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  1. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Berkan; Sancak, Eyup Burak; Resorlu, Mustafa; Gulpinar, Murat Tolga; Adam, Gurhan; Akbas, Alpaslan; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-11-01

    Urinary tract stone disease is seen at a level of 1%-2% in childhood (< 18 years). In recent years, however, there has been a marked increased in pediatric stone disease, particularly in adolescence. A carbohydrate- and salt-heavy diet and a more sedentary lifestyle are implicated in this increase. Although stone disease is rare in childhood, its presence is frequently associated with metabolic or anatomical disorders or infectious conditions, for which reason there is a high possibility of post-therapeutic recurrence. Factors such as a high possibility of recurrence and increasing incidence further enhance the importance of minimally invasive therapeutic options in children, with their expectations of a long life. In children in whom active stone removal is decided on, the way to achieve the highest level of success with the least morbidity is to select the most appropriate treatment modality. Thanks to today's advanced technology, renal stones that were once treated only by surgery can now be treated with minimally invasive techniques, from invasion of the urinary system in an antegrade (percutaneous nephrolithotomy) or retrograde (retrograde intrarenal surgery) manner or shock wave lithotripsy to laparoscopic stone surgery. This compilation study examined studies involving the RIRS procedure, the latest minimally invasive technique, in children and compared the results of those studies with those from other techniques. PMID:25374812

  2. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in cross-fused ectopic kidney.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Kabar, Mucahit; Resorlu, Berkan; Doluoglu, Omer Gokhan; Kilinc, Muhammet Fatih; Karakan, Tolga

    2015-02-01

    Cross-fused renal ectopia is a rare congenital anomaly in which both kidneys are fused and located on the same side. We report a case of right-to-left cross-fused renal ectopia and nephrolithiasis, in whom retrograde intrarenal surgery was used to treat the stone disease. To our knowledge, this is the first case of retrograde intrarenal surgery of a crossed-fused ectopic kidney. PMID:25481231

  3. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in Nepal: an early experience.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, P R; Luitel, B R; Luitel, B R

    2013-06-01

    With the advancement in technology and miniaturization of instruments, retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) with flexible ureteroscope is gaining popularity. Flexible ureteroscope is introduced into renal collecting system through the urethra. Holmium YAG (Ho-YAG) Laser fiber of different sizes is introduced through the ureteroscope and renal stones are pulverized. Removal of renal stones less than 15 mm in size with RIRS has sharply reduced post operative morbidity. This is a Prospective study comprised of 58 RIRS performed from January 2013 to July 2013. Preoperative investigations like full blood count (FBC), renal function test (RFT), serological investigations, urine culture, intravenous urogram or CT-urogram, chest ray and electrocardiogram were done in all patients. Renal stones less than 15 mm in size were included for RIRS. Intra renal stones were treated with 7.5 Fr flexible ureteroscope (Flex - X2) using Holmium-YAG laser. Mean stone burden in our study was 10.5 +/- 3.3 mm. Out of 32 male patients, 29 (90.6%) required pre-stenting before RIRS and all 58 patients with successful dusting of stones in single sitting were discharged on next day. Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery is advanced and successful technique and a viable alternative to Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) and Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in the treatment of selected intrarenal stones with minimum morbidity. PMID:24696935

  4. Subcapsular Renal-Infected Hematoma After Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Rare but Serious Complication

    PubMed Central

    Consigliere, Lucas; Gallegos, Hector; Rojas, Francisco; Astroza, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected by a left kidney stone and persistent positive urinary culture treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery. During postoperative day 1, she developed a sudden back pain associated with a decrease in hemoglobin. CT scan showed a subcapsular hematoma giving the impression of partial compression of kidney and upper urinary tract. For that reason, in the first instance, a Double-J ureteral stent was installed. Unfortunately, an open surgical drainage was necessary because a secondary infection of the hematoma was evident during the following days. PMID:27579416

  5. Subcapsular Renal-Infected Hematoma After Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Rare but Serious Complication.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, José A; Consigliere, Lucas; Gallegos, Hector; Rojas, Francisco; Astroza, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected by a left kidney stone and persistent positive urinary culture treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery. During postoperative day 1, she developed a sudden back pain associated with a decrease in hemoglobin. CT scan showed a subcapsular hematoma giving the impression of partial compression of kidney and upper urinary tract. For that reason, in the first instance, a Double-J ureteral stent was installed. Unfortunately, an open surgical drainage was necessary because a secondary infection of the hematoma was evident during the following days. PMID:27579416

  6. Retrograde intrarenal surgery for lower pole renal calculi smaller than one centimeter

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Hemendra Navinchandra

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Recently there has been an increasing interest in the application of retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for managing renal calculi. In this review we discuss its application for the management of lower calyceal (LC) stones less than 10 mm in maximum dimension. Materials and Methods: Literature was reviewed to summarize the technical development in flexible ureterorenoscopy and its accessories. Further, the indications, outcome and limitations of RIRS for LC calculi < 1 cm were reviewed. Results: Use of access sheath and displacement of LC stone to a more favorable location is increasingly employed during RIRS. Patients who are anticoagulated or obese; those with adverse stone composition and those with concomitant ureteral calculi are ideally suited for RIRS. It is used as a salvage therapy for shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) refractory calculi but with a lower success rate (46-62%). It is also increasingly being used as a primary modality for treating LC calculi, with a stone-free rate ranging from 50-90.9%. However, the criteria for defining stone-free status are not uniform in the literature. The impact of intrarenal anatomy on stone-free rates after RIRS is unclear; however, unfavorable lower calyceal anatomy may hamper the efficacy of the procedure. The durability of flexible ureteroscopes remains an important issue. Conclusions: RIRS continues to undergo significant advancements and is emerging as a first-line procedure for challenging stone cases. The treatment of choice for LC calculi < 1 cm depends on patient's preference and the individual surgeon's preference and level of expertise. PMID:19468515

  7. Is it necessary to actively remove stone fragments during retrograde intrarenal surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, You Jin; Bak, Dong Jae; Chung, Jae-Wook; Lee, Jun Nyung; Kim, Hyun Tae; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Based on the experiences of our center, we sought to verify the necessity of actively removing stones during retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for the management of renal stones. Materials and Methods From March 2010 to March 2015, 248 patients underwent RIRS at our center. We classified these patients into 2 groups according to the performance of active stone removal; group A (n=172) included the patients whose stones were actively removed using a stone basket, and group B (n=76) included the patients whose stones were fragmented with laser lithotripsy without active removal of the fragments. We retrospectively compared the operation time, success rate, and complication rate between the 2 groups. Results There were no significant differences between groups A and B in terms of mean age (56.1 years vs. 58.6 years), male to female ratio (115:57 vs. 46:30), mean body mass index (24.5 kg/m2 vs. 25.0 kg/m2), mean preoperative size of stone (11.1 mm vs. 11.1 mm), the ratio of unilateral and bilateral stones (136:36 vs. 64:12), success rate (89.0% vs. 86.8%), operation time (82.5 minutes vs. 82.1 minutes), overall complication rate (9.9% vs. 11.8%), incidence of febrile urinary tract infection (6.4% vs. 2.6%), gross hematuria (1.7% vs. 2.6%), or postoperative de novo hydronephrosis (2.9% vs. 5.3%). Conclusions This study demonstrated that during RIRS, fragmentation only, without the active removal of stones, is a safe and effective technique in which the surgical outcomes are comparable to those of procedures involving the active removal of stones. PMID:27437537

  8. Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery with Combined Spinal-Epidural vs General Anesthesia: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhijian; Yang, Fengquan; Zhong, Wen; Wu, Wenqi; Chen, Wenzhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) involves a minimally invasive stone surgery, lending itself potential to combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA), although it is performed preferably under general anesthesia (GA). This prospective randomized study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of CSEA for patients undergoing RIRS. Patients and Methods: Seventy consecutive patients who were scheduled for RIRS were randomized to receive CSEA (n=35) or GA (n=35). Operative time, stone clearance rate, visual analog scale (VAS) of pain, complication rate, anesthetic cost, and hospital stay were compared between the two groups. Results: A total of 65 patients randomized to CSEA (31) or GA (34) completed the study. In the CSEA group, each procedure was completed and there was no anesthetic conversion. Although based on the prospective randomized method, the GA group still had a little larger stone size (p=0.059) and more multiple caliceal stones (p=0.037). Overall, there were no statistically significant differences in operative time (p=0.088), stone fragmentation time (p=0.074), postoperative VAS pain score at 6 and 24 hours (p=0.156, 0.146), incidence of complications (p=0.870), stone-free rate (p=0.804), and hospital stays (p=0.907) between the two groups. The patients in the GA group experienced a higher mean hemoglobin drop (6.5±3.2 vs 8.6±2.7 g/L, p=0.012). In addition, the anesthetic cost was much cheaper in the CSEA group (183.8±31.4 vs 391.9±59.1 dollars, p<0.001). Conclusion: RIRS with CSEA can be completed with no anesthetic conversions and with the same efficacy and safety compared with GA. When considering economical aspects, CSEA appears to be a preferable alternative to GA for the patient whose general health status permits it. PMID:25358059

  9. The comparison of laparoscopy, shock wave lithotripsy and retrograde intrarenal surgery for large proximal ureteral stones

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, M.D. Ufuk; Şener, Nevzat Can; Goktug, H.N. Goksel; Gucuk, Adnan; Nalbant, Ismail; İmamoglu, M. Abdurrahim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In this study we compare the success rates and complication rates of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), laparoscopic, and ureteroscopic approaches for large (between 1 and 2 cm) proximal ureteral stones. Methods: In total, 151 patients with ureteral stones between 1 and 2 cm in diameter were randomized into 3 groups (52 SWL, 51 laparoscopy and 48 retrograde intrarenal surgery [RIRS]). The groups were compared for stone size, success rates, and complication rates using the modified Clavien grading system. Results: Stone burden of the groups were similar (p = 0.36). The success rates were 96%, 81% and 79%, respectively in the laparoscopy, SWL, and ureteroscopy groups. The success rate in laparoscopy group was significantly higher (p < 0.05). When these groups were compared for complication rates, RIRS seemed to be the group with the lowest complication rates (4.11%) (p < 0.05). SWL and laparoscopy seem to have similar rates of complication (7.06% and 7.86%, respectively, p = 0.12). Interpretation: To our knowledge, this is the first study to compare the results of laparoscopy, SWL and RIRS in ureteral stones. Our results showed that in management of patients with upper ureteral stones between 1 and 2 cm, laparoscopy is the most successful method based on its stone-free rates and acceptable complication rates. However, the limitations of our study are lack of hospital stay and cost-effectiveness data. Also, studies conducted on larger populations should support our findings. When a less invasive method is the only choice, SWL and flexible ureterorenoscopy methods have similar success rates. RIRS, however, has a lower complication rate than the other approaches. PMID:24282455

  10. Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery is equally efficient and safe in patients with different American Society of Anesthesia physical status.

    PubMed

    Guzel, Ozer; Tuncel, Altug; Balci, Melih; Karakoyunlu, Nihat; Aslan, Yilmaz; Erkan, Anil; Senel, Cagdas

    2016-05-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery to treat renal stones in patients with different American Society of Anesthesia (ASA) physical status. Material and methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 150 patients who underwent Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery for renal stone between October 2013 and December 2014. Patients were categorized into three groups according to their ASA physical status: ASA Class 1 (Group 1, n = 23), ASA Class 2 (Group 2, n = 113) and ASA Class 3 (Group 3, n = 14). We documented and stratified the per-operative and postoperative complications according to modified Satava Classification System and Clavien-Dindo Classification. Results The mean age of the patients was 44 years. The total stone-free rate was 81.2%. According to the groups, the stone-free rate was 75% in Group 1, 82.5% in Group 2, and 83.3% in Group 3 (p   =   0.340). Per-operative and postoperative complications were recorded in 12% (n = 18) and 5.3% (n = 8) of the patients. We did not find significant difference in terms of per-operative and postoperative complication rates among patients with different ASA physical status (pper-operative = 0.392 and ppostoperative = 0.136). Conclusions Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery is an effective and safe surgery with high stone-free rates and low morbidity in patients with different ASA physical status. PMID:26895083

  11. The Cystoscope Sheath as a Platform for Performing Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery in a Transplanted Kidney with Complex Renal Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Wardenburg, Marla J.; Bird, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Endourology is a widely used means by which to manage urolithiasis. Patient anatomy can oftentimes limit what can be accomplished with current technology. Case Presentation: This is a case of a patient with renal and ureteral stones within a transplant kidney. Her anatomy would not allow for a standard retrograde ureteroscopic approach. We describe a method by which to overcome this difficult scenario by using a rigid cystoscope as a platform by which a ureteroscope was passed to allow for stone removal. Conclusion: For this difficult case, we effectively used our instruments to achieve our goal of retrograde ureteroscopy in a transplant kidney with an unfavorably angulated ureter.

  12. Bilateral single-session retrograde intra-renal surgery: A safe option for renal stones up to 1.5 cm

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Punit; Bansal, Neeru; Sehgal, Anand; Singla, Subhash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Assessment of treatment outcomes in patients undergoing bilateral single-session retrograde intra-renal surgery (RIRS) for bilateral renal stones up to 1.5 cm. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 74 patients was done with bilateral renal calculi, who underwent bilateral single-session RIRS at our stone referral hospital from December 2011 to May 2014. The selection criteria for this intervention were patient's preference, failure of other treatments and stone up to 1.5 cm. Patients with creatinine more than 2, pyonephrosis sepsis, bilateral impacted pelviureteric junction calculi were excluded from study. All patients were evaluated with serum biochemistry, urinalysis, urine culture, plain radiography of kidney-ureter-bladder, intravenous urography, renal ultrasonography (USG) and/or computed tomography (CT). Follow-up evaluation included serum biochemistry and postoperative plain film and renal USG. The success rate was defined as patients who were stone-free or only had a residual fragment of less than 4 mm. CT was conducted only in patients with residual stones, which were present in seven patients. Results: A total of 74 patients (50 male, 24 female) with a mean age 39.2 ± 15.2 were included in the present study. The mean stone size was 11.7 ± 2.4 mm. The stone-free rates were 86.84% and 97.29% after the first and second procedures, respectively. In eight patients (10.8%), minor complications were observed, whereas no major complications were noted in the studied group. There was no significant difference in pre- and post-operative serum creatinine levels. Conclusion: In patients with bilateral renal stones up to 1.5 cm bilateral single-session RIRS with flexible ureteroscope can be safely performed with low complication rate. PMID:26834403

  13. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy versus retrograde intrarenal surgery for treatment for renal stones 1-2 cm: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Changjian; Yang, Hongmei; Luo, Jun; Xiong, Bo; Wang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    This study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) versus retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for the treatment for renal calculi 1-2 cm. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database were researched and hand-searched for relevant congress abstracts and journals about RIRS and ESWL for the treatment for 1- to 2-cm renal stones. The retrieval time ended in September 2014. The related trials met the inclusion criteria were included in the meta-analysis. Two reviewers independently assessed the quality of all included studies, and meta-analysis was performed with RevMan 5.2. Seven literatures were retrieved, including 983 patients. The meta-analysis results showed that, compared to RIRS group, the patients in ESWL group had the following features:(1) the stone-free rate [relative risk (RR) 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.95, P = 0.005] was significantly different between two groups; (2) The retreatment rate of RIRS group was lower (RR 8.12; 95% CI 4.77-13.83, P < 0.00); (3) The complications were not significantly different between two groups (Grade I RR 1.06; 95% CI 0.67-1.69, P = 0.80; Grade II RR 0.75; 95% CI 0.29-1.91, P = 0.54; Grade III RR 0.86; 95% CI 0.26-2.86, P = 0.80). Compared to ESWL, our results showed that RIRS provided significantly higher stone-free rate and lower retreatment rate and without increase in the incidence of complications. However, further randomized trials are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26211003

  14. Cumulative Sum Analysis for Experiences of a Single-Session Retrograde Intrarenal Stone Surgery and Analysis of Predictors for Stone-Free Status

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Yong; Choo, Min Soo; Jung, Jae Hyun; Jeong, Chang Wook; Oh, Sohee; Lee, Seung Bae; Son, Hwancheol; Jeong, Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the learning curve of a single-session retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) in patients with mid-sized stones. Competence and trainee proficiency for RIRS was assessed using cumulative sum analysis (CUSUM). Materials and Methods The study design and the use of patients' information stored in the hospital database were approved by the Institutional Review Board of our institution. A retrospective review was performed for 100 patients who underwent a single-session RIRS. Patients were included if the main stone had a maximal diameter between 10 and 30 mm. The presence of a residual stone was checked on postoperative day 1 and at one-month follow-up visit. Fragmentation efficacy was calculated “removed stone volume (mm3) divided by operative time (min)”. CUSUM analysis was used for monitoring change in fragmentation efficacy, and we tested whether or not acceptable surgical outcomes were achieved. Results The mean age was 54.7±14.8 years. Serum creatinine level did not change significantly. Estimated GFR and hemoglobin were within normal limits postoperatively. The CUSUM curve tended to be flat until the 25th case and showed a rising pattern but declined again until the 56th case. After that point, the fragmentation efficacy reached a plateau. The acceptable level of fragmentation efficacy was 25 ml/min. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that stone-free rate was significantly lower for cases with multiple stones than those with a single stone (OR = 0.147, CI 0.032 – 0.674, P value  = 0.005) and for cases with higher number of sites (OR = 0.676, CI 0.517 – 0.882, P value  = 0.004). Conclusions The statistical analysis of RIRS learning experience revealed that 56 cases were required for reaching a plateau in the learning curve. The number of stones and the number of sites were significant predictors for stone-free status. PMID:24454757

  15. Comparison of retrograde intrarenal surgery versus a single-session percutaneous nephrolithotomy for lower-pole stones with a diameter of 15 to 30 mm: A propensity score-matching study

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Gyoo Hwan; Jung, Jae Hyun; Ahn, Tae Sik; Lee, Joong Sub; Cho, Sung Yong; Jeong, Chang Wook; Lee, Seung Bae; Kim, Hyeon Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate surgical outcomes between retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) groups for a main stone sized 15 to 30 mm and located in the lower-pole calyx. Materials and Methods Patients who underwent PNL or RIRS for a main stone sized 15 to 30 mm and located in the lower-pole calyx were retrospectively reviewed. Each patient in the RIRS group was matched to one in the PNL group on the basis of calculated propensity scores by use of age, sex, body mass index, previous treatment history, stone site, maximum stone size, and stone volume. We compared perioperative outcomes between the unmatched and matched groups. Results Patients underwent PNL (n=87, 66.4%) or RIRS (n=44, 33.6%). After matching, 44 patients in each group were included. Mean patient age was 54.4±13.7 years. Perioperative hemoglobin drop was significantly higher and the hospital stay was longer in the PNL group than in the RIRS group. The operative time was significantly longer in the RIRS group than in the PNL group. Stone-free rates were higher and complications rates were lower in the RIRS group than in the PNL group without statistical significance. The presence of a stone located in the lower-anterior minor calyx was a predictor of stone-free status. Conclusions RIRS and single-session PNL for patients with a main stone of 15 to 30 mm located in the lower-pole calyx showed comparable surgical results. However, RIRS can be performed more safely than PNL with less bleeding. Stones in the lower-anterior minor calyx should be carefully removed during these procedures. PMID:26175872

  16. Laparoscopy assisted transjejunal endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for treatment of intrahepatic duct stones in a post Roux-en-Y patient.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Salah M; Abdalla, Salem I; Bendardaf, Rashed S

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old female patient, who was operated on for choledocal cyst with Roux-en Y hepatojejunostomy. She was admitted to hospital with recurrent attacks of acute ascending cholangitis due to left intrahepatic duct stones. After a failed attempt at conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography through the anatomical route, she was treated successfully with laparoscopy assisted transjejunal endoscopic retrograde cholangiography.  PMID:25630013

  17. Laparoscopy assisted transjejunal endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for treatment of intrahepatic duct stones in a post Roux-en-Y patient

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Salah M.; Abdalla, Salem I.; Bendardaf, Rashed S.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old female patient, who was operated on for choledocal cyst with Roux-en Y hepatojejunostomy. She was admitted to hospital with recurrent attacks of acute ascending cholangitis due to left intrahepatic duct stones. After a failed attempt at conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography through the anatomical route, she was treated successfully with laparoscopy assisted transjejunal endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. PMID:25630013

  18. Yeast as a tool to study mitochondrial retrograde pathway en route to cell stress response.

    PubMed

    Ždralević, Maša; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial retrograde signaling is a mitochondria-to-nucleus communication pathway, conserved from yeast to humans, by which dysfunctional mitochondria relay signals that lead to cell stress adaptation in physiopathological conditions by changes in nuclear gene expression. The best comprehension of components and regulation of retrograde signaling have been obtained in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where retrograde target gene expression is regulated by RTG genes. In this chapter, we describe the methods to measure mitochondrial retrograde pathway activation in yeast cells by monitoring the mRNA levels of RTG target genes, such as those encoding for peroxisomal citrate synthase, aconitase, and NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase subunit 1, as well as the phosphorylation status of Rtg1/3p transcriptional factor which controls RTG target gene transcription. PMID:25634284

  19. Hydroperitoneum: A Rare Complication Performing Endoscopic Combined Intrarenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nicolosi, Federico; Falsaperla, Mario; Saita, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Recently endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery (ECIRS) has been introduced as an innovative approach for the treatment of complex single, multiple, and staghorn urolithiasis, which reveals to be a viable alternative to standard percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Although considered to be a versatile, safe, and efficient endoscopic procedure, it is not free from complications. We would like to report two rare cases of hydroperitoneum that occurred during ECIRS and their management. Case Presentation: Two female patients, respectively, of 75 and 41 years of age, underwent ECIRS procedure for the treatment of complex staghorn kidney urolithiasis, previously evaluated by noncontrast computed tomography (CT) scan. A combined retrograde-percutaneous access to the intrarenal collecting system, under fluoroscopic and ultrasound guidance with the additional assistance of Endovision technique, was performed. At the end of the procedures, both patients revealed a taut and globous abdomen, and a perioperative CT and ultrasonography revealed the presence of intraperitoneal liquid. Both patients were effectively treated with immediate positioning of abdominal drain with rapid improvement of the clinical presentation. Conclusion: To our knowledge these are the first two cases of hydroperitoneum occurring during ECIRS and reported in the literature. An early detection of the complication and its prompt treatment revealed to be crucial to effectively prevent morbidity. PMID:27579417

  20. Retrograde ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    Retrograde ejaculation occurs when semen enters the bladder instead of going out through the urethra during ejaculation. ... bladder (bladder neck) does not close. This causes semen to go backwards into the bladder rather than ...

  1. Retrograde ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem. Alternative Names Ejaculation retrograde; Dry climax Images Male reproductive system References Bhasin S, Basson R. Sexual dysfunction in men and women. In: Kronenberg HM, Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, eds. Williams ... management of male infertility. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . ...

  2. Ureteral retrograde brush biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - brush - urinary tract; Retrograde ureteral brush biopsy cytology; Cytology - ureteral retrograde brush biopsy ... to be biopsied is rubbed with the brush. Biopsy forceps may be used instead to collect a ...

  3. Retrograde peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Jumshad B; Shivakumar, B; Sudarsan, Sabitha; Arun, K V; Kumar, T S S

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to) retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation. PMID:20922082

  4. Intrarenal distribution of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole.

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, S; Bergeron, M G; Lessard, C

    1980-01-01

    In the present study, rats were given trimethoprim (TMP, 10 mg/kg), sulfamethoxazole (SMZ, 50 mg/kg), or a combination of the respective doses of TMP and SMZ. Thirty-six rats received each of the drugs studied. Six recipients of a compound (or mixture) were evaluated hourly, from 1 to 6 h after intraperitoneal injection of the agent. At each timed interval, serum, urine, cortex, medulla, and papilla were analyzed for drug content. Peak serum values of 1.1 microgram of TMP and 131.1 microgram of active SMZ (nonacetylated sulfonamide) per ml were observed after injection of the combination TMP-SMZ. Although the cortical, medullary, and papillary TMP concentrations were severalfold higher than the respective serum values (P < 0.01), microbiologically active SMZ did not concentrate in the renal parenchyma and was found in lower concentration there than in the serum (P < 0.01). The levels of SMZ in all parts of the kidney of animals which received the mixture SMZ-TMP were lower than those detected in the animals which were given SMZ alone. The average ratio of active SMZ to TMP within the medulla and the papilla was less than 20 to 1 in the first 2 h. The intrarenal distribution of these drugs may have therapeutic implications. PMID:7425603

  5. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in the management of symptomatic calyceal diverticular stones: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiong; Li, Dongjie; Dai, Yuanqing; Bai, Yao; Luo, Qizhan; Zhao, Zhongwei; Chen, Hequn; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the outcome of RIRS in managing symptomatic calyceal diverticular as a minimally invasive option, we retrospectively reviewed the records of 43 patients who underwent RIRS from 2005 to 2014 for symptomatic calyceal diverticular stones. A month after the initial operation, the success rate was (81.4%, 35 patients) of which 21 (48.83%) patients were stone free and 14 (32.6%) patients had clinically insignificant residual fragments (CIRFs), and 90% patients were symptom free. Eight patients (16.6%) had significant residual fragments (>3 mm), five of them became completely stone free after the second procedure, other three patients were symptom free and underwent a routine follow-up. The final treatment success rate was 93.0%. The initial success rate in the lower calyx was significantly lower than the other calices (P = 0.040). In addition, the association between the stone size and the initial treatment success was significant (P = 0.036). There was no association between any of our other variables and the success rate. The mean first operative time was 60.95 ± 12.43 min (range 34-92). No major complication (Clavien III-V) occurred, although there were five minor complications (11.6%) (Clavien I-II). There were no admissions to intensive care or deaths in our series, the mean hospitalization time was 1.77 ± 0.80 days. The management of calyceal diverticular calculus with RIRS is highly effective and can be accomplished with low morbidity. PMID:26139572

  6. Intrarenal Adrenocortical Adenoma Treated by Robotic Partial Nephrectomy with Adrenalectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sulek, Jay; Smith, Steven C.; Hampton, Lance J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We present an intrarenal adrenocortical adenoma discovered incidentally after robot-assisted partial nephrectomy and total adrenalectomy for a suspicious renal mass. Current literature describes the rare occurrence of an adrenocortical adenoma arising from a renal–adrenal fusion. This case represents an uncommon, benign pathology that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an enhancing renal mass. Case Presentation: The patient is a 62-year-old female found to have an enhancing mass at the anterolateral aspect of the upper pole of the right kidney concerning for renal-cell carcinoma. CT imaging was performed to work up a cause for hyperparathyroidism. During robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, the lesion was found to be partially adherent to the lateral limb of the right adrenal gland. Microscopic evaluation with Melan-A staining showed the mass to be of adrenal origin with benign features and lack of capsulation, indicating an adrenal adenoma arising from intrarenal ectopic adrenal rests. Conclusion: An intrarenal adrenal adenoma arising from ectopic adrenal tissue is a unique pathology that represents a benign differential diagnosis in the evaluation of an enhancing renal mass. However, it cannot be differentiated from renal-cell carcinoma based on cross-sectional imaging alone and requires postoperative pathologic assessment to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27579413

  7. Emerging Trends in Retrograde Signaling.

    PubMed

    Suvarna, Yashasvi; Maity, Nivedita; Shivamurthy, M C

    2016-05-01

    Retrograde signaling is defined as the signaling events leading from the plastids to the nucleus in plants and across the chemical synapse, from the postsynaptic neuron to the presynaptic neuron in animals. The discovery of various retrograde messengers has opened many avenues and clouds of thoughts as to the role of retrograde signaling. They have been implicated particularly in long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity. But the basic assumptions about retrograde signaling have not been studied upon for many years. This review focuses on established facts and hypothesis put forward in retrograde signaling. PMID:26081150

  8. Intrarenal Reflux: Diagnosis at Contrast-Enhanced Voiding Urosonography.

    PubMed

    Colleran, Gabrielle C; Barnewolt, Carol E; Chow, Jeanne S; Paltiel, Harriet J

    2016-08-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a childhood condition that is usually diagnosed by fluoroscopic voiding cystourethrography (VCUG). Intrarenal reflux (IRR) of infected urine is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of reflux-associated pyelonephritis and subsequent parenchymal scarring and is traditionally depicted by fluoroscopic VCUG. This case series describes the phenomenon of IRR occurring in association with VUR in 4 children as depicted by contrast-enhanced voiding urosonography. The ability of contrast-enhanced voiding urosonography to show IRR when it occurs in conjunction with VUR compares favorably to that of fluoroscopic VCUG. PMID:27371375

  9. Laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty in a child with a relatively inaccessible intrarenal pelvis.

