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Sample records for retrieved temporomandibular joint

  1. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health > The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Main Content Title: The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Description: The temporomandibular joint connects the lower ...

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  3. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008 Previous Next Related Articles: Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD) Are You Biting Off More Than You Can Chew? Equilibration May Lessen TMD Pain Fender-benders: Source of TMD? First Comes ...

  4. Imaging the temporomandibular joint

    SciTech Connect

    Katzberg, R.W.; Manzione, J.V.; Westesson, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book encompasses all imaging modalities as they apply to the Temporomandibular Joint and its disorders. The volume employs correlative line drawings to elaborate on diagnostic images. It helps teach methods of TMJ imaging and describes findings identified by different imaging modalities to both radiologists and dental clinicians.

  5. Temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal; Singh, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon but debilitating condition of the facial skeleton. The condition may be acute or chronic. Acute TMJ dislocation is common in clinical practice and can be managed easily with manual reduction. Chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation is a challenging situation to manage. In this article, we discuss the comprehensive review of the different treatment modalities in managing TMJ dislocation. PMID:26668447

  6. Temporomandibular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal; Singh, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon but debilitating condition of the facial skeleton. The condition may be acute or chronic. Acute TMJ dislocation is common in clinical practice and can be managed easily with manual reduction. Chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation is a challenging situation to manage. In this article, we discuss the comprehensive review of the different treatment modalities in managing TMJ dislocation. PMID:26668447

  7. Posttraumatic temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Helen E; Quinn, Peter D; Granquist, Eric; Chou, Joli C

    2009-05-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has many essential functions. None of its components are exempt from injury. Facial asymmetry, malocclusion, disturbances in growth, osteoarthritis, and ankylosis can manifest as complications from trauma to the TMJ. The goals of initial treatment include achievement of pretraumatic function, restoration of facial symmetry, and resolution of pain. These same objectives hold true for late repairs and reconstruction of the TMJ apparatus. Treatment is demanding, and with opposing approaches. The following article explores various treatment options for problems presenting as a result of a history of trauma to the TMJ. PMID:22110802

  8. Human temporomandibular joint morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carini, Francesco; Scardina, Giuseppe Alessandro; Caradonna, Carola; Messina, Pietro; Valenza, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint morphogenesis was studied. Ranging in age of fetuses examined was from 6 to14 weeks' gestation. Our results showed the condyle so first element that appear between 6 degrees and 8 degrees week (condylar blastema). After a week appear temporal elements. Disk appear at the same time of glenoid blastema and it reaches an advanced differentation before of the condyle and temporal element, so these don't effect machanical compression on mesenchyma where we find the disk. So we think that the disk result of genetic expression and it isn't the result of mechanical compression. The inferior joint cavity appear to 12 week. The superior joint cavity appear to 13-14 week. In conclusion, the appearance of the condyle is the first event during TMJ morphogenesis, with its initial bud, in form of a mesenchymal thickening, becoming detectable between the sixth and eight week of development, when all the large joints of the limbs are already well defined. PMID:18333411

  9. Inaudible temporomandibular joint vibrations.

    PubMed

    Widmalm, Sven E; Bae, Hanna E K; Djurdjanovic, Dragan; McKay, Duane C

    2006-07-01

    The aim was to test the hypothesis that inaudible vibrations with significant amounts of energy increasing during jaw movements can be recorded in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) area. Twenty one subjects, who could perform wide opening movements without feeling discomfort, 12 with and 9 without TMJ sounds audible at conventional auscultation with a stethoscope, were included. Recordings were made during opening-closing, 2/s without tooth contact, and during mandibular rest, using accelerometers with a flat frequency response between the filter cutoff frequencies 0.1 Hz and 1000 Hz. The signals were digitized using a 24 bits card and sampled with the rate 96000 Hz. Power spectral analyses, and independent and paired samples t-tests were used in the analysis of the vibration power observed in frequency bands corresponding to audible and inaudible frequencies. An alpha-level of 5% was chosen for accepting a difference as being significant. In the group with audible sounds, about 47% of the total vibration energy was in the inaudible area below 20 Hz during opening-closing and about 76% during mandibular rest. In the group without audible sounds, the corresponding proportions were significantly different, 85% vs. 69%. The energy content of the vibrations, both those below and those above 20 Hz, increased significantly during jaw movement in both groups. Furthermore, percentage of signal energy above 20 Hz showed a noticeable increase in the group of subjects with audible sounds. This can physically be explained by decreased damping properties of damaged tissues surrounding the TMJ. Vibrations in the TMJ area can be observed with significant portions in the inaudible area below 20 Hz both during mandibular rest and during jaw movements whether or not the subjects have audible joint sounds. Further studies are needed to identify sources and evaluate possible diagnostic value. PMID:16933462

  10. Temporomandibular joint dislocation: experiences from Zaria, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Fomete, Benjamin; Obiadazie, Athanasius Chukwudi; Idehen, Kelvin; Okeke, Uche

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint may occur for various reasons. Although different invasive methods have been advocated for its treatment, this study highlights the value of non-invasive treatment options even in chronic cases in a resource-poor environment. Materials and Methods A seven-year retrospective analysis of all patients managed for temporomandibular joint dislocation in our department was undertaken. Patient demographics, risk factors associated with temporomandibular joint dislocation and treatment modalities were retrieved from patient records. Results In all, 26 patients were managed over a seven-year period. Males accounted for 62% of the patients, and yawning was the most frequent etiological factor. Conservative treatment methods were used successfully in 86.4% of the patients managed. Two (66.7%) of the three patients who needed surgical treatment developed complications, while only one (5.3%) patient who was managed conservatively developed complications. Conclusion Temporomandibular joint dislocation appears to be associated with male sex, middle age, yawning, and low socio-economic status, although these observed relationships were not statistically significant. Non-invasive methods remain an effective treatment option in this environment in view of the low socio-economic status of the patients affected. PMID:25045637

  11. [Gout in the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Deferm, J T; Barkhuysen, R; de Rooy, J; Coppen, C; Merkx, M Aw

    2016-06-01

    A 76-year-old woman, with a medical history of diabetes mellitus and hypertension, presented herself to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon with a sudden pre-auricular swelling of the right temporomandibular joint. As a result of the atypical clinical appearance and signs of local destruction in the initial panoramic x-ray, a malign process was first eliminated from consideration. With the aid of extensive diagnostics and an open biopsy, the diagnosis of gout was established. PMID:27275659

  12. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Orofacial Pain.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mansur; Schiffman, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) affect 5% to 12% of the United States population. This article discusses common conditions related to temporomandibular joints, including disc displacements, inflammatory disturbances, loose joint bodies, traumatic disturbances, and developmental conditions. Also addressed are the appropriate imaging modalities and diagnostic criteria for TMD. PMID:26614951

  13. Management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Movahed, Reza; Mercuri, Louis G

    2015-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a pathologic condition where the mandible is fused to the fossa by bony or fibrotic tissues. This interferes with mastication, speech, oral hygiene, and normal life activities, and can be potentially life threatening when struggling to acquire an airway in an emergency. Trauma is the most common cause of TMJ ankylosis, followed by infection. Diagnosis of TMJ ankylosis is usually made by clinical examination and imaging studies. The management goal in TMJ ankylosis is to increase the patient's mandibular function, correct associated facial deformity, decrease pain, and prevent reankylosis. PMID:25483442

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Amandeep; Naik, Shobha; Pai, Anuradha; Anuradha, Ardra

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT) in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease. PMID:25684928

  15. Characteristics of temporomandibular joint in patients with temporomandibular joint complaint

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanfeng; Guo, Xiaoqian; Sun, Xiaoxue; Wang, Ning; Xie, Min; Zhang, Jianqiang; Lv, Yuan; Han, Weili; Hu, Min; Liu, Hongchen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study was to investigate whether there was statistical difference between the bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: TMJ CBCT images of 123 cases were used to preliminarily determine the indicators suitable for the measuring method. TMJ CBCT image reconstruction was performed and 19 indicators were measured. Thirty-six cases without TMJ complaint served as controls. The comparison of bilateral TMJs was analyzed by paired t-test to find out the indicators without statistical significance. Twenty-nine patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds who underwent CBCT at the hospital were enrolled for the comparative study. The measured values were analyzed by paired t-test to determine the indicators with statistical difference. Results: In the control group, only radius value of bilateral TMJ was different statistically (P < 0.05). In the TMJ complaint group, the vertical 60° joint space of the bilateral TMJ was statistically different (P < 0.05) and the rest of the measured values showed no statistical difference. Conclusions: In the patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds, the vertical 60° joint space of the symptomatic side was significantly increased comparing with the asymptomatic side. PMID:26629112

  16. [Condylar fracture and temporomandibular joint ankylosis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    This article summarized the advances in treatment and research of temporomandibular joint surgery in the last 5 years which was presented in "The 2nd Condyle Fracture and Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis Symposium". The content includes 5 parts: non-surgical treatment of children condyle fracture and long-term follow-up, the improvement of operative approach for condyle fracture and key techniques, the importance and the method for the simultanesous reduction of disc in condylar fracture treatment, the development of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis similar to hypertrophic non-union and the improved safety and accuracy by applying digital surgery in joint surgery. PMID:26980648

  17. Engineering Alloplastic Temporomandibular Joint Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Sinno, Hani; Tahiri, Youssef; Gilardino, Mirko; Bobyn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are part of a heterogeneous group of pathologies that manifest with a constellation of signs and symptoms. They are the most frequent cause of chronic orofacial pain and are prevalent in 12% of the general population. Despite the debilitating nature of these disorders, there is no standardization for treatment of the diseased temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this review, we present an overview of the functional anatomy of the TMJ and the engineering concepts that must be understood to better understand the indications for surgical management, the types of available treatments and the requirements for reconstruction. A comparison is made of the clinical outcomes with autogenous versus alloplastic reconstruction, including a history of alloplastic materials and the design features of currently available implants. Emphasis is made on material selection, modulus, stiffness, notch sensitivity and modularity. For the treatment of TMD, engineered TMJ alloplastic replacements have had considerable promise with additional room for improvement using new materials and recent design concepts. PMID:22363183

  18. Condylar hyperplasia following unilateral temporomandibular joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Machon, V; Levorova, J; Hirjak, D; Foltan, R

    2015-06-01

    Total joint replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TJR) can be associated with intraoperative and postoperative complications. We report herein the occurrence of a postoperative open bite malocclusion, the result of condylar hyperplasia affecting the non-operated joint at 1 year after unilateral total joint replacement. PMID:25662429

  19. Temporomandibular joint diagnostics using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, A-K; Kristensen, M; Arvidsson, L Z

    2015-01-01

    The present review will give an update on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging using CBCT. It will focus on diagnostic accuracy and the value of CBCT compared with other imaging modalities for the evaluation of TMJs in different categories of patients; osteoarthritis (OA), juvenile OA, rheumatoid arthritis and related joint diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other intra-articular conditions. Finally, sections on other aspects of CBCT research related to the TMJ, clinical decision-making and concluding remarks are added. CBCT has emerged as a cost- and dose-effective imaging modality for the diagnostic assessment of a variety of TMJ conditions. The imaging modality has been found to be superior to conventional radiographical examinations as well as MRI in assessment of the TMJ. However, it should be emphasized that the diagnostic information obtained is limited to the morphology of the osseous joint components, cortical bone integrity and subcortical bone destruction/production. For evaluation of soft-tissue abnormalities, MRI is mandatory. There is an obvious need for research on the impact of CBCT examinations on patient outcome. PMID:25369205

  20. Temporomandibular joint multidisciplinary team clinic.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nabeela; Poate, Tim; Nacher-Garcia, Cristina; Pugh, Nicola; Cowgill, Helen; Page, Lisa; Matthews, N Shaun

    2014-11-01

    Patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) commonly present to oral and maxillofacial departments and are increasingly being managed by a subspecialist group of surgeons. We review the outcomes of patients attending a specialist TMJ multidisciplinary team (MDT) clinic. All patients are simultaneously reviewed by a consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeon, consultant in oral medicine, specialist physiotherapist, and maxillofacial prosthetist, and they can also see a consultant liaison psychiatrist. They are referred from primary, secondary, and tertiary care when medical and surgical treatment in the routine TMJ clinic has failed, and are triaged by the attending maxillofacial surgeon. On discharge they are returned to the care of the referring practitioner. We review the outcomes of patients attending this clinic over a 2-year period and show improvements in pain scores and maximal incisal opening, as well as quality of life outcome measures. All units in the UK with an interest in the management of diseases of the TMJ should consider establishing this type of clinic and should use available resources and expertise to maximise outcomes. PMID:25179688

  1. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  4. Temporomandibular joint internal derangements: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Helms, C.A.; Vogler, J.B. III; Morrish, R.B. Jr.; Goldman, S.M.; Capra, R.E.; Proctor, E.

    1984-08-01

    Two hundred patients with suspected displaced temporomandibular joint meniscus were studied with computed tomography. In 75 cases confirmation of the CT diagnosis was subsequently obtained via surgery or arthrography; correlation was found in 73 cases (97%), with one false-negative and one false-positive examination. When meniscus displacement was graded as mild, moderate, or severe, those cases diagnosed as moderate or severe were more likely to require surgery. The technique and interpretation of this technique is described; in most cases CT can replace arthrography in diagnosing displaced temporomandibular joint menisci.

  5. Predisposition for temporomandibular joint disorders: loose ligaments.

    PubMed

    Deodato, Francesco; Trusendi, Raffaello; Giorgetti, Roberto; Scalese, Marco U

    2006-07-01

    Loose ligaments are often a predisposing factor of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. This causal factor was analyzed in 701 subjects presenting at the TMJ and Posture Center of Siena University with TMJ pain or dysfunction. Along with the conventional jaw examination, a Carter and Wilkinson test as modified by Beighton was also done. We found a correlation among the parameters of age, gender, TMJ disorder, joint pain, muscle pain, and loose ligaments. PMID:16933458

  6. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Asim K; Gaddikeri, Santhosh; Singhal, Aparna; Hardin, Simms; Tran, Benson D; Medina, Josue A; Curé, Joel K

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and common tumors are also discussed in this article. PMID:25170394

  7. Direct sagital computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint

    SciTech Connect

    Manzione, J.V.; Seltzer, S.E.; Katzberg, R.W.; Hammerschlag, S.B.; Chiango, B.F.

    1983-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a common clinical problem that has been reported to affect 4%-28% of adults. Temporomandibular joint arthrography has shown that many of these patients have intraarticular abnormalities involving the meniscus. A noninvasive test that could demonstrate the meniscus as well as bony abnormalities of the joint would be an important advance. In an attempt to develop such a noninvasive test, we have performed direct sagittal computed tomography (CT) on cadaver temporomandibular joints and have correlated the images with anatomic sections. We are currently applying this technique clinically and report one representative example in which direct sagittal computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint accurately demonstrated an anteriorly displaced meniscus.

  8. Imaging Approach to Temporomandibular Joint Disorders.

    PubMed

    Morales, H; Cornelius, R

    2016-03-01

    Internal derangement is the most common temporomandibular joint disorder. Degenerative osteoarthritis and trauma are next in frequency. Less common pathology includes rheumatoid arthritis, synovial chondromatosis, calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate deposition disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, tumors, infection, and osteonecrosis. We provide a systematic approach to facilitate interpretation based on major anatomic structures: disc-attachments, joint space, condyle, and lateral pterygoid muscle. Relevant graphic anatomy and state of the art imaging are discussed in correlation with current clinical and therapeutic highlights of pathologic entities affecting the joint. PMID:26374243

  9. Radiation dose in temporomandibular joint zonography

    SciTech Connect

    Coucke, M.E.; Bourgoignie, R.R.; Dermaut, L.R.; Bourgoignie, K.A.; Jacobs, R.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Temporomandibular joint morphology and function can be evaluated by panoramic zonography. Thermoluminescent dosimetry was applied to evaluate the radiation dose to predetermined sites on a phantom eye, thyroid, pituitary, and parotid, and the dose distribution on the skin of the head and neck when the TMJ program of the Zonarc panoramic x-ray unit was used. Findings are discussed with reference to similar radiographic techniques.

  10. Laser arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Gerard, N; Hendler, B H

    1995-04-01

    Laser surgery is very different than traditional surgery. The clinician must be familiar with the physical properties of the laser to use this instrument safely and properly. Various lasers are available for use in oral and maxillofacial surgery and dentistry, namely the carbon dioxide laser, the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, and the holmium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser (Ho:YAG). Only the Ho:YAG laser has been used with effectiveness in temporomandibular joint arthroscopic surgery. PMID:8935004

  11. Intrauterine Temporomandibular Joint Dislocation: Prenatal Sonographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Çil, Ahmet Said; Bozkurt, Murat; Bozkurt, Duygu Kara

    2014-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases are very rare disorders and are usually diagnosed in childhood. Developmental disorders of the TMJ such as hypoplasia, hyperplasia, and aplasia of the TMJ compartments are characterized by TMJ dysfunction. In childhood, these patients experience recurrent dislocation, pain, and malocclusion. We present the case of a 25-week fetus with unilateral TMJ dislocation with fluid retention in the joint diagnosed by ultrasonography. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of TMJ dislocation diagnosed by ultrasonographic evaluation during the prenatal period. PMID:23669613

  12. Quantitative Radiological Diagnosis Of The Temporomandibular Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Steven L.; Heffez, Leslie B.

    1989-05-01

    Recent impressive technological advances in imaging techniques for the human temporomandibular (tm) joint, and in enabling geometric algorithms have outpaced diagnostic analyses. The authors present a basis for systematic quantitative diagnoses that exploit the imaging advancements. A reference line, coordinate system, and transformations are described that are appropriate for tomography of the tm joint. These yield radiographic measurements (disk displacement) and observations (beaking of radiopaque dye and disk shape) that refine diagnostic classifications of anterior displacement of the condylar disk. The relevance of these techniques has been clinically confirmed. Additional geometric invariants and procedures are proposed for future clinical verification.

  13. Intrauterine temporomandibular joint dislocation: prenatal sonographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Çil, Ahmet Said; Bozkurt, Murat; Bozkurt, Duygu Kara

    2014-09-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases are very rare disorders and are usually diagnosed in childhood. Developmental disorders of the TMJ such as hypoplasia, hyperplasia, and aplasia of the TMJ compartments are characterized by TMJ dysfunction. In childhood, these patients experience recurrent dislocation, pain, and malocclusion. We present the case of a 25-week fetus with unilateral TMJ dislocation with fluid retention in the joint diagnosed by ultrasonography. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of TMJ dislocation diagnosed by ultrasonographic evaluation during the prenatal period. PMID:23669613

  14. Temporomandibular joint involvement in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pallak; Amarnath, Janardhan; Ravindra, Setru Veerabhadrappa; Rallan, Mandeep

    2013-01-01

    Frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has varied from 4% to 35%. It is more common in men and produces generalised stiffness in involved joints. Clinician should be suspicious of AS when a patient reports with painful restricted movements of joint, neck or back and with no trauma history. Conventional radiographic methods have allowed the demonstration of TMJ abnormalities in patients with AS, but CT is necessary to establish joint space relations and bony morphology. We describe a case of severe AS with TMJ involvement in a 40-year-old female patient and demonstrated TMJ changes on CT. A CT was able to demonstrate articular cartilage changes, disc- and joint abnormalities. Thus, if conventional radiographs in a symptomatic patient with rheumatic diseases are unable to demonstrate changes, CT can provide valuable additional information of the changes in the TMJ. PMID:23645650

  15. Coronal joint spaces of the Temporomandibular joint: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Joana-Cristina; Pires, Carlos A.; Ponces-Ramalhão, Maria-João-Feio; Lopes, Jorge-Dias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The joint space measurements of the temporomandibular joint have been used to determine the condyle position variation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the coronal joint spaces measurements of the temporomandibular joint. Material and Methods An electronic database search was performed with the terms “condylar position”; “joint space”AND”TMJ”. Inclusionary criteria included: tomographic 3D imaging of the TMJ, presentation of at least two joint space measurements on the coronal plane. Exclusionary criteria were: mandibular fractures, animal studies, surgery, presence of genetic or chronic diseases, case reports, opinion or debate articles or unpublished material. The risk of bias of each study was judged as high, moderate or low according to the “Cochrane risk of bias tool”. The values used in the meta-analysis were the medial, superior and lateral joint space measurements and their differences between the right and left joint. Results From the initial search 2706 articles were retrieved. After excluding the duplicates and all the studies that did not match the eligibility criteria 4 articles classified for final review. All the retrieved articles were judged as low level of evidence. All of the reviewed studies were included in the meta-analysis concluding that the mean coronal joint space values were: medial joint space 2.94 mm, superior 2.55 mm and lateral 2.16 mm. Conclusions the analysis also showed high levels of heterogeneity. Right and left comparison did not show statistically significant differences. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, systematic review, meta-analysis. PMID:26330944

  16. Temporomandibular joint: true sagittal computed tomography with meniscus visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Sartorix, D.J.; Neumann, C.H.; Riley, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Accessory patient support equipment was constructed that allows patient positioning for true sagittal projection of the temporomandibular joint using a GE 8800 CT/T scanner. Range of motion abnormalities, osseous alterations of the mandibular condyle and temporal bone, joint-space narrowing, and meniscal configuration may be demonstrated. The technique has potential advantages over other CT projections and sagittal reconstruction for evaluation of temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

  17. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  18. Absorbed doses from temporomandibular joint radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, S.L.; Lanzetta, M.L.

    1985-06-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used in a tissue-equivalent phantom to measure doses of radiation absorbed by various structures in the head when the temporomandibular joint was examined by four different radiographic techniques--the transcranial, transorbital, and sigmoid notch (Parma) projections and the lateral tomograph. The highest doses of radiation occurred at the point of entry for the x-ray beam, ranging from 112 mrad for the transorbital view to 990 mrad for the sigmoid notch view. Only the transorbital projection a radiation dose to the lens of the eye. Of the four techniques evaluated, the lateral tomograph produced the highest doses to the pituitary gland and the bone marrow, while the sigmoid notch radiograph produced the highest doses to the parotid gland.

  19. Temporomandibular joint replacement: a New Zealand perspective.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, B; Buchanan, J; Cliff, J

    2014-05-01

    Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacement (TMJ TJR) has been performed in New Zealand utilizing the TMJ Concepts patient-fitted system since 2000. The data analysed in this study were collected retrospectively from questionnaires sent to all maxillofacial surgeons in New Zealand who had implanted TMJ Concepts devices between 2000 and 2011. A total of 63 devices were implanted in 42 patients (13 males, 29 females) during this 12-year period. The primary indication for TMJ TJR was end-stage joint disease resulting from ankylosis and arthritis. The mean age of the patients was 47 years (range 7-80 years). The most common complication reported was transient facial nerve impairment in 4.8% of the patients. Objective results, measured as the maximal incisional opening, improved by a mean of 17.3mm (P<0.01); 90% of patients reported improved quality of life. New Zealand oral and maxillofacial surgeons have concluded that TMJ TJR using the TMJ Concepts prosthesis is a reliable treatment option for the management of end-stage TMJ disease. PMID:24332584

  20. [Total temporomandibular joint replacement with alloplastic prosthesis].

    PubMed

    García-Huerta, Marco Antonio; Romero-Flores, Jovita; Mena-Gómez, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Three total temporomandibular joint (TMJ) replacement surgeries were performed on two patients with TMJ ankylosis using W. Lorenz system. The first surgery was performed on a female patient with osseous ankylosis who had no mandibular movement since she was 18 months old. The second surgery was on a patient with fibrous ankylosis who had an interincisive opening distance of 12 mm. Her condition was the result of a three year old subcondylar fracture which didn't receive any treatment. The first patient had total replacement of both TMJs, while the other just one TMJ. The follow up until today has been of eight months with an interincisive opening of 29 mm in the first patient and 34 mm in the other. There has not been any mandibular deviation during opening, nor postoperative pain in both cases. Facial nerve affection was not permanent in both patients. For all of this, we can conclude that total TMJ replacement is an effective treatment with stable results in patients with TMJ ankylosis. PMID:23234748

  1. Osteochondritis dissecans of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Campos, P S F; Freitas, C E; Pena, N; Gonzalez, M O D; Almeida, S M; Mariz, A C R; Lorens, F G L

    2005-05-01

    A case is reported of a 43-year-old female patient presenting bilateral osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in different stages for each side, associated with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the right condyle. Additionally observed was anterior disk displacement without reduction for both sides. We have proposed an adaptation of the previous classification of OCD for cases affecting the TMJ. We have also stressed the fundamental role of panoramic radiography on the diagnosis of stage 3 and stage 4 OCD of the TMJ. In relation to MRI, we have recommended sagittal (slice thickness of 2 mm) and coronal (slice thickness of 1 mm) fast spin-echo proton density-weighted sequences to better identify bone lesions (stage 1 and 2) and also localize osteochondral loose bodies; and coronal (slice thickness of 1 mm) fat-suppressed fast spin-echo T2 weighted sequence to better evaluate OCD (stable or unstable) and the features of the occasionally associated AVN (acute or chronic). PMID:15897292

  2. Inflammatory pseudotumour of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, Y; Yau, A Y; Ziai, K; Maducdoc, M M; Djalilian, H R

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck inflammatory pseudotumors (IPs) are rare, idiopathic, non-neoplastic lesions that most commonly affect the orbit, but may involve other areas such as the larynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinuses, and meninges. We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with progressive left-sided hearing loss, aural fullness, and otalgia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected a soft-tissue mass in the left temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Histopathologic examination showed overlying squamous epithelium with hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, subepithelial fibrosis, and chronic inflammatory infiltrate, which were consistent with an IP. Radiologic images and MRI indicated an ill-defined soft tissue involving the roof and posterior aspect of the TMJ, extending into the anterior external auditory canal. Our case was treated with a 2-week course of high dose prednisone (1 mg/kg) and a 2-week taper with resolution of symptoms. Two years after treatment, the patient shows no evidence of recurrence on MRI. PMID:26891541

  3. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40–70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. PMID:26096083

  4. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in various rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Avila, F J; Chávez-López, M; Chavira-González, J R; Ramos-Remus, C

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is an inclusive term in which those conditions disturbing the masticatory function are embraced. It has been estimated that 33% of the population have signs of TMD, but less than 5% of the population will require treatment. The objective of this study was to measure the frequency of TMD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthrosis (OA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus, and to define the limitations in everyday's life that patients perceive when present. A six-month survey of consecutive outpatients in a rheumatology clinic in a teaching hospital in Mexico was carried out. We defined TMD as: 1) the presence of pain; 2) difficulty on mouth opening, chewing or speaking; 3) the presence of non-harmonic movements of the temporomaxilar joints. All three characteristics had to be present. Z test was used to define differences between proportions. We present the results of 171 patients. Overall, 50 patients had TMD according to our operational definition (29.24%). Up to 76% of the sample had symptoms associated with the condition. TMD is more frequent in OA and in AS (29.24% vs 38% OA, P=0.009; 39% AS; P=0.005). We found no association between the severity of TMD and the request for specific attention for the discomfort produced by the condition. Only 8 of 50 (16%) patients with TMD had requested medical help for their symptoms, and they were not the most severe cases. TMD is more frequent in RA and OA. Although it may produce severe impairment, patients seem to adapt easily. PMID:23884028

  5. Surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint ankyloses: meniscus conservation and relocation.

    PubMed

    Rinna, Claudio; Reale, Gabriele; Calvani, Francesco; Cascone, Piero

    2013-03-01

    Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint is a serious complication, mainly after trauma and local or systemic infection. In rare cases, ankylosis is associated with systemic disease such as ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. According to the functional restriction and the provoked disturbances of facial growth in the youth, an early and effective therapy is desirable. There is a wide variety of surgical approaches to temporomandibular joint ankylosis, ranging from chondro-osseous grafts to prothesis. In the article the authors present the clinical case of a 60-year-old patient who, at the age of 6, accidentally fell from a height of about 2 m. In 60 years old, after removing the temporomandibular ankylosis with surgical technique, patient showed a marked improvement of mandibular kinetics. PMID:23524812

  6. An Interesting Case of Gunshot Injury to the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Mário Sergio Medeiros; Giongo, Caroline Comis; Antonello, Guilherme de Marco; Couto, Ricardo Torres do; Filho, Ruy de Oliveira Veras; Junior, Otacílio Luiz Chagas

    2014-01-01

    The head and face are relatively common sites of gunshot injury, and the temporomandibular joint is often affected. These wounds usually produce major deformity and functional impairment, particularly when the temporomandibular joint is affected or when structures such as the facial nerve are damaged. Complications may include mandibular displacement at maximum mouth opening and in protrusion, limited mouth opening, limited lateral movement of the jaw, anterior open bite, and, more rarely, temporomandibular ankylosis. Projectiles that strike the mandible usually cause comminuted fractures; maxillary wounds, in turn, are most commonly perforating. The present report describes a case of gunshot injury in which the projectile lodged within the mandibular fossa but did not cause any fractures. Oral and maxillofacial trauma surgeons must be aware of the different types of gunshot injury, as they produce distinct patterns of tissue destruction due to projectile trajectory and release of kinetic energy into surrounding tissue. PMID:25709756

  7. Temporomandibular joint computed tomography: development of a direct sagittal technique

    SciTech Connect

    van der Kuijl, B.; Vencken, L.M.; de Bont, L.G.; Boering, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Radiology plays an important role in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders. Different techniques are used with computed tomography offering simultaneous imaging of bone and soft tissues. It is therefore suited for visualization of the articular disk and may be used in patients with suspected internal derangements and other disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Previous research suggests advantages to direct sagittal scanning, which requires special positioning of the patient and a sophisticated scanning technique. This study describes the development of a new technique of direct sagittal computed tomographic imaging of the temporomandibular joint using a specially designed patient table and internal light visor positioning. No structures other than the patient's head are involved in the imaging process, and misleading artifacts from the arm or the shoulder are eliminated. The use of the scanogram allows precise correction of the condylar axis and selection of exact slice level.

  8. Duplex Doppler ultrasound study of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Stagnitti, A.; Marini, A.; Impara, L.; Drudi, F.M.; Lo mele, L.; Lillo Odoardi, G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The anatomy and physiology of the temporomandibular joint can be studied clinically and by diagnostic imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiography (X-ray) and computed tomography (CT) have thus for many years contributed to the study of the kinetics in the mandibular condyle. However, also duplex Doppler ultrasound (US) examination is widely used in the study of structures during movement, particularly vascular structures. Materials and methods A total of 30 patients were referred by the Department of Orthodontics to the Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, University of Rome “La Sapienza”. All patients underwent duplex Doppler ultrasound (US) examination of the temporomandibular joint using Toshiba APLIO SSA-770A equipment and duplex Doppler multi-display technique, which allows simultaneous display of US images and color Doppler signals. A linear phased array probe with crystal elements was used operating at a basic frequency of 6 MHz during pulsed Doppler spectral analysis and 7.5 MHz during US imaging. Results In normal patients a regular alternation in the spectral Doppler waveforms was obtained, while in patients with temporomandibular joint meniscus dysfunction there was no regularity in the sum of the Fourier series with an unsteady waveform pattern related to irregular movements of the temporomandibular joint. Conclusions In all cases duplex Doppler US examination proved able to differentiate between normal and pathological patients and among the latter this technique permitted identification of the most significant aspects of the dysfunctional diseases. PMID:23397016

  9. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reconstruct the temporomandibular joint. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food... approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before being placed in commercial distribution....

  10. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reconstruct the temporomandibular joint. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food... approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before being placed in commercial distribution....

  11. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of “TMJ arthroscopic surgery”, this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results. PMID:25737901

  12. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rahul; Jyoti, Bhuvan; Devi, Parvathi

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer™, an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient's pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline. PMID:24019797

  13. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis can be classified into fibrous, fibro-osseous and bony ankylosis. It is still a huge challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons due to the technical difficulty and high incidence of recurrence. The poor outcome of disease may be partially attributed to the limited understanding of its pathogenesis. The purpose of this article was to comprehensively review the literature and summarise results from both human and animal studies related to the genesis of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25189735

  14. Regional 3D superimposition to assess temporomandibular joint condylar morphology

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, J; Gomes, L C R; Benavides, E; Nguyen, T; Paniagua, B; Styner, M; Boen, V; Gonçalves, J R; Cevidanes, L H S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the reliability of regional three-dimensional registration and superimposition methods for assessment of temporomandibular joint condylar morphology across subjects and longitudinally. Methods: The sample consisted of cone beam CT scans of 36 patients. The across-subject comparisons included 12 controls, mean age 41.3 ± 12.0 years, and 12 patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis, mean age 41.3 ± 14.7 years. The individual longitudinal assessments included 12 patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis, mean age 37.8 ± 16.7 years, followed up at pre-operative jaw surgery, immediately after and one-year post-operative. Surface models of all condyles were constructed from the cone beam CT scans. Two previously calibrated observers independently performed all registration methods. A landmark-based approach was used for the registration of across-subject condylar models, and temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis vs control group differences were computed with shape analysis. A voxel-based approach was used for registration of longitudinal scans calculated x, y, z degrees of freedom for translation and rotation. Two-way random intraclass correlation coefficients tested the interobserver reliability. Results: Statistically significant differences between the control group and the osteoarthritis group were consistently located on the lateral and medial poles for both observers. The interobserver differences were ≤0.2 mm. For individual longitudinal comparisons, the mean interobserver differences were ≤0.6 mm in translation errors and 1.2° in rotation errors, with excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.75). Conclusions: Condylar registration for across-subjects and longitudinal assessments is reliable and can be used to quantify subtle bony differences in the three-dimensional condylar morphology. PMID:24170802

  15. Diagnosis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis in children.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Priya; Thomas, Ann; Sowmya, B

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis involves fusion of the mandibular condyle with the base of the skull. It results in functional, esthetic, and psychosocial limitations, if it affects children at an early age. Hence, it is important to recognize and diagnose the pathology and provide immediate treatment alternatives to improve the patient condition. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic perspective of TMJ ankylosis in children, and the use of 3D computed tomography as an effective diagnostic aid. PMID:25001450

  16. Dislocation of the Temporomandibular Joint and Relocation Procedures.

    PubMed

    White, Thomas; Hedderick, Viki; Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation requires prompt medical attention due to the crucial impact of airway, nutrition acquisition, and communication. Recognition of this injury by the practitioner, based on clinical presentation and history, is paramount for identification of accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment of TMJ dislocation. Relocation or reduction methods vary on the basis of the severity of the injury and whether it is an acute or chronic dislocation. PMID:27482989

  17. Effects of several temporomandibular disorders on the stress distributions of temporomandibular joint: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan; Qian, Yingli; Zhang, Yuanli; Fan, Yubo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate stress distributions in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) for comparison with healthy TMJs. A model of mandible and normal TMJs was developed according to CT images. The interfaces between the discs and the articular cartilages were treated as contact elements. Nonlinear cable elements were used to simulate disc attachments. Based on this model, seven models of various TMDs were established. The maximum stresses of the discs with anterior, posterior, medial and lateral disc displacement (ADD, PDD, MDD and LDD) were 12.09, 9.33, 10.71 and 6.07 times magnitude of the identically normal disc, respectively. The maximum stresses of the posterior articular eminences in ADD, PDD, MDD, LDD, relaxation of posterior attachments and disc perforation models were 21, 59, 46, 21, 13 and 15 times greater than the normal model, respectively. TMDs could cause increased stresses in the discs and posterior articular eminences. PMID:25587737

  18. Value of the nuclear medical scan in the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disease

    SciTech Connect

    Craemer, T.D.; Ficara, A.J.

    1984-10-01

    A total of 125 patients with temporomandibular joint complaints underwent nuclear medical scans of their joints as part of their diagnostic work-ups. The scan results were compared with the radiographic and arthrogram findings of these patients. The results suggest that the nuclear medical scan is not a highly reliable diagnostic aid for the majority of temporomandibular joint patients.

  19. Management of the Temporomandibular Joint after Ablative Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bredell, Marius; Grätz, Klaus; Obwegeser, Joachim; Gujer, Astrid Kruse

    2014-01-01

    Management of the temporomandibular joint in ablative head and neck surgery is controversial with no standardized approach. The aim of the study was to establish risk-based guidelines for the management of the temporomandibular joint after ablative surgery. Analysis of all patients' records receiving ablative surgery involving the temporomandibular joint in the Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, University Hospital of Zürich, from 2001 to 2012, was performed, identifying 15 patients and 14 reconstructive procedures. A literature search was done identifying all relevant literature on current approaches. Applicable cohorts were constructed, and relevant risks were extrapolated. Evaluated studies are not uniform in their reporting with nonhomogeneous patient groups. A diverse approach is used in the management of these patients with complications such as infection, ankylosis, limited mouth opening, plate penetration in the skull base, and plate loosening. Risk factors for complications appear to be radiation, costochondral graft, disk loss, and plate use alone. Clinical data suggest use of a plate with metal condyle reconstructions and previous radiation therapy as potential risks factors. Employing literature evidence and cumulated clinical data, a risk-based flowchart was developed to assist surgical decision making. Risk factors such as radiation, disk preservation, and soft tissue conditions are important complication-associated factors when planning surgery. Free vascularized fibula grafts appear to have the least complications that must be weighed against donor site morbidity. PMID:25379124

  20. Neurology of the temporomandibular joints: an experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments on anaesthetized cats are described in which the reflex effects of stimulation of the mechanoreceptors in the temporomandibular joints on the ipsilateral and contralateral mandibular muscles were studied. The effects on this reflex activity and on dynamic manidublar muscle activity of the production of temporary and permanent dysfunction of the mechanoreceptors in different regions of the joint capsule were also studied. The significance of the findings in relation to the maintenance of normal jaw posture and the disturbance of mandibular muscular function by trauma, disease, and malocclusion is discussed. PMID:1259326

  1. Management of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid disorders.

    PubMed

    Sidebottom, A J; Salha, R

    2013-04-01

    This article summarises the rheumatoid diseases that particularly affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ): psoriatic arthropathy, ankylosing spondylitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Management is by a joint approach between rheumatologists and maxillofacial surgeons with a specific interest in diseases of the TMJ who give early surgical advice. Steroid injections, whilst useful in the short term, are not useful for long term or repeated treatment, and may lead to collapse of the joint and development of a deformed anterior open bite. These disorders should be managed primarily using standard conservative regimens, and failure to respond should lead to diagnostic or therapeutic arthroscopy and appropriate surgical treatment. When ankylosis develops or the joint collapses, a replacement joint should be considered and patients should be referred to an appropriately trained surgeon. PMID:22658606

  2. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F. Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space. PMID:26981483

  3. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis.

    PubMed

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space. PMID:26981483

  4. Body posture evaluations in subjects with internal temporomandibular joint derangement.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Wagner Cesar; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to verify possible relationships between global body posture and temporomandibular joint internal derangement (TMJ-id), by comparing 30 subjects presenting typical TMJ-id signs to 20 healthy subjects. Body posture was assessed using the analysis of muscle chains on several photographs. Results show a higher frequency of lifted shoulders (p=0.04) and of changes in the antero-internal hip chain (p=0.02) in the test group, but no further differences were found significant between the control and test groups. The test group was then divided into three subgroups according to the Helkimo index of temporomandibular disorder severity. Again, no significant differences were found between the subgroups. However, there was a trend noticed in the group with the most severe dysfunction, to present a forward head and shoulders posture. Results are discussed in light of previous studies using the same sample. PMID:19891257

  5. Ear pain following temporomandibular surgery originating from the temporomandibular joint or the cranial nervous tissue? A case report.

    PubMed

    Geerse, Wouter K; von Piekartz, Harry J M

    2015-02-01

    A patient presenting with local pain and limitation of movement in the temporomandibular region following surgery of the left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is described. Manual techniques like distraction of the TMJ combined with motor control exercises to restore TMJ function were not sufficient to relieve the patient's symptoms and her orofacial functions. However, during manual assessment and treatment of cranial nervous tissue, in this case the auriculotemporal nerve and its interface, pain was relieved and orofacial functions improved. PMID:24948551

  6. Genetic Influences on Temporomandibular Joint Development and Growth.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Robert J; Jing, Junjun; Feng, Jian Q

    2015-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small synovial joint at which the mandible articulates with the skull during movements involved in speaking and mastication. However, the secondary cartilage lining its joint surfaces is indicative of a very different developmental history than limb cartilages. This review summarizes our current knowledge of genes that regulate the formation of primary components of the TMJ, as well as genes that regulate postnatal growth of the TMJ. Although the TMJ is regulated by some of the same genes that are important in limb joints, others appear unique to the TMJ or have different actions. Runx2, Sox9, and members of the TGF-β/BMP family are critical drivers of chondrogenesis during condylar cartilage morphogenesis, and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is important for formation of the articular disc and cavitation. Osterix (Osx) is a critical regulator of endochondral bone formation during postnatal TMJ growth. PMID:26589922

  7. Temporomandibular joints: high-resolution computed tomographic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was performed in 43 patients. Exquisite detail of the face, skull base, and TMJs was obtained with CT using soft tissue and bone algorithms, narrow collimation, and multiplanar images. In 10 patients clinically suspected of joint derangement, CT results were in close agreement with surgical findings and arthrography in 13/15 joints. CT showed indirect signs of disc dislocation, and the dislocated disc itself in 81% of affected joints. In two patients, arthrography with CT proved to be more helpful than conventional arthrography alone. CT without intra-articular contrast material provided information not appreciated on conventional radiogaphs in 28 patients (65%) and was particularly helpful in evaluating patients with disc pathosis and trauma. Early experience with CT of the TMJ shows that it is an excellent method of evaluation at acceptable radiation exposure levels that adds essential information not seen on standard radiographs.

  8. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  9. Temporomandibular Joint Hypermobility Manifestation Based on Clinical Observations

    PubMed Central

    Nosouhian, Saeid; Haghighat, Abbas; Mohammadi, Iman; Shadmehr, Elham; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Joint range of motion might affected by some factors like laxity and increase joint mobility. Generalized joint hypermobility and temporomandibular joint hypermobility (TMJH) are reported as risk factors for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to survey the etiological factors of TMJH and its relations to habitual status. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 69 patients with TMJH were involved. After profiling personal information and medical history, the patients were divided into three groups based on their maximum mouth opening (MMO) as follow: (Light) MMO of 50-55 mm, (moderate): MMO between 55 and 65 mm, (severe) MMO >65 mm. For subjective observations, patients were asked to fill the prepared questionnaire. The objective evaluations conducted by a specialist. Finally, all the data subjected Chi-Square test by using SPSS software version 22 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: TMJH was more common in women (74.2%). The light group had significant differences with other groups in the discomfort of TMJ and TMJ sound (P < 0.05). Furthermore, sever group manifested highest percentage of masticatory pains, significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It can be concluded that pain in TMJ would have a correlation with MMO. PMID:26464530

  10. Bilateral Temporomandibular Joint Replacement Using Computer-Assisted Surgical Simulation and Three-Dimensional Printing.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jaeyoung; Cho, Jinyong; Kim, Hyeon Min

    2016-07-01

    The dental occlusion is the important reference for replacement of the temporomandibular joint. If a patient does not have normal occlusion, few considerations are needed for temporomandibular joint replacement. The custom-made prosthesis, typically fabricated with a stereolithographic model, is probably the optimized solution currently available. However the ready-made stock from Biomet Microfixation System (Jacksonville, FL) is the only available product, which is authorized by the government ministry in South Korea, for replacement of the temporomandibular joint. This report presents a patient with the problems that were retrognathic "bird face" profile subsequent to severe bilateral condylar resorption and temporomandibular joint ankylosis without enough natural teeth for occlusion. Bilateral temporomandibular joint replacement using the ready-made prosthesis was done by reestablishing the mandibular position with new occlusion and improved facial profile via the virtual surgical planning and stereolithographic model simulation. PMID:27315318

  11. A conservative surgical approach to temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Cocilovo, Francesco; Olivo, Marco; Ferronato, Giuseppe; Manfredini, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    The current article describes a case of a patient with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis undergoing surgery performed with a tailored technique for condylar reshaping. A patient with posttraumatic bilateral TMJ ankylosis underwent interpositional arthroplasty with temporalis fascia, and focus was put on the need to maintain the vertical height of the mandible. The postoperative course was uneventful, and positive outcomes were kept during a 1-year follow-up span. The adoption of surgical strategies aiming at restoring a condylar shape as similar as possible to the natural one may be important in the light of the search for surgeries providing and/or recreating normal function of the TMJ. PMID:24705240

  12. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Won; Cho, Jin-Yong; Kim, Hyeon-Min

    2016-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  13. Bilateral Traumatic Temporomandibular Joint Luxation in a Rat

    PubMed Central

    Shientag, Lisa J; Rosenthal, Karen L; Chandler, Heidi K; Wheeler, Suzanne M

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) luxation was diagnosed postmortem in a female, 6-mo-old CD rat (Rattus norvegicus) after probable head entrapment and subsequent disentanglement from a protective jacket. Clinical antemortem signs included inability to close her mouth, prehend food and drink water, anxiety, and linear skin erosions extending down the right and left commissures of the mouth. Radiography revealed rostral displacement of the mandible with concomitant malocclusion. The combination of clinical signs, acute nature of the presentation, and torn appearance of the protective jacket were strongly indicative of a traumatic etiology. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of TMJ luxation in a rat. PMID:22330578

  14. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  15. Component Approach to the Temporomandibular Joint and Coronoid Process

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, Miles J.; Clune, James; Steinbacher, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region is challenging. The conventional direct preauricular incision permits only limited access to the TMJ and surrounding structures, therefore risking injury to the facial nerve during retraction. The ideal approach allows sufficient exposure, preservation of underlying neurovascular structures, and achieves an optimal aesthetic outcome. We describe a preauricular posttragal incision with a superficial musculoaponeurotic system flap to allow wide exposure of the zygomatic arch, TMJ, condyle, and coronoid process. We postulate that this approach improves access, lessens the amount of retraction required, and creates a more inconspicuous scar. PMID:25383157

  16. Component approach to the temporomandibular joint and coronoid process.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Miles J; Clune, James; Steinbacher, Derek

    2014-12-01

    Reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region is challenging. The conventional direct preauricular incision permits only limited access to the TMJ and surrounding structures, therefore risking injury to the facial nerve during retraction. The ideal approach allows sufficient exposure, preservation of underlying neurovascular structures, and achieves an optimal aesthetic outcome. We describe a preauricular posttragal incision with a superficial musculoaponeurotic system flap to allow wide exposure of the zygomatic arch, TMJ, condyle, and coronoid process. We postulate that this approach improves access, lessens the amount of retraction required, and creates a more inconspicuous scar. PMID:25383157

  17. Deficient cytokine control modulates temporomandibular joint pain in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Neveen; Catrina, Anca I; Alyamani, Ahmed O; Mustafa, Hamid; Alstergren, Per

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to investigate how endogenous cytokine control of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) influences temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in relation to the role of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-six consecutive patients with TMJ RA were included. Temporomandibular joint pain intensity was assessed at rest, on maximum mouth opening, on chewing, and on palpation. Mandibular movement capacity and degree of anterior open bite (a clinical sign of structural destruction of TMJ tissues) were also assessed. Systemic inflammatory activity was assessed using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) for rheumatoid arthritis. Samples of TMJ synovial fluid and blood were obtained and analyzed for TNF, its soluble receptor, soluble TNF receptor II (TNFsRII), and ACPA. A high concentration of TNF in relation to the concentration of TNFsRII in TMJ synovial fluid was associated with TMJ pain on posterior palpation on maximum mouth opening. The ACPA concentration correlated significantly to the TNF concentration, but not to the TNFsRII concentration, indicating that increased inflammatory activity is mainly caused by an insufficient increase in anti-inflammatory mediators. This study indicates that TMJ pain on palpation in patients with RA is related to a deficiency in local cytokine control that contributes to increased inflammatory activity, including sensitization to mechanical stimuli over the TMJ. PMID:26010823

  18. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Unique Presentation.

    PubMed

    Pianosi, Kiersten; Rigby, Matthew; Hart, Robert; Trites, Jonathan; Taylor, S Mark

    2016-04-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare and benign proliferative disorder of synovium with potentially locally aggressive growth and invasion of the bone. Occurring within the joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae, it is most commonly a monoarticular disease affecting large joints. In particular, most cases of PVNS occur in the knee. PVNS of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a highly rare disorder, with approximately 60 cases reported. Herein, we present a unique case of an elderly male presenting with ear pain and subsequently diagnosed with PVNS of the TMJ with a history of trauma to the area. Initial imaging of the TMJ and the surrounding region looked concerning for invasive and/or malignant disease, but an open biopsy confirmed PVNS. PMID:27200236

  19. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Unique Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Matthew; Hart, Robert; Trites, Jonathan; Taylor, S. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare and benign proliferative disorder of synovium with potentially locally aggressive growth and invasion of the bone. Occurring within the joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae, it is most commonly a monoarticular disease affecting large joints. In particular, most cases of PVNS occur in the knee. PVNS of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a highly rare disorder, with approximately 60 cases reported. Herein, we present a unique case of an elderly male presenting with ear pain and subsequently diagnosed with PVNS of the TMJ with a history of trauma to the area. Initial imaging of the TMJ and the surrounding region looked concerning for invasive and/or malignant disease, but an open biopsy confirmed PVNS. PMID:27200236

  20. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint Successfully Treated by Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Aécio Abner Campos; Ferreira e Costa, Rafael; de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Chagas, Marcelo Roncalli Pinheiro; do Carmo, Maria Auxiliadora Vieira; de Lacerda, Júlio César Tanos

    2015-12-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a chronic process, defined as a reactive cartilaginous proliferation, characterized by formation of cartilaginous nodules, usually loose in the joint space of the synovial membrane. It mainly affects large joints such as knee, hip, shoulder, and elbow, commonly in male patients. However, its manifestation in the Temporomandibular joint (TMJ), is a rare finding, occurring predominantly in females. This paper reports a case of a woman who presented to the service of Stomatology complaining of mouth opening limitations and pain in her left pre-auricular region. After clinical and radiographic analyses, the condition was diagnosed as SC of the TMJ. The loose bodies within the TMJ were removed under general anesthesia. Histological and follow-up features of this lesion are also discussed. To our knowledge, this is the second report of SC of the TMJ in Brazil. PMID:25912648

  1. Multidetector computed tomography of temporomandibular joint: A road less travelled

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Shivani; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Roychaudhary, Ajoy; Bhutia, Ongkila

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the imaging anatomy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), describes the technique of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) of the TMJ, and describes in detail various osseous pathologic afflictions affecting the joint. Traumatic injuries affecting the mandibular condyle are most common, followed by joint ankylosis as a sequel to arthritis. The congenital anomalies are less frequent, hemifacial microsomia being the most commonly encountered anomaly involving the TMJ. Neoplastic afflictions of TMJ are distinctly uncommon, osteochondroma being one of the most common lesions. MDCT enables comprehensive evaluation of osseous afflictions of TMJ, and is a valuable tool for surgical planning. Sagittal, coronal and 3D reformatted images well depict osseous TMJ lesions, and their relationship to adjacent structures. PMID:25984518

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Arthur B; Laor, Tal

    2013-12-01

    For more than a century, it has been known that juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can affect the temporomandibular joint. With advances in medical imaging in more recent decades, there has been an increase in awareness of the spectrum of pathology that can affect the temporomandibular joint in children with JIA. This pathology can lead to symptoms ranging from decreased chewing ability, jaw and facial pain, headaches and malocclusion to craniofacial morphological changes such as a retrognathic mandible. The purpose of this review is to suggest an MR imaging protocol for the temporomandibular joint and to illustrate normal and abnormal appearances of the joint in children with JIA. PMID:24257698

  3. Congenital Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ryan Chin Taw; Kassam, Karim; Eccles, Simon; Hensher, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is an uncommon condition that presents itself at or soon after birth in the absence of acquired factors that could have contributed to the ankylosis such as infection and trauma. The experience of managing one such case is reported in light of a review of the literature on this condition. Key management principles include adequate removal of the ankylotic mass, costochondral grafting, and post-op physiotherapy. Most patients reported in the literature with the condition experienced relapse. This echoes our own experience where there was recurrence of the ankylosis. However, after removal of the ankylotic mass, the patient maintains a satisfactory maximal incisal opening (MIO) till the present day. The additional challenges faced in the congenital form in addition to the already complex management of acquired paediatric temporomandibular joint ankylosis are (1) much earlier insult to the TMJ, (2) reduced opportunity for neuromuscular development of the muscles of mastication, and (3) reduced compliance with postoperative physiotherapy programmes due to the younger age of these patients. PMID:27190665

  4. Congenital Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Ryan Chin Taw; Kassam, Karim; Eccles, Simon; Hensher, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is an uncommon condition that presents itself at or soon after birth in the absence of acquired factors that could have contributed to the ankylosis such as infection and trauma. The experience of managing one such case is reported in light of a review of the literature on this condition. Key management principles include adequate removal of the ankylotic mass, costochondral grafting, and post-op physiotherapy. Most patients reported in the literature with the condition experienced relapse. This echoes our own experience where there was recurrence of the ankylosis. However, after removal of the ankylotic mass, the patient maintains a satisfactory maximal incisal opening (MIO) till the present day. The additional challenges faced in the congenital form in addition to the already complex management of acquired paediatric temporomandibular joint ankylosis are (1) much earlier insult to the TMJ, (2) reduced opportunity for neuromuscular development of the muscles of mastication, and (3) reduced compliance with postoperative physiotherapy programmes due to the younger age of these patients. PMID:27190665

  5. Effects of COX-2 inhibitor in temporomandibular joint acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schütz, T C B; Andersen, M L; Tufik, S

    2007-05-01

    Since it is recognized that cyclo-oxygenase-2 mediates nociception and the sleep-wake cycle as well, and that acute inflammation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) results in sleep disturbances, we hypothesized that cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor would restore the sleep pattern in this inflammatory rat model. First, sleep was monitored after the injection of Freund's adjuvant (FA group) or saline (SHAM group) into the rats' temporomandibular joint. Second, etoricoxib was co-administered in these groups. The Freund's adjuvant group showed a reduction in sleep efficiency, in rapid eye movement (REM), and in non-REM sleep, and an increase in sleep and REM sleep latency when compared with the SHAM group, while etoricoxib substantially increased sleep quality in the Freund's adjuvant group. These parameters returned progressively to those found in the SHAM group. Etoricoxib improved the sleep parameters, suggesting the involvement of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 enzyme in acute inflammation of the TMJ, specifically in REM sleep. PMID:17452571

  6. Stem Cells for Temporomandibular Joint Repair and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shipin; Yap, Adrian U J; Toh, Wei Seong

    2015-10-01

    Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) represent a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles and/or associated structures. They are a major cause of non-dental orofacial pain. As a group, they are often multi-factorial in nature and have no common etiology or biological explanations. TMD can be broadly divided into masticatory muscle and TMJ disorders. TMJ disorders are characterized by intra-articular positional and/or structural abnormalities. The most common type of TMJ disorders involves displacement of the TMJ articular disc that precedes progressive degenerative changes of the joint leading to osteoarthritis (OA). In the past decade, progress made in the development of stem cell-based therapies and tissue engineering have provided alternative methods to attenuate the disease symptoms and even replace the diseased tissue in the treatment of TMJ disorders. Resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from the synovia of TMJ, suggesting an important role in the repair and regeneration of TMJ. The seminal discovery of pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have provided promising cell sources for drug discovery, transplantation as well as for tissue engineering of TMJ condylar cartilage and disc. This review discusses the most recent advances in development of stem cell-based treatments for TMJ disorders through innovative approaches of cell-based therapeutics, tissue engineering and drug discovery. PMID:26123357

  7. Fibrous Ankylosis of the Temporomandibular Joint in a Young Child.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Nigel R; Meena, Manoj; Dinkar, Ajit D; Khorate, Manisha M

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is an intracapsular union of the disccondyle complex to the temporal articular surface that restricts mandibular movements, including fibrous adhesions or bony fusion between the condyle, disc, glenoid fossa, and articular eminence. The leading causes include trauma and infection. It can be a serious and disabling condition that leads to difficulties in mastication, swallowing, speaking, esthetics and oral hygiene. Disturbances of facial and mandibular growth and acute compromise of the airway invariably result in physical and psychological disability. Treatment should be initiated as soon as the condition is recognized, with the main objective of re-establishing joint function and harmonious jaw function. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of unilateral fibrous ankylosis of the right TMJ in a three-year-old girl. PMID:26349799

  8. Temporomandibular joint disorders' impact on pain, function, and disability.

    PubMed

    Chantaracherd, P; John, M T; Hodges, J S; Schiffman, E L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders ("TMJ intra-articular status"), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability ("TMD impact"). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject's most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, -0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure → DDwR → DDwoR → DJD) should be explored. PMID:25572112

  9. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Materials and Methods Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. Results The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. Conclusion The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:23525363

  10. Manual therapy of the mandibular accessory ligaments for the management of temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico

    2011-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders are characterized by chronic or acute musculoskeletal or myofascial pain with dysfunction of the masticatory system. Treatment modalities include occlusal splints, patient education, activity modification, muscle and joint exercises, myofascial therapy, acupuncture, and manipulative therapy. In the physiology of the temporomandibular joint, accessory ligaments limit the movement of the mandible. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy of accessory ligaments is necessary for good clinical management of temporomandibular joint disorders. Although general principles regarding the anatomy of the ligaments are relatively clear, very little substantiated information on the dimension, orientation, and function of the ligaments has been published, to the authors' knowledge. The authors review the literature concerning the accessory ligaments of the temporomandibular joint and describe treatment options, including manual techniques for mobilizing the accessory ligaments. PMID:21357496

  11. Pseudotumor in the temporomandibular joint: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Hiroyuki; Kayamori, Kou; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Wake, Sou; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neoplastic disease in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition and is difficult to differentiate from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) based on symptoms and simple X-ray examinations. Potential differential diagnoses include synovial chondromatosis and pseudotumor, both of which are also relatively rare in the TMJ. Presentation of case We report a case of pseudotumor of the TMJ that was difficult to differentiate from synovial chondromatosis in a 71-year-old woman with a chief complaint of pain in the left TMJ. MRI of the right TMJ initially led to diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis. Extirpation of the lesion was performed under general anesthesia. Histopathological findings of the resected specimen revealed inflammatory granulation tissue without cellular atypism. Discussion The pathological findings for the resected specimen were compatible with pseudotumor of the TMJ. These findings were not supportive of synovial chondromatosis or other tumor diseases. Conclusion This case illustrates the importance of careful examination of a mass lesion in the TMJ for differentiation from other TMJ-related diseases. PMID:26298241

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of double-contrast arthrotomography of the temporomandibular joint: correlation with postmortem morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Westesson, P.L.; Rohlin, M.

    1984-09-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of double-contrast arthrotomography in the evaluation of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint is unknown. Therefore, findings from double-contrast arthrotomograms of 48 temporomandibular joint autopsy specimens were correlated with postmortem morphology seen from dissections or cryosections. Arthrotomographic diagnosis was confirmed in 41 joints, signifying a diagnostic accuracy of 85%. Misinterpretations were made in seven joints. False-positive reports due to observation errors can be avoided with improved knowledge of the joint anatomy as well as with increased experience in the technique. False-negative examinations were due to limitation of the tomographic reproduction of the lateral part of the joint.

  13. [MRI of the temporomandibular joint--the gold standard].

    PubMed

    Barmeir, E; Teich, S; Gutmcher, Z

    2014-04-01

    MRI has been established as the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD), as it allows for a noninvasive detailed evaluation of the joint that is not otherwise available. During the last decade, the introduction of dynamic (cine-mode) MR imaging has made functional evaluation feasible in addition to the morphologic study of the joint. The major advantage of MRI is its ability to study the articular disc and its congruity as well as its location relative to the condyle in both closed- and open-mouth positions. Due to its high contrast resolution, MRI is unique in demonstrating joint effusion, bone edema and sclerosis, rupture of the retrodiscal layers and impairment of the lateral pterigoid muscle. In Mor-Mar Imaging Center we performed during the last two years MRI studies of the TMJ in 234 subjects, 172 (74%) female and 62 (26%) male patients. The average age of the patients was 29 years. In this article we present our experience in the evaluation of TMD and review the main indications and findings. In addition, our experience in optimizing the MRI sequence protocols in both static and dynamic modes are discussed. MRI examinations provide the clinician with anatomic and physiologic information that can guide treatment decisions. It has a special role in monitoring and evaluating treatment results, both conservative and surgical. PMID:25252468

  14. Osteochondroma with secondary synovial chondromatosis in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwen; Li, Lingzhi; Chen, Minjie; Yang, Chi

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondroma with secondary synovial chondromatosis is rare in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), so we retrospectively reviewed 210 such patients who presented to our hospital from 2001-2013. The final sample included 3 patients with secondary synovial chondromatosis (mean (SD) age 40 (??) years), all of whom had symptoms of disorders of the TMJ. Condylar neoplasms and loose bodies were found during operation. Histopathological examination showed a bony growth capped with hyaline cartilage and clustering chondrocytes, with partial calcification and ossification of the loose bodies, and primary osteochondroma with secondary synovial chondromatosis was diagnosed. There were no recurrences during a follow-up that ranged from 3 months to 5 years. The presence of loose calcified bodies in osteochondroma is a possible sign of secondary synovial chondromatosis. PMID:26320566

  15. Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis as a Complication of Neonatal Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saadi, Noor J.; Bakathir, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Hashmi, Ahmed K.; Al-Ismaili, Mohammad I.

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis as a complication of neonatal septic arthritis is rarely reported in the literature. We report two clinical cases of unilateral TMJ ankylosis occurring in paediatric patients subsequent to neonatal septic arthritis. The first case was a 15-month-old male infant who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in May 2010. According to the published English scientific literature, he is the youngest person yet to be diagnosed with this condition. The second case was a five-year-old female who presented to the Al-Nahda Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in October 2011. Both cases presented with facial asymmetry and trismus. They subsequently underwent gap arthroplasty and interpositional temporalis muscle and fascia grafts which resulted in an immediate improvement in mouth opening. Postoperatively, the patients underwent active jaw physiotherapy which was initially successful. Both patients were followed up for a minimum of two years following their surgeries. PMID:26629387

  16. SAPHO syndrome of the temporomandibular joint associated with sudden deafness.

    PubMed

    Marsot-Dupuch, K; Doyen, J E; Grauer, W O; de Givry, S C

    1999-05-01

    We report a case of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) associated with sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible and temporal bone, causing deafness. The presence of a palmoplantar pustulosis established the diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome. SAPHO (an acronym referring to synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) syndrome is defined by the association of characteristic osteoarticular and dermatologic manifestations, with diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible being a part of this entity. We review the literature of SAPHO syndrome with mandibular manifestations and discuss the mechanisms of inflammatory spread from the TMJ to the cochlea. To our knowledge, this is the first description of skull base involvement in a patient with SAPHO syndrome leading to sudden deafness. PMID:10369364

  17. Can orthodontic relapse be blamed on the temporomandibular joint?

    PubMed Central

    Wolford, Larry M

    2014-01-01

    There are many temporomandibular joint (TMJ) conditions that can cause orthodontic treatment instability and relapse. These conditions are often associated with dentofacial deformities, malocclusion, TMJ pain, headaches, myofascial pain, TMJ and jaw functional impairment, ear symptoms, etc., Many of these TMJ conditions can cause progressive and continuous changes in the occlusion and jaw relationships. Patients with these conditions may benefit from corrective orthodontic and surgical intervention. The difficulty for many clinicians may lie in identifying the presence of a TMJ condition, diagnosing the specific TMJ pathology, and selecting the proper treatment for that condition. This paper will discuss the most common TMJ pathologies that can adversely affect orthodontic stability and outcomes as well as present the treatment considerations to correct the specific TMJ conditions and associated jaw deformities to provide stable and predictable treatment results. PMID:25426452

  18. Detection of degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint by bone scintigraphy: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Bloom, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nine patients with facial pain were evaluated with limited bone scans. The scintigrams correlated with microscopy in all patients, although radiographs correlated with microscopy in only five patients. The degenerative disease process in the temporomandibular joint was more extensive in the patients with radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities than in those with scintigraphic abnormalities alone. The limited bone scan appears useful in detecting early degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint.

  19. Lubricin protects the temporomandibular joint surfaces from degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adele; Duran, Juanita; Purcell, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint essential for the mobility and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ is composed of the mandibular condyle, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, and a fibrocartilagenous disc interposed between these bones. A fibrous capsule, lined on the luminal surface by the synovial membrane, links these bones and retains synovial fluid within the cavity. The major component of synovial fluid is lubricin, a glycoprotein encoded by the gene proteoglycan 4 (Prg4), which is synthesized by chondrocytes at the surface of the articular cartilage and by synovial lining cells. We previously showed that in the knee joint, Prg4 is crucial for maintenance of cartilage surfaces and for regulating proliferation of the intimal cells in the synovium. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the role of lubricin in the maintenance of the TMJ. We found that mice lacking lubricin have a normal TMJ at birth, but develop degeneration resembling TMJ osteoarthritis by 2 months, increasing in severity over time. Disease progression in Prg4-/- mice results in synovial hyperplasia, deterioration of cartilage in the condyle, disc and fossa with an increase in chondrocyte number and their redistribution in clusters with loss of superficial zone chondrocytes. All articular surfaces of the joint had a prominent layer of protein deposition. Compared to the knee joint, the osteoarthritis-like phenotype was more severe and manifested earlier in the TMJ. Taken together, the lack of lubricin in the TMJ causes osteoarthritis-like degeneration that affects the articular cartilage as well as the integrity of multiple joint tissues. Our results provide the first molecular evidence of the role of lubricin in the TMJ and suggest that Prg4-/- mice might provide a valuable new animal model for the study of the early events of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:25188282

  20. Absence of the articular disc in the tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Sugisaki, M; Abe, S

    2013-12-01

    The articular disc of the temporomandibular joint is a constant structure in mammals. According to Parsons' report in 1900, however, it is absent in four animals: the armadillo, two kinds of monotremes and the Tasmanian devil. Thereafter, no research was performed to confirm this observation. The aim of this study was to determine by anatomical and histological examination whether the Tasmanian devil has an articular disc in its temporomandibular joint. Six fresh frozen corpses and one dry skull of Tasmanian devils were obtained from the School of Zoology, University of Tasmania. The corpses were dissected and the morphology of the temporomandibular joint was carefully observed by gross anatomical and histological examination. The structure of the temporomandibular joint of the dry skull was examined macroscopically and by micro-computed tomography. In all cases, absence of the articular disc in the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint was morphologically confirmed. The surface layer of both the condyle and the glenoid fossa comprised a thick fibrous tissue. Micro-computed tomography revealed dense and fine trabecular bone in the condyle. The thick fibrous tissue covering the condyle and high-density trabecular bone in the condyle might play a role in absorption against powerful mastication and heavy loading of the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint. PMID:23438215

  1. Change of range of motion of the temporomandibular joint after correction of mild scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongnam; Bae, Youngsook

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to verify the change in range of motion of the temporomandibular joint on correction of scoliosis. [Subjects and Methods] This study examined 31 male and female participants in their 20s and 30s with a spinal curve degree of 10° or greater. The subjects performed therapeutic exercise based on the pilates exercise system, which is known to be effective in mitigating the spinal curve for patients with scoliosis. All participants completed an 8-week therapeutic exercise regimen to alleviate the scoliosis in which exercise was performed, the exercise was done three times a week for 8 weeks and each session lasted 60 minutes. Among them, 19 participants were selected as an experiment group, whose symptoms were mitigated significantly, and 12 participants who did not undergo the exercise were identified as a control group. All subject was assessed for spinal curve degree, apparent leg length discrepancy, and deviation and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint before and after the study. [Results] In the experimental group, the apparent leg length discrepancy and the deviation of the temporomandibular joint were significantly decreased after the exercise, and the ROM in the temporomandibular joint was significantly increased. In intergroup comparisons, all variables showed a significant difference. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that as the spinal curve degree decreases significantly, the range of motion and deviation in the temporomandibular joint showed a significant change, indicating that mild scoliosis may be a negative factor affecting the deviation and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:25202172

  2. High-resolution arthrosonography of the temporomandibular joint with video and computer support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sader, Robert; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Deppe, Herbert; Horch, Hans-Henning; Kling, Bettina

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the temporomandibular joint has been problematic due to the lower frequency of the transducers used up to the present time. Imaging of temporomandibular joint structures being utilizable for diagnosis and therapy was only possible through time-consuming and expensive radiological image yielding procedures (computertomography, magnetic resonance imaging). 84 temporomandibular joints in 42 patients were examined clinically, radiologically, by axiographic tracing, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging. An ultrasound unit was used with a high- frequency 13MHz transducer. The temporomandibular joint was examined preauricularily; by this the lateral section of the joint could be represented. The image sequences in functional condylus movements were taped via a video output into a film recorder. Selected ultrasound images from the beginning to the end of the movement could then be digitalized and read into a personal computer to be evaluated. The computer then calculated a line of movement and the angle of the joint's course. By ultrasound imaging the joint space could be represented and measured clearly. Compared with the space measured in the magnetic resonance image the value determined by ultrasonography was a tenth power more exact. The computer-supported image analysis of the condylus movements led to an exact presentation of the condylus course. The sonographically determined condylar guidance corresponded to the value traced by axiography with high significance within a range of 3 degrees. The temporomandibular joint's disc could be localized just as exactly as with the magnetic resonance imaging. The use of a 13MHz transducer offers a new low-cost method of noninvasive dynamic imaging of important temporomandibular joint structures. The possibility of video and computer support enables movement analysis and opens new possibilities in the morphological and functional evaluation of the temporomandibular joint.

