

    2016-06-01

    The endodermal pouches are a series of reiterated structures that segment the pharyngeal arches and help pattern the vertebrate face. Multiple pathways regulate the complex process of endodermal development, including the Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) pathway. However, the role of Bmp signaling in pouch morphogenesis is poorly understood. Using genetic and chemical inhibitor approaches, we show that pouch morphogenesis requires Bmp signaling from 10-18 h post-fertilization, immediately following gastrulation. Blocking Bmp signaling during this window results in morphological defects to the pouches and craniofacial skeleton. Using genetic chimeras we show that Bmp signals directly to the endoderm for proper morphogenesis. Time-lapse imaging and analysis of reporter transgenics show that Bmp signaling is necessary for pouch outpocketing via the Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) pathway. Double loss-of-function analyses demonstrate that Bmp and Fgf signaling interact synergistically in craniofacial development. Collectively, our analyses shed light on the tissue and signaling interactions that regulate development of the vertebrate face. PMID:27122171

  2. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy ileal pouch anal anastomosis: How I do it?

    PubMed Central

    Madnani, Manish A; Mistry, Jitendra H; Soni, Harshad N; Shah, Atul J; Patel, Kantilal S; Haribhakti, Sanjiv P

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for ulcerative colitis is a major and complex colorectal surgery. Laparoscopy benefits these patients with better outcomes in context of cosmesis, pain and early recovery, especially in young patients. For surgeons, it is a better tool for improving vision and magnification in deep cavities. This is not the simple extension of the laparoscopy training. Starting from preoperative preparation to post operative care there are wide variations as compared to open surgery. There are also many variations in steps of laparoscopic surgery. It involves left colon, right colon and rectal mobilisation, low division of rectum, pouch creation and anastomosis of pouch to rectum. Over many years after standardisation of this technique, it takes same operative time as open surgery at our centre. So we present our standardized technique of laparoscopic assisted restorative proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA). PMID:26195886

  3. Morphological characteristics of the temporomandibular joint in the pouch young of the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Kawashima, S; Amemiya, T

    2015-04-01

    We recently reported the absence of the articular disc, which is a constant structure in mammals, in the temporomandibular joint of the adult Tasmanian devil. However, whether the articular disc disappears with growth of the animal was unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pouch young of the Tasmanian devil has the articular disc. The temporomandibular joint of a fresh carcass of the pouch young, whose crown-rump length was 43 mm, was examined microscopically and by microcomputed tomography. The absence of the articular disc in the pouch young temporomandibular joint was histologically confirmed. It is suggested that the articular disc of the Tasmanian devil is naturally absent. PMID:24809824

  4. A Novel Model of Surgical Injury in Adult Rat Kidney: A “Pouch Model”

    PubMed Central

    Litbarg, Natalia O.; Vujicic, Snezana; Setty, Suman; Sethupathi, Periannan; Dunea, George; Arruda, Jose A.; Singh, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative mechanisms after surgical injury have been studied in many organs but not in the kidney. Studying surgical injury may provide new insights into mechanisms of kidney regeneration. In rodent models, extrarenal tissues adhere to surgical kidney wound and interfere with healing. We hypothesized that this can be prevented by wrapping injured kidney in a plastic pouch. Adult rats tolerated 5/6 nephrectomy with pouch application well. Histological analysis demonstrates that application of the pouch effectively prevented formation of adhesions and induced characteristic wound healing manifested by formation of granulation tissue. Additionally, selected tubules of the wounded kidney extended into the granulation tissue forming branching tubular epithelial outgrowths (TEOs) without terminal differentiation. Tubular regeneration outside of renal parenchyma was not previously observed, and suggests previously unrecognized capacity for regeneration. Our model provides a novel approach to study kidney wound healing. PMID:24100472

  5. Development and Evaluation of a Reflective Solar Disinfection Pouch for Treatment of Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D. Carey; Len, Soo-Voon; Sheehan, Brita

    2004-01-01

    A second-generation solar disinfection (SODIS) system (pouch) was constructed from food-grade, commercially available packaging materials selected to fully transmit and amplify the antimicrobial properties of sunlight. Depending upon the season, water source, and challenge organism, culturable bacteria were reduced between 3.5 and 5.5 log cycles. The system was also capable of reducing the background presumptive coliform population in nonsterile river water below the level of detection. Similar experiments conducted with a model virus, the F-specific RNA bacteriophage MS2, indicated that the pouch was slightly less efficient, reducing viable plaques by 3.5 log units in comparison to a 5.0 log reduction of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O18:H11 within the same time period. These results suggest that water of poor microbiological quality can be improved by using a freely available resource (sunlight) and a specifically designed plastic pouch constructed of food-grade packaging materials. PMID:15066858

  6. The Quechua Manta Pouch: A Caretaking Practice for Buffering the Peruvian Infant against the Multiple Stressors of High Altitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tronick, E. Z.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes the caretaking practices employed by the Peruvian Quechua mountain people, who swaddle infants in cloths and blankets (known as a manta pouch) to protect them from the harsh and frigid environment. The practices of 14 mother-infants pairs are examined in detail, and the benefits and drawbacks of the manta pouch are examined. (MDM)

  7. Giant African Pouched Rats as Detectors of Tuberculosis in Human Sputum: Comparison of Two Techniques for Sputum Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Alisha M.; Mahoney, Amanda; Weetjens, Bart J.; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Kazwala, Rudovic; Mfinanga, Godfrey S.; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that pouched rats can detect the presence of "Mycobacterium tuberculosis," which causes tuberculosis, in human sputum samples obtained from clinical facilities. Although pouched rats evaluate sputum samples quickly, preparing the samples is relatively slow. The present study evaluated whether the rats can detect…

  8. Single stage management of a unique variant of congenital pouch colon with triplet fistula and normal anus.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vaibhav; Gangopadhyay, Ajay Narayan; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Sharma, Shiv Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pouch colon (CPC) in the female patient presents with highly variable and anomalous anatomy. We herein report the first case of CPC with uterus didelphys having normal anal opening, H-type vestibular fistula, two other fistulous communications between pouch colon and two vagina managed in a single stage with excellent postoperative outcome. PMID:26166988

  9. Single stage management of a unique variant of congenital pouch colon with triplet fistula and normal anus

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Vaibhav; Gangopadhyay, Ajay Narayan; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Sharma, Shiv Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pouch colon (CPC) in the female patient presents with highly variable and anomalous anatomy. We herein report the first case of CPC with uterus didelphys having normal anal opening, H-type vestibular fistula, two other fistulous communications between pouch colon and two vagina managed in a single stage with excellent postoperative outcome. PMID:26166988

  10. FIELD STUDIES ON PARAHO RETORTED OIL SHALE LYSIMETERS: LEACHATE, VEGETATION, MOISTURE, SALINITY, AND RUNOFF, 1977-1980

    EPA Science Inventory

    A disposal scheme for Paraho retorted shale utilizing lysimeters to simulate a low-elevation (dry site) and a high-elevation (moist site) was constructed. Objectives of the study were to investigate (1) vegetative stabilization of Paraho retored shale, as affected by leaching and...

  11. ALKALINE AND STRETFORD SCRUBBING TESTS FOR H2S REMOVAL FROM IN-SITU OIL RETORT OFFGAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of two mobile pilot-plant scrubbers (one alkaline, the other Stretford) for removing reduced sulfur compounds from the offgas of an in-situ retort at Geokinetics. The alkaline scrubber had a tray tower and a venturi contactor used alterna...

  12. Explosively produced fracture of oil shale. Progress report, July-September 1981. [Field experiments; computer models; retort stability

    SciTech Connect

    1982-04-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is conducting rock fragmentation research in oil shale to develop the blasting technologies and designs required to create a rubble bed for a modified in situ retort. This report outlines our first field experiments at the Anvil Points Mine in Colorado. These experiments are part of a research program, sponsored by the Laboratory through the Department of Energy and by a Consortium of oil companies. Also included are some typical numerical calculations made in support of proposed field experiments. Two papers detail our progress in computer modeling and theory. The first presents a method for eliminating hourglassing in two-dimensional finite-difference calculations of rock fracture without altering the physical results. The second discusses the significant effect of buoyancy on tracer gas flow through the retort. A paper on retort stability details a computer application of the Schmidt graphical method for calculating fine-scale temperature gradients in a retort wall. The final paper, which describes our approach to field experiments, presents the instrumentation and diagnostic techniques used in rock fragmentation experiments at Anvil Points Mine.

  13. Seasonal energy requirements and thermoregulation of growing pouched mice, Saccostomus campestris (Cricetidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, G. T. H.; Skinner, J. D.

