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Sample records for retrieval knowledge center

  1. EM-21 Retrieval Knowledge Center: Waste Retrieval Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, Andrew P.; Rinker, Michael W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Minichan, Richard L.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Martin, Bruce A.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Saldivar, Eloy; Mullen, O Dennis; Chapman, Noel F.; Wells, Beric E.; Gibbons, Peter W.

    2009-04-10

    EM-21 is the Waste Processing Division of the Office of Engineering and Technology, within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). In August of 2008, EM-21 began an initiative to develop a Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) to provide the DOE, high level waste retrieval operators, and technology developers with centralized and focused location to share knowledge and expertise that will be used to address retrieval challenges across the DOE complex. The RKC is also designed to facilitate information sharing across the DOE Waste Site Complex through workshops, and a searchable database of waste retrieval technology information. The database may be used to research effective technology approaches for specific retrieval tasks and to take advantage of the lessons learned from previous operations. It is also expected to be effective for remaining current with state-of-the-art of retrieval technologies and ongoing development within the DOE Complex. To encourage collaboration of DOE sites with waste retrieval issues, the RKC team is co-led by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Two RKC workshops were held in the Fall of 2008. The purpose of these workshops was to define top level waste retrieval functional areas, exchange lessons learned, and develop a path forward to support a strategic business plan focused on technology needs for retrieval. The primary participants involved in these workshops included retrieval personnel and laboratory staff that are associated with Hanford and Savannah River Sites since the majority of remaining DOE waste tanks are located at these sites. This report summarizes and documents the results of the initial RKC workshops. Technology challenges identified from these workshops and presented here are expected to be a key component to defining future RKC-directed tasks designed to facilitate tank waste retrieval solutions.

  2. Object-Centered Knowledge Representation and Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panyr, Jiri

    1996-01-01

    Discusses object-centered knowledge representation and information retrieval. Highlights include semantic networks; frames; predicative (declarative) and associative knowledge; cluster analysis; creation of subconcepts and superconcepts; automatic classification; hierarchies and pseudohierarchies; graph theory; term classification; clustering of…

  3. EM-31 RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER MEETING REPORT: MOBILIZE AND DISLODGE TANK WASTE HEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, A.

    2010-02-16

    The Retrieval Knowledge Center sponsored a meeting in June 2009 to review challenges and gaps to retrieval of tank waste heels. The facilitated meeting was held at the Savannah River Research Campus with personnel broadly representing tank waste retrieval knowledge at Hanford, Savannah River, Idaho, and Oak Ridge. This document captures the results of this meeting. In summary, it was agreed that the challenges to retrieval of tank waste heels fell into two broad categories: (1) mechanical heel waste retrieval methodologies and equipment and (2) understanding and manipulating the heel waste (physical, radiological, and chemical characteristics) to support retrieval options and subsequent processing. Recent successes and lessons from deployments of the Sand and Salt Mantis vehicles as well as retrieval of C-Area tanks at Hanford were reviewed. Suggestions to address existing retrieval approaches that utilize a limited set of tools and techniques are included in this report. The meeting found that there had been very little effort to improve or integrate the multiple proven or new techniques and tools available into a menu of available methods for rapid insertion into baselines. It is recommended that focused developmental efforts continue in the two areas underway (low-level mixing evaluation and pumping slurries with large solid materials) and that projects to demonstrate new/improved tools be launched to outfit tank farm operators with the needed tools to complete tank heel retrievals effectively and efficiently. This document describes the results of a meeting held on June 3, 2009 at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina to identify technology gaps and potential technology solutions to retrieving high-level waste (HLW) heels from waste tanks within the complex of sites run by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The meeting brought together personnel with extensive tank waste retrieval knowledge from DOE's four major waste sites - Hanford, Savannah River

  4. THE RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER EVALUATION OF LOW TANK LEVEL MIXING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK RETRIEVAL 10516

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, A.

    2009-12-08

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Complex has over two-hundred underground storage tanks containing over 80-million gallons of legacy waste from the production of nuclear weapons. The majority of the waste is located at four major sites across the nation and is planned for treatment over a period of almost forty years. The DOE Office of Technology Innovation & Development within the Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sponsors technology research and development programs to support processing advancements and technology maturation designed to improve the costs and schedule for disposal of the waste and closure of the tanks. Within the waste processing focus area are numerous technical initiatives which included the development of a suite of waste removal technologies to address the need for proven equipment and techniques to remove high level radioactive wastes from the waste tanks that are now over fifty years old. In an effort to enhance the efficiency of waste retrieval operations, the DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation & Development funded an effort to improve communications and information sharing between the DOE's major waste tank locations as it relates to retrieval. The task, dubbed the Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) was co-lead by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with core team members representing the Oak Ridge and Idaho sites, as well as, site contractors responsible for waste tank operations. One of the greatest challenges to the processing and closure of many of the tanks is complete removal of all tank contents. Sizeable challenges exist for retrieving waste from High Level Waste (HLW) tanks; with complications that are not normally found with tank retrieval in commercial applications. Technologies currently in use for waste retrieval are generally adequate for bulk removal; however, removal of tank heels, the materials settled in the bottom of the tank, using the same

  5. Knowledge Retrieval Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Kamran

    1998-01-01

    Excalibur RetrievalWare offers true knowledge retrieval solutions. Its fundamental technologies, Adaptive Pattern Recognition Processing and Semantic Networks, have capabilities for knowledge discovery and knowledge management of full-text, structured and visual information. The software delivers a combination of accuracy, extensibility,…

  6. Representation of Legal Knowledge for Conceptual Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, George R.; deBessonet, Cary G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes traditional legal information retrieval systems--Juris, Lexis, Westlaw--and several new rule-based, knowledge-based, legal knowledge reasoning, and analytical legal information systems--Waterman and Peterson's Legal Decisionmaking System, Hafner's Legal Information Retrieval System, McCarty's TAXMAN, and the deBessonet representation of…

  7. Knowledge Retrieval through Virtual Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammelgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) manages knowledge retrieval by employees when they need to access documents written by colleagues in geographically distant units. CSC's establishment of virtual communities of practice facilitates the coordination of knowledge, and minimises contextual gaps between senders and…

  8. Introduction and Overview: Visualization, Retrieval, and Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rorvig, Mark; Lunin, Lois F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes this perspectives issue that was designed to provide an historical background to visualization in information retrieval. Topics include knowledge, digital technology, the first visual interface to a collection at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), theoretical foundations, and applications. (LRW)

  9. Knowledge Discovery in Spatial Cartographic Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Lixin

    1999-01-01

    Describes a prototype system--GeoMatch--that allows users to interactively define geographic areas of interest on a background map and to define, qualitatively or quantitatively, the relationship between the user-defined area and the map coverage. The knowledge discovery in database (KDD) factor is analyzed in the retrieval process. The MARC…

  10. Problem solving as intelligent retrieval from distributed knowledge sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zhengxin

    1987-01-01

    Distributed computing in intelligent systems is investigated from a different perspective. From the viewpoint that problem solving can be viewed as intelligent knowledge retrieval, the use of distributed knowledge sources in intelligent systems is proposed.

  11. The Creation of New Knowledge by Information Retrieval and Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Roy

    1989-01-01

    Reviews previous work on producing knowledge by the use of information retrieval or classification schemes, and describes techniques by which hidden knowledge may be retrieved, i.e., serendipity in browsing and use of appropriate search strategies. Possible future methods based on relational indexing or artificial intelligence are also explored.…

  12. An Ebola virus-centered knowledge base.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Maulik R; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), of the family Filoviridae viruses, is a NIAID category A, lethal human pathogen. It is responsible for causing Ebola virus disease (EVD) that is a severe hemorrhagic fever and has a cumulative death rate of 41% in the ongoing epidemic in West Africa. There is an ever-increasing need to consolidate and make available all the knowledge that we possess on EBOV, even if it is conflicting or incomplete. This would enable biomedical researchers to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease and help develop tools for efficient diagnosis and effective treatment. In this article, we present our approach for the development of an Ebola virus-centered Knowledge Base (Ebola-KB) using Linked Data and Semantic Web Technologies. We retrieve and aggregate knowledge from several open data sources, web services and biomedical ontologies. This knowledge is transformed to RDF, linked to the Bio2RDF datasets and made available through a SPARQL 1.1 Endpoint. Ebola-KB can also be explored using an interactive Dashboard visualizing the different perspectives of this integrated knowledge. We showcase how different competency questions, asked by domain users researching the druggability of EBOV, can be formulated as SPARQL Queries or answered using the Ebola-KB Dashboard. PMID:26055098

  13. An Ebola virus-centered knowledge base

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Maulik R.; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), of the family Filoviridae viruses, is a NIAID category A, lethal human pathogen. It is responsible for causing Ebola virus disease (EVD) that is a severe hemorrhagic fever and has a cumulative death rate of 41% in the ongoing epidemic in West Africa. There is an ever-increasing need to consolidate and make available all the knowledge that we possess on EBOV, even if it is conflicting or incomplete. This would enable biomedical researchers to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease and help develop tools for efficient diagnosis and effective treatment. In this article, we present our approach for the development of an Ebola virus-centered Knowledge Base (Ebola-KB) using Linked Data and Semantic Web Technologies. We retrieve and aggregate knowledge from several open data sources, web services and biomedical ontologies. This knowledge is transformed to RDF, linked to the Bio2RDF datasets and made available through a SPARQL 1.1 Endpoint. Ebola-KB can also be explored using an interactive Dashboard visualizing the different perspectives of this integrated knowledge. We showcase how different competency questions, asked by domain users researching the druggability of EBOV, can be formulated as SPARQL Queries or answered using the Ebola-KB Dashboard. Database URL: http://ebola.semanticscience.org. PMID:26055098

  14. Conventional and Knowledge-Based Information Retrieval with Prolog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, William; Paz, Noemi

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of PROLOG to program knowledge-based information retrieval systems, in which the knowledge contained in a document is translated into machine processable logic. Several examples of the resulting search process, and the program rules supporting the process, are given. (10 references) (CLB)

  15. Intelligent Focusing in Knowledge Indexing and Retrieval: The Relatedness Tool

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Ron D.; Komorowski, Henryk Jan; Barr, Charles E; Greenes, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Most present day information retrieval systems use the presence or absence of certain words to decide which documents are appropriate for a user's query. This approach has had certain successes, but it fails to capture relationships between concepts represented by the words, and hence reduces the potential specificity of both indexing and searching of documents. A richer representation of the semantics of documents and queries, and methods for reasoning about these representations, have been provided by artificial intelligence. Navigational tools for browsing and authoring knowledge bases (KB's) add a convenient technique for focusing in the complex landscape of semantic representations. The center of such representations is usually a frame or a semantic network system. We are developing a prototype Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) taxonomy to represent objects and relationships in medicine. One focus of our research is improved methods for indexing and querying repositories of biomedical literature. The technique which we propose is based on the notion of relatedness of concepts. To this end we define heuristics which find related concepts and apply it to the UMLS taxonomy. Preliminary results from experiments with the implemented heuristics demonstrate its potential usefulness.

  16. Apraxia impairs intentional retrieval of incidentally acquired motor knowledge.

    PubMed

    Dovern, Anna; Fink, Gereon R; Saliger, Jochen; Karbe, Hans; Koch, Iring; Weiss, Peter H

    2011-06-01

    Apraxia caused by left hemispheric stroke typically impairs skilled sequential movements. After stroke, apraxic patients need to reacquire motor skills by motor learning. The current study assessed for the first time incidental motor sequence learning in apraxic patients. Forty-eight human subjects (henceforth called "patients") with left hemispheric stroke affecting the middle cerebral artery territory (18 with apraxia and 30 without apraxia) and 17 age-matched healthy controls were tested on a visuomanual serial reaction time task. Subjects performed four blocks consisting of repetitions of a complex six element sequence containing ambiguous pairwise transitions before a new and unfamiliar sequence was introduced in block 5. Reaction time (RT) disadvantages in this fifth block indicated incidental sequence-specific motor learning. The intentional retrieval of the learned motor knowledge was assessed subsequently with a free recall task. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) was performed to investigate for the first time the lesion correlates of deficits in learning and retrieving sequential motor knowledge. Despite generally prolonged RTs, apraxic patients showed sequence-specific motor learning as could be observed in nonapraxic patients and healthy controls. However, apraxic patients showed reduced intentional retrieval of the learned sequence. VLSM revealed that impaired intentional retrieval of motor sequence knowledge resulted from dorsal premotor cortex lesions. Apraxic patients showed a dissociation of preserved incidental motor (sequence) learning and deficient intentional retrieval of this incidentally learned motor knowledge. The data suggest that novel approaches for treating apraxia should focus on incidental motor learning, but that automatic rather than intentional retrieval strategies should be enforced. PMID:21632932

  17. Automatic retrieval of bone fracture knowledge using natural language processing.

    PubMed

    Do, Bao H; Wu, Andrew S; Maley, Joan; Biswal, Sandip

    2013-08-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) techniques to extract data from unstructured text into formal computer representations are valuable for creating robust, scalable methods to mine data in medical documents and radiology reports. As voice recognition (VR) becomes more prevalent in radiology practice, there is opportunity for implementing NLP in real time for decision-support applications such as context-aware information retrieval. For example, as the radiologist dictates a report, an NLP algorithm can extract concepts from the text and retrieve relevant classification or diagnosis criteria or calculate disease probability. NLP can work in parallel with VR to potentially facilitate evidence-based reporting (for example, automatically retrieving the Bosniak classification when the radiologist describes a kidney cyst). For these reasons, we developed and validated an NLP system which extracts fracture and anatomy concepts from unstructured text and retrieves relevant bone fracture knowledge. We implement our NLP in an HTML5 web application to demonstrate a proof-of-concept feedback NLP system which retrieves bone fracture knowledge in real time. PMID:23053906

  18. Modes of knowledge acquisition and retrieval in artificial grammar learning.

    PubMed

    Poznanski, Yael; Tzelgov, Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to conceptualize artificial grammar learning (AGL) in terms of two orthogonal dimensions--the mode of knowledge acquisition and the mode of knowledge retrieval--as was done by Perlman and Tzelgov (2006) for sequence learning. Experiment 1 was carried out to validate our experimental task; Experiments 2-4 tested, respectively, performance in the intentional, incidental, and automatic retrieval modes, for each of the three modes of acquisition. Furthermore, signal detection theory (SDT) was used as an analytic tool, consistent with our assumption that the processing of legality-relevant information involves decisions along a continuous dimension of fluency. The results presented support the analysis of AGL in terms of the proposed dimensions. They also indicate that knowledge acquired during training may include many aspects of the presented stimuli (whole strings, relations among elements, etc.). The contribution of the various components to performance depends on both the specific instruction in the acquisition phase and the requirements of the retrieval task. PMID:20063258

  19. Dissipation of 'dark energy' by cortex in knowledge retrieval.

    PubMed

    Capolupo, Antonio; Freeman, Walter J; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    We have devised a thermodynamic model of cortical neurodynamics expressed at the classical level by neural networks and at the quantum level by dissipative quantum field theory. Our model is based on features in the spatial images of cortical activity newly revealed by high-density electrode arrays. We have incorporated the mechanism and necessity for so-called dark energy in knowledge retrieval. We have extended the model first using the Carnot cycle to define our measures for energy, entropy and temperature, and then using the Rankine cycle to incorporate criticality and phase transitions. We describe the dynamics of two interactive fields of neural activity that express knowledge, one at high and the other at low energy density, and the two operators that create and annihilate the fields. We postulate that the extremely high density of energy sequestered briefly in cortical activity patterns can account for the vividness, richness of associations, and emotional intensity of memories recalled by stimuli. PMID:23333569

  20. Knowledge-Based Query Construction Using the CDSS Knowledge Base for Efficient Evidence Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Hussain, Maqbool; Ali, Taqdir; Hussain, Jamil; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Lee, Sungyoung; Kang, Byeong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Finding appropriate evidence to support clinical practices is always challenging, and the construction of a query to retrieve such evidence is a fundamental step. Typically, evidence is found using manual or semi-automatic methods, which are time-consuming and sometimes make it difficult to construct knowledge-based complex queries. To overcome the difficulty in constructing knowledge-based complex queries, we utilized the knowledge base (KB) of the clinical decision support system (CDSS), which has the potential to provide sufficient contextual information. To automatically construct knowledge-based complex queries, we designed methods to parse rule structure in KB of CDSS in order to determine an executable path and extract the terms by parsing the control structures and logic connectives used in the logic. The automatically constructed knowledge-based complex queries were executed on the PubMed search service to evaluate the results on the reduction of retrieved citations with high relevance. The average number of citations was reduced from 56,249 citations to 330 citations with the knowledge-based query construction approach, and relevance increased from 1 term to 6 terms on average. The ability to automatically retrieve relevant evidence maximizes efficiency for clinicians in terms of time, based on feedback collected from clinicians. This approach is generally useful in evidence-based medicine, especially in ambient assisted living environments where automation is highly important. PMID:26343669

  1. Knowledge-Based Query Construction Using the CDSS Knowledge Base for Efficient Evidence Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad; Hussain, Maqbool; Ali, Taqdir; Hussain, Jamil; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Lee, Sungyoung; Kang, Byeong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Finding appropriate evidence to support clinical practices is always challenging, and the construction of a query to retrieve such evidence is a fundamental step. Typically, evidence is found using manual or semi-automatic methods, which are time-consuming and sometimes make it difficult to construct knowledge-based complex queries. To overcome the difficulty in constructing knowledge-based complex queries, we utilized the knowledge base (KB) of the clinical decision support system (CDSS), which has the potential to provide sufficient contextual information. To automatically construct knowledge-based complex queries, we designed methods to parse rule structure in KB of CDSS in order to determine an executable path and extract the terms by parsing the control structures and logic connectives used in the logic. The automatically constructed knowledge-based complex queries were executed on the PubMed search service to evaluate the results on the reduction of retrieved citations with high relevance. The average number of citations was reduced from 56,249 citations to 330 citations with the knowledge-based query construction approach, and relevance increased from 1 term to 6 terms on average. The ability to automatically retrieve relevant evidence maximizes efficiency for clinicians in terms of time, based on feedback collected from clinicians. This approach is generally useful in evidence-based medicine, especially in ambient assisted living environments where automation is highly important. PMID:26343669

  2. Mapping Knowledge-Making in Writing Center Research: A Taxonomy of Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liggett, Sarah; Jordan, Kerri; Price, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes a taxonomy of methodologies to understand how knowledge is--and can be--made in the complex context of writing centers. The authors found it to be a powerful tool to generate critical thinking, helping to classify, critique, and retrieve knowledge. Likewise, they believe it can serve various audiences. For example, those…

  3. Virtual Knowledge Center Five Year Vision

    SciTech Connect

    KENNY, N.E.

    2003-06-01

    The vision for Virtual Knowledge Center (VKC) is to make information accessible from one verifiable source, provide an environment for knowledge capture and sharing, and provide for automated business process management. VKC will be the foundation for management and integration of information activities at the Hanford Site for the next 5 years. It provides a distinctive solution that can increase return on investment, increase a facility's efficiency, and reduce a project's cost and schedule. This Five-Year Vision presents a clear path forward to support the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors in their goals of achieving the Site's missions of preparing for the future, restoring the river corridor, and transitioning the central plateau. Diminishing funds and reduced availability of resources has created a direct obligation for the Hanford Site to be more innovative and resourceful in the use of its current information assets. The difficulty and, in some instances, the inability of current systems to effectively and efficiently meet evolving standards and directions, coupled with Hanford's geographical size, pose challenges to information acquisition, sharing, and use. An imbalance exists in the lifecycle process of information between locating information and executing work. The need to capture and retain workers' knowledge for future use was evaluated to identify cost effective alternatives. The VKC is comprised of a suite of technologies that enables seamless access to the information available through integration of databases and systems. The VKC uses web technology to provide the environment for gathering information from disparate data sources. The VKC makes information available to users; allowing them to search, access documents, retain enterprise knowledge, or interact with other users. The VKC provides a single path to electronic information; allows capture of knowledge at its source and makes data and information available for informed decision

  4. The Influence of Prior Knowledge on the Retrieval-Directed Function of Note Taking in Prior Knowledge Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzels, Sandra A. J.; Kester, Liesbeth; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.; Broers, Nick J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Prior knowledge activation facilitates learning. Note taking during prior knowledge activation (i.e., note taking directed at retrieving information from memory) might facilitate the activation process by enabling learners to build an external representation of their prior knowledge. However, taking notes might be less effective in…

  5. Large, colorful, or noisy? Attribute- and modality-specific activations during retrieval of perceptual attribute knowledge.

    PubMed

    Kellenbach, M L; Brett, M; Patterson, K

    2001-09-01

    Position emission tomography was used to investigate whether retrieval of perceptual knowledge from long-term memory activates unique cortical regions associated with the modality and/or attribute type retrieved. Knowledge about the typical color, size, and sound of common objects and animals was probed, in response to written words naming the objects. Relative to a nonsemantic control task, all the attribute judgments activated similar left temporal and frontal regions. Visual (color, size) knowledge selectively activated the right posterior inferior temporal (PIT) cortex, whereas sound judgments elicited selective activation in the left posterior superior temporal gyrus and the adjacent parietal cortex. All of the attribute judgments activated a left PIT region, but color retrieval generated more activation in this area. Size judgments activated the right medial parietal cortex. These results indicate that the retrieval of perceptual semantic information activates not only a general semantic network, but also cortical areas specialized for the modality and attribute type of the knowledge retrieved. PMID:12467121

  6. The center for expanded data annotation and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Musen, Mark A; Bean, Carol A; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Dumontier, Michel; Durante, Kim A; Gevaert, Olivier; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Khatri, Purvesh; Kleinstein, Steven H; O'Connor, Martin J; Pouliot, Yannick; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Wiser, Jeffrey A

    2015-11-01

    The Center for Expanded Data Annotation and Retrieval is studying the creation of comprehensive and expressive metadata for biomedical datasets to facilitate data discovery, data interpretation, and data reuse. We take advantage of emerging community-based standard templates for describing different kinds of biomedical datasets, and we investigate the use of computational techniques to help investigators to assemble templates and to fill in their values. We are creating a repository of metadata from which we plan to identify metadata patterns that will drive predictive data entry when filling in metadata templates. The metadata repository not only will capture annotations specified when experimental datasets are initially created, but also will incorporate links to the published literature, including secondary analyses and possible refinements or retractions of experimental interpretations. By working initially with the Human Immunology Project Consortium and the developers of the ImmPort data repository, we are developing and evaluating an end-to-end solution to the problems of metadata authoring and management that will generalize to other data-management environments. PMID:26112029

  7. Increasing levels of assistance in refinement of knowledge-based retrieval systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baudin, Catherine; Kedar, Smadar; Pell, Barney

    1994-01-01

    The task of incrementally acquiring and refining the knowledge and algorithms of a knowledge-based system in order to improve its performance over time is discussed. In particular, the design of DE-KART, a tool whose goal is to provide increasing levels of assistance in acquiring and refining indexing and retrieval knowledge for a knowledge-based retrieval system, is presented. DE-KART starts with knowledge that was entered manually, and increases its level of assistance in acquiring and refining that knowledge, both in terms of the increased level of automation in interacting with users, and in terms of the increased generality of the knowledge. DE-KART is at the intersection of machine learning and knowledge acquisition: it is a first step towards a system which moves along a continuum from interactive knowledge acquisition to increasingly automated machine learning as it acquires more knowledge and experience.

  8. Measuring the Storage and Retrieval of Knowledge Units: An Empirical Study Using MES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justus, Selwyn; Iyakutti, K.

    Computer applications are smart that they require efficient storage and retrieval of data. Object-relational data models are the opted and the widely appreciable approach because of their power in object representation and relational retrieval. Two OR models were designed for representing knowledge units in the Music Expert System and three metrics were proposed to study the storage and retrieval of the knowledge units from the OR schemas. Experiments conducted to asses the storage efficiency and relational retrieval of the objects indicated significant results. The metrics were used to keep in check the size of the objects created during runtime and their relational coupling helped in the retrieval of objects, with minimal disk reads. The empirical results and interpretations concludes the work, focusing on the efficient design of OR schema models which commend the functioning of the system’s performance.

  9. Retrieval Enhances Route Knowledge Acquisition, but Only When Movement Errors Are Prevented

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jonathan W.; Carpenter, Shana K.; Sjolund, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the "testing effect" have shown that retrieval significantly improves learning. However, most of these studies have been restricted to simple types of declarative verbal knowledge. Five experiments were designed to explore whether testing improves acquisition of route knowledge, which has a procedural component consisting of…

  10. A Model of Knowledge Based Information Retrieval with Hierarchical Concept Graph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young Whan; Kim, Jin H.

    1990-01-01

    Proposes a model of knowledge-based information retrieval (KBIR) that is based on a hierarchical concept graph (HCG) which shows relationships between index terms and constitutes a hierarchical thesaurus as a knowledge base. Conceptual distance between a query and an object is discussed and the use of Boolean operators is described. (25…

  11. Genes, information and sense: complexity and knowledge retrieval.

    PubMed

    Sadovsky, Michael G; Putintseva, Julia A; Shchepanovsky, Alexander S

    2008-06-01

    Information capacity of nucleotide sequences measures the unexpectedness of a continuation of a given string of nucleotides, thus having a sound relation to a variety of biological issues. A continuation is defined in a way maximizing the entropy of the ensemble of such continuations. The capacity is defined as a mutual entropy of real frequency dictionary of a sequence with respect to the one bearing the most expected continuations; it does not depend on the length of strings contained in a dictionary. Various genomes exhibit a multi-minima pattern of the dependence of information capacity on the string length, thus reflecting an order within a sequence. The strings with significant deviation of an expected frequency from the real one are the words of increased information value. Such words exhibit a non-random distribution alongside a sequence, thus making it possible to retrieve the correlation between a structure, and a function encoded within a sequence. PMID:18443840

  12. Towards knowledge-based retrieval of medical images. The role of semantic indexing, image content representation and knowledge-based retrieval.