  3. Synovial fluid dynamics with small disc perforation in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhan, J; Zheng, Y; Han, Y; Zhang, Z; Xi, Y; Zhu, P

    2012-10-01

    The articular disc plays an important role as a stress absorber in joint movement, resulting in stress reduction and redistribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The flow of synovial fluid in the TMJ may follow a regular pattern during movement of the jaw. We hypothesised that the regular pattern is disrupted when the TMJ disc is perforated. By computed tomography arthrography, we studied the upper TMJ compartment in patients with small disc perforation during jaw opening-closing at positions from 0 to 3 cm. Finite element fluid dynamic modelling was accomplished to analyse the pattern of fluid flow and pressure distribution during the movements. The results showed that the fluid flow in the upper compartment generally formed an anticlockwise circulation but with local vortexes with the jaw opening up to 2 cm. However, when the jaw opening-closing reached 3 cm, an abnormal flow field and the fluid pressure change associated with the perforation may increase the risk of perforation expansion or rupture and is unfavourable for self-repair of the perforated disc. PMID:22582815

  4. Effects of Enzymatic Degradation after Loading in Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa-Tanne, Y.; Su, S.; Kunimatsu, R.; Hirose, N.; Mitsuyoshi, T.; Okamoto, Y.; Tanaka, E.; Tanne, K.

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid of the joint decreases friction between the cartilage surfaces and reduces cartilage wear during articulation. Characteristic changes of synovial fluid have been shown in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). OA is generally considered to be induced by excessive mechanical stress. However, whether the changes in synovial fluid precede the mechanical overloading or vice versa remains unclear. In the present study, our purpose was to examine if the breakdown of joint lubrication affects the frictional properties of mandibular condylar cartilage and leads to subsequent degenerative changes in TMJ. We measured the frictional coefficient in porcine TMJ by a pendulum device after digestion with hyaluronidase (HAase) or trypsin. Gene expressions of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), type II collagen, and histology were examined after prolonged cyclic loading by an active pendulum system. The results showed that the frictional coefficient increased significantly after HAase (35%) or trypsin (74%) treatment. Gene expression of IL-1β, COX-2, and MMPs-1, -3, and -9 increased significantly in enzyme-treated TMJs after cyclic loading. The increase in the trypsin-treated group was greater than that in the HAase-treated group. Type II collagen expression was reduced in both enzyme-treated groups. Histology revealed surface fibrillation and increased MMP-1 in the trypsin-treated group, as well as increased IL-1β in both enzyme-treated groups after cyclic loading. The findings demonstrated that the compromised lubrication in TMJ is associated with altered frictional properties and surface wear of condylar cartilage, accompanied by release of pro-inflammatory and matrix degradation mediators under mechanical loading. PMID:25503611

  5. Impact of temporomandibular joint pain in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Neveen; Mustafa, Hamid Masoud; Catrina, Anca Irinel; Alstergren, Per

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the impact of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain on daily activities and quality of life in relation to systemic inflammatory activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), thirty-three consecutive outpatients with RA were included. TMJ pain intensity at rest, on maximum mouth opening, and on chewing was assessed on a 0-10 numerical rating scale. TMJ palpatory tenderness, degree of anterior open bite, the impact of TMJ pain on daily activities and quality of life were also assessed. The systemic inflammatory activity was estimated by the disease activity score 28 (DAS28), blood levels of inflammatory markers and number of painful musculoskeletal regions. TMJ pain at rest, on maximum mouth opening, and on chewing as well as DAS28 was correlated with the impact of the TMJ pain on daily activities and quality of life. Partial correlations showed a significant interaction between TMJ pain on movement and DAS28 that explained the TMJ pain impact on daily activities and quality of life to a significant degree. This study indicates that both current TMJ pain intensity and systemic inflammatory activity play roles in the impact of TMJ pain on daily living and quality of life in RA. PMID:24363501

  6. Pseudodynamic imaging of the temporomandibular joint: SE versus GE sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Masui, Takayuki; Isoda, Haruo; Mochizuki, Takao

    1996-05-01

    Pseudodynamic MR imaging of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) has been used for the evaluation of the functional aspects of the TMJs. To evaluate the value of T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GE) techniques, both techniques were performed in 9 asymptomatic (mean 25.7 years, 22-32 years), and 25 symptomatic (mean 44.9 years, 20-71 years) subjects with signs and symptoms of internal derangement or osteoarthrosis of the TMJs. The imaging time for the SE (180 ms / 15 ms / 110{degrees} repetition time / echo time /flip angle) and GE (fast low angle shot; FLASH, 90 ms / 12 ms / 40{degrees}) sequences was 27 and 28 s, respectively. In asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects, the confidence of the identification of the meniscal position was better on SE than GE images (3.6 {+-} 0.6 vs. 2.9 {+-} 0.9, p < 0.01, 3.2 {+-} 0.8 vs. 2.8 {+-} 0.8, p < 0.05), respectively and the sizes of the menisci were bigger on SE than GE images. The delineation of the condylar cortex was better on GE than SE images. For pseudodynamic imaging display of the TMJs, the SE images might be better than GE images to provide the stable recognition of the menisci. 17 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Morphological characteristics of the temporomandibular joint in the pouch young of the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Kawashima, S; Amemiya, T

    2015-04-01

    We recently reported the absence of the articular disc, which is a constant structure in mammals, in the temporomandibular joint of the adult Tasmanian devil. However, whether the articular disc disappears with growth of the animal was unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pouch young of the Tasmanian devil has the articular disc. The temporomandibular joint of a fresh carcass of the pouch young, whose crown-rump length was 43 mm, was examined microscopically and by microcomputed tomography. The absence of the articular disc in the pouch young temporomandibular joint was histologically confirmed. It is suggested that the articular disc of the Tasmanian devil is naturally absent. PMID:24809824

  8. Oral squamous cell carcinoma: an atypical presentation mimicking temporomandibular joint disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Andrea; Nolet, Paul S; Diwan, Murtaza A

    2004-01-01

    A 50-year-old female presented to a chiropractic clinic with left jaw pain consistent with temporomandibular joint disorder. Examination revealed a large ulcerated mass on the posterolateral margin of the tongue which was later diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common of the oral cancers. These cancers are often detected late making treatment more complicated and reducing the chance of survival. In the early stages squamous cell carcinoma can be asymptomatic. Symptoms can be similar to that of temporomandibular joint disorder making examination of the patient’s mouth important to rule out oral cancers. Oral cancers should be considered when patients present to a chiropractor with pain in the area of the temporomandibular joint. Risk factors such as chronic tobacco and alcohol use should raise concern in these patients. Suspicious lesions should be referred immediately for further investigation. PMID:17549104

  9. Angioarchitecture and morphology of temporomandibular joint of Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Matheus Silvestre; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Yokoyama, Fernando Yukio; Dias, Fernando José; Iyomasa, Daniela Mizusaki; Guimarães, Elaine Aparecida Del-Bel Belluz; Watanabe, Ii-Sei; Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki

    2016-09-01

    The opossum Monodelphis domestica presents movement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reflecting adaptation to eating habits similar to movement in humans, but the structure of the TMJ is not yet known. Thus, nine young M. domestica, of both sexes were weighed, anesthetized with xylazine (10 mg kg(-1) ), and ketamine (70 mg kg(-1) ) and processed for: 1. The analyses of the macroscopic angioarchitecture after latex injection, as well as the topography of the TMJ; 2. The analysis of microvascularization after injection of Mercox resin and corrosion of soft tissue with NaOH using scanning electron microscopy and; 3. The histological evaluation of the TMJ with an optical microscope. Macroscopic analysis of the latex injected vessels revealed the distribution of the arteries from the common carotid artery, receiving branches of the superficial temporal and maxillary arteries. The mandibular condyle has the long axis in the lateral-lateral direction, and is convex in the anterior-posterior direction. Its topography was determined in relation to the eye and external acoustic meatus. With scanning electron microscopy, microvascularization consists of arterioles of varying diameter (85-15 µm) of the meandering capillary network in the retrodiscal region, and a network of straight capillaries in the TMJ anterior region. Via light microscopy the TMJ has similar histological features to those of humans. These macroscopic, microscopic and ultrastructural data from TMJ of the M. domestica could be a suitable model for TMJ physiology and pathophysiology studies for then speculate on possible human studies. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:806-813, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27324400

  10. Dietary correlates of temporomandibular joint morphology in New World primates.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Claire E

    2011-11-01

    Previous analyses of the masticatory apparatus have demonstrated that the shape of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is functionally and adaptively linked to variation in feeding behavior and diet in primates. Building on previous research, this study presents an analysis of the link between diet and TMJ morphology in the context of functional and dietary differences among New World primates. To evaluate this proposed relationship, I used three-dimensional morphometric methods to quantify TMJ shape across a sample of 13 platyrrhine species. A broad interspecific analysis of this sample found strong relationships among TMJ size, TMJ shape, and diet, suggesting that both size and diet are significant factors influencing TMJ morphology in New World primates. However, it is likely that at least some of these differences are related to a division of dietary categories along clade lines. A series of hypotheses related to load resistance capabilities and range of motion in the TMJ were then tested among small groups of closely related taxa with documented dietary differences. These pairwise analyses indicate that some aspects of TMJ morphology can be used to differentiate among closely related species with different diets. However, not all of my predictions were upheld. The anteroposterior dimensions of the TMJ were most strongly consistent with hypothesized differences in ingestive/masticatory behaviors and jaw gape, whereas the predictions generated for variation in entoglenoid and articular tubercle height were not upheld. These results imply that while some features can be reliably associated with increased load resistance and facilitation of wider jaw gapes in the masticatory apparatus, other features are less strongly correlated with masticatory function. PMID:21920583

  11. Neocartilage integration in temporomandibular joint discs: physical and enzymatic methods

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Meghan K.; Arzi, Boaz; Prouty, Shannon M.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Integration of engineered musculoskeletal tissues with adjacent native tissues presents a significant challenge to the field. Specifically, the avascularity and low cellularity of cartilage elicit the need for additional efforts in improving integration of neocartilage within native cartilage. Self-assembled neocartilage holds significant potential in replacing degenerated cartilage, though its stabilization and integration in native cartilage require further efforts. Physical and enzymatic stabilization methods were investigated in an in vitro model for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc degeneration. First, in phase 1, suture, glue and press-fit constructs were compared in TMJ disc intermediate zone defects. In phase 1, suturing enhanced interfacial shear stiffness and strength immediately; after four weeks, a 15-fold increase in stiffness and a ninefold increase in strength persisted over press-fit. Neither suture nor glue significantly altered neocartilage properties. In phase 2, the effects of the enzymatic stabilization regimen composed of lysyl oxidase, CuSO4 and hydroxylysine were investigated. A full factorial design was employed, carrying forward the best physical method from phase 1, suturing. Enzymatic stabilization significantly increased interfacial shear stiffness after eight weeks. Combined enzymatic stabilization and suturing led to a fourfold increase in shear stiffness and threefold increase in strength over press-fit. Histological analysis confirmed the presence of a collagen-rich interface. Enzymatic treatment additionally enhanced neocartilage mechanical properties, yielding a tensile modulus over 6 MPa and compressive instantaneous modulus over 1200 kPa at eight weeks. Suturing enhances stabilization of neocartilage, and enzymatic treatment enhances functional properties and integration of neocartilage in the TMJ disc. Methods developed here are applicable to other orthopaedic soft tissues, including knee meniscus and hyaline articular

  12. Effects of growth factors on temporomandibular joint disc cells.

    PubMed

    Detamore, Michael S; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2004-07-01

    The effects of growth factors on cartilaginous tissues are well documented. An exception is the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc, where data for growth factor effects on proliferation and biosynthesis are very limited. The purpose of this study was to quantify proliferation of and synthesis by TMJ disc cells cultured in monolayer with either platelet derived growth factor-AB (PDGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF), at either a low (10 ng/ml) or high (100 ng/ml) concentration. Proliferation was assessed with a DNA quantitation technique, collagen synthesis was measured via a hydroxyproline assay, and GAG synthesis was determined with a dimethylmethylene blue dye binding assay at 14 days. Overall, the most beneficial growth factor was bFGF, which was most potent in increasing proliferation and GAG synthesis, and also effective in promoting collagen synthesis. At the high concentration, bFGF resulted in 96% more cells than the control and 30 to 45% more cells than PDGF and IGF. PDGF and bFGF were the most potent upregulators of GAG synthesis, producing 2-3 times more GAG than the control. IGF had no significant effect on GAG production, although at its higher concentration it increased collagen production by 4.5 times over the control. Collagen synthesis was promoted by bFGF at its lower concentration, with levels 4.2 times higher than the control, whereas PDGF had no significant effect on collagen production. In general, higher concentrations increased proliferation, whereas lower concentrations favoured biosynthesis. PMID:15126139

  13. Use of indomethacin as an adjuvant to surgery for recurrent temporomandibular joint ankylosis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krushna; Pandey, Sandeep; Bhutia, Ongkila; Roychoudhury, Ajoy

    2014-01-01

    Two cases with multiple recurrences of temporomandibular joint ankylosis and multiple failed interposition/gap arthroplasty procedures are presented here. Heterotopic bone formation was thought to be the reason. Indomethacin prophylaxis for prevention of heterotopic new bone formation at the osteoarthrectomy site was used as an adjuvant to surgery, in dosages of 75 mg/day for six weeks. Indomethacin is used frequently in hip and elbow arthroplasties to prevent heterotopic ossification, but its use in temporomandibular joint is not routine. The presented cases did not develop further recurrence and attained stable mouth opening over two-year follow-up after osteoarthrectomy and oral indomethacin. PMID:25937735

  14. Treatment of acute temporomandibular joint dislocation using manipulation technique for disk displacement.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Tetsuji; Tsuda, Tomoyuki; Hirose, Shunsuke; Ozawa, Toshiyuki; Kawai, Katsuya

    2014-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint dislocation is not frequently encountered, but it is often difficult to reduce the dislocation with conventional methods described in textbooks. The key points to success of reduction depend on the patient's position, route of approach, and timing of reducing each side. We apply a manipulation technique for disk displacement to the reduction that corresponds to these key points. Using our method, temporomandibular joint dislocation can be easily reduced, without using sedative or analgesics. This method is simple, convenient, and worth trying in place of the conventional method. PMID:24621705

  15. Psychoeducation Program on Strategies for Coping with Stress in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction). Preliminary patients' opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients' lives. PMID:25610871

  16. Inferior joint space arthrography of normal temporomandibular joints: Reassessment of diagnostic criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.A.; Tu, H.K.; Sleder, P.R.; Lydiatt, D.D.; Laney, T.J.

    1986-06-01

    Inferior joint space arthrograms of the temporomandibular joints of 31 healthy volunteers (62 joints) were obtained to determine normal arthrographic findings. The superior margin of the anterior recess was smooth and flat in 68% of the joints and concave in 32% with the subjects' mouths closed. The concavity was the result of the anterior ridge of the meniscus impinging on the contrast material. The concave impression could be distinguished easily from an anteriorly displaced meniscus on videotaped studies, which demonstrated a smooth transition of contrast material from the anterior to the posterior recess during opening of a subject's mouth. With the mouth open, the anterior recess decreased in size, appearing as a small, crescent-shaped collection of contrast material anterior to the head of the condyle in 52 joints (84%); it remained large in ten joints (16%) at maximal mouth opening. The configuration of the posterior recess was identical to that described previously; however, with the subjects' mouths closed, it was larger than the anterior recess, contrary to most previously reported results.

  17. Gait changes after using a temporomandibular joint exerciser in patients who underwent lower limb joint surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Gu-Young; Choi, Geun-Seok; Shin, Ki-Young; Park, Joon-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The improvements in gait of the patients with lower limb disease who used a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) exerciser were verified. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven subjects were included. Their mean age was 53.2 years. The lower limb joint angles before and after using the TMJ exerciser were measured using a gait analyzer. Before the gait experiment, the TMJ exerciser setting process and one-leg stance balance test (OLST) were repeated until the balance maintenance time improved. [Results] Because of the OLST, the mean change in the body center point after the subjects used the exerciser improved from 5.76 mm to 4.20 mm. When the TMJ exerciser was used, the joint angle range of the subjects approached that of the normal individuals. [Conclusion] According to the gait experiments, the angles of the subjects’ hips, knees, and ankle joints approached to those of the normal individuals after the subjects used the TMJ exerciser; however, the results did not completely match. The changes in the hip, knee, and ankle joint angles were statistically significant, which confirm the usefulness of the TMJ exerciser. PMID:27313377

  18. Septic Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint--Unusual Presentations.

    PubMed

    Lohiya, Sapna; Dillon, Jasjit

    2016-01-01

    This report describes 2 patients whose septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (SATMJ) presented atypically, resulting in treatment delay and complications. A 49-year-old man developed left-side facial allodynia, which was first treated unsuccessfully as trigeminal neuralgia. On day 21, the patient sustained facial trauma from a fall and presented to the emergency department (ED). Maxillofacial contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan was suggestive of parotiditis, SATMJ, or hemarthrosis. His condition did not improve with empiric antibiotic treatment. On day 30, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed SATMJ. Incision and drainage yielded 6 mL of pus and produced clinical improvement. Cultures grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which was treated with amoxicillin plus clavulanate and sulfamethoxazole plus trimethoprim for 30 days. On day 59, the patient still had slight preauricular pain and CT-proved TMJ osteoarthritic changes. A 56-year-old woman developed right-side facial pain after a crown procedure on her right mandibular second molar. Oral prednisone (and clindamycin) produced partial relief. Her primary physician suspected temporal arteritis, but its biopsy result on day 11 was normal. Gradually, the patient developed trismus and malocclusion refractory to various medicines. On day 49, she presented to the ED. A contrast-enhanced maxillofacial CT scan suggested SATMJ. Incision and drainage yielded 30 mL of pus and produced clinical improvement. During days 50 to 57, the patient received intravenous ampicillin plus sulbactam and metronidazole. However, preauricular tenderness and drainage from the surgical incision persisted. On day 55, CT scan showed a residual abscess. Secondary debridement yielded 5 mL of pus. Culture grew coagulase-negative S aureus. On day 141, the patient still had slight preauricular pain and TMJ osteoarthritic changes on MRI. In these cases, the SATMJ diagnosis was delayed owing

  19. Groningen temporomandibular total joint prosthesis: an 8-year longitudinal follow-up on function and pain.

    PubMed

    Schuurhuis, Jennifer M; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Stegenga, Boudewijn; de Bont, Lambert G M; Spijkervet, Fred K L

    2012-12-01

    Total temporomandibular joint replacement is a surgical procedure for patients with severe temporomandibular joint afflictions affecting quality of life, which have not responded beneficially to previous conventional surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term outcome of the Groningen temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis in patients with chronic pain and mutilated temporomandibular joints following multiple surgical procedures, with respect to prosthesis failure, the patient's postoperative level of satisfaction and longitudinal changes in maximum mouth opening, functional mandibular impairment and pain. Eight female patients were studied in whom Groningen TMJ prostheses were inserted, two unilaterally and six bilaterally. The Groningen TMJ prosthesis was mechanically successful during 8 years of follow-up in seven out of eight patients with a disc dislocation being seen in one patient (7%). Patients were satisfied, despite the limited improvement of the maximum mouth opening, and pain scores. Although the decline of MFIQ scores during 8 years of follow-up was significant compared to baseline (p=0.027), the effects of the prosthesis on maximum mouth opening, function and pain were limited. This may be due to persistent chronic pain and the adverse effects of multiple previous surgical procedures. PMID:22484125

  20. [Synovial chondromatosis of the right temporomandibular joint: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Fan, Rui-xian; Zhang, Kui-hong; Ding, Wei; Wang, Yan-ling

    2016-04-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint(TMJ) is an extremely rare condition. A case of synovial chondromatosis with postoperative recurrence and involvement of base of skull was reported. The clinic pathological features, diagnosis and treatment were discussed with literature review. PMID:27329898

  1. Biofeedback and Relaxation Therapy for Chronic Temporomandibular Joint Pain: Predicting Successful Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funch, Donna P.; Gale, Elliot N.

    1984-01-01

    Randomly assigned 57 patients with chronic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain to receive either relaxation or biofeedback therapy. Successful patients in the relaxation condition tended to be younger and had experienced TMJ pain for a shorter period of time than the successful biofeedback patients. (BH)

  2. Psoriatic arthritis of the temporomandibular joints with ankylosis. Literature review and case reports.

    PubMed

    Koorbusch, G F; Zeitler, D L; Fotos, P G; Doss, J B

    1991-03-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is currently defined as psoriasis associated with chronic, erosive inflammatory arthritis, which is seronegative for rheumatoid factor. A review of the etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment is accompanied by two unusual case reports of psoriatic arthritis affecting the temporomandibular joints with ankylosis. PMID:2011347

  3. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis caused by chondroid hyperplasia from the callus of condylar neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Min; Park, Jung Min; Kim, Ji Hyuck; Kwon, Kwang Jun; Park, Young Wook; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Sang Shin; Lee, Suk Keun

    2009-01-01

    A patient who complained of difficulty in opening his mouth after condylar neck fracture 1 year ago presented typical features of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in clinical and radiologic examinations. To demonstrate a possible pathogenesis of temporomandibular joint ankylosis after condylar neck fracture, the fractured condylar portion removed was examined by histologic and immunohistochemical stainings. Interpositional gap arthroplasty was performed by removing the inferomesially displaced fractured condyle, and reconstruction with subcutaneous dermis to the previous vertical height was performed immediately. The fractured condylar portion was almost intact with slight erosion of the condylar cartilage. In the hematoxylin and eosin and Masson trichrome stainings, an extensive chondroid hyperplasia with abundant hyaline cartilage was shown in the removed condylar portion. There were also hyperplastic features of the synovial membrane, which were abnormally distributed throughout the chondroid tissues. In the immunohistochemical stainings of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and BMP-4, the chondroid tissues were conspicuously hyperplastic and strongly positive for BMP-4 but sparse for BMP-2. From these results, we think that the hyperplastic chondroid tissue was derived from the callus of the primary fractured site of the condylar neck and propose that the chondroid tissue could proliferate continuously because of synovial tissue support from around the temporomandibular joint, resulting in temporomandibular joint ankylosis. This pathogenesis is quite different from those of other diaphyseal fracture of long bones. PMID:19165036

  4. The relationship between the temporomandibular joint capsule, articular disc and jaw muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Schmolke, C

    1994-01-01

    The anatomy of the temporomandibular joint capsule and its possible relationships to other structures near the joint are not fully understood. A 3-dimensional analysis based on sagittal, frontal and horizontal serial sections through the human temporomandibular joint region was therefore undertaken. Capsular elements which directly connect the temporal bone with the mandible were seen only on the lateral side of the joint. In the posterior, anterior and medial regions of the joint the upper and lower laminae of the articular disc are attached separately either to the temporal bone or to the mandibular condyle. The shaping of the articular cavities and the texture of the joint capsule permit movements of the articular disc predominantly in the anteromedial direction. On the entire medial side of the joint the articular disc and its capsular attachments are in close contact with the fascia of the lateral pterygoid muscle whereby a small portion of the upper head of this muscle inserts directly into the anteromedial part of the articular disc. Thus both the upper and the lower heads of the lateral pterygoid muscle are likely to influence the position of the articular disc directly during temporomandibular joint movements. Laterally, the articular disc is attached to the fascia of the masseter muscle, and part of the lateral ligament inserts into the temporalis fascia. Since these attachments are relatively weak, neither the temporalis nor the masseter muscles are considered to act directly on the articular disc; instead, via afferents from muscle spindles, they may take part in signalling the position of the temporomandibular joint components, including that of the articular disc. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8014124

  5. MRI Slice Segmentation and 3D Modelling of Temporomandibular Joint Measured by Microscopic Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirg, O.; Liberda, O.; Smekal, Z.; Sprlakova-Pukova, A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices and 3D modelling of the temporomandibular joint disc in order to help physicians diagnose patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The TMJ is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The most common joint dysfunction is due to the disc. The disc is a soft tissue, which in principle cannot be diagnosed by the CT method. Therefore, a 3D model is made from the MRI slices, which can image soft tissues. For the segmentation of the disc in individual slices a new method is developed based on spatial distribution and anatomical TMJ structure with automatic thresholding. The thresholding is controlled by a genetic algorithm. The 3D model is realized using the marching cube method.

  6. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings. PMID:24792314

  7. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the temporomandibular joint: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    El Assar de la Fuente, S; Angenete, O; Jellestad, S; Tzaribachev, N; Koos, B; Rosendahl, K

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common inflammatory rheumatic disease of childhood and represents a series of chronic inflammatory arthritides of unknown cause. Involvement of the temporomandibular joint has been reported in up to 87% of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis when based on magnetic tomography imaging; it can be asymptomatic and may lead to severe long term complications. In this review a summary of the contemporary literature of imaging of the temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis will be provided, including ultrasound which is a valuable method for guided joint injections, but does not necessarily allow detection of acute inflammation, cone beam computed tomography, which has emerged as a feasible and accurate low-dose alternative as compared to conventional computed tomography to detect destructive change, and magnetic resonance imaging which is considered the method of choice for assessing acute, inflammatory change, although the lack of normative standards remains a challenge in children. PMID:26924432

  8. Temporomandibular pain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, H R; Kalavathi, S D

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  9. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  10. Acoustic characteristics of sounds from temporomandibular joints with and without effusion: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Sano, T; Widmalm, S E; Westesson, P L; Yamaga, T; Yamamoto, M; Takahashi, K; Michi, K I; Okano, T

    2002-02-01

    Joint effusion has been associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain but can only be diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For screening of patients with suspected effusion a simple and less expensive method would be desirable. We recorded joint sounds during jaw opening and closing movement from 34 TMJs with internal derangement (ID). Seventeen joints had joint effusion seen on MRI. Spectrograms of the sounds were displayed as waterfall plots showing profiles of the consecutive Hamming windows. If the profiles were similar, as judged by initial evaluation, the displayed pattern was classified as stable. If some profiles were distinctly deviating in their pattern, this was classified as unstable. Joints with effusion showed unstable sound pattern more often than joints without effusion (P < 0.001). It was concluded that TMJ sound analyses have a potential to identify joints with effusion based on their unstable sound pattern. PMID:11856395

  11. A radiographic evaluation of temporomandibular and hand (Metacarpophalangeal) / wrist joints of patients with adult rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, Seema; Gharote, Harshkant; Jose, Renju

    2012-01-01

    Background: A review of literature revealed that, although the involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients is not uncommon, variation in presentation persist. Comparative studies of bony changes in the right and left TMJ with the right and left peripheral hand (Metacarpophalangeal-MCP)/wrist joints have not been done, to the best of our knowledge. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the temporomandibular and hand (MCP) and wrist joints of fifteen rheumatoid arthritis patients were evaluated with questionnaires, clinical and lab assessment and radiographically using conventional radiographs and computed tomography. Students t-test was applied for the statistical analysis of the data obtained and a P value of 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Comparisons between the right TMJ with right MCP/wrist joint and left TMJ with left MCP/wrist joint did not reveal statistically significant results. Radiographically, flattening and erosions were the common manifestations. MCP joints were more affected than the wrist, but whenever the wrist was involved, it was more likely to be bilaterally affected. Conclusions: Although the TMJ showed osseous changes of a higher grade than the hand (MCP) and wrist joints radiographically, it was observed that patients were more aware of the peripheral joint discomfort. There were no significant differences between TMJ and peripheral joints on both right and left sides. PMID:23814559

  12. Clinical-surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder in a psoriatic arthritis patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Condylotomy is a surgical procedure that has been used as an option to treat temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. This technique has the advantage of avoiding intra-capsular alterations that might be found involving other surgical procedures. Its use, even when unilateral, has positive effect on treatment of both joints. Methods In order to better evaluate the benefits of a clinical-surgical treatment for TMD, the present report describes the case of a psoriatic arthritis patient. The case was clinically characterized by dental malloclusion, and imaging exams showed joint degeneration of the right mandibular condyle. The patient was treated by condylotomy technique after a prosthetic oral rehabilitation. Results No clinical-radiological signs or symptoms of progression of articular disease were observed within a period of 16 months after surgery. Furthermore, there was functional stability of the temporomandibular joint, total absence of local pain and improvement of mouth opening. Conclusion The present study suggests that condylotomy can be considered as a valid option for the management of TMD, since it has low surgical morbidity and favorable clinical outcomes. In this case, the patient had a medical diagnosis of systemic disease presenting general pain and pain at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in addition of causal agent of TMD (dental malloclusion). The difficulty of finding a single etiology (malocclusion vs. systemic disease) did not exclude the indication of a clinical-surgical treatment to re-establish the balance of TMJ. PMID:23556553

  13. In vitro application of optical transmission systems in erbium:YAG laser temporomandibular joint surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Hering, Peter; Niederdellmann, Herbert; Deuerling, Christian; Dammer, Ralf

    1995-05-01

    The experimental setup of this study is focused on the changes in temporomandibular joint tissue after irradiation with an Erbium:YAG laser. Initially, the free-running beam from the laser was focused onto freshly excised porcine tissue samples, indicating an optimum average energy density and pulse duration for the purpose of temporomandibular joint surgery of about 15 - 60 J/cm2 and 120 microsecond(s) - 240 microsecond(s) , respectively. Consecutively, an attempt was made to couple the Erbium:YAG laser beam on the one hand to optical fibers made of infrared-transmitting glasses (fluoride- and chalcogenide-based), on the other hand to a recently developed sapphire and liquid core fiber, respectively. From the preliminary observations of this investigation it appears that both the liquid core and the sapphire fiber are the most promising candidates for delivery of Erbium-YAG laser radiation in arthroscopic surgery of the craniomandibular articulation.

  14. Giant cell tumor of bone involving the temporomandibular joint and temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Akyigit, Abdulvahap; Karlidag, Turgut; Sakallioglu, Öner; Polat, Cahit; Keles, Erol

    2014-07-01

    Giant cell tumor is a primary bone tumor that usually originates from the epiphysis of the long bones and is rarely seen in the cranial region. Most frequently, the tumor develops in the sphenoid and temporal bones in the middle cranial fossa. Giant cell tumor generally shows diversity with respect to benignity, local invasiveness, and histology. Although surgical excision with negative surgical margin may lead to cure, adjuvant radiotherapy is still debated. The patient was admitted with a humming in the left ear and hearing loss. After radiologic examination, a mass with temporomandibular joint involvement as well as temporal and sphenoid bone localization was detected. The patient was diagnosed with giant cell tumor after a biopsy specimen was taken from the mass extending to the middle ear and destroying the temporomandibular joint. The current study reviewed the patient's clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment in light of the literature. PMID:25006918

  15. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with ankylosis of temporomandibular joint and cleft palate: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Manisha; Pradhan, Gaurav; Gupta, Sunita; Kapoor, Seema

    2015-01-01

    The ectodermal dysplasias are a heterogenous group of diseases, which have one or more anomalies of the hair, teeth, nails, and sweat glands. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is the most common type and is usually transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait. It is characterized by classical triad of hypotrichosis, anhidrosis/hypohidrosis, and hypodontia/anodontia. Here, we describe an Indian boy affected with HED and rare features including ankylosis of temporomandibular joint and cleft palate. PMID:25684924

  16. Reconstruction of Temporomandibular Joint With a Fibula Free Flap: A Case Report With a Histological Study.

    PubMed

    Fariña, Rodrigo; Campos, Pía; Beytía, Javiera; Martínez, Benjamín

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) for congenital or acquired deformities is a major challenge for maxillofacial surgeons. The alternatives for reconstructing the TMJ include free grafts (costochondral, iliac crest, clavicle, or metatarsus), free flaps (fibula), osteogenic distraction, and alloplastic grafts. The lack of biological knowledge of cartilaginous grafts and their reaction to the environment of the TMJ is largely responsible for the inability to predict growth. This report describes the use of a free flap for TMJ reconstruction. PMID:26342950

  17. Condylar resorption following temporomandibular joint arthroscopy in a patient with essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Van Sickels, Joseph; Falace, Donald

    2006-05-01

    Condylar resorption of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a poorly understood phenomenon that is the subject of much controversy. The following case report depicts a unique case of condylar resorption (CR) in a 49-year-old female patient with essential thrombocythemia who underwent arthrocentesis of the TMJ. The exact cause of the CR is unclear but it is speculated that it was likely due to hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications during surgery secondary to an elevated platelet count. PMID:16632268

  18. Modified T-Plate Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A New and Versatile Option

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Bariar, Lalit Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Background This study has been conducted with the aim of evaluating modified T-plate interpositional arthroplasty. Methods A prospective comparative study in patients admitted with temporomandibular joint ankylosis. Ankylotic temporomandibular joint arthroplasty included condylectomy gap arthroplasty in 7, temporalis muscle flap interpositional arthroplasty in 8, and modified T-plate interpositional arthroplasty in 13 cases. The patients were followed for three years. Collected data were tabulated and subjected to Fisher's exact test, chi-square test and probability estimation. Results A significant increase in interincisal distance of 32 mm was seen in 12 (92.31%) patients in the T-plate interposition group, in 2 (25%) cases of the temporalis muscle flap interposition group, and in 1 case (14.28%) of the condylectomy group at 12, 24, and 36 months. Re-ankylosis was observed in 1 case (9.69%) of the T-plate interposition group, while as it was observed in 4 (50%) cases in the temporalis muscle flap interposition group and 4 (57.14%) cases in the condylectomy group, and these differences were statistically significant. Conclusions Our clinical experience with the use of the T-plate over the past 5 years has been encouraging, and our physiotherapy technique is quite simple. Even illiterate parents can assess it easily. Hence, we recommend this easy technique that does not damage the temporalis muscle for the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis. PMID:26618118

  19. The Role of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

    PubMed

    Awan, Kamran Habib; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) constitutes of a group of diseases that functionally affect the masticatory system, including the muscles of mastication and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A number of etiologies with specific treatment have been identified, including the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). The current paper presents a literature review on the use of TENS in the management of TMD patients. Temporomandibular joint disorder is very common disorder with approximately 75% of people showing some signs, while more than quarter (33%) having at least one symptom. An attempt to treat the pain should be made whenever possible. However, in cases with no defined etiology, starting with less intrusive and reversible techniques is prescribed. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is one such treatment modality, i.e. useful in the management of TMD. It comprises of controlled exposure of electrical current to the surface of skin, causing hyperactive muscles relaxation and decrease pain. Although the value of TENS to manage chronic pain in TMD patients is still controversial, its role in utilization for masticatory muscle pain is significant. However, an accurate diagnosis is essential to minimize its insufficient use. Well-controlled randomized trials are needed to determine the utilization of TENS in the management of TMD patients. PMID:27018034

  20. Synovial chondromatosis in the temporomandibular joint: case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ivask, Oksana; Leibur, Edvitar; Voog-Oras, Ülle

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare benign condition characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilage in the synovium resulting in numerous attached and unattached osteocartilagenous (calcified) loose bodies within the joint. The purpose of this article is to present a case of SC of the TMJ and to discuss current diagnostic approaches, treatment options and relevant follow-up data. We present a case of SC in the TMJ that was confirmed by histopathological analysis and treated via arthrotomy, and present the typical imaging findings, including Computed Tomography (CT) and orthopantomography (OPTG) findings. PMID:26879402

  1. Development of Synovial Membrane in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, R.C.; Arraéz-Aybar, L.A.; Klein, O.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities. PMID:26708184

  2. Giant Solitary Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint with Intracranial Extension

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Salú, José L.; Lázaro, Rafael; Aldasoro, José; Gonzalez-Darder, José M.

    1998-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis are rare entities but are well-described lesions in the literature that can affect many joint areas of the body. A case of tumoral synovial chondromatosis involving the temporomandibular joint with intracranial extension through mandibular fossa is reported. As long as there was significant infratemporal and extradural invasion of the middle and posterior fossa, a transtemporal and infratemporal approach was performed and total removal of the lesions was achieved. A brief review of skull base synovial chondromatosis is presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17171059

  3. Evaluation of body posture in individuals with internal temporomandibular joint derangement.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Wagner Cesar; Marques, Amélia Pasqual; de Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli

    2005-10-01

    Temporomandibular dysfunctions (TMD) comprise a great number of disruptions that may affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the masticatory muscles, or both. TMJ internal derangement is a specific type of TMD, of which the etiology and physiopathology are broadly unknown, but have been suggested to be linked to head, neck, and body posture factors. This study aimed at verifying possible relationships between body posture and TMJ internal derangements (TMJ-id), by comparing 30 subjects presenting typical TMJ-id signs to 20 healthy subjects. Subjects' clinical evaluations included anamnesis, stomatognatic system evaluation, and plotting analysis on body posture photographs. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups. Results do not support the assertion that body posture plays a role in causing or enhancing TMD; however, these results should be cautiously considered because of the small number of subjects evaluated and the many posture variables submitted to statistical procedures that lead to high standard deviations. PMID:16353467

  4. 'Costen's syndrome'--correlation or coincidence: a review of 45 patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, otalgia and other aural symptoms.

    PubMed

    Brookes, G B; Maw, A R; Coleman, M J

    1980-02-01

    Forty-five patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, and otalgia together with other aural symptoms (deafness, tinnitus, pressure/blockage and vertigo) were evaluated clinically and audiometrically. The theoretical mechanisms by which aural symptoms may be produced as a result of temporomandibular joint dysfunction are outlined and discussed in the light of the patients under review. The wide diversity in the incidence of additional aural symptoms apart from otalgia reported in the literature is noted, together with the general lack of full objective audiometric assessment. In 37 patients the aural symptoms were directly attributable to other coincidental otolaryngological pathology. Details of the remaining 8 cases are presented. The other aural symptoms of 4 of these patients were also probably accounted for by other coincidental otalaryngological pathology. It may be significant that 2 of the other patients were suffering from concurrent psychiatric disorders. Thus in this series at least 9% of the patients were considered to have other aural symptoms coincidental to temporomandibular joint dysfunction. This is compatible with the relatively common occurrence of both temporomandibular joint dysfunction and aural symptoms in the general population. This study leads us to believe that there is no direct aetiological basis to link temporomandibular joint dysfunction and other aural symptoms apart from otalgia. PMID:7363490

  5. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis: cone beam computed tomography findings, clinical features, and correlations.

    PubMed

    Cömert Kiliç, S; Kiliç, N; Sümbüllü, M A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and associations between clinical signs and symptoms and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) findings of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). Seventy-six patients (total 117 TMJ) with osteoarthritis were included in this study. Clinical signs and symptoms and CBCT findings were reviewed retrospectively. A considerable decrease in mandibular motions and mastication efficiency, and considerable increase in joint sounds and general pain complaints were observed. The most frequent condylar bony changes were erosion (110 joints, 94.0%), followed by flattening (108 joints, 92.3%), osteophytes (93 joints, 79.5%), hypoplasia (22 joints, 18.8%), sclerosis (14 joints, 12.0%), and subchondral cyst (four joints, 3.4%). Flattening of the articular eminence and pneumatization were each observed in five joints. Forty-one patients had bilateral degeneration and 35 had unilateral degeneration. Hypermobility was detected in 47 degenerative joints. Masticatory efficiency was negatively correlated with both condylar flattening and sclerosis, and general pain complaints was positively correlated with condylar flattening. Condylar erosion, flattening, osteophytes, pain, joint sounds, reduced jaw movements, and worsened mastication were common findings in TMJ-OA in the present study. Poor correlations were found between osseous changes and clinical signs and symptoms of TMJ-OA. CBCT is a powerful diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of TMJ-OA. PMID:26194774

  6. Use of Theraflex-TMJ topical cream for the treatment of temporomandibular joint and muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Silvia Lobo; Mehta, Noshir; Forgione, Albert G; Melis, Marcello; Al-Badawi, Emad; Ceneviz, Caroline; Zawawi, Khalid H

    2004-04-01

    This randomized, double-blind study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the topical cream Theraflex-TMJ (NaBob/Rx, San Mateo, CA) in patients with masseter muscle pain and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. Fifty-two subjects (5 males and 47 females) were instructed to apply a cream over the afflicted masseter muscle(s) or over the jaw joint(s) twice daily for two weeks. Theraflex-TMJ cream was used by the experimental group, while a placebo cream was used by the control group. The means of pain ratings were calculated prior to the application of the cream (baseline), after ten days of tx (period 1), and 15 days of tx (period 2) days of treatment and five days after stopping the treatment (follow-up). There was a significant decrease in reported pain levels from baseline in the experimental group for period 1 (p < 0.01), period 2 (p < 0.001), and follow-up (p < 0.01). For the control group, no significant differences were found between the different time periods (p > 0.05). There was evidence of minor side effects such as skin irritation and/or burning on the site of the application in two subjects in the experimental as well as two subjects in the control groups. The data strongly suggest that Theraflex-TMJ topical cream is safe and effective for reducing pain in the masseter muscle and the temporomandibular joint. PMID:15134414

  7. Innovative Surgical Management of the Synovial Chondromatosis of Temporo-Mandibular Joints: Highly Conservative Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Ionna, Franco; Amantea, Massimiliano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Ballini, Andrea; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Aversa, Corrado; De Cecio, Rossella; Russo, Daniela; Marrelli, Massimo; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is an uncommon disease characterized by a benign nodular cartilaginous proliferation arising from the joint synovium, bursae, or tendon sheaths. Although the temporomandibular joint is rarely affected by neoplastic lesions, SC is the most common neoplastic lesion of this joint. The treatment of this disease consists in the extraoral surgery with a wide removal of the lesion; in this study, the authors described a more conservative intraoral surgical approach. Patient with SC of temporomandibular joint typically refer a limitation in the mouth opening, together with a persistent not physiological mandibular protrusion and an appearance of a neoformation located at the right preauricular region: the authors reported 1 scholar patient. After biopsy of the neoformation, confirming the synovial chondromatosis, the patient underwent thus to the surgical excision of the tumor, via authors' conservative transoral approach, to facilitate the enucleation of the neoformation. The mass fully involved the pterygo-maxillary fossa with involvement of the parotid lodge and of the right TMJ: this multifocal extension suggested for a trans-oral surgical procedure, in the light of the suspicion of a possible malignant nature of the neoplasm. Our intraoral conservative approach to surgery is aimed to reduce the presence of unaesthetic scars in preauricular and facial regions, with surgical results undoubtedly comparable to the traditional surgical techniques much more aggressive. Our technique could be a valid, alternative, and safe approach to treat this rare and complex kind of oncological disease. PMID:27300457

  8. Application of the rapid prototyping technique to design a customized temporomandibular joint used to treat temporomandibular ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Chaware, Suresh M.; Bagaria, Vaibhav; Kuthe, Abhay

    2009-01-01

    Anthropometric variations in humans make it difficult to replace a temporomandibular joint (TMJ), successfully using a standard “one-size-fits-all” prosthesis. The case report presents a unique concept of total TMJ replacement with customized and modified TMJ prosthesis, which is cost-effective and provides the best fit for the patient. The process involved in designing and modifications over the existing prosthesis are also described. A 12-year- old female who presented for treatment of left unilateral TMJ ankylosis underwent the surgery for total TMJ replacement. A three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scan suggested features of bony ankylosis of left TMJ. CT images were converted to a sterolithographic model using CAD software and a rapid prototyping machine. A process of rapid manufacturing was then used to manufacture the customized prosthesis. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, with an improvement in mouth opening of 3.5 cm and painless jaw movements. Three years postsurgery, the patient is pain-free, has a mouth opening of about 4.0 cm and enjoys a normal diet. The postoperative radiographs concur with the excellent clinical results. The use of CAD/CAM technique to design the custom-made prosthesis, using orthopaedically proven structural materials, significantly improves the predictability and success rates of TMJ replacement surgery. PMID:19881026

  9. Evaluation of the mechanism and principles of management of temporomandibular joint dislocation. Systematic review of literature and a proposed new classification of temporomandibular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Virtually all the articles in literature addressed only a specific type of dislocation. The aim of this review was to project a comprehensive understanding of the pathologic processes and management of all types of dislodgement of the head of the mandibular condyle from its normal position in the glenoid fossa. In addition, a new classification of temporomandibular joint dislocation was also proposed. Method and materials A thorough computer literature search was done using the Medline, Cochrane library and Embase database. Key words like temporo-mandibular joint dislocation were used for the search. Additional manual search was done by going through published home-based and foreign articles. Case reports/series, and original articles that documented the type of dislocation, number of cases treated in the series and original articles. Treatment done and outcome of treatment were included in the study. Result A total of 128 articles were reviewed out which 79 were found relevant. Of these, 26 were case reports, 17 were case series and 36 were original articles. 79 cases were acute dislocations, 35 cases were chronic protracted TMJ dislocations and 311 cases were chronic recurrent TMJ dislocations. Etiology was predominantly trauma in 60% of cases and other causes contributed about 40%. Of all the cases reviewed, only 4 were unilateral dislocation. Various treatment modalities are outlined in this report as indicated for each type of dislocation. Conclusion The more complex and invasive method of treatment may not necessarily offer the best option and outcome of treatment, therefore conservative approaches should be exhausted and utilized appropriately before adopting the more invasive surgical techniques. PMID:21676208

  10. Clinical treatment of a ruptured temporomandibular joint disc: morphological changes at 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Lucas; Porto, Felipe; Agarwal, Sachin; Grossman, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis is a disease that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This case report chronicles the diagnosis and treatment of a patient for whom this pathological condition was accompanied by a rupture of the articular disc. The patient presented with loud sounds in the left TMJ and an irregular mandibular occlusal plane due to condylar intrusion in the glenoid fossa on the ipsilateral side. A noninvasive treatment was selected. A 4-month follow-up revealed remission of the articular sounds, and tissue regeneration was noted. These improvements remained visible at 5-year follow-up. PMID:24598507

  11. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Nanostructured diamond film deposition on curved surfaces of metallic temporomandibular joint implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Marc D.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2002-10-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured diamond films was carried out on curved surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V alloy machined to simulate the shape of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dental implant. Raman spectroscopy shows that the deposited films are uniform in chemical composition along the radius of curvature of the TMJ condyle. Thin film x-ray diffraction reveals an interfacial carbide layer and nanocrystalline diamond grains in this coating. Nanoindentation hardness measurements show an ultra-hard coating with a hardness value of 60+/-5 GPa averaged over three samples.

  12. Alterations of the Temporomandibular Joint on Magnetic Resonance Imaging according to Growth and Development in Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tatsurou; Konoo, Tetsuro; Habu, Manabu; Oda, Masafumi; Kito, Shinji; Kodama, Masaaki; Kokuryo, Shinya; Wakasugi-Sato, Nao; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Nishida, Ikuko; Morikawa, Kazumasa; Saeki, Katsura; Maki, Kenshi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Terashita, Masamichi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The paper explains the alterations of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the growth and development of schoolchildren. Appearance and disappearance of a “double contour-like structure” (DCLS) of the mandibular condyle on MRI according to the growth and development of schoolchildren were demonstrated. In addition, possible constituents of DCLS and the significance of detection of DCLS on MRI were also speculated. The relationship between red marrow and yellow marrow in the articular eminence of temporal bone, the disappearance of DCLS, and alterations of the mandibular condyle have been elucidated. PMID:23316233

  13. Computed tomography of the meniscus of the temporomandibular joint: preliminary observations

    SciTech Connect

    Helms, C.A.; Morrish, R.B. Jr.; Kircos, L.T.; Dolwick, M.F.

    1982-12-01

    Anterior displacement of the meniscus of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was diagnosed in nine patients who had undergone arthrography, and they were later examined with computed tomography (CT) to see if this modality could supplant arthrography in some patients with TMJ dysfunction. The anteriorly displaced menisci were visualizsed in all nine patients by using sagittal reformations and blink mode. Four of the nine patients had the diagnosis confirmed at surgery. The precise protocol for the CT examination and how to interpret it are discussed. We are optimistic that CT may replace TMJ arthrography in selected patients.

  14. Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: diagnosis by direct sagittal computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Manzione, J.V.; Katzberg, R.W.; Brodsky, G.L.; Seltzer, S.E.; Mellins, H.Z.

    1984-01-01

    The authors performed direct sagittal computed tomography (CT) on 4 cadaver temporomandibular joints (TMJ) and examined 51 TMJs in 47 patients clinically. The results were correlated with cadaver anatomical sections and clinical arthrographic findings. A fat plane between the bellies of the lateral pterygoid muscles, termed the ''lateral pterygoid fat pad,'' served as the anatomical basis for detection of internal derangements by CT. CT was 94% accurate in detecting meniscal derangements and 96% accurate in detecting degenerative arthritis. The authors suggest that CT rather than arthrography be employed as the primary TMJ imaging modality when internal derangement or arthritis is suspected.

  15. Clinical and MRI investigation of temporomandibular joint in major depressed patients

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, SLPC; Costa, ALF; Cruz, AD; Li, LM; de Almeida, SM

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to describe the clinical and MRI findings of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with major depressive disorders (MDDs) of the non-psychotic type. Methods 40 patients (80 TMJs) who were diagnosed as having MDDs were selected for this study. The clinical examination of the TMJs was conducted according to the research diagnostic criteria and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). The MRIs were obtained bilaterally in each patient with axial, parasagittal and paracoronal sections within a real-time dynamic sequence. Two trained oral radiologists assessed all images. For statistical analyses, Fisher's exact test and χ2 test were applied (α = 0.05). Results Migraine was reported in 52.5% of subjects. Considering disc position, statistically significant differences between opening patterns with and without alteration (p = 0.00) and between present and absent joint noises (p = 0.00) were found. Regarding muscular pain, patients with and without abnormalities in disc function and patients with and without abnormalities in disc position were not statistically significant (p = 0.42 and p = 0.40, respectively). Significant differences between mandibular pathway with and without abnormalities (p = 0.00) and between present and absent joint noises (p = 0.00) were observed. Conclusion Based on the preliminary results observed by clinical and MRI examination of the TMJ, no direct relationship could be determined between MDDs and TMDs. PMID:22517997

  16. The relationship between unilateral mandibular angle fracture and temporomandibular joint function.

    PubMed

    Baltrusaityte, Ausra; Surna, Algimantas; Pileicikiene, Gaivile; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Zilinskas, Juozas

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE. Aim of this study was to analyze relation of occlusal correction and alterations of temporomandibular joint function during treatment of unilateral mandibular fractures. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We compared 49 patients treated for unilateral mandibular fracture without occlusal correction with 21 patient treated for unilateral mandibular fracture along with early and consequent occlusal analysis and correction and with 49 control subjects. Patients' complaints, mandibular movements and occlusal parameters were evaluated during the period of healing. ZEBRIS ultrasound system (Jaw Motion Analyzer, Zebris Medical GmbH, Isny, Germany) was used for analysis of mandibular movements and T-Scan analyzer (Tekscan, Inc., Boston, MA, USA) was used for occlusal analysis. RESULTS. Findings of our study showed statistically significant (p<0.05) diminution of patients complaints, mandibular movement alterations and occlusal disturbances in patients who received occlusal correction during MF treatment if compared to patients treated without occlusal correction, except noises from the joint in the injured side and mandibular lateral track to the injured side in the final stage of investigation. Despite applied treatment recovery of the TMJ function was not complete and the investigated parameters remained worse if compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS. Results of this study confirmed positive influence of early and subsequent occlusal analysis and correction during stages of MF treatment on diminution of functional alterations of the temporomandibular joint function. Timely occlusal correction improves and hastens process of rehabilitation therefore it is indispensable part of MF treatment. PMID:25471992

  17. Gene Expression Profiling of IL-17A-Treated Synovial Fibroblasts from the Human Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Toshio; Ogura, Naomi; Akutsu, Miwa; Kawashima, Mutsumi; Watanabe, Suguru; Ito, Ko; Kondoh, Toshirou

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fibroblasts contribute to the inflammatory temporomandibular joint under pathogenic stimuli. Synovial fibroblasts and T cells participate in the perpetuation of joint inflammation in a mutual activation feedback, via secretion of cytokines and chemokines that stimulate each other. IL-17 is an inflammatory cytokine produced primarily by Th17 cells which plays critical role in the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here, we investigated the roles of IL-17A in temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) using genome-wide analysis of synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with TMD. IL-17 receptors were expressed in synovial fibroblasts as assessed using real-time PCR. Microarray analysis indicated that IL-17A treatment of synovial fibroblasts upregulated the expression of IL-6 and chemokines. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the gene expression of IL-6, CXCL1, IL-8, and CCL20 was significantly higher in IL-17A-treated synovial fibroblasts compared to nontreated controls. IL-6 protein production was increased by IL-17A in a time- and a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, IL-17A simulated IL-6 protein production in synovial fibroblasts samples isolated from three patients. Furthermore, signal inhibitor experiments indicated that IL-17-mediated induction of IL-6 was transduced via activation of NFκB and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt. These results suggest that IL-17A is associated with the inflammatory progression of TMD. PMID:26839464

  18. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis as part of the clinical spectrum of Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome?

    PubMed

    Pasetti, Martina; Mazzoleni, Fabio; Novelli, Giorgio; Iascone, Maria; Bozzetti, Alberto; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    The Carey-Finema-Ziter syndrome (CFZS, MIM 254940) is an apparently autosomal recessively inherited disorder consisting of the combination of non-progressive congenital myopathy with Moebius and Pierre Robin sequence, facial anomalies and growth delay. Mental development has been described as normal or delayed. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is the immobility of the joint caused by ankylotic fusion of the mandible to the cranial base or zygoma. It is a serious and disabling condition that may cause problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and oral hygiene. Most often is a true ankylosis of the TMJ but other pathological mechanisms are described (i.e., the fusion of the coronoid process to temporal bone or with the zygoma, or a variety of soft tissues disorders like Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva). Here we report a 2-year-old girl fitting with a clinical diagnosis of CFZS associated with a limited mouth opening in which temporomandibular joint ankylosis was suspected. Because it has been postulated that many clinical features in CFZS may only be secondary effects of brainstem anomalies and muscle weakness during development, the limited opening of the mouth observed in our patient could represent a rare clinical feature of CFZS itself. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27232676

  19. Stress Analysis of Anterior-Disc-Displaced Temporomandibular Joint Using Individual Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masao; Tanaka, Eiji; Todoh, Masahiro; Asai, Daisuke; Kuroda, Yukiko

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder relates to the biomechanical irregularity of the structual joint components, and the behavior of soft tissue components is considered as a key to understand the biomechanical condition in the TMJ. The configuration of joint components, however, closely depends on individual patients. In this study, attention has been focused on the stress and displacement of irregular TMJs with anterior disc displacement. Using biplane magnetic resonance (MR) images, typical anterior-disc-displaced (ADD) TMJ of a patient with temporomandibular disorder has been modeled individually. The stress distribution in ADD TMJs has been compared with that in normal TMJs. Parameter studies with the elastic modulus have been carried out and it revealed that the stress distribution in the TMJ is highly dependent on the connective tissue modulus as well as disc modulus in the case of ADD TMJ, and that the disc displacement due to mouth opening movement depends on disc modulus in normal TMJ but depends on retrodiscal connective tissue in ADD TMJ.

  20. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Connective tissue variations in skin biopsy and mitral valve function.

    PubMed

    Westling, L; Holm, S; Wallentin, I

    1992-12-01

    Ten women with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and general joint hypermobility (score, 4 to 8) and 10 symptom-free female volunteers without systemic laxity (score, 0 to 2) were selected for the study. A biopsy of connective tissue from arm skin found that the total collagen concentrations were lower and the proteoglycan values were higher in the hypermobile TMJ patients than in the control subjects. The mitral region of the heart was inspected by echocardiography. Eight patients and four controls had slightly abnormal echocardiographic findings. Two patients fulfilled the criteria for mitral valve prolapse. The patients had significantly more musculoskeletal complaints than did the controls. The study suggests an association between joint hypermobility, abnormal skin connective tissue composition, mitral valve malfunction, and musculoskeletal disorders in young women with TMJ dysfunction, especially internal derangement. PMID:1488224

  1. Fracture of the articular disc in the temporomandibular joint: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    An, S-Y

    2015-01-01

    Disc fracture of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a little-known pathological condition owing to its extreme rarity. We report two cases of elderly patients who were diagnosed with disc fracture of the TMJ based on MRI, and we review related reports. On physical examination, an incomplete bite and mild joint pain were observed on the affected side in both patients. An MRI showed a complete fracture in the intermediate zone of the articular disc in the TMJ; the posterior fragment was displaced posteriorly, causing occlusal change in the closed position of the condyle and an incomplete bite. Conservative treatment including manual manipulation, physical therapy and oral appliance had no effect on the occlusal abnormality. Although the inciting cause of the disc fracture remained unclear, the degenerative changes in the joint may have been a factor by increasing the brittleness and reducing the elasticity of the disc. PMID:25308829

  2. Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint meniscus: contrast arthrography vs. computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Sauser, D.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A prospective study to determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) meniscus was made by performing both CT and contrast arthrography on 18 joints suspected of meniscus dislocation. Arthography rather than surgery was chosen as the quality standard for comparing CT findings, as not all patients undergoing the studies underwent surgery. The results of each test were reported independently by the radiologist who obtained either all of the arthograms or all of the CT scans. For dislocation of the meniscus, there were excellent agreement between the two methods. CT seems to be nearly as accurate as arthrography for showing meniscus dislocation, is performed with lower x-ray exposure, and is noninvasive. Arthrograpy discloses more detailed information about the joint meniscus, such as perforation and maceration, and should continue to be used when this kind of information is clinically important.

  3. Arthroscopic eminoplasty for habitual dislocation of the temporomandibular joint: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Segami, N; Kaneyama, K; Tsurusako, S; Suzuki, T

    1999-12-01

    A unique surgical technique, arthroscopic eminoplasty was undertaken in 16 joints of 11 patients with habitual dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). There were 10 joints with subluxation and 6 joints with complete dislocation in 4 male and 7 female patients with a mean age of 33 +/- 20 years. The procedure consisted of conventional diagnostic arthroscopy, followed by shaving of approximately 3 to 5 mm in height of the articular eminence with an electric motorized shaver with bone files, depending on the bone thickness as detected by preoperative imaging. The arthroscopic eminoplasty was accomplished without any peri- or postoperative complication. During the postoperative follow-up period of 19 months on average (6-36 months), all patients were free of dislocation of the TMJ, except for one joint. The patients could open their mouth 42 +/- 6 mm without arthralgia 2 weeks after surgery, and finally 47 +/- 7 mm without any subjective symptom but small joint noises (clicking or crepitus) in 10 joints. On postoperative radiographs only minor changes of the mandibular condyle were apparent in four joints. Arthroscopic eminoplasty might become a significant procedure for habitual dislocation of the TMJ and seems to produce results comparable to open arthrotomy. Further study will be required to assess this method as an acceptable modality in the future. PMID:10870759

  4. Effectiveness of a Home Exercise Program in Combination with Ultrasound Therapy for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Mehmet; Sarp, Ümit; Koca, İrfan; Eroğlu, Selma; Yetisgin, Alparslan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Boyacı, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effectiveness of home exercise alone versus home exercise combined with ultrasound for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders. [Subjects and Methods] This study enrolled 23 female and 15 male patients who were divided randomly into two groups. The home exercise group performed a home exercise program consisting of an exercise program and patient education, and the home exercise combined with ultrasound group received ultrasound therapy in addition to the home exercise program. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Pain free maximum mouth opening was evaluated at baseline and 2 weeks after the treatment. [Results] There was no difference between the two groups in baseline values. After the treatment, the visual analogue scale decreased and pain free maximum mouth opening scores improved significantly in each group. Additionally, both values were higher in the home exercise combined with ultrasound group than in the home exercise group. [Conclusion] The combination of home exercise combined with ultrasound appears to be more effective at providing pain relief and increasing mouth opening than does home exercise alone for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders. PMID:25540479

  5. Differential Diagnostics of Pain in the Course of Trigeminal Neuralgia and Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pihut, M.; Szuta, M.; Ferendiuk, E.; Zeńczak-Więckiewicz, D.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic oral and facial pain syndromes are an indication for intervention of physicians of numerous medical specialties, while the complex nature of these complaints warrants interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Oftentimes, lack of proper differentiation of pain associated with pathological changes of the surrounding tissues, neurogenic pain, vascular pain, or radiating pain from idiopathic facial pain leads to improper treatment. The objective of the paper is to provide detailed characterization of pain developing in the natural history of trigeminal neuralgia and temporomandibular joint dysfunction, with particular focus on similarities accounting for the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment as well as on differences between both types of pain. It might seem that trigeminal neuralgia can be easily differentiated from temporomandibular joint dysfunction due to the acute, piercing, and stabbing nature of neuralgic pain occurring at a single facial location to spread along the course of the nerve on one side, sometimes a dozen or so times a day, without forewarning periods. Both forms differ significantly in the character and intensity of pain. The exact analysis of the nature, intensity, and duration of pain may be crucial for the differential diagnostics of the disorders of our interest. PMID:24995309

  6. Is there a niche for arthroscopic laser surgery of the temporomandibular joint?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Hering, Peter; Bachmaier, Uli; Schiessl, Robert; Rueschoff, Josef; Meister, Joerg

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare effects of currently available laser systems at different wavelengths (XeCl excimer laser, Holmium:YAG laser, Erbium:YAG laser) on porcine articulating facets, capsule and meniscus of the temporomandibular joint via photomacroscopy, light and scanning electron microscopy. From a critical review of the relevant literature and the preliminary observations of this investigation, it appears that the Neodymium:YAG laser is inappropriate for TMJ arthroscopic surgery with regard to the huge thermal injury caused to the remaining tissue. The Holmium:YAG laser suffers from remarkable photomechanical and photothermal side effects, whereas the Erbium:YAG laser ablates temporomandibular joint tissue efficiently with minimal adjacent damage--similar to the XeCl excimer laser, without entailing the risk of potential mutagenity. To sum up, it can be concluded that there is a clinical need for laser- assisted arthroscopic surgery of the craniomandibular articulation. Nevertheless, at present none of the available laser systems meet the medical demands completely. Currently, the Erbium:YAG laser seems to be the most suitable for TMJ arthroscopic surgery.