    1991-06-01

    Pouched mice ( Saccostomus campestris) were born in captivity during January and March and subsequently maintained under long photoperiod (14 h light: 10 h dark) at 25°C. During their first winter (July) and the following summer (January) the pouched mice were exposed to natural photoperiod in an unheated laboratory for 3 weeks prior to measurement. The pouched mice continued to grow during the study, and were significantly heavier after summer exposure than after winter exposure 6 months earlier. Although this increase in body mass would result in a decline in their surface area to volume ratio there was no significant decline in minimal thermal conductance ( C m) and winter-exposed pouched mice had a relatively lower C m than expected. Meanwhile the smaller, winter-exposed animals displayed a significantly higher capacity for non-shivering thermogenesis, together with higher levels of basal metabolism than summer individuals. These differences were not solely attributable to the contrasting body mass of each group and it is therefore clear that S. campestris can increase thermoregulatory heat production, and modify heat loss following exposure to short photoperiod and cold during their first winter. Despite the significant increase in metabolism, the overall energy requirements of small, winter-exposed animals were significantly lower than those for heavier pouched mice following exposure to summer conditions. These results suggest that growing pouched mice can effectively adapt to lower temperature conditions during their first winter, yet accrue considerable overall savings in total energy requirements as a result of their smaller body mass.

  14. Giant African pouched rats (Cricetomys gambianus) that work on tilled soil accurately detect land mines.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Timothy L; Cox, Christophe; Weetjens, Bart; Tewelde, Tesfazghi; Poling, Alan

    2015-09-01

    Pouched rats were employed as mine-detection animals in a quality-control application where they searched for mines in areas previously processed by a mechanical tiller. The rats located 58 mines and fragments in this 28,050-m(2) area with a false indication rate of 0.4 responses per 100 m(2) . Humans with metal detectors found no mines that were not located by the rats. These findings indicate that pouched rats can accurately detect land mines in disturbed soil and suggest that they can play multiple roles in humanitarian demining. PMID:25962550

  15. Eastern oil shale research involving the generation of retorted and combusted oil shale solid waste, shale oil collection, and process stream sampling and characterization: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    Approximately 518 tons of New Albany oil shale were obtained from the McRae quarry in Clark County, Indiana and shipped to Golden, CO. A portion of the material was processed through a TOSCO II pilot plant retort. About 273 tons of crushed raw shale, 136 tons of retorted shale, 1500 gallons of shale oil, and 10 drums of retort water were shipped to US Department of Energy, Laramie, WY. Process conditions were documented, process streams were sampled and subjected to chemical analysis, and material balance calculations were made. 6 refs., 12 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Localization of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase in hamster buccal pouch epithelium treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene

    SciTech Connect

    Solt, D.B.

    1981-07-01

    The utility of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) was explored as a histochemical marker for chemical carcinogenesis in hamster buccal pouch mucosa. One or both buccal pouches of 18 noninbred male Syrian golden hamsters were treated topically with 0.5% 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) in mineral oil over 16 weeks to produce numerous epithelial lesions at various stages of neoplastic development. Both buccal pouches of 4 control animals were similarly treated with mineral oil alone. GGT activity was not detectable in untreated pouches or pouches treated with mineral oil alone. With this technique, multiple discrete GGT-stained areas were visible in wholemounts prepared at 1 and 6 weeks after the final application of DMBA. The experimental results were consistent with the hypothesis that the early GGT-stained cell populations are preneoplastic in nature.

  17. Task 38 - commercial mercury remediation demonstrations: Thermal retorting and physical separation/chemical leaching. Topical report, December 1, 1994--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, D.S.; Fraley, R.H.; Stepan, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    Results are presented on the demonstration of two commercial technologies for the removal of mercury from soils found at natural gas metering sites. Technologies include a thermal retorting process and a combination of separation, leaching, and electrokinetic separation process.

  18. Ethanolic leaf extract of neem (Azadirachta indica) inhibits buccal pouch carcinogenesis in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Subapriya, R; Bhuvaneswari, V; Ramesh, V; Nagini, S

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the chemopreventive effects of ethanolic neem leaf extract in the initiation and post-initiation phases of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis. The frequency of bone marrow micronuclei as well as the concentrations of lipid peroxides, ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), and the activities of the GSH-dependent enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in the buccal pouch, liver and erythrocytes were used as biomarkers of chemoprevention. All the hamsters painted with DMBA alone for 14 weeks developed buccal pouch carcinomas that showed diminished lipid peroxidation and enhanced antioxidant status associated with increased frequencies of bone marrow micronuclei. In the liver and erythrocytes of tumour-bearing animals, enhanced lipid peroxidation was accompanied by compromised antioxidant defences. Administration of ethanolic neem leaf extract effectively suppressed DMBA-induced HBP carcinogenesis as revealed by the absence of tumours in the initiation phase and reduced tumour incidence in the post-initiation phase. In addition, ethanolic neem leaf extract modulated lipid peroxidation and enhanced antioxidant status in the pouch, liver and erythrocytes and reduced the incidence of bone marrow micronuclei. The results of the present study, demonstrate that ethanolic neem leaf extract inhibits the development of DMBA-induced HBP tumours by protecting against oxidative stress. PMID:15473007

  19. Mycotic encephalitis, sinus osteomyelitis, and guttural pouch mycosis in a 3-year-old Arabian colt.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Barbara; Nation, Patrick N

    2011-12-01

    Mycotic encephalitis caused severe ataxia and other neurologic deficits in a horse. The finding of a single, large focus of cerebral malacia, with histopathologic evidence of fungal elements, suggested infection was a result of direct transfer from the frontal sinuses, rather than hematogenous spread from the guttural pouch. PMID:22654140

  20. Using Trained Pouched Rats to Detect Land Mines: Another Victory for Operant Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie W.; Bach, Harvard; Sully, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    We used giant African pouched rats ("Cricetomys gambianus") as land mine-detection animals in Mozambique because they have an excellent sense of smell, weigh too little to activate mines, and are native to sub-Saharan Africa, and therefore are resistant to local parasites and diseases. In 2009 the rats searched 93,400 m[superscript 2] of land,…

  1. Using Trained Pouched Rats (Cricetomys Gambianus) to Detect Land Mines: Another Victory for Operant Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie W.; Bach, Harvard; Sully, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    We used giant African pouched rats ("Cricetomys gambianus") as land mine-detection animals in Mozambique because they have an excellent sense of smell, weigh too little to activate mines, and are native to sub-Saharan Africa, and therefore are resistant to local parasites and diseases. In 2009 the rats searched 93,400 m[superscript 2] of land,…

  2. A Case of Extragonadal Teratoma in the Pouch of Douglas and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, Mamoru; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Kobayashi, Eiji; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Morii, Eiichi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Mature cystic teratoma is a germ cell tumor of the ovaries and is often observed in clinical practice. However, extragonadal teratomas are rare tumors and have been reported outside the ovaries, (e.g., in the greater omentum). The mechanism underlying the development of extragonadal teratomas remains unknown. We encountered a case of extragonadal teratoma in the pouch of Douglas that appeared to be a parasitic dermoid cyst. From our experience and the literature review, we discuss the potential mechanism leading to the development of extragonadal teratomas. A 41-year-old nonpregnant woman was referred to our department due to myoma and anemia. A 4-cm asymptomatic mass in the pouch of Douglas was observed, and the patient was diagnosed with ovarian mature cystic teratoma. She underwent laparoscopic surgery, and intraoperative findings revealed that the fallopian tube was injured and torn, and a residual small ovary was observed in the left side of the ovary. A tumor measuring approximately 4 cm observed in the pouch of Douglas was extracted without rupturing. The tumor was diagnosed as a parasitic dermoid cyst by macroscopic and histopathological findings. Auto-amputation could be the underlying mechanism that leads to an isolated parasitic dermoid cyst in the pouch of Douglas. PMID:26205577

  3. Malabsorption and pouch ulcerations following the Martin repair for total colonic aganglionosis.

    PubMed

    Perrault, J; Stockwell, M; Stephens, C; Forstner, G

    1979-08-01

    A late complication of the Martin repair for total colonic aganglionosis is described. Pouch malfunction resulted in stasis and ulceration, excessive blood and protein loss, and bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. The severity and nature of the lesion was identified by colonoscopy. PMID:490294

  4. High liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale

    DOEpatents

    Coburn, Thomas T.

    1990-01-01

    This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process.

  5. A high liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale

    DOEpatents

    Coburn, T.T.

    1988-07-26

    This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process. 2 figs.

  6. Apparatus and method for igniting an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Chambers, Carlon C.

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus for conducting such method are disclosed for igniting a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in an in situ oil shale retort. The method is conducted by forming a hole through unfragmented formation to the fragmented mass. An oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the hole. A fuel is introduced into a portion of the hole spaced apart from the fragmented mass. The fuel and oxygen-containing gas mix forming a combustible mixture which is ignited for establishing a combustion zone in a portion of the hole spaced apart from the fragmented mass. The hot gas generated in the combustion zone is conducted from the hole into the fragmented mass for heating a portion of the fragmented mass above an ignition temperature of oil shale.

  7. Acid mine drainage potential of raw, retorted, and combusted Eastern oil shale: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.J.; Yelton, J.L.; Reddy, K.J.

    1987-09-01

    In order to manage the oxidation of pyritic materials effectively, it is necessary to understand the chemistry of both the waste and its disposal environment. The objective of this two-year study was to characterize the acid production of Eastern oil shale waste products as a function of process conditions, waste properties, and disposal practice. Two Eastern oil shales were selected, a high pyrite shale (unweathered 4.6% pyrite) and a low pyrite shale (weathered 1.5% pyrite). Each shale was retorted and combusted to produce waste products representative of potential mining and energy conversion processes. By using the standard EPA leaching tests (TCLP), each waste was characterized by determining (1) mineralogy, (2) trace element residency, and (3) acid-base account. Characterizing the acid producing potential of each waste and potential trace element hazards was completed with laboratory weathering studies. 32 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Patterning of the third pharyngeal pouch into thymus/parathyroid by Six and Eya1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dan; Silvius, Derek; Davenport, Julie; Grifone, Raphaelle; Maire, Pascal; Xu, Pin-Xian

    2006-05-15

    Previous studies have suggested a role of the homeodomain Six family proteins in patterning the developing vertebrate head that involves appropriate segmentation of three tissue layers, the endoderm, the paraxial mesoderm and the neural crest cells; however, the developmental programs and mechanisms by which the Six genes act in the pharyngeal endoderm remain largely unknown. Here, we examined their roles in pharyngeal pouch development. Six1-/- mice lack thymus and parathyroid and analysis of Six1-/- third pouch endoderm demonstrated that the patterning of the third pouch into thymus/parathyroid primordia is initiated. However, the endodermal cells of the thymus/parathyroid rudiments fail to maintain the expression of the parathyroid-specific gene Gcm2 and the thymus-specific gene Foxn1 and subsequently undergo abnormal apoptosis, leading to a complete disappearance of organ primordia by E12.5. This thus defines the thymus/parathyroid defects present in the Six1 mutant. Analyses of the thymus/parathyroid development in Six1-/-;Six4-/- double mutant show that both Six1 and Six4 act synergistically to control morphogenetic movements of early thymus/parathyroid tissues, and the threshold of Six1/Six4 appears to be crucial for the regulation of the organ primordia-specific gene expression. Previous studies in flies and mice suggested that Eya and Six genes may function downstream of Pax genes. Our data clearly show that Eya1 and Six1 expression in the pouches does not require Pax1/Pax9 function, suggesting that they may function independently from Pax1/Pax9. In contrast, Pax1 expression in all pharyngeal pouches requires both Eya1 and Six1 function. Moreover, we show that the expression of Tbx1, Fgf8 and Wnt5b in the pouch endoderm was normal in Six1-/- embryos and slightly reduced in Six1-/-;Six4-/- double mutant, but was largely reduced in Eya1-/- embryos. These results indicate that Eya1 appears to be upstream of very early events in the initiation of thymus

  9. Hydrogeologic consequences of the modified in-situ retorting process, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Mehran, M.; Narasimhan, T.N.; Fox, J.P.

    1981-04-01

    This study is aimed at studying the possible alteration of the groundwater regime in and around the C-a and the C-b tracts due to the proposed MIS strategies. Results suggest that mine-inflow rates will gradually increase with time and that the phreatic surface will be drawn down significantly over several square kilometers around the C-a and C-b tracts. These drawdowns could have profound effects on the shallow groundwater and surface water supplies. The expected inflow rates may vary from 0.15 to 1.4 m/sup 3//s at the C-a tract and from 0.5 to 0.9 m/sup 3//s at the C-b tract. The computations suggest that over a 30-y period of activity at the C-a tract, the water table in the vicinity of a tributary to the Yellow Creek may be drawn down by as much as 31 m. Similarly, 60 years of MIS retorting at the C-b tract may draw down the water table in the vicnity of the Piceance Creek by 100 m or more. The studies indicate that in an expanding mine, the inflows are likely to be concentrated in the neighborhood of newly excavated regions where hydraulic gradients will be highest. It has been estimated that inflow into individual retorts may vary from 0.15 x 10/sup -3/ to 0.95 x 10/sup -3/ m/sup 3//s. These infow rates may or may not have significant effects on combustion efficiency, depending upon such factors as shale richness, uniformity of flow, and steam-air ratio. Higher porosities, lower residual saturations, and higher permeabilities will tend to increase mine inflows. 16 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Leachability of retorted oil shale by strong complexometric agents. [Sodium citrates, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, E.; Carroll, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    Extraction of solid waste materials with complexometric agents may offer a quick and effective method for assessing the potential long-term release of hazardous chemical constituents. Complexometric agent extraction may establish the maximum amount of elements of environmental concern that can be released to the environment and the capability of waste materials to release them. In this study, four samples of directly (DH) and indirectly (IH) retorted oil shales were extracted with deionized-distilled water and strong complexometric agents. The complexometric agent solutions were composed of 0.5M sodium citrate (citrate), 0.05M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 0.05M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The water extracts were very alkaline with pH values ranging from 11.0 to 11.8 for IH extracts and 12.2 to 12.8 for DH extracts. Sodium, chloride, sulfate, and fluoride were the predominant dissolved species in the IH water extracts. The DH water extracts contained mainly sodium, calcium, chloride, potassium, and sulfate. Water-extractable minor and trace elements were aluminum, arsenic, boron, barium, lithium, magnesium, molybdenum, silicon, and strontium. Complexometric extraction released detectable amounts of arsenic, antimony, selenium, lead, vanadium, and zinc. Other elements of environmental concern, including silver, cobalt, chromium, and nickel, were not detected in excess of the limits of quantitation in complexometric extracts. Based upon the analytical results, it was found that the retorted oil shale mineralogy influenced the extracting solution composition, i.e., when comparing the leachates from the IH and DH samples. Also, the complexometric agents hastened the release of certain constituents into solution compared to water extracts. 17 refs., 12 figs., 20 tabs.

  11. Changes in the absorption of bile acids after total colectomy in patients with an ileostomy or pouch-anal anastomosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nasmyth, D.G.; Johnston, D.; Williams, N.S.; King, R.F.; Burkinshaw, L.; Brooks, K.

    1989-03-01

    Bile acid absorption was investigated using /sup 75/Se Taurohomocholate (SeHCAT) in controls and patients who had undergone total colectomy with either conventional ileostomy or pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis or adenomatous polyposis. Whole-body retention of SeHCAT after 168 hours was greater in the controls than the patients who had undergone colectomy (P less than .05). Retention of SeHCAT did not differ significantly between patients with an ileostomy and patients with pouch-anal anastomosis, but patients with an ileostomy and ileal resection of more than 20 cm retained less SeHCAT than patients with a pouch-anal anastomosis (P less than .01). Analysis of fecal bile acids from ileostomies and pouches showed that bacterial metabolism of primary conjugated bile acids was greater in patients with a pouch. It was concluded that bile acid absorption was not significantly impaired by construction of a pouch compared with conventional ileostomy, but bacterial metabolism of bile acids was greater in the pouches.

  12. Measuring neoplastic transformation in the hamster cheek pouch using Fourier domain low-coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Robert N.; Chen, Xiaoxin; Brown, William; Wax, Adam

    2008-02-01

    Fourier Domain Low Coherence Interferometry (fLCI) is a promising technique which combines the depth resolution of low coherence interferometry with the sensitivity of light scattering spectroscopy for probing the health of epithelial tissue layers. Our new fLCI system configuration utilizes a white light Xe arc lamp source and a 4-f interferometer which re-images light scattered from the sample onto the detection plane. The system employs an imaging spectrometer at the detection plane to acquire depth resolved profiles from 252 adjacent spatial points without the need for any scanning. The limited spatial coherence of the light source requires the resolution of adjacent spatial points for the generation of depth information. Depth-resolved spectral information is recovered by performing a short-time Fourier transform on the detected spectra, similar to spectroscopic optical coherence tomography. Wavelength dependent variations in scattering intensity are analyzed as a function of depth to obtain information about the neoplastic transformation of the probed cells. Previous studies have demonstrated fLCI as an excellent technique for probing the scatterer morphology of simple phantoms and of in vitro cancer cell monolayers. We now seek to assess the ability of the new fLCI system to measure the health of subsurface tissue layers using the hamster cheek pouch model. Seven hamsters will have one cheek pouch treated with the known carcinogen DMBA. At the conclusion of the 24 week treatment period the animals will be anesthetized and the cheek pouches will be extracted. We will use the fLCI optical system to measure the neoplastic transformation of the in situ subsurface tissue layers in both the normal and DMBA-treated cheek pouches. Traditional histological analysis will be used to verify the fLCI measurements. We expect our results to establish the feasibility of fLCI to distinguish between healthy and dysplastic epithelial tissues in the hamster cheek pouch.

  13. Postnatal development of Blake's pouch cyst: a case report and new insight for its pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hirono, Seiichiro; Ito, Daisuke; Murai, Hisayuki; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Suyama, Maiko; Fujii, Katsunori; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2014-10-01

    Blake's pouch cyst (BPC), a rare cystic malformation in the posterior fossa, is believed to be caused by the congenital expansion of the posterior membranous area that normally regresses during embryogenesis. However, due to the wide spectrum of the onset pattern and age of patients, the natural history and the pathogenesis are poorly understood. The authors describe the case of a girl who admitted with headache and right abducens nerve paresis at the age of 3 years and 10 months. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a tetraventricular hydrocephalus, an open aqueduct, and a posterior fossa cyst compatible with BPC. Multiple tumors were also noticed in the ventricular wall. Tumor biopsy and an endoscopic third ventriculostomy were performed. Intraoperative observation confirmed the BPC, and pathological diagnosis was pilomyxoid astrocytoma. In retrospect, MR imaging was performed twice in the past, at the age of 8 months and again at 22 months, and no anomaly was detected, suggesting that Blake's pouch was once regressed. Therefore, a BPC in this patient was certainly developed after her second or third year of life. The ventricular tumors may influence the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption, which triggered the re-expansion of BPC from the possible remnant of Blake's pouch. This is a rare but important report providing evidence that in addition to the classic congenital BPC in which the remnant of Blake's pouch remains persistent, there could be postnatal or secondary BPC, which develops after birth. Possible mechanisms include that the remnant of Blake's pouch, which originally disappears, may re-expand postnatally in association with unknown trigger or a change in CSF dynamics or absorption. PMID:24907110

  14. Method for establishing a combustion zone in an in situ oil shale retort having a pocket at the top

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1980-01-01

    An in situ oil shale retort having a top boundary of unfragmented formation and containing a fragmented permeable mass has a pocket at the top, that is, an open space between a portion of the top of the fragmented mass and the top boundary of unfragmented formation. To establish a combustion zone across the fragmented mass, a combustion zone is established in a portion of the fragmented mass which is proximate to the top boundary. A retort inlet mixture comprising oxygen is introduced to the fragmented mass to propagate the combustion zone across an upper portion of the fragmented mass. Simultaneously, cool fluid is introduced to the pocket to prevent overheating and thermal sloughing of formation from the top boundary into the pocket.

  15. Surgical considerations in FAP-related pouch surgery: Could we do better?

    PubMed

    Möslein, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    The ileoanal pouch has become the standard restorative procedure of choice for patients with the classical phenotype in FAP (familial adenomatous polyposis) and also for ulcerative colitis (UC). Whilst we tend to encounter descriptive analyses comparing functional outcome, fertility and quality of life (QOL) between series in literature, there may be an urgent need to discuss the subtle technical modifications that may be pivotal for improving long-term QOL in FAP patients. Our aim is to review the current literature and discuss the aspects of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis that may require specific reevaluation for FAP. Surgical strategies aimed at minimizing post-interventional desmoid growth is one of the most important aspects. For this study, the following topics of interest were selected: Timing of surgery, IRA or ileoanal pouch for classical FAP, laparoscopic or conventional surgery, TME or mesenteric dissection, preservation of the ileocolic vessels, handsewn or double-staple anastomosis, shape and size of pouch, protective ileostomy, Last and definitely not least: how to manage desmoid plaques or desmoids at the time of prophylactic surgery. For the depicted technicalities of the procedure, a review of recent literature was performed and evaluated. For the topics selected, only sparse reference in literature was identified that was focused on the specific condition situation of FAP. Almost all pouch literature focusses on the procedural aspects, and FAP patients are always a very minor number. Therefore it becomes obvious that the specific entity is not adequately taken into account. This is a serious bias for identification of important steps in the procedure that may be beneficial for patients with either of the diseases. The results of this study demonstrate that several technical differences for construction of ileoanal pouches in FAP patients deserve more attention and prospective evaluation-perhaps even randomized trials. The role, importance and

  16. Cytotoxic and mutagenic properties of shale oil byproducts. I. Activation of retort process waters with near ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to dilutions of shale oil retort process waters obtained from three different retorting processes located in the Green River oil shale formations in the western part of the United States. Although the intensity of the response was dictated by the process water used, all induced a cytotoxic (reduction in colony-forming ability) and mutagenic (induced at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus) response in cells pretreated with dilutions of the waters and subsequent exposure to near ultraviolet light (NUV). Combinations of process water plus NUV yielded mutation frequencies as great as 50% that witnessed for the mutation frequency induced by the potent carcinogen far ultraviolet light. NUV alone was nontoxic and nonmutagenic at the doses of radiation used. Exposure of CHO cells in the dark to nontoxic dilutions of the process waters resulted in small but significant increases in 6-thioguanine resistent mutants (1-2 times background rates). The biological consequences resulting from the disposal of retort process waters into the delcate environment present in this oil shale region could be further complicated by this photoactivating process.

  17. Cytotoxic and mutagenic properties of shale oil byproducts. I. Activation of retort process waters with near ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to dilutions of shale oil retort process waters obtained from three different retorting processes located in the Green River oil shale formations in the western part of the United States. Although the intensity of the response was dictated by thd process water used, all induced a cytotoxic (reduction in colony-forming ability) and mutagenic (induced at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus) response in cells pretreated with dilutions of the waters and subsequent exposure to near ultraviolet light (NUV). Combinations of process water plus NUV yielded mutation frequencies as great as 50% that witnessed for the mutation frequency induced by the potent carcinogen far ultraviolet light. NUV alone was nontoxic and nonmutagenic at the doses of radiation used. Exposure of CHO cells in the dark to nontoxic dilutions of the process waters resulted in small but significant increases in 6-thioguanine resistant mutants. (1-2 time background rates). The biological consequences resulting from the disposal of retort process waters into the delicate environment present in this oil shale region could be further complicated by this photoactivating process.

  18. Gastric-jejunum pouch side-to-end anastomosis: a novel and safe operation of gastrojejunostomy for preventing reflux gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yongkuan; Gong, Jiaqing; Gan, Wei; Zhou, Jun; Huang, Ling; Wang, Yonghua; Luo, Guode; Song, Yaning

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to introduce a simple operation method of gastrojejunostomy for preventing reflux esophagitis --gastric-jejunum pouch side-to-end anastomosis. Methods: Based on Billroth II anastomosis (Billroth II) method, we designed a new technique of anastomosis between stomach wall and jejunal pouch. The technique was named gastric-jejunum pouch side-end anastomosis. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data which was collected from March 2012 to February 2014. Among all the recruited 66 patients, 51 gastric cancer patients and 7 pyloric obstruction patients were implemented with hand-assisted laparoscopic distal gastrectomy plus D2 lymph node dissection. The remaining 8 patients were malignant pyloric obstruction; they were treated with small exploratory incision on the upper abdomen and distal gastric partial transection. All the patients were treated with gastric-jejunum pouch side-to-end anastomosis. Results: The surgical incision was small, the operative time was short, their bleeding volume was little, the recovery time of the bowel function and hospitalization time was relatively short. Postoperatively, there was neither mortality and gastroparesis, nor anastomotic leakage and jejunal pouch leakage. Minor postoperative complications were detected followed up for 12 months, no acid reflux and reflux esophagitis symptoms was reported. Conclusions: Gastric -jejunum pouch side-to-end anastomosis is a simple operation technique with highly surgical safety. PMID:26131135

  19. The relationship between hatching rate and number of embryos of the brood pouch in Littorina saxatilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde-Padín, P.; Carballo, M.; Caballero, A.; Rolán-Alvarez, E.

    2008-10-01

    Littorina saxatilis is an ovoviviparous organism in which shelled embryos can be directly observed in nearly all mature females captured in the wild. This characteristic has been used a number of times as an indirect estimate for fecundity of natural populations. However, there is no experimental corroboration that the number of embryos within a female brood pouch is actually related to the rate of hatching per unit of time, a more realistic estimate of female fecundity. In order to make this corroboration we estimated the correlation between the number of embryos in the brood pouch and the hatching rate of isolated females grown in the laboratory. We also compared the hatching rates of females from two sympatric ecotypes (RB and SU) of this species, which differ significantly in the number of embryos. We found a high agreement between hatching rate and number of embryos, concluding that the latter is a good proxy for fecundity.

  20. Indiana pouch continent urinary reservoir in patients with previous pelvic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mannel, R.S.; Braly, P.S.; Buller, R.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Little information exists on the use of continent urinary reservoirs in patients with previous pelvic irradiation. We report the use of the Indiana pouch urinary reservoir in ten women with a history of pelvic irradiation for cervical cancer, of whom eight underwent a total pelvic exenteration for recurrent pelvic tumor and two had diversion for radiation-induced vesicovaginal fistula. All ten women achieved daytime continence, with a median time between catheterizations of 4.5 hours and a median pouch capacity of 500 mL. There was no evidence of leakage from the reservoir or significant ureteral reflux or obstruction on postoperative radiographic evaluation. No patient has required reoperation or had significant postoperative complications with the technique described.

  1. The Primary Implantation of Human Tumours to the Hamster Cheek Pouch

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dorothy E.; Evans, D. M. D.; Blamey, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The hamster cheek pouch is an immunologically privileged site. The present study is of simple implantation of human tumours direct from operative specimen to cheek pouch, in particular to determine whether tumour type influences the rate of successful implant. All implants were studied 10 or 20 days later. The use of cortisone significantly improved the number of implants growing. Carcinomas of the cervix were found to show growth in 55% of implants, in animals conditioned with cortisone. Growth from tumours of the uterine body, or from colorectal carcinomas, occurred in 25-30% of implants. Breast cancer gave poor results. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:5144526

  2. Nd:YAG photovaporization of residual equine guttural-pouch mycotic lesions after internal carotid occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Lloyd P.; Tudor, R. A.; Little, Edwina D. E.

    1998-07-01

    Hospital records reviewed over a 12-year period determined that 6 horses had been presented for guttural pouch mycosis. All had a history of epistaxis and several had accompanying neurologic signs, including dysphagia. Initially, conformation of the disease was obtained by radiographic and endoscopic examinations. Surgical treatment was directed at controlling and preventing additional hemorrhage by occluding the arterial source of the hemorrhage. Direct treatment of the mycotic plaque present within the guttural pouch was conducted using transendoscopic technique to direct irradiation from the Nd:YAG laser. The protocol described for the laser application was successful in resolving the lesions and was less complicated and stressful than previously reported topically applied chemical protocols.

  3. [Necrosis of the pouch due to nontraumatic rupture of the pile during permanent endocardial electrostimulation].

    PubMed

    Circo, A; Mangiameli, S; Vanaria, D; Lombardo, D; Evola, R

    1977-09-30

    Necrosis of the pouch containing the generator, due to non-traumatic breakage of the batteries, was observed in a patient with a permanent pacemaker, followed by rapid ingravescence. The cause of this complication is discussed. Chemical inflammation was noted soon after the pacemaker ceased to function. Initially this was similar to the not uncommon bacterial inflammation noted in such patients. Here, of course, the pacemaker usually continues to work, and its replacement is optional, whereas in the reported case is an emergency matter. In situations where tissue distress in the pouch is accompanied by inflammation, therefore, thought should be given to the possibility that, even if the batteries are still working, the cause may be chemical or electrochemical rather than septic, and than sudden breakdown of the generator may be expected. PMID:917334

  4. Detecting neoplastic development in the hamster cheek pouch using Fourier domain low coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Robert N.; Robles, Francisco; Chen, Xiaoxin; Wax, Adam

    2009-02-01

    Fourier Domain Low Coherence Interferometry (fLCI) is an optical technique that recovers depth-resolved spectroscopic information about scatterers. The current fLCI system utilizes a white light Xe arc lamp source, a 4-f interferometer, and an imaging spectrometer at the detection plane to acquire spectra from 256 adjacent spatial points. This configuration permits the acquisition of ultrahigh depth resolution Fourier domain OCT images without the need for any beam scanning. fLCI has traditionally obtained depth-resolved spectral information by performing a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) on the detected spectra, similar to the processing techniques of spectroscopic OCT. We now employ a dual Gaussian window processing method which simultaneously obtains high spectral and temporal resolution, thus avoiding the resolution trade-off normally associated with the STFT. Wavelength dependent variations in scattering intensity are analyzed as a function of depth to obtain structural information about the probed scatterers. We now verify fLCI's ability to distinguish between normal and dysplastic epithelial tissue using the hamster cheek pouch model. Thirty hamsters will have one cheek pouch treated with the known carcinogen DMBA. At the conclusion of the 24 week treatment period the animals will be anesthetized and the cheek pouches will be extracted. We will use the fLCI optical system to measure the neoplastic transformation of the in situ subsurface tissue layers in both the normal and DMBA-treated cheek pouches. Traditional histological analysis will be used to verify the fLCI measurements. Our results will further establish fLCI as an effective method for distinguishing between normal and dysplastic epithelial tissues.

  5. Modulation of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes by ethanolic neem leaf extract during hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Subapriya, R; Velmurugan, B; Nagini, S

    2005-06-01

    Chemoprevention by medicinal plants is a promising approach for controlling cancer. There is substantial evidence to indicate that chemopreventive agents exert their anticarcinogenic effects by modulation of phase I and phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. Therefore, we examined the chemopreventive potential of ethanolic neem leaf extract (ENLE) on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis. Hamsters were divided into four groups of six animals each. The right buccal pouches of animals in Group I were painted with 0.5 per cent DMBA in liquid paraffin three times per week. Animals in Group 2 painted with DMBA as in group 1, received in addition, intragastric administration of ENLE at a concentration of 200 mg/kg bw three times per week on days alternate to DMBA application. Group 3 was given ENLE alone. Animals in Group 4 served as controls. All animals were killed after an experimental period of 14 weeks. Five out of six hamsters painted with DMBA alone developed squamous cell carcinomas in the buccal pouch. The HBP tumours showed an increase in phase I carcinogen activation (cytochrome P450 and b5) and phase II detoxification enzyme (glutathione-S-transferase, DT-diaphorase and NADPH-diaphorase) activities. In the liver of tumour-bearing animals, enhanced cytochrome P450 and b5 levels were accompanied by a decrease in phase II detoxification enzyme activities. Administration of ENLE effectively suppressed DMBA-induced HBP tumours, decreased cytochrome P450 and b5 levels, and enhanced phase II enzyme activities in the pouch and liver. Our results suggest that the modulation of DMBA metabolism is a possible mechanism for the chemopreventive effects of ethanolic neem leaf extract. PMID:16110755

  6. Modeling Lithium Ion Battery Safety: Venting of Pouch Cells; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram.; Yang, Chuanbo.; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2013-07-01

    This report documents the successful completion of the NREL July milestone entitled “Modeling Lithium-Ion Battery Safety - Complete Case-Studies on Pouch Cell Venting,” as part of the 2013 Vehicle Technologies Annual Operating Plan with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This work aims to bridge the gap between materials modeling, usually carried out at the sub-continuum scale, and the

  7. Teaching Giant African Pouched Rats to Find Landmines: Operant Conditioning With Real Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart J; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Bach, Håvard; Sully, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Giant African pouched rats recently have been used as mine-detection animals in Mozambique. To provide an example of the wide range of problems to which operant conditioning procedures can be applied and to illustrate the common challenges often faced in applying those procedures, this manuscript briefly describes how the rats are trained and used operationally. To date, the rats have performed well and it appears they can play a valuable role in humanitarian demining. PMID:22532890

  8. Teaching giant african pouched rats to find landmines: operant conditioning with real consequences.

    PubMed

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart J; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Bach, Håvard; Sully, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Giant African pouched rats recently have been used as mine-detection animals in Mozambique. To provide an example of the wide range of problems to which operant conditioning procedures can be applied and to illustrate the common challenges often faced in applying those procedures, this manuscript briefly describes how the rats are trained and used operationally. To date, the rats have performed well and it appears they can play a valuable role in humanitarian demining. PMID:22532890

  9. Effects of chlorhexidine on the structure and permeability of hamster cheek pouch mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, B.V.; Squier, C.A.; Hall, B.K.