    PubMed

    Lintula, Hannu; Kokki, Hannu

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic pyeloplasty is an accepted way of dealing with pelviureteric junction obstruction in children with extrarenal pelvis. However, intrarenal pelvis has been considered a relative contraindication for laparoscopic pyeloplasty. Here, we describe the technique of laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty in a child with intrarenal pelvis. The key when one embraces laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty is to ensure that outcomes are not compromised. A successful outcome requires a widely patent, well-vascularised anastomosis performed free of tension. PMID:22005372

  10. Comparison of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for treatment of stone disease in horseshoe kidney patients

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Mehmet Ilker; Tokatli, Zafer; Suer, Evren; Hajiyev, Parviz; Akinci, Aykut; Esen, Baris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives In this study it is aimed to compare the success and complication rates of SWL and RIRS in treatment of HSK stone disease. Materials and methods In this retrospective study data of 67 patients treated with either SWL (n=44) or RIRS (n=23) for stone disease in HSK between May 2003 to August 2014 was investigated. age, gender, stone size and multiplicity, stone free status, renal colic episodes and complication rates of the SWL and RIRS groups were compared. Results Mean age of the population was 42.5±8.2 (range: 16-78) years and mean stone size was 16.9±4.1 mm. SWL and RIRS groups were similar with regard to demographic characteristics and stone related characteristics. SFR of the SWL and RIRS groups were 47.7%(21/44 patients) and 73.9% (17/23 patients) respectively (p=0.039).Renal colic episodes were observed in 3 and 16 patients in the RIRS and SWL groups respectively (p=0.024). No statistically significant complications were observed between the SWL (8/44 patients) and RIRS (4/23) groups (p=0.936). Conclusions In HSK patients with stone disease, both SWL and RIRS are effective and safe treatment modalities. However RIRS seems to maintain higher SFRs with comparable complication rates. PMID:27136473

  11. Activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-system in murine polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Saigusa, Takamitsu; Dang, Yujing; Bunni, Marlene A; Amria, May Y; Steele, Stacy L; Fitzgibbon, Wayne R; Bell, P Darwin

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism for early hypertension in polycystic kidney disease (PKD) has not been elucidated. One potential pathway that may contribute to the elevation in blood pressure in PKD is the activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-system (RAS). For example, it has been shown that kidney cyst and cystic fluid contains renin, angiotensin II (AngII), and angiotensinogen (Agt). Numerous studies suggest that ciliary dysfunction plays an important role in PKD pathogenesis. However, it is unknown whether the primary cilium affects the intrarenal RAS in PKD. The purpose of this study was to determine whether loss of cilia or polycystin 1 (PC1) increases intrarenal RAS in mouse model of PKD. Adult Ift88 and Pkd1 conditional floxed allele mice with or without cre were administered tamoxifen to induce global knockout of the gene. Three months after tamoxifen injection, kidney tissues were examined by histology, immunofluorescence, western blot, and mRNA to assess intrarenal RAS components. SV40 immortalized collecting duct cell lines from hypomorphic Ift88 mouse were used to assess intrarenal RAS components in collecting duct cells. Mice without cilia and PC1 demonstrated increased kidney cyst formation, systolic blood pressure, prorenin, and kidney and urinary angiotensinogen levels. Interestingly immunofluorescence study of the kidney revealed that the prorenin receptor was localized to the basolateral membrane of principal cells in cilia (−) but not in cilia (+) kidneys. Collecting duct cAMP responses to AngII administration was greater in cilia (−) vs. cilia (+) cells indicating enhanced intrarenal RAS activity in the absence of cilia. These data suggest that in the absence of cilia or PC1, there is an upregulation of intrarenal RAS components and activity, which may contribute to elevated blood pressure in PKD. PMID:25999403

  12. Successful endovascular treatment of transplant intrarenal artery stenosis in renal transplant recipients: Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Koukoulaki, Maria; Brountzos, Elias; Loukopoulos, Ioannis; Pomoni, Maria; Antypa, Eleni; Vougas, Vasileios; Drakopoulos, Spiros

    2015-06-24

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a relatively rare complication after renal transplantation. The site of the surgical anastomosis is most commonly involved, but sites both proximal and distal to the anastomosis may occur, as well. Angioplasty is the gold standard for the treatment of the stenosis, especially for intrarenal lesions. We report two cases of intrarenal TRAS and successful management with angioplasty without stent placement. Both patients were male, 44 and 55 years old respectively, and they presented with elevated blood pressure or serum creatinine within three months after transplantation. Subsequently, they have undergone angioplasty balloon dilatation with normalization of blood pressure and serum creatinine returning to baseline level. Percutaneous transluminal balloon renal angioplasty is a safe and effective method for the treatment of the intrarenal TRAS. PMID:26131408

  13. Measuring the intrarenal distribution of glomerular volumes from histological sections.

    PubMed

    Hann, Bradley D; Baldelomar, Edwin J; Charlton, Jennifer R; Bennett, Kevin M

    2016-06-01

    Glomerular volume is an important metric reflecting glomerular filtration surface area within the kidney. Glomerular hypertrophy, or increased glomerular volume, may be an important marker for renal stress. Current stereological techniques report the average glomerular volume (AVglom) within the kidney. These techniques cannot assess the spatial or regional heterogeneity common in developing renal pathology. Here, we report a novel "unfolding" technique to measure the actual distribution of individual glomerular volumes in a kidney from the two-dimensional glomerulus profiles observed by optical microscopy. The unfolding technique was first developed and tested for accuracy with simulations and then applied to measure the number of glomeruli (Nglom), AVglom, and intrarenal distribution of individual glomerular volume (IVglom) in the oligosyndactyl (Os/(+)) mouse model compared with wild-type (WT) controls. The Os/(+) mice had fewer and larger glomeruli than WT mice: Nglom was 12,126 ± 1,658 (glomeruli/kidney) in the WT mice and 5,516 ± 899 in the Os/(+) mice; AVglom was 2.01 ± 0.28 × 10(-4) mm(3) for the WT mice and 3.47 ± 0.35 × 10(-4) mm(3) for the Os/(+) mice. Comparing the glomerular volume distributions in Os/(+) and WT kidneys, we observed that the Os/(+) distribution peaked at a higher value of IVglom than the WT distribution peak, and glomeruli with a radius greater than 55 μm were more prevalent in the Os/(+) mice (3.4 ± 1.6% of total glomeruli vs. 0.6 ± 1.2% in WT). Finally, the largest profiles were more commonly found in the juxtamedullary region. Unfolding is a novel stereological technique that provides a new quantitative view of glomerular volume distribution in the individual kidney. PMID:26984953

  14. Effects of intrarenal injection of nickel subsulfide in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Hopfer, S.M.; Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Morse, E.E.; Fredrickson, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    After intrarenal (i.r.) administration of 5 mg of nickel subsulfide (..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/) to Fischer rats, blood hematocrit became increased within one week and reached 76 +- 1 percent at eight weeks (p<0.001 versus mean hematocrit of 46 +- 1 percent in control rats). The ..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/-induced erythrocytosis was attended by intense stimulation of erythropoiesis, with reticulocytosis, increased /sup 59/Fe-uptake into erythrocytes and erythroid hyperplasia in bone marrow and spleen. The half-life of /sup 51/Cr-labeled erythrocytes from ..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/-treated rats was prolonged, consistent with increased proportion of circulating juvenile erythrocytes. Histological examination of rat kidneys after i.r. injection of ..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ showed mile inflammation at one and two weeks. Dense black particles of ..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ were visible in histological sections of rat kidneys for eight weeks. 5'-Nucleotidase activity in rat kidney microsomes was inhibited at one to seven days after i.r. injection of ..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/. Erythrocytosis did not occur in rats after (a) i.r. implantation of semi-permeable cellulose tubules containing ..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/, (b) repeated i.m. injections of ..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/, or (c) intrahepatic injection of ..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ after partial hepatectomy. Erythrocytosis did not occur in male BALB/c mice or ground squirrels after i.r. injection of ..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/.

  15. [Comparative sonographic-anatomic studies aimed at demonstrating intrarenal fine structure].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H G; Posel, P

    1985-07-01

    The detailed structure of the kidneys was studied in 40 excised organs by means of high resolution sonography. It becomes possible to differentiate the details within the renal parenchyma and the sinus. Intrarenal vascular details can also be defined. The clinical relevance of these results is discussed. PMID:2992015

  16. Retrograde signaling: Organelles go networking.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tatjana; Leister, Dario

    2016-08-01

    The term retrograde signaling refers to the fact that chloroplasts and mitochondria utilize specific signaling molecules to convey information on their developmental and physiological states to the nucleus and modulate the expression of nuclear genes accordingly. Signals emanating from plastids have been associated with two main networks: 'Biogenic control' is active during early stages of chloroplast development, while 'operational' control functions in response to environmental fluctuations. Early work focused on the former and its major players, the GUN proteins. However, our view of retrograde signaling has since been extended and revised. Elements of several 'operational' signaling circuits have come to light, including metabolites, signaling cascades in the cytosol and transcription factors. Here, we review recent advances in the identification and characterization of retrograde signaling components. We place particular emphasis on the strategies employed to define signaling components, spanning the entire spectrum of genetic screens, metabolite profiling and bioinformatics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26997501

  17. CT Findings of Intrarenal Yolk Sac Tumor with Tumor Thrombus Extending into the Inferior Vena Cava: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lin, ShaoChun; Li, XueHua; Feng, ShiTing; Peng, ZhenPeng; Huang, SiYun; Li, ZiPing

    2014-01-01

    Yolk sac tumor (YST) is a rare germ cell neoplasm of childhood that usually arises from the testis or ovary. The rare cases of YST in various extragonadal locations have been reported, but the primary intrarenal YST is even more uncommon. Here, we report a case of a primary intrarenal YST with tumor thrombus of the inferior vena cava and left renal vein in a 2-year-old boy, with an emphasis on the CT features. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an intrarenal YST with intravascular involvement. PMID:25246826

  18. Intrarenal pressure and irrigation flow with commonly used ureteric access sheaths and instruments

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Anna; Williams, Kevin; Somani, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flexible ureterorenoscopy is becoming a first-line treatment for many intrarenal stones. Ureteric access sheaths are commonly used to aid access, stone removal and reduce intrarenal pressure. We evaluated the effects of two commonly used access sheaths on irrigation flow and intrarenal pressure during flexible ureterorenoscopy. We measured the effect of scope instrumentation on flow and pressure. Material and methods We utilized a 10/12F and 12/14F, 35 cm Re-Trace™ access sheath with a FlexX2 scope in a cadaveric porcine kidney. We evaluated the effect of four Nitinol baskets (1.3F, 1.5F, 1.9F, 2.2F), three different 200 µm laser fibres and a hand-held pump. Measurements of irrigation flow and intrarenal pressure were recorded and compared between the different sized access sheaths. Results Flow rates varied widely between access sheaths. Without instrumentation, mean flow was 17 mls/min (10/12F access sheath), versus 33 mls/min (12/14F sheath) (p <0.0001). Increasing basket size produced a gradual reduction in flow and pressure in both access sheaths. Reassuringly, pressures were low overall (<40 cm H2O). Pressures were significantly reduced when using the larger 12/14F sheath, with and without all instrumentations (p <0.0001). Hand-held pump devices have a marked effect on flow and pressure in both sheaths; with pressures rising up to 121 cm H2O with a 10/12F sheath, versus 29 cm H2O (12/14F) (p <0.0001). Conclusions A 12/14F access sheath offered significantly improved irrigation whilst maintaining significantly lower intrarenal pressure, when compared to a 10/12F access sheath in a cadaveric porcine model. Scope instrumentation affects irrigation flow and pressure in both sized sheaths. Furthermore, there should be caution with hand-held pump devices, especially with smaller sized sheaths, as intrarenal pressure can be very high. PMID:26855796

  19. Intrarenal mature cystic teratoma associated with renal dysplasia: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Otani, M; Tsujimoto, S; Miura, M; Nagashima, Y

    2001-07-01

    We report a case of intrarenal teratoma in a 6-year-old boy. Two years before his operation, multicystic masses had been found in the left side of his abdomen. In the operation, three main cystic masses were located in the upper and lower poles of the left kidney, which were removed in pieces. Histologically, the cyst wall was lined mainly with keratinizing squamous epithelium with hair follicles, shafts and sebaceous glands. The adjacent renal parenchyma showed atrophy, with partially dysplastic and angiomyolipoma-like lesions. Based on these findings, the lesion was diagnosed as mature cystic teratoma of dermoid cyst type. Extragonadal teratoma occurs predominantly along the median line of the body. Intrarenal teratoma is extremely rare; however, it should be distinguished from teratoid Wilms' tumor and other renal cystic lesions. PMID:11472570

  20. Renal failure: unusual clinical presentation of an isolated intrarenal hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Mehwash; Biyabani, Syed Raziuddin; Pervez, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis or hydatid disease is a zoonotic parasitic infection caused by larval stage of cestode Echinococcus spp. Humans are an accidental intermediate host and present with the involvement of different organs, the liver being the most common while kidney is the rarest site. Here, authors are reporting a case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with renal failure and was found to have a right-sided intrarenal hydatid cyst, diagnosed and treated with nephroscopy without sacrificing the kidney. She had an uneventful postoperative course and her renal function improved dramatically. She is now on oral albendazole therapy and doing well on follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, renal failure has never been reported in the literature as clinical manifestation of intrarenal hydatid cyst in adult population. PMID:24243503

  1. A successful treatment of an intrarenal arteriovenous fistual by percutaneous embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, J.; Neuman-Levin, M.; Boner, G. Univ. of Tel-Aviv )

    1991-02-06

    A 37-year-old woman patient, known to have poorly controlled arterial hypertension that was diagnosed following a cerebrovascular accident at the age of 15 years, was referred to the authors' outpatient clinic for investigation in 1987. An intrarenal arteriovenous fistula was diagnosed by selective renal angiography. Embolization of the fistula was performed using four 15-mm/5-cm coils, which induced thrombosis and obstructed the fistula. The vascularization of the affected kidney improved immediately. During the following 4 months, the antihypertensive treatment was stopped gradually, and the patient remained normotensive. This is an unusual case of a large intrarenal arteriovenous fistula, whose etiology was not clear, that was successfully treated by percutaneous embolization.

  2. Repetitive measurements of intrarenal oxygenation in vivo using L band electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Stephanie; Pihl, Liselotte; Khan, Nadeem; Palm, Fredrik; Gustafsson, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    Intrarenal oxygenation is heterogeneous with oxygen levels normally being highest in the superficial cortex and lowest in the inner medulla. Reduced intrarenal oxygenation has been implied in the pathology of several kidney diseases. However, there is currently no method available to repetitively monitor regional renal oxygenation using minimally invasive procedures. We therefore evaluated implantable lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) probes, which display a close correlation between EPR line width and oxygen availability.LiPc probes were implanted in the kidney cortex and medulla in the same mouse and EPR spectra were acquired using a L band scanner during inhalation of air (21 % oxygen) or a mixture of air and nitrogen (10 % oxygen). In order to separate the signals from the two probes, a 1 G/cm gradient was applied and the signals were derived from 40 consecutive sweeps. Peak-to-peak comparison of the EPR line was used to convert the signal to an approximate oxygen tension in MATLAB. Kidney cortex as well as medullary oxygenation was stable over the 45 day period (cortex 56 ± 7 mmHg and medulla 43 ± 6 mmHg). However, 10 % oxygen inhalation significantly reduced oxygenation in both cortex (56 ± 6 to 34 ± 2 mmHg n = 15 p < 0.05) and medulla (42 ± 5 to 29 ± 3 mmHg n = 7 p < 0.05).In conclusion, L band EPR using LiPc probes implanted in discrete intrarenal structures can be used to repetitively monitor regional renal oxygenation. This minimally invasive method is especially well suited for conditions of reduced intrarenal oxygenation since this increases the signal intensity which facilitates the quantification of the EPR signal to absolute oxygenation values. PMID:24729225

  3. Targeting of Rho Kinase Ameliorates Impairment of Diabetic Endothelial Function in Intrarenal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hongping; Ru, Hailong; Yu, Liping; Kang, Yanhua; Lin, Guohua; Liu, Chuanfei; Sun, Lixian; Shi, Liyun; Sun, Qinghua; Liu, Cuiqing

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction in kidney vasculature is the initial and key element for nephropathy in diabetes mellitus. Accumulating evidence suggests the protective role of Rho kinase inhibitors in endothelial dysfunction via modulating eNOS activity and NO production. However, the role of Rho kinase in diabetes-related endothelial dysfunction in kidney vasculature and the relevant mechanisms remain unknown. We assessed whether pharmacological inhibition of Rho kinase attenuates endothelial dysfunction in intrarenal arteries from type 1 diabetic rats. Fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor effectively decreased the phosphorylated level of MYPT1 without affecting the expression of ROCKs in the kidney. Fasudil treatment showed no improvement in diabetes-related abnormality in metabolic indices, but it significantly ameliorated endothelial dysfunction in intrarenal arteries and lessened the mesangial matrix expansion in the kidney cortex. Mechanistically, superoxide production in the intrarenal artery and NOX4 member of NADPH oxidase in the renal cortex that contribute to diabetic nephropathy were also prevented by the Rho kinase inhibitor. In conclusion, the present results indicate that Rho kinase is involved in endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes via enhancement of oxidative stress and provides new evidence for Rho kinase inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24129169

  4. Effects of prostaglandin inhibition on intrarenal hemodynamics in acutely saline-loaded rats.

    PubMed

    Düsing, R; Melder, B; Kramer, H J

    1977-09-01

    We studied the effect of inhibition of the prostaglandin (PG)-synthesizing enzyme system in female Sprague-Dawley rats following acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume (ECV). In 57 conscious rats expansion of the ECV with isotonic saline corresponding to an increase in body weight of 10% was induced. Prior to ECV expansion 31 rats received indomethacin (10 mg/kg of body wt) by stomach tube. In six non-ECV-expanded rats indomethacin had no effect on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF). In ECV-expanded rats pretreated with indomethacin, GFR was unaltered but 125I-hippuran clearance decreased, and filtration fraction significantly increased. Intrarenal 86Rb distribution was similar in control and ECV-expanded rats. Indomethacin caused a slight increase in relative cortical 86 RB activity in non-ECV-expanded rats, but had no effect on intrarenal 86Rb distribution in ECV-expanded rats. No difference in intracortical glomerular perfusion was noted between control and ECV-expanded rats. In indomethacin-treated ECV-expanded rats an increase in relative inner cortical perfusion was observed. Absolute perfusion remained unaltered. Thus the decrease in total RPF was entirely due to decreased perfusion of outer cortical nephrons. Renal prostaglandins therefore may play a permissive role for physical factors to promote renal sodium excretion in acute ECV expansion via changes in intrarenal hemodynamics. PMID:890884

  5. Evaluation of intrarenal mesenchymal stem cell injection for treatment of chronic kidney disease in cats: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Jessica M; Webb, Tracy L; Gibbons, Debra S; Dow, Steven W

    2011-06-01

    The feasibility of autologous intrarenal mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) was investigated. Six cats (two healthy, four with CKD) received a single unilateral intrarenal injection of autologous bone marrow-derived or adipose tissue-derived MSC (bmMSC or aMSC) via ultrasound guidance. Minimum database and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) via nuclear scintigraphy were determined pre-injection, at 7 days and at 30 days post-injection. Intrarenal injection did not induce immediate or long-term adverse effects. Two cats with CKD that received aMSC experienced modest improvement in GFR and a mild decrease in serum creatinine concentration. Despite the possible benefits of intrarenal MSC injections for CKD cats, the number of sedations and interventions required to implement this approach would likely preclude widespread clinical application. We concluded that MSC could be transferred safely by ultrasound-guided intrarenal injection in cats, but that alternative sources and routes of MSC therapy should be investigated. PMID:21334237

  6. Chronic cyclosporin A nephrotoxicity, P-glycoprotein overexpression, and relationships with intrarenal angiotensin II deposits.

    PubMed Central

    del Moral, R. G.; Andujar, M.; Ramírez, C.; Gómez-Morales, M.; Masseroli, M.; Aguilar, M.; Olmo, A.; Arrebola, F.; Guillén, M.; García-Chicano, M. J.; Nogales, F. F.; O'Valle, F.

    1997-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expels hydrophobic substances from the cell, including chemotherapeutic agents and immunosuppressants such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506. Exposure of cultured renal tubular cells to CsA induces P-gp overexpression in cell membranes. Angiotensin II has recently been implicated as the principal factor responsible for progression of interstitial fibrosis induced by CsA. To investigate the in vivo relationships between histological lesions, P-gp overexpression, and intrarenal angiotensin II deposits, we developed a model of chronic CsA toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats treated with 25 mg/kg/day CsA for 28 and 56 days and fed either a standard maintenance diet or a low-salt diet. Immunohistochemical methods were used to study the expression of P-gp in renal tubular cells and the appearance of intrarenal angiotensin II deposits. Rats treated with CsA developed chronic nephrotoxicity lesions that were more evident in the group fed the low-salt diet. Treatment with CsA induced overexpression of P-gp in tubular cells of the kidney that increased with time. We found that immunohistochemical expression of P-gp was slightly more severe in rats fed a low-salt diet. Intrarenal deposits of angiotensin II were more evident in rats treated with CsA; these deposits also increased with time. This finding was also more relevant in rats given the low-salt diet. The up-regulation of P-gp was inversely related to the incidence of hyaline arteriopathy (r = -0.65; P < 0.05), periglomerular (r = -0.58; P < 0.05) and peritubular fibrosis (r = -0.63; P < 0.05), and intrarenal angiotensin H deposits in animals with severe signs of nephrotoxicity (r = -0.65; P < 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that the role of P-gp as a detoxicant in renal cells may be related to mechanisms that control the cytoplasmic removal of both toxic metabolites from CsA and those originating from the catabolism of signal transduction proteins (methylcysteine esters), which are produced

  7. Intrarenal mouse renin-angiotensin system during ANG II-induced hypertension and ACE inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A; Satou, Ryousuke; Ohashi, Naro; Semprun-Prieto, Laura C; Katsurada, Akemi; Kim, Catherine; Upchurch, G M; Prieto, Minolfa C; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition (ACEi) ameliorates the development of hypertension and the intrarenal ANG II augmentation in ANG II-infused mice. To determine if these effects are associated with changes in the mouse intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, the expression of angiotensinogen (AGT), renin, ACE, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) mRNA (by quanitative RT-PCR) and protein [by Western blot (WB) and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC)] were analyzed. C57BL/6J male mice (9-12 wk old) were distributed as controls (n = 10), ANG II infused (ANG II = 8, 400 ng x kg(-1) x min(-1) for 12 days), ACEi only (ACEi = 10, lisinopril, 100 mg/l), and ANG II infused + ACEi (ANG II + ACEi = 11). When compared with controls (1.00), AGT protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.29 +/- 0.13, P < 0.05), and this was not prevented by ACEi (ACEi + ANG II, 1.31 +/- 0.14, P < 0.05). ACE protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.21 +/- 0.08, P < 0.05), and it was reduced by ACEi alone (0.88 +/- 0.07, P < 0.05) or in combination with ANG II (0.80 +/- 0.07, P < 0.05). AT(1)R protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.27 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.17 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05) but not ANG II + ACEi [1.15 +/- 0.06, not significant (NS)]. Tubular renin protein (semiquantified by IHC) was increased by ANG II (1.49 +/- 0.23, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.57 +/- 0.15, P < 0.05), but not ANG II + ACEi (1.10 +/- 0.15, NS). No significant changes were observed in AGT, ACE, or AT(1)R mRNA. In summary, reduced responses of intrarenal tubular renin, ACE, and the AT(1)R protein to the stimulatory effects of chronic ANG II infusions, in the presence of ACEi, are associated with the effects of this treatment to ameliorate augmentations in blood pressure and intrarenal ANG II content during ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:19846570

  8. Intrarenal mouse renin-angiotensin system during ANG II-induced hypertension and ACE inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Satou, Ryousuke; Ohashi, Naro; Semprun-Prieto, Laura C.; Katsurada, Akemi; Kim, Catherine; Upchurch, G. M.; Prieto, Minolfa C.; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition (ACEi) ameliorates the development of hypertension and the intrarenal ANG II augmentation in ANG II-infused mice. To determine if these effects are associated with changes in the mouse intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, the expression of angiotensinogen (AGT), renin, ACE, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) mRNA (by quanitative RT-PCR) and protein [by Western blot (WB) and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC)] were analyzed. C57BL/6J male mice (9–12 wk old) were distributed as controls (n = 10), ANG II infused (ANG II = 8, 400 ng·kg−1·min−1 for 12 days), ACEi only (ACEi = 10, lisinopril, 100 mg/l), and ANG II infused + ACEi (ANG II + ACEi = 11). When compared with controls (1.00), AGT protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.29 ± 0.13, P < 0.05), and this was not prevented by ACEi (ACEi + ANG II, 1.31 ± 0.14, P < 0.05). ACE protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.21 ± 0.08, P < 0.05), and it was reduced by ACEi alone (0.88 ± 0.07, P < 0.05) or in combination with ANG II (0.80 ± 0.07, P < 0.05). AT1R protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.27 ± 0.06, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.17 ± 0.06, P < 0.05) but not ANG II + ACEi [1.15 ± 0.06, not significant (NS)]. Tubular renin protein (semiquantified by IHC) was increased by ANG II (1.49 ± 0.23, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.57 ± 0.15, P < 0.05), but not ANG II + ACEi (1.10 ± 0.15, NS). No significant changes were observed in AGT, ACE, or AT1R mRNA. In summary, reduced responses of intrarenal tubular renin, ACE, and the AT1R protein to the stimulatory effects of chronic ANG II infusions, in the presence of ACEi, are associated with the effects of this treatment to ameliorate augmentations in blood pressure and intrarenal ANG II content during ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:19846570

  9. AT1 Receptor Mediated Augmentation of Intrarenal Angiotensinogen in Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Hiroyuki; Prieto-Carrasquero, Minolfa C.; Ozawa, Yuri; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II-infused hypertensive rats exhibit increases in renal angiotensinogen mRNA and protein, as well as urinary angiotensinogen excretion in association with increased intrarenal Ang II content. The present study was performed to determine if the augmentation of intrarenal angiotensinogen requires activation of Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200 to 220 g) were divided into 3 groups: sham surgery (n=10), subcutaneous infusion of Ang II (80 ng/min, n=11), and Ang II infusion plus AT1 blocker (ARB), olmesartan (5 mg/d, n=12). Ang II infusion progressively increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) compared with sham (178±8 mm Hg versus119±4 at day 11). ARB treatment prevented hypertension (113±6 at day 11). Twenty-four-hour urine collections were taken at day 12, and plasma and tissue samples were harvested at day 13. The Ang II+ARB group had a significant increase in plasma Ang II compared with Ang II and sham groups (365±46 fmol/mL versus 76±9 and 45±14, respectively). Nevertheless, ARB treatment markedly limited the enhancement of kidney Ang II by Ang II infusion (65±17 fmol/g in sham, 606±147 in Ang II group, and 288±28 in Ang II+ARB group). Ang II infusion significantly increased kidney angiotensinogen compared with sham (1.69±0.21 densitometric units versus 1.00±0.17). This change was reflected by increased angiotensinogen immunostaining in proximal tubules. ARB treatment prevented this increase (1.14±0.12). Urinary angiotensinogen excretion rates were enhanced 4.7× in Ang II group (4.67±0.41 densitometric units versus 1.00±0.21) but ARB treatment prevented the augmentation of urinary angiotensinogen (0.96±0.23). These data demonstrate that augmentation of intrarenal angiotensinogen in Ang II-infused rats is AT1-dependent and provide further evidence that urinary angiotensinogen is closely linked to intrarenal Ang II in Ang II-dependent hypertension. PMID:15037565

  10. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation. PMID:26860788

  11. Effects of Intrarenal and Intravenous Infusion of the Phosphodiesterase 3 Inhibitor Milrinone on Renin Secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Kazuhiro; Reid, Ian A.

    1994-01-01

    We have reported that administration of the phosphodiesterase III inhibitor milrinone increases renin secretion in conscious rabbits. The aim of the present study was to determine if the increase in renin secretion results from a direct renal action of milrinone, or from an indirect extrarenal effect of the drug. This was accomplished by comparing the effects of intrarenal and intravenous infusion of graded doses of milrinone on plasma renin activity in unilaterally nephrectomized conscious rabbits. Milrinone was infused into the renal artery in doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 micro-g/kg/min, and intravenously in the same rabbits in doses of 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 micro-g/kg/min. Each dose was infused for 15 min. No intrarenal dose of milrinone altered plasma renin activity or arterial pressure, although at the highest dose, there was a small increase in heart rate. Intravenous infusion of milrinone at 1.0 micro-g/kg/min increased plasma renin activity to 176 +/- 55% of the control value (P less than 0.05). Heart rate increased but arterial pressure did not change. Intravenous infusion of milrinone at 1O micro-g/kg/min increased plasma renin activity to 386 +/- 193% of control in association with a decrease in arterial pressure and an increase in heart rate. These results confirm that milrinone increases renin secretion, and indicate that the stimulation is due to an extrarenal effect of the drug.

  12. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  13. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  14. Causes of retrograde flow in fish keratocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuhs, Thomas; Goegler, Michael; Brunner, Claudia A; Wolgemuth, Charles W; Kaes, Josef A

    2014-01-01

    Confronting motile cells with obstacles doubling as force sensors we tested the limits of the driving actin and myosin machinery. We could directly measure the force necessary to stop actin polymerization as well as the force present in the retrograde actin flow. Combined with detailed measurements of the retrograde flow velocity and specific manipulation of actin and myosin we found that actin polymerization and myosin contractility are not enough to explain the cells behavior. We show that ever-present depolymerization forces, a direct entropic consequence of actin filament recycling, are sufficient to fill this gap, even under heavy loads. PMID:24127260

  15. External security stitch for retrograde cardioplegia cannula.

    PubMed

    Gabbieri, Davide; Pedulli, Marco; Bianchi, Tiziano; Ghidoni, Italo

    2009-01-01

    Retrograde cardioplegia catheter displacement represents a troublesome complication, frequently forcing the surgeon to interrupt the operative procedure and cannulate newly the coronary sinus. However, this maneuver is time consuming, often implies the loss of surgical exposure, and exposes again the coronary sinus to the risk of iatrogenic injuries. We describe the use of an external security stitch through the muscular right atrial wall to avoid the displacement of a retrograde cardioplegia catheter and analyze the anatomic conditions which predispose to this complication. PMID:19583611

  16. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (ERCP) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (ERCP) - series URL of this ...

  17. Retrograde Lymphatic Spread of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Osaka, Yoshiaki; Tachibana, Shingo; Aoki, Takaya; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Nagao, Toshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The concept of the retrograde lymphatic spread of cancer cells appears to account for a subset of the essential mechanisms of cancer metastasis in various organs. However, no adequate data currently exist to illustrate the pathology of the retrograde lymphatic metastasis of cancer cells in human bodies. To shed light on this phenomenon, we report a case of a 63-year-old Japanese man who underwent an esophagectomy and lymph node dissection for early-stage esophageal cancer. The patient's clinical information was evaluated by board-certified surgeons and internists. Surgically excised materials were histopathologically evaluated by attending pathologists. Postoperative pathological examination revealed that the patient's tumor was a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with negative surgical margins (T1N0M0, stage I). Apart from the primary lesion, a single lymphatic vessel invasion was found between the lamina propria and lamina muscularis of the esophagus where intralymphatic cancer cells had spread against the direction of backflow prevention valves and skipped beyond these valves without destroying them. The present case demonstrated that the retrograde lymphatic spread of cancer cells can occur in valve-equipped lymphatic vessels. Our study may not only provide a scientific basis for the concept of retrograde lymphatic metastasis but also explain a portion of the complexities associated with the lymphogenous metastasis of esophageal cancer. PMID:26166121

  18. Change in intrarenal Ghrelin expression in immune complex-mediated glomerular disease in dogs

    PubMed Central

    YABUKI, Akira; MIZUKAMI, Keijiro; TOKUNAGA, Satoshi; YAMATO, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that is mainly produced by the stomach. The kidney is a major source of local ghrelin, and maintaining body fluid balance is considered a critical role of renal ghrelin. However, there are no reports on renal ghrelin in small animal medicine. The present study investigated the intrarenal localization of and change in ghrelin expression in dogs with immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN). Ghrelin immunoreactivity (IR) was observed in the distal tubules of normal kidneys. Ghrelin IR was weak in ICGN kidneys, and the quantitative ghrelin IR score was significantly lower in ICGN kidneys than in normal kidneys. In cases of ICGN, plasma creatinine concentrations showed a positive correlation with the ghrelin IR score. PMID:26256231

  19. Effect of retransfusion after hemorrhagic hypotension on intrarenal distribution of blood flow in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Carriere, Serge; Daigneault, Bernard

    1970-01-01

    Hemorrhagic hypotension in anesthetized dogs produces a marked decrease of the cortical blood flow, whereas the medullary blood flow is well preserved. These animals were maintained at blood pressures of 50 mm Hg during a 3 hr period after which their blood pressures were restored by the reinfusion of blood or dextran, or both. In the first group of animals, the reinfusion of blood reestablished the blood pressure to control values, but the cortical blood flow was still nonuniformly decreased whereas the medullary blood flow appeared to be increased. In the second group of animals, phenoxybenzamine failed to protect the kidney completely since after blood reinfusion, the same anomalies described for the preceding group were found in 7 out of 10 dogs. The animals of the third group were reinfused with 50% of the shed blood and 10 ml/kg of a 10 g/100 ml solution of low molecular weight dextran. The modifications of the intrarenal distribution of the blood flow were less marked in this group although the blood flow rate of the inner cortex and the outer medulla was always elevated under these conditions. The reinfusion of low molecular weight dextran alone (20 ml/kg of a 10 g/100 ml solution) restored the blood pressure to levels slightly lower than those observed under control conditions but reestablished a normal pattern of intrarenal blood flow. The reinfusion of high molecular weight dextran was inefficient in correcting completely the anomalies of the renal blood flow. Mechanisms such as the increased sympathetic tone, the liberation of angiotensin, and the intravascular cellular aggregation could possibly account for the persisting anomalies of the renal circulation after reinfusion and are discussed. Images PMID:5480847

  20. Intrarenal blood flow distributions from first transit recordings of Tc-99m radiochelates

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, G.R.; Wesolowski, C.; Kirchner, P.T.

    1985-05-01

    A computer-assisted curve stripping technique was used to derive renal transit times and flow fractions from the first transit aortic and renal recordings of Tc-99m radiochelate (DTPA, GHA, MDP) following peripheral bolus injection. Mean values +- 1 S.D. for 40 normal kidneys: first and second component transit times: T1=6.8 +- 2.4 sec., T2=12.8 +- 3.2 sec; flow fractions: fl=67 +- 9%, f2=17 +- 10%; residual fraction (slower components and filtration): Rf=16 +- 9%. A tumor population of 11 patients without known renal disease was studied prior to chemotherapy. Mean fl was diminished, and mean f2, T1, and Rf were elevated (p<.05). 18 hypertensive patients evaluated with angiography, renal vein renins, and scintigraphy were also reviewed. The mean f1 was decreased and the mean f2,T1, T2, and Rf were increased in this population (p<.01). The fl:T1 ratio proved to be a sensitive indicator asymmetric renal disease. The mean left-to-right ratio (L/R) of f1/T1 in normals was 1.02 +- 0.10 (r=.93) and 1.6 +- 1.5(r=.50) in the hypertensives. A L/R fl/T1 <.82 or >1.22 had a sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 80%, and positive prediction value of 92% for the presence of an arterial lesion (stenosis of >70%). The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value for lateralized or bilaterally elevated renins were 73%, 50%, and 73%, respectively. The authors conclude that intrarenal blood flow distributions can be derived non-invasively and simultaneously for both kidneys, that the results obtained are similar to those previously reported with the invasive xenon washout technique, and that disease tends to produce intrarenal flow shifts and prolongation of transit times.

  1. Intrarenal and urinary oxygenation during norepinephrine resuscitation in ovine septic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lankadeva, Yugeesh R; Kosaka, Junko; Evans, Roger G; Bailey, Simon R; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive N

    2016-07-01

    Norepinephrine is the principal vasopressor used to restore blood pressure in sepsis, but its effects on intrarenal oxygenation are unknown. To clarify this, we examined renal cortical, medullary, and urinary oxygenation in ovine septic acute kidney injury and the response to resuscitation with norepinephrine. A renal artery flow probe and fiberoptic probes were placed in the cortex and medulla of sheep to measure tissue perfusion and oxygenation. A probe in the bladder catheter measured urinary oxygenation. Sepsis was induced in conscious sheep by infusion of Escherichia coli for 32 hours. At 24 to 30 hours of sepsis, either norepinephrine, to restore mean arterial pressure to preseptic levels or vehicle-saline was infused (8 sheep per group). Septic acute kidney injury was characterized by a reduction in blood pressure of ∼12 mm Hg, renal hyperperfusion, and oliguria. Sepsis reduced medullary perfusion (from an average of 1289 to 628 blood perfusion units), medullary oxygenation (from 32 to 16 mm Hg), and urinary oxygenation (from 36 to 24 mm Hg). Restoring blood pressure with norepinephrine further reduced medullary perfusion to an average of 331 blood perfusion units, medullary oxygenation to 8 mm Hg and urinary oxygenation to 18 mm Hg. Cortical perfusion and oxygenation were preserved. Thus, renal medullary hypoxia caused by intrarenal blood flow redistribution may contribute to the development of septic acute kidney injury, and resuscitation of blood pressure with norepinephrine exacerbates medullary hypoxia. The parallel changes in medullary and urinary oxygenation suggest that urinary oxygenation may be a useful real-time biomarker for risk of acute kidney injury. PMID:27165831

  2. Effect of vinpocetine on retrograde axoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Knyihar-Csillik, Elizabeth; Vecsei, Laszlo; Mihaly, Andras; Fenyo, Robert; Farkas, Ibolya; Krisztin-Peva, Beata; Csillik, Bertalan

    2007-01-01

    Vinpocetine, a derivate of vincamine, is widely used in the clinical pharmacotherapy of cerebral circulatory diseases. Herewith we report on a novel effect of vinpocetine: inhibition of retrograde axoplasmic transport of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the peripheral nerve. Blockade of retrograde transport of NGF results in transganglionic degenerative atrophy (TDA) in the segmentally related ipsilateral superficial spinal dorsal horn, which is characterized by depletion of the marker enzymes fluoride-resistant acid phosphatase (FRAP) and thiamine monophosphatase (TMP). At the same time, pain-related neuropeptides such as substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), are depleted from lamina I-III from the segmentally related, ipsitateral Rolando substance of the spinal cord. On the basis of these experiments it is suggested that vinpocetine may result in a locally restricted decrease of nociception, that might be useful in clinical treatment of intractable pain. Pilot self-experiments support this assumption. PMID:17319607

  3. Impact of retrograde flexible ureteroscopy and intracorporeal lithotripsy on kidney functional outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hoarau, Nicolas; Martin, Francois; Lebdai, Souhil; Chautard, Denis; Culty, Thibaut; Azzouzi, Abdel Rahmene; Bigot, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate renal function and to identify factors associated with renal function deterioration after retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for kidney stones. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients with renal stones treated by RIRS between January 2010 and June 2013 at a single institute. We used the National Kidney Foundation classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) to classify Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) in 5 groups. The baseline creatinine level was systematically pre-operatively and post-operatively evaluated. All patients had a creatinine blood measurement in June 2013. A change toward a less or a more favorable GFR group following RIRS was considered significant. Results: We included 163 patients. There were 86 males (52.8%) and 77 females (47.3%) with a mean age of 52.8±17 years. After a mean follow-up of 15.5±11.5 months, median GFR was not significantly changed from 84.3±26.2 to 84.9±24.5 mL/min (p=0.675). Significant renal function deterioration occurred in 8 cases (4.9%) and significant renal function amelioration occurred in 23 cases (14.1%). In univariate analysis, multiple procedures (p=0.023; HR: 5.4) and preoperative CKD (p=0.011; HR: 6.8) were associated with decreased renal function. In multivariate analysis these factors did not remain as predictive factors. Conclusion: Stone management with RIRS seems to have favorable outcomes on kidney function; however, special attention should be given to patients with multiple procedures and preoperative chronic kidney disease. PMID:26689517

  4. Are Wnts Retrogradely Transported to the ER?

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-11-01

    A recent report showed that Drosophila miR-307a initiates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in wingless (wg)-expressing cells by suppression of the evolutionarily conserve Wnt secretion factor Wntless (Wls). Interestingly, the authors noted that wg has a putative C-terminal dilysine motif (KKVY), which is required for its apparent retrograde Golgi-to-ER transport. Wls suppression resulted in ER stress, which was phenocopied by several other manipulations that impaired wg secretion in flies, as well as Wnt5a secretion in mammalian cells. The authors surmised that their data "reveals a previously unknown Golgi-to-ER retrograde route of wg, and elucidates a correlation between Wnt secretion and ER stress." However, there are obvious caveats to this interpretation, as ER stress resulting from Wnt secretion impairment could be readily explained by its inability to leave the ER, and not resulting from Golgi-to-ER retrograde transport. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2315-2316, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26916992

  5. Urinary Angiotensinogen as a Potential Biomarker of Intrarenal Renin-angiotensin System Activity in Chinese Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Xu, B; Xu, C

    2014-09-01

    Urinary angiotensinogen (AGT) mainly derives from the AGT produced in the proximal tubular cells. Evidence exists that supports the correlation between urinary AGT and circulating AGT. Previous studies measured urinary AGT by radioimmunoassay which is not convenient for clinical practice. In this study, we utilized an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based method to quantify urinary AGT. We analysed the relationship between urinary AGT and intrarenal angiotensin II (Ang II) activity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Urinary and plasma renin activity, AGT, Ang II and aldosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay or ELISA in 128 CKD patients. Furthermore, expression levels of intrarenal renin, AGT, Ang II and Ang II receptor were examined by immunohistochemistry staining (IHCS) in 72 CKD patients undergoing renal biopsy. Average urinary AGT was 2.02 ± 0.55 ng/(mg Cr). Hypertension, urinary protein, urinary Ang II and urinary Type IV collagen (Col IV) positively correlated with urinary AGT. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urinary sodium and serum AGT negatively correlated with urinary AGT. Multiple regression analysis indicated that low serum AGT, high urinary protein, urinary Ang II and urinary Col IV correlated significantly with high urinary AGT. Moreover, we observed positive correlation between urinary AGT and positive IHCS area of AGT, Ang II and Ang II Type 1 receptor inrenal tissue. These data suggest that urinary AGT might be a potential biomarker of intrarenal angiotensin II activity in CKD patients. PMID:25781279

  6. Urinary Angiotensinogen as a Potential Biomarker of Intrarenal Renin-angiotensin System Activity in Chinese Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Z; Xu, B; Xu, C

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary angiotensinogen (AGT) mainly derives from the AGT produced in the proximal tubular cells. Evidence exists that support the correlation between urinary AGT and circulating AGT. Previous studies measured urinary AGT by radioimmunoassay which is not convenient for clinical practice. In this study, we utilized an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based method to quantify urinary AGT. We analysed the relationship between urinary AGT and intrarenal angiotensin II (Ang II) activity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Urinary and plasma renin activity, AGT, Ang II and aldosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay or ELISA in 128 CKD patients. Furthermore, expression levels of intrarenal renin, AGT, Ang II and Ang II receptor were examined by immunohistochemistry staining (IHCS) in 72 CKD patients undergoing renal biopsy. Average urinary AGT was 2.02 ± 0.55 ng/(mg Cr). Hypertension, urinary protein, urinary Ang II and urinary Type IV collagen (Col IV) positively correlated with urinary AGT. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urinary sodium and serum AGT negatively correlated with urinary AGT. Multiple regression analysis indicated that low serum AGT, high urinary protein, urinary Ang II and urinary Col IV correlated significantly with high urinary AGT. Moreover, we observed positive correlation between urinary AGT and positive IHCS area of AGT, Ang II and Ang II Type 1 receptor in renal tissue. These data suggest that urinary AGT might be a potential biomarker of intrarenal angiotensin II activity in CKD patients. PMID:25781279

  7. A Preliminary Study Into the Significance of Intrarenal Reflux in BK Virus Nephropathy After Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kawanishi, Kunio; Honda, Kazuho; Koike, Junki; Hattori, Motoshi; Fuchinoue, Shouhei; Tanabe, Kazunari; Oda, Hideaki; Nagashima, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    Background The BK virus typically colonizes the lower urinary tract and is the causative agent in BK virus nephropathy (BKVN), which can progress to allograft dysfunction and graft loss. Urinary reflux in kidney allografts is induced by vesicoureteral reflux or disturbances in intrarenal reflux (IRR), believed to be associated with BKVN. This study was designed to elucidate the relationship between BKVN and IRR. Methods We examined 30 renal transplant recipients histologically diagnosed with BKVN using anti-Simian virus 40 immunohistochemistry and 60 clinically matched control recipients. The BKVN patients were divided into stable (n = 12) and progressive (n = 18) groups according to allograft kidney function 1 year after diagnosis. Histological rejection scores according to the pathological classification of rejection in renal allografts (Banff classification), histological BKVN stages, and histological polyomavirus load levels (pvl) proposed by the Banff working group were evaluated. The IRR was quantified by histological reflux scores defined with retention and reflux of immunostained Tamm-Horsfall protein in renal tubules and glomeruli. Results Higher reflux scores were observed in the BKVN group compared with that in the control group. No differences in clinical parameters were observed between the BKVN and control groups. Reflux scores and pvl were significantly higher in the progressive group than in the stable BKVN group with no significant difference in BK stage observed between groups. Reflux scores were found to be significantly correlated with pvl. Conclusions Our preliminary study suggested that IRR might be a predisposing and prognostic factor in BKVN.

  8. Safety and Feasibility of Salvage Endoscopic Combined Intrarenal Surgery in Embolized Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Nicolosi, Federico; Lughezzani, Giovanni; Buffi, Nicolò Maria; Casale, Paolo; Hurle, Rodolfo; Lazzeri, Massimo; Cardone, Pasquale; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Saita, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Although endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery (ECIRS) is well established as primary approach to complex lithiasis, no evidences are still available on its use in salvage context. Case Presentation: A male patient, of 55 years of age, underwent many unsuccessful surgical procedures to treat large and multiple right kidney stones, including percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). The latter was complicated by severe postoperative hemorrhage, managed with super-selective renal artery embolization (SRAE). Therefore he came to our institution to achieve a complete resolution of the urolithiasis. Preoperative evaluation included CT scan and renal scintigraphy to establish kidney and stone morphologic features and residual renal function. Salvage ECIRS was performed and postoperative assessment showed a complete resolution of lithiasis and absence of renal function impairment. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first case of salvage ECIRS reported in literature after previous failed PCNL. Even after SRAE, this procedure appears as safe and as efficacious as standard salvage PCNL when performed by experienced hands. PMID:27579440

  9. Erythropoietin-mediated erythrocytosis in rodents after intrarenal injection of nickel subsulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Hopfer, S.M.; Reid, M.C.; Shen, S.K.; Kevorkian, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    Rats and guinea pigs developed pronounced erythrocytosis at one to four months after unilateral intrarenal (ir) injection of nickel subsulfide (Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/). Hamsters and gerbils did not develop erythrocytosis after ir injection blood hematocrit. Erythrocytosis in rats was completely blocked by excision of the Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/-injected kidney but was unaffected by excision of the non-injected kidney. Partial inhibition of Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/-induced erythrocytosis in rats occurred after simultaneous ir injection of Mn, Cu, or Al dusts, benzo(a)pyrene, or subcutaneous (sc) infusion of sodium diethyldithiocarbamate. Erythrocytosis induced by ir injection of Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ was augmented by ir injection of Cr dust or intramuscular (im) administration of iron-dextran. Erythrocytosis occurred in rats after ir implantation of Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ within semi-permeable cellulose tubules, indicating that phagocytosis of Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ particles is unnecessary for erythropoietic stimulation. This study identifies several factors that influence erythropoietic stimulation by Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/, and furnishes salient information concerning the pathogenesis of Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/-induced erythrocytosis.

  10. Mitochondrial emitted electromagnetic signals mediate retrograde signaling.

    PubMed

    Bagkos, Georgios; Koufopoulos, Kostas; Piperi, Christina

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence shows that mitochondria regulate nuclear transcriptional activity both in normal and cell stress conditions, known as retrograde signaling. Under normal mitochondrial function, retrograde signaling is associated with mitochondrial biogenesis, normal cell phenotype and metabolic profile. In contrast, mitochondrial dysfunction leads to abnormal (oncogenic) cell phenotype and altered bio-energetic profile (nucleus reprogramming). Despite intense research efforts, a concrete mechanism through which mitochondria determine the group of genes expressed by the nucleus is still missing. The present paper proposes a novel hypothesis regarding retrograde signaling. More specifically, it reveals the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the accompanied strong electromagnetic field (EF) as key regulatory factors of nuclear activity. Mitochondrial emitted EFs extend in long distance and affect the function of nuclear membrane receptors. Depending on their frequencies, EFs can directly activate or deactivate different groups of nuclear receptors and so determine nuclear gene expression. One of the key features of the above hypothesis is that nuclear membrane receptors, besides their own endogenous or chemical ligands (hormones, lipids, etc.), can also be activated by electromagnetic signals. Moreover, normal MMP values (about -140 mV) are associated with the production of high ATP quantities and small levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) while the hyperpolarization observed in all cancer cell types leads to a dramatic fall in ATP production and an analogous increase in ROS. The diminished ATP and increased ROS production negatively affect the function of all cellular systems including nucleus. Restoration of mitochondrial function, which is characterized by the fluctuation of MMP and EF values within a certain (normal) range, is proposed as a necessary condition for normal nuclear function and cancer therapy. PMID:26474928

  11. Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling: Triggers, Pathways, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Fernanda Marques; Torelli, Nicole Quesada; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles for eukaryotic homeostasis. Although these organelles possess their own DNA, the vast majority (>99%) of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nucleus. This situation makes systems that allow the communication between mitochondria and the nucleus a requirement not only to coordinate mitochondrial protein synthesis during biogenesis but also to communicate eventual mitochondrial malfunctions, triggering compensatory responses in the nucleus. Mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling has been described in various organisms, albeit with differences in effector pathways, molecules, and outcomes, as discussed in this review. PMID:26583058

  12. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers. PMID:26465546

  13. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S.; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers.

  14. Subtrochanteric fractures after retrograde femoral nailing.

    PubMed

    Mounasamy, Varatharaj; Mallu, Sathya; Khanna, Vishesh; Sambandam, Senthil

    2015-10-18

    Secondary fractures around femoral nails placed for the management of hip fractures are well known. We report, two cases of a fracture of the femur at the interlocking screw site in the subtrochanteric area after retrograde femoral nailing of a femoral shaft fracture. Only a few reports in the existing literature have described these fractures. Two young men after sustaining a fall presented to us with pain, swelling and deformity in the upper thigh region. On enquiring, examining and radiographing them, peri-implant fractures of subtrochanteric nature through the distal interlocking screws were revealed in both patients who also had histories of previous falls for which retrograde intramedullary nailing was performed for their respective femora. Both patients were managed with similar surgical routines including removal of the existing hardware, open reduction and ace cephallomedullary antegrade nailing. The second case did show evidence of delayed healing and was additionally stabilized with cerclage wires. Both patients had uneventful postoperative outcomes and union was evident at the end of 6 mo postoperatively with a good range of motion at the hip and knee. Our report suggests that though seldom reported, peri-implant fractures around the subtrochanteric region can occur and pose a challenge to the treating orthopaedic surgeon. We suggest these be managed, after initial stabilization and resuscitation, by implant removal, open reduction and interlocking intramedullary antegrade nailing. Good results and progression to union can be expected in these patients by adhering to basic principles of osteosynthesis. PMID:26495251

  15. Role for intrarenal mechanisms in the impaired salt excretion of experimental nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, I; Rennke, H G; Hoyer, J R; Badr, K F; Schor, N; Troy, J L; Lechene, C P; Brenner, B M

    1983-01-01

    increases in total and SNGFR, urinary sodium excretion by PAN-perfused kidneys remained at a level far below that for nonperfused kidneys, again indicating that the antinatriuresis characterizing the PAN-perfused kidney is due to alterations in sodium handling by the tubules rather than changes in GFR. These results therefore indicate (a) that reductions in Kf and depressed sodium reabsorption by proximal tubules and Henle's loop segments in this model are brought about by intrarenal rather than circulating or systemic factors, and (b) assuming that superficial nephrons are representative of the entire nephron population, renal salt retention in this model is due primarily to intrarenal factor(s) acting beyond the distal convolution. Images PMID:6848563

  16. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways coverage to antogonistically regulate a light-induced transcription network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde and photosensory-receptor signaling has remained undefined. Here, we show that the phytochrome (phy) and retrograde signaling pathways converge a...

  17. Beyond Glycosuria: Exploring the intrarenal effects of SGLT₋₂ inhibition in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M C; Jandeleit-Dahm, K; Bonnet, F

    2014-12-01

    For millennia, the syndrome that has become known as diabetes was considered to be primarily a disease of the urinary system and, by association, of dysfunction in the kidneys (recognized as the source of urine). In the last decade, there has been renewed interest in the role of the kidneys in the development and maintenance of high glucose levels. This has led to the development of novel agents to inhibit sodiumglucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) as a means to control glucose levels and augment calorie-wasting leading to weight loss. However, beyond actions on glycaemic control, inhibition of proximal glucose absorption via SGLT-2 has significant direct effects to attenuate hyperfiltration and reduce renal hypertrophy. Increased distal sodium delivery may also act to suppress the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, although systemic activity may be modestly increased due to osmotic diuresis. Reducing proximal glucose reabsorption may also protect the tubular cells from exposure to excess glucose and glucose-induced reactive oxygen species. On the other hand, distal glucose delivery following inhibition of SGLT-2 may increase glycogen deposition, the significance of which is unclear. However, subjects with familial glycosuria appear to have a benign renal prognosis. Some studies have demonstrated significant reductions in albumin excretion in various experimental models and as post-hoc observations in clinical trials. Whether these reflect renoprotection or are simply the result of intraglomerular haemodynamic changes remains unclear. Although promising, such actions remain to be established by comprehensive clinical trials with a renal focus, many of which are currently in progress. PMID:25554067

  18. Association between erythrocytosis and renal cancers in rats following intrarenal injection of nickel compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; McCully, K.S.; Hopfer, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    Seventeen nickel compounds were administered to Fischer-344 rats (N=270) by intrarenal injection (7 mg Ni/rat); the compounds included nickel sulfides, selenides, arsenides, oxide, antimonide, telluride, titanate, ferronickel alloy and metallic nickel dust. Erythrocytosis, as defined by peak hematocrit values that averaged >55% during 1-4 months post-injection, occurred in nine of 17 Ni-treated groups (NiS2, US NiS, NiS2, Ni4FeS4, NiSe, Ni3Se2, NiAsS, NiO, Ni dust). Renal cancers (N=23) developed within 2 years post-injection in nine of 17 Ni-treated groups (NiS2, US NiS, Ni3S2, Ni4FeS4, NiSe, Ni3Se2, NiAsS, NiAs, NiFe alloy). The renal cancers included eight fibrosarcomas, five mesangial cell sarcomas, two renal cell carcinomas, two carcinosarcomas, two leiomyosarcomas, two undifferentiated sarcomas, one rhabdomyosarcoma and one nephroblastoma. No erythrocytosis or renal cancers occurred in control rats (N=97) in three groups treated with the vehicles or metallic iron dust. Rank correlation (p < 0.0001) was observed between the incidences of erythrocytosis and renal cancers in the 17 Ni-treated groups. Rank correlation (p <0.001) was observed between the present incidences of renal cancers and the sarcoma incidences previously reported following intramuscular administration of the 17 nickel compounds to Fischer-344 rats (14 mg Ni/rat). The incidences of renal cancer were not correlated with (i) the mass-fractions of nickel in the 17 compounds, (ii) the dissolution half-times of the compounds in rat serum or renal cytosol, or (iii) the phagocytic indices of the compounds in rat peritoneal macrophages. 48 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Intrarenal renin-angiotensin system mediates fatty acid-induced ER stress in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunling; Lin, Yu; Luo, Renfei; Chen, Shaoming; Wang, Feifei; Zheng, Peili; Levi, Moshe; Yang, Tianxin; Wang, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    Obesity-related kidney disease is related to caloric excess promoting deleterious cellular responses. Accumulation of saturated free fatty acids in tubular cells produces lipotoxicity involving significant cellular dysfunction and injury. The objectives of this study were to elucidate the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation in saturated fatty acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in cultured human proximal tubule epithelial cells (HK2) and in mice fed with a high-fat diet. Treatment with saturated fatty acid palmitic acid (PA; 0.8 mM) for 24 h induced ER stress in HK2, leading to an unfolded protein response as reflected by increased expressions of the ER chaperone binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and proapoptotic transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) protein as evaluated by immunoblotting. PA treatment also induced increased protein expression of inositol requiring protein 1α (IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor-α (eIF2α), and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) as well as activation of caspase-3. PA treatment was associated with increased angiotensin II levels in cultured medium. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker valsartan or renin inhibitor aliskiren dramatically suppressed PA-induced upregulation of BiP, CHOP, IRE1α, p-eIF2α, and ATF4 in HK2 cells. In contrast, valsartan or aliskiren did not prevent ER stress induced by tunicamycin. C57BL/6 mice fed with a high-fat diet for 14 wk exhibited increased protein expressions of BiP and CHOP compared with control mice, which were significantly attenuated by the valsartan treatment. Increased angiotensin II levels in serum and urine were observed in mice fed with a high-fat diet when compared with controls. It is suggested that the intrarenal RAS activation may play an important role in diabetic kidney injury via mediating ER stress induced by saturated fatty acid. PMID:26672616

  20. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ted

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that…

  1. Retrograde Epidural Catheter Relieves Intractable Sacral Pain.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ruchir; Shodhan, Shivam; Hosny, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT) drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a "band of anesthesia" which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique. PMID:27162431

  2. Asteroids in Retrograde Orbits: Interesting Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, Paweł; Włodarczyk, Ireneusz

    2014-12-01

    We present the most interesting examples of the orbital evolution of asteroids in retrograde orbits (i > 90°). First, we used the latest observational data to determine nominal and averaged orbital elements of these objects. Next, the equations of motion of these asteroids were integrated backward 1 My, taking into account the propagation of observational errors. We used so-called 'cloning' procedure to reproduce the reliability of initial data. We obtained some possible scenarios of the orbit inversion in the past, what is often caused by the long-term influence of outer planets. For two most interesting cases (Apollo and Amor type) we did additional calculations: 100 My in the future. Additionally, we investigated the potential influence of Yarkovski/YORP effects on the long-time orbital evolution.

  3. Retrograde Epidural Catheter Relieves Intractable Sacral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ruchir; Shodhan, Shivam; Hosny, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT) drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a “band of anesthesia” which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique. PMID:27162431

  4. Distant retrograde orbits for the Moon's exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenko, Vladislav

    We discuss the properties of the distant retrograde orbits (which are called quasi-satellite orbits also) around Moon. For the first time the distant retrograde orbits were described by J.Jackson in studies on restricted three body problem at the beginning of 20th century [1]. In the synodic (rotating) reference frame distant retrograde orbit looks like an ellipse whose center is slowly drifting in the vicinity of minor primary body while in the inertial reference frame the third body is orbiting the major primary body. Although being away the Hill sphere the third body permanently stays close enough to the minor primary. Due to this reason the distant retrograde orbits are called “quasi-satellite” orbits (QS-orbits) too. Several asteroids in solar system are in a QS-orbit with respect to one of the planet. As an example we can mention the asteroid 2002VE68 which circumnavigates Venus [2]. Attention of specialists in space flight mechanics was attracted to QS-orbits after the publications of NASA technical reports devoted to periodic moon orbits [3,4]. Moving in QS-orbit the SC remains permanently (or at least for long enough time) in the vicinity of small celestial body even in the case when the Hill sphere lies beneath the surface of the body. The properties of the QS-orbit can be studied using the averaging of the motion equations [5,6,7]. From the theoretical point of view it is a specific case of 1:1 mean motion resonance. The integrals of the averaged equations become the parameters defining the secular evolution of the QS-orbit. If the trajectory is robust enough to small perturbations in the simplified problem (i.e., restricted three body problem) it may correspond to long-term stability of the real-world orbit. Our investigations demonstrate that under the proper choice of the initial conditions the QS-orbits don’t escape from Moon or don’t impact Moon for long enough time. These orbits can be recommended as a convenient technique for the large

  5. Biomechanical performance of retrograde nail for supracondylar fractures stabilization.

    PubMed

    Chantarapanich, Nattapon; Sitthiseripratip, Kriskrai; Mahaisavariya, Banchong; Siribodhi, Pongwit

    2016-06-01

    The study compared the biomechanical performance of retrograde nail used to stabilize supracondylar fracture (three different levels) by means of finite element analysis. Three different nail lengths (200, 260, and 300 mm) of stainless steel and titanium nails were under consideration. Intact femur model was reconstructed from Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine images of Thai cadaveric femur scanned by computed tomography spiral scanner, whereas geometry of retrograde nail was reconstructed with the data obtained from three-dimensional laser scanner. The retrograde nail was virtually attached to the femur before nodes and elements were generated for finite element model. The finite element models were analyzed in two stages, the early stage of fracture healing and the stage after fracture healing. The finding indicated that purchasing proximal locking screw in the bowing region of the femur may be at risk due to the high stresses at the implant and bone. There were no differences in stress level, elastic strain at a fracture gap, and bone stress between stainless steel and titanium implant. Since the intramedullary canal requires reaming to accommodate the retrograde nail, the length of retrograde nail should be as long as necessary. However, in case that the retrograde nail can be accommodated into the intramedullary canal without reaming, the longer retrograde nail can be used. PMID:27032932

  6. PRODUCTION OF NEAR-EARTH ASTEROIDS ON RETROGRADE ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstreet, S.; Gladman, B.; Ngo, H.; Granvik, M.; Larson, S.

    2012-04-20

    While computing an improved near-Earth object (NEO) steady-state orbital distribution model, we discovered in the numerical integrations the unexpected production of retrograde orbits for asteroids that had originally exited from the accepted main-belt source regions. Our model indicates that {approx}0.1% (a factor of two uncertainty) of the steady-state NEO population (perihelion q < 1.3 AU) is on retrograde orbits. These rare outcomes typically happen when asteroid orbits flip to a retrograde configuration while in the 3:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter and then live for {approx}0.001 to 100 Myr. The model predicts, given the estimated near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population, that a few retrograde 0.1-1 km NEAs should exist. Currently, there are two known MPC NEOs with asteroidal designations on retrograde orbits which we therefore claim could be escaped asteroids instead of devolatilized comets. This retrograde NEA population may also answer a long-standing question in the meteoritical literature regarding the origin of high-strength, high-velocity meteoroids on retrograde orbits.

  7. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Ted

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that students who participated in these activities performed better on examination questions pertaining to retrograde motion than students who did not. Potential explanations for this result, including the breaking of classroom routine, the effect of body movement on conceptual memory, and egocentric spatial proprioception, are considered.

  8. Using balloon-overtube-assisted enteroscopy for postoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Matthew; Velázquez-Aviña, Jacobo

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is technically more challenging in patients with postsurgical anatomy such as Roux-en-Y anastomosis, frequently mandating an operative intervention. Although limited, there is growing evidence that ERCP can be performed using the balloon-overtube-assisted enteroscopy (BOAE) in patients with complex postoperative anatomy. We present the technical aspects of performing ERCP with the BOAE in patients presenting with complex postsurgical anatomy having biliary problems. ERCP using the BOAE is feasible in patients with complex postsurgical anatomy, permitting diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in 80% of patients. PMID:25364385

  9. The 'SAFARI' Technique Using Retrograde Access Via Peroneal Artery Access

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Kun Da; Tan, Seck Guan; Tay, Kiang Hiong

    2012-08-15

    The 'SAFARI' technique or subintimal arterial flossing with antegrade-retrograde intervention is a method for recanalisation of chronic total occlusions (CTOs) when subintimal angioplasty fails. Retrograde access is usually obtained via the popliteal, distal anterior tibial artery (ATA)/dorsalis pedis (DP), or distal posterior tibial artery (PTA). Distal access via the peroneal artery has not been described and has a risk of continued bleeding, leading to compartment syndrome due to its deep location. We describe our experience in two patients with retrograde access via the peroneal artery and the use of balloon-assisted hemostasis for these retrograde punctures. This approach may potentially give more options for endovascular interventions in lower limb CTOs.

  10. Retrograde crossing for chronic total occlusion lesions: the Japanese way.

    PubMed

    Takano, Masamichi; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) lesions remains one of the major challenges in the field of interventional cardiology. Crossing guidewires through the CTO lesions has been conventionally performed from the proximal arteries to the lesions as an antegrade approach. To date, a retrograde approach, to penetrate PCI devices including guidewires and balloons into the distal end of CTO lesions via collateral vessels or coronary artery bypass grafts, has been attempted in order to achieve procedural success. With introduction of the retrograde approach for treatments of CTO lesions, several kinds of devices, techniques, and strategies have been developed. Although the techniques and strategies for the retrograde approach have not been worldwide accepted to interventional cardiologists, we introduce a way to obtain recanalization of the CTO lesions using the retrograde approach in this article. PMID:19276488

  11. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Bassilakis, R.; Kroo, E.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the proposed processing schemes for improving liquefaction yields involve favoring bond-breaking and radical stabilization reactions over the retrograde reactions. The retrograde reactions are often encountered before liquefaction temperatures are reached. The objective of this program is to elucidate and model the retrograde reaction chemistry in direct coal liquefaction through the application of experimental techniques and theoretical models which have been successfully employed at Advanced Fuel Research (AFR) and SRI International (a subcontractor) to understand and predict coal reaction behavior. The study of retrograde reactions is being done using an integrated approach using extensive characterization of the liquefaction chemistry of three kinds of systems: (1) model polymers; (2) coal; and (3) modified coals.

  12. Retrograde Melting and Internal Liquid Gettering in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hudelson, Steve; Newman, Bonna K.; Bernardis, Sarah; Fenning, David P.; Bertoni, Mariana I.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Lai, Barry; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2011-07-01

    Retrograde melting (melting upon cooling) is observed in silicon doped with 3d transition metals, via synchrotron-based temperature-dependent X-ray microprobe measurements. Liquid metal-silicon droplets formed via retrograde melting act as efficient sinks for metal impurities dissolved within the silicon matrix. Cooling results in decomposition of the homogeneous liquid phase into solid multiple-metal alloy precipitates. These phenomena represent a novel pathway for engineering impurities in semiconductor-based systems.

  13. IgG4-related Disease: A Mass Lesion in the Intrarenal Sinus near the Renal Pelvis.

    PubMed

    Inenaga, Jun-Ichi; Ueno, Toshiharu; Kawada, Masahiro; Imafuku, Aya; Mise, Koki; Sumida, Keiichi; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Hasegawa, Eiko; Hayami, Noriko; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Junichi; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Okaneya, Toshikazu; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital with the renal pelvic mass lesion detected on a health screening examination. The surgical specimen contained a mass exhibiting the histological features of immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-related disease, including lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and sclerosis with numerous IgG4-producing plasma cells. Postoperatively, an elevation of the serum IgG4 level was confirmed at 403 mg/dL; however, there was no evidence of tubulointerstitial nephritis or glomerulopathy, including membranous nephropathy, and the urothelium of the renal pelvis was intact without inflammation. We herein report this case in which IgG4-related disease of the renal pelvic region presented with a mass lesion in the intrarenal sinus near the renal pelvis, not 'pyelitis' (as described by Stone). PMID:26234232

  14. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography during pregnancy without radiation

    PubMed Central

    Akcakaya, Adem; Ozkan, Orhan Veli; Okan, Ismail; Kocaman, Orhan; Sahin, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To present our experience with pregnant patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) without using radiation, and to evaluate the acceptability of this alternative therapeutic pathway for ERCP during pregnancy. METHODS: Between 2000 and 2008, six pregnant women underwent seven ERCP procedures. ERCP was performed under mild sedoanalgesia induced with pethidine HCl and midazolam. The bile duct was cannulated with a guidewire through the papilla. A catheter was slid over the guidewire and bile aspiration and/or visualization of the bile oozing around the guidewire was used to confirm correct cannulation. Following sphincterotomy, the bile duct was cleared by balloon sweeping. When indicated, stents were placed. Confirmation of successful biliary cannulation and stone extraction was made by laboratory, radiological and clinical improvement. Neither fluoroscopy nor spot radiography was used during the procedure. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 28 years (range, 21-33 years). The mean gestational age for the fetus was 23 wk (range, 14-34 wk). Five patients underwent ERCP because of choledocholithiasis and/or choledocholithiasis-induced acute cholangitis. In one case, a stone was extracted after precut papillotomy with a needle-knife, since the stone was impacted. One patient had ERCP because of persistent biliary fistula after hepatic hydatid disease surgery. Following sphincterotomy, scoleces were removed from the common bile duct. Two weeks later, because of the absence of fistula closure, repeat ERCP was performed and a stent was placed. The fistula was closed after stent placement. Neither post-ERCP complications nor premature birth or abortion was seen. CONCLUSION: Non-radiation ERCP in experienced hands can be performed during pregnancy. Stent placement should be considered in cases for which complete common bile duct clearance is dubious because of a lack of visualization of the biliary tree. PMID:19653343

  15. H2S Inhibits Hyperglycemia-Induced Intrarenal Renin-Angiotensin System Activation via Attenuation of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jun; Li, Chen; Shao, Decui; Liu, Jia; Shen, Yang; Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yu; Yu, Chen; Wang, Rui; Lu, Limin

    2013-01-01

    Decrease in endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was reported to participate in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). This study is aimed at exploring the relationship between the abnormalities in H2S metabolism, hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and the activation of intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Cultured renal mesangial cells (MCs) and streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats were used for the studies. The expressions of angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II (Ang II) type I receptor (AT1), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and collagen IV were measured by real time PCR and Western blot. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was assessed by fluorescent probe assays. Cell proliferation was analyzed by 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation assay. Ang II concentration was measured by an enzyme immunoassay. AGT, ACE and AT1 receptor mRNA levels and Ang II concentration were increased in high glucose (HG) -treated MCs, the cell proliferation rate and the production of TGF-β1 and of collagen IV productions were also increased. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylenechloride iodonium (DPI) was able to reverse the HG-induced RAS activation and the changes in cell proliferation and collagen synthesis. Supplementation of H2S attenuated HG-induced elevations in ROS and RAS activation. Blockade on H2S biosynthesis from cystathione-γ-lyase (CSE) by DL-propargylglycine (PPG) resulted in effects similar to that of HG treatment. In STZ-induced diabetic rats, the changes in RAS were also reversed by H2S supplementation without affecting blood glucose concentration. These data suggested that the decrease in H2S under hyperglycemic condition leads to an imbalance between oxidative and reductive species. The increased oxidative species results in intrarenal RAS activation, which, in turn, contributes to the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction. PMID:24058553

  16. Aging has small effects on initial ischemic acute kidney injury development despite changing intrarenal immunologic micromilieu in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hye Ryoun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Kwon, Ghee Young; Park, Jae Berm; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Dae Joong; Kim, Yoon-Goo; Kim, Sung Joo; Oh, Ha Young; Huh, Wooseong

    2016-02-15

    Inflammatory process mediated by innate and adaptive immune systems is a major pathogenic mechanism of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). There are concerns that organ recipients may be at increased risk of developing IRI after receiving kidneys from elder donors. To reveal the effects of aging on the development of renal IRI, we compared the immunologic micromilieu of normal and postischemic kidneys from mice of three different ages (9 wk, 6 mo, and 12 mo). There was a higher number of total T cells, especially effector memory CD4/CD8 T cells, and regulatory T cells in the normal kidneys of old mice. On day 2 after IRI, the proportion of necrotic tubules and renal functional changes were comparable between groups although old mice had a higher proportion of damaged tubule compared with young mice. More T cells, but less B cells, trafficked into the postischemic kidneys of old mice. The infiltration of NK T cells was similar across the groups. Macrophages and neutrophils were comparable between groups in both normal kidneys and postischemic kidneys. The intrarenal expressions of TNF-α and VEGF were decreased in normal and postischemic kidneys of aged mice. These mixed effects of aging on lymphocytes and cytokines/chemokines were not different between the two groups of old mice. Our study demonstrates that aging alters the intrarenal micromilieu but has small effects on the development of initial renal injury after IRI. Further study investigating aging-dependent differences in the repair process of renal IRI may be required. PMID:26661651

  17. Sequential activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system in the progression of hypertensive nephropathy in Goldblatt rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang Gyun; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Se-Yun; Lee, Arah; Moon, Ju Young; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Tae Won; Lim, Sung Jig; Sohn, Il Suk; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo

    2016-07-01

    The intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has an important role in generating and maintaining hypertension in two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) rats. This study evaluated how various intrarenal RAS components contributed to hypertension not only in the maintenance period (5w; 5 wk after operation) but also earlier (2w; 2 wk after operation). We inserted a 2.5-mm clip into the left renal artery of Sprague-Dawley rats and euthanized them at 2w and 5w following the operation. Systolic blood pressure increased within 1 wk after the operation, and left ventricular hypertrophy occurred in 2K1C rats. At 2w, juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA) and collecting duct (CD) renin increased in clipped kidney (CK) of 2K1C rats. The tubular angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) was not changed, but peritubular ACE2 decreased in nonclipped kidney (NCK) and CK of 2K1C rats. At 5w, ACE and CD renin were enhanced, and ACE2 was still lessened in both kidneys of 2K1C rats. However, plasma renin activity (PRA) was not different from that in sham rats. In proximal tubules of CK, the ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) was not suppressed, but the Mas receptor (MasR) was reduced; thus the AT1R/MasR ratio was elevated. Although hypoxic change in CK could not be excluded, the JGA renin of CK and CD renin in both kidneys was highly expressed independent of time. Peritubular ACE2 changed in the earlier period, and uninhibited AT1R in proximal tubules of CK was presented in the maintenance period. In 2K1C rats, attenuated ACE2 seems to contribute to initiating hypertension while upregulated ACE in combination with unsuppressed AT1R may have a key role in maintaining hypertension. PMID:26823279

  18. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-12-17

    The overall objective of the program was to improve the understanding of retrograde reactions and their dependencies on coal rank and structure, and/or coal modifications and reaction conditions. Because retrograde reactions are competitive with bond breaking reactions, an understanding of both is required to shift the competition in favor of the latter. Related objectives were to clarify the conflicting observations reported in literature on such major topics as the role of oxygen groups in retrograde reactions and to provide a bridge from very fundamental studies on pure compounds to phenomenological studies on actual coal. This information was integrated into the FG-DVC model, which was improved and extended to the liquefaction context.

  19. Study of the prograde and retrograde Chandler excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotov, , L.; Bizouard, , C.

    2014-12-01

    Observed motion of the Earth's rotation axis consists of components at both positive and negative frequencies. New generalized equations of Bizouard, which takes into account triaxiality of the Earth and asymmetry of the ocean tide, show that retrograde and prograde excitations are coupled. In this work using designed narrow-band filter and inversion we reconstruct geodetic excitation at the prograde and retrograde Chandler frequencies. Then we compare it with geophysical excitation, filtered out from the series of the oceanic angular momentum (OAM) and atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) for 1960-2000 yrs. Their sum coincides well with geodetic excitation only in the prograde Chandler band. The retrograde excitation coincides worse, probably in result of amplification of observational noises.

  20. Large retrograde Centaurs: visitors from the Oort cloud?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2014-08-01

    Among all the asteroid dynamical groups, Centaurs have the highest fraction of objects moving in retrograde orbits. The distribution in absolute magnitude, H, of known retrograde Centaurs with semi-major axes in the range 6-34 AU exhibits a remarkable trend: 10 % have H<10 mag, the rest have H>12 mag. The largest objects, namely (342842) 2008 YB3, 2011 MM4 and 2013 LU28, move in almost polar, very eccentric paths; their nodal points are currently located near perihelion and aphelion. In the group of retrograde Centaurs, they are obvious outliers both in terms of dynamics and size. Here, we show that these objects are also trapped in retrograde resonances that make them unstable. Asteroid 2013 LU28, the largest, is a candidate transient co-orbital to Uranus and it may be a recent visitor from the trans-Neptunian region. Asteroids 342842 and 2011 MM4 are temporarily submitted to various high-order retrograde resonances with the Jovian planets but 342842 may be ejected towards the trans-Neptunian region within the next few hundred kyr. Asteroid 2011 MM4 is far more stable. Our analysis shows that the large retrograde Centaurs form an heterogeneous group that may include objects from various sources. Asteroid 2011 MM4 could be a visitor from the Oort cloud but an origin in a relatively stable closer reservoir cannot be ruled out. Minor bodies like 2011 MM4 may represent the remnants of the primordial planetesimals and signal the size threshold for catastrophic collisions in the early Solar System.

  1. Dynein is the motor for retrograde axonal transport of organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Schnapp, B.J.; Reese, T.S.

    1989-03-01

    Vesicular organelles in axons of nerve cells are transported along microtubules either toward their plus ends (fast anterograde transport) or toward their minus ends (retrograde transport). Two microtubule-based motors were previously identified by examining plastic beads induced to move along microtubules by cytosol fractions from the squid giant axon: (i) an anterograde motor, kinesin, and (ii) a retrograde motor, which is characterized here. The retrograde motor, a cytosolic protein previously termed HMW1, was purified from optic lobes and extruded axoplasm by nucleotide-dependent microtubule affinity and release; microtubule gliding was used as the assay of motor activity. The following properties of the retrograde motor suggest that it is cytoplasmic dynein: (i) sedimentation at 20-22 S with a heavy chain of Mr greater than 200,000 that coelectrophoreses with the alpha and beta subunits of axonemal dynein, (ii) cleavage by UV irradiation in the presence of ATP and vanadate, and (iii) a molecular structure resembling two-headed dynein from axonemes. Furthermore, bead movement toward the minus end of microtubules was blocked when axoplasmic supernatants were treated with UV/vanadate. Treatment of axoplasmic supernatant with UV/vanadate also blocks the retrograde movement of purified organelles in vitro without changing the number of anterograde moving organelles, indicating that dynein interacts specifically with a subgroup of organelles programmed to move toward the cell body. However, purified optic lobe dynein, like purified kinesin, does not by itself promote the movement of purified organelles along microtubules, suggesting that additional axoplasmic factors are necessary for retrograde as well as anterograde transport.

  2. Transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus Valsalva aneurysm with retrograde approach.

    PubMed

    Narin, Nazmi; Ozyurt, Abdullah; Baykan, Ali; Uzüm, Kazım

    2014-04-01

    A three-year-old girl with multiple heart malformations admitted to the pediatric cardiology unit because of excessive sweating and fatigue. Abnormal color Doppler flow was detected into the right atrium from the dilated coronary sinus on the echocardiographic examination, and ruptured sinus Valsalva aneurysm (SVA) was diagnosed. Although in most such cases, an antegrade transcatheter approach has been used, a retrograde approach can be used as a cost-effective treatment modality in those cases with selective high-risk surgery. In this report, we present a patient with ruptured SVA, which was closed via Amplatzer vascular plug-4 by retrograde approach. PMID:24769826

  3. Orbital Evolution and Impact Hazard of Asteroids on Retrograde Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, P.; Włodarczyk, I.

    2014-07-01

    We present the past evolutional scenarios of known group of asteroids in retrograde orbits. Applying the latest observational data, we determined their nominal and averaged orbital elements. Next, we studied the behaviour of their orbital motion 1~My in the past (100~My in the future for two NEAs) taking into account the limitations of observational errors. It has been shown that the influence of outer planets perturbations in many cases can import small bodies on high inclination or retrograde orbits into the inner Solar System.

  4. Prostaglandin I2 and prostaglandin E2 modulate human intrarenal artery contractility through prostaglandin E2-EP4, prostacyclin-IP, and thromboxane A2-TP receptors.

    PubMed

    Eskildsen, Morten P; Hansen, Pernille B L; Stubbe, Jane; Toft, Anja; Walter, Steen; Marcussen, Niels; Rasmussen, Lars M; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Jensen, Boye L

    2014-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase inhibitors decrease renal blood flow in settings with decreased effective circulating volume. The present study examined the hypothesis that prostaglandins, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and prostacyclin (PGI2), induce relaxation of human intrarenal arteries through PGE2-EP and PGI2-IP receptors. Intrarenal arteries were microdissected from human nephrectomy samples (n=53, median diameter ≈362 μm, 88% viable, 76% relaxed in response to acetylcholine). Rings were suspended in myographs to record force development. In vessels with K(+)-induced tension (EC70: -log [mol/L]=1.36±0.03), PGE2 and PGI2 induced concentration-dependent relaxation (-log EC50: PGE2=7.1±0.3 and PGI2=7.7). The response to PGE2 displayed endothelium dependence and desensitization. Relaxation by PGE2 was mimicked by an EP4 receptor agonist (CAY10598, EC50=6.7±0.2). The relaxation after PGI2 was abolished by an IP receptor antagonist (BR5064, 10(-8) mol/L). Pretreatment of quiescent arteries with PGE2 for 5 minutes (10(-6) mol/L) led to a significant right shift of the concentration-response to norepinephrine (EC50 from 6.6±0.1-5.9±0.1). In intrarenal arteries with K(+)-induced tone, PGE2 and PGI2 at 10(-5) mol/L elicited increased tension. This was abolished by thromboxane receptor (TP) antagonist (S18886, 10(-6) mol/L). A TP agonist (U46619, n=6) evoked tension (EC50=8.1±0.2) that was inhibited by S18886. Polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting showed EP4, IP, and TP receptors in intrarenal arteries. In conclusion, PGE2 and PGI2 may protect renal perfusion by activating cognate IP and EP4 receptors associated with smooth muscle cells and endothelium in human intrarenal arteries and contribute to increased renal vascular resistance at high pathological concentrations mediated by noncognate TP receptor. PMID:24914192

  5. The kinematics of turnaround and retrograde axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Snyder, R E

    1986-11-01

    Rapid axonal transport of a pulse of 35S-methionine-labelled material was studied in vitro in the sensory neurons of amphibian sciatic nerve using a position-sensitive detector. For 10 nerves studied at 23.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C it was found that a pulse moved in the anterograde direction characterized by front edge, peak, and trailing edge transport rates of (mm/d) 180.8 +/- 2.2 (+/- SEM), 176.6 +/- 2.3, and 153.7 +/- 3.0, respectively. Following its arrival at a distal ligature, a smaller pulse was observed to move in the retrograde direction characterized by front edge and peak transport rates of 158.0 +/- 7.3 and 110.3 +/- 3.5, respectively, indicating that retrograde transport proceeds at a rate of 0.88 +/- 0.04 that of anterograde. The retrograde pulse was observed to disperse at a rate greater than the anterograde. Reversal of radiolabel at the distal ligature began 1.49 +/- 0.15 h following arrival of the first radiolabel. Considerable variation was seen between preparations in the way radiolabel accumulated in the end (ligature) regions of the nerve. Although a retrograde pulse was seen in all preparations, in 7 of 10 preparations there was no evidence of this pulse accumulating within less than 2-3 mm of a proximal ligature; however, accumulation was observed within less than 5 mm in all preparations. PMID:2432169

  6. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  7. A systematic review of in vitro retrograde obturation materials.

    PubMed

    Theodosopoulou, Joanna N; Niederman, Richard

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this review was two-fold: (a) to determine which retrograde obturation material(s) best prevents dye/ink penetration in vitro; and (b) to determine whether in vitro results agree with in vivo results. A MEDLINE search was conducted to identify in vitro studies published between January 1966 and October, week 4, 2003, conducted on human teeth, and published in English, German, or French language, testing the resistance to retrograde penetration of retrograde filling materials. The MEDLINE search identified 278 published articles. Of those, 115 studies examined the resistance to penetration of various retrograde filling materials, in vitro. Thirty-four studies met all the inclusion and validity criteria. The results indicate that, beyond 10 days in vitro, the most effective retrofilling materials, when measured by dye/ink penetration are: composites>glass ionomer cement>amalgam>orthograde gutta-percha>EBA. The results of these in vitro studies are not congruent with in vivo study results, suggesting a need to re-evaluate the clinical validity and importance of in vitro studies. PMID:15851926

  8. Water dynamics and retrogradation of ultrahigh pressurized wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Doona, Christopher J; Feeherry, Florence E; Baik, Moo-Yeol

    2006-09-01

    The water dynamics and retrogradation kinetics behavior of gelatinized wheat starch by either ultrahigh pressure (UHP) processing or heat are investigated. Wheat starch completely gelatinized in the condition of 90, 000 psi at 25 degrees C for 30 min (pressurized gel) or 100 degrees C for 30 min (heated gel). The physical properties of the wheat starches were characterized in terms of proton relaxation times (T2 times) measured using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and evaluated using commercially available continuous distribution modeling software. Different T2 distributions in both micro- and millisecond ranges between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels suggest distinctively different water dynamics between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels. Smaller water self-diffusion coefficients were observed for pressurized wheat starch gels and are indicative of more restricted translational proton mobility than is observed with heated wheat starch gels. The physical characteristics associated with changes taking place during retrogradation were evaluated using melting curves obtained with differential scanning calorimetry. Less retrogradation was observed in pressurized wheat starch, and it may be related to a smaller quantity of freezable water in pressurized wheat starch. Starches comprise a major constituent of many foods proposed for commercial potential using UHP, and the present results furnish insight into the effect of UHP on starch gelatinization and the mechanism of retrogradation during storage. PMID:16939331

  9. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  10. Retrograde fluids in granulites: Stable isotope evidence of fluid migration

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J. ); Valley, J.W. )

    1991-07-01

    Widespread retrograde alteration assemblages document the migration of mixed H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} fluids into granulite facies rocks in the Adirondack Mountains. Fluid migration is manifest by (1) veins and patchy intergrowths of chlorite {plus minus} sericite {plus minus} calcite, (2) small veins of calcite, many only identifiable by cathodoluminescence, and (3) high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich or mixed H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} fluid inclusions. The distinct and varied textural occurrences of the alteration minerals indicate that fluid-rock ratios were low and variable on a local scale. Stable isotope ratios of C, O, and S have been determined in retrograde minerals from samples of the Marcy anorthosite massif and adjacent granitic gneisses (charnockites). Retrograde calcite in the anorthosite has a relatively small range in both {delta}{sup 18}O{sub SMOW} and {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} (8.6 to 14.9% and {minus}4.1 to 0.4%, respectively), probably indicating that the hydrothermal fluids that precipitated the calcite had exchanged with a variety of crustal lithologies including marbles and orthogneisses, and that calcite was precipitated over a relatively narrow temperature interval. Values of {delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} that range from 2.8 to 8.3% within the anorthosite can also be interpreted to reflect exchange between orthogneisses and metasediments. The recognition of retrograde fluid migration is particularly significant in granulite facies terranes because the controversy surrounding the origin of granulites arises in part from differing interpretations of fluid inclusion data, specifically, the timing of entrapment of high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich inclusions. Results indicate that retrograde fluid migration, which in some samples may leave only cryptic petrographic evidence, is a process capable of producing high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich fluid inclusions.

  11. Intra-Renal Oxygenation in Rat Kidneys During Water-loading: Effects of COX Inhibition & NO Donation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lin; Li, Lu-Ping; Schnitzer, Thomas; Du, Hongyan; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate intra-renal oxygenation by blood oxygenation level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) in rat kidneys during water-loading and to investigate if the nitric oxide donating moiety in naproxcinod could compensate the effect of cyclooxygenase inhibition of naproxen. Materials and Methods Nineteen male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups and dosed with vehicle, naproxen or naproxcinod by gavage for two weeks. On the day of the experiment, hypotonic saline with glucose was infused intravenously to induce water diuresis. BOLD MRI data to monitor renal oxygenation and timed urine samples for estimation of prostaglandins and urine flow were obtained. Results The data in this study is consistent with previous experience in humans in that pre-treatment with naproxen abolished the improvement in medullary oxygenation during water-loading. In addition, the inhibition of prostaglandins by naproxcinod reached similar levels as naproxen but maintained the improvement in oxygenation in renal medulla during water-loading. Conclusion This suggests that naproxcinod may have less nephrotoxicity and that the nitric oxide donating moiety partially compensates for the hemodynamic effects of prostaglandin inhibition by naproxen. PMID:20677266

  12. Association between the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system and renal injury in chronic kidney disease of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    The association of renin and angiotensin II, which are potent components of the renin-angiotensin system, with the severity of chronic renal disease was investigated immunohistochemically in dogs and cats. Immunoreactivities of renin and angiotensin II were evaluated quantitatively, and their correlations with the degrees of glomerulosclerosis, glomerular hypertrophy, interstitial cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis were statistically analyzed. Immunoreactivities for renin were detected in afferent arteries in both dogs and cats. The score of renin-positive signals showed no correlation with plasma creatinine concentration or any of the histopathological parameters, except for the diameter of glomeruli in dogs. Immunoreactivities for angiotensin II were detected in tubules (primarily proximal tubules) and interstitial mononuclear cells in both dogs and cats. The score of tubular angiotensin II correlated with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats but not in dogs. The score of interstitial angiotensin II correlated with plasma creatinine concentration, glomerulosclerosis, cell infiltration and fibrosis in dogs and with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats. In conclusion, the results of the study suggest that intrarenal renin-angiotensin system is correlated with the severity of kidney disease, with the underlying mechanism differing between dogs and cats. PMID:22986274

  13. The adipose renin-angiotensin system modulates sysemic markers of insulin sensitivity activates the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suyeon; Soltani-Bejnood, Morvarid; Quignard-Boulange, Annie; Massiera, Florence; Teboul, Michele; Ailhaud, Gerard; Kim, Jung; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima; Voy, Brynn H

    2006-07-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing body of data provides increasing evidence that the adipose tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to regulation of fat mass. Beyond its paracrine actions within adipose tissue, adipocyte-derived angiotensin II (Ang II) may also impact systemic functions such as blood pressure and metabolism. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used a genetic approach to manipulate adipose RAS activity in mice and then study the consequences on metabolic parameters and on feedback regulation of the RAS. The models included deletion of the angiotensinogen (Agt) gene (Agt-KO), its expression solely in adipose tissue under the control of an adipocyte-specific promoter (aP2-Agt/ Agt-KO), and overexpression in adipose tissue of wild type mice (aP2-Agt). Total body weight, epididymal fat pad weight, and circulating levels of leptin, insulin and resistin were significantly decreased in Agt-KO mice, while plasma adiponectin levels were increased. Overexpression of Agt in adipose tissue resulted in increased adiposity and plasma leptin and insulin levels compared to wild type (WT) controls. Angiotensinogen and type I Ang II receptor protein levels were also markedly elevated in kidney of aP2-Agt mice, suggesting that hypertension in these animals may be in part due to stimulation of the intrarenal RAS. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, the results from this study demonstrate that alterations in adipose RAS activity significantly alter both local and systemic physiology in a way that may contribute to the detrimental health effects of obesity.

  14. Spontaneous subcapsular and intrarenal hematoma demonstrated by various diagnostic modalities and monitored by ultrasonography until complete resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Shih, W. J.; Pulmano, C.; Han, J. K.; Lee, C.

    2000-01-01

    A patient with acute right abdominal pain and nausea underwent various diagnostic imaging studies, including ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), technetium-99m DTPA renal study, and contrast arteriogram. The 99mTc renal study showed a linear photopenic area along the lateral cortical aspect of the right kidney and a focal cortical defect in the left kidney. These lesions corresponded to the findings of US, CT, MRI, and contrast angiography. Because of a suspected malignant mass, a CT-guided aspiration biopsy of the right kidney was performed that resulted in bloody fluid without malignant cells. The patient's condition was diagnosed as intrarenal and subcapsular renal hematoma. The patient was treated conservatively and followed up with CT and US studies. Sequential CT and US demonstrated gradual reduction of the size of the hematoma, and complete resolution was confirmed by US 1.5 years later. As long as underlying pathology can be ruled out, conservative management of spontaneous renal subcapsular hematoma is recommended. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:10976177

  15. Hemoglobinuria-related acute kidney injury is driven by intrarenal oxidative reactions triggering a heme toxicity response

    PubMed Central

    Deuel, J W; Schaer, C A; Boretti, F S; Opitz, L; Garcia-Rubio, I; Baek, J H; Spahn, D R; Buehler, P W; Schaer, D J

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular hemolysis can result in hemoglobinuria with acute kidney injury. In this study we systematically explored two in vivo animal models and a related cell culture system to identify hemoglobinuria-triggered damage pathways. In models of stored blood transfusion and hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in guinea pigs and beagle dogs we found that hemoglobinuria led to intrarenal conversion of ferrous Hb(Fe2+) to ferric Hb(Fe3+), accumulation of free heme and Hb-cross-linking products, enhanced 4-hydroxynonenal reactivity in renal tissue, and acute tubule injury. These changes were associated in guinea pigs with activation of a renal cortex gene expression signature indicative of oxidative stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Tubule cells of hemolytic animals demonstrated enhanced protein expression of heme oxygenase and heat shock protein and enhanced expression of acute kidney injury-related neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. These adverse changes were completely prevented by haptoglobin treatment. The in vivo findings were extrapolated to a MS-based proteome analysis of SILAC-labeled renal epithelial cells that were exposed to free heme within a concentration range estimate of renal tubule heme exposure. These experiments confirmed that free heme is a likely trigger of tubule barrier deregulation and oxidative cell damage and reinforced the hypothesis that uncontrolled free heme could trigger the UPR as an important pathway of renal injury during hemoglobinuria. PMID:26794659

  16. Studies of the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis induced in rats by intrarenal injection of a carcinogen, nickel subsulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Hopfer, S.M.; Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; McCully, K.S.; Reid, M.C.; Liber, C.; Spears, J.R.; Serur, J.

    1984-01-01

    Widespread arteriosclerotic lesions were detected by histological examinations of rats killed at seven or nine weeks after an intrarenal (ir) injection of nickel subsulfide (Ni3S2, 5 mg per rat). Arteriosclerotic plaques were readily visualized by administering hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) iv to rats at 24 hours before sacrifice. At necropsy, the major arteries were inspected under ultraviolet light, revealing patches of intense HPD-fluorescence in the arterial endothelium of Ni3S2-treated rats, but not in control rats. Consistent with previous reports, the Ni3S2-treated rats developed pronounced erythrocytosis; blood hematocrit values averaged 70 +/- 4% at seven weeks after ir injection of Ni3S2 (P<0.001 vs corresponding value of 49 +/- 2% in vehicle controls). At seven weeks, blood platelet counts averaged 17% lower and serum glucose concentrations averaged 23% lower in Ni3S2-treated rats than in controls; serum lipids, lipoproteins, non-protein nitrogen constituents, electrolytes, proteins, and enzymes were not significantly affected. These findings exclude hypertension and hyperlipidemia as pathogenic factors in Ni3S2-induced arteriosclerosis. 57 references, 1 figure, 6 tables.

  17. Retrograde jejunal intussusception after total gastrectomy: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Huang, G S; Jin, Y

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde jejunal intussusception is a rare disease. A 60-year-old female patient was hospitalized due to vomiting for 2 days, with a history of radical gastrectomy plus esophagus jejunum Rouxs-en-Y. On examination, there was a palpable wax-like mass on the left-hand side underneath the umbilicus. Computerized tomography scan showed a proximal jejunal intussusception. During surgery, the distal jejunum was found set into the proximal jejunum for a length of 30 cm, and bowel necrosis was also observed. The necrotic tube was resected and anastomosis was performed. Four days after the surgery, gastrointestinal function resumed. After a 10-month follow-up, the patient had no discomfort. PMID:27022810

  18. Effects of chitin nano-whiskers on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and potato starches.

    PubMed

    Ji, Na; Liu, Chengzhen; Zhang, Shuangling; Yu, Jing; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2017-01-01

    Starch is very prone to retrogradation after gelatinization. Inhibition of starch retrogradation has been an important factor in improving the quality of food. For the first time, we investigated the effect of nano-materials, represented by chitin nano-whiskers (CNWs), on the short- and long-term retrogradation of maize and potato starches. Rapid Visco-Analyser results showed that the addition of CNWs significantly decreased the setback values of maize and potato starches, which suggested that CNWs could retard the short-term retrogradation of starch. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction results showed that the percentage of retrogradation of maize and potato starches significantly decreased (P<0.05), suggesting the inhibition of long-term retrogradation. The CNWs could be used as a new inhibitor of starch retrogradation to develop starch-based food with longer shelf life. PMID:27507508

  19. New technique for retrograde cerebral perfusion during arch aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Bartoccioni, S; Lanzillo, G; deJong, A A; Fiaschini, P; Martinelli, G; Fedeli, C; Di Lazarro, D; Mercati, U

    1995-09-01

    Many techniques are used to reduce brain damage during surgery for dissecting aneurysms of the ascending aorta and arch. Recently, new techniques of protection were proposed, consistent with hypothermic circulatory arrest in association with retrograde cerebral perfusion via superior vena cava. We propose a simple, time-saving method, which does not require any manipulation of the heart. We use a multilumen cannula for cardioplegia (D 860-DIDECO FUNDARO') with pressure transducer. This cannula is inserted in superior vena cava by means of a simple purse-string, and linked to the arterial line with a "Y" derivation, allowing retrograde perfusion of the brain and monitoring the perfusion pressure at every moment. The superior vena cava placed downstream from the cannula is closed by a small vascular clamp, to avoid blood reflux in the right atrium. This method is time- and money-saving, is readily available, and can be prepared whenever necessary, also in the middle of the surgical procedure. PMID:7488786

  20. Learning the Languages of the Chloroplast: Retrograde Signaling and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kai Xun; Phua, Su Yin; Crisp, Peter; McQuinn, Ryan; Pogson, Barry J

    2016-04-29

    The chloroplast can act as an environmental sensor, communicating with the cell during biogenesis and operation to change the expression of thousands of proteins. This process, termed retrograde signaling, regulates expression in response to developmental cues and stresses that affect photosynthesis and yield. Recent advances have identified many signals and pathways-including carotenoid derivatives, isoprenes, phosphoadenosines, tetrapyrroles, and heme, together with reactive oxygen species and proteins-that build a communication network to regulate gene expression, RNA turnover, and splicing. However, retrograde signaling pathways have been viewed largely as a means of bilateral communication between organelles and nuclei, ignoring their potential to interact with hormone signaling and the cell as a whole to regulate plant form and function. Here, we discuss new findings on the processes by which organelle communication is initiated, transmitted, and perceived, not only to regulate chloroplastic processes but also to intersect with cellular signaling and alter physiological responses. PMID:26735063

  1. Photosynthetic light reactions: integral to chloroplast retrograde signalling.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signalling is ultimately dependent on the function of the photosynthetic light reactions and not only guides the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental and metabolic cues, but has a much wider influence on the growth and development of plants. New information generated during the past few years about regulation of photosynthetic light reactions and identification of the underlying regulatory proteins has paved the way towards better understanding of the signalling molecules produced in chloroplasts upon changes in the environment. Likewise, the availability of various mutants lacking regulatory functions has made it possible to address the role of excitation energy distribution and electron flow in the thylakoid membrane in inducing the retrograde signals from chloroplasts to the nucleus. Such signalling molecules also induce and interact with hormonal signalling cascades to provide comprehensive information from chloroplasts to the nucleus. PMID:26318477

  2. Ureteroscopy assisted retrograde nephrostomy for complete staghorn renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-09-01

    Complete staghorn calculi are typically managed with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). However, dilating nephrostomy and inserting a nephro access sheath can be difficult to perform without hydronephrosis. We reported the procedure of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) during PCNL. UARN is effective without dilating the renal collecting system in cases of complete staghorn calculi. A 63-year old female with a left complete staghorn renal calculus was referred to our hospital. Under general and epidural anesthesia, the patient was placed in a modified-Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope was inserted and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible ureteroscope. The puncture wire was forwarded along the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was done using a pneumatic lithotripter and the Ho: YAG laser. UARN during PCNL was effective for the treatment of a complete staghorn calculus. PMID:24917723

  3. Ureteroscopy-Assisted Retrograde Nephrostomy (UARN) after Anatrophic Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Kato, Yoshitake; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Open surgical anatrophic nephrolithotomy (ANL) had been the standard treatment for large renal calculi prior to the development of endoscopic devices and endoscopic techniques. A previous report described the efficacy of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) and presented a case of renal calculi successfully treated with UARN during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in a patient after ANL. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male with left renal calculi was referred for further treatment. The patient was placed under general and epidural anesthesia, in a Galdakao-modified Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope (URS) was inserted, and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible URS. The puncture wire then followed the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was undertaken using a pneumatic lithotripter. Conclusions. UARN for PCNL was therefore found to be a safe, effective, and appropriate treatment for a patient presenting with renal calculi after undergoing ANL. PMID:22924043

  4. Sealing ability of five different retrograde filling materials.

    PubMed

    Gerhards, F; Wagner, W

    1996-09-01

    The sealing ability of Amalgam, Harvard-Cement, Diaket, gold-leaf, and Ketac-Endo as retrofilling materials was investigated. Paper cones were fixed with Harvard-Cement in the instrumented roots of 100 extracted human incisors. Apicectomy was performed and a 2-mm-deep retrograde cavity was prepared. Teeth were assigned to five groups (n = 20); each group received a different filling material. Surfaces of the roots were isolated with nail polish. Teeth, were stored in 1% methylene blue dye for 72 h. Roots were sectioned, and the depth of dye penetration was evaluated through a stereomicroscope. Retrofills with Ketac-Endo showed significantly less leakage compared with amalgam. There was no significant difference between the amalgam and Diaket groups. The sealing ability of Harvard-Cement and gold foil was lower than amalgam. It was concluded that retrograde fillings with Ketac-Endo or Diaket can be considered as alternatives for amalgam. PMID:9198426

  5. Subversion of Retrograde Trafficking by Translocated Pathogen Effectors.

    PubMed

    Personnic, Nicolas; Bärlocher, Kevin; Finsel, Ivo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert the endocytic bactericidal pathway to form specific replication-permissive compartments termed pathogen vacuoles or inclusions. To this end, the pathogens employ type III or type IV secretion systems, which translocate dozens, if not hundreds, of different effector proteins into their host cells, where they manipulate vesicle trafficking and signaling pathways in favor of the intruders. While the distinct cocktail of effectors defines the specific processes by which a pathogen vacuole is formed, the different pathogens commonly target certain vesicle trafficking routes, including the endocytic or secretory pathway. Recently, the retrograde transport pathway from endosomal compartments to the trans-Golgi network emerged as an important route affecting pathogen vacuole formation. Here, we review current insight into the host cell's retrograde trafficking pathway and how vacuolar pathogens of the genera Legionella, Coxiella, Salmonella, Chlamydia, and Simkania employ mechanistically distinct strategies to subvert this pathway, thus promoting intracellular survival and replication. PMID:26924068

  6. Transit Timing Variations for Inclined and Retrograde Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B.; Veras, Dimitri

    2010-03-01

    We perform numerical calculations of the expected transit timing variations (TTVs) induced on a hot-Jupiter by an Earth-mass perturber. Motivated by the recent discoveries of retrograde transiting planets, we concentrate on an investigation of the effect of varying relative planetary inclinations, up to and including completely retrograde systems. We find that planets in low-order (e.g., 2:1) mean-motion resonances (MMRs) retain approximately constant TTV amplitudes for 0° < i < 170°, only reducing in amplitude for i>170°. Systems in higher order MMRs (e.g., 5:1) increase in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase toward 45°, becoming approximately constant for 45° < i < 135°, and then declining for i>135°. Planets away from resonance slowly decrease in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase from 0° to 180°, whereas planets adjacent to resonances can exhibit a huge range of variability in TTV amplitude as a function of both eccentricity and inclination. For highly retrograde systems (135° < i <= 180°), TTV signals will be undetectable across almost the entirety of parameter space, with the exceptions occurring when the perturber has high eccentricity or is very close to an MMR. This high inclination decrease in TTV amplitude (on and away from resonance) is important for the analysis of the known retrograde and multi-planet transiting systems, as inclination effects need to be considered if TTVs are to be used to exclude the presence of any putative planetary companions: absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

  7. Retrograde approach for closure of ruptured sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Jayaranganath, M; Subramanian, Anand; Manjunath, Cholenahally Nanjappa

    2010-07-01

    Though ruptured sinuses of Valsalva have been traditionally managed surgically, they are amenable to transcatheter closure. Various devices have been used for closure of these defects. We describe a novel technique of closure of a ruptured right sinus of Valsalva into the right ventricular outflow tract. A muscular ventricular septal defect occluder was deployed retrogradely, without resorting to the usual antegrade technique involving formation of an arteriovenous loop. PMID:20603510

  8. Formation Flying in Earth, Libration, and Distant Retrograde Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David C.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation examines the current and future state of formation flying, LEO formations, control strategies for flight in the vicinity of the libration points, and distant retrograde orbit formations. This discussion of LEO formations includes background on perturbation theory/accelerations and LEO formation flying. The discussion of strategies for formation flight in the vicinity of the libration points includes libration missions and natural and controlled libration orbit formations. A reference list is included.

  9. Activity-Dependent Regulation of Synapses by Retrograde Messengers

    PubMed Central

    Regehr, Wade G.; Carey, Megan R.; Best, Aaron R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Throughout the brain postsynaptic neurons release substances from their cell bodies and dendrites that regulate the strength of the synapses they receive. Diverse chemical messengers have been implicated in retrograde signaling from postsynaptic neurons to presynaptic boutons. Here we provide an overview of the signaling systems that lead to rapid changes in synaptic strength. We consider the capabilities, specializations and physiological roles of each type of signaling system. PMID:19640475

  10. Osteochondritis Dissecans Involving the Trochlear Groove Treated With Retrograde Drilling

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Yoshio; Nakamura, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Konosuke; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) occurs frequently in the humeral capitellum of the upper extremity, whereas OCD involving the trochlear groove (trochlear groove OCD) is rarely reported. A standard treatment for trochlear groove OCD has therefore not been determined, although several methods have been tried. The case of a 14-year-old male gymnast with bilateral trochlear groove OCD is presented. Retrograde drilling from the lateral condyle of the humerus was applied for the OCD lesion of the left elbow, since it was larger in size than that in the right elbow and was symptomatic. Conversely, since the right lesion was small and asymptomatic, it was managed conservatively. After treatment, consolidation of the OCD lesions was observed in both elbows. However, the time to healing was shorter in the left elbow treated surgically than in the right elbow managed conservatively. In conclusion, retrograde drilling is a very simple and minimally invasive treatment. This case suggests that retrograde drilling for trochlear groove OCD may be a useful procedure that may accelerate the healing process for OCD lesions. PMID:26356703

  11. Huge biloma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.; Al-azzawi, Khairallh H.; Alkarboly, Taha A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biliary leak can occur as a complication of biliary surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography manipulations and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, bile may collect in the abdominal cavity, a condition called biloma. Rarely, it may reach a massive size. Case presentation A 72-year-old man presented with gastric upset with gradual abdominal distension reaching a large size due to intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography plus endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stenting for post laparoscopic cholecystectomy common bile duct stricture. This huge biloma was treated by percutaneous insertion of a tube drain for a few days, evacuating the collection successfully without recurrence. Discussion This patient might sustain injury to the common bile duct either by the guide wire or stent, or the injury occurred at the angle between the common bile duct and duodenum during sphincterotomy of the ampulla. Although any of these rents may lead to a bile leak, causing a huge biloma, they could be successfully treated by percutaneous drainage. Conclusions (1) Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a patient’s complaints should not be ignored. (2) A massive biloma can occur due to such procedures. (3) Conservative treatment with minimal invasive technique can prove to be effective. PMID:26402876

  12. Retrogradation behaviour of high-amylose rice starch prepared by improved extrusion cooking technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Liu, Wei; Liu, Chengmei; Luo, Shunjing; Li, Ti; Liu, Yunfei; Wu, Di; Zuo, Yanna

    2014-09-01

    Native rice starch (NRS, amylose/28.9%) was gelatinized by improved extrusion cooking technology (IECT) and retrograded (RRS) after low temperature storage (4 °C). The retrogradation behaviour of RRS was changed to low retrogradation percentage and low retrogradation rate. The retrogradation resulted in a high compact morphology. The melt enthalpy change and percentage of retrogradation of RRS was 3.68 J/g and 37.7%, respectively, compared to those of NRS (9.75 J/g, 100%). The retrogradation percentage for RRS was low during storage as shown as a low retrogradation rate (0.21 d(-1)) and a high Avrami exponent (0.89). The pattern of rice starch changed from A-type to amorphous and B-type. Both the relative crystallinity of RRS (12.7%) by the X-ray diffractograms and the ratio of the band height (0.63) in the FTIR spectra were low. The analysis of retrogradation structure and short-range molecular order further confirmed the retrogradation behaviour of rice starch after IECT treatment. PMID:24731339

  13. Coupling of Retrograde Flow to Force Production During Malaria Parasite Migration.

    PubMed

    Quadt, Katharina A; Streichfuss, Martin; Moreau, Catherine A; Spatz, Joachim P; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2016-02-23

    Migration of malaria parasites is powered by a myosin motor that moves actin filaments, which in turn link to adhesive proteins spanning the plasma membrane. The retrograde flow of these adhesins appears to be coupled to forward locomotion. However, the contact dynamics between the parasite and the substrate as well as the generation of forces are complex and their relation to retrograde flow is unclear. Using optical tweezers we found retrograde flow rates up to 15 μm/s contrasting with parasite average speeds of 1-2 μm/s. We found that a surface protein, TLP, functions in reducing retrograde flow for the buildup of adhesive force and that actin dynamics appear optimized for the generation of force but not for maximizing the speed of retrograde flow. These data uncover that TLP acts by modulating actin dynamics or actin filament organization and couples retrograde flow to force production in malaria parasites. PMID:26792112

  14. Intrarenal distributions and changes of Angiotensin-converting enzyme and Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in feline and canine chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Sawa, Mariko; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yamato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). ACE2 is a newly identified member of the RAS. The present immunohistochemical study focused on changes in intrarenal ACE and ACE2 immunoreactivity in feline and canine chronic kidney disease (CKD). ACE immunoreactivity was predominantly observed in the brush border of the proximal tubules in dogs and cats. ACE immunoreactivity was lower in CKD kidneys than in normal kidneys, and quantitative analysis demonstrated negative correlations between ACE and renal tissue damage in dogs. ACE2 immunoreactivity was also detected in the proximal tubules; it increased or decreased with CKD in dogs, depending on the renal region assessed. The changes in ACE and ACE2 in CKD were associated with the plasma creatinine concentration in dogs. Findings from dogs with glomerulonephritis were similar to those from dogs with non-glomerulonephritis. The present study suggests that changes in the intrarenal expression of ACE and ACE2 contribute to the pathological mechanisms of canine CKD, but not to the mechanisms of feline CKD. PMID:24004970

  15. Hemodynamic changes and retrograde flow in LVAD failure.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Koenig, Steven C; Soucy, Kevin G; Choi, Young; Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Bartoli, Carlo R; Monreal, Gretel; Sobieski, Michael A; Schumer, Erin; Cheng, Allen; Slaughter, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    In the event of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) failure, we hypothesized that rotary blood pumps will experience significant retrograde flow and induce adverse physiologic responses. Catastrophic LVAD failure was investigated in computer simulation with pulsatile, axial, and centrifugal LVAD, mock flow loop with pulsatile (PVAD) and centrifugal (ROTAFLOW), and healthy and chronic ischemic heart failure bovine models with pulsatile (PVAD), axial (HeartMate II), and centrifugal (HVAD) pumps. Simulated conditions were LVAD "off" with outflow graft clamped (baseline), LVAD "off" with outflow graft unclamped (LVAD failure), and LVAD "on" (5 L/min). Hemodynamics (aortic and ventricular blood pressures, LVAD flow, and left ventricular volume), echocardiography (cardiac volumes), and end-organ perfusion (regional blood flow microspheres) were measured and analyzed. Retrograde flow was observed with axial and centrifugal rotary pumps during LVAD failure in computer simulation (axial = -3.4 L/min, centrifugal = -2.8 L/min), mock circulation (pulsatile = -0.1 L/min, centrifugal = -2.7 L/min), healthy (pulsatile = -1.2 ± 0.3 L/min, axial = -2.2 ± 0.2 L/min, centrifugal = -1.9 ± 0.3 L/min), and ischemic heart failure (centrifugal = 2.2 ± 0.7 L/min) bovine models for all test conditions (p < 0.05). Differences between axial and centrifugal LVAD were statistically indiscernible. Retrograde flow increased ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes and workload, and decreased myocardial and end-organ perfusion during LVAD failure compared with baseline, LVAD support, and pulsatile LVAD failure. PMID:25635935

  16. A chloroplast retrograde signal regulates nuclear alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Herz, Micaela A. Godoy; Fuchs, Armin; Reifer, Dominik; Fuller, John; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Simpson, Craig; Brown, John W. S.; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2015-01-01

    Light is a source of energy and also a regulator of plant physiological adaptations. We show here that light/dark conditions affect alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes preferentially encoding proteins involved in RNA processing. The effect requires functional chloroplasts and is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. Using photosynthetic electron transfer inhibitors with different mechanisms of action we deduce that the reduced pool of plastoquinones initiates a chloroplast retrograde signaling that regulates nuclear alternative splicing and is necessary for proper plant responses to varying light conditions. PMID:24763593

  17. Approximations of distant retrograde orbits for mission design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirani, Anil N.; Russell, Ryan P.

    2006-01-01

    Distant retrograde orbits (DROs) are stable periodic orbit solutions of the equations of motion in the circular restricted three body problem. Since no closed form expressions for DROs are known, we present methods for approximating a family of planar DROs for an arbitrary, fixed mass ratio. Furthermore we give methods for computing the first and second derivatives of the position and velocity with respect to the variables that parameterize the family. The approximation and derivative methods described allow a mission designer to target specific DROs or a range of DROs with no regard to phasing in contrast to the more limited case of targeting a six-state only.

  18. The Role of Central and Enteric Nervous Systems in the Control of the Retrograde Giant Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Ivan M

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The role of the enteric (ENS) and central (CNS) nervous systems in the control of the retrograde giant contraction (RGC) associated with vomiting is unknown. Methods The effects of myotomy or mesenteric nerve transection (MNT) on apomorphine-induced emesis were investigated in 18 chronically instrumented dogs Results Neither surgery affected the RGC orad of the surgical site or the velocity of the RGC over the entire small intestine. Myotomy blocked the RGC for 17 ± 5 cm aborad of the myotomy, and the velocity of the RGC from 100 to 70 cm from the pylorus slowed (18.1 ± 3.0 to 9.0 ± 0.8 cm/sec) such that the RGC orad and aborad of the myotomy occurred simultaneously. After MNT, the RGC was unchanged up to 66 ± 6 cm from the pylorus, and the sequence of the RGC across the denervated intestine was unaltered. The velocity of the RGC from 100 to 70 cm from the pylorus increased from 12.8 ± 1.6 to 196 ± 116 cm/sec. After myotomy or MNT, the percent occurrence and magnitude of the RGC across the intestine 100 to 70 cm from the pylorus decreased. Conclusions The CNS activates the RGC 10 to 20 cm aborad of its innervation of the intestine and controls the RGC sequence. On the other hand, the ENS plays a role in initiation and generation of the RGC. PMID:26645249

  19. Retrograde closed orbits in a rotating triaxial potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisler, J.; Merritt, D.; Schwarzschild, M.

    1982-07-01

    Four closed periodic orbit sequences are determined numerically, and their stability is investigated by the standard Floquet method, for the case of a specific, triaxial rotating potential. The sequences comprise (1) stable anomalous orbits that are tipped to the long axis which they circle, so that they also circle the short rotation axis, (2) unstable, anomalous orbits circling the intermediate axis, otherwise behaving like (1), (3) stable, normal retrograde orbits lying in the equatorial plane, which become unstable against perpendicular perturbations in Binney's instability strip, and (4) Z-axis orbits lying on the rotation axis, which, although stable in their inner section, become unstable to perturbations parallel to the intermediate axis farther out, and to the long axis farther out still. The entire set contains one composite sequence which is stable over the entire energy range, consisting of the outer section of the normal retrograde orbits, the sequence of the anomalous orbits, and the inner section of the Z-axis orbits. It is suggested that the composite sequence may be relevant to the dynamics of gas masses captured by rotating triaxial galaxies.

  20. Quantitative radioactive analysis of microleakage of four different retrograde fillings.

    PubMed

    Danin, J; Linder, L; Sund, M L; Strömberg, T; Torstenson, B; Zetterqvist, L

    1992-07-01

    Sealing properties of four different retrograde filling materials were investigated in vitro. Radioactive isotopes were applied in the root canal, and leakage into an extraradicular fluid was measured at regular intervals. The method permitted repeated observation of the specimens over prolonged periods of time. Forty single-rooted human teeth were biomechanically instrumented and obturated using calcium-hydroxide paste. Following obturation, an apicectomy was performed and retrograde cavities were filled with four different materials: group 1, non gamma 2 amalgam (Amalcap); group 2, glass ionomer cement (Ketac Silver); group 3, calcium-hydroxide-based root canal sealer (Sealapex); group 4, composite resin (Palfique Light-S). After removal of the calcium hydroxide, the teeth were immersed in a fluid. An isotope solution was then placed in the root canals. Samples were taken from the fluid at 0, 3, 7, 28, 56, 105, 210, 285 and 376 days to determine the radioactivity. It was found that Sealapex and Palfique Light-S showed significantly less leakage than amalgam and glass ionomer cement, which had the highest apical leakage. PMID:1399068

  1. Intrarenal alterations of the angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2/angiotensin 1-7 complex of the renin-angiotensin system do not alter the course of malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Husková, Zuzana; Kopkan, Libor; Červenková, Lenka; Doleželová, Šárka; Vaňourková, Zdeňka; Škaroupková, Petra; Nishiyama, Akira; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Janusz; Kramer, Herbert J; Červenka, Luděk

    2016-04-01

    The role of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pathophysiology of malignant hypertension is not fully understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that the recently discovered vasodilator axis of the RAS, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) type 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin 1-7 (ANG 1-7), constitutes an endogenous system counterbalancing the hypertensiogenic axis, ACE/angiotensin II (ANG II)/AT1 receptor. This study aimed to evaluate the role of the intrarenal vasodilator RAS axis in the pathophysiology of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension was induced by 13 days' dietary administration of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural xenobiotic that activates the mouse renin gene in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. It was hypothesized that pharmacologically-induced inhibition of the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex should aggravate, and activation of this axis should attenuate, the course of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension. Blood pressure (BP) was monitored by radiotelemetry. ACE2 inhibitor (DX 600, 0.2 μg/day) and ACE2 activator (DIZE, 1 mg/day) were administrated via osmotic minipumps. Even though ACE2 inhibitor significantly decreased and ACE2 activator increased intrarenal ANG 1-7 concentrations, the course of BP, as well as of albuminuria, cardiac hypertrophy and renal glomerular damage, were not altered. It was shown that intrarenal alterations in the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex did not significantly modify the course of malignant hypertension in I3C-induced Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. Thus, in our experimental setting alterations of this intrarenal vasodilator complex of the RAS do not significantly modify the form of malignant hypertension that clearly depends on the inappropriately increased activity of the ACE/ANG II/AT1 receptor axis. PMID:26833491

  2. Origin of the Y chromosome influences intrarenal vascular responsiveness to angiotensin I and angiotensin (1-7) in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Amanda K; Andrews, Karen L; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W; Head, Geoffrey A; Thomas, Merlin C; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F; Dominiczak, Anna F; Jennings, Garry L

    2014-12-01

    The lineage of the Y chromosome accounts for up to 15 to 20 mm Hg in arterial pressure. Genes located on the Y chromosome from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) are associated with the renin-angiotensin system. Given the important role of the renin-angiotensin system in the renal regulation of fluid homeostasis and arterial pressure, we hypothesized that the origin of the Y chromosome influences arterial pressure via interaction between the intrarenal vasculature and the renin-angiotensin system. Sixteen-week-old normotensive rats (Wistar Kyoto [WKY]), spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rat (SHRSP), and 2 reciprocal Y consomic rat strains, 1 comprising the WKY autosomes and X chromosome with the Y chromosome from the hypertensive rat strain (WKY.SPGlaY) and vice versa (SP.WKYGlaY), were examined. SP.WKYGlaY had lower systolic blood pressure than SHRSP (195±5 versus 227±8 mm Hg; P<0.03), whereas WKY.SPGlaY had higher systolic blood pressure compared with WKY (157±3 versus 148±3 mm Hg; P<0.05), measured by radiotelemetry. Compared with WKY rats, SHRSP had higher plasma angiotensin(1-7) (Ang (1-7)):Ang II ratio (WKY: 0.13±0.01 versus SHRSP: 1.33±0.4; P<0.005), greater angiotensin II receptor type 2 and Mas receptor mRNA expression, and a blunted renal constrictor response to intrarenal Ang I and Ang(1-7) infusions. Introgression of the normotensive Y chromosome into the SHRSP background (SP.WKYGlaY) restored responses in the SHRSP to WKY levels, evidenced by a reduction in plasma Ang(1-7):Ang II ratio (SP.WKYGlaY: 0.24±0.02; P<0.01), angiotensin II receptor type 2, and Mas receptor mRNA expression and an increased vasoconstrictor response to intrarenal Ang I and Ang(1-7) infusion. This study demonstrates that the origin of the Y chromosome significantly impacts the renal vascular responsiveness and therefore may influence the long-term renal regulation of blood pressure. PMID:25201895

  3. Anterograde and Retrograde Amnesia of Place Discrimination in Retrosplenial Cortex and Hippocampal Lesioned Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haijima, Asahi; Ichitani, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    Retrograde and anterograde amnesic effects of excitotoxic lesions of the rat retrosplenial cortex (RS) and hippocampus (HPC) were investigated. To test retrograde amnesia, rats were trained with two-arm place discrimination in a radial maze 4 wk and 1 d before surgery with a different arm pair, respectively. In the retention test 1 wk after…

  4. Use of the Conventional Side-viewing Duodenoscope for Successful Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Postgastrectomy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Guang; Mei, Jia-wei; Zhao, Ming-Ning; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Gu, Jun; Tao, Yi-Jing; Liu, Ying-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the conventional side-viewing duodenoscope for successful endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in postgastrectomy patients. Methods: A total of 220 consecutive patients with bile duct stones or a distal common bile duct stricture who had previously undergone gastrectomy and were referred for ERCP were analyzed for the outcome of their ERCP. All ERCP procedures were performed using a conventional side-viewing duodenoscope. In patients who had undergone a Billroth II gastroenterostomy and total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction, we also used the procedure of retrieval balloon–assisted enterography. Results: The study group included 220 patients who had previously undergone gastrectomy (77 women and 143 men; mean age, 72.2 y; range, 11 to 93 y). The overall enterography success rate was 90.5% (199/220), and the diagnostic and ERCP success rates were both 88.6% (195/220). Endoscopy was unsuccessful in 21 patients who received Billroth II gastroenterostomy and Roux-en-Y reconstruction. After successful endoscopy, diagnostic and ERCP success was not achieved in 4 patients with Billroth II gastroenterostomy, with or without Braun anastomosis, due to cannulation failure. The procedure-related complication rate was 5.5% (12/220), including immediate bleeding (0.9%, 2/220), pancreatitis (4.1%, 9/220), and perforation (0.5%, 1/220). There were no procedure-related deaths. Conclusions: The side-viewing duodenoscope is a useful instrument for performing successful ERCP in patients postgastrectomy. In addition, retrieval balloon–assisted enterography may improve the enterography success rate in postgastrectomy patients with Billroth II and Roux-en-Y reconstruction. PMID:26535481

  5. Retrograde nailing for distal femur fractures in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Giddie, Jasdeep; Sawalha, Seif; Parker, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We report the results of treating a series of 56 fractures in 54 elderly patients with a distal femur fracture with a retrograde femoral nail. Methods: Fifty-four of the nails were inserted percutaneously with a closed reduction. After surgery all patients were allowed to weight bear as tolerated. Four fractures were supported in a temporary external splint. Results: The mean age of patients was 80.6 years (range 51–103 years), 52/54 (96%) were females. There were no cases of nail related complications and no re-operations were required. One patient was lost to follow up. The 30-day mortality was 5/54 (9.3%) and the one year mortality was 17/54 (31.5%). Conclusions: Distal femoral nail fixation provides a good method of fixation allowing immediate mobilisation for this group of patients. PMID:27163086

  6. Left Subclavian Artery Occlusion: Femoro-Axillary Artery Retrograde Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The treatment tactics for subclavian artery occlusion include the more commonly used endovascular therapy rather than surgical intervention. We present a case of a 61-year-old woman with dialysis-dependent chronic renal failure who experienced left finger necrosis in the left upper extremity. To salvage the limb, we performed femoro-axillary (fem-ax) artery bypass using an autologous saphenous vein graft. However, 10 months later, she experienced coldness in the left forearm. Angiography revealed chronic total occlusion of the venous bypass. Despite emergent thrombectomy, redo fem-ax artery bypass operation was performed using a prosthetic graft. Upper limb salvage can be achieved by fem-ax artery retrograde bypass. PMID:27386454

  7. Emotion-induced retrograde amnesia and trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Miu, Andrei C; Heilman, Renata M; Opre, Adrian; Miclea, Mircea

    2005-11-01

    Emotional arousal can both enhance and impair memory. Considering that both emotional memory and trait anxiety (TA) have been associated with adrenergic activity, the authors investigated whether there is an association between 2 opposite emotional memory biases and the TA. The authors used a procedure recently put forward by B. A. Strange, R. Hurlemann, and R. J. Dolan (2003) to elicit an emotion-induced retrograde amnesia (ERA) coupled to an emotional memory enhancement (EME). The authors contrasted the association between these emotional memory biases and the TA in several conditions involving different levels of encoding and types of recall. The results presented here indicated a significant interaction of the TA with EME and ERA and the dependency of these biases on the consciously controlled use of memory. PMID:16393044

  8. Inhibition of wheat starch retrogradation by tea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Sun, Binghua; Zhang, Shikang; Zhu, Yuejin; Tian, Yaoqi

    2015-12-10

    The effect of four industrial tea derivatives (tea polyphenols [TPS], tea water-soluble extracts [TSE], tea polysaccharides [TSS], and green tea powder [GTP]), on the retrogradation of wheat starch was investigated using texture profile analysis (TPA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), rapid viscosity analysis (RVA), and the α-amylase-iodine method. The addition of the four tea derivatives resulted in decreased hardness and increased cohesiveness of the starch gel as shown by the TPA test. The DSC data demonstrated an increase in the enthalpy change of starch gelatinization and a decrease in the enthalpy change of starch recrystallite dissociation. The RVA results indicated that the peak viscosity, representing the intermolecular forces of wheat starch, was reduced after addition of TPS, TSE, and TSS, respectively, but was increased by GTP. Furthermore, the half crystallization time in the Avrami equation almost doubled after the separate addition of the tea derivatives. PMID:26428142

  9. CONFIRMATION OF A RETROGRADE ORBIT FOR EXOPLANET WASP-17b

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Daniel D. R.; Sackett, Penny D.; Winn, Joshua N.; Mardling, Rosemary A.

    2010-10-20

    We present high-precision radial velocity observations of WASP-17 throughout the transit of its close-in giant planet, using the MIKE spectrograph on the 6.5 m Magellan Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. By modeling the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we find the sky-projected spin-orbit angle to be {lambda} = 167.4 {+-} 11.2 deg. This independently confirms the previous finding that WASP-17b is on a retrograde orbit, suggesting it underwent migration via a mechanism other than just the gravitational interaction between the planet and the disk. Interestingly, our result for {lambda} differs by 45 {+-} 13 deg from the previously announced value, and we also find that the spectroscopic transit occurs 15 {+-} 5 minutes earlier than expected, based on the published ephemeris. The discrepancy in the ephemeris highlights the need for contemporaneous spectroscopic and photometric transit observations whenever possible.

  10. Primary Retrograde Tibiotalocalcaneal Nailing For Fragility Ankle Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin C.; Hansen, Dane C.; Harrison, Ryan; Lucas, Douglas E; Degenova, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background Ankle fragility fractures are difficult to treat due to poor bone quality and soft tissues as well as the near ubiquitous presence of comorbidities including diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Conventional open reduction and internal fixation in this population has been shown to lead to a significant rate of complications. Given the high rate of complications with contemporary fixation methods, the present study aims to critically evaluate the use of acute hindfoot nailing as a percutaneous fixation technique for high-risk ankle fragility fractures. Methods In this study, we retrospectively evaluated 31 patients treated with primary retrograde tibiotalocalcaneal nail without joint preparation for a mean of 13.6 months postoperatively from an urban Level I trauma center during the years 2006-2012. Results Overall, there were two superficial infections (6.5%) and three deep infections (9.7%) in the series. There were 28 (90.3%) patients that went on to radiographic union at a mean of 22.2 weeks with maintenance of foot and ankle alignment. There were three cases of asymptomatic screw breakage observed at a mean of 18.3 months postoperatively, which were all treated conservatively.. Conclusions This study shows that retrograde hindfoot nailing is an acceptable treatment option for treatment of ankle fragility fractures. Hindfoot nailing allows early weightbearing, limited soft tissue injury, and a relatively low rate of complications, all of which are advantages to conventional open reduction internal fixation techniques. Given these findings, larger prospective randomized trials comparing this treatment with conventional open reduction internal fixation techniques are warranted. PMID:27528840

  11. Comparison of antegrade and retrograde laparoscopic radical prostatectomy techniques.

    PubMed

    Tugcu, Volkan; Sahin, Selcuk; Resorlu, Berkan; Yigitbasi, Ismail; Yavuzsan, Abdullah H; Tasci, Ali I

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of antegrade and retrograde approaches on functional recovery and surgical outcomes of extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP). We analyzed 135 patients who underwent extraperitoneal LRP, with the retrograde technique performed on 42 (31%; Group 1) and the antegrade technique on 93 (69%; Group 2). Both groups were statistically similar with respect to age, clinical stage, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores, prostate volume, and previous surgical history. Mean operative time was significantly longer in Group 1 (244±18.3 vs. 203.3±18.4 min, p<0.001), whereas mean anastomosis times for both groups were similar (35.8±7.2 vs. 34.7±5.8 min, p=0.155). Estimated blood loss and transfusion rates were significantly lower in Group 2. A significant difference was observed for both hospitalization (6.79±3.3 vs. 5.46±3.08 days, respectively; p=0.026) and catheterization times (12.24±2.1 vs. 11±1.08 days, respectively; p=0.001) for Group 2. The total complication rate was 47.6% in Group 1, and 11.8% in Group 2 (p<0.01). Rates of positive surgical margins were 14.2% and 15% for Groups 1 and 2, respectively. At the 12-month interval from operation, similar recoveries in urinary continence were obtained for both groups (81% in Group 1; 91% in Group 2). Upon comparison of the two LRP techniques, we found that both were effective; however, the latter resulted in lower minor complication rate, lower blood loss, shorter operation time, and shorter length of hospital stay. PMID:27523453

  12. Selective biliary cannulation techniques for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures and prevention of post- endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Shuntaro; Itoi, Takao

    2016-06-01

    Numerous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) techniques have been reported to achieve selective biliary cannulation success. For standard biliary cannulation procedures, the wire-guided cannulation technique has been reported to reduce the rate of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) and increase the biliary cannulation success rate, although conflicting reports exist. The pancreatic or double-guidewire technique and several precut techniques have been reported as useful techniques in difficult biliary cannulation cases. Although ERCP is a useful endoscopic procedure, the risk of adverse events, particularly post-ERCP pancreatitis, is inevitable. Previous studies and analyses have revealed the risk factors for PEP. The efficacy of prophylactic pancreatic duct stent placement and the administration of rectal nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for preventing PEP has also been reported. Herein, we reviewed reports in the literature regarding the current status of selective biliary cannulation techniques and PEP prevention. PMID:26782710

  13. Identification of the main retrogradation-related properties of rice starch.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Kang, Haiqi; Sun, Haibo; Liu, Lizeng; Li, Lin

    2015-02-11

    The retrogradation of rice in shelf life is the biggest barrier to the industrial production of traditional foods using rice as material. Many rice breeders have tried their best to screen low-retrogradation rice cultivars without a specific indicator. To identify the main retrogradation-related properties of rice, the starch, amylose, and amylopectin from 16 rice cultivars were extracted from rice powder and their physicochemical properties, such as visible absorbance, infrared, average molecule weight (amylopectin), chain-length distribution (amylopectin), X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry, were determined. The correlation between starch retrogradation rates and those physicochemical properties was investigated. The results show that a significant positive correlation (R(2) = 0.85; r = 0.926; p < 0.01) exists only between proportions of the chains [degree of polymerization (DP) > 10] in amylopectin and the retrogradation rates of different rice starches. The findings in the paper offer a shortcut for rice breeders to screen cultivars with a low retrogradation rate. Because the genes related to the branching enzyme control the DP of amylopectin, they can be exploited as molecular markers to screen low-retrogradation rice cultivars. PMID:25615262

  14. Effect of pullulan on the short-term and long-term retrogradation of rice starch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Ren, Fei; Zhang, Zipei; Tong, Qunyi; Rashed, Marwan M A

    2015-01-22

    The effect of pullulan (PUL) on the retrogradation of rice starch (RS) was investigated by means of rapid visco-analyzer (RVA), rotational rheometer, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). RVA results showed that addition of pullulan significantly decreased the breakdown and setback values, which meant that the short-term retrogradation of RS was inhibited. The dynamic time sweep of samples also proved the retarding effect of pullulan on the retrogradation of RS. DSC curves showed clearly that pullulan significantly reduced the retrogradation enthalpy of amylopectin, and the kinetics of retrogradation was analyzed using the Avrami model. XRD results showed that recrystallinity of RS was reduced from 11.565% to 8.841% with the addition of pullulan and this was in line with the DSC results. It could be concluded that the addition of pullulan apparently influenced not only the short-term retrogradation of amylose, but also the long-term retrogradation of amylopectin. PMID:25439913

  15. RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 Promote Retrograde Transport in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Donglei; Dubey, Jyoti; Koushika, Sandhya P.; Rongo, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde transport is a critical mechanism for recycling certain membrane cargo. Following endocytosis from the plasma membrane, retrograde cargo is moved from early endosomes to Golgi followed by transport (recycling) back to the plasma membrane. The complete molecular and cellular mechanisms of retrograde transport remain unclear. The small GTPase RAB-6.2 mediates the retrograde recycling of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) subunit GLR-1 in C. elegans neurons. Here we show that RAB-6.2 and a close paralog, RAB-6.1, together regulate retrograde transport in both neurons and non-neuronal tissue. Mutants for rab-6.1 or rab-6.2 fail to recycle GLR-1 receptors, resulting in GLR-1 turnover and behavioral defects indicative of diminished GLR-1 function. Loss of both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 results in an additive effect on GLR-1 retrograde recycling, indicating that these two C. elegans Rab6 isoforms have overlapping functions. MIG-14 (Wntless) protein, which undergoes retrograde recycling, undergoes a similar degradation in intestinal epithelia in both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 mutants, suggesting a broader role for these proteins in retrograde transport. Surprisingly, MIG-14 is localized to separate, spatially segregated endosomal compartments in rab-6.1 mutants compared to rab-6.2 mutants. Our results indicate that RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 have partially redundant functions in overall retrograde transport, but also have their own unique cellular- and subcellular functions. PMID:26891225

  16. Retrograde mechanochemical ablation of the small saphenous vein for the treatment of a venous ulcer.

    PubMed

    Moore, Hayley M; Lane, Tristan R A; Franklin, Ian J; Davies, Alun H

    2014-10-01

    We present the first case of retrograde ablation of the small saphenous vein to treat active venous ulceration. A 73-year-old gentleman with complicated varicose veins of the left leg and a non-healing venous ulcer despite previous successful endovenous treatment to his left great saphenous vein underwent mechanochemical ablation of his small saphenous vein with the ClariVein® system, under local anaesthetic, using a retrograde cannulation technique. Post-operatively the patient had improved symptomatically and the ulcer size had reduced. This report highlights that patients with small saphenous vein incompetence and active ulceration can be treated successfully with retrograde mechanochemical ablation. PMID:24347131

  17. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R; Mans, Dorus A; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J F; Taylor, S Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A; Scambler, Peter J; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M; Beales, Philip L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M; Witman, George B

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  18. Retrograde Proximal Anterior Tibial Artery Access for Treating Femoropopliteal Segment Occlusion: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Affonso, Breno Boueri; Golghetto Domingos, Fernanda Uchiyama; da Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Maurício; Maciel, Macello José Sampaio; Cavalcante, Rafael Noronha; Bortolini, Edgar; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2016-05-01

    Some challenges have been detected when there are long and complex lesions of femoropopliteal arterial occlusive disease, even with descriptions of the retrograde pedal approaches. The aim of this article is to describe the retrograde proximal anterior tibial artery access for treatment of femoropopliteal segment occlusion when antegrade recanalization failed (retrograde recanalization and rearranging the system into an antegrade position). Technical and clinical success was achieved in 100% of 4 cases, with an improvement of at least 2 Rutherford classes. Minor complication, small hematoma in an anterior compartment of the limb, occurred in 1 patient. No sign of compartmental syndrome was observed. PMID:26902943

  19. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Taylor, S. Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A.; Scambler, Peter J.; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M.; Beales, Philip L.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Witman, George B.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Asimit, Jennifer; Ayub, Mohammad; Barrett, Jeff; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Brion, Marie-Jo; Brown, Andrew; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Cirak, Sebhattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Collier, David; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Daly, Allan; Danecek, Petr; Smith, George Davey; Day-Williams, Aaron; Day, Ian; Durbin, Richard; Edkins, Sarah; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fitzpatrick, David; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gaunt, Tom; Geschwind, Daniel; Greenwood, Celia; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey; Holmans, Peter; Huang, Jie; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Hysi, Pirro; Jackson, David; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jewell, David; Chris, Joyce; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lee, Irene; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Ryan, Liu; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Margarida; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Massimo, Mangino; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; McCarthy, Shane; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew; McKechanie, Andrew; McQuillin, Andrew; Memari, Yasin; Metrustry, Sarah; Min, Josine; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Brent Richards, J.; Ring, Sue; Ritchie, Graham R S; Savage, David B.; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Shihab, Hashem; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin; Smee, Carol; Soler, Artigas María; Soranzo, Nicole; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Tim; St Pourcain, Beate; St. Clair, David; Stalker, Jim; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tian, Jing; Timpson, Nic; Tobin, Martin; Valdes, Ana; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Wain, Louise; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Jun; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Ellie; Whittall, Ros; Williams, Hywel; Williamson, Kathy; Wilson, Scott G.; Wong, Kim; Whyte, Tamieka; ChangJiang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Hou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  20. NGF-stimulated retrograde transport of trkA in the mammalian nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, M D; Kaplan, D R; Price, D L; Koliatsos, V E

    1995-07-01

    The present study was designed to clarify the in vivo function of trkA as an NGF receptor in mammalian neurons. Using the rat sciatic nerve as a model system, we examined whether trkA is retrogradely transported and whether transport is influenced by physiological manipulations. Following nerve ligation, trkA protein accumulates distal to the ligation site as shown by Western blot analysis. The distally accumulating trkA species were tyrosine phosphorylated. The trkA retrograde transport and phosphorylation were enhanced by injecting an excess of NGF in the footpad and were abolished by blocking endogenous NGF with specific antibodies. These results provide evidence that, upon NGF binding, trkA is internalized and retrogradely transported in a phosphorylated state, possibly together with the neurotrophin. Furthermore, our results suggest that trkA is a primary retrograde NGF signal in mammalian neurons in vivo. PMID:7540615

  1. Retrograde Transvenous Ethanol Embolization of High-flow Peripheral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Edwin van der; Baalen, Jary M. van; Pattynama, Peter M. T.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To report the clinical efficiency and complications in patients treated with retrograde transvenous ethanol embolization of high-flow peripheral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Retrograde transvenous ethanol embolization of high-flow AVMs is a technique that can be used to treat AVMs with a dominant outflow vein whenever conventional interventional procedures have proved insufficient. Methods: This is a retrospective study of the clinical effectiveness and complications of retrograde embolization in five patients who had previously undergone multiple arterial embolization procedures without clinical success. Results: Clinical outcomes were good in all patients but were achieved at the cost of serious, although transient, complications in three patients. Conclusion: Retrograde transvenous ethanol embolization is a highly effective therapy for high-flow AVMs. However, because of the high complication rate, it should be reserved as a last resort, to be used after conventional treatment options have failed.

  2. Pancreatitis with an unusual fatal complication following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kanen, Boris; Loffeld, Ruud JLF

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography has been the treatment of choice for stones in the common bile duct. Although the procedure is usually safe, procedure-related complications do occur. Case presentation A case of pancreatitis following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography is described in a 55-year-old woman. After an uneventful recovery the patient's condition deteriorated rapidly 16 days after the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography, and the patient died within 1 hour. Post-mortem examination revealed massive intrapulmonary fat embolism. The complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography and pancreatitis are described. Conclusion Fat embolism can occur after the remission of pancreatitis and pancreatic necrosis may be overlooked on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning. PMID:18577211

  3. Reducing retrogradation and lipid oxidation of normal and glutinous rice flours by adding mango peel powder.

    PubMed

    Siriamornpun, Sirithon; Tangkhawanit, Ekkarat; Kaewseejan, Niwat

    2016-06-15

    Green and ripe mango peel powders (MPP) were added to normal rice flour (NRF) and glutinous rice flour (GRF) at three levels (400, 800 and 1200 ppm) and their effects on physicochemical properties and lipid oxidation inhibition were investigated. Overall, MPP increased the breakdown viscosity and reduced the final viscosity in rice flours when compared to the control. Decreasing in retrogradation was observed in both NRF and GRF with MPP added of all levels. MPP addition also significantly inhibited the lipid oxidation of all flours during storage (30 days). Retrogradation values were strongly negatively correlated with total phenolic and flavonoid contents, but not with fiber content. The hydrogen bonds and hydrophilic interactions between phenolic compounds with amylopectin molecule may be involved the decrease of starch retrogradation, especially GRF. We suggest that the addition of MPP not only reduced the retrogradation but also inhibited the lipid oxidation of rice flour. PMID:26868561

  4. PULMONARY IMPEDANCE IN DOGS MEASURED BY FORCED RANDOM NOISE WITH A RETROGRADE CATHETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retrograde catheter and forced random noise techniques were combined to study the distribution of resistance and compliance in dogs following the inhalation of aerosols containing 2.5 and 5.0 mg/ml of histamine.

  5. Vesicourethral fistula after retrograde primary endoscopic realignment in posterior urethral injury.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rajat; John, Nirmal Thampi; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male patient presented with iatrogenic vesicourethral fistula after immediate retrograde endoscopic realignment of urethra after a posterior urethral injury associated with pelvic fracture. PMID:25440761

  6. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction. Topical report, September 30, 1988--September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Bassilakis, R.; Kroo, E.

    1989-12-31

    Most of the proposed processing schemes for improving liquefaction yields involve favoring bond-breaking and radical stabilization reactions over the retrograde reactions. The retrograde reactions are often encountered before liquefaction temperatures are reached. The objective of this program is to elucidate and model the retrograde reaction chemistry in direct coal liquefaction through the application of experimental techniques and theoretical models which have been successfully employed at Advanced Fuel Research (AFR) and SRI International (a subcontractor) to understand and predict coal reaction behavior. The study of retrograde reactions is being done using an integrated approach using extensive characterization of the liquefaction chemistry of three kinds of systems: (1) model polymers; (2) coal; and (3) modified coals.

  7. Model for how retrograde actin flow regulates adhesion traction stresses.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Bhimalapuram, Prabhakar; Dinner, Aaron R

    2010-05-19

    Cells from animals adhere to and exert mechanical forces on their surroundings. Cells must control these forces for many biological processes, and dysfunction can lead to pathologies. How the actions of molecules within a cell are coordinated to regulate the adhesive interaction with the extracellular matrix remains poorly understood. It has been observed that cytoplasmic proteins that link integrin cell-surface receptors with the actin cytoskeleton flow with varying rates from the leading edge toward the center of a cell. Here, we explore theoretically how measurable subcellular traction stresses depend on the local speed of retrograde actin flow. In the model, forces result from the stretching of molecular complexes in response to the drag from the flow; because these complexes break with extension-dependent kinetics, the flow results in a decrease in their number when sufficiently large. Competition between these two effects naturally gives rise to a clutch-like behavior and a nonmonotonic trend in the measured stresses, consistent with recent data for epithelial cells. We use this basic framework to evaluate slip and catch bond mechanisms for integrins; better fits of experimental data are obtained with a catch bond representation. Extension of the model to one comprising multiple molecular interfaces shifts the peak stress to higher speeds. Connections to other models and cell movement are discussed. PMID:21386439

  8. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in periampullary diverticulum: The challenge of cannulation.

    PubMed

    Altonbary, Ahmed Youssef; Bahgat, Monir Hussein

    2016-03-25

    Periampullary diverticulum (PAD) is duodenal outpunching defined as herniation of the mucosa or submucosa that occurs via a defect in the muscle layer within an area of 2 to 3 cm around the papilla. Although PAD is usually asymptomatic and discovered incidentally during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is associated with different pathological conditions such as common bile duct obstruction, pancreatitis, perforation, bleeding, and rarely carcinoma. ERCP has a low rate of success in patients with PAD, suggesting that this condition may complicate the technical application of the ERCP procedure. Moreover, cannulation of PAD can be challenging, time consuming, and require the higher level of skill of more experienced endoscopists. A large portion of the failures of cannulation in patients with PAD can be attributed to inability of the endoscopist to detect the papilla. In cases where the papilla is identified but does not point in a suitable direction for cannulation, different techniques have been described. Endoscopists must be aware of papilla identification in the presence of PAD and of different cannulation techniques, including their technical feasibility and safety, to allow for an informed decision and ensure the best outcome. Herein, we review the literature on this practical topic and propose an algorithm to increase the success rate of biliary cannulation. PMID:27014423

  9. Early Results of Retrograde Transpopliteal Angioplasty of Iliofemoral Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Saumitra; Gibson, Matthew; Magee, Timothy R.; Galland, Robert B.; Torrie, E. Peter H.

    2001-12-15

    Purpose: To assess whether the retrograde transpopliteal approach is a safe, practical and effective alternative to femoral puncture for percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA).Methods: Forty PTAs in 38 patients were evaluated. Intentional subintimal recanalization was performed in 13 limbs. Ultrasound evaluation of the popliteal fossa was carried out 30 min and 24 hr post procedurally in the first 10 patients to exclude local complications. All patients had a follow-up of at least 6 weeks.Results: The indication for PTA was critical ischemia in seven limbs and disabling claudication in the remainder.Stenoses (single or multiple) were present in 24 and occlusion in 15.The superficial femoral artery (SFA) was the commonest segment affected(36) followed by common femoral artery (CFA) in four and iliac artery in four. Technical success was achieved in 38 of 39 limbs where angioplasty was carried out. In one limb no lesion was found.Immediate complications were distal embolization in two and thrombosis in one. None of these required immediate surgery. There were no puncture site hematomas or popliteal arteriovenous fistulae.Symptomatic patency at 6 weeks was 85%. Further reconstructive surgery was required in three limbs and amputation in two.Conclusion: The transpopliteal approach has a high technical success rate and a low complication rate with a potential to develop into an outpatient procedure. It should be considered for flush SFA occulsions or iliac disease with tandem CFA/SFA disease where the contralateral femoral approach is often technically difficult.

  10. Advances in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Dushant S; Wang, Andrew Y

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignancy of the bile ducts that carries high morbidity and mortality. Patients with CCA typically present with obstructive jaundice, and associated complications of CCA include cholangitis and biliary sepsis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a valuable treatment modality for patients with CCA, as it enables internal drainage of blocked bile ducts and hepatic segments by using plastic or metal stents. While there remains debate as to if bilateral (or multi-segmental) hepatic drainage is required and/or superior to unilateral drainage, the underlying tenant of draining any persistently opacified bile ducts is paramount to good ERCP practice and good clinical outcomes. Endoscopic therapy for malignant biliary strictures from CCA has advanced to include ablative therapies via ERCP-directed photodynamic therapy (PDT) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). While ERCP techniques cannot cure CCA, advancements in the field of ERCP have enabled us to improve upon the quality of life of patients with inoperable and incurable disease. ERCP-directed PDT has been used in lieu of brachytherapy to provide neoadjuvant local tumor control in patients with CCA who are awaiting liver transplantation. Lastly, mounting evidence suggests that palliative ERCP-directed PDT, and probably ERCP-directed RFA as well, offer a survival advantage to patients with this difficult-to-treat malignancy. PMID:26140095

  11. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in periampullary diverticulum: The challenge of cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Altonbary, Ahmed Youssef; Bahgat, Monir Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Periampullary diverticulum (PAD) is duodenal outpunching defined as herniation of the mucosa or submucosa that occurs via a defect in the muscle layer within an area of 2 to 3 cm around the papilla. Although PAD is usually asymptomatic and discovered incidentally during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is associated with different pathological conditions such as common bile duct obstruction, pancreatitis, perforation, bleeding, and rarely carcinoma. ERCP has a low rate of success in patients with PAD, suggesting that this condition may complicate the technical application of the ERCP procedure. Moreover, cannulation of PAD can be challenging, time consuming, and require the higher level of skill of more experienced endoscopists. A large portion of the failures of cannulation in patients with PAD can be attributed to inability of the endoscopist to detect the papilla. In cases where the papilla is identified but does not point in a suitable direction for cannulation, different techniques have been described. Endoscopists must be aware of papilla identification in the presence of PAD and of different cannulation techniques, including their technical feasibility and safety, to allow for an informed decision and ensure the best outcome. Herein, we review the literature on this practical topic and propose an algorithm to increase the success rate of biliary cannulation. PMID:27014423

  12. Retrograde signalling at the synapse: a role for Wnt proteins.

    PubMed

    Salinas, P C

    2005-12-01

    The formation of functional synapses requires a proper dialogue between incoming axons and their future synaptic targets. As axons approach their target, they are instructed to slow down and remodel to form proper presynaptic terminals. Although significant progress has been made in the identification of the mechanisms that control axon guidance, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the conversion of actively growing axon into a presynaptic terminal. We found that Wnt secreted proteins are retrograde signals that regulate the terminal arborization of axons and synaptic differentiation. Wnts released from postsynaptic neurons induce extensive remodelling on incoming axons. This remodelling is manifested by a decrease in axon extension with a concomitant increase in growth-cone size. This morphological change is correlated with changes in the dynamics and organization of microtubules. Studies of a vertebrate synapse and the Drosophila neuromuscular junction suggest that a conserved Wnt signalling pathway modulates presynaptic microtubules as axons remodel during synapse formation. In this paper I discuss the role of the Wnt-Dvl (Dishevelled protein)-GSK-3beta (glycogen synthase kinase-3beta) signalling pathway in axon remodelling during synapse formation in the central nervous system. PMID:16246102

  13. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in ruptured liver hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Borahma, Mohamed; Afifi, Rajaa; Benelbarhdadi, Imane; Ajana, Fatima Zahra; Essamri, Wafaa; Essaid, Abdellah

    2015-07-01

    One of the most common and serious complications of hepatic hydatid cyst disease is communication between the cyst and the biliary tree. Surgical management of biliary fistula is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively reviewed the effectiveness of endoscopic treatment of ruptured hydatid cyst into intrahepatic bile ducts. Diagnosis of intrabiliary rupture of hydatid cyst was mostly suspected by acute cholangitis, jaundice, pain, and/or persistent external biliary fistula after surgery. The diagnosis was confirmed by radiology and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) findings. We retrospectively reviewed clinical, laboratory, imagery, and ERCP findings for all patients. The therapeutic methods performed were endoscopic sphincterotomy, extraction by balloon or Dormia basket, stenting, or nasobiliary drainage. Sixteen patients with ruptured hepatic hydatid cyst into bile ducts were seen in 9 years. Nine of 16 patients had a surgical history of hepatic hydatid cyst and three patients had a percutanous treatment history. We carried out ERCP with sphincterotomy and extraction of hydatid materials (extraction balloon n = 11; Dormia basket n = 5) or biliary drainage (nasobiliary drainage n = 1; biliary stenting n = 1). The fistula healed in 80 % of patients with a median time of 6 weeks [range, 1-12] after endoscopic treatment. ERCP was an effective method of treatment for hepatic hydatid cyst with biliary fistula. PMID:26345677

  14. Acute pulmonary embolism during an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Painter, Nate P; Kumar, Priya A; Arora, Harendra

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old female patient presented for an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the removal of a biliary stent and lithotripsy. During the procedure, an acute drop in the end-tidal CO 2 , followed by cardiovascular collapse prompted the initiation of the advanced cardiac life support protocol. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated direct evidence of pulmonary embolism. The patient was promptly treated with thrombolytic therapy and subsequently discharged home on oral warfarin therapy, with no noted sequelae. Although, there have been case reports of air embolism during an ERCP presenting with cardiovascular collapse, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of acute pulmonary embolus during this procedure. While the availability of TEE in the operating suites is quite common, quick access and interpretation capabilities in remote locations may not be as common. With the expansion of anesthesia services outside of the operating rooms, it may be prudent to develop rapid response systems that incorporate resources such as TEE and trained personnel to deal with such emergent situations. PMID:24732617

  15. Retrograde heart perfusion: the Langendorff technique of isolated heart perfusion.

    PubMed

    Bell, Robert M; Mocanu, Mihaela M; Yellon, Derek M

    2011-06-01

    In the late 19th century, a number of investigators were working on perfecting isolated heart model, but it was Oscar Langendorff who, in 1895, pioneered the isolated perfused mammalian heart. Since that time, the Langendorff preparation has evolved and provided a wealth of data underpinning our understanding of the fundamental physiology of the heart: its contractile function, coronary blood flow regulation and cardiac metabolism. In more recent times, the procedure has been used to probe pathophysiology of ischaemia/reperfusion and disease states, and with the dawn of molecular biology and genetic manipulation, the Langendorff perfused heart has remained a stalwart tool in the study of the impact upon the physiology of the heart by pharmacological inhibitors and targeted deletion or up-regulation of genes and their impact upon intracellular signalling and adaption to clinically relevant stressful stimuli. We present here the basic structure of the Langendorff system and the fundamental experimental rules which warrant a viable heart preparation. In addition, we discuss the use of the isolated retrograde perfused heart in the model of ischaemia-reperfusion injury ex-vivo, and its applicability to other areas of study. The Langendorff perfusion apparatus is highly adaptable and this is reflected not only in the procedure's longevity but also in the number of different applications to which it has been turned. PMID:21385587

  16. Endoscopic prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Park, Do Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP) is not an uncommon adverse event but may be an avoidable complication. Although pancreatitis of severe grade is reported in 0.1%-0.5% of ERCP patients, a serious clinical course may be lethal. For prevention of severe PEP, patient risk stratification, appropriate selection of patients using noninvasive diagnostic imaging methods such as magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), and avoidance of unnecessary invasive procedures, are important measures to be taken before any procedure. Pharmacological prevention is also commonly attempted but is usually ineffective. No ideal agent has not yet been found and the available data conflict. Currently, rectal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used to prevent PEP in high-risk patients, but additional studies using larger numbers of subjects are necessary to confirm any prophylactic effect. In this review, we focus on endoscopic procedures seeking to prevent or decrease the severity of PEP. Among various cannulation methods, wire-guided cannulation, precut fistulotomy, and transpancreatic septostomy are reviewed. Prophylactic pancreatic stent placement, which is the best-known prophylactic method, is reviewed with reference to the ideal stent type, adequate duration of stent placement, and stent-related complications. Finally, we comment on other treatment alternatives, and make the point that further advances in EUS-guided techniques may afford useful PEP prophylaxis. PMID:25469026

  17. Retrograde root filling with dentin-bonded modified resin composite.

    PubMed

    Rud, J; Rud, V; Munksgaard, E C

    1996-09-01

    A retrograde root-end cover with a special resin composite (Retroplast) combined with the dentin bonding agent Gluma (Bayer AG) has been used since 1984 by the authors. Its content of silver, added to promote radiopacity, has been found to lower the working time and storage stability of the composite and might cause discolorations. Since 1990, silver has therefore been replaced with ytterbium trifluoride, which eliminates these side effects. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results obtained with these two resin composites and to evaluate the healing results after several years in function. Apical fillings (351) with the modified Retroplast showed the following radiographic healing pattern 1 yr after surgery: 80% complete healing, 2% scar tissue, 12% uncertain healing, and 6% failure. No significant difference in this healing pattern was found, compared with that obtained with the silver-containing Retroplast. Cases with ytterbium trifluoride classified as scar tissue and uncertain healing at 1 yr when examined at 2 to 4 yr postoperatively showed 89% complete healing. 0% scar tissue, 1% uncertain healing, and 9% failure. This result is significantly different from that obtained 1 yr after surgery. Based on calculations, it was predicted that with time 90% will become complete healing, whereas 10% will become failure. PMID:9198430

  18. Radiation dose to patients during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Boix, Jaume; Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of the hepatobiliary system. The use of fluoroscopy to aid ERCP places both the patient and the endoscopy staff at risk of radiation-induced injury. Radiation dose to patients during ERCP depends on many factors, and the endoscopist cannot control some variables, such as patient size, procedure type, or fluoroscopic equipment used. Previous reports have demonstrated a linear relationship between radiation dose and fluoroscopy duration. When fluoroscopy is used to assist ERCP, the shortest fluoroscopy time possible is recommended. Pulsed fluoroscopy and monitoring the length of fluoroscopy have been suggested for an overall reduction in both radiation exposure and fluoroscopy times. Fluoroscopy time is shorter when ERCP is performed by an endoscopist who has many years experience of performing ERCP and carried out a large number of ERCPs in the preceding year. In general, radiation exposure is greater during therapeutic ERCP than during diagnostic ERCP. Factors associated with prolonged fluoroscopy have been delineated recently, but these have not been validated. PMID:21860683

  19. Retrograde amnesia in praying mantis after two successive learning processes.

    PubMed

    Zabala, N A; Maldonado, H

    1990-01-01

    Learning and memory consolidation was investigated in the mantis Stagmatoptera biocellata, by two successive trainings: a) the attack (A) avoidance training in which animals were not allowed to catch a mobile star, followed by the deimatic reaction (DR) avoidance training of not displaying this defensive response, or b) DR-avoidance training followed by A-avoidance training. The results showed that the presence and the 1 of A-avoidance learning and DR-avoidance learning did not affect the learning of the other training. Total retention of A-avoidance memory was demonstrated when A-avoidance training was given first, whereas DR-avoidance memory was significantly lost (716%) when the DR-avoidance training was given first. The retroactive forgetting of DR-avoidance memory is considered as retrograde amnesia rather than retroactive memory inhibition because it depends on the activity during A-avoidance training (number of attacks) and not the quantity of A-avoidance learning. The magnitude of the amnesic effect due to this distracting activity in the A-avoidance training appears to be remarkably similar to that reported in a previous work using nitrogen-induced anoxia as the amnesic factor. PMID:2152377

  20. Successful Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for Gastric Varix Mainly Draining into the Pericardiophrenic Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, Ken; Nishida, N. Matsui, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Nakamura, K.; Miki, Y.

    2012-02-15

    Two cases of gastric varices were treated by balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration via the pericardiophrenic vein at our hospital, and both were successful. One case developed left hydrothorax. Gastric varices did not bled and esophageal varices were not aggravated in both cases for 24-30 months thereafter. These outcomes indicate the feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration via the pericardiophrenic vein.

  1. Emergent retrograde tracheal intubation in a 3-year-old with stevens-johnsons syndrome.

    PubMed

    He, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A 3-year-old girl suffering from Stevens-Johnsons Syndrome with severe sloughing of the oropharyngeal mucosa was brought to the operating room for an emergent tracheostomy after multiple failed attempts to intubate the trachea in the pediatric intensive care unit. However, a retrograde tracheal intubation was successfully performed in the operating room to secure her airway, after which a tracheostomy was performed. Retrograde intubation can be a quick and effective method for securing the difficult airway. PMID:25612259

  2. Retrograde solubility of formamidinium and methylammonium lead halide perovskites enabling rapid single crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Abdelhady, Ahmed L; Maculan, Giacomo; Bakr, Osman M

    2015-12-28

    Here we show the retrograde solubility of various hybrid perovskites through the correct choice of solvent(s) and report their solubility curves. Retrograde solubility enables to develop inverse temperature crystallization of FAPbX3 (FA = HC(NH2)2(+), X = Br(-)/I(-)). FAPbI3 crystals exhibit a 1.4 eV bandgap--considerably narrower than their polycrystalline counterparts. PMID:26511771

  3. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  4. Local translation and retrograde axonal transport of CREB regulates IL-6-induced nociceptive plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of genes by cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) is essential for the maintenance of long-term memory. Moreover, retrograde axonal trafficking of CREB in response to nerve growth factor (NGF) is critical for the survival of developing primary sensory neurons. We have previously demonstrated that hindpaw injection of interleukin-6 (IL-6) induces mechanical hypersensitivity and hyperalgesic priming that is prevented by the local injection of protein synthesis inhibitors. However, proteins that are locally synthesized that might lead to this effect have not been identified. We hypothesized that retrograde axonal trafficking of nascently synthesized CREB might link local, activity-dependent translation to nociceptive plasticity. To test this hypothesis, we determined if IL-6 enhances the expression of CREB and if it subsequently undergoes retrograde axonal transport. IL-6 treatment of sensory neurons in vitro caused an increase in CREB protein and in vivo treatment evoked an increase in CREB in the sciatic nerve consistent with retrograde transport. Importantly, co-injection of IL-6 with the methionine analogue azido-homoalanine (AHA), to assess nascently synthesized proteins, revealed an increase in CREB containing AHA in the sciatic nerve 2 hrs post injection, indicating retrograde transport of nascently synthesized CREB. Behaviorally, blockade of retrograde transport by disruption of microtubules or inhibition of dynein or intrathecal injection of cAMP response element (CRE) consensus sequence DNA oligonucleotides, which act as decoys for CREB DNA binding, prevented the development of IL-6-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and hyperalgesic priming. Consistent with previous studies in inflammatory models, intraplantar IL-6 enhanced the expression of BDNF in dorsal root ganglion (DRG). This effect was blocked by inhibition of retrograde axonal transport and by intrathecal CRE oligonucleotides. Collectively, these findings

  5. Posterior tibial artery access using transradial techniques: retrograde approach to inaccessible lower extremity lesions.

    PubMed

    Londoño, Juan Carlos; Singh, Vikas; Martinez, Claudia A

    2012-06-01

    Percutaneous intervention of chronic limb ischemia is often limited by vascular access especially in patients with previous surgical interventions. This warrants development of alternative endovascular techniques, particularly for patients in whom traditional ipsilateral antegrade or contralateral retrograde access has failed or is not possible. We describe a novel approach to the posterior tibial artery using retrograde access with transradial techniques including closure devices in two patients with inaccessible antegrade access. PMID:21432983

  6. Control of respiration-driven retrograde flow in the subdiaphragmatic venous return of the Fontan circulation.

    PubMed

    Vukicevic, Marija; Conover, Timothy; Jaeggli, Michael; Zhou, Jian; Pennati, Giancarlo; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Figliola, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    Respiration influences the subdiaphragmatic venous return in the total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) of the Fontan circulation whereby both the inferior vena cava (IVC) and hepatic vein flows can experience retrograde motion. Controlling retrograde flows could improve patient outcomes. Using a patient-specific model within a Fontan mock circulatory system with respiration, we inserted a valve into the IVC to examine its effects on local hemodynamics while varying retrograde volumes by changing vascular impedances. A bovine valved conduit reduced IVC retrograde flow to within 3% of antegrade flow in all cases. The valve closed only under conditions supporting retrograde flow and its effects on local hemodynamics increased with larger retrograde volume. Liver and TCPC pressures improved only when the valve leaflets were closed whereas cycle-averaged pressures improved only slightly (<1 mm Hg). Increased pulmonary vascular resistance raised mean circulation pressures, but the valve functioned and cardiac output improved and stabilized. Power loss across the TCPC improved by 12%-15% (p < 0.05) with a valve. The effectiveness of valve therapy is dependent on patient vascular impedance. PMID:24814833

  7. Retrogradation of Waxy Rice Starch Gel in the Vicinity of the Glass Transition Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Charoenrein, Sanguansri; Udomrati, Sunsanee

    2013-01-01

    The retrogradation rate of waxy rice starch gel was investigated during storage at temperatures in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature of a maximally concentrated system (Tg′), as it was hypothesized that such temperatures might cause different effects on retrogradation. The Tg′ value of fully gelatinized waxy rice starch gel with 50% water content and the enthalpy of melting retrograded amylopectin in the gels were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. Starch gels were frozen to −30°C and stored at 4, 0, −3, −5, and −8°C for 5 days. The results indicated that the Tg′ value of gelatinized starch gel annealed at −7°C for 15 min was −3.5°C. Waxy rice starch gels retrograded significantly when stored at 4°C with a decrease in the enthalpy of melting retrograded starch in samples stored for 5 days at −3, −5, and −8°C, respectively, perhaps due to the more rigid glass matrix and less molecular mobility facilitating starch chain recrystallization at temperatures below Tg′. This suggests that retardation of retrogradation of waxy rice starch gel can be achieved at temperature below Tg′. PMID:26904602

  8. Focal retrograde amnesia: voxel-based morphometry findings in a case without MRI lesions.

    PubMed

    Sehm, Bernhard; Frisch, Stefan; Thöne-Otto, Angelika; Horstmann, Annette; Villringer, Arno; Obrig, Hellmuth

    2011-01-01

    Focal retrograde amnesia (FRA) is a rare neurocognitive disorder presenting with an isolated loss of retrograde memory. In the absence of detectable brain lesions, a differentiation of FRA from psychogenic causes is difficult. Here we report a case study of persisting FRA after an epileptic seizure. A thorough neuropsychological assessment confirmed severe retrograde memory deficits while anterograde memory abilities were completely normal. Neurological and psychiatric examination were unremarkable and high-resolution MRI showed no neuroradiologically apparent lesion. However, voxel-based morphometry (VBM)-comparing the MRI to an education-, age-and sex-matched control group (n = 20) disclosed distinct gray matter decreases in left temporopolar cortex and a region between right posterior parahippocampal and lingual cortex. Although the results of VBM-based comparisons between a single case and a healthy control group are generally susceptible to differences unrelated to the specific symptoms of the case, we believe that our data suggest a causal role of the cortical areas detected since the retrograde memory deficit is the preeminent neuropsychological difference between patient and controls. This was paralleled by grey matter differences in central nodes of the retrograde memory network. We therefore suggest that these subtle alterations represent structural correlates of the focal retrograde amnesia in our patient. Beyond the implications for the diagnosis and etiology of FRA, our results advocate the use of VBM in conditions that do not show abnormalities in clinical radiological assessment, but show distinct neuropsychological deficits. PMID:22028902

  9. Retrograde reactions in coal processing: The behavior of ether and sulfide model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Skeen, J.T.

    1997-04-01

    Retrograde reactions that produce more refractory molecular structures are undesirable in coal liquefaction. The authors previously found that restricted mass transport, induced by immobilization on a silica support, promotes retrograde reactions for 1,2-diphenylethane (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) by both skeletal rearrangement and ring growth (cyclization-dehydrogenation) pathways involving free-radical intermediates. They are now examining the influence of heteroatoms on the retrograde pathways for the corresponding surface-immobilized ether (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) and sulfide (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) model compounds at 275--350 C. Cyclization-dehydrogenation pathways are not detected for either model compound. However, retrograde skeletal rearrangements involving 1,2-phenyl shifts in C{sub 6}H{sub 5}XCH{center_dot}C{sub 6}H{sub 5} (X = O,S) are found to be significant under restricted diffusion, and for X = O, radical coupling at ring carbons to form benzylphenols is also observed as a major pathway. For surface-immobilized benzyl phenyl ether, the two retrograde processes account for ca. 50% of the thermolysis products, and also generate reactive hydroxyl and keto functionalities that can be involved in additional retrograde reactions.

  10. Post-Golgi anterograde transport requires GARP-dependent endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Tetsuya; Fujita, Morihisa; Nakamura, Shota; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Motooka, Daisuke; Murakami, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2015-01-01

    The importance of endosome-to–trans-Golgi network (TGN) retrograde transport in the anterograde transport of proteins is unclear. In this study, genome-wide screening of the factors necessary for efficient anterograde protein transport in human haploid cells identified subunits of the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex, a tethering factor involved in endosome-to-TGN transport. Knockout (KO) of each of the four GARP subunits, VPS51–VPS54, in HEK293 cells caused severely defective anterograde transport of both glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored and transmembrane proteins from the TGN. Overexpression of VAMP4, v-SNARE, in VPS54-KO cells partially restored not only endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport, but also anterograde transport of both GPI-anchored and transmembrane proteins. Further screening for genes whose overexpression normalized the VPS54-KO phenotype identified TMEM87A, encoding an uncharacterized Golgi-resident membrane protein. Overexpression of TMEM87A or its close homologue TMEM87B in VPS54-KO cells partially restored endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport and anterograde transport. Therefore GARP- and VAMP4-dependent endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport is required for recycling of molecules critical for efficient post-Golgi anterograde transport of cell-surface integral membrane proteins. In addition, TMEM87A and TMEM87B are involved in endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport. PMID:26157166

  11. Control of respiration-driven retrograde flow in the subdiaphragmatic venous return of the Fontan circulation

    PubMed Central

    Vukicevic, M; Conover, T; Jaeggli, M; Zhou, J; Pennati, G; Hsia, TY; Figliola, RS

    2014-01-01

    Respiration influences the subdiaphragmatic venous return in the total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) of the Fontan circulation whereby both the inferior vena cava (IVC) and hepatic vein flows can experience retrograde motion. Controlling retrograde flows could improve patient outcomes. Using a patient-specific model within a Fontan mock circulatory system with respiration, we inserted a valve into the IVC to examine its effects on local hemodynamics while varying retrograde volumes by changing vascular impedances. A bovine valved conduit reduced IVC retrograde flow to within 3% of antegrade flow in all cases. The valve closed only under conditions supporting retrograde flow and its effects on local hemodynamics increased with larger retrograde volume. Liver and TCPC pressures improved only while the valve leaflets were closed while cycle-averaged pressures improved only slightly (italic>1 mm Hg). Increased pulmonary vascular resistance raised mean circulation pressures but the valve functioned and cardiac output improved and stabilized. Power loss across the TCPC improved by 12–15% (pbold>0.05) with a valve. The effectiveness of valve therapy is dependent on patient vascular impedance. PMID:24814833

  12. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related perforations: Diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Vezakis, Antonios; Fragulidis, Georgios; Polydorou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become an important therapeutic modality for biliary and pancreatic disorders. Perforation is one of the most feared complications of ERCP and endoscopic sphincterotomy. A MEDLINE search was performed from 2000-2014 using the keywords “perforation”, “ERCP” and “endoscopic sphincterotomy”. All articles including more than nine cases were reviewed. The incidence of ERCP-related perforations was low (0.39%, 95%CI: 0.34-0.69) with an associated mortality of 7.8% (95%CI: 3.80-13.07). Endoscopic sphincterotomy was responsible for 41% of perforations, insertion and manipulations of the endoscope for 26%, guidewires for 15%, dilation of strictures for 3%, other instruments for 4%, stent insertion or migration for 2% and in 7% of cases the etiology was unknown. The diagnosis was made during ERCP in 73% of cases. The mechanism, site and extent of injury, suggested by clinical and radiographic findings, should guide towards operative or non-operative management. In type I perforations early surgical repair is indicated, unless endoscopic closure can be achieved. Patients with type II perforations should be treated initially non-operatively. Non-operative treatment includes biliary stenting, fasting, intravenous fluid resuscitation, nasogastric drainage, broad spectrum antibiotics, percutaneous drainage of fluid collections. Non-operative treatment was successful in 79% of patients with type II injuries, with an overall mortality of 9.4%. Non-operative treatment was sufficient in all patients with type III injuries. Surgical technique depends on timing, site and size of defect and clinical condition of the patient. In conclusion, diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion and clinical and radiographic findings. Whilst surgery is usually indicated in patients with type I injuries, patients with type II or III injuries should be treated initially non-operatively. A minority of them will finally require surgical

  13. Properties of Cores Formed by Retrograde Minor Mergers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, J.

    1999-09-01

    In the last 10 years over a dozen elliptical galaxies have been observed to posses a core which rotates counter to the rest of the galaxy. In one formation scenario, dynamical friction causes a compact companion to spiral into the center of a much larger elliptical galaxy on a retrograde orbit relative to the larger galaxy's rotation. If the core of the smaller galaxy is not tidally disrupted it may carry some of it's orbital angular momentum to the center. I present results from N-body simulations, which cover the parameter space over which satellite accretion is most likely to form counter rotating cores. The kinematic parts of the results are analyzed using the penalized likelihood method of Merritt to calculate 2D line-of-sight velocity fields, including third and fourth order Gauss-Hermite terms. By combining this method with IRAF, the photometric aspects of the results are analyzed and compared with observations. The results indicate that dissipationless satellite accretion can only form counter rotating cores when the larger galaxy's intrinsic angular momentum is almost perfectly antiparallel to the orbital angular momentum of the satellite. In most other cases a kinematically distinct core is formed. I present statistical properties of the cores, which include the deviations from pure isophote ellipses as well as deviations of the line-of-sight velocity profiles from a pure Gaussian form. To test the robustness of the results, some of the simulations are redone with a minor amount of dissipation added to the satellite. These simulations indicate that including small amounts of gas does not significantly effect the conclusions. I would like to thank the Student Stipend Committee for making this presentation possible.

  14. Combination treatment of transjugular retrograde obliteration and endoscopic embolization for portosystemic encephalopathy with esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Chikamori, Fumio; Kuniyoshi, Nobutoshi; Shibuya, Susumu; Takase, Yasuhiro

    2004-01-01

    The treatment of chronic portosystemic encephalopathy with esophageal varices has not yet been established. We were able to control a case of chronic portosystemic encephalopathy with esophageal varices using a combination treatment of transjugular retrograde obliteration and endoscopic embolization. A 57-year-old man came to our hospital in a confused, apathetic and tremulous state. The grade of encephalopathy was II. The plasma ammonia level was abnormally elevated to 119 microg/dL, and the ICGR15 was 59%. Endoscopic examination revealed nodular esophageal varices with cherry-red spots. There were no gastric varices. Ultrasonography and CT revealed liver cirrhosis with a splenorenal shunt. We first applied endoscopic embolization for the esophageal varices before transjugular retrograde obliteration. We injected 5% ethanolamine oleate with iopamidol retrogradely into the esophageal varices and their associated blood routes under fluoroscopy and obliterated the palisade vein, the cardiac venous plexus and left gastric vein. Transjugular retrograde obliteration was performed 14 days after endoscopic embolization. Retrograde shunt venography visualized the splenorenal shunt and communicating route to the retroperitoneal vein. There was no communicating route to the azygos vein. After obliteration of the communicating route to the retroperitoneal vein with absolute ethanol, 5% ethanolamine oleate with iopamidol was injected into the splenorenal shunt as far as the root of the posterior gastric vein. After transjugular retrograde obliteration, the encephalopathy improved to grade 0 even without the administration of lactulose and branched-chain amino acid. The plasma ammonia level and ICGR15 were reduced to 62 microg/dL and 26%. We conclude that combination treatment of transjugular retrograde obliteration and endoscopic embolization is a rational, effective and safe treatment for chronic portosystemic encephalopathy complicated with esophageal varices. PMID:15362757

  15. Endothelin-1 impairs retrograde axonal transport and leads to axonal injury in rat optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Takazumi; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Sasaoka, Masaaki; Shimazaki, Atsushi; Hara, Hideaki

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of endothelin-1 (ET-1) on retrograde axonal transport in the rat optic nerve. Vehicle or ET-1 (0.2, 1, or 5 pmol/eye) were injected into the vitreous body in Sprague-Dawley rats. Retinal vessels were observed, using a fundus camera, before, and at 10 min, 3 days and 7 days after a single intravitreous injection. Two days after the injection, a neuronal tracer, fluoro gold, was administered via the superior colliculi to retrogradely label active retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Five days after the tracer administration, retrogradely labeled RGCs were evaluated in the flat-mounted retina, and cross sections from each optic nerve were graded for injury by four independent, masked observers. ET-1 at 5 pmol/eye caused a significant constriction of retinal vessels (versus the vehicle-treated group) at 10 min after the injection. Intravitreous injection of ET-1 caused a dose-related decrease in the number of retrogradely labeled RGCs. Injection of 5 pmol/eye ET-1 led to a statistically significant decrease in the number of retrogradely labeled RGCs (versus the vehicle-treated group). ET-1 at 1 and 5 pmol/eye caused histological optic nerve damage (evaluated using a graded scale). The histological optic nerve damage correlated with the number of retrogradely labeled RGCs. In conclusion, a single intravitreous injection of ET-1 impaired retrograde axonal transport in the rat optic nerve and this impairment correlated with the histological optic nerve damage. PMID:16719791

  16. On remembering and forgetting our autobiographical pasts: retrograde amnesia and Andrew Mayes's contribution to neuropsychological method.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, M D; Bright, P

    2012-11-01

    Andrew Mayes's contribution to the neuropsychology of memory has consisted in steadily teasing out the nature of the memory deficit in the amnesic syndrome. This has been done with careful attention to matters of method at all stages. This particularly applies to his investigations of forgetting rates in amnesia and to his studies of retrograde amnesia. Following a brief outline of his work, the main current theories of retrograde amnesia are considered: consolidation theory, episodic-to-semantic shift theory, and multiple trace theory. Findings across the main studies in Alzheimer dementia are reviewed to illustrate what appears to be consistently found, and what is much more inconsistent. A number of problems and issues in current theories are then highlighted--including the nature of the temporal gradient, correlations with the extent of temporal lobe damage, what we would expect 'normal' remote memory curves to look like, how they would appear in focal retrograde amnesia, and whether we can pinpoint retrograde amnesia to hippocampal/medial temporal damage on the basis of existing studies. A recent study of retrograde amnesia is re-analysed to demonstrate temporal gradients on recollected episodic memories in hippocampal/medial temporal patients. It is concluded that there are two requirements for better understanding of the nature of retrograde amnesia: (i) a tighter, Mayesian attention to method in terms of both the neuropsychology and neuroimaging in investigations of retrograde amnesia; and (ii) acknowledging that there may be multiple factors underlying a temporal gradient, and that episodic and semantic memory show important interdependencies at both encoding and retrieval. Such factors may be critical to understanding what is remembered and what is forgotten from our autobiographical pasts. PMID:22884958

  17. Retrograde binaries of massive black holes in circumbinary accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Maureira-Fredes, Cristián; Dotti, Massimo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-06-01

    accretion only explores the late evolution stages of the binary in an otherwise unperturbed retrograde disc to illustrate how eccentricity evolves with time in relation to the shape of the underlying surface density distribution.

  18. Retrogradation of Maize Starch after High Hydrostatic Pressure Gelation: Effect of Amylose Content and Depressurization Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi; Swedlund, Peter; Gu, Qinfen; Hemar, Yacine; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been employed to gelatinize or physically modify starch dispersions. In this study, waxy maize starch, normal maize starch, and two high amylose content starch were processed by a HHP of the order of 600 MPa, at 25°C for 15min. The effect of HHP processing on the crystallization of maize starches with various amylose content during storage at 4°C was investigated. Crystallization kinetics of HHP treated starch gels were investigated using rheology and FTIR. The effect of crystallization on the mechanical properties of starch gel network were evaluated in terms of dynamic complex modulus (G*). The crystallization induced increase of short-range helices structures were investigated using FTIR. The pressure releasing rate does not affect the starch retrogradation behaviour. The rate and extent of retrogradation depends on the amylose content of amylose starch. The least retrogradation was observed in HHP treated waxy maize starch. The rate of retrogradation is higher for HHP treated high amylose maize starch than that of normal maize starch. A linear relationship between the extent of retrogradation (phase distribution) measured by FTIR and G* is proposed. PMID:27219066

  19. Kinematical evolution of tidally limited star clusters: the role of retrograde stellar orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiongco, Maria A.; Vesperini, Enrico; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2016-06-01

    The presence of an external tidal field often induces significant dynamical evolutionary effects on the internal kinematics of star clusters. Previous studies investigating the restricted three-body problem with applications to star cluster dynamics have shown that unbound stars on retrograde orbits (with respect to the direction of the cluster's orbit) are more stable against escape than prograde orbits, and predicted that a star cluster might acquire retrograde rotation through preferential escape of stars on prograde orbits. In this study we present evidence of this prediction, but we also illustrate that there are additional effects that cannot be accounted for by the preferential escape of prograde orbits alone. Specifically, in the early evolution, initially underfilling models increase their fraction of retrograde stars without losing significant mass, and acquire a retrograde angular velocity. We attribute this effect to the development of preferentially eccentric/radial orbits in the outer regions of star clusters as they are expanding into their tidal limitation. We explore the implications of the evolution of the fraction of prograde and retrograde stars for the evolution of the cluster internal rotation, and its dependence on the initial structural properties. Although all the systems studied here evolve towards an approximately solid-body internal rotation with angular velocity equal to about half of the angular velocity of the cluster orbital motion around the host galaxy, the evolutionary history of the radial profile of the cluster internal angular velocity depends on the cluster initial structure.

  20. Exercise intensity modulates brachial artery retrograde blood flow and shear rate during leg cycling in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Erika; Katayama, Keisho; Ishida, Koji

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of exercise intensity on retrograde blood flow and shear rate (SR) in an inactive limb during exercise under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The subjects performed two maximal exercise tests on a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer to estimate peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2peak) while breathing normoxic (inspired oxygen fraction [FIO2 = 0.21]) and hypoxic (FIO2 = 0.12 or 0.13) gas mixtures. Subjects then performed four exercise bouts at the same relative intensities (30 and 60% V˙O2peak) for 30 min under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity were simultaneously recorded, using Doppler ultrasonography. Retrograde SR was enhanced with increasing exercise intensity under both conditions at 10 min of exercise. Thereafter, retrograde blood flow and SR in normoxia returned to pre-exercise levels, with no significant differences between the two exercise intensities. In contrast, retrograde blood flow and SR in hypoxia remained significantly elevated above baseline and was significantly greater at 60% than at 30% V˙O2peak. We conclude that differences in exercise intensity affect brachial artery retrograde blood flow and SR during prolonged exercise under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26038470

  1. Kinematical evolution of tidally limited star clusters: the role of retrograde stellar orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiongco, Maria A.; Vesperini, Enrico; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2016-09-01

    The presence of an external tidal field often induces significant dynamical evolutionary effects on the internal kinematics of star clusters. Previous studies investigating the restricted three-body problem with applications to star cluster dynamics have shown that unbound stars on retrograde orbits (with respect to the direction of the cluster's orbit) are more stable against escape than prograde orbits, and predicted that a star cluster might acquire retrograde rotation through preferential escape of stars on prograde orbits. In this study, we present evidence of this prediction, but we also illustrate that there are additional effects that cannot be accounted for by the preferential escape of prograde orbits alone. Specifically, in the early evolution, initially underfilling models increase their fraction of retrograde stars without losing significant mass, and acquire a retrograde angular velocity. We attribute this effect to the development of preferentially eccentric/radial orbits in the outer regions of star clusters as they are expanding into their tidal limitation. We explore the implications of the evolution of the fraction of prograde and retrograde stars for the evolution of the cluster internal rotation, and its dependence on the initial structural properties. Although all the systems studied here evolve towards an approximately solid-body internal rotation with angular velocity equal to about half of the angular velocity of the cluster orbital motion around the host galaxy, the evolutionary history of the radial profile of the cluster internal angular velocity depends on the cluster initial structure.

  2. Profound loss of general knowledge in retrograde amnesia: evidence from an amnesic artist

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Emma; McCloskey, Michael; Landau, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Studies of retrograde amnesia have focused on autobiographical memory, with fewer studies examining how non-autobiographical memory is affected. Those that have done so have focused primarily on memory for famous people and public events—relatively limited aspects of memory that are tied to learning during specific times of life and do not deeply tap into the rich and extensive knowledge structures that are developed over a lifetime. To assess whether retrograde amnesia can also cause impairments to other forms of general world knowledge, we explored losses across a broad range of knowledge domains in a newly-identified amnesic. LSJ is a professional artist, amateur musician and history buff with extensive bilateral medial temporal and left anterior temporal damage. We examined LSJ's knowledge across a range of everyday domains (e.g., sports) and domains for which she had premorbid expertise (e.g., famous paintings). Across all domains tested, LSJ showed losses of knowledge at a level of breadth and depth never before documented in retrograde amnesia. These results show that retrograde amnesia can involve broad and deep deficits across a range of general world knowledge domains. Thus, losses that have already been well-documented (famous people and public events) may severely underestimate the nature of human knowledge impairment that can occur in retrograde amnesia. PMID:24834048

  3. The effect of partial gelatinization of corn starch on its retrogradation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zong-qiang; Wang, Li-jun; Li, Dong; Zhou, Yu-guang; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-09-12

    The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of partial gelatinization of starch on its retrogradation using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The Avrami equation was used to predict the evolution of starch retrogradation kinetics. The degree of retrogradation in starch samples partially gelatinized 64°C (S64), 68°C (S68) and 70°C (S70) and control (S25) increased with storage time. The retrogradation enthalpies of S68 and S70 were almost four times as high as that of S64. The S25 and S64 had dominant A-type crystalline pattern while S68 and S70 showed dominant B-type crystalline pattern. The growth of remainder crystals was faster in S25 and S64, while both the nucleation and growth rates of new crystals were faster in S68 and S70. The Avrami model was found to represent the retrogradation kinetics data of these partially gelatinized starch samples quite satisfactorily (R(2)>0.95). PMID:23911478

  4. A radiographic study of the effect of various retrograde fillings on periapical healing after replantation.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, J O; Pitt Ford, T R

    1994-12-01

    An effective retrograde sealing procedure places great demands upon both technique and materials. Prevention of micro-leakage, biocompatibility and stability of the material in the apical tissues are very important. To evaluate potential retrograde filling materials, a replantation model has been developed in which extracted permanent molars were replanted in monkeys after apicectomy of each root, preparation of a 2-mm deep retrograde cavity and its sealing with various dental materials. Prior to retro-filling the remaining pulp was exposed to saliva. Apicected molars which were infected and did not receive retrograde fillings served as positive controls. Periapical healing was evaluated radiographically after 8 weeks based on planimetric measurements of the size of the periapical radiolucency. The following dental materials were tested: amalgam, glass ionomer cement, calcium-hydroxide lining cement, AH 26 root canal sealer, various zinc oxide-eugenol cements, Cavit, and gutta-percha with various sealers. The materials which were associated with better apical healing than the infected controls were glass ionomer cement, Cavit, and the zinc oxide-eugenol cements. When plain zinc oxide-eugenol or IRM were combined with a gutta-percha core, healing was best and not statistically different from normal apices. It was concluded that radiographic assessment at 8 weeks of molar teeth retrograde filled prior to replantation could be a valuable method for discrimination of potentially useful materials in vivo. PMID:7867616

  5. Exercise intensity modulates brachial artery retrograde blood flow and shear rate during leg cycling in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Erika; Katayama, Keisho; Ishida, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of exercise intensity on retrograde blood flow and shear rate (SR) in an inactive limb during exercise under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The subjects performed two maximal exercise tests on a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer to estimate peak oxygen uptake (O2peak) while breathing normoxic (inspired oxygen fraction [FIO2 = 0.21]) and hypoxic (FIO2 = 0.12 or 0.13) gas mixtures. Subjects then performed four exercise bouts at the same relative intensities (30 and 60% O2peak) for 30 min under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity were simultaneously recorded, using Doppler ultrasonography. Retrograde SR was enhanced with increasing exercise intensity under both conditions at 10 min of exercise. Thereafter, retrograde blood flow and SR in normoxia returned to pre-exercise levels, with no significant differences between the two exercise intensities. In contrast, retrograde blood flow and SR in hypoxia remained significantly elevated above baseline and was significantly greater at 60% than at 30% O2peak. We conclude that differences in exercise intensity affect brachial artery retrograde blood flow and SR during prolonged exercise under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26038470

  6. GBT Reveals Satellite of Milky Way in Retrograde Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    New observations with National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) suggest that what was once believed to be an intergalactic cloud of unknown distance and significance, is actually a previously unrecognized satellite galaxy of the Milky Way orbiting backward around the Galactic center. Path of Complex H Artist's rendition of the path of satellite galaxy Complex H (in red) in relation to the orbit of the Sun (in yellow) about the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The outer layers of Complex H are being stripped away by its interaction with the Milky Way. The hydrogen atmosphere (in blue) is shown surrounding the visible portion (in white) of the Galaxy. CREDIT: Lockman, Smiley, Saxton; NRAO/AUI Jay Lockman of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virginia, discovered that this object, known as "Complex H," is crashing through the outermost parts of the Milky Way from an inclined, retrograde orbit. Lockman's findings will be published in the July 1 issue of the Astrophysical Journal, Letters. "Many astronomers assumed that Complex H was probably a distant neighbor of the Milky Way with some unusual velocity that defied explanation," said Lockman. "Since its motion appeared completely unrelated to Galactic rotation, astronomers simply lumped it in with other high velocity clouds that had strange and unpredictable trajectories." High velocity clouds are essentially what their name implies, fast-moving clouds of predominately neutral atomic hydrogen. They are often found at great distances from the disk of the Milky Way, and may be left over material from the formation of our Galaxy and other galaxies in our Local Group. Over time, these objects can become incorporated into larger galaxies, just as small asteroids left over from the formation of the solar system sometimes collide with the Earth. Earlier studies of Complex H were hindered because the cloud currently is passing almost exactly behind the outer disk of

  7. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction. Final report, September 20, 1988--November 20, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-12-17

    The overall objective of the program was to improve the understanding of retrograde reactions and their dependencies on coal rank and structure, and/or coal modifications and reaction conditions. Because retrograde reactions are competitive with bond breaking reactions, an understanding of both is required to shift the competition in favor of the latter. Related objectives were to clarify the conflicting observations reported in literature on such major topics as the role of oxygen groups in retrograde reactions and to provide a bridge from very fundamental studies on pure compounds to phenomenological studies on actual coal. This information was integrated into the FG-DVC model, which was improved and extended to the liquefaction context.

  8. Retrograde diurnal motion of the instantaneous rotation axis observed by a large ring laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.

    2016-07-01

    Ring laser gyroscope technique directly senses the Earth's instantaneous rotation pole (IRP), whose polar motion contains strong retrograde diurnal components induced by external torques due to the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun. The first direct measurement of this retrograde diurnal motion with three large ring lasers was reported by Schreiber et al. (J Geophys Res 109(B18):B06405, 2004). Since then many technical improvements led to a significant increase in precision and stability of ring laser gyroscopes; however, precise determination of amplitude and phase at main partial waves has not been given in the literature. In this paper, I will report on determination of the retrograde diurnal motion of the IRP at main partial waves (Oo_1, J_1, K_1, M_1, O_1, Q_1 ) by the ring laser "G", located in Wettzell, Germany, which is the most stable one amongst the currently running large ring laser gyroscopes.

  9. NGF signaling in sensory neurons: evidence that early endosomes carry NGF retrograde signals.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, Jean-Dominique; Valletta, Janice S; Wu, Chengbiao; Hunt, Stephen J; Kowal, Anthony S; Mobley, William C

    2003-07-01

    Target-derived NGF promotes the phenotypic maintenance of mature dorsal root ganglion (DRG) nociceptive neurons. Here, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the presence within DRG neurons of endosomes containing NGF, activated TrkA, and signaling proteins of the Rap1/Erk1/2, p38MAPK, and PI3K/Akt pathways. Signaling endosomes were shown to be retrogradely transported in the isolated sciatic nerve in vitro. NGF injection in the peripheral target of DRG neurons increased the retrograde transport of p-Erk1/2, p-p38, and pAkt in these membranes. Conversely, NGF antibody injections decreased the retrograde transport of p-Erk1/2 and p-p38. Our results are evidence that signaling endosomes, with the characteristics of early endosomes, convey NGF signals from the target of nociceptive neurons to their cell bodies. PMID:12848933

  10. Effect of high-speed jet on flow behavior, retrogradation, and molecular weight of rice starch.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhen; Luo, Shun-Jing; BeMiller, James N; Liu, Wei; Liu, Cheng-Mei

    2015-11-20

    Effects of high-speed jet (HSJ) treatment on flow behavior, retrogradation, and degradation of the molecular structure of indica rice starch were investigated. Decreasing with the number of HSJ treatment passes were the turbidity of pastes (degree of retrogradation), the enthalpy of melting of retrograded rice starch, weight-average molecular weights and weight-average root-mean square radii of gyration of the starch polysaccharides, and the amylopectin peak areas of SEC profiles. The areas of lower-molecular-weight polymers increased. The chain-length distribution was not significantly changed. Pastes of all starch samples exhibited pseudoplastic, shear-thinning behavior. HSJ treatment increased the flow behavior index and decreased the consistency coefficient and viscosity. The data suggested that degradation of amylopectin was mainly involved and that breakdown preferentially occurred in chains between clusters. PMID:26344255

  11. A new link between the retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Watanabe, Naoki

    2014-11-01

    The retrograde actin flow, continuous centripetal movement of the cell peripheral actin networks, is widely observed in adherent cells. The retrograde flow is believed to facilitate cell migration when linked to cell adhesion molecules. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the functional relationship between the retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions (FAs). We also introduce our recent study in which single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy dissected the complex interactions between FAs and the local actin flow. FAs do not simply impede the actin flow, but actively attract and remodel the local actin network. Our findings provide a new insight into the mechanisms for protrusion and traction force generation at the cell leading edge. Furthermore, we discuss possible roles of the actin flow-FA interaction based on the accumulated knowledge and our SiMS study. PMID:25190817

  12. Retrograde Transcatheter Closure of Mitral Paravalvular Leak through a Mechanical Aortic Valve Prosthesis: 2 Successful Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daxin; Pan, Wenzhi; Guan, Lihua; Qian, Juying

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis has been considered a contraindication to retrograde percutaneous closure of mitral paravalvular leaks, because passing a catheter through the mechanical aortic valve can affect the function of a mechanical valve and thereby lead to severe hemodynamic deterioration. We report what we believe are the first 2 cases of retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis without transseptal or transapical puncture. Our experience shows that retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks in this manner can be an optional approach for transcatheter closure of such leaks, especially when a transapical or transseptal puncture approach is not feasible. This technique might also be applied to other transcatheter procedures in which there is a need to pass a catheter through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis. PMID:27127428

  13. The effects of electrolysis at room temperature on retrogradation of sweet potato starch.

    PubMed

    Xijun, Lian; Kunsheng, Zhang; Qingfeng, Luo; Xu, Zhang; Shuyi, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    The effects of electrolysis at room temperature on formation of sweet potato retrograded starch were studied by photographic method in the paper. The optimal parameters of electrolytic preparation of sweet potato retrograded starch were determined. The ratio between sweet potato starch and water was 10 g/100 mL with addition of NaCl 1.0 g/100 mL, pH value of the solution was 6.0 and the solution was electrolyzed for 30 min at 90 V at room temperature, then it was stored at 4°C for 24h after being autoclaved for 30 min at 120°C, the retrogradation rate of sweet potato starch at this condition was 33.1%, which is 138% higher than that of control group. Four possible reasons are put forward to explain the results. PMID:22008104

  14. Transport According to GARP: Receiving Retrograde Cargo at the Trans-Golgi Network

    PubMed Central

    Bonifacino, Juan S.; Hierro, Aitor

    2010-01-01

    Tethering factors are large protein complexes that capture transport vesicles and enable their fusion with acceptor organelles at different stages of the endomembrane system. Recent studies have shed new light on the structure and function of a heterotetrameric tethering factor named Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP), which promotes fusion of endosome-derived, retrograde transport carriers to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). X-ray crystallography of the Vps53 and Vps54 subunits of GARP has revealed that this complex is structurally related to other tethering factors such as the exocyst, COG and Dsl1, indicating that they all might work by a similar mechanism. Loss of GARP function compromises the growth, fertility and/or viability of the defective organisms, underscoring the essential nature of GARP-mediated retrograde transport. PMID:21183348

  15. Interactions among endoplasmic reticulum, microtubules, and retrograde movements of the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, M; Reese, T S

    1994-01-01

    Relationships among the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), microtubules, and bead movements on the cell surface were investigated in the thin peripheral region of A6 cells, a frog kidney cell line. ER tubules were often aligned with microtubules, as shown by double-labeling with DiOC6(3) and anti-tubulin in fixed cells. In living cells stained with DiOC6(3) and observed in time lapse, there were frequent extensions, but few retractions, of ER tubules. In addition, there was a steady retrograde (towards the cell center) movement of all of the ER at approximately 0.3 microns/min. Since microtubules are often aligned with the ER, microtubules must also be moving retrogradely. By simultaneous imaging, it was found that the ER moves retrogradely at the same rate as aminated latex beads on the cell surface. This indicates that the mechanisms for ER and bead movement are closely related. Cytochalasin B stopped bead and ER movement in most of the cells, providing evidence that actin is involved in both retrograde movements. The ER retracted towards the cell center in nocodazole while both ER and microtubules retracted in taxol. Time lapse observations showed that for both drugs, the retraction of the ER is the result of retrograde movement in the absence of new ER extensions. Presumably, ER extensions do not occur in nocodazole because of the absence of microtubules, and do not occur in taxol because taxol-stabilized microtubules move retrogradely and there is no polymerization of new microtubule tracks for ER elongation. PMID:7859292

  16. Addition of hydrochlorothiazide to angiotensin receptor blocker therapy can achieve a lower sodium balance with no acceleration of intrarenal renin angiotensin system in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuwa, Daisuke; Fukuda, Michio; Ogiyama, Yoshiaki; Sato, Ryo; Mizuno, Masashi; Miura, Toshiyuki; Abe-Dohmae, Sumiko; Michikawa, Makoto; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) produce a lower sodium (Na) balance, and the natriuretic effect is enhanced under Na deprivation, despite falls in blood pressure (BP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Methods The effect of additional hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ; 12.5 mg/day) to ARB treatment (valsartan; 80 mg/day) on glomerulotubular Na balance was evaluated in 23 patients with chronic kidney disease. Results Add-on HCTZ decreased GFR, tubular Na load, and tubular Na reabsorption (tNa), although 24-hour urinary Na excretion (UNaV) remained constant. Daily urinary angiotensinogen excretion (UAGTV, 152±10→82±17 μg/g Cre) reduced (p=0.02). Changes in tubular Na load (r2=0.26) and tNa (r2=0.25) correlated with baseline 24-hour UAGTV. Changes in filtered Na load correlated with changes in nighttime systolic BP (r2=0.17), but not with changes in daytime systolic BP. The change in the tNa to filtered Na load ratio was influenced by the change in daytime UNaV (β=−0.67, F=16.8), rather than the change in nighttime UNaV. Conclusions Lower Na balance was produced by add-on HCTZ to ARB treatment without an increase of intra-renal renin-angiotensin system activity, leading to restoration of nocturnal hypertension. A further study is needed to demonstrate that the reduction of UAGTV by additional diuretics to ARBs prevents the progression of nephropathy or cardiovascular events. PMID:27283968

  17. Renal Intramedullary Infusion of Tempol Normalizes the Blood Pressure Response to Intrarenal Blockade of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stec, David E.; Juncos, Luis A.; Granger, Joey P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that intramedullary inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) increases the blood pressure and superoxide production response to angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that increased renal medullary superoxide production contributes to the increase in blood pressure in response to blockade of renal medullary HO-1 in Ang II-induced hypertension. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice (16–24 weeks of age) were implanted with chronic intrarenal medullary interstitial (IRMI) and infused with: saline, Tempol (6mM), the HO-1 inhibitor QC-13 (25 μM), or a combination of tempol + QC-13. Tempol treatment was started 2 days before infusion of QC-13. After 2 days, Ang II was infused subcutaneously at at a rate of 1 μg/kg/min for 10 days. Results Blood pressures on days 7–10 of Ang II infusion alone averaged 150 ± 3 mmHg in mice receiving IRMI infusion of saline. IRMI infusion of QC-13 increased blood pressure in Ang II treated mice to 164 ± 2 (p<0.05). Renal medullary superoxide production in Ang II treated mice was significantly increased by infusion of QC-13 alone. Ang II treated mice receiving IRMI infusion of tempol had a blood pressure of 136 ± 3 mmHg. Ang II treated mice receiving IRMI infusion of tempol and QC-13 had a significantly lower blood pressure (142 ± 2 mmHg, p<0.05) than mice receiving QC-13 alone. The increase in renal medullary superoxide production was normalized by infusion of tempol alone or in combination with QC-13. Conclusion These results demonstrate that renal medullary interstitial blockade of HO-1 exacerbates Ang II-induced hypertension via a mechanism that is dependent on enhanced superoxide generation and highlight the important anti-oxidant function of HO-1 in the renal medulla. PMID:26922123

  18. Brachial artery retrograde flow increases with age: relationship to physical function

    PubMed Central

    Credeur, Daniel P.; Dobrosielski, Devon A.; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A.; Welsch, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the flow velocity pattern of the brachial artery and to determine its relationship to measures of physical function. Subjects from the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (n = 95; age = 84 ± 10 years) were evaluated. Brachial artery flow velocities and dimensions were measured using high-resolution ultrasonography. The continuous scale of physical function and performance test (CS-PFP10) was used to assess physical function. This test is based on the performance of 11 activities of daily living. Total CS-PFP10 score was 39.51 ± 21.21 U. Mean antegrade and retrograde velocities at rest were 14.2 ± 4.7 and 3.6 ± 2.2 cm/s, respectively. Ante-/retrograde ratio was 5.5 ± 4.6. Brachial artery diameter was 4.3 ± 0.7 mm. Pulse pressure and vascular conductance were 66 ± 18 mmHg, and 0.9 ± 0.5 ml/min/mmHg, respectively. Vascular conductance (r = −0.34), ante-/retrograde ratio (r = −0.42) and CS-PFP10 (r = −0.65) were inversely and retrograde velocity (r = 0.40) and pulse pressure (r = 0.36), were directly associated with age. Retrograde velocity was inversely related to vascular conductance (r = −0.27) and CS-PFP10 total score (r = −0.45). A MANOVA revealed that those with the higher CS-PFP10 scores had a lower retrograde velocity (P = 0.0001), but this association was, in part, age-dependent. Among nonagenarians (n = 52), those in the lower tertiles of the CS-PFP10 scores had significantly higher retrograde velocities compared to those in the higher tertiles (P = 0.035). These data indicate an increase in brachial retrograde velocity with age. These hemodynamic changes are related to a decline in physical function. PMID:19565260

  19. Reexposure to the amnestic agent alleviates cycloheximide-induced retrograde amnesia for reactivated and extinction memories.

    PubMed

    Briggs, James F; Olson, Brian P

    2013-05-01

    We investigated whether reexposure to an amnestic agent would reverse amnesia for extinction of learned fear similar to that of a reactivated memory. When cycloheximide (CHX) was administered immediately after a brief cue-induced memory reactivation (15 sec) and an extended extinction session (12 min) rats showed retrograde amnesia for both memories. CHX did not produce amnesia for a moderate extinction session (6 min). Re-administering CHX before testing reversed the amnestic effect for both memories (i.e., the memories were recovered). These results are discussed using a modified state dependent model of retrograde amnesia. PMID:23596315

  20. Paradoxical air embolus during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: an uncommon fatal complication.

    PubMed

    Markin, Nicholas W; Montzingo, Candice R

    2015-04-01

    Air embolism during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is a rare but potentially fatal complication. A 66-year-old man underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and remained stable until the end of the procedure, when he was found to have mottling on his right side and became hypoxic and unresponsive. Transesophageal echocardiography showed air within the left ventricle, consistent with systemic air embolism. Mortality resulted from significant cardiac and cerebral ischemia. The literature suggests that capnography is helpful in early diagnosis of air embolus, but it could not be used in this case because the patient's trachea was not intubated. PMID:25827860

  1. Combined Retrograde/Antegrade Approach to Transcatheter Closure of an Aortic Paravalvular Leak

    PubMed Central

    Damluji, Abdulla A.; Kaynak, Husnu E.

    2015-01-01

    New interventional techniques have made transcatheter closure of aortic paravalvular leaks a viable therapeutic option to treat the sequelae of these defects, including congestive heart failure and hemolysis. We report the transcatheter closure of an aortic paravalvular leak via a combined retrograde/antegrade approach. This was necessary because of difficulty in crossing the defect with a sheath from the retrograde approach. This technique might be useful in application to other difficult structural heart interventions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a treated paravalvular leak around a Mitroflow® Aortic Pericardial Heart Valve. PMID:26504437

  2. [Multidimensional corrective osteotomy of the distal femur using a retrograde femoral nail].

    PubMed

    Wich, M; Veltin, J; Höllen, I; Letsch, R

    1999-08-01

    We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with marked valgus and limitation of extension of the right knee joint as the result of a supracondylar fracture of the femur, originally treated by internal fixation with a dynamic condylar screw. Two years later, revision osteotomy with retrograde femoral nailing was carried out to achieve variation and improve extension. Within a week of operation the patient's right leg was fully weight bearing with normal axial positioning. A retrograde locking nail provides satisfactory and stable internal fixation in cases of revision. PMID:10484909

  3. The Orbital Evolution of 2007 VA85, an Amor-type Asteroid on a Retrograde Orbit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, P.; Włodarczyk, I.

    2010-06-01

    Among the known population of asteroids on retrograde orbits (i > 90°) we found an object classified as an Amor-type asteroid. During the analysis of the first results of astrometry, we found some possible Earth-impact solutions for this asteroid. After taking into account the latest observations, we excluded any significant impact solution. However, this asteroid is the first known example of potentially hazardous object on a retrograde orbit. We also investigated the orbital evolution of 2007 VA85 (1 My in the past), obtaining possible scenarios of its dynamical origin.

  4. A novel fluorescent retrograde neural tracer: cholera toxin B conjugated carbon dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nan; Hao, Zeyu; Zhao, Xiaohuan; Maharjan, Suraj; Zhu, Shoujun; Song, Yubin; Yang, Bai; Lu, Laijin

    2015-09-01

    The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde tracers.The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde

  5. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M.; Quail, Peter H.; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  6. Structure of Waxy Maize Starch Hydrolyzed by Maltogenic α-Amylase in Relation to Its Retrogradation.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Navneet; Faubion, Jon; Feng, Guohua; Kaufman, Rhett C; Wilson, Jeff D; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2015-04-29

    Maltogenic α-amylase is widely used as an antistaling agent in bakery foods. The objective of this study was to determine the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and starch structure after maltogenic amylase treatments in relation to its retrogradation. Waxy maize starch was cooked and hydrolyzed to different degrees by a maltogenic amylase. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography and size exclusion chromatography were used to determine saccharides formed and the molecular weight (Mw) distributions of the residual starch structure, respectively. Chain length (CL) distributions of debranched starch samples were further related to amylopectin (AP) retrogradation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results showed the complete inhibition of retrogradation when starches were hydrolyzed to >20% DH. Mw and CL distributions of residual AP structure indicated that with an increase in %DH, a higher proportion of unit chains with degree of polymerization (DP) ≤9 and a lower proportion of unit chains with DP ≥17 were formed. A higher proportion of short outer AP chains that cannot participate in the formation of double helices supports the decrease in and eventual inhibition of retrogradation observed with the increase in %DH. These results suggest that the maltogenic amylase could play a powerful role in inhibiting the staling of baked products even at limited starch hydrolysis. PMID:25843595

  7. In vitro analyses of resistant starch in retrograded waxy and normal corn starches.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xing; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jong-Yea; Lim, Seung-Taik

    2013-04-01

    Gelatinized waxy and normal corn starches (40% starch) were subjected to temperature cycling between 4 and 30°C (1 day at each temperature) or isothermal storage (4°C) to induce retrogradation. The in vitro analysis methods that are currently used for the measurement of resistant starch (RS), i.e. Englyst, AACC 32-40 and Goni methods, were compared with homogenized retrograded starch gels and freeze-dried powders of the gels. RS contents obtained by the three analysis methods were in the following order: Goni>Englyst>AACC. Although different RS values were obtained among the analysis methods, similar trends in regards to the starch type and storage conditions could be observed. Little or no RS was found in freeze-dried powders of the retrograded starch gels and storage conditions had no effect, indicating that the physical state for RS analysis is important. More RS was found in normal corn starch gels than in waxy corn starch gels under identical storage conditions and in the gels stored under temperature cycling than those under isothermal storage (4°C), indicating that the presence of amylose inhibits starch digestion and the level of crystalline structure of re-crystallized amylopectin also affects the RS formation during retrogradation. PMID:23291029

  8. LOCALLY SYNTHESIZED PHOSPHATIDYCHOLINE, BUT NOT PROTEIN, UNDERGOES RAPID RETROGRADE AXONAL TRANSPORT IN THE RAT SCIATIC NERVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retrograde axonal transport of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in the sciatic nerve has been demonstrated only after injection of lipid precursors into the cell body regions (Armstrong et al. 1985). icroinjection of [methyl-3H]choline into the sciatic nerve results in extensive incorpor...

  9. Reexposure to the Amnestic Agent Alleviates Cycloheximide-Induced Retrograde Amnesia for Reactivated and Extinction Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, James F.; Olson, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether reexposure to an amnestic agent would reverse amnesia for extinction of learned fear similar to that of a reactivated memory. When cycloheximide (CHX) was administered immediately after a brief cue-induced memory reactivation (15 sec) and an extended extinction session (12 min) rats showed retrograde amnesia for both…

  10. Retrograde approach for percutaneous closure in a patient with ruptured sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    İlkay, Erdoğan; Çelebi, Özlem Özcan; Kaçmaz, Fehmi; Pampal, Kutluk

    2014-12-01

    In this report, we present a 37-year-old male with ruptured right sinus of Valsalva. He was treated by percutaneous closure of the rupture using the retrograde approach. The procedure was performed successfully within 26 minutes. We think this approach may be used in future instead of the antegrade approach. PMID:25620339

  11. Structure of waxy maize starch hydrolyzed by maltogenic alpha-amylase in relation to its retrogradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maltogenic a-amylase is widely used as an antistaling agent in bakery foods. The objective of this study was to determine the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and starch structure after maltogenic amylase treatments in relation to its retrogradation. Waxy maize starch was cooked and hydrolyzed to different...

  12. Self-repair in a bidirectionally coupled astrocyte-neuron (AN) system based on retrograde signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wade, John; McDaid, Liam; Harkin, Jim; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Kelso, Scott

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that retrograde signaling via astrocytes may underpin self-repair in the brain. Faults manifest themselves in silent or near silent neurons caused by low transmission probability (PR) synapses; the enhancement of the transmission PR of a healthy neighboring synapse by retrograde signaling can enhance the transmission PR of the “faulty” synapse (repair). Our model of self-repair is based on recent research showing that retrograde signaling via astrocytes can increase the PR of neurotransmitter release at damaged or low transmission PR synapses. The model demonstrates that astrocytes are capable of bidirectional communication with neurons which leads to modulation of synaptic activity, and that indirect signaling through retrograde messengers such as endocannabinoids leads to modulation of synaptic transmission PR. Although our model operates at the level of cells, it provides a new research direction on brain-like self-repair which can be extended to networks of astrocytes and neurons. It also provides a biologically inspired basis for developing highly adaptive, distributed computing systems that can, at fine levels of granularity, fault detect, diagnose and self-repair autonomously, without the traditional constraint of a central fault detect/repair unit. PMID:23055965

  13. F-actin polymerization and retrograde flow drive sustained PLCγ1 signaling during T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Alexander; Li, Shuixing; O'Connor, Roddy S.; Milone, Michael C.; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of T cells by antigen-presenting cells involves assembly of signaling molecules into dynamic microclusters (MCs) within a specialized membrane domain termed the immunological synapse (IS). Actin and myosin IIA localize to the IS, and depletion of F-actin abrogates MC movement and T cell activation. However, the mechanisms that coordinate actomyosin dynamics and T cell receptor signaling are poorly understood. Using pharmacological inhibitors that perturb individual aspects of actomyosin dynamics without disassembling the network, we demonstrate that F-actin polymerization is the primary driver of actin retrograde flow, whereas myosin IIA promotes long-term integrity of the IS. Disruption of F-actin retrograde flow, but not myosin IIA contraction, arrested MC centralization and inhibited sustained Ca2+ signaling at the level of endoplasmic reticulum store release. Furthermore, perturbation of retrograde flow inhibited PLCγ1 phosphorylation within MCs but left Zap70 activity intact. These studies highlight the importance of ongoing actin polymerization as a central driver of actomyosin retrograde flow, MC centralization, and sustained Ca2+ signaling. PMID:22665519

  14. A comparison of Er, Cr: YSGG laser with ultrasonic preparation on the seal of retrograde cavities

    PubMed Central

    Roghanizad, Nasrin; Kalhori, Katayoun AM; Khalilak, Zohreh; Esmaeili, Maryam Ali; de Fatima Zanirato Lizarelli, Rosane

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare Er, Cr: YSGG laser with ultrasonic preparation on the seal of retrograde cavities. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight maxillary anterior teeth were used in this study. After removing the crowns, the canals were prepared with the step-back technique and filled with guttapercha. Three millimeters below the apex; each root was cut with a fissure diamond bur. The root surfaces were then covered with nail polish and three millimeters deep retrograde class I cavities were prepared, using Er, Cr: YSGG laser (group L=12 roots) or ultrasonic retro-tip (group U=12 roots). Four roots were arranged for negative and positive control groups. Retrograde cavities were then filled with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and teeth were placed in 2% methylene blue dye for 72 hours. The amount of dye penetration in sagittal sections of each tooth was measured with a stereomicroscope. An independent sample t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Cavities prepared with the Er, Cr: YSGG laser (1.61 + 0.81) showed significantly less micro-leakage than those prepared with the ultrasound (2.55+ 1.84) (P value =0.02). Conclusions: Under the conditions of this research, the use of Er, Cr: YSGG laser for retrograde cavity preparation causes significantly less apical leakage and may increase the success rate of endodontic surgeries. PMID:25941423

  15. On Common Ground: Jost's (1897) Law of Forgetting and Ribot's (1881) Law of Retrograde Amnesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wixted, John T.

    2004-01-01

    T. Ribot's (1881) law of retrograde amnesia states that brain damage impairs recently formed memories to a greater extent than older memories, which is generally taken to imply that memories need time to consolidate. A. Jost's (1897) law of forgetting states that if 2 memories are of the same strength but different ages, the older will decay more…

  16. Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling at the crossroads of tumor bioenergetics, genetics and epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Manti; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria play a central role not only in energy production but also in the integration of metabolic pathways as well as signals for apoptosis and autophagy. It is becoming increasingly apparent that mitochondria in mammalian cells play critical roles in the initiation and propagation of various signaling cascades. In particular, mitochondrial metabolic and respiratory states and status on mitochondrial genetic instability are communicated to the nucleus as an adaptive response through retrograde signaling. Each mammalian cell contains multiple copies of mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). A reduction in mtDNA copy number has been reported in various human pathological conditions such as diabetes, obesity, neurodegenerative disorders, aging and cancer. Reduction in mtDNA copy number disrupts mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) resulting in dysfunctional mitochondria. Dysfunctional mitochondria trigger retrograde signaling and communicate their changing metabolic and functional state to the nucleus as an adaptive response resulting in altered nuclear gene expression profile and altered cell physiology and morphology. In this review, we provide an overview of the various modes of mitochondrial retrograde signaling focusing particularly on the Ca2+/Calcineurin mediated retrograde signaling. We discuss the contribution of the key factors of the pathway such as Calcineurin, IGF1 receptor, Akt kinase and HnRNPA2 in the propagation of signaling and their role in modulating genetic and epigenetic changes favoring cellular reprogramming towards tumorigenesis. PMID:24004957

  17. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M; Quail, Peter H; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  18. The planetary increase of brightness during retrograde motion: An explanandum constructed ad explanantem.

    PubMed

    Carman, Christián Carlos

    2015-12-01

    In Ancient Greek two models were proposed for explaining the planetary motion: the homocentric spheres of Eudoxus and the Epicycle and Deferent System. At least in a qualitative way, both models could explain the retrograde motion, the most challenging phenomenon to be explained using circular motions. Nevertheless, there is another explanandum: during retrograde motion the planets increase their brightness. It is natural to interpret a change of brightness, i.e., of apparent size, as a change in distance. Now, while according to the Eudoxian model the planet is always equidistant from the earth, according to the epicycle and deferent system, the planet changes its distance from the earth, approaching to it during retrograde motion, just as observed. So, it is usually affirmed that the main reason for the rejection of Eudoxus' homocentric spheres in favor of the epicycle and deferent system was that the first cannot explain the manifest planetary increase of brightness during retrograde motion, while the second can. In this paper I will show that this historical hypothesis is not as firmly founded as it is usually believed to be. PMID:26568091

  19. Treatment of infertility due to retrograde ejaculation: a simple, cost-effective method.

    PubMed

    Shangold, G A; Cantor, B; Schreiber, J R

    1990-07-01

    Our data indicate that an appropriate therapy for the infertility associated with retrograde ejaculation is isolation of sperm from voided urine after orgasm, plus IUI. This technique is simple and can be performed in the physician's office, in contrast to more complex techniques such as GIFT or in vitro fertilization. PMID:2358086

  20. A Hands-on Exploration of the Retrograde Motion of Mars as Seen from the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pincelli, M. M.; Otranto, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a set of activities based on the use of a celestial simulator to gain insights into the retrograde motion of Mars as seen from the Earth. These activities provide a useful link between the heliocentric concepts taught in schools and those tackled in typical introductory physics courses based on classical mechanics for…

  1. Retrogradation behavior of corn starch treated with 1,4-α-glucan branching enzyme.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenwen; Li, Caiming; Gu, Zhengbiao; Qiu, Yijing; Cheng, Li; Hong, Yan; Li, Zhaofeng

    2016-07-15

    The retrogradation behavior of corn starch treated with 1,4-α-glucan branching enzyme (GBE) was investigated using rheometry, pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (PNMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Dynamic time sweep analysis confirmed that the storage modulus (G') of corn starch stored at 4 °C decreased with increasing GBE treatment time. PNMR analysis demonstrated that the transverse relaxation times (T2) of corn starches treated with GBE were higher than that of control during the storage at 4 °C. DSC results demonstrated that the retrogradation enthalpy (ΔHr) of corn starch was reduced by 22.3% after GBE treatment for 10h. Avrami equation analysis showed that GBE treatment reduced the rate of starch retrogradation. FTIR analysis revealed that GBE treatment led to a decrease in hydrogen bonds within the starch. Overall, these results demonstrate that both short- and long-term retrogradation of corn starch were retarded by GBE treatment. PMID:26948619

  2. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A; Porter, Mary E

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  3. Behavioral and Functional Neuroanatomical Correlates of Anterograde Autobiographical Memory in Isolated Retrograde Amnesic Patient M. L.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Brian; Svoboda, Eva; Turner, Gary R.; Mandic, Marina; Mackey, Allison

    2009-01-01

    Patient M. L. [Levine, B., Black, S. E., Cabeza, R., Sinden, M., Mcintosh, A. R., Toth, J. P., et al. (1998). "Episodic memory and the self in a case of isolated retrograde amnesia." "Brain", "121", 1951-1973], lost memory for events occurring before his severe traumatic brain injury, yet his anterograde (post-injury) learning and memory appeared…

  4. Mitochondrial retrograde signaling induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition and generates breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guha, M; Srinivasan, S; Ruthel, G; Kashina, AK; Carstens, RP; Mendoza, A; Khanna, C; Van Winkle, T; Avadhani, NG

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast tumors undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which renders them resistant to therapies targeted to the primary cancers. The mechanistic link between mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA) reduction, often seen in breast cancer patients, and EMT is unknown. We demonstrate that reducing mtDNA content in human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs) activates Calcineurin (Cn)-dependent mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway, which induces EMT-like reprogramming to fibroblastic morphology, loss of cell polarity, contact inhibition and acquired migratory and invasive phenotype. Notably, mtDNA reduction generates breast cancer stem cells. In addition to retrograde signaling markers, there is an induction of mesenchymal genes but loss of epithelial markers in these cells. The changes are reversed by either restoring the mtDNA content or knockdown of CnAα mRNA, indicating the causal role of retrograde signaling in EMT. Our results point to a new therapeutic strategy for metastatic breast cancers targeted to the mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway for abrogating EMT and attenuating cancer stem cells, which evade conventional therapies. We report a novel regulatory mechanism by which low mtDNA content generates EMT and cancer stem cells in hMECs. PMID:24186204

  5. Control of Autophagosome Axonal Retrograde Flux by Presynaptic Activity Unveiled Using Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Martin, Sally; Papadopulos, Andreas; Harper, Callista B.; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Glass, Nick R.; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Davletov, Bazbek; Meunier, Frédéric A.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that elicits flaccid paralysis by enzymatic cleavage of the exocytic machinery component SNAP25 in motor nerve terminals. However, recent evidence suggests that the neurotoxic activity of BoNT/A is not restricted to the periphery, but also reaches the CNS after retrograde axonal transport. Because BoNT/A is internalized in recycling synaptic vesicles, it is unclear which compartment facilitates this transport. Using live-cell confocal and single-molecule imaging of rat hippocampal neurons cultured in microfluidic devices, we show that the activity-dependent uptake of the binding domain of the BoNT/A heavy chain (BoNT/A-Hc) is followed by a delayed increase in retrograde axonal transport of BoNT/A-Hc carriers. Consistent with a role of presynaptic activity in initiating transport of the active toxin, activity-dependent uptake of BoNT/A in the terminal led to a significant increase in SNAP25 cleavage detected in the soma chamber compared with nonstimulated neurons. Surprisingly, most endocytosed BoNT/A-Hc was incorporated into LC3-positive autophagosomes generated in the nerve terminals, which then underwent retrograde transport to the cell soma, where they fused with lysosomes both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking autophagosome formation or acidification with wortmannin or bafilomycin A1, respectively, inhibited the activity-dependent retrograde trafficking of BoNT/A-Hc. Our data demonstrate that both the presynaptic formation of autophagosomes and the initiation of their retrograde trafficking are tightly regulated by presynaptic activity. PMID:25878289

  6. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q; Breedlove, S Marc; Miller, Kyle E; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2016-01-01

    Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique "myogenic" transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons. PMID:27517091

  7. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q.; Breedlove, S. Marc; Miller, Kyle E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique “myogenic” transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons. PMID:27517091

  8. Control of autophagosome axonal retrograde flux by presynaptic activity unveiled using botulinum neurotoxin type a.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Martin, Sally; Papadopulos, Andreas; Harper, Callista B; Mavlyutov, Timur A; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Glass, Nick R; Cooper-White, Justin J; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Davletov, Bazbek; Meunier, Frédéric A

    2015-04-15

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that elicits flaccid paralysis by enzymatic cleavage of the exocytic machinery component SNAP25 in motor nerve terminals. However, recent evidence suggests that the neurotoxic activity of BoNT/A is not restricted to the periphery, but also reaches the CNS after retrograde axonal transport. Because BoNT/A is internalized in recycling synaptic vesicles, it is unclear which compartment facilitates this transport. Using live-cell confocal and single-molecule imaging of rat hippocampal neurons cultured in microfluidic devices, we show that the activity-dependent uptake of the binding domain of the BoNT/A heavy chain (BoNT/A-Hc) is followed by a delayed increase in retrograde axonal transport of BoNT/A-Hc carriers. Consistent with a role of presynaptic activity in initiating transport of the active toxin, activity-dependent uptake of BoNT/A in the terminal led to a significant increase in SNAP25 cleavage detected in the soma chamber compared with nonstimulated neurons. Surprisingly, most endocytosed BoNT/A-Hc was incorporated into LC3-positive autophagosomes generated in the nerve terminals, which then underwent retrograde transport to the cell soma, where they fused with lysosomes both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking autophagosome formation or acidification with wortmannin or bafilomycin A1, respectively, inhibited the activity-dependent retrograde trafficking of BoNT/A-Hc. Our data demonstrate that both the presynaptic formation of autophagosomes and the initiation of their retrograde trafficking are tightly regulated by presynaptic activity. PMID:25878289

  9. Retrograde intra-vesical reconstructive surgery (RIVRS): A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Laddha, Abhishek; Ganpule, Arvind; Mishra, Sahshikant; Sabnis, Ravindra; Desai, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Management of distal ureter by en block resection during radical nephrectomy for upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is considered as standard of care. In this report, we describe our technique for management of lower ureter which utilizes both the endoscopic and laparoscopic approach. The nephrectomy including the dissection of the lower ureter was completed laproscopically. The ureteral orifice was scored using a hook passed through a 24 Fr nephroscope and secured .Transurethral suturing of the defect with SewRight SR5 device passed through the working channel of the 24 Fr nephroscope was done. Our report highlights the fact that management of lower ureter in TCC pelvis can be done endoscopically/laproscopically without compromising the oncological principles. Our novel technique demonstrates feasibility of intra mural resection of the ureter and primary closure of the bladder endoscopically. PMID:27279408

  10. Retrograde intra-vesical reconstructive surgery (RIVRS): A novel technique.

    PubMed

    Laddha, Abhishek; Ganpule, Arvind; Mishra, Sahshikant; Sabnis, Ravindra; Desai, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Management of distal ureter by en block resection during radical nephrectomy for upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is considered as standard of care. In this report, we describe our technique for management of lower ureter which utilizes both the endoscopic and laparoscopic approach. The nephrectomy including the dissection of the lower ureter was completed laproscopically. The ureteral orifice was scored using a hook passed through a 24 Fr nephroscope and secured .Transurethral suturing of the defect with SewRight SR5 device passed through the working channel of the 24 Fr nephroscope was done. Our report highlights the fact that management of lower ureter in TCC pelvis can be done endoscopically/laproscopically without compromising the oncological principles. Our novel technique demonstrates feasibility of intra mural resection of the ureter and primary closure of the bladder endoscopically. PMID:27279408