    PubMed

    Lowe, H J; Antipov, I; Hersh, W; Smith, C A

    1998-01-01

    Medicine is increasingly image-intensive. The central importance of imaging technologies such as computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in clinical decision making, combined with the trend to store many "traditional" clinical images such as conventional radiographs, microscopic pathology and dermatology images in digital format present both challenges and an opportunities for the designers of clinical information systems. The emergence of Multimedia Electronic Medical Record Systems (MEMRS), architectures that integrate medical images with text-based clinical data, will further hasten this trend. The development of these systems, storing a large and diverse set of medical images, suggests that in the future MEMRS will become important digital libraries supporting patient care, research and education. The representation and retrieval of clinical images within these systems is problematic as conventional database architectures and information retrieval models have, until recently, focused largely on text-based data. Medical imaging data differs in many ways from text-based medical data but perhaps the most important difference is that the information contained within imaging data is fundamentally knowledge-based. New representational and retrieval models for clinical images will be required to address this issue. Within the Image Engine multimedia medical record system project at the University of Pittsburgh we are evolving an approach to representation and retrieval of medical images which combines semantic indexing using the UMLS Metathesuarus, image content-based representation and knowledge-based image analysis. PMID:9929345

  13. "What-Where-Which" Episodic Retrieval Requires Conscious Recollection and Is Promoted by Semantic Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Saive, Anne-Lise; Royet, Jean-Pierre; Garcia, Samuel; Thévenet, Marc; Plailly, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory is defined as the conscious retrieval of specific past events. Whether accurate episodic retrieval requires a recollective experience or if a feeling of knowing is sufficient remains unresolved. We recently devised an ecological approach to investigate the controlled cued-retrieval of episodes composed of unnamable odors (What) located spatially (Where) within a visual context (Which context). By combining the Remember/Know procedure with our laboratory-ecological approach in an original way, the present study demonstrated that the accurate odor-evoked retrieval of complex and multimodal episodes overwhelmingly required conscious recollection. A feeling of knowing, even when associated with a high level of confidence, was not sufficient to generate accurate episodic retrieval. Interestingly, we demonstrated that the recollection of accurate episodic memories was promoted by odor retrieval-cue familiarity and describability. In conclusion, our study suggested that semantic knowledge about retrieval-cues increased the recollection which is the state of awareness required for the accurate retrieval of complex episodic memories. PMID:26630170

  14. Bioenergy Science Center KnowledgeBase

    DOE Data Explorer

    Syed, M. H.; Karpinets, T. V.; Parang, M.; Leuze, M. R.; Park, B. H.; Hyatt, D.; Brown, S. D.; Moulton, S. Galloway, M.D.; Uberbacher, E. C.

    The challenge of converting cellulosic biomass to sugars is the dominant obstacle to cost effective production of biofuels in s capable of significant enough quantities to displace U. S. consumption of fossil transportation fuels. The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) tackles this challenge of biomass recalcitrance by closely linking (1) plant research to make cell walls easier to deconstruct, and (2) microbial research to develop multi-talented biocatalysts tailor-made to produce biofuels in a single step. [from the 2011 BESC factsheet] The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) is a multi-institutional, multidisciplinary research (biological, chemical, physical and computational sciences, mathematics and engineering) organization focused on the fundamental understanding and elimination of biomass recalcitrance. The BESC Knowledgebase and its associated tools is a discovery platform for bioenergy research. It consists of a collection of metadata, data, and computational tools for data analysis, integration, comparison and visualization for plants and microbes in the center.The BESC Knowledgebase (KB) and BESC Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) enable bioenergy researchers to perform systemic research. [http://bobcat.ornl.gov/besc/index.jsp

  15. Intentional retrieval suppression can conceal guilty knowledge in ERP memory detection tests.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Zara M; Anderson, Michael C; Buda, Marie; Simons, Jon S; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Brain-activity markers of guilty knowledge have been promoted as accurate and reliable measures for establishing criminal culpability. Tests based on these markers interpret the presence or absence of memory-related neural activity as diagnostic of whether or not incriminating information is stored in a suspect's brain. This conclusion critically relies on the untested assumption that reminders of a crime uncontrollably elicit memory-related brain activity. However, recent research indicates that, in some circumstances, humans can control whether they remember a previous experience by intentionally suppressing retrieval. We examined whether people could use retrieval suppression to conceal neural evidence of incriminating memories as indexed by Event-Related Potentials (ERPs). When people were motivated to suppress crime retrieval, their memory-related ERP effects were significantly decreased, allowing guilty individuals to evade detection. Our findings indicate that brain measures of guilty knowledge may be under criminals' intentional control and place limits on their use in legal settings. PMID:23664804

  16. Intentional retrieval suppression can conceal guilty knowledge in ERP memory detection tests☆

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Zara M.; Anderson, Michael C.; Buda, Marie; Simons, Jon S.; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Brain-activity markers of guilty knowledge have been promoted as accurate and reliable measures for establishing criminal culpability. Tests based on these markers interpret the presence or absence of memory-related neural activity as diagnostic of whether or not incriminating information is stored in a suspect's brain. This conclusion critically relies on the untested assumption that reminders of a crime uncontrollably elicit memory-related brain activity. However, recent research indicates that, in some circumstances, humans can control whether they remember a previous experience by intentionally suppressing retrieval. We examined whether people could use retrieval suppression to conceal neural evidence of incriminating memories as indexed by Event-Related Potentials (ERPs). When people were motivated to suppress crime retrieval, their memory-related ERP effects were significantly decreased, allowing guilty individuals to evade detection. Our findings indicate that brain measures of guilty knowledge may be under criminals’ intentional control and place limits on their use in legal settings. PMID:23664804

  17. Features and Feedback: Enhancing Metamnemonic Knowledge at Retrieval Reduces Source-Monitoring Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Sean M.; Roussel, Cristine C.; Villa, Diane; Morita, Shelby K.

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments explored the issue of whether enhanced metamnemonic knowledge at retrieval can improve participants' ability to make difficult source discriminations in the context of the eyewitness suggestibility paradigm. The 1st experiment documented differences in phenomenal experience between veridical and false memories. Experiment 2…

  18. Testing of a Natural Language Retrieval System for a Full Text Knowledge Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Lionel M.; Williamson, Robert E.

    1984-01-01

    The Hepatitis Knowledge Base (text of prototype information system) was used for modifying and testing "A Navigator of Natural Language Organized (Textual) Data" (ANNOD), a retrieval system which combines probabilistic, linguistic, and empirical means to rank individual paragraphs of full text for similarity to natural language queries proposed by…

  19. Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford Retrievable Storage from the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, California

    SciTech Connect

    Vejvoda, E.J.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; DeLorenzo, D.S.; Weyns-Rollosson, M.I.; Duncan, D.R.

    1993-10-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) wastes now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Approximately 3.8% of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to WIPP was generated at the General Electric (GE) Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) in Pleasanton, California and shipped to the Hanford Site for storage. The purpose of this report is to characterize these radioactive solid wastes using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews. The waste was generated almost exclusively from the activities, of the Plutonium Fuels Development Laboratory and the Plutonium Analytical Laboratory. Section 2.0 provides further details of the VNC physical plant, facility operations, facility history, and current status. The solid radioactive wastes were associated with two US Atomic Energy Commission/US Department of Energy reactor programs -- the Fast Ceramic Reactor (FCR) program, and the Fast Flux Test Reactor (FFTR) program. These programs involved the fabrication and testing of fuel assemblies that utilized plutonium in an oxide form. The types and estimated quantities of waste resulting from these programs are discussed in detail in Section 3.0. A detailed discussion of the packaging and handling procedures used for the VNC radioactive wastes shipped to the Hanford Site is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides an in-depth look at this waste including the following: weight and volume of the waste, container types and numbers, physical description of the waste, radiological components, hazardous constituents, and current storage/disposal locations.

  20. Knowledge representation and retrieval using conceptual graphs and free text document self-organisation techniques.

    PubMed

    Chu, S; Cesnik, B

    2001-07-01

    Hospitals generate and store a large amount of clinical data each year, a significant portion of which is in free text format. Conventional database storage and retrieval algorithms are incapable of effectively processing free text medical data. The rich information and knowledge buried in healthcare records are unavailable for clinical decision-making. We examined a number of techniques for structuring and processing free text documents to effective and efficient for information retrieval and knowledge discovery. One critical success criterion is that the complexity of the techniques must be polynomial both in space and time for them to be able to cope with very large databases. We used conceptual graphs (CG) to capture the structure and semantic information/knowledge contained within the free text medical documents. Ordering and self-organising techniques (lattice techniques and knowledge space) were used to improve organisation of concepts from standard medical nomenclatures and large sets of free text medical documents. Pair-wise union of CG was performed to identify the common generalisation structure and a lattice structure of these CG documents. A combination of all three techniques allowed us to organise a set of 9000 discharge summaries into a generalisation hierarchy that supported efficient and rich information/knowledge retrieval. PMID:11470615

  1. Test bed control center design concept for Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, E.; Draper, J.V.; Fausz, A.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes the design concept for the control center for the Single Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System test bed and the design process behind the concept. The design concept supports all phases of the test bed mission, including technology demonstration, comprehensive system testing, and comparative evaluation for further development and refinement of the TWRMS for field operations.

  2. Does this ring a bell? Music-cued retrieval of semantic knowledge and metamemory judgments.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Maya; Levy, Daniel A; Tibon, Roni; Reggev, Niv; Maril, Anat

    2012-11-01

    Failed knowledge recall attempts are sometimes accompanied by a strong feeling of imminent success, giving rise to a "tip-of-the-tongue" (TOT) experience. Similar to successful retrieval (i.e., the Know state, K), a TOT commences with strong cue familiarity but involves only partial retrieval of related information. We sought to characterize the cognitive processes and temporal dynamics of these retrieval states and to extend the applicability of previous findings about TOT to the auditory modality. Participants heard 3-sec initial segments of popular songs and were asked to recall their names. EEG was recorded while participants indicated their retrieval state via button press. Stimulus-locked analyses revealed a significant early left fronto-central difference between TOT and K, at 300-550 msec postcue onset. Post hoc analysis revealed that, in this time window, TOT also differed from DK (Don't Know) responses, which themselves were similar to the K responses. This finding indicates that neural processes, which may reflect strategy selection, ease of semantic processing, familiarity-related processes, or conflict monitoring, are indicative of the fate of our knowledge judgments long before we actually execute them. PMID:22816368

  3. From capturing nursing knowledge to retrieval of data from a data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Thoroddsen, Asta; Guðjónsdóttir, Hanna K; Guðjónsdóttir, Elisabet

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to capture nursing data and knowledge, represent it for use and re-use by retrieval from a data warehouse, which contains both clinical and financial hospital data. Today nurses at LUH use standardized nursing terminologies to document information related to patients and the nursing care in the EHR at all times. Pre-defined order sets for nursing care have been developed using best practice where available and tacit nursing knowledge has been captured and coded with standardized nursing terminologies and made explicit for dissemination in the EHR. All patient-nursing data is permanently stored in a data repository. Core nursing data elements have been selected for transfer and storage in the data warehouse and patient-nursing data are now captured, stored, can be related to other data elements from the warehouse and be retrieved for use and re-use. PMID:24943528

  4. Information Retrieval Center of the Northern Colorado Educational Board of Cooperative Services. Final Report, F.Y. 1971-72.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCleary, William H.

    The Northern Colorado Educational Board of Cooperative Services (NCEBOCS) Information Retrieval Center is designed to provide a communications link for teachers, librarians, and administrators with the latest research, resources and materials in the field of education. The Information Retrieval Center also provides school personnel who contact the…

  5. An overview of the National Space Science data Center Standard Information Retrieval System (SIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, A.; Blecher, S.; Verson, E. E.; King, M. L. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    A general overview is given of the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Standard Information Retrieval System. A description, in general terms, the information system that contains the data files and the software system that processes and manipulates the files maintained at the Data Center. Emphasis is placed on providing users with an overview of the capabilities and uses of the NSSDC Standard Information Retrieval System (SIRS). Examples given are taken from the files at the Data Center. Detailed information about NSSDC data files is documented in a set of File Users Guides, with one user's guide prepared for each file processed by SIRS. Detailed information about SIRS is presented in the SIRS Users Guide.

  6. A knowledge continuity management program for the energy, infrastructure and knowledge systems center, Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, David F.

    2006-07-01

    A growing recognition exists in companies worldwide that, when employees leave, they take with them valuable knowledge that is difficult and expensive to recreate. The concern is now particularly acute as the large ''baby boomer'' generation is reaching retirement age. A new field of science, Knowledge Continuity Management (KCM), is designed to capture and catalog the acquired knowledge and wisdom from experience of these employees before they leave. The KCM concept is in the final stages of being adopted by the Energy, Infrastructure, and Knowledge Systems Center and a program is being applied that should produce significant annual cost savings. This report discusses how the Center can use KCM to mitigate knowledge loss from employee departures, including a concise description of a proposed plan tailored to the Center's specific needs and resources.

  7. Knowledge-driven multidimensional indexing structure for biomedical media database retrieval.

    PubMed

    Scott, Grant; Shyu, Chi-Ren

    2007-05-01

    Today, biomedical media data are being generated at rates unimaginable only years ago. Content-based retrieval of biomedical media from large databases is becoming increasingly important to clinical, research, and educational communities. In this paper, we present the recently developed entropy balanced statistical (EBS) k-d tree and its applications to biomedical media, including a high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) lung image database and the first real-time protein tertiary structure search engine. Our index utilizes statistical properties inherent in large-scale biomedical media databases for efficient and accurate searches. By applying concepts from pattern recognition and information theory, the EBS k-d tree is built through top-down decision tree induction. Experimentation shows similarity searches against a protein structure database of 53 363 structures consistently execute in less than 8.14 ms for the top 100 most similar structures. Additionally, we have shown improved retrieval precision over adaptive and statistical k-d trees. Retrieval precision of the EBS k-d tree is 81.6% for content-based retrieval of HRCT lung images and 94.9% at 10% recall for protein structure similarity search. The EBS k-d tree has enormous potential for use in biomedical applications embedded with ground-truth knowledge and multidimensional signatures. PMID:17521082

  8. Family-Centered Residential Treatment: Knowledge, Research, and Values Converge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Uta M.; Petr, Christopher G.

    2008-01-01

    Although the evidence base for the effectiveness of residential treatment is still very limited, a review of the literature reveals family-centered residential care as an emerging best practice. Synthesizing knowledge from research, families, youth, professionals, as well as values put forth in the standards by accrediting organizations, this…

  9. Accessibility effects on implicit social cognition: the role of knowledge activation and retrieval experiences.

    PubMed

    Gawronski, Bertram; Bodenhausen, Galen V

    2005-11-01

    Performance on measures of implicit social cognition has been shown to vary as a function of the momentary accessibility of relevant information. The present research investigated the mechanisms underlying accessibility effects of self-generated information on implicit measures. Results from 3 experiments demonstrate that measures based on response compatibility processes (e.g., Implicit Association Test, affective priming with an evaluative decision task) are influenced by subjective feelings pertaining to the ease of retrieving relevant information from memory, whereas measures based on stimulus compatibility processes (e.g., semantic priming with a lexical-decision task) are influenced by direct knowledge activation in associative memory. These results indicate that the mediating mechanisms underlying context effects on implicit measures can differ as a function of the task even when these tasks show similar effects on a superficial level. Implications for research on implicit social cognition and the ease-of-retrieval effect are discussed. PMID:16351361

  10. Information Retrieval Center of the Northern Colorado Educational Board of Cooperative Services. Final Report, FY 1970-71.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Colorado Educational Board of Cooperative Services, Boulder. Information Retrieval Center.

    The Information Retrieval Center of the Northern Colorado Educational Board of Cooperative Services (NCEBOCS) offers computer-and manually-produced information products to educators within a regional network. The Center searches the automated Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) data base to provide three products: Catalog of…

  11. Features and feedback: enhancing metamnemonic knowledge at retrieval reduces source-monitoring errors.

    PubMed

    Lane, Sean M; Roussel, Cristine C; Villa, Diane; Morita, Shelby K

    2007-11-01

    Three experiments explored the issue of whether enhanced metamnemonic knowledge at retrieval can improve participants' ability to make difficult source discriminations in the context of the eyewitness suggestibility paradigm. The 1st experiment documented differences in phenomenal experience between veridical and false memories. Experiment 2 revealed that drawing participants' attention to these differences by pairing the ratings of the features with instructions about their utility was successful in reducing source misattributions of suggested items to the event. The results of Experiment 3 showed that participants can make online adjustments in the types of evidence used to make source judgments, as participants who received correct feedback during the training portion of the test reduced misattribution errors on the remainder of the test where feedback was not provided. Altogether, these studies suggest that people can discover and benefit from updated knowledge of the types of memorial evidence that discriminate between sources of information in memory. PMID:17983318

  12. Dissipation of ‘dark energy’ by cortex in knowledge retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Capolupo, Antonio; Freeman, Walter J.; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We have devised a thermodynamic model of cortical neurodynamics expressed at the classical level by neural networks and at the quantum level by dissipative quantum field theory. Our model is based on features in the spatial images of cortical activity newly revealed by high-density electrodearrays. We have incorporated the mechanism and necessity for so-called dark energy in knowledge retrieval. We have extended the model first using the Carnot cycle to define our measures for energy, entropy and temperature, and then using the Rankine cycle to incorporate criticality and phase transitions. We describe the dynamics of two interactive fields of neural activity that express knowledge, one at high and the other at low energy density, and the two operators that create and annihilate the fields. We postulate that the extremely high density of energy sequestered briefly in cortical activity patterns can account for the vividness, richness of associations, and emotional intensity of memories recalled by stimuli. PMID:23333569

  13. Dissipation of ‘dark energy’ by cortex in knowledge retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capolupo, Antonio; Freeman, Walter J.; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    We have devised a thermodynamic model of cortical neurodynamics expressed at the classical level by neural networks and at the quantum level by dissipative quantum field theory. Our model is based on features in the spatial images of cortical activity newly revealed by high-density electrode arrays. We have incorporated the mechanism and necessity for so-called dark energy in knowledge retrieval. We have extended the model first using the Carnot cycle to define our measures for energy, entropy and temperature, and then using the Rankine cycle to incorporate criticality and phase transitions. We describe the dynamics of two interactive fields of neural activity that express knowledge, one at high and the other at low energy density, and the two operators that create and annihilate the fields. We postulate that the extremely high density of energy sequestered briefly in cortical activity patterns can account for the vividness, richness of associations, and emotional intensity of memories recalled by stimuli.

  14. Computer Assisted Multi-Center Creation of Medical Knowledge Bases

    PubMed Central

    Giuse, Nunzia Bettinsoli; Giuse, Dario A.; Miller, Randolph A.

    1988-01-01

    Computer programs which support different aspects of medical care have been developed in recent years. Their capabilities range from diagnosis to medical imaging, and include hospital management systems and therapy prescription. In spite of their diversity these systems have one commonality: their reliance on a large body of medical knowledge in computer-readable form. This knowledge enables such programs to draw inferences, validate hypotheses, and in general to perform their intended task. As has been clear to developers of such systems, however, the creation and maintenance of medical knowledge bases are very expensive. Practical and economical difficulties encountered during this long-term process have discouraged most attempts. This paper discusses knowledge base creation and maintenance, with special emphasis on medical applications. We first describe the methods currently used and their limitations. We then present our recent work on developing tools and methodologies which will assist in the process of creating a medical knowledge base. We focus, in particular, on the possibility of multi-center creation of the knowledge base.

  15. SYSTEMS MANUAL FOR THE EXPERIMENTAL LITERATURE COLLECTION AND REFERENCE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM OF THE CENTER FOR THE INFORMATION SCIENCES. EXPERIMENTAL RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS STUDIES, REPORT NUMBER 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ANDERSON, RONALD R.; TAYLOR, ROBERT S.

    THE MANUAL DESCRIBES AND DOCUMENTS THE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM IN TERMS OF ITS TAPE AND DISK FILE PROGRAMS AND ITS SEARCH PROGRAMS AS USED BY THE LEHIGH CENTER FOR THE INFORMATION SCIENCES FOR SELECTED CURRENT LITERATURE OF THE INFORMATION SCIENCES, ABOUT 2500 DOCUMENT REFERENCES. THE SYSTEM IS PRESENTLY ON-LINE VIA TELETYPE AND CONVERSION IS IN PROCESS…

  16. "I know you are but what am I?!": neural bases of self- and social knowledge retrieval in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Jennifer H; Lieberman, Matthew D; Dapretto, Mirella

    2007-08-01

    Previous neuroimaging research with adults suggests that the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the medial posterior parietal cortex (MPPC) are engaged during self-knowledge retrieval processes. However, this has yet to be assessed in a developmental sample. Twelve children and 12 adults (average age = 10.2 and 26.1 years, respectively) reported whether short phrases described themselves or a highly familiar other (Harry Potter) while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. In both children and adults, the MPFC was relatively more active during self- than social knowledge retrieval, and the MPPC was relatively more active during social than self-knowledge retrieval. Direct comparisons between children and adults indicated that children activated the MPFC during self-knowledge retrieval to a much greater extent than adults. The particular regions of the MPPC involved varied between the two groups, with the posterior precuneus engaged by adults, but the anterior precuneus and posterior cingulate engaged by children. Only children activated the MPFC significantly above baseline during self-knowledge retrieval. Implications for social cognitive development and the processing functions performed by the MPFC are discussed. PMID:17651006

  17. Tool Manipulation Knowledge is Retrieved by way of the Ventral Visual Object Processing Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jorge; Fintzi, Anat R.; Mahon, Bradford Z.

    2013-01-01

    Here we find, using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), that object manipulation knowledge is accessed by way of the ventral object processing pathway. We exploit the fact that parvocellular channels project to the ventral but not the dorsal stream, and show that increased neural responses for tool stimuli are observed in the inferior parietal lobule when those stimuli are visible only to the ventral object processing stream. In a control condition, tool-preferences were observed in a superior and posterior parietal region for stimuli titrated so as to be visible by the dorsal visual pathway. Functional connectivity analyses confirm the dissociation between sub-regions of parietal cortex according to whether their principal afferent input is via the ventral or dorsal visual pathway. These results challenge the ‘Embodied Hypothesis of Tool Recognition’, according to which tool identification critically depends on simulation of object manipulation knowledge. Instead, these data indicate that retrieval of object-associated manipulation knowledge is contingent on accessing the identity of the object, a process that is subserved by the ventral visual pathway. PMID:23810714

  18. Multi-Standard Metadata Retrieval Framework at the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, N. T.; Huang, T.; Armstrong, E. M.; Gangl, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    With the vast amount of Earth Science data available, providing the user community with high quality metadata to facilitate information retrieval and exchange is integral to scientific research. The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archives and distributes data products along with metadata pertinent to the physical state of the ocean. As one of the Earth Science data center for NASA, PO.DAAC is expected to work with multiple metadata standards. Since there is no single metadata standard that meets everyone's needs, a web-based framework has been designed and integrated as part of PO.DAAC's scalable Core Data System to enable users to quickly retrieve metadata in the format that they need. Currently, the framework supports the Open Search specification for data discovery, ISO 19115-2, Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata standards, with new metadata standards still being added. In this talk we will present the architecture behind the framework that makes it possible to support various metadata standards as well as the challenges we encountered.

  19. Retrieval enhances route knowledge acquisition, but only when movement errors are prevented.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jonathan W; Carpenter, Shana K; Sjolund, Lori A

    2015-09-01

    Studies of the testing effect have shown that retrieval significantly improves learning. However, most of these studies have been restricted to simple types of declarative verbal knowledge. Five experiments were designed to explore whether testing improves acquisition of route knowledge, which has a procedural component consisting of actions to be performed at decision points (Golledge, 1991). Participants learned a route through a series of connected rooms in a virtual building. Each room contained multiple doors, only one of which led to the next room. During encoding, participants were shown the correct sequence of doors in a manner similar to global positioning system (GPS) navigation guidance. During subsequent exposures to the route, participants were either shown the correct sequence again or had to recall the sequence from memory. Participants later completed a final test in which they traversed the route without guidance or feedback. Testing improved route memory compared to studying, but only when participants were given feedback about the correct door prior to moving through the room. When feedback occurred after moving to an incorrect door, testing resulted in worse performance compared to studying. These findings parallel work on errorless learning, in which procedural skills are acquired more quickly when errors are minimized during learning. PMID:25581223

  20. ArhiNet - A Knowledge-Based System for Creating, Processing and Retrieving Archival eContent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomie, Ioan; Dinsoreanu, Mihaela; Pop, Cristina; Suciu, Sorin

    This paper addresses the problem of creating, processing and querying semantically enhanced eContent from archives and digital libraries. We present an analysis of the archival domain, resulting in the creation of an archival domain model and of a domain ontology core. Our system adds semantic mark-up to the historical documents content, thus enabling document and knowledge retrieval as response to natural language ontology-guided queries. The system functionality follows two main workflows: (i) semantically enhanced eContent generation and knowledge acquisition and (ii) knowledge processing and retrieval. Within the first workflow, the relevant domain information is extracted from documents written in natural languages, followed by semantic annotation and domain ontology population. In the second workflow, ontologically guided natural language queries trigger reasoning processes that provide relevant search results. The paper also discusses the transformation of the OWL domain ontology into a hierarchical data model, thus providing support for the efficient ontology processing.

  1. Generic Information Can Retrieve Known Biological Associations: Implications for Biomedical Knowledge Discovery

    PubMed Central

    van Haagen, Herman H. H. B. M.; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; Mons, Barend; Schultes, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Weighted semantic networks built from text-mined literature can be used to retrieve known protein-protein or gene-disease associations, and have been shown to anticipate associations years before they are explicitly stated in the literature. Our text-mining system recognizes over 640,000 biomedical concepts: some are specific (i.e., names of genes or proteins) others generic (e.g., ‘Homo sapiens’). Generic concepts may play important roles in automated information retrieval, extraction, and inference but may also result in concept overload and confound retrieval and reasoning with low-relevance or even spurious links. Here, we attempted to optimize the retrieval performance for protein-protein interactions (PPI) by filtering generic concepts (node filtering) or links to generic concepts (edge filtering) from a weighted semantic network. First, we defined metrics based on network properties that quantify the specificity of concepts. Then using these metrics, we systematically filtered generic information from the network while monitoring retrieval performance of known protein-protein interactions. We also systematically filtered specific information from the network (inverse filtering), and assessed the retrieval performance of networks composed of generic information alone. Results Filtering generic or specific information induced a two-phase response in retrieval performance: initially the effects of filtering were minimal but beyond a critical threshold network performance suddenly drops. Contrary to expectations, networks composed exclusively of generic information demonstrated retrieval performance comparable to unfiltered networks that also contain specific concepts. Furthermore, an analysis using individual generic concepts demonstrated that they can effectively support the retrieval of known protein-protein interactions. For instance the concept “binding” is indicative for PPI retrieval and the concept “mutation abnormality” is

  2. Information Retrieval Center: A Proposal for the Implementation of CD-ROM Database Technology at Memphis State University Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John; Park, Betsy

    This planning proposal recommends that Memphis State University Libraries make information on CD-ROM (compact disc--read only memory) available in the Reference Department by establishing an Information Retrieval Center (IRC). Following a brief introduction and statement of purpose, the library's databases, users, staffing, facilities, and…

  3. Information Extraction from Unstructured Text for the Biodefense Knowledge Center

    SciTech Connect

    Samatova, N F; Park, B; Krishnamurthy, R; Munavalli, R; Symons, C; Buttler, D J; Cottom, T; Critchlow, T J; Slezak, T

    2005-04-29

    The Bio-Encyclopedia at the Biodefense Knowledge Center (BKC) is being constructed to allow an early detection of emerging biological threats to homeland security. It requires highly structured information extracted from variety of data sources. However, the quantity of new and vital information available from every day sources cannot be assimilated by hand, and therefore reliable high-throughput information extraction techniques are much anticipated. In support of the BKC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, together with the University of Utah, are developing an information extraction system built around the bioterrorism domain. This paper reports two important pieces of our effort integrated in the system: key phrase extraction and semantic tagging. Whereas two key phrase extraction technologies developed during the course of project help identify relevant texts, our state-of-the-art semantic tagging system can pinpoint phrases related to emerging biological threats. Also we are enhancing and tailoring the Bio-Encyclopedia by augmenting semantic dictionaries and extracting details of important events, such as suspected disease outbreaks. Some of these technologies have already been applied to large corpora of free text sources vital to the BKC mission, including ProMED-mail, PubMed abstracts, and the DHS's Information Analysis and Infrastructure Protection (IAIP) news clippings. In order to address the challenges involved in incorporating such large amounts of unstructured text, the overall system is focused on precise extraction of the most relevant information for inclusion in the BKC.

  4. A Survey of Knowledge Management Research & Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This chapter catalogs knowledge management research and development activities at NASA Ames Research Center as of April 2002. A general categorization scheme for knowledge management systems is first introduced. This categorization scheme divides knowledge management capabilities into five broad categories: knowledge capture, knowledge preservation, knowledge augmentation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge infrastructure. Each of nearly 30 knowledge management systems developed at Ames is then classified according to this system. Finally, a capsule description of each system is presented along with information on deployment status, funding sources, contact information, and both published and internet-based references.

  5. Knowledge integration at the center of genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Muin J; Gwinn, Marta; Dotson, W David; Schully, Sheri D

    2012-07-01

    Three articles in this issue of Genetics in Medicine describe examples of "knowledge integration," involving methods for generating and synthesizing rapidly emerging information on health-related genomic technologies and engaging stakeholders around the evidence. Knowledge integration, the central process in translating genomic research, involves three closely related, iterative components: knowledge management, knowledge synthesis, and knowledge translation. Knowledge management is the ongoing process of obtaining, organizing, and displaying evolving evidence. For example, horizon scanning and "infoveillance" use emerging technologies to scan databases, registries, publications, and cyberspace for information on genomic applications. Knowledge synthesis is the process of conducting systematic reviews using a priori rules of evidence. For example, methods including meta-analysis, decision analysis, and modeling can be used to combine information from basic, clinical, and population research. Knowledge translation refers to stakeholder engagement and brokering to influence policy, guidelines and recommendations, as well as the research agenda to close knowledge gaps. The ultrarapid production of information requires adequate public and private resources for knowledge integration to support the evidence-based development of genomic medicine. PMID:22555656

  6. The Defense Technical Information Center: Acquiring Information and Imparting Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molholm, Kurt N.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This overview of the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) discusses how DTIC fits into the Department of Defense Scientific and Technical Information Program; its history, organization, users, and operations; types of information handled; subject classification; cataloging standards; Information Analysis Centers (IACs); and research and…

  7. KARL: A Knowledge-Assisted Retrieval Language. Presentation visuals. M.S. Thesis Final Report, 1 Jul. 1985 - 31 Dec. 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros

    1985-01-01

    A collection of presentation visuals associated with the companion report entitled KARL: A Knowledge-Assisted Retrieval Language, is presented. Information is given on data retrieval, natural language database front ends, generic design objectives, processing capababilities and the query processing cycle.

  8. A hierarchical knowledge-based approach for retrieving similar medical images described with semantic annotations

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Camille; Beaulieu, Christopher F.; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted image retrieval applications could assist radiologist interpretations by identifying similar images in large archives as a means to providing decision support. However, the semantic gap between low-level image features and their high level semantics may impair the system performances. Indeed, it can be challenging to comprehensively characterize the images using low-level imaging features to fully capture the visual appearance of diseases on images, and recently the use of semantic terms has been advocated to provide semantic descriptions of the visual contents of images. However, most of the existing image retrieval strategies do not consider the intrinsic properties of these terms during the comparison of the images beyond treating them as simple binary (presence/absence) features. We propose a new framework that includes semantic features in images and that enables retrieval of similar images in large databases based on their semantic relations. It is based on two main steps: (1) annotation of the images with semantic terms extracted from an ontology, and (2) evaluation of the similarity of image pairs by computing the similarity between the terms using the Hierarchical Semantic-Based Distance (HSBD) coupled to an ontological measure. The combination of these two steps provides a means of capturing the semantic correlations among the terms used to characterize the images that can be considered as a potential solution to deal with the semantic gap problem. We validate this approach in the context of the retrieval and the classification of 2D regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from computed tomographic (CT) images of the liver. Under this framework, retrieval accuracy of more than 0.96 was obtained on a 30-images dataset using the Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain (NDCG) index that is a standard technique used to measure the effectiveness of information retrieval algorithms when a separate reference standard is available. Classification

  9. Personalizing Information Retrieval Using Task Features, Topic Knowledge, and Task Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jingjing

    2010-01-01

    Personalization of information retrieval tailors search towards individual users to meet their particular information needs by taking into account information about users and their contexts, often through implicit sources of evidence such as user behaviors and contextual factors. The current study looks particularly at users' dwelling behavior,…

  10. A Knowledge-Based Approach to Retrieving Teaching Materials for Context-Aware Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Wen-Chung; Tseng, Shian-Shyong

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless communication and sensor technologies, ubiquitous learning has become a promising solution to educational problems. In context-aware ubiquitous learning environments, it is required that learning content is retrieved according to environmental contexts, such as learners' location. Also, a learning content…

  11. User centered and ontology based information retrieval system for life sciences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because of the increasing number of electronic resources, designing efficient tools to retrieve and exploit them is a major challenge. Some improvements have been offered by semantic Web technologies and applications based on domain ontologies. In life science, for instance, the Gene Ontology is widely exploited in genomic applications and the Medical Subject Headings is the basis of biomedical publications indexation and information retrieval process proposed by PubMed. However current search engines suffer from two main drawbacks: there is limited user interaction with the list of retrieved resources and no explanation for their adequacy to the query is provided. Users may thus be confused by the selection and have no idea on how to adapt their queries so that the results match their expectations. Results This paper describes an information retrieval system that relies on domain ontology to widen the set of relevant documents that is retrieved and that uses a graphical rendering of query results to favor user interactions. Semantic proximities between ontology concepts and aggregating models are used to assess documents adequacy with respect to a query. The selection of documents is displayed in a semantic map to provide graphical indications that make explicit to what extent they match the user's query; this man/machine interface favors a more interactive and iterative exploration of data corpus, by facilitating query concepts weighting and visual explanation. We illustrate the benefit of using this information retrieval system on two case studies one of which aiming at collecting human genes related to transcription factors involved in hemopoiesis pathway. Conclusions The ontology based information retrieval system described in this paper (OBIRS) is freely available at: http://www.ontotoolkit.mines-ales.fr/ObirsClient/. This environment is a first step towards a user centred application in which the system enlightens relevant information to provide

  12. Music to knowledge: A visual programming environment for the development and evaluation of music information retrieval techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmann, Andreas F.; Downie, J. Stephen

    2005-09-01

    The objective of the International Music Information Retrieval Systems Evaluation Laboratory (IMIRSEL) project is the creation of a large, secure corpus of audio and symbolic music data accessible to the music information retrieval (MIR) community for the testing and evaluation of various MIR techniques. As part of the IMIRSEL project, a cross-platform JAVA based visual programming environment called Music to Knowledge (M2K) is being developed for a variety of music information retrieval related tasks. The primary objective of M2K is to supply the MIR community with a toolset that provides the ability to rapidly prototype algorithms, as well as foster the sharing of techniques within the MIR community through the use of a standardized set of tools. Due to the relatively large size of audio data and the computational costs associated with some digital signal processing and machine learning techniques, M2K is also designed to support distributed computing across computing clusters. In addition, facilities to allow the integration of non-JAVA based (e.g., C/C++, MATLAB, etc.) algorithms and programs are provided within M2K. [Work supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and NSF Grants No. IIS-0340597 and No. IIS-0327371.

  13. Manufacturing Technology Information Analysis Center: Knowledge is strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safar, Michal

    1992-04-01

    The Center's primary function is to facilitate technology transfer within DoD, other government agencies and industry. The DoD has recognized the importance of technology transfer, not only to support specific weapon system manufacture, but to strengthen the industrial base that sustains DoD. MTIAC uses an experienced technical staff of engineers and information specialists to acquire, analyze, and disseminate technical information. Besides ManTech project data, MTIAC collects manufacturing technology from other government agencies, commercial publications, proceedings, and various international sources. MTIAC has various means of disseminating this information. Much of the technical data is on user accessible data bases. The Center researches and writes a number of technical reports each year and publishes a newsletter monthly. Customized research is performed in response to specific inquiries from government and industry. MTIAC serves as a link between Government and Industry to strengthen the manufacturing technology base through the dissemination of advanced manufacturing information.

  14. Manufacturing Technology Information Analysis Center: Knowledge Is Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safar, Michal

    1992-01-01

    The Center's primary function is to facilitate technology transfer within DoD, other government agencies and industry. The DoD has recognized the importance of technology transfer, not only to support specific weapon system manufacture, but to strengthen the industrial base that sustains DoD. MTIAC uses an experienced technical staff of engineers and information specialists to acquire, analyze, and disseminate technical information. Besides ManTech project data, MTIAC collects manufacturing technology from other government agencies, commercial publications, proceedings, and various international sources. MTIAC has various means of disseminating this information. Much of the technical data is on user accessible data bases. The Center researches and writes a number of technical reports each year and publishes a newsletter monthly. Customized research is performed in response to specific inquiries from government and industry. MTIAC serves as a link between Government and Industry to strengthen the manufacturing technology base through the dissemination of advanced manufacturing information.

  15. National Space Science Data Center data archive and distribution service (NDADS) automated retrieval mail system user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Charleen M.; Vansteenberg, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) has developed an automated data retrieval request service utilizing our Data Archive and Distribution Service (NDADS) computer system. NDADS currently has selected project data written to optical disk platters with the disks residing in a robotic 'jukebox' near-line environment. This allows for rapid and automated access to the data with no staff intervention required. There are also automated help information and user services available that can be accessed. The request system permits an average-size data request to be completed within minutes of the request being sent to NSSDC. A mail message, in the format described in this document, retrieves the data and can send it to a remote site. Also listed in this document are the data currently available.

  16. Estimating Temperature Retrieval Accuracy Associated With Thermal Band Spatial Resolution Requirements for Center Pivot Irrigation Monitoring and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Irons, James; Spruce, Joseph P.; Underwood, Lauren W.; Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the use of synthetic thermal center pivot irrigation scenes to estimate temperature retrieval accuracy for thermal remote sensed data, such as data acquired from current and proposed Landsat-like thermal systems. Center pivot irrigation is a common practice in the western United States and in other parts of the world where water resources are scarce. Wide-area ET (evapotranspiration) estimates and reliable water management decisions depend on accurate temperature information retrieval from remotely sensed data. Spatial resolution, sensor noise, and the temperature step between a field and its surrounding area impose limits on the ability to retrieve temperature information. Spatial resolution is an interrelationship between GSD (ground sample distance) and a measure of image sharpness, such as edge response or edge slope. Edge response and edge slope are intuitive, and direct measures of spatial resolution are easier to visualize and estimate than the more common Modulation Transfer Function or Point Spread Function. For these reasons, recent data specifications, such as those for the LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission), have used GSD and edge response to specify spatial resolution. For this study, we have defined a 400-800 m diameter center pivot irrigation area with a large 25 K temperature step associated with a 300 K well-watered field surrounded by an infinite 325 K dry area. In this context, we defined the benchmark problem as an easily modeled, highly common stressing case. By parametrically varying GSD (30-240 m) and edge slope, we determined the number of pixels and field area fraction that meet a given temperature accuracy estimate for 400-m, 600-m, and 800-m diameter field sizes. Results of this project will help assess the utility of proposed specifications for the LDCM and other future thermal remote sensing missions and for water resource management.

  17. Intelligent Text Retrieval and Knowledge Acquisition from Texts for NASA Applications: Preprocessing Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A system that retrieves problem reports from a NASA database is described. The database is queried with natural language questions. Part-of-speech tags are first assigned to each word in the question using a rule based tagger. A partial parse of the question is then produced with independent sets of deterministic finite state a utomata. Using partial parse information, a look up strategy searches the database for problem reports relevant to the question. A bigram stemmer and irregular verb conjugates have been incorporated into the system to improve accuracy. The system is evaluated by a set of fifty five questions posed by NASA engineers. A discussion of future research is also presented.

  18. The Cultivation of Esteem and Retrieval of Scientific Knowledge in Physician Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menchik, Daniel A.; Meltzer, David O.

    2010-01-01

    This article evaluates how physicians draw upon scientific and other forms of knowledge in different professional communities. We argue that because physicians will draw upon clinical research findings to improve their reputation with colleagues, and because the terms for accruing esteem in an academic hospital may differ depending on the dominant…

  19. Using Heterogeneous Linguistic Knowledge in Local Coherence Identification for Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Samuel W. K.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses natural language processing and proposes a novel approach to automatic text segmentation using heterogeneous linguistic knowledge and cluster algorithms. Represents the diversity of textual relations in a discourse network in order to analyze the linguistic bonds and determine the degree of coherence that a text may exhibit. (Author/LRW)

  20. Globalization of Knowledge Discovery and Information Retrieval in Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidel, Mark; Guerrero, Osiris

    2008-01-01

    Developments in communication and information technologies in the last decade have had a significant impact on instructional and learning activities. For many students and educators, the Internet became the significant medium for sharing instruction, learning and communication. Access to knowledge beyond boundaries and cultures has an impact on…

  1. Citation guidelines for nuclear data retrieved from databases resident at the Nuclear Data Centers Network

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    The Nuclear Data Centers Network is a world-wide cooperation of nuclear data centers under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Network organizes the task of collecting, compiling, standardizing, storing, assessing, and distributing the nuclear data on an international scale. Information available at the Centers includes bibliographic, experimental, and evaluated databases for nuclear reaction data and for nuclear structure and radioactive decay data. The objective of the Network is to provide the information to users in a convenient, readily-available form. To this end, online data services have been established at three of the centers: the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (NDS), and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (NEADB). Some information is also available at the NNDC and NEADB World Wide Web sites.

  2. Implementations of the HL7 Context-Aware Knowledge Retrieval (“Infobutton”) Standard: Challenges, Strengths, Limitations, and Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Del Fiol, Guilherme; Huser, Vojtech; Strasberg, Howard R; Maviglia, Saverio M; Curtis, Clayton; Cimino, James J

    2012-01-01

    To support clinical decision-making,computerized information retrieval tools known as “infobuttons” deliver contextually-relevant knowledge resources intoclinical information systems.The Health Level Seven International(HL7)Context-Aware Knowledge Retrieval (Infobutton) Standard specifies a standard mechanism to enable infobuttons on a large scale. Objective To examine the experience of organizations in the course of implementing the HL7 Infobutton Standard. Method Cross-sectionalonline survey and in-depth phone interviews. Results A total of 17 organizations participated in the study.Analysis of the in-depth interviews revealed 20 recurrent themes.Implementers underscored the benefits, simplicity, and flexibility of the HL7 Infobutton Standard. Yet, participants voiced the need for easier access to standard specifications and improved guidance to beginners. Implementers predicted that the Infobutton Standard will be widely or at least fairly well adopted in the next five years, but uptake will dependlargely on adoption among electronic health record (EHR) vendors. To accelerate EHR adoption of the Infobutton Standard,implementers recommended HL7-compliant infobutton capabilities to be included in the United States Meaningful Use Certification Criteria EHR systems. Limitations Opinions and predictions should be interpreted with caution, since all the participant organizations have successfully implemented the Standard and overhalf of the organizations were actively engaged in the development of the Standard. Conclusion Overall, implementers reported a very positive experience with the HL7 Infobutton Standard.Despite indications of increasing uptake, measures should be taken to stimulate adoption of the Infobutton Standard among EHR vendors. Widespread adoption of the Infobutton standard has the potential to bring contextually relevant clinical decision support content into the healthcare provider workflow. PMID:22226933

  3. CoalSORT: a knowledge-based interface to an information retrieval system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Monarch, I.; Carbonell, J.

    1986-06-27

    The aim of the CoalSORT project is to determine the most appropriate ways to apply Al techniques to facilitate and extend the use of bibliographic databases in coal technology. The project's main task is to design and implement a prototype which provides an intelligent interface to a bibliographic database. The intelligence of the prototype is embodied in a frame-based semantic network which is a representation of an expert's domain knowledge, especially in its cognitive organization. Achieving optimal use of this intelligence depends on how effective the system is at communicating partial descriptors which express a match between a user's information need and a document's information content. The system communicates with the user through menus, windows for displaying and keeping track of information, and the selection of key phrases as search terms. A number of features were added to enable the interface to present the shape or organization of the categorial network system. This organization plays an important role in delineating the meaning of key concepts communicated to the user. The adequacy of this knowledge representation will be tested by appropriate users. 23 refs., 38 figs.

  4. The cultivation of esteem and retrieval of scientific knowledge in physician networks.

    PubMed

    Menchik, Daniel A; Meltzer, David O

    2010-06-01

    This article evaluates how physicians draw upon scientific and other forms of knowledge in different professional communities. We argue that because physicians will draw upon clinical research findings to improve their reputation with colleagues, and because the terms for accruing esteem in an academic hospital may differ depending on the dominant task structure of the organization, the form of knowledge that is valued by a physician will vary with his or her hospital's level of prestige. We use social network and multivariate analyses to test this theory in six U.S. hospitals with varying levels of prestige. We find that in lower-prestige hospitals, physicians can improve their reputation by reading a relatively broad range of scientific journals, whereas in higher-prestige hospitals, esteem is allocated to those with a more elite medical school pedigree. Statistically significant differences also exist between hospitals in terms of whether work with patients is valued, with physicians who engage in more clinical activity in the highest-ranked hospitals receiving less esteem from their colleagues. We finish by discussing how the functioning of higher- and lower-prestige hospitals is interconnected in ways that sustain both the development of innovations and their widespread adoption. PMID:20617755

  5. The Cultivation of Esteem and Retrieval of Scientific Knowledge in Physician Networks

    PubMed Central

    Menchik, Daniel A.; Meltzer, David O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates how physicians use scientific and other forms of knowledge in different professional communities. We argue that because physicians will draw upon clinical research findings to improve their reputation with colleagues, and since the terms for accruing esteem in an academic hospital may differ depending on the dominant task structure of the organization, the form of knowledge that is therefore valued by physicians will vary with their hospital’s level of prestige. Social network and multivariate analyses are used to test this theory in six U.S. hospitals with varying levels of prestige. We find that in lower-prestige hospitals physicians can improve their reputation by reading a relatively broad range of scientific journals, whereas in higher-prestige hospitals esteem is allocated to those with a more elite medical school pedigree. Statistically significant differences also exist between hospitals in terms of whether work with patients is valued, with physicians who engage in more clinical activity in the highest-ranked hospitals receiving less esteem from their colleagues. We finish by discussing how the functioning of higher and lower prestige hospitals are interconnected in ways that sustain both the development of innovations and their widespread adoption. PMID:20617755

  6. Assessing the Potential of the AIRS Retrieved Surface Temperature for 6-Hour Average Temperature Forecast in River Forecast Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, F.; Theobald, M.; Vollmer, B.; Savtchenko, A. K.; Hearty, T. J.; Esfandiari, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    Producing timely and accurate water forecast and information is the mission of National Weather Service River Forecast Centers (NWS RFCs) of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The river forecast system in RFCs requires average surface temperature in the fixed 6-hour period 000-0600, 0600-1200, 1200-1800, and 1200-0000 UTC. The current logic of RFC temperature forecast relies on ingest of point values of daytime maximum and nighttime minimum temperature. Meanwhile, the mean temperature for the 6-hour period is estimated from a weighted average of daytime maximum and nighttime minimum temperature. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) in the first high spectral resolution infrared sounder on board the Aqua satellite which was launched in May 2002 and follows a Sun-synchronous polar orbit. It is aimed to produce high resolution atmospheric profile and surface atmospheric parameters. As Aqua crosses the equator at about 1330 and 0130 local time, the AIRS retrieved surface temperature may represent daytime maximum and nighttime minimum value. Comparing to point observation from surface weather stations which are often sparse over the less-populated area and are unevenly distributed, satellite may obtain better area averaged observation. This test study assesses the potential of using AIRS retrieved surface temperature to forecast 6-hour average temperature for NWS RFCs. The California Nevada RFC is selected due to the poor coverage of surface observation in the mountainous region and spring snow melting. The study focuses on the March to May spring season when water from snowpack melting often plays important role in flood. AIRS retrieved temperature and surface weather station data set will be used to derive statistical weighting coefficient for 6-hour average temperature forecast. The resulting forecast biases and errors will be the main indicators of the potential usage. All study results will be presented in the meeting.

  7. The center for causal discovery of biomedical knowledge from big data.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gregory F; Bahar, Ivet; Becich, Michael J; Benos, Panayiotis V; Berg, Jeremy; Espino, Jeremy U; Glymour, Clark; Jacobson, Rebecca Crowley; Kienholz, Michelle; Lee, Adrian V; Lu, Xinghua; Scheines, Richard

    2015-11-01

    The Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Center for Causal Discovery is developing and disseminating an integrated set of open source tools that support causal modeling and discovery of biomedical knowledge from large and complex biomedical datasets. The Center integrates teams of biomedical and data scientists focused on the refinement of existing and the development of new constraint-based and Bayesian algorithms based on causal Bayesian networks, the optimization of software for efficient operation in a supercomputing environment, and the testing of algorithms and software developed using real data from 3 representative driving biomedical projects: cancer driver mutations, lung disease, and the functional connectome of the human brain. Associated training activities provide both biomedical and data scientists with the knowledge and skills needed to apply and extend these tools. Collaborative activities with the BD2K Consortium further advance causal discovery tools and integrate tools and resources developed by other centers. PMID:26138794

  8. Developing a Strategic Plan for Transitioning to Healthcare Knowledge Services Centers (HKSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, H. Mark; Coletti, Margaret H.

    2012-01-01

    Facing a negative trend in the form of downsizing, layoffs, and closures, a small committee of hospital librarians in New England was formed in 2004 to provide library advocacy. Between 2008 and 2010, 23 hospital libraries closed in New England. In 2010, the committee shifted its focus from advocacy to a platform for change. This resulted in the creation of the Healthcare Knowledge Services Center (HKSC) Template. The Template is the basis for a 3-phased, 5-year strategic plan to establish several regional pilots, transitioning traditional hospital libraries to healthcare knowledge services centers. This article focuses on Phase One of the strategic plan, Development. PMID:23125551

  9. Development of a component centered fault monitoring and diagnosis knowledge based system for space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. C.; Lollar, Louis F.

    1988-01-01

    The overall approach currently being taken in the development of AMPERES (Autonomously Managed Power System Extendable Real-time Expert System), a knowledge-based expert system for fault monitoring and diagnosis of space power systems, is discussed. The system architecture, knowledge representation, and fault monitoring and diagnosis strategy are examined. A 'component-centered' approach developed in this project is described. Critical issues requiring further study are identified.