    1984-10-01

    This study examined the effects of chlorhexidine (CHD) on the clinical appearance, morphology, and in vitro permeability of hamster cheek pouch mucosa. The cheek pouches were treated daily for 3 weeks with topical applications of saline, 0.2% CHD, or 2.0% CHD. Treatment with 2.0% CHD resulted in the formation of discrete white lesions in every animal in the group, whereas no changes were identified in any animal treated with 0.2% CHD or saline. Upon microscopic examination it was determined that treatment with 2.0% CHD resulted in a statistically significant increase in epithelial thickness, when compared to the other groups, and the lesions were found to consist of hyperplastic areas of epithelium with associated inflammatory cell accumulations. Daily treatments with 2.0% CHD, 0.2% CHD or saline had no effect on the very low permeability of cheek pouch mucosa to /sup 14/C-CHD. However, treatment with 2.0% CHD resulted in decreased permeability to /sup 3/H/sub 2/O when compared to the other groups. Treatment with 2.0% CHD also resulted in a thickened permeability barrier, as determined using a tracer, horseradish peroxidase. It is concluded that topical applications of 0.2% T CHD have no detectable effect on cheek-pouch mucosa while applications of 2.0% CHD result in hyperplasia and a decrease in mucosal permeability. Results suggest that CHD should be used with caution clinically and at a concentration of 0.2% or less.

  10. Pouched Rats' Detection of Tuberculosis in Human Sputum: Comparison to Culturing and Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Amanda; Weetjens, Bart J.; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Reither, Klaus; Makingi, George; Jubitana, Maureen; Kazwala, Rudovick; Mfinanga, Godfrey S.; Kahwa, Amos; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Setting. Tanzania. Objective. To compare microscopy as conducted in direct observation of treatment, short course centers to pouched rats as detectors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Design. Ten pouched rats were trained to detect tuberculosis in sputum using operant conditioning techniques. The rats evaluated 910 samples previously evaluated by smear microscopy. All samples were also evaluated through culturing and multiplex polymerase chain reaction was performed on culture growths to classify the bacteria. Results. The patientwise sensitivity of microscopy was 58.0%, and the patient-wise specificity was 97.3%. Used as a group of 10 with a cutoff (defined as the number of rat indications to classify a sample as positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis) of 1, the rats increased new case detection by 46.8% relative to microscopy alone. The average samplewise sensitivity of the individual rats was 68.4% (range 61.1–73.8%), and the mean specificity was 87.3% (range 84.7–90.3%). Conclusion. These results suggest that pouched rats are a valuable adjunct to, and may be a viable substitute for, sputum smear microscopy as a tuberculosis diagnostic in resource-poor countries. PMID:22848808

  11. Comparative rice seed toxicity tests using filter paper, growth pouch-tm, and seed tray methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, W

    1993-02-01

    Paper substrate, especially circular filter paper placed inside a Petri dish, has long been used for the plant seed toxicity test (PSTT). Although this method is simple and inexpensive, recent evidence indicates that it gives results that are significantly different from those obtained using a method that does not involve paper, especially when testing metal cations. The study compared PSTT using three methods: filter paper, Growth Pouch-TM, and seed tray. The Growth Pouch-TM is a commercially available device. The seed tray is a newly designed plastic receptacle placed inside a Petri dish. The results of the Growth Pouch-TM method showed no toxic effects on rice for Ag up to 40 mg L(-1) and Cd up to 20 mg L(-1). Using the seed tray method, IC50 (50% inhibitory effect concentration) values were 0.55 and 1.4 mg L(-1) for Ag and Cd, respectively. Although results of filter paper and seed tray methods were nearly identical for NaF, Cr(VI), and phenol, the toxicities of cations Ag and Cd were reduced by using the filter paper method; IC50 values were 22 and 18 mg L(-1), respectively. The results clearly indicate that paper substrate is not advisable for PSTT. PMID:24227383

  12. Comparative rice seed toxicity tests using filter paper, growth pouch-tm, and seed tray methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.

    1993-01-01

    Paper substrate, especially circular filter paper placed inside a Petri dish, has long been used for the plant seed toxicity test (PSTT). Although this method is simple and inexpensive, recent evidence indicates that it gives results that are significantly different from those obtained using a method that does not involve paper, especially when testing metal cations. The study compared PSTT using three methods: filter paper, Growth Pouch-TM, and seed tray. The Growth Pouch-TM is a commercially available device. The seed tray is a newly designed plastic receptacle placed inside a Petri dish. The results of the Growth Pouch-TM method showed no toxic effects on rice for Ag up to 40 mg L-1 and Cd up to 20 mg L-1. Using the seed tray method, IC50 (50% inhibitory effect concentration) values were 0.55 and 1.4 mg L-1 for Ag and Cd, respectively. Although results of filter paper and seed tray methods were nearly identical for NaF, Cr(VI), and phenol, the toxicities of cations Ag and Cd were reduced by using the filter paper method; IC50 values were 22 and 18 mg L-1, respectively. The results clearly indicate that paper substrate is not advisable for PSTT.

  13. Initial evaluation of fracturing oil shale with propellants for in situ retorting, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lekas, M.A.; Lekas, J.M.; Strickland, F.G.

    1991-05-01

    A series of field experiments was carried out to gather preliminary information on the use of propellant charges to create horizontal fractures in oil shale beds for in situ retorting. Development of a propellant tool specifically designed to create horizontal fractures, and testing of various sizes and designs of the tool to create fractures in oil shale beds were carried out simultaneously. Ten prototype tools with energy yields from 2 pounds to 60 pounds were fired at depths ranging from 10 feet to 60 feet. Ten preshot observation holes and 13 postshot core holes were used to gather information and to serve as injection wells to inject air into the formation for permeability tests. Most shots vented large volumes of gas or water from observation holes 13 to 20 feet distant, indicating that a horizontal fracture communicating from the shot point to the observation hole had been created. Shot-related horizontal fracturing was noted in most core holes at the same depth as the shot point. Air injection tests on all holes showed a significant increase in permeability after the shots.

  14. Shale oil from the LLNL pilot retort: Metal ions as markers for water and dust

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, T.T.; Duewer, T.I.; King, K.J.; Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    A metal ion found primarily in one of the three phases (oil, water, or dust) can serve as a marker for that phase. Emulsified water contains most of the magnesium detected in a shale oil. Extraction with saturated salt solution removes most of that Mg. The Mg content of retort water and the percentage of water in the oil (by ASTM D-4006) provides a good estimate of an oil`s Mg content. Mineral matter elements with poorly water soluble carbonates (or oxides) at pH 8 (calcium, for example) serve as markers for dust. When the water is separated from the main and light oil fractions before adding the heavy fraction containing dust, a much drier oil can be obtained. However, when done in this way, a powder containing Ca and Si remains in the oil; it cannot be completely removed even by filtering through a 0.24-{mu} frit. Iron, and certain other transition metal ions, is quite oil soluble. Extraction with dilute nitric acid to remove basic amines reduces the Fe content of shale oil. Unlike carboxylate- complexed metal ions in crude oils, the iron in shale oil does not extract efficiently into an aqueous EDTA solution (pH 5.9). Distillation of shale oil leaves most of the iron and other metals behind in the vacuum residum. Shale oil corrodes the hottest condenser`s steel interior; this is the chief source of iron in the oil.

  15. Developing the Geokinetics/Department of Energy horizontal in situ retorting process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lekas, M.A.

    1985-06-01

    This report summarizes work performed under a cooperative agreement between Geokinetics Inc., and the US Department of Energy, spanning on eight year period. A large body of experimental data was generated which has been previously reported in a series of published and unpublished reports, as indicated in Chapter VII. The report summarizes research work performed from April of 1975 to August 15, 1985, but emphasizes data generated during the final three years of the project, when five large retorts were tested. The report draws conclusions based upon the total program, including work performed by Geokinetics prior to entering into the Cooperative Agreement, and presents the initial parameters useful for scaleup and design of a commercial scale operation, including data useful for assessing the environmental impacts and criteria for mitigation of such impacts. Specific details concerning the various aspects of the program may be obtained from the many previous reports that have been generated from the date of project initiation. A list of these reports is presented in Chapter VII. 28 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Self-cementing properties of oil shale solid heat carrier retorting residue.

    PubMed

    Talviste, Peeter; Sedman, Annette; Mõtlep, Riho; Kirsimäe, Kalle

    2013-06-01

    Oil shale-type organic-rich sedimentary rocks can be pyrolysed to produce shale oil. The pyrolysis of oil shale using solid heat carrier (SHC) technology is accompanied by large amount of environmentally hazardous solid residue-black ash-which needs to be properly landfilled. Usage of oil shale is growing worldwide, and the employment of large SHC retorts increases the amount of black ash type of waste, but little is known about its physical and chemical properties. The objectives of this research were to study the composition and self-cementing properties of black ash by simulating different disposal strategies in order to find the most appropriate landfilling method. Three disposal methods were simulated in laboratory experiment: hydraulic disposal with and without grain size separation, and dry dumping of moist residue. Black ash exhibited good self-cementing properties with maximum compressive strength values of >6 MPa after 90 days. About 80% of strength was gained in 30 days. However, the coarse fraction (>125 µm) did not exhibit any cementation, thus the hydraulic disposal with grain size separation should be avoided. The study showed that self-cementing properties of black ash are governed by the hydration of secondary calcium silicates (e.g. belite), calcite and hydrocalumite. PMID:23528998

  17. Effects of stripped oil shale retort water on fishes, birds, and mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Nystrom, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus Water), coturnix quail (Coturnix coturnix Teminck and Schlegal), fathead minnows (Pimphales promelas Rafinesque), and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri Richardson) were subjected to various exposures of stripped oil shale retort water (SRW). Chronic low-level exposures of all experimental animals to SRW revealed no adverse histological effects attributable to SRW. Also, production and development of second generation fathead minnows and coturnix quail exposed to SRW was normal. Subacute exposure of rainbow trout to SRW produced ultrastructural changes detected by transmission, scanning, and freeze fracture electron microscopy) in the gill, liver, and kidney tissues. The gills showed a swelling of secondary lamellae, disorganization of normal tissue architecture, and sloughing of respiratory cells. The liver contained lamellar bodies not seen in the controls. Relatively large, electron dense, membrane-bounded deposits were present in proximal tubule cells of the kidney. Sodium arsenite (a significant component of SRW) was shown to cause swelling of granular endosplasmic reticulum in quail liver tissue with an acute exposure. This effect could be related to the fact that arsenic inhibits ATP production, which would decrease the ability of the sodium pumps to maintain a normal osmotic balance.

  18. FINGERPRINTING INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ORGANOARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT AND PROCESS VOTERS USING A LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPH COUPLED WITH AN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AS A DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, Richard H.; Brinckman, Frederick E.; Jewett, Kenneth L.

    1981-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic and organoarsenic compounds were speciated in seven oil shale retort and process waters, including samples from simulated, true and modified in situ processes, using a high performance liquid chromatograph automatically coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption detector. The molecular forms of arsenic at ppm levels (({micro}g/mL) in these waters are identified for the first time, and shown to include arsenate, methylarsonic acid and phenylarsonic acid. An arsenic-specific fingerprint chromatogram of each retort or process water studied has significant impliestions regarding those arsenical species found and those marginally detected, such as dimethylarsinic acid and the suspected carcinogen arsenite. The method demonstrated suggests future means for quantifying environmental impacts of bioactive organometal species involved in oil shale retorting technology.

  19. Laboratory study of the effects of combustion gases on retorting of Green River oil shale with superheated steam

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, A.L.; Bullen, E.A.; Jacobs, H.R.

    1983-04-01

    The leached zone of the Parachute Creek member of the Piceance Basin in the Green River Formation has a unique natural porosity that makes it a likely source for in-situ production of oil from oil shale by injection of superheated steam. The Equity Oil Co. of Salt Lake City, in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Energy, carried out field tests using surface generated steam. Difficulties in delivering steam of sufficiently high temperature to the formation resulted in an experiment which was only marginally successful yielding less than 1 percent of the estimated 300,000 barrels of oil in place. In 1981, personnel at Sandia National Laboratory suggested that a downhole steam generator which could produce steam at temperatures in excess of 1000/sup 0/F (538/sup 0/C) at depth could well solve the temperature problem. In order to evaluate the effects of combustion gases which would be injected along with steam, should a downhole steam generator be used, laboratory studies have been completed using steam diluted with CO/sub 2/ and with CO/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ as the heating medium. Results of experiments in an autoclave reactor and in a laboratory retort are reported. The temperature, residence time, and partial pressure of steam are the parameters which effect oil yield and oil quality. Oil properties are reported for several experimental conditions and include oil yield, boiling point distributions, pour points, gravity, and elemental and hydrocarbon-type analyses. Both the autoclave and laboratory retort experiments indicate that CO/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ do not take a reactive part in the formation of oils except as they dilute the steam. However, the presence of CO/sub 2/ in the gaseous atmosphere during retorting does promote a low-temperature transformation of dolomite to calcite in the inorganic matrix of the oil shale.

  20. Black tea polyphenols protect against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Letchoumy, P Vidjaya; Chandra Mohan, K V P; Kumaraguruparan, R; Hara, Y; Nagini, S

    2006-01-01

    Dietary chemoprevention has emerged as a cost-effective approach for cancer control. We evaluated the chemopreventive effects of black tea polyphenols (Polyphenon-B) administration during the preinitiation phase of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the buccal pouch and the concentration of lipid peroxides, protein carbonyl, and the antioxidant status in the buccal pouch, liver and erythrocytes were used as biomarkers of chemoprevention. All the hamsters painted with DMBA alone for 14 weeks developed buccal pouch carcinomas associated with increased expression of PCNA, diminished lipid and protein oxidation, and enhanced antioxidant status. In the liver and erythrocytes of tumor-bearing animals, enhanced oxidation of lipids and proteins was accompanied by compromised antioxidant defenses. Dietary administration of Polyphenon-B effectively suppressed DMBA-induced HBP carcinogenesis as revealed by decreased incidence of tumours and PCNA expression. In addition, Polyphenon-B modulated lipid and protein oxidation and enhanced the antioxidant status in the pouch, liver, and erythrocytes. We suggest that Polyphenon-B exerts its chemopreventive effects by inhibiting cell proliferation in the target tissue and modulating the oxidant-antioxidant status in the target as well as in host tissues. PMID:17120615

  1. Means and method for producing hydrocarbons from an earth formation during the RF retorting of a hydrocarbon stratum

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, K.D.

    1987-01-27

    A method is described for obtaining hydrocarbon liquid from a hydrocarbon strata of an earth formation traversed by a borehole, the hydrocarbon strata being subjected to RF electromagnetic energy retorting, comprising the steps of: (a) forming metal tubing so as to create a tubing coil having a predetermined electrical inductance, (b) connecting straight metal tubing with the metal tubing of step (a) so that the tubing of steps (a) and (b) form a production string, and (c) pumping the hydrocarbon liquid from the borehole through the production string to the surface of the earth formation.

  2. Fluidized-bed retorting of Colorado oil shale: Topical report. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Albulescu, P.; Mazzella, G.

    1987-06-01

    In support of the research program in converting oil shale into useful forms of energy, the US Department of Energy is developing systems models of oil shale processing plants. These models will be used to project the most attractive combination of process alternatives and identify future direction for R and D efforts. With the objective of providing technical and economic input for such systems models, Foster Wheeler was contracted to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates for commercial scale processing plants to produce syncrude from oil shales via various routes. This topical report summarizes the conceptual design of an integrated oil shale processing plant based on fluidized bed retorting of Colorado oil shale. The plant has a nominal capacity of 50,000 barrels per operating day of syncrude product, derived from oil shale feed having a Fischer Assay of 30 gallons per ton. The scope of the plant encompasses a grassroots facility which receives run of the mine oil shale, delivers product oil to storage, and disposes of the processed spent shale. In addition to oil shale feed, the battery limits input includes raw water, electric power, and natural gas to support plant operations. Design of the individual processing units was based on non-confidential information derived from published literature sources and supplemented by input from selected process licensors. The integrated plant design is described in terms of the individual process units and plant support systems. The estimated total plant investment is similarly detailed by plant section and an estimate of the annual operating requirements and costs is provided. In addition, the process design assumptions and uncertainties are documented and recommendations for process alternatives, which could improve the overall plant economics, are discussed.

  3. Effects of thermal maturation on steroid hydrocarbons as determined by hydrous pyrolysis of Phosphoria Retort Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewan, M. D.; Bjorøy, M.; Dolcater, D. L.

    1986-09-01

    Hydrous pyrolysis experiments on the Phosphoria Retort Shale generate bitumen extracts and expelled oils that have steroid hydrocarbons with m/z 217-, 231-, and 253-mass Chromatographic distributions that are similar to those of bitumens and crude oils in the natural system. These experiments agree with the natural observations that diasteroid hydrocarbons increase relative to their regular counterparts with increasing thermal stress, while their C 27 through C 29 proportionality shows a slight enrichment in C 27. Relative concentrations of 20S to 20R configurations of 24-ethyl-14α,17α-cholestane show the expected increase with increasing thermal stress into the early part of the primary oil generation stage, but thereafter decrease with increasing thermal stress. If this reversal is found in high maturity sections of the natural system, the utility of this transformation as a maturity index will be limited. Triaromatic- to monoaromatic-steroid hydrocarbon concentrations increase with increasing thermal stress as observed in the natural system. Preferred migration of monoaromatic steroid hydrocarbons from bitumen extracts to expelled oils places considerable doubt on currently employed kinetic models for this aromatization reaction. As in the natural system, the experiments show relative concentrations of low-molecular weight- to high-molecular weight-triaromatic steroid hydrocarbons to increase with increasing thermal stress. Assuming a first-order reaction rate, the apparent activation energy and pre-exponential factor for this apparent side-chain cleavage reaction are 175.59 kJ mol -1 and 2.82 × 10 13hr-1, respectively. These kinetic parameters are geologically reasonable and are similar to those for the overall generation of expelled oil.

  4. Irrigation experiments with produced waters from the retorting of oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1980-12-01

    The research described herein was conducted by Geokinetics to qualitatively assess the tolerance of native and certain introduced species of vegetation to irrigation with produced water from the retorting of oil shale. Two separate experiments were conducted at the Kamp Kerogen field site in Uintah County, Utah. The results indicate possible effects on vegetation that a prolonged exposure to produced water would have. The two simple experiments were initiated during the summer of 1979. It was expected that irrigation with produced water would eventually result in detrimental effects to the plants receiving it; the concentrations of boron, molybdenum, arsenic, oil and other constituents in untreated production waters are high enough to likely cause damage to plants. In one experiment a 27 foot by 27 foot plot of native vegetation was irrigated with one inch of produced water per week for five weeks using a lawn sprinkler. Grasses and shrubs within the test plot appeared to have died; germination of annual plants was greatly inhibited. In the other experiment, 30 container-grown seedlings ranging in height from 0.3 feet to 3.0 feet were transplanted. Six species of broadleaf, deciduous trees not native to the test site were represented by five seedlings each. All 30 trees received well water irrigation for one month, after which four trees of each species were irrigated with produced water for seven weeks. One tree of each species continued to receive well water throughout the experiment; only two of those trees survived the summer of 1979. All six species appeared to have been adversely affected by produced water. The horse chesnut trees were the hardiest of the species planted. Most of the 30 trees, including those irrigated with well water, did not survive the winter season.

  5. Association between gastro-intestinal symptoms and menstruation in patients with ileal pouches

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Wu, Xian-rui; Barber, Matthew D.; Queener, Elaine; Graff, Lesley; Shen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Gastro-intestinal (GI) symptoms are often experienced by healthy women during menstruation. An increased frequency of GI symptoms during menses has also been reported in women with irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, IBD patients with restorative proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomoses (IPAA) have not been studied. We aimed to examine the association between GI symptoms before and during menses in patients with IPAA, and to assess factors for exacerbation of GI symptoms in those patients. Methods: Adult women recorded in the Pouchitis Registry were invited to participate in a mailed survey. Participants reported on GI symptoms 1–5 days prior to- (pre-menses) and during the days of their menses in recent months. Demographic and clinical variables were obtained through the survey and chart review. Results: One hundred and twenty-eight (21.3%) out of 600 women with IPAA responded to the survey questionnaire. Forty-three (33.5%) were excluded for reasons including post-menopausal (n = 25), hysterectomy (n = 14) and use of contraceptives (n = 4). Abdominal pain (P = 0.001), diarrhea (P = 0.021), and urgency (P = 0.031) were more commonly reported during menses than pre-menses by the participants. Only a history of painful menses was significantly associated with increased GI symptoms during menses for patients with ileal pouch (odds ratio = 5.67; 95% confidence interval: 1.41–22.88; P = 0.015). Conclusion: GI symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and urgency are commonly associated with menses in patients with ileo-anal pouch. Painful menses may be associated with worsening of GI symptoms. PMID:25016379

  6. Critical review, comparative evaluation, cost update, and baseline data development services in oil shale mining, in-situ liquefaction, and above ground retorting processes from the environmental, permitting, and licensing viewpoints. Volume I. Oil-shale retorting process engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-15

    The present volume is the first of a series of three constituting the title study. It provides a brief but thorough description of six Oil Shale Retorting Processes, namely: Paraho, Tosco II, Oxidental Modified In-Situ, Rio Blanco, Union Oil, and Superior Oil. The processes are treated at Unit Operations level, including operations such as Mining, Crushing, Screening, Conveying, Hydrogenation (or Upgrading), Hydrogen Manufacturing Plant, Amine Treating, Low-Btu Gas Treating, Tail Gas Treating, Sulfur Recovery, Wastewater Treatment, Sour Waste Stripping, Refining, Spent Shale Disposal, etc. The present first volume of the study provides most process engineering information required in order for Control Requirements, at specific points of a given unit operations flowsheet, to be fully assessed. Flow sheets for unit operations presented in the present Volume I are only conceptual and qualitative. Some quantitative data on volumeric flow rates of specific flow streams are occasionally given. However, no systematic effort has been presently made to develop a numerical data base on process flow streams. This has been done in a much more systematic and thorough manner in another FMR study performed on behalf of DOE under title Source Terms for the Health and Environmental Effects Document (HEED) for Oil Shale - 1982. Additional original quantitative analysis has been performed by FMR towards developing material balances for specific oil shale feeds into specific retorting processes.

  7. Coverage of Gingival Fenestration Using Modified Pouch and Tunnel Technique: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pendor, Sunil; Baliga, Vidya; Muthukumaraswamy, A.; Dhadse, Prasad V.; Ganji, Kiran Kumar; Thakare, Kaustubh

    2013-01-01

    Gingival fenestration defects are a rare phenomenon. Gingival fenestration means the exposure of the tooth due to loss of the overlying bone and gingiva. Though treatment of mucosal fenestration occurring in association with chronic periapical inflammation has been reported previously, the occurrence and treatment of gingival fenestration have not been documented in great detail. This report describes the occurrence of a gingival fenestration that developed secondarily to a gutka chewing habit. Treatment of the fenestration along with coverage of an adjacent recession defect in a single-step procedure using a pouch and tunnel technique is described. PMID:23936687

  8. Controversies in J Pouch Surgery for Ulcerative Colitis: A Focus on Handsewn Versus Stapled Anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Nobel, Tamar; Khaitov, Sergey; Greenstein, Alexander J

    2016-09-01

    The accepted current standard for treatment of medically refractory ulcerative colitis is total proctocolectomy with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for restoration of continence. There are 2 techniques by which the anastomosis can be performed, including handsewn and stapled. Handsewn anastomosis with mucosectomy was the first method described; however, it has been associated with significant incontinence. The double-stapled anastomosis was developed in response to improve postoperative function. Controversy remains as to which technique is superior as both have disadvantages. This review article addresses differences between the 2 methodologies in relation to postoperative complications, anorectal physiology, functional outcomes, and oncological safety. PMID:27542137

  9. Use of the Anaerobic Pouch in Isolating Clostridium botulinum Spores from Fresh Meats

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Richard A.; Bladel, Bendt O.; Zingelmann, Walter J.

    1966-01-01

    The anaerobic film pouch was demonstrated to be an effective device for the primary isolation of Clostridium botulinum types A and B spores from raw pork, beef, and chicken. Optimal pasteurization of these meats (for reduction of nonspore microflora without affecting indigenous putrefactive anaerobic spore levels) was 50 min at 60 C. C. botulinum spores were recovered with good precision from meat samples inoculated with mixtures of C. botulinum and Putrefactive Anaerobe 3679 at 1:1 and at 1:99 ratios. Verification of C. botulinum isolates was accomplished by protection testing of subcultures in mice. PMID:5335387

  10. Using Giant African Pouched Rats to Detect Tuberculosis in Human Sputum Samples: 2009 Findings

    PubMed Central

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart J.; Cox, Christophe; Mgode, Georgies; Jubitana, Maureen; Kazwala, Rudovic; Mfinanga, Godfrey S.; Huis in ‘t Veld, Diana

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, giant African pouched rats trained to detect tuberculosis (TB) evaluated sputum samples from 10,523 patients whose sputum had previously been evaluated by smear microscopy. Microscopists found 13.3% of the patients to be TB-positive. Simulated second-line screening by the rats revealed 620 new TB-positive patients, increasing the case detection rate by 44%. These data suggest that the rats may be useful for TB detection in developing countries, although further research is needed. PMID:21118940