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  1. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  2. Rett Syndrome: Reaching for Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Pati, Sandipan; Percy, Alan K

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a syndromic autism spectrum disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2. The methyl CpG binding protein 2 binds methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethycytosine at CpG sites in promoter regions of target genes, controlling their transcription by recruiting co-repressors and co-activators. Several preclinical studies in mouse models have identified rational molecular targets for drug therapies aimed at correcting the underlying neural dysfunction. These targeted therapies are increasingly translating into human clinical trials. In this review, we present an overview of RTT and describe the current state of preclinical studies in methyl CpG binding protein 2-based mouse models, as well as current clinical trials in individuals with RTT. PMID:25861995

  3. Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, E.E.J.; Pelc, K.; Dan, B.

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome is one of the most common causes of complex disability in girls. It is characterized by early neurological regression that severely affects motor, cognitive and communication skills, by autonomic dysfunction and often a seizure disorder. It is a monogenic X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder related to mutation in MECP2, which encodes the methyl-CpG-binding protein MeCP2. There are several mouse models either based on conditional knocking out of the Mecp2 gene or on a truncating mutation. We discuss the clinical aspects with special emphasis on the behavioral phenotype and we review current perspectives in clinical management alongside with perspectives in altering gene expression. PMID:22670134

  4. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... binding protein 2 (MeCP2), which is needed for brain development and acts as one of the many biochemical ... the following criteria do not have Rett syndrome: brain injury secondary to ... abnormal psychomotor development in the first 6 months of life. Is ...

  5. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  6. Improving Treatment Trial Outcomes for Rett Syndrome: The Development of Rett-specific Anchors for the Clinical Global Impression Scale.

    PubMed

    Neul, Jeffrey L; Glaze, Daniel G; Percy, Alan K; Feyma, Tim; Beisang, Arthur; Dinh, Thuy; Suter, Bernhard; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Snape, Mike; Horrigan, Joseph; Jones, Nancy E

    2015-11-01

    Rett syndrome is a genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder. Although the clinical consequences of Rett syndrome are profound and lifelong, currently no approved drug treatments are available specifically targeted to Rett symptoms. High quality outcome measures, specific to the core symptoms of a disorder are a critical component of well-designed clinical trials for individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. The Clinical Global Impression Scale is a measure of global clinical change with strong face validity that has been widely used as an outcome measure in clinical trials of central nervous system disorders. Despite its favorable assay sensitivity in clinical trials, as a global measure, the Clinical Global Impression Scale is not specific to the signs and symptoms of the disorder under study. Development of key anchors for the scale, specific to the disorder being assessed, holds promise for enhancing the validity and reliability of the measure for disorders such as Rett syndrome. PMID:25895911

  7. Improving Treatment Trial Outcomes for Rett Syndrome: the development of Rett-specific anchors for the Clinical Global Impression Scale

    PubMed Central

    Neul, Jeff; Glaze, Daniel; Percy, Alan; Feyma, Tim; Beisang, Arthur; Dinh, Thuy; Suter, Bernhard; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Snape, Mike; Horrigan, Joseph; Jones, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder. While the clinical consequences of Rett syndrome are profound and life-long, currently no approved drug treatments are available specifically targeted to Rett symptoms. High quality outcome measures, specific to the core symptoms of a disorder are a critical component to well-designed clinical trials for individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. The Clinical Global Impression Scale is a measure of global clinical change with strong face validity that has been widely used as an outcome measure in clinical trials of central nervous system disorders. Despite its favorable assay sensitivity in clinical trials, as a global measure, the Clinical Global Impression Scale is not specific to the signs and symptoms of the disorder under study. Development of key anchors for the scale, specific to the disorder being assessed, holds promise for enhancing the validity and reliability of the measure for disorders such as Rett syndrome. PMID:25895911

  8. Progress in Rett Syndrome: from discovery to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Percy, Alan K

    2016-09-01

    Fifty years ago, Andreas Rett described a disorder in 22 females featuring prominent regression of fine motor and communication skills, cognitive impairment, stereotypic movements, periodic breathing, and gait abnormalities. This disorder became known as Rett syndrome (RTT) following the report of Hagberg et al. in 1983. Although RTT was scarcely recognized at that time in the United States, here the efforts of Rett and Hagberg led to rapid progress in recognition and diagnosis, a clearer understanding of its clinical and pathological underpinnings, and, ultimately, identification of mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene as the primary cause of this unique and challenging neurodevelopmental disorder. Thereafter, a natural history study and critical translational research in animal models paved the way for potential disease-modifying agents to be assessed in human clinical trials. To be successful, the energies of the international community at all levels, including researchers in clinical and basic science, funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies, patient advocates, and, above all, parents and their children are essential. Otherwise, hopes for effective treatment, if not, a cure, will remain unfulfilled. PMID:27491553

  9. Rett Syndrome: Crossing the Threshold to Clinical Translation.

    PubMed

    Katz, David M; Bird, Adrian; Coenraads, Monica; Gray, Steven J; Menon, Debashish U; Philpot, Benjamin D; Tarquinio, Daniel C

    2016-02-01

    Lying at the intersection between neurobiology and epigenetics, Rett syndrome (RTT) has garnered intense interest in recent years, not only from a broad range of academic scientists, but also from the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. In addition to the critical need for treatments for this devastating disorder, optimism for developing RTT treatments derives from a unique convergence of factors, including a known monogenic cause, reversibility of symptoms in preclinical models, a strong clinical research infrastructure highlighted by an NIH-funded natural history study and well-established clinics with significant patient populations. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the biology of RTT, particularly promising preclinical findings, lessons from past clinical trials, and critical elements of trial design for rare disorders. PMID:26830113

  10. Rett Syndrome: Crossing the Threshold to Clinical Translation

    PubMed Central

    Katz, David M.; Bird, Adrian; Coenraads, Monica; Gray, Steven J.; Menon, Debashish U.; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Tarquinio, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Lying at the intersection between neurobiology and epigenetics, Rett syndrome (RTT) has garnered intense interest in recent years, not only from a broad range of academic scientists, but also from the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. In addition to the critical need for treatments for this devastating disorder, optimism for developing RTT treatments derives from a unique convergence of factors, including a known monogenic cause, reversibility of symptoms in preclinical models, a strong clinical research infrastructure highlighted by an NIH-funded natural history study and well-established clinics with significant patient populations. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the biology of RTT, particularly promising preclinical findings, lessons from past clinical trials, and critical elements of trial design for rare disorders. PMID:26830113

  11. CONSTIPATION IN RETT SYNDROME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal problems occur frequently in girls with Rett syndrome. Constipation is a common problem in girls with Rett syndrome because of their neurological abnormalities. Research studies to better understand the abnormalities of large bowel function in our girls with Rett syndrome have not b...

  12. Neurophysiology versus clinical genetics in Rett syndrome: A multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Halbach, Nicky; Smeets, Eric E; Julu, Peter; Witt-Engerström, Ingegerd; Pini, Giorgio; Bigoni, Stefania; Hansen, Stig; Apartopoulos, Flora; Delamont, Robert; van Roozendaal, Kees; Scusa, Maria F; Borelli, Paolo; Candel, Math; Curfs, Leopold

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have attempted to establish the genotype-phenotype correlation in Rett syndrome (RTT). Cardiorespiratory measurements provide robust objective data, to correlate with each of the different clinical phenotypes. It has important implications for the management and treatment of this syndrome. The aim of this study was to correlate the genotype with the quantitative cardiorespiratory data obtained by neurophysiological measurement combined with a clinical severity score. This international multicenter study was conducted in four European countries from 1999 to 2012. The study cohort consisted of a group of 132 well-defined RTT females aged between 2 and 43 years with extended clinical, molecular, and neurophysiological assessments. Diagnosis of RTT was based on the consensus criteria for RTT and molecular confirmation. Genotype-phenotype analyses of clinical features and cardiorespiratory data were performed after grouping mutations by the same type and localization or having the same putative biological effect on the MeCP2 protein, and subsequently on eight single recurrent mutations. A less severe phenotype was seen in females with CTS, p.R133C, and p.R294X mutations. Autonomic disturbances were present in all females, and not restricted to nor influenced by one specific group or any single recurrent mutation. The objective information from non-invasive neurophysiological evaluation of the disturbed central autonomic control is of great importance in helping to organize the lifelong care for females with RTT. Further research is needed to provide insights into the pathogenesis of autonomic dysfunction, and to develop evidence-based management in RTT. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27354166

  13. How can clinical ethics guide the management of comorbidities in the child with Rett syndrome?

    PubMed

    Downs, Jenny; Forbes, David; Johnson, Michael; Leonard, Helen

    2016-08-01

    Rett syndrome is a rare disorder caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene. Those affected generally have severe functional impairments, and medical comorbidities such as scoliosis and poor growth are common. There is a paucity of information on the natural history of many rare disorders and an even greater deficit of evidence to guide best practice. The population-based and longitudinal Australian Rett Syndrome Database established in 1993 has supported investigations of the natural history of Rett syndrome and effectiveness of treatments. This paper reviews the disorder Rett syndrome and evidence for the management of scoliosis and poor growth within a clinical ethics framework. Compared with conservative management, we have shown that spinal fusion is associated with reduced mortality and better respiratory health. We have also shown that gastrostomy insertion is associated with subsequent weight gain. Family counselling for both procedures necessarily must include family perspectives and careful clinical attention to their needs and wishes. Vignettes describing family decision-making and experiences are presented to illustrate the principals of beneficence and autonomy in determining the best interests of the child and family. A blend of evidence-based practice with a strong clinical ethics framework has capacity to build existing strengths in families and reduce the negative impacts of disability and in so doing, optimise the health and wellbeing of those with Rett syndrome. PMID:27243819

  14. What Are the Treatments for Rett Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... 2012, from http://www.rettsyndrome.org/understanding-rett-syndrome/about-rett-syndrome [top] PubMed Health. (2010). Rett syndrome . Retrieved ...

  15. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... your state! State Resources Rettsyndrome.org is the world's leading Rett syndrome research funding organization We have ... toward treatments for millions of people around the world with Autism, Parkinson's, Alzheimers, Schizophrenia and Traumatic Brain ...

  16. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Research Goals Activities and Advances Scientific Articles Staff Contacts Clinical Trials Resources and Publications For Patients and Consumers For Researchers and Health ...

  17. Polysomnography in the Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Segawa, M; Nomura, Y

    1992-05-01

    The features of sleep parameters in the Rett syndrome were compared with those in early infantile autism (EIA) and hereditary progressive dystonia with marked diurnal fluctuation (HPD). The sleep-wakefulness cycle and the tonic and phasic components of sleep were evaluated in each disorder, the former was estimated by the day-by-day plot method and the latter two by polysomnography (PSG) following our method. Abnormalities of the sleep-wakefulness cycle were observed in the Rett syndrome and EIA, but in the latter these abnormalities became inapparent with age and improved markedly by correcting the environmental condition and completely by 5-hydroxytriptophan. The latter, if treated early, was followed by improvement of behavior. In the Rett syndrome, however, the abnormalities continued into late childhood to adolescence. In HPD, PSG abnormalities were restricted to the phasic component, which improved completely after levodopa in accordance with the clinical improvement. On the other hand, in the Rett syndrome as well as in EIA both the phasic and tonic components were involved and also the leakage of the components of REM stage into NREM stage was observed. In the Rett syndrome, these abnormalities aggravated with age, with disturbances in % sleep stage, nocturnal variation of tonic and phasic components of sleep and REM-NREM cycles, while in EIA the results of PSGs revealed no such progressions but showed an increase in twitch movement and a lack of normal increase in the number of REMs occurring in short intervals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1626634

  18. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  19. Two Sisters with Rett Syndrome. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haenggeli, Charles A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Clinical histories and physical findings are presented for 2 sisters with Rett syndrome. The older sister, age 25, was typically affected, whereas the younger sister, 22 years old, was affected with a seizure disorder showing an unusually early onset. The paper discusses hypotheses in genetic causation of Rett syndrome. (JDD)

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Rett Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... Rett syndrome may not always be present, so health care providers also need to evaluate the child's symptoms ...

  1. What Are the Symptoms of Rett Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lack of age-related decrease in sleep duration. Brain Development , Dec;23(Suppl 1). [top] Nomura, Y. (2005). ... behavior characteristics and sleep disturbance in Rett syndrome. Brain and Development , Nov;27(Suppl 1). [top] Rare Diseases Clinical ...

  2. Scoliosis in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keret, D; Bassett, G S; Bunnell, W P; Marks, H G

    1988-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a progressive encephalopathy observed only in girls, who are apparently normal until 6 to 12 months of age. It is characterized by autism, dementia, ataxia, stereotypic hand movements, hyperreflexia, spasticity, and seizures. Eight of 10 females with Rett syndrome evaluated at the Alfred I. duPont Institute have C-shaped neuromuscular curves averaging 29 degrees (range 22-48 degrees). Curve progression was seen in all eight patients and occurred despite bracing in four, averaging 21 degrees (range 12-31 degrees). Five patients, two of whom were braced, have undergone posterior spinal fusion with segmental instrumentation for curves ranging in size from 49 to 105 degrees (average 67 degrees). PMID:3350946

  3. Validating the Rett Syndrome Gross Motor Scale

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Jenny; Stahlhut, Michelle; Wong, Kingsley; Syhler, Birgit; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Jacoby, Peter; Leonard, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder associated with a pathogenic mutation on the MECP2 gene. Impaired movement is a fundamental component and the Rett Syndrome Gross Motor Scale was developed to measure gross motor abilities in this population. The current study investigated the validity and reliability of the Rett Syndrome Gross Motor Scale. Video data showing gross motor abilities supplemented with parent report data was collected for 255 girls and women registered with the Australian Rett Syndrome Database, and the factor structure and relationships between motor scores, age and genotype were investigated. Clinical assessment scores for 38 girls and women with Rett syndrome who attended the Danish Center for Rett Syndrome were used to assess consistency of measurement. Principal components analysis enabled the calculation of three factor scores: Sitting, Standing and Walking, and Challenge. Motor scores were poorer with increasing age and those with the p.Arg133Cys, p.Arg294* or p.Arg306Cys mutation achieved higher scores than those with a large deletion. The repeatability of clinical assessment was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient for total score 0.99, 95% CI 0.93–0.98). The standard error of measurement for the total score was 2 points and we would be 95% confident that a change 4 points in the 45-point scale would be greater than within-subject measurement error. The Rett Syndrome Gross Motor Scale could be an appropriate measure of gross motor skills in clinical practice and clinical trials. PMID:26800272

  4. The orthopedic management of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, M J; Haas, R H

    1988-01-01

    Musculoskeletal deformity sufficiently severe to require orthopedic surgery is a significant problem in Rett syndrome. Preliminary results from the study of 16 patients suggest deformity in nearly all patients. Eight patients in stage III and seven patients in stage IV showed clinical evidence of scoliosis. Radiographic studies confirmed a structural curve in nine of ten patients studied. Heel cord tightening was seen in nine of 16 patients. Hip instability was identified as an area of potential concern in the Rett patient. PMID:3198902

  5. Clinical Guidelines for Management of Bone Health in Rett Syndrome Based on Expert Consensus and Available Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Amanda; Leonard, Helen; Siafarikas, Aris; Woodhead, Helen; Fyfe, Sue; Ward, Leanne M.; Munns, Craig; Motil, Kathleen; Tarquinio, Daniel; Shapiro, Jay R.; Brismar, Torkel; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Coppola, Giangennaro; Ellaway, Carolyn; Freilinger, Michael; Geerts, Suzanne; Humphreys, Peter; Jones, Mary; Lane, Jane; Larsson, Gunilla; Lotan, Meir; Percy, Alan; Pineda, Mercedes; Skinner, Steven; Syhler, Birgit; Thompson, Sue; Weiss, Batia; Witt Engerström, Ingegerd; Downs, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We developed clinical guidelines for the management of bone health in Rett syndrome through evidence review and the consensus of an expert panel of clinicians. Methods An initial guidelines draft was created which included statements based upon literature review and 11 open-ended questions where literature was lacking. The international expert panel reviewed the draft online using a 2-stage Delphi process to reach consensus agreement. Items describe the clinical assessment of bone health, bone mineral density assessment and technique, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Results Agreement was reached on 39 statements which were formulated from 41 statements and 11 questions. When assessing bone health in Rett syndrome a comprehensive assessment of fracture history, mutation type, prescribed medication, pubertal development, mobility level, dietary intake and biochemical bone markers is recommended. A baseline densitometry assessment should be performed with accommodations made for size, with the frequency of surveillance determined according to individual risk. Lateral spine x-rays are also suggested. Increasing physical activity and initiating calcium and vitamin D supplementation when low are the first approaches to optimizing bone health in Rett syndrome. If individuals with Rett syndrome meet the ISCD criterion for osteoporosis in children, the use of bisphosphonates is recommended. Conclusion A clinically significant history of fracture in combination with low bone densitometry findings is necessary for a diagnosis of osteoporosis. These evidence and consensus-based guidelines have the potential to improve bone health in those with Rett syndrome, reduce the frequency of fractures, and stimulate further research that aims to ameliorate the impacts of this serious comorbidity. PMID:26849438

  6. Unexpected cellular players in Rett syndrome pathology.

    PubMed

    Cronk, James C; Derecki, Noel C; Litvak, Vladimir; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Rett syndrome is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder, primarily caused by mutations of methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Although the genetic cause of disease was identified over a decade ago, a significant gap still remains in both our clinical and scientific understanding of its pathogenesis. Neurons are known to be primary players in pathology, with their dysfunction being the key in Rett syndrome. While studies in mice have demonstrated a clear causative - and potential therapeutic - role for neurons in Rett syndrome, recent work has suggested that other tissues also contribute significantly to progression of the disease. Indeed, Rett syndrome is known to present with several common peripheral pathologies, such as osteopenia, scoliosis, gastrointestinal problems including nutritional defects, and general growth deficit. Mouse models assessing the potential role of non-neuronal cell types have confirmed both roles in disease and potential therapeutic targets. A new picture is emerging in which neurons both initiate and drive pathology, while dysfunction of other cell types and peripheral tissues exacerbate disease, possibly amplifying further neurologic problems, and ultimately result in a positive feedback loop of progressively worsening symptoms. Here, we review what is known about neuronal and non-neuronal cell types, and discuss how this new, integrative understanding of the disease may allow for additional clinical and scientific pathways for treating and understanding Rett syndrome. PMID:25982834

  7. Social Impairments in Rett Syndrome: Characteristics and Relationship with Clinical Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, W. E.; Tierney, E.; Rohde, C. A.; Suarez-Pedraza, M. C.; Clarke, M. A.; Salorio, C. F.; Bibat, G.; Bukelis, I.; Naram, D.; Lanham, D. C.; Naidu, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: While behavioural abnormalities are fundamental features of Rett syndrome (RTT), few studies have examined the RTT behavioural phenotype. Most of these reports have focused on autistic features, linked to the early regressive phase of the disorder, and few studies have applied standardised behavioural measures. We used a battery of…

  8. International Conference on Rett Syndrome (4th, Vienna, Austria, October 2-5, 1986). Synopsis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percy, Alan

    Presentations from speakers at a conference on Rett Syndrome are summarized. The presentations focused on Rett Syndrome's genetic basis and identification as a clinical syndrome, involving, among other things, mental subnormality, epilepsy, infantile spasms, hand stereotypes, and poor hand use. Also discussed were: Rett Syndrome's predictive…

  9. Rett Syndrome: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Adrienne

    1991-01-01

    This nontechnical review of the literature on Rett Syndrome, a developmental disability found only in females, examines the syndrome's history, diagnostic criteria, clinical stages, incidence, differential diagnosis, etiology, genetics, treatment approaches, and prognosis. (Author/DB)

  10. [Rett syndrome as a hodogenesis disorder].

    PubMed

    Narbona, J

    In the last few years, Rett syndrome is conceived as a peculiar form of neurodevelopmental post-migrational disorder affecting dendritogenesis. In this article the clinical pathochronic pattern of classical forms is reviewed and the recent neurobiological and genetic evidences suggesting possible future explanations of its nature and origin are discussed. PMID:10101775

  11. Rett Syndrome: A Longitudinal Developmental Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Norman; Veydt, Nicole

    1990-01-01

    The clinical course of development of a 14-year-old girl with Rett Syndrome is outlined. Results indicated a general stagnation in gross and fine motor skills, self-help skills, communication, and cognition, beginning at approximately 15 months. No skills progressed beyond the 2-year level despite several years of intensive intervention.…

  12. Rett Syndrome: A Review of Current Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Acker, Rick

    1991-01-01

    This review describes Rett syndrome as a disorder afflicting females and characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive and motor skills and development of stereotypic hand movements. The paper discusses its clinical manifestations, etiology, diagnostic criteria and differential diagnosis, prevalence, pathogenesis, treatment, and educational…

  13. Rett syndrome in adolescent and adult females: clinical and molecular genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Smeets, E; Schollen, E; Moog, U; Matthijs, G; Herbergs, J; Smeets, H; Curfs, L; Schrander-Stumpel, C; Fryns, J P

    2003-10-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder which is diagnosed clinically. We report on 30 adolescent and adult females with classical or atypical RTT of whom 24 have a MECP2 mutation. In these 24 females, the clinical manifestations, degree of severity, and disorder profiles are discussed as well as the genotype phenotype correlation. After X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) study in these cases, we found no correlation between skewing and milder phenotype. Three large deletions were found after additional Southern blot analysis in three classical RTT cases. We confirm that early truncating mutations in MECP2 are responsible for a more severe course of the disorder. Three disorder profiles related to the missense mutations R133C and R306C, and to deletions in the C terminal segment are described and are of interest for further clinical study on larger numbers of cases. The R133C genotype has a predominantly autistic presentation while the R306C genotype is associated with a slower disease progression. The phenotype of the "hotspot" deletions in the C terminal segment is predominantly characterized by rapid progressive neurogenic scoliosis. Older women with RTT are underdiagnosed: seven adults were first diagnosed as having RTT between 29 and 60 years of age, and confirmed on finding a MECP2 mutation. Knowledge of the clinical phenotype of RTT at an adult age is important for all involved in the care of these individuals. The involvement of the parent support group is very important in this matter. PMID:12966523

  14. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Danielle; Banerjee, Abhishek; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic effects of MeCP2, which is expressed very early in neuronal progenitors and continues to be expressed into adulthood. The effects of MeCP2 are mediated by diverse signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms. Attempts to reverse the effects of Rett Syndrome need to take into account the developmental dynamics and temporal impact of MeCP2 loss. PMID:26942018

  15. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Danielle; Banerjee, Abhishek; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic effects of MeCP2, which is expressed very early in neuronal progenitors and continues to be expressed into adulthood. The effects of MeCP2 are mediated by diverse signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms. Attempts to reverse the effects of Rett Syndrome need to take into account the developmental dynamics and temporal impact of MeCP2 loss. PMID:26942018

  16. A national survey of Rett syndrome: age, clinical characteristics, current abilities, and health.

    PubMed

    Cianfaglione, Rina; Clarke, Angus; Kerr, Mike; Hastings, Richard P; Oliver, Chris; Felce, David

    2015-07-01

    As part of a wider study to investigate the behavioral phenotype of a national sample of girls and women with Rett syndrome (RTT) in comparison to a well-chosen contrast group and its relationship to parental well-being, the development, clinical severity, current abilities and health of 91 participants were analyzed in relation to diagnostic, clinical and genetic mutation categories. Early truncating mutations or large deletions were associated with greater severity. Early regression was also associated with greater severity. All three were associated with lower current abilities. Epilepsy and weight, gastrointestinal and bowel problems were common co-morbidities. Participants with classic RTT had greater health problems than those with atypical RTT. A substantial minority of respondents reported fairly frequent signs of possible pain experienced by their relative with RTT. Overall, the study provides new data on the current abilities and general health of people with RTT and adds to the evidence that the severity of the condition and variation of subsequent disability, albeit generally within the profound range, may be related to gene mutation. The presence of certain co-morbidities represents a substantial ongoing need for better health. The experience of pain requires further investigation. PMID:25820775

  17. Rett syndrome - Stimulation of endogenous biogenic amines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R.; Norton, R. D.; Wilkinson, R.; Leon, H. A.; Matson, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    Transient hypercapnic hyperoxemia was induced in two Rett syndrome children by the administration of a gaseous mixture of 80 percent O2 and 20 percent CO2. Time course studies of neurotransmitters and their metabolites showed an immediate and marked increase in central biogenic amine turnover following inhalation of the gas mixture. The increased turnover of biogenic amines was associated with improved clinical changes. This suggests a coupled relationship and provides further support for an etiological role of neurotransmitter dysfunction in Rett syndrome. In a complementary study, elevation of pulmonary CO2 by application of a simple rebreathing device resulted in improvement of abnormal blood gases and elimination of the Cheyne-Stokes-like respiratory pattern of the Rett syndrome. Near normalization of the EEG occurred when a normal respiratory pattern was imposed by means of a respirator. Taken together, these results lead to the preliminary conclusion that cerebral hypoxemia secondary to abnormal respiratory function may contribute to diminished production of biogenic amines in Rett syndrome.