  10. Toward an interim standard for patient-centered knowledge-access.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, M S; Sherertz, D D; Fagan, L M; Carlson, R W; Cole, W G; Schipma, P B; Nelson, S J

    1993-01-01

    Most care-giver "knowledge" needs arise at the point of care and are "patient-centered." Many of these knowledge needs can be met using existing on-line knowledge sources, but the process is too time-consuming, currently, for even the computer-proficient. We are developing a set of public domain standards aimed at bringing potentially relevant knowledge to the point of care in a straight-forward and timely fashion. The standards will a) make use of selected items from a Computer-based Patient Record (CPR), e.g., a diagnosis and measure of severity, b) anticipate certain care-giver knowledge needs, e.g., "therapy," "protocols," "complications," and c) try to satisfy those needs from available knowledge sources, e.g., knowledge-bases, citation databases, practice guidelines, and on-line textbooks. The standards will use templates, i.e., fill-in-the-blank structures, to anticipate knowledge needs and UMLS Metathesaurus enhancements to represent the content of knowledge sources. Together, the standards will form the specification for a "Knowledge-Server" (KS) designed to be accessed from any CPR system. Plans are in place to test an interim version of this specification in the context of medical oncology. We are accumulating anecdotal evidence that a KS operating in conjunction with a CPR is much more compelling to users than either a CPR or a KS operating alone. PMID:8130537

  11. Design of a Mission Data Storage and Retrieval System for NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, Jessica; Downing, Bob; Sheldon, Jack

    2007-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) employs the WATR Integrated Next Generation System (WINGS) for the processing and display of aeronautical flight data. This report discusses the post-mission segment of the WINGS architecture. A team designed and implemented a system for the near- and long-term storage and distribution of mission data for flight projects at DFRC, providing the user with intelligent access to data. Discussed are the legacy system, an industry survey, system operational concept, high-level system features, and initial design efforts.

  12. The Job Is the Learning Environment: Performance-Centered Learning To Support Knowledge Worker Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickover, Noel T.

    2002-01-01

    Explains performance-centered learning (PCL), an approach to optimize support for performance on the job by making corporate assets available to knowledge workers so they can solve actual problems. Illustrates PCL with a Web site that provides just-in-time learning, collaboration, and performance support tools to improve performance at the…

  13. A Simple and Effective Program to Increase Faculty Knowledge of and Referrals to Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Susan A.; Pace, Kristi A.; Iannelli, Richard J.; Palma, Thomas V.; Pakalns, Gail P.

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe a simple, cost-effective, and empirically supported program to increase faculty referrals of students to counseling centers (CCs). Incoming faculty members at 3 universities received a mailing and personal telephone call from a CC staff member. Faculty assigned to the outreach program had greater knowledge of and rates of…

  14. KARL: A Knowledge-Assisted Retrieval Language. M.S. Thesis Final Report, 1 Jul. 1985 - 31 Dec. 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros

    1985-01-01

    Data classification and storage are tasks typically performed by application specialists. In contrast, information users are primarily non-computer specialists who use information in their decision-making and other activities. Interaction efficiency between such users and the computer is often reduced by machine requirements and resulting user reluctance to use the system. This thesis examines the problems associated with information retrieval for non-computer specialist users, and proposes a method for communicating in restricted English that uses knowledge of the entities involved, relationships between entities, and basic English language syntax and semantics to translate the user requests into formal queries. The proposed method includes an intelligent dictionary, syntax and semantic verifiers, and a formal query generator. In addition, the proposed system has a learning capability that can improve portability and performance. With the increasing demand for efficient human-machine communication, the significance of this thesis becomes apparent. As human resources become more valuable, software systems that will assist in improving the human-machine interface will be needed and research addressing new solutions will be of utmost importance. This thesis presents an initial design and implementation as a foundation for further research and development into the emerging field of natural language database query systems.

  15. Learning and Relevance in Information Retrieval: A Study in the Application of Exploration and User Knowledge to Enhance Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyman, Harvey

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the impact of exploration and learning upon eDiscovery information retrieval; it is written in three parts. Part I contains foundational concepts and background on the topics of information retrieval and eDiscovery. This part informs the reader about the research frameworks, methodologies, data collection, and…

  16. Genomics as knowledge enterprise: Implementing an electronic research habitat at the Biopolis Experimental Therapeutics Center.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Wayne; Breen, Colin; Entzeroth, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The Experimental Therapeutics Center (ETC) has been established at Biopolis to advance translational research by bridging the gap between discovery science and commercialization. We describe the Electronic Research Habitat at ETC, a comprehensive hardware and software infrastructure designed to effectively manage terabyte data flows and storage, increase back office efficiency, enhance the scientific work experience, and satisfy rigorous regulatory and legal requirements. Our habitat design is secure, scalable and robust, and it strives to embody the core values of the knowledge-based workplace, thus contributing to the strategic goal of building a "knowledge economy" in the context of Singapore's on-going biotechnology initiative. PMID:18022858

  17. Invasive brain-machine interfaces: a survey of paralyzed patients’ attitudes, knowledge and methods of information retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahr, Jacob; Schwartz, Christina; Heimbach, Bernhard; Aertsen, Ad; Rickert, Jörn; Ball, Tonio

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) are an emerging therapeutic option that can allow paralyzed patients to gain control over assistive technology devices (ATDs). BMI approaches can be broadly classified into invasive (based on intracranially implanted electrodes) and noninvasive (based on skin electrodes or extracorporeal sensors). Invasive BMIs have a favorable signal-to-noise ratio, and thus allow for the extraction of more information than noninvasive BMIs, but they are also associated with the risks related to neurosurgical device implantation. Current noninvasive BMI approaches are typically concerned, among other issues, with long setup times and/or intensive training. Recent studies have investigated the attitudes of paralyzed patients eligible for BMIs, particularly patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These studies indicate that paralyzed patients are indeed interested in BMIs. Little is known, however, about the degree of knowledge among paralyzed patients concerning BMI approaches or about how patients retrieve information on ATDs. Furthermore, it is not yet clear if paralyzed patients would accept intracranial implantation of BMI electrodes with the premise of decoding improvements, and what the attitudes of a broader range of patients with diseases such as stroke or spinal cord injury are towards this new kind of treatment. Approach. Using a questionnaire, we surveyed 131 paralyzed patients for their opinions on invasive BMIs and their attitude toward invasive BMI treatment options. Main results. The majority of the patients knew about and had a positive attitude toward invasive BMI approaches. The group of ALS patients was especially open to the concept of BMIs. The acceptance of invasive BMI technology depended on the improvements expected from the technology. Furthermore, the survey revealed that for paralyzed patients, the Internet is an important source of information on ATDs. Significance. Websites tailored to

  18. Evaluation of employees in public day care centers knowledge about breastfeeding and complementary feeding

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Joelânia Pires de O.; Prudente, Amanda Moura; Silva, Dyene Aparecida; Pereira, Leandro Alves; Rinaldi, Ana Elisa M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the knowledge of public day care centers employees about breastfeeding and complementary feeding. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 public day care centers randomly selected in the city of Uberlandia, Southeast Brazil. A questionnaire applied to school principals, teachers, educators and general services assistants (GSA) included demographic and socioeconomic variables and questions about knowledge on breastfeeding, complementary feeding besides employees' perceptions about these subjects. Kruskal-Wallis with multiple comparison and chi-square tests were used to compare variables by professional category. RESULTS: 304 employees participated in the study. The highest percentages of correct answers were noted for questions about exclusive breastfeeding: definition - 97% (n=296) and duration - 65% (n=199). Regarding complementary feeding, 61% (n=187) correctly answered about the appropriate age to introduce it, with a lower percentage for meat (56%; n=170) and sugar (16%; n=50). Concerning employees' perceptions, 9% (n=29) believed that there is weak breast milk, 79% (n=241) and 51% (n=157) reported the negative influence of bottle feeding and pacifier use on breastfeeding. Among the interviewed subjects, 77% (n=234) answered that they had a positive influence on the quality of the food given to the children. There were no differences in the answers according to professional category, except for the negative influence of pacifiers on breastfeeding. CONCLUSIONS: Employees of public day care centers knew more about breastfeeding than about complementary feeding. Educational activities about breastfeeding and complementary feeding are necessary for day care centers employees. PMID:24473953

  19. Trend of knowledge production of research centers in the field of medical sciences in iran.

    PubMed

    Falahat, K; Eftekhari, Mb; Habibi, E; Djalalinia, Sh; Peykari, N; Owlia, P; Malekafzali, H; Ghanei, M; Mojarrab, Sh

    2013-01-01

    Establishment of medical research centers at universities and health-related organizations and annually evaluation of their research activities was one of the strategic policies which followed by governmental organization in last decade in order to strengthening the connections between health research system and health system. The aim of this study is to scrutinize the role of medical research centers in medical science production in Iran. This study is a cross sectional which has been performed based on existing reports on national scientometrics and evaluation results of research performance of medical research centers between years 2001 to 2010. During last decade number of medical research centers increased from 53 in 2001 to 359 in 2010. Simultaneous scientific output of medical research centers has been increased especially articles indexed in ISI (web of science). Proper policy implementation in the field of health research system during last decades led to improving capacity building and growth knowledge production of medical science in recent years in Iran. The process embedding research into the health systems requires planning up until research products improves health outcomes and health equity in country. PMID:23865017

  20. Center of excellence for mobile sensor data-to-knowledge (MD2K).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Abowd, Gregory D; Abraham, William T; al'Absi, Mustafa; Beck, J Gayle; Chau, Duen Horng; Condie, Tyson; Conroy, David E; Ertin, Emre; Estrin, Deborah; Ganesan, Deepak; Lam, Cho; Marlin, Benjamin; Marsh, Clay B; Murphy, Susan A; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Patrick, Kevin; Rehg, James M; Sharmin, Moushumi; Shetty, Vivek; Sim, Ida; Spring, Bonnie; Srivastava, Mani; Wetter, David W

    2015-11-01

    Mobile sensor data-to-knowledge (MD2K) was chosen as one of 11 Big Data Centers of Excellence by the National Institutes of Health, as part of its Big Data-to-Knowledge initiative. MD2K is developing innovative tools to streamline the collection, integration, management, visualization, analysis, and interpretation of health data generated by mobile and wearable sensors. The goal of the big data solutions being developed by MD2K is to reliably quantify physical, biological, behavioral, social, and environmental factors that contribute to health and disease risk. The research conducted by MD2K is targeted at improving health through early detection of adverse health events and by facilitating prevention. MD2K will make its tools, software, and training materials widely available and will also organize workshops and seminars to encourage their use by researchers and clinicians. PMID:26555017

  1. Examination of cultural knowledge and provider sensitivity in nurse managed health centers.

    PubMed

    Waite, Roberta; Nardi, Deena; Killian, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    It is important to examine empirical evidence of cultural competence among health care providers and to understand how it is assessed from an organizational context. There is a dearth of information about these concepts. Given its relevance to caring for diverse patient populations, the purpose of this paper is to present findings from a mixed method study which conducted a general cultural assessment survey of Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHCs) that were affiliates of the National Nursing Centers Consortium. Findings enabled the authors to formulate recommendations that could strengthen the cultural competence of staff Organizational leadership and advanced practice nurses would benefit from more intentional efforts to increase proficiency of NMHC staff members in their cultural knowledge and sensitivity skills when delivering care to the populations they serve. PMID:25011210

  2. The National Center for Biomedical Ontology: Advancing Biomedicinethrough Structured Organization of Scientific Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Daniel L.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Mungall, Chris J.; Misra,Sima; Westerfield, Monte; Ashburner, Michael; Sim, Ida; Chute,Christopher G.; Solbrig, Harold; Storey, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry; Day-Richter, John; Noy, Natalya F.; Musen, Mark A.

    2006-01-23

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (http://bioontology.org) is a consortium that comprises leading informaticians, biologists, clinicians, and ontologists funded by the NIH Roadmap to develop innovative technology and methods that allow scientists to record, manage, and disseminate biomedical information and knowledge in machine-processable form. The goals of the Center are: (1) to help unify the divergent and isolated efforts in ontology development by promoting high quality open-source, standards-based tools to create, manage, and use ontologies, (2) to create new software tools so that scientists can use ontologies to annotate and analyze biomedical data, (3) to provide a national resource for the ongoing evaluation, integration, and evolution of biomedical ontologies and associated tools and theories in the context of driving biomedical projects (DBPs), and (4) to disseminate the tools and resources of the Center and to identify, evaluate, and communicate best practices of ontology development to the biomedical community. The Center is working toward these objectives by providing tools to develop ontologies and to annotate experimental data, and by developing resources to integrate and relate existing ontologies as well as by creating repositories of biomedical data that are annotated using those ontologies. The Center is providing training workshops in ontology design, development, and usage, and is also pursuing research in ontology evaluation, quality, and use of ontologies to promote scientific discovery. Through the research activities within the Center, collaborations with the DBPs, and interactions with the biomedical community, our goal is to help scientists to work more effectively in the e-science paradigm, enhancing experiment design, experiment execution, data analysis, information synthesis, hypothesis generation and testing, and understand human disease.

  3. National Center for Biomedical Ontology: advancing biomedicine through structured organization of scientific knowledge.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Daniel L; Lewis, Suzanna E; Mungall, Chris J; Misra, Sima; Westerfield, Monte; Ashburner, Michael; Sim, Ida; Chute, Christopher G; Solbrig, Harold; Storey, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry; Day-Richter, John; Noy, Natalya F; Musen, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology is a consortium that comprises leading informaticians, biologists, clinicians, and ontologists, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap, to develop innovative technology and methods that allow scientists to record, manage, and disseminate biomedical information and knowledge in machine-processable form. The goals of the Center are (1) to help unify the divergent and isolated efforts in ontology development by promoting high quality open-source, standards-based tools to create, manage, and use ontologies, (2) to create new software tools so that scientists can use ontologies to annotate and analyze biomedical data, (3) to provide a national resource for the ongoing evaluation, integration, and evolution of biomedical ontologies and associated tools and theories in the context of driving biomedical projects (DBPs), and (4) to disseminate the tools and resources of the Center and to identify, evaluate, and communicate best practices of ontology development to the biomedical community. Through the research activities within the Center, collaborations with the DBPs, and interactions with the biomedical community, our goal is to help scientists to work more effectively in the e-science paradigm, enhancing experiment design, experiment execution, data analysis, information synthesis, hypothesis generation and testing, and understand human disease. PMID:16901225

  4. Oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children’s center

    PubMed Central

    Wyne, Amjad; Hammad, Nouf; Splieth, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children’s center. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect following information: demographics, oral hygiene practices, importance of fluoride, dental visits, cause of tooth decay, gingival health, and sources of oral health information. The study was conducted at Riyadh Center for Special Children in Riyadh City from December 2013 to May 2014. Results: All 60 health care workers in the center completed the questionnaire. A great majority (95%) of the workers brushed their teeth twice or more daily. More than two-third (71.7%) of the workers knew that fluoride helps in caries prevention. One in five (21.7%) workers thought that a dental visit only becomes necessary in case of a dental problem. Similarly, 13.3% of the workers thought to “wait till there is some pain in case of a dental cavity” before seeking dental treatment. The workers ranked soft drinks/soda (98.3%), flavored fizzy drinks (60%) and sweetened/flavored milks (43.3%) as top three cariogenic drinks. A great majority (95%) of the workers correctly responded that blood on toothbrush most probably is a sign of “gum disease”. Dentists (50%) and media (45%) were the main source of their oral health information. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in workers’ response in relation to their specific job. Conclusion: The special health care workers in the disabled children’s center generally had satisfactory oral health knowledge and practices. PMID:25878636

  5. Color, Context, and Cognitive Style: Variations in Color Knowledge Retrieval as a Function of Task and Subject Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Nina S.; Kraemer, David J. M.; Oliver, Robyn T.; Schlichting, Margaret L.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging tests of sensorimotor theories of semantic memory hinge on the extent to which similar activation patterns are observed during perception and retrieval of objects or object properties. The present study was motivated by the hypothesis that some of the seeming discrepancies across studies reflect flexibility in the systems responsible…

  6. Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) Knowledge Management (KM) Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccioli, Paul; Varnedoe, Tom; Smith, Randy; McCarter, Mike; Wilson, Barry; Porter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) is four months into a fifteen month Knowledge Management (KM) initiative to support enhanced engineering decision making and analyses, faster resolution of anomalies (near-term) and effective, efficient knowledge infused engineering processes, reduced knowledge attrition, and reduced anomaly occurrences (long-term). The near-term objective of this initiative is developing a KM Pilot project, within the context of a 3-5 year KM strategy, to introduce and evaluate the use of KM within PSD. An internal NASA/MSFC PSD KM team was established early in project formulation to maintain a practitioner, user-centric focus throughout the conceptual development, planning and deployment of KM technologies and capabilities within the PSD. The PSD internal team is supported by the University of Alabama's Aging Infrastructure Systems Center of Excellence (AISCE), lntergraph Corporation, and The Knowledge Institute. The principle product of the initial four month effort has been strategic planning of PSD KNI implementation by first determining the "as is" state of KM capabilities and developing, planning and documenting the roadmap to achieve the desired "to be" state. Activities undertaken to suppoth e planning phase have included data gathering; cultural surveys, group work-sessions, interviews, documentation review, and independent research. Assessments and analyses have beon pedormed including industry benchmarking, related local and Agency initiatives, specific tools and techniques used and strategies for leveraging existing resources, people and technology to achieve common KM goals. Key findings captured in the PSD KM Strategic Plan include the system vision, purpose, stakeholders, prioritized strategic objectives mapped to the top ten practitioner needs and analysis of current resource usage. Opportunities identified from research, analyses, cultural1KM surveys and practitioner interviews include

  7. Supporting users through integrated retrieval, processing, and distribution systems at the land processes distributed active archive center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalvelage, T.; Willems, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    The design of the EOS Data and Information Systems (EOSDIS) to acquire, archive, manage and distribute Earth observation data to the broadest possible user community was discussed. A number of several integrated retrieval, processing and distribution capabilities have been explained. The value of these functions to the users were described and potential future improvements were laid out for the users. The users were interested in acquiring the retrieval, processing and archiving systems integrated so that they can get the data they want in the format and delivery mechanism of their choice.

  8. Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center (NEKVaC) Needs Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gougar, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has made significant progress developing simulation tools to predict the behavior of nuclear systems with greater accuracy and of increasing our capability to predict the behavior of these systems outside of the standard range of applications. These analytical tools require a more complex array of validation tests to accurately simulate the physics and multiple length and time scales. Results from modern simulations will allow experiment designers to narrow the range of conditions needed to bound system behavior and to optimize the deployment of instrumentation to limit the breadth and cost of the campaign. Modern validation, verification and uncertainty quantification (VVUQ) techniques enable analysts to extract information from experiments in a systematic manner and provide the users with a quantified uncertainty estimate. Unfortunately, the capability to perform experiments that would enable taking full advantage of the formalisms of these modern codes has progressed relatively little (with some notable exceptions in fuels and thermal-hydraulics); the majority of the experimental data available today is the "historic" data accumulated over the last decades of nuclear systems R&D. A validated code-model is a tool for users. An unvalidated code-model is useful for code developers to gain understanding, publish research results, attract funding, etc. As nuclear analysis codes have become more sophisticated, so have the measurement and validation methods and the challenges that confront them. A successful yet cost-effective validation effort requires expertise possessed only by a few, resources possessed only by the well-capitalized (or a willing collective), and a clear, well-defined objective (validating a code that is developed to satisfy the need(s) of an actual user). To that end, the Idaho National Laboratory established the Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center to address the challenges of modern code validation and to

  9. Removing the center from computing: biology's new mode of digital knowledge production.

    PubMed

    November, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    This article shows how the USA's National Institutes of Health (NIH) helped to bring about a major shift in the way computers are used to produce knowledge and in the design of computers themselves as a consequence of its early 1960s efforts to introduce information technology to biologists. Starting in 1960 the NIH sought to reform the life sciences by encouraging researchers to make use of digital electronic computers, but despite generous federal support biologists generally did not embrace the new technology. Initially the blame fell on biologists' lack of appropriate (i.e. digital) data for computers to process. However, when the NIH consulted MIT computer architect Wesley Clark about this problem, he argued that the computer's quality as a device that was centralized posed an even greater challenge to potential biologist users than did the computer's need for digital data. Clark convinced the NIH that if the agency hoped to effectively computerize biology, it would need to satisfy biologists' experimental and institutional needs by providing them the means to use a computer without going to a computing center. With NIH support, Clark developed the 1963 Laboratory Instrument Computer (LINC), a small, real-time interactive computer intended to be used inside the laboratory and controlled entirely by its biologist users. Once built, the LINC provided a viable alternative to the 1960s norm of large computers housed in computing centers. As such, the LINC not only became popular among biologists, but also served in later decades as an important precursor of today's computing norm in the sciences and far beyond, the personal computer. PMID:21879517

  10. Gresham's Law: Knowledge or Information? The Center for the Book Viewpoint Series No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boorstin, Daniel J.

    There is a distinction to be made between knowledge and information. Knowledge is orderly and cumulative; information is random and miscellaneous and may be collected simply because it is there. The information industry is flourishing, but knowledge institutions--colleges, universities, and libraries--go begging. The knowledge industry is actually…

  11. The mobilize center: an NIH big data to knowledge center to advance human movement research and improve mobility.

    PubMed

    Ku, Joy P; Hicks, Jennifer L; Hastie, Trevor; Leskovec, Jure; Ré, Christopher; Delp, Scott L

    2015-11-01

    Regular physical activity helps prevent heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic diseases, yet a broad range of conditions impair mobility at great personal and societal cost. Vast amounts of data characterizing human movement are available from research labs, clinics, and millions of smartphones and wearable sensors, but integration and analysis of this large quantity of mobility data are extremely challenging. The authors have established the Mobilize Center (http://mobilize.stanford.edu) to harness these data to improve human mobility and help lay the foundation for using data science methods in biomedicine. The Center is organized around 4 data science research cores: biomechanical modeling, statistical learning, behavioral and social modeling, and integrative modeling. Important biomedical applications, such as osteoarthritis and weight management, will focus the development of new data science methods. By developing these new approaches, sharing data and validated software tools, and training thousands of researchers, the Mobilize Center will transform human movement research. PMID:26272077

  12. Website Quality, Expectation, Confirmation, and End User Satisfaction: The Knowledge-Intensive Website of the Korean National Cancer Information Center

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Chulmo; Wati, Yulia; Park, Keeho

    2011-01-01

    Background The fact that patient satisfaction with primary care clinical practices and physician-patient communications has decreased gradually has brought a new opportunity to the online channel as a supplementary service to provide additional information. Objective In this study, our objectives were to examine the process of cognitive knowledge expectation-confirmation from eHealth users and to recommend the attributes of a “knowledge-intensive website.”. Knowledge expectation can be defined as users’ existing attitudes or beliefs regarding expected levels of knowledge they may gain by accessing the website. Knowledge confirmation is the extent to which user’s knowledge expectation of information systems use is realized during actual use. In our hypothesized research model, perceived information quality, presentation and attractiveness as well as knowledge expectation influence knowledge confirmation, which in turn influences perceived usefulness and end user satisfaction, which feeds back to knowledge expectation. Methods An empirical study was conducted at the National Cancer Center (NCC), Republic of Korea (South Korea), by evaluating its official website. A user survey was administered containing items to measure subjectively perceived website quality and expectation-confirmation attributes. A study sample of 198 usable responses was used for further analysis. We used the structural equation model to test the proposed research model. Results Knowledge expectation exhibited a positive effect on knowledge confirmation (beta = .27, P < .001). The paths from information quality, information presentation, and website attractiveness to knowledge confirmation were also positive and significant (beta = .24, P < .001; beta = .29, P < .001; beta = .18, P < .001, respectively). Moreover, the effect of knowledge confirmation on perceived usefulness was also positively significant (beta = .64, P < .001). Knowledge expectation together with knowledge confirmation

  13. An approach to knowledge engineering to support knowledge-based simulation of payload ground processing at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Shawn; Mcdaniel, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Planning for processing payloads was always difficult and time-consuming. With the advent of Space Station Freedom and its capability to support a myriad of complex payloads, the planning to support this ground processing maze involves thousands of man-hours of often tedious data manipulation. To provide the capability to analyze various processing schedules, an object oriented knowledge-based simulation environment called the Advanced Generic Accomodations Planning Environment (AGAPE) is being developed. Having nearly completed the baseline system, the emphasis in this paper is directed toward rule definition and its relation to model development and simulation. The focus is specifically on the methodologies implemented during knowledge acquisition, analysis, and representation within the AGAPE rule structure. A model is provided to illustrate the concepts presented. The approach demonstrates a framework for AGAPE rule development to assist expert system development.

  14. A Learner-Centered Spiral Knowledge Approach to Teaching Isotope Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    Aided by the insights I gained by participation in the Arizona Board of Regents Tri-University Collaboration on Learner-Centered Practice, I made major changes to a graduate course in isotope geology (GLG617), including: 1) implementation of a spiral knowledge approach (e.g., Bruner, 1990; Dyar et al., 2004); 2) incorporation of more learner-centered in-class activities; and 3) more explicit emphasis on skills that I regarded as important for success in geochemistry. In the geosciences, the field of isotope geology is now an essential area of inquiry with implications for geologic timescales, climate information, tracing geochemical processes, and biological evolution, to name a few. The traditional approach to teaching isotope geology suffers from the fact that learning tends to be compartmentalized by technique/approach and one subfield (e.g., stable or radiogenic isotopes) is usually favored by appearing earlier in semester. To make learning more integrated, I employed a simplified spiral learning approach so that common principles could be revisited several times over the course of the semester and, in so doing, students' grasp of the fundamental principles could be scaffolded into greater understanding. Other learner-centered changes to the course included more explicit emphasis on helping students become comfortable with interpreting data displayed graphically and explicit emphasis on helping students give and evaluate oral presentations that rely on isotope data. I also developed a detailed grading rubric for the final paper and allowed students to have a draft of their final papers evaluated and graded (guided by Huba and Freed, 2000) A number of cooperative learning activities developed specifically for this course (19 in all) enabled me to gain a better appreciation for students' learning. Activities included pair share, round-robin, small group explorations of techniques and case studies (sometimes as introduction to, sometimes as review of material

  15. Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on knowledge includes annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROMs and computer software, videos, books, and additional resources that deal with knowledge and differences between how animals and humans learn. Sidebars discuss animal intelligence, learning proper behavior, and getting news from the Internet. (LRW)

  16. Increasing Practitioners Knowledge of Participation Among Elderly Adults in Senior Center Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jan; Bisbee, Carol; Porter, Russell; Flanders, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper attempted to identify predictors of senior center participation and to ascertain why there has been a decline in the number of individuals participating at senior centers in recent years. The research reports the results of a survey conducted among senior center participants in an 11-county area in the Nortex…

  17. Increasing Practitioners' Knowledge of Participation among Elderly Adults in Senior Center Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jan; Bisbee, Carol; Porter, Russell; Flanders, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper attempted to identify predictors of senior center participation and to ascertain why there has been a decline in the number of individuals participating at senior centers in recent years. The research reports the results of a survey conducted among senior center participants in an 11-county area in the Nortex…

  18. From data to knowledge in e-health applications: an integrated system for medical information modelling and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Dotsika, Fefie

    2003-12-01

    The system described in this paper uses the technological advances in information technology in order to influence and improve healthcare practice by enabling the flexible modelling, direct representation and adaptable use of medical knowledge. It aims at resolving a number of difficulties encountered by current information repositories, such as costly customization, reusability, high maintenance and poor information modelling, by employing the architecture of the functional data model (FDM), while maintaining full interoperability with existing systems by means of XML. On the information-modelling front the system supports a variety of modelling techniques that are especially relevant to medical applications, such as complex objects, incomplete or missing information, partially structured data and multimedia content. A prototype implementation of the system has been developed which consists of a multimedia-enhanced version of the functional database language FDL, and a web-based, two-way translator interface between the application's native language and XML. This interface provides full interoperability with other, heterogeneous systems over the web, thus, significantly reducing the complexity of developing distributed healthcare systems and e-health applications. PMID:14668128

  19. Analyzing the level of knowledge and attitude of the mothers referring the urban health centers of Birjand about nutritional behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Omolbanin Motamed; Moodi, Mitra; Moazam, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Achieving a balanced and proper nutrition is one of the most important health objectives in the early years of the child's life. The aim of this study is to determine the level of knowledge and attitude of the mothers covered by the urban health centers of Birjand about nutritional behaviors. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was conducted on the mothers with children less than five years referring the health centers of Birjand, in 1387. A questionnaire was prepared for data collection. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, Chi square, ANOVA, Tukey's post hoc and Pearson correlation coefficient statistical tests with a accuracy level of P < 0.05. Results: Two hundred ninety four patients were studied. A meaningful difference was observed between the knowledge and attitude scores in terms of the mothers’ education stand (P = 0.002). Eighty three point seven percent, 65.6%, 82.7% and 64.6% of mothers were aware about the importance of iron absorption, the onset of iron supplement drop, the minerals and vitamins in the body, and the effects of vitamin A deficiency, respectively. The mothers’ knowledge and attitude about the nutritional behavior was evaluated at the average and good level, respectively. Conclusions: Considering the average level of the mothers’ knowledge and attitude about children's nutritional behaviors, the retraining of family physicians and health centers staff about the importance of nutritional behaviors is recommended. PMID:25013830

  20. La tecnología y las monjitas: constellations of authoritative knowledge at a religious birthing center in south Texas.

    PubMed

    Fleuriet, K Jill

    2009-09-01

    In this article, I contrast conceptualizations of authoritative knowledge in pregnancy and birth between U.S. midwives and their Mexican immigrant clients at a religious birthing center in south Texas. Although the two groups share certain orientations to pregnancy management, essential differences in prenatal care and birth epistemologies underscore distinct social and economic positions. I use narrative data to document and explain these differences, which throw into relief the hierarchies of identity and need that structure immigrant women's reproductive experiences. Unveiling the different epistemologies can also help to explain sometimes radically divergent ideas that have impacted the very survivability of the birthing center. By focusing on Mexican immigrant women's reproductive decision making in an alternative birthing center, this analysis responds to feminists' call to look to the margins to understand the diversity of women's responses to what Rapp and Ginsburg have called "stratified reproduction". PMID:19764312

  1. Delivering spacecraft control centers with embedded knowledge-based systems: The methodology issue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayache, S.; Haziza, M.; Cayrac, D.

    1994-01-01

    Matra Marconi Space (MMS) occupies a leading place in Europe in the domain of satellite and space data processing systems. The maturity of the knowledge-based systems (KBS) technology, the theoretical and practical experience acquired in the development of prototype, pre-operational and operational applications, make it possible today to consider the wide operational deployment of KBS's in space applications. In this perspective, MMS has to prepare the introduction of the new methods and support tools that will form the basis of the development of such systems. This paper introduces elements of the MMS methodology initiatives in the domain and the main rationale that motivated the approach. These initiatives develop along two main axes: knowledge engineering methods and tools, and a hybrid method approach for coexisting knowledge-based and conventional developments.

  2. The National Center for Biomedical Ontology: Advancing Biomedicinethrough Structured Organization of Scientific Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Daniel L.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Mungall, Chris J.; Misra,Sima; Westerfield, Monte; Ashburner, Michael; Sim, Ida; Chute,Christopher G.; Solbrig, Harold; Storey, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry; Day-Richter, John; Noy, Natalya F.; Musen, Mark A.

    2006-01-23

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology(http://bioontology.org) is a consortium that comprises leadinginformaticians, biologists, clinicians, and ontologists funded by the NIHRoadmap to develop innovative technology and methods that allowscientists to record, manage, and disseminate biomedical information andknowledge in machine-processable form. The goals of the Center are: (1)to help unify the divergent and isolated efforts in ontology developmentby promoting high quality open-source, standards-based tools to create,manage, and use ontologies, (2) to create new software tools so thatscientists can use ontologies to annotate and analyze biomedical data,(3) to provide a national resource for the ongoing evaluation,integration, and evolution of biomedical ontologies and associated toolsand theories in the context of driving biomedical projects (DBPs), and(4) to disseminate the tools and resources of the Center and to identify,evaluate, and communicate best practices of ontology development to thebiomedical community. The Center is working toward these objectives byproviding tools to develop ontologies and to annotate experimental data,and by developing resources to integrate and relate existing ontologiesas well as by creating repositories of biomedical data that are annotatedusing those ontologies. The Center is providing training workshops inontology design, development, and usage, and is also pursuing research inontology evaluation, quality, and use of ontologies to promote scientificdiscovery. Through the research activities within the Center,collaborations with the DBPs, and interactions with the biomedicalcommunity, our goal is to help scientists to work more effectively in thee-science paradigm, enhancing experiment design, experiment execution,data analysis, information synthesis, hypothesis generation and testing,and understand human disease.

  3. Individual Influences on Knowledge Acquisition in a Call Center Training Context in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowold, Jens

    2007-01-01

    From both a practical and a theoretical point of view, it is important to identify factors that foster knowledge acquisition in organizational training programs. Recent models of training effectiveness have proposed relationships between trainees' characteristics and subsequent learning. The present study tested the impact of trainees' pretraining…

  4. Teacher-Centered Professionalism: A Feminist Perspective on Supported Access to Digital Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twomey, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study creates a case for teacher learning through increased access to digital knowledge and information made available through the Internet. I ask how reading environments, supported through online access to scholarly texts, might create intellectual engagement and transformative possibilities for teachers within their…

  5. Connecting Learning: Brain-Based Strategies for Linking Prior Knowledge in the Library Media Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderbilt, Kathi L.

    2005-01-01

    The brain is a complex organ and learning is a complex process. While there is not complete agreement among researchers about brain-based learning and its direct connection to neuroscience, knowledge about the brain as well as the examination of cognitive psychology, anthropology, professional experience, and educational research can provide…

  6. Silencing the Center: Local Knowledge and Imported Model in Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazna, Maysaa

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates the interaction between local and imported knowledges in a specific case of transnational importation; the whole-sale importation of the American medical learning disabilities (LDs) model in Kuwait. A discourse analysis of the narratives of local educators at the only school for LDs in the country reveals a…

  7. The effects of educational program on health volunteers’ knowledge regarding their approach to earthquake in health centers in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    JOUHARI, ZAHRA; PIRASTEH, AFSHAR; GHASSEMI, GHOLAM REZA; BAZRAFKAN, LEILA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The people's mental, intellectual and physical non-readiness to confront earthquake may result in disastrous outcomes. This research aimed to study of effects of a training intervention on health connector’s knowledge regarding their approach to earthquake in health-training centers in East of Tehran. Methods This research which is a semi-experimental study was designed and executed in 2011, using a questionnaire with items based on the information of Crisis Management Org. After a pilot study and making the questionnaire valid and reliable, we determined the sample size. Then, the questionnaires were completed before and after the training program by 82 health connectors at health-treatment centers in the East of Tehran. Finally, the collected data were analyzed by SPSS 14, using paired sample t–test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results Health connectors were women with the mean age of 43.43±8.51 years. In this research, the mean score of connectors’ knowledge before and after the training was 35.15±4.3 and 43.73±2.91 out of 48, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.001). The classes were the most important source of information for the health connectors. Conclusion The people's knowledge to confront earthquake can be increased by holding training courses and workshops. Such training courses and workshops have an important role in data transfer and readiness of health connectors. PMID:25927068

  8. Nurturing 21st century physician knowledge, skills and attitudes with medical home innovations: the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education teaching health center curriculum experience

    PubMed Central

    Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Gollamudi, Lakshmi Rani; Sheth, Jignesh; Ebersole, Brian; Gardner, Katlyn J.; Nardella, Julie; Ruddy, Meaghan P.; Meade, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The effect of patient centered medical home (PCMH) curriculum interventions on residents’ self-reported and demonstrated knowledge, skills and attitudes in PCMH competency arenas (KSA) is lacking in the literature. This study aimed to assess the impact of PCMH curricular innovations on the KSA of Internal Medicine residents. Methods. Twenty four (24) Internal Medicine residents—12 Traditional (TR) track residents and 12 Teaching Health Center (THC) track residents—began training in Academic Year (AY) 2011 at the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education (WCGME). They were followed through AY2013, covering three years of training. PCMH curricular innovations were focally applied July 2011 until May 2012 to THC residents. These curricular innovations were spread program-wide in May 2012. Semi-annual, validated PCMH Clinician Assessments assessing KSA were started in AY2011 and were completed by all residents. Results. Mean KSA scores of TR residents were similar to those of THC residents at baseline for all PCMH competencies. In May 2012, mean scores of THC residents were significantly higher than TR residents for most KSA. After program-wide implementation of PCMH innovations, mean scores of TR residents for all KSA improved and most became equalized to those of THC residents. Globally improved KSA scores of THC and TR residents were maintained through May 2014, with the majority of improvements above baseline and reaching statistical significance. Conclusions. PCMH curricular innovations inspired by Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA’s) Teaching Health Center funded residency program expansion quickly and consistently improved the KSA of Internal Medicine residents. PMID:25699213

  9. Nurturing 21st century physician knowledge, skills and attitudes with medical home innovations: the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education teaching health center curriculum experience.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Hemak, Linda; Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Gollamudi, Lakshmi Rani; Sheth, Jignesh; Ebersole, Brian; Gardner, Katlyn J; Nardella, Julie; Ruddy, Meaghan P; Meade, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The effect of patient centered medical home (PCMH) curriculum interventions on residents' self-reported and demonstrated knowledge, skills and attitudes in PCMH competency arenas (KSA) is lacking in the literature. This study aimed to assess the impact of PCMH curricular innovations on the KSA of Internal Medicine residents. Methods. Twenty four (24) Internal Medicine residents-12 Traditional (TR) track residents and 12 Teaching Health Center (THC) track residents-began training in Academic Year (AY) 2011 at the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education (WCGME). They were followed through AY2013, covering three years of training. PCMH curricular innovations were focally applied July 2011 until May 2012 to THC residents. These curricular innovations were spread program-wide in May 2012. Semi-annual, validated PCMH Clinician Assessments assessing KSA were started in AY2011 and were completed by all residents. Results. Mean KSA scores of TR residents were similar to those of THC residents at baseline for all PCMH competencies. In May 2012, mean scores of THC residents were significantly higher than TR residents for most KSA. After program-wide implementation of PCMH innovations, mean scores of TR residents for all KSA improved and most became equalized to those of THC residents. Globally improved KSA scores of THC and TR residents were maintained through May 2014, with the majority of improvements above baseline and reaching statistical significance. Conclusions. PCMH curricular innovations inspired by Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA's) Teaching Health Center funded residency program expansion quickly and consistently improved the KSA of Internal Medicine residents. PMID:25699213

  10. Assessing Knowledge and Attitudes of Diabetes in Zuni Indians Using a Culture-Centered Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ghahate, Donica M.; Bobelu, Jeanette; Sandy, Phillip; Faber, Thomas; Shah, Vallabh O.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Zuni Pueblo, in collaboration with the University of New Mexico, have formed the Zuni Health Initiative (ZHI) engaged in community-based participatory research to plan and implement educational interventions to reduce health disparities. We conducted the first phase of ZHI study and identified barriers to healthcare. We concluded that the burden presented by these barriers ultimately translates into a lack of patient activation and engagement in their health care including for diabetes, effectively hindering adoption of healthy behaviors. Methods Community health representatives (CHRs) led 10 one-hour focus group sessions to elicit information on diabetes knowledge and self-management strategies at which a total of 84 people participated. Audiotapes were translated and transcribed by bilingual ZHI staff. We reduced the text to thematic categories, constructed a coding dictionary and inserted the text into NVivo 9 program. Results The focus groups revealed that despite extensive personal or family experiences with diabetes or complications, participants identified knowledge gaps in the disease progression and disease management. However, we gained insight into how many Zunis conceptualize the etiology of diabetes, risk factors associated with diabetes, sources of knowledge and self-management practices. Conclusion We concluded that many of the Zuni diabetics experience significant impacts on their life when they were diagnosed with diabetes and suffered the plight of stigmatization. We further concluded that developing Zuni culture specific diabetes care should focus on family involvement with continued education. PMID:24919064

  11. The effect of breast cancer health education on the knowledge, attitudes, and practice: a community health center catchment area.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Yan-Qiong; Hu, Xiaoyan

    2014-06-01

    Studies indicate that women in China are not frequently carrying out breast cancer prevention practices. This is assumed to be due to lack of knowledge and/or lack of personalized instruction. This study was to explore the effect of breast cancer health education on women's knowledge and attitudes on breast cancer and breast self-examination, behavior related to breast self-examination among women living in the catchment area of a community health center. A pretest and posttest assessment of a 1-h health education session was conducted with 38 participants. A telephone reminder and questionnaires were administered at 1 and 3 months after the education. Three instruments were administered at each contact to assess the knowledge and attitudes on breast cancer and behavior related to breast self-examination and accuracy of breast self-examination before education, 1- and 3-month follow-ups after education. The findings showed the incidence of self-examination, and scores on the accuracy of breast self-examination practice were significantly increased immediately following the intervention and at 1- and 3-month follow-ups. Furthermore, the scores of the health belief regarding perceived benefits, perceived competency, and perceived seriousness significantly improved. The current findings imply community-based intervention could be used to teach women about the general knowledge of breast cancer and how to perform breast self-examination correctly, especially for women who are lack of such information. PMID:24504664

  12. Knowledge Management in Cardiac Surgery: The Second Tehran Heart Center Adult Cardiac Surgery Database Report

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Kyomars; Karimi, Abbasali; Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; Ahmadi, Seyed Hossein; Davoodi, Saeed; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza; Movahedi, Namdar; Salehiomran, Abbas; Shirzad, Mahmood; Bina, Peyvand

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Adult Cardiac Surgery Databank (ACSD) of Tehran Heart Center was established in 2002 with a view to providing clinical prediction rules for outcomes of cardiac procedures, developing risk score systems, and devising clinical guidelines. This is a general analysis of the collected data. Methods: All the patients referred to Tehran Heart Center for any kind of heart surgery between 2002 and 2008 were included, and their demographic, medical, clinical, operative, and postoperative data were gathered. This report presents general information as well as in-hospital mortality rates regarding all the cardiac procedures performed in the above time period. Results: There were 24959 procedures performed: 19663 (78.8%) isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgeries (CABGs); 1492 (6.0%) isolated valve surgeries; 1437 (5.8%) CABGs concomitant with other procedures; 832 (3.3%) CABGs combined with valve surgeries; 722 (2.9%) valve surgeries concomitant with other procedures; 545 (2.2%) surgeries other than CABG or valve surgery; and 267 (1.1%) CABGs concomitant with valve and other types of surgery. The overall mortality was 205 (1.04%), with the lowest mortality rate (0.47%) in the isolated CABGs and the highest (4.49%) in the CABGs concomitant with valve surgeries and other types of surgery. Meanwhile, the overall mortality rate was higher in the female patients than in the males (1.90% vs. 0.74%, respectively). Conclusion: Isolated CABG was the most prevalent procedure at our center with the lowest mortality rate. However, the overall mortality was more prevalent in our female patients. This database can serve as a platform for the participation of the other countries in the region in the creation of a regional ACSD. PMID:23304179

  13. Retrieval Attempts Enhance Learning, but Retrieval Success (versus Failure) Does Not Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornell, Nate; Klein, Patricia Jacobs; Rawson, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Retrieving information from memory enhances learning. We propose a 2-stage framework to explain the benefits of retrieval. Stage 1 takes place as one attempts to retrieve an answer, which activates knowledge related to the retrieval cue. Stage 2 begins when the answer becomes available, at which point appropriate connections are strengthened and…

  14. Overview of NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's program on knowledge of atmospheric processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is charged with the responsibility to enhance aviation safety through improving understanding of various atmospheric phenomena. A brief discussion is presented concerning the tasks and work being accomplished by MSFC. The tasks are defined as follows: (1) to determine and define the turbulence and steady wind environments induced by buildings, towers, hills, trees, etc., (2) to identify, develop, and apply natural environment technology for the reconstruction and/or simulation of the natural environment for aircraft accident investigation and hazard identification, (3) to develop basic information about free atmosphere perturbations, (4) to develop and apply fog modification mathematical models to assess candidate fog modification schemes and to develop appropriate instrumentation to aquire basic data about fog. To accomplish these tasks MSFC has developed a program involving field data acquisition, wind tunnel studies, theoretical studies, data analysis, and flight simulation studies.

  15. A consumer informed workshop can improve knowledge and attitude to patient-centered care among hospital clinicians-in-training

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Sharon A.; Tellis, Betty; Michel, Kelly L.; O’Connor, Patricia; Clarke, Caroline; Keeffe, Jill E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Patient and family involvement in the education and training of medical practitioners increases the likelihood that the care delivered will meet the needs of service users and carers. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a consumer informed educational program on knowledge and attitude to patient-centered care among hospital clinical trainees. Methods: A total of 66 junior medical staff and 35 orthoptists in training were invited to participate in a controlled before-and-after trial at the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital from October to November, 2011. Thirty-eight participants were allocated to the intervention program (interactive workshop) and 63 to the control program (assigned reading). Questionnaires regarding knowledge, attitude, and practice, patient-practitioner orientation and communication were administered. Differences between groups and differences before and after the program were evaluated using the t-test or Chi-square test, as appropriate. Narrative data obtained from the questionnaires were analyzed using Grounded Theory qualitative analysis techniques. Results: A total of 24 participants (63%) completed the intervention program and eight (13%) the control program. The intervention group felt more prepared to introduce themselves and their role (Chi-square = 11.19, P = 0.01) and to acknowledge patients’ waiting time prior to consultation (Chi-square 8.52, P = 0.04) compared with the control group. For the intervention group, there was an improvement in mean score on the Communication Assessment Tool (mean change = 0.55, P = 0.01). Conclusion: There were minor improvements in self-perceived knowledge and attitude to patient-centered care and communication among hospital clinicians-in-training following a consumer informed education program. The majority of participants who received this program agreed it would influence how they conducted future consultations. Further work is required to determine if these

  16. Assessing students' genre knowledge in an engineering writing center: An analysis of sophomore lab reports in electrical and computer engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kristin Wilds Davidson

    As discipline-specific writing centers continue to increase in number, writing center consultants must determine ways to help their clients acquire discipline-specific and course-specific literacy. One way to achieve this goal is through genre analysis. This study focuses on the genre of EECE 201 (Tools and Techniques for Electrical and Computer Engineers) lab reports and strategies writing center consultants can implement to teach students communication skills necessary for discipline-specific literacy. Beginning with a discussion of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Writing Center's history, the methodological foundations of this study, and an historical overview of genre theory from classical times to the present, this study surveys the history and debates surrounding teaching genres to students. The role of assessment in analyzing and teaching genre is discussed as well, with application specifically to the sophomore-level EECE 201 course within ECE at the University of South Carolina. The study itself consists of analyzing four students' lab reports written for the EECE 201 course. Using a list of eleven characteristics developed with experienced communicators within this discipline, I analyzed each report (there is a total of 14), determining to what extent the characteristics appeared in the reports. At the end of each student's analysis, a table summarizes the information gathered from the reports, and overall conclusions are drawn for each student. The end of the study chapter presents generic writing trends exhibited by the students during the semester, such as inability to show evidence of inductive/deductive reasoning and difficulties with conceptualizing audience and applying formatting skills. The study concludes by recommending strategies that ECE Writing Center consultants can implement to help the sophomore students acquire discipline-specific knowledge. Going beyond the ECE Writing Center's context, however, the study also suggests

  17. Effects of Health Education of Diabetic Patient’s Knowledge at Diabetic Health Centers, Khartoum State, Sudan: 2007-2010

    PubMed Central

    MakkiAwouda, Fathia Osman; Elmukashfi, Taha Ahmed; Hag Al-Tom, Seed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Educating and training diabetic patients is necessary for controlling and improving their health. Methods: It was Quasi-experimental study design study. The study aimed to determine the effects of health education on the achievements of diabetic patients regarding control and improvement of their health status; at Diabetic Health Centers in Khartoum State, Sudan; 2007-2010. The target populations were diabetic patients, who attended the diabetic health centers to receive their treatment. Using simple random sampling 152 patients were selected (58 males and 94 females). Before and after comparison was done. Data was processed using SPSS and pair t-test was used to determine the effect of health education. P-value equal or less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Findings: Test for before and after comparison was found to be statistically significant (p<0.05) for diabetic patients. They gained more knowledge after the implementation of the program; particularly in the areas of the nature and signs and symptoms of the disease, signs and symptoms of hypo & hyperglycemia, causes and warning signs of foot problems, foot care, and importance of exercises. Conclusion and Recommendations: Health education of diabetic patients is crucial for control of diabetes. Capacity building of diabetic health centers, strengthening diabetic patients association, and more research to study the effect of health education on diabetic patients were needed. PMID:24576384

  18. Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basinger, Scott A.; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa; Cohen, David; Green, Joseph J.; Lou, John; Ohara, Catherine; Redding, David; Shi, Fang

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval software uses the Modified Gerchberg-Saxton (MGS) algorithm, an image-based sensing method that can turn any focal plane science instrument into a wavefront sensor, avoiding the need to use external metrology equipment. Knowledge of the wavefront enables intelligent control of active optical systems.

  19. IMIRSEL: a secure music retrieval testing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downie, John S.

    2004-10-01

    The Music Information Retrieval (MIR) and Music Digital Library (MDL) research communities have long noted the need for formal evaluation mechanisms. Issues concerning the unavailability of freely-available music materials have greatly hindered the creation of standardized test collections with which these communities could scientifically assess the strengths and weaknesses of their various music retrieval techniques. The International Music Information Retrieval Systems Evaluation Laboratory (IMIRSEL) is being developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) specifically to overcome this hindrance to the scientific evaluation of MIR/MDL systems. Together with its subsidiary Human Use of Music Information Retrieval Systems (HUMIRS) project, IMIRSEL will allow MIR/MDL researchers access to the standardized large-scale collection of copyright-sensitive music materials and standardized test queries being housed at UIUC's National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). Virtual Research Labs (VRL), based upon NCSA's Data-to-Knowledge (D2K) tool set, are being developed through which MIR/MDL researchers will interact with the music materials under a "trusted code" security model.

  20. Test plan for the retrieval demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Valentich, D.J.

    1993-05-01

    This test plan describes a simulated buried waste retrieval demonstration that will be performed at the Caterpillar, Inc., Edwards Training Center located near Peoria, Illinois. The purpose of the demonstration is to determine the effectiveness of using readily available excavation equipment to retrieve, size, and handle various simulated waste forms that are similar in size, structure, and composition to those expected to be found in US Department of Energy contaminated waste pits and trenches. The objectives of this demonstration are to: meet and maintain daily production goals of 80 yd{sup 3}/day; minimize spillage and dust generation through careful and deliberate operations; document and evaluate methods for manipulating, sizing, and/or working around large objects; and document and evaluate requirements for operator augmentation and remote operation for hot test pit excavation operations. Four conditions comprising the range of environments to be evaluated include excavation of random material from below grade; stacked boxes and barrels from below grade; random materials from at grade; and stacked boxes and barrels from at grade. Results of the retrieval demonstration will reduce unknowns in the body of knowledge about retrieval equipment and procedural options for removal of buried transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It is anticipated that DOE will factor this information into a remedial investigation/feasibility plan leading to a final record of decision for disposition of buried TRU waste.

  1. The Networking of Interactive Bibliographic Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Richard S.; Reintjes, J. Francis

    Research in networking of heterogeneous interactive bibliographic retrieval systems is being conducted which centers on the concept of a virtual retrieval system. Such a virtual system would be created through a translating computer interface that would provide access to the different retrieval systems and data bases in a uniform and convenient…

  2. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Animal Bite Victims Attending an Anti-rabies Health Center in Jimma Town, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kabeta, Tadele; Deresa, Benti; Tigre, Worku; Ward, Michael P.; Mor, Siobhan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rabies is an important but preventable cause of death in Ethiopia. We assessed the knowledge, attitudes and practices of animal bite victims attending an anti-rabies health center in Jimma Town, Ethiopia. Methodology/Principal Findings Between July 2012 and March 2013 a cross-sectional questionnaire was administered to 384 bite victims or their guardians in the case of minors (aged <15 years). Factors associated with knowledge, attitudes and practices were evaluated using generalized linear models. Almost all participants (99%) were aware that rabies was transmitted by the bite or lick of a rabid dog, however only 20.1% identified “germs” as the cause of disease. A majority of participants stated rabies could be prevented by avoiding dog bites (64.6%) and confining dogs (53.9%); fewer (41.7%) recognized vaccination of dogs/cats as an important preventive strategy. Regarding attitudes, most (91.1%) agreed that medical evaluation should be sought as soon as possible. However, most (75.0%) also believed that traditional healers could cure rabies. Rural residence (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.1, p = 0.015) and Protestant religion (OR = 2.4, p = 0.041) were independently associated with this belief. Among 186 participants who owned dogs, only 9 (4.8%) had ever vaccinated their dog and more than 90% of respondents indicated that their dog was free-roaming or cohabitated with the family. Only 7.0% of participants applied correct first aid following exposure, and the majority (47.7%) reported that the animal was killed by the community following the incident. Female sex and Muslim religion were independently associated with higher and lower practices scores, respectively, due largely to differences in animal management practices following the incident. Conclusions/Significance Although respondents demonstrated reasonably sound knowledge of rabies and its transmission, attitudes and practices were inconsistent with rabies prevention. Culturally- and gender

  3. Golden Retrievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Provides a basic definition of metadata, including the usefulness of metatags for online information retrieval and documentation. Defines the elements of the Dublin Core, the next level of metadata. Discusses how librarians can take advantage of metadata. Describes the Gateway to Educational Materials (GEM) Project whose goal is to use metadata to…

  4. Information retrieval at the millenium.

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, W.

    1998-01-01

    Information retrieval systems were among the first medical informatics applications, yet their use has changed substantially in this decade with the growth of end-user computers and the Internet. While early challenges revolved around how to increase the amount of information available in electronic form, more recent challenges center on how to manage the growing volume. Traditional information retrieval issues--such as how to organize and index information to make it more retrievable as well as how to evaluate the effectiveness of systems--are still as pertinent as ever. PMID:9929180

  5. Evaluation of the knowledge level of health violations in food production, distribution, sales centers and public places and their authorities investigating among the women of Bushehr city

    PubMed Central

    Rassafiani, Hamidreza; Ghazanfari, Mahtab; Ravanipour, Masoumeh; Motamed, Niloofar; Ravanipour, Maryam; Vakilabadi, Dariush Ranjbar; Zare, Sedigheh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women and mothers are the most important educational audience to convey health teachings. This study was aimed to evaluate the knowledge level of different types of health violations of food production, distribution, sale centers and public places; and authorities investigating the violations among women referring to health care centers in Bushehr. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, which was done cross-sectionally, 600 women who were referred to health care centers affiliated to the Bushehr University of Medical Sciences was selected by convenience sampling. Two-part questionnaire was used to collect data: demographic information and a researcher-designed knowledge survey questionnaire consisted of 25 questions with Cronbach's alpha = 0.7. Data were analyzed with the software SPSS version 13; using Chi-square test and Phi and Cramer test. P ≤ 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The findings showed that 56.9% and 26.5% of women had good and moderate knowledge levels regarding health violations, while the general knowledge level of authorities investigating health violations were at the moderate level among 57.3% and at the good level among 15.3% of women. Overall, there was a significant relationship between education level and the women's knowledge level of health violations (P < 0.0001). The relationship between the women's education level and authorities investigating health violations was not significant (P = 0.073). Conclusion: Applying interventional methods of education in health violations to the women by health centers can elevate the level of health knowledge among them. PMID:27500164

  6. Retrieval of LAI and leaf chlorophyll content from remote sensing data by agronomy mechanism knowledge to solve the ill-posed inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhai; Nie, Chenwei; Yang, Guijun; Xu, Xingang; Jin, Xiuliang; Gu, Xiaohe

    2014-10-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) and LCC, as the two most important crop growth variables, are major considerations in management decisions, agricultural planning and policy making. Estimation of canopy biophysical variables from remote sensing data was investigated using a radiative transfer model. However, the ill-posed problem is unavoidable for the unique solution of the inverse problem and the uncertainty of measurements and model assumptions. This study focused on the use of agronomy mechanism knowledge to restrict and remove the ill-posed inversion results. For this purpose, the inversion results obtained using the PROSAIL model alone (NAMK) and linked with agronomic mechanism knowledge (AMK) were compared. The results showed that AMK did not significantly improve the accuracy of LAI inversion. LAI was estimated with high accuracy, and there was no significant improvement after considering AMK. The validation results of the determination coefficient (R2) and the corresponding root mean square error (RMSE) between measured LAI and estimated LAI were 0.635 and 1.022 for NAMK, and 0.637 and 0.999 for AMK, respectively. LCC estimation was significantly improved with agronomy mechanism knowledge; the R2 and RMSE values were 0.377 and 14.495 μg cm-2 for NAMK, and 0.503 and 10.661 μg cm-2 for AMK, respectively. Results of the comparison demonstrated the need for agronomy mechanism knowledge in radiative transfer model inversion.

  7. Nutrition and physical activity randomized control trial in child care centers improves knowledge, policies, and children’s body mass index

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To address the public health crisis of overweight and obese preschool-age children, the Nutrition And Physical Activity Self Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) intervention was delivered by nurse child care health consultants with the objective of improving child care provider and parent nutrition and physical activity knowledge, center-level nutrition and physical activity policies and practices, and children’s body mass index (BMI). Methods A seven-month randomized control trial was conducted in 17 licensed child care centers serving predominantly low income families in California, Connecticut, and North Carolina, including 137 child care providers and 552 families with racially and ethnically diverse children three to five years old. The NAP SACC intervention included educational workshops for child care providers and parents on nutrition and physical activity and consultation visits provided by trained nurse child care health consultants. Demographic characteristics and pre - and post-workshop knowledge surveys were completed by providers and parents. Blinded research assistants reviewed each center’s written health and safety policies, observed nutrition and physical activity practices, and measured randomly selected children’s nutritional intake, physical activity, and height and weight pre- and post-intervention. Results Hierarchical linear models and multiple regression models assessed individual- and center-level changes in knowledge, policies, practices and age- and sex-specific standardized body mass index (zBMI), controlling for state, parent education, and poverty level. Results showed significant increases in providers’ and parents’ knowledge of nutrition and physical activity, center-level improvements in policies, and child-level changes in children’s zBMI based on 209 children in the intervention and control centers at both pre- and post-intervention time points. Conclusions The NAP SACC intervention, as delivered by

  8. A Knowledge-Based Approach to Improving and Homogenizing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning Quality Among Treatment Centers: An Example Application to Prostate Cancer Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Good, David; Lo, Joseph; Lee, W. Robert; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin, Fang-Fang; Das, Shiva K.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning can have wide variation among different treatment centers. We propose a system to leverage the IMRT planning experience of larger institutions to automatically create high-quality plans for outside clinics. We explore feasibility by generating plans for patient datasets from an outside institution by adapting plans from our institution. Methods and Materials: A knowledge database was created from 132 IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer at our institution. The outside institution, a community hospital, provided the datasets for 55 prostate cancer cases, including their original treatment plans. For each “query” case from the outside institution, a similar “match” case was identified in the knowledge database, and the match case’s plan parameters were then adapted and optimized to the query case by use of a semiautomated approach that required no expert planning knowledge. The plans generated with this knowledge-based approach were compared with the original treatment plans at several dose cutpoints. Results: Compared with the original plan, the knowledge-based plan had a significantly more homogeneous dose to the planning target volume and a significantly lower maximum dose. The volumes of the rectum, bladder, and femoral heads above all cutpoints were nominally lower for the knowledge-based plan; the reductions were significantly lower for the rectum. In 40% of cases, the knowledge-based plan had overall superior (lower) dose–volume histograms for rectum and bladder; in 54% of cases, the comparison was equivocal; in 6% of cases, the knowledge-based plan was inferior for both bladder and rectum. Conclusions: Knowledge-based planning was superior or equivalent to the original plan in 95% of cases. The knowledge-based approach shows promise for homogenizing plan quality by transferring planning expertise from more experienced to less experienced institutions.

  9. Using Induction to Refine Information Retrieval Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baudin, Catherine; Pell, Barney; Kedar, Smadar

    1994-01-01

    Conceptual information retrieval systems use structured document indices, domain knowledge and a set of heuristic retrieval strategies to match user queries with a set of indices describing the document's content. Such retrieval strategies increase the set of relevant documents retrieved (increase recall), but at the expense of returning additional irrelevant documents (decrease precision). Usually in conceptual information retrieval systems this tradeoff is managed by hand and with difficulty. This paper discusses ways of managing this tradeoff by the application of standard induction algorithms to refine the retrieval strategies in an engineering design domain. We gathered examples of query/retrieval pairs during the system's operation using feedback from a user on the retrieved information. We then fed these examples to the induction algorithm and generated decision trees that refine the existing set of retrieval strategies. We found that (1) induction improved the precision on a set of queries generated by another user, without a significant loss in recall, and (2) in an interactive mode, the decision trees pointed out flaws in the retrieval and indexing knowledge and suggested ways to refine the retrieval strategies.

  10. Improving Medication Knowledge among Older Adults with Heart Failure: A Patient-Centered Approach to Instruction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Daniel G.; Weiner, Michael; Young, James; Steinley, Douglas; Deer, Melissa; Murray, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether patient-centered instructions for chronic heart failure medications increase comprehension and memory for medication information in older adults diagnosed with chronic heart failure. Design and Methods: Patient-centered instructions for familiar and unfamiliar medications were compared with instructions for the…

  11. Sexual Behavior and Knowledge among Adolescents with Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Compared to HIV-Uninfected Adolescents at an Urban Tertiary Center in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Carol; Kest, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sexual behaviors and knowledge among PHIV-infected (PHIV+) adolescents in comparison with HIV-uninfected youths are not well understood and continue to be studied actively. Objective. To compare sexual behavior and sexual knowledge of PHIV+ and HIV-uninfected adolescents at an urban, tertiary-care center in New Jersey. Study Design. Modified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance questionnaire was administered to PHIV+ and HIV-uninfected adolescents to assess and compare sexual behavior and knowledge over a 1-year-period. Results. Twenty-seven PHIV+ and 100 HIV-uninfected adolescents were studied; 59% PHIV+ and 52% HIV-uninfected adolescents were sexually active. A significantly higher proportion of PHIV+ adolescents compared to HIV-uninfected adolescents reported ≥1 occasion of unprotected penetrative sex (p < 0.0001) and reported multiple (>4) sexual partners (p = 0.037). Significantly more PHIV+ males reported receptive anal intercourse (p < 0.001). About 1/3 of adolescents in both groups were unaware that sexual abstinence can prevent HIV transmission and >80% adolescents in both groups did not consider multiple sexual partners a risk factor for HIV transmission. Only 25% PHIV+ adolescents reported disclosing their seropositive status to their first sexual partners. Conclusions. High risk sexual behaviors were significantly more prevalent among PHIV+ youths; however both groups demonstrated considerable gaps in sexual knowledge. There is an urgent need for heightening awareness about risky behaviors, interventions for prevention, and reproductive health promotion among adolescents. PMID:27595131

  12. Sexual Behavior and Knowledge among Adolescents with Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Compared to HIV-Uninfected Adolescents at an Urban Tertiary Center in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ashlesha; Pineda, Carol; Kest, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sexual behaviors and knowledge among PHIV-infected (PHIV(+)) adolescents in comparison with HIV-uninfected youths are not well understood and continue to be studied actively. Objective. To compare sexual behavior and sexual knowledge of PHIV(+) and HIV-uninfected adolescents at an urban, tertiary-care center in New Jersey. Study Design. Modified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance questionnaire was administered to PHIV(+) and HIV-uninfected adolescents to assess and compare sexual behavior and knowledge over a 1-year-period. Results. Twenty-seven PHIV(+) and 100 HIV-uninfected adolescents were studied; 59% PHIV(+) and 52% HIV-uninfected adolescents were sexually active. A significantly higher proportion of PHIV(+) adolescents compared to HIV-uninfected adolescents reported ≥1 occasion of unprotected penetrative sex (p < 0.0001) and reported multiple (>4) sexual partners (p = 0.037). Significantly more PHIV(+) males reported receptive anal intercourse (p < 0.001). About 1/3 of adolescents in both groups were unaware that sexual abstinence can prevent HIV transmission and >80% adolescents in both groups did not consider multiple sexual partners a risk factor for HIV transmission. Only 25% PHIV(+) adolescents reported disclosing their seropositive status to their first sexual partners. Conclusions. High risk sexual behaviors were significantly more prevalent among PHIV(+) youths; however both groups demonstrated considerable gaps in sexual knowledge. There is an urgent need for heightening awareness about risky behaviors, interventions for prevention, and reproductive health promotion among adolescents. PMID:27595131

  13. Enhanced Text Retrieval Using Natural Language Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddy, Elizabeth D.

    1998-01-01

    Defines natural language processing (NLP); describes the use of NLP in information retrieval (IR); provides seven levels of linguistic analysis: phonological, morphological, lexical, syntactic, semantic, discourse, and pragmatic. Discusses the commercial use of NLP in IR with the example of DR-LINK (Document Retrieval using LINguistic Knowledge)…

  14. Efficient Methods to Assimilate Satellite Retrievals Based on Information Content. Part 2; Suboptimal Retrieval Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Dee, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    One of the outstanding problems in data assimilation has been and continues to be how best to utilize satellite data while balancing the tradeoff between accuracy and computational cost. A number of weather prediction centers have recently achieved remarkable success in improving their forecast skill by changing the method by which satellite data are assimilated into the forecast model from the traditional approach of assimilating retrievals to the direct assimilation of radiances in a variational framework. The operational implementation of such a substantial change in methodology involves a great number of technical details, e.g., pertaining to quality control procedures, systematic error correction techniques, and tuning of the statistical parameters in the analysis algorithm. Although there are clear theoretical advantages to the direct radiance assimilation approach, it is not obvious at all to what extent the improvements that have been obtained so far can be attributed to the change in methodology, or to various technical aspects of the implementation. The issue is of interest because retrieval assimilation retains many practical and logistical advantages which may become even more significant in the near future when increasingly high-volume data sources become available. The central question we address here is: how much improvement can we expect from assimilating radiances rather than retrievals, all other things being equal? We compare the two approaches in a simplified one-dimensional theoretical framework, in which problems related to quality control and systematic error correction are conveniently absent. By assuming a perfect radiative transfer model and perfect knowledge of radiance and background error covariances, we are able to formulate a nonlinear local error analysis for each assimilation method. Direct radiance assimilation is optimal in this idealized context, while the traditional method of assimilating retrievals is suboptimal because it

  15. Knowledge of HPV and Surgery among Women Who Underwent Cervical Conization: A Korean Multi-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Jun, So Yeun; Kim, Se Ik; Lee, Jung-Yun; Lee, San Hui; Song, Yong Jung; Chun, Kyoung-Chul; Kim, Jae Weon; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a well-known cause of cervical cancer, which, along with its precursors, can be diagnosed and treated with cervical conization (CC). This study aimed to assess HPV- and procedure-related knowledge among women who had undergone CC. Materials and Methods Between February and May 2014, consecutive women who had undergone CC at five different educational hospitals were recruited. All patients had undergone a loop electrosurgical excision procedure as the method of CC. A survey was conducted with a self-developed, 29-item questionnaire, measuring knowledge related to HPV and CC. We analyzed the responses of 160 patients who completed the questionnaire. Results Mean total knowledge scores (±standard deviation) for HPV and CC were 5.2±3.0 of a possible 13.0 and 8.3±4.2 of a possible 16.0, respectively. While 73% of the patients knew that HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer, only 44% knew that HPV is sexually transmitted. The purpose of CC was correctly identified by 71% of the patients. However, 35% failed to indicate the anatomical area resected at the time of CC in the schematic diagram. Women who were younger (p<0.001), had higher education level (p<0.001), and higher family income (p=0.008) had higher knowledge scores. In contrast, neither interval from CC to survey nor disease severity were associated with total knowledge score. Conclusion The level of knowledge related to HPV and CC was unexpectedly low in women who had undergone CC. Intuitive educational resources may improve this knowledge, and further cohort studies are warranted. PMID:27401655

  16. Mobile medical image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Samuel; Depeursinge, Adrien; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2011-03-01

    the text. Problems with the many, often incompatible mobile platforms were discovered and are listed in the text. Mobile information access is a quickly growing domain and the constraints of mobile access also need to be taken into account for image retrieval. The demonstrated access to the medical literature is most relevant as the medical literature and their images are clearly the largest knowledge source in the medical field.

  17. Retrieval of Mir Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    1999-01-01

    A Russian solar array panel removed in November 1997 from the non-articulating photovoltaic array on the Mir core module was returned to Earth on STS-89 in January 1998. The panel had been exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) for 10 years prior to retrieval. The retrieval provided a unique opportunity to study the effects of the LEO environment on a functional solar array. To take advantage of this opportunity, a team composed of members from RSC-Energia (Russia), the Boeing Company, and the following NASA Centers--Johnson Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Lewis Research Center--was put together to analyze the array. After post-retrieval inspections at the Spacehab Facility at Kennedy in Florida, the array was shipped to Lewis in Cleveland for electrical performance tests, closeup photodocumentation, and removal of selected solar cells and blanket material. With approval from RSC-Energia, five cell pairs and their accompanying blanket and mesh material, and samples of painted handrail materials were selected for removal on the basis of their ability to provide degradation information. Sites were selected that provided different sizes and shapes of micrometeoroid impacts and different levels of surface contamination. These materials were then distributed among the team for round robin testing.

  18. Fostering a Collaborative and Creative Climate in a College Class through Idea-Centered Knowledge-Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Huang-Yao; Chang, Yu-Hui; Chai, Chin Sing

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the effects of student engagement in a knowledge-building (KB) environment on their collaborative learning process and the perceived creative climate of that environment. The participants were 30 college students who undertook a living technology course in which KB were employed. The main data sources include students'…

  19. Skill in Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Manning, Evan

    2008-01-01

    Retrieval Skill quantifies the ability of one retrieval from a sounder to be more accurate than the best forecast relative to another with the same of another sounder. This is summarized using a Retrieval Anomaly Skill Score (RASS) which is the cor (retrieved-background, truth-background) * sqrt(f), Where f is defined as the ratio of accepted to the possible retrievals. Charts show various features and comparisons of RASS to other methods of retrieval.

  20. Publication search and retrieval system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winget, Elizabeth A.

    1981-01-01

    The publication search and retrieval system of the Branch of Atlantic-Gulf of Mexico Geology, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, Mass., is a procedure for listing and describing branch-sponsored publications. It is designed for maintenance and retrieval by those having limited knowledge of computer languages and programs. Because this branch currently utilizes the Hewlett-Packard HP-1000 computer with RTE-IVB operating system, database entry and maintenance is performed in accordance with the TE-IVB Terminal User’s Reference Manual (Hewlett-Packard Company, 1980) and within the constraints of GRASP (Bowen and Botbol, 1975) and WOLF (Evenden, 1978).

  1. Information retrieval for patient care.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M.

    1997-01-01

    Doctors need clinical information during most consultations with patients, and much of this need could be satisfied by material from online sources. Advances in data communication technologies mean that multimedia information can be transported rapidly to various clinical care locations. However, selecting the few items of information likely to be useful in a particular clinical situation from the mass of information available is a major problem. Current information retrieval systems are designed primarily for use in research rather than clinical care. The design, implementation, and critical evaluation of new information retrieval systems for clinical care should be guided by knowledgeable clinical users. PMID:9099122

  2. Knowledge Discovery in Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, M. Jay

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) revolves around the investigation and creation of knowledge, processes, algorithms, and mechanisms for retrieving knowledge from data collections. The article is an introductory overview of KDD. The rationale and environment of its development and applications are discussed. Issues related to database design…

  3. Knowledge About the Waterpipe (Hookah), a Qualitative Assessment Among Community Workers in a Major Urban Center in Canada.

    PubMed

    Hammal, Fadi; Wild, T Cameron; Finegan, Barry A

    2016-08-01

    Waterpipe (WP) use has surged in popularity since the introduction of flavoured shisha. It is now an increasingly popular form of smoking among youth in North America. Health professionals/educators knowledge about the WP may well be inadequate. This study, using qualitative methods, sought to explore the knowledge and attitude of leaders in the community toward the WP. Family physicians, pharmacists, tobacco counsellors, social workers and educators were invited to participate in a one-one interview using open-ended questions. A total of 27 interviews were conducted. Individuals from Eastern Mediterranean backgrounds raised doubt about the overemphasised cultural significance of the WP and perceived this as a marketing strategy by industry. Most felt that WP smokers believed the WP to be less harmful than cigarettes and that the use of flavoured tobacco was motivating people to smoke. Participants believed that education should be directed at the general public and healthcare professionals, suggesting school programs and the use of social media to inform young smokers. Most thought that the current practices regarding packaging and second hand smoke exposure are confusing. They identified the lack of knowledge, poor enforcement procedures, "so called cultural aspects" and the economic impact of banning the WP on small businesses as barriers to change. Despite the awareness of an increase in WP use, our participants recognized that little has been done to curb this problem. Our findings emphasize the need for further education and better legislation to regulate WP use and availability. PMID:26704909

  4. JURASSIC Retrieval Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, J.; Ungermann, J.; Guggenmoser, T.; Kaufmann, M.; Riese, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging in the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an aircraft based infrared limb-sounder. This presentation will give an overview of the retrieval techniques used for the analysis of data produced by the GLORIA instrument. For data processing, the JUelich RApid Spectral SImulation Code 2 (JURASSIC2) was developed. It consists of a set of programs to retrieve atmospheric profiles from GLORIA measurements. The GLORIA Michelson interferometer can run with a wide range of parameters. In the dynamics mode, spectra are generate with a medium spectral and a very high temporal and spatial resolution. Each sample can contain thousands of spectral lines for each contributing trace gas. In the JURASSIC retrieval code this is handled by using a radiative transport model based on the Emissivity Growth Approximation. Deciding which samples should be included in the retrieval is a non-trivial task and requires specific domain knowledge. To ease this problem we developed an automatic selection program by analysing the Shannon information content. By taking into account data for all relevant trace gases and instrument effects, optimal integrated spectral windows are computed. This includes considerations for cross-influence of trace gases, which has non-obvious consequence for the contribution of spectral samples. We developed methods to assess the influence of spectral windows on the retrieval. While we can not exhaustively search the whole range of possible spectral sample combinations, it is possible to optimize information content using a genetic algorithm. The GLORIA instrument is mounted with a viewing direction perpendicular to the flight direction. A gimbal frame makes it possible to move the instrument 45° to both direction. By flying on a circular path, it is possible to generate images of an area of interest from a wide range of angles. These can be analyzed in a 3D-tomographic fashion, which yields superior spatial resolution along line of

  5. Knowledge about Danger Signs of Obstetric Complications and Associated Factors among Postnatal Mothers of Mechekel District Health Centers, East Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Amenu, Gedefa; Mulaw, Zerfu; Seyoum, Tewodros; Bayu, Hinsermu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Developing countries like Ethiopia contributed highest level of maternal mortality due to obstetric complications. Women awareness of obstetric danger sign to recognize complications to seek medical care early is the first intervention in an effort to decrease maternal death. Objective. To assess knowledge about danger signs of obstetric complications and associated factors among postnatal mothers at Mechekel district health centers, East Gojjam zone, Northwest Ethiopia, 2014. Methods. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted from August to October, 2014, in Mechekel district health centers. Systematic random sampling was used to select four hundred eleven study participants. A pretested structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were entered to Epi Info version 3.5.3 and exported to SPSS 20.0 for further analysis. Descriptive and summary statistics were done. Logistic regression analyses were used to see the association of different variables. Odds ratios and 95% confidence interval were computed to determine the presence and strength of association. Results. According to this study, 55.1% participants were knowledgeable about danger signs of obstetric complications. Maternal and husband educational level ((AOR = 1.977, 95% CI: 1.052, 3.716) and (AOR = 3.163, 95% CI: 1.860, 5.3770), resp.), family monthly income ≥ 1500 (AOR = 2.954, 95% CI: 1.289, 6.770), being multipara (AOR = 7.463, 95% CI: 1.301, 12.800), ANC follow-up during last pregnancy (AOR = 2.184, 95% CI: 1.137, 4.196), and place of last delivery (AOR = 1.955, 95% CI: 1.214, 3.150) were variables found to be significantly associated with women's knowledge on danger signs of obstetric complications. Conclusion. Significant proportion of respondents were not knowledgeable about obstetric danger signs and factors like educational status, place of last delivery, and antenatal follow-up were found to be associated. PMID:27375920

  6. Visualizing Knowledge Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borner, Katy; Chen, Chaomei; Boyack, Kevin W.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews visualization techniques for scientific disciplines and information retrieval and classification. Highlights include historical background of scientometrics, bibliometrics, and citation analysis; map generation; process flow of visualizing knowledge domains; measures and similarity calculations; vector space model; factor analysis;…

  7. Preparing for Patient-Centered Care: Assessing Nursing Student Knowledge, Comfort, and Cultural Competence Toward the Latino Population

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Rachel M.; Sherrill, Windsor W.; Truong, Khoa D.; Nichols, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    As the Latino population continues to grow throughout the United States, cultural competence training of nursing students at the baccalaureate level has become a priority. This study aimed to explore undergraduate nursing students’ attitudes and beliefs toward Latino patients and their perceived readiness to provide care to Latino patients. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at four major nursing schools in the southeastern United States, which is the region that has seen the highest percentage of growth in the Latino population. Results from multivariable regression suggest that social interaction with Latino individuals and cultural immersion in a Spanish-speaking country predict student knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latino patients. Direct influence by nursing programs, such as clinical experience, coursework, and language proficiency, are positively associated with the designed outcomes, but these relationships are not statistically significant. Our findings suggest that dosage of training matters. Implications for student recruitment, selection, and training are discussed. PMID:24766083

  8. Trends in academic health sciences libraries and their emergence as the “knowledge nexus” for their academic health centers*

    PubMed Central

    Kronenfeld, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify trends in academic health sciences libraries (AHSLs) as they adapt to the shift from a print knowledgebase to an increasingly digital knowledgebase. This research was funded by the 2003 David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship. Methods: The author spent a day and a half interviewing professional staff at each library. The questionnaire used was sent to the directors of each library in advance of the visit, and the directors picked the staff to be interviewed and set up the schedule. Results: Seven significant trends were identified. These trends are part of the shift of AHSLs from being facility and print oriented with a primary focus on their role as repositories of a print-based knowledgebase to a new focus on their role as the center or “nexus” for the organization, access, and use of an increasingly digital-based knowledgebase. Conclusion: This paper calls for a national effort to develop a new model or structure for health sciences libraries to more effectively respond to the challenges of access and use of a digital knowledgebase, much the same way the National Library of Medicine did in the 1960s and 1970s in developing and implementing the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. The paper then concludes with some examples or ideas for research to assist in this process. PMID:15685271

  9. Retrieval-Based Learning: A Perspective for Enhancing Meaningful Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpicke, Jeffrey D.; Grimaldi, Phillip J.

    2012-01-01

    Learning is often identified with the acquisition, encoding, or construction of new knowledge, while retrieval is often considered only a means of assessing knowledge, not a process that contributes to learning. Here, we make the case that retrieval is the key process for understanding and for promoting learning. We provide an overview of recent…

  10. Analyzing Document Retrievability in Patent Retrieval Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Shariq; Rauber, Andreas

    Most information retrieval settings, such as web search, are typically precision-oriented, i.e. they focus on retrieving a small number of highly relevant documents. However, in specific domains, such as patent retrieval or law, recall becomes more relevant than precision: in these cases the goal is to find all relevant documents, requiring algorithms to be tuned more towards recall at the cost of precision. This raises important questions with respect to retrievability and search engine bias: depending on how the similarity between a query and documents is measured, certain documents may be more or less retrievable in certain systems, up to some documents not being retrievable at all within common threshold settings. Biases may be oriented towards popularity of documents (increasing weight of references), towards length of documents, favour the use of rare or common words; rely on structural information such as metadata or headings, etc. Existing accessibility measurement techniques are limited as they measure retrievability with respect to all possible queries. In this paper, we improve accessibility measurement by considering sets of relevant and irrelevant queries for each document. This simulates how recall oriented users create their queries when searching for relevant information. We evaluate retrievability scores using a corpus of patents from US Patent and Trademark Office.

  11. EVA Retriever Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The EVA retriever is demonstrated in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF). The retriever moves on the air bearing table 'searching' for its target, in this case tools 'dropped' by astronauts on orbit.

  12. Connectionist Interaction Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominich, Sandor

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of connectionist views for adaptive clustering in information retrieval focuses on a connectionist clustering technique and activation spreading-based information retrieval model using the interaction information retrieval method. Presents theoretical as well as simulation results as regards computational complexity and includes…

  13. IRES: image retrieval expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu Sheng, Olivia R.; Wang, Hui-Chin; Garcia, Hong-Mei C.

    1990-08-01

    Image Retrieval Expert System (IRES), a knowledge-based system for automatic image retrieval, is being prototyped at the University of Arizona (U of A). IRES is to couple with the distributed database system designed for Structured PACS (S-PACS)1 to achieve the high system performance required by radiologists. IRES encompasses the "intelligence" of multiple expert radiologists. The system will predict and migrate the "old" images needed for comparison purposes during radiological exam readings from slower or remote storage devices to the local buffers of workstations. The use of IRES with the PACS Distributed Database System (DDBS) is expected to shorten the PACS system response time, save the time of radiologists in selecting films, minimize the turnaround time of the exam interpretation function, and increase diagnostic effectiveness by providing relevant images automatically. This paper presents the implementation details of this IRES prototype.

  14. Neural systems behind word and concept retrieval.

    PubMed

    Damasio, H; Tranel, D; Grabowski, T; Adolphs, R; Damasio, A

    2004-01-01

    Using both the lesion method and functional imaging (positron emission tomography) in large cohorts of subjects investigated with the same experimental tasks, we tested the following hypotheses: (A) that the retrieval of words which denote concrete entities belonging to distinct conceptual categories depends upon partially segregated regions in higher-order cortices of the left temporal lobe; and (B) that the retrieval of conceptual knowledge pertaining to the same concrete entities also depends on partially segregated regions; however, those regions will be different from those postulated in hypothesis A, and located predominantly in the right hemisphere (the second hypothesis tested only with the lesion method). The analyses provide support for hypothesis A in that several regions outside the classical Broca and Wernicke language areas are involved in name retrieval of concrete entities, and that there is a partial segregation in the temporal lobe with respect to the conceptual category to which the entities belong, and partial support for hypothesis B in that retrieval of conceptual knowledge is partially segregated from name retrieval in the lesion study. Those regions identified here are seen as parts of flexible, multi-component systems serving concept and word retrieval for concrete entities belonging to different conceptual categories. By comparing different approaches the article also addresses a number of method issues that have surfaced in recent studies in this field. PMID:15037130

  15. A tutorial on information retrieval: basic terms and concepts

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Smalheiser, Neil R; Yu, Clement

    2006-01-01

    This informal tutorial is intended for investigators and students who would like to understand the workings of information retrieval systems, including the most frequently used search engines: PubMed and Google. Having a basic knowledge of the terms and concepts of information retrieval should improve the efficiency and productivity of searches. As well, this knowledge is needed in order to follow current research efforts in biomedical information retrieval and text mining that are developing new systems not only for finding documents on a given topic, but extracting and integrating knowledge across documents. PMID:16722601

  16. Multilingual information retrieval system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Chan, Syin; Lai, Kok-Fung

    1996-11-01

    In this paper, we present an approach in implementing intelligent information retrieval systems. We have constructed a multilingual information system which combines both image and text retrieval. We have developed an English/Chinese text retrieval tool on the WWW, and later incorporated an image retrieval tool based on associated multilingual captions. The system allows the general public to locate and keep abreast of information about Singapore. It has a novel user interface which accepts queries that are expressed in English, Chinese and mixed text into its database. The titles, summaries, URLs and the matching scores of retrieved documents will then be returned, and a thumbnail will be displayed as well if an image document is retrieved.

  17. Learning Resources Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Len S.

    1974-01-01

    A learning resources center has three roles: storage and retrieval of learning media, creation and production of learning materials, and instruction and advice in the utilization of the facilities available. The design, purpose, and staffing of a resources center are discussed in detail in this article. (DS)

  18. Image selection system. [computerized data storage and retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knutson, M. A.; Hurd, D.; Hubble, L.; Kroeck, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    An image selection (ISS) was developed for the NASA-Ames Research Center Earth Resources Aircraft Project. The ISS is an interactive, graphics oriented, computer retrieval system for aerial imagery. An analysis of user coverage requests and retrieval strategies is presented, followed by a complete system description. Data base structure, retrieval processors, command language, interactive display options, file structures, and the system's capability to manage sets of selected imagery are described. A detailed example of an area coverage request is graphically presented.

  19. Computer and Human Understanding in Intelligent Retrieval Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Richard S.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses general issues of computer and human understanding; contrasts three paradigms of information retrieval methodology, including statistical, deep semantic or natural language, and smart Boolean; describes CONIT, a knowledge-based intermediary retrieval assistance system; and examines system evaluation procedures, including a…

  20. Information Retrieval and Creativity: Towards Support for the Original Thinker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Nigel

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the requirements of information retrieval systems to support creative thinking as well as more convergent thinking. Highlights include the nature of creative thinking; similarity relationships; serendipity; machine processing of similarities; high order knowledge representation; and fuzzy and parallel information retrieval. (Contains 34…

  1. Prospects for Intelligent, Language-Based Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeaton, Alan F.

    1991-01-01

    Unlike conventional information retrieval systems, natural language processing (NLP) systems translate queries automatically into the language of the system. This paper discusses the potential impact of NLP on both the indexing and retrieval of text and examines some current NLP projects and systems that have established knowledge bases in narrow…

  2. An Intelligent System for Document Retrieval in Distributed Office Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Uttam; And Others

    1986-01-01

    MINDS (Multiple Intelligent Node Document Servers) is a distributed system of knowledge-based query engines for efficiently retrieving multimedia documents in an office environment of distributed workstations. By learning document distribution patterns and user interests and preferences during system usage, it customizes document retrievals for…

  3. Understanding Student Article Retrieval Behaviors: Instructional Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Cottone, Catherine P.; Dutt-Doner, Karen; Schoen, David

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the use of full-text databases amongst 425 undergraduate and graduate students in western New York. A review of literature implicated convenience, time issues, article retrieval option knowledge, and the appreciation and understanding of research article quality as potential predictors of full-text reliance. These variables…

  4. Bibliographic Information Retrieval Systems: Increasing Cognitive Compatibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Philip J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the impact of research in artificial intelligence and human computer interaction on the design of bibliographic information retrieval systems, and presents design principles of a prototype system that uses semantically based searches and a knowledge base consisting of conceptual frames. (10 references) (CLB)

  5. Use of Metadata Vocabularies in Data Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, Edwin M.

    1999-01-01

    Introduces a prototype system for devising and using a metadata vocabulary for data retrieval, based on a project at the United States Department of Agriculture. A unified information-access system called REEIS (Research, Education, Economics, Extension Information System) is being designed to provide a knowledge base of programs, projects, and…

  6. WWW Entrez: A Hypertext Retrieval Tool for Molecular Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Jonathan A.; Kans, Jonathan A.; Schuler, Gregory D.

    This article describes the World Wide Web (WWW) Entrez server which is based upon the National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI) Entrez retrieval database and software. Entrez is a molecular sequence retrieval system that contains an integrated view of portions of Medline and all publicly available nucleotide and protein databases,…

  7. A Comparative Study of Document Retrieval Systems of Nursing Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Virginia Kathleen Joseph

    Intended to provide the nursing community with a comparative analysis of four major computerized document retrieval systems and one manual system providing coverage of the nursing literature, this study compares the indexing vocabulary, database coverage, and retrieval performance of the Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC),…

  8. The Setting Up of a Resources Centre. 3: Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm, Adam H., Ed.

    Assembled to aid educators and administrators in Scotland in selecting and applying appropriate information retrieval systems in learning resources centers, this collection contains an introductory essay and four articles on the characteristics and features of some basic information retrieval systems. The articles include (1) a discussion of the…

  9. NATIONAL PESTICIDE INFORMATION RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (NPIRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Pesticide Information Retrieval System (NPIRS) is a collection of pesticide-related databases available through subscription to the Center for Environmental and Regulatory Information Systems, CERIS. The following is a summary of data found in the databases, data sou...

  10. RETRIEVAL EVENTS EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    T. Wilson

    1999-11-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate impacts to the retrieval concept presented in the Design Analysis ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' (Reference 6), from abnormal events based on Design Basis Events (DBE) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDBE) as defined in two recent analyses: (1) DBE/Scenario Analysis for Preclosure Repository Subsurface Facilities (Reference 4); and (2) Preliminary Preclosure Design Basis Event Calculations for the Monitored Geologic Repository (Reference 5) The objective of this task is to determine what impacts the DBEs and BDBEs have on the equipment developed for retrieval. The analysis lists potential impacts and recommends changes to be analyzed in subsequent design analyses for developed equipment, or recommend where additional equipment may be needed, to allow retrieval to be performed in all DBE or BDBE situations. This analysis supports License Application design and therefore complies with the requirements of Systems Description Document input criteria comparison as presented in Section 7, Conclusions. In addition, the analysis discusses the impacts associated with not using concrete inverts in the emplacement drifts. The ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' analysis was based on a concrete invert configuration in the emplacement drift. The scope of the analysis, as presented in ''Development Plan for Retrieval Events Evaluation'' (Reference 3) includes evaluation and criteria of the following: Impacts to retrieval from the emplacement drift based on DBE/BDBEs, and changes to the invert configuration for the preclosure period. Impacts to retrieval from the main drifts based on DBE/BDBEs for the preclosure period.

  11. Information Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahle, Jack D., Jr.

    The Fort Detrick Information Retrieval System is a system of computer programs written in COBOL for a CDC 3150 to store and retrieve information about the scientific and technical reports and documents of the Fort Detrick Technical Library. The documents and reports have been abstracted and indexed. This abstract, the subject matter descriptors,…

  12. Efficient Graffiti Image Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chunlei; Wong, Pak C.; Ribarsky, William; Fan, Jianping

    2012-07-05

    Research of graffiti character recognition and retrieval, as a branch of traditional optical character recognition (OCR), has started to gain attention in recent years. We have investigated the special challenge of the graffiti image retrieval problem and propose a series of novel techniques to overcome the challenges. The proposed bounding box framework locates the character components in the graffiti images to construct meaningful character strings and conduct image-wise and semantic-wise retrieval on the strings rather than the entire image. Using real world data provided by the law enforcement community to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we show that the proposed framework outperforms the traditional image retrieval framework with better retrieval results and improved computational efficiency.

  13. Topological Aspects of Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egghe, Leo; Rousseau, Ronald

    1998-01-01

    Discusses topological aspects of theoretical information retrieval, including retrieval topology; similarity topology; pseudo-metric topology; document spaces as topological spaces; Boolean information retrieval as a subsystem of any topological system; and proofs of theorems. (LRW)

  14. Retrieval options study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    This Retrieval Options Study is part of the systems analysis activities of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation to develop the scientific and technological bases for radioactive waste repositories in various geologic media. The study considers two waste forms, high level waste and spent fuel, and defines various classes of waste retrieval and recovery. A methodology and data base are developed which allow the relative evaluation of retrieval and recovery costs and the following technical criteria: safety; technical feasibility; ease of retrieval; probable intact retrieval time; safeguards; monitoring; criticality; and licensability. A total of 505 repository options are defined and the cost and technical criteria evaluated utilizing a combination of facts and engineering judgments. The repositories evaluated are selected combinations of the following parameters: Geologic Media (salt, granite, basalt, shale); Retrieval Time after Emplacement (5 and 25 years); Emplacement Design (nominal hole, large hole, carbon steel canister, corrosion resistant canister, backfill in hole, nominal sleeves, thick wall sleeves); Emplacement Configuration (single vertical, multiple vertical, single horizontal, multiple horizontal, vaults; Thermal Considerations; (normal design, reduced density, once-through ventilation, recirculated ventilation); Room Backfill; (none, run-of-mine, early, 5 year delay, 25 year delay, decommissioned); and Rate of Retrieval; (same as emplacement, variably slower depending on repository/canister condition).

  15. The Center Master Plan For NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigach, Kristin M.

    2004-01-01

    , practical, and cost effective. To properly formulate any future plans, background information and research are required. Before bringing in a consultant to tackle the three year process anticipated to prepare a Center Master Plan, my job was to gather information on different organizations contributions to the NASA mission, their facility needs, consistent trends they observe, etc. I conducted numerous interviews with personnel such as Directorate Representatives, Division Chiefs, Branch Chiefs, System Managers and Building Managers. I documented the information I received from them for future use. I used the information to create various color-coded maps layering the different data. This was done with the ending objective being to collect the information and place it in a database that will be linked with Aperture (a computer program that generates color-coded map layers from database information) and made electronically retrievable to the Planning Consultant, NASA personnel, program stakeholders, and other governmental agencies. My goal this summer was to gather information and ideas appropriate for use in NASA Glenn Research Center s Master Plan and organize them for future application by the Planning Consultant. By the end of the summer, after completion of my goal, I will utilize my knowledge and create an array of preliminary future plans for the facility that can be passed along as a guidance tool.

  16. Requirements for SPIRES II. An External Specification for the Stanford Public Information Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Edwin B.

    SPIRES (Stanford Public Information Retrieval System) is a computerized information storage and retrieval system intended for use by students and faculty members who have little knowledge of computers but who need rapid and sophisticated retrieval and analysis. The functions and capabilities of the system from the user's point of view are…

  17. RETRIEVAL EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Steinhoff

    1997-08-25

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) retrieval from the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. There are no quality assurance requirements or QA controls in this document. Retrieval under normal conditions is accomplished with the same fleet of equipment as is used for emplacement. Descriptions of equipment used for retrieval under normal conditions is found in Emplacement Equipment Descriptions, DI: BCAF00000-01717-5705-00002 (a document in progress). Equipment used for retrieval under abnormal conditions is addressed in this document and consists of the following: (1) Inclined Plane Hauler; (2) Bottom Lift Transporter; (3) Load Haul Dump (LHD) Loader; (4) Heavy Duty Forklift for Emplacement Drifts; (5) Covered Shuttle Car; (6) Multipurpose Vehicle; and (7) Scaler.

  18. Retrieving Patent Information Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaback, Stuart M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses patent information retrieval from online files in terms of types of questions, file contents, coverage, timeliness, and other file variations. CLAIMS, Derwent, WPI, APIPAT and Chemical Abstracts Service are described. (KP)

  19. Information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, R. F.; Holcomb, J. E.; Kelroy, E. A.; Levine, D. A.; Mee, C., III

    1970-01-01

    Generalized information storage and retrieval system capable of generating and maintaining a file, gathering statistics, sorting output, and generating final reports for output is reviewed. File generation and file maintenance programs written for the system are general purpose routines.

  20. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to paragraph (j)...

  1. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to paragraph (j)...

  2. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to paragraph (j)...

  3. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to paragraph (j)...

  4. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to 42 CFR 433.113(c... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  5. Retrievability Strategy Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gehner, P; Gilstrap, O J; Memory, R D; Wagner, R C

    1997-04-30

    Section 122 of the ''Nuclear Waste Policy Act'' requires that a repository be designed and constructed to permit retrieval of any spent fuel placed in such repository, during an appropriate period of operation of the facility, for one of these reasons: (1) to protect public health and safety, or the environment; and (2) to permit the recovery of the economically valuable contents of such spent fuel. The Act also requires the Secretary to specify an appropriate period of retrievability at the time of the design of a repository. The Secretary has not yet defined any such period. However, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 Part 60.111, requires the design of a geologic repository operations area to allow the retrieval of any or all waste on a reasonable schedule starting at any time up to 50 years after waste operations are initiated. NRC describes a reasonable schedule as one that would permit retrieval in about the same time as it took to construct the repository and emplace the waste. Based on the existing conceptual repository and waste package design and analysis, the Yucca Mountain Project described retrieval operations under normal and abnormal conditions in the 1988 ''Site Characterization Plan (SCP)'' document. In 1991, under the same design assumptions, the Project issued a ''Retrieval Strategy Report for a Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository''. Both the conceptual design of the waste package and the emplacement methods have since changed significantly. This report presents the results of a study to determine whether and to what degree these design and other changes require a revision of the retrieval strategy and, if they do, to recommend a revised strategy. The aim of such a revised strategy was to inform decision makers on how to proceed with design to allow retrievability.

  6. Retrieval with gene queries

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Aditya K; Srinivasan, Padmini

    2006-01-01

    Background Accuracy of document retrieval from MEDLINE for gene queries is crucially important for many applications in bioinformatics. We explore five information retrieval-based methods to rank documents retrieved by PubMed gene queries for the human genome. The aim is to rank relevant documents higher in the retrieved list. We address the special challenges faced due to ambiguity in gene nomenclature: gene terms that refer to multiple genes, gene terms that are also English words, and gene terms that have other biological meanings. Results Our two baseline ranking strategies are quite similar in performance. Two of our three LocusLink-based strategies offer significant improvements. These methods work very well even when there is ambiguity in the gene terms. Our best ranking strategy offers significant improvements on three different kinds of ambiguities over our two baseline strategies (improvements range from 15.9% to 17.7% and 11.7% to 13.3% depending on the baseline). For most genes the best ranking query is one that is built from the LocusLink (now Entrez Gene) summary and product information along with the gene names and aliases. For others, the gene names and aliases suffice. We also present an approach that successfully predicts, for a given gene, which of these two ranking queries is more appropriate. Conclusion We explore the effect of different post-retrieval strategies on the ranking of documents returned by PubMed for human gene queries. We have successfully applied some of these strategies to improve the ranking of relevant documents in the retrieved sets. This holds true even when various kinds of ambiguity are encountered. We feel that it would be very useful to apply strategies like ours on PubMed search results as these are not ordered by relevance in any way. This is especially so for queries that retrieve a large number of documents. PMID:16630348

  7. AIRS Retrieval Validation During the EAQUATE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Barnet, Christopher D.; DiGirolamo, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Newman, Stuart M.

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric and surface thermodynamic parameters retrieved with advanced hyperspectral remote sensors of Earth observing satellites are critical for weather prediction and scientific research. The retrieval algorithms and retrieved parameters from satellite sounders must be validated to demonstrate the capability and accuracy of both observation and data processing systems. The European AQUA Thermodynamic Experiment (EAQUATE) was conducted mainly for validation of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the AQUA satellite, but also for assessment of validation systems of both ground-based and aircraft-based instruments which will be used for other satellite systems such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the European MetOp satellite, the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) from the NPOESS Preparatory Project and the following NPOESS series of satellites. Detailed inter-comparisons were conducted and presented using different retrieval methodologies: measurements from airborne ultraspectral Fourier transform spectrometers, aircraft in-situ instruments, dedicated dropsondes and radiosondes, and ground based Raman Lidar, as well as from the European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) modeled thermal structures. The results of this study not only illustrate the quality of the measurements and retrieval products but also demonstrate the capability of these validation systems which are put in place to validate current and future hyperspectral sounding instruments and their scientific products.

  8. Retrieval Studies with LIDORT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor); Spurr, Robert J. D.; Chance, K. V.

    2003-01-01

    This short program of LIDORT-based research in atmospheric trace gas retrieval was conducted over the 1 year period 01 July 2002 to 30 June 2003. After consultation with the NASA reporting officer, the first of the two original proposal activities (development of a direct-fitting total O3 column retrieval algorithm with operational capability for GOME data) was replaced by other tasks. The three activities addressed were: (1) Sensitivity studies for column and profile retrieval of NO2 distributions from a new generation of multi-axis ground-based spectrometers; (2) use of the LIDORT-RRS model to determine the effect of inelastic rotational Raman scattering at SBUV wavelengths; (3) an examination of ozone profile weighting functions in the presence of optically thick tropospheric clouds.

  9. Semantic-Aware Co-Indexing for Image Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiliang; Yang, Ming; Wang, Xiaoyu; Lin, Yuanqing; Tian, Qi

    2015-12-01

    In content-based image retrieval, inverted indexes allow fast access to database images and summarize all knowledge about the database. Indexing multiple clues of image contents allows retrieval algorithms search for relevant images from different perspectives, which is appealing to deliver satisfactory user experiences. However, when incorporating diverse image features during online retrieval, it is challenging to ensure retrieval efficiency and scalability. In this paper, for large-scale image retrieval, we propose a semantic-aware co-indexing algorithm to jointly embed two strong cues into the inverted indexes: 1) local invariant features that are robust to delineate low-level image contents, and 2) semantic attributes from large-scale object recognition that may reveal image semantic meanings. Specifically, for an initial set of inverted indexes of local features, we utilize semantic attributes to filter out isolated images and insert semantically similar images to this initial set. Encoding these two distinct and complementary cues together effectively enhances the discriminative capability of inverted indexes. Such co-indexing operations are totally off-line and introduce small computation overhead to online retrieval, because only local features but no semantic attributes are employed for the query. Hence, this co-indexing is different from existing image retrieval methods fusing multiple features or retrieval results. Extensive experiments and comparisons with recent retrieval methods manifest the competitive performance of our method. PMID:26539859

  10. Attitude, Knowledge, and Practice on Evidence-Based Nursing among Registered Nurses in Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals: A Multiple Center Cross-Sectional Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yufang; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study was to describe RNs' attitude, knowledge, and practice on evidence-based practice (EBP) in traditional Chinese nursing field and to estimate the related sociodemographic and professional factors. Methods. A multiple institutional cross-sectional survey design with self-reported EBP Questionnaire (EBPQ) and self-designed questionnaires were used. Results. The average scores of the total EBPQ were with a mean of 4.24 (SD = 0.79). The score of attitude was the highest one, followed by the knowledge score, and the lowest one is practice. RNs with longer experience reported stronger EBP knowledge (H = 6.64, P < 0.05). And RNs under higher working pressure reported less positive attitudes (ρ = 0.17, P < 0.001), whereas RNs holding negative professional attitude reported lower scores (Spearman's ρ: 0.12 to 0.15, P < 0.001). Significant statistics were found between RNs with research experience and without in attitude (t = −2.40, P < 0.05) and knowledge (t = −2.43, P < 0.05). Conclusions. Respondents generally viewed EBP positively and their attitudes towards EBP tended to be more positive than knowledge and practice of EBP. Data also showed that longer working experience, having administrative position, research experience, lighter working load, and better professional attitude might facilitate EBP. PMID:27528882

  11. Attitude, Knowledge, and Practice on Evidence-Based Nursing among Registered Nurses in Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals: A Multiple Center Cross-Sectional Survey in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fen; Hao, Yufang; Guo, Hong; Liu, Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study was to describe RNs' attitude, knowledge, and practice on evidence-based practice (EBP) in traditional Chinese nursing field and to estimate the related sociodemographic and professional factors. Methods. A multiple institutional cross-sectional survey design with self-reported EBP Questionnaire (EBPQ) and self-designed questionnaires were used. Results. The average scores of the total EBPQ were with a mean of 4.24 (SD = 0.79). The score of attitude was the highest one, followed by the knowledge score, and the lowest one is practice. RNs with longer experience reported stronger EBP knowledge (H = 6.64, P < 0.05). And RNs under higher working pressure reported less positive attitudes (ρ = 0.17, P < 0.001), whereas RNs holding negative professional attitude reported lower scores (Spearman's ρ: 0.12 to 0.15, P < 0.001). Significant statistics were found between RNs with research experience and without in attitude (t = -2.40, P < 0.05) and knowledge (t = -2.43, P < 0.05). Conclusions. Respondents generally viewed EBP positively and their attitudes towards EBP tended to be more positive than knowledge and practice of EBP. Data also showed that longer working experience, having administrative position, research experience, lighter working load, and better professional attitude might facilitate EBP. PMID:27528882

  12. Learning Center Unlimited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivrette, Lyndon

    Cuesta College's Learning Center is designed to totally support the instructional methods of each instructor, to meet the individual learning and study needs of each student, and to provide cultural and educational resource opportunities to the community. The facility is to be a traditional library, whose total media storage and retrieval capacity…

  13. Retrieval of Aerosol Height with TROPOMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, A. F. J.; de Haan, J. F.; Veefkind, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    retrieval is robust against inaccurate knowledge of the single scattering albedo and that precise knowledge of the phase function or the surface albedo is not needed.

  14. Feedback in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spink, Amanda; Losee, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    As Information Retrieval (IR) has evolved, it has become a highly interactive process, rooted in cognitive and situational contexts. Consequently the traditional cybernetic-based IR model does not suffice for interactive IR or the human approach to IR. Reviews different views of feedback in IR and their relationship to cybernetic and social…

  15. Retrieving Product Documentation Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racine, Sam J.; Crandall, Irving B.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses demands users face when searching for information in online libraries of product documentation. Demonstrates how physical libraries provide a helpful metaphor for design. Offers heuristics and a conceptual prototype for facilitating electronic document retrieval. Argues that the search form itself should communicate the way materials are…

  16. Collaborative Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Harry; Fidel, Raya

    1999-01-01

    Researchers from the University of Washington, Microsoft Research, Boeing, and Risoe National Laboratory in Denmark have embarked on a project to explore the manifestations of Collaborative Information Retrieval (CIR) in work settings and to propose technological innovations and organizational changes that can support, facilitate, and improve CIR.…

  17. Information Retrieval Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantor, Paul B.

    1994-01-01

    Identifies current trends in the automation of indexing, of information retrieval, and of interaction between the system and the users. Topics discussed include location, navigation, and indexing; digital libraries; matching documents to queries; weight of concepts; query structure, including fuzzy sets; algorithms; stemming; clustering; users'…

  18. Music Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downie, J. Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Identifies MIR (Music Information Retrieval) computer system problems, historic influences, current state-of-the-art, and future MIR solutions through an examination of the multidisciplinary approach to MIR. Highlights include pitch; temporal factors; harmonics; tone; editorial, textual, and bibliographic facets; multicultural factors; locating…

  19. Dropout Retrieval Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salerno, Anne; Fink, Mary

    This paper describes 15 dropout retrieval programs that have components with potential for helping migrant dropout youth return to an educational program. Each profile contains information on eligibility, identification or recruitment method, funding, services, and contacts. In addition, each program is categorized as to type of sponsoring…

  20. OPAC Missing Record Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karl E.

    1996-01-01

    When the Higher Education Library Information Network of Rhode Island transferred members' bibliographic data into a shared online public access catalog (OPAC), 10% of the University of Rhode Island's monograph records were missing. This article describes the consortium's attempts to retrieve records from the database and the effectiveness of…

  1. Information Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Service (GSA), Washington, DC. Office of Records Management.

    Descriptions of representative nonconventional information systems in use today are given in order to provide managers, management analysts, supervisors, and others with ideas as to how they might improve the dissemination, storage, and retrieval of information in their offices. No attempt was made to evaluate the relative merits of the systems…

  2. Information Retrieval by Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billowes, C. A.

    1968-01-01

    Bell Canada, the Public School and Collegiate Institute Boards of Ottawa, and the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education are collaborating on an educational television project which will provide a retrieval system that can supply any given program at any time under the control of the classroom teacher. Four schools in Ottawa will participate…

  3. The Effect of Student- and Teacher-Centered Small-Group Learning in Medical School on Knowledge Acquisition, Retention and Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolars, Joseph C.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Compares the effects of two types of small-group instruction on retention and application of gastroenterology knowledge during a gastroenterology pathophysiology course taught to 198 second-year medical students. Concludes that the specific format of small-group instruction appears to have little impact on retention or application of…

  4. An evaluation of unmediated versus mediated retrieval services.

    PubMed Central

    Buntrock, James D.; Chute, Christopher G.

    2002-01-01

    To understand if unmediated services could serve the data retrieval needs for the Mayo research investigator, a study was conducted to determine researcher interest, ability, and outcome of using a clinical data retrieval system. The results indicate about 25% of the research investigators would use a self-service retrieval tool. However, there is clear evidence a majority of the research investigators are satisfied with and prefer the mediated service because of convenience, retrieval specialist knowledge, and lack of time to perform the search themselves. Approximately 61% of the non-participants indicated they would be willing to pay a fee for continued use of the mediated service. This study confirms the interest in self-service retrieval tools, but the actual interest is lower than anticipated. The recommendation is to continue the use of mediated services and to offer self-service methods as needed, allowing the most options to the research investigator. PMID:12463791

  5. Comparing Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Profiles and Cloud Vertical Structure from Multiwavelength Raman Lidar Retrievals and Radiosounding Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Surós, Montserrat; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Markowicz, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    A study of comparison of water vapor mixing ratio profiles, relative humidity profiles, and cloud vertical structures using two different instruments, a multiwavelength Aerosol-Depolarization-Raman lidar and radiosoundings, is presented. The observations were taken by the lidar located in Warsaw center and the radiosoundings located about 30km to the North in Legionowo (Poland). We compared the ground-based remote sensing technology with in-situ method in order to improve knowledge about water content thought the atmosphere and cloud formation. The method used for retrieving the cloud vertical structure can be improved comparing the radiosonde results with the lidar observations, which show promising results.

  6. An Approach for the Long-Term 30-m Land Surface Snow-Free Albedo Retrieval from Historic Landsat Surface Reflectance and MODIS-based A Priori Anisotropy Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal B.; He, Tao

    2014-01-01

    respectively with that from the "concurrent" approach and the coincident MODIS operational surface albedo products. Using the tower measurements as reference, the derived Landsat 30-m snow-free shortwave broadband albedo yields an absolute accuracy of 0.02 with a root mean square error less than 0.016 and a bias of no more than 0.007. A further cross-comparison over individual scenes shows that the retrieved white sky shortwave albedo from the "pre-MODIS era" LUT approach is highly consistent (R(exp 2) = 0.988, the scene-averaged low RMSE = 0.009 and bias = -0.005) with that generated by the earlier "concurrent" approach. The Landsat albedo also exhibits more detailed landscape texture and a wider dynamic range of albedo values than the coincident 500-m MODIS operational products (MCD43A3), especially in the heterogeneous regions. Collectively, the "pre-MODIS" LUT and "concurrent" approaches provide a practical way to retrieve long-term Landsat albedo from the historic Landsat archives as far back as the 1980s, as well as the current Landsat-8 mission, and thus support investigations into the evolution of the albedo of terrestrial biomes at fine resolution.

  7. First direct aortic retrievable transcatheter aortic valve implantation in humans.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Glover, Chris; Labinaz, Marino; Ruel, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We describe 2 cases in which transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a Portico prosthesis (St Jude Medical, St Paul, MN) through a direct aortic approach. In 1 of the cases, prosthesis retrieval was needed during the procedure and was essential to the successful outcome. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of direct aortic Portico prosthesis implantation, and it highlights the significance of the retrievable nature of this device. PMID:25442452

  8. Alcohol and Memory: Retrieval Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Isabel M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The influence of alcohol intoxication on the retrieval of information from memory was investigated in nonalcoholic subjects Intoxicated subjects recalled fewer categories and words within categories. The retrieval stage of memory did not appear to be affected by alcohol. (SW)

  9. A national survey of child advocacy center directors regarding knowledge of assessment, treatment referral, and training needs in physical and sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Wherry, Jeffrey N; Huey, Cassandra C; Medford, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Mental health services are a core component of child advocacy centers in the United States. Child advocacy center directors were surveyed about (a) trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder; (b) referral criteria for treatment of abuse victims; (c) evidence-based treatments for abused children; (d) reliable, valid, and normed measures helpful in assessment; and (e) training needs. Directors accurately identified posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, but additional symptoms were misidentified. Directors identified best practices for assessment and treatment, but they misidentified non-evidence-based practices. Primary reasons for referral for services included severity of abuse and emotional response of the child. However, referrals based on assessment findings were not a high priority. Directors expressed some training needs for staff consistent with issues identified in the study. PMID:25942286

  10. Re-processing TOMS UV Measurements to Retrieve SO2 Emissions From Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, B. L.; Krotkov, N. A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Li, C.; Haffner, D. P.; Leonard, P.; Carn, S. A.; Telling, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The SO2 Monitoring Group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is producing a new multi-satellite long term data set of volcanic SO2 column amounts and heights (MSVOLSO2L4) as part of the NASA MEaSUREs Program. Here we present re-analysis of the UV measurements (BUV) from the NASA Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (N7 TOMS: 1978-1993). Ozone is the dominant atmospheric absorber in the BUV spectrum, but volcanic eruptions can produce enough SO2 to be distinguished from ozone background. Quantitative retrieval of volcanic SO2 requires:1) Separation of the O3 and SO2 absorption in BUV radiances;2) Close to zero mean SO2 background;3) RT forward model that accounts for the presence of volcanic ash in the plume; 4) A priori knowledge of the ozone and SO2 vertical profiles.Our iterative retrieval algorithm returns O3 and SO2 column amounts, effective reflectivity and its spectral slope. The retrieval model also generates a 4 x 4 gain matrix for the SO2 free regions that is used to soft calibrate the measured 340 nm BUV radiance. The spectral slope implicitly accounts for the interference of volcanic ash, but more explicit ash treatment is required to better quantify SO2 errors in volcanic plumes heavily loaded with ash. This presentation will discuss the methods used to characterize the error sources and assess the quality of this unique long-term SO2 data set.

  11. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report No. 36: The Technical Communications Practices of US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of the Phase 1 NASA Langley Research Center Mail Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were assigned to the Research and Technology Group (RTG) at the NASA Langley Research Center in September 1995.

  12. Retrieval practice produces more learning than elaborative studying with concept mapping.

    PubMed

    Karpicke, Jeffrey D; Blunt, Janell R

    2011-02-11

    Educators rely heavily on learning activities that encourage elaborative studying, whereas activities that require students to practice retrieving and reconstructing knowledge are used less frequently. Here, we show that practicing retrieval produces greater gains in meaningful learning than elaborative studying with concept mapping. The advantage of retrieval practice generalized across texts identical to those commonly found in science education. The advantage of retrieval practice was observed with test questions that assessed comprehension and required students to make inferences. The advantage of retrieval practice occurred even when the criterial test involved creating concept maps. Our findings support the theory that retrieval practice enhances learning by retrieval-specific mechanisms rather than by elaborative study processes. Retrieval practice is an effective tool to promote conceptual learning about science. PMID:21252317

  13. Evaluation of database technologies for the CTBT Knowledge Base prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, R.; Shepard-Dombroski, E.; Baur, D.; Hipp, J.; Moore, S.; Young, C.; Chael, E.

    1996-11-01

    This document examines a number of different software technologies in the rapidly changing field of database management systems, evaluates these systems in light of the expected needs of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) Knowledge Base, and makes some recommendations for the initial prototypes of the Knowledge Base. The Knowledge Base requirements are examined and then used as criteria for evaluation of the database management options. A mock-up of the data expected in the Knowledge Base is used as a basis for examining how four different database technologies deal with the problems of storing and retrieving the data. Based on these requirement and the results of the evaluation, the recommendation is that the Illustra database be considered for the initial prototype of the Knowledge Base. Illustra offers a unique blend of performance, flexibility, and features that will aid in the implementation of the prototype. At the same time, Illustra provides a high level of compatibility with the hardware and software environments present at the US NDC (National Data Center) and the PIDC (Prototype International Data Center).

  14. Satellite services and orbital retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adornato, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Within the capabilities of the Space Shuttle Orbiter, a broad range of services which can be made available to the satellite user community as summarized. Payload deployment, close proximity retrieval, and a number of other mission related functions are discussed. The focus here is on close proximity retrieval and retrieval of payloads in higher energy low Earth orbits.

  15. A Visual Information Retrieval Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of visualization for information retrieval, that transforms unseen internal semantic representation of a document collection into visible geometric displays, focuses on DARE (Distance Angle Retrieval Environment). Highlights include expression of information need; interpretation and manipulation of information retrieval models; ranking…

  16. Language Processing in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doszkocs, Tamase

    1986-01-01

    Examines role and contributions of natural-language processing in information retrieval and artificial intelligence research in context of large operational information retrieval systems and services. State-of-the-art information retrieval systems combining the functional capabilities of conventional inverted file term adjacency approach with…

  17. Improving aerosol retrieval over urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picón, A. J.; Wu, Y.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosol retrieval over urban areas is complicated since surface models in the operational algorithms are based on vegetation models such as the case of MODIS. To improve satellite retrieval of aerosols in urban areas, we use simultaneous AERONET radiometer and MODIS measurements in combination to refine surface albedo models. Refined surface models have been implemented for NYC and Mexico City demonstrating significant improvement in AOD in terms of accuracy and spatial resolution. Based on these direct retrievals of the surface reflection for the MODIS Land Aerosol Bands, we were able to show that current parameterizations of the surface as a function of the Modified Vegetation Index are not in good agreement either quantitatively or qualitatively. Further comparisons in other urban areas (eg. Beijing) show that for cases with surface reflectance ratios sufficiently high at the AERONET site, similar over biases can be observed. On the other hand, other cities such as Kanpur, Buenos Aires and Rome do not show any significant bias which can be traced to the fact that these sites are located in regions with less urban surface correlations. Further comparisons in these urban centers are also made with other satellites aerosol retrievals such as POLDER, MISR and OMI.

  18. Practical quantum retrieval games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrazola, Juan Miguel; Karasamanis, Markos; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2016-06-01

    Complex cryptographic protocols are often constructed from simpler building blocks. In order to advance quantum cryptography, it is important to study practical building blocks that can be used to develop new protocols. An example is quantum retrieval games (QRGs), which have broad applicability and have already been used to construct quantum money schemes. In this work, we introduce a general construction of quantum retrieval games based on the hidden matching problem and show how they can be implemented in practice using available technology. More precisely, we provide a general method to construct (1-out-of-k ) QRGs, proving that their cheating probabilities decrease exponentially in k . In particular, we define QRGs based on coherent states of light, which can be implemented even in the presence of experimental imperfections. Our results constitute a tool in the arsenal of the practical quantum cryptographer.

  19. Satellite retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, E. C.; Robertson, K. B.; Loughead, T. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A satellite retrieval system with first and second pairs of coacting parallel bars are separately mounted in spaced parallel planes on the front of a spacecraft. The bars of one pair are at right angles to bars of the other pair, and together the two pairs of bars effect a variable aperture adapted to close around a rod extending from a second spacecraft to effect the capture of the latter.

  20. Magnetic junk retriever

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, M.D.

    1980-10-07

    An improved magnetic junk retriever arranged to magnetize a drill bit just prior to its removal from the bottom of the well bore. A wound, electromagnet subassembly is connected between the drill bit and the drill collar. A battery-pack tool is used to energize the electromagnet by lowering the tool through the bore of the drill pipe and collars to contact pins projecting into the bore of the sub. Energizing the electromagnet causes the drill bit to be magnetized.

  1. REMOTE RETRIEVING TOOL

    DOEpatents

    Fromm, L.W. Jr.

    1958-08-19

    A retrieving tool is described to securely grasp an object for emplacement in, or withdrawal from, an elongated tube. The object is grasped by hooks actuated by a wedge and cann mechanism. The mechanism on the end of a long rodlike structure is controlled by levers or bars at the access end of the tube. This device is particularly useful for positioning fuel elements within a reactor core.

  2. Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Factors that Affect Retrieval Success

    SciTech Connect

    Geisbuesch, Philipp Benenati, James F.; Pena, Constantino S.; Couvillon, Joseph; Powell, Alex; Gandhi, Ripal; Samuels, Shaun; Uthoff, Heiko

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To report and analyze the indications, procedural success, and complications of retrievable inferior vena cava filters (rIVCF) placement and to identify parameters that influence retrieval attempt and failure. Methods: Between January 2005 and December 2010, a total of 200 patients (80 men, median age 67 years, range 11-95 years) received a rIVCF with the clinical possibility that it could be removed. All patients with rIVCF were prospectively entered into a database and followed until retrieval or a decision not to retrieve the filter was made. A retrospective analysis of this database was performed. Results: Sixty-one percent of patients had an accepted indication for filter placement; 39% of patients had a relative indication. There was a tendency toward a higher retrieval rate in patients with relative indications (40% vs. 55%, P = 0.076). Filter placement was technically successful in all patients, with no procedure-related mortality. The retrieval rate was 53%. Patient age of >80 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.056, P > 0.0001) and presence of malignancy (OR 0.303, P = 0.003) was associated with a significantly reduced probability for attempted retrieval. Retrieval failure occurred in 7% (6 of 91) of all retrieval attempts. A time interval of > 90 days between implantation and attempted retrieval was associated with retrieval failure (OR 19.8, P = 0.009). Conclusions: Patient age >80 years and a history of malignancy are predictors of a reduced probability for retrieval attempt. The rate of retrieval failure is low and seems to be associated with a time interval of >90 days between filter placement and retrieval.

  3. Ground-based assessment of retrieved aerosol properties from GOSAT observations in multiple carbon dioxide retrieval algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R.; O'Dell, C. W.; Frankenberg, C.; Oshchepkov, S.; Bril, A.; Yokota, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Butz, A.; Guerlet, S.; Boesch, H.; Parker, R.

    2012-12-01

    Spaced-based near-infrared measurements of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane are now routinely made from the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) via an assortment of retrieval algorithms. The measurements are based on assumed knowledge of the light paths followed by the measured solar photons, paths which can be altered in the presence of clouds and aerosols. Most algorithms therefore attempt to simultaneously retrieval aerosol information alongside the desired gas concentrations, in an attempt to mitigate errors caused by atmospheric scattering. However, recent studies have hinted that most algorithms tend to retrieve biased aerosol information over certain surface types (such as bright surfaces), leading in particular to biased estimates of the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of carbon dioxide (XCO2). In this work, we compare GOSAT-retrieved AEROSOL properties from multiple XCO2 retrieval algorithms with those of the well-validated AERONET sun photometer network. We present a correlation analysis of retrieved aerosol errors and their effect on retrieved XCO2, as a function of multiple variables such as surface type and viewing geometry, with the goal of providing critical information on how best to deal with aerosols in the context of these challenging greenhouse gas retrievals.

  4. Guenter Tulip Filter Retrieval Experience: Predictors of Successful Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Turba, Ulku Cenk Arslan, Bulent Meuse, Michael Sabri, Saher; Macik, Barbara Gail

    2010-08-15

    We report our experience with Guenter Tulip filter placement indications, retrievals, and procedural problems, with emphasis on alternative retrieval techniques. We have identified 92 consecutive patients in whom a Guenter Tulip filter was placed and filter removal attempted. We recorded patient demographic information, filter placement and retrieval indications, procedures, standard and nonstandard filter retrieval techniques, complications, and clinical outcomes. The mean time to retrieval for those who experienced filter strut penetration was statistically significant [F(1,90) = 8.55, p = 0.004]. Filter strut(s) IVC penetration and successful retrieval were found to be statistically significant (p = 0.043). The filter hook-IVC relationship correlated with successful retrieval. A modified guidewire loop technique was applied in 8 of 10 cases where the hook appeared to penetrate the IVC wall and could not be engaged with a loop snare catheter, providing additional technical success in 6 of 8 (75%). Therefore, the total filter retrieval success increased from 88 to 95%. In conclusion, the Guenter Tulip filter has high successful retrieval rates with low rates of complication. Additional maneuvers such as a guidewire loop method can be used to improve retrieval success rates when the filter hook is endothelialized.

  5. Monetary rewards influence retrieval orientations.

    PubMed

    Halsband, Teresa M; Ferdinand, Nicola K; Bridger, Emma K; Mecklinger, Axel

    2012-09-01

    Reward anticipation during learning is known to support memory formation, but its role in retrieval processes is so far unclear. Retrieval orientations, as a reflection of controlled retrieval processing, are one aspect of retrieval that might be modulated by reward. These processes can be measured using the event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by retrieval cues from tasks with different retrieval requirements, such as via changes in the class of targeted memory information. To determine whether retrieval orientations of this kind are modulated by reward during learning, we investigated the effects of high and low reward expectancy on the ERP correlates of retrieval orientation in two separate experiments. The reward manipulation at study in Experiment 1 was associated with later memory performance, whereas in Experiment 2, reward was directly linked to accuracy in the study task. In both studies, the participants encoded mixed lists of pictures and words preceded by high- or low-reward cues. After 24 h, they performed a recognition memory exclusion task, with words as the test items. In addition to a previously reported material-specific effect of retrieval orientation, a frontally distributed, reward-associated retrieval orientation effect was found in both experiments. These findings suggest that reward motivation during learning leads to the adoption of a reward-associated retrieval orientation to support the retrieval of highly motivational information. Thus, ERP retrieval orientation effects not only reflect retrieval processes related to the sought-for materials, but also relate to the reward conditions with which items were combined during encoding. PMID:22547161

  6. Annotation and retrieval in protein interaction databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannataro, Mario; Hiram Guzzi, Pietro; Veltri, Pierangelo

    2014-06-01

    Biological databases have been developed with a special focus on the efficient retrieval of single records or the efficient computation of specialized bioinformatics algorithms against the overall database, such as in sequence alignment. The continuos production of biological knowledge spread on several biological databases and ontologies, such as Gene Ontology, and the availability of efficient techniques to handle such knowledge, such as annotation and semantic similarity measures, enable the development on novel bioinformatics applications that explicitly use and integrate such knowledge. After introducing the annotation process and the main semantic similarity measures, this paper shows how annotations and semantic similarity can be exploited to improve the extraction and analysis of biologically relevant data from protein interaction databases. As case studies, the paper presents two novel software tools, OntoPIN and CytoSeVis, both based on the use of Gene Ontology annotations, for the advanced querying of protein interaction databases and for the enhanced visualization of protein interaction networks.

  7. Electronic publishing and intelligent information retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, A.

    1992-01-01

    Europeans are now taking steps to homogenize policies and standardize procedures in electronic publishing (EP) in astronomy and space sciences. This arose from an open meeting organized in Oct. 1991 at Strasbourg Observatory (France) and another business meeting held late Mar. 1992 with the major publishers and journal editors in astronomy and space sciences. The ultimate aim of EP might be considered as the so-called 'intelligent information retrieval' (IIR) or better named 'advanced information retrieval' (AIR), taking advantage of the fact that the material to be published appears at some stage in a machine-readable form. It is obvious that the combination of desktop and electronic publishing with networking and new structuring of knowledge bases will profoundly reshape not only our ways of publishing, but also our procedures of communicating and retrieving information. It should be noted that a world-wide survey among astronomers and space scientists carried out before the October 1991 colloquium on the various packages and machines used, indicated that TEX-related packages were already in majoritarian use in our community. It has also been stressed at each meeting that the European developments should be carried out in collaboration with what is done in the US (STELLAR project, for instance). American scientists and journal editors actually attended both meetings mentioned above. The paper will offer a review of the status of electronic publishing in astronomy and its possible contribution to advanced information retrieval in this field. It will also report on recent meetings such as the 'Astronomy from Large Databases-2 (ALD-2)' conference dealing with the latest developments in networking, in data, information, and knowledge bases, as well as in the related methodologies.

  8. Autonomous Phase Retrieval Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estlin, Tara A.; Chien, Steve A.; Castano, Rebecca; Gaines, Daniel M.; Doubleday, Joshua R.; Schoolcraft, Josua B.; Oyake, Amalaye; Vaughs, Ashton G.; Torgerson, Jordan L.

    2011-01-01

    The Palomar Adaptive Optics System actively corrects for changing aberrations in light due to atmospheric turbulence. However, the underlying internal static error is unknown and uncorrected by this process. The dedicated wavefront sensor device necessarily lies along a different path than the science camera, and, therefore, doesn't measure the true errors along the path leading to the final detected imagery. This is a standard problem in adaptive optics (AO) called "non-common path error." The Autonomous Phase Retrieval Calibration (APRC) software suite performs automated sensing and correction iterations to calibrate the Palomar AO system to levels that were previously unreachable.

  9. Music retrieval in ICOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsterle, Lutz; Fischer, Stephan; Rimac, Ivica; Steinmetz, Ralf

    1999-08-01

    In this paper we describe music retrieval in ICOR, a project of Darmstadt TU. It is the goal of ICOR to find new interfaces to support applications of music video and music CDs. Although the project consists of audio and video analysis we concentrate on a description of the audio algorithms in this paper. We describe our MPEG-7 like data structure to store meta information for music pieces and explain which algorithms we use to analyze the content of music pieces automatically. We currently use an applause detection to distinguish live music from studio recordings, a genre classifier to distinguish pieces with beats form classical music, and a singer recognition.

  10. 2. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF XY RETRIEVER. THE XY RETRIEVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF X-Y RETRIEVER. THE X-Y RETRIEVER WAS HOUSED IN MODULE K AND WAS USED TO SORT AND RETRIEVE PLUTONIUM METAL FROM A STORAGE VAULT FOR DISTRIBUTION TO OTHER PROCESSES IN BUILDING 707. (11/29/88) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Manufacturing Facility, North-central section of Plant, just south of Building 776/777, Golden, Jefferson County, CO