  7. Differential diagnostics of pain in the course of trigeminal neuralgia and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pihut, M; Szuta, M; Ferendiuk, E; Zeńczak-Więckiewicz, D

    2014-01-01

    Chronic oral and facial pain syndromes are an indication for intervention of physicians of numerous medical specialties, while the complex nature of these complaints warrants interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Oftentimes, lack of proper differentiation of pain associated with pathological changes of the surrounding tissues, neurogenic pain, vascular pain, or radiating pain from idiopathic facial pain leads to improper treatment. The objective of the paper is to provide detailed characterization of pain developing in the natural history of trigeminal neuralgia and temporomandibular joint dysfunction, with particular focus on similarities accounting for the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment as well as on differences between both types of pain. It might seem that trigeminal neuralgia can be easily differentiated from temporomandibular joint dysfunction due to the acute, piercing, and stabbing nature of neuralgic pain occurring at a single facial location to spread along the course of the nerve on one side, sometimes a dozen or so times a day, without forewarning periods. Both forms differ significantly in the character and intensity of pain. The exact analysis of the nature, intensity, and duration of pain may be crucial for the differential diagnostics of the disorders of our interest. PMID:24995309

  8. Dexmedetomidine premedication for fiberoptic intubation in patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kumkum; Jain, Manish; Gupta, Prashant K.; Rastogi, Bhawna; Saxena, Sanjeev K.; Manngo, Aman

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fiberoptic intubation is the gold standard technique for difficult airway management in patients of temporomandibular joint. This study was aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine as premedication with propofol infusion for fiberoptic intubation. Methods: Consent was obtained from 46 adult patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis, scheduled for gap arthroplasty. They were enrolled for thisdouble-blind, randomized, prospective clinical trial with two treatment groups – Group D and Group P, of 23 patients each. Group D patients had received premedication of dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg infused over 10 min followed by sedative propofol infusion and the control Group P patients were given only propofol infusion to achieve sedation. Condition achieved at endoscopy, intubating conditions, hemodynamic changes and postoperative events were evaluated as primary outcome. Results: The fiberoptic intubation was successful with satisfactory endoscopic and intubating condition in all patients. Dexmedetomidine premedication has provided satisfactory conditions for fiberoptic intubation and attenuated the hemodynamic response of fiberoptic intubation than the propofol group. Conclusion: Fiberoptic intubation was found to be easier with dexmedetomidine premedication along with sedative infusion of propofol with complete amnesia of the procedure, hemodynamic stability and preservation of patent airway. PMID:23162393

  9. Long-term stability of conservative orthodontic treatment in a patient with temporomandibular joint disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Silvia Naomi; Yasue, Akihiro; Kuroda, Shingo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the orthodontic treatment of a 20-year-old patient with dental crowding and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). The patient presented moderate anterior crowding with a Class I molar relationship and masticatory disturbance in the mandibular position induced by previous splint therapy. Orthodontic treatment with multi-bracket appliance was initiated to correct the anterior crowding in both dental arches, after the extraction of first premolars and third molars, and also to maintain the splint-induced position of the condyles. After 26 months of treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved without any TMD symptoms. After 18-month retention, flattening on the right condyle was observed, possibly as an adaptative remodeling. After 16-year retention period, the occlusion was maintained without recurrence of any TMD symptoms, indicating a long-term stability of occlusion and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) components. Our results suggest the possibility of compromised treatment in patients with TMD to achieve a long-term stability in occlusion and TMJ function. PMID:27556023

  10. Long-term stability of conservative orthodontic treatment in a patient with temporomandibular joint disorder.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Silvia Naomi; Yasue, Akihiro; Kuroda, Shingo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the orthodontic treatment of a 20-year-old patient with dental crowding and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). The patient presented moderate anterior crowding with a Class I molar relationship and masticatory disturbance in the mandibular position induced by previous splint therapy. Orthodontic treatment with multi-bracket appliance was initiated to correct the anterior crowding in both dental arches, after the extraction of first premolars and third molars, and also to maintain the splint-induced position of the condyles. After 26 months of treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved without any TMD symptoms. After 18-month retention, flattening on the right condyle was observed, possibly as an adaptative remodeling. After 16-year retention period, the occlusion was maintained without recurrence of any TMD symptoms, indicating a long-term stability of occlusion and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) components. Our results suggest the possibility of compromised treatment in patients with TMD to achieve a long-term stability in occlusion and TMJ function. PMID:27556023

  11. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of the temporomandibular joints of professional violin and viola players.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M

    1995-04-01

    The frequency of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of professional violin and viola players was investigated in 26 orchestra violinists/violists (VP group) and in their sex-, age-, and dentition-matched controls (C group). A routine clinical stomatognathic examination, a standardized interview, and radiography of the condyles were carried out for all subjects. The VP group showed a higher frequency of subjective symptoms and clinical signs of TMD, such as palpatory tenderness of masticatory muscles, TMJ clicking, painful mandibular movements, and deviation on opening or closing. There was no difference between the groups in terms of radiologic findings in the condyles. Weekly playing hours correlated positively with some signs of TMD. It is concluded that professional violin or viola playing might be a predisposing factor for TMD. PMID:7610780

  12. Custom Anatomical 3D Spacer for Temporomandibular Joint Resection and Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Green, John Marshall; Lawson, Sarah T; Liacouras, Peter C; Wise, Edward M; Gentile, Michael A; Grant, Gerald Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Two cases are presented using a two-stage approach and a custom antibiotic spacer placement. Temporomandibular reconstruction can be very demanding and accomplished with a variety of methods in preparation of a total joint and ramus reconstruction with total joint prostheses (TMJ Concepts, Ventura, CA). Three-dimensional reconstructions from diagnostic computed tomography were used to establish a virtually planned resection which included the entire condyle-ramus complex. From these data, digital designs were used to manufacture molds to facilitate intraoperative fabrication of precise custom anatomic spacers from rapidly setting antibiotic-impregnated polymethyl methacrylate. Molds were manufactured using vat polymerization (stereolithography) with a photopolymer in the first case and powder bed fusion (electron beam melting) with Ti6AL4V for the second. Surgical methodology and the use of molds for intraoperative spacer fabrication for each case are discussed. PMID:26889353

  13. Estrogen receptors in the temporomandibular joint of the baboon (Papio cynocephalus): an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdemorte, T.B.; Van Sickels, J.E.; Dolwick, M.F.; Sheridan, P.J.; Holt, G.R.; Aragon, S.B.; Gates, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Using an autoradiographic method, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) complex of five aged female baboons was studied for the presence of receptors for estradiol-17 beta. The study was performed in an effort to learn more of the pathophysiology of this joint and in an attempt to provide a scientific basis to explain the reported preponderance of women who seek and undergo treatment for signs and symptoms referable to the TMJ. This experiment revealed that the TMJ complex contains numerous cells with receptors for estrogen, particularly the articular surface of the condyle, articular disk, and capsule. Muscles of mastication contained relatively fewer receptors. As a result, one may postulate a role for the sex steroid hormones in the maintenance, repair, and/or pathogenesis of the TMJ. Additional studies are necessary to fully determine the significance of hormone receptors in this site and any correlation between diseases of the TMJ and the endocrine status of affected patients.

  14. Ankylosis of temporomandibular joint caused by psoriatic arthritis: a report of four cases with literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi Hui; Zhao, Yan Ping; Ma, Xu Chen

    2014-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis. PsA is often confused with other diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PsA involving temporomandibular joints (TMJs) are uncommon: only 19 articles with 43 cases have been documented in the literature. TMJ ankylosis caused by PsA is rare, with only six cases having been reported. The authors present four cases of ankylosis of the TMJ secondary to PsA and review the literature. The findings of this study suggest that more attention should be paid to psoriasis patients with TMJ symptoms and proper treatment should be taken to prevent irreversible TMJ damage. PMID:25028690

  15. [Computed tomography investigation of temporomandibular joint in surgery of dento-maxillary anomalies].

    PubMed

    Popescu, M A; Dincă, O; Bucur, A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in the temporomandibular joint morphology, regarding the relation between mandibular condyle and fossa, after bilateral sagittal split osteotomy in Angle class III dentomaxillary anomalies. Preserving the preoperative position of the condyle during sagittal split osteotomy is considered important to obtain skeletal and occlusal stability. Cone-beam computed tomography of 20 class III patients with mandibular prognathism were assessed before and 6 weeks after operation to evaluate changes of the condylar position. We propose a protocol for head posture and computed tomography investigation, which makes possible the comparison between cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in different moments at the same patient. There are no significant changes after bilateral sagittal split osteotomy regarding joint relations. PMID:19943558

  16. Temporomandibular joint arthrography: a comparison between a fluoroscopic and a nonfluoroscopic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, B.W.; Langlais, R.P.; Abramovitch, K.

    1989-05-01

    A nonfluoroscopic temporomandibular joint arthrographic technique is contrasted with a more widely employed fluoroscopically guided technique. The nonfluoroscopic technique uses a posterior approach to joint injection, as contrasted with the lateral injection approach of the fluoroscopically guided technique. The advantages of the nonfluoroscopic technique are less radiation dose to the patient, less expensive and less sophisticated imaging equipment, and less potential for neurovascular trauma. The fluoroscopic technique offers greater control of the procedure, less patient and operator time, and the capability for a dynamic videofluoroscopic study. Both techniques appear to be safe and efficacious. Differences in anatomy, imaging modalities, patient radiation exposure, and potential complications are also discussed as part of this comparison.48 references.

  17. TNF Accelerates Death of Mandibular Condyle Chondrocytes in Rats with Biomechanical Stimulation-Induced Temporomandibular Joint Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Lei; Liao, Lifan; Wang, Meiqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if temporomandibular joint chondrocyte apoptosis is induced in rats with dental biomechanical stimulation and what a role TNF takes. Methods Thirty-two rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 8/group) and exposed to incisor mal-occlusion induced by unilateral anterior crossbite biomechanical stimulation. Two groups were sampled at 2 or 4 weeks. The other two groups were treated with local injections of a TNF inhibitor or PBS into the temporomandibular joints area at 2 weeks and then sampled at 4 weeks. Twenty-four rats either served as unilateral anterior crossbite mock operation controls (n = 8/group) with sampling at 2 or 4 weeks or received a local injection of the TNF inhibitor at 2 weeks with sampling at 4 weeks. Chondrocytes were isolated from the temporomandibular joints of 6 additional rats and treated with TNF in vitro. Joint samples were assessed using Hematoxylin&eosin, Safranin O, TUNEL and immunohistochemistry staining, real-time PCR, fluorogenic activity assays and Western blot analyses. The isolated chondrocytes were also analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation led to temporomandibular joint cartilage degradation, associated with an increase in TUNEL-positive chondrocytes number, caspase-9 expression levels, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria at 2 weeks without changes in TNF and caspase-8 levels until after 4 weeks. TNF stimulated apoptosis of the isolated chondrocytes and up-regulated caspase-8 expression, but did not change caspase-9 expression levels. Local injection of TNF inhibitor down-regulated caspase-8 expression and reduced TUNEL-positive cell number, but did not reverse cartilage thickness reduction, caspase-9 up-regulation or cytochrome c release. Conclusions Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation induces mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis of articular chondrocytes. TNF accelerated the unilateral anterior crossbite induced chondrocytes apoptosis via death

  18. A model to simulate the mastication motion at the temporomandibular joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamil, Marta B.; Nedel, Luciana P.; Freitas, Carla M. D. S.; Maciel, Anderson

    2005-04-01

    The understanding of the mastication system motion is essential to maxillofacial surgeons and dentists in the procedures concerning jaw and teeth corrections. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ), despite its complexity, is one of the most frequently used joints of the human body. The incidence of a great number of injuries in this joint is influenced not only by its regular use during the mastication, but also by the strong forces applied by the muscles and the wide range of movements it is capable to perform. In this work, we propose the development of a jaw simulator capable of reproducing the complete mastication movement. Our jaw simulator is basically composed by three triangle meshes representing the 3D model of the cranium, mandible and teeth; and an anatomically-based joint model conceived to represent the TMJ motion. The polygonal meshes describing the bones and teeth are obtained from CT images and the jaw motion is simulated using the joint model guided by a 3D motion curve obtained from the composition of the standard 2D curves available in the medical literature. The scale, height and width of these original curves are modified to simulate different kind and size of food and to represent the movements" variability depending on patient morphology (teeth, bones, joints and muscles). The evaluation of preliminary results involved the comparison of a dynamic MRI of a healthy person with the respective simulation.

  19. A simple technique for the distraction and mobilization of the temporomandibular joint condyle in nonreducing disk derangements.

    PubMed

    Harkins, S J; Marteney, J L; Cueva, L

    1987-11-01

    The clothespin traction technique described in this article is simple, inexpensive, and offers high patient compliance when used by the patient outside the clinic. This procedure may be effective in recapturing nonreducible disks and regaining range of motion in hypomobile temporomandibular joints. PMID:3479559

  20. Radiologic Techniques Used to Evaluate the Temporomandibular Joint; I. Conventional Methods

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, David; Pettigrew, James; Ram, Carol; Joseph, Peter M.

    1984-01-01

    Symptoms of temporomandibular joint pathology are present in a relatively high proportion of the population. Conventional radiographic techniques used to evaluate the morphology of the joint provide data which may be difficult to interpret. These techniques are reviewed briefly and their interpretational shortcomings are noted. Computed tomography is currently being used by some clinicians to evaluate the joint. This technique may also yield data which are difficult to interpret. Extended processing of CT data to provide three-dimensional images of the joint enhances the technique as a means of diagnosing hard tissue pathology, but despite reports in the literature detailing its use in diagnosing soft tissue pathology, CT is not optimal for this purpose. The introduction of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging provides a means of examining the soft tissues of the joint in either two- or three-dimensional images and has the advantage over all previous techniques in that the patient is not subjected to ionizing radiation during the scan process. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:6594954

  1. Using interactive multi-media to teach the anatomy and pathology of the temporo-mandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Demirjian, A; David, B

    1995-01-01

    An interactive multi-media courseware on the Temporo-mandibular Joint is presented. All the latest technological innovations are integrated into this document to make the learning process more enjoyable for the user. We believe that the complex anatomy and physiology of this joint, and mostly its various disorders will be better understood with this interactive multi-media approach. The courseware is intended for continuing education in dentistry and medicine. PMID:8591428

  2. Identification of prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 in the synovial fluid of painful, dysfunctional temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Quinn, J H; Bazan, N G

    1990-09-01

    It has been hypothesized that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) should be present in the synovial fluid of inflamed, dysfunctional temporomandibular joints. An assay to identify PGE2 and LTB4 and platelet-activating factor (PAF) was used, and a strong correlation between the levels of these lipid mediators of pain and inflammation and an index of clinical joint pathology was found. PMID:2168477

  3. Magnetic Resonance Image Evaluation of Temporomandibular Joint Osteophytes: Influence of Clinical Factors and Artrogenics Changes.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Eduardo; Remedi, Marcelo Pereira; Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2016-03-01

    This research aims to examine the presence of osteophyte in patients with arthrogenic temporomandibular disorders through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); to investigate the influence of sex and clinical symptoms in its prevalence; and the position of the osteophytes in the condyle. The study was based on 100 MRI and on reports of patients, which corresponded to the evaluation of 200 joints. Patients of both sexes were aged from 18 to 82 years (average = 49.48) and were subjected to the aforementioned examination from January 2006 to March 2009. The assessment considered the type of disc displacement, the presence of effusion, bone marrow edema, condyle changes, joint noise and pain. The MRI machine used was the GE Signa HDX (General Electric, Milwaukee, WI), with T1 and T2-weighted, 1.5 T magnetic field, sagittal oblique (mouth closed, mouth open) and coronal (mouth closed) imaging, with spherical surface coil and an asymmetric matrix. All images were interpreted by an experienced radiologist. A total of 28% (n = 56) of the temporomandibular joints showed osteophytes on the anterior surface of the mandible. No relationship was found between sex and osteophytes. The authors found a statistically significant difference between osteophytes and disc displacement without reduction (P < 0.001). The presence of osteophytes suggested a possible cause and effect relationship between osteoarthritis and disc displacement without reduction; the osteophyte was always located in the anterior surface of condyle, regardless of the sex variable; no significant difference was found between osteophytes and the main complaints of the patient. PMID:26825745

  4. Viscoelastic properties of the pig temporomandibular joint articular soft tissues of the condyle and disc.

    PubMed

    Kuboki, T; Shinoda, M; Orsini, M G; Yamashita, A

    1997-11-01

    It has been suggested that a sustained loading condition such as clenching could compress the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articular soft tissues. However, there is still no clear understanding of how the TM joint articular tissues respond under compression. To answer this question, we performed in vitro indentation tests on fresh articular discs and cartilage-bone systems of the condyles of 10 Yorkshire pigs (aged 7 months) using a self-developed indentation tester. The indenter was 5 mm in diameter and was controlled by means of a computer-aided feedback mechanism. Bilateral condyles from the same mandible were uniformly prepared; one was used for measurements under sustained compression (SC) and the other for measurements under intermittent compression (IC). The displacements of the indenter induced by a SC of 10, 20, and 30 Newtons (N, units of force) for 10 min and by an IC, also of 10, 20, and 30 N, with one-second duration and two-second intervals for 10 min were measured by means of a displacement sensor with a resolution of 0.001 mm. From these data, the indentation curves of the articular discs and the cartilage-bone systems were calculated. Both the disc and the articular cartilage showed characteristic displacement vs. time curves-namely, an instantaneous deformation upon load application, followed by a time-dependent creep phase of asymptotically increasing deformation under constant load. However, the indentation curves of the two tissues were not identical: The deformation of the articular cartilage was dose-dependent, but that of the disc was not. Moreover, the articular cartilage deformed significantly less under IC than under SC. This difference was not found in the disc. It can be concluded that both the disc and the articular cartilage of the pig temporomandibular joint have viscoelastic properties against compression; however, the disc is stiffer than the articular cartilage. PMID:9372793

  5. Chitosan-Based Thermosensitive Hydrogel for Controlled Drug Delivery to the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Talaat, Wael M; Haider, Mohamed; Kawas, Sausan Al; Kandil, Nadia G; Harding, David R K

    2016-05-01

    Intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) and corticosteroids have been extensively used in treating temporomandibular disorders. However, rapid clearance from the site of injection is a major concern that is commonly managed by frequent dosing, which is not without complications. This study aimed to determine the suitability of thermosensitive chitosan-based hydrogels for intra-articular controlled release of drugs in the rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A series of hydrogels were prepared using different chitosan (Ch) to β-glycerophosphate (β-GP) ratios. The gelation time, swelling ratio, the shape, and surface morphology of the prepared gels were investigated to select the formulation with optimum characteristics. The left TMJ in 13 adult male New Zealand white rabbits was injected with 0.2 mL of Chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/HA while the right TMJ was injected with 0.2 mL of control solution of HA. Hyaluronic acid concentrations in experimental and control groups were measured using Hyaluronan Quantikine Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Kit. In vitro characterization showed that both the Ch:β-GP ratio and incorporation of HA had a significant effect on gelation time, degree of swelling, and surface morphology of the hydrogels. No morphological changes were observed in the joints in both groups. The mean concentration of HA in the experimental joints after 7 days (1339.79 ± 244.98 μg/g) was significantly higher than that in the control (474.52 ± 79.36 μg/g). In conclusion, the chitosan-based thermosensitive hydrogel can be considered as a promising controlled drug release system to the TMJ in a rabbit model that would potentially overcome many of the current limitations of intra-articular formulations. PMID:27100649

  6. Impact of functional mandibular advancement appliances on the temporomandibular joint - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ivorra-Carbonell, Laura; Montiel-Company, José-María; Almerich-Silla, José-Manuel; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Background Although many orthodontists have no doubts about the effectiveness of functional appliances for mandibular advancement, the impact on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is still in dispute. The objective of this systematic review is to examine the main effects on the TMJ of using functional appliances, both in healthy patients and in patients with a pre-existing disorder. Material and Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Only systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), case-control studies and cohort studies were included. A detailed language-independent electronic search was conducted in the Pubmed, Scopus, Cochrane Library and Embase databases. All studies published between 2000 and 2015 were included. Results A total of 401 articles were identified. Of these, 159 were duplicates and were excluded. On reading the title and abstract, 213 articles were excluded because they did not answer the research question, leaving a total of 29 articles. These articles were read and assessed. Following critical reading of the full text, eight articles were excluded: seven because they were considered of low quality and one because it published redundant data. As a result, 21 articles were included. Conclusions After treatment with functional appliances, the condyle was found to be in a more advanced position, with remodelling of the condyle and adaptation of the morphology of the glenoid fossa. No significant adverse effects on the TMJ were observed in healthy patients and the appliances could improve joints that initially presented forward dislocation of the disk. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, TMJ, orthodontic appliances, functional, mandibular advancement, herbst appliance, bionator. PMID:27475694

  7. Engineered microporosity: enhancing the early regenerative potential of decellularized temporomandibular joint discs.

    PubMed

    Juran, Cassandra M; Dolwick, M Franklin; McFetridge, Peter S

    2015-02-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is susceptible to numerous pathologies that may lead to structural degradation and jaw dysfunction. The limited treatment options and debilitating nature of severe temporomandibular disorders has been the primary driving force for the introduction and development of TMJ disc tissue engineering as an approach to alleviate this important clinical issue. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of laser micropatterning (LMP) ex vivo-derived TMJ disc scaffolds to enhance cellular integration, a major limitation to the development of whole tissue implant technology. LMP was incorporated into the decellularized extracellular matrix scaffold structure using a 40 W CO2 laser ablation system to drill an 8×16 pattern with a bore diameter of 120 μm through the scaffold thickness. Disc scaffolds were seeded with human neonatal-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into chondrocytes at a density of 900 cells per mm(2) and then assessed on days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of culture. Results derived from histology, PicoGreen DNA quantification, and cellular metabolism assays indicate that the LMP scaffolds improve cellular remodeling compared to the unworked scaffold over the 21-day culture period. Mechanical analysis further supports the use of the LMP showing the compressive properties of the LMP constructs closely represent native disc mechanics. The addition of an artificial path of infiltration by LMP culminated in improved chondrocyte adhesion, dispersion, and migration after extended culture aiding in recapitulating the native TMJ disc characteristics. PMID:25319941

  8. BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE SUBCATEGORIES OF ACUTE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS*

    PubMed Central

    Dougall, Angela Liegey; Jimenez, Carmen A.; Haggard, Robbie A.; Stowell, Anna W.; Riggs, Richard R.; Gatchel, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to assess the biopsychosocial factors associated with acute temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) based upon the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Methods Participants were assessed in community-based dental clinics, and evaluated by trained clinicians on physical and psychosocial measures. A total of 207 subjects were evaluated. Patients’ high-risk versus low-risk status for potentially developing chronic TMD was also determined. Analyses of variance and chi square analyses were applied to these data. Results Participants’ characteristic pain intensity differed among RDC/TMD Axis I diagnoses. They also significantly varied in their: self-reported graded chronic pain; depression; somatization, pain inclusive; somatization, pain excluded, and physical well-being. In addition, participants with differing RDC/TMD Axis I diagnoses varied in self-reported pain during their chewing performance. Finally, there were also significant differences in chewing performance between high-risk vs. low-risk (for developing chronic TMD) patients. Conclusions Participants with multiple diagnoses reported higher pain, as well as other symptoms, relative to participants without a TMD diagnosis. For chewing performance, participants with mutual diagnoses reported more pain compared to other participants. Finally, the risk-status of patients significantly affected chewing performance. PMID:22292135

  9. Engineered Microporosity: Enhancing the Early Regenerative Potential of Decellularized Temporomandibular Joint Discs

    PubMed Central

    Juran, Cassandra M.; Dolwick, M. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is susceptible to numerous pathologies that may lead to structural degradation and jaw dysfunction. The limited treatment options and debilitating nature of severe temporomandibular disorders has been the primary driving force for the introduction and development of TMJ disc tissue engineering as an approach to alleviate this important clinical issue. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of laser micropatterning (LMP) ex vivo-derived TMJ disc scaffolds to enhance cellular integration, a major limitation to the development of whole tissue implant technology. LMP was incorporated into the decellularized extracellular matrix scaffold structure using a 40 W CO2 laser ablation system to drill an 8×16 pattern with a bore diameter of 120 μm through the scaffold thickness. Disc scaffolds were seeded with human neonatal-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into chondrocytes at a density of 900 cells per mm2 and then assessed on days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of culture. Results derived from histology, PicoGreen DNA quantification, and cellular metabolism assays indicate that the LMP scaffolds improve cellular remodeling compared to the unworked scaffold over the 21-day culture period. Mechanical analysis further supports the use of the LMP showing the compressive properties of the LMP constructs closely represent native disc mechanics. The addition of an artificial path of infiltration by LMP culminated in improved chondrocyte adhesion, dispersion, and migration after extended culture aiding in recapitulating the native TMJ disc characteristics. PMID:25319941

  10. A retrospective study of temporomandibular joint ankylosis secondary to surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guo-lin; Long, Xing; Deng, Mo-hong; Han, Qian-chao; Meng, Qing-gong; Li, Bo

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the incidence of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) after open operations for fractures of the mandibular condyle, and analysed possible risk factors in a total of 385 patients with 492 condylar fractures who had been operated on in our department from 2001 to 2010. Sixteen patients developed postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ with 26 joints (5%) affected during a follow-up of 6 months-10 years. Of the 492 condylar fractures, the most common ones that were associated with postoperative ankylosis were those of the condylar head (20/248), followed by the condylar neck (6/193). Subcondylar fractures did not cause postoperative ankylosis (0/51). Among the 16 patients with postoperative ankylosis, 13 had associated anterior mandibular fractures. Long-screw (bicortical screw) fixation of fractures of the condylar head seemed to be associated with a lower incidence of postoperative ankylosis than fixation by miniplate and wire or removal of the fractured fragment. The articular discs were damaged in all ankylosed joints, and the remaining fractured fragment was found in 10 ankylosed joints after fractures of the condylar head. The results suggest that fractures of the condylar head are more prone to lead to postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ, and that the possible risk factors seem to include the technique used for fixation and damage to the disc, together with an anterior mandibular fracture with the fractured fragment remaining. PMID:24485809

  11. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Review of Etiology, Clinical Management, and Tissue Engineering Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Meghan K.; MacBarb, Regina F.; Wong, Mark E.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology reports state temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) affect up to 25% of the population, yet their etiology and progression are poorly understood. As a result, treatment options are limited and fail to meet the long-term demands of the relatively young patient population. TMD are a class of degenerative musculoskeletal conditions associated with morphological and functional deformities. In up to 70% of cases, TMD are accompanied by malpositioning of the TMJ disc, termed “internal derangement.” Though onset is not well characterized, correlations between internal derangement and osteoarthritic change have been identified. Due to the complex and unique nature of each TMD case, diagnosis requires patient-specific analysis accompanied by various diagnostic modalities. Likewise, treatment requires customized plans to address the specific characteristics of each patient’s disease. In the mechanically demanding and biochemically active environment of the TMJ, therapeutic approaches capable of restoring joint functionality while responding to changes in the joint have become a necessity. Capable of integration and adaptation in the TMJ, one such approach, tissue engineering, carries significant potential in the development of repair and replacement tissues. The following review presents a synopsis of etiology, current treatment methods, and the future of tissue engineering for repairing and/or replacing diseased joint components, specifically the mandibular condyle and TMJ disc. Preceding the current trends in tissue engineering is an analysis of native tissue characterization, toward identifying tissue engineering objectives and validation metrics for restoring healthy and functional structures of the TMJ. PMID:24278954

  12. Iatrogenic arteriovenous fistula of the superficial temporal artery after manual reduction of temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Takasato, Yoshio

    2011-09-01

    A 33-year-old man fell from a height and was referred to our hospital. Physical examination showed a swelling in the left preauricular region without laceration. No thrill or bruit was detected at this time. A face x-ray and a computed tomographic scan showed a left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation, Le Fort I fractures, and a mandibular body fracture. Left TMJ dislocation was treated by manual reduction. Two days after admission, a swelling in the left preauricular region progressed, with thrill and bruit. Left external carotid artery angiograms showed an arteriovenous fistula with a dilated pouch near the left TMJ. The fistula was fed by the left superficial temporal artery and drained into the left superficial temporal vein. The fistula was successfully embolized using Tornado coils. This is the first case of an arteriovenous fistula of the superficial temporal artery after manual reduction of TMJ dislocation. PMID:21959481

  13. Radiographic manifestations of the temporomandibular joint in a case of Proteus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, E; Kansu, Ö; Özgen, B; Akçiçek, G; Kansu, H

    2013-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare disorder with progressive asymmetrical and disproportionate overgrowth of various tissues of the body. The syndrome is characterized by a wide range of malformations, including craniofacial deformities. Extraoral examination revealed several of the classical craniofacial features of Proteus syndrome: pronounced hemifacial hypertrophy, macrodactyly and hyperostosis. Intraoral examination revealed a high arched palate and gingival hyperplasia. Other findings were unilateral enlargement of the tongue, alveolar growth and dilaceration of the roots of the teeth. There were severe degenerative changes and deformities in the left temporomandibular joint but the oversized condyle was asymptomatic; there was no pain, limitation and deviation at mouth opening. Treatment was not necessary owing to the asymptomatic situation but periodic follow-up with clinical and radiographic examination was considered. The aim of this article is to describe the radiographic manifestations of an asymptomatic condyle malformation and other craniofacial, oral and dental findings in a 33-year-old female patient with known Proteus syndrome. PMID:22241876

  14. A rare case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome following temporomandibular joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Lehman, H; Rushinek, H

    2015-08-01

    Surgical approaches to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) have been designed specifically to minimize injury to the temporal branch of the facial nerve. In spite of this, facial nerve dysfunction occurs in 1-32% of patients undergoing TMJ surgery. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by peripheral facial paralysis that often involves other cranial nerves, mostly cranial nerve VIII. The pathology is attributed to the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus in the geniculate ganglion. The diagnosis is based mostly on history and physical findings. Surgical procedures have been known to reactivate varicella zoster virus, but Ramsay Hunt syndrome subsequent to TMJ surgery has not been described yet. This report describes a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with TMJ surgery. Because of the relatively high incidence of facial nerve dysfunction associated with TMJ surgery, patients with varicella zoster virus reactivation may initially be misdiagnosed with iatrogenic facial palsy, or vice versa. PMID:25864001

  15. Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: findings in the pediatric age group

    SciTech Connect

    Katzberg, R.W.; Tallents, R.H.; Hayakawa, K.; Miller, T.L.; Goske, M.J.; Wood, B.P.

    1985-01-01

    Findings in 31 pediatric patients with pain and dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are reported. The average age was 14 years and the average duration of symptoms was 21.4 months. Internal derangements were found in 29 patients (94%) and degenerative arthritis in 13 (42%). In 12 patients (39%), the problem could be traced to an injury to the jaw. Secondary condylar hypoplasia was associated with the meniscal abnormality in 3 patients (10%). Further awareness of internal derangements of the TMJ in the pediatric population should permit greater recognition of their etiology. It is important that threatment be initiated as soon as possible, not only to minimize the development of osseous disease in young adults but also to prevent facial growth deformities.

  16. En bloc resection of the temporal bone and temporomandibular joint for advanced temporal bone carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kutz, Joe Walter; Mitchell, Derek; Isaacson, Brandon; Roland, Peter S; Allen, Kyle P; Sumer, Baran D; Barnett, Sam; Truelson, John M; Myers, Larry L

    2015-03-01

    Advanced skin malignancies involving the temporal bone can involve the temporomandibular joint and glenoid fossa. Many of these tumors can be removed with a lateral temporal bone resection; however, extensive involvement of the glenoid fossa should include an en bloc resection of the temporal bone, glenoid fossa, and condyle. We describe a novel surgical approach that is an extension of a temporal bone resection that includes the glenoid fossa and condyle in an en bloc resection with the temporal bone. This procedure has been performed in 7 patients with advanced carcinoma of the temporal bone involving the glenoid fossa. There were no short-term complications as a result of the surgical approach. The addition of a middle fossa craniotomy and inclusion of the glenoid fossa and condyle as part of an en bloc resection of the temporal bone can be performed safely. PMID:25616770

  17. Three-Dimensional Imaging of the Temporomandibular Joint in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D.; Pettigrew, J.; Udupa, J.

    1983-01-01

    Interpretational difficulties experienced with currently used diagnostic radiation techniques can be reduced via the use of 3-D images constructed from conventional CT data. Each 1.5 mm CT section yields interpolated sections (6 or 8) containing cubile voxels. Structures to be imaged separately are masked in the interpolated sections prior to windowing for the appropriate tissue. A special algorithm detects the surface boundary of the selected structure. The surface pixels are assigned gray levels based on their distance and attitude from the observer. When displayed, this produces a simulated 3-D image. The image can be rotated and sectioned. Rotations permit otherwise hidden surfaces to be examined. Images of two temporomandibular joints are presented, a) bony components; b) bony components + meniscus. It is concluded that the 3-D imaging process is potentially useful in diagnosing TMJ pathology. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8

  18. Anatomy of the temporomandibular joint in the cat: a study by microdissection, cryosection and vascular injection.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Jorge; Agut, Amalia; Rodríguez, María Jesús; Sarriá, Ricardo; Latorre, Rafael

    2013-02-01

    The minute anatomy of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is of great clinical relevance in cats owing to a high number of lesions involving this articulation. However, the precise anatomy is poorly documented in textbooks and scientific articles. The aim of this study was to describe, in detail, the TMJ anatomy and its relationship with other adjacent anatomical structures in the cat. Different anatomical preparations, including vascular and articular injection, microdissection, cryosection and plastination, were performed in 12 cadaveric cats. All TMJ anatomical structures were identified and described in detail. A thorough understanding of the TMJ anatomy is essential to understand the clinical signs associated with TMJ disorders, to locate lesions precisely and to accurately interpret the results in all diagnostic imaging techniques. PMID:23015066

  19. Synovial Cysts of the Temporomandibular Joint: An Immunohistochemical Characterization and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Sirera, B.; Tomás-Amerigo, J. A.; Baquero, C.; Vera-Sempere, F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are very rare, and to date, only 12 cases of a synovial cyst in the TMJ region have been reported in the literature. In this paper, we present the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of one such lesion affecting a 48-year-old woman, presented with a mass in the left preauricular region. We describe the usefulness of immunohistochemical analysis for recognizing the synovial lining, which allowed for clear differentiation between ganglion and synovial cysts. Immunohistochemical analyses can be used to diagnose synovial cysts with certainty; however, using at least two markers is advisable to distinguish the two existing synovial cell subtypes. Our findings indicate that synovial cysts of TMJ possess an internal lining dominated by type B (fibroblast-like) synoviocytes. PMID:23573446

  20. Ganglion and Synovial Cyst of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Diederik J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. Although histopathological findings differ, clinical presentation is comparable. This study adds a case report of a ganglion of the TMJ to existing literature and a review of all available case reports on ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. Including our own case report, we reviewed 49 cases of ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. They occurred in a female:male ratio of 3:1, at an median age of 46 years (range, 11–64 years). Patients mainly presented with preauricular swelling and pain. After imaging, the ganglion or synovial cyst was most commonly excised under general anesthesia. No recurrences were described. PMID:26495237

  1. Ganglion and Synovial Cyst of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Steen, M Willemijn; Hofstede, Diederik J

    2015-09-01

    Ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. Although histopathological findings differ, clinical presentation is comparable. This study adds a case report of a ganglion of the TMJ to existing literature and a review of all available case reports on ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. Including our own case report, we reviewed 49 cases of ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. They occurred in a female:male ratio of 3:1, at an median age of 46 years (range, 11-64 years). Patients mainly presented with preauricular swelling and pain. After imaging, the ganglion or synovial cyst was most commonly excised under general anesthesia. No recurrences were described. PMID:26495237

  2. Solid-state temporomandibular joint imaging: accuracy in detecting osseous changes of degenerative joint disease and determining condylar spatial relations.

    PubMed

    Scarfe, William C; Farman, Allan G; Silveira, Anibal; Fairbanks, Brandon W; Kelly, Paul J

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the off-label use of an intraoral charge-coupled device (CCD) for extraoral transcranial radiography of the temporomandibular joint. Corrected linear tomograms and transcranial images made with conventional screen-film combinations and a CCD detector were compared with sectioned cadaver specimens. Radiation dosage, qualitative assessment of condylar degenerative features, and condylar position within the glenoid fossa of the 3 modalities were assessed and compared. The CCD method required special adjustments to achieve adequate quality, and it involved greater exposure than the other methods. This use of this intraoral system for extraoral imaging cannot now be recommended, but future refinements might make it more viable. PMID:14560277

  3. Management of painful temporomandibular joint clicking with different intraoral devices and counseling: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; CORRÊA, Ana Silvia da Mota; LAURIS, José Roberto Pereira; STUGINSKI-BARBOSA, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Objective The benefit of the use of some intraoral devices in arthrogenous temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients is still unknown. This study assessed the effectiveness of the partial use of intraoral devices and counseling in the management of patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR) and arthralgia. Materials and Methods A total of 60 DDWR and arthralgia patients were randomly divided into three groups: group I (n=20) wore anterior repositioning occlusal splints (ARS); group II (n=20) wore the Nociceptive Trigeminal Inhibition Clenching Suppression System devices (NTI-tss); and group III (n=20) only received counseling for behavioral changes and self-care (the control group). The first two groups also received counseling. Follow-ups were performed after 2 weeks, 6 weeks and 3 months. In these sessions, patients were evaluated by means of a visual analogue scale, pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), maximum range of motion and TMJ sounds. Possible adverse effects were also recorded, such as discomfort while using the device and occlusal changes. The results were analyzed with ANOVA, Tukey’s and Fisher Exact Test, with a significance level of 5%. Results Groups I and II showed improvement in pain intensity at the first follow-up. This progress was recorded only after 3 months in Group III. Group II showed an increased in joint sounds frequency. The PPT values, mandibular range of motion and the number of occlusal contacts did not change significantly. Conclusion The simultaneous use of intraoral devices (partial time) plus behavioral modifications seems to produce a more rapid pain improvement in patients with painful DDWR. The use of NTI-tss could increase TMJ sounds. Although intraoral devices with additional counseling should be considered for the management of painful DDWR, dentists should be aware of the possible side effects of the intraoral device’s design. PMID:26200526

  4. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PHYSICAL FACTORS IN THE TREATMENT OF COMPRESSION-DISLOCATION DYSFUNCTION OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT.

    PubMed

    Rybalov, O; Yatsenko, P; Moskalenko, P; Yatsenko, O; Lakhtin, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was clinical and functional assessment of the effectiveness of physical factors in the treatment of patients with compression-dislocation dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint. We observed two groups of patients. All patients were undergone the repositioning of the joint heads of the lower jaw. Patients of the index group were assigned a vibrating massage of all masseter muscles, tourmaline ceramic on the joint area and a local physical therapy. Patients in the control group had only lidocaine blockade of periarticular area twice a week. Treatment efficacy was evaluated on the eighth day after the start of the treatment according to the bioelectric activity of the genuine masseter and temporal muscles, the intensity of pain according to in Visual Analog Scale, and according to the results of the clinical examination. In most patients of the index group the electromyography data after treatment were approaching to norm, the phenomenon of dysfunction of the temporomandibular joints was reversed. In the control group the full restoration of the functional activity of muscle did not occur. The addition to the complex of therapeutic measures a vibration massage, tourmaline ceramics and local physical therapy for patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joints allows to get a positive effect. PMID:27001782

  5. On the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint and the muscles that act upon it: observations on the gray whale, Eschrichtius robustus.

    PubMed

    El Adli, Joseph J; Deméré, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    The temporomandibular joint and its associated musculature are described in a neonate gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) and serve as the basis for direct anatomical comparisons with the temporomandibular region in other clades of baleen whales (Mysticeti). Members of the right whale/bowhead whale clade (Balaenidae) are known to possess a synovial lower jaw joint, while members of the rorqual clade (Balaenopteridae) have a nonsynovial temporomandibular joint characterized by a highly flexible fibrocartilaginous pad and no joint capsule. In contrast, the gray whale possesses a modified temporomandibular joint (intermediate condition), with a vestigial joint cavity lacking a fibrous capsule, synovial membrane, and articular disk. In addition, the presence of a rudimentary fibrocartilaginous pad appears to be homologous to that seen in balaenopterid mysticetes. The intrinsic temporomandibular musculature in the gray whale was found to include a multibellied superficial masseter and a single-bellied deep masseter. The digastric and internal pterygoid muscles in E. robustus are enlarged relative to the condition documented in species of Balaenoptera. A relatively complex insertion of the temporalis muscle on the dentary is documented in the gray whale and the low, knob-like process on the gray whale dentary is determined to be homologous with the prominent coronoid process of rorquals. Comparison with the anatomy of the temporomandibular musculature in rorquals reveals an increased importance of alpha rotation of the dentary in the gray whale. This difference in muscular morphology and lines of muscle action is interpreted as representing adaptations for suction feeding. PMID:25737135

  6. Alloplastic temporomandibular joint replacement: rationale for the use of custom devices.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, L G

    2012-09-01

    The essential life functions of mastication, speech, airway support and deglutition are supported by temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function and form. Over a lifetime, this puts the TMJ complex under more cyclical loading and unloading than any other joint. Therefore, to provide long-term effective outcomes, the TMJ total joint replacement (TJR) device selected must be capable of managing the anatomical, functional and aesthetic discrepancies that dictated its use. The primary goal of TMJ TJR is the restoration of mandibular function and form. Outcomes data confirm that any pain relief attained must be considered of only secondary benefit. Despite persistent but reduced chronic pain, increased mandibular function and form improvement have been reported, resulting in quality of life improvement for 85% of custom TMJ TJR patients studied long-term. Based on the literature and the accepted orthopaedic criteria for the development and utilisation of successful TJR devices, this paper presents a rationale for the use of custom TMJ TJR devices as a 'fitting' management option for end-stage TMJ disorders. PMID:22771166

  7. Removal of a Solitary Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint Using Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Gabriel Pires; Goulart, Douglas Rangel; Pastore, Patrícia Radaic; Prati, Alexandre Javaroni

    2016-06-01

    The diagnosis of synovial chrondromatosis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) requires a combined assessment consisting of clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic examinations. The purpose of this study is to report in 1 patient the removal of a single large cartilaginous nodule floating in the upper joint compartment using arthroscopy. A 30-year-old woman was referred to our department complaining about pain in preauricular area and restricted mouth opening. Imaging of magnetic resonance reveals anterior disc displacement and right joint effusion. Arthroscopy of TMJ was performed for diagnosis and treatment. During the arthroscopy a large loose body was identified and removed with a biopsy forceps; lavage was conducted with ringer solution. Hyaluronic acid was injected in TMJ at surgery, 1 and 3 months after surgery. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed articular disc on position and no effusion. The patient was followed up of 1 year without sign and symptoms. Arthroscopic procedure of TMJ was effective in diagnosis and removal of a solitary loose body of synovial chrondromatosis. Viscosupplementation appers to offer benefits in controlling pain and functional improvements. PMID:27244213

  8. Shox2-deficiency leads to dysplasia and ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shuping; Wei, Na; Yu, Ling; Fei, Jian; Chen, YiPing

    2010-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a unique synovial joint whose development differs from the formation of other synovial joints. Mutations have been associated with the developmental defects of the TMJ only in a few genes. In this study, we report the expression of the homeobox gene Shox2 in the cranial neural crest derived mesenchymal cells of the maxilla-mandibular junction and later in the progenitor cells and undifferentiated chondrocytes of the condyle as well as the glenoid fossa of the developing TMJ. A conditional inactivation of Shox2 in the cranial neural crest-derived cells causes developmental abnormalities in the TMJ, including dysplasia of the condyle and glenoid fossa. The articulating disc forms but fuses with the fibrous layers of the condyle and glenoid fossa, clinically known as TMJ ankylosis. Histological examination indicates a delay in development in the mutant TMJ, accompanied by a significantly reduced rate of cell proliferation. In situ hybridization further demonstrates an altered expression of several key osteogenic genes and a delayed expression of the osteogenic differentiation markers. Shox2 appears to regulate the expression of osteogenic genes and is essential for the development and function of the TMJ. The Shox2 conditional mutant thus provides a unique animal model of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:18514492

  9. Temporoparietal fascia flap and total temporomandibular joint replacement for the management of patent foramen of Huschke.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M C; Osborn, T

    2016-08-01

    Spontaneous herniation of the condylar head into the external auditory canal (EAC) through the foramen of Huschke is extremely rare, with approximately 30 cases reported in the international literature. The typical presentation is a constellation of non-specific symptoms including otalgia, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, malocclusion, otorrhea, tinnitus while chewing, and hearing loss. Clinical examination may reveal pain, granulation tissue in the EAC, or the exposed mandibular condyle with the mouth closed. With mouth opening, the tissue or exposed bone retracts anteriorly leaving an often normal-appearing EAC. Having the patient open and close the mouth while performing otoscopy will show the displacement of tissue, which is critical for diagnosis of the condition. Radiographic examination with a computed tomography scan typically reveals a discontinuous anterior wall of the EAC with visible soft tissue in the protruding in the EAC. A case of spontaneous TMJ herniation into the EAC in a 54-year-old male patient with a history of otalgia and malocclusion is reported here. Total joint replacement therapy for the treatment of this rare condition is reported, and its importance in providing a posterior mechanical stop to prevent joint relapse is discussed. PMID:27066740

  10. Tumors and pseudotumors at the temporomandibular joint region in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Bin; Chen, Min-Jie; Yang, Chi; Qiu, Yating; Zhou, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical manifestations and types of, and our surgical experience with, neoplasms in the region of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in pediatric patients. Materials and Methods: From September 1997 to December 2013, a total of 18 patients with neoplasms in the region of the TMJ were treated at our department. They all underwent open surgeries. The clinical manifestations and radiological aspects of all the patients were reviewed. The average follow-up period was 61.8 months with a range of 12-221 months. We reviewed the history, physical examination, images, and related radiological examinations. Results: Of the 18 patients, 14 had benign tumors or pseudotumors, and four had malignant tumors. The ratio of pseudotumor to benign tumor to malignant tumor was 2.5:1:1. Limitations of mouth opening were more likely to occur with malignant tumors, and facial deformity had a higher incidence in benign tumors. Local resection was the first choice for patients with benign tumors or pseudotumors. All patients with malignant tumors underwent whole-tumor resection along the boundary, including the joint capsule, disc, and part of the temporal bone and mandible. During the follow-up period, no tumor reformation or new deformity was detected. Conclusions: In the diagnosis of masses in the TMJ region, CT and MRI play an important role. Surgical removal of the mass with/without joint attachment was sufficient to treat benign and malignant tumors. PMID:26885147

  11. Investigation of an autologous blood treatment strategy for temporomandibular joint hypermobility in a pig model.

    PubMed

    Stembirek, J; Matalova, E; Buchtova, M; Machon, V; Misek, I

    2013-03-01

    Many different surgical and non-surgical techniques are used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) hypermobility. One of these methods is autologous blood injection into the TMJ. The fate of the autologous blood used for treatment of recurring condylar dislocation is still not completely understood. The authors used 12 pigs (Sus scrota f. domestica) as a model species for autologous blood delivery into the TMJ. Blood injection was followed by histopathological analysis at different times after treatment (1h, 1, 2 and 4 weeks). Samples were examined by magnetic resonance imaging, macroscopic and histological methods. The deposition of the remaining blood was observed in the form of clots in the distal parts of the upper joint cavity 1h and 1 week after treatment. 2 weeks after treatment, small blood clots were still apparent in the distal part of the upper joint cavity. 4 weeks after surgery, no remnants of blood, changes or adhesions were apparent inside the TMJ. No morphological or histological changes were observed in the TMJ after the injection of autologous blood suggesting another mechanism is involved in the hypermobility treatment. PMID:22867740

  12. Radiation dose in radiography, CT, and arthrography of the temporomandibular joint

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, E.L.; Moore, R.J.; Thompson, J.R.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies were performed on a Rando Humanoid head phantom to compare radiation dosages used in temporomandibular joint examinations. Studies included transaxial and direct sagittal high-resolution CT, reduced milliamperage dynamic CT, tomoarthrography, pluridirectional and linear tomography, pantomography, transcranial plain films, and fluoroscopy. Radiation doses were determined for the brain, lens, pituitary gland, condylar marrow, and thyroid gland. Condylar marrow received doses of 64 and 52 mGy, respectively, for the GE 9800 and 8800 high-resolution scans; 21 and 17 mGy, respectively, for the dynamically sequenced scans; and 26 mGy for the GE 9800 direct sagittal sections. Tomoarthrography yielded 31 mGy and fluoroscopy 12 mGy. Other lower doses showed 5 mGy for polytomography, 3 mGy for ipsilateral joint linear tomography, 1.9 mGy for the GE 9800 slow ScoutView, 1.8 mGy for xeroradiography, 0.9 mGy for contralateral joint linear tomography, 0.3-0.4 mGy for transcranial plain films and pantomography, and 0.2 mGy for the GE 8800 ScoutView. The estimated error in this study was calculated to be +/- 15%. On a relative scale, the radiation doses from high-resolution CT and tomoarthrography are high, dynamic CT yields a medium dose, and all other tomographic and plain-film techniques yield low doses.

  13. Does condylar height decrease more in temporomandibular joint nonreducing disc displacement than reducing disc displacement?

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying-Kai; Yang, Chi; Cai, Xie-Yi; Xie, Qian-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to compare condylar height changes of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) quantitatively, to get a better understanding of the changes in condylar height of patients with anterior disc displacement who had received no treatment, and to provide useful information for treatment protocol. This longitudinal retrospective study enrolled 206 joints in 156 patients, which were divided into ADDWR group and ADDwoR group based on magnetic resonance imaging examination. The joints were assessed quantitatively for condylar height at initial and follow-up visits. Also, both groups were further divided into 3 subgroups according to age: <15 years group, 15 to 21 years group, and 22 to 35 years group. Paired t test and independent t test were used to assess intra- and intergroup differences. The average age of the ADDwR group was 19.65 years with a mean of 9.47 months’ follow-up. The follow-up interval of the patients with ADDwoR was 7.96 months, with a mean age of 18.51 years. Condylar height in ADDwoR tended to decrease more than those in ADDwR, especially during the pubertal growth spurt and with the presence of osteoarthrosis, meaning ADDwoR could cause a severe disturbance in mandibular development. Thus, an early disc repositioning was suggested to avoid decrease in condylar height. PMID:27583909

  14. Congenital deformities and developmental abnormalities of the mandibular condyle in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Kaneyama, Keiseki; Segami, Natsuki; Hatta, Toshihisa

    2008-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) consists of the mandibular condyle and the articular eminence of the temporal bone. The morphological development of the TMJ during prenatal life lags behind other joints in terms of both the timing of its appearance and its progress. At birth, the joint is still largely underdeveloped. There are many causes of the various growth disturbances and abnormalities of the mandibular condyle and related structures. Growth disturbances in the development of the mandibular condyle may occur in utero late in the first trimester and may result in disorders such as aplasia or hypoplasia of the mandibular condyle. Meanwhile, hyperplasia of the mandibular condyle is not visible at birth and seems to be gradually acquired during growth. In the present review article, the congenital abnormalities of the mandibular condyle are classified morphologically into three major groups and two subgroups from a clinical standpoint: (1) hypoplasia or aplasia of the mandibular condyle, including (i) primary condylar aplasia and hypoplasia, (ii) secondary condylar hypoplasia; (2) hyperplasia; and (3) bifidity. In addition, the molecular-based etiology of anomalies of the mandibular condyle is also discussed. PMID:18778456

  15. Morphologic and histologic changes in canine temporomandibular joint tissues following arthroscopic guided neodymium:YAG laser exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bradrick, J.P.; Eckhauser, M.L.; Indresano, A.T. )

    1989-11-01

    A neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser beam was introduced by a quartz fiber passed arthroscopically into the superior joint space of the temporomandibular joints (TMJ) of five mongrel dogs, with one joint serving as a control without laser wounds. Immediate postoperative death and examination of the disc grossly and histologically revealed different patterns for contact and noncontact burn wounds. The wounds exhibited signs of thermal coagulation necrosis similar to those reported in other tissues. The potential implications of the adaptation of the Nd:YAG laser to TMJ arthroscopic surgery are discussed.

  16. Review of temporomandibular joint pathology. Part I: classification, epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Poveda Roda, Rafael; Bagan, José V; Díaz Fernández, José María; Hernández Bazán, Sergio; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda

    2007-08-01

    Pathology of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) affects an important part of the population, though it is not viewed as a public health problem. Between 3-7% of the population seeks treatment for pain and dysfunction of the ATM or related structures. The literature reports great variability in the prevalence of the clinical symptoms (6-93%) and signs (0-93%), probably as a result of the different clinical criteria used. In imaging studies it is common to observe alterations that have no clinical expression of any kind. Radiographic changes corresponding to osteoarthrosis are observed in 14-44% of the population. Age is a risk factor, though with some particularities. In elderly patients there is an increased prevalence of clinical and radiological signs, though also a lesser prevalence of symptoms and of treatment demands than in younger adults. Approximately 7% of the population between 12 and 18 years of age is diagnosed with mandibular pain-dysfunction. Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is more frequent in females. No clear relationship has been established between occlusal alterations and TMJ disease. Only disharmony between centric relation and maximum intercuspidation, and unilateral crossbite, have demonstrated a certain TMJ disease-predictive potential. Both local and systemic hyperlaxity has been postulated as a possible cause of TMD. Parafunctional habits and bruxism are considered risk factors of TMD with odds ratios (ORs) of up to 4.8. Psychophysiological theory holds stress as a determinant factor in myofascial pain. Genetic factors and orthodontic treatment have not been shown to cause TMD. PMID:17664915

  17. Comparison of Serum and Salivary Antioxidants in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lawaf, Shirin; Tabarestani, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is a group of disorders in the facial region and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Biomarkers are assumed to play a role in pain and early detection of destruction. The aim of this study was to compare the saliva and serum antioxidant levels in patients with TMD and healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 28 TMD patients without pain, 28 TMD patients with pain and 28 healthy controls. The total antioxidant capacity of saliva and serum of patients was measured. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tamhane’s test. Results: The mean (±SD) total antioxidant capacity of serum (plasma TAC) was 0.8900 (±0.11627) mmol/L in TMD patients with pain, 1.2717 (±0.18711) mmol/L in TMD patients without pain and 1.7500(±0.18711) mmol/L in the control group. Based on ANOVA, the difference in this regard among the three groups was statistically significant (P=0.000). The mean salivary TAC was 1.34 (±0.06721) mmol/L in TMD patients with pain, 1.42 (±0.16677) mmol/L in TMD patients without pain and 1.35 (±0.11627) mmol/L in the control group. The difference in this respect among the three groups was not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The mean plasma TAC in TMD patients with/without pain was significantly lower than that in the control group but no significant difference was detected in salivary TAC among the three groups. PMID:26622281

  18. Effectiveness of Physiotherapy and GaAlAs Laser in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hlinakova, Petra; Kasparova, Magdalena; Rehacek, Adam; Vavrickova, Lenka; Navrátil, Leoš

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a treatment method commonly used in physiotherapy for musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to monitor the function of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding tissues and compare the objective measurements of the effect of LLLT. Background data: LLLT has been considered effective in reducing pain and muscular tension; thus improving the quality of patients' lives. Materials and Methods: TMJ function was evaluated by cephalometric tracing analysis, orthopantomogram, TMJ tomogram, and computer face-bow record. Interalveolar space between central incisors before and after therapy was measured. Patients evaluated pain on the Visual Analog Scale. LLLT was performed in five treatment sessions (energy density of 15.4 J/cm2) by semiconductive GaAlAs laser with an output of 280 mW, emitting radiation wavelength of 830 mm. The laser supplied a spot of∼0.2 cm2. Results: Baseline comparisons between the healthy patients and patients with low-level laser application show that TMJ pain during function is based on anatomical and function changes in TMJ areas. Significant differences were seen in the posterior and anterior face height. The results comparing healthy and impaired TMJ sagittal condyle paths showed that patients with TMJ pain during function had significantly flatter nonanatomical movement during function. After therapy, the unpleasant feeling was reduced from 27.5 to 4.16 on the pain Visual Analog Scale. The pain had reduced the ability to open the mouth from 34 to 42 mm. Conclusions: The laser therapy was effective in the improvement of the range of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and promoted a significant reduction of pain symptoms. PMID:22551049

  19. Influence of unilateral disc displacement on the stress response of the temporomandibular joint discs during opening and mastication

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Palomar, A; Doblaré, M

    2007-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint plays a crucial role in human mastication acting as a guide of jaw movements. During these movements, the joint is subjected to loads which cause stresses and deformations in its cartilaginous structures. A perfect balance between the two sides of the joint is essential to maintain the physiological stress level within the tissues. Therefore, it has been suggested that a derangement of the joint is a contributing factor in the development of mandibular asymmetry, especially if problems of the temporomandibular joint start in childhood or adolescence. To analyze the movement of the mandible and the stresses undergone by the discs, two finite element models of the human temporomandibular joint including the masticatory system were developed, one corresponding to a healthy joint and the other with a unilateral anterior disc displacement with their movement controlled by muscle activation. A fibre-reinforced porohyperelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the articular discs. The stress distribution was analyzed in both models during free opening and closing, and during the introduction of a resistant force between incisors or molars. It was found that a slight unilateral anterior disc displacement does not lead to mandibular asymmetry but to a slight decrease of the maximum gape. With the introduction of a restriction between incisors, the maximum stresses moved to the anterior band in contrast to what happened if the restriction was imposed between molars where maximum stresses were located more posteriorly. Finally, the presence of a unilateral displacement of the disc involved a strong change in the overall behaviour of the joint including also the healthy side, where the maximum stresses moved to the posterior part. PMID:17725577

  20. Stakeholder engagement analysis - a bioethics dilemma in patient-targeted intervention: patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Barkhordarian, Andre; Demerjian, Gary; Jan, Allison; Sama, Nateli; Nguyen, Mia; Du, Angela; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Modern health care in the field of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing is grounded in fundamental philosophy and epistemology of translational science. Recently in the U.S major national initiatives have been implemented in the hope of closing the gaps that sometimes exist between the two fundamental components of translational science, the translational research and translational effectiveness. Subsequent to these initiatives, many improvements have been made; however, important bioethical issues and limitations do still exist that need to be addressed. One such issue is the stakeholder engagement and its assessment and validation. Federal, state and local organizations such as PCORI and AHRQ concur that the key to a better understanding of the relationship between translational research and translational effectiveness is the assessment of the extent to which stakeholders are actively engaged in the translational process of healthcare. The stakeholder engagement analysis identifies who the stakeholders are, maps their contribution and involvement, evaluates their priorities and opinions, and accesses their current knowledge base. This analysis however requires conceptualization and validation from the bioethics standpoint. Here, we examine the bioethical dilemma of stakeholder engagement analysis in the context of the person-environment fit (PE-fit) theoretical model. This model is an approach to quantifying stakeholder engagement analysis for the design of patient-targeted interventions. In our previous studies of Alzheimer patients, we have developed, validated and used a simple instrument based on the PE-fit model that can be adapted and utilized in a much less studied pathology as a clinical model that has a wide range of symptoms and manifestations, the temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the jaw joint endowed with sensory and motor innervations that project from within the central nervous system and its dysfunction can

  1. Quality of life: patient-reported outcomes after total replacement of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Kunjur, J; Niziol, R; Matthews, N S

    2016-09-01

    Since publication of the UK guidelines on total replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in 2008 by the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (BAOMS), pain scores, mouth opening, and diet have been used as markers of success. We have looked at quality of life (QoL) as another. We analysed the data from a single surgeon on patients who had had joints replaced and devised a questionnaire to find out about the subjective, functional, psychological, and social aspects of TMJ disease. A total of 18 patients who had the same operation were included (mean (range) age 50 (33 - 73) years, mean (range) follow up 30 (18 - 48) months). Jaw function and facial aesthetics had improved, and patients needed less analgesia. Overall, they reported a better QoL with improvements in mood and social interaction, and the activities of daily life were easier. The NHS uses QoL questionnaires to measure success in fields such as orthopaedic surgery, but currently we know of no nationally accepted questionnaire that measures success after total replacement of the TMJ. PMID:27209222

  2. Spontaneously developed osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint in STR/ort mice

    PubMed Central

    KUMAGAI, KENICHI; SUZUKI, SATSUKI; KANRI, YORIAKI; MATSUBARA, RYOTA; FUJII, KEISUKE; WAKE, MASAHIRO; SUZUKI, RYUJI; HAMADA, YOSHIKI

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis is typically a slowly progressive asymmetric disease. Little is known regarding the natural destruction of TMJ articular tissues. The aim of the present study was to investigate morphological changes in the TMJ of STR/ort mice, known to be the model for spontaneous osteoarthritis in the knee joint, and to evaluate STR/ort mice as a suitable animal model for TMJ osteoarthritis. TMJs from 32 STR/ort mice euthanized at 30, 40, 50 or 60 weeks of age, and from 6 CBA mice euthanized at 30, 40 or 60 weeks of age were examined. Toluidine blue and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were used to assess histological changes in the articular cartilage. Morphological changes in the articular cartilage of the TMJ were evaluated using microcomputed tomography. At the age of 40–50 weeks, 17 (68%) of the 25 STR/ort mice had loss of articular cartilage on histology, with cavitation and erosion of the exposed bone and gradual changes in condylar shape. Furthermore, osteoarthritic morphological changes, and structural alterations were observed by microcomputed tomography. The STR/ort mouse strain appears to develop spontaneous osteoarthritis-like lesions in the TMJ with age, and would be a useful model to study the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:26171147

  3. Severe proliferative congenital temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a proposed treatment protocol utilizing distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Scott P; Reid, Russell R; Losee, Joseph E; Quinn, Peter D

    2006-05-01

    The classical treatment for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis in children: 1) joint release; 2) arthroplasty; 3) reconstruction; and 4) postoperative physical therapy (PT), is often unsuccessful. Postoperative physical therapy is difficult in the young patient due to poor cooperation. Moreover, there is a subgroup of patients who have a refractory congenital proliferative bony process that is the cause of their disease. In these patients, a role for distraction osteogenesis (DO) has been defined. We present a series of young patients with congenital proliferative TMJ ankylosis. Some have failed classic treatment. In such cases, DO is used to expand the mandibular size and soft tissue matrix. This creates a static open bite, facilitates mid-facial growth, and avoids compromise of the airway, speech, nutrition, and oral hygiene. To maintain these objectives, mandibular DO may be repeated as the child matures. Once skeletal maturity is reached, DO is used to normalize occlusion and further expand the soft tissue envelope prior to definitive reconstruction and aggressive post-op PT. In seven patients, this protocol has been used. Five patients are currently in the active phase of growth and undergoing interim treatment with mandibular DO. Two patients have reached skeletal maturity and have completed the protocol of DO with definitive arthroplasty and reconstruction. DO is a valuable aid in the treatment of the problematic child with congenital proliferative TMJ ankylosis. Interim DO, prior to definitive arthroplasty and reconstruction, can provide a static open bite that prevents progressive deformity and its associated functional disturbances. PMID:16770209

  4. Total alloplastic temporomandibular joint reconstruction using Biomet stock prostheses: the University of Florida experience.

    PubMed

    Sanovich, R; Mehta, U; Abramowicz, S; Widmer, C; Dolwick, M F

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the subjective and objective outcomes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) replacement with Biomet stock prostheses at a single institution in Florida. In this retrospective study, patients who underwent TMJ replacement using a Biomet stock prosthesis from 2005 to 2012 were analyzed. Subjective (pain, diet) and objective (maximal incisal opening) information was obtained. In addition, a quality of life measure was obtained pre- and postoperatively. Significance was set at <0.01. Thirty-six patients (26 bilateral, 6 left, and 4 right) who underwent TMJ replacement using a Biomet stock prosthesis were eligible for the study. Maximal incisal opening improved from 26.1mm preoperatively to a mean of 34.4mm postoperatively. The pain score decreased from 7.9 preoperatively to a mean of 3.8 postoperatively. Diet restriction decreased from 6.8 preoperatively to a mean of 3.5 postoperatively. Quality of life improved from a median of 4 preoperatively to a postoperative median of 2. Four implants were removed/replaced because of heterotopic bone formation, infection, and/or loose hardware. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 83 months. Overall, TMJ reconstruction using the Biomet stock joint is effective and safe in this patient population. PMID:24861472

  5. Transforming growth factor beta 3 involved in the pathogenesis of synovial chondromatosis of temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingjie; El.Mozen, Loaye Abdelaziz; Cai, Hengxing; Fang, Wei; Meng, Qinggong; Li, Jian; Deng, Mohong; Long, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) of temporomandibular joint is rare proliferative disorder featured by the formation of cartilaginous nodules in synovium and joint space. Transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-β3) is closely related to chondrogenic differentiation, and might participate in pathogenesis of SC. We discovered that increased quantity of synoviocytes and blood vessels were observed in SC synovium. The vessel wall and sublining fibroblasts were stained positively by the antibodies against TGF-β3, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), and CD34. In loose bodies (LBs), TGF-β3 was mainly expressed in chondrocytes and FGF-2 was expressed in chondrocytes, fibroblasts, and vessel walls. Expressions of TGF-β1, TGF-β3, FGF-2, Sox9, Wnt-4, Foxc2, and VEGF-A mRNA were significantly higher in SC synovium. Stimulation of TGF-β3 on synoviocytes increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and expressions of chondrogenic genes (Sox9, Col2α1, Aggrecan, Wnt-4, and Wnt-11), osteogenic genes (Runx2, Foxc2, osteocalcin, and Col1α1), and VEGF-A, but failed to influence FGF-2 expression. However, the addition of FGF-2 increased TGF-β3 expression. In conclusion, TGF-β3 existed in synovium and LBs of SC, and was responsible for the pathogenesis of SC. PMID:25742744

  6. Transforming growth factor beta 3 involved in the pathogenesis of synovial chondromatosis of temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingjie; El Mozen, Loaye Abdelaziz; Cai, Hengxing; Fang, Wei; Meng, Qinggong; Li, Jian; Deng, Mohong; Long, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) of temporomandibular joint is rare proliferative disorder featured by the formation of cartilaginous nodules in synovium and joint space. Transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-β3) is closely related to chondrogenic differentiation, and might participate in pathogenesis of SC. We discovered that increased quantity of synoviocytes and blood vessels were observed in SC synovium. The vessel wall and sublining fibroblasts were stained positively by the antibodies against TGF-β3, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), and CD34. In loose bodies (LBs), TGF-β3 was mainly expressed in chondrocytes and FGF-2 was expressed in chondrocytes, fibroblasts, and vessel walls. Expressions of TGF-β1, TGF-β3, FGF-2, Sox9, Wnt-4, Foxc2, and VEGF-A mRNA were significantly higher in SC synovium. Stimulation of TGF-β3 on synoviocytes increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and expressions of chondrogenic genes (Sox9, Col2α1, Aggrecan, Wnt-4, and Wnt-11), osteogenic genes (Runx2, Foxc2, osteocalcin, and Col1α1), and VEGF-A, but failed to influence FGF-2 expression. However, the addition of FGF-2 increased TGF-β3 expression. In conclusion, TGF-β3 existed in synovium and LBs of SC, and was responsible for the pathogenesis of SC. PMID:25742744

  7. Temporomandibular joint health status in war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghi, Ahmad; Zamani, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) in the Iran/Iraq war veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 subjects in the age range of 27 to 55 years were included; it included case group (30 war veterans with PTSD) and three control groups (30 patients with PTSD who had not participated in the War, 30 healthy war veterans, and 30 healthy subjects who had not participated in the War). All subjects underwent a clinical TMJ examination that involved the clinical assessment of the TMJ signs and symptoms. Results: The groups of veterans had high prevalence of TMJD signs and symptoms vs. other groups; history of Trauma to joint was significantly higher in subjects who had participated in the war compare with subjects who had not participated in the war (P = 0.0006). Furthermore, pain in palpation of masseter, temporal, pterygoideus, digastric, and sternocleidomastoid muscles in the groups of veterans was significantly greater than other groups (P < 0.0001). Clicking noise during mouth chewing was significantly different between groups (P = 0.01). And, there was significant difference in the frequencies of maximum opening of the mouth between groups (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that subjects’ war veterans with PTSD have significantly poorer TMJ functional status than the control subjects. PMID:25077153

  8. Inflammatory mediators and radiographic changes in temporomandibular joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Voog, Ulle; Alstergren, Per; Eliasson, Sören; Leibur, Edvitar; Kallikorm, Riina; Kopp, Sigvard

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and serotonin (5-HT), the inflammatory markers erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP), as well as rheumatoid factor (RF) and thrombocyte particle concentration (TPC) in blood versus temporomandibular joint (TMJ) radiographic changes in patients with clinical TMJ involvement by rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty patients were included. Venous blood was collected for quantification of the mediators, markers, and TPC. The radiographic signs of erosion, flattening, sclerosis, subchondral pseudocyst, and osteophyte as well as radiographic grade were investigated with computed tomography. The median (IQR) plasma levels of TNFalpha and 5-HT were 0 (13) pg/ mL and 13 (22) nmol/L, respectively, while serum level of 5-HT was 1360 874) nmol/L ESR, CRP, and TPC were abnormally high in 53%, 250%, and 15% of the patients, respectively. The most frequent radiographic signs were sclerosis (75%), erosion (50%), and flattening (30%). Erosion was found to be associated with high TPC and flattening with high plasma level of TNFalpha. In conclusion, patients with clinical TMJ involvement by RA show an association between high level of TPC and TNFalpha in plasma versus radiographic signs of joint bone destruction. PMID:12635783

  9. Comparison of the outcomes of three surgical treatments for end-stage temporomandibular joint disease.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, G

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any differences between condylectomy, rib grafts, and prosthetic joints (Biomet TMJ stock prosthesis) with regard to outcomes for patients with end-stage temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease. Fifty-six of a total 127 patients who presented with category 5 end-stage TMJ disease over 3 years (2010-2013) agreed to participate in this retrospective, comparative, cohort study. Patients were divided into four groups: preoperative (n=16), condylectomy (n=8), rib graft (n=16), and prosthetic joint (n=16). They were assessed for major postoperative complications (i.e., return to theatre) and maximum range of mandibular motion, and all completed a specific quality of life (QOL) questionnaire. Whilst the condylectomy group demonstrated the best mandibular range of motion (P<0.01), rib graft patients were more likely to experience complications (43.8%) necessitating a return to theatre. The prosthesis group recorded the best mean aggregate QOL score, but the difference compared to the rib graft and condylectomy groups was not statistically significant. The results of this study suggest that for dentate patients, prosthetic joints are highly dependable with no returns to theatre and favourable QOL outcomes. For edentulous patients, condylectomies alone also appear to work well. Future TMJ prosthetic designs should focus on improving mandibular range of motion, as the current stock prosthesis allows only a restricted range, no better than that achieved with rib graft (P>0.05) and far less than that achieved with condylectomy (P<0.01). PMID:24629849

  10. Diagnostic concordance between MRI and electrovibratography of the temporomandibular joint of subjects with disc displacement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Deregibus, A; Castroflorio, T; De Giorgi, I; Burzio, C; Debernardi, C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic concordance of MRI and electrovibratography (EVG) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the diagnosis of articular disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) and articular disc displacement without reduction (ADDw/oR). Methods: 50 patients (12 males, 38 females; mean age 37.46 ± 15.64 years) with a hypothesis of disc displacement were selected. For each patient an MRI of the TMJ was performed. MRIs were evaluated sorting the 100 TMJs by kind of pathology (no pathology, ADDwR, ADDw/oR, and joint hypermobility). Afterwards, the patients had an EVG exam. The EVG exams were performed with vibration transducers over each TMJ, enabling simultaneous, bilateral recording of vibrations emanating from joint sounds during the opening and closing movements. The presence of a sound peak was compared with the MRI diagnosis of ADDwR, while a multipeak aspect was compared with ADDw/oR diagnosis using Cohen's kappa test. Results: The presence of a peak-shaped track has high specificity for ADDwR (90.27%). The Cohen's kappa calculated for the ADDwR was 0.5615 (good–moderate). The presence of a multipeak-shaped track has low specificity (65.22%) and sensitivity (70.42%). The Cohen's kappa calculated for the ADDw/oR was 0.2992 (poor). Conclusions: The present study recommends the use of EVG to support the clinical diagnosis of a disc displacement with reduction when MRI is not available or when subjects cannot be investigated by MRI. PMID:23420863

  11. Osteoarthritis of the temporo-mandibular joint in free-living Soay sheep on St Kilda.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Colin; Watt, Kathryn; Nussey, Daniel H; Pemberton, Josephine M; Pilkington, Jill G; Herman, Jeremy S; Timmons, Zena L; Clements, Dylan N; Scott, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative disease of synovial joints with the potential to cause pathology and welfare issues in both domestic and wild ruminants. Previous work has identified OA of the elbow joint in domestic sheep, but the prevalence of OA of the jaw and in particular the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has not been previously reported. Following up a previous report of a single case of TMJ OA in a free-living population of Soay sheep on St Kilda in the Outer Hebrides, an archive of 2736 jaw bones collected from this population between 1985 and 2010 was surveyed. Evidence of TMJ OA was found in 35 sheep. Of these, 15 cases were unilateral (11 right side, 4 left side) and the remaining 20 were bilateral. TMJ pathology was much more common in females than males: only 3/35 cases were in males, with overall prevalence at 2.3% for females and 0.2% in males. Radiographic examination of TMJ with OA revealed extensive bone re-modelling with osteophytosis, particularly of the condyle of the mandible. There was a highly significant age-dependence in TMJ OA incidence among age classes: 30/35 cases occurred in geriatric sheep (aged 7 years or more; 11.1% prevalence within this age class), four in adults (2-6 years old; 0.9% prevalence), one in yearlings (0.3% prevalence) and none in lambs. The low incidence in males was confounded by sex differences in longevity: while 18% of females sampled died in the geriatric age class, only 2% of males did so. Although the low prevalence of the pathology limited the ability to test its association with other traits, it was possible to examine relationships with reproductive performance measures amongst geriatric females with and without TMJ OA. Although there were trends towards lower fecundity and lower lamb birth weight in the breeding season prior to death, these were not statistically significant. PMID:25458883

  12. Single stage treatment of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint using patient-specific total joint replacement and virtual surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Haq, Jahrad; Patel, Nishma; Weimer, Katherine; Matthews, N Shaun

    2014-04-01

    Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a debilitating condition that can result in pain, trismus, and a poor quality of life. It can be caused by injury, infection, and rheumatoid disease. Current management includes gap arthroplasty, interpositional arthroplasty, and reconstruction. Traditionally, joints are reconstructed using stock implants, or the procedure is done in two stages with an additional computed tomography (CT) scan between the resective and reconstructive procedures and use of stereolithographic models to aid the design of the definitive prostheses. We describe a technique for the resection of ankylosis and reconstruction of the joint in a single operation using virtually designed custom-made implants. Five patients with ankylosis of the TMJ had a single stage operation with reconstruction between 2010 and 2012. All had preoperative high-resolution CT with contrast angiography. During an international web-based teleconference between the surgeon and the engineer a virtual resection of the ankylosis was done using the reconstructed CT images. The bespoke cutting guides and implants were designed virtually at the same time and were then manufactured precisely using computer-aided design and manufacture (CAD-CAM) over 6 weeks. After release of the ankylosis and reconstruction, the patients underwent an exercise regimen to improve mouth opening. Follow-up was for a minimum of 6 months. Four patients had one operation, and one patient had two. Median/Mean maximum incisal opening increased from 0.6mm before operation to 25 mm afterwards (range 23-27), and there was minimal surgical morbidity. This new method effectively treats ankylosis of the TMJ in a single stage procedure. Fewer operations and hospital stays, and the maintenance of overall clinical outcome are obvious advantages. PMID:24480620

  13. Expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the rat trigeminal ganglion during the development of temporomandibular joint inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, G.C.; Rizzi, E.; Gerlach, R.F.; Leite-Panissi, C.R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial pain is a prevalent symptom in modern society. Some musculoskeletal orofacial pain is caused by temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). This condition has a multi-factorial etiology, including emotional factors and alteration of the masticator muscle and temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMJ inflammation is considered to be a cause of pain in patients with TMD. Extracellular proteolytic enzymes, specifically the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), have been shown to modulate inflammation and pain. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the expression and level of gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the trigeminal ganglion are altered during different stages of temporomandibular inflammation, as determined by gelatin zymography. This study also evaluated whether mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia, induced by the injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the TMJ capsule, were altered by an MMP inhibitor (doxycycline, DOX). TMJ inflammation was measured by plasma extravasation in the periarticular tissue (Evans blue test) and infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils into the synovial fluid (myeloperoxidase enzyme quantification). MMP expression in the trigeminal ganglion was shown to vary during the phases of the inflammatory process. MMP-9 regulated the early phase and MMP-2 participated in the late phase of this process. Furthermore, increases in plasma extravasation in periarticular tissue and myeloperoxidase activity in the joint tissue, which occurred throughout the inflammation process, were diminished by treatment with DOX, a nonspecific MMP inhibitor. Additionally, the increases of mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia were attenuated by the same treatment. PMID:24270905

  14. Use of adipose stem cells and polylactide discs for tissue engineering of the temporomandibular joint disc

    PubMed Central

    Mäenpää, Katja; Ellä, Ville; Mauno, Jari; Kellomäki, Minna; Suuronen, Riitta; Ylikomi, Timo; Miettinen, Susanna

    2010-01-01

    There is currently no suitable replacement for damaged temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs after discectomy. In the present study, we fabricated bilayer biodegradable polylactide (PLA) discs comprising a non-woven mat of poly(L/D)lactide (P(L/D)LA) 96/4 and a P(L/DL)LA 70/30 membrane plate. The PLA disc was examined in combination with adipose stem cells (ASCs) for tissue engineering of the fibrocartilaginous TMJ disc in vitro. ASCs were cultured in parallel in control and chondrogenic medium for a maximum of six weeks. Relative expression of the genes, aggrecan, type I collagen and type II collagen present in the TMJ disc extracellular matrix increased in the ASC-seeded PLA discs in the chondrogenic medium. The hypertrophic marker, type X collagen, was moderately induced. Alcian blue staining showed accumulation of sulphated glycosaminoglycans. ASC differentiation in the PLA discs was close to that observed in pellet cultures. Comparison of the mRNA levels revealed that the degree of ASC differentiation was lower than that in TMJ disc-derived cells and tissue. The pellet format supported the phenotype of the TMJ disc-derived cells under chondrogenic conditions and also enhanced their hyalinization potential, which is considered part of the TMJ disc degeneration process. Accordingly, the combination of ASCs and PLA discs has potential for the development of a tissue-engineered TMJ disc replacement. PMID:19474082

  15. Lateral impingements of the temporomandibular joint: a classification system and MRI imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kirk, W S

    2013-02-01

    Finite element analysis of dynamic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) loading reveals a predominance of localization of loading laterally towards the collateral ligament regions and disc/capsule attachments to the mandibular condyle. A previous publication (Kirk, Kirk. OMS Clin North Am 2006;18:345-68) introduced biomechanical principles for surgeons to consider in the diagnostic phase of management as well as initial surgical procedure selection. The concept of impingements and their impact with development of derangement is presented in this paper with an expanded collection of imaging characteristics. Diagnostic coronal imaging using a dual photon imaging technique is presented. This technique is superior to traditional T1 and T2 weighted imaging sequences when sagittal imaging is employed. Coronal imaging using this technique adds a new dimension to preoperative imaging. Impingement presence and the discernment of early lateral disc/capsule rupture from the condyle of the mandible is superior with the dual photon technique. Images and a classification of degrees of impingement are presented. The biomechanical importance of diagnosis of impingement is discussed. PMID:23218512

  16. HLA analysis in patients with degenerative diseases of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Learreta, Jorge A; Bono, Andrea E; Durst, Andreas C

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of HLA alleles, specifically HLA-DR alleles, and to correlate them with clinical and radiological features of patients with degenerative processes (DP) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The final goal was to determine which allele can be used to identify patients having more aggressive forms of the articular pathologies. Thirty-two (32) Caucasian patients with DP of the TMJ were included in the study. The SSOP (Luminex Corp., Austin, TX) method was used to determine class II HLA alleles. The presence of HLA-II DR in patients with DP of the TMJ was 98%. The presence of HLA was significantly higher in patients with DP of the TMJ than in healthy subjects (66%) (p=0.003). HLA DR52 was significantly more frequent in patients than in healthy individuals (40.62% vs. 13.79%, p = 0.041). While the percentage of DR11 positive individuals was also higher among patients than among healthy control subjects, the association with DP of the TMJ was not significant (p=0.220). Patients having the DR52 allele had higher deformation or DP. It was concluded that HLA-DR54 and DR11 alleles are associated with a higher susceptibility to DP of the TMJ, and HLA-DR54 and DR52 are associated with a higher severity of DP. PMID:21370767

  17. The contribution of computerized axiography to the functional evaluation of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Botos, Alexandra Maria; Mesaros, Anca Stefania; Zimbran, Adela Ioana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to give comprehensive information on the clinical use of computerized axiography (CA) in the evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mobility in a patient who undergoes orthognatic surgery. A 20-year-old female patient with class III skeletal anomaly and who underwent orthognatic surgery is presented. Pre- and postsurgical CA recordings for the patient are compared in order to evaluate the functional modifications that appear. The CA is a functional investigation of the TMJ and records the border movements of the mandible: protrusion, lateral movements and open/close. The starting point for every movement is the centric relation position. This allows for very high reproducibility of the CA and the data can later become available for comparison of examinations performed at different times. The CA can offer data to programme an articulator or to evaluate the functional evolution of the TMJs after various occlusal interventions (prosthodontic, orthodontic or orthognatic). After comparing the pre- and postsurgical CA recordings, a significant improvement of the TMJ function after the repositioning of the maxilla and mandible through orthognatic surgery was confirmed. In conclusion, our case confirms the results in literature that CA is a reproducible and reliable investigation method in the evaluation of TMJ function in orthognatic surgery patients, that it facilitates the monitoring of the evolution of the functionality of the TMJ ever time and that it allows for comparative evaluation of the two TMJs. PMID:27547067

  18. Pre-arthroplastic and simultaneous mandibular distraction for correction of facial deformity in temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Chellappa, A.L.; Mehrotra, D.; Vishwakarma, K.; Mahajan, N.; Bhutia, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In cases of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis, interposition arthroplasty allows return of functional jaw movements. In order to improve the facial appearance, distraction osteogenesis is the treatment of choice, and may be timed either as a pre-arthroplastic, simultaneous or post-arthroplastic procedure. This study was planned to compare the treatment outcomes of pre-arthroplastic distraction (PAD) and simultaneous arthroplastic distraction (SAD) to establish the better treatment modality in terms of improvement in function and aesthetics. Materials and methods This prospective randomized experimental study included 20 children and adolescents suffering from facial deformity due to long standing unilateral TMJ ankylosis. They were randomly allocated to the two surgical groups with ten in each group. Result Both groups resulted in good facial symmetry and aesthetics. Initially, during the distraction period, mouth opening of SAD group scored less than that of PAD group but became comparable in 30 days. More pain at the distraction site and over the normal TMJ was observed in PAD group. The excursive movements were almost comparable in both the groups. Conclusion We conclude that both procedures are effective in correcting the post-ankylotic deformity and improving function. Although PAD has better control over movement of the distracting segment, the contralateral TMJ may experience pain. SAD requires a shorter management period but is associated with a temporary decrease in function. Also, control of distraction may be difficult and chances of reankylosis are always there. PMID:26587380

  19. Zurich pediatric distractor for ramal condylar unit distraction in temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Brig N. K.; Roy, I. D.; Sharma, Rohit; Kaur, Maj Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) Ankylosis is an extremely disabling condition characterized by difficulty or inability to open the mouth resulting in facial asymmetry, malocclusion and dental problems. Surgical excision of the ankylosed mass is the only treatment option available to gain mouth opening. The loss in vertical height of ramus following release of ankylosis is difficult to manage in both unilateral and bilateral TMJ ankylosis. Out of all the methods to restore this height Distraction Osteogenesis (DO) is gaining popularity because of predictable gain in the length without any associated morbidity. Recurrent bilateral TMJ ankylosis in a 32 year old male was treated by osteoarthrectomy and temporal fascia interpositioning arthroplasty. Bilateral reconstruction of ramal condylar unit (RCU) was carried out by Zurich paediatric distractor (KLS Martin, Tuttlingen Germany). Following a latency period of 7 days distraction was carried out at a rate of 1mm/day for 8 days. Distractors were removed after 12 weeks of consolidation period. The case was followed up for 12 months during which the mouth opening was maintained at 38 mm and there was no anterior open bite.

  20. Prediction at long-term condyle screw fixation of temporomandibular joint implant: A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A; Duarte, R J; Mesnard, M

    2015-05-01

    The fixation of commercial temporomandibular joint (TMJ) implant is accomplished by using screws, which, in some cases, can lead to loosening of the implant. The aim of this study was to predict the evolution of fixation success of a TMJ. Numerical models using a Christensen TMJ implant were developed to analyze strain distributions in the adjacent mandibular bone. The geometry of a human mandible was developed based on computed tomography (CT) scans from a cadaveric mandible on which a TMJ implant was subsequently placed. In this study, the five most important muscle forces acting were applied and the anatomical conditions replicated. The evolution of fixation was defined according to bone response methodology focused in strain distribution around the screws. Strain and micromotions were analyzed to evaluate implant stability, and the evolution process conduct at three different stages: start with all nine screws in place (initial stage); middle stage, with three screws removed (middle stage), and end stage, with only three screws in place (final stage). With regard to loosening, the implant success fixation changed the strains in the bone between 21% and 30%, when considering the last stage. The most important screw positions were #1, #7, and #9. It was observed that, despite the commercial Christensen TMJ implant providing nine screw positions for fixation, only three screws were necessary to ensure implant stability and fixation success. PMID:25819477

  1. Temporomandibular Joint Ganglion Cyst: A Unique Case of Complete Resolution Following Subtotal Excision.

    PubMed

    Levarek, Rachel E; Nolan, Patrick J

    2016-09-01

    Ganglion cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are a rare entity. Most often, ganglions present in anatomic regions, such as the hand, wrist, knee, foot, or ankle. Ganglion cysts are pseudocysts characterized by a fibrous connective tissue lining that lacks synovial cells and contains a thick gelatinous material. The etiology remains unclear, but might involve myxoid degeneration or softening of the collagen and connective tissue after long-term irritation and trauma. Ganglion cysts of the TMJ most commonly present as a swelling in the preauricular region, produce limited or no pain, and often have no effect on mouth opening. Because of the infrequent involvement of ganglion cysts with the TMJ and the nonspecific clinical presentation, the diagnosis is challenging. Diagnostic imaging tools, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have aided in diagnosis; however, only histopathologic examination will lead to a definitive diagnosis. The precise management of ganglion cysts of the TMJ remains uncertain owing to the uncommon appearance of these lesions. Treatment has focused on surgical excision without regard for lesion size or symptoms. This seems to be due to the decreased rate of recurrence after complete excision and microscopic examination providing the best method for a definitive diagnosis. This report describes a unique case of an 88-year-old woman with a large multilocular ganglion cyst of the right TMJ that completely resolved approximately 1.5 years after subtotal cystectomy. PMID:27019412

  2. Zurich pediatric distractor for ramal condylar unit distraction in temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Brig N K; Roy, I D; Sharma, Rohit; Kaur, Maj Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) Ankylosis is an extremely disabling condition characterized by difficulty or inability to open the mouth resulting in facial asymmetry, malocclusion and dental problems. Surgical excision of the ankylosed mass is the only treatment option available to gain mouth opening. The loss in vertical height of ramus following release of ankylosis is difficult to manage in both unilateral and bilateral TMJ ankylosis. Out of all the methods to restore this height Distraction Osteogenesis (DO) is gaining popularity because of predictable gain in the length without any associated morbidity. Recurrent bilateral TMJ ankylosis in a 32 year old male was treated by osteoarthrectomy and temporal fascia interpositioning arthroplasty. Bilateral reconstruction of ramal condylar unit (RCU) was carried out by Zurich paediatric distractor (KLS Martin, Tuttlingen Germany). Following a latency period of 7 days distraction was carried out at a rate of 1mm/day for 8 days. Distractors were removed after 12 weeks of consolidation period. The case was followed up for 12 months during which the mouth opening was maintained at 38 mm and there was no anterior open bite. PMID:27563617

  3. Diagnostic index of three-dimensional osteoarthritic changes in temporomandibular joint condylar morphology.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Liliane R; Gomes, Marcelo; Jung, Bryan; Paniagua, Beatriz; Ruellas, Antonio C; Gonçalves, João Roberto; Styner, Martin A; Wolford, Larry; Cevidanes, Lucia

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate imaging statistical approaches for classifying three-dimensional (3-D) osteoarthritic morphological variations among 169 temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyles. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired from 69 subjects with long-term TMJ osteoarthritis (OA), 15 subjects at initial diagnosis of OA, and 7 healthy controls. Three-dimensional surface models of the condyles were constructed and SPHARM-PDM established correspondent points on each model. Multivariate analysis of covariance and direction-projection-permutation (DiProPerm) were used for testing statistical significance of the differences between the groups determined by clinical and radiographic diagnoses. Unsupervised classification using hierarchical agglomerative clustering was then conducted. Compared with healthy controls, OA average condyle was significantly smaller in all dimensions except its anterior surface. Significant flattening of the lateral pole was noticed at initial diagnosis. We observed areas of 3.88-mm bone resorption at the superior surface and 3.10-mm bone apposition at the anterior aspect of the long-term OA average model. DiProPerm supported a significant difference between the healthy control and OA group ([Formula: see text]). Clinically meaningful unsupervised classification of TMJ condylar morphology determined a preliminary diagnostic index of 3-D osteoarthritic changes, which may be the first step towards a more targeted diagnosis of this condition. PMID:26158119

  4. Changes in Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Symptoms Following Massage Therapy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Melissa Joan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this case report was to describe the effects that massage therapy had on a woman with temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Participant The 26-year-old woman’s primary symptoms were pain, decreased range of motion, clicking, and crepitus. These symptoms were reportedly associated with emotional stress and bruxism. Intervention Ten 45-minute massage therapy treatments were administered over a five-week period. The client’s progress was monitored by an initial, midway, and final assessment, using range of motion testing, personal interview, an orthopedic test, and postural analysis. Progress was also evaluated by the use of a daily journal. The client participated in a home care routine consisting of stretches, self-massage, postural training, a proprioception exercise, and hydrotherapy. Results Results include an increase in maximal opening from 3.1 cm to 3.8 cm, an overall increase in neck range of motion, a decrease in muscle hypertonicity using the Wendy Nickel’s Scale, a decrease in pain from 7/10 to 3/10 on a numerical pain scale, and a decline in stress. Conclusion Although the client in this report experienced positive results, more extensive studies are needed to understand the effects of massage on TMD. PMID:22211156

  5. Injecting vascular endothelial growth factor into the temporomandibular joint induces osteoarthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pei; Jiao, ZiXian; Zheng, Ji Si; Xu, Wei Feng; Zhang, Shang Yong; Qin, An; Yang, Chi

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can initiate osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study we evaluated the effects of intra-articular injection of exogenous VEGF in the TMJ in mice on the early stage. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley mice were equally divided into 3 groups. In the vegf group, the mice received an injection of VEGF solution (50 μL) in the TMJ once a week over a period of 4 weeks. In the sham group, the mice received an injection of saline (50 μL). The control group did not receive any injection. Four mice from each group were sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Gradual prominent cartilage degeneration was observed in the vegf group. Additionally, this group showed higher expressions of metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-13, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and a higher number of apoptotic chondrocytes and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-positive chondrocytes. Micro-computed tomography (CT) revealed prominent subchondral bone resorption in the vegf group, with a high number of osteoclasts in the subchondral bone. In vitro study demonstrated that VEGF can promote osteoclast differentiation. In conclusion, our study found that VEGF can initiate TMJ OA by destroying cartilage and subchondral bone. PMID:26531672

  6. Electromyographic power spectrum of jaw muscles during clenching in unilateral temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Park, I H; McCall, W D; Chung, J W

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between temporomandibular joints (TMJ) osteoarthritis and masticatory muscle disorders is poorly understood. The data are sparse, the results are conflicting, and electromyographic (EMG) power spectrum analysis has not been used. The aims of this study were to compare the differences in EMG power spectrum during, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) before and after, sustained clenching in patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis and healthy control subjects. Nineteen patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis without masticatory muscle pain and 20 control subjects were evaluated. We measured EMG amplitudes at maximum voluntary contraction, median frequency from the EMG power spectrum during sustained clenching at 70% and PPTs before and after the clenching in both temporalis and masseter muscles. There were no significant differences in PPT decrease between muscles or between groups during sustained clenching. There were no significant differences in maximum voluntary contraction EMG activity ratios of affected to unaffected sides between groups, or of masseter to temporalis muscles between affected and unaffected side of patients with TMJ osteoarthritis. Median frequencies decreased from the beginning to the end of the sustained clench, and the interaction between group and clench was significant: the median frequency decrease was larger in the osteoarthritis group. Our results suggested that masticatory muscles of patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis are more easily fatigued during sustained clenching than normal subjects. PMID:22672238

  7. Comparison of ultrasound-guided and conventional arthrocentesis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Sivri, Mustan Barıs; Ozkan, Yasar; Pekiner, Filiz Namdar; Gocmen, Gokhan

    2016-07-01

    Arthrocentesis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can be done either conventionally or under ultrasonographic guidance, and we have compared the effectiveness of the two techniques. Twenty patients who required arthrocentesis of the TMJ were randomly assigned to ultrasonographically guided (US-guided) and conservative arthrocentesis (n=10 in each group). The number of relocations of the first and second punctures, pain experienced during each procedure measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), and the duration of the procedure were the main outcome variables. The pain score compared with the maximal interincisal mouth opening measured preoperatively, immediately after operation, at 1 week, and 1 and 3 months, were secondary outcome variables. No patient in either group developed a complication, and there was no significant difference between the two groups, except that US-guided arthrocentesis took significantly longer than the conventional technique (p=0.000). US-guided arthrocentesis of the TMJ was no more successful than the conventional technique, and took longer. Further studies with more patients are required to validate these findings. PMID:27118616

  8. Stability of treatments for recurrent temporomandibular joint luxation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, V L; Vitorino, N de S; Nascimento, A L de O; da Silva Júnior, D C; de Freitas, P H L

    2016-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint luxation (TMJ) is the excessive anterior translation of the mandibular condyle out of its normal range of movement and away from the glenoid fossa. Once dislocation occurs, the abnormal condylar position generates reflex contractions of the masticatory muscles, which in turn hinder movement of the condyle back to its resting position. Frequent luxation episodes characterize a condition referred to as recurrent TMJ luxation. While there are several surgical and conservative therapeutic options available for recurrent TMJ luxation, a robust, evidence-based rationale for choosing one technique over another is missing. Thus, a systematic review based on the PRISMA statement was proposed in an attempt to determine which therapeutic option results in the longest time to relapse. There is no good quality evidence on which treatment options guarantee the long-term elimination of recurrent TMJ luxation. In cases of post-surgical relapse, eminectomy has often been used as a 'rescue procedure', which may mean that surgeons empirically consider this treatment to be the 'gold standard' for addressing recurrent TMJ luxation. PMID:26616027

  9. Methotrexate pharmacotherapy for implant-related temporomandibular joint pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Paul; Peterson, Erik J; Durham, Justin; Nixdorf, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    This article presents a patient experiencing several years of pain associated with bilateral failed temporomandibular joint (TMJ) Proplast/Teflon fossa prostheses. Despite surgical removal of the prostheses and comprehensive conservative management, including typical pharmacotherapy approaches for chronic pain, pain was still not relieved, and management was revised to target a putative chronic inflammatory disorder. Methotrexate was prescribed because of its known efficacy for inflammation and pain reduction in rheumatoid arthritis. Titration of methotrexate dosage over 5 months to a weekly dose of 20 mg resulted in reduced pain intensity at rest, increased pain-free maximal jaw opening, and a reduction in the sensory component of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Maximum assisted jaw opening remained the same, as did the palpation tenderness of both TMJs and of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Methotrexate pharmacotherapy may represent a viable option when conservative treatments have failed to provide significant pain relief in patients who have had Proplast/Teflon TMJ implants. PMID:25047933

  10. Comparison of different approaches to the reduction of anterior temporomandibular joint dislocation: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ardehali, M M; Tari, N; Bastaninejad, Sh; Amirizad, E

    2016-08-01

    This randomized clinical trial was designed to compare three different reduction methods for anterior temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation. The three methods evaluated were the conventional method, wrist pivot method, and extraoral method. The study sample comprised 90 consecutive patients suffering from anterior dislocation of the TMJ, who were allocated randomly to one of the three groups. This study found success rates of 86.7% for the conventional method, 96.7% for the wrist pivot method, and 66.7% for the extraoral method. The extraoral method was more difficult for the physician and the patient than the other two methods. For the patients, the wrist pivot method was easier than the other methods. For the doctors, the extraoral method was significantly more difficult than the other methods. In conclusion, due to the absence of a biting risk with the extraoral method and the lack of a significant difference in success between this method and the conventional method, the extraoral method could be considered the appropriate first-line treatment where there is a risk of the patient biting the surgeon's hand. Given the overall benefits of the wrist pivot method, this method could be considered the first-line and gold standard treatment modality in other cases. PMID:27160610

  11. Computed tomographic findings in dogs and cats with temporomandibular joint disorders: 58 cases (2006–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Arzi, Boaz; Cissell, Derek D.; Verstraete, Frank J. M.; Kass, Philip H.; DuRaine, Grayson D.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe CT findings in dogs and cats with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Design Retrospective case-series. Animals 41 dogs and 17 cats. Procedures Medical records and CT images of the skull were reviewed for dogs and cats that were examined at a dentistry and oral surgery specialty practice between 2006 and 2011. Results Of 142 dogs and 42 cats evaluated, 41 dogs and 17 cats had CT findings consistent with a TMJ disorder. In dogs, the most common TMJ disorder was osteoarthritis; however, in most cases, there were other TMJ disorders present in addition to osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis was more frequently identified at the medial aspect rather than the lateral aspect of the TMJ, whereas the frequency of osteoarthritic involvement of the dorsal and ventral compartments did not differ significantly. In cats, fractures were the most common TMJ disorder, followed by osteoarthritis. Clinical signs were observed in all dogs and cats with TMJ fractures, dysplasia, ankylosis, luxation, and tumors; however, only 4 of 15 dogs and 2 of 4 cats with osteoarthritis alone had clinical signs. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results indicated that TMJ disorders are frequently present in combination. Osteoarthritis was the most common TMJ disorder in dogs and the second most common TMJ disorder in cats. Computed tomography should be considered as a tool for the diagnosis of TMJ disorders in dogs and cats with suspected orofacial disorders and pain. PMID:23234284

  12. Early-onset osteoarthritis of mouse temporomandibular joint induced by partial discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, L.; Polur, I.; Lim, C.; Servais, J. M.; Dobeck, J.; Li, Y.; Olsen, B. R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of this study is to characterize mouse temporomandibular joint (TMJ) following partial discectomy, since there is no documentation of whether or not partial discectomy can induce early-onset osteoarthritis (OA) in mouse TMJ. Methods Partial discs of TMJ in mice were removed by microsurgery. Histology was performed to characterize articular cartilages from the TMJ of mice. The morphology of the articular cartilages was evaluated using a modified Mankin scoring system. Immunohistostaining was carried out to examine the expression of discoidin domain receptor 2 (Ddr2), a type II collagen receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp-13), and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments in the articular cartilage of condyles from the mouse TMJ. Results Articular cartilage degeneration was seen in the mouse TMJ post discectomy, including increased proteoglycan staining in the extracellular matrix at 4 weeks, the appearance of chondrocyte clusters at 8 weeks, reduced proteoglycan staining and fibrillation at 12 weeks and the loss of articular cartilage at 16 weeks. Increased immunostaining for Ddr2, Mmp-13, and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments was detected. Conclusion Results indicate that partial discectomy induces early-onset OA in mouse TMJ and that increased expression of Mmp-13, likely due to the elevated expression of Ddr2, may be one of the factors responsible for the early-onset OA in mouse TMJ. PMID:19230720

  13. Imaging modalities to access bony tumors and hyperplasic reactions of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Werner H; Venturin, Jaqueline S; Langlais, Robert P; Clark, Glenn T

    2010-08-01

    Benign and malignant tumors in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. However, when a patient presents with clinical findings such as altered occlusion or facial asymmetry, a morphologic alteration in the condyle should be ruled out. The differential diagnosis for benign hyperplastic bony lesions in the TMJ should include condylar hyperplasia, osteochondroma, osteoma, chondroma, and osteoblastoma. If malignant features are present, chondrosarcoma and osteosarcoma should be considered. For the differential diagnosis, imaging is the most noninvasive method to evaluate the integrity of the TMJ. Imaging can be classified as morphologic or functional according to the information provided. The current scientific data have shown that panoramic images have 97% sensitivity and 45% specificity for identifying hyperplastic conditions in the TMJ. The sensitivity and specificity of medical computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT is 70% and 100%, and 80% and 100%, respectively, for the detection of bony abnormalities. To differentiate benign and malignant bony tumors, magnetic resonance imaging has a sensitivity and specificity of 44% and 95%, respectively. The corresponding percentages for single positron emission CT are 91% and 94%, for single positron emission CT/CT are 100% and 100%, for positron emission tomography are 88% and 72%, and for positron emission tomography/CT are 100% and 97%. The combination of morphologic and functional (single positron emission CT and positron emission tomography) modalities appears to improve the sensitivity and specificity to assess a hyperplastic condyle, facilitating treatment planning and providing a better prognosis for the patient. PMID:20452115

  14. Distraction osteogenesis in the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis with mandibular micrognathia

    PubMed Central

    Giraddi, Girish B.; Arora, Kirti; Sai Anusha, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aims of the study were to evaluate the efficacy of simultaneous interpositional arthroplasty with distraction osteogenesis (DO) as a single procedure and to give the patient acceptable functional rehabilitation with correction of the gross facial asymmetry. Materials and Methods: Nine patients of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis with micrognathia were treated with interpositional arthroplasty and simultaneous DO and followed for a period of minimum 3 years. Preoperative, immediate postoperative, at the end of distraction, at 6 months and 3 years postdistraction consolidation radiographs were taken along with the clinical examination for mouth opening, deviation, length of the mandible and ramus, midline shift, occlusal cant, and occlusion. Results: The results showed an increase in the mouth opening, length of the mandible and ramus height, correction of deviation, occlusion, and midline shift. Relapse was not seen in any case, rather one patient developed infection at the distractor site and two patients had fracture of the roots of the teeth at the osteotomy site. There was an overall improvement in the facial asymmetry. Conclusion: Simultaneous interpositional arthroplasty with DO should be used to correct TMJ ankylosis associated with facial asymmetry/micrognathia, as it reduces the need for second surgery, thereby saving the trauma of a second surgery and difficulty in intubation, increases the length of the mandible, corrects the deformity, thereby resulting in an acceptable facial esthetics and function.

  15. Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; Winer, J N; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2013-11-01

    Museum skull specimens (n = 1,008) of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were examined macroscopically according to defined criteria for the presence, severity and characteristics of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). The specimens were from stranded young adult to adult animals. Overall, 4.1% of the specimens had findings consistent with TMJ-OA. Of these, 61.0% were from females and 39.0% were from males. In addition, 85.4% of the affected specimens were from adults and 14.6% were from young adults. However, there was no significant association between age and sex with the presence or severity of TMJ-OA. Lesion severity was mild in 41.5%, moderate in 19.5% and severe in 39.0% of affected specimens. The most prominent changes were the presence of osteophytes and subchondral bone defects and porosity. The mandibular condylar process and fossa were affected equally. The lengths of the right and left mandibular heads were significantly associated with age (P = 0.002 and P = 0.003, respectively) and sex (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.001, respectively), but not with the presence of TMJ-OA. The significance of this disease in sea otters remains elusive, but this condition may play an important role in survival of these animals. PMID:23721871

  16. Diagnostic index of three-dimensional osteoarthritic changes in temporomandibular joint condylar morphology

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Liliane R.; Gomes, Marcelo; Jung, Bryan; Paniagua, Beatriz; Ruellas, Antonio C.; Gonçalves, João Roberto; Styner, Martin A.; Wolford, Larry; Cevidanes, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. This study aimed to investigate imaging statistical approaches for classifying three-dimensional (3-D) osteoarthritic morphological variations among 169 temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyles. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired from 69 subjects with long-term TMJ osteoarthritis (OA), 15 subjects at initial diagnosis of OA, and 7 healthy controls. Three-dimensional surface models of the condyles were constructed and SPHARM-PDM established correspondent points on each model. Multivariate analysis of covariance and direction-projection-permutation (DiProPerm) were used for testing statistical significance of the differences between the groups determined by clinical and radiographic diagnoses. Unsupervised classification using hierarchical agglomerative clustering was then conducted. Compared with healthy controls, OA average condyle was significantly smaller in all dimensions except its anterior surface. Significant flattening of the lateral pole was noticed at initial diagnosis. We observed areas of 3.88-mm bone resorption at the superior surface and 3.10-mm bone apposition at the anterior aspect of the long-term OA average model. DiProPerm supported a significant difference between the healthy control and OA group (p-value=0.001). Clinically meaningful unsupervised classification of TMJ condylar morphology determined a preliminary diagnostic index of 3-D osteoarthritic changes, which may be the first step towards a more targeted diagnosis of this condition. PMID:26158119

  17. Association between Ear Fullness, Earache, and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Julya; Doi, Marcelo; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Gorres, Vanessa; Mendes, Marina Stephany; Silva, Izabele Machado; Navarro, Ricardo; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction An earache (otalgia or ear pain) is pain in one or both ears that may last a short or long time. Earache is prevalent in the population with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs), but there is a dearth of epidemiologic studies regarding the association between TMJD and ear pain and ear fullness in older people. Objective To assess the presence of earache and ear fullness in elderly patients with TMJD. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in independently living, elderly individuals. TMJD was assessed by dental evaluation and earache was verified by medical history. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test and relative risk. Results Of the 197 subjects evaluated in this part of the study, 22 had earache, and 35 was verified by ear fullness. Of the 22 subjects with earache, none had conductive or mixed hearing loss in the ears tested. There was a significant association (p = 0.036) between the TMJD and earache (odds ratio = 2.3), but there was no significant association between the TMJD and ear fullness. Conclusion These results highlight the importance of identifying risk factors for earache that can be modified through specific interventions, which is essential in the prevention of future episodes, as well as managing the process of treatment of elderly patients in general. PMID:25992127

  18. The effect of occlusal relationships on the occurrence of sounds in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Uhac, I; Kovac, Z; Vukovojac, S; Zuvić-Butorac, M; Grzić, R; Delić, Z

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of occlusal relationships on the occurrence of sounds in the temporomandibular joint. A group of 100 male subjects aged 24-52 years (X = 35.03+/-6.92) was examined. Analysis of occlusion included determination of the number of existing teeth, number of teeth in occlusion, overbite and overjet, type of occlusion, mediotrusion interferences, relationship of the retruded contact position (RCP) to intercuspal position (ICP), and the amount and direction of sliding from RCP to ICP. Sound was registered by means of a stethoscope and classified according to its character in click or crepitation. Sound was present in 29% of subjects. In 28% of cases it was registered as click and in 2% of cases as crepitation. One subject had simultaneous click and crepitation. The results of the statistical analysis indicate that overbite, type of occlusion, existence of mediotrusion interferences, the relationship of RCP to ICP, and the amount and direction of sliding from RCP to ICP do not have an influence on the occurrence of sounds. The risk of the occurrence of crepitation is significantly increased in the case of the loss of more than 5 teeth, and in the case of horizontal overbite larger than 7.5 mm (p<0.05). PMID:12137311

  19. The contribution of computerized axiography to the functional evaluation of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    BOTOS, ALEXANDRA MARIA; MESAROS, ANCA STEFANIA; ZIMBRAN, ADELA IOANA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to give comprehensive information on the clinical use of computerized axiography (CA) in the evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mobility in a patient who undergoes orthognatic surgery. A 20-year-old female patient with class III skeletal anomaly and who underwent orthognatic surgery is presented. Pre- and postsurgical CA recordings for the patient are compared in order to evaluate the functional modifications that appear. The CA is a functional investigation of the TMJ and records the border movements of the mandible: protrusion, lateral movements and open/close. The starting point for every movement is the centric relation position. This allows for very high reproducibility of the CA and the data can later become available for comparison of examinations performed at different times. The CA can offer data to programme an articulator or to evaluate the functional evolution of the TMJs after various occlusal interventions (prosthodontic, orthodontic or orthognatic). After comparing the pre- and postsurgical CA recordings, a significant improvement of the TMJ function after the repositioning of the maxilla and mandible through orthognatic surgery was confirmed. In conclusion, our case confirms the results in literature that CA is a reproducible and reliable investigation method in the evaluation of TMJ function in orthognatic surgery patients, that it facilitates the monitoring of the evolution of the functionality of the TMJ ever time and that it allows for comparative evaluation of the two TMJs. PMID:27547067

  20. Occlusal changes secondary to temporomandibular joint conditions: a critical review and implications for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    CALDAS, Waleska; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; JANSON, Guilherme; Paulo César Rodrigues, CONTI

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and malocclusion is an extremely critical issue in dentistry. Contrary to the old concept that malocclusion causes TMD, occlusal changes, especially those observed as sudden, may be secondary and reflect joint or muscle disorders due to the obvious connection between these structures and the dental occlusion. Objectives The aim of this article is to present the most commonly occlusal changes secondary to TMD. Methods The clinical presentation of these conditions is discussed. Details regarding diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients presenting TMD prior or during treatment are also presented. Conclusions All plans for irreversible therapy should be preceded by a meticulous analysis of TMD signs and symptoms in such a way that patients are not submitted to irreversible treatment, based on an untrue occlusal relationship, secondary to articular and/or muscular disorders. When present, TMD symptoms must always be controlled to reestablish a “normal” occlusion and allow proper treatment strategy. PMID:27556214

  1. How muscle relaxation and laterotrusion resolve open locks of the temporomandibular joint. Forward dynamic 3D-modeling of the human masticatory system.

    PubMed

    Tuijt, M; Koolstra, J H; Lobbezoo, F; Naeije, M

    2016-01-25

    Patients with symptomatic hypermobility of the temporomandibular joint report problems with the closing movement of their jaw. Some are even unable to close their mouth opening wide (open lock). Clinical experience suggests that relaxing the jaw muscles or performing a jaw movement to one side (laterotrusion) might be a solution. The aim of our study was to assess the potential of these strategies for resolving an open lock and we hypothesised that both strategies work equally well in resolving open locks. We assessed the interplay of muscle forces, joint reaction forces and their moments during closing of mouth, following maximal mouth opening. We used a 3D biomechanical model of the masticatory system with a joint shape and muscle orientation that predispose for an open lock. In a forward dynamics approach, the effect of relaxation and laterotrusion strategies was assessed. Performing a laterotrusion movement was predicted to release an open lock for a steeper anterior slope of the articular eminence than relaxing the jaw-closing muscles, herewith we rejected our hypothesis. Both strategies could provide a net jaw closing moment, but only the laterotrusion strategy was able to provide a net posterior force for steeper anterior slope angles. For both strategies, the temporalis muscle appeared pivotal to retrieve the mandibular condyles to the glenoid fossa, due to its' more dorsally oriented working lines. PMID:26726782

  2. Change the myofascial pain and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint following kinesio taping of latent myofascial trigger points in the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30 years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle three times per week for two weeks. The pain triggered when the taut band or nodule was palpated was measured. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The range of motion of the temporomandibular joint was measured. In all subjects, VAS, PPT, and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] In the experimental group, it was found that pain in the SCM was relived, as the VAS and PPT score decrease significantly and range of motion of temporomandibular joint increase significantly. In comparison between the groups, significant differences were shown in the VAS and PPT scores and in the range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping is thought to be an intervention method that can be applied to latent myofascial trigger points. PMID:25276008

  3. Change the Myofascial Pain and Range of Motion of the Temporomandibular Joint Following Kinesio Taping of Latent Myofascial Trigger Points in the Sternocleidomastoid Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30 years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle three times per week for two weeks. The pain triggered when the taut band or nodule was palpated was measured. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The range of motion of the temporomandibular joint was measured. In all subjects, VAS, PPT, and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] In the experimental group, it was found that pain in the SCM was relived, as the VAS and PPT score decrease significantly and range of motion of temporomandibular joint increase significantly. In comparison between the groups, significant differences were shown in the VAS and PPT scores and in the range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping is thought to be an intervention method that can be applied to latent myofascial trigger points. PMID:25276008

  4. Temporomandibular joint disorders and maxillomandibular malformations: role of condylar "repositionin" plate.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Noemi; Matteini, Claudio; Incisivo, Veronica; Belli, Evaristo; Evaristo, Belli

    2009-05-01

    Even if the relationship between condylar position and/or temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and dentofacial deformity is controversial in literature, several patients presenting malocclusion refer to pain and TMDs as the main trouble. There are also various opinions concerning the alterations or improvements of temporomandibular joint symptoms after orthognathic surgery. In agreement with the experience of Universität Würzburg, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of splint technique to reproduce centric condyle positioning in bimaxillary osteotomy surgeries for the patients with skeletal-facial disorders and coexisting TMDs. The present study is based on a sample of patients with maxillomandibular malocclusion and coexisting TMDs who underwent bimaxillary osteotomy surgeries with splint technique. All patients underwent a protocol consisting of various steps: Pretreatment evaluation consisted of a questionnaire on subjective symptoms, clinical examinations, photographs of the occlusion, plaster casts, bite registrations, examination of the posture; instrumental examinations; panoramic, teleradiography, and cephalometric analysis; stratigraphy of TMD; and electromyography. Presurgical treatment consisted of therapy by modified Farrar splint associated with a pharmacologic therapy for the acute symptoms; orthodontic treatment associated with a global reeducation of the posture and a pompage of the masticatory muscles; and manufacturing of an occlusal splint in the most posterior asymptomatic position. Surgical treatment consisted of bimaxillary osteotomies performed after registering condyle position by a "repositioning" plate. The condyle position is guided by the intermaxillary fixation with the interposition of the occlusal splint. Surgery on maxillary is performed through Le Fort I osteotomy and fixation. Later, sagittal splint osteotomy of mandible is performed. Position of ramus and TMD complex is guided by the positioning of the plates

  5. Effectiveness of different surgical modalities in the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohan; Shen, Pei; Zhang, Shanyong; Yang, Chi; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background: A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of three surgical modalities-gap arthroplasty (GA), interpositional gap arthroplasty (IPG) and joint reconstruction (AR)-in treating temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. Methods: A systematic review was performed using the PUBMED, EMBASE and OVID search engines in February 2015 to identify cohort studies with no restrictions, with the aim of evaluating the three surgical modalities. The outcome was the change between the pre- and postoperative maximal incisal opening (MIO). Analyses of category, heterogeneity, sensitivity and publication bias were performed. A fixed-effects model was used to compute the pooled weighted mean difference in the MIO among the different groups. Result: Seventeen studies with 740 participants were included in the final analysis. The IPG therapy showed a significantly greater MIO when compared to GA (WMD=1.16 mm; 95% CI, 0.15-2.16) and AR (WMD=0.99 mm; 95% CI, 0.05-1.92) therapies. The weighted mean difference between the AR and GA modalities was 2.94 mm (95% CI, 0.12-5.75). The pooled odds ratios (ORs) of the recurrence rate for IPG, GA and AR were 0.01 (95% CI, 0.00-0.03), 0.03 (95% CI, 0.00-0.07) and 0.06 (95% CI, 0.04-0.09), respectively. Conclusion: The analysis showed that IPG was more effective and displayed a lower recurrence rate, followed by AR and GA, in treating TMJ ankylosis. Thus, this analysis provides strong evidence supporting IPG as a first-line therapy for TMJ ankylosis. PMID:26884893

  6. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    PubMed Central

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J. M.; Leale, Dustin M.; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure–function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure–function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter’s hard diet and continuous food intake. PMID:26664997

  7. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J M; Leale, Dustin M; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure-function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure-function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter's hard diet and continuous food intake. PMID:26664997

  8. Ruptured disc after arthroscopic repositioning in the temporomandibular joint: a retrospective magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Cai, Xieyi; Yang, Chi; Wang, Shaoyi; Huang, Linjian

    2014-07-01

    Our aim was to explore the incidence of rupture after arthroscopic repositioning of the disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by reviewing magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the TMJ taken before and after operation, and to investigate correlations retrospectively. We studied 247 patients with anterior disc displacement of the TMJ, and categorised them into 3 groups based on the postoperative MRI. The first group comprised those whose disc ruptured after repositioning, the second those who had a possible rupture of the disc after repositioning, and the third had no rupture of the disc after repositioning. Age, sex, duration of symptoms, maximum incisal mouth opening, whether the anterior disc displacement was unilateral or bilateral, and the Wilkes stage, were included in the analysis. The incidence of rupture (5/247) was 2%. Weak points at the intermediate zone of the disc were found in 4 of the 5 joints. The patients whose discs ruptured were significantly younger than the other 2 groups (p=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in preoperative duration of symptoms and mouth opening among the groups. The proportions of unilateral and bilateral disc displacement (p=0.047) and Wilkes stage (p=0.027) differed among the 3 groups. The Wilkes stages was significantly more advanced in the ruptured group than in the other 2 groups (p=0.027) with 4/5 being bilateral. The weak point in the intermediate zone of the disc on MRI could be a sign of rupture. Teenagers and young adults with anterior disc displacement without reduction, particularly those in whom it is bilateral, are at a higher risk of a rupture after repositioning of the disc by arthroscopy. PMID:24736122

  9. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT IN 1018 ASYMPTOMATIC HORSES: A MULTI-INSTITUTION STUDY.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Kneissl, Sibylle; Rawlinson, Jennifer E; Zwick, Timo; Zekas, Lisa; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Bienert-Zeit, Astrid

    2016-05-01

    Published descriptions of nonseptic arthritis of the equine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare and large studies investigating variations in the TMJ for asymptomatic horses are lacking. The objectives of this cross-sectional, retrospective, multi-institutional study were to describe anatomical variations in the TMJ detected using computed tomography (CT) in an equid population asymptomatic for TMJ disease and determine whether these variations were associated with patient signalment, reason for CT examination, or CT slice width. Medical records at eight hospitals were searched for horses that had head/neck CT scans and no clinical signs of TMJ disease. Age, breed, sex, clinical presentation, and CT slice width data were recorded. Alterations in CT contour and density of the mandibular condyles, mandibular fossae, and TMJ intra-articular discs were described for each horse. Generalized logistic regression was used to test associations between anatomical variations and horse age. A total of 1018 horses were sampled. Anatomical variations were found in TMJ CT images for 40% of horses and 29% of joints. These were dichotomous with regard to age. Horses <1 year old commonly had alterations in the shape and density of the mandibular condyle. Older horses commonly had spherical hypodensities within the mandibular condyles consistent with bone cysts; and hyperdense regions of the intra-articular disc consistent with dystrophic mineralization. Findings indicated that TMJ anatomic variations were common in CT images of younger and older horses asymptomatic for TMJ disease. Future studies are needed to more definitively characterize these CT variations using gross pathology and histopathology. PMID:26773281

  10. RANKL, OPG and CTR mRNA expression in the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEI-WEI; XU, ZHI-MIN; LI, ZHENG-QIANG; ZHANG, YAN; HAN, BING

    2015-01-01

    The calcitonin receptor (CTR) and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) have been found to be involved in the differentiation of osteoclasts. The association between the RANKL:osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression ratio and the pathogenesis of bone-destructive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been described in several joints, but the available data for the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are limited. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of osteoclasts at sites of bone erosion by determining the CTR expression and the RANKL:OPG expression ratio in the TMJ in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: Control group, injected with saline solution for 6 weeks; and CIA group, injected with emulsion. The RANKL and OPG mRNA expression was significantly increased in immunized rats compared with that in non-immunized rats. The RANKL:OPG expression ratio on the trabecular bone surface was 9.0 and 6.4 in the CIA group at weeks 4 and 6, respectively, while the RANKL:OPG expression ratio in the controls was 1.0:2. CTR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in immunized rats compared with that in non-immunized rats; the level of CTR mRNA in the CTR-positive osteoclasts on the trabecular bone surface was 10.9- and 7.8-fold higher in the CIA rats than that in the control rats at weeks 4 and 6, respectively. In conclusion, focal bone destruction in an experimental model of arthritis in the TMJ can be attributed to cells expressing CTR, a defining feature of osteoclasts. The expression of RANKL and OPG mRNA within the inflamed synovium provides an insight into the mechanism of osteoclast differentiation and function at the border of bone erosion in arthritis. PMID:26622411

  11. Transcriptional regulation of Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) by 17β-estradiol in immortalized baboon temporomandibular joint disc cells

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Jennifer S.; Babu, Ramya Akula Suresh; Navarro, Mary M.; LeBaron, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) affect a significant portion of the U.S. population with the majority seeking treatment being women of childbearing age. Due to this striking sexual dimorphism it has been postulated that there is a role for sex hormones in the maintenance of normal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is a secreted lubricating molecule required for maintaining low frictional levels within articular joints, however its role in the TMJ is not well characterized. In this study we describe the development of immortalized baboon cells isolated from specific regions of the TMJ disc and their use in the investigation of PRG4 expression and localization patterns in the TMJ. We identified conserved estrogen response elements within the 5′ flanking region of the PRG4 gene of several species, and found that treatment of baboon TMJ disc cells with estrogen led to reduced PRG4 promoter activity and mRNA expression in vitro. The observed negative regulation of PRG4 by estrogen could lead to increased friction and degradation of joint components over time. This study, for the first time, provides evidence of the regulatory potential of estrogen on PRG4 gene expression and suggests a novel etiology for the gender disparity observed among TMD patients. PMID:24621258

  12. Association of Temporomandibular Joint Signs & Symptoms with Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Manifestations in Endemic Fluoride Areas of Dungarpur District, Rajasthan, India

    PubMed Central

    Asawa, Kailash; Bhat, Nagesh; Tak, Mridula; Shinde, Kushal; Jain, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Endemic fluorosis resulting from high fluoride concentration in groundwater is a major public health problem. India is among the numerous nations, where fluoride sullied groundwater is creating wellbeing issues. Safe drinking water in rural areas of India is predominantly rely on groundwater sources, which are exceptionally contaminated with fluoride. Aim To investigate the association of temporomandibular joint Signs & Symptoms with Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Manifestations among people living in Dad, Bokersal & Deotalab villages of Dungarpur District, Rajasthan, India. Materials and Methods The study group consisted of 750 subjects who were born & brought up in Dad, Bokersal & Deotalab villages of Dungarpur District, Rajasthan. Temporomandibular joint & Dental fluorosis was assessed by performing type III clinical examination according to WHO guidelines (1997). For the assessment of skeletal manifestations, participants were asked to perform three diagnostic tests: (1)Touching the toes without bending the knees; (2) Touching the chest with the chin; (3) Stretching the arms sideways & folding the arms to touch the back of the head. Chi Square test & Multiple Logistic Regression were applied for statistical analysis. Results Among the 750 (462 males & 288 females) who participated in the study, 53% had moderate grade of dental fluorosis. The most prominent symptom suggesting Temporomandibular Joint Disorder was the clicking sound affecting 21.4% population.(p>0.001). TMJ Signs & Symptoms were prominent in the age group of 45-54 years & males were highly affected than females. Conclusion Clinical examination of TMJ in Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Fluorosis subjects showed a significant association with Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Fluorosis. PMID:26816986

  13. Effect of asymmetric force on the condylar cartilage, subchondral bone and collagens in the temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caixia; Xu, Yue; Cheng, Yangxi; Wu, Tuojiang; Li, Huang

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to define the effects of asymmetric force on rat temporomandibular joints (TMJs). A total of 232 10-week-old rats were used in the experiment. Their left TMJs were kept forward and upward with 40g or 120g. The histological and osteogenic changes, as well as the expression of type I, II and III collagens were observed. Our results showed that the curve of the cartilage thickness changes in the anterior part of the treated side in the heavy force group (HS) decreased first and increased later during the strength and the recovery periods, while the reverse changes were shown in the middle and posterior parts. The cartilage thickness change on the other side in the heavy force group (HO) was the opposite. Additionally, the cartilage thickness change on the treated side and the other side of the light force group (LS and LO) were similar to but not as significantly changed as HS and HO. There were significant differences among the experimental groups. The subchondral bone trabecula also decreased after the pressure loading and removing, then recovered, without significant differences among these groups. Furthermore, more pathological changes such as fractures, bone cysts, the degradation of type II collagen and the increased expression of type III collagen were observed on the treated sides following the application of heavy force. In contrast, more osteogenesis and more active changes were found in the light force group. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that asymmetric force exerted different effects on the cartilage, subchondral bone and collagens of TMJs. Greater changes occurred in the heavy force group, and light force provided more benefits for TMJs remodelling. PMID:25703817

  14. Temporomandibular joint pain: A critical role for Trpv4 in the trigeminal ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Williams, Susan H.; McNulty, Amy L.; Hong, Ji Hee; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E.; Parekh, Puja K.; Moore, Carlene; Gereau, Robert; Taylor, Andrea B.; Wang, Fan; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD) is known for its mastication-associated pain. TMJD is medically relevant because of its prevalence, severity, chronicity, and “therapy-refractoriness” of its pain, and its largely elusive pathogenesis. Against this background we sought to investigate pathogenetic contributions of the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel, robustly expressed in the trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons, to TMJ inflammation and pain behavior. We demonstrate here that TRPV4 is critical for TMJ-inflammation evoked pain behavior in mice, and that trigeminal ganglion pro-nociceptive changes are Trpv4-dependent. As a quantitative metric, bite force was recorded as evidence of masticatory sensitization, in keeping with human translational studies. In Trpv4−/− mice with TMJ-inflammation, attenuation of bite force was significantly less than in WT mice. Similar effects were seen with systemic application of a specific TRPV4 inhibitor. TMJ-inflammation and mandibular bony changes were apparent after CFA injections, but remarkably independent of Trpv4 genotype. Intriguingly, as a result of TMJ-inflammation, WT mice exhibited significant up-regulation of TRPV4 and phosphorylated ERK in TMJ-innervating trigeminal sensory neurons, absent in Trpv4−/− mice. Mice with genetically-impaired MEK/ERK phosphorylation in neurons showed a similar resistance to reduction of bite-force as Trpv4−/− mice. Thus, TRPV4 is necessary for masticatory sensitization in TMJ-inflammation, and likely functions up-stream of MEK/ERK phosphorylation in trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons in-vivo. TRPV4 therefore represents a novel pro-nociceptive target in TMJ inflammation, and should be considered a target-of-interest in human TMJD. PMID:23726674

  15. Modeling of muscle forces in humans with and without temporomandibular joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, LR; Liu, H; Gonzalez, YM; Marx, DB; Nickel, JC

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Subjects with/without temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD) were tested for differences in muscle forces. Setting and Sample Population School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo. Ninety-one subjects were classified in 4 groups based on presence/absence (+/-) of chronic myofascial and/or TMJ pain (P) and bilateral disc displacement (DD). Material & Methods Validated numerical models employed an organizational objective and subjects’ anatomy to calculate masticatory muscle forces during static biting. ANOVA and Holm step-down procedure post-hoc tests assessed group differences. Theoretical geometries, representing the range of subjects’ muscle orientations, were surveyed via numerical models to identify key combinations resulting in high muscle forces. Effect-size (Cohen’s d) and ANOVA/post-hoc tests assessed group differences in key muscle orientations. Results +P-DD subjects had significantly higher muscle forces, especially for lateral pterygoid muscles, compared to the other groups (P<0.01) for bite-forces that were directed posteromedially or posterolaterally on mandibular molars and posteriorly and slightly medially on mandibular incisors. Key muscle orientations for peak lateral pterygoid muscle forces were identified and group comparisons showed mean orientation in +P-DD compared to other diagnostic groups was ≥5° more upright for masseter and ≥3° more posteriorly-directed for temporalis muscles (all Cohen’s d ≥0.8). Conclusion Predicted lateral pterygoid muscle forces were significantly higher in +P-DD compared to other groups for specific biting conditions and were attributable, in part, to differences in masseter and temporalis muscle orientations. PMID:25865546

  16. Reactive arthritis in relation to internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Lund, Bodil; Holmlund, Anders; Wretlind, Bengt; Jalal, Shah; Rosén, Annika

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if reactive arthritis was involved in the aetiology of chronic closed lock of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by looking for bacterial antigens in the synovial membrane of the TMJ, and by studying the antibody serology and carriage of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 in patients with chronic closed lock. Patients with reciprocal clicking and healthy subjects acted as controls. We studied a total of 43 consecutive patients, 15 with chronic closed lock, 13 with reciprocal clicking, and 15 healthy controls with no internal derangements of the TMJ. Venous blood samples were collected from all subjects for measurement of concentrations of HLA tissue antigen and serology against Chlamydia trachomatis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Samples of synovial tissue from patients with closed lock and reciprocal clicking were obtained during discectomy and divided into two pieces, the first of which was tested by strand displacement amplification for the presence of C trachomatis, and the second of which was analysed for the presence of species-specific bacterial DNA using 16s rRNA pan-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidence of antibodies against M pneumoniae, Salmonella spp. or Y enterocolitica. No patient had antibodies towards C trachomatis or C jejuni. We found no bacterial DNA in the synovial fluid from any patient. The HLA B27 antigen was present in 2/15 subjects in both the closed lock and control groups, and none in the reciprocal clicking group. In conclusion, reactive arthritis does not seem to be the mechanism of internal derangement of the TMJ. PMID:25957137

  17. Evaluation of Glucosamine sulfate and Ibuprofen effects in patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis symptom

    PubMed Central

    Haghighat, Abbas; Behnia, Ali; Kaviani, Naser; Khorami, Behnam

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Ibuprofen – a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)- and glucosamine sulfate – a natural compound and a food supplement- are two therapeutic agents which have been widely used for treatment of patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. This study was aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of these two medications in the treatment of patients suffering from TMJ disorders. Methods: After obtaining informed consent, 60 patients were randomly allocated to two groups. Patients with painful TMJ, TMJ crepitation or limitation of mouth opening entered the study. Exclusion criteria were history of depressive disorders, cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, asthma, gastrointestinal problems, kidney or liver dysfunction or diabetes mellitus, dental diseases needing ongoing treatment; taking aspirin or warfarin, or concomitant treatment of TMJ disorder with other agents or methods. Thirty patients were treated with ibuprofen 400 mg twice a day, (mean age 27.12 ± 10.83 years) and 30 patients (mean age 26.60 ± 10) were treated with glucosamine sulfate 1500 mg daily. Patients were visited 30, 60 and 90 days after starting the treatment, pain and mandibular opening were checked and compared within and between two groups. Findings: Comparing with baseline measures, both groups had significantly improved post-treatment pain (P < 0.0001 for both groups) and mandibular opening (P value: 0.001 for glucosamine sulfate and 0.03 for ibuprofen). Post treatment pain and mandibular opening showed significantly more improvement in the glucosamine treated patients (P < 0.0001 and 0.01 respectively). Rate of adverse events was significantly lower in the P value glucosamine sulfate group (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: This investigation demonstrated that comparing with a commonly prescribed NSAID – ibuprofen-, glucosamine sulfate is a more effective and safer therapeutic agent for treatment of patients with TMJ degenerative join disorder. PMID

  18. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  19. Clinical, radiographic and MRI findings of the temporomandibular joint in patients with different rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Helenius, L M J; Tervahartiala, P; Helenius, I; Al-Sukhun, J; Kivisaari, L; Suuronen, R; Kautiainen, H; Hallikainen, D; Lindqvist, C; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the condition of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with different rheumatic diseases, and report correlations between the clinical, radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The 67 patients were divided into four groups: 16 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 15 with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 18 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and 18 with spondyloarthropathy (SPA). They were clinically examined, and panoramic tomography, lateral panoramic radiography and MRI of the TMJ were performed. MRI showed reduced articular cartilage in 25% (4/16) of RA, 0% (0/15) of MCTD, 17% (3/18) of AS and 17% (3/18) of SPA patients. Condylar changes included erosion, osteophytes and abnormal shape. Disc alterations included perforation, abnormal anterior position and decreased movement. These abnormalities were most frequent in RA patients, and least frequent in MCTD and SPA patients. Crepitation and reduced maximum opening of the mouth correlated with abnormalities of the disc and articular cartilage as shown by MRI. Severe condylar erosion in panoramic tomograms significantly correlated with MRI findings of condylar erosion (P<0.01), diminished thickness of condylar cartilage, abnormal condylar shape, and abnormal shape of the temporal surface of the TMJ (P< or =0.001). The presence of crepitation, limited mandibular movement and/or pain on movement of the jaw often indicated structural damage to the TMJ. Panoramic radiographs provide an alternative method to MRI but, to obtain a more detailed anatomic picture, MRI is recommended for patients with acute unexplained pain or as part of preoperative work up. A panoramic recording is not indicated when MRI is planned. PMID:17052893

  20. Gap Arthroplasty versus Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junli; Liang, Limin; Jiang, Hua; Gu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gap arthroplasty (GA) and interpositional arthroplasty (IA) are widely used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). However, controversy remains as to whether IA is superior to GA. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Web of science and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched for literature regarding these procedures (published from 1946 to July 28, 2014). A study was included in this analysis if it was: (1) a randomized controlled trial or non-randomized observational cohort study; (2) comparing the clinical outcomes between GA and IA with respect to the maximal incisal opening (MIO) and reankylosis; (3) with a follow-up period of at least 12 months. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale Eight non-randomized observational cohort studies with 272 patients were included. All the statistical analyses were performed using the RevMan 5.3 and Stat 12. The pooled analysis showed no significant difference in the incidence of reankylosis between the IA group (13/120) and the GA group (29/163) (RR= 0.67, 95% CI=0.38 to 1.16; Z=1.43, p=0.15). The IA group showed a significantly larger MIO than the GA group (MD=1.96, 95% CI=0.21 to 3.72, Z=2.19, p=0.03, I2=0%). In conclusion, patients with TMJA could benefit more from IA than GA, with a larger MIO and a similar incidence of reankylosis. IA shows to be an adequate option in the treatment of TMJA based on the results of maximal incisal opening. PMID:26010224

  1. Temporomandibular Joint Condylar Changes Following Maxillomandibular Advancement and Articular Disc Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Joao Roberto; Wolford, Larry Miller; Cassano, Daniel Serra; da Porciuncula, Guilherme; Paniagua, Beatriz; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate condylar changes 1 year after bimaxillary surgical advancement with or without articular disc repositioning using longitudinal quantitative measurements in 3-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) models. Methods Twenty-seven patients treated with maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) underwent cone-beam computed tomography before surgery immediately after surgery and at 1-year follow-up. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging before surgery to assess disc displacements. Ten patients without disc displacement received MMA only. Seventeen patients with articular disc displacement received MMA with simultaneous TMJ disc repositioning (MMA-Drep). Pre- and postsurgical 3D models were superimposed using a voxel-based registration on the cranial base. Results The location, direction, and magnitude of condylar changes were displayed and quantified by graphic semitransparent overlays and 3D color-coded surface distance maps. Rotational condylar displacements were similar in the 2 groups. Immediately after surgery, condylar translational displacements of at least 1.5 mm occurred in a posterior, superior, or mediolateral direction in patients treated with MMA, whereas patients treated with MMA-Drep presented more marked anterior, inferior, and mediolateral condylar displacements. One year after surgery, more than half the patients in the 2 groups presented condylar resorptive changes of at least 1.5 mm. Patients treated with MMA-Drep presented condylar bone apposition of at least 1.5 mm at the superior surface in 26.4%, the anterior surface in 23.4%, the posterior surface in 29.4%, the medial surface in 5.9%, or the lateral surface in 38.2%, whereas bone apposition was not observed in patients treated with MMA. Conclusions One year after surgery, condylar resorptive changes greater than 1.5 mm were observed in the 2 groups. Articular disc repositioning facilitated bone apposition in localized condylar regions in patients treated with MMA

  2. Assessing the reliability of MRI-CBCT image registration to visualize temporomandibular joints

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, J L; Alsufyani, N; Jibri, Z; Lai, H; Major, P W

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate image quality of two methods of registering MRI and CBCT images of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), particularly regarding TMJ articular disc–condyle relationship and osseous abnormality. Methods: MR and CBCT images for 10 patients (20 TMJs) were obtained and co-registered using two methods (non-guided and marker guided) using Mirada XD software (Mirada Medical Ltd, Oxford, UK). Three radiologists independently and blindly evaluated three types of images (MRI, CBCT and registered MRI-CBCT) at two times (T1 and T2) on two criteria: (1) quality of MRI-CBCT registrations (excellent, fair or poor) and (2) TMJ disc–condylar position and articular osseous abnormalities (osteophytes, erosions and subcortical cyst, surface flattening, sclerosis). Results: 75% of the non-guided registered images showed excellent quality, and 95% of the marker-guided registered images showed poor quality. Significant difference was found between the non-guided and marker-guided registration (χ2 = 108.5; p < 0.01). The interexaminer variability of the disc position in MRI [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.50 at T1, 0.56 at T2] was lower than that in MRI-CBCT registered images [ICC = 0.80 (0.52–0.92) at T1, 0.84 (0.62–0.93) at T2]. Erosions and subcortical cysts were noticed less frequently in the MRI-CBCT images than in CBCT images. Conclusions: Non-guided registration proved superior to marker-guided registration. Although MRI-CBCT fused images were slightly more limited than CBCT alone to detect osseous abnormalities, use of the fused images improved the consistency among examiners in detecting disc position in relation to the condyle. PMID:25734241

  3. Differential gene expression in the perichondrium and cartilage of the neonatal mouse temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hinton, R J; Serrano, M; So, S

    2009-08-01

    Our goal was to discover genes differentially expressed in the perichondrium (PC) of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) that might enhance regenerative medicine or orthopaedic therapies directed at the tissues of the temporomandibular joint. We used targeted gene arrays (osteogenesis, stem cell) to identify genes preferentially expressed in the PC and the cartilaginous (C) portions of the MCC in 2-day-old mice. Genes with higher expression in the PC sample related to growth factor ligand-receptor interactions [FGF-13 (6.4x), FGF-18 (4x), NCAM (2x); PGDF receptors, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and IGF-1], the Notch isoforms (especially Notch 3 and 4) and their ligands or structural proteins/proteoglycans [collagen XIV (21x), collagen XVIII (4x), decorin (2.5x)]. Genes with higher expression in the C sample consisted mostly of known cartilage-specific genes [aggrecan (11x), procollagens X (33x), XI (14x), IX (4.5x), Sox 9 (4.4x) and Indian hedgehog (6.7x)]. However, the functional or structural roles of several genes that were expressed at higher levels in the PC sample are unclear [myogenic factor (Myf) 9 (9x), tooth-related genes such as tuftelin (2.5x) and dentin sialophosphoprotein (1.6x), VEGF-B (2x) and its receptors (3-4x) and sclerostin (1.7x)]. FGF, Notch and TGF-beta signalling may be important regulators of MCC proliferation and differentiation; the relatively high expression of genes such as Myf6 and VEGF-B and its receptors suggests a degree of unsuspected plasticity in PC cells. PMID:19627518

  4. Exposure factors and screen-film combinations in temporomandibular joint radiography.

    PubMed

    Thorburn, D N; Stockdill, D A; Kenyon, R P; Cowan, I; Ferguson, M M

    1991-05-01

    Exposure factors and screen-film combinations providing optimal quality are identified for transcranial and transpharyngeal temporomandibular joint views, using conventional intra-oral radiographic equipment without grids. Standardized transcranial and transpharyngeal views, using a fixed whole cadaver head, were performed. Ten readily available screen-film combinations, ranging in nominal speed 20-600, were exposed over 40-100 kV. Films were blindly and independently order ranked by three observers on the basis of sharpness and contrast of cortical outline, trabecular detail, and visualization of adjacent bony structures. Preferred screen-film combinations as a function of kV, preferred kV levels for each screen-film combination, and overall ranking irrespective of kV or screen-film combination, were established. Accepting the use of the lowest radiation dose possible for diagnostically useful radiographs but imposing arbitrarily an upper limit of 20 mGy, it was found that exposures between 50 kV and 70 kV gave the optimal result for both techniques. The amount of scattered radiation in the emergent beam differs greatly between the two techniques. The most favoured combinations for the transpharyngeal technique used screens of fine resolution. Min-r/ortho M screen and film with nominal speed 40 at 60 kV gave 8.0 mGy skin dosage at 0.8 seconds exposure; the same combination at 50 kV was the most favoured, but with skin dosage calculated at 16.7 mGy for 3.0 seconds exposure. For the transcranial technique, medium speed screens providing better differentiation of scattered radiation beams and increased speeds were preferred. Most favoured for image quality was the Lanex Fine/T-Mat G combination at 60 kV giving 17.5 mGy skin radiation dose at 1.75 seconds exposure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1936423

  5. Unilateral Ankylosis of Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) with Contralateral Condylar Aplasia and Related Orthopedic Deformity - Syndromic or Nonsyndromic?

    PubMed

    Vijay, Pradkhshana; Pardhe, Nilesh; Sunil, Vsb; Bajpai, Manas; Chhibber, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Condylar aplasia which means "failure of development" is a rare condition and can be unilateral or bilateral. Mandibular condylar Aplasia without any association with syndrome is extremely rare. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis results from trauma, infection and inadequate surgical treatment of the condylar area. Congenital cases are very rare. We report case of congenital unilateral aplasia of left mandibular condyle with ankylosis of right condyle, with an associated orthopedic deformity in a nine-year-old male patient, which may be a part of some unreported syndrome that has not been mentioned so far in literature. As per our best knowledge, no other case including such clinical features has been reported. PMID:25738097

  6. Differential activation by cytokines of mitogen-activated protein kinases in bovine temporomandibular-joint disc cells.

    PubMed

    Landesberg, R; Takeuchi, E; Puzas, J E

    1999-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders affect a significant proportion of the population. While their aetiology is not well defined, recent histological studies suggest that the majority are similar to the osteoarthritis seen in other joints. Inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha appear to be important in the cascade of events leading to joint destruction in osteoarthritis. Here, cells from the disc of bovine temporomandibular joint were used to examine the response to various cytokines in vitro. Disc cells were stimulated with interleukin-1alpha, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta, platelet-derived growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Their effects were monitored by assessing the phosphorylation of selected signal-transduction intermediates using western blot. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (Erk 1, Erk 2) were rapidly phosphorylated by exposure to basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha, while interleukin-1alpha showed a weak response. Transforming growth factor-beta failed to activate these kinases. Examination of the effect of these cytokines on p38 (an intermediate in the stress-activated protein-kinase pathway) showed an increase in phosphorylated p38 when stimulated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1alpha. The amounts of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 did not significantly increase when the cells were exposed to any of the cytokines. PMID:10075149

  7. Total reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint. Up to 8 years of follow-up of patients treated with Biomet(®) total joint prostheses.

    PubMed

    Westermark, A

    2010-10-01

    12 patients underwent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reconstruction with Biomet total joint prostheses. Indications for TMJ reconstruction included ankylosis, rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative joint disease and condylar resorption. Five patients had unilateral procedures, seven had bilateral. The follow-up ranged between 2 and 8 years. Amongst the ankylotic patients the mean jaw-opening capacity increased from 3.8mm preoperatively to 30.2mm 1 year after surgery, and in most of those patients the opening capacity remained stable over the years. The other patients maintained a mean opening capacity of more than 35 mm. Joint related pain and interference with eating were eliminated after TMJ reconstruction. There were no permanent facial nerve disturbance, no postoperative infections and no device related complications. The outcome supports prosthetic TMJ reconstruction as a useful treatment modality in patients with advanced TMJ disease. PMID:20594807

  8. Clinical effects of an avocado-soybean unsaponifiable extract on arthralgia and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Catunda, I S; Vasconcelos, B C do E; Andrade, E S de S; Costa, D F N

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present preliminary study was to investigate the effectiveness of an avocado-soybean unsaponifiable extract (ASU) in patients with arthralgia and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out. Fourteen women diagnosed with arthralgia and osteoarthritis of the TMJ using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were included in the statistical analysis. The women were allocated randomly to two groups: ASU group and placebo group. Pain was measured using a visual analogue scale and pressure algometer. Mandibular function was evaluated through measurement of mandibular movements. Quality of life was measured using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). The medication (ASU capsules or placebo capsules) was used for 4 months and the total follow-up was 6 months. Those taking the ASU extract had a decrease in pain symptoms and an improvement in quality of life. Moreover, a significant reduction in the use of rescue medication was found in the ASU group compared to the placebo group. This preliminary study provides strong evidence of the effectiveness of an avocado-soybean unsaponifiable extract in patients with degenerative joint diseases and arthralgia in the TMJ. Further studies with larger samples should be performed. PMID:27026059

  9. Primary intra- and juxta-articular vascular malformations of the temporomandibular joint: a clinical analysis of 8 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Yang, Chi; Chen, Min-Jie; Qiu, Ya-Ting; Qiu, Wei-Liu; Zheng, Jia-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze primary intra- and juxta-articular vascular malformations of the temporomandibular joint. Patients and methods: This study retrospectively reviewed eight patients (seven venous malformations and one lymphatico-venous malformation) who were treated for intra- or juxta-articular vascular malformations of the temporomandibular joint from November 2005 to January 2011. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively. Results: According to MRI findings, vascular malformations involving TMJ could be divided into 3 types; homogenous, lacunar and mixed types. All patients underwent surgical resection, and the final clinical diagnoses were confirmed by postoperative histopathology and immunohistochemical examinations. All treated patients had no clinical or radiographic signs of recurrence. Conclusion: Owing to the lower incidence and nonspecific clinical presentations, preoperative diagnosis of vascular malformations involving the TMJ region is very difficult. The classification based on MRI manifestations is proposed first, then it may greatly help in the initial diagnosis. Surgical resection is considered the first option for these TMJ lesions with excellent results. PMID:25932158

  10. Hydroxyapatite/collagen block with platelet rich plasma in temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a pilot study in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, D; Kumar, S; Dhasmana, S

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using preshaped hydroxyapatite/collagen condyles as carriers for platelet-rich plasma after gap arthroplasty in patients with temporomandibular ankylosis, to assess the aesthetic and functional outcomes, and to find out if neocondylar regeneration was possible. We studied 19 patients with temporomandibular joint ankylosis (25 joints), in whom preshaped hydroxyapatite/collagen condyles with platelet-rich plasma were fixed to the ramus with a titanium miniplate, and temporal fascia was placed in between. We evaluated the type of ankylosis, mouth opening before and after operation, deviation on mouth opening, lateral excursion, protrusion, postoperative anterior open bite, radiographic assessment, and complications. All patients showed appreciable improvements in mouth opening and excursion of the jaw. There were a few complications such as mild fever, and temporary involvement of the facial nerve, which improved with time. No open bite or recurrence was reported during the 18 months' follow up. Radiographic evaluation at 3 months showed a less opaque condyle, but the opacity at 18 months was more defined, suggesting a newly formed condyle. A preshaped hydroxyapatite/collagen condyle with platelet-rich plasma improves both aesthetics and function. However, a long term study is required to follow the growth patterns to see if the patients develop any facial deformity as they grow. PMID:22293028

  11. Gender Difference in Prevalence of Signs and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Retrospective Study on 243 Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bagis, Bora; Ayaz, Elif Aydogan; Turgut, Sedanur; Durkan, Rukiye; Özcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated the prevalence of the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) among patients with TMD symptoms. Methods: Between September 2011 and December 2011, 243 consecutive patients (171 females, 72 males, mean age 41 years) who were referred to the Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon were examined physically and completed a questionnaire regarding age, gender, social status, general health, antidepressant drug usage, dental status, limited mouth opening, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds, and parafunctions (bruxism, clenching). The data were analyzed using the chi-square test and binary logistic regression model (alpha = 0.05). Results: With a frequency of 92%, pain in the temporal muscle was the most common symptom, followed by pain during mouth opening (89%) in both genders. TMJ pain at rest, pain in the masseter muscle, clicking, grinding, and anti-depressant use were significantly more frequent in females than males. Age (p=0.006; odds ratio 0.954; 95% CI 0.922-0.987) and missing teeth (p=0.003; odds ratio 3.753; 95% CI 1.589-8.863) had significant effects on the prevalence of TMD. Conclusion: Females had TMD signs and symptoms more frequently than males in the study population. The most common problem in both genders was pain. PMID:22991492

  12. Stress change on the temporomandibular joint in mandibular prognathism subjects with asymmetry after orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Koichiro; Nakagawa, Kiyomasa; Marukawa, Kohei; Yamamoto, Etsuhide; Takeuchi, Norio

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in stress on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in 80 Japanese subjects (21 males and 59 females, mean age 23.7 years) with mandibular prognathism, with and without asymmetry after orthognathic surgery using the rigid bodies spring model (RBSM). The asymmetric group consisted of 40 subjects whose Mx-Md midline was more than 3 degrees. The remaining 40 subjects formed the symmetric group. The geometry of the stress analysis model was based on frontal cephalograms of the subjects. Menton (Me), the centre point of occlusal force on a line connecting the bilateral buccal cusps of the second molars, and the most lateral, superior, and medial points on the condyle were plotted on a computer display and stress on the condyle was calculated with the two-dimensional RBSM program, Fortran. The degree (force partition) of the resultant force, the direction (angulation), and the displacement (X, Y) of each condyle were calculated and the horizontal displacement (u), the vertical displacement (v), and rotation displacement (theta) of the mandibular body at Me were calculated pre- and post-operatively. The data was analysed using paired and unpaired t-tests. For the vertical (v) and rotational (theta) displacement, the post-operative value was smaller than the pre-operative value (v: P < 0.001, theta: P = 0.0063) in the asymmetric group. For angulation and the X-component, the post-operative value was smaller than that pre-operatively on the deviated (angulation: P = 0.0074, X-component: P = 0.0003) and non-deviated (angulation: P = 0.0024, X-component: P = 0.001) side in the asymmetric group. However, there was no significant difference between the pre- and post-operative value for any parameter in the symmetric group. These findings suggest that surgical correction of mandibular prognathism, with and without asymmetry, could induce an improvement in stress balance on the TMJ in the frontal aspect. PMID:20798211

  13. ACTIVATION OF B-CATENIN SIGNALLING LEADS TO TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DEFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M.; Li, S.; Xie, W.; Shen, J.; Im, H-J.; Holz, J.D.; Wang, M.; Diekwisch, T.G.H.; Chen, D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive research in knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanism of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the constitutive activation of β-catenin in the middle and deep layers of the articular cartilage can compromise the homeostasis of this tissue in the TMJ. Co12CreERT2 transgenic mice were bred with RosamT/mG reporter mice to determine Cre recombination efficiency. Co12CreERT2 mice were then crossed with β-cateninflox (ex3)/+ mice to generate β-catenin conditional activation mice, β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER. TMJ samples were harvested when the mice were 1-, 3- or 6-month-old and evaluated using histology, histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry. β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice were further crossed with Mmp13flox/flox and Adamts5−/− mice to generate β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)Co12ER and β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER)/Adamts5−/− double mutant mice to investigate the role of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in the development of TMJ disorder. High levels of Cre-recombination were seen in Co12CreERT2;RosamT/mG mice. Progressive TMJ defects developed in 1-, 3- and 6-month-old β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice, as revealed by histology and histomorphometry. Results further demonstrated that the defects observed in β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice were significantly decelerated after deletion of the Mmp13 or Adamts5 gene in (β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)co12ER or β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER/ Adamts5−/− double mutant mice. In summary, we found that β-catenin is a critical gene in the induction of TMJ cartilage degeneration, and over-expressing β-catenin in TMJ cartilage leads to defects assembling an OA-like phenotype. Deletion of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice ameliorates the development of TMJ defects. This study suggests that Mmp13 and Adamts5 could be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of TMJ disorders. PMID:25340802

  14. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Winer, J N; Arzi, B; Leale, D M; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Museum specimens (maxillae and/or mandibles) from 317 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) were examined macroscopically according to predefined criteria and 249 specimens were included in this study. The specimens were acquired between 1906 and 2011. There were 126 specimens (50.6%) from male animals, 93 (37.3%) from female animals and 30 (12.1%) from animals of unknown sex. The ages of the animals ranged from neonate to adult, with 125 adults (50.2%) and 124 young adults (49.8%) included and neonates/juveniles excluded from the study. The number of teeth available for examination was 7,638 (73.5%); 12.3% of teeth were absent artefactually, 0.8% were deemed absent due to acquired tooth loss and 13.4% were absent congenitally. With respect to tooth morphology, 20 teeth (0.26% of available teeth) in 18 specimens (7.2% of available specimens) were small vestigial structures with crowns that were flush with the level of surrounding alveolar bone. One supernumerary tooth and one tooth with enamel hypoplasia were encountered. Persistent deciduous teeth and teeth with an aberrant number of roots were not found. Relatively few teeth (3.7%) displayed attrition/abrasion, 90% of which were the maxillary and mandibular incisor teeth, in 41 polar bears (16.5%). Nearly twice as many adult specimens exhibited attrition/abrasion as those from young adults; significantly more males were affected than females. Dental fractures were noted in 52 polar bears, affecting 20.9% of specimens and 1.3% of the total number of teeth present. More adult polar bears had dental fractures than young adults. There were 21 specimens (8.4%) that displayed overt periapical disease, affecting a total of 24 dental alveoli (0.23%). Some degree of periodontitis was seen in 199 specimens (79.9%); however, only 12.6% of dental alveoli had bony changes indicative of periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 23 specimens (9.2%). TMJ-OA was significantly

  15. Activation of β-catenin signalling leads to temporomandibular joint defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Li, S; Xie, W; Shen, J; Im, H J; Holz, J D; Wang, M; Diekwisch, T G; Chen, D

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive research in knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanism of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the constitutive activation of β-catenin in the middle and deep layers of the articular cartilage can compromise the homeostasis of this tissue in the TMJ. Col2CreERT2 transgenic mice were bred with RosamT/mG reporter mice to determine Cre recombination efficiency. Col2CreERT2 mice were then crossed with β-cateninflox(ex3)+ mice to generate β-catenin conditional activation mice, β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER. TMJ samples were harvested when the mice were 1-, 3- or 6-month-old and evaluated using histology, histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry. β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER mice were further crossed with Mmp13flox/flox and Adamts5-/- mice to generate (β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)Col2ER and β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER)/Adamts5-/- double mutant mice to investigate the role of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in the development of TMJ disorder. High levels of Cre-recombination were seen in Col2CreERT2;RosamT/mGmice. Progressive TMJ defects developed in 1-, 3- and 6-month-old β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER mice, as revealed by histology and histomorphometry. Results further demonstrated that the defects observed in β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER mice were significantly decelerated after deletion of the Mmp13 or Adamts5 gene in (β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)Col2ER or β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER/Adamts5-/- double mutant mice. In summary, we found that β-catenin is a critical gene in the induction of TMJ cartilage degeneration, and over-expressing β-catenin in TMJ cartilage leads to defects assembling an OA-like phenotype. Deletion of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER mice ameliorates the development of TMJ defects. This study suggests that Mmp13 and Adamts5 could be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of TMJ disorders. PMID:25340802

  16. Cyclic Tensile Strain Suppresses Catabolic Effects of Interleukin-1β in Fibrochondrocytes From the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sudha; Long, Ping; Gassner, Robert; Piesco, Nicholas P.; Buckley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To discern the effects of continuous passive motion on inflamed temporomandibular joints (TMJ). Methods The effects of continuous passive motion on TMJ were simulated by exposing primary cultures of rabbit TMJ fibrochondrocyte monolayers to cyclic tensile strain (CTS) in the presence of recombinant human interleukin-1β (rHuIL-1β) in vitro. The messenger RNA (mRNA) induction of rHuIL-1β response elements was examined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. The synthesis of nitric oxide was examined by Griess reaction, and the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was examined by radioimmunoassay. The synthesis of proteins was examined by Western blot analysis of the cell extracts, and synthesis of proteoglycans via incorporation of 35S-sodium sulfate in the culture medium. Results Exposure of TMJ fibrochondrocytes to rHuIL-1β resulted in the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), which were paralleled by NO and PGE2 production. Additionally, IL-1β induced significant levels of collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase 1 [MMP-1]) within 4 hours, and this was sustained over a period of 48 hours. Concomitant application of CTS abrogated the catabolic effects of IL-1β on TMJ chondrocytes by inhibiting iNOS, COX-2, and MMP-1 mRNA production and NO, PGE2, and MMP-1 synthesis. CTS also counteracted cartilage degradation by augmenting expression of mRNA for tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 that is inhibited by rHuIL-1β. In parallel, CTS also counteracted rHuIL-1β–induced suppression of proteoglycan synthesis. Nevertheless, the presence of an inflammatory signal was a prerequisite for the observed CTS actions, because fibrochondrocytes, when exposed to CTS alone, did not exhibit any of the effects described above. Conclusion CTS acts as an effective antagonist of rHuIL-1β by potentially diminishing its catabolic actions on TMJ fibrochondrocytes. Furthermore, CTS actions appear

  17. The use of low level laser therapy in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Herranz-Aparicio, Judit; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Arnabat-Domínguez, Josep; España-Tost, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have been identified as the most important cause of pain in the facial region. The low level laser therapy (LLLT) has demonstrated to have an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and biostimulating effects. The LLLT is a noninvasive, quick and safe, non-pharmaceutical intervention that may be beneficial for patients with TMDs. However the clinical efficiency of LLLT in the treatment of this kind of disorders is controversial. Objectives: Literature review in reference to the use of LLLT in the treatment of TMDs, considering the scientific evidence level of the published studies. Material and Methods: A MEDLINE and COCHRANE database search was made for articles. The keywords used were “temporomandibular disorders” and “low level laser therapy” or “phototherapy” and by means of the Boolean operator “AND”. The search provided a bank of 35 articles, and 16 relevant articles were selected to this review. These articles were critically analyzed and classified according to their level of scientific evidence. This analysis produced 3 literature review articles and 13 are clinical trials. The SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy) was used to classify the articles. Results: Only one article presented an evidence level 1, twelve presented an evidence level 2, and three presented an evidence level 3. According to the principle of evidence-based dentistry, currently there is a scientific evidence level B in favor of using LLLT for treatment of TMDs. Discussion and conclusions: Publications on the use of LLLT for treatment of TMDs are limited making difficult to compare the different studies due to the great variability of the studied variables and the selected laser parameters. The great majority of the studies concluded that the results should be taken with caution due to the methodological limitations. Key words:Low level laser therapy; phototherapy; temporomandibular joint disorders. PMID:23722130

  18. Modified Labial Button Technique for Maintaining Occlusion After Caudal Mandibular Fracture/Temporomandibular Joint Luxation in the Cat.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Alice E; Carmichael, Daniel T

    2016-03-01

    Maxillofacial trauma in cats often results in mandibular symphyseal separation in addition to injuries of the caudal mandible and/or temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Caudal mandibular and TMJ injuries are difficult to access and stabilize using direct fixation techniques, thus indirect fixation is commonly employed. The immediate goals of fixation include stabilization for return to normal occlusion and function with the long-term objective of bony union. Indirect fixation techniques commonly used for stabilization of caudal mandibular and temporomandibular joint fracture/luxation include maxillomandibular fixation (MMF) with acrylic composite, interarcade wiring, tape muzzles, and the bignathic encircling and retaining device (BEARD) technique. This article introduces a modification of the previously described "labial reverse suture through buttons" technique used by Koestlin et al and the "labial locking with buttons" technique by Rocha et al. In cases with minimally displaced subcondylar and pericondylar fractures without joint involvement, the labial button technique can provide sufficient stabilization for healing. Advantages of the modified labial button technique include ease of application, noninvasive nature, and use of readily available materials. The construct can remain in place for a variable of amount of time, depending on its intended purpose. It serves as an alternative to the tape muzzle, which is rarely tolerated by cats. This technique can be easily used in conjunction with other maxillomandibular repairs, such as cerclage wire fixation of mandibular symphyseal separation. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate a modified labial button technique for maintaining occlusion of feline caudal mandibular fractures/TMJ luxations in a step-by-step fashion. PMID:27487655

  19. Association of GDF5, SMAD3 and RUNX2 polymorphisms with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis in female Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J-L; Meng, J-H; Gan, Y-H; Zhou, C-Y; Ma, X-C

    2015-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA) is a complex disease and has a strong genetic component in its pathogenesis. Experimental evidence suggests the involvement of biological pathway in the disease. This case-control study was designed to investigate whether five common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GDF5, SMAD3, RUNX2, TGFβ1 and CHST11, respectively, are associated with TMJOA in female Han Chinese patients. A total of 240 participants were evaluated comprising 114 female patients diagnosed with TMJOA based on Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and 126 healthy female controls. The SNPs of the five genes in the genomic DNA were examined by sequencing, and their allelic, genotypic and carriage rate frequency distributions, as well as the triple combination of the risk genotypes, were analysed using the logistic regression model. The SNP in GDF5 or SMAD3 showed significant association with TMJOA, a relatively weak association was observed in RUNX2. In the triple combinational analysis, the risk of TMJOA grew 5·09 times in the patients with five or six risk alleles (P < 0·01). This is the first study to evaluate the association of GDF5, SMAD3, RUNX2, TGFβ1 and CHST11 with TMJOA in female Han Chinese. Our study suggests that the SNPs of genes related to TGFβ family might contribute to the risk of TMJOA. PMID:25757091

  20. Effects of mandibular advancement surgery on the temporomandibular joint and muscular and articular adaptive changes-a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bermell-Baviera, A; Bellot-Arcís, C; Montiel-Company, J M; Almerich-Silla, J M

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the anatomical changes to the condyle and articular disc following mandibular advancement surgery, the adaptation of the masticatory muscles, and the improvement or worsening of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with pre-existing disorders and those who developed them following surgery. Four databases were searched systematically: PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane Library. Of the 544 articles initially selected, 219 were duplicates and a further 165 were excluded on the basis of their titles and abstracts. On reading the full text, 89 were excluded because they were of no interest and 43 because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. Of the remaining 28 articles, six were excluded because they were considered of low quality and 22 articles were reviewed. Mandibular advancement surgery with condyle repositioning is associated with less TMD. Condylar resorption is a physiological process with a multifactorial aetiology. It is accelerated following mandibular advancement surgery but is not a contraindication to this procedure. Despite the large number of studies on the effects of mandibular advancement surgery on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), this surgery can neither be said to improve nor to worsen TMJ health. PMID:26644217

  1. Retrospective evaluation of airway management with blind awake intubation in temporomandibular joint ankylosis patients: A review of 48 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Duraiswamy; Krishnan, Radhika; Veerabahu, Muthusubramanian; Vikraman, Bhaskara Pandian; Nathan, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the morbidity or mortality associated with the blind awake intubation technique in temporomandibular ankylosis patients. Settings and Design: A total of 48 cases with radiographically and clinically confirmed cases of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis were included in the study for evaluation of anesthetic management and its complications. Materials and Methods: Airway assessment was done with standard proforma including Look externally, evaluate 3-3-2 rule, Mallampati classification, Obstruction, Neck mobility (LEMON) score assessment in all TMJ ankylosis patients. The intubation was carried out with the standard departmental anesthetic protocol in all the patients. The preoperative difficulty assessment and postoperative outcome were recorded. Results: Blind awake intubation was done in 92% of cases, 6% of cases were intubated by fiberoptic awake intubation, and 2% patient required surgical airway. Ninety-eight percent of the patients were cooperative during the awake intubation. The frequent complications encountered during the blind awake intubation were epistaxis and sore throat. Conclusion: In an anesthetic setup, where fiberoptic intubation is not available, blind awake intubation could be considered in the anesthetic management algorithm. PMID:27563608

  2. Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacement using stock prosthesis: a one-year follow-up report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Ryu, Da-Jung; Kim, Hye-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Gon

    2013-01-01

    Alloplastic total replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was developed in recent decades. In some conditions, previous studies suggested the rationale behind alloplastic TMJ replacement rather than reconstruction with autogenous grafts. Currently, three prosthetic products are available and approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Among these products, customized prostheses are manufactured, via computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system for customized design; stock-type prostheses are provided in various sizes and shapes. In this report, two patients (a 50-year-old female who had undergone condylectomy for the treatment of osteochondroma extending to the cranial base on the left condyle, and a 21-year-old male diagnosed with left temporomandibular ankylosis) were treated using the alloplastic total replacement of TMJ using stock prosthesis. The follow-up results of a favorable one-year, short-term therapeutic outcome were obtained for the alloplastic total TMJ replacement using a stock-type prosthesis. PMID:24516821

  3. A Study of the Association Between Sleep Bruxism, Low Quality of Sleep, and Degenerative Changes of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Dias, Glaucia Marques; Bonato, Letícia Ladeira; Guimarães, Josemar Parreira; Silva, Jesca Neftali Nogueira; Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Grossmann, Eduardo; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of degenerative bone changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in individuals suffering from sleep bruxism (SB), associating these characteristics with the quality of sleep. For this, we followed the International Classification of Sleep Disorders for the diagnosis of SB, in addition to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) for the classification of TMD and cone beam computed tomography. It was found that 97.7% of the individuals with bruxism had at least 1 RDC/TMD group III diagnosis, 75.6% of the subjects considered their sleep quality as poor, and the largest group (23%) had centric bruxism. There was no significant association between the pattern of sleep quality (P = 0.36), the type of SB (P = 0.277), and the presence of degenerative changes of the TMJ. Regardless of the quality of sleep and the type of bruxism presented, the prevalence of degenerative bone disorders was high (67%) among women with a mean age of 46 years and a clinical diagnosis of SB. PMID:26501968

  4. Derangement of the temporomandibular joint; a case study using Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Krog, C; May, S

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (MDT) is widely used for spinal problems, and more recently the principles and mechanical syndromes have been applied to extremity musculoskeletal problems. One of the most common classifications is derangement syndrome, which describes a presentation in which repeated movements causes a decrease in symptoms and a restoration of restricted range of movement. The case study describes the application of repeated movements to a patient with a 7-year history of non-specific temporomandibular pain and reduced function, who had had lots of previous failed treatment. Examination using repeated movements resulted in a classification of derangement, and the patient rapidly responded in 4 treatment sessions, with an abolition of pain and full restoration of function, and remained improved after many years. The case study demonstrates the application of Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy principles to a patient with a temporomandibular problem. PMID:22177711

  5. Immediate effects of the serotonin antagonist granisetron on temporomandibular joint pain in patients with systemic inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Voog, O; Alstergren, P; Leibur, E; Kallikorm, R; Kopp, S

    2000-12-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the 5-HT3 antagonist granisetron reduces temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in patients with systemic inflammatory joint disorders. Sixteen patients with systemic inflammatory joint disease with pain localized over the TMJ region and tenderness to digital palpation of the TMJ were included. The current resting pain (VASRest) and the pain during maximum mouth opening (VAS(MVM)) of the TMJs were assessed with a 100 mm visual analogue scale. An electronic pressure algometer was used to estimate the pressure pain threshold (PPT) over the lateral aspect of the TMJ. Venous blood was collected for measurement of the plasma and serum levels of 5-HT, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein. The selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron or saline were injected into the posterior part of the upper TMJ compartment in a randomized double-blind manner. The patients in the granisetron group had lower VASRest than the patients in the saline group after 10 min. In the granisetron group, VASRest was decreased after 10 min, while VAS(MVM) was decreased and PPT increased after 20 min. In the saline group, VAS(MVM) was decreased after 20 min. In conclusion, granisetron has an immediate, short-lasting and specific pain reducing effect in TMJ inflammatory arthritis. The 5-HT3 receptor may therefore be involved in the mediation of TMJ pain in systemic inflammatory joint disorders. PMID:11197756

  6. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Northern Fur Seal (Callorhinus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Aalderink, M T; Nguyen, H P; Kass, P H; Arzi, B; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-05-01

    associated with mild periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 29 specimens (20.0%). Both periodontal disease and TMJ-OA were significantly more common in adults than in juveniles (P <0.0001). Periodontitis was found to be more common in males than in females (P <0.012). Although the significance of the high incidence of periodontitis and TMJ-OA in the northern fur seal remains unknown, the occurrence and severity of these diseases found in this study may play an important role in this species morbidity and mortality. PMID:25824117

  7. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Eastern Pacific Harbour Seal (Phoca vitulina richardii).

    PubMed

    Aalderink, M T; Nguyen, H P; Kass, P H; Arzi, B; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-05-01

    .2%) in seven animals. Periapical lesions were found in four skulls (2.1% of the total number of specimens). None of the specimens showed signs of enamel hypoplasia. More than half (55.6%) of alveoli, either with or without teeth, showed signs of alveolar bony changes consistent with periodontitis. A total of 178 specimens (91.8%) had at least one tooth associated with mild periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 67 specimens (34.5%). The most common articular surface to be affected was the left mandibular fossa of the temporal bone, with lesions in 44 cases (32.8% of all lesions). In 13 specimens (6.7%) all articular surfaces were affected. Both periodontal disease and TMJ-OA were significantly more common in adults than in juveniles (P <0.0001). Although the significance of the high incidence of periodontitis and TMJ-OA in the Eastern Pacific harbor seal remains unknown, the occurrence and severity of these diseases as found in this study may play an important role in the morbidity and mortality of this species. PMID:25824118

  8. Contribution of synovial lining cells to synovial vascularization of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Harada, Fumiko; Magara, Jin; Ohazama, Atsushi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2016-03-01

    The lining layer of the synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) contains two types of lining cells: macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells. The type B cells are particularly heterogeneous in their morphology and immunoreactivity, so that details of their functions remain unclear. Some of the type B cells exhibit certain resemblances in their ultrastructure to those of an activated capillary pericyte at the initial stage of the angiogenesis. The articular surface, composed of cartilage and the disc in the TMJ, has few vasculatures, whereas the synovial lining layer is richly equipped with blood capillaries to produce the constituent of synovial fluid. The present study investigated at both the light and electron microscopic levels the immunocytochemical characteristics of the synovial lining cells in the adult rat TMJ, focusing on their contribution to the synovial vascularization. It also employed an intravascular perfusion with Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) lectin to identify functional vessels in vivo. Results showed that several type B cells expressed desmin, a muscle-specific intermediate filament which is known as the earliest protein to appear during myogenesis as well as being a marker for the immature capillary pericyte. These desmin-positive type B cells showed immunoreactions for vimentin and pericyte markers (neuron-glial 2; NG2 and PDGFRβ) but not for the other markers of myogenic cells (MyoD and myogenin) or a contractile apparatus (αSMA and caldesmon). Immunoreactivity for RECA-1, an endothelial marker, was observed in the macrophage-like type A cells. The arterioles and venules inside the synovial folds extended numerous capillaries with RECA-1-positive endothelial cells and desmin-positive pericytes to distribute densely in the lining layer. The distal portion of these capillaries showing RECA-1-immunoreactivity lacked lectin-staining, indicating a loss of blood-circulation due to sprouting or termination in the

  9. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis and Mandibular Osteomyelitis Arising From an Odontogenic Infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gams, Kevin; Freeman, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been infrequently reported in the literature. Some investigators believe that this condition is under-reported because it is underdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of this condition can lead to serious morbidity, including fistula formation, intracranial abscess, fibrous or bony ankylosis, temporal bone or condylar osteomyelitis, growth alteration, and several others. This report describes a case of septic TMJ arthritis arising from direct spread of an odontogenic infection with subsequent development of mandibular osteomyelitis. The purpose of this case report is to 1) increase awareness of an underdiagnosed condition, 2) establish the seriousness of this infection, 3) for the first time report on a case of TMJ septic arthritis caused by Bacteroides infection, and 4) provide a review of the relevant literature. PMID:26657399

  10. Tenosynovial, Diffuse Type Giant Cell Tumor of the Temporomandibular Joint, Diagnosis and Management of a Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bredell, Marius; Schucknecht, Bernhard; Bode-Lesniewska, Baete

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe a rare unusual case of primary mandibular condylar tenosynovial giant cell tumor of diffuse type with predominantly intraosseous growth and its management by resection and functional reconstruction with a vascularized costochondral graft. Clinical presentation was swelling in the right condylar area and limited mouth opening with radiological evidence of central bone destruction and magnetic resonance imaging showed central hemosiderin deposition. Fine needle aspiration did not lead to a diagnosis and an open biopsy had to be performed. Management consisted of tumor resection and reconstruction with a free vascularized costochondral graft. Tenosynovial diffuse type giant cell tumor of the temporomandibular joint is very rare. Complete resection leads to a low recurrence rate and reconstruction with a costochondral free vascularized flap leads to an excellent functional outcome. PMID:25699124

  11. Prospective analysis of the incidence of metal allergy in patients listed for total replacement of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Sidebottom, A J; Mistry, K

    2014-01-01

    We prospectively analysed the incidence of metal allergies in patients listed for total replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the efficacy of patch testing to prevent rejection phenomena. All patients (n=101) that required a prosthetic TMJ between March 2004 and August 2012 were tested preoperatively. A total of 39% had an allergy to one or more metals and they were given all-titanium prostheses. Following the introduction of this protocol no patients have shown signs of an allergic rejection within 6 months of operation. We suggest that all patients listed for total TMJ replacement should have patch tests for metal allergies and that all-titanium prostheses are used when allergy is detected. PMID:23850381

  12. Immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen antibodies in the temporomandibular joint disc of human foetuses

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, L.O.C.; Lodi, F.R.; Gomes, T.S.; Marques, S.R.; Oshima, C.T.F.; Lancellotti, C.L.P.; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J.F.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyse the immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen markers in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc of human foetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human foetuses supplied by Universidade Federal de Uberaba with gestational ages from 17 to 24 weeks were studied. The gestational age of the foetuses was determined by measuring the crown-rump (CR) length. Macroscopically, the foetuses were fixed in 10% formalin solution and dissected by removing the skin and subcutaneous tissue and exposing the deep structures. Immunohistochemical markers of type I and III were used to characterize the existence of collagen fibres. Analysis of the immunohistochemical markers of types I and III collagen revealed the presence of heterotypical fibril networks. PMID:22073371

  13. Unilateral Ankylosis of Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) with Contralateral Condylar Aplasia and Related Orthopedic Deformity – Syndromic or Nonsyndromic?

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Pradkhshana; Sunil, VSB; Bajpai, Manas; Chhibber, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Condylar aplasia which means “failure of development” is a rare condition and can be unilateral or bilateral. Mandibular condylar Aplasia without any association with syndrome is extremely rare. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis results from trauma, infection and inadequate surgical treatment of the condylar area. Congenital cases are very rare. We report case of congenital unilateral aplasia of left mandibular condyle with ankylosis of right condyle, with an associated orthopedic deformity in a nine-year-old male patient, which may be a part of some unreported syndrome that has not been mentioned so far in literature. As per our best knowledge, no other case including such clinical features has been reported. PMID:25738097

  14. Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage in the synovial cells of the temporomandibular joint in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yamaza, T; Masuda, K F; Atsuta, I; Nishijima, K; Kido, M A; Tanaka, T

    2004-08-01

    Synovial hyperplasia is a feature of degenerative temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease. However, the mechanism by which hyperplasia progresses in the TMJ is unknown. Based on the hypothesis that the oxidative stress generated by mechanical loading causes degenerative changes in the TMJ synovium, we investigated the generation of the highly reactive species, peroxynitrite, and the occurrence of DNA damage in the synovium. After condylar hypermobility of rat TMJs, a marker of peroxynitrite, nitrotyrosine, was localized to the nuclei and cytoplasm of the synovial lining cells and fibroblasts in synovitis-induced TMJ. DNA single-strand breaks were found in the nuclei of the synovial cells only after enzyme treatment, whereas DNA double-strand breaks were not detected. These findings indicate that condylar hypermovement induces the proliferation of synovial cells, and suggest that oxidative stress leads to the progression of synovial hyperplasia via DNA damage of the synovial cells in TMJs after mechanical loading. PMID:15271970

  15. Effect of clenching on biomechanical response of human mandible and temporomandibular joint to traumatic force analyzed by finite element method

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sugiura, Tsutomu; Kawakami, Masayoshi; Kang, Yu B.; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to analyze the effect of clenching on the biomechanical response of human mandible and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) to traumatic force by the finite element (FE) method. Material and Methods: FE models of the mandible and the TMJ in resting and clenching positions were prepared. Distribution and magnitude of von Mises stress were analyzed by applying force as a point load in the symphyseal, canine, body and angle regions of the mandible. In addition, strain energy density (SED) at the articular disc and in posterior connective tissue of TMJ was analyzed. Results: In the resting position, von Mises stress was mainly concentrated at the condylar neck and in the retromolar region of the mandible. In the clenching position, the stress at the condylar neck decreased in all loadings. The stress in the retromolar region similary decreased in the symphyseal, canine and body loading, respectively; however, higher stress was observed in the retromolar region on the loading side in the angle loading. High SED was generated at the articular disc and in posterior connective tissues of TMJ in the resting position. The SED in these tissues decreased in all loadings in the clenching position. Conclusions: Clenching generally reduces stress at the condylar neck and in the retromolar region of the mandible, and strain energy at the articular disc and in posterior connective tissue of TMJ by traumatic forces on the mandible; however, clenching induces greater stress in the retromolar region on the loading side by traumatic force to the angle region. Key words:Mandibular, temporomandibular joint, traumatic force, clenching, finite element analysis. PMID:23524422

  16. Late arthroscopic retrieval of a bullet from hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi K; Aggarwal, Varun

    2009-01-01

    We describe a case of arthroscopic retrieval of a bullet from the hip joint of an 18-year-old boy, who sustained the injury four months back, accidentally, while bird hunting with a country made shotgun. The surgery was performed with the standard ordinary instrumentation of knee arthroscopy. The patient became pain-free the same evening and started partial weight bearing on the next day of surgery. At 13 months follow-up, the patient had returned to normal activity without any functional limitations. PMID:19838396

  17. A longitudinal study on the osteoarthritic change of the temporomandibular joint based on 1-year follow-up computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Yun; Kim, Dae-Jung; Lee, Sang-Goo; Chung, Jin-Woo

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to report the results of a 1-year computed tomographic (CT) follow up of 54 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) affected by osteoarthritis (OA) and to provide longitudinal information on changes in OA and its relationship with clinical signs and symptoms. TMJ OA was diagnosed by history, clinical and CT examinations. The second CT examination was done after about 1 year of conservative treatment. Joints were divided into three groups labeled as no change, improved CT, and worsened CT groups depending on the longitudinal bony change of OA observed in the CT. The sex distribution, mean age, joint noise, subjective pain, joint tenderness, masticatory muscle tenderness, and improvement of subjective symptoms were not different between the groups at the first and second examination, while maximum (p < 0.01) and painless mouth opening range (p < 0.001) at the first examination were both smaller in the worsened CT group. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of OA were improved in 40 joints, 74.1%, at 7.2 ± 4.6 months, the amount if improvement did not differ between the groups. The extent of the destructive change of the condyle was highest in the improved CT group at the first (p < 0.001) and in the worsened CT group at the second examination (p < 0.001). These results imply that the prognosis of OA changes may be independent of the clinical signs and symptoms. More specific longitudinal information as regards OA changes of the TMJ based on a larger sample and a longer follow-up period would be likely to provide a better understanding of TMJ OA. PMID:22075324

  18. Two cases of posterior open bite caused by the thickness of retrodiscal tissue in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Shibuya, Y; Minamikawa, T; Komori, T

    2014-09-01

    There have been few reports of mouth closing disturbances in the final phase of occlusion caused by the posterior thickness of the retrodiscal tissue. Two such cases are described here. The first was a 70-year-old female suffering from a painless mouth closing disturbance on the right side of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). She complained of a feeling like there was an air cushion. The second case was a 51-year-old male with a painless mouth closing disturbance on the left side of the TMJ. In both cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed enlargement of the posterior joint space on the affected side. The conditions of these two cases were improved by local injection of steroid preparations; however further additional treatments were required, including mandible traction in one case and dental prosthetics in the other. Consequently, we consider that the local injection of steroid preparations is useful as an initial treatment, while the use of local injection of steroid preparations alone is not sufficient for the treatment of posterior thickness of the retrodiscal tissue. PMID:24907131

  19. Rabbit model for osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint as a basis for assessment of outcomes after intervention.

    PubMed

    Artuzi, Felipe Ernesto; Langie, Renan; Abreu, Maíra Cavallet de; Quevedo, Alexandre Silva; Corsetti, Adriana; Ponzoni, Deise; Puricelli, Edela

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis can be induced in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by primary or secondary trauma, or overloading of the joint. We have therefore systematically evaluated the histological progression of experimental osteoarthritis induced by a high concentration of monosodium iodoacetate into the rabbit TMJ. These findings may contribute to the establishment of a protocol to investigate the benefits of treatment of osteoarthritis of the TMJ. We used 21 male New Zealand rabbits; the 15 in the test group were given an intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate 10mg/ml into the right TMJ and were killed after 60 (n=5), 80 (n=5), and 100 days (n=5). The six in the control group were given an injection of saline into the right TMJ. The assessment system for osteoarthritis based on six grades was used for the histological analysis of severity. The model was effective in producing histological changes in the cartilage consistent with those found in osteoarthritis at all time points. The within-group analysis indicated that the disease did not progress after 60 days. The successful induction of osteoarthritis in this way, its stabilisation after 60 days, and the appropriate size of the animal suggest that this experimental model is ideal for future studies of the effectiveness of treatment in osteoarthritis of the TMJ. PMID:26872897

  20. β2-adrenergic signal transduction plays a detrimental role in subchondral bone loss of temporomandibular joint in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Kai; Niu, Li-Na; Li, Qi-hong; Ren, Gao-tong; Zhao, Chang-ming; Liu, Yun-dong; Tay, Franklin R.; Wang, Mei-qing

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested whether activation of the sympathetic tone by aberrant joint loading elicits abnormal subchondral bone remodeling in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Abnormal dental occlusion was created in experimental rats, which were then intraperitoneally injected by saline, propranolol or isoproterenol. The norepinephrine contents, distribution of sympathetic nerve fibers, expression of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) and remodeling parameters in the condylar subchondral bone were investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from condylar subchondral bones were harvested for comparison of their β-ARs, pro-osteoclastic gene expressions and pro-osteoclastic function. Increases in norepinephrine level, sympathetic nerve fiber distribution and β2-AR expression were observed in the condylar subchondral bone of experimental rats, together with subchondral bone loss and increased osteoclast activity. β-antagonist (propranolol) suppressed subchondral bone loss and osteoclast hyperfunction while β-agonist (isoproterenol) exacerbated those responses. MSCs from experimental condylar subchondral bone expressed higher levels of β2-AR and RANKL; norepinephrine stimulation further increased their RANKL expression and pro-osteoclastic function. These effects were blocked by inhibition of β2-AR or the PKA pathway. RANKL expression by MSCs decreased after propranolol administration and increased after isoproterenol administration. It is concluded that β2-AR signal-mediated subchondral bone loss in TMJ osteoarthritisis associated with increased RANKL secretion by MSCs. PMID:26219508

  1. Three-Dimensional Measurement and Cluster Analysis for Determining the Size Ranges of Chinese Temporomandibular Joint Replacement Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu-Zhu; Meng, Shuai-Shuai; He, Dong-Mei; Fu, Yu-Zhuo; Liu, Ting; Wang, Fei-Yu; Dong, Min-Jun; Chang, Yu-Si

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the osseous characteristics of Chinese temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and detect the size clusters for total joint prostheses design.Computer tomography (CT) data from 448 Chinese adults (226 male and 222 female, aged from 20 to 83 years, mean age 39.3 years) with 896 normal TMJs were chosen from the Department of Radiology in the Shanghai 9th People's Hospital. Proplan CMF 1.4 software was used to reconstruct the skulls. Three-dimensional (3D) measurements of the TMJ fossa and condyle-ramus units with 13 parameters were performed. Size clusters for prostheses design were determined by hierarchical cluster analyses, nonhierarchical (K-means) cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis.The glenoid fossa was grouped into 3 clusters, and the condyle-ramus units were grouped into 4 clusters. Discriminant analyses were capable of correctly classifying 97.24% of the glenoid fossa and 94.98% of the condyle-ramus units. The means and standard deviations for the parameter values in each cluster were determined.Fossa depth and angles between the condyle and ramus were important parameters for Chinese TMJ prostheses design. 3D measurements and cluster analysis of the osseous morphology of the TMJ provided an anatomical reference and identified the dimensions of the minimum numbers of prosthesis sizes required for Chinese TMJ replacement. PMID:26937929

  2. Relationship of articular soft tissue contour and shape to the underlying eminence and slope profile in young adult temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Pullinger, A G; Bibb, C A; Ding, X; Baldioceda, F

    1993-11-01

    This study examined whether the overall shape of the articular soft tissue overlying the posterior slope and articular eminence of the temporal bone could be predicted by the underlying osseous contour in a histologic model of 51 central sagittal sections of young adult temporomandibular joints. Articular soft tissue and bone contours were traced, and osseous landmarks identified on the basis of joint geometry. Soft tissue thickness measurements were made under low power light microscopy. Seven categories of articular soft tissue pattern were identified. The soft tissue uniformly followed the osseous contour in only one (14%). A progressive increase in soft tissue thickness from the middle of the posterior slope to the articular crest was the most common pattern (35%) but did not describe most of the sample that was more asymmetric. Pattern was poorly predicted by the shape and slope of the temporal bone outline or by dental factors that describe anterior guidance and did not relate to disk displacement. The articular soft tissue compensated for flatter eminence slopes and osseous irregularities and maintained an intact surface. This study has clinical implications for radiographic interpretation of disk space, condyle translation pathways, and the integrity of the functional articular surface. PMID:8247507

  3. Is dextrose prolotherapy superior to placebo for the treatment of temporomandibular joint hypermobility? A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cömert Kiliç, S; Güngörmüş, M

    2016-07-01

    A randomized clinical trial involving adult patients with bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) hypermobility referred for treatment was implemented. The sample comprised 30 consecutive patients, who were divided randomly into two groups. The TMJ hypermobility was treated with either saline (placebo group) or dextrose injections (study group). The solution was injected into five different TMJ areas in three sessions at monthly intervals. The predictor variable was the treatment technique. The outcome variables were visual analogue scale (VAS) evaluations and maximum inter-incisal opening (MIO). Outcome variables were recorded preoperatively and at 12 months postoperatively. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed, and significance was set at a P-value of <0.05. The follow-up sample comprised 26 subjects: 12 in the placebo group and 14 in the study group. Masticatory efficiency increased and general pain complaints and joint sounds decreased significantly in both groups. MIO decreased significantly only in the study group. Insignificant changes in the other parameters were found for both groups. After estimating differences between follow-up and baseline outcomes, the mean change in primary outcome variables showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups. These findings suggest that dextrose prolotherapy is no more effective than placebo treatment for any of the outcome variables of TMJ hypermobility assessed. PMID:26846795

  4. Three-Dimensional Measurement and Cluster Analysis for Determining the Size Ranges of Chinese Temporomandibular Joint Replacement Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu-Zhu; Meng, Shuai-Shuai; He, Dong-Mei; Fu, Yu-Zhuo; Liu, Ting; Wang, Fei-Yu; Dong, Min-Jun; Chang, Yu-Si

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the osseous characteristics of Chinese temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and detect the size clusters for total joint prostheses design. Computer tomography (CT) data from 448 Chinese adults (226 male and 222 female, aged from 20 to 83 years, mean age 39.3 years) with 896 normal TMJs were chosen from the Department of Radiology in the Shanghai 9th People's Hospital. Proplan CMF 1.4 software was used to reconstruct the skulls. Three-dimensional (3D) measurements of the TMJ fossa and condyle-ramus units with 13 parameters were performed. Size clusters for prostheses design were determined by hierarchical cluster analyses, nonhierarchical (K-means) cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis. The glenoid fossa was grouped into 3 clusters, and the condyle-ramus units were grouped into 4 clusters. Discriminant analyses were capable of correctly classifying 97.24% of the glenoid fossa and 94.98% of the condyle-ramus units. The means and standard deviations for the parameter values in each cluster were determined. Fossa depth and angles between the condyle and ramus were important parameters for Chinese TMJ prostheses design. 3D measurements and cluster analysis of the osseous morphology of the TMJ provided an anatomical reference and identified the dimensions of the minimum numbers of prosthesis sizes required for Chinese TMJ replacement. PMID:26937929

  5. Is high-resolution ultrasonography suitable for the detection of temporomandibular joint involvement in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Assaf, AT; Kahl-Nieke, B; Feddersen, J; Habermann, CR

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of high-resolution ultrasonography for the detection of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) changes in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods: We investigated prospectively 20 children (17 female and 3 male; mean age 11.06 years, standard deviation 3.43 years) with TMJ disorders caused by JIA, over a period of 16 months. Using a 12 MHz array transducer, four images in each TMJ (160 images) were acquired. Each image was analysed with regard to five different aspects (condylar erosion, thickness of the condylar disc, synovial thickness, joint effusion and enlargement of the intra-articular space). Results: Diagnosis of JIA was ensured for every child and involvement of the TMJ was proven by MRI. Overall 287 changes (35.9%) were detected by using high-resolution ultrasonography. On 124 images (77.5%) condylar erosions were diagnosed; on 55 images (34.4%) synovial thickness was abnormal; on 48 images (30%) we could see higher thickness of the condylar disc; on 40 images (25%) irregularities of the bony surface were detected; and on 20 images (12.5%) we found joint effusion. Conclusion: High-resolution ultrasonography could be a sufficient diagnostic method, especially for the detection of condylar involvement in children with JIA, even if not all parts of the TMJ are visible for ultrasonography. High-resolution ultrasonography is a valuable tool in particular situations: (i) when MRI examination is not available; (ii) when children fear MRI examination; (iii) in more advanced stages of JIA; and (iv) for monitoring the progression of TMJ involvement and response of therapy. PMID:23439686

  6. Observing the development of the temporomandibular joint in embryonic and post-natal mice using various staining methods

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, WENNA; LI, XIHAI; GAO, BIZHEN; GAN, HUIJUAN; LIN, XUEJUAN; LIAO, LINGHONG; LI, CANDONG

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint that is essential for the movement and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ develops from two mesenchymal condensations, and is composed of the glenoid fossa that originates from the otic capsule by intramembranous ossification, the mandibular condyle of the temporal bone and a fibrocartilagenous articular disc derived from a secondary cartilaginous joint by endochondral ossification. However, the development of the TMJ remains unclear. In the present study, the formation and development of the mouse TMJ was investigated between embryonic day 13.5 and post-natal day 180 in order to elucidate the morphological and molecular alterations that occur during this period. TMJ formation appeared to proceed in three stages: Initiation or blastema stage; growth and cavitation stage; and the maturation or completion stage. In order to investigate the activity of certain transcription factors on TMJ formation and development, the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM), sex determining region Y-box 9, runt-related transcription factor 2, Indian hedgehog homolog, Osterix, collagen I, collagen II, aggrecan, total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), MMP-9 and MMP-13 were detected in the TMJ using in situ and/or immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that the transcription factors, ECM and MMP serve critical functions in the formation and development of the mouse TMJ. In summary, the development of the mouse TMJ was investigated, and the molecular regulation of mouse TMJ formation was partially characterized. The results of the present study may aid the systematic understanding of the physiological processes underlying TMJ formation and development in mice. PMID:26893634

  7. Differences Regarding Branded HA in Italy, Part 2: Data from Clinical Studies on Knee, Hip, Shoulder, Ankle, Temporomandibular Joint, Vertebral Facets, and Carpometacarpal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, A.; Bizzi, E.; De Lucia, O.; Delle Sedie, A.; Tropea, S.; Bentivegna, M.; Mahmoud, A.; Foti, C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of the current study is to collect scientific data on all branded hyaluronic acid (HA) products in Italy that are in use for intra-articular (IA) injection in osteoarthritis (OA) compared with that reported in the leaflet. METHODS An extensive literature research was performed for all articles reporting data on the IA use of HA in OA. Selected studies were taken into consideration only if they are related to products based on HAs that are currently marketed in Italy with the specific joint indication for IA use in patients affected by OA. RESULTS Sixty-two HA products are marketed in Italy: 30 products are indicated for the knee but only 8 were proved with some efficacy; 9 products were effective for the hip but only 6 had hip indication; 7 products proved to be effective for the shoulder but only 3 had the indication; 5 products proved effective for the ankle but only one had the indication; 6 products were effective for the temporomandibular joint but only 2 had the indication; only 2 proved effective for vertebral facet joints but only 1 had the indication; and 5 products proved effective for the carpometacarpal joint but only 2 had the indication. CONCLUSIONS There are only a few products with some evidences, while the majority of products remain without proof. Clinicians and regulators should request postmarketing studies from pharmaceuticals to corroborate with that reported in the leaflet and to gather more data, allowing the clinicians to choose the adequate product for the patient. PMID:27279754

  8. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis caused by condylar fractures: a retrospective analysis of cases at an urban teaching hospital in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Anyanechi, C E

    2015-08-01

    Mandibular condylar fractures are common presentations to hospitals across the globe and remain the most important cause of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. This study aimed to analyze cases of mandibular condylar fracture complicated by TMJ ankylosis after treatment. A 16-year retrospective analysis was performed at the dental and maxillofacial surgery clinic of the study institution; patient data were collected from the hospital records and entered into a pro-forma questionnaire. It was found that 56/3596 (1.6%) fractures resulted in TMJ ankylosis. The age of patients with ankylosis ranged from 12 to 47 years. The age (P=0.03) and gender (P=0.01) distributions were significant, with most cases of ankylosis occurring in those aged 11-30 years (n=43/56, 76.8%). Fractures complicated by ankylosis were intracapsular (n=22/56, 39.3%) and extracapsular (n=34/56, 60.7%). Ankylosis increased significantly with the increase in time lag between injury and fracture treatment (P=0.001). Ankylosis was associated with concomitant mandibular (85.7%) and middle third (66.1%) fractures. Treatment methods were not significantly related to ankylosis (P=0.32). All cases of ankylosis were unilateral, and complete (n=36, 64.3%) and incomplete ankylosis (n=20, 35.7%) were diagnosed clinically. The incorporation of computed tomography scans and rigid internal fixation in the management of condylar fractures will reduce ankylosis. PMID:26008733

  9. Effect of unilateral mandibular distraction osteogenesis on mandibular morphology in rabbits with antigen-induced temporomandibular joint arthritis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, K; Pedersen, T K; Svendsen, P; Hauge, E M; Schou, S; Nørholt, S E

    2015-08-01

    Aim was to evaluate effect of unilateral distraction osteogenesis (DO) on mandibular morphology in rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Forty 8-week-old rabbits were divided into four groups. In groups A,C, arthritis was induced in the right TMJ. Groups A,B underwent DO. Group D served as control group. Cephalometric analysis of mandibular angle, mandibular ramus height, mandibular collum height, and total posterior mandibular height was done on CT-scans preoperatively (T0), after distraction (T1), and at euthanasia (T2). Two-factor ANOVA evaluated the effect of DO and antigen-induced arthritis. No effect of DO or arthritis was observed on mandibular angle or mandibular collum height. For T0-T1, DO increased mandibular ramus height 12.3% (95% CI 5.2-19.4%) in group B (P=0.001) and total posterior mandibular height 6.2% (95% CI 0.3-12.1%) in group A (P=0.04) and 10.0% (95% CI 4.3-15.7%) in group B (P=0.001). For T1-T2, no significant changes occurred in arthritic rabbits (group A). In conclusion, DO increased total posterior mandibular height in rabbits with arthritis. Postoperatively, no significant effect of DO was observed in rabbits with arthritis. Mandibular DO could be a viable treatment modality in patients with TMJ-arthritis. PMID:25835759

  10. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr3 in Chondrocytes leads to Osteoarthritis-like Defects in Temporomandibular Joint of Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Siru; Xie, Yangli; Li, Wei; Huang, Junlan; Wang, Zuqiang; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xianding; Tan, Qiaoyan; Huang, Shuo; Luo, Fengtao; Xu, Meng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Tingting; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hangang; Su, Nan; Du, Xiaolan; Shen, Yue; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a common degenerative disease in adult, which is characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage. To investigate the role of FGFR3 in the homeostasis of TMJ cartilage during adult stage, we generated Fgfr3(f/f); Col2a1-CreER(T2) (Fgfr3 cKO) mice, in which Fgfr3 was deleted in chondrocytes at 2 months of age. OA-like defects were observed in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant increase in expressions of COL10, MMP13 and AMAMTS5. In addition, there was a sharp increase in chondrocyte apoptosis at the Fgfr3 cKO articular surface, which was accompanied by a down-regulation of lubricin expression. Importantly, the expressions of RUNX2 and Indian hedgehog (IHH) were up-regulated in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ. Primary Fgfr3 cKO chondrocytes were treated with IHH signaling inhibitor, which significantly reduced expressions of Runx2, Col10, Mmp13 and Adamts5. Furthermore, the IHH signaling inhibitor partially alleviated OA-like defects in the TMJ of Fgfr3 cKO mice, including restoration of lubricin expression and improvement of the integrity of the articular surface. In conclusion, our study proposes that FGFR3/IHH signaling pathway plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of TMJ articular cartilage during adult stage. PMID:27041063

  11. Expression of lumican related to CD34 and VEGF in the articular disc of the human temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Kiga, N.; Tojyo, I.; Matsumoto, T.; Hiraishi, Y.; Shinohara, Y.; Fujita, S.

    2010-01-01

    Lumican belongs to the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan (SLRP) gene family and has been reported to exist in the cornea, intervertebral disc and tendon. Lumican plays a significant role in the assembly and regulation of collagen fibres. The human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is made up of fibrocartilage with an extracellular matrix (ECM) composed of collagen and proteoglycans. The existence and behaviour of lumican have not been studied in the human TMJ disc. Therefore, we used immunohistochemical methods to detect lumican, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and histochemical staining with toluidine blue in 13 human TMJ specimens (10 surgically removed and 3 obtained from autopsy). In both normal and deformed discs we observed staining with toluidine blue. We found that the area of metachromasia inside the deformed disc was uneven and expression of lumican was strong in the areas negative for metachromasia. Staining of VEGF and CD34 inside the deformed disc was seen. We confirmed the expression of lumican in the human TMJ disc and showed that a large number of fibroblast-like cells existed in the area of strong lumican expression. These new findings about the behaviour of lumican suggest that it may play a key role in the generation of a new collagen network by fibroblast-like cells. PMID:20819773

  12. Testing patient targeted therapies in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder with the arthrokinetic reflex: individual patient research.

    PubMed

    Demerjian, Garabed G; Barkhordarian, Andre; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Traditional research in the health sciences has involved control and experimental groups of patients, and descriptive and inferential statistical analyses performed on the measurements obtained from the samples in each group. As the novel model of translational healthcare, which integrates translational research and translational effectiveness, becomes increasingly established in modern contemporary medicine, healthcare continues to evolve into a model of care that is evidence-based, effectiveness-focused and patient-centered. Patient-centered care and patient-targeted therapies require the timely and critical development and validation of a new research paradigm, individual patient research (IPR), as opposed to the customary group research approach. Here, we propose a model of individual patient research to define and characterize the effectiveness of a novel therapeutic intervention for temporomandibular joint disorder. The intervention must be tailor-made for each individual patient, and the data from each patient must be analyzed individually. We propose that this endeavor is best achieved by means of an adaptive cluster randomized stepped wedge blinded controlled trial, because it permit individual patient outcomes research and analysis, ensures equipoise, and maintains adequate power. The patient targeted therapies section of the Journal of Translational Medicine must endeavor to facilitate the dissemination of studies that focus broadly on translational research for the ultimate benefit of individual patients. PMID:27484895

  13. Management of open bite that developed during treatment for internal derangement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Won; Nakaoka, Kazutoshi; Hamada, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment performed for open bite caused by internal derangement (ID) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A Japanese woman, aged 31 years and 11 months, referred to our department by an oral surgeon had an open bite with clockwise rotation of the mandible and degeneration of the condyle. The overbite was corrected through intrusion of the maxillary and mandibular molars using mini-screw implants to induce counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. Then, the mandibular second premolars were extracted and comprehensive orthodontic treatment was performed to establish a Class I molar relationship with distalization of the maxillary arch and to eliminate anterior crowding. Following treatment, her facial profile improved and a functional and stable occlusion was achieved without recurrence of the TMJ symptoms. These results suggest that orthodontic intrusion of the molars is one of the safer and less stressful alternatives for the management of open bite due to degeneration of the condyles caused by ID and OA of TMJ. PMID:26023542

  14. Temporomandibular joint effusion and its relationship with perceived disability assessed using musculoskeletal ultrasound and a patient-reported disability index

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Lance; Bright, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between effusion of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and patient-reported disability is poorly researched. This pilot study explored the link between TMJ inflammation as measured by ultrasound and patient disability assessed by the Steigerwald Maher TMD Disability Index (SMTDI). The study design used a prospective correlational approach involving a sample with TMJ dysfunction (TMD). Twenty-four patients were recruited from the European School of Osteopathy and a Kent dental practice. Participants completed the SMTDI to determine the level of TMD (symptomatic score >20). A SonoSite SLA “Hockey Stick” [13-6 MHz] musculo-skeletal transducer was placed over the TMJ in a transverse direction and effusion was calculated indirectly by measuring capsular width. An upper left quadrant protocol was used throughout. A regression analysis was run with participants’ gender, age and capsular width as predictor variables modelled against reported SMTDI. Larger capsular widths were found to be significant predictors of SMTDI scores (r = 0.803, p < 0.0001). The patient profile matched with the previous studies and the TMD sufferer population, indicating external validity. Results suggest that the SMTDI could be integrated into practice life as a quick, accessible and easy tool to monitor patients’ progress and assess levels of inflammation, without the need for repetitive imaging. The study design proved reproducible and a larger scale study is indicated.

  15. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr3 in Chondrocytes leads to Osteoarthritis-like Defects in Temporomandibular Joint of Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Siru; Xie, Yangli; Li, Wei; Huang, Junlan; Wang, Zuqiang; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xianding; Tan, Qiaoyan; Huang, Shuo; Luo, Fengtao; Xu, Meng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Tingting; chen, Liang; Chen, Hangang; Su, Nan; Du, Xiaolan; Shen, Yue; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a common degenerative disease in adult, which is characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage. To investigate the role of FGFR3 in the homeostasis of TMJ cartilage during adult stage, we generated Fgfr3f/f; Col2a1-CreERT2 (Fgfr3 cKO) mice, in which Fgfr3 was deleted in chondrocytes at 2 months of age. OA-like defects were observed in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant increase in expressions of COL10, MMP13 and AMAMTS5. In addition, there was a sharp increase in chondrocyte apoptosis at the Fgfr3 cKO articular surface, which was accompanied by a down-regulation of lubricin expression. Importantly, the expressions of RUNX2 and Indian hedgehog (IHH) were up-regulated in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ. Primary Fgfr3 cKO chondrocytes were treated with IHH signaling inhibitor, which significantly reduced expressions of Runx2, Col10, Mmp13 and Adamts5. Furthermore, the IHH signaling inhibitor partially alleviated OA-like defects in the TMJ of Fgfr3 cKO mice, including restoration of lubricin expression and improvement of the integrity of the articular surface. In conclusion, our study proposes that FGFR3/IHH signaling pathway plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of TMJ articular cartilage during adult stage. PMID:27041063

  16. Experimental investigations of the use of an erbium:YAG laser on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) structures: first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Niederdellmann, Herbert; Hering, Peter; Deuerling, Christian; Dammer, Ralf; Behr, M.

    1995-04-01

    The following paper introduces the results of an interdisciplinary research project. With the aid of photomacroscopic examination, light and scanning electron microscope investigations, changes to temporomandibular joint structures were detected in vitro after irradiation with an Erbium:YAG laser system. The solid-state Erbium:YAG laser, operating at a wavelength of 2.94 micrometers was used in the normal- spiking mode. The free-running laser beam was focussed onto freshly excised porcine tissue samples using a 108-mm sapphire lens. In this study the output was generally pulsed at a repetition rate of 4 Hz, with a pulse duration varying from 120 microsecond(s) to 500 microsecond(s) . Between 50 mJ and 500 mJ per pulse were applied to create pinpoint lesions. The optimum average energy density and pulse duration of the Erbium:YAG laser radiation for the purpose of TMJ-surgery (as far as it concerns meniscus and articulating facets) - which means efficient etch rate and minimal adjacent injury - seems to be about 24-42 J/cm2 and 120 microsecond(s) -240 microsecond(s) , respectively.

  17. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: bacterial diversity in temporomandibular joint synovial fluid in comparison with immunological and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Olsen-Bergem, H; Kristoffersen, A K; Bjørnland, T; Reseland, J E; Aas, J A

    2016-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) occurs in up to 80% of affected children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of bacterial DNA in synovial fluid, and to compare this with clinical and immunological findings in children with JIA, adults with persistent JIA, and adults with rheumatoid arthritis, in order to detect whether bacteria contribute to inflammation in TMJ arthritis. Synovial fluid and skin swab samples were collected from 30 patients (54 TMJs). Bacterial detection was performed using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial DNA was detected in 31 TMJs (57%) in 19 patients (63%). A positive statistically significant correlation was registered between bacterial DNA detected in TMJ synovial fluid and the following factors: total protein concentration in synovial fluid, interleukin 1β, tumour necrosis factor alpha, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and adiponectin, as well as the duration of the general medical disease. Fourteen different bacterial species were detected in synovial fluid. Bacterial DNA in TMJ synovial fluid without contamination was detected in more than 50% of the patients. Studies are needed to evaluate the consequences of this bacterial DNA in synovial fluid with regard to TMJ arthritis. PMID:26554824

  18. Strain induced in the condyle by self-tapping screws in the Biomet alloplastic temporomandibular joint: a preliminary experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A; Duarte, R J; Mesnard, M

    2015-11-01

    The main aim of this study was to analyze how screws affect the strain concentration induced on the mandibular condyle during implantation, screwing, and drilling, as well as after condylar loading. A clean cadaveric mandible was analyzed experimentally in the intact state and was then implanted with a Biomet/Lorenz Microfixation temporomandibular joint (TMJ) implant with seven bicortical self-tapping screws. The external surface of the mandible was instrumented with three strain gauges. A load of 500N on the TMJ was applied to the condyle before and after implantation. The results showed a strain concentration of -1500μɛ near the screws due to their implantation on the external surface of the mandible. The drilling process induced up to 80μɛ near the hole. The strain concentration did not change when there were more than six screws. Loading on the TMJ before and after implantation presented only a 10% difference in maximum principal strain. This study demonstrates the importance of the strain concentration induced by the screws. The process of implanting screws shows the importance of lateral surface preparation for a good fit in the condyle. Strain distribution after implantation and loading of the Biomet implant was found to be similar to that in the intact condyle. PMID:26194773

  19. 3-D sonography for diagnosis of osteoarthrosis and disk degeneration of the temporomandibular joint, compared with MRI.

    PubMed

    Landes, Constantin A; Goral, Wojciech; Mack, Martin G; Sader, Robert

    2006-05-01

    This study determined the value of three-dimensional (3-D) sonography for the assessment of osteoarthrosis and disk degeneration of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Sixty-eight patients (136 TMJ) with clinical dysfunction were examined by 272 sonographic 3-D scans. An 8- to 12.5-MHz motor-angulated transducer positioned inferior-parallel to the zygomatic arch scanned the region-of-interest. 3-D condylar morphology was compared with subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fifty-three datasets were complete, i.e., 106 TMJ, 212 examinations. 3-D sonographic examination took 5 min and attained 70% sensitivity/76% specificity/75% accuracy; positive predictive value was 44%%; negative predictive value was 90%. Disk degeneration was diagnosed synonymously with 64%/73%/71%/42%/ 87%. 3-D sonography proved to be reliable for exclusion of osteoarthrosis as disk degeneration compared with MRI, whereas the presence of osteoarthrosis and disk dislocation cannot be reliably diagnosed. Prospective use will include routine screening, using more sophisticated equipment with higher frequency in real-time 3-D viewing. PMID:16677921

  20. Analysis of magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and pain in temporomandibular joints with and without degenerative changes of the condyle.

    PubMed

    Campos, M I G; Campos, P S F; Cangussu, M C T; Guimarães, R C; Line, S R P

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics in 104 TMJs with and 58 without degenerative changes of the condyle, such as osteophytes, erosion, avascular necrosis, subcondral cyst and intra-articular loose bodies. TMJ images were also assessed for flattening, retropositioning and hypomobility of condyle and disc displacement. Comparison of the TMJ side-related data showed a significant relationship between disc displacement without reduction (DDwoR) and the presence of degenerative bony changes (p=0.00). Flattening, retropositioning and hypomobility of condyle showed no significant difference in relation to the presence or absence of degenerative bony changes. Retropositioning of the condyle was significantly associated to disc displacement with reduction (DDwR) (p=0.00), while condylar hypomobility was significantly more frequent in TMJ with DDwoR (p<0.05). Independent of the presence or type of DD, TMJ pain was more frequent in the presence of degenerative bony changes. When considering only DDwR, TMJ pain was significantly associated to a degenerative condition (p=0.03). When there were no degenerative bony changes, TMJ pain was significantly more frequent in DDwoR (p=0.04). Despite the present findings, the absence of symptoms in some patients with condylar bony changes suggests that the diagnosis of osteoarthritis should be established by evaluation of magnetic resonance images in association with clinical examination. PMID:18440778

  1. Temporomandibular joint effusion and its relationship with perceived disability assessed using musculoskeletal ultrasound and a patient-reported disability index.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Katie; Bird, Lance; Bright, Phillip

    2015-05-01

    The relationship between effusion of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and patient-reported disability is poorly researched. This pilot study explored the link between TMJ inflammation as measured by ultrasound and patient disability assessed by the Steigerwald Maher TMD Disability Index (SMTDI). The study design used a prospective correlational approach involving a sample with TMJ dysfunction (TMD). Twenty-four patients were recruited from the European School of Osteopathy and a Kent dental practice. Participants completed the SMTDI to determine the level of TMD (symptomatic score >20). A SonoSite SLA "Hockey Stick" [13-6 MHz] musculo-skeletal transducer was placed over the TMJ in a transverse direction and effusion was calculated indirectly by measuring capsular width. An upper left quadrant protocol was used throughout. A regression analysis was run with participants' gender, age and capsular width as predictor variables modelled against reported SMTDI. Larger capsular widths were found to be significant predictors of SMTDI scores (r = 0.803, p < 0.0001). The patient profile matched with the previous studies and the TMD sufferer population, indicating external validity. Results suggest that the SMTDI could be integrated into practice life as a quick, accessible and easy tool to monitor patients' progress and assess levels of inflammation, without the need for repetitive imaging. The study design proved reproducible and a larger scale study is indicated. PMID:27433242

  2. Management of open bite that developed during treatment for internal derangement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Arai, Chihiro; Choi, Jae Won; Nakaoka, Kazutoshi; Hamada, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2015-05-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment performed for open bite caused by internal derangement (ID) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A Japanese woman, aged 31 years and 11 months, referred to our department by an oral surgeon had an open bite with clockwise rotation of the mandible and degeneration of the condyle. The overbite was corrected through intrusion of the maxillary and mandibular molars using mini-screw implants to induce counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. Then, the mandibular second premolars were extracted and comprehensive orthodontic treatment was performed to establish a Class I molar relationship with distalization of the maxillary arch and to eliminate anterior crowding. Following treatment, her facial profile improved and a functional and stable occlusion was achieved without recurrence of the TMJ symptoms. These results suggest that orthodontic intrusion of the molars is one of the safer and less stressful alternatives for the management of open bite due to degeneration of the condyles caused by ID and OA of TMJ. PMID:26023542

  3. Morphology of the temporomandibular joint in skeletal class iii symmetrical and asymmetrical cases: a study by cephalometric laminography.

    PubMed

    Akahane, Y; Deguchi, T; Hunt, N P

    2001-06-01

    The aetiology of asymmetric growth in the mandible is not well understood. Previous studies have indicated that the functional lateral shift of the mandible in the period of prepubertal growth may translate to a true skeletal asymmetry, exclusively in skeletal Class III malocclusion. This asymmetry develops more characteristic features during the pubertal and post-pubertal growth periods. Early correction of a functional lateral shift of the mandible is recommended. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the morphology of the temporomandibular joints and asymmetry in skeletal Class III malocclusion in adult female patients. Cephalometric and laminographic findings in 36 asymmetric skeletal Class III patients with a lateral shift of mandible (group 3) were compared to those of 25 symmetric skeletal Class I patients (group 1) and the same number of symmetric skeletal Class III malocclusions (group 2). All the patients had received no orthodontic treatment. The results showed that the TMJ of the side to which the mandible shifted showed a significantly narrower and shorter shape of the condyle head, smaller superior condylar space, and steeper eminence than those of the unshifted side. PMID:11395526

  4. Platelet-derived growth factor enhances proliferation and matrix synthesis of temporomandibular joint disc-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Koichi; Tanaka, Eiji; Takata, Takashi; Miyauchi, Mutsumi; Aoyama, Junko; Kawai, Nobuhiko; Dalla-Bona, Diego A; Yamano, Eizo; Tanne, Kazuo

    2006-05-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is an essential signaling molecule for wound healing and tissue repair. This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of PDGF on the proliferation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc-derived cells and extracellular matrix synthesis. The number of cultured cells were counted by COULTER Z1. The assay for collagen synthesis was performed using a sircol soluble collagen assay. Hyaluronic acid (HA) synthesis was analyzed by a high performance liquid chromatography. The expression of collagens, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were examined using SYBR Green in terms of the RNA levels. PDGF treatment significantly (P < .01) increased the proliferation rate of the disc-derived cells as compared with the controls when the dose was 5 ng/ mL or greater. Treatment with more than 5 ng/mL PDGF resulted in an amount of collagen synthesis significantly (P < .01) higher than the controls. HA synthesis was maximal with 5 ng/mL PDGF treatment. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that treatment with 5 ng/mL of PDGF-BB upregulated the mitochondrial RNA levels of type I and II collagens, MMPs, and TIMPs within 6 hours. It is concluded that PDGF, if its concentration is optimal, enhanced proliferation and matrix synthesis of TMJ disc-derived cells, indicating that PDGF may be effective for use in tissue engineering of the TMJ disc. PMID:16637732

  5. Effect of Stomatognathic Alignment Exercise on Temporomandibular Joint Function and Swallowing Function of Stroke Patients with Limited Mouth Opening

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Duck-Won; Kang, Tae-Woo; Kim, Sun-Ju

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of stomatognathic alignment exercise on temporomandibular joint function and swallowing function of stroke patients presenting limited mouth opening. [Subjects] Fourteen subjects with post-stroke hemiparesis presenting limited mouth opening were randomly assigned to either the experimental group or the control group, with 7 subjects in each group. [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group participated in a stomatognathic alignment exercise program that consisted of mobility exercises of the TMJ and neck and postural correction. Main outcome measures were neck mobility, the active maximum range of mouth opening, the craniomandibular index (CMI), and the Mann assessment of swallowing ability (MASA) score. [Results] The changes in the values of the range of mouth opening, CMI, MASA, and all the parameters of neck mobility were significantly different between the groups. Furthermore, post-test values appeared to be significantly different for the range of mouth opening, the craniomandibular index, and the MASA scores between the groups (p>0.05). [Conclusion] Stomatognathic alignment exercise may improve TMJ function and swallowing function of patients with post-stroke hemiparesis. PMID:24259786

  6. Activation of α2A-adrenergic signal transduction in chondrocytes promotes degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Kai; Zeng, Guang; Niu, Li-Na; Yang, Hong-Xu; Ren, Gao-Tong; Xu, Xin-Yue; Li, Fei-Fei; Tay, Franklin R; Wang, Mei-Qing

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether activation of adrenoreceptors in chondrocytes has roles in degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to determine associated mechanisms. Unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) was established to induce TMJ degeneration in rats. Saline vehicle, α2- and β-adrenoreceptor antagonists or agonists were injected locally into the TMJ area of UAC rats. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone microarchitecture and the expression of adrenoreceptors, aggrecans, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and RANKL by chondrocytes were evaluated. Chondrocytes were stimulated by norepinephrine to investigate signal transduction of adrenoreceptors. Increased α2A-adrenoreceptor expression was observed in condylar cartilage of UAC rats, together with cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone loss. Norepinephrine depresses aggrecans expression but stimulates MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL production by chondrocytes through ERK1/2 and PKA pathway; these effects were abolished by an α2A-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Furthermore, inhibition of α2A-adrenoreceptor attenuated degenerative remodelling in the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone, as revealed by increased cartilage thickness, proteoglycans and aggrecan expression, and decreased MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL expressions in cartilage, increased BMD, BV/TV, and decreased Tb.Sp in subchondral bone. Conversely, activation of α2A-adrenoreceptor intensified aforementioned degenerative changes in UAC rats. It is concluded that activation of α2A-adrenergic signal in chondrocytes promotes TMJ degenerative remodelling by chondrocyte-mediated pro-catabolic activities. PMID:27452863

  7. Activation of α2A-adrenergic signal transduction in chondrocytes promotes degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Kai; Zeng, Guang; Niu, Li-Na; Yang, Hong-xu; Ren, Gao-tong; Xu, Xin-yue; Li, Fei-fei; Tay, Franklin R.; Wang, Mei-qing

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether activation of adrenoreceptors in chondrocytes has roles in degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to determine associated mechanisms. Unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) was established to induce TMJ degeneration in rats. Saline vehicle, α2- and β-adrenoreceptor antagonists or agonists were injected locally into the TMJ area of UAC rats. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone microarchitecture and the expression of adrenoreceptors, aggrecans, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and RANKL by chondrocytes were evaluated. Chondrocytes were stimulated by norepinephrine to investigate signal transduction of adrenoreceptors. Increased α2A-adrenoreceptor expression was observed in condylar cartilage of UAC rats, together with cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone loss. Norepinephrine depresses aggrecans expression but stimulates MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL production by chondrocytes through ERK1/2 and PKA pathway; these effects were abolished by an α2A-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Furthermore, inhibition of α2A-adrenoreceptor attenuated degenerative remodelling in the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone, as revealed by increased cartilage thickness, proteoglycans and aggrecan expression, and decreased MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL expressions in cartilage, increased BMD, BV/TV, and decreased Tb.Sp in subchondral bone. Conversely, activation of α2A-adrenoreceptor intensified aforementioned degenerative changes in UAC rats. It is concluded that activation of α2A-adrenergic signal in chondrocytes promotes TMJ degenerative remodelling by chondrocyte-mediated pro-catabolic activities. PMID:27452863

  8. Evaluation of validity and reliability of a methodology for measuring human postural attitude and its relation to temporomandibular joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Ramón Fuentes; Carter, Pablo; Muñoz, Sergio; Silva, Héctor; Venegas, Gonzalo Hernán Oporto; Cantin, Mario; Ottone, Nicolás Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs) are caused by several factors such as anatomical, neuromuscular and psychological alterations. A relationship has been established between TMJDs and postural alterations, a type of anatomical alteration. An anterior position of the head requires hyperactivity of the posterior neck region and shoulder muscles to prevent the head from falling forward. This compensatory muscular function may cause fatigue, discomfort and trigger point activation. To our knowledge, a method for assessing human postural attitude in more than one plane has not been reported. Thus, the aim of this study was to design a methodology to measure the external human postural attitude in frontal and sagittal planes, with proper validity and reliability analyses. METHODS The variable postures of 78 subjects (36 men, 42 women; age 18–24 years) were evaluated. The postural attitudes of the subjects were measured in the frontal and sagittal planes, using an acromiopelvimeter, grid panel and Fox plane. RESULTS The method we designed for measuring postural attitudes had adequate reliability and validity, both qualitatively and quantitatively, based on Cohen’s Kappa coefficient (> 0.87) and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r = 0.824, > 80%). CONCLUSION This method exhibits adequate metrical properties and can therefore be used in further research on the association of human body posture with skeletal types and TMJDs. PMID:26768173

  9. [Maxillo-facial surgery in skeletal Class II: repercussions on the temporo-mandibular joints].

    PubMed

    Manière-Ezvan, Armelle; Savoldelli, Charles; Busson, Floriant; Oueiss, Arlette; Orthlieb, Jean-Daniel

    2016-03-01

    These interventions usually aimed at the correction of the skeletal discrepancy by mandibular retrognatism with an advancement of the distal portion of the mandible after mandibular osteotomy. The position of the condyle is determined during the osteosynthesis with miniplates. Condyles are set back in relation with the supine position of the patient and the weakness of his (her) curarized muscle. All studies show that surgery of mandibular advancement causes a lateral, torque and backward movement of the condyles, all harmful to the condyles. Factors that predispose to condylar resorption are "the patient": a woman, young (between 15 and 40), high mandibular angle, with a history of temporo-mandibular disorders and surgical overload applied to the condyles. What are the possible solutions to avoid failures? Patient preparation before surgery and surgery simulation with an articulator, condylar position control during surgery, working with surgeons to achieve a condylar portion stabilization system (with the CAD), quickly set up a mobilization of the mandible by physiotherapy. PMID:27083225

  10. Investigation of human frontal cortex under noxious thermal stimulation of temporo-mandibular joint using functional near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yennu, Amarnath; Rawat, Rohit; Manry, Michael T.; Gatchel, Robert; Liu, Hanli

    2013-03-01

    According to American Academy of Orofacial Pain, 75% of the U.S. population experiences painful symptoms of temporo-mandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD) during their lifetime. Thus, objective assessment of pain is crucial for efficient pain management. We used near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a tool to explore hemodynamic responses in the frontal cortex to noxious thermal stimulation of temporomadibular joint (TMJ). NIRS experiments were performed on 9 healthy volunteers under both low pain stimulation (LPS) and high pain stimulation (HPS), using a temperature-controlled thermal stimulator. To induce thermal pain, a 16X16 mm2 thermode was strapped onto the right TMJ of each subject. Initially, subjects were asked to rate perceived pain on a scale of 0 to 10 for the temperatures from 41°C to 47°C. For the NIRS measurement, two magnitudes of temperatures, one rated as 3 and another rated as 7, were chosen as LPS and HPS, respectively. By analyzing the temporal profiles of changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration (HbO) using cluster-based statistical tests, we were able to identify several regions of interest (ROI), (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex and prefrontal cortex), where significant differences (p<0.05) between HbO responses to LPS and HPS are shown. In order to classify these two levels of pain, a neural-network-based classification algorithm was used. With leave-one-out cross validation from 9 subjects, the two levels of pain were identified with 100% mean sensitivity, 98% mean specificity and 99% mean accuracy to high pain. From the receiver operating characteristics curve, 0.99 mean area under curve was observed.

  11. Association Between Harmful Oral Habits and Sign and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jayaprakash; Kamate, Shivalingesh; Kushwaha, Sumedha; Anand, Richa; Gupta, Neha; Gupta, Bhuvandeep; Singh, Ishan

    2015-01-01

    Context Temporomandibular disorder (TDM) is defined as a heterogenous group of psychophysiological disorders commonly characterised by orofacial pain, chewing dysfunction or both. Various Epidemiological studies had shown occurrence of TMD in all age groups including children. Also research had shown that non nutritional oral habits to be associated with TMD. Aim Present study aimed to find whether harmful oral habits are associated with sign and symptoms of TMD among adolescents in Greater Noida. Setting and Design Schools in Gautam Buddha district and descriptive study. Materials and Methods Cross sectional study was carried out among 240 adolescents (10 – 19 years) studying in schools of Greater Noida. Study population were selected by random sampling to whom screening questionnaires recommended by American Academy of Orofacial Pain (AAOP) were distributed. Patient history and clinical examination was used to determine harmful oral habits. Data analysis was done in SPSS version 21 and Chi-square test was applied. Results Sixty one participants (25.4%) displayed no sign and symptoms of TMD, 34 (14.2%) responded affirmatively to atleast one item on the questionnaire and 108(46%) gave at least three affirmative responses. Headache, Neckpain and Toothache were most frequent reported sign and symptoms of TMD (46.2%). There was statistically significant association between gender and sign and symptoms of TMD on three items of the questionnaire (p < 0.05). Nail Biting (45.8%), Biting Lips/objects (37%) were most common habits among the study group. There was statistically significant association between Nail Biting (p = 0.001), Lip Biting/ object biting (p=0.001), Grinding of teeth (p = 0.01) and sign and symptoms of TMD. Conclusion A statistically significant association was found between nail biting, lip/ object biting and grinding of teeth with signs and/or symptoms of TMD. Thus there is need for preventive dental treatment and community dental education so that

  12. Changes in the temporomandibular joint space after functional treatment of disk displacement with reduction.

    PubMed

    Ma, ZhiGui; Xie, QianYang; Yang, Chi; Zhang, ShanYong; Shen, YuQing; Cai, XieYi

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the changes of temporomandibularjoint (TMJ) space in the treatment of disk displacement with reduction (DDWR) for class II cases. Forty-two adolescent patients with unilateral DDWR, who were successfully treated by functional appliance, were selected in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were used before treatment (T1), at the start of treatment (T2), and after functional treatment (T3). Compared with the normal joint, the change of joint space index was calculated. The anterior, posterior, and superior joint spaces were analyzed on the largest sagittal plane among T1, T2, and T3. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. The mean treatment period was 10 months (6-16 mo). Functional appliance was effective in eliminating pain and clicking. During the phase of T1, the value of the joint space index of DDWR was significantly higher than that of the control (P < 0.05). There was a significant decrease in the anterior space and an increase in the postsuperior space at T2 (P < 0.01), and then the contrary changes occurred at T3. However, there was a significant increase in the postsuperior space and no significant decrease in the anterior space when T1 and T3 were compared. This study indicates that the TMJ space is well distributed after disk repositioning with functional treatment of DDWR. It is also suggested that the adaptive remodeling in TMJ occurs via functional treatment. PMID:25759936

  13. The Protective Effects of Salubrinal on the Cartilage and Subchondral Bone of the Temporomandibular Joint under Various Compressive Mechanical Stimulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caixia; Chen, Sheng; Li, Huang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive mechanical loads on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can cause mandibular cartilage degradation and subchondral bone erosion, but the treatment of these conditions remains challenging. Salubrinal, which target eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha, has been shown to have multiple beneficial effects on skeletal tissue. Here, we examined the effect of a Salubrinal injection on the mandibular cartilage and subchondral bone of the TMJ under various compressive stresses. We conducted in vivo analyses in rat models using various compressive stresses (40 g and 80 g), and we observed time-related degeneration and pathological changes in the cartilage and subchondral bone of the TMJ at days 1, 3 and 7 through histological measurements, subcellular observation, and changes in proliferation and apoptosis. After the Salubrinal injection, the thickness of the cartilage recovered, and the pathological change was alleviated. In the Salubrinal/light (Sal/light) compressive stress group, the drug altered the proliferation and apoptosis of chondrocytes most significantly at day 1. In the Salubrinal/heavy (Sal/heavy) compressive stress group, the drug increased the proliferation of chondrocytes most significantly at day 1 and reduced the apoptosis of chondrocytes most significantly at day 7. Salubrinal also increased the area of the bone trabeculae and suppressed inflammatory responses and pathological change in the subchondral bone of the TMJ. Together, these results indicate that the administration of Salubrinal reduces apoptosis and strengthens the proliferation of chondrocyte to varying degrees at days 1, 3 and 7 under various compressive mechanical stresses, both of which contribute to the recovery of cartilage thickness and the alleviation of pathological change. Salubrinal also suppresses inflammatory responses and pathological change in the subchondral bone of the TMJ. PMID:27196267

  14. Effect of biomechanical disturbance of the temporomandibular joint on the prevalence of internal derangement in mandibular asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Buranastidporn, B; Hisano, M; Soma, K

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the relationship between biomechanical changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and internal derangement (ID) symptoms in mandibular asymmetry. Posteroanterior cephalograms (PA) of 140 patients with TMJ ID associated with mandibular asymmetry were used to investigate the inclination of the frontal occlusal plane (FOP), and were analysed in conjunction with the results of a report providing information on ID symptoms. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model (FEM) of the entire mandible was created to investigate the distribution of TMJ forces during clenching. The inclination of the FOP was modified to simulate various degrees of vertical asymmetry. The stresses on the TMJ on the ipsilateral and contralateral sides were analysed and their values were compared with those of the standard model. The results showed that the symptomatic sides were significantly related to the degree of inclination of the FOP. Increasing its angulation resulted in a decrease of the symptoms on the ipsilateral side and an increase of those on the contralateral side. The analysis showed that stress-distribution patterns and overall stresses of the articular disc were influenced by the angulation of inclination of the FOP. These mechanical changes exhibited a distinct relationship with the prevalence of ID in the patients. These results suggest that disturbances in the stresses either in amount or direction due to occlusal inclination can be responsible for ID. Therefore, an attempt to establish a flat occlusal plane is an important orthodontic treatment objective in maintaining the normal health and structure of the TMJ. PMID:16230327

  15. Effects of Chronic Sleep Deprivation on the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway in the Temporomandibular Joint of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peihuan; Wu, Longmei; Zhu, Guoxiong; Zhao, Huaqiang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the possible involvement and regulatory mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats subjected to chronic sleep deprivation (CSD). Methods Rats were subjected to CSD using the modified multiple platform method (MMPM). The serum levels of corticosterone (CORT) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were tested and histomorphology and ultrastructure of the TMJ were observed. The ERK and phospho-ERK (p-ERK) expression levels were detected by Western blot analysis, and the MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 expression levels were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting. Results The elevated serum CORT and ACTH levels confirmed that the rats were under CSD stress. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed pathological alterations in the TMJ following CSD; furthermore, the p-ERK was activated and the mRNA and protein expression levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 were upregulated after CSD. In the rats administered with the selective ERK inhibitor U0126, decreased tissue destruction was observed. Phospho-ERK activation was visibly blocked and the MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 mRNA and protein levels were lower than the corresponding levels in the CSD without U0126 group. Conclusion These findings indicate that CSD activates the ERK pathway and upregulates the MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 mRNA and protein levels in the TMJ of rats. Thus, CSD induces ERK pathway activation and causes pathological alterations in the TMJ. ERK may be associated with TMJ destruction by promoting the expression of MMPs. PMID:25226519

  16. Connexin43 Hemichannels Mediate Small Molecule Exchange between Chondrocytes and Matrix in Biomechanically-Stimulated Temporomandibular Joint Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Mian; Qiu, Zhongying; Wu, Yaoping; Callaway, Danielle A.; Jiang, Jean X.; Lu, Lei; Jing, Lei; Yang, Ting; Wang, Meiqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective Connexin (Cx) 43 hemichannels play a role in mechanotransduction. This study was undertaken in order to determine if Cx43 hemichannels were activated in rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ) chondrocytes under mechanical stimulation. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were stimulated dental-mechanically. Cx43 expression in rat TMJ cartilage was determined with immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR, and Cx43 hemichannel opening was evaluated by the extra- and intracellular levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Both primary rat chondrocytes and ATDC5 cells were treated with fluid flow shear stress (FFSS) to induce hemichannel opening. The Cx43 expression level was then determined by real-time PCR or western blotting, and the extent of Cx43 hemichannel opening was evaluated by measuring both PGE2 release and cellular dye uptake. Results Cx43 expression and intra- and extracellular PGE2 levels were increased in mechanically-stimulated rat TMJ cartilage compared to the unstimulated control. The FFSS treatment increased Cx43 expression and induced Cx43 hemichannel opening in primary rat chondrocytes and ATDC5 cells indicated by enhanced PGE2 release and dye uptake. Furthermore, the Cx43 hemichannel opening could be blocked by the addition of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, a connexin channel inhibitor, Cx43-targeting siRNA, or by withdrawal of FFSS stimulation. The migration of cytosolic Cx43 protein to the plasma membrane in ATDC5 cells was still significant after 8h post 2-h FFSS treatment, and the Cx43 protein level was still high at 48h which returned to control levels at 72h after treatment. Conclusion Cx43 hemichannels are activated and mediate small molecule exchange between TMJ chondrocytes and matrix under mechanical stimulation. PMID:24704497

  17. ACCURACY AND PRECISION OF A METHOD TO STUDY KINEMATICS OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT: COMBINATION OF MOTION DATA AND CT IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Baltali, Evre; Zhao, Kristin D.; Koff, Matthew F.; Keller, Eugene E.; An, Kai-Nan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to test the precision and accuracy of a method used to track selected landmarks during motion of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A precision phantom device was constructed and relative motions between two rigid bodies on the phantom device were measured using optoelectronic (OE) and electromagnetic (EM) motion tracking devices. The motion recordings were also combined with a 3D CT image for each type of motion tracking system (EM+CT and OE+CT) to mimic methods used in previous studies. In the OE and EM data collections, specific landmarks on the rigid bodies were determined using digitization. In the EM+CT and OE+CT data sets, the landmark locations were obtained from the CT images. 3D linear distances and 3D curvilinear path distances were calculated for the points. The accuracy and precision for all 4 methods were evaluated (EM, OE, EM+CT and OE+CT). In addition, results were compared with and without the CT imaging (EM vs. EM+CT, OE vs. OE+CT). All systems overestimated the actual 3D curvilinear path lengths. All systems also underestimated the actual rotation values. The accuracy of all methods was within 0.5 mm for 3D curvilinear path calculations, 0.05 mm for 3D linear distance calculations, and 0.2° for rotation calculations. In addition, Bland-Altman plots for each configuration of the systems suggest that measurements obtained from either system are repeatable and comparable. PMID:18617178

  18. P2X and NMDA receptor involvement in temporomandibular joint-evoked reflex activity in rat jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Tsuboi, Y; Sessle, B J; Iwata, K; Hu, J W

    2010-07-30

    We have previously shown that injection of the excitatory amino glutamate into the rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ) evokes reflex activity in both anterior digastric (DIG) and masseter (MASS) muscles that can be attenuated by prior TMJ injection of an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. The aim of the present study was to test if jaw muscle activity could also be evoked by P2X receptor agonist injection into the rat TMJ region and if the reflex activity could be modulated by TMJ injection of P2X receptor antagonist or NMDA receptor antagonist. The selective P2X subtype agonist alpha,beta-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (alpha,beta-me ATP) and vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) or the selective P2X antagonist, 2'-(or-3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP) or the selective NMDA antagonist (+/-)-d-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate(APV) were injected into the rat TMJ region. Electromyographic (EMG) reflex activity was recorded in both DIG and MASS muscles. Compared with the baseline EMG activity, alpha,beta-me-ATP injection into the TMJ (but not its systemic administration) following pre-injection of the vehicle significantly increased the magnitude and the duration of ipsilateral DIG and MASS EMG activity in a dose-dependent manner. The alpha,beta-me-ATP-evoked responses could be antagonized by pre-injection of TNP-ATP into the same TMJ site but contralateral TMJ injection of TNP-ATP proved ineffective. Furthermore, the alpha,beta-me-ATP-evoked responses could also be antagonized by APV injected into the same TMJ site but not by its systemic injection. These results indicate the interaction of peripheral purinergic as well as glutamatergic receptor mechanisms in the processing of TMJ nociceptive afferent inputs that evoke reflex activity in jaw muscles. PMID:20501327

  19. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in a sickle-cell anemia patient in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    Braimah, Ramat Oyebunmi; Oladejo, Taoreed; Olarinoye, Timothy Oyetunde; Adetoye, Adedapo Omowonuola; Osho, Patrick Olanrewaju

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the multidisciplinary management of a 35-year-old female sickle-cell anemia patient who had unilateral bony ankylosis of the left temporomandibular joint secondary to septic arthritis. She was managed by a team comprising of maxillofacial surgeons, anesthetists, otorhinolaryngologist, and hematologist. Unilateral left interpositional arthroplasty and ipsilateral coronoidectomy through a postrami approach were done and followed by aggressive jaw physiotherapy in the postsurgical period. No perioperative morbidity was encountered. Mouth opening of 3.5 cm was achieved and maintained 7 months after surgery. Challenges and rationale for the use of a multidisciplinary team approach in treatment of such cases were discussed.

  20. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in a sickle-cell anemia patient in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Braimah, Ramat Oyebunmi; Oladejo, Taoreed; Olarinoye, Timothy Oyetunde; Adetoye, Adedapo Omowonuola; Osho, Patrick Olanrewaju

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the multidisciplinary management of a 35-year-old female sickle-cell anemia patient who had unilateral bony ankylosis of the left temporomandibular joint secondary to septic arthritis. She was managed by a team comprising of maxillofacial surgeons, anesthetists, otorhinolaryngologist, and hematologist. Unilateral left interpositional arthroplasty and ipsilateral coronoidectomy through a postrami approach were done and followed by aggressive jaw physiotherapy in the postsurgical period. No perioperative morbidity was encountered. Mouth opening of 3.5 cm was achieved and maintained 7 months after surgery. Challenges and rationale for the use of a multidisciplinary team approach in treatment of such cases were discussed. PMID:27563622

  1. Reduction of temporomandibular joint dislocation: an ancient technique that has stood the test of time.

    PubMed

    Forshaw, R J

    2015-07-01

    The first known recorded evidence for the reduction of a mandibular joint dislocation is documented in a papyrus dated to c. 1500 BC that originated from ancient Egypt. This same technique was later discussed by Hippocrates in Greece and the Hippocratic corpus is referred to in early Islamic writings. It is detailed in medieval European texts and eventually was incorporated into modern dental and medical practice. Today, mandibular joint dislocation is probably not that common but to be included in an important ancient Egyptian treatise, predominately concerned with trauma to the head and neck, could suggest it was a more frequent occurrence in antiquity. This could relate to the heavy tooth wear, frequent antemortem tooth loss and the related sequelae of severe malocclusion and overclosure evident in many surviving ancient Egyptian skulls. PMID:26114704

  2. Differences in skeletal components of temporomandibular joint of an early medieval and contemporary Croatian population obtained by different methods.

    PubMed

    Kranjcic, Josip; Slaus, Mario; Persic, Sanja; Vodanovic, Marin; Vojvodic, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The anatomical configuration of the TMJ allows for a large range of mandibular movements as well as transmission of masticatory forces and loads to the skull base. The measurements of the TMJ's anatomical structures and their interpretations contribute to the understanding of how pathological changes, tooth loss, and the type of diet (changing throughout human history) can affect biomechanical conditions of the masticatory system and the TMJ. The human TMJ and its constituent parts are still the subject of extensive investigation and comparisons of measurement methods are being made in order to determine the most precise and suitable measurement methods. The aim of this study has been to examine the morphology of skeletal components of TMJ of an early medieval population (EMP) in Croatia and to compare measured values with TMJ values of the contemporary Croatian population (CP) using various methods of measurement. The study was performed on 30 EMP specimens - human dry skulls, aged from 18 to 55 years, and 30 CP human dry skulls, aged from 18 to 65 years. Only fully preserved specimens (in measured areas) were included. The articular eminence (AE) inclination was measured in relation to the Frankfurt horizontal using two methods. Also, the AE height (glenoid fossa depth) and the length of the curved line - highest to the lowest point of the AE were measured. Measurements were performed on lateral skull photographs, panoramic radiographs and lateral cephalograms using VistaMetrix software on skull images. The results were statistically analyzed using SPSS statistical software. No statistically significant differences were obtained for AE parameters between the EMP and CP populations independent of age and gender. However, statistically significant (p<0.05) differences were revealed when comparing results of three different measuring methods. It could not be determined which of

  3. [Primary and secondary prevention procedures of temporo-mandibular joint disease in the evolutive age].

    PubMed

    Ciavarella, D; Mastrovincenzo, M; Sabatucci, A; Campisi, G; Di Cosola, M; Suriano, M; Lo Muzio, L

    2009-02-01

    In the last years prevention of temporomandiboular joint (TMJ) disease had acquired great importance. According to the neuro-occlusal rehabilitation (RNO) it is possible to say that TMJ disease starts since first years of life. So it is important both for dentist and for pediatric know what are the conditions and the atypical functions which predispose to this pathology. The aim of this work was to show how it is possible to intercept since primary teeth and the correct norms of primary and secondary prevention. PMID:19180004

  4. An Inductive, Scaffold-Based, Regenerative Medicine Approach to Reconstruction of the Temporomandibular Joint Disk

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Bryan N.; Chung, William L.; Almarza, Alejandro J.; Pavlick, Matthew; Reppas, Serafim; Ochs, Mark W.; Russell, Alan J.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A device composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) was investigated as an inductive template in vivo for reconstruction of the TMJ disk following discectomy. Methods A scaffold material composed of porcine derived ECM was configured to mimic the shape and size of the TMJ. This device was implanted in a canine model of bilateral TMJ discectomy. Following discectomy, one side was repaired with an ECM scaffold material and the contralateral side was left empty as a control. At 6 months post-implantation the joint space was opened, the joints evaluated for signs of gross pathologic degenerative changes, and newly formed tissue was excised for histologic, biochemical, and biomechanical analysis. Results The results show that implantation of an initially acellular material supported the formation of site-appropriate, functional host tissue which resembled that of the native TMJ disk. Further, this prevented gross degenerative changes in the temporal fossa and mandibular condyle. No tissue formation and mild to severe gross pathologic changes were observed in the contralateral controls. Conclusion These results suggest that an ECM based bioscaffold may represent an off-the-shelf solution for TMJ disk replacement. PMID:22365981

  5. Radiographic anatomy of the rabbit skull, with particular reference to the tympanic bulla and temporomandibular joint. Part 2: Ventral and dorsal rotational angles.

    PubMed

    King, A M; Cranfield, F; Hall, J; Hammond, G; Sullivan, M

    2010-11-01

    This is the second part of a two-part study to document rabbit skull radiographic anatomy with particular reference to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and tympanic bulla (TB), and identify views that allowed their optimal visualisation. Equipment was used that allowed repeatable positioning of skulls at known rotational angles in ventral (rostrocaudal to ventrodorsal) with the mouth closed and open, and dorsal (rostrocaudal to dorsoventral position) directions. The views were repeated with lead markers attached to anatomical features and cadaver heads. The TBs were visible between 40° and 90° from rostrocaudal in both directions, but opening the mouth did not improve visualisation. The TMJs were visible until 40° in a ventral direction, but only 20° in a dorsal one. Opening the mouth slightly altered the regions of the joint being skylined, but did not otherwise enhance imaging of this region. PMID:19717319

  6. Response properties of temporomandibular joint mechanosensitive neurons in the trigeminal sensory complex of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osuke; Tsuboi, Akito; Tabata, Takayoshi; Takafuji, Yasuo; Sakurai, Takeshi; Watanabe, Makoto

    2012-10-01

    The neurophysiological properties of neurons sensitive to TMJ movement (TMJ neurons) in the trigeminal sensory complex (Vcomp) during passive movement of the isolated condyle were examined in 46 rabbits. Discharges of TMJ neurons from the rostral part of the Vcomp were recorded with a microelectrode when the isolated condyle was moved manually and with a computer-regulated mechanostimulator. A total of 443 neurons responding to mechanical stimulation of the face and oral cavity were recorded from the brainstem. Twenty-one TMJ neurons were detected rostrocaudally from the dorsal part of the trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (NVsnpr), subnucleus oralis of the trigeminal spinal nucleus, and reticular formation surrounding the trigeminal motor nucleus. Most of the TMJ neurons were located in the dorso-rostral part of the NVsnpr. Of the TMJ units recorded, 90 % were slowly adapting and 26 % had an accompanying resting discharge. The majority (86 %) of the TMJ units responded to the movement of the isolated condyle in the anterior and/or ventral directions, and half were sensitive to the condyle movement in a single direction. The discharge frequencies of TMJ units increased as the condyle displacement and constant velocity (5 mm/s) increased within a 5-mm anterior displacement of the isolated condyle. Based on these results, we conclude that sensory information is processed by TMJ neurons encoding at least joint position and displacement in the physiological range of mandibular displacement. PMID:22855309

  7. Alterations in intermediate filaments expression in disc cells from the rat temporomandibular joint following exposure to continuous compressive force

    PubMed Central

    Magara, Jin; Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Suzuki, Akiko; Kawano, Yoshiro; Ono, Kazuhiro; Nomura, Shuichi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2012-01-01

    The articular disc in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that serves in load relief and stabilizing in jaw movements is a dense collagenous tissue consisting of extracellular matrices and disc cells. The various morphological configurations of the disc cells have given us diverse names, such as fibroblasts, chondrocyte-like cells and fibrochondrocytes; however, the characteristics of these cells have remained to be elucidated in detail. The disc cells have been reported to exhibit heterogeneous immunoreaction patterns for intermediate filaments including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), nestin and vimentin in the adult rat TMJ. Because these intermediate filaments accumulate in the disc cells as tooth eruption proceeds during postnatal development, it might be surmised that the expression of these intermediate filaments in the disc cells closely relates to mechanical stress. The present study was therefore undertaken to examine the effect of a continuous compressive force on the immunoexpression of these intermediate filaments and an additional intermediate filament – muscle-specific desmin – in the disc cells of the TMJ disc using a rat experimental model. The rats wore an appliance that exerts a continuous compressive load on the TMJ. The experimental period with the appliance was 5 days as determined by previous studies, after which some experimental animals were allowed to survive another 5 days after removal of the appliance. Histological observations demonstrated that the compressive force provoked a remarkable acellular region and a decrease in the thickness of the condylar cartilage of the mandible, and a sparse collagen fiber distribution in the articular disc. The articular disc showed a significant increase in the number of desmin-positive cells as compared with the controls. In contrast, immunopositive cells for GFAP, nestin and vimentin remained unchanged in number as well as intensity. At 5 days after removal of the appliance, both the disc

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of perforation of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Yura, Shinya; Nobata, Koji; Shima, Tsuyoshi

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of diagnosing a perforation of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is poor with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We recently reported that a high signal-intensity area is usually found on fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI in the joint space between the articular disc and cartilage surface in joints in which the disc is displaced. A discrete image with an area of high signal-intensity in the middle of the articular disc may indicate perforation or rupture. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of diagnosis of a perforated articular disc by fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI with that of arthroscopy. We studied 50 joints in 50 patients with closed lock of the TMJ who were examined with MRI and then by arthroscopy using an ultra-thin arthroscope. The agreement between the two methods of diagnosis was assessed using the κ coefficient. Evidence of perforation of the disc on MRI and arthroscopically was found in the same 7 joints; there was complete concordance (κ=1.00, p<0.001). The accuracy of diagnosis of perforation of a disc by fat-saturated MRI was therefore the same as that by arthroscopy using an ultra-thin arthroscope. PMID:21723011

  9. A joint method to retrieve directional ocean wave spectra from SAR and wave spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lin; Yang, Jingsong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Juan

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a joint method to simultaneously retrieve wave spectra at different scales from spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and wave spectrometer data. The method combines the output from the two different sensors to overcome retrieval limitations that occur in some sea states. The wave spectrometer sensitivity coefficient is estimated using an effective significant wave height (SWH), which is an average of SAR-derived and wave spectrometer-derived SWH. This averaging extends the area of the sea surface sampled by the nadir beam of the wave spectrometer to improve the accuracy of the estimated sensitivity coefficient in inhomogeneous sea states. Wave spectra are then retrieved from SAR data using wave spectrometer-derived spectra as first guess spectra to complement the short waves lost in SAR data retrieval. In addition, the problem of 180° ambiguity in retrieved spectra is overcome using SAR imaginary cross spectra. Simulated data were used to validate the joint method. The simulations demonstrated that retrieved wave parameters, including SWH, peak wave length (PWL), and peak wave direction (PWD), agree well with reference parameters. Collocated data from ENVISAT advanced SAR (ASAR), the airborne wave spectrometer STORM, the PHAROS buoy, and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) were then used to verify the proposed method. Wave parameters retrieved from STORM and two ASAR images were compared to buoy and ECMWF wave data. Most of the retrieved parameters were comparable to reference parameters. The results of this study show that the proposed joint retrieval method could be a valuable complement to traditional methods used to retrieve directional ocean wave spectra, particularly in inhomogeneous sea states.

  10. A joint method to retrieve directional ocean wave spectra from SAR and wave spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lin; Yang, Jingsong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Juan

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a joint method to simultaneously retrieve wave spectra at different scales from spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and wave spectrometer data. The method combines the output from the two different sensors to overcome retrieval limitations that occur in some sea states. The wave spectrometer sensitivity coefficient is estimated using an effective significant wave height (SWH), which is an average of SAR-derived and wave spectrometer-derived SWH. This averaging extends the area of the sea surface sampled by the nadir beam of the wave spectrometer to improve the accuracy of the estimated sensitivity coefficient in inhomogeneous sea states. Wave spectra are then retrieved from SAR data using wave spectrometer-derived spectra as first guess spectra to complement the short waves lost in SAR data retrieval. In addition, the problem of 180° ambiguity in retrieved spectra is overcome using SAR imaginary cross spectra. Simulated data were used to validate the joint method. The simulations demonstrated that retrieved wave parameters, including SWH, peak wave length (PWL), and peak wave direction (PWD), agree well with reference parameters. Collocated data from ENVISAT advanced SAR (ASAR), the airborne wave spectrometer STORM, the PHAROS buoy, and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) were then used to verify the proposed method. Wave parameters retrieved from STORM and two ASAR images were compared to buoy and ECMWF wave data. Most of the retrieved parameters were comparable to reference parameters. The results of this study show that the proposed joint retrieval method could be a valuable complement to traditional methods used to retrieve directional ocean wave spectra, particularly in inhomogeneous sea states.

  11. Prospective outcome analysis of total replacement of the temporomandibular joint with the TMJ Concepts system in patients with inflammatory arthritic diseases.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Rory C; Saleem, Saarah; Sidebottom, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    We report the outcomes of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis, who had total replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using the TMJ Concepts system between 2005 and 2014. We prospectively measured mouth opening (mm), and pain and dietary function (visual analogue scale (VAS), 1 - 100) before operation, and at 6 weeks, 6 months, one year, and beyond. Forty-six joints were replaced in 26 patients (mean age 40, range 16 - 71), 22 of whom were female. Most had rheumatoid (n=17) or psoriatic arthritis (n=7). At one year the mean (SD) pain scores had fallen from 55 (36) to 2 (7) on the left, and from 62 (31) to 2 (5) on the right (p<0.001). Mean (SD) scores for dietary function had increased from 48(25) to 95(9) (p<0.001), and mouth opening had increased from a mean (SD) of 23(10) mm to 35(5) mm (p<0.001). The joints dislocated during the operation in 5 patients, and 4 had temporary weakness of the facial nerve. Outcomes after replacement of the TMJ with the TMJ Concepts system were good in patients with inflammatory arthritis, which further validates the procedure, as damage to the joint is severe in this group. PMID:27015729

  12. Temporomandibular Joint, Open

    MedlinePlus

    ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A–Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum ...

  13. 5-HT induces temporomandibular joint nociception in rats through the local release of inflammatory mediators and activation of local β adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Fusaro, Maria Cláudia G; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana Trindade; Teixeira, Juliana Maia; Torres-Chávez, Karla Elena; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Tambeli, Cláudia Herrera

    2012-09-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is an important inflammatory mediator found in high levels in the synovial fluid of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of patients with inflammatory pain. In this study, we used the nociceptive behavior responses, measured as flinching the head and rubbing the orofacial region, as a nociceptive assay. We demonstrated that the local blockade of the 5-HT₃ receptor and β₁ or β₂-adrenoceptors, the depletion of norepinephrine in the sympathetic terminals and the local inhibition of cyclooxygenase significantly reduced 5-HT-induced TMJ nociception. These results demonstrated that 5-HT induces nociception in the TMJ region by the activation of β₁ and β₂ adrenoceptors located in the TMJ region and local release of sympathetic amines and prostaglandins. Therefore, the high levels of 5-HT in the synovial fluid of patients with TMJ inflammatory pain may contribute to TMJ pain by similar mechanisms. PMID:22683622

  14. Radiographic anatomy of the rabbit skull with particular reference to the tympanic bulla and temporomandibular joint: Part 1: Lateral and long axis rotational angles.

    PubMed

    King, A M; Cranfield, F; Hall, J; Hammond, G; Sullivan, M

    2010-11-01

    Radiography is frequently used to investigate otitis media and dental disease in rabbits, although there are few detailed reports regarding the radiographic anatomy of the rabbit skull. The aim of this study was to document rabbit skull radiographic anatomy, with particular reference to the tympanic bulla (TB) and temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and to identify views that allowed optimal assessment of these areas. Equipment was used that allowed repeatable positioning of skulls at known rotational angles in lateral (lateral to rostrocaudal) and long axis (lateral to ventrodorsal) directions. The views were repeated with lead markers attached to anatomical features and cadaver heads. The TB could be best examined between 30° and 60° in both planes. The TMJ was best visualised between 70° and 90° in a lateral direction, particularly along a true rostrocaudal plane, but could not be imaged well at any of the long axis rotational angles. Similar images were obtained using cadavers. PMID:19853482

  15. Improvement of GOME-2 Tropospheric Ozone Profile Retrievals from Joint UV/Visible Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zoogman, P.; Chance, K.; Cai, Z.; Nowlan, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    It has been shown that adding visible measurements in the Chappuis band to UV measurements in the Hartley/Huggins bands can significantly enhance retrieval sensitivity to lower tropospheric ozone from backscattered solar radiances due to deeper photon penetration in the visible to the surface than in the ultraviolet. The first NASA EVI TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) instrument is being developed to measure backscattered solar radiation in two channels (~290-490 and 540-740 nm) and make atmospheric pollution measurements over North America from the Geostationary orbit. However, this retrieval enhancement has yet to be solidly demonstrated from existing measurements due to the weak ozone absorption in the visible and strong interference from surface reflectance and the requirement of accurate radiometric calibration across different spectral channels. We present GOME-2 retrievals from joint UV/visible measurements using the SAO optimal estimation based ozone profile retrieval algorithm, to directly explore the retrieval improvement in lower tropospheric ozone from additional visible measurements. To reduce the retrieval interference from surface reflectance, we add characterization of surface spectral reflectance in the visible based on ASTER and other surface reflectance spectra and MODIS BRDF climatology into the ozone profile algorithm using two approaches: fitting several EOFs (Empirical Orthogonal Functions) and scaling reflectance spectra. We also perform empirical radiometric calibration of the GOME-2 data based on radiative transfer simulations. We evaluate the retrieval improvement of joint UV/visible retrieval over the UV retrieval. These results clearly show the potential of using the visible to improve lower tropospheric ozone retrieval.

  16. Analysis by Light, Scanning, and Transmission Microscopy of the Intima Synovial of the Temporomandibular Joint of Human Fetuses during the Development

    PubMed Central

    Alvez, Carlos Sabu; Carvalho de Moraes, Luis Otavio; Marques, Sergio R.; Tedesco, Roberto C.; Harb, Leandro J. C.; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose F.; Mérida-Velasco, Jose R.; Alonso, Luis Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To characterize morphologically and ultrastructurally using light microscopy, the scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy the intima synovial of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of human fetuses between the 10th and the 38th week of development. Materials and Methods. The TMJ was dissected bilaterally in 37 human fetuses belonging to the Institute of Embryology of the University Complutense of Madrid and of the Federal University of São Paulo. Results. The outcome by light microscopy showed the morphology of the TMJ and that the formation of inferior joint cavity precedes the superior joint cavity and the presence of blood vessels in the synovial. Conclusion. By scanning and transmission electron microscopy we observed the presence of two well-defined cell types in the intima layer of synovial of the TMJ of human fetuses, macrophage-like type A cell and fibroblast-like type B cell, and the presence of the a third cell type, defined by the name of intermediate lining cell in the intima layer of the synovial. PMID:24527214

  17. Does condylar height decrease more in temporomandibular joint nonreducing disc displacement than reducing disc displacement?: A magnetic resonance imaging retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying-Kai; Yang, Chi; Cai, Xie-Yi; Xie, Qian-Yang

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare condylar height changes of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) quantitatively, to get a better understanding of the changes in condylar height of patients with anterior disc displacement who had received no treatment, and to provide useful information for treatment protocol. This longitudinal retrospective study enrolled 206 joints in 156 patients, which were divided into ADDWR group and ADDwoR group based on magnetic resonance imaging examination. The joints were assessed quantitatively for condylar height at initial and follow-up visits. Also, both groups were further divided into 3 subgroups according to age: <15 years group, 15 to 21 years group, and 22 to 35 years group. Paired t test and independent t test were used to assess intra- and intergroup differences. The average age of the ADDwR group was 19.65 years with a mean of 9.47 months' follow-up. The follow-up interval of the patients with ADDwoR was 7.96 months, with a mean age of 18.51 years. Condylar height in ADDwoR tended to decrease more than those in ADDwR, especially during the pubertal growth spurt and with the presence of osteoarthrosis, meaning ADDwoR could cause a severe disturbance in mandibular development. Thus, an early disc repositioning was suggested to avoid decrease in condylar height. PMID:27583909

  18. Effect of psychological stress on the structure of the temporomandibular joint and the expression of MMP-3 and TIMP-3 in the cartilage in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu; Liu, Haixia; Xiao, Peng; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Hongyu

    2014-10-01

    Our aim was to observe the effects of psychological stress on the structure of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and to evaluate the expression of matrix metallopeptidase-3 (MMP-3) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3) in condylar chondrocytes in rats. The rats were divided into 3 groups of 12 according to the duration of psychological stress: 3 weeks or 6 weeks, and 6 weeks of recovery. A fourth group of 12 rats was used as controls. Each rat was evaluated by the open-field test and the weight measured. The results confirmed psychological stress in 24 of the 36 rats (67%). The tissues of the TMJ were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and pathological changes were studied under a light microscope. MMP-3 and TIMP-3 expression was investigated using the SP kit. The experimental groups showed thinning of articular cartilage, shedding of collagen fibres, cracks in the articular discs, and other structural changes that were aggravated with time, from three weeks to six weeks. The 6-week recovery group showed an improvement in these changes, which indicated the initiation of joint repair. The MMP-3 expression rate correlated with the degree of joint lesion, while the TIMP-3 rate showed an opposite trend and was highest in the 6-week recovery group. Our findings clearly indicate that psychological stress may play an important part in the development of TMJ diseases in rats; further studies should be made to extrapolate the results to other models before clinical use. PMID:25060974

  19. Three-dimensional assessment of the temporomandibular joint and mandibular dimensions after early correction of the maxillary arch form in patients with Class II division 1 or division 2 malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Ciger, Semra

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess three-dimensional changes in the temporomandibular joint positions and mandibular dimensions after correction of dental factors restricting mandibular growth in patients with Class II division 1 or division 2 malocclusion in the pubertal growth period. Methods This prospective clinical study included 14 patients each with Class II division 1 (group I) and Class II division 2 (group II) malocclusions. The quad-helix was used for maxillary expansion, while utility arches were used for intrusion (group I) or protrusion and intrusion (group II) of the maxillary incisors. After approximately 2 months of treatment, an adequate maxillary arch width and acceptable maxillary incisor inclination were obtained. The patients were followed for an average of 6 months. Intraoral and extraoral photographs, plaster models, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained before and after treatment. Lateral cephalometric and temporomandibular joint measurements were made from the CBCT images. Results The mandibular dimensions increased in both groups, although mandibular positional changes were also found in group II. There were no differences in the condylar position within the mandibular fossa or the condylar dimensions. The mandibular fossa depth and condylar positions were symmetrical at treatment initiation and completion. Conclusions Class II malocclusion can be partially corrected by achieving an ideal maxillary arch form, particularly in patients with Class II division 2 malocclusion. Restrictions of the mandible in the transverse or sagittal plane do not affect the temporomandibular joint positions in these patients because of the high adaptability of this joint. PMID:26023540

  20. Pharmacologic Treatment for Temporomandibular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Dym, Harry; Bowler, Dustin; Zeidan, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacologic agents play an integral role in the overall management of temporomandibular joint disorder. The general dentist should be familiar with the different classes of drugs currently in use for dealing with this often complex medical/dental problem. PMID:27040290

  1. Upregulation of lncRNA HOTAIR contributes to IL-1β-induced MMP overexpression and chondrocytes apoptosis in temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunping; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Pengfei; Lv, Yongbin; Dong, Changxia; Dai, Xiuyu; Tan, Lixia; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-07-25

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) is a common and heterogeneous disease that causes painful and progressive joint degeneration, which restricts daily activities, including talking and chewing. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are an important class of genes involved in various physiological and pathological functions, including osteoarthritis (OA).The present study aimed to identify the lncRNAs that are important in TMJ OA and their potential functions. Here, we found that HOTAIR was significantly upregulated in the synovial fluid of TMJ OA patients compared with that of normal controls. Increased HOTAIR was similarly observed in the synovial fluid of TMJ OA rabbits as compared to control rabbits. Furthermore, in interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced TMJ OA in vitro model (primary rabbit condylar chondrocytes), the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP3, MMP9 and HOTAIR were all dramatically increased. Most importantly, knockdown of HOTAIR in IL-1β-induced TMJ OA in vitro model could not only reverse the IL-1β-stimulated expressions of MMP1, MMP3 and MMP9, but also significantly decrease the apoptosis rate induced by IL-1β in primary rabbit condylar chondrocytes. Our data provides new insight into the mechanisms of chondrocytes destruction in TMJ OA. PMID:27063559

  2. Effect of Interleukin-1beta and Dehydroepiandrosterone on the Expression of Lumican and Fibromodulin in Fibroblast-Like Synovial Cells of the Human Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, K.; Kiga, N.; Shinohara, Y.; Tojyo, I.; Fujita, S.

    2015-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have reported that temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are more prevalent in women than in men. It has recently been proposed that sex hormones such as estrogen, testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are involved with the pathogenesis of TMDs. Although studies have investigated the relationship between estrogen and testosterone and the restoration of TMDs, the relationship between DHEA and TMDs is unknown. The synovial tissue of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is made up of connective tissue with an extracellular matrix (ECM) composed of collagen and proteoglycan. One proteoglycan family, comprised of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans (SLRPs), was found to be involved in collagen fibril formation and interaction. In recent years, the participation of SLRPs such as lumican and fibromodulin in the internal derangement of TMJ has been suggested. Although these SLRPs may contribute to the restoration of the synovium, their effect is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of DHEA, a sex hormone, on the expression of lumican and fibromodulin in human temporomandibular specimens and in cultured human TMJ fibroblast-like synovial cells in the presence or absence of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). In the in vivo study, both normal and osteoarthritic (OA) human temporomandibular synovial tissues were immunohistochemically examined. In the in vitro study, five fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) cell lines were established from human TMJ synovial tissue of patients with osteoarthritis. The subcultured cells were then incubated for 3, 6, 12 or 24 h with/without IL-1beta (1 ng/mL) in the presence or absence of DHEA (10 μM). The gene expression of lumican and fibromodulin was examined using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and their protein expression was examined using immunofluorescent staining. We demonstrated that the expression of lumican differs from that

  3. Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Frederick; Steinkeler, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial disease process caused by muscle hyperfunction or parafunction, traumatic injuries, hormonal influences, and articular changes. Symptoms of TMD include decreased mandibular range of motion, muscle and joint pain, joint crepitus, and functional limitation or deviation of jaw opening. Only after failure of noninvasive options should more invasive and nonreversible treatments be initiated. Treatment can be divided into noninvasive, minimally invasive, and invasive options. Temporomandibular joint replacement is reserved for severely damaged joints with end-stage disease that has failed all other more conservative treatment modalities. PMID:23809304

  4. Temporomandibular disorders and headaches.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Bassiur, Jennifer P

    2014-05-01

    Headache and temporomandibular disorders should be treated together but separately. If there is marked limitation of opening, imaging of the joint may be necessary. The treatment should then include education regarding limiting jaw function, appliance therapy, instruction in jaw posture, and stretching exercises, as well as medications to reduce inflammation and relax the muscles. The use of physical therapies, such as spray and stretch and trigger point injections, is helpful if there is myofascial pain. Tricyclic antidepressants and the new-generation antiepileptic drugs are effective in muscle pain conditions. Arthrocentesis and/or arthroscopy may help to restore range of motion. PMID:24703543

  5. Effects of osteoarthritis on radiographic measures of laxity and congruence in hip joints of Labrador Retrievers.

    PubMed

    Gold, Randi M; Gregor, Thomas P; Huck, Jennifer L; McKelvie, Pamela J; Smith, Gail K

    2009-06-15

    OBJECTIVE- To determine effects of hip joint osteoarthritis on radiographic measures of hip joint laxity and congruence. DESIGN- Longitudinal study. ANIMALS- 40 Labrador Retrievers. PROCEDURES- Dogs were assigned to 2 groups based on radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. Dogs in the osteoarthritis group were free of osteoarthritis at initial radiographic evaluation (t(1)) and developed osteoarthritis by a subsequent radiographic evaluation (t(2)). Dogs in the nonosteoarthritis group had no radiographic osteoarthritis at either evaluation. Hip joint laxity was quantified by use of the distraction index (DI) from a distraction radiographic view and use of the Norberg angle (NA) from a ventrodorsal hip-extended radiographic view. The compression index (CI) from a compression radiographic view was used as a measure of joint congruence (concentricity). RESULTS- Hip joint laxity (NA or DI) did not change over time in the nonosteoarthritis group. Mean hip joint laxity (NA and DI) for the osteoarthritis group was greater at t(1) than for the nonosteoarthritis group. With the onset of osteoarthritis, mean NA decreased significantly and mean CI increased significantly, but mean DI remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE- No radiographic evidence for compensatory hip joint tightening associated with osteoarthritis was detected. Hip-extended radiography revealed that hip joints got looser with osteoarthritis and NA decreased. Hip joint laxity (DI) on distraction radiographs was unchanged by the onset of osteoarthritis and remained constant in the osteoarthritis and nonosteoarthritis groups at both evaluations. However, the CI increased with osteoarthritis, as reflected in nonzero indices (incongruence). The CI may be a valid marker for early hip joint osteoarthritis. PMID:19527128

  6. Nociceptive behavior induced by mustard oil injection into the temporomandibular joint is blocked by a peripheral non-opioid analgesic and a central opioid analgesic.

    PubMed

    Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; da Silva, Adriana Pelegrini; Gameiro, Gustavo Hauber; Tambeli, Cláudia Herrera; Ferraz de Arruda Veiga, Maria Cecília

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the mustard oil (MO) induced temporomandibular joint (TMJ) nociception model and to investigate the potential analgesic activity of systemic dipyrone and tramadol on the nociceptive behavioral responses induced by injection of low concentrations of the MO into the rat TMJ region. TMJ injection of 2.5% MO produced a significant nociceptive behavior expressed by head flinching and orofacial rubbing. This activity was related to the MO injection since mineral oil (vehicle) did not elicit response. Local application of the lidocaine N-ethyl bromide quaternary salt, QX-314 (2%) and systemic administration of morphine (4 mg/kg) significantly reduced the MO-induced nociceptive responses, validating the nociceptive character of the behaviors. The pretreatment with systemic dipyrone (19, 57 or 95 mg/kg) as well as tramadol (5, 7.5 or 10 mg/kg) was effective in decreasing the nociceptive behavioral responses induced by the injection of MO into the rat TMJ. In conclusion, TMJ injection of low concentrations of MO in rats produces well defined and quantifiable nociceptive behaviors constituting a reliable behavioral model for studying TMJ pain mechanisms and testing analgesic drugs. The results also suggest that dipyrone and tramadol could be effective analgesic options in the management of TMJ pain. PMID:18755210

  7. Changes in temporomandibular joint morphology in class II patients treated with fixed mandibular repositioning and evaluated through 3D imaging: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, M A Q; Alsufyani, N; Flores-Mir, C; Nebbe, B; Major, P W

    2015-11-01

    To estimate the effects of skeletal class II malocclusion treatment using fixed mandibular repositioning appliances on the position and morphology of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Two independent reviewers performed comprehensive electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBM reviews and Scopus (until May 5, 2015). The references of the identified articles were also manually searched. All studies investigating morphological changes of the TMJ articular disc, condyle and glenoid fossa with 3D imaging following non-surgical fixed mandibular repositioning appliances in growing individuals with class II malocclusions were included in the analysis. Of the 269 articles initially reviewed, only 12 articles used magnetic resonance imaging and two articles used computed tomography (CT) or cone-beam CT images. Treatment effect on condyle and glenoid fossa was discussed in eight articles. Treatment effect on TMJ articular disc position and morphology was discussed in seven articles. All articles showed a high risk of bias due to deficient methodology: inadequate consideration of confounding variables, blinding of image assessment, selection or absence of control group and outcome measurement. Reported changes in osseous remodelling, condylar and disc position were contradictory. The selected articles failed to establish conclusive evidence of the exact nature of TMJ tissue response to fixed mandibular repositioning appliances. PMID:26260422

  8. Feasibility of a Clinical Trial of Pain-related Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Disorders: A Survey from the CONDOR Dental PBRNs

    PubMed Central

    Velly, Ana M.; Schiffman, Eric L.; Rindal, D. Brad; Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Lehmann, Maryann; Horowitz, Allan; Fricton, James

    2011-01-01

    Background This survey characterized the strategies used by general dentists to manage temporomandibular muscle joint disorders (TMJD) pain, and assessed the feasibility of doing a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of the effectiveness of these strategies. Methods Dentists from three Practice-Based Research Networks (PBRNs) specifically, DPBRN, PEARL, NWPRECEDENT) accepted to participate in this survey. Results Out of 862 dentists surveyed, 654 were general dentists who treat TMJD; among these, 80.3 percent stated they would participate in a RCT. Dentists treated an average of three pain-related TMJD patients per month. Splints (97.6 percent), self-care (85.9 percent) and over-the-counter or prescribed medications (84.6 percent) were the treatments most frequently used. The preferred treatments to compare in a RCT were splint therapy (35.8 percent), self-care (27.4 percent) and medications (16.9 percent). Conclusions Most general dentists treat TMJD pain, and reversible initial care is typically provided. Finally, it is feasible to conduct a RCT in the PBRNs to assess the effectiveness of splint therapy, medications and/or self-care, for the initial management of painful TMJD. Clinical Implications There is an opportunity to do a RCT in PBRNs leading to the development of evidence-based treatment guidelines for the initial treatment of pain-related TMJD by primary care dentists. PMID:23283934

  9. The relationship between dental occlusion/temporomandibular joint status and general body health: part 2. Fascial connection of TMJ with other parts of the body.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-Joo; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2011-12-01

    In part 1 of this study, it was discussed that dental occlusion/temporomandibular joint (TMJ) status is functionally connected to general body health. The purpose of this part of the study was to attempt to formulate a conceptual account, the "fascial connection theory for TMJ and other parts of the body," to explain the functional connection between TMJ and other parts of the body. The first hypothesis that was studied is that TMJ and other parts of body are connected through the fascia as asserted by the myofascial-release schools, and the second one is that they are connected through the meridian system constituted of fascia (connective tissue). The fascial connection theory proposed here can explain the functional connection between dental occlusion/TMJ and other parts of the body based on either myofascial release or the qi and meridian system, or a combination of the two. Therefore, dental occlusion should be built up and maintained in a normal natural condition, and causes of deterioration of TMJ status should be treated in an effort to restore the natural condition. Other possible mechanisms that can account for these connections require elucidation, and additional experimental investigation should be undertaken. PMID:22082433

  10. Comparative study in patients with symptomatic internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: analgesic outcomes of arthrocentesis with or without intra-articular morphine and tramadol.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, A; Satilmis, T; Basa, S

    2015-04-01

    Our aim was to find out whether pain was better controlled if morphine or tramadol was injected intra-articularly after arthrocentesis with Ringer's lactate in patients with painful temporomandibular joints (TMJ). This placebo-controlled, double-blind study involved 30 patients who had not responded to conservative treatment and who were divided randomly into 3 groups of 10 patients each. All patients had arthrocentesis, and the drugs were given as intra-articular injections immediately after the procedure. One group was give 5% Ringer's lactate 1ml, the second morphine 1mg, and the third tramadol 50mg. Visual analogue scales (VAS) for pain were recorded at maximum mouth opening and at rest before intra-articular injection and after 15 and 30min; at 1, 2, 3, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48h; and at 1, 3, and 6 monthly follow-up. The mean (SD) VAS decreased from 6.90 (1.45) to 2.6 (2.5) in the control group, from 7.30 (1.64) to 1.20 (0.79) in the morphine group (p=0.005), and from 7.10 (1.73) to 1.50 (1.78) in the tramadol group (p=0.005). We conclude that morphine given by intra-articular injection after arthrocentesis gives a significant, sustained (6 months) improvement in pain relief compared with simple arthrocentesis alone. The effect was similar with tramadol except that it was shorter lived. PMID:25623934

  11. Effect of pumping with injection of sodium hyaluronate and the other factors related to outcome in patients with non-reducing disk displacement of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Goto, S; Kasahara, T; Kawamura, H; Motegi, K

    2001-06-01

    We retrospectively examined the effect of pumping with injection of sodium hyaluronate into the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the other factors influencing outcome in patients with non-reducing disk displacement of the TMJ. Fifty-nine patients underwent pumping with injection of sodium hyaluronate into the TMJ. As control, 62 patients were observed without any treatment. Both groups were observed for 12 months. The relation between outcome and the following clinical characteristics was also studied: sex, age, range of motion for maximal mouth opening, TMJ pain, TMJ noise, tenderness of masticatory muscles, locking duration, intercuspal occlusions, angle of posterior slope of articular eminence and degenerative bony changes of the condyle. Logistic regression analysis revealed that pumping with injection of sodium hyaluronate was related to a good outcome. Clinical characteristics of presentation significantly related to a good outcome were a large maximal mouth opening, a short locking duration, and a steep posterior slope of articular eminence. We conclude that pumping with injection of sodium hyaluronate into the TMJ is an effective treatment method for non-reducing disk displacement of the TMJ and that some clinical characteristics also influence outcome. PMID:11420900

  12. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the somatic system. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic actions of maresin 1 on TMJ pain are unclear in the trigeminal system. Here, by performing TMJ injection of a retrograde labeling tracer DiI (a fluorescent dye), I showed that maresin 1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents and neuronal activity via Gαi-coupled G-protein coupled receptors in DiI-labeled trigeminal nociceptive neurons. Further, maresin 1 blocked TRPV1 agonist-evoked increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency and abolished TMJ inflammation-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal nucleus. These results demonstrate the potent actions of maresin 1 in regulating TRPV1 in the trigeminal system. Thus, maresin 1 may serve as a novel endogenous inhibitor for treating TMJ-inflammatory pain in the orofacial region. PMID:26617436

  13. The Evaluation of Head and Craniocervical Posture among Patients with and without Temporomandibular Joint Disorders- A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Saddu, Shweta Channavir; Dyasanoor, Sujatha; Ravi, Beena Varma

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most common non-dental cause of orofacial pain with a multifactorial aetiology. Aim To evaluate the head and craniocervical posture between individuals with and without TMD and its sub types by photographic and radiographic method. Materials and Methods Thirty four TMD patients diagnosed according to Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD’s (RDC/TMD) and were divided into 2 groups: Group I (muscle disorder), Group II (disc displacement). Control group comprised of 34 age and sex matched subjects without TMD. Lateral view photographs were taken and the head posture angle was measured. Craniocervical posture was assessed on lateral skull radiograph with two angles (Craniocervical Angle, Cervical Curvature Angle) and two distances (Suboccipital Space, Atlas-Axis Distance). To compare the results, t-test was used with significance level of 0.05. Results Head posture showed no statistical significant difference (p > 0.05) between Group I, II and control group in both photographic and radiographic methods. The cervical curvature angle showed significant difference (p = 0.045) in Group I only. Atlas-Axis Distance was statistically significant in Group II (p = 0.001). Conclusion The present study confirmed that there is a negative association of head posture and TMD whereas, cervical lordosis was present in Group I only. PMID:26436048

  14. Morphologic Analysis of the Temporomandibular Joint Between Patients With Facial Asymmetry and Asymptomatic Subjects by 2D and 3D Evaluation: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Li; Song, Jin-Lin; Xu, Xian-Chao; Zheng, Lei-Lei; Wang, Qing-Yuan; Fan, Yu-Bo; Liu, Zhan

    2016-03-01

    Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction are commonly found in patients with facial asymmetry. Previous studies on the TMJ position have been limited to 2-dimensional (2D) radiographs, computed tomography (CT), or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The purpose of this study was to compare the differences of TMJ position by using 2D CBCT and 3D model measurement methods. In addition, the differences of TMJ positions between patients with facial asymmetry and asymptomatic subjects were investigated.We prospectively recruited 5 patients (cases, mean age, 24.8 ± 2.9 years) diagnosed with facial asymmetry and 5 asymptomatic subjects (controls, mean age, 26 ± 1.2 years). The TMJ spaces, condylar and ramus angles were assessed by using 2D and 3D methods. The 3D models of mandible, maxilla, and teeth were reconstructed with the 3D image software. The variables in each group were assessed by t-test and the level of significance was 0.05.There was a significant difference in the horizontal condylar angle (HCA), coronal condylar angle (CCA), sagittal ramus angle (SRA), medial joint space (MJS), lateral joint space (LJS), superior joint space (SJS), and anterior joint space (AJS) measured in the 2D CBCT and in the 3D models (P < 0.05). The case group had significantly smaller SJS compared to the controls on both nondeviation side (P = 0.009) and deviation side (P = 0.004). In the case group, the nondeviation SRA was significantly larger than the deviation side (P = 0.009). There was no significant difference in the coronal condylar width (CCW) in either group. In addition, the anterior disc displacement (ADD) was more likely to occur on the deviated side in the case group.In conclusion, the 3D measurement method is more accurate and effective for clinicians to investigate the morphology of TMJ than the 2D method. PMID:27043669

  15. Morphologic Analysis of the Temporomandibular Joint Between Patients With Facial Asymmetry and Asymptomatic Subjects by 2D and 3D Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan-Li; Song, Jin-Lin; Xu, Xian-Chao; Zheng, Lei-Lei; Wang, Qing-Yuan; Fan, Yu-Bo; Liu, Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction are commonly found in patients with facial asymmetry. Previous studies on the TMJ position have been limited to 2-dimensional (2D) radiographs, computed tomography (CT), or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The purpose of this study was to compare the differences of TMJ position by using 2D CBCT and 3D model measurement methods. In addition, the differences of TMJ positions between patients with facial asymmetry and asymptomatic subjects were investigated. We prospectively recruited 5 patients (cases, mean age, 24.8 ± 2.9 years) diagnosed with facial asymmetry and 5 asymptomatic subjects (controls, mean age, 26 ± 1.2 years). The TMJ spaces, condylar and ramus angles were assessed by using 2D and 3D methods. The 3D models of mandible, maxilla, and teeth were reconstructed with the 3D image software. The variables in each group were assessed by t-test and the level of significance was 0.05. There was a significant difference in the horizontal condylar angle (HCA), coronal condylar angle (CCA), sagittal ramus angle (SRA), medial joint space (MJS), lateral joint space (LJS), superior joint space (SJS), and anterior joint space (AJS) measured in the 2D CBCT and in the 3D models (P < 0.05). The case group had significantly smaller SJS compared to the controls on both nondeviation side (P = 0.009) and deviation side (P = 0.004). In the case group, the nondeviation SRA was significantly larger than the deviation side (P = 0.009). There was no significant difference in the coronal condylar width (CCW) in either group. In addition, the anterior disc displacement (ADD) was more likely to occur on the deviated side in the case group. In conclusion, the 3D measurement method is more accurate and effective for clinicians to investigate the morphology of TMJ than the 2D method. PMID:27043669

  16. [Interdisciplinary treatment of temporomandibular inflammation in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Gönner-Ozkan, V; Meyer, P; Tzaribachev, N

    2010-03-01

    Involvement of the temporomandibular joints in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis usually leads to destruction of the mandibular condyles with consistent growth disturbances and facial anomalies. Due to its frequently silent course, temporomandibular arthritis tends to be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. In addition to drug therapy, orthodontics and physiotherapy are essential to prevent further progression and restore lost temporomandibular function. PMID:20107815

  17. The Role of Potentially Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters in High-Risk Patients Undergoing Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Stulberg, S. David; Puri, Lalit; Karp, Jennifer; Ryu, Robert K; Lewandowski, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Some patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty are at increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of prIVCF in preventing PE in patients undergoing joint replacement surgery who are at high-risk for VTE. Materials and Methods In this prospective, IRB-approved study, prIVCF were placed in consecutive patients who met specific high-risk criteria (history of VTE or hypercoaguable state) prior to total joint arthroplasty. Patients were followed until the IVC filter was removed. Outcomes and complications were recorded per Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines. Results One hundred and nine potentially retrievable IVC filters were placed in 105 patients, who all subsequently underwent joint arthroplasty. One hundred eight IVC filters (98.9%) were retrieved successfully in a mean time of 44.1 days (range 13-183 days). There was 1 failed IVC filter retrieval attempt (0.9%) at 46 days post implantation. Two patients (1.9%) presented with recurrent PE and were successfully treated with anticoagulation prior to IVC filter retrieval. There were no fatalities from perioperative PE. In 1 patient (0.9%), a fractured filter leg had embolized during retrieval. Conclusion Potentially retrievable IVC filters are safe and effective for prophylaxis against PE in patients at high-risk for VTE undergoing joint arthroplasty. PMID:26816965

  18. Brain Signature of Chronic Orofacial Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on Neuroimaging Research of Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-shu

    2014-01-01

    Brain neuroimaging has been widely used to investigate the bran signature of chronic orofacial pain, including trigeminal neuropathic pain (TNP) and pain related to temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). We here systematically reviewed the neuroimaging literature regarding the functional and structural changes in the brain of TNP and TMD pain patients, using a computerized search of journal articles via PubMed. Ten TNP studies and 14 TMD studies were reviewed. Study quality and risk of bias were assessed based on the criteria of patient selection, the history of medication, the use of standardized pain/psychological assessments, and the model and statistics of imaging analyses. Qualitative meta-analysis was performed by examining the brain regions which showed significant changes in either brain functions (including the blood-oxygen-level dependent signal, cerebral blood flow and the magnetic resonance spectroscopy signal) or brain structure (including gray matter and white matter anatomy). We hypothesized that the neuroimaging findings would display a common pattern as well as distinct patterns of brain signature in the disorders. This major hypothesis was supported by the following findings: (1) TNP and TMD patients showed consistent functional/structural changes in the thalamus and the primary somatosensory cortex, indicating the thalamocortical pathway as the major site of plasticity. (2) The TNP patients showed more alterations at the thalamocortical pathway, and the two disorders showed distinct patterns of thalamic and insular connectivity. Additionally, functional and structural changes were frequently reported in the prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia, suggesting the role of cognitive modulation and reward processing in chronic orofacial pain. The findings highlight the potential for brain neuroimaging as an investigating tool for understanding chronic orofacial pain. PMID:24759798

  19. Progression of radiographic changes in the temporomandibular joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in relation to inflammatory markers and mediators in the blood.

    PubMed

    Voog, Ulle; Alstergren, Per; Eliasson, Sören; Leibur, Edvitar; Kallikorm, Riina; Kopp, Sigvard

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate longitudinal radiographic changes in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with clinical involvement of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its relation to the blood level of inflammatory mediators and markers. Sixteen patients were investigated by computed tomography on two occasions 25-46 months apart. The radiographs were assessed independently for changes in presence of erosions, sclerosis, flattening, osteophytes, and subchondral pseudocysts. The serum (S) or plasma (P) concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), thrombocyte particle concentration, scrotonin (S-5-HT and P-5-HT), tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, tumor necrosis factor soluble receptor type II, interleukin-1 soluble receptor type II (P-IL-1sRII) and interleukin 6 as well as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured. The radiographic status showed no consistent or significant change during the observation period, but the individual variation was considerable. The radiographic signs of erosion and sclerosis varied most. Regression of erosions was associated with high S-5-HT and P-IL-1sRII, while progression of erosions was associated with high P-5-HT. Regression of sclerosis was associated with an increase in P-5-HT and high ESR. Progression of flattening was associated with high CRP. In conclusion, this study indicates that the progression of radiographic changes that occurs in the TMJ of patients with well-controlled RA during a period of 25-46 months seems to be related to the blood levels of CRP, 5-HT, and IL-1sRII. However, only minor progression can be expected to occur, and with considerable individual variation. PMID:15124777

  20. Comparative evaluation of low-level laser and systemic steroid therapy in adjuvant-enhanced arthritis of rat temporomandibular joint: A histological study

    PubMed Central

    Khozeimeh, Faezeh; Moghareabed, Ahmad; Allameh, Maryam; Baradaran, Shahrzad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has shown a promising effect in ameliorating symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this investigation was to compare the early and late anti-inflammatory effects of LLLT and betamethasone in RA. Materials and Methods: In this animal experimental study, after inducing a model of RA in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of 37 Wistar rats using adjuvant injection, they were randomly distributed into three experimental groups of 12 animals each: (1) LLLT group; (2) steroid group which received a single dose of betamethasone systemically; and (3) positive control group, which did not receive any treatment. One rat served as the negative control. Half of the animals in all the experimental groups were sacrificed on the 21st day after RA induction (early phase), and the other half were sacrificed 2 weeks later (late phase). Then, the severity of TMJ inflammation was assessed histologically in each group on a semi-quantitative scale. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare differences (α = 0.05). Results: The LLLT and steroid groups showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower inflammation mean scores in both early (5.66 [±1.86] and 1.66 [±1.21], respectively) and late phases of evaluation (1.16 [±1.47] and 6.50 [±1.04], respectively) compared to positive control group in early and late stages of assessment (11.66 [±3.50] and 8.66 [±1.36], respectively). However, the best results (P < 0.005) were achieved in early phase of the steroid group as well as late phase of the LLLT group. Conclusion: Within limitations of this study, it may be concluded that LLLT method has a long-term promising effect on reducing inflammation severity of TMJ similar to betamethasone in earlier stages. PMID:26005460

  1. Low-level laser therapy stimulates tissue repair and reduces the extracellular matrix degradation in rats with induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Lemos, George Azevedo; Rissi, Renato; de Souza Pires, Ivan Luiz; de Oliveira, Letícia Prado; de Aro, Andrea Aparecida; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Palomari, Evanisi Teresa

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize morphological and biochemistry action of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into groups with 12 animals each: (AG) group with arthritis induced in the left TMJ and (LG) group with arthritis induced in the left TMJ and treated with LLLT (830 nm, 30 mW, 3 J/cm(2)). Right TMJs in the AG group were used as noninjected control group (CG). Arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of 50 μl Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) and LLLT began 1 week after arthritis induction. Histopathological analysis was performed using sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Toluidine Blue, and picrosirius. Biochemical analysis was determined by the total concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and evaluation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9). Statistical analysis was performed using paired and unpaired t tests, with p < 0.05. Compared to AG, LG had minor histopathological changes in the TMJ, smaller thickness of the articular disc in the anterior (p < 0.0001), middle (p < 0.0001) and posterior regions (p < 0.0001), high birefringence of collagen fibers in the anterior (p < 0.0001), middle (p < 0.0001) and posterior regions (p < 0.0001) on the articular disc, and statistically lower activity of MMP-2 latent (p < 0.0001), MMP-2 active (P = 0.02), MMP-9 latent (p < 0.0001), and MMP-9 active (p < 0.0001). These results suggest that LLLT can increase the remodeling and enhancing tissue repair in TMJ with induced arthritis. PMID:27147076

  2. Initial Retrieval Validation from the Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, WIlliam L.; Larar, Allen M.; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Mango, Stephen A.; Schluessel, Peter; Calbet, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx) was conducted during April 2007 mainly for validation of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp satellite, but also included a strong component focusing on validation of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) aboard the AQUA satellite. The cross validation of IASI and AIRS is important for the joint use of their data in the global Numerical Weather Prediction process. Initial inter-comparisons of geophysical products have been conducted from different aspects, such as using different measurements from airborne ultraspectral Fourier transform spectrometers (specifically, the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST-I) and the Scanning-High resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) aboard the NASA WB-57 aircraft), UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe146-301 aircraft insitu instruments, dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and ground based Raman Lidar. An overview of the JAIVEx retrieval validation plan and some initial results of this field campaign are presented.

  3. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint as a complication of acute otitis media in a child: A rare case and the importance of real-time PCR for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bast, F; Collier, S; Chadha, P; Collier, J

    2015-11-01

    We document the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with pain in his left ear and trismus after a diagnosis of acute otitis media one week previously. His blood inflammatory markers were raised and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed significant left temporomandibular joint effusion and partial attenuation of the left mastoid. A clinical diagnosis of septic arthritis of the TMJ was made and the patient was commenced on broad-spectrum antibiotics. Analysis using real time PCR enabled identification of the offending organism, confirmation of the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment to be specifically tailored for treatment. PMID:26340928

  4. Effects of glucosamine-chondroitin combination on synovial fluid IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and PGE2 levels in internal derangements of temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Emin; Tatli, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of glucosamine-chondroitin sulphate combination on internal derangements of temporomandibular joint in clinical and biochemical manners. Material and Methods This randomized clinical study included 31 cases reporting joint tenderness, in which disc displacement was detected on MR imaging. In all patients, synovial fluid sampling was performed under local anesthesia. In the study group, the patients were prescribed a combination of 1500 mg glucosamine and 1200 mg chondroitin sulphate, while patients in the control group were only prescribed 50 mg tramadol HCl (twice daily) for pain control. After 8 weeks, synovial fluid sampling was repeated in the same manner. The levels of pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO), synovial fluid IL-1ß, IL-6, TNF-α and PGE2 measured before and after pharmacological intervention were compared. Results The reduction in pain levels was significant in both groups. There was no significant difference between two groups in terms of pain reduction. The improvement in MMO was significant in the study group but it was not in the control group. The MMO improvement was significantly higher in the study group compared to the control group. In the study group, significant decrease was observed in PGE2 level, while the decreases in IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were not significant. In the control group, no significant decrease was observed in any of the inflammatory cytokines after 8 weeks, moreover IL-1ß and IL-6 levels were increased. Alterations of IL-1ß and IL-6 levels were significant in study group while TNF-α and PGE2 levels were not, compared to control group. Conclusions In conclusion, these results might suggest that glucosamine-chondroitin combination significantly increases the MMO and decreases the synovial fluid IL1β and IL6 levels in internal derangements of TMJ compared to tramadol. The modifications of synovial fluid TNF-α and PGE2 levels do not reach

  5. Maximum Standardized Uptake Value of (99m)Tc Hydroxymethylene Diphosphonate SPECT/CT for the Evaluation of Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

    PubMed

    Suh, Min Seok; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Young-Kyun; Yun, Pil-Young; Kim, Sang Eun

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the quantitative parameter standardized uptake value (SUV) at single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder (TMD). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board, and the need for informed consent was waived. Forty-four TMJs in 22 patients with TMD (five men and 17 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 30.0 years ± 12.1) were evaluated. The patients underwent planar bone scintigraphy and SPECT/CT 3-4 hours after injection of technetium 99m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate. The planar scintigraphy parameter of relative ratio (RR) and SPECT/CT parameters mean SUV (SUVmean) and maximum SUV (SUVmax) were compared for the visual assessment of TMD on planar scintigraphy images and for the presence of TMJ arthralgia. Group comparisons, receiver operating characteristic analysis, and Pearson correlation analysis were conducted. Results SUVmax gradually increased from normal (2.82 ± 0.73) to mild or moderately abnormal (3.56 ± 0.76, P < .05) and then to severely abnormal (4.86 ± 1.25, P < .05). However, RR and SUVmean did not vary significantly according to visual grade (P > .05). On the other hand, SUVmax was significantly greater in arthralgic TMJs (4.15 ± 1.11) than in nonarthralgic TMJs (2.97 ± 0.75, P < .001), as was SUVmean (1.63 ± 0.42 vs 1.30 ± 0.31, respectively; P = .005). However, there was no significant difference in RR (3.61 ± 0.57 vs 3.76 ± 0.68, P = .45). In receiver operating characteristic curve analyses for arthralgic TMJ, SUVmax had the greatest area under the curve (area of 0.815). Conclusion SUVmax derived from bone SPECT/CT may be useful for the evaluation of TMD. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27035060

  6. Use of Oral Mucoperiosteal and Pterygo-Masseteric Muscle Flaps as Interposition Material in Surgery of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Anyanechi, CE; Osunde, OD; Bassey, GO

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most common complication of surgery for the release of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is relapse of the ankylosis. To prevent re-ankylosis, a variety of interpositional materials have been used. Aim: The aim was to compare the surgical outcome of oral mucoperiosteal flap, not hitherto used as interpositional material, with pterygo-masseteric muscles flap after surgical release of TMJ ankylosis. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective randomized study of all consecutive patients treated for the release of complete TMJ bony ankylosis, from January 2003 to December 2012, at the Oral and Maxillofacial unit of our institution. The patients were randomized into two groups: The pterygo-masseteric group comprises 22 patients while the oral mucoperiosteal group had 23 patients. Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, and postoperative complications over a 5 year follow-up period were obtained, and analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 13, Chicago, IL, USA). A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The age of the patients ranged from 15 to 28 mean 20.3 (3.35) years while the duration of ankylosis ranged from 2 to 16 mean 5.1 (3.4) years. The baseline demographic (gender; P = 0.92; side; P = 0.58) and clinical characteristics in terms of etiology (P = 0.60) and age (P = 0.52) were comparable in both treatment groups. All the patients presented with complete bony TMJ ankylosis with a preoperative inter-incisal distance of <0.5 cm. The intraoperative mouth opening achieved ranged from 4 cm to 5 cm, mean 4.6 (0.27) cm and this was not different for either group (P = 0.51). The patients were followed up postoperatively for a period ranging from 3 to 5 years, mean 3.4 (0.62) years. The mouth opening decreased, over the period of postoperative review, from the initial range of 4–5 cm to 2.9–3.6 cm, and this was not different in both groups (P = 0

  7. Nanocrystalline diamond thin films on titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium alloy temporomandibular joint prosthesis simulants by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Marc Douglas

    A course of research has been performed to assess the suitability of nanocrystal-line diamond (NCD) films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy as wear-resistant coatings in biomedical implant use. A series of temporomandibular (TMJ) joint condyle simulants were polished and acid-passivated as per ASTM F86 standard for surface preparation of implants. A 3-mum-thick coating of NCD film was deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) over the hemispherical articulation surfaces of the simulants. Plasma chemistry conditions were measured and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), using hydrogen as a relative standard. The films consist of diamond grains around 20 nm in diameter embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, free of any detectable film stress gradient. Hardness averages 65 GPa and modulus measures 600 GPa at a depth of 250 nm into the film surface. A diffuse film/substrate boundary produces a minimal film adhesion toughness (GammaC) of 158 J/m2. The mean RMS roughness is 14.6 +/- 4.2 nm, with an average peak roughness of 82.6 +/- 65.9 nm. Examination of the surface morphology reveals a porous, dendritic surface. Wear testing resulted in two failed condylar coatings out of three tests. No macroscopic delamination was found on any sample, but micron-scale film pieces broke away, exposing the substrate. Electrochemical corrosion testing shows a seven-fold reduction in corrosion rate with the application of an NCD coating as opposed to polished, passivated Ti-6Al-4V, producing a corrosion rate comparable to wrought Co-Cr-Mo. In vivo biocompatibility testing indicates that implanted NCD films did not elicit an immune response in the rabbit model, and osteointegration was apparent for both compact and trabecular bone on both NCD film and bare Ti-6Al-4V. Overall, NCD thin film material is reasonably smooth, biocompatible, and very well adhered. Wear testing indicates that this material is unacceptable for use in demanding TMJ applications without

  8. Orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders: a curriculum proposal for postgraduate programs.

    PubMed

    Greene, Charles S; Stockstill, John; Rinchuse, Donald; Kandasamy, Sanjivan

    2012-07-01

    In a previous article, we reported the results of a survey of American and Canadian orthodontic postgraduate programs to determine how the topics of occlusion, temporomandibular joint, and temporomandibular disorders were currently being taught. Based on the finding of considerable diversity among those programs, we decided to write a curriculum proposal for temporomandibular disorders that would be compatible with and satisfy the current curriculum guidelines for postgraduate orthodontic programs. These guidelines arose from a combination of the requirements published by the American Dental Association's Commission on Dental Accreditation and the written guide (July 2010) of the American Board of Orthodontics for the its clinical examination. The proposed curriculum, based on the latest scientific evidence in the temporomandibular disorder field, gives program directors a template for covering these subjects thoroughly. At the same time, they can focus on related orthodontic issues, so that their future graduates will be prepared to deal with patients who either have or later develop temporomandibular disorder problems. PMID:22748986

  9. Neutering Dogs: Effects on Joint Disorders and Cancers in Golden Retrievers

    PubMed Central

    Torres de la Riva, Gretel; Hart, Benjamin L.; Farver, Thomas B.; Oberbauer, Anita M.; Messam, Locksley L. McV.; Willits, Neil; Hart, Lynette A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to European countries, the overwhelming majority of dogs in the U.S. are neutered (including spaying), usually done before one year of age. Given the importance of gonadal hormones in growth and development, this cultural contrast invites an analysis of the multiple organ systems that may be adversely affected by neutering. Using a single breed-specific dataset, the objective was to examine the variables of gender and age at the time of neutering versus leaving dogs gonadally intact, on all diseases occurring with sufficient frequency for statistical analyses. Given its popularity and vulnerability to various cancers and joint disorders, the Golden Retriever was chosen for this study. Veterinary hospital records of 759 client-owned, intact and neutered female and male dogs, 1–8 years old, were examined for diagnoses of hip dysplasia (HD), cranial cruciate ligament tear (CCL), lymphosarcoma (LSA), hemangiosarcoma (HSA), and mast cell tumor (MCT). Patients were classified as intact, or neutered early (<12 mo) or late (≥12 mo). Statistical analyses involved survival analyses and incidence rate comparisons. Outcomes at the 5 percent level of significance are reported. Of early-neutered males, 10 percent were diagnosed with HD, double the occurrence in intact males. There were no cases of CCL diagnosed in intact males or females, but in early-neutered males and females the occurrences were 5 percent and 8 percent, respectively. Almost 10 percent of early-neutered males were diagnosed with LSA, 3 times more than intact males. The percentage of HSA cases in late-neutered females (about 8 percent) was 4 times more than intact and early-neutered females. There were no cases of MCT in intact females, but the occurrence was nearly 6 percent in late-neutered females. The results have health implications for Golden Retriever companion and service dogs, and for oncologists using dogs as models of cancers that occur in humans. PMID:23418479

  10. Neutering dogs: effects on joint disorders and cancers in golden retrievers.

    PubMed

    Torres de la Riva, Gretel; Hart, Benjamin L; Farver, Thomas B; Oberbauer, Anita M; Messam, Locksley L McV; Willits, Neil; Hart, Lynette A

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to European countries, the overwhelming majority of dogs in the U.S. are neutered (including spaying), usually done before one year of age. Given the importance of gonadal hormones in growth and development, this cultural contrast invites an analysis of the multiple organ systems that may be adversely affected by neutering. Using a single breed-specific dataset, the objective was to examine the variables of gender and age at the time of neutering versus leaving dogs gonadally intact, on all diseases occurring with sufficient frequency for statistical analyses. Given its popularity and vulnerability to various cancers and joint disorders, the Golden Retriever was chosen for this study. Veterinary hospital records of 759 client-owned, intact and neutered female and male dogs, 1-8 years old, were examined for diagnoses of hip dysplasia (HD), cranial cruciate ligament tear (CCL), lymphosarcoma (LSA), hemangiosarcoma (HSA), and mast cell tumor (MCT). Patients were classified as intact, or neutered early (<12 mo) or late (≥12 mo). Statistical analyses involved survival analyses and incidence rate comparisons. Outcomes at the 5 percent level of significance are reported. Of early-neutered males, 10 percent were diagnosed with HD, double the occurrence in intact males. There were no cases of CCL diagnosed in intact males or females, but in early-neutered males and females the occurrences were 5 percent and 8 percent, respectively. Almost 10 percent of early-neutered males were diagnosed with LSA, 3 times more than intact males. The percentage of HSA cases in late-neutered females (about 8 percent) was 4 times more than intact and early-neutered females. There were no cases of MCT in intact females, but the occurrence was nearly 6 percent in late-neutered females. The results have health implications for Golden Retriever companion and service dogs, and for oncologists using dogs as models of cancers that occur in humans. PMID:23418479

  11. Synovial chondromatosis of the right side temporomandibular joint extending to the middle cranial fossa: A case report with 7-year postoperative follow up and expression of a biomarker of cell proliferative activity

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Hiroyuki; Kayamori, Kou; Wake, So; Sato, Fumiaki; Kino, Koji; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with cranial extension is rare. Here, we report 7-year follow-up of a case with immunohistochemical examination of cell proliferative activity. Presentation of case The patient was a 72-year-old man. Severe bone resorption of the glenoid fossa was apparent on CT images. Pathological findings by biopsy led to diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis of the right side TMJ. Extirpation of the tumor was performed via temporopreauricular incision under general anesthesia. PCNA expression was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The lesion had penetrated into the middle cranial fossa, but the cranial dura mater was intact. Expression of PCNA was confirmed. Discussion The PCNA expression suggested that growth activity caused expansion of the lesion to the skull base. Conclusion We were able to follow up this case for a long period without recurrence postoperatively. PMID:26855075

  12. Lectin from Abelmoschus esculentus reduces zymosan-induced temporomandibular joint inflammatory hypernociception in rats via heme oxygenase-1 pathway integrity and tnf-α and il-1β suppression.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Raul Sousa; do Val, Danielle Rocha; Fernandes, Maria Ester Frota; Gomes, Francisco Isaac Fernandes; de Lacerda, José Thalles Jocelino Gomes; SantiGadelha, Tatiane; de Almeida Gadelha, Carlos Alberto; de Paulo Teixeira Pinto, Vicente; Cristino-Filho, Gerardo; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders show inflammatory components, heavily impacting on quality of life. Abelmoschus esculentus is largely cultivated in Northeastern Brazil for medicinal purposes, having it shown anti-inflammatory activity. We evaluated A. esculentus lectin (AEL) efficacy in reducing zymosan-induced temporomandibular joint inflammatory hypernociception in rats along with the mechanism of action through which it exerts anti-inflammatory activity. Animals were pre-treated with AEL (0.01, 0.1 or 1mg/kg) before zymosan (Zy) injection in the TMJ to determine anti-inflammatory activity. To analyse the possible effect of the hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and the nitric oxide (NO) pathways on AEL efficacy, animals were pre-treated with ZnPP-IX (3mg/kg), a specific HO-1 inhibitor, or aminoguanidine (30mg/kg), a selective iNOS inhibitor, before AEL administration. Von Frey test evaluated inflammatory hypernociception, synovial fluid collection was performed to determine leukocyte counting and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity 6h after Zy injection, and Evans Blue extravasation determined vascular permeability. TMJ tissue was collected for histopathological analysis (H&E) and immunohistochemistry (TNF-α, IL-1β, HO-1). In addition, TMJ tissue and trigeminal ganglion collection was performed for TNF-α and IL-1β dosage (ELISA). AEL increased inflammatory nociceptive threshold, reduced leukocyte influx along with MPO activity, leukocyte influx into the synovial membrane, and Evans Blue extravasation. It promoted HO-1 overexpression whilst decreased TNF-α and IL-1β expression in the TMJ tissue. AEL reduced TNF-α and IL-1β levels in TMJ tissue and trigeminal ganglion. AEL effects, however, were not observed in the presence of ZnPP-IX. These findings suggest that AEL efficacy depends on TNF-α/IL-1β inhibition and HO-1 pathway integrity. PMID:27344040

  13. Prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Sena, Marina Fernandes; de Mesquita, Késsia Suênia F.; Santos, Fernanda Regina R.; Silva, Francisco Wanderley G. P.; Serrano, Kranya Victoria D.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in children and adolescents, verifying the methodological variations. DATA SOURCES: Research conducted in Medline, PubMed, Lilacs and BBO databases, including manuscripts (except reviews and case reports) published from 1990 to 2012. The descriptors were "temporomandibular joint syndrome", "temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome", "temporomandibular joint disorders", "prevalence studies", and "cross-sectional studies"; the words "dysfunction", "disorder", "temporomandibular", "children", "adolescents", "prevalence", "frequency", and "transversal" were used. DATA SYNTHESIS: Seventeen articles were selected, and the TMD frequency varied from 16 to 68%. Regarding the methodological criteria, only three articles (18%) reported sample size determination, three (18%) clearly described the sample selection process by stratified selection technique, and nine studies (53%) carried out the calibration of the examiners. The diagnostic criteria used in the studies were: Helkimo index (n=2; 12%), Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) (n=4; 24%), the jaw index (n=1; 6%), clinical protocols (n=10; 59%), and anamnestic questionnaires (n=6; 35%). CONCLUSIONS: The TMD prevalence in children and adolescents varies in the literature. Appropriate and standardized methods are needed to identify, with greater validity, the presence of TMD in this population, allowing a better understanding of the pathological aspects in order to address more effective preventive and therapeutic procedures. PMID:24473961

  14. Temporomandibular juxtaarticular chondroma: case report.

    PubMed

    Vázquez Mahía, Inés; López-Cedrún Cembranos, José Luis; Ferreras Granado, José; Lorenzo Franco, Fernanda

    2007-03-01

    Chondromas are benign tumours composed of mature hyaline cartilage. We present here the first case in the English language medical literature of juxtaarticular chondroma of the temporomandibular joint in the parotid region. Within the rarity of cartilage disorders of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ), this particular condition is a diagnostic curiosity. The patient, a 54 year old woman, presented a right preauricular tumour of 3.5 cm. which had been developing for 4 years. It was not painful but there was a recent symptomology of TMJ dysfunction, with pain and clicks. The diagnostic possibilities of a parotid pleomorphic adenoma and of a cartilage tumour of the TMJ suggested a difficult preoperative differential diagnosis, which influenced our approach regarding therapy. The tumour was excised, preserving the parotid gland. This enabled us to confirm the histological diagnosis of chondroma, composed solely of chondroide tissue. We have described the clinical characteristics of our case, and carried out a review of the relevant literature, emphasising the differential diagnoses. PMID:17322809

  15. Detection of cracks in polyethylene components of retrieved knee joint prostheses.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, M; Tomita, N; Tamai, S; Oonishi, H; Ikada, Y

    1998-01-01

    Subsurface cracks that had formed in polyethylene artificial knee components were observed nondestructively with a new method, scanning acoustic tomography (SAT). Standardization of the SAT observation was done by in-vitro rolling fatigue testing on an unimplanted ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) knee component. Retrieved knee components were of two types; KOM (Kyocera, Kyoto, Japan) sterilized with ethylene oxide gas, and MG (Zimmer, IN, USA) sterilized with gamma-irradiation. The SAT images revealed cracks in all the retrieved components, and these existed mainly 0. 3-1.0 mm from the surface. Comparison of crack formation in each portion of the contact area of the polyethylene components showed that the middle portion of the MG type had the highest concentration of cracks. When the distribution of compressive stress on the polyethylene components was assessed by mechanical testing, the strongest compressive stress was seen in the middle portion of MG type components. PMID:9811985

  16. Case-Based Learning for Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Glenn T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The use of interactive computer-based simulation of cases of chronic orofacial pain and temporomandibular joint disfunction patients for clinical dental education is described. Its application as a voluntary study aid in a third-year dental course is evaluated for effectiveness and for time factors in case completion. (MSE)

  17. Deriving High Resolution UV Aerosol Optical Depth over East Asia using CAI-OMI Joint Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Lee, S.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring aerosols using near UV spectral region have been successfully performed over decades by Ozong Monitoring Instruments (OMI) with benefit of strong aerosol signal over continuous dark surface reflectance, both land and ocean. However, because of big foot print of OMI, the cloud contamination error was a big issue in the UV aerosol algorithm. In the present study, high resolution UV aerosol optical depth (AOD) over East Asia was derived by collaborating the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite/Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (GOSAT/TANSO)-Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI) and OMI together. AOD of 0.1 degree grid resolution was retrieved using CAI band 1 (380nm) by bring OMI lv.2 aerosol type, single scattering albedo, and aerosol layer peak height in 1 degree grid resolution. Collocation of the two dataset within the 0.5 degree grid with time difference of OMI and CAI less than 5 minute was selected. Selected region becomes wider as it goes to the higher latitude. Also, calculated degradation factor of 1.57 was applied to CAI band1 (380nm) by comparing normalized radiance and Lambertian Equivalent Reflectivity (LER) of both sensors. The calculated degradation factor was reasonable over dark scene, but inconsistent over cirrus cloud and bright area. Then, surface reflectance was developed by compositing CAI LER minimum data over three month period, since the infrequent sampling rate associated with the three-day recursion period of GOSAT and the narrow CAI swath of 1000 km. To retrieve AOD, look up table (LUT) was generated using radiative transfer model VLIDORT NGST. Finally, the retrieved AOD was validated with AERONET ground based measurement data during the Dragon-NE Asia campaign in 2012.

  18. Temporomandibular Disorders: The Habitual Chewing Side Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Santana-Mora, Urbano; López-Cedrún, José; Mora, María J.; Otero, Xosé L.; Santana-Penín, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain, but, except where they occur subsequent to trauma, their cause remains unknown. This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side) and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder. This is the preliminary report of a randomized trial that aimed to test the effect of a new occlusal adjustment therapy. Methods The masticatory function of 21 randomly selected completely dentate participants with chronic temporomandibular disorders (all but one with unilateral symptoms) was assessed by observing them eat almonds, inspecting the lateral horizontal movement of the jaw, with kinesiography, and by means of interview. The condylar path in the sagittal plane and the lateral anterior guidance angles with respect to the Frankfort horizontal plane in the frontal plane were measured on both sides in each individual. Results Sixteen of 20 participants with unilateral symptoms chewed on the affected side; the concordance (Fisher’s exact test, P = .003) and the concordance-symmetry level (Kappa coefficient κ = 0.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.99; P = .002) were significant. The mean condylar path angle was steeper (53.47(10.88) degrees versus 46.16(7.25) degrees; P = .001), and the mean lateral anterior guidance angle was flatter (41.63(13.35) degrees versus 48.32(9.53) degrees P = .036) on the symptomatic side. Discussion The results of this study support the use of a new term based on etiology, “habitual chewing side syndrome”, instead of the nonspecific symptom-based “temporomandibular joint disorders”; this denomination is characterized in adults by a steeper condylar path, flatter lateral anterior guidance, and habitual chewing on the symptomatic side. PMID:23593156

  19. Temporomandibular disorders. Part 2: conservative management

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate management of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) requires an understanding of the underlying dysfunction associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding structures. A comprehensive examination process, as described in part 1 of this series, can reveal underlying clinical findings that assist in the delivery of comprehensive physical therapy services for patients with TMD. Part 2 of this series focuses on management strategies for TMD. Physical therapy is the preferred conservative management approach for TMD. Physical therapists are professionally well-positioned to step into the void and provide clinical services for patients with TMD. Clinicians should utilize examination findings to design rehabilitation programs that focus on addressing patient-specific impairments. Potentially appropriate plan of care components include joint and soft tissue mobilization, trigger point dry needling, friction massage, therapeutic exercise, patient education, modalities, and outside referral. Management options should address both symptom reduction and oral function. Satisfactory results can often be achieved when management focuses on patient-specific clinical variables. PMID:24976744

  20. Risk factors for temporomandibular disorder: Binary logistic regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Bruno G.; de-Sousa, Stéphanie T.; de Mello, Victor V C.; da-Silva-Barbosa, André C.; de-Assis-Morais, Mariana P L.; Barbosa-Vasconcelos, Márcia M V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the influence of socioeconomic and demographic factors (gender, economic class, age and marital status) on the occurrence of temporomandibular disorder. Study Design: One hundred individuals from urban areas in the city of Recife (Brazil) registered at Family Health Units was examined using Axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) which addresses myofascial pain and joint problems (disc displacement, arthralgia, osteoarthritis and oesteoarthrosis). The Brazilian Economic Classification Criteria (CCEB) was used for the collection of socioeconomic and demographic data. Then, it was categorized as Class A (high social class), Classes B/C (middle class) and Classes D/E (very poor social class). The results were analyzed using Pearson’s chi-square test for proportions, Fisher’s exact test, nonparametric Mann-Whitney test and Binary logistic regression analysis. Results: None of the participants belonged to Class A, 72% belonged to Classes B/C and 28% belonged to Classes D/E. The multivariate analysis revealed that participants from Classes D/E had a 4.35-fold greater chance of exhibiting myofascial pain and 11.3-fold greater chance of exhibiting joint problems. Conclusions: Poverty is a important condition to exhibit myofascial pain and joint problems. Key words:Temporomandibular joint disorders, risk factors, prevalence. PMID:24316706

  1. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Abbott, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and primary headaches can be perpetual and debilitating musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The presence of both can affect up to one-sixth of the population at any one time. Initially, TMDs were thought to be predominantly musculoskeletal disorders, and migraine was thought to be solely a cerebrovascular disorder. The further understanding of their pathophysiology has helped to clarify their clinical presentation. This article focuses on the role of the trigeminal system in associating TMD and migraine. By discussing recent descriptions of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of headache and TMD, we will further elucidate this relationship. PMID:27475510

  2. Temporomandibular disorders. A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, Jose V.; Sanchis, Jose M.; Carbonell, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the risk factors and clinical manifestations of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) diagnosed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) (axis I) versus an age and gender matched control group. Study Design: A total of 162 patients explored according to the RDC/TMD (mean age 40.6±18.8 years, range 7-90; 11.1% males and 88.9% females) were compared with 119 controls, measuring differences in TMD risk factors (sleep disturbances, stress, psychoactive medication, parafunctions, loss of posterior support, ligament hyperlaxity) and clinical variables (joint sounds, painful muscle and joint palpation, maximum aperture). Results: Myofascial pain (MFP) (single or multiple diagnoses) was the most frequent diagnosis (42%). The most common diagnostic combination was MFP plus arthralgia (16.0%). Statistically significant differences were observed in clenching (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1.4-3.8) and in maximum active aperture (MAA) on comparing the two groups both globally (TMD vs. controls) (patients 36.7±8.6 mm, controls 43.1±5.8 mm; F=45.41, p = 0.000) and on comparing according to diagnostic categories. MFP explained most of the observed differences in the risk factors: stress perception (OR=1.98;I.C.:1.01-3.89), psychoactive medication (OR=2.21; I.C.:1.12-4.37), parafunctions (OR=2.14;I.C.:1.12-4.11), and ligament laxity (OR=2.6;I.C.:1.01-6.68). Joint sounds were more frequent in patients with MFP (39.7% vs. 24.0%; χ2=4.66; p=0.03), and painful joint palpation was more common in patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR)(15.9% vs. 5.0%; χ2 = 5.2; p = 0.02) and osteoarthrosis (20.8% vs. 5.0%; χ2 = 7.0; p = 0.008). Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMDs in the general population. Significant differences are observed in clenching and MAA between patients and controls considered both globally and for each diagnostic category individually. The analyzed risk

  3. Improved mathematical model of the wear of the cup articular surface in hip joint prostheses and comparison with retrieved components.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, M T; Santambrogio, C; Pietrabissa, R; Raffelini, F; Molfetta, L

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model of the cobalt-based alloy-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear coupling. Based on a previous model in which the cup wear volume over a gait cycle (WG) was calculated under the simplifying assumption of an ideal rigid coupling, the current version proposes a more realistic wear simulation. All three components of the hip loading force were considered for the contact pressure calculation and all three components of the hip motion were taken into account for the sliding distance calculation. The contact pressure distribution was calculated on the basis of the Hertzian theory for the elastic contact of two bodies with non-conforming geometrical shapes. The wear factor was taken from hip simulator wear tests. The calculated WG is 67 x 10(-6) mm3 for a standard reference patient. The parametric model simulations show that WG increases linearly with the patient weight, femoral head diameter and surface roughness. It increases non-linearly to a maximum and decreases to an asymptotic value with increasing cup/head clearance and with cup isotropic elastic modulus. The cup orientation in the pelvis affects only slightly the total amount of WG whereas it is the dominant factor affecting the shape of the wear distribution. The iso-wear maps show paracentral patterns at low cup inclination angles and marginal patterns at higher inclination angles. The maximum wear depth is supero-posterior when the cup is in neutral alignment and supero-anterior at increasing anteversion angles. Complex patterns with a combination of paracentral and marginal wear were obtained at specific clearance values and cup orientations. The results of the simulations are discussed in relation to the wear distribution measured on the articular surface of 12 UHMWPE components retrieved from failed hip joint prostheses, after a period of in situ functioning. PMID:11521761

  4. Validation of primary metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties on the National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland using data from the London Implant Retrieval Centre

    PubMed Central

    Sabah, S. A.; Henckel, J.; Cook, E.; Whittaker, R.; Hothi, H.; Pappas, Y.; Blunn, G.; Skinner, J. A.; Hart, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroplasty registries are important for the surveillance of joint replacements and the evaluation of outcome. Independent validation of registry data ensures high quality. The ability for orthopaedic implant retrieval centres to validate registry data is not known. We analysed data from the National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (NJR) for primary metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties performed between 2003 and 2013. Records were linked to the London Implant Retrieval Centre (RC) for validation. A total of 67 045 procedures on the NJR and 782 revised pairs of components from the RC were included. We were able to link 476 procedures (60.9%) recorded with the RC to the NJR successfully. However, 306 procedures (39.1%) could not be linked. The outcome recorded by the NJR (as either revised, unrevised or death) for a primary procedure was incorrect in 79 linked cases (16.6%). The rate of registry-retrieval linkage and correct assignment of outcome code improved over time. The rates of error for component reference numbers on the NJR were as follows: femoral head category number 14/229 (5.0%); femoral head batch number 13/232 (5.3%); acetabular component category number 2/293 (0.7%) and acetabular component batch number 24/347 (6.5%). Registry-retrieval linkage provided a novel means for the validation of data, particularly for component fields. This study suggests that NJR reports may underestimate rates of revision for many types of metal-on-metal hip replacement. This is topical given the increasing scope for NJR data. We recommend a system for continuous independent evaluation of the quality and validity of NJR data. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:10–18. PMID:25568407

  5. Goldenhar Syndrome and Pain-Related Temporomandibular Disorders. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Shehryar Nasir; Crow, Heidi; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2016-04-01

    Goldenhar syndrome (GS) is a development syndrome, characterized by incomplete development of the craniofacial region. The involvement is mainly unilateral; it varies from being mild to severe; and it can range from malocclusion and facial asymmetry to a more complex phenotype with complete absence of the mandibular ramus and temporomandibular joint. However, orthopedic symptoms of orofacial pain and dysfunction have not generally been considered as part of the symptom complex in GS cases. The case presented here is of a 15-year-old Caucasian patient, who was referred for evaluation because of bilateral pain in the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints. PMID:27348947

  6. Myofascial Temporomandibular Disorder.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-de-Las-Penas, César; Svensson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have been discussed for more than 70 years without reaching consensus on causes, etiological factors, pathophysiology, or rationale management. Indeed, TMD pain remains an enigma and a diagnostic and management challenge for many clinicians. Perhaps the many and often conflicting views on TMD pain by different health care providers are routed in professional traditions, personal beliefs, experience, and clinical training. This review aims to provide an updated and critical discussion on what is known and supported by scientific evidence about myofascial TMD pain and which gaps there still may be in our understanding of this condition. It has not been the intention to make a systematic review on all aspects of TMD but rather to point out some of the more recent (and important) pieces of information that may help us to better appreciate TMD pain as a complex and multifaceted pain disorder manifested in the craniofacial system. PMID:26717949

  7. Retrospective Analysis for Genetic Improvement of Hip Joints of Cohort Labrador Retrievers in the United States: 1970–2007

    PubMed Central

    Lust, George; Zhu, Lan; Zhang, Zhiwu; Todhunter, Rory J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD) is a common inherited disease that affects dog wellbeing and causes a heavy financial and emotional burden to dog owners and breeders due to secondary hip osteoarthritis. The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) initiated a program in the 1960's to radiograph hip and elbow joints and release the OFA scores to the public for breeding dogs against CHD. Over last four decades, more than one million radiographic scores have been released. Methodology/Principal Findings The pedigrees in the OFA database consisted of 258,851 Labrador retrievers, the major breed scored by the OFA (25% of total records). Of these, 154,352 dogs had an OFA hip score reported between 1970 and 2007. The rest of the dogs (104,499) were the ancestors of the 154,352 dogs to link the pedigree relationships. The OFA hip score is based on a 7-point scale with the best ranked as 1 (excellent) and the worst hip dysplasia as 7. A mixed linear model was used to estimate the effects of age, sex, and test year period and to predict the breeding value for each dog. Additive genetic and residual variances were estimated using the average information restricted maximum likelihood procedure. The analysis also provided an inbreeding coefficient for each dog. The hip scores averaged 1.93 (±SD = 0.59) and the heritability was 0.21. A steady genetic improvement has accrued over the four decades. The breeding values decreased (improved) linearly. By the end of 2005, the total genetic improvement was 0.1 units, which is equivalent to 17% of the total phenotypic standard deviation. Conclusion/Significance A steady genetic improvement has been achieved through the selection based on the raw phenotype released by the OFA. As the heritability of the hip score was on the low end (0.21) of reported ranges, we propose that selection based on breeding values will result in more rapid genetic improvement than breeding based on phenotypic selection alone. PMID:20195372

  8. Proposed frequencies of a vibrator used for implant retrieval at the time of hip joint revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Amit; Hayes, Westley; Rasquinha, Vijay J; Saha, Subrata

    2009-01-01

    The number and the rate of success of hip implantation surgeries have increased significantly during last thirty years, not only in the USA, but also throughout the world. It has been reported that the failure rates of implanted hip joints are less than 8% after 10 years, and less than 20% after twenty years. Failures occur directly or indirectly due to wear, stress shielding and infection. Revision surgery is needed for those failed implant replacements. In the future, as the elderly population increases, the frequency of this type of revision surgery will also increase. At the time of revision surgery, removal of the existing cemented femoral implant can be a problem for the surgeon. Use of a vibrator for loosening of the existing cement layer between the bone and the implant may be a helpful solution. In this study, we investigated the optimum resonance frequencies of such a vibrator that might be used to loosen the cement layer easily and efficiently. Natural frequencies of different-sized implants and of different materials were determined. For harmonic analysis, CT scan data of a femur was processed in the image processing software MIMICS. Then the outline of the total hip was modeled and was analyzed by the finite element software ANSYS. The required portion of the femoral part was edited, implant and cement layer were introduced in that model, and elements were generated in that FEA software. Then elements of the femoral part, except the cement layer and the implant, were sent to MIMICS software again for assignment of different Youngs modulus of each element, which are proportionate to their densities. Then the elements were brought back to the FEA software. The harmonic analysis was performed for the total model in the FEA software ANSYS. For that particular boundary condition, the first three natural frequencies of the three types of implant sizes and materials varied by a maximum of 7-8%. Results of the numerical harmonic analysis showed that at the

  9. Oral health status and temporomandibular disorders in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Zoran; Uhac, Ivone; Buković, Dino; Cabov, Tomislav; Kovacević, Daniela; Grzić, Renata

    2005-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology involving the central nervous system. Certain clinical manifestations affect the oro-facial region. Three in particular should be of interest to the dentist: trigeminal neuralgia, sensory neuropathy of the trigeminal nerve and facial palsy. The aim of this study was to determine the oral health status, the frequency of subjective symptoms and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) subtype according to Research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) among MS patients. Examinees in this study were 50 patients suffering from MS, who were at least once treated during their disease in the Clinic Hospital Center, Rijeka, Clinic for Neurology. All examinees had to meet the diagnostic criteria for clinically and laboratory confirmed MS, according to Poser. The results show the difference in mean DMFT (decayed, missing, filled teeth) between MS and the control group. The number of decayed and missing teeth was higher, but the number of filled teeth was significantly lower in MS group. Eighty-two per cent of the subjects with MS had a least one symptom of dysfunction compared with 24% of the subjects in the healthy control group. In the present study, pain, the pain during mouth opening, the difficulty with mouth opening and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds were more commonly reported in the MS group than in the control group. This study shows a statistically significant excess of dental caries and temporomandibular disorders among MS patients compared with the control group. These results suggest that MS is a possible etiological factor in temporomandibular disorders. PMID:16417141

  10. [Improvement of outcomes by primary treatment for temporomandibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Shigeru; Kino, Koji; Iwaki, Hiroshi; Amagasa, Teruo

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the current state of the temporomandibular joint disorder treatment in our clinic and to confirm the therapeutic outcomes. The subjects in this study were recruited from among the patients with temporomandibular disorders who attended the Temporomandibular Disorder Special Clinic, Department of Oral Surgery, Hitachi Yokohama Hospital during one year period from February 2007 to January 2008. A total of 100 consecutive outpatients diagnosed with temporomandibular disorders were selected for the study. Pain intensity and the degree to which daily function was limited before and after treatment were evaluated using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) score was evaluated simultaneously, and the correlation with changes in symptom was evaluated. The median (25th, 75th percentiles) of pain intensity (VAS value) before treated was 45 (25.0, 65.0) and the degree of limitation of daily function (VAS value) was 15 (0.0, 50.0). The median (25th, 75th percentiles) of pain intensity at 4 weeks after was 10 (0.0, 30.0), and significantly lower than that before treatment (p = 0.000). The degree of limitation of daily function was 0 (0.0, 10.0), also significantly lower than that before treatment (p = 0.000). The BDI-II score decreased from 8 (2.0, 11.8) before treatment to 5 (2.0, 11.0, p = 0.024) and showed no significant correlation with the improvement in outcomes by primary treatment for temporomandibular disorders. PMID:19044015

  11. [Diagnosis and treatment of temporo-mandibular disorders in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Bocquet, Emmanuelle; Moreau, Alexis; Danguy, Michel; Danguy, Chantal

    2010-03-01

    Orthodontists are fully prepared to treat the problems of occlusion that they are called upon to deal with every day. On the other hand temporo-mandibular joint disorders present more obscure difficulties from the point of view of detection and diagnosis as well the management of their treatment. That is why a profound understanding of the anatomical and physiological functioning of the temporo-mandibular joint has become indispensable for today's orthodontists who are now asked to detect and diagnose an assortment of TMJ disturbances whose etiology may vary greatly. By performing a rigorous diagnostic procedure, based on a thorough clinical examination supported by careful axiographic and radiological studies, of temporo-mandibular malfunctioning and its underlying etiological causes, which are primarily dento-alveolar and occlusal in nature, orthodontists will be able to adopt an appropriate therapeutic approach that might be purely orthodontic or multi-disciplinary and carried out with the collaboration of specialists in occlusion, oral surgery, and even osteopathy. PMID:20359450

  12. Chiropractic Treatment of Temporomandibular Dysfunction: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Pavia, Steven; Fischer, Rebecca; Roy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to describe chiropractic treatment of 14 patients who presented with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD). Methods This is a retrospective case series of 14 patients, including 13 adults and 1 child. The majority of these patients were undergoing chiropractic care for spine-related conditions when they presented with additional TMD signs and symptoms. They were evaluated and treated with Activator Methods International published protocols relative to the temporomandibular joint before the addition of treatment to the suprahyoid muscles. Results All pre- and postadjustment assessments were recorded using a numeric pain scale. The resulting average showed a reduction in the patients’ pain scores from the initial visit of 8.3 ± 1.6 to the last visit at 1.4 ± 1.1 with an 80.9% ± 15.4% improvement. The average number of visits was 13.6 ± 8.2. Conclusion All patients selected for this case series showed a reduction of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms. PMID:26793040

  13. [Can orthodontic treatment generate temporomandibular disorders and pain? A review].

    PubMed

    Gebeile-Chauty, Sarah; Robin, Olivier; Messaoudi, Yassine; Aknin, Jean-Jacques

    2010-03-01

    While considered for years to play the primary role in the etiology of temporo-mandibular joint disturbances (TMD), occlusal discrepancies are now considered to be just one causative factor among many. Recent studies, literature reviews or meta-analyses, and longitudinal studies with follow-up of children treated for many years all conclude that there is no risk of orthodontic treatment giving rise to episodes of temporo-mandibular disorders. The signs of TMD appearing during the course of orthodontic treatment should be considered in the context of the epidemiology of the disorder, which is characterized by a strong increase in its occurrence during adolescence. In conclusion, it should be stated that if orthodontic treatment can no longer be considered as one of the etiopathogenic factors in the TMD complex, there are no scientific arguments to justify the converse, that there are indications for orthodontic treatment whose sole goal would be the treatment of TMD. PMID:20359451

  14. Joint retrieval of surface reflectance and aerosol properties from MSG/SEVIRI observations in the framework of aerosol_CCI2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damman, Alix; Zunz, Violette; Govaerts, Yves; Kaminski, Thomas; Voßbeck, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Meteosat satellites play an important role for the generation of consistent long time series of aerosol properties. This importance relies on (i) the long duration of past (Meteosat First Generation, MFG), present (Meteosat Second Generation, MSG) and future (Meteosat Third Generation, MTG) missions and (ii) their frequent cycle of acquisition that can be used to document the anisotropy of the surface and therefore the lower boundary condition for aerosol retrieval over land surfaces. The Package for the joint Inversion of Surface and Aerosol (PISA) is a new algorithm developed by Rayference and The Inversion Lab for the joint retrieval of surface reflectance and aerosol properties. It relies on the inversion of a physically-based radiative transfer model accounting for the surface reflectance anisotropy and its coupling with aerosol scattering. The inversion scheme accounts for prior knowledge on the surface properties and smoothness constraints on the temporal variation of aerosols. PISA also provides the posterior uncertainty covariance matrix for the retrieved variables in every processed pixel. The package has been applied on Top Of Atmosphere (TOA) Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) acquired by SEVIRI onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) in the VIS0.6, VIS0.8 and NIR1.6 spectral bands. Observations are accumulated during a certain period of time to sufficiently document the surface anisotropy and minimize the impact of clouds. The surface radiative properties are retrieved for this entire accumulation period during which they are supposed to be constant. Aerosol properties however are derived on an hourly basis. Based on PISA, a processing chain has been developed and applied on 2008 MSG/SEVIRI observations for some specific sub-domains of the Earth disk. For these processed sub-domains, the information content of each MSG/SEVIRI band will be analysed based on the prior and posterior uncertainty covariance matrices. This constitutes a first step

  15. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-02-16

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer cloud using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievals using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulusmore » under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m−2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent 3-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m−2.« less

  16. Evaluation of Pain Regression in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction Treated by Intra-Articular Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Pihut, M.; Szuta, M.; Ferendiuk, E.; Zeńczak-Więckiewicz, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regression of temporomandibular pain as a result of intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction previously subjected to prosthetic treatment. Materials and Methods. The baseline study material consisted of 10 patients, both males and females, aged 28 to 53 years, previously treated due to painful temporomandibular joint dysfunction using occlusal splints. All patients were carried out to a specialist functional assessment of the dysfunction using the Polish version of the RDC/TMD questionnaire axis I and II. Intra-articular injections were preceded by a preparation of PRP. The injection sites were determined by the method used during arthroscopic surgical procedures. Following aspiration, 0.5 mL of plasma was injected into each temporomandibular joint. Results. The comparison of the intensity of pain during all examinations suggests a beneficial effect of the procedure being performed as the mean VAS score was 6.5 at examination I, 2.8 at examination II, and 0.6 at examination III. Conclusion. Application of the intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma into the temporomandibular joints has a positive impact on the reduction of the intensity of pain experienced by patients treated for temporomandibular joint dysfunction. PMID:25157351

  17. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-07-02

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer clouds using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances under conditions when precipitation does not reach the surface. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievalsmore » using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulus under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m-2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the Northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent three-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m-2.« less

  18. Temporomandibular disorders in fibromyalgia patients: are there different pain onset?

    PubMed

    Fujarra, Fábio J C; Kaziyama, Helena Hideko Seguchi; Siqueira, Silvia Regina D T de; Yeng, Lin Tchia; Camparis, Cinara M; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli de

    2016-03-01

    Objective To identify temporomandibular disorders (TMD) symptoms in two groups of fibromyalgia patients according to the temporal relation between the onset of facial pain (FP) and generalized body pain (GBP). Cross-sectional study design: Fifty-three consecutive women with fibromyalgia and FP were stratified according to the onset of orofacial pain: Group-A (mean age 47.30 ± 14.20 years old), onset of FP preceded GBP; Group-B (mean age 51.33 ± 11.03 years old), the FP started concomitant or after GBP. Clinical assessment Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and the Visual Analogue Scale. Results Myofascial pain with mouth opening limitation (p = 0.038); right disc displacement with reduction (p = 0.012) and jaw stiffness (p = 0.004) were predominant in Group A. Myofascial pain without mouth opening limitation (p = 0.038) and numbness/burning were more common in Group B. Conclusion All patients had temporomandibular joint symptoms, mainly muscle disorders. The prevalence of myofascial pain with limited mouth opening and right TMJ disc displacement with reduction were higher in Group A. PMID:27050847

  19. Joint retrieval of aerosol and water-leaving radiance from multispectral, multiangular and polarimetric measurements over ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Dubovik, Oleg; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Diner, David J.; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Seidel, Felix C.; Litvinov, Pavel; Bovchaliuk, Andrii; Garay, Michael J.; van Harten, Gerard; Davis, Anthony B.

    2016-07-01

    An optimization approach has been developed for simultaneous retrieval of aerosol properties and normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw) from multispectral, multiangular, and polarimetric observations over ocean. The main features of the method are (1) use of a simplified bio-optical model to estimate nLw, followed by an empirical refinement within a specified range to improve its accuracy; (2) improved algorithm convergence and stability by applying constraints on the spatial smoothness of aerosol loading and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration across neighboring image patches and spectral constraints on aerosol optical properties and nLw across relevant bands; and (3) enhanced Jacobian calculation by modeling and storing the radiative transfer (RT) in aerosol/Rayleigh mixed layer, pure Rayleigh-scattering layers, and ocean medium separately, then coupling them to calculate the field at the sensor. This approach avoids unnecessary and time-consuming recalculations of RT in unperturbed layers in Jacobian evaluations. The Markov chain method is used to model RT in the aerosol/Rayleigh mixed layer and the doubling method is used for the uniform layers of the atmosphere-ocean system. Our optimization approach has been tested using radiance and polarization measurements acquired by the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) over the AERONET USC_SeaPRISM ocean site (6 February 2013) and near the AERONET La Jolla site (14 January 2013), which, respectively, reported relatively high and low aerosol loadings. Validation of the results is achieved through comparisons to AERONET aerosol and ocean color products. For comparison, the USC_SeaPRISM retrieval is also performed by use of the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties algorithm (Dubovik et al., 2011). Uncertainties of aerosol and nLw retrievals due to random and systematic instrument errors are analyzed by truth-in/truth-out tests with three Chl a concentrations, five aerosol loadings

  20. Joint retrieval of surface reflectance and aerosol optical depth from MSG/SEVIRI observations with an optimal estimation approach: 1. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govaerts, Y. M.; Wagner, S.; Lattanzio, A.; Watts, P.

    2010-01-01

    An original method is presented in this paper for the joint retrieval of the mean daily total column aerosol optical depth and surface BRF from the daily accumulated Meteosat Second Generation-Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (MSG/SEVIRI) observations in the solar channels. The proposed algorithm is based on the optimal estimation (OE) theory, a one-dimensional variational retrieval scheme that seeks an optimal balance between information that can be derived from the observations, and the one that is derived from prior knowledge of the system. The forward radiative transfer model explicitly accounts for the surface anisotropy and its coupling with the atmosphere. The low rate of change in the surface reflectance is used to derive the prior information on the surface state variables. The reliable estimation of the measurement system error is one of the most critical aspects of the OE method as it strongly determines the likelihood of the solution. An important effort in the proposed method has thus been dedicated to this issue, where the actual radiometric performances of SEVIRI are dynamically taken into account.

  1. A joint effort to deliver satellite retrieved atmospheric CO2 concentrations for surface flux inversions: the ensemble median algorithm EMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, M.; Bösch, H.; Bovensmann, H.; Bril, A.; Buchwitz, M.; Butz, A.; Burrows, J. P.; O'Dell, C. W.; Guerlet, S.; Hasekamp, O.; Heymann, J.; Kikuchi, N.; Oshchepkov, S.; Parker, R.; Pfeifer, S.; Schneising, O.; Yokota, T.; Yoshida, Y.

    2012-09-01

    We analyze an ensemble of seven XCO2 retrieval algorithms for SCIAMACHY and GOSAT. The ensemble spread can be interpreted as regional uncertainty and can help to identify locations for new TCCON validation sites. Additionally, we introduce the ensemble median algorithm EMMA combining individual soundings of the seven algorithms into one new dataset. The ensemble takes advantage of the algorithms' independent developments. We find ensemble spreads being often <1 ppm but rising up to 2 ppm especially in the tropics and East Asia. On the basis of gridded monthly averages, we compare EMMA and all individual algorithms with TCCON and CarbonTracker model results (potential outliers, north/south gradient, seasonal (peak-to-peak) amplitude, standard deviation of the difference). Our findings show that EMMA is a promising candidate for inverse modeling studies. Compared to CarbonTracker, the satellite retrievals find consistently larger north/south gradients (by 0.3 ppm-0.9 ppm) and seasonal amplitudes (by 1.5 ppm-2.0 ppm).

  2. A joint effort to deliver satellite retrieved atmospheric CO2 concentrations for surface flux inversions: the ensemble median algorithm EMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, M.; Bösch, H.; Bovensmann, H.; Bril, A.; Buchwitz, M.; Butz, A.; Burrows, J. P.; O'Dell, C. W.; Guerlet, S.; Hasekamp, O.; Heymann, J.; Kikuchi, N.; Oshchepkov, S.; Parker, R.; Pfeifer, S.; Schneising, O.; Yokota, T.; Yoshida, Y.

    2013-02-01

    We analyze an ensemble of seven XCO2 retrieval algorithms for SCIAMACHY (scanning imaging absorption spectrometer of atmospheric chartography) and GOSAT (greenhouse gases observing satellite). The ensemble spread can be interpreted as regional uncertainty and can help to identify locations for new TCCON (total carbon column observing network) validation sites. Additionally, we introduce the ensemble median algorithm EMMA combining individual soundings of the seven algorithms into one new data set. The ensemble takes advantage of the algorithms' independent developments. We find ensemble spreads being often < 1 ppm but rising up to 2 ppm especially in the tropics and East Asia. On the basis of gridded monthly averages, we compare EMMA and all individual algorithms with TCCON and CarbonTracker model results (potential outliers, north/south gradient, seasonal (peak-to-peak) amplitude, standard deviation of the difference). Our findings show that EMMA is a promising candidate for inverse modeling studies. Compared to CarbonTracker, the satellite retrievals find consistently larger north/south gradients (by 0.3-0.9 ppm) and seasonal amplitudes (by 1.5-2.0 ppm).

  3. Dust Aerosol Optical Properties Retrieval and Radiative Forcing over Northwestern China during 2008 China-US Joint Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Su, J.; Ackerman, T. P.; Fu, Q.; Huang, J.; Shi, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Atmosphere Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program’s Ancillary Facility (AAF/SMART-COMMIT) was deployed to Zhangye (39.082° N, 100.276° E), which is located in a semi-desert area of Northwest China, during the period of late April to mid June in 2008. We selected 11 cases to retrieve dust aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent, size distribution, single-scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASY) from Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) measurements. These cases are dominated by large particles with Angstrom exponent values ranging from 0.34 to 0.93. The values of AOD at 0.67 µm range from 0.074 to 0.249. The mean SSA value increases with wavelength from 0.76±0.02 at 0.415 µm to 0.86±0.01 at 0.867 µm, while the mean ASY value decreases from 0.74±0.04 to 0.70±0.02. Before estimating dust aerosol direct radiative forcing, a radiative closure experiment was performed to verify that the retrieved aerosol optical properties and other input parameters to the radiative transfer model appropriately represent atmospheric conditions. The daytime-averaged differences between model simulations and ground observations are -8.5, -2.9, and -2.1 Wm-2 for the total, diffuse, and direct normal fluxes, respectively. The mean difference in the instantaneous reflected solar fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) between the model and CERES observations is 8.0 Wm-2. The solar aerosol direct radiative forcing (ARF), averaged over a 24-hour period, at the surface is-22.4±8.9 Wm-2, while the TOA ARF is small and has an average value of only 0.52±1.69 Wm-2. The daily-average surface aerosol radiative forcing efficiency (ARFE) at 0.5 µm is -95.1±10.3 Wm-2τ-1. Our results illustrate that the primary role of dust aerosol is to alter the distribution of solar radiation within the climate system, rather than reflecting solar energy to space. We assess the satellite aerosol optical depth products from MISR and MODIS observations by comparing them

  4. Effect of low-level laser therapy on pain levels in patients with temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    MAIA, Mila Leite de Moraes; BONJARDIM, Leonardo Rigoldi; QUINTANS, Jullyana de Souza Siqueira; RIBEIRO, Maria Amália Gonzaga; MAIA, Luiz Guilherme Martins; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are characterized by the presence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and/or masticatory muscle pain and dysfunction. Low-level laser is presented as an adjuvant therapeutic modality for the treatment of TMD, especially when the presence of inflammatory pain is suspected. Objective To systematically review studies that investigated the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on the pain levels in individuals with TMD. Material and Methods The databases Scopus, embase, ebsco and PubMed were reviewed from January/2003 to October/2010 with the following keywords: laser therapy, low-level laser therapy, temporomandibular joint disorders, temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome, temporomandibular joint, temporomandibular, facial pain and arthralgia, with the inclusion criteria for intervention studies in humans. exclusion criteria adopted were intervention studies in animals, studies that were not written in english, Spanish or Portuguese, theses, monographs, and abstracts presented in scientific events. Results After a careful review, 14 studies fit the criteria for inclusion, of which, 12 used a placebo group. As for the protocol for laser application, the energy density used ranged from 0.9 to 105 J/cm2, while the power density ranged from 9.8 to 500 mW. The number of sessions varied from 1 to 20 and the frequency of applications ranged from daily for 10 days to 1 time per week for 4 weeks. A reduction in pain levels was reported in 13 studies, with 9 of these occurring only in the experimental group, and 4 studies reporting pain relief for both the experimental group and for the placebo. Conclusion Most papers showed that LLLT seemed to be effective in reducing pain from TMD. However, the heterogeneity of the standardization regarding the parameters of laser calls for caution in interpretation of these results. Thus, it is necessary to conduct further research in order to obtain a consensus regarding the best application protocol

  5. Joint retrieval of hourly-resolved aerosol optical depths and surface reflectance using MSG/SEVIRI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sebastien; Govaerts, Yves

    2010-05-01

    A new aerosol algorithm is developed at EUMETSAT to derive simultaneously the surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) and the hourly variations of the tropospheric aerosol load from observations acquired by the SEVIRI radiometer on-board the Meteosat Second Generation satellites. In order to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness for each cloud-free observation, the algorithm makes the assumption that both the aerosol class and the surface radiative properties do not change during the course of the day. Hence, this algorithm infers the surface BRF from a forward radiative transfer model against daily accumulated observations in the 0.6, 0.8 and 1.6 MSG/SEVIRI bands. These daily time series provide the angular sampling used to discriminate the radiative effects that result from the surface anisotropy, from those caused by the aerosol scattering. The inversion method relies on the Optimal Estimation method which balances the information derived from the observations and the prior knowledge on the system. This approach allows the tracking of sharp daily variations of the aerosol atmospheric load, in particular in the case of quickly developing dust storm fronts. Results of comparisons with the AERONET aerosol product are presented on specific cases on pixel basis in order to assess the performance of this new algorithm.

  6. Optoelectronic pantography diagnostics of temporomandibular disorders in patients with bruxism.

    PubMed

    Mehulić, Ketij; Gospić, Renata Kevilj; Dundjer, Alenko; Skrinjarić, Tomislav; Stefancić, Sanja; Vojvodić, Denis; Perinić, Margareta

    2009-09-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is a joint term that encompasses a number of clinical symptoms that involve the teeth, masticatory musculature and temporomandibular joints (TMJ). They are a frequent cause of orofacial medical conditions. The aetiology of disorders is complex and individual etiologic factors are not sufficiently defined. Bruxism, in its centric or eccentric form, is becoming a frequent problem for dentists. The purpose of this study is to show factors of the condyle leading in patients with bruxism by optoelectronic pantography, and to establish the possibility of using optoelectronic pantography in the diagnostic procedure of TMD. Patients were selected (N = 42), with incomplete sets of teeth, without prosthodontic appliances and with traces and symptoms of TMD. After completing the history questionnaire a clinical check up and plaster cast analysis patients with bruxism were selected (N = 22) and without bruxism (N = 20). During the study optoelectronic String-condylocomp LR3, Dentron, D-Höchberg (software JAWS 30) was used. This study showed the possibility of applying optoelectronic pantography in TMD diagnostics and compares history, clinical and condylographic parameters in TMD patients with and without bruxism. Optoelectronic pantography enables us, by using relatively easy methods, to determine a more accurate diagnosis, highly important when choosing therapeutic methods and control of the aforementioned disorders. PMID:19860114

  7. Temporomandibular disorders and bruxism. Part I.

    PubMed

    Kevilj, R; Mehulic, K; Dundjer, A

    2007-01-01

    Correct functioning of the entire stomatognathic system is achieved by a compatible relationship of all its parts. Four determinants, by their mutual harmonious activity, dictate the function of the entire system: the teeth, periodontium with supporting structure, muscles, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and CNS. In such a complex system a disorder of any integrative part causes disturbances also in other parts of the system. Changed functions can arise through organic disorder, and also iatrogenically by inadequate conservative, prosthetic, surgical or orthodontic therapy. For this reason it is often difficult to recognise the primary cause. The first responses of the system to the disorder are adaptive mechanisms which occur within one or more integrative parts, and depending on their intensity and duration symptoms grow more prominent. Tissue response can be ortho- or parafunctional. Attempts are made to exclude psychoemotional influences and the obstacle eliminated by either abrasion, clenching or grinding of the teeth. If the obstacle is not eliminated by abrasion, the cause of such functional disorder becomes the trigger for parafunctional activity. From a review of the relevant literature it can be concluded that parafunctional activity is caused by changed occlusion, with determined psychological habits of the patient and specific tissue response of the stomatognathic system. Therefore, therapy of these disorders is made more difficult and includes a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:17912197

  8. Joint retrieval of surface reflectance and aerosol optical depth from MSG/SEVIRI observations with an optimal estimation approach: 2. Implementation and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, S. C.; Govaerts, Y. M.; Lattanzio, A.

    2010-01-01

    An original method, based on optimal estimation, was presented in a part one of this paper for the joint retrieval of the mean daily total column aerosol optical depth and the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) from the daily accumulated Meteosat Second Generation-Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (MSG/SEVIRI) observations in the solar channels. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the benefits of the proposed approach and to document the limits of the algorithm assumptions in the context of its implementation in an operational ground segment. A twofold approach is followed. In a first step, by looking at the posterior correlation error matrix the capability of the so-called Land Daily Aerosol (LDA) algorithm to decouple the surface-atmosphere signal is analyzed. In particular, the impact of the prior information is investigated in detail. In a second step, the results of the algorithm are compared with independent data sets of aerosol optical depth and surface reflectance. In this phase, the accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated against ground observations from the AERONET network. LDA is shown to be in good agreement with these data, especially when the prior update mechanism is activated. Comparisons with the MODIS surface product showed that the bihemispherical reflectance derived from the LDA products is consistent with the equivalent MODIS white-sky albedo. Aerosol spatial distributions are comparable in terms of geographical location and intensity, in particular for aerosol episodes with a limited daily variation.

  9. Accuracy of methods for calculating volumetric wear from coordinate measuring machine data of retrieved metal-on-metal hip joint implants.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhen; McKellop, Harry A

    2014-03-01

    This study compared the accuracy and sensitivity of several numerical methods employing spherical or plane triangles for calculating the volumetric wear of retrieved metal-on-metal hip joint implants from coordinate measuring machine measurements. Five methods, one using spherical triangles and four using plane triangles to represent the bearing and the best-fit surfaces, were assessed and compared on a perfect hemisphere model and a hemi-ellipsoid model (i.e. unworn models), computer-generated wear models and wear-tested femoral balls, with point spacings of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mm. The results showed that the algorithm (Method 1) employing spherical triangles to represent the bearing surface and to scale the mesh to the best-fit surfaces produced adequate accuracy for the wear volume with point spacings of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mm. The algorithms (Methods 2-4) using plane triangles to represent the bearing surface and to scale the mesh to the best-fit surface also produced accuracies that were comparable to that with spherical triangles. In contrast, if the bearing surface was represented with a mesh of plane triangles and the best-fit surface was taken as a smooth surface without discretization (Method 5), the algorithm produced much lower accuracy with a point spacing of 0.5 mm than Methods 1-4 with a point spacing of 3 mm. PMID:24531891

  10. Surgical treatment of temporomandibular disorder in a 24-year-old male patient with ganglion cyst.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi Wei; Shao, Xia; Yang, Chi; Fang, Yi Ming

    2015-03-01

    Ganglion cysts are common pseudocystic masses, whereas those arising from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare entities. We report a case of ganglion cyst of the right TMJ with symptomatic bilateral TMJ internal derangement in a 24-year-old man. Disk repositioning using bone anchors and excision of the ganglion cyst were performed. A unique characteristic of inflammatory infiltrates was revealed in the specimen, and the relationship between these 2 distinct entities and probable pathogenesis of infectious involvement are discussed. PMID:25643336

  11. Mood spectrum in patients with different painful temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Daniele; di Poggio, Adolfo Bandettini; Romagnoli, Mario; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Bosco, Mario

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate for difference in the prevalence of mood disorders between patients with different painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD). After a sample size necessary for the study was calculated, 60 patients with a painful TMD were selected and divided into the following groups: myofascial pain (n=20), temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain (n=18), combined myofascial and TMJ pain (n=22). Two distinct comparison groups were selected: subjects with a nonpainful TMD (n=25) and TMD-free subjects (n=29). All participants filled out a self-report validated instrument (MOODS-SR) to evaluate psychopathological symptoms related to mood disturbances. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni's post hoc test for multiple comparisons was performed to investigate for significant differences among the groups. The three groups of patients with painful TMD scored significantly higher than comparison groups in all MOODS-SR domains investigating depression, but no difference was shown between subjects with myofascial pain and those with TMJ pain. No significant differences among the groups emerged for the presence of manic symptoms, indicating that depressive disorders associated with TMD are not an expression of a more complex manic depressive illness. The study concluded that the presence of depressive symptoms in TMD patients seems to be related to the presence of a painful condition and seems to be unrelated to the location of pain. Furthermore, depressive disturbances in painful TMD patients affect the whole spectrum of depressive psychopathology. PMID:15293779

  12. Masticatory function in temporomandibular dysfunction patients: electromyographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Berretin-Felix, Giédre; Genaro, Katia Flores; Trindade, Inge Elly Kiemle; Trindade Júnior, Alceu Sergio

    2005-12-01

    Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is a complex disturbance that involves the masticatory muscles and/or temporomandibular joint, causing damage to the masticatory function. This study evaluated the electromyographic activity of the masseter muscle during habitual mastication of bread, apple, banana, cashew nut and paraffin film (Parafilm M) in 25 adult subjects, of both gender, with TMD. The results were compared to those of a control group, composed of 15 adult subjects, of both sexes, free of signs and/or symptoms of TMD. The MYO-TRONICS Inc., K6-I computer software was used for electromyographic processing and analyzed the following parameters: duration of the act, duration of the masticatory cycle and number of cycles. No significant differences were found between subjects in the control group and individuals with TMD as to duration of the masticatory act and of the masticatory cycle, considering all materials used for mastication. The duration of the masticatory act and cycle was longer during mastication of paraffin film in both groups. The number of masticatory cycles was higher for mastication of apple in comparison to mastication of banana, in both groups. It can be concluded that the consistency of foods influences the duration parameters of the act, duration of the cycle and the number of masticatory cycles, and the behavior of the masticatory muscles in individuals with TMD during habitual mastication is similar to that verified in individuals without TMD. PMID:20865220

  13. Temporomandibular disorders. Part 1: anatomy and examination/diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a heterogeneous group of diagnoses affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding tissues. A variety of methods for evaluating and managing TMD have been proposed within the physical therapy profession but these sources are not peer-reviewed and lack updates from scientific literature. The dental profession has provided peer-reviewed sources that lack thoroughness with respect to the neuromusculoskeletal techniques utilized by physical therapists. The subsequent void creates the need for a thorough, research informed, and peer-reviewed source regarding TMD evaluation and management for physical therapists. This paper is the first part in a two-part series that seeks to fill the current void by providing a brief but comprehensive outline for clinicians seeking to provide services for patients with TMD. Part one focuses on anatomy and pathology, arthro- and osteokinematics, epidemiology, history taking, and physical examination as they relate to TMD. An appreciation of the anatomical and mechanical features associated with the TMJ can serve as a foundation for understanding a patient’s clinical presentation. Performance of a thorough patient history and clinical examination can guide the clinician toward an improved diagnostic process. PMID:24976743

  14. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in adolescent violin players.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M

    1996-08-01

    Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and the frequency of radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of adolescent violin players (VP group) were investigated in a group of 31 music students and in their age- and sex-matched controls (C group). All subjects underwent a routine clinical stomatognathic examination, a standardized interview, and radiography of the condyles. The VP group reported a higher frequency of the subjective symptoms: pain in the TMJ when chewing, a feeling of stiffness in the TMJ, and clenching of the teeth. Clinically, the VP group showed a greater range of maximal protrusion and of maximal laterotrusion to the right, and a greater frequency of deviation to the right on opening. They also showed more palpatory tenderness in the masticatory muscles and pain in the TMJ on maximal opening. The number of playing years and the number of weekly playing hours correlated with several signs and symptoms of TMDs. In terms of radiologic findings in the condyles of the TMJs there was no difference between the groups. It is concluded that intense violin playing may have a predisposing role in the etiology of TMDs in adolescence. PMID:8876740

  15. Treatment of temporomandibular myofascial pain with deep dry needling

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Luis M.; Granados-Nuñez, Mercedes; Urresti-Lopez, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of deep dry needling in the treatment of temporomandibular myofascial pain. Study Design: We selected 36 patients with myofascial pain located in the external pterygoid muscle (30 women/6 men, mean age=27 years with SD±6,5). We studied differences in pain with a visual analog scale and range of mandibular movements before and after intervention. Results: We found a statistically significant relationship (p<0,01) between therapeutic intervention and the improvement of pain and jaw movements, which continued up to 6 months after treatment. Pain reduction was greater the higher was the intensity of pain at baseline. Conclusions: Although further studies are needed, our findings suggest that deep dry needling in the trigger point in the external pterygoid muscle can be effective in the management of patients with myofascial pain located in that muscle. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, myofascial pain, external pterygoid muscle, trigger point, deep dry needling. PMID:22549679

  16. Widespread pain in temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pei Feng; Maixner, William; Khan, Asma A

    2011-03-01

    SUMMARY Chronic widespread pain (CWP) represents pain involving several regions of the body. Various psychological and social risk factors such as poor general health status, sleep disturbance, fatigue and high psychological distress have been identified for the development of CWP. Numerous chronic pain conditions are comorbid, resulting in the development of CWP in many of these patients. Temporomandibular disorder is one of the most extensively studied chronic musculoskeletal pain condition in terms of its comorbidity with CWP and fibromyalgia. It has been proposed that these comorbid pain disorders share common denominators, including exposure to certain environmental events, elevated psychological distress, pain amplification and genetic predisposition. Increased awareness of CWP is important for improved diagnoses and more effective pain management. Patients with CWP can be effectively managed in multidisciplinary pain clinics. PMID:24646357

  17. Evaluation of condylar positions in patients with temporomandibular disorders: A cone-beam computed tomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Imanimoghaddam, Mahrokh; Madani, Azam Sadat; Mahdavi, Pirooze; Bagherpour, Ali; Darijani, Mansoreh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the condylar position in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) and a normal group by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods In the TMD group, 25 patients (5 men and 20 women) were randomly selected among the ones suffering from TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). The control group consisted of 25 patients (8 men and 17 women) with normal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) who were referred to the radiology department in order to undergo CBCT scanning for implant treatment in the posterior maxilla. Linear measurements from the superior, anterior, and posterior joint spaces between the condyle and glenoid fossa were made through defined landmarks in the sagittal view. The inclination of articular eminence was also determined. Results The mean anterior joint space was 2.3 mm in the normal group and 2.8 mm in the TMD group, respectively. The results showed that there was a significant correlation between the superior and posterior joint spaces in both the normal and TMD groups, but it was only in the TMD group that the correlation coefficient among the dimensions of anterior and superior spaces was significant. There was a significant correlation between the inclination of articular eminence and the size of the superior and posterior spaces in the normal group. Conclusion The average dimension of the anterior joint space was different between the two groups. CBCT could be considered a useful diagnostic imaging modality for TMD patients. PMID:27358820

  18. Physical therapy and anesthetic blockage for treating temporomandibular disorders: A clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Mirella M.; Porto, Gabriela G.; Ferdinanda, Greiciane; Nogueira, Cyntia M.; Raimundo, Ronaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: the aim of this study was to evaluate the use of physical therapy and anesthetic blockage of the auriculotemporal nerve as a treatment for temporomandibular joint disorders. Methods: the sample comprised of twenty patients with a diagnosis of disc displacement with/ without reduction and arthralgia according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD Axis I Group IIa, IIb and IIIa). Ten patients (group 1) underwent a cycle of eight anesthetic blockages of the auriculotemporal nerve with injections (1 per week) of 1 ml of bupivacaine 0.5% without vasoconstrictor for 8 weeks. The other 10 patients (group 2) received anesthetic blockage and physical therapy (massage and muscular stretching exercises). After the end of treatment all patients were evaluated at baseline, 1st week, 4th week and 2 months. The t-Student and F (ANOVA) tests were used for statistical analysis, with a significance rate of 5%. Results: there was a significant difference when both groups were compared according to VAS score (p=0.027). There was no significant difference for the other variables: MMO and jaw protrusion. Conclusion: the anesthetic blockage and physical therapy, when used together, are effective in the reduction of pain in patients with TMD. Key words:Temporomandibular joint disorders, physical therapy, physiotherapy and nerve block, local anesthetic, bupivacaine. PMID:23229236

  19. Application of Infrared Thermal Imaging in a Violinist with Temporomandibular Disorder.

    PubMed

    Clemente, M; Coimbra, D; Silva, A; Aguiar Branco, C; Pinho, J C

    2015-12-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) consist of a group of pathologies that affect the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joints (TMJ), and/or related structures. String instrumentalists, like many orchestra musicians, can spend hours with head postures that may influence the biomechanical behavior of the TMJ and the muscles of the craniocervicomandibular complex (CCMC). The adoption of abnormal postures acquired during performance by musicians can lead to muscular hyperactivity of the head and cervical muscles, with the possible appearance of TMD. Medical infrared thermography is a non-invasive procedure that can monitor the changes in the superficial tissue related to blood circulation and may serve as a complement to the clinical examination. The objective of this study was to use infrared thermography to evaluate, in one subject, the cutaneous thermal changes adjacent to the CCMC that occur before, during, and after playing a string instrument. PMID:26614980

  20. Influence of orthodontic treatment on temporomandibular disorders. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cañigral, Aránzazu; López-Caballo, José L.; Brizuela, Aritza; Moreno-Hay, Isabel; del Río-Highsmith, Jaime; Vega, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this literature systematic review was to evaluate the possible association between malocclusions, orthodontic treatment and development of temporomandibular disorders. Material and Methods: A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords “orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders”, “orthodontics and facial pain” and “malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders”. Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. Material and Methods A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords “orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders”, “orthodontics and facial pain” and “malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders”. Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. Results The search strategy resulted in 61 articles. After selection according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria 9 articles qualified for the final analysis. The articles which linked orthodontics and development of temporomandibular disorders showed very discrepant results. Some indicated that orthodontic treatment could improve signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, but none of them obtained statistically significant differences. Conclusions According to the authors examined, there is no evidence for a cause-effect relationship between orthodontic treatment and temporomandibular disorders, or that such treatment might improve or prevent them. More longitudinal studies are needed to verify any possible interrelationship. Key words:Malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders, orthodontics and facial pain, orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular dysfunction. PMID:26155354

  1. Validation of primary metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties on the National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland using data from the London Implant Retrieval Centre: a study using the NJR dataset.

    PubMed

    Sabah, S A; Henckel, J; Cook, E; Whittaker, R; Hothi, H; Pappas, Y; Blunn, G; Skinner, J A; Hart, A J

    2015-01-01

    Arthroplasty registries are important for the surveillance of joint replacements and the evaluation of outcome. Independent validation of registry data ensures high quality. The ability for orthopaedic implant retrieval centres to validate registry data is not known. We analysed data from the National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (NJR) for primary metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties performed between 2003 and 2013. Records were linked to the London Implant Retrieval Centre (RC) for validation. A total of 67,045 procedures on the NJR and 782 revised pairs of components from the RC were included. We were able to link 476 procedures (60.9%) recorded with the RC to the NJR successfully. However, 306 procedures (39.1%) could not be linked. The outcome recorded by the NJR (as either revised, unrevised or death) for a primary procedure was incorrect in 79 linked cases (16.6%). The rate of registry-retrieval linkage and correct assignment of outcome code improved over time. The rates of error for component reference numbers on the NJR were as follows: femoral head category number 14/229 (5.0%); femoral head batch number 13/232 (5.3%); acetabular component category number 2/293 (0.7%) and acetabular component batch number 24/347 (6.5%). Registry-retrieval linkage provided a novel means for the validation of data, particularly for component fields. This study suggests that NJR reports may underestimate rates of revision for many types of metal-on-metal hip replacement. This is topical given the increasing scope for NJR data. We recommend a system for continuous independent evaluation of the quality and validity of NJR data. PMID:25568407

  2. Can Pin-on-Disk Testing Be Used to Assess the Wear Performance of Retrieved UHMWPE Components for Total Joint Arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven M.; MacDonald, Daniel W.; Kocagöz, Sevi; Baykal, Doruk

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the suitability of using multidirectional pin-on-disk (POD) testing to characterize wear behavior of retrieved ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). The POD wear behavior of 25 UHMWPE components, retrieved after 10 years in vivo, was compared with 25 that were shelf aged for 10–15 years in their original packaging. Components were gamma sterilized (25–40 kGy) in an air or reduced oxygen (inert) package. 9 mm diameter pins were fabricated from each component and evaluated against CoCr disks using a super-CTPOD with 100 stations under physiologically relevant, multidirectional loading conditions. Bovine serum (20 g/L protein concentration) was used as lubricant. Volumetric wear rates were found to vary based on the aging environment, as well as sterilization environment. Volumetric wear rates were the lowest for the pins in the gamma inert, shelf aged cohort. These results support the utility of using modern, multidirectional POD testing with a physiologic lubricant as a novel method for evaluating wear properties of retrieved UHMWPE components. The data also supported the hypothesis that wear rates of gamma-inert liners were lower than gamma-air liners for both retrieved and shelf aging conditions. However, this difference was not statistically significant for the retrieved condition. PMID:25295264

  3. Association between estrogen levels and temporomandibular disorders: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Marcin; Szalewski, Leszek; Bakalczuk, Magdalena; Bakalczuk, Szymon; Szkutnik, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate whether the hypothesis that estrogen levels are associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in humans can be confirmed or contradicted by available literature. Material and methods A systematic review based on the content of PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane Library databases was performed. Studies were identified using a combination of key words ‘temporomandibular disorder’ and ‘estrogen’. Nine studies were included into our review. Results The relationship between estrogen levels and TMD was found in seven out of nine reviewed papers. Results from two papers suggest that a high estrogen level is associated with an increased prevalence of TMD. Five additional papers found a relationship between a low estrogen level and an increase in TMD pain. In considering the value of evidence and inconsistencies of results in the reviewed publications, we state that there is weak evidence to support the hypothesis that estrogen levels are associated with TMD. Conclusions Results of reviewed studies were divergent and sometimes contradictory. One possible explanation is that estrogen influences TMD pain processing differently than temporomandibular joints (TMJ) structures, as shown in many animal studies. Estrogen may influence TMD pain processing differently than TMJ structures. We suggest consideration of the dual action of estrogen when planning future studies on its association with TMD. PMID:26848299

  4. Parasympathetic Reactivity in Fibromyalgia and Temporomandibular Disorder: Associations with Sleep Problems, Symptom Severity, and Functional Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A.; Crofford, Leslie J.; Howard, Thomas; Yepes, Juan F.; Carlson, Charles R.; de Leeuw, Reny

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence of autonomic disturbances in chronic multi-symptom illnesses such as temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and fibromyalgia (FM), additional work is needed to characterize the role of parasympathetic reactivity in these disorders. Given the high levels of comorbidity with psychiatric disorders characterized by stronger parasympathetic reductions than controls in safe contexts (leading to higher arousal), it was hypothesized that individuals with TMD and FM would respond similarly. In this preliminary investigation, 43 women with TMD (n = 17), TMD + FM (n = 11), or neither (controls; n = 15) completed a baseline assessment of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA; a measure of parasympathetic activity) followed by ongoing parasympathetic assessment during a questionnaire period. As predicted, patients showed greater parasympathetic decline in response to the questionnaire period, suggesting an autonomic stance that supports defensive rather than engagement behaviors. Individual differences in parasympathetic reduction during the questionnaire period were related to a variety of physical and psychosocial variables. Although this study has a number of key limitations, including a convenience sampling approach and the small group sizes, if replicated in larger samples, the findings would have important implications for the treatment of patients with these disorders. Perspective Compared to controls, individuals with temporomandibular disorders or temporomandibular disorder and fibromyalgia demonstrated greater parasympathetic reduction during psychosocial assessment, and individual differences in parasympathetic reduction predicted negative patient outcomes. Such parasympathetic reductions may betray a tendency to readily perceive danger in safe environments. PMID:25542636

  5. Condylar bony changes in patients with temporomandibular disorders: a CBCT study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Diagnosis of osteoarthritis most commonly depends on clinical and radiographic findings. The present study attempted to observe the bony changes in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) patients from all age groups. Materials and Methods The first-visit clinical records and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data of 440 TMJs from 220 consecutive TMJ patients were reviewed retrospectively. Results The most frequent condylar bony change observed was sclerosis (133 joints, 30.2%) followed by surface erosion (129 joints, 29.3%), flattening of the articular surface (112 joints, 25.5%), and deviation in form (58 joints, 13.2%), which included 33 TMJs in a cane-shape, 16 with a lateral or medial pole depression, 6 with posterior condylar surface flattening, and 3 with a bifid-shaped condyle. Fifty-three joints (12.0%) showed hypoplastic condyles but only 1 joint showed hyperplasia. Osteophyte was found in 35 joints (8.0%) and subcortical cyst in 24 joints (5.5%), 5 of which had surface erosion as well. One hundred nineteen joints (27.0%) had only one kind of condylar bony change, 66 joints (15.0%) had two, 52 joints (11.8%) had three, 12 joints (5.0%) had four, and 6 joints (1.4%) had five kinds of condylar bony changes at the same time. Eighty-five (65.9%) of 129 joints with surface erosion had pain recorded at the chief complaint. Conclusion With more widespread use of CBCT, more specific or detailed guidelines for osteoarthritis are needed. PMID:23301212

  6. Relationship between pain and effusion on magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ha-Na; Kim, Kyoung-A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to find the relationship between pain and joint effusion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Materials and Methods The study subjects included 232 TMD patients. The inclusion criteria in this study were the presence of spontaneous pain or provoked pain on one or both temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The provoked pain was divided into three groups: pain on palpation (G1), pain on mouth opening (G2), and pain on mastication (G3). MRI examinations were performed using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. T1- and T2-weighted images with para-sagittal and para-coronal images were obtained. According to the T2-weighted image findings, the cases of effusions were divided into four groups: normal, mild (E1), moderate (E2), and marked effusion (E3). A statistical analysis was carried out using the χ2 test with SPSS (version 12.0, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results Spontaneous pain, provoked pain, and both spontaneous and provoked pain were significantly related to joint effusion in TMD patients (p<0.05). However, among the various types of provoked pain, pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles and TMJ (G1) was not related to joint effusion in TMD patients (p>0.05). Conclusion Spontaneous pain was related to the MRI findings of joint effusion; however, among the various types of provoked pain, pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles and TMJ was not related to the MRI findings of joint effusion. These results suggest that joint effusion has a significant influence on the prediction of TMJ pain. PMID:25473637

  7. Natural Language Information Retrieval: Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Carballo, Jose; Strzalkowski, Tomek

    2000-01-01

    Reports on the progress of the natural language information retrieval project, a joint effort led by GE (General Electric) Research, and its evaluation at the sixth TREC (Text Retrieval Conference). Discusses stream-based information retrieval, which uses alternative methods of document indexing; advanced linguistic streams; weighting; and query…

  8. Quality of life and general health in patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Resende, Camila Maria Bastos Machado de; Alves, Arthur César de Medeiros; Coelho, Lidiane Thomaz; Alchieri, Joõo Carlos; Roncalli, Angelo Giuseppe; Barbosa, Gustavo Augusto Seabra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to associate minor psychiatric disorders (general health) and quality of life with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients diagnosed with different TMD classifications and subclassifications with varying levels of severity. Among 150 patients reporting TMD symptoms, 43 were included in the present study. Fonseca's anamnestic index was used for initial screening while axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC-TMD) was used for TMD diagnosis (muscle-related, joint-related or muscle and joint-related). Minor psychiatric disorders were evaluated through the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and quality of life was assessed using the World Health Organization Quality Of Life-Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF). An association was found between minor psychiatric disorders and TMD severity, except for stress. A stronger association was found with mild TMD. Considering TMD classifications and severity together, only the item "death wish" from the GHQ was related to severe muscle-related TMD (p = 0.049). For quality of life, an association was found between disc displacement with reduction and social domain (p = 0.01). Physical domains were associated with TMD classifications and severity and the association was stronger for muscle and joint-related TMD (p = 0.37) and mild TMD (p = 0.042). It was concluded that patients with TMD require multiple focuses of attention since psychological indicators of general health and quality of life are likely associated with dysfunction. PMID:23459771

  9. Validation of a simulator for temporomandibular joint arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monje Gil, F; Hernandez Vila, C; Moyano Cuevas, J L; Lyra, M; Pagador, J B; Sanchez Margallo, F M

    2016-07-01

    The traditional method of surgical training has followed the 'observe, practice, and teach' model, which is useful for open surgery, but is insufficient for minimally invasive surgery. This study presents the validation of a new simulator designed for TMJ arthroscopy training. A group of 10 senior maxillofacial surgeons performed an arthroscopy procedure using the simulator. They then completed a questionnaire analyzing the realism of the simulator, its utility, and the educational quality of the audiovisual software. The mean age of the 10 surgeons was 42.6 years, and they had performed a mean 151 arthroscopies. With regard to the realism of the simulator, 80% reported that it was of an appropriate size and design and 70% referred to the very realistic positions and relationships between the internal structures. Regarding its educational potential, 80% reported the simulator to be very useful for acquiring the basic skills and to acquire the sensation of depth during access to the TMJ. Finally, 90% reported the prototype to be very useful for TMJ arthroscopy training. These preliminary results showed a high degree of approval. The general opinion of the group of experts was that the experience was rewarding and inspiring, and that the prototype has the educational potential for the achievement of basic TMJ arthroscopy skills. PMID:26850940

  10. Absorbed radiation doses in transcranial temporomandibular joint radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, T.S.; Fischer, W.G.; Verbin, R.S.

    1986-05-01

    Lateral transcranial radiographs are commonly used to evaluate TMJ morphology and function. This study evaluated the use of four TMJ positioners in controlling the amount of radiation absorbed at predetermined sites on a phantom head. Use of positioners and collimators can reduce the amount of radiation exposure.

  11. Vertical Craniofacial Morphology and its Relation to Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bavia, Paula Furlan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This study investigated the association between craniofacial morphology and temporomandibular disorders in adults. The influence of different craniofacial morphologies on painful temporomandibular disorders was also evaluated. Material and Methods A total of 200 subjects were selected, including 100 with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and 100 without TMD (control), diagnosed by research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders. All subjects were submitted to lateral cephalometric radiographs, and classified as brachyfacial, mesofacial, or dolichofacial by Ricketts’ analysis. Data were analysed by Tukey-Kramer and Chi-square tests. Results No association between craniofacial morphology and TMD was found (P = 0.6622). However, brachyfacial morphology influences the presence of painful TMD (P = 0.0077). Conclusions Craniofacial morphology is not related to temporomandibular disorders in general. PMID:27489610

  12. A Collaborative Approach Between Chiropractic and Dentistry to Address Temporomandibular Dysfunction: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rubis, Lisa M.; Rubis, David; Winchester, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic and dental comanagement of a patient with temporomandibular dysfunction, headaches, and myalgia. Clinical features A 38-year-old black female patient presented for chiropractic care with a chief concern of jaw pain, tinnitus, headaches, and neck and shoulder soreness of 8 months’ duration. The patient rated the pain a 6/10. The patient had a maximum mouth opening of 42 mm, graphed evidence of disk displacement, loss of translation on opening of the right temporomandibular joint viewed on the lateral radiograph, and numerous areas of point tenderness on the Kinnie-Funt Chief Complaint Visual Index. She had decreased lateral cervical flexion. Intervention and outcome Dental treatment consisted of an anterior repositioning splint. Chiropractic care consisted of Activator treatment to the pelvis and the thoracic and cervical spine. Manual manipulation of the temporomandibular joint was performed along with a soft tissue technique intraorally on the lateral pterygoid. Postisometric relaxation in the head and neck region was also done. The patient was treated 6 times over 3 weeks. At the end of treatment, the patient had a pain rating of 0/10, maximum mouth opening of 49 mm, no tender points on the follow-up Kinnie-Funt, and increased cervical range of motion. Conclusion The patient demonstrated increased mouth opening, decreased pain rating, improved Kinnie-Funt visual index, and an increased cervical lateral flexion range of motion after 3 weeks of a combination of chiropractic and dental care. PMID:24711786

  13. Effectiveness of two different splints to treat temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Aksakalli, Sertac; Temucin, Fatih; Pamukcu, Ayca; Ezirganlı, Seref; Kazancioglu, Hakki Oguz; Malkoc, Meral Arslan

    2015-07-01

    Nearly 5% of the the world's population has temporomandibular disorder (TMD) severe enough to make them seek treatment. A third of the total population has at least one TMD symptom. There are different types of splints to treat TMD. In our study, we compared the success of two different appliances [stabilization splint (ss), nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splint (NTI)] by using Fonseca's questionnaire, the OHQoL-UK and visual analog scale (VAS). A total of 40 patients suffering from TMD were included in this study and answered questionnaires twice, at the beginning of the treatment and 3 months later. Regarding TMD alone, 39 patients (97.5%) had some degree of the disorder, 7 of of these cases being mild (17.5%), 15 moderate (37.5%), and 17 severe (42.5%). We analyzed posttreatment changes compared to baseline. Pain complaints decreased in both groups, and the OHQoL-UK revealed better quality of life after treatment. Based on the posttreatment Fonseca's questionnaires, significant changes in the patients' complaints in the group SS (p < 0.01) were observed. The group NTI also displayed changes but these were not statistically significant after treatment (p > 0.05). Patients in both groups had fewer TMD complaints after TMJ treatment. According to the Fonseca's questionnaire, the patients' major TMD complaint was clenching-grinding, followed by pain in the craniomandibular joint, or earache. PMID:26149971

  14. Myogenous temporomandibular disorders: diagnostic and management considerations.

    PubMed

    Fricton, James

    2007-01-01

    Myogenous temporomandibular disorders (or masticatory myalgia) are characterized by pain and dysfunction that arise from pathologic and functional processes in the masticatory muscles. There are several distinct muscle disorder subtypes in the masticatory system, including myofascial pain, myositis, muscle spasm, and muscle contracture. The major characteristics of masticatory myalgia include pain, muscle tenderness, limited range of motion, and other symptoms (eg, fatigability, stiffness, subjective weakness). Comorbid conditions and complicating factors also are common and are discussed. Management follows with stretching, posture, and relaxation exercises, physical therapy, reduction of contributing factors, and as necessary, muscle injections. PMID:17185060

  15. Effect of Facial Massage on Static Balance in Individuals with Temporomandibular Disorder – a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    El Hage, Yasmin; Politti, Fabiano; Herpich, Carolina Marciela; de Souza, Dowglas Fernando Magalhães; de Paula Gomes, Cid André Fidelis; Amorim, Cesar Ferreira; de Oliveira Gonzalez, Tabajara; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The influence of the neuromuscular system on the cervical region and mastication is directly associated with mandibular movements and neck posture. Normal occlusal homeostasis depends on complex sensory feedback mechanisms of the periodontal ligament, temporomandibular joint and other structures of the stomatognathic system. This feedback serves as a regulatory mechanism that helps determine the force and nature of muscle contractions. Alterations in the muscles of mastication, neck muscles, and occlusal characteristics constitute causal factors of imbalances in the postural muscle chains, leading to alterations in the center of pressure (CoP) of the feet. Thus, therapies that seek occlusal reestablishment, such as muscle relaxation techniques, may lead to a restructuring of the global equilibrium of the neuromuscular system and an improvement in body posture. Purpose The aim of the present pilot study was to investigate the immediate effect of facial massage on the CoP in the anteroposterior (CoPAP) and mediolateral (CoPML) directions in individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Methods Twenty individuals with a diagnosis of TMD based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) were submitted to a facial massage technique. CoPAP and CoPML were evaluated using a force plate. Evaluations were performed under two visual conditions (eyes open and eyes closed) prior to resting in dorsal decubitus (baseline), after 10 minutes of rest (premassage) and after the administration of the massage technique (postmassage). Results No significant differences were found regarding CoPAP velocity with eyes open or the following aspects under either visual condition (eyes open or closed): CoPML velocity, RMS of CoPAP, RMS of CoPML, and sway area. The only significant difference was found for mean CoPAP velocity with eyes closed. Conclusions While the results of the present study demonstrate the reliability of the reproduction of

  16. Role of Auriculotherapy in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders with Anxiety in University Students.

    PubMed

    Iunes, Denise Hollanda; Chaves, Érika de Cássia Lopes; Moura, Caroline de Castro; Côrrea, Bruna; Carvalho, Leonardo César; Silva, Andreia Maria; de Carvalho, Emília Campos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of auriculotherapy with mustard seeds in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), anxiety, and electromyographic (EMG) activity in university students. Methodology. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for TMDs (RDC/TMDs), and electromyography were used in this study of 44 college students with high levels of anxiety and TMDs. The subjects were divided into two groups: an auriculotherapy (AA) group (n = 31) and an AA sham group (n = 13). The mustard seeds were applied to the shenmen, rim, sympathetic, brain stem, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) points in the AA group and to sham points in the external ear and wrist in the AA sham group. The treatment protocol was 10 sessions (two treatments per week). Results. Anxiety (p < 0.01) was significantly reduced in the AA group. This group also showed a decrease in tender points in the mandibular posterior region (p = 0.04) and in the right side of the submandibular region (p = 0.02). Complaints of bilateral pain were reduced in the temporal tendon (p ≤ 0.01) and in the left side of the ATM (p < 0.01). In addition, electromyographic (EMG) activity was reduced during temporal muscle contraction (p = 0.03).  Conclusion. Auriculotherapy was effective in the treatment of students with anxiety and TMDs. PMID:26495012

  17. Role of Auriculotherapy in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders with Anxiety in University Students

    PubMed Central

    Iunes, Denise Hollanda; Chaves, Érika de Cássia Lopes; Moura, Caroline de Castro; Côrrea, Bruna; Carvalho, Leonardo César; Silva, Andreia Maria; de Carvalho, Emília Campos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of auriculotherapy with mustard seeds in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), anxiety, and electromyographic (EMG) activity in university students. Methodology. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for TMDs (RDC/TMDs), and electromyography were used in this study of 44 college students with high levels of anxiety and TMDs. The subjects were divided into two groups: an auriculotherapy (AA) group (n = 31) and an AA sham group (n = 13). The mustard seeds were applied to the shenmen, rim, sympathetic, brain stem, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) points in the AA group and to sham points in the external ear and wrist in the AA sham group. The treatment protocol was 10 sessions (two treatments per week). Results. Anxiety (p < 0.01) was significantly reduced in the AA group. This group also showed a decrease in tender points in the mandibular posterior region (p = 0.04) and in the right side of the submandibular region (p = 0.02). Complaints of bilateral pain were reduced in the temporal tendon (p ≤ 0.01) and in the left side of the ATM (p < 0.01). In addition, electromyographic (EMG) activity was reduced during temporal muscle contraction (p = 0.03).  Conclusion. Auriculotherapy was effective in the treatment of students with anxiety and TMDs. PMID:26495012

  18. Is Mandibular Fossa Morphology and Articular Eminence Inclination Associated with Temporomandibular Dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Akhlaghian, Marzieh; Abolvardi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Finding a significant relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) morphology and the incidence of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) may help early prediction and prevention of these problems. Purpose The purpose of the present study was to determine the morphology of mandibular fossa and the articular eminence inclination in patients with TMD and in control group using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Method The CBCT data of bilateral TMJs of 40 patients with TMD and 23 symptom-free cases were evaluated. The articular eminence inclination, as well as the glenoid fossa depth and width of the mandibular fossa were measured. The paired t-test was used to compare these values between two groups. Results The articular eminence inclination and glenoid fossa width and depth were significantly higher in patients with TMD than in the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion The articular eminence inclination was steeper in patients with TMD than in the control group. Glenoid fossa width and depth were higher in patients with TMD than that in the control group. This information may shed light on the relationship between TMJ morphology and the incidence of TMD. PMID:27284559

  19. Relationship between oral tori and temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Sirirungrojying, S; Kerdpon, D

    1999-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the presence of oral tori and parafunctional activity (clenching, grinding teeth and/or bruxism) between temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients and control subjects. Fifty-nine TMD and 353 control subjects were included. The groups were similar in sex and age distribution. There was no significant difference in prevalence of torus palatinus (TP) between TMD and control group (P = 0.2), while torus mandibularis (TM) was more common in TMD than in control group (P < 0.0005). Parafunctional habit was more common in TMD patients than in the control group (P < 0.0005). There was no significant association between size of TM and Helkimo's dysfunction index (P = 0.4). The results show that the prevalence of TM and parafunctional activity was higher in TMD than control patients. TM might be useful as an indicator of increased risk of TMD in some patients. PMID:10858740

  20. Association between temporomandibular disorders and obesity.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Eunmi; Han, Kyungdo; Yun, Kyoung-In

    2016-08-01

    Psychological stress can induce altered eating patterns, and studies have indicated that there is a correlation between temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and psychological stress. This study investigated the relationship between TMD and body mass index (BMI) in a large representative sample of the South Korean population using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Men and women with TMD showed decreased prevalence of abdominal obesity. Women with TMD had lower age, lower BMI, lower metabolic syndromic waist circumference, lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome, and lower prevalence of diabetes compared with the group without TMD. However, males with TMD didn't show any statistically significant difference between BMI, and metabolic syndromic waist circumference compared with the group without TMD, although there were similar tendencies in the female subject groups. Overall, TMD was associated with decreased BMI and abdominal obesity in women. PMID:27349686

  1. Prevalence of the different Axis I clinical subtypes in a sample of patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders in the Andalusian Healthcare Service

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Aguilera, Antonio; Blanco-Aguilera, Elena; Serrano-del-Rosal, Rafael; Biedma-Velázquez, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Torronteras, Alejandro; Segura-Saint-Gerons, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background The main objective of this paper is to analyze the prevalence of each of the different clinical subtypes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a sample of patients with this pathology. In addition, a second objective was to analyze their distribution according to gender. Material and Methods To this end, the results of 1603 patients who went to the Unit of Temporomandibular Disorders in the Córdoba Healthcare District because they suffered from this pathology were analyzed. In order to diagnose them, the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) were applied, analyzing the different Axis I subtypes (myopathy, discopathy and arthropathy) and obtaining the combined Axis I for each patient and the relation of all these variables according to gender. The null-hypothesis test confirmed the lack of connection between the gender variable and the different subtypes in the clinical analysis, and between the former and the combined Axis I of the RDC/TMD. Results The prevalence was high for the muscle disorders subtype in general, showing an 88.7% prevalence, while the presence of discopathies or arthropathies was much lower. Among discopathies, the most frequent ones were disc displacements with reduction, with 39.7% and 42.8% for the left and right temporomandibular joints (TMJ), respectively, while the prevalence of arthropathies was 26.3% for the right TMJ and 32.9% for the left TMJ. The bivariate analysis on the connection with gender reveals a p≥ 0.05 value for the muscle and arthralgia subtypes. Conclusions The patients seen at the TMD Unit where mostly middle-aged women whose main clinical axis subtype was the muscle disorder subtype. For their part, both discopathies and arthropathies, although present, are much less prevalent. Key words:RDCTMD, axis I, orofacial pain, temporomandibular disorders, gender. PMID:26615508

  2. Factors involved in the etiology of temporomandibular disorders - a literature review

    PubMed Central

    CHISNOIU, ANDREA MARIA; PICOS, ALINA MONICA; POPA, SEVER; CHISNOIU, PETRE DANIEL; LASCU, LIANA; PICOS, ANDREI; CHISNOIU, RADU

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim This review aims at presenting a current view on the most frequent factors involved in the mechanisms causing temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Method We conducted a critical review of the literature for the period January 2000 to December 2014 to identify factors related to TMD development and persistence. Results The etiology of TMD is multidimensional: biomechanical, neuromuscular, bio-psychosocial and biological factors may contribute to the disorder. Occlusal overloading and parafunctions (bruxism) are frequently involved as biomechanical factors; increased levels of estrogen hormones are considered biological factors affecting the temporo-mandibular-joint. Among bio-psychosocial factors, stress, anxiety or depression, were frequently encountered. Conclusions The etiopathogenesis of this condition is poorly understood, therefore TMDs are difficult to diagnose and manage. Early and correct identification of the possible etiologic factors will enable the appropriate treatment scheme application in order to reduce or eliminate TMDs debilitating signs and symptoms. PMID:26732121

  3. Golden Retrievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Provides a basic definition of metadata, including the usefulness of metatags for online information retrieval and documentation. Defines the elements of the Dublin Core, the next level of metadata. Discusses how librarians can take advantage of metadata. Describes the Gateway to Educational Materials (GEM) Project whose goal is to use metadata to…

  4. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  5. The “at-home LLLT” in temporo-mandibular disorders pain control: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pelosi, A; Queirolo, V; Vescovi, P; Merigo, E

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The Temporo-Mandibular Disorders (TMD) are a set of dysfunctional patterns concerning the temporo-mandibular joints (TMJ) and the masticatory muscles; its main symptom is pain, probably caused by inflammatory changes in the synovial membrane, alterations in the bone marrow of the mandibular condyle and impingement and compression. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the effectiveness in the TMD pain reduction of a new laser device recently proposed by the commerce that, due to its reduced dimensions and to be a class I laser according the ANSI classification, may be used at home by the patient himself. Material and methods: Twenty-four patients with TMD were randomly selected: the inclusion criteria for the sample was the diagnosis of mono- or bi-lateral TMD, with acute pain restricted to the joint area, associated with the absence of any muscle tenderness during palpation. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 (12 patients): patients receiving real LLLT (experimental group). Group 2 (12 patients): patients receiving inactive laser (placebo group). The treatment was performed once a day for two weeks with an 808 nm diode laser by the patient himself with irradiation of the cutaneous zone corresponding to the TMJ for 15 minutes each side. Each patient was instructed to express its pain in a visual analogue scale (VAS) making a perpendicular line between the two extremes representing the felt pain level. Statistical analysis was realized with GraphPad Instat Software, where P<0.05 was considered significant and P<0.01 very significant. Results: The patient's pain evaluation was expressed in the two study groups before the treatment, 1 week and two weeks after the treatment. The differences between the two groups result extremely significant with p<0.0001 for the comparison of VAS value after 1 and 2 weeks. Conclusion: This study, even if it may be considered such a pilot study, investigated a new way to control the

  6. Sleep bruxism and myofascial temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Karen G.; Sirois, David A.; Janal, Malvin N.; Wigren, Pia E.; Dubrovsky, Boris; Nemelivsky, Lena V.; Klausner, Jack J.; Krieger, Ana C.; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many dentists believe that sleep bruxism (SB) is a pathogenic factor in myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD), but almost all supportive data rely on patients’ self-reports rather than on direct observation. Methods The authors administered a structured self-report interview to determine whether a large and well-characterized sample of patients with myofascial TMD (124 women) experienced SB more often than did matched control participants (46 women). The authors then used data from a two-night laboratory-based polysomnographic (PSG) study to determine whether the case participants exhibited more SB than the control participants. Results The results of independent sample t tests and χ2 analyses showed that, although self-reported rates of SB were significantly higher in case participants (55.3 percent) than in control participants (15.2 percent), PSG-based measures showed much lower and statistically similar rates of SB in the two groups (9.7 percent and 10.9 percent, respectively). Grinding noises were common in both case participants (59.7 percent) and control participants (78.3 percent). Conclusions Most case participants did not exhibit SB, and the common belief that SB is a sufficient explanation for myofascial TMD should be abandoned. Clinical Implications Although other reasons to consider treating SB may exist, misplaced concern about SB’s sustaining or exacerbating a chronic myofascial TMD condition should not be used to justify SB treatment. PMID:23115152

  7. Assessment of temporomandibular injury and orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Talley, R L

    1995-01-01

    Every individual has physical faults which makes him less than a perfect biological specimen. This is the foundation for the legal "eggshell principal." Most of us do not have perfect skeletal formation, muscular adaptation, neurological or vascular systems. Additionally, we may not have complete symmetry and ideal form to our cranium or mandible. Our dentitions are imperfect. All of these imperfections play a role in every injury. The variances of normal that are seen in any medical or dental population, must be accepted; therefore, a given injury can have tremendously varied sequelae, depending on the person receiving it. The patho-physiology resultant from an accident may not parallel the severity of the motor vehicle accident, fall or blow. Prompt and proper evaluation of the individual-turned-patient is imperative. Referral to a dentist, competent in providing the necessary evaluation of the injury, is the responsibility of those individuals attending to the injured person's physical, emotional, and financial trauma. Their physician, dentist, attorney or counselor should take the responsibility of providing proper referral. The four most dangerous words in medicine and dentistry today are: "It Will Go Away." People often develop serious sequelae by assuming that their problem will "go away" by just leaving it alone long enough or by simply ignoring it. With proper evaluation and management, most trauma related temporomandibular injuries can be corrected or at least be properly managed. PMID:9526244

  8. Long-term health effects of neutering dogs: comparison of Labrador Retrievers with Golden Retrievers.

    PubMed

    Hart, Benjamin L; Hart, Lynette A; Thigpen, Abigail P; Willits, Neil H

    2014-01-01

    Our recent study on the effects of neutering (including spaying) in Golden Retrievers in markedly increasing the incidence of two joint disorders and three cancers prompted this study and a comparison of Golden and Labrador Retrievers. Veterinary hospital records were examined over a 13-year period for the effects of neutering during specified age ranges: before 6 mo., and during 6-11 mo., year 1 or years 2 through 8. The joint disorders examined were hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament tear and elbow dysplasia. The cancers examined were lymphosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumor, and mammary cancer. The results for the Golden Retriever were similar to the previous study, but there were notable differences between breeds. In Labrador Retrievers, where about 5 percent of gonadally intact males and females had one or more joint disorders, neutering at <6 mo. doubled the incidence of one or more joint disorders in both sexes. In male and female Golden Retrievers, with the same 5 percent rate of joint disorders in intact dogs, neutering at <6 mo. increased the incidence of a joint disorder to 4-5 times that of intact dogs. The incidence of one or more cancers in female Labrador Retrievers increased slightly above the 3 percent level of intact females with neutering. In contrast, in female Golden Retrievers, with the same 3 percent rate of one or more cancers in intact females, neutering at all periods through 8 years of age increased the rate of at least one of the cancers by 3-4 times. In male Golden and Labrador Retrievers neutering had relatively minor effects in increasing the occurrence of cancers. Comparisons of cancers in the two breeds suggest that the occurrence of cancers in female Golden Retrievers is a reflection of particular vulnerability to gonadal hormone removal. PMID:25020045

  9. Long-Term Health Effects of Neutering Dogs: Comparison of Labrador Retrievers with Golden Retrievers

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Benjamin L.; Hart, Lynette A.; Thigpen, Abigail P.; Willits, Neil H.

    2014-01-01

    Our recent study on the effects of neutering (including spaying) in Golden Retrievers in markedly increasing the incidence of two joint disorders and three cancers prompted this study and a comparison of Golden and Labrador Retrievers. Veterinary hospital records were examined over a 13-year period for the effects of neutering during specified age ranges: before 6 mo., and during 6–11 mo., year 1 or years 2 through 8. The joint disorders examined were hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament tear and elbow dysplasia. The cancers examined were lymphosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumor, and mammary cancer. The results for the Golden Retriever were similar to the previous study, but there were notable differences between breeds. In Labrador Retrievers, where about 5 percent of gonadally intact males and females had one or more joint disorders, neutering at <6 mo. doubled the incidence of one or more joint disorders in both sexes. In male and female Golden Retrievers, with the same 5 percent rate of joint disorders in intact dogs, neutering at <6 mo. increased the incidence of a joint disorder to 4–5 times that of intact dogs. The incidence of one or more cancers in female Labrador Retrievers increased slightly above the 3 percent level of intact females with neutering. In contrast, in female Golden Retrievers, with the same 3 percent rate of one or more cancers in intact females, neutering at all periods through 8 years of age increased the rate of at least one of the cancers by 3–4 times. In male Golden and Labrador Retrievers neutering had relatively minor effects in increasing the occurrence of cancers. Comparisons of cancers in the two breeds suggest that the occurrence of cancers in female Golden Retrievers is a reflection of particular vulnerability to gonadal hormone removal. PMID:25020045

  10. The Revised Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders: Methods used to Establish and Validate Revised Axis I Diagnostic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Eric L.; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond L.; Feng, Tai; Anderson, Gary C.; Pan, Wei; Gonzalez, Yoly M.; John, Mike T.; Sommers, Earl; List, Thomas; Velly, Ana M.; Kang, Wenjun; Look, John O.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To derive reliable and valid revised Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic algorithms for clinical TMD diagnoses. METHODS The multi-site RDC/TMD Validation Project’s dataset (614 TMD community and clinic cases, and 91 controls) was used to derive revised algorithms for Axis I TMD diagnoses. Validity of diagnostic algorithms was assessed relative to reference standards, the latter based on consensus diagnoses rendered by 2 TMD experts using criterion examination data, including temporomandibular joint imaging. Cut-offs for target validity were sensitivity ≥ 0.70 and specificity ≥ 0.95. Reliability of revised algorithms was assessed in 27 study participants. RESULTS Revised algorithm sensitivity and specificity exceeded the target levels for myofascial pain (0.82, 0.99, respectively) and myofascial pain with limited opening (0.93, 0.97). Combining diagnoses for any myofascial pain showed sensitivity of 0.91 and specificity of 1.00. For joint pain, target sensitivity and specificity were observed (0.92, 0.96) when arthralgia and osteoarthritis were combined as “any joint pain.” Disc displacement without reduction with limited opening demonstrated target sensitivity and specificity (0.80, 0.97). For the other Group II disc displacements and Group III osteoarthritis and osteoarthrosis, sensitivity was below target (0.35 to 0.53), and specificity ranged from 0.80 to meeting target. Kappa for revised algorithm diagnostic reliability was ≥ 0.63. CONCLUSION Revised RDC/TMD Axis I TMD diagnostic algorithms are recommended for myofascial pain and joint pain as reliable and valid. However, revised clinical criteria alone, without recourse to imaging, are inadequate for valid diagnosis of two of the three disc displacements and osteoarthritis/osteoarthrosis. PMID:20213032

  11. Oral parafunctions, piercing and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in high school students.

    PubMed

    Mejersjö, Christina; Ovesson, Daniel; Mossberg, Birgitta

    2016-05-01

    Objective The use of chewing-gum and piercing has become common among adolescents and might result in increased oral muscle activity and overloading. Aim To investigate the frequency of oral piercing and parafunctions in relation to symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) among adolescents. Materials and methods One hundred and twenty-four third level high school students, living either in a city or in a small town, enrolled in either science or media programmes, were included. The students completed a questionnaire regarding different parafunctions and symptoms of TMD. A clinical examination of the temporomandibular system and estimation of the tooth wear was performed in 116 students. Results Chewing-gum was used by 86% of the students (25% with a daily use) and 14% had an oral piercing. The science students used more chewing gum than the media students (p = 0.008), while the media students had more piercings (p < 0.001). Symptoms once a week or more were reported with 39% for headache, 18% for clicking, 7% for facial pain and 6% for difficulty to open wide. Girls reported more headaches (p = 0.007) and more severe symptoms (p = 0.003), had more medical consultations and used more analgesics (both p < 0.05) and had more clinical signs (p = 0.01) than boys. Girls had more oral piercings and used more chewing gum than boys (both p < 0.05). The media students had more sick leave (p < 0.01) than the science students. Chewing-gum use was associated with headache (p < 0.01), with difficulty to open wide (p < 0.05) and with tenderness of the temporomandibular joints and muscles (both p < 0.05). Oral piercing was associated with headache and muscle tenderness (both p < 0.05) and daily nail biting with headache (p < 0.05) and tooth wear (p = 0.004). Conclusions There is an association between use of chewing gum, nail biting, oral piercing, and symptoms of TMD. PMID:26621674

  12. Correlation Between Clinical Findings of Temporomandibular Disorders and MRI Characteristics of Disc Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman; Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Sheikh, Soheyl; Mittal, Amit; Gupta, Deepak; Gupta, Sonam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives : Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is a common condition that is best evaluated with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The first step in MR imaging of the TMJ is to evaluate the articular disk, or meniscus, in terms of its morphologic features and its location relative to the condyle in both closed- and open-mouth positions. Disk location is of prime importance because the presence of a displaced disk is a critical sign of TMJ dysfunction. However, disk displacement is also frequently seen in asymptomatic volunteers. It is important for the maxillofacial radiologist to detect early MR imaging signs of dysfunction, thereby avoiding the evolution of this condition to its advanced and irreversible phase which is characterized by osteoarthritic changes such as condylar flattening or osteophytes. Further the MR imaging techniques will allow a better understanding of the sources of TMJ pain and of any discrepancy between imaging findings and patient symptoms. Henceforth, the aim of the study was to evaluate whether MRI findings of various degrees of disk displacement could be correlated with the presence or absence of clinical signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. Materials and Methods : In this clinical study, 44 patients (88 TMJs) were examined clinically and divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients with clinical signs and symptoms of TMDs either unilaterally or bilaterally and considered as study group. Group 2 consisted of 22 patients with no signs and symptoms of TMDs and considered as control group. MRI was done for both the TMJs of each patient. Displacement of the posterior band of articular disc in relation to the condyle was quantified as anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR), anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWR), posterior disc displacement (PDD). Results : Disk displacement was found in 18 (81.8%) patients of 22 symptomatic subjects in Group 1

  13. [Temporomandibular ankylosis in Gabon (apropos of 13 case reports)].

    PubMed

    Rives, J M; Cantaloube, D; Kremer, A

    1988-01-01

    The authors report on 13 cases of temporomandibular ankylosis observed in Gabon. Based on an epidemiologic and etio-pathogenic study, they dwell on the existing therapy of this affection, i.e. broad osteotomy with silicone interposition followed by mechanotherapy prolonged in time. Prophylaxis is discussed in the framework of Primary Health Care. PMID:3405073

  14. Speech evaluation in children with temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    PIZOLATO, Raquel Aparecida; FERNANDES, Frederico Silva de Freitas; GAVIÃO, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the influence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) on speech in children, and to verify the influence of occlusal characteristics. Material and methods Speech and dental occlusal characteristics were assessed in 152 Brazilian children (78 boys and 74 girls), aged 8 to 12 (mean age 10.05 ± 1.39 years) with or without TMD signs and symptoms. The clinical signs were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) (axis I) and the symptoms were evaluated using a questionnaire. The following groups were formed: Group TMD (n=40), TMD signs and symptoms (Group S and S, n=68), TMD signs or symptoms (Group S or S, n=33), and without signs and symptoms (Group N, n=11). Articulatory speech disorders were diagnosed during spontaneous speech and repetition of the words using the "Phonological Assessment of Child Speech" for the Portuguese language. It was also applied a list of 40 phonological balanced words, read by the speech pathologist and repeated by the children. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact or Chi-square tests (α=0.05). Results A slight prevalence of articulatory disturbances, such as substitutions, omissions and distortions of the sibilants /s/ and /z/, and no deviations in jaw lateral movements were observed. Reduction of vertical amplitude was found in 10 children, the prevalence being greater in TMD signs and symptoms children than in the normal children. The tongue protrusion in phonemes /t/, /d/, /n/, /l/ and frontal lips in phonemes /s/ and /z/ were the most prevalent visual alterations. There was a high percentage of dental occlusal alterations. Conclusions There was no association between TMD and speech disorders. Occlusal alterations may be factors of influence, allowing distortions and frontal lisp in phonemes /s/ and /z/ and inadequate tongue position in phonemes /t/; /d/; /n/; /l/. PMID:21986655

  15. Laser Acupuncture Therapy in Patients with Treatment-Resistant Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yu-Chiang; Tseng, Ying-Jung; Hung, I-Ling; Hsu, Sheng-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effects of laser acupuncture therapy for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) after ineffective previous treatments. Methods A retrospective observational study was conducted in 29 treatment-resistant TMD patients (25 women, 4 men; age range, 17–67 years). Subjects were treated 3 times per week for 4 weeks with the Handylaser Trion (GaAlAs laser diode, 810 nm, 150 mW, pulsed waves), which delivered 0.375 J of energy (5 s) to ST7, ST6, and LI4 and 3 J (40 s) to each Ashi point, 7.5–26.25 J/cm2 in total. The visual analog scale (VAS) and maximal mouth opening (MMO) were evaluated before and after treatment. Results VAS analysis showed that the patients were free of pain at rest (endpoint) after 5.90±6.08 sessions of laser acupuncture for acute TMD and after 16.21±17.98 sessions for chronic TMD. The VAS score on palpation of the temporomandibular joint reduced to 0.30±0.67 for patients with acute TMD (p = 0.005) and to 0.47±0.84 for those with chronic TMD (p<0.001). The MMO significantly increased in patients with acute TMD (7.80±5.43 mm, p = 0.008) and in patients with chronic TMD (15.58±7.87 mm, p<0.001). Conclusions Our study shows that laser acupuncture therapy improves the symptoms of treatment-resistant TMD. Further studies with a more appropriate design, involving l