  18. Communication Abilities and Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodyatt, Gail; Ozanne, Anne

    1992-01-01

    The communicative behaviors of 6 girls with Rett syndrome (ages 2-13) were evaluated. Findings indicated that all subjects were at a preintentional level of communication, which was consistent with their profound intellectual disability and their lack of demonstration of "means-end" behavior beyond Piagetian Sensorimotor Stage III. (Author/DB)

  19. De novo WDR45 mutation in a patient showing clinically Rett syndrome with childhood iron deposition in brain.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Chihiro; Nabatame, Shin; Iijima, Yoshitaka; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Ozono, Keiichi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-05-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder mostly caused by MECP2 mutations. We identified a de novo WDR45 mutation, which caused a subtype of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, in a patient showing clinically typical RTT. The mutation (c.830+1G>A) led to aberrant splicing in lymphoblastoid cells. Sequential brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that iron deposition in the globus pallidus and the substantia nigra was observed as early as at 11 years of age. Because the patient showed four of the main RTT diagnostic criteria, WDR45 should be investigated in patients with RTT without MECP2 mutations. PMID:24621584

  20. Towards a Behavioral Phenotype for Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount, Rebecca H.; Hastings, Richard P.; Reilly, Sheena; Cass, Hilary; Charman, Tony

    2003-01-01

    A study compared 143 girls (ages 6-14) with Rett syndrome with 85 girls with severe mental retardation on the Developmental Behavior Checklist. Girls with Rett syndrome presented more "autistic relating" and fewer antisocial behaviors. When compared to children with autism, they did not present with classic autistic behavioral features. (Contains…

  1. Autistic Disorder Symptoms in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulffaert, Josette; Van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina A.; Scholte, Evert M.

    2009-01-01

    According to the major classification systems it is not possible to diagnose a comorbid autistic disorder in persons with Rett syndrome. However, this is a controversial issue, and given the level of functioning of persons with Rett syndrome, the autistic disorder is expected to be present in a comparable proportion as in people with the same…

  2. Severe respiratory dysrhythmia in Rett syndrome treated with topiramate.

    PubMed

    Krajnc, Natalija

    2014-10-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that manifests itself early in childhood, progresses with the evolution of characteristic clinical signs and symptoms and is confirmed by mutation in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene. Seizures are present in a majority of Rett patients. Respiratory dysrhythmia in the awake state is present in two-thirds of patients, leading in some cases to severe nonepileptic paroxysmal events. There are no optimal treatment recommendations thus far. The aim of this case study is to present the electro-clinical correlation of severe respiratory dysrhythmia mimicking seizures in 2 Rett patients and effective treatment with topiramate. PMID:24309241

  3. The Rett syndrome--clinical presentation of the first 9 Albanian cases.

    PubMed

    Preza, B; Baboçi, H; Ashta, A; Lleshi, L

    1990-01-01

    Out of the 1,000 patients (girls, 2-18 years old) examined since 1984, there were identified 9 cases with classical symptoms of the Rett Syndrome. Geographically considered the cases were concentrated in three regions. First, in the eastern part of Albania (Korça-Pogradec-Peshkopia) and in the western-central part (Durrës-Tirana), within a distance of 40-45 km in each region. The most important fact is that the two cases in Durrës town lived in the same quarter, at a distance of 300 m. Secondly, in the northern part of the country (Shkodra city), averagely 150 km away from the first centers. Three of the patients became relatively improved both intellectually and physically, due to their parents' special care as well as intensive medical rehabilitation and music therapy. PMID:2344024

  4. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  5. The diagnosis of autism in a female: could it be Rett syndrome?

    PubMed

    Young, Deidra J; Bebbington, Ami; Anderson, Alison; Ravine, David; Ellaway, Carolyn; Kulkarni, Alpana; de Klerk, Nick; Kaufmann, Walter E; Leonard, Helen

    2008-06-01

    The overlap between autism and Rett syndrome clinical features has led to many cases of Rett syndrome being initially diagnosed with infantile autism or as having some autistic features. Both conditions seriously disrupt social and language development and are often accompanied by repetitive, nonpurposeful stereotypic hand movements. The aims of this study were to compare the early and subsequent clinical courses of female subjects with Rett syndrome categorised by whether or not a diagnosis of autism had been proposed before Rett syndrome had been diagnosed and compare the spectrum of methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) mutations identified among the two groups. This study made use of a total of 313 cases recorded in two databases: the Australian Rett Syndrome Database (ARSD) and the International Rett Syndrome Phenotype Database (InterRett). Cases with an initial diagnosis of autism had significantly milder Rett syndrome symptoms and were more likely to remain ambulant, to have some functional hand use and not to have developed a scoliosis. Females with the p.R306C or p.T158M mutations in the MECP2 gene were more likely to have an initial diagnosis of autism, and the specific Rett syndrome symptoms were noted at a later age. We recommend that females who are initially considered to have autism be carefully monitored for the evolution of the signs and symptoms of Rett syndrome. PMID:17684768

  6. Mutations in epilepsy and intellectual disability genes in patients with features of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olson, Heather E; Tambunan, Dimira; LaCoursiere, Christopher; Goldenberg, Marti; Pinsky, Rebecca; Martin, Emilie; Ho, Eugenia; Khwaja, Omar; Kaufmann, Walter E; Poduri, Annapurna

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome and neurodevelopmental disorders with features overlapping this syndrome frequently remain unexplained in patients without clinically identified MECP2 mutations. We recruited a cohort of 11 patients with features of Rett syndrome and negative initial clinical testing for mutations in MECP2. We analyzed their phenotypes to determine whether patients met formal criteria for Rett syndrome, reviewed repeat clinical genetic testing, and performed exome sequencing of the probands. Using 2010 diagnostic criteria, three patients had classical Rett syndrome, including two for whom repeat MECP2 gene testing had identified mutations. In a patient with neonatal onset epilepsy with atypical Rett syndrome, we identified a frameshift deletion in STXBP1. Among seven patients with features of Rett syndrome not fulfilling formal diagnostic criteria, four had suspected pathogenic mutations, one each in MECP2, FOXG1, SCN8A, and IQSEC2. MECP2 mutations are highly correlated with classical Rett syndrome. Genes associated with atypical Rett syndrome, epilepsy, or intellectual disability should be considered in patients with features overlapping with Rett syndrome and negative MECP2 testing. While most of the identified mutations were apparently de novo, the SCN8A variant was inherited from an unaffected parent mosaic for the mutation, which is important to note for counseling regarding recurrence risks. PMID:25914188

  7. Rett Syndrome: Revised Diagnostic Criteria and Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Neul, Jeffrey L.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Christodoulou, John; Clarke, Angus J.; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Leonard, Helen; Bailey, Mark E. S.; Schanen, N. Carolyn; Zappella, Michele; Renieri, Alessandra; Huppke, Peter; Percy, Alan K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disease that affects approximately 1 in 10,000 live female births and is often caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Despite distinct clinical features, the accumulation of clinical and molecular information in recent years has generated considerable confusion regarding the diagnosis of RTT. The purpose of this work was revise and clarify 2002 consensus criteria for the diagnosis of RTT in anticipation of treatment trials. Method RettSearch members, representing the majority of the international clinical RTT specialists, participated in an iterative process to come to a consensus on a revised and simplified clinical diagnostic criteria for RTT. Results The clinical criteria required for the diagnosis of classic and atypical RTT were clarified and simplified. Guidelines for the diagnosis and molecular evaluation of specific variant forms of RTT were developed. Interpretation These revised criteria provide clarity regarding the key features required for the diagnosis of RTT and reinforce the concept that RTT is a clinical diagnosis based on distinct clinical criteria, independent of molecular findings. We recommend that these criteria and guidelines be utilized in any proposed clinical research. PMID:21154482

  8. Anaesthesia and Rett syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maguire, D; Bachman, C

    1989-07-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder of females characterized by dementia, autism, movement disorders and an abnormality of respiratory control. A 14-year-old girl with Rett Syndrome underwent spinal fusion surgery under general anaesthesia. No exacerbation of the respiratory control defect with surgery and anaesthesia was observed. Hypothermia, ongoing blood loss and a normal anion gap acidosis were encountered, but were not attributable to features of this disorder. PMID:2758549

  9. Self-Injurious Behavior in Rett Syndrome: Interactions between Features of Rett Syndrome and Operant Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Chris; And Others

    1993-01-01

    In this case study, interactions were examined between features of Rett syndrome and operant conditioning as determinants of self-injurious behavior (SIB). Analysis suggested different functions for two forms of SIB: automatic reinforcement by sensory stimulation and escape from social interactions. Features of Rett syndrome tended to maximize the…

  10. Dental issues in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Janas, Anna; Osica, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The advancements in science and technology allowed saving the lives of children, who had no chance of survival before. Hence the problem of so called rare diseases, usually genetically determined. It is a new challenge for both the physicians and the health services. These children require a coordinated multi specialist oriented health care, which includes also dentists. This situation is reflected by the case of an 18 years old girl with Rett Syndrome, described by us. In this patient despite numerous visits to various dental practices, no decision of a radical surgical extraction of the tooth has been conducted. In our Department the extraction of teeth 22, 16 and 14 has been performed, as a part of 1 day surgery procedures, thus eliminating the dental infections and pain. Conclusion: Elaboration and introduction into praxis principles of dental care in children and young adults with rare diseases are needed. PMID:26982756

  11. Autism and Rett Syndrome: Behavioural Investigations and Differential Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, Bo; Rett, Andreas

    1987-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of Rett syndrome and infantile autism among 63 female patients (22 months to 15 years) was investigated. Conclusions concerned: characteristics of some Rett subjects but no autistic subjects, characteristics of all Rett subjects but not all autistic subjects, and characteristics of most Rett subjects and some autistic…

  12. Recent advances in understanding synaptic abnormalities in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Michael; Blue, Mary E; Naidu, Sakkubai

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome is an extremely disabling X-linked nervous system disorder that mainly affects girls in early childhood and causes autism-like behavior, severe intellectual disability, seizures, sleep disturbances, autonomic instability, and other disorders due to mutations in the MeCP2 (methyl CpG-binding protein 2) transcription factor. The disorder targets synapses and synaptic plasticity and has been shown to disrupt the balance between glutamate excitatory synapses and GABAergic inhibitory synapses. In fact, it can be argued that Rett syndrome is primarily a disorder of synaptic plasticity and that agents that can correct this imbalance may have beneficial effects on brain development. This review briefly summarizes the link between disrupted synaptic plasticity mechanisms and Rett syndrome and early clinical trials that aim to target these abnormalities to improve the outcome for these severely disabled children. PMID:26918155

  13. Recent advances in understanding synaptic abnormalities in Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Michael; Blue, Mary E.; Naidu, Sakkubai

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome is an extremely disabling X-linked nervous system disorder that mainly affects girls in early childhood and causes autism-like behavior, severe intellectual disability, seizures, sleep disturbances, autonomic instability, and other disorders due to mutations in the MeCP2 (methyl CpG-binding protein 2) transcription factor. The disorder targets synapses and synaptic plasticity and has been shown to disrupt the balance between glutamate excitatory synapses and GABAergic inhibitory synapses. In fact, it can be argued that Rett syndrome is primarily a disorder of synaptic plasticity and that agents that can correct this imbalance may have beneficial effects on brain development. This review briefly summarizes the link between disrupted synaptic plasticity mechanisms and Rett syndrome and early clinical trials that aim to target these abnormalities to improve the outcome for these severely disabled children. PMID:26918155

  14. Is Rett Syndrome a Subtype of Pervasive Developmental Disorders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Luke Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews whether Rett syndrome is a subtype of pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). The paper analyzes internal and external diagnostic validity and discusses whether Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder or a mental disorder. The paper concludes that data support the idea of classifying Rett syndrome as a subtype of PDD.…

  15. Learning ability in children with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elefant, Cochavit; Wigram, Tony

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to present results of a research study examining learning ability in individuals with Rett syndrome. The material for this article was drawn from a more extensive doctoral study, designed to investigate intentional communication in this population, through the use of songs in music therapy. Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder resulting from an X-linked mutation, affecting mainly females, and found across racial and ethnic groups worldwide. One of the main areas affecting functioning in individuals with Rett syndrome is a severe impairment of receptive and expressive communication. This creates difficulties when attempting to reveal their potential learning abilities. This population has been observed as very responsive to music hence music therapy intervention has been advocated in promoting and motivating them to communicate and to learn. Seven girls with Rett syndrome, between ages 4 and 10 participated in the study. A single subject, multiple probe design was applied during 30-min trials, three times per week and lasted 8 months. During the trials the participants were asked to choose from a selection of 18 familiar and unfamiliar songs, while their ability to learn was observed and measured. Findings revealed that all seven girls demonstrated an ability to learn and to sustain learning over time. This intervention demonstrated that individuals with Rett syndrome could be promoted and motivated to communicate and learn when therapeutically employed by a trained music therapists. PMID:16182495

  16. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT. PMID:26807990

  17. Contributing to the early detection of Rett syndrome: The potential role of auditory Gestalt perception

    PubMed Central

    Marschik, Peter B.; Einspieler, Christa; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    To assess whether there are qualitatively deviant characteristics in the early vocalizations of children with Rett syndrome, we had 400 native Austrian–German speakers listen to audio recordings of vocalizations from typically developing girls and girls with Rett syndrome. The audio recordings were rated as (a) inconspicuous, (b) conspicuous or (c) not able to decide between (a) and (b). The results showed that participants were accurate in differentiating the vocalizations of typically developing children compared to children with Rett syndrome. However, the accuracy for rating verbal behaviors was dependent on the type of vocalization with greater accuracy for canonical babbling compared to cooing vocalizations. The results suggest a potential role for the use of rating child vocalizations for early detection of Rett syndrome. This is important because clinical criteria related to speech and language development remain important for early identification of Rett syndrome. PMID:22119693

  18. Rett's syndrome in the west of Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, A M; Stephenson, J B

    1985-01-01

    Nineteen girls with characteristic features of Rett's syndrome, including normal initial development, regression at about 12 months of age, repetitive hand movements, and severe mental handicap were studied. This represents an estimated incidence of one in 30 000 live births (one in 15 000 girls) in the west of Scotland. Although the children were often initially considered to be autistic, they did not conform to this diagnosis as they made good personal contact within the limits of their mental development. The developmental regression was sometimes falsely attributed to vaccination. Each child showed striking involuntary movements and abnormality of tone, varying from hypotonia, which was found only in the youngest, to rigidity, which was common in older girls; this permitted classification into three clinical subtypes. The abnormalities were highly suggestive of an extrapyramidal disorder, and this has implications for further research and possible treatment. Images FIG 3 PMID:2412628

  19. Measuring Use and Cost of Health Sector and Related Care in a Population of Girls and Young Women with Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrie, Delia; Bebbington, Ami; Bower, Carol; Leonard, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This study measured use and cost of health sector and related services in Rett syndrome and effects of socio-demographic, clinical severity and genetic factors on costs. The study population consisted of individuals with Rett syndrome registered with the Australian Rett Syndrome Database in 2004. Descriptive analysis was used to examine patterns…

  20. GALLBLADDER (BILLARY TRACT) DISEASE IN RETT SYNDROME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gallstone formation appears to be common in girls with Rett Syndrome (RS) and they may be affected at a young age. It is important to recognize this condition because it is a treatable cause of pain and distress. The exact cause of gallbladder disease in RS is not known. All children with gallstones...

  1. Communication Skills in Girls with Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartolotta, Theresa E.; Zipp, Genevieve P.; Simpkins, Susan D.; Glazewski, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Rett Syndrome (RS) is an X-linked, neurodevelopmental disorder that occurs primarily in females and causes significant impairment in cognition, motor control, and communication. Teachers and speech-language pathologists (SLPs) encounter girls with RS with increasing frequency as awareness of the disorder increases, yet the literature on clinical…

  2. Attention and Communication in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabio, Rosa Angela; Antonietti, Alessandro; Castelli, Ilaria; Marchetti, Antonella

    2009-01-01

    The study of selective attention and its influence on communication in patients with Rett Syndrome (RS), in which communication abilities are impaired is particularly relevant. The aim of this study was to analyse attention and communication abilities in RS. A sample of 20 children (10 girls with RS and 10 control girls, matched on mental age)…

  3. The Invisible Enemy: Fighting Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisz, Chaudia Minden

    1986-01-01

    The mother of a child with Rett Syndrome, a degenerative brain disease, describes difficulties in obtaining a diagnosis and the relief she and her family felt once the diagnosis was made. She emphasizes the need for parents to offer each other support. (CL)

  4. Nosology and Diagnosis of Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Fodstad, Jill C.; Boisjoli, Jessica A.

    2008-01-01

    Rett Syndrome is one of the least commonly occurring autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but certainly one of the most devastating. A genetic profile has been identified, but checklists still have an important role for prescreening, especially before expensive genetic testing, and to provide precise strengths and weaknesses with respect to the core…

  5. Rett's Syndrome in an Australian Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossiter, E. J. R.; Callaghan, C.

    1987-01-01

    Following a literature review on Rett's Syndrome, a case study is presented of a 15-year-old girl with normal development during the first months of life followed by manifestation of behavior abnormalities and deterioration of intellectual level. The child's medical history and the mother's description of the girl's development are included.…

  6. Recognizing and Treating Rett Syndrome in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanzek, Megan; Jenson, William R.; Houlihan, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A review of the literature on Rett syndrome (RS) for school-based professionals is presented from a behavioral perspective. A description of RS is provided, including distinctive physical, behavioral, and emotional features, diagnostic criteria for classic and "formes frustes" forms of RS, and stages of the disorder. The similarities and…

  7. SATB2-associated syndrome presenting with Rett-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Yoo, Y; Lim, B C; Kim, K J; Choi, M; Chae, J-H

    2016-06-01

    The SATB2-associated syndrome (SAS) was proposed recently, after the SATB2 gene was initially discovered to be associated with isolated cleft palate. This syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability with delayed speech development, facial dysmorphism, cleft or high-arched palate, and dentition problems. Here, we describe two novel SATB2 sequence variants in two unrelated patients presenting with Rett-like phenotypes. We performed trio-based whole-exome sequencing in a 17-month-old girl presenting with severe retardation and Rett-like phenotypes, which revealed a de novo missense variant in SATB2 (p.Glu396Gln). Moreover, targeted sequencing of the SATB2 gene was performed in a 2-year-old girl with severe psychomotor retardation, facial hypotonia, and cleft palate who also exhibited some features of Rett syndrome. A nonsense variant in SATB2 was identified in this patient (p.Arg459*). This study expanded the clinical and genetic spectrum of SAS. SATB2 variants should be considered in cases with psychomotor retardation alone or in any cases with Rett-like phenotypes, regardless of the typical features of SAS such as cleft palate. PMID:26596517

  8. Aging in Rett syndrome: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Halbach, N S J; Smeets, E E J; Steinbusch, C; Maaskant, M A; van Waardenburg, D; Curfs, L M G

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about the aging process of people with specific syndromes, like Rett syndrome (RTT). Recognition of the clinical and behavioral characteristics of the adult RTT is needed in order to improve future management of the RTT girl and counseling of parents. In association with the Dutch RTT parent association, a 5-year longitudinal study was carried out. The study population consisted of 53 adult women with a clinical diagnosis of RTT. Postal questionnaires were sent, including demographic features, skills, physical and psychiatric morbidity. At the time of the second measurement seven women had died. In 2012, 80% of the questionnaires (37/46) were returned. Mean age of the women was 31.4 years. Molecular confirmation was possible for 83% of the women for whom analyses were carried out. The adult RTT woman has a more or less stable condition. The general disorder profile is that of a slow on-going deterioration of gross motor functioning in contrast to a better preserved cognitive functioning, less autonomic and epileptic features and good general health. This is the first longitudinal cohort study about aging in RTT. Continuing longitudinal studies are needed to gain more insight into the aging process in RTT. PMID:23167724

  9. Adult Phenotypes in Angelman- and Rett-Like Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, M.H.; Rensen, J.H.M.; van Schrojenstein-Lantman de Valk, H.M.J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Kleefstra, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Angelman- and Rett-like syndromes share a range of clinical characteristics, including intellectual disability (ID) with or without regression, epilepsy, infantile encephalopathy, postnatal microcephaly, features of autism spectrum disorder, and variable other neurological symptoms. The phenotypic spectrum generally has been well studied in children; however, evolution of the phenotypic spectrum into adulthood has been documented less extensively. To obtain more insight into natural course and prognosis of these syndromes with respect to developmental, medical, and socio-behavioral outcomes, we studied the phenotypes of 9 adult patients who were recently diagnosed with 6 different Angelman- and Rett-like syndromes. Methods All these patients were ascertained during an ongoing cohort study involving a systematic clinical genetic diagnostic evaluation of over 250, mainly adult patients with ID of unknown etiology. Results We describe the evolution of the phenotype in adults with EHMT1, TCF4, MECP2, CDKL5, and SCN1A mutations and 22qter deletions and also provide an overview of previously published adult cases with similar diagnoses. Conclusion These data are highly valuable in adequate management and follow-up of patients with Angelman- and Rett-like syndromes and accurate counseling of their family members. Furthermore, they will contribute to recognition of these syndromes in previously undiagnosed adult patients. PMID:22670143

  10. Gait Initiation in Children with Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Isaias, Ioannis Ugo; Dipaola, Mariangela; Michi, Marlies; Marzegan, Alberto; Volkmann, Jens; Rodocanachi Roidi, Marina L.; Frigo, Carlo Albino; Cavallari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked neurodevelopmental condition mainly characterized by loss of spoken language and a regression of purposeful hand use, with the development of distinctive hand stereotypies, and gait abnormalities. Gait initiation is the transition from quiet stance to steady-state condition of walking. The associated motor program seems to be centrally mediated and includes preparatory adjustments prior to any apparent voluntary movement of the lower limbs. Anticipatory postural adjustments contribute to postural stability and to create the propulsive forces necessary to reach steady-state gait at a predefined velocity and may be indicative of the effectiveness of the feedforward control of gait. In this study, we examined anticipatory postural adjustments associated with gait initiation in eleven girls with Rett syndrome and ten healthy subjects. Muscle activity (tibialis anterior and soleus muscles), ground reaction forces and body kinematic were recorded. Children with Rett syndrome showed a distinctive impairment in temporal organization of all phases of the anticipatory postural adjustments. The lack of appropriate temporal scaling resulted in a diminished impulse to move forward, documented by an impairment in several parameters describing the efficiency of gait start: length and velocity of the first step, magnitude and orientation of centre of pressure-centre of mass vector at the instant of (swing-)toe off. These findings were related to an abnormal muscular activation pattern mainly characterized by a disruption of the synergistic activity of antagonistic pairs of postural muscles. This study showed that girls with Rett syndrome lack accurate tuning of feedforward control of gait. PMID:24743294

  11. Perioperative management of a patient with Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kako, Hiromi; Martin, David P; Cartabuke, Richard; Beebe, Allan; Klamar, Jan; Tobias, Joseph D

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from mutations in the genes encoding methyl-cytosine-guanosine binding protein 2 located on the X chromosome. Clinical features of central nervous system involvement include regression of developmental milestones in the late infant and early toddler stages, mental retardation, seizures and other electroencephalographic abnormalities. Given the invariable association of this degenerative disorder with orthopedic deformities including scoliosis, patients with Rett syndrome may present for anesthetic care during various surgical procedures. The complexity of the end-organ involvement, specifically the progressive nature of respiratory and cardiac involvement, makes the anesthetic care of such patients challenging. Specific perioperative concerns include potential difficulties with airway management, an underlying seizure disorder, an increased sensitivity to anesthetic agents, prolonged QT syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. We present an 11-year-old girl with Rett syndrome who required anesthetic care for posterior spinal fusion. Previous reports of anesthetic care for these patients are reviewed, the end-organ involvement discussed, and options for anesthetic care presented. PMID:23724160

  12. Subclinical Inflammatory Status in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cortelazzo, Alessio; De Felice, Claudio; Guerranti, Roberto; Landi, Claudia; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation has been advocated as a possible common central mechanism for developmental cognitive impairment. Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder, mainly caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding MeCP2. Here, we investigated plasma acute phase response (APR) in stage II (i.e., “pseudo-autistic”) RTT patients by routine haematology/clinical chemistry and proteomic 2-DE/MALDI-TOF analyses as a function of four major MECP2 gene mutation types (R306C, T158M, R168X, and large deletions). Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate values (median 33.0 mm/h versus 8.0 mm/h, P < 0.0001) were detectable in RTT, whereas C-reactive protein levels were unchanged (P = 0.63). The 2-DE analysis identified significant changes for a total of 17 proteins, the majority of which were categorized as APR proteins, either positive (n = 6 spots) or negative (n = 9 spots), and to a lesser extent as proteins involved in the immune system (n = 2 spots), with some proteins having overlapping functions on metabolism (n = 7 spots). The number of protein changes was proportional to the severity of the mutation. Our findings reveal for the first time the presence of a subclinical chronic inflammatory status related to the “pseudo-autistic” phase of RTT, which is related to the severity carried by the MECP2 gene mutation. PMID:24511209

  13. Addressing the Needs of Students with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ellenburg, Jennifer S.; Acton, Olivia M.; Torrey, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses symptoms of students with Rett Syndrome, a disability in females characterized by the development of multiple specific deficits following a period of normal functioning after birth. Specific interventions for students with Rett syndrome are provided and address communication, stereotypic movements, self-injurious behaviors,…

  14. Music Therapy: A Therapeutic Intervention for Girls with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Kathleen A.

    The paper reviews music therapy, the educational background of music therapists, music therapy's various settings, and its use as an intervention with girls with Rett Syndrome. Sample music therapy programs for three girls (aged 5, 14, and 20 years) with Rett Syndrome are presented. The sample programs provide: student descriptions; the girls'…

  15. Targeted pharmacological treatment of autism spectrum disorders: fragile X and Rett syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hansen; Pati, Sandipan; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Doering, Laurie C.

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous and lack effective medications to treat their core symptoms. Studies of syndromic ASDs caused by single gene mutations have provided insights into the pathophysiology of autism. Fragile X and Rett syndromes belong to the syndromic ASDs in which preclinical studies have identified rational targets for drug therapies focused on correcting underlying neural dysfunction. These preclinical discoveries are increasingly translating into exciting human clinical trials. Since there are significant molecular and neurobiological overlaps among ASDs, targeted treatments developed for fragile X and Rett syndromes may be helpful for autism of different etiologies. Here, we review the targeted pharmacological treatment of fragile X and Rett syndromes and discuss related issues in both preclinical studies and clinical trials of potential therapies for the diseases. PMID:25767435

  16. Targeted pharmacological treatment of autism spectrum disorders: fragile X and Rett syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hansen; Pati, Sandipan; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Doering, Laurie C

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous and lack effective medications to treat their core symptoms. Studies of syndromic ASDs caused by single gene mutations have provided insights into the pathophysiology of autism. Fragile X and Rett syndromes belong to the syndromic ASDs in which preclinical studies have identified rational targets for drug therapies focused on correcting underlying neural dysfunction. These preclinical discoveries are increasingly translating into exciting human clinical trials. Since there are significant molecular and neurobiological overlaps among ASDs, targeted treatments developed for fragile X and Rett syndromes may be helpful for autism of different etiologies. Here, we review the targeted pharmacological treatment of fragile X and Rett syndromes and discuss related issues in both preclinical studies and clinical trials of potential therapies for the diseases. PMID:25767435

  17. Rett syndrome and MeCP2.

    PubMed

    Liyanage, Vichithra R B; Rastegar, Mojgan

    2014-06-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe and progressive neurological disorder, which mainly affects young females. Mutations of the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene are the most prevalent cause of classical RTT cases. MECP2 mutations or altered expression are also associated with a spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders with recent links to fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Collectively, MeCP2 relation to these neurodevelopmental disorders highlights the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms by which MeCP2 impacts brain development, mental conditions, and compromised brain function. Since MECP2 mutations were discovered to be the primary cause of RTT, a significant progress has been made in the MeCP2 research, with respect to the expression, function and regulation of MeCP2 in the brain and its contribution in RTT pathogenesis. To date, there have been intensive efforts in designing effective therapeutic strategies for RTT benefiting from mouse models and cells collected from RTT patients. Despite significant progress in MeCP2 research over the last few decades, there is still a knowledge gap between the in vitro and in vivo research findings and translating these findings into effective therapeutic interventions in human RTT patients. In this review, we will provide a synopsis of Rett syndrome as a severe neurological disorder and will discuss the role of MeCP2 in RTT pathophysiology. PMID:24615633

  18. [Rett syndrome: a progressive neurological syndrome in girls].

    PubMed

    Spiess, Y; Boltshauser, E; Hänggeli, C A; Bubl, R

    1986-04-12

    Rett syndrome, named after Rett's first description in 1966, evolves typically in 3 stages: after normal early psychomotor development up to the age of 6-24 months, stagnation and regression occur over a few months resulting in severe dementia, loss of speech, of social response and of purposeful hand use. This is accompanied by particular stereotyped hand movements and usually also by deceleration of head growth. The further course is often stable for a prolonged period, or only slowly progressive. Common features are seizures, episodic hyperpnea, scoliosis, spasticity and vasomotor disturbances of lower limbs. Rett syndrome has been observed only in girls, all cases (with 2 exceptions) being sporadic. This is probably explained by a X-linked dominant new mutation lethal in males. The pathogenesis is still unknown: no consistent metabolic, morphologic or neuroradiologic abnormalities have been found. According to some epidemiologic investigations, Rett syndrome affects about 1:15,000 girls and is thus responsible for a considerable proportion of severely retarded girls. Within one year the authors have retrospectively diagnosed 15 cases, which is assumed to represent only about a third of patients in Switzerland. PMID:3704608

  19. Assessment and management of nutrition and growth in Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Helen; Ravikumara, Madhur; Baikie, Gordon; Naseem, Nusrat; Ellaway, Carolyn; Percy, Alan; Abraham, Suzanne; Geerts, Suzanne; Lane, Jane; Jones, Mary; Bathgate, Katherine; Downs, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We developed recommendations for the clinical management of poor growth and weight gain in Rett syndrome through evidence review and the consensus of an expert panel of clinicians. Methods Initial draft recommendations were created based upon literature review and 34 open-ended questions where the literature was lacking. Statements and questions were made available to an international, multi-disciplinary panel of clinicians in an online format and a Microsoft Word formatted version of the draft via email. Input was sought using a 2-stage modified Delphi process to reach consensus agreement. Items included clinical assessment of growth, anthropometry, feeding difficulties and management to increase caloric intake, decrease feeding difficulties and consideration of gastrostomy. Results Agreement was achieved on 101/112 statements. A comprehensive approach to the management of poor growth in Rett syndrome is recommended that takes into account factors such as feeding difficulties and nutritional needs. A BMI of approximately the 25th centile can be considered as a reasonable target in clinical practice. Gastrostomy is indicated for very poor growth, if there is risk of aspiration and if feeding times are prolonged. Conclusions These evidence- and consensus-based recommendations have the potential to improve care of nutrition and growth in a rare condition and stimulate research to improve the current limited evidence base. PMID:24084372

  20. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Miller, Eric C.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Spines are small cytoplasmic extensions of dendrites that form the postsynaptic compartment of the majority of excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Alterations in the numerical density, size, and shape of dendritic spines have been correlated with neuronal dysfunction in several neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders associated with intellectual disability, including Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability that is caused by loss of function mutations in the transcriptional regulator methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that principal neurons in RTT individuals and Mecp2-based experimental models exhibit alterations in the number and morphology of dendritic spines. We also discuss the exciting possibility that signaling pathways downstream of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is transcriptionally regulated by MeCP2, offer promising therapeutic options for modulating dendritic spine development and plasticity in RTT and other MECP2-associated neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25309341

  1. Is riluzole a potential therapy for Rett syndrome?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with autistic features and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) in the majority of cases. Besides symptomatic treatment, no therapeutic trials have shown effectiveness for RTT. Some perspectives in the treatment of RTT have been provided by recent works showing a phenotypic reversal by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in a RTT mouse model. Glutamate may also play an important role in the primary pathogenesis in Rett syndrome through the excitotoxic neuronal injury in experimental models. Riluzole, an agent currently approved for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a glutamatergic modulator and BDNF enhancer with neuroprotective properties. For these reasons, riluzole could potentially play an important role in the treatment of RTT symptoms. Several points regarding the use of riluzole in RTT are discussed. Further evaluation of the therapeutic effects of this agent in RTT animal models is needed before clinical trials can begin. PMID:25858436

  2. Gastrostomy placement favorably alters the natural history of growth failure and undernutrition in Rett syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth failure and undernutrition complicate the clinical course of girls with Rett syndrome (RTT). These abnormalities are, in part, the consequence of oral motor dysfunction and inadequate dietary intake. Our objective was to determine if gastrostomy placement for nutritional therapy alters the na...

  3. Gastrostomy placement improves height and weight gain in girls with Rett syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth failure and undernutrition complicate the clinical course of girls with Rett syndrome (RTT). These abnormalities are, in part, the consequence of oral motor dysfunction and inadequate dietary intake. We hypothesized that gastrostomy placement for nutritional therapy reverses the decline in he...

  4. Normal Reactions to Orthostatic Stress in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsson, Gunilla; Julu, Peter O. O.; Engerstrom, Ingegerd Witt; Sandlund, Marlene; Lindstrom, Britta

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate orthostatic reactions in females with Rett syndrome (RTT), and also whether the severity of the syndrome had an impact on autonomic reactions. Based on signs of impaired function of the central autonomic system found in RTT, it could be suspected that orthostatic reactions were affected. The orthostatic…

  5. Divorce in families of children with Down Syndrome or Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Vivian Renne Gerber; Alves, Bianca dos Santos; Negrão, Juliana; Maria, Juliana Negrão; Schwartzman, José Salomão; D'Antino, Maria Eloisa Famá; Brunoni, Decio

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the impact in the stability and management of the marriage of parents of a child with Down or Rett Syndrome. Morbidity of the syndromes and the marital status of the couples before and after the birth of the affected children were considered variables. The divorce rate in families with Down syndrome was 10%, similar to the Brazilian rate population. In Rett Syndrome, the divorce rate was significantly higher, 23.5%. The higher morbidity of Rett Syndrome, and the moment of diagnosis could be relevant factors for the increased divorce rate related to this syndrome. PMID:26017939

  6. Inflammatory Lung Disease in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Claudio; Rossi, Marcello; Chisci, Glauco; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Vannuccini, Laura; Spina, Donatella; Iacona, Ingrid; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA), upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228) and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228) of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with “high” (39.8%) and “low” (34.8%) patterns dominating over “mixed” (19.6%) and “simple mismatch” (5.9%) types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI), and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG) were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease. PMID:24757286

  7. Treating hypoxia in a feeble breather with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Julu, Peter O O; Witt Engerström, Ingegerd; Hansen, Stig; Apartopoulos, Flora; Engerström, Bengt

    2013-03-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a unique X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder affecting 1 in 10,000 females. Mutations in the MECP2 gene located on Xq28 have been identified. Many of the characteristic features evolve due to immaturity of the brain in RS. Cardiorespiratory function should be investigated early to characterise the clinical phenotype of the person with RS because each of the three cardiorespiratory phenotypes; apneustic, feeble and forceful breathers have unique and different management strategies. We report a case of a feeble breather showing a correlation between cortical function and tissue pO(2) and pCO(2). We conclude that subtle changes in the levels of blood gases significantly affect cortical function in RS. PMID:22617859

  8. FRACTIONAL CALCIUM ABSORPTION IS INCREASED IN GIRLS WITH RETT SYNDROME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rett Syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized in part by osteopenia and increased risk of skeletal fractures. We hypothesized that causally related factors may include decreased intestinal Ca absorption relative to dietary Ca intakes and in...

  9. Rett syndrome diagnostic criteria: Lessons from the Natural History Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of 819 participants enrolled in the Rett syndrome (RTT) Natural History Study, validates recently revised diagnostic criteria. Seven hundred sixty-five females fulfilled 2002 consensus criteria for classic (653/85.4%) or variant (112/14.6%) RTT. All participants classified as classic RTT fu...

  10. Communication Intervention in Rett Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigafoos, Jeff; Green, Vanessa A.; Schlosser, Ralf; O'eilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Rispoli, Mandy; Lang, Russell

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed communication intervention studies involving people with Rett syndrome. Systematic searches of five electronic databases, selected journals, and reference lists identified nine studies meeting the inclusion criteria. These studies were evaluated in terms of: (a) participant characteristics, (b) target skills, (c) procedures, (d) main…

  11. Sensory-Motor Rehabilitation in Rett Syndrome: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizzamiglio, Maria Rosa; Nasti, Marianna; Piccardi, Laura; Zotti, Antonella; Vitturini, Claudio; Spitoni, Grazia; Nanni, Maria Vittoria; Guariglia, Cecilia; Morelli, Daniela

    2008-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that mostly affects females. It is characterized by a regression of motor, cognitive, linguistic, and social abilities and by an inappropriate and stereotypical use of the hands. The purpose of the current study was to explore the possibility of rehabilitating purposeful use of the hands…

  12. Features of Autism in Rett Syndrome and Severe Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount, Rebecca H.; Charman, Tony; Hastings, Richard P.; Reilly, Sheena; Cass, Hilary

    2003-01-01

    The Autism Behavior Checklist measured autistic symptoms in 15 girls (ages 11-16) with Rett Syndrome (RS) and 14 with severe mental retardation. Girls with RS scored higher on the Sensory and Relating subscales. There were no differences on the Body and Object Use, Language, and Social and Self-Help subscales. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  13. Brief Report: Systematic Review of Rett Syndrome in Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichow, Brian; George-Puskar, Annie; Lutz, Tara; Smith, Isaac C.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurogenetic disorder in which a period of typical development is followed by loss of previously acquired skills. Once thought to occur exclusively in females, increasing numbers of male cases of RTT have been reported. This systematic review included 36 articles describing 57 cases of RTT in males. Mutations of the MECP2…

  14. Functional Communication Training in Rett Syndrome: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byiers, Breanne J.; Dimian, Adele; Symons, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is associated with a range of serious neurodevelopmental consequences including severe communicative impairments. Currently, no evidence-based communication interventions exist for the population (Sigafoos et al., 2009). The purpose of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of functional assessment (FA) and…

  15. The Role of Stereotypies in Overselectivity Process in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabio, Rosa Angela; Giannatiempo, Samantha; Antonietti, Alessandro; Budden, Sarojini

    2009-01-01

    Ten Rett syndrome (RS) girls and 10 control girls executed an attentional task in which a complex stimulus was shown followed by individual stimuli presented with distractors. Participants had to discriminate previously presented stimuli from distractors. RS girls carried out the task both in a condition with the containment of stereotypies and in…

  16. Intentionality and Communication in Four Children with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodyatt, Gail; Ozanne, Anne

    1994-01-01

    A multiple case study design was used to describe the cognitive and communicative behaviors of four girls with Rett syndrome (RS). Three subjects were at a preintentional level of communication. Communication levels for all subjects was consistent with cognitive status. Dyspraxia appeared to interfere with communicative attempts of the one subject…

  17. Communication Assessment for Individuals with Rett Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigafoos, Jeff; Kagohara, Debora; van der Meer, Larah; Green, Vanessa A.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Lang, Russell; Rispoli, Mandy; Zisimopoulos, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed studies that aimed to determine whether behaviors, such as body movements, vocalizations, eye gaze, and facial expressions, served a communicative function for individuals with Rett syndrome. A systematic search identified eight studies, which were summarized in terms of (a) participants, (b) assessment targets, (c) assessment…

  18. Changing the Perspective on Early Development of Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschik, Peter B.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Wolin, Thomas; Zhang, Dajie; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D.; Pini, Giorgio; Zappella, Michele; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Einspieler, Christa; Johnston, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    We delineated the achievement of early speech-language milestones in 15 young children with Rett syndrome ("MECP2" positive) in the first two years of life using retrospective video analysis. By contrast to the commonly accepted concept that these children are normal in the pre-regression period, we found markedly atypical development of…

  19. Preliminary Assessment of Choice Making among Children with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigafoos, Jeff; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Choice making was studied among 7 students (ages 7-17) with Rett syndrome. Half the opportunities to choose food, beverage, and leisure items elapsed without a choice being made. Results suggest that the relationship between selecting and accepting items vary as a function of task configuration, and lack of choice may not necessarily indicate lack…

  20. IGF1 as a Potential Treatment for Rett Syndrome: Safety Assessment in Six Rett Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Giorgio; Scusa, Maria Flora; Congiu, Laura; Benincasa, Alberto; Morescalchi, Paolina; Bottiglioni, Ilaria; Di Marco, Pietro; Borelli, Paolo; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Della-Chiesa, Andrea; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Tropea, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that affects one in ten thousand girls and has no cure. The majority of RTT patients display mutations in the gene that codes for the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Clinical observations and neurobiological analysis of mouse models suggest that defects in the expression of MeCP2 protein compromise the development of the central nervous system, especially synaptic and circuit maturation. Thus, agents that promote brain development and synaptic function, such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), are good candidates for ameliorating the symptoms of RTT. IGF1 and its active peptide, (1–3) IGF1, cross the blood brain barrier, and (1–3) IGF1 ameliorates the symptoms of RTT in a mouse model of the disease; therefore they are ideal treatments for neurodevelopmental disorders, including RTT. We performed a pilot study to establish whether there are major risks associated with IGF1 administration in RTT patients. Six young girls with classic RTT received IGF1 subcutaneous injections twice a day for six months, and they were regularly monitored by their primary care physicians and by the unit for RTT in Versilia Hospital (Italy). This study shows that there are no risks associated with IGF1 administration. PMID:22934177

  1. InterRett, a Model for International Data Collection in a Rare Genetic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louise, Sandra; Fyfe, Sue; Bebbington, Ami; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Anderson, Alison; Pineda, Merce; Percy, Alan; Zeev, Bruria Ben; Wu, Xi Ru; Bao, Xinhua; MacLeod, Patrick; Armstrong, Judith; Leonard, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare genetic disorder within the autistic spectrum. This study compared socio-demographic, clinical and genetic characteristics of the international database, InterRett, and the population-based Australian Rett syndrome database (ARSD). It also explored the strengths and limitations of InterRett in comparison with other…

  2. The therapist's role in the management of girls with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lieb-Lundell, C

    1988-01-01

    Guidelines for providing therapy intervention for persons with Rett syndrome are presented according to the four stages of the disease. In describing various aspects of Rett syndrome the differences between Rett syndrome, cerebral palsy, and autism are discussed. The role of the therapist in maintaining functional skills is emphasized. The changing nature of the therapist's involvement in relation to the progression of the disease is briefly addressed. PMID:3058786

  3. Homozygous c.1160C>T (P38L) in the MECP2 gene in a female Rett syndrome patient.

    PubMed

    Bhanushali, Aparna A; Mandsaurwala, A; Das, Bibhu R

    2016-03-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder. Mutations in the MECP2 gene on chromosome Xq28 have been shown to be the cause of Rett syndrome. Sequencing of the MECP2 gene in a patient with clinical suspicion of Rett syndrome revealed c.1160C>T (P387L) in exon 4 of the MECP2 gene homozygously. Females with Rett syndrome are usually heterozygous for a mutation in MECP2. Uniparental disomy as a probable cause for the homozygous presence of this mutation was ruled out by quantitative fluorescence-polymerase chain reaction. Moreover to our knowledge this mutation has only been reported in males with X-linked mental retardation (MRX). We hypothesize that the presence of this mutation c.1160C>T (P387L) in the homozygous form is responsible for the Rett syndrome-like phenotype seen in this patient. This novel report reveals for the first time the homozygous presence of a mutation which has hitherto only been reported in males with MRX. PMID:26755454

  4. Training communication abilities in Rett Syndrome through reading and writing

    PubMed Central

    Fabio, Rosa Angela; Castelli, Ilaria; Marchetti, Antonella; Antonietti, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this clinical case study is to investigate the possibility of training communication abilities in people with Rett Syndrome (RS). Usually, girls with RS never exceed the sensorimotor stage of development, but the inter-individual variability typical of RS may lead us to doubt the irrevocability of that developmental limit, especially for those girls who are engaged in cognitive rehabilitation. The case study reported here concerns a 21-year-old girl with RS who was engaged in cognitive rehabilitation training based upon the principles of Feuerstein's modificability and mediated learning theory. The training aimed to teach her basic concepts and enhance reading-writing abilities. Statistical analyses showed that the girl reached adequate reading-writing abilities, proving the validity of the cognitive intervention which allowed her to communicate by composing words with her forefinger on an alphabetic table. Although these results need to be cautiously considered as they derive from a single case study, they have implications for future cognitive rehabilitation for deeply impaired clinical conditions as in the case of RS. PMID:24367345

  5. Effect of hand splints on stereotypic hand behavior of three girls with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, G M; Billingsley, F F

    1988-05-01

    The purpose of this multiple baseline study was to examine the effect of bilateral hand splints on the persistent stereotypic hand movements of three adolescent girls with Rett syndrome. Among the most characteristic features of Rett syndrome are stereotypic hand-writing and hand-biting behavior and loss of previously acquired functional hand skills. The hand splints used in this study consisted of cuffs encircling the palm that positioned the subjects' thumbs in abduction. Duration percentages of subjects' stereotypic hand behavior and functional hand use were calculated from five-minute videotaped segments recorded during a finger-feeding condition and a free-time condition. All three subjects demonstrated a decrease in the amount of time spent in stereotypic hand behavior after application of hand splints, and one subject showed an increase in finger-feeding skills while wearing hand splints. Limitations of the study are discussed, and suggestions for clinical application and future research are offered. PMID:3362979

  6. Seizures and pain uncertainty associated with parenting stress and Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Byiers, Breanne J; Tervo, Raymond C; Feyma, Timothy J; Symons, Frank J

    2014-04-01

    Data were collected parenting stress, adaptive behavior, pain, and health issues from the caregivers of 35 girls and women with Rett syndrome (mean age = 20.3). A majority (60%) of parents reported stress in the clinical range on at least 1 subscale of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form. Seizures and uncertainty about their daughter's gastrointestinal pain experience were significantly associated with higher levels of parenting stress. No other child factors (adaptive behavior, age, residential status) were significantly related to parenting stress. Factors related to chronic health concerns (seizures, ambiguous pain presentation) may be important when considering family stress issues in relation to general outcomes for girls with Rett syndrome and related developmental disorders. PMID:23307883

  7. Reduction of Stereotypical Hand Movements in Girls with Rett Syndrome: Two Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotan, Meir; Roth, Dana

    This study explains the characteristics and treatment of individuals with Rett Syndrome and presents two case studies that investigated the use of interventions in reducing stereotypical hand movements (SHM). The case studies involve two girls (ages 5 and 7) with Rett Syndrome who were enrolled in a special education school. Information was…

  8. Contributing to the Early Detection of Rett Syndrome: The Potential Role of Auditory Gestalt Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschik, Peter B.; Einspieler, Christa; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    To assess whether there are qualitatively deviant characteristics in the early vocalizations of children with Rett syndrome, we had 400 native Austrian-German speakers listen to audio recordings of vocalizations from typically developing girls and girls with Rett syndrome. The audio recordings were rated as (a) inconspicuous, (b) conspicuous or…

  9. Rett Syndrome Symptomatology of Institutionalized Adults with Mental Retardation: Comparison of Males and Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burd, Larry; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The study of 297 institutionalized adults with mental retardation found no symptom of Rett syndrome occurred more frequently in males than in females and no single cluster of symptoms appeared to differentiate males from females. Only females were found to meet the necessary criteria for diagnosis of Rett syndrome. (Author/DB)

  10. The trajectories of sleep disturbances in Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kingsley; Leonard, Helen; Jacoby, Peter; Ellaway, Carolyn; Downs, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder usually affecting females and associated with a mutation in the MECP2 gene. Sleep problems occur commonly and we investigated the trajectories and influences of age, mutation and treatments. Data was collected at six time points over 12 years from 320 families registered with the Australian Rett Syndrome Database. Regression analysis was used to investigate relationships between sleep disturbances, age, mutation type and use of treatment, and latent class growth analysis was performed to identify sleep problem phenotypes and model the effect of mutation type. The age range of subjects was 2.0–35.8 years. The study showed that sleep problems occurred in more than 80% of individuals and the prevalence decreased with age. Night laughing and night screaming occurred in 77% and 49% respectively when younger. Those with a large deletion had a higher prevalence of night laughing which often occurred frequently. Treatment was associated with a 1.7% reduction in risk of further sleep problem. High and low baseline prevalence groups were identified. Approximately three quarters of girls and women with sleep disturbances were in the high baseline group and problems persisted into adulthood. On the contrary, 57% with night laughing and 42% with night screaming in the high baseline group exhibited mild improvement over time. Mutation type was not found to be a significant predictor of group membership. In conclusion, the evolution of sleep problems differed between subgroups of girls and women with Rett syndrome, in part explained by age and genotype. Treatment was not associated with improvement in sleep problems. PMID:25219940

  11. The trajectories of sleep disturbances in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kingsley; Leonard, Helen; Jacoby, Peter; Ellaway, Carolyn; Downs, Jenny

    2015-04-01

    Rett syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder usually affecting females, and is associated with a mutation in the MECP2 gene. Sleep problems occur commonly and we investigated the trajectories and influences of age, mutation and treatments. Data were collected at six time points over 12 years from 320 families registered with the Australian Rett Syndrome Database. Regression analysis was used to investigate relationships between sleep disturbances, age, mutation type and use of treatment, and latent class growth analysis was performed to identify sleep problem phenotypes and model the effect of mutation type. The age range of subjects was 2.0-35.8 years. The study showed that sleep problems occurred in more than 80% of individuals and the prevalence decreased with age. Night laughing and night screaming occurred in 77 and 49%, respectively, when younger. Those with a large deletion had a higher prevalence of night laughing, which often occurred frequently. Treatment was associated with a 1.7% reduction in risk of further sleep problems. High and low baseline prevalence groups were identified. Approximately three-quarters of girls and women with sleep disturbances were in the high baseline group and problems persisted into adulthood. Conversely, 57% with night laughing and 42% with night screaming in the high baseline group exhibited mild improvement over time. Mutation type was not found to be a significant predictor of group membership. In conclusion, the evolution of sleep problems differed between subgroups of girls and women with Rett syndrome, in part explained by age and genotype. Treatment was not associated with improvement in sleep problems. PMID:25219940

  12. Brief report: systematic review of Rett syndrome in males.

    PubMed

    Reichow, Brian; George-Puskar, Annie; Lutz, Tara; Smith, Isaac C; Volkmar, Fred R

    2015-10-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurogenetic disorder in which a period of typical development is followed by loss of previously acquired skills. Once thought to occur exclusively in females, increasing numbers of male cases of RTT have been reported. This systematic review included 36 articles describing 57 cases of RTT in males. Mutations of the MECP2 gene were present in 56 % of cases, and 68 % of cases reported other genetic abnormalities. This is the first review of published reports of RTT in male patients. PMID:26254891

  13. Twenty years of surveillance in Rett syndrome: what does this tell us?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical characteristics of children diagnosed with Rett syndrome are well described. Survival and how these characteristics persist or change in adulthood are less well documented. This study aimed to describe overall survival and adult health in those with Rett syndrome. Methods Using the Kaplan-Meier method, we estimated survival of individuals registered with the Australian Rett syndrome Database (ARSD) who had been followed for up to 20 years (n = 396). We then conducted logistic and linear regression analyses investigating epilepsy, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, autonomic dysfunction and behaviour of individuals aged 18 years and over using cross sectional cohorts from the ARSD (n = 150) and the international database InterRett (n = 273). Results The likelihood of survival was 77.6% at 20 years, 71.5% at 25 years and 59.8% at 37 years. The median age of the combined cross-sectional cohort was 25 years (range 18 to 54 years), the majority (71%) were living in their parental home and the remainder being cared for in group homes or other institutions. Just over half walked either independently (18%) or with assistance (43%). The majority (86%) had scoliosis with 40% of those having undergone corrective surgery. Almost two-thirds (64%) of the women were taking anti-epileptic medications at the time of data collection. Constipation was highly prevalent (83%) and many experienced bloating (53%). Biliary dyskinesia, inflammation or infection of the gallbladder was reported for 20 women (5%) and of those 13 had undergone gallbladder surgery. Sleep disturbance was relatively common (63%), and adverse mood events and anxiety were slightly more prevalent in those aged 26-30 years in comparison to the younger and older age groups. Other frequently reported medical conditions included urinary tract infections, pneumonia and other respiratory conditions. Conclusions Survival in Rett syndrome has now been estimated with the most accurate

  14. KCC2 rescues functional deficits in human neurons derived from patients with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xin; Kim, Julie; Zhou, Li; Wengert, Eric; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Zheng; Carromeu, Cassiano; Muotri, Alysson R; Marchetto, Maria C N; Gage, Fred H; Chen, Gong

    2016-01-19

    Rett syndrome is a severe form of autism spectrum disorder, mainly caused by mutations of a single gene methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) on the X chromosome. Patients with Rett syndrome exhibit a period of normal development followed by regression of brain function and the emergence of autistic behaviors. However, the mechanism behind the delayed onset of symptoms is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter2 (KCC2) is a critical downstream gene target of MeCP2. We found that human neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with Rett syndrome showed a significant deficit in KCC2 expression and consequently a delayed GABA functional switch from excitation to inhibition. Interestingly, overexpression of KCC2 in MeCP2-deficient neurons rescued GABA functional deficits, suggesting an important role of KCC2 in Rett syndrome. We further identified that RE1-silencing transcriptional factor, REST, a neuronal gene repressor, mediates the MeCP2 regulation of KCC2. Because KCC2 is a slow onset molecule with expression level reaching maximum later in development, the functional deficit of KCC2 may offer an explanation for the delayed onset of Rett symptoms. Our studies suggest that restoring KCC2 function in Rett neurons may lead to a potential treatment for Rett syndrome. PMID:26733678

  15. KCC2 rescues functional deficits in human neurons derived from patients with Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xin; Kim, Julie; Zhou, Li; Wengert, Eric; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Zheng; Carromeu, Cassiano; Muotri, Alysson R.; Marchetto, Maria C. N.; Gage, Fred H.; Chen, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe form of autism spectrum disorder, mainly caused by mutations of a single gene methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) on the X chromosome. Patients with Rett syndrome exhibit a period of normal development followed by regression of brain function and the emergence of autistic behaviors. However, the mechanism behind the delayed onset of symptoms is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that neuron-specific K+-Cl− cotransporter2 (KCC2) is a critical downstream gene target of MeCP2. We found that human neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with Rett syndrome showed a significant deficit in KCC2 expression and consequently a delayed GABA functional switch from excitation to inhibition. Interestingly, overexpression of KCC2 in MeCP2-deficient neurons rescued GABA functional deficits, suggesting an important role of KCC2 in Rett syndrome. We further identified that RE1-silencing transcriptional factor, REST, a neuronal gene repressor, mediates the MeCP2 regulation of KCC2. Because KCC2 is a slow onset molecule with expression level reaching maximum later in development, the functional deficit of KCC2 may offer an explanation for the delayed onset of Rett symptoms. Our studies suggest that restoring KCC2 function in Rett neurons may lead to a potential treatment for Rett syndrome. PMID:26733678

  16. PTP1B: a new therapeutic target for Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tautz, Lutz

    2015-08-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by successive loss of acquired cognitive, social, and motor skills and development of autistic behavior. RTT affects approximately 1 in 10,000 live female births and is the second most common cause of severe mental retardation in females, after Down syndrome. Currently, there is no cure or effective therapy for RTT. Approved treatment regimens are presently limited to supportive management of specific physical and mental disabilities. In this issue, Krishnan and colleagues reveal that the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is upregulated in patients with RTT and in murine models and provide strong evidence that targeting PTP1B has potential as a viable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of RTT. PMID:26214520

  17. Rett syndrome in adults with severe intellectual disability: exploration of behavioral characteristics.

    PubMed

    Matson, Johnny L; Dempsey, Timothy; Wilkins, Jonathan

    2008-09-01

    Rett syndrome is a genetically linked form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) accompanied by intellectual disability (ID). The disorder is also characterized by cardiorespiratory dysregulation, disturbance in muscle tone, reduced brain growth and scoliosis. Over 300 studies have been published on the disorder, most of which has focused on identification of causative factors, which appears to be the result of mutations of gene MECP2. Rarely have adults with Rett syndrome been studied, and behavioral characteristics in these individuals are largely unknown. The present study aimed to extend what little is known about behavioral characteristics of Rett syndrome in adults, with particular emphasis on social, communicative, and adaptive behavior. Rett syndrome adults with severe ID were matched to autistic adults with ID and ID only controls. The implications of these data for more fully describing and diagnosing the condition in adults are discussed. PMID:18207372

  18. Alternative therapeutic intervention for individuals with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Meir

    2007-01-01

    The individual with Rett syndrome (RS) displays an array of challenging difficulties in all areas of daily living. Since there is no cure for the disorder at this moment, parents of the individual with Rett search for different interventional modalities that will improve the condition and quality of life for their child. During the last few years, many individuals with RS have experienced different kinds of interventions. This paper presents these methods with relevant case stories for others to share the possibilities. This paper reviews the following interventions: animal-assisted therapy, such as dolphin therapy and dog-assisted therapy; auditory integration training; hyperbaric chamber; manual therapy, such as acupuncture/acupressure, aromatherapy, craniosacral therapy, Mayo facial release, Treager massage, chiropractor, and Reiki; mental modification techniques, such as Lovas and cognitive rehabilitation; motoric interventions, such as advanced biomechanical rehabilitation, patterning/Doman-DeLacato approach, and yoga. The present paper is not a recommendation for any of the above-mentioned techniques, but merely a review of different interventions available for the inquisitive parent of the individual with RS. PMID:17619753

  19. Conceptualizing a quality of life framework for girls with Rett syndrome using qualitative methods.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Amy; Leonard, Helen; Davis, Elise; Williams, Katrina; Reddihough, Dinah; Murphy, Nada; Whitehouse, Andrew; Downs, Jenny

    2016-03-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder mainly affecting females and associated with a mutation on the MECP2 gene. There has been no systematic evaluation of the domains of quality of life (QOL) in Rett syndrome. The aims of this study were to explore QOL in school-aged children with Rett syndrome and compare domains with those identified in other available QOL scales. The sample comprised 21 families registered with the Australian Rett Syndrome Database whose daughter with Rett syndrome was aged 6-18 years. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with each parent caregiver (19 mothers, 2 fathers) to investigate aspects of their daughter's life that were satisfying or challenging to her. Qualitative thematic analysis using a grounded theory framework was conducted, and emerging domains compared with those in two generic and three disability parent-report child QOL measures. Ten domains were identified: physical health, body pain, and discomfort, behavioral and emotional well-being, communication skills, movement and mobility, social connectedness, variety of activities, provision of targeted services, stability of daily routines, and the natural environment. The two latter domains were newly identified and each domain contained elements not represented in the comparison measures. Our data articulated important aspects of life beyond the genetic diagnosis. Existing QOL scales for children in the general population or with other disabilities did not capture the QOL of children with Rett syndrome. Our findings support the construction of a new parent-report measure to enable measurement of QOL in this group. PMID:26686505

  20. Management of epilepsy in patients with Rett syndrome: perspectives and considerations

    PubMed Central

    Krajnc, Natalija

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder that appears in infancy with regression of acquired motor skills, loss of purposeful activity, hand stereotypies, loss of acquired spoken language, and seizures. Epilepsy affects the majority of patients in a specific clinical stage of the disease and is drug resistant in approximately one-third of cases. The association of epilepsy and even drug-resistant epilepsy has been reported in certain genotypes of the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 mutation, which is present in a majority of patients with classical RTT. The evolution of electroencephalographic abnormalities accompanying the clinical development of the syndrome is well described, but much less is known about the seizure semiology and the effectiveness of specific antiepileptic drugs. The aim of this review is to present the clinical and electrophysiological aspects of epilepsy in RTT and the current treatment approach. PMID:26089674

  1. Management of epilepsy in patients with Rett syndrome: perspectives and considerations.

    PubMed

    Krajnc, Natalija

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder that appears in infancy with regression of acquired motor skills, loss of purposeful activity, hand stereotypies, loss of acquired spoken language, and seizures. Epilepsy affects the majority of patients in a specific clinical stage of the disease and is drug resistant in approximately one-third of cases. The association of epilepsy and even drug-resistant epilepsy has been reported in certain genotypes of the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 mutation, which is present in a majority of patients with classical RTT. The evolution of electroencephalographic abnormalities accompanying the clinical development of the syndrome is well described, but much less is known about the seizure semiology and the effectiveness of specific antiepileptic drugs. The aim of this review is to present the clinical and electrophysiological aspects of epilepsy in RTT and the current treatment approach. PMID:26089674

  2. The Preserved Speech Variant: A Subgroup of the Rett Complex: A Clinical Report of 30 Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zappella, Michele; Gillberg, Christopher; Ehlers, Stephan

    1998-01-01

    Thirty females (ages 5-28) with autism also had many features of classic Rett syndrome (RS). The course of the disorder was more benign that in classic RS. A category of "Rett Complex" is proposed in which individuals have classic RS, but have a preserved speech variant. (Author/CR)

  3. Dysregulated brain immunity and neurotrophin signaling in Rett syndrome and autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Athanassiou, Marianna; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Doyle, Robert

    2015-02-15

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder, which occurs in about 1:15,000 females and presents with neurologic and communication defects. It is transmitted as an X-linked dominant linked to mutations of the methyl-CpG-binding protein (MeCP2), a gene transcription suppressor, but its definitive pathogenesis is unknown thus hindering development of effective treatments. Almost half of children with Rett syndrome also have behavioral symptoms consistent with those of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). PubMed was searched (2005-2014) using the terms: allergy, atopy, brain, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), cytokines, gene mutations, inflammation, mast cells (MCs), microglia, mitochondria, neurotensin (NT), neurotrophins, seizures, stress, and treatment. There are a number of intriguing differences and similarities between Rett syndrome and ASDs. Rett syndrome occurs in females, while ASDs more often in males, and the former has neurologic disabilities unlike ASDs. There is evidence of dysregulated immune system early in life in both conditions. Lack of microglial phagocytosis and decreased levels of BDNF appear to distinguish Rett syndrome from ASDs, in which there is instead microglia activation and/or proliferation and possibly defective BDNF signaling. Moreover, brain mast cell (MC) activation and focal inflammation may be more prominent in ASDs than Rett syndrome. The flavonoid luteolin blocks microglia and MC activation, provides BDNF-like activity, reverses Rett phenotype in mouse models, and has a significant benefit in children with ASDs. Appropriate formulations of luteolin or other natural molecules may be useful in the treatment of Rett syndrome. PMID:25669997

  4. Functional communication training in rett syndrome: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Byiers, Breanne J; Dimian, Adele; Symons, Frank J

    2014-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is associated with a range of serious neurodevelopmental consequences including severe communicative impairments. Currently, no evidence-based communication interventions exist for the population ( Sigafoos et al., 2009 ). The purpose of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of functional assessment (FA) and functional communication training (FCT) methods for teaching 3 individuals (ages 15-47 years) with classic RTT novel communicative behaviors. Using single-case experimental designs, functional reinforcers were identified (FA) and each participant quickly learned to activate a voice-output switch to obtain a reinforcer (FCT). These results suggest that individuals with classic RTT can learn novel communicative responses, which has important implications for future intervention research. PMID:25007298

  5. Spectrum and distribution of MECP2 mutations in 64 Italian Rett syndrome girls: tentative genotype/phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Giunti, L; Pelagatti, S; Lazzerini, V; Guarducci, S; Lapi, E; Coviello, S; Cecconi, A; Ombroni, L; Andreucci, E; Sani, I; Brusaferri, A; Lasagni, A; Ricotti, G; Giometto, B; Nicolao, P; Gasparini, P; Granatiero, M; Uzielli, M L

    2001-12-01

    We report a direct DNA sequencing analysis of the MECP2 gene undertaken on a further 64 Italian patients with Rett syndrome by using a LICOR 4200 Automated Sequencer. All of the girls entering the study had a consistent clinical diagnosis for this disorder. All coding regions and the flanking intronic splice site sequences were amplified as three non-overlapping fragments by using both forward and reverse primers. The results were then compared to the MECP2 reference sequences published in GenBank. Mutations of the MECP2 gene were identified in 64 of 75 (85.33%) unrelated sporadic Rett syndrome girls. Genotype/phenotype correlation studies, in particular in groups of patients with the same mutation, did not offer definitive and interesting data. PMID:11738883

  6. Quantitative and qualitative insights into the experiences of children with Rett syndrome and their families.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jenny; Leonard, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Rett syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene. It is associated with severe functional impairments and medical comorbidities such as scoliosis and poor growth. The population-based and longitudinal Australian Rett Syndrome Database was established in 1993 and has supported investigations of the natural history of Rett syndrome and effectiveness of treatments, as well as a suite of qualitative studies to identify deeper meanings. This paper describes the early presentation of Rett syndrome, including regression and challenges for families seeking a diagnosis. We discuss the importance of implementing strategies to enhance daily communication and movement, describe difficulties interpreting the presence of pain and discomfort, and argue for a stronger evidence base in relation to management. Finally, we outline a framework for understanding quality of life in Rett syndrome and suggest areas of life to which we can direct efforts in order to improve quality of life. Each of these descriptions is illustrated with vignettes of child and family experiences. Clinicians and researchers must continue to build this framework of knowledge and understanding with efforts committed to providing more effective treatments and supporting the best quality of life for those affected. PMID:27491552

  7. Spinal Fusion for Scoliosis in Rett Syndrome With an Emphasis on Respiratory Failure and Opioid Usage.

    PubMed

    Rumbak, Dania M; Mowrey, Wenzhu; W Schwartz, Skai; Sarwahi, Vishal; Djukic, Aleksandra; Killinger, James S; Katyal, Chhavi

    2016-02-01

    Our objective was to characterize our experience with 8 patients with Rett syndrome undergoing scoliosis surgery in regard to rates of respiratory failure and rates of ventilator-acquired pneumonia in comparison to patients with neurologic scoliosis and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This study was a retrospective chart review of patients undergoing scoliosis surgery at a tertiary children's hospital. Patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, (2) neurologic scoliosis, and (3) Rett syndrome. There were 133 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, 48 patients with neurologic scoliosis, and 8 patients with Rett syndrome. We found that patients with Rett syndrome undergoing scoliosis surgery have higher rates of respiratory failure and longer ventilation times in the postoperative period when compared with both adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and neurologic scoliosis patients. There is insufficient evidence to suggest a difference in the incidence of ventilator-acquired pneumonia between the Rett syndrome and the neurologic scoliosis group. We believe our findings are the first in the literature to show a statistically significant difference between these 3 groups in regard to incidence of respiratory failure. PMID:25991642

  8. Evolving role of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome and autism

    PubMed Central

    LaSalle, Janine M; Yasui, Dag H

    2010-01-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked autism-spectrum disorder caused by mutations in MECP2, encoding methyl CpG-binding protein 2. Since the discovery of MECP2 mutations as the genetic cause of Rett syndrome, the understanding of MeCP2 function has evolved. Although MeCP2 was predicted to be a global transcriptional repressor of methylated promoters, large-scale combined epigenomic approaches of MeCP2 binding, methylation and gene expression have demonstrated that MeCP2 binds preferentially to intergenic and intronic regions, and sparsely methylated promoters of active genes. This review compares the evolution of thought within two ‘classic’ epigenetic mechanisms of parental imprinting and X chromosome inactivation to that of the MeCP2 field, and considers the future relevance of integrated epigenomic databases to understanding autism and Rett syndrome. PMID:20473347

  9. Rett syndrome management with Snoezelen or controlled multi-sensory stimulation. A review.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Meir; Merrick, Joav

    2004-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder resulting from an X-linked dominant mutation. It is characterized by a variety of physical and perceptual disabilities, resulting in a need for constant therapy programs to be administered on a regular basis throughout life. Resistance to physical activity has driven the authors in a search for new intervention techniques which might improve the ability to cope while reducing difficulty in handling an external physical facilitator. Snoezelen, or multi-sensory environment, can provide a soothing environment appealing to the child or adolescent with Rett syndrome while at the same time improving physical abilities. The article reviews Rett syndrome typical phenotype and suggests suitable activities that might take place in the multi-sensory environment. PMID:15148853

  10. The Quality of Life in Girls with Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Lucia; Di Filippo, Teresa; Roccella, Michele

    2016-05-18

    Nowadays, quality of life is receiving an increasing attention in all scientific areas. Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurological development, affecting mainly females. The congenital disease affects the central nervous system, and is one of the most common causes of severe intellectual disability. The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of RTT on the quality of life of people who are affected. Both parents of 18 subjects, all female, diagnosed with RTT, took part in the research. Quality of life was assessed using the Italian version of the Impact of Childhood Illness Scale. This scale consists of 30 questions that investigate the effect of illness on children, parents and families. For each question, the parent was asked to rate two variables: frequency and importance. Another questionnaire was administered to obtain medical history, diagnostic and therapeutic data of the persons with RTT. Our data show that RTT has a considerable impact on both the child's development and the entire family. Parents' answers demonstrated that their child's illness had consequences for the child and how the family coped with it. For this reason, attention should be directed at psychological and social aspects, as well as attitudes, manners, reactions and effects such disturbances can have on the entire family. PMID:27403274

  11. The Quality of Life in Girls with Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Lucia; Di Filippo, Teresa; Roccella, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, quality of life is receiving an increasing attention in all scientific areas. Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurological development, affecting mainly females. The congenital disease affects the central nervous system, and is one of the most common causes of severe intellectual disability. The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of RTT on the quality of life of people who are affected. Both parents of 18 subjects, all female, diagnosed with RTT, took part in the research. Quality of life was assessed using the Italian version of the Impact of Childhood Illness Scale. This scale consists of 30 questions that investigate the effect of illness on children, parents and families. For each question, the parent was asked to rate two variables: frequency and importance. Another questionnaire was administered to obtain medical history, diagnostic and therapeutic data of the persons with RTT. Our data show that RTT has a considerable impact on both the child’s development and the entire family. Parents’ answers demonstrated that their child’s illness had consequences for the child and how the family coped with it. For this reason, attention should be directed at psychological and social aspects, as well as attitudes, manners, reactions and effects such disturbances can have on the entire family. PMID:27403274

  12. Behavioural biomarkers of typical Rett syndrome: moving towards early identification.

    PubMed

    Einspieler, Christa; Freilinger, Michael; Marschik, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic course of Rett syndrome (RTT) is still said to begin with a period of apparently normal development although there is mounting evidence that individuals with RTT show behavioural peculiarities and abnormalities during their infancy. Their spontaneous general movements are abnormal from birth onwards. Normal cooing vocalisation and canonical babbling (if at all required) are interspersed with abnormalities such as proto-vowel and proto-consonant alternations produced on ingressive airstream, breathy voice characteristics, and pressed or high-pitched vocalisations. The gestural repertoire is limited. Certain developmental motor and speech-language milestones are not at all acquired or show a significant delay. Besides abnormal blinking, repetitive and/or long lasting tongue protrusion, and bizarre smiling, there are already the first body and/or hand stereotypies during the first year of life. We are currently on a promising way to define a specific set of behavioural biomarkers pinpointing RTT. PMID:27514944

  13. Modeling Rett Syndrome Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Inouye, Michiko O; Miyake, Kunio; Kubota, Takeo; Okano, Hideyuki; Akamatsu, Wado

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is one of a group of neurodevelopmental disorders typically characterized by deficits in the X-linked gene MECP2 (methyl-CpG binding protein 2). The MECP2 gene encodes a multifunctional protein involved in transcriptional repression, transcriptional activation, chromatin remodeling, and RNA splicing. Genetic deletion of Mecp2 in mice revealed neuronal disabilities including RTT-like phenotypes and provided an excellent platform for understanding the pathogenesis of RTT. So far, there are no effective pharmacological treatments for RTT because the role of MECP2 in RTT is incompletely understood. Recently, human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technologies have improved our knowledge of neurological and neurodevelopmental diseases including RTT because neurons derived from RTT-hiPSCs can be used for disease modeling to understand RTT phenotypes and to perform high throughput pharmaceutical drug screening. In this review, we provide an overview of RTT, including MeCP2 function and mouse models of RTT. In addition, we introduce recent advances in disease modeling of RTT using hiPSC-derived neural cells. PMID:27071793

  14. Breathing challenges in Rett Syndrome: Lessons learned from humans and animal models✩,✩✩

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Ward, Christopher Scott; Neul, Jeffrey Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    Breathing disturbances are a major challenge in Rett Syndrome (RTT). These disturbances are more pronounced during wakefulness; but irregular breathing occurs also during sleep. During the day patients can exhibit alternating bouts of hypoventilation and irregular hyperventilation. But there is significant individual variability in severity, onset, duration and type of breathing disturbances. Research in mouse models of RTT suggests that different areas in the ventrolateral medulla and pons give rise to different aspects of this breathing disorder. Pre-clinical experiments in mouse models that target different neuromodulatory and neurotransmitter receptors and MeCP2 function within glia cells can partly reverse breathing abnormalities. The success in animal models raises optimism that one day it will be possible to control or potentially cure the devastating symptoms also in human patients with RTT. PMID:23816600

  15. Technological aids to support choice strategies by three girls with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stasolla, Fabrizio; Perilli, Viviana; Di Leone, Antonia; Damiani, Rita; Albano, Vincenza; Stella, Anna; Damato, Concetta

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at extending the use of assistive technology (i.e., photocells, interface and personal computer) to support choice strategies by three girls with Rett syndrome and severe to profound developmental disabilities. A second purpose of the study was to reduce stereotypic behaviors exhibited by the participants involved (i.e., body rocking, hand washing and hand mouthing). Finally, a third goal of the study was to monitor the effects of such program on the participants' indices of happiness. The study was carried out according to a multiple probe design across responses for each participant. Results showed that the three girls increased the adaptive responses and decreased the stereotyped behaviors during intervention phases compared to baseline. Moreover, during intervention phases, the indices of happiness augmented for each girl as well. Clinical, psychological and rehabilitative implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:25310833

  16. VPA Alleviates Neurological Deficits and Restores Gene Expression in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka I., Maky; Irie, Koichiro; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Nakashima, Kinichi; Zhao, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that occurs once in every 10,000–15,000 live female births. Despite intensive research, no effective cure is yet available. Valproic acid (VPA) has been used widely to treat mood disorder, epilepsy, and a growing number of other disorders. In limited clinical studies, VPA has also been used to control seizure in RTT patients with promising albeit somewhat unclear efficacy. In this study we tested the effect of VPA on the neurological symptoms of RTT and discovered that short-term VPA treatment during the symptomatic period could reduce neurological symptoms in RTT mice. We found that VPA restores the expression of a subset of genes in RTT mouse brains, and these genes clustered in neurological disease and developmental disorder networks. Our data suggest that VPA could be used as a drug to alleviate RTT symptoms. PMID:24968028

  17. Determinants of sleep disturbances in Rett syndrome: Novel findings in relation to genotype.

    PubMed

    Boban, Sharolin; Wong, Kingsley; Epstein, Amy; Anderson, Barbara; Murphy, Nada; Downs, Jenny; Leonard, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Rett syndrome is a rare but severe neurological disorder associated with a mutation in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Sleep problems and epilepsy are two of many comorbidities associated with this disorder. This study investigated the prevalence and determinants of sleep problems in Rett syndrome using an international sample. Families with a child with a confirmed Rett syndrome diagnosis and a MECP2 mutation registered in the International Rett Syndrome Phenotype Database (InterRett) were invited to participate. Questionnaires were returned by 364/461 (78.9%) either in web-based or paper format. Families completed the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children and provided information on the presence, nature, and frequency of their child's sleep problems. Multivariate multinomial regression was used to investigate the relationships between selected sleep problems, age group, and genotype and linear regression for the relationships between sleep disturbance scales and a range of covariates. Night waking was the most prevalent sleep problem affecting over 80% with nearly half (48.3%) currently waking often at night. Initiating and maintaining sleep was most disturbed for younger children and those with a p.Arg294* mutation. Severe seizure activity was associated with poor sleep after adjusting for age group, mutation type, and mobility. We were surprised to find associations between the p.Arg294* mutation and some sleep disturbances given that other aspects of its phenotype are milder. These findings highlight the complexities of aberrant MECP2 function in Rett syndrome and explain some of the variation in manifestation of sleep disturbances. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27255190

  18. MECP2 Duplication Syndrome: Evidence of Enhanced Oxidative Stress. A Comparison with Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Cinzia; De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Møller, Rikke S; Zollo, Gloria; Buoni, Sabrina; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Guerranti, Roberto; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; D'Esposito, Maurizio; Ravn, Kirstine; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) and MECP2 duplication syndrome (MDS) are neurodevelopmental disorders caused by alterations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene expression. A relationship between MECP2 loss-of-function mutations and oxidative stress has been previously documented in RTT patients and murine models. To date, no data on oxidative stress have been reported for the MECP2 gain-of-function mutations in patients with MDS. In the present work, the pro-oxidant status and oxidative fatty acid damage in MDS was investigated (subjects n = 6) and compared to RTT (subjects n = 24) and healthy condition (subjects n = 12). Patients with MECP2 gain-of-function mutations showed increased oxidative stress marker levels (plasma non-protein bound iron, intraerythrocyte non-protein bound iron, F2-isoprostanes, and F4-neuroprostanes), as compared to healthy controls (P ≤ 0.05). Such increases were similar to those observed in RTT patients except for higher plasma F2-isoprostanes levels (P < 0.0196). Moreover, plasma levels of F2-isoprostanes were significantly correlated (P = 0.0098) with the size of the amplified region. The present work shows unique data in patients affected by MDS. For the first time MECP2 gain-of-function mutations are indicated to be linked to an oxidative damage and related clinical symptoms overlapping with those of MECP2 loss-of-function mutations. A finely tuned balance of MECP2 expression appears to be critical to oxidative stress homeostasis, thus shedding light on the relevance of the redox balance in the central nervous system integrity. PMID:26930212

  19. MECP2 Duplication Syndrome: Evidence of Enhanced Oxidative Stress. A Comparison with Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leoncini, Silvia; Møller, Rikke S.; Zollo, Gloria; Buoni, Sabrina; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Guerranti, Roberto; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; D’Esposito, Maurizio; Ravn, Kirstine; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) and MECP2 duplication syndrome (MDS) are neurodevelopmental disorders caused by alterations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene expression. A relationship between MECP2 loss-of-function mutations and oxidative stress has been previously documented in RTT patients and murine models. To date, no data on oxidative stress have been reported for the MECP2 gain-of-function mutations in patients with MDS. In the present work, the pro-oxidant status and oxidative fatty acid damage in MDS was investigated (subjects n = 6) and compared to RTT (subjects n = 24) and healthy condition (subjects n = 12). Patients with MECP2 gain-of-function mutations showed increased oxidative stress marker levels (plasma non-protein bound iron, intraerythrocyte non-protein bound iron, F2-isoprostanes, and F4-neuroprostanes), as compared to healthy controls (P ≤ 0.05). Such increases were similar to those observed in RTT patients except for higher plasma F2-isoprostanes levels (P < 0.0196). Moreover, plasma levels of F2-isoprostanes were significantly correlated (P = 0.0098) with the size of the amplified region. The present work shows unique data in patients affected by MDS. For the first time MECP2 gain-of-function mutations are indicated to be linked to an oxidative damage and related clinical symptoms overlapping with those of MECP2 loss-of-function mutations. A finely tuned balance of MECP2 expression appears to be critical to oxidative stress homeostasis, thus shedding light on the relevance of the redox balance in the central nervous system integrity. PMID:26930212

  20. Italian Rett database and biobank.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Meloni, Ilaria; Scala, Elisa; Ariani, Francesca; Caselli, Rossella; Pescucci, Chiara; Longo, Ilaria; Artuso, Rosangela; Bruttini, Mirella; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Speciale, Caterina; Causarano, Vincenza; Hayek, Giuseppe; Zappella, Michele; Renieri, Alessandra; Mari, Francesca

    2007-04-01

    Rett syndrome is the second most common cause of severe mental retardation in females, with an incidence of approximately 1 out of 10,000 live female births. In addition to the classic form, a number of Rett variants have been described. MECP2 gene mutations are responsible for about 90% of classic cases and for a lower percentage of variant cases. Recently, CDKL5 mutations have been identified in the early onset seizures variant and other atypical Rett patients. While the high percentage of MECP2 mutations in classic patients supports the hypothesis of a single disease gene, the low frequency of mutated variant cases suggests genetic heterogeneity. Since 1998, we have performed clinical evaluation and molecular analysis of a large number of Italian Rett patients. The Italian Rett Syndrome (RTT) database has been developed to share data and samples of our RTT collection with the scientific community (http://www.biobank.unisi.it). This is the first RTT database that has been connected with a biobank. It allows the user to immediately visualize the list of available RTT samples and, using the "Search by" tool, to rapidly select those with specific clinical and molecular features. By contacting bank curators, users can request the samples of interest for their studies. This database encourages collaboration projects with clinicians and researchers from around the world and provides important resources that will help to better define the pathogenic mechanisms underlying Rett syndrome. PMID:17186495

  1. The molecular basis of variable phenotypic severity among common missense mutations causing Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kyla; Selfridge, Jim; Lagger, Sabine; Connelly, John; De Sousa, Dina; Kerr, Alastair; Webb, Shaun; Guy, Jacky; Merusi, Cara; Koerner, Martha V; Bird, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, which encodes a chromosomal protein that binds to methylated DNA. Mouse models mirror the human disorder and therefore allow investigation of phenotypes at a molecular level. We describe an Mecp2 allelic series representing the three most common missense Rett syndrome (RTT) mutations, including first reports of Mecp2[R133C] and Mecp2[T158M] knock-in mice, in addition to Mecp2[R306C] mutant mice. Together these three alleles comprise ∼25% of all RTT mutations in humans, but they vary significantly in average severity. This spectrum is mimicked in the mouse models; R133C being least severe, T158M most severe and R306C of intermediate severity. Both R133C and T158M mutations cause compound phenotypes at the molecular level, combining compromised DNA binding with reduced stability, the destabilizing effect of T158M being more severe. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that the R133C mutation exclusively abolishes binding to hydroxymethylated DNA, as interactions with DNA containing methyl-CG, methyl-CA and hydroxymethyl-CA are all reduced in vivo. We find that MeCP2[T158M] is significantly less stable than MeCP2[R133C], which may account for the divergent clinical impact of the mutations. Overall, this allelic series recapitulates human RTT severity, reveals compound molecular aetiologies and provides a valuable resource in the search for personalized therapeutic interventions. PMID:26647311

  2. WDR45 mutations in Rett (-like) syndrome and developmental delay: Case report and an appraisal of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hoffjan, Sabine; Ibisler, Aysegül; Tschentscher, Anne; Dekomien, Gabriele; Bidinost, Carla; Rosa, Alberto L

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in the WDR45 gene have been identified as causative for the only X-linked type of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA), clinically characterized by global developmental delay in childhood, followed by a secondary neurological decline with parkinsonism and/or dementia in adolescence or early adulthood. Recent reports suggest that WDR45 mutations are associated with a broader phenotypic spectrum. We identified a novel splice site mutation (c.440-2 A > G) in a 5-year-old Argentinian patient with Rett-like syndrome, exhibiting developmental delay, microcephaly, seizures and stereotypic hand movements, and discuss this finding, together with a review of the literature. Additional patients with a clinical diagnosis of Rett (-like) syndrome were also found to carry WDR45 mutations before (or without) clinical decline or signs of iron accumulation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This information indicates that WDR45 mutations should be added to the growing list of genetic alterations linked to Rett-like syndrome. Further, clinical symptoms associated with WDR45 mutations ranged from early-onset epileptic encephalopathy in a male patient with a deletion of WDR45 to only mild cognitive delay in a female patient, suggesting that analysis of this gene should be considered more often in patients with developmental delay, regardless of severity. The increasing use of next generation sequencing technologies as well as longitudinal follow-up of patients with an early diagnosis will help to gain additional insight into the phenotypic spectrum associated with WDR45 mutations. PMID:26790960

  3. Suggestions for Educational and Therapeutic Interventions with the Rett Syndrome Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Rett Syndrome Association, Inc., Fort Washington, MD.

    This paper comprises a compilation of nine case studies of girls (aged 4-16 years) with Rett Syndrome. The educational settings involved are various and include private day school, public elementary school in both integrated and special needs classrooms, and a county-operated preschool program for handicapped children. Each case study outlines the…

  4. Expression profiling of clonal lymphocyte cell cultures from Rett syndrome patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 85% of Rett syndrome (RTT) patients have heterozygous mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene which encodes methyl-CpG-binding protein 2, a transcriptional repressor that binds methylated CpG sites. Because MECP2 is subject to X chromosome inactivation (XCI), girls with RTT express either the...

  5. Improving Functional Skills and Physical Fitness in Children with Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotan, M.; Isakov, E.; Merrick, J.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of a physical exercise programme with treadmill for persons with Rett syndrome (RS) in order to promote fitness and health. A daily training programme on a treadmill was designed for four females with RS over a period of 2 months with tests performed in three intervals, at time 1, 2 and 3, 2 months apart with…

  6. Brief Report:MECP2 Mutations in People without Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Bernhard; Treadwell-Deering, Diane; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Neul, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in "Methyl-CpG-Binding protein 2" ("MECP2") are commonly associated with the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). However, some people with RTT do not have mutations in "MECP2," and interestingly there have been people identified with "MECP2" mutations that do not have the clinical…

  7. Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in girls and women with rett syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and identify the relation between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-(OH)D) levels and the consumption of dietary sources of vitamin D or exposure to anticonvulsants in girls and women with Rett syndrome (RTT). Retrospective review of...

  8. Forensic issues and possible mechanisms of sudden death in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W

    2006-02-01

    A 20-year-old female with an established diagnosis of Rett syndrome was found dead in bed. There had been no history of recent deterioration in health and at autopsy no acute lesions were found. There was no evidence of trauma. Toxicological analysis of blood revealed therapeutic levels of carbamazepine and clonazepam. Death was attributed to the complications of Rett syndrome, an uncommon developmental disorder characterized by autistic type behaviour, hypotonia, stereotyped movements, seizures and growth failure, caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene on the X chromosome. Establishing the precise cause of sudden death in individuals with Rett syndrome may be difficult as epilepsy, defective autonomic nervous system control and cardiac arrhythmias may relate more to functional problems rather than to defects that can be demonstrated at autopsy. Thus, although there are a variety of well-documented underlying mechanisms that may cause sudden death in this condition, determining the exact sequence of events in an unwitnessed death may be more by inference and elimination, given the absence of pathognomonic and acute lethal lesions that are able to be found histopathologically. 'Complications of Rett syndrome' may, therefore, be the most accurate designation when individuals with this condition are found unexpectedly dead and no anatomical cause of death can be identified at autopsy. PMID:16263320

  9. Fostering Environmental Control in a Young Child with Rett Syndrome: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret Wolan; And Others

    The progress of a 4-year-old child with Rett Syndrome (a developmental disability resulting in severe mental and physical deficits in female children) in learning simple environmental control over an 18-month-period is described. A systematic program providing for contingency control of toys and music via switches was provided in the child's…

  10. Degraded neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds in a rat model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Crystal T; Rahebi, Kimiya C; Borland, Michael S; Buell, Elizabeth P; Centanni, Tracy M; Fink, Melyssa K; Im, Kwok W; Wilson, Linda G; Kilgard, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Individuals with Rett syndrome have greatly impaired speech and language abilities. Auditory brainstem responses to sounds are normal, but cortical responses are highly abnormal. In this study, we used the novel rat Mecp2 knockout model of Rett syndrome to document the neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds. We hypothesized that both speech discrimination ability and the neural response to speech sounds would be impaired in Mecp2 rats. We expected that extensive speech training would improve speech discrimination ability and the cortical response to speech sounds. Our results reveal that speech responses across all four auditory cortex fields of Mecp2 rats were hyperexcitable, responded slower, and were less able to follow rapidly presented sounds. While Mecp2 rats could accurately perform consonant and vowel discrimination tasks in quiet, they were significantly impaired at speech sound discrimination in background noise. Extensive speech training improved discrimination ability. Training shifted cortical responses in both Mecp2 and control rats to favor the onset of speech sounds. While training increased the response to low frequency sounds in control rats, the opposite occurred in Mecp2 rats. Although neural coding and plasticity are abnormal in the rat model of Rett syndrome, extensive therapy appears to be effective. These findings may help to explain some aspects of communication deficits in Rett syndrome and suggest that extensive rehabilitation therapy might prove beneficial. PMID:26321676

  11. Peculiarities in the Gestural Repertoire: An Early Marker for Rett Syndrome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschik, Peter B.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Wolin, Thomas; Talisa, Victor B.; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D.; Budimirovic, Dejan B.; Vollmann, Ralf; Einspieler, Christa

    2012-01-01

    We studied the gestures used by children with classic Rett syndrome (RTT) to provide evidence as to how this essential aspect of communicative functions develops. Seven participants with RTT were longitudinally observed between 9 and 18 months of life. The gestures used by these participants were transcribed and coded from a retrospective analysis…

  12. Fostering Environmental Control in a Young Child with Rett Syndrome: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret Wolan; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The performance of a 3-year-old with Rett Syndrome in a Contingency Intervention Program using head and hand switches and adapted toys was assessed over 18 months. Learning contingent control of the stimuli positively motivated the child, promoted attention to toys and objects, and generalized to the classroom. (SW)

  13. Parent Reading Behaviors and Communication Outcomes in Girls with Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skotko, Brian G.; Koppenhaver, Dave A.; Erickson, Karen A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe evidence and intervention strategies for parents, educators, and researchers who seek to enhance communication and literacy in children with Rett syndrome (RS). Four girls with RS and their mothers videotaped their storybook interactions at home for 4 months. Parent-child storybook interactions were coded for child behaviors (e.g., use…

  14. Sleep Disturbance in Children with Rett Syndrome: A Qualitative Investigation of the Parental Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDougall, Allyson; Kerr, Alison M.; Espie, Colin A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Sleep problems in children with intellectual disability can be precipitated and maintained by intrinsic and external factors. The present study comprised a qualitative investigation of the experiences of parents of children with Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder where sleep disturbance is common. Method: Audio-taped…

  15. The Rett Syndrome Complex: Communicative Functions in Relation to Developmental Level and Autistic Features.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Annika Dahlgren; Ehlers, Stephan; Hagberg, Bengt; Gillberg, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    Communicative functions, overall developmental level, and autistic features were studied in eight females (ages 11-36) with Rett Syndrome. Low levels of communicative abilities and overall functioning were demonstrated, and joint attention behaviors and expression of communicative intent were rare. Six subjects, however, showed clear examples of…

  16. Development of a Video-Based Evaluation Tool in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyfe, S.; Downs, J.; McIlroy, O.; Burford, B.; Lister, J.; Reilly, S.; Laurvick, C. L.; Philippe, C.; Msall, M.; Kaufmann, W. E.; Ellaway, C.; Leonard, H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a video-based evaluation tool for use in Rett syndrome (RTT). Components include a parent-report checklist, and video filming and coding protocols that contain items on eating, drinking, communication, hand function and movements, personal care and mobility. Ninety-seven of the 169 families who initially…

  17. The Borderland of Autism and Rett Syndrome: Five Case Histories to Highlight Diagnostic Difficulties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher

    1989-01-01

    Case studies of 4 females and 1 male, aged 6-25, with pervasive developmental disorders are described. All met standard diagnostic criteria for autism and showed many Rett syndrome symptoms. It is concluded that there is considerable overlap between the 2 disorders and that symptomatic similarities might mirror common pathopsychological…

  18. Supporting Communication of Girls with Rett Syndrome and Their Mothers in Storybook Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppenhaver, David A.; Erickson, Karen A.; Skotko, Brian G.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, mother-child storybook reading was explored as a context within which to support early symbolic communication of four girls (ages 3-7) with Rett syndrome. Access to communication symbols, assistive technologies, and parent training consistently enhanced children's frequency of labeling/commenting and appropriate symbolic…

  19. Coaching Communication Partners: A Preliminary Investigation of Communication Intervention during Mealtime in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartolotta, Theresa E.; Remshifski, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) occurs primarily in females and is characterized by deficits in cognition, communication, hand use and ambulation. This quasi-experimental study explored the use of a coaching program to increase communicative interactions between girls with RTT and their communication partners. Communication coaching strategies were provided…

  20. Cognitive Performance in Rett Syndrome Girls: A Pilot Study Using Eyetracking Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptista, P. M.; Mercadante, M. T.; Macedo, E. C.; Schwartzman, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Rett syndrome (RS) is a pervasive developmental disorder with cognitive and neuromotor impairments (including loss of handiness and loss of communicative skills). Objective: To verify whether girls with RS use their gaze intentionally, by observing their performance in three cognitive tasks: (1) verbal instruction condition (look at…

  1. An Analogue Assessment of Repetitive Hand Behaviours in Girls and Young Women with Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wales, L.; Charman, T.; Mount, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neuro-developmental disorder that almost exclusively affects females. In addition to neuro-developmental regression and loss of hand skills, apraxia, deceleration of head growth, and increasing spasticity and scoliosis, a number of behavioural features are also seen, including stereotypic hand movements, hyperventilation and…

  2. Rett Syndrome: Of Girls and Mice--Lessons for Regression in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaze, Daniel G.

    2004-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder occurring almost exclusively in females. Regression is a defining feature of RTT. During the regression stage, RTT girls display many autistic features, such as loss of communication and social skills, poor eye contact, and lack of interest, and initially may be given the diagnosis of autism.…

  3. Cognitive and Adaptive Functioning in 28 Girls with Rett Syndrome. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Adrienne; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study of 28 girls (ages 2-19) with Rett Syndrome found profound handicaps in the intellectual and adaptive areas, according to standardized tests. Subjects seemed capable of learning some self-help skills at a basic level. The Cattell Mental Age was significantly negatively correlated with chronological age. (JDD)

  4. Use of Equipment and Respite Services and Caregiver Health among Australian Families Living with Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Downs, Jenny; Bebbington, Ami; Jacoby, Peter; Girdler, Sonya; Leonard, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed factors that could influence equipment and respite services use among Australian families caring for a girl/woman with Rett syndrome and examined relationships between use of these resources and the health of female caregivers. Data was sourced from questionnaires completed by families (n=170) contributing to the Australian…

  5. The Use of Assistive Technology for Symbol Identification by Children with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzroni, Orit; Rubin, Corinne; Konkol, Orna

    2002-01-01

    A study investigated whether the use of assistive technology would assist in the ability to identify symbols by three girls (ages 8-10) with Rett syndrome. Individualized multimedia programs resulted in a steady learning curve across symbol sets and a partial retention of knowledge throughout maintenance probes. (Contains references.) (CR)

  6. Stress and Family Functioning in Parents of Girls with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Adrienne; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This survey of parents of 29 girls with Rett syndrome found that subjects reported more stress, lower marital satisfaction, and certain adaptations in family functioning compared to norms. However, most parents scored in the normal range. Scores were not related to socioeconomic status or characteristics of the affected child. (DB)

  7. Modifying Adult Interactional Style as Positive Behavioural Intervention for a Child with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ian M.; Meyer, Luanna H.

    1999-01-01

    A naturalistic behavioral assessment and intervention program over a 3-year period for a New Zealand girl (age 5) with Rett syndrome is described. The most significant reduction in hand mannerisms and other excess behaviors was related to positive social interactions and play that allowed for communication at the affective level. (Author/CR)

  8. An Effective Computer-Based Requesting System for Persons with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Acker, Richard; Grant, Sharon H.

    1995-01-01

    This study explored the use of a computer-based requesting system, employing animated graphics and touch-sensitive screen input, with three girls with Rett syndrome (characterized by severe motor disorder, impaired cognitive function, and language disorder). All three girls displayed increased item requesting when provided computer-based…

  9. Physical and Mental Health of Mothers Caring for a Child with Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurvick, Crystal L.; Msall, Michael E.; Silburn, Sven; Bower, Carol; de Klerk, Nicholas; Leonard, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Our goal was to investigate the physical and mental health of mothers who care for a child with Rett syndrome. Methods: We assessed maternal physical and mental health by using the SF-12 version 1 physical component summary and mental component summary scores as the outcome measures of interest. Mothers (n = 135) of children with Rett…

  10. Mutations in JMJD1C are involved in Rett syndrome and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Mauricio A.; Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Moutinho, Catia; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V.; Gomez, Antonio; Vidal, Enrique; Petazzi, Paolo; Szczesna, Karolina; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Lucariello, Mario; Lorden, Patricia; Delgado-Morales, Raul; de la Caridad, Olga J.; Huertas, Dori; Gelpí, Josep L.; Orozco, Modesto; López-Doriga, Adriana; Milà, Montserrat; Perez-Jurado, Luís A.; Pineda, Mercedes; Armstrong, Judith; Lázaro, Conxi; Esteller, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Autism spectrum disorders are associated with defects in social response and communication that often occur in the context of intellectual disability. Rett syndrome is one example in which epilepsy, motor impairment, and motor disturbance may co-occur. Mutations in histone demethylases are known to occur in several of these syndromes. Herein, we aimed to identify whether mutations in the candidate histone demethylase JMJD1C (jumonji domain containing 1C) are implicated in these disorders. Genet Med 18 1, 378–385. Methods: We performed the mutational and functional analysis of JMJD1C in 215 cases of autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, and Rett syndrome without a known genetic defect. Genet Med 18 1, 378–385. Results: We found seven JMJD1C variants that were not present in any control sample (~ 6,000) and caused an amino acid change involving a different functional group. From these, two de novo JMJD1C germline mutations were identified in a case of Rett syndrome and in a patient with intellectual disability. The functional study of the JMJD1C mutant Rett syndrome patient demonstrated that the altered protein had abnormal subcellular localization, diminished activity to demethylate the DNA damage-response protein MDC1, and reduced binding to MECP2. We confirmed that JMJD1C protein is widely expressed in brain regions and that its depletion compromises dendritic activity. Genet Med 18 1, 378–385. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that mutations in JMJD1C contribute to the development of Rett syndrome and intellectual disability. Genet Med 18 1, 378–385. PMID:26181491

  11. Retracing Atypical Development: A Preserved Speech Variant of Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschik, Peter B.; Einspieler, Christa; Oberle, Andreas; Laccone, Franco; Prechtl, Heinz F. R.

    2009-01-01

    The subject of the present study is the development of a girl with the preserved speech variant of Rett disorder. Our data are based on detailed retrospective and prospective video analyses. Despite achieving developmental milestones, movement quality was already abnormal during the girl's first half year of life. In addition, early hand…

  12. Recent insights into genotype-phenotype relationships in patients with Rett syndrome using a fine grain scale.

    PubMed

    Fabio, Rosa Angela; Colombo, Barbara; Russo, Silvia; Cogliati, Francesca; Masciadri, Maura; Foglia, Silvia; Antonietti, Alessandro; Tavian, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting around 1 in 10,000 female births. The clinical picture of RTT appears quite heterogeneous for each single feature. Mutations in MECP2 gene have been associated with the onset of RTT. The most known gene function consists of transcriptional repression of specific target genes, mainly by the binding of its methyl binding domain (MBD) to methylated CpG nucleotides and recruiting co-repressors and histone deacetylase binding to DNA by its transcription repressor domain (TRD). This study aimed at evaluating a cohort of 114 Rett syndrome (RTT) patients with a detailed scale measuring the different kinds of impairments produced by the syndrome. The sample included relatively large subsets of the most frequent mutations, so that genotype-phenotype correlations could be tested. Results revealed that frequent missense mutations showed a specific profile in different areas of impairment. The R306C mutation, considered as producing mild impairment, was associated to a moderate phenotype in which behavioural characteristics were mainly affected. A notable difference emerged by comparing mutations truncating the protein before and after the nuclear localization signal; such a difference concerned prevalently the motor-functional and autonomy skills of the patients, affecting the management of everyday activities. PMID:25124696

  13. X inactivation in Rett syndrome: A preliminary study showing partial preferential inactivation of paternal X with the M27{beta} probe

    SciTech Connect

    Camus, P.; Abbadi, N.; Gilgenkrantz, S.

    1994-04-15

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a severe progressive neurological disorder occurring exclusively in females. Most cases are sporadic. The few familial cases (less than 1%) cannot be explained by a simple mode of inheritance. Several hypotheses have been proposed: X-linked male lethal mutation, maternal uniparental disomy, fresh mutation on the X chromosome, involvement of mitochondrial DNA and differential inactivation with metabolic interference of X-borne alleles. The authors have examined the pattern of X inactivation in 10 affected girls who were selected according to the clinical criteria previously described and accepted by the French Rett Scientific Committee. The X inactivation pattern was studied by analysis of methylation at the hypervariable locus DXS255 with the M27{beta} probe. The results show a more-or-less skewed inactivation of paternal X in 8 Rett females, and 2 cases of symmetrical inactivation. In control girls, inactivation was symmetrical cases and the maternal X has been preferentially inactivated in the other 2 cases. In no case was a total skewed inactivation observed. Though there was clear evidence for a preferential paternal X inactivation that was statistically significant further studies are necessary to establish a relationship between X inactivation pattern and Rett syndrome.

  14. Wild type microglia do not arrest pathology in mouse models of Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jieqi; Wegener, Jan Eike; Huang, Teng-Wei; Sripathy, Smitha; De Jesus-Cortes, Hector; Xu, Pin; Tran, Stephanie; Knobbe, Whitney; Leko, Vid; Britt, Jeremiah; Starwalt, Ruth; McDaniel, Latisha; Ward, Chris; Parra, Diana; Newcomb, Benjamin; Lao, Uyen; Flowers, David A.; Cullen, Sean; Jorstad, Nikolas L; Yang, Yue; Glaskova, Lena; Vigneau, Sebastian; Kozlitina, Julia; Reichardt, Sybille D.; Reichardt, Holger M.; Gärtner, Jutta; Bartolomei, Marisa S.; Fang, Min; Loeb, Keith; Keene, C. Dirk; Bernstein, Irwin; Goodell, Margaret; Brat, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the X chromosomal gene Methyl-CpG-binding Protein 2 (MECP2) (1). RTT treatment so far is symptomatic. Mecp2 disruption in mice phenocopies major features of the syndrome (2) that can be reversed upon re-expression of Mecp2 (3. It has recently been reported that transplantation of wild type (WT) bone marrow (BMT) into lethally irradiated Mecp2tm1.1Jae/y mice prevented neurologic decline and early death by restoring microglial phagocytic activity against apoptotic targets (4). Based on this report, clinical trials of BMT for patients with RTT have been initiated (5). We aimed to replicate and extend the BMT experiments in three different RTT mouse models but found that despite robust microglial engraftment, BMT from WT donors did not rescue early death or ameliorate neurologic deficits. Furthermore, early and specific genetic expression of Mecp2 in microglia did not rescue Mecp2-deficient mice. In conclusion our experiments do not support BMT as therapy for RTT. PMID:25993969

  15. Brief Report: Autistic Behaviors among Children with Fragile X or Rett Syndrome: Implications for the Classification of Pervasive Developmental Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Pulsifer, Margaret; Fiumara, Agata; Cocuzza, M.; Nigro, F.; Incorpora, G.; Barone, R.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 14 males with fragile X syndrome, 12 females with Rett Syndrome, and 25 individuals with other developmental disorders found that among those with fragile X syndrome, none of the 11 who did not have a diagnosis of autism met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria for pervasive developmental disorder.…

  16. Repeated Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Treatment in a Patient with Rett Syndrome: A Single Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Giorgio; Scusa, M. Flora; Benincasa, Alberto; Bottiglioni, Ilaria; Congiu, Laura; Vadhatpour, Cyrus; Romanelli, Anna Maria; Gemo, Ilaria; Puccetti, Chetti; McNamara, Rachel; O’Leary, Seán; Corvin, Aiden; Gill, Michael; Tropea, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that has no cure. Patients show regression of acquired skills, motor, and speech impairment, cardio-respiratory distress, microcephaly, and stereotyped hand movements. The majority of RTT patients display mutations in the gene that codes for the Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2), which is involved in the development of the central nervous system, especially synaptic and circuit maturation. Thus, agents that promote brain development and synaptic function are good candidates for ameliorating the symptoms of RTT. In particular, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and its active peptide (1–3) IGF1 cross the Blood Brain Barrier, and therefore are ideal treatments for RTT Indeed, both (1–3) IGF1 and IGF1 treatment significantly ameliorates RTT symptoms in a mouse model of the disease In a previous study, we established that IGF1 is safe and well tolerated on Rett patients. In this open label clinical case study, we assess the safety and tolerability of IGF1 administration in two cycles of the treatment. Before and after each cycle, we monitored the clinical and blood parameters, autonomic function, and social and cognitive abilities, and we found that IGF1 was well tolerated each time and did not induce any side effect, nor it interfered with the other treatments that the patient was undergoing. We noticed a moderate improvement in the cognitive, social, and autonomic abilities of the patient after each cycle but the benefits were not retained between the two cycles, consistent with the pre-clinical observation that treatments for RTT should be administered through life. We find that repeated IGF1 treatment is safe and well tolerated in Rett patients but observed effects are not retained between cycles. These results have applications to other pathologies considering that IGF1 has been shown to be effective in other disorders of the autism spectrum. PMID:24918098

  17. Evoking communication in Rett syndrome: comparisons with conversations and games in mother-infant interaction.

    PubMed

    Burford, B; Trevarthen, C

    1997-01-01

    Girls with Rett syndrome retain a responsiveness with care-givers that corresponds in many respects with the preverbal communication observed with normal infants. This has characteristic rhythmic patterns and phrases, mutual imitation, reciprocal emotional phases and rudimentary oral, vocal and gestural expressions. After individuals with Rett syndrome have passed the critical stage in dissolution of their attention, co-ordination and voluntary control, they retain positive orientation to human faces and eyes with smiling. Video analyses show that they can engage with rhythms and phrases of conversation, sometimes showing a sense of humour and sensitivity to playful teasing. They respond to repeated patterns of expression in rhythmic/prosodic play and to certain forms in music. It is suggested that sensitive and appropriately attuned support for the rudimentary motives for human contact that survive in Rett syndrome can help stabilisation of self-regulatory states, alleviate panic and confusion and facilitate learning. The effects of the disorder may be a consequence of a genetic fault in the elaboration of an Intrinsic Motive Formation in the reticular core of the embryo brain, leading to dysregulation of differentiation in higher cognitive systems and learning, but leaving partially intact motive principles for human intersubjective response. PMID:9452916

  18. Rett syndrome in a 47,XXX patient with a de novo MECP2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Sara; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Hartiala, Jaana; Stein, Stuart; Schanen, N Carolyn

    2003-10-15

    Rett syndrome is caused by mutation in MECP2, a gene located on Xq28 and subject to X-inactivation. MECP2 encodes methyl CpG-binding protein 2, a widely expressed transcriptional repressor of methylated DNA. Mutations in MECP2 are primarily de novo events in the male germ line and thus lead to an excess of affected females. Here we report the identification of a unique 47,XXX girl with relatively mild atypical Rett syndrome leading initially to a diagnosis of infantile autism with regression. Mutation analysis of the MECP2 gene identified a de novo MECP2 mutation, L100V. Examination of a panel of X-linked microsatellite markers indicated that her supernumerary X chromosome is maternally derived. X-inactivation patterns were determined by analysis of methylation of the androgen receptor locus, and indicated preferential inactivation of her paternal allele. The parental origin of her MECP2 mutation could not be determined because she was uninformative for intronic polymorphisms flanking her mutation. This is the first reported case of sex chromosome trisomy and MECP2 mutation in a female, and it illustrates the importance of allele dosage on the severity of Rett syndrome phenotype. PMID:12966522

  19. Neurotrophic effects of Cerebrolysin in the Mecp2308/Y transgenic model of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Doppler, Edith; Rockenstein, Edward; Ubhi, Kiren; Inglis, Chandra; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Crews, Leslie; Hitzl, Monika; Moessler, Herbert; Masliah, Eliezer

    2009-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a childhood neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding for methyl CpG binding protein (MeCP2). Neuropathological studies in patients with Rett syndrome and in MeCP2 mutant models have shown reduced dendritic arborization and abnormal neuronal packing. We have previously shown that Cerebrolysin (CBL), a neurotrophic peptide mixture, ameliorates the synaptic and dendritic pathology in models of aging and neurodegeneration. This study aimed to determine whether CBL was capable of reducing behavioral and neuronal alterations in Mecp2308/Y mutant mice. Two sets of experiments were performed, the first with 4 month old male Mecp2308/Y mutant mice treated with CBL or vehicle for 3 months (Group A) and the second with 1 month old mice treated for 6 months (Group B). Behavioral analysis showed improved motor performance with CBL in Group A and a trend toward improvement in Group B. Consistent with behavioral findings, neuropathological analysis of the basal ganglia showed amelioration of dendritic simplification in CBL-treated Mecp2308/Y mutant mice. CBL treatment also ameliorated dendritic pathology and neuronal loss in the hippocampus and neocortex in Mecp2308/Y mutant mice. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that CBL promotes recovery of dendritic and neuronal damage and behavioral improvements in young adult Mecp2308/Y mutant mice and suggests that CBL may have neurotrophic effects in this model. These findings support the possibility that CBL may have beneficial effects in the management of Rett syndrome. PMID:18600331

  20. [Epigenome: what we learned from Rett syndrome, a neurological disease caused by mutation of a methyl-CpG binding protein].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenome is defined as DNA and histone modification-dependent gene regulation system. Abnormalities in this system are known to cause various neuro-developmental diseases. We recently reported that neurological symptoms of Rett syndrome, which is an autistic disorder caused by mutations in methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2), was associated with failure of epigenomic gene regulation in neuronal cells, and that clinical differences in the identical twins with Rett syndrome in the differences in DNA methylation in neuronal genes, but not caused by DNA sequence differences. Since central nervus system requires precise gene regulation, neurological diseases including Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases may be caused by acquired DNA modification (epigenomic) changes that results in aberrant gene regulation as well as DNA sequence changes congenitally occurred (mutation). PMID:24291980

  1. New insights in Rett syndrome using pathway analysis for transcriptomics data.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, Friederike; Coort, Susan L M; Cirillo, Elisa; Smeets, Eric; Evelo, Chris T; Curfs, Leopold

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of transcriptomics data is able to give an overview of cellular processes, but requires sophisticated bioinformatics tools and methods to identify the changes. Pathway analysis software, like PathVisio, captures the information about biological pathways from databases and brings this together with the experimental data to enable visualization and understanding of the underlying processes. Rett syndrome is a rare disease, but still one of the most abundant causes of intellectual disability in females. Cause of this neurological disorder is mutation of one single gene, the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. This gene is responsible for many steps in neuronal development and function. Although the genetic mutation and the clinical phenotype are well described, the molecular pathways linking them are not yet fully elucidated. In this study we demonstrate a workflow for the analysis of transcriptomics data to identify biological pathways and processes which are changed in a Mecp2 (-/y) mouse model. PMID:27517371

  2. Management of Rett syndrome in the controlled multisensory (Snoezelen) environment. A review with three case stories.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Meir

    2006-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a neurological disorder resulting from an X-linked dominant mutation. It is characterized by a variety of physical and perceptual disabilities, resulting in a need for continuous intervention programs to be administered on a regular basis throughout life. Many of these individuals with RS show fear of movement and, therefore, find it hard to accept external facilitation (so common in physical therapy intervention). In a search for novel intervention techniques that might improve their ability to cope with difficulties in daily situations, while also reducing their difficulty in handling motion inflicted by an external physical facilitator, we examined the use of the Snoezelen room. The Snoezelen, also known as the controlled multisensory environment, can provide a soothing atmosphere that appeals to the individual with RS, while at the same time it can improve physical, sensorial, and functional abilities. This article suggests various intervention goals that are appropriate for individuals with RS at different stages of the disorder. Since the management of young children with RS in the multisensory environment has been discussed at length in the past, this article will mainly describe intervention with adults with RS, focusing on three case stories. The present article reviews the available scientific materials on the topic of Snoezelen, incorporating clinical knowledge in the field of RS and suggesting this approach as an appropriate intervention method for this population. PMID:16830051

  3. A novel CDKL5 mutation in a Japanese patient with atypical Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christianto, Antonius; Katayama, Syouichi; Kameshita, Isamu; Inazu, Tetsuya

    2016-08-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe X-linked dominant inheritance disorder with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Mutations in Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2), Cyclin dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) have been associated with classic and/or variant RTT. This study was conducted to identify the responsible gene(s) in atypical RTT patient, and to examine the effect of the mutation on protein function. DNA sequence analysis showed a novel heterozygous mutation in CDKL5 identified as c.530A>G which resulted in an amino acid substitution at position 177, from tyrosine to cysteine. Genotyping analysis indicated that the mutation was not merely a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). We also revealed that patient's blood lymphocytes had random X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) pattern. Further examination by bioinformatics analysis demonstrated the mutation caused damage or deleterious in its protein. In addition, we demonstrated in vitro kinase assay of mutant protein showed impairment of its activity. Taken together, the results suggested the mutant CDKL5 was responsible for the disease. PMID:27265524

  4. The Relationship between "MECP2" Mutation Type and Health Status and Service Use Trajectories over Time in a Rett Syndrome Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Deidra; Bebbington, Ami; de Klerk, Nick; Bower, Carol; Nagarajan, Lakshmi; Leonard, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the trajectories over time of health status and health service use in Rett syndrome by mutation type. Data were obtained from questionnaires administered over 6 years to 256 participants from the Australian Rett Syndrome Database. Health status (episodes of illness and medication load) and health service use…

  5. F2-dihomo-isoprostanes as potential early biomarkers of lipid oxidative damage in Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Claudio; Signorini, Cinzia; Durand, Thierry; Oger, Camille; Guy, Alexandre; Bultel-Poncé, Valérie; Galano, Jean-Marie; Ciccoli, Lucia; Leoncini, Silvia; D'Esposito, Maurizio; Filosa, Stefania; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Hayek, Joussef

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative damage has been reported in Rett syndrome (RTT), a pervasive developmental disorder caused in up to 95% of cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene. Herein, we have synthesized F2-dihomo-isoprostanes (F2-dihomo-IsoPs), peroxidation products from adrenic acid (22:4 n-6), a known component of myelin, and tested the potential value of F2-dihomo-IsoPs as a novel disease marker and its relationship with clinical presentation and disease progression. F2-dihomo-IsoPs were determined by gas chromatography/negative-ion chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Newly synthesized F2-dihomo-IsoP isomers [ent-7(RS)-F2t-dihomo-IsoP and 17-F2t-dihomo-IsoP] were used as reference standards. The measured ions were the product ions at m/z 327 derived from the [M–181]− precursor ions (m/z 597) produced from both the derivatized ent-7(RS)-F2t-dihomo-IsoP and 17-F2t-dihomo-IsoP. Average plasma F2-dihomo-IsoP levels in RTT were about one order of magnitude higher than those in healthy controls, being higher in typical RTT as compared with RTT variants, with a remarkable increase of about two orders of magnitude in patients at the earliest stage of the disease followed by a steady decrease during the natural clinical progression. hese data indicate for the first time that quantification of F2-dihomo-IsoPs in plasma represents an early marker of the disease and may provide a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms behind the neurological regression in patients with RTT PMID:21917727

  6. Pain experience and expression in Rett syndrome: Subjective and objective measurement approaches

    PubMed Central

    Barney, Chantel C.; Feyma, Timothy; Beisang, Arthur; Symons, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is associated with myriad debilitating health issues and significant motor and communicative impairments. Because of the former there is concern about the possibility of recurrent and chronic pain but because of the latter it remains difficult to determine what pain ‘looks like’ in RTT. This study investigated pain experience and expression using multiple complementary subjective and objective approaches among a clinical RTT sample. Following informed consent, 18 participants (all female) with RTT (mean age= 12.8 years, SD= 6.32) were characterized in terms of pain experience and interference, typical pain expression, and elicited pain behavior during a passive range of motion-like examination procedure. Parents completed the Dalhousie Pain Interview (DPI; pain type, frequency, duration, intensity), the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI; pain interference), and the Non-Communicating Children’s Pain Checklist – Revised (NCCPC-R; typical pain expression). A Pain Examination Procedure (PEP) was conducted and scored using the Pain and Discomfort Scale (PADS). The majority of the sample (89%) were reported to experience pain in the previous week which presented as gastrointestinal (n=8), musculoskeletal (n=5), and seizure related pain (n=5) that was intense (scored 0–10; M= 5.67, SD= 3.09) and long in duration (M= 25.22 hours, SD= 53.52). Numerous pain-expressive behaviors were inventoried (e.g., vocal, facial, mood/interaction changes) when parents reported their child’s typical pain behaviors and based on independent direct observation during a reliably coded pain exam. This study provides subjective and objective evidence that individuals with RTT experience recurring and chronic pain for which pain expression appears intact. PMID:26425056

  7. Biomechanical properties of bone in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Bushra; Russell, David; Payne, Anthony; Constante, Diogo; Tanner, K. Elizabeth; Isaksson, Hanna; Mathavan, Neashan; Cobb, Stuart R.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked genetic disorder and a major cause of intellectual disability in girls. Mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene are the primary cause of the disorder. Despite the dominant neurological phenotypes, MECP2 is expressed ubiquitously throughout the body and a number of peripheral phenotypes such as scoliosis, reduced bone mineral density and skeletal fractures are also common and important clinical features of the disorder. In order to explore whether MeCP2 protein deficiency results in altered structural and functional properties of bone and to test the potential reversibility of any defects, we have conducted a series of histological, imaging and biomechanical tests of bone in a functional knockout mouse model of RTT. Both hemizygous Mecp2stop/y male mice in which Mecp2 is silenced in all cells and female Mecp2stop/+ mice in which Mecp2 is silenced in ~ 50% of cells as a consequence of random X-chromosome inactivation, revealed significant reductions in cortical bone stiffness, microhardness and tensile modulus. Microstructural analysis also revealed alterations in both cortical and cancellous femoral bone between wild-type and MeCP2-deficient mice. Furthermore, unsilencing of Mecp2 in adult mice cre-mediated stop cassette deletion resulted in a restoration of biomechanical properties (stiffness, microhardness) towards wild-type levels. These results show that MeCP2-deficiency results in overt, but potentially reversible, alterations in the biomechanical integrity of bone and highlights the importance of targeting skeletal phenotypes in considering the development of pharmacological and gene-based therapies. PMID:25445449

  8. Astrocyte Transcriptome from the Mecp2(308)-Truncated Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Delépine, Chloé; Nectoux, Juliette; Letourneur, Franck; Baud, Véronique; Chelly, Jamel; Billuart, Pierre; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional modulator methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) are responsible for the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome which is one of the most frequent sources of intellectual disability in women. Recent studies showed that loss of Mecp2 in astrocytes contributes to Rett-like symptoms and restoration of Mecp2 can rescue some of these defects. The goal of this work is to compare gene expression profiles of wild-type and mutant astrocytes from Mecp2(308/y) mice (B6.129S-MeCP2/J) by using Affymetrix mouse 2.0 microarrays. Results were confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and by Western blot analysis. Gene set enrichment analysis utilizing Ingenuity Pathways was employed to identify pathways disrupted by Mecp2 deficiency. A total of 2152 genes were statistically differentially expressed between wild-type and mutated samples, including 1784 coding transcripts. However, only 257 showed fold changes >1.2. We confirmed our data by replicative studies in independent primary cultures of cortical astrocytes from Mecp2-deficient mice. Interestingly, two genes known to encode secreted proteins, chromogranin B and lipocalin-2, showed significant dysregulation. These proteins secreted from Mecp2-deficient glia may exert negative non-cell autonomous effects on neuronal properties, including dendritic morphology. Moreover, transcriptional profiling revealed altered Nr2f2 expression which may explain down- and upregulation of several target genes in astrocytes such as Ccl2, Lcn2 and Chgb. Unraveling Nr2f2 involvement in Mecp2-deficient astrocytes could pave the way for a better understanding of Rett syndrome pathophysiology and offers new therapeutic perspectives. PMID:26208914

  9. MECP2 mutations in Czech patients with Rett syndrome and Rett-like phenotypes: novel mutations, genotype-phenotype correlations and validation of high-resolution melting analysis for mutation scanning.

    PubMed

    Zahorakova, Daniela; Lelkova, Petra; Gregor, Vladimir; Magner, Martin; Zeman, Jiri; Martasek, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by developmental regression with loss of motor, communication and social skills, onset of stereotypic hand movements and often seizures. RTT is primarily caused by de novo mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2). We established a high-resolution melting (HRM) technique for mutation scanning of the MECP2 gene and performed analyses in Czech patients with RTT, autism spectrum conditions and intellectual disability with Rett-like features. In the cases with confirmed MECP2 mutations, we determined X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), examined the relationships between genotype and clinical severity and evaluated the modifying influence of XCI. Our results demonstrate that HRM analysis is a reliable method for the detection of point mutations, small deletions and duplications in the MECP2 gene. We identified 29 pathogenic mutations in 75 girls, including four novel mutations: c.155_1189del1035;909_932inv;insC, c.573delC, c.857_858dupAA and c.1163_1200del38. Skewed XCI (ratio >75%) was found in 19.3% of the girls, but no gross divergence in clinical severity was observed. Our findings confirm a high mutation frequency in classic RTT (92%) and a correlation between the MECP2 mutation type and clinical severity. We also demonstrate limitations of XCI in explaining all of the phenotypic differences in RTT. PMID:26984561

  10. Osteopenia is present at an early age and worsens across the life span in girls and women with Rett syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Girls and women with Rett syndrome (RTT) are at increased risk for osteopenia and skeletal fractures. Our objective was to characterize the natural history of bone mineralization in RTT girls and women across their life span and to identify genetic, nutritional, physical, hormonal, or inflammatory ...

  11. Psychological Well-Being of Mothers and Siblings in Families of Girls and Women with Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cianfaglione, Rina; Hastings, Richard P.; Felce, David; Clarke, Angus; Kerr, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Few published studies have reported on the psychological well-being of family members of individuals with Rett syndrome (RTT). Eighty-seven mothers of girls and women with RTT completed a questionnaire survey about their daughters' behavioral phenotype, current health, and behavior problems, and their own and a sibling's well-being. Mothers…

  12. How Facial Expressions in a Rett Syndrome Population Are Recognised and Interpreted by Those around Them as Conveying Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergstrom-Isacsson, Marith; Lagerkvist, Bengt; Holck, Ulla; Gold, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder, including autonomic nervous system dysfunctions and severe communication impairment with an extremely limited ability to use verbal language. These individuals are therefore dependent on the capacity of caregivers to observe and interpret communicative signals, including emotional expressions.…

  13. Bone mineral content and bone mineral density are lower in older than in younger females with Rett syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although bone mineral deficits have been identified in Rett syndrome (RTT), the prevalence of low bone mineral density (BMD) and its association with skeletal fractures and scoliosis has not been characterized fully in girls and women with RTT. Accordingly, we measured total body bone mineral conten...

  14. Profiling Early Socio-Communicative Development in Five Young Girls with the Preserved Speech Variant of Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschik, Peter B.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Einspieler, Christa; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D.; Wolin, Thomas; Pini, Giorgio; Budimirovic, Dejan B.; Zappella, Michele; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a developmental disorder characterized by regression of purposeful hand skills and spoken language, although some affected children retain some ability to speech. We assessed the communicative abilities of five young girls, who were later diagnosed with the preserved speech variant of RTT, during the pre-regression period…

  15. Bone microarchitecture in Rett syndrome and treatment with teriparatide: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, M B; Scioscia, M F; Zanchetta, J R

    2016-09-01

    We present the case of a 28-year-old female Rett syndrome patient with low bone mass and a recent fracture who was successfully treated with teriparatide. Bone mineral density and microarchitecture substantially improved after treatment. Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked progressive neuro-developmental disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding 2 (MECP2) gene, has been consistently associated with low bone mass. Consequently, patients with RTT are at increased risk of skeletal fractures. Teriparatide is a bone-forming agent for the treatment of osteoporosis that has demonstrated its effectiveness in increasing bone strength and reducing the risk of fractures in postmenopausal women, but, recently, its positive action has also been reported in premenopausal women. We present the case of a 28-year-old female RTT patient with low bone mass and a recent fracture who was successfully treated with teriparatide. Both bone mass measured by DXA and microarchitecture assessed by high resolution peripheral computed tomography (HR pQCT) were substantially improved after treatment. PMID:27068223

  16. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Carlos; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moraleda, Jose M.; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the idea that MeCP2 may

  17. Longitudinal bone mineral content and density in Rett syndrome and their contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Amanda; Fyfe, Sue; Downs, Jenny; Woodhead, Helen; Jacoby, Peter; Leonard, Helen

    2015-05-01

    Bone mass and density are low in females with Rett syndrome. This study used Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry to measure annual changes in z-scores for areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) in the lumbar spine and total body in an Australian Rett syndrome cohort at baseline and then after three to four years. Bone mineral apparent density (BMAD) was calculated in the lumbar spine. Annual changes in lean tissue mass (LTM) and bone area (BA) were also assessed. The effects of age, genotype, mobility, menstrual status and epilepsy diagnosis on these parameters were also investigated. The baseline sample included 97 individuals who were representative of the total live Australian Rett syndrome population under 30years in 2005 (n=274). Of these 74 had a follow-up scan. Less than a quarter of females were able to walk on their own at follow-up. Bone area and LTM z-scores declined over the time between the baseline and follow-up scans. Mean height-standardised z-scores for the bone outcomes were obtained from multiple regression models. The lumbar spine showed a positive mean annual BMAD z-score change (0.08) and a marginal decrease in aBMD (-0.04). The mean z-score change per annum for those 'who could walk unaided' was more positive for LS BMAD (p=0.040). Total body BMD mean annual z-score change from baseline to follow-up was negative (-0.03). However this change was positive in those who had achieved menses prior to the study (0.03, p=0,040). Total body BMC showed the most negative change (-0.60), representing a decrease in bone mineral content over time. This normalised to a z-score change of 0.21 once adjusted for the reduced lean tissue mass mean z-score change (-0.21) and bone area mean z-score change (-0.14). Overall, the bone mineral content, bone mineral density, bone area and lean tissue mass z-scores for all outcome measures declined, with the TB BMC showing significant decreases. Weight, height and muscle mass appear to have

  18. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Carlos; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moraleda, Jose M; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the idea that MeCP2 may

  19. Rett syndrome and other autism spectrum disorders—brain diseases of immune malfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Derecki, NC; Privman, E; Kipnis, J

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimmunology was once referred to in terms of its pathological connotation only and was generally understood as covering the deleterious involvement of the immune system in various diseases and disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). However, our conception of the function of the immune system in the structure, function, and plasticity of the CNS has undergone a sea change after relevant discoveries over the past two decades, and continues to be challenged by more recent studies of neurodevelopment and cognition. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding of immune-system participation in the development and functioning of the CNS under physiological conditions. Considering as an example Rett syndrome a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, we offer a hypothesis that might help to explain the part played by immune cells in its etiology, and hence suggests that the immune system might be a feasible therapeutic target for alleviation of some of the symptoms of this and other autism spectrum disorders. PMID:20177406

  20. Concepts of color, shape, size and position in ten children with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Velloso, Renata de Lima; de Araújo, Ceres Alves; Schwartzman, José Salomão

    2009-03-01

    Individuals with Rett syndrome (RS) present severe motor, language and cognitive deficits, as well as spontaneous hand movement loss. On the other hand, there are strong evidence that these individuals use the eyes with intentional purpose. Ten girls aged 4y8m to 12y10m with RS were assessed with a computer system for visual tracking regarding their ability of indicating with eyes the recognition of concepts of color (red, yellow and blue), shape (circle, square and triangle), size (big and small) and spatial position (over and under) to which they were first exposed to. Results from comparing the time of eyes fixation on required and not required concepts did not differ significantly. Children did not show with eyes the recognition of the required concepts when assessed with eye tracking system. PMID:19330211

  1. Development of a video-based evaluation tool in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, S; Downs, J; McIlroy, O; Burford, B; Lister, J; Reilly, S; Laurvick, C L; Philippe, C; Msall, M; Kaufmann, W E; Ellaway, C; Leonard, H

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a video-based evaluation tool for use in Rett syndrome (RTT). Components include a parent-report checklist, and video filming and coding protocols that contain items on eating, drinking, communication, hand function and movements, personal care and mobility. Ninety-seven of the 169 families who initially agreed to participate returned a videotape within 8 months of the first request. Subjects whose videos were returned had a similar age profile to those who did not provide a video but were more likely to have classical than atypical RTT. Evidence of the content and social validity and inter-rater reliability on 11 videos is provided. Video may provide detailed, objective assessment of function and behaviour in RTT. PMID:17180458

  2. Experience of gastrostomy using a quality care framework: the example of rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jenny; Wong, Kingsley; Ravikumara, Madhur; Ellaway, Carolyn; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Christodoulou, John; Jacoby, Peter; Leonard, Helen

    2014-12-01

    Rett syndrome is one of many severe neurodevelopmental disorders with feeding difficulties. In this study, associations between feeding difficulties, age, MECP2 genotype, and utilization of gastrostomy were investigated. Weight change and family satisfaction following gastrostomy were explored. Data from the longitudinal Australian Rett Syndrome Database whose parents provided data in the 2011 family questionnaire (n=229) were interrogated. We used logistic regression to model relationships between feeding difficulties, age group, and genotype. Content analysis was used to analyze data on satisfaction following gastrostomy. In those who had never had gastrostomy and who fed orally (n=166/229), parents of girls<7 years were more concerned about food intake compared with their adult peers (odds ratio [OR] 4.26; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29, 14.10). Those with a p.Arg168 mutation were often perceived as eating poorly with nearly a 6-fold increased odds of choking compared to the p.Arg133Cys mutation (OR 5.88; 95% CI 1.27, 27.24). Coughing, choking, or gagging during meals was associated with increased likelihood of later gastrostomy. Sixty-six females (28.8%) had a gastrostomy, and in those, large MECP2 deletions and p.Arg168 mutations were common. Weight-for-age z-scores increased by 0.86 (95% CI 0.41, 1.31) approximately 2 years after surgery. Families were satisfied with gastrostomy and felt less anxious about the care of their child. Mutation type provided some explanation for feeding difficulties. Gastrostomy assisted the management of feeding difficulties and poor weight gain, and was acceptable to families. Our findings are likely applicable to the broader community of children with severe disability. PMID:25526491

  3. Pinpointing brainstem mechanisms responsible for autonomic dysfunction in Rett syndrome: therapeutic perspectives for 5-HT1A agonists

    PubMed Central

    Abdala, Ana P.; Bissonnette, John M.; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder caused by loss of function of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Reduced function of this ubiquitous transcriptional regulator has a devastating effect on the central nervous system. One of the most severe and life-threatening presentations of this syndrome is brainstem dysfunction, which results in autonomic disturbances such as breathing deficits, typified by episodes of breathing cessation intercalated with episodes of hyperventilation or irregular breathing. Defects in numerous neurotransmitter systems have been observed in Rett syndrome both in animal models and patients. Here we dedicate special attention to serotonin due to its role in promoting regular breathing, increasing vagal tone, regulating mood, alleviating Parkinsonian-like symptoms and potential for therapeutic translation. A promising new symptomatic strategy currently focuses on regulation of serotonergic function using highly selective serotonin type 1A (5-HT1A) “biased agonists.” We address this newly emerging therapy for respiratory brainstem dysfunction and challenges for translation with a holistic perspective of Rett syndrome, considering potential mood and motor effects. PMID:24910619

  4. Novel CDKL5 Mutations in Czech Patients with Phenotypes of Atypical Rett Syndrome and Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Záhoráková, D; Langová, M; Brožová, K; Laštůvková, J; Kalina, Z; Rennerová, L; Martásek, P

    2016-01-01

    The X-linked CDKL5 gene, which encodes cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 protein, has been implicated in early-onset encephalopathy and atypical Rett syndrome with early-onset seizures. The CDKL5 protein is a kinase required for neuronal development and morphogenesis, but its precise functions are still largely unexplored. Individuals with CDKL5 mutations present with severe global developmental delay, intractable epilepsy, and Rett-like features. A clear genotype-phenotype correlation has not been established due to an insufficient number of reported cases. The aim of this study was to analyse the CDKL5 gene in Czech patients with early-onset seizures and Rett-like features. We performed mutation screening in a cohort of 83 individuals using high-resolution melting analysis, DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification. Molecular analyses revealed heterozygous pathogenic mutations in three girls with severe intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy starting at the age of two months. All three identified mutations, c.637G>A, c.902_977+29del105, and c.1757_1758delCT, are novel, thus significantly extending the growing spectrum of known pathogenic CDKL5 sequence variants. Our results support the importance of genetic testing of the CDKL5 gene in patients with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy and Rett-like features with early-onset seizures. This is the first study referring to molecular defects of CDKL5 in Czech cases. PMID:27187038

  5. Illness Severity, Social and Cognitive Ability, and EEG Analysis of Ten Patients with Rett Syndrome Treated with Mecasermin (Recombinant Human IGF-1)

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Giorgio; Congiu, Laura; Benincasa, Alberto; DiMarco, Pietro; Bigoni, Stefania; Dyer, Adam H.; Mortimer, Niall; Della-Chiesa, Andrea; O'Leary, Sean; McNamara, Rachel; Mitchell, Kevin J.; Gill, Michael; Tropea, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an apparently normal development followed by an arrest and subsequent regression of cognitive and psychomotor abilities. At present, RTT has no definitive cure and the treatment of RTT represents a largely unmet clinical need. Following partial elucidation of the underlying neurobiology of RTT, a new treatment has been proposed, Mecasermin (recombinant human Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1), which, in addition to impressive evidence from preclinical murine models of RTT, has demonstrated safety in human studies of patients with RTT. The present clinical study examines the disease severity as assessed by clinicians (International Scoring System: ISS), social and cognitive ability assessed by two blinded, independent observers (RSS: Rett Severity Score), and changes in brain activity (EEG) parameters of ten patients with classic RTT and ten untreated patients matched for age and clinical severity. Significant improvement in both the ISS (p = 0.0106) and RSS (p = 0.0274) was found in patients treated with IGF1 in comparison to untreated patients. Analysis of the novel RSS also suggests that patients treated with IGF1 have a greater endurance to social and cognitive testing. The present clinical study adds significant preliminary evidence for the use of IGF-1 in the treatment of RTT and other disorders of the autism spectrum. PMID:26925263

  6. Illness Severity, Social and Cognitive Ability, and EEG Analysis of Ten Patients with Rett Syndrome Treated with Mecasermin (Recombinant Human IGF-1).

    PubMed

    Pini, Giorgio; Congiu, Laura; Benincasa, Alberto; DiMarco, Pietro; Bigoni, Stefania; Dyer, Adam H; Mortimer, Niall; Della-Chiesa, Andrea; O'Leary, Sean; McNamara, Rachel; Mitchell, Kevin J; Gill, Michael; Tropea, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an apparently normal development followed by an arrest and subsequent regression of cognitive and psychomotor abilities. At present, RTT has no definitive cure and the treatment of RTT represents a largely unmet clinical need. Following partial elucidation of the underlying neurobiology of RTT, a new treatment has been proposed, Mecasermin (recombinant human Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1), which, in addition to impressive evidence from preclinical murine models of RTT, has demonstrated safety in human studies of patients with RTT. The present clinical study examines the disease severity as assessed by clinicians (International Scoring System: ISS), social and cognitive ability assessed by two blinded, independent observers (RSS: Rett Severity Score), and changes in brain activity (EEG) parameters of ten patients with classic RTT and ten untreated patients matched for age and clinical severity. Significant improvement in both the ISS (p = 0.0106) and RSS (p = 0.0274) was found in patients treated with IGF1 in comparison to untreated patients. Analysis of the novel RSS also suggests that patients treated with IGF1 have a greater endurance to social and cognitive testing. The present clinical study adds significant preliminary evidence for the use of IGF-1 in the treatment of RTT and other disorders of the autism spectrum. PMID:26925263

  7. Detection of rarely identified multiple mutations in MECP2 gene do not contribute to enhanced severity in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, Christopher A; Lane, Jane; Kirwin, Susan M; Schanen, Carolyn; Vinette, Kathy M B; Stubbolo, Danielle; MacLeod, Patrick; Glaze, Daniel G; Motil, Kathleen J; Neul, Jeffrey L; Skinner, Steven A; Kaufmann, Walter E; Percy, Alan K

    2013-07-01

    The objective of our study was to characterize the influence of multiple mutations in the MECP2 gene in a cohort of individuals with Rett syndrome. Further analysis demonstrated that nearly all resulted from de novo in cis mutations, where the disease severity was indistinguishable from single mutations. Our methods involved enrolling participants in the RTT Natural History Study (NHS). After providing informed consent through their parents or principal caretakers, additional molecular assessments were performed in the participants and their parents to assess the presence and location of more than one mutation in each. Clinical severity was assessed at each visit in those participants in the NHS. Non-contiguous MECP2 gene variations were detected in 12 participants and contiguous mutations involving a deletion and insertion in three participants. Thirteen of 15 participants had mutations that were in cis; four (of 13) had three MECP2 mutations; two (of 15) had mutations that were both in cis and in trans (i.e., on different alleles). Clinical severity did not appear different from NHS participants with a single similar mutation. Mutations in cis were identified in most participants; two individuals had mutations both in cis and in trans. The presence of multiple mutations was not associated with greater severity. Nevertheless, multiple mutations will require greater thought in the future, if genetic assignment to drug treatment protocols is considered. PMID:23696494

  8. Induced gamma oscillations differentiate familiar and novel voices in children with MECP2 duplication and Rett syndromes.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sarika U; Gordon, Reyna L; Key, Alexandra P

    2015-02-01

    Normal levels of the methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) are critical to neurologic functioning, and slight alterations result in intellectual disability and autistic features. It was hypothesized that children with MECP2 duplication (overexpression of MeCP2) and Rett syndrome (underexpression of MeCP2) would exhibit distinct electroencephalographic (EEG) indices of auditory stimulus discrimination. In this study, gamma-band oscillatory responses to familiar and novel voices were examined and related to social functioning in 17 children (3-11 years old) with MECP2 duplication (n = 12) and Rett syndrome (n = 5). Relative to the stranger's voice, gamma activity in response to the mother's voice was increased in MECP2 duplication but decreased in Rett syndrome. In MECP2 duplication, greater mother versus stranger differences in gamma activity were associated with higher social functioning. For the first time, brain responses in a passive voice discrimination paradigm show that overexpression and underexpression of MeCP2 have differential effects on cortical information processing. PMID:24776956

  9. Induced gamma oscillations differentiate familiar and novel voices in children with MECP2 Duplication and Rett syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Sarika U.; Gordon, Reyna L.; Key, Alexandra P.

    2015-01-01

    Normal levels of the methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) are critical to neurological functioning, and slight alterations result in intellectual disability and autistic features. It was hypothesized that children with MECP2 duplication (overexpression of MeCP2) and Rett syndrome (underexpression of MeCP2) would exhibit distinct electroencephalographic indices of auditory stimulus discrimination. In this study, gamma-band oscillatory responses to familiar and novel voices were examined and related to social functioning in 17 children (3-11 years old) with MECP2 duplication (n=12) and Rett syndrome (n=5). Relative to the stranger's voice, gamma activity in response to the mother's voice was increased in MECP2 duplication but decreased in Rett syndrome. In MECP2 duplication, greater mother vs. stranger differences in gamma activity were associated with higher social functioning. For the first time, brain responses in a passive voice discrimination paradigm show that overexpression and underexpression of MeCP2 have differential effects on cortical information processing. PMID:24776956

  10. Comparison of Genomic and Epigenomic Expression in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kunio, Miyake; Yang, Chunshu; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohori, Kenta; Soutome, Masaki; Hirasawa, Takae; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Noboru; Suzuki, Seiko; Itoh, Masayuki; Goto, Yu-ichi; Andoh, Tomoko; Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Akamatsu, Wado; Ohyama, Manabu; Okano, Hideyuki; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Sasaki, Masayuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubota, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    Monozygotic (identical) twins have been widely used in genetic studies to determine the relative contributions of heredity and the environment in human diseases. Discordance in disease manifestation between affected monozygotic twins has been attributed to either environmental factors or different patterns of X chromosome inactivation (XCI). However, recent studies have identified genetic and epigenetic differences between monozygotic twins, thereby challenging the accepted experimental model for distinguishing the effects of nature and nurture. Here, we report the genomic and epigenomic sequences in skin fibroblasts of a discordant monozygotic twin pair with Rett syndrome, an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by autistic features, epileptic seizures, gait ataxia and stereotypical hand movements. The twins shared the same de novo mutation in exon 4 of the MECP2 gene (G269AfsX288), which was paternal in origin and occurred during spermatogenesis. The XCI patterns in the twins did not differ in lymphocytes, skin fibroblasts, and hair cells (which originate from ectoderm as does neuronal tissue). No reproducible differences were detected between the twins in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels), or copy number variations. Differences in DNA methylation between the twins were detected in fibroblasts in the upstream regions of genes involved in brain function and skeletal tissues such as Mohawk Homeobox (MKX), Brain-type Creatine Kinase (CKB), and FYN Tyrosine Kinase Protooncogene (FYN). The level of methylation in these upstream regions was inversely correlated with the level of gene expression. Thus, differences in DNA methylation patterns likely underlie the discordance in Rett phenotypes between the twins. PMID:23805272

  11. Comparison of Genomic and Epigenomic Expression in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Kunio; Yang, Chunshu; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohori, Kenta; Soutome, Masaki; Hirasawa, Takae; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Noboru; Suzuki, Seiko; Itoh, Masayuki; Goto, Yu-Ichi; Andoh, Tomoko; Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Sasaki, Masayuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubota, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    Monozygotic (identical) twins have been widely used in genetic studies to determine the relative contributions of heredity and the environment in human diseases. Discordance in disease manifestation between affected monozygotic twins has been attributed to either environmental factors or different patterns of X chromosome inactivation (XCI). However, recent studies have identified genetic and epigenetic differences between monozygotic twins, thereby challenging the accepted experimental model for distinguishing the effects of nature and nurture. Here, we report the genomic and epigenomic sequences in skin fibroblasts of a discordant monozygotic twin pair with Rett syndrome, an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by autistic features, epileptic seizures, gait ataxia and stereotypical hand movements. The twins shared the same de novo mutation in exon 4 of the MECP2 gene (G269AfsX288), which was paternal in origin and occurred during spermatogenesis. The XCI patterns in the twins did not differ in lymphocytes, skin fibroblasts, and hair cells (which originate from ectoderm as does neuronal tissue). No reproducible differences were detected between the twins in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels), or copy number variations. Differences in DNA methylation between the twins were detected in fibroblasts in the upstream regions of genes involved in brain function and skeletal tissues such as Mohawk Homeobox (MKX), Brain-type Creatine Kinase (CKB), and FYN Tyrosine Kinase Protooncogene (FYN). The level of methylation in these upstream regions was inversely correlated with the level of gene expression. Thus, differences in DNA methylation patterns likely underlie the discordance in Rett phenotypes between the twins. PMID:23805272

  12. Rett syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider if you: Have any concerns about your child's development Notice a lack of normal development with motor or language skills in your child Think your child has a health problem that needs treatment

  13. Rett syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Similarly, some children walk independently within the normal age range, while others: Are delayed Do not learn to walk independently at all Do not learn to walk until late childhood or early adolescence For those children who do learn to ...

  14. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be used to control seizures. Occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and hydrotherapy may prolong mobility. Some children may require special equipment and aids such as braces to arrest scoliosis, splints to modify hand movements, and nutritional programs ...

  15. Cytokine Dysregulation in MECP2- and CDKL5-Related Rett Syndrome: Relationships with Aberrant Redox Homeostasis, Inflammation, and ω-3 PUFAs.

    PubMed

    Leoncini, Silvia; De Felice, Claudio; Signorini, Cinzia; Zollo, Gloria; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Durand, Thierry; Galano, Jean-Marie; Guerranti, Roberto; Rossi, Marcello; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2015-01-01

    An involvement of the immune system has been suggested in Rett syndrome (RTT), a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder related to oxidative stress, and caused by a mutation in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) or, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5). To date, it is unclear whether both mutations may have an impact on the circulating cytokine patterns. In the present study, cytokines involved in the Th1-, Th2-, and T regulatory (T-reg) response, as well as chemokines, were investigated in MECP2- (MECP2-RTT) (n = 16) and CDKL5-Rett syndrome (CDKL5-RTT) (n = 8), before and after ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) supplementation. A major cytokine dysregulation was evidenced in untreated RTT patients. In MECP2-RTT, a Th2-shifted balance was evidenced, whereas in CDKL5-RTT both Th1- and Th2-related cytokines (except for IL-4) were upregulated. In MECP2-RTT, decreased levels of IL-22 were observed, whereas increased IL-22 and T-reg cytokine levels were evidenced in CDKL5-RTT. Chemokines were unchanged. The cytokine dysregulation was proportional to clinical severity, inflammatory status, and redox imbalance. Omega-3 PUFAs partially counterbalanced cytokine changes, as well as aberrant redox homeostasis and the inflammatory status. RTT is associated with a subclinical immune dysregulation as the likely consequence of a defective inflammation regulatory signaling system. PMID:26236424

  16. Cytokine Dysregulation in MECP2- and CDKL5-Related Rett Syndrome: Relationships with Aberrant Redox Homeostasis, Inflammation, and ω-3 PUFAs

    PubMed Central

    Leoncini, Silvia; De Felice, Claudio; Signorini, Cinzia; Zollo, Gloria; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Durand, Thierry; Galano, Jean-Marie; Guerranti, Roberto; Rossi, Marcello; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2015-01-01

    An involvement of the immune system has been suggested in Rett syndrome (RTT), a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder related to oxidative stress, and caused by a mutation in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) or, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5). To date, it is unclear whether both mutations may have an impact on the circulating cytokine patterns. In the present study, cytokines involved in the Th1-, Th2-, and T regulatory (T-reg) response, as well as chemokines, were investigated in MECP2- (MECP2-RTT) (n = 16) and CDKL5-Rett syndrome (CDKL5-RTT) (n = 8), before and after ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) supplementation. A major cytokine dysregulation was evidenced in untreated RTT patients. In MECP2-RTT, a Th2-shifted balance was evidenced, whereas in CDKL5-RTT both Th1- and Th2-related cytokines (except for IL-4) were upregulated. In MECP2-RTT, decreased levels of IL-22 were observed, whereas increased IL-22 and T-reg cytokine levels were evidenced in CDKL5-RTT. Chemokines were unchanged. The cytokine dysregulation was proportional to clinical severity, inflammatory status, and redox imbalance. Omega-3 PUFAs partially counterbalanced cytokine changes, as well as aberrant redox homeostasis and the inflammatory status. RTT is associated with a subclinical immune dysregulation as the likely consequence of a defective inflammation regulatory signaling system. PMID:26236424

  17. The MECP2 variant c.925C>T (p.Arg309Trp) causes intellectual disability in both males and females without classic features of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schönewolf-Greulich, B; Tejada, M-I; Stephens, K; Hadzsiev, K; Gauthier, J; Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Pfundt, R; Ravn, K; Maortua, H; Gener, B; Martínez-Bouzas, C; Piton, A; Rouleau, G; Clayton-Smith, J; Kleefstra, T; Bisgaard, A-M; Tümer, Z

    2016-06-01

    Missense MECP2 variants can have various phenotypic effects ranging from a normal phenotype to typical Rett syndrome (RTT). In females, the phenotype can also be influenced by the X-inactivation pattern. In this study, we present detailed clinical descriptions of six patients with a rare base-pair substitution affecting Arg309 at the C-terminal end of the transcriptional repression domain (TRD). All patients have intellectual disability and present with some RTT features, but they do not fulfill the clinical criteria for typical or atypical RTT. Most of the patients also have mild facial dysmorphism. Intriguingly, the mother of an affected male patient is an asymptomatic carrier of this variant. It is therefore likely that the p.(Arg309Trp) variation does not necessarily lead to male lethality, and it results in a wide range of clinical features in females, probably influenced by different X-inactivation patterns in target tissues. PMID:26936630

  18. The Utility of Next-Generation Sequencing in Gene Discovery for Mutation-Negative Patients with Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Wendy Anne; Christodoulou, John

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare, severe disorder of neuronal plasticity that predominantly affects girls. Girls with RTT usually appear asymptomatic in the first 6–18 months of life, but gradually develop severe motor, cognitive, and behavioral abnormalities that persist for life. A predominance of neuronal and synaptic dysfunction, with altered excitatory–inhibitory neuronal synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity, are overarching features of RTT in children and in mouse models. Over 90% of patients with classical RTT have mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG-binding (MECP2) gene, while other genes, including cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5), Forkhead box protein G1 (FOXG1), myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C), and transcription factor 4 (TCF4), have been associated with phenotypes overlapping with RTT. However, there remain a proportion of patients who carry a clinical diagnosis of RTT, but who are mutation negative. In recent years, next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized approaches to genetic studies, making whole-exome and even whole-genome sequencing possible strategies for the detection of rare and de novo mutations, aiding the discovery of novel disease genes. Here, we review the recent progress that is emerging in identifying pathogenic variations, specifically from exome sequencing in RTT patients, and emphasize the need for the use of this technology to identify known and new disease genes in RTT patients. PMID:26236194

  19. Treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in a mouse model of Rett syndrome with Na+-channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Herrera, José A; Ward, Christopher S; Pitcher, Meagan R; Percy, Alan K; Skinner, Steven; Kaufmann, Walter E; Glaze, Daniel G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2015-04-01

    One quarter of deaths associated with Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, are sudden and unexpected. RTT is associated with prolonged QTc interval (LQT), and LQT-associated cardiac arrhythmias are a potential cause of unexpected death. The standard of care for LQT in RTT is treatment with β-adrenergic antagonists; however, recent work indicates that acute treatment of mice with RTT with a β-antagonist, propranolol, does not prevent lethal arrhythmias. In contrast, acute treatment with the Na(+) channel blocker phenytoin prevented arrhythmias. Chronic dosing of propranolol may be required for efficacy; therefore, we tested the efficacy of chronic treatment with either propranolol or phenytoin on RTT mice. Phenytoin completely abolished arrhythmias, whereas propranolol showed no benefit. Surprisingly, phenytoin also normalized weight and activity, but worsened breathing patterns. To explore the role of Na(+) channel blockers on QT in people with RTT, we performed a retrospective analysis of QT status before and after Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Individuals with RTT and LQT significantly improved their QT interval status after being started on Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Thus, Na(+) channel blockers should be considered for the clinical management of LQT in individuals with RTT. PMID:25713300

  20. Breathing dysfunction in Rett syndrome: Understanding epigenetic regulation of the respiratory network

    PubMed Central

    Ogier, Michael; Katz, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Severely arrhythmic breathing is a hallmark of Rett syndrome (RTT) and profoundly affects quality of life for patients and their families. The last decade has seen the identification of the disease-causing gene, methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (Mecp2) and the development of mouse models that phenocopy many aspects of the human syndrome, including breathing dysfunction. Recent studies have begun to characterize the breathing phenotype of Mecp2 mutant mice and to define underlying electrophysiological and neurochemical deficits. The picture that is emerging is one of defects in synaptic transmission throughout the brainstem respiratory network associated with abnormal expression in several neurochemical signaling systems, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), biogenic amines and gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA). Based on such findings, potential therapeutic strategies aimed at improving breathing by targeting deficits in neurochemical signaling are being explored. This review details our current understanding of respiratory dysfunction and underlying mechanisms in RTT with a particular focus on insights gained from mouse models. PMID:18534925

  1. Does microglial dysfunction play a role in autism and Rett syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    MAEZAWA, IZUMI; CALAFIORE, MARCO; WULFF, HEIKE; JIN, LEE-WAY

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) including classic autism is a group of complex developmental disabilities with core deficits of impaired social interactions, communication difficulties and repetitive behaviors. Although the neurobiology of ASDs has attracted much attention in the last two decades, the role of microglia has been ignored. Existing data are focused on their recognized role in neuroinflammation, which only covers a small part of the pathological repertoire of microglia. This review highlights recent findings on the broader roles of microglia, including their active surveillance of brain microenvironments and regulation of synaptic connectivity, maturation of brain circuitry and neurogenesis. Emerging evidence suggests that microglia respond to pre- and postnatal environmental stimuli through epigenetic interface to change gene expression, thus acting as effectors of experience-dependent synaptic plasticity. Impairments of these microglial functions could substantially contribute to several major etiological factors of autism, such as environmental toxins and cortical underconnectivity. Our recent study on Rett syndrome, a syndromic autistic disorder, provides an example that intrinsic microglial dysfunction due to genetic and epigenetic aberrations could detrimentally affect the developmental trajectory without evoking neuroinflammation. We propose that ASDs provide excellent opportunities to study the influence of microglia on neurodevelopment, and this knowledge could lead to novel therapies. PMID:22717189

  2. Variant Rett syndrome in a girl with a pericentric X-chromosome inversion leading to epigenetic changes and overexpression of the MECP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Vieira, José Pedro; Lopes, Fátima; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Sousa, Maria Vânia; Moura, Sofia; Sousa, Susana; Costa, Bruno M; Barbosa, Mafalda; Ylstra, Bauke; Temudo, Teresa; Lourenço, Teresa; Maciel, Patrícia

    2015-11-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene. We investigated the genetic basis of disease in a female patient with a Rett-like clinical. Karyotype analysis revealed a pericentric inversion in the X chromosome -46,X,inv(X)(p22.1q28), with breakpoints in the cytobands where the MECP2 and CDKL5 genes are located. FISH analysis revealed that the MECP2 gene is not dislocated by the inversion. However, and in spite of a balanced pattern of X inactivation, this patient displayed hypomethylation and an overexpression of the MECP2 gene at the mRNA level in the lymphocytes (mean fold change: 2.55±0.38) in comparison to a group of control individuals; the expression of the CDKL5 gene was similar to that of controls (mean fold change: 0.98±0.10). No gains or losses were detected in the breakpoint regions encompassing known or suspected transcription regulatory elements. We propose that the de-regulation of MECP2 expression in this patient may be due to alterations in long-range genomic interactions caused by the inversion and hypothesize that this type of epigenetic de-regulation of the MECP2 may be present in other RTT-like patients. PMID:26287660

  3. Peculiarities in the gestural repertoire: an early marker for Rett syndrome?

    PubMed

    Marschik, Peter B; Sigafoos, Jeff; Kaufmann, Walter E; Wolin, Thomas; Talisa, Victor B; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D; Budimirovic, Dejan B; Vollmann, Ralf; Einspieler, Christa

    2012-01-01

    We studied the gestures used by children with classic Rett syndrome (RTT) to provide evidence as to how this essential aspect of communicative functions develops. Seven participants with RTT were longitudinally observed between 9 and 18 months of life. The gestures used by these participants were transcribed and coded from a retrospective analysis of a video footage. Gestures were classified as deictic gestures, play schemes, and representational gestures. Results of the analysis showed that the majority of gestures observed were of deictic character. There were no gestures that could be classified as play schemes and only two (e.g., head nodding and waving bye bye) that were coded as representational or symbolic gestures. The overall repertoire of gestures, even though not necessarily delayed in it's onset, was characterized by little variability and a restricted pragmatic functionality. We conclude that the gestural abilities in girls with RTT appear to remain limited and do not constitute a compensatory mechanism for the verbal language modality. PMID:22699245

  4. Misregulation of Alternative Splicing in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ronghui; Dong, Qiping; Yuan, Xinni; Zeng, Xin; Gao, Yu; Li, Hongda; Keles, Sunduz; Wang, Zefeng; Chang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the human MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. Despite decades of work, the molecular function of MeCP2 is not fully understood. Here we report a systematic identification of MeCP2-interacting proteins in the mouse brain. In addition to transcription regulators, we found that MeCP2 physically interacts with several modulators of RNA splicing, including LEDGF and DHX9. These interactions are disrupted by RTT causing mutations, suggesting that they may play a role in RTT pathogenesis. Consistent with the idea, deep RNA sequencing revealed misregulation of hundreds of splicing events in the cortex of Mecp2 knockout mice. To reveal the functional consequence of altered RNA splicing due to the loss of MeCP2, we focused on the regulation of the splicing of the flip/flop exon of Gria2 and other AMPAR genes. We found a significant splicing shift in the flip/flop exon toward the flop inclusion, leading to a faster decay in the AMPAR gated current and altered synaptic transmission. In summary, our study identified direct physical interaction between MeCP2 and splicing factors, a novel MeCP2 target gene, and established functional connection between a specific RNA splicing change and synaptic phenotypes in RTT mice. These results not only help our understanding of the molecular function of MeCP2, but also reveal potential drug targets for future therapies. PMID:27352031

  5. Redox Imbalance and Morphological Changes in Skin Fibroblasts in Typical Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Amabile, Sonia; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Galano, Jean-Marie; Ciccoli, Lucia; Renieri, Alessandra; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of oxidative stress has been reported in the blood of patients with Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder mainly caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. Little is known regarding the redox status in RTT cellular systems and its relationship with the morphological phenotype. In RTT patients (n = 16) we investigated four different oxidative stress markers, F2-Isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), F4-Neuroprostanes (F4-NeuroPs), nonprotein bound iron (NPBI), and (4-HNE PAs), and glutathione in one of the most accessible cells, that is, skin fibroblasts, and searched for possible changes in cellular/intracellular structure and qualitative modifications of synthesized collagen. Significantly increased F4-NeuroPs (12-folds), F2-IsoPs (7.5-folds) NPBI (2.3-folds), 4-HNE PAs (1.48-folds), and GSSG (1.44-folds) were detected, with significantly decreased GSH (−43.6%) and GSH/GSSG ratio (−3.05 folds). A marked dilation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, associated with several cytoplasmic multilamellar bodies, was detectable in RTT fibroblasts. Colocalization of collagen I and collagen III, as well as the percentage of type I collagen as derived by semiquantitative immunofluorescence staining analyses, appears to be significantly reduced in RTT cells. Our findings indicate the presence of a redox imbalance and previously unrecognized morphological skin fibroblast abnormalities in RTT patients. PMID:24987493

  6. Disruption of DNA methylation-dependent long gene repression in Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, Harrison W.; Kinde, Benyam Z.; Stroud, Hume; Gilbert, Caitlin S.; Harmin, David A.; Kastan, Nathaniel R.; Hemberg, Martin; Ebert, Daniel H.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of the MECP2 gene leads to Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurological disorder with features of autism1. MECP2 encodes a methyl-DNA-binding protein2 that has been proposed to function as a transcriptional repressor, but despite numerous studies examining neuronal gene expression in Mecp2 mutants, no clear model has emerged for how MeCP2 regulates transcription3–9. Here we identify a genome-wide length-dependent increase in gene expression in MeCP2 mutant mouse models and human RTT brains. We present evidence that MeCP2 represses gene expression by binding to methylated CA sites within long genes, and that in neurons lacking MeCP2, decreasing the expression of long genes attenuates RTT-associated cellular deficits. In addition, we find that long genes as a population are enriched for neuronal functions and selectively expressed in the brain. These findings suggest that mutations in MeCP2 may cause neurological dysfunction by specifically disrupting long gene expression in the brain. PMID:25762136

  7. Up-regulation of glucocorticoid-regulated genes in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nuber, Ulrike A; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas; Roloff, Tim C; Guy, Jacky; Selfridge, Jim; Steinhoff, Christine; Schulz, Ralph; Lipkowitz, Bettina; Ropers, H Hilger; Holmes, Megan C; Bird, Adrian

    2005-08-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe form of mental retardation, which is caused by spontaneous mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2. How the loss of MeCP2 function leads to RTT is currently unknown. Mice lacking the Mecp2 gene initially show normal postnatal development but later acquire neurological phenotypes, including heightened anxiety, that resemble RTT. The MECP2 gene encodes a methyl-CpG-binding protein that can act as a transcriptional repressor. Using cDNA microarrays, we found that Mecp2-null animals differentially express several genes that are induced during the stress response by glucocorticoids. Increased levels of mRNAs for serum glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (Sgk) and FK506-binding protein 51 (Fkbp5) were observed before and after onset of neurological symptoms, but plasma glucocorticoid was not significantly elevated in Mecp2-null mice. MeCP2 is bound to the Fkbp5 and Sgk genes in brain and may function as a modulator of glucocorticoid-inducible gene expression. Given the known deleterious effect of glucocorticoid exposure on brain development, our data raise the possibility that disruption of MeCP2-dependent regulation of stress-responsive genes contributes to the symptoms of RTT. PMID:16002417

  8. Mutation analysis of 16S rRNA in patients with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J; Pineda, M; Monrós, E

    2000-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder that affects one in 10,000-15,000 females. RTT is mainly sporadic; familial cases have an estimated frequency of less than 1%. Before the recent identification of de novo dominant mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, many other hypotheses had been proposed to explain the particular pattern of inheritance and the phenotypic expression of the disease. The involvement of mitochondrial DNA had been investigated because of the structural and functional mitochondrial abnormalities evident in the patients. In 1997 the finding of mutations at 16S rRNA in several affected RTT females and their mothers was reported, suggesting that mitochondrial DNA might play a key role in the pathogenesis of RTT. To investigate the relevance of such mutations, we used the same methodologic approach to analyze RTT mitochondrial DNA in our series. No 16S rRNA alterations were evident in 27 Spanish patients with classic RTT. PMID:10963979

  9. Deficient Purposeful Use of Forepaws in Female Mice Modelling Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Bianca; Musto, Mattia; Altabella, Luisa; Romano, Emilia; Canese, Rossella; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioural and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause more than 95% of classic cases. Motor abnormalities represent a significant part of the spectrum of RTT symptoms. In the present study we investigated motor coordination and fine motor skill domains in MeCP2-308 female mice, a validated RTT model. This was complemented by the in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) analysis of metabolic profile in behaviourally relevant brain areas. MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice (Het, 10-12 months of age) were impaired in tasks validated for the assessment of purposeful and coordinated forepaw use (Morag test and Capellini handling task). A fine-grain analysis of spontaneous behaviour in the home-cage also revealed an abnormal handling pattern when interacting with the nesting material, reduced motivation to explore the environment, and increased time devoted to feeding in Het mice. The brain MRS evaluation highlighted decreased levels of bioenergetic metabolites in the striatal area in Het mice compared to controls. Present results confirm behavioural and brain alterations previously reported in MeCP2-308 males and identify novel endpoints on which the efficacy of innovative therapeutic strategies for RTT may be tested. PMID:26185689

  10. Quantification of functional abilities in Rett syndrome: a comparison between stages III and IV

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Carlos BM; Savelsbergh, Geert JP; Smorenburg, Ana RP; Graciani, Zodja; Torriani-Pasin, Camila; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor E; Kok, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the functional abilities of persons with Rett syndrome (RTT) in stages III and IV. The group consisted of 60 females who had been diagnosed with RTT: 38 in stage III, mean age (years) of 9.14, with a standard deviation of 5.84 (minimum 2.2/maximum 26.4); and 22 in stage IV, mean age of 12.45, with a standard deviation of 6.17 (minimum 5.3/maximum 26.9). The evaluation was made using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, which has 197 items in the areas of self-care, mobility, and social function. The results showed that in the area of self-care, stage III and stage IV RTT persons had a level of 24.12 and 18.36 (P=0.002), respectively. In the area of mobility, stage III had 37.22 and stage IV had 14.64 (P<0.001), while in the area of social function, stage III had 17.72 and stage IV had 12.14 (P=0.016). In conclusion, although persons with stage III RTT have better functional abilities when compared with stage IV, the areas of mobility, self-care, and social function are quite affected, which shows a great functional dependency and need for help in basic activities of daily life. PMID:25061307

  11. Breathing Disorders in Rett Syndrome: Progressive Neurochemical Dysfunction in the Respiratory Network after Birth

    PubMed Central

    Katz, David M.; Dutschmann, Mathias; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Hilaire, Gérard

    2009-01-01

    Disorders of respiratory control are a prominent feature of Rett syndrome (RTT), a severely debilitating condition caused by mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). RTT patients present with a complex respiratory phenotype that can include periods of hyperventilation, apnea, breath holds terminated by Valsalva maneuvers, forced and deep breathing and apneustic breathing, as well as abnormalities of heart rate control and cardiorespiratory integration. Recent studies of mouse models of RTT have begun to shed light on neurologic deficits that likely contribute to respiratory dysfunction including, in particular, defects in neurochemical signaling resulting from abnormal patterns of neurotransmitter and neuromodulator expression. The authors hypothesize that breathing dysregulation in RTT results from disturbances in mechanisms that modulate the respiratory rhythm, acting either alone or in combination with more subtle disturbances in rhythm and pattern generation. This article reviews the evidence underlying this hypothesis as well as recent efforts to translate our emerging understanding of neurochemical defects in mouse models of RTT into preclinical trials of potential treatments for respiratory dysfunction in this disease. PMID:19394452

  12. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone exhibits therapeutic efficacy in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rebecca A.; Lam, Maxine; Punzo, Antonio M.; Li, Hongda; Lin, Benjamin R.; Ye, Keqiang; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2), is a debilitating autism spectrum developmental disorder predominantly affecting females. Mecp2 mutant mice have reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the brain; conditional deletion and overexpression of BDNF in the brain accelerates and slows, respectively, disease progression in Mecp2 mutant mice. Thus we tested the hypothesis that 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), a small molecule reported to activate the high affinity BDNF receptor (TrkB) in the CNS, would attenuate disease progression in Mecp2 mutant mice. Following weaning, 7,8-DHF was administered in drinking water throughout life. Treated mutant mice lived significantly longer compared with untreated mutant littermates (80 ± 4 and 66 ± 2 days, respectively). 7,8-DHF delayed body weight loss, increased neuronal nuclei size and enhanced voluntary locomotor (running wheel) distance in Mecp2 mutant mice. In addition, administration of 7,8-DHF partially improved breathing pattern irregularities and returned tidal volumes to near wild-type levels. Thus although the specific mechanisms are not completely known, 7,8-DHF appears to reduce disease symptoms in Mecp2 mutant mice and may have potential as a therapeutic treatment for RTT patients. PMID:22194327

  13. Cognitive training modifies frequency EEG bands and neuropsychological measures in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fabio, Rosa Angela; Billeci, Lucia; Crifaci, Giulia; Troise, Emilia; Tortorella, Gaetano; Pioggia, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a childhood neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a primary disturbance in neuronal development. Neurological abnormalities in RS are reflected in several behavioral and cognitive impairments such as stereotypies, loss of speech and hand skills, gait apraxia, irregular breathing with hyperventilation while awake, and frequent seizures. Cognitive training can enhance both neuropsychological and neurophysiological parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate whether behaviors and brain activity were modified by training in RS. The modifications were assessed in two phases: (a) after a short-term training (STT) session, i.e., after 30min of training and (b) after long-term training (LTT), i.e., after 5 days of training. Thirty-four girls with RS were divided into two groups: a training group (21 girls) who underwent the LTT and a control group (13 girls) that did not undergo LTT. The gaze and quantitative EEG (QEEG) data were recorded during the administration of the tasks. A gold-standard eye-tracker and a wearable EEG equipment were used. Results suggest that the participants in the STT task showed a habituation effect, decreased beta activity and increased right asymmetry. The participants in the LTT task looked faster and longer at the target, and show increased beta activity and decreased theta activity, while a leftward asymmetry was re-established. The overall result of this study indicates a positive effect of long-term cognitive training on brain and behavioral parameters in subject with RS. PMID:26859707

  14. Misregulation of Alternative Splicing in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Ronghui; Dong, Qiping; Yuan, Xinni; Zeng, Xin; Gao, Yu; Chiao, Cassandra; Li, Hongda; Zhao, Xinyu; Keles, Sunduz; Wang, Zefeng; Chang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the human MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. Despite decades of work, the molecular function of MeCP2 is not fully understood. Here we report a systematic identification of MeCP2-interacting proteins in the mouse brain. In addition to transcription regulators, we found that MeCP2 physically interacts with several modulators of RNA splicing, including LEDGF and DHX9. These interactions are disrupted by RTT causing mutations, suggesting that they may play a role in RTT pathogenesis. Consistent with the idea, deep RNA sequencing revealed misregulation of hundreds of splicing events in the cortex of Mecp2 knockout mice. To reveal the functional consequence of altered RNA splicing due to the loss of MeCP2, we focused on the regulation of the splicing of the flip/flop exon of Gria2 and other AMPAR genes. We found a significant splicing shift in the flip/flop exon toward the flop inclusion, leading to a faster decay in the AMPAR gated current and altered synaptic transmission. In summary, our study identified direct physical interaction between MeCP2 and splicing factors, a novel MeCP2 target gene, and established functional connection between a specific RNA splicing change and synaptic phenotypes in RTT mice. These results not only help our understanding of the molecular function of MeCP2, but also reveal potential drug targets for future therapies. PMID:27352031

  15. PTP1B inhibition suggests a therapeutic strategy for Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Navasona; Krishnan, Keerthi; Connors, Christopher R.; Choy, Meng S.; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang; Van Aelst, Linda; Shea, Stephen D.; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    The X-linked neurological disorder Rett syndrome (RTT) presents with autistic features and is caused primarily by mutations in a transcriptional regulator, methyl CpG–binding protein 2 (MECP2). Current treatment options for RTT are limited to alleviating some neurological symptoms; hence, more effective therapeutic strategies are needed. We identified the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B as a therapeutic candidate for treatment of RTT. We demonstrated that the PTPN1 gene, which encodes PTP1B, was a target of MECP2 and that disruption of MECP2 function was associated with increased levels of PTP1B in RTT models. Pharmacological inhibition of PTP1B ameliorated the effects of MECP2 disruption in mouse models of RTT, including improved survival in young male (Mecp2–/y) mice and improved behavior in female heterozygous (Mecp2–/+) mice. We demonstrated that PTP1B was a negative regulator of tyrosine phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase TRKB, the receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Therefore, the elevated PTP1B that accompanies disruption of MECP2 function in RTT represents a barrier to BDNF signaling. Inhibition of PTP1B led to increased tyrosine phosphorylation of TRKB in the brain, which would augment BDNF signaling. This study presents PTP1B as a mechanism-based therapeutic target for RTT, validating a unique strategy for treating the disease by modifying signal transduction pathways with small-molecule drugs. PMID:26214522

  16. PTP1B inhibition suggests a therapeutic strategy for Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Navasona; Krishnan, Keerthi; Connors, Christopher R; Choy, Meng S; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang; Van Aelst, Linda; Shea, Stephen D; Tonks, Nicholas K

    2015-08-01

    The X-linked neurological disorder Rett syndrome (RTT) presents with autistic features and is caused primarily by mutations in a transcriptional regulator, methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Current treatment options for RTT are limited to alleviating some neurological symptoms; hence, more effective therapeutic strategies are needed. We identified the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B as a therapeutic candidate for treatment of RTT. We demonstrated that the PTPN1 gene, which encodes PTP1B, was a target of MECP2 and that disruption of MECP2 function was associated with increased levels of PTP1B in RTT models. Pharmacological inhibition of PTP1B ameliorated the effects of MECP2 disruption in mouse models of RTT, including improved survival in young male (Mecp2-/y) mice and improved behavior in female heterozygous (Mecp2-/+) mice. We demonstrated that PTP1B was a negative regulator of tyrosine phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase TRKB, the receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Therefore, the elevated PTP1B that accompanies disruption of MECP2 function in RTT represents a barrier to BDNF signaling. Inhibition of PTP1B led to increased tyrosine phosphorylation of TRKB in the brain, which would augment BDNF signaling. This study presents PTP1B as a mechanism-based therapeutic target for RTT, validating a unique strategy for treating the disease by modifying signal transduction pathways with small-molecule drugs. PMID:26214522

  17. Reduced synaptic activity in neuronal networks derived from embryonic stem cells of murine Rett syndrome model

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Lydia; Sütterlin, Rosmarie; Nenniger, Markus; Vogt, Kaspar E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental diseases such as the Rett syndrome (RTT) have received renewed attention, since the mechanisms involved may underlie a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In vertebrates early stages in the functional development of neurons and neuronal networks are difficult to study. Embryonic stem cell-derived neurons provide an easily accessible tool to investigate neuronal differentiation and early network formation. We used in vitro cultures of neurons derived from murine embryonic stem cells missing the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene (MeCP2-/y) and from wild type cells of the corresponding background. Cultures were assessed using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology and immunofluorescence. We studied the functional maturation of developing neurons and the activity of the synaptic connections they formed. Neurons exhibited minor differences in the developmental patterns for their intrinsic parameters, such as resting membrane potential and excitability; with the MeCP2-/y cells showing a slightly accelerated development, with shorter action potential half-widths at early stages. There was no difference in the early phase of synapse development, but as the cultures matured, significant deficits became apparent, particularly for inhibitory synaptic activity. MeCP2-/y embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cultures show clear developmental deficits that match phenotypes observed in slice preparations and thus provide a compelling tool to further investigate the mechanisms behind RTT pathophysiology. PMID:24723848

  18. Choline Ameliorates Disease Phenotypes in Human iPSC Models of Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chin, Eunice W M; Marcy, Guillaume; Yoon, Su-In; Ma, Dongliang; Rosales, Francisco J; Augustine, George J; Goh, Eyleen L K

    2016-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder that primarily affects girls. Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene account for approximately 95 % of all RTT cases. To model RTT in vitro, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of two RTT patients with different mutations (MECP2 (R306C) and MECP2 (1155Δ32)) in their MECP2 gene. We found that these iPSCs were capable of differentiating into functional neurons. Compared to control neurons, the RTT iPSC-derived cells had reduced soma size and a decreased amount of synaptic input, evident both as fewer Synapsin 1-positive puncta and a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Supplementation of the culture media with choline rescued all of these defects. Choline supplementation may act through changes in the expression of choline acetyltransferase, an important enzyme in cholinergic signaling, and also through alterations in the lipid metabolite profiles of the RTT neurons. Our study elucidates the possible mechanistic pathways for the effect of choline on human RTT cell models, thereby illustrating the potential for using choline as a nutraceutical to treat RTT. PMID:27379379

  19. Reduced synaptic activity in neuronal networks derived from embryonic stem cells of murine Rett syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Barth, Lydia; Sütterlin, Rosmarie; Nenniger, Markus; Vogt, Kaspar E

    2014-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental diseases such as the Rett syndrome (RTT) have received renewed attention, since the mechanisms involved may underlie a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In vertebrates early stages in the functional development of neurons and neuronal networks are difficult to study. Embryonic stem cell-derived neurons provide an easily accessible tool to investigate neuronal differentiation and early network formation. We used in vitro cultures of neurons derived from murine embryonic stem cells missing the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene (MeCP2-/y) and from wild type cells of the corresponding background. Cultures were assessed using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology and immunofluorescence. We studied the functional maturation of developing neurons and the activity of the synaptic connections they formed. Neurons exhibited minor differences in the developmental patterns for their intrinsic parameters, such as resting membrane potential and excitability; with the MeCP2-/y cells showing a slightly accelerated development, with shorter action potential half-widths at early stages. There was no difference in the early phase of synapse development, but as the cultures matured, significant deficits became apparent, particularly for inhibitory synaptic activity. MeCP2-/y embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cultures show clear developmental deficits that match phenotypes observed in slice preparations and thus provide a compelling tool to further investigate the mechanisms behind RTT pathophysiology. PMID:24723848

  20. Examination of X chromosome markers in Rett syndrome: Exclusion mapping with a novel variation on multilocus linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, K.A.; Fill, C.P. ); Terwililger, J.; Percy, A.K.; Zobhbi, H. ); DeGennaro, L.J.; Ott, J. ); Anvret, M.; Martin-Gallardo, A. )

    1992-02-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurologic disorder characterized by early normal development followed by regression, acquired deceleration of head growth, autism, ataxia, and sterotypic hand movements. The exclusive occurrence of the syndrome in females and the occurrence of a few familial cases with inheritance through maternal lines suggest that this disorder is most likely secondary to a mutation on the X chromosome. To address this hypothesis and to identify candidate regions for the Rett syndrome gene locus, genotypic analysis was performed in two families with maternally related affected half-sisters by using 63 DNA markers from the X chromosome. Nineteen of the loci studied were chosen for multipoint linkage analysis because they have been previously genetically mapped using a large number of meioses from reference families. Using the exclusion criterion of a lod score less than [minus]2, the authors were able to exclude the region between the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus and the DXS456 locus. This region extends from Xp21.2 to Xq21-q23. The use of the multipoint linkage analysis approach outlined in this study should allow the exclusion of additional regions of the X chromosome as new markers are analyzed.

  1. Affective dysfunction in a mouse model of Rett syndrome: Therapeutic effects of environmental stimulation and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Mari A; Gray, Laura J; Pelka, Gregory J; Leang, Sook-Kwan; Christodoulou, John; Tam, Patrick P L; Hannan, Anthony J

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and consequent dysregulation of brain maturation. Patients suffer from a range of debilitating physical symptoms, however, behavioral and emotional symptoms also severely affect their quality of life. Here, we present previously unreported and clinically relevant affective dysfunction in the female heterozygous Mecp2(tm1Tam) mouse model of RTT (129sv and C57BL6 mixed background). The affective dysfunction and aberrant anxiety-related behavior of the Mecp2(+/-) mice were found to be reversible with environmental enrichment (EE) from 4 weeks of age. The effect of exercise alone (via wheel running) was also explored, providing the first evidence that increased voluntary physical activity in an animal model of RTT is beneficial for some phenotypes. Mecp2(+/-) mutants displayed elevated corticosterone despite decreased Crh expression, demonstrating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. EE of Mecp2(+/-) mice normalized basal serum corticosterone and hippocampal BDNF protein levels. The enrichment-induced rescue appears independent of the transcriptional regulation of the MeCP2 targets Bdnf exon 4 and Crh. These findings provide new insight into the neurodevelopmental role of MeCP2 and pathogenesis of RTT, in particular the affective dysfunction. The positive outcomes of environmental stimulation and physical exercise have implications for the development of therapies targeting the affective symptoms, as well as behavioral and cognitive dimensions, of this devastating neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:26019053

  2. Heightened Delta Power during Slow-Wave-Sleep in Patients with Rett Syndrome Associated with Poor Sleep Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ammanuel, Simon; Chan, Wesley C.; Adler, Daniel A.; Lakshamanan, Balaji M.; Gupta, Siddharth S.; Ewen, Joshua B.; Johnston, Michael V.; Marcus, Carole L.; Naidu, Sakkubai; Kadam, Shilpa D.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep problems are commonly reported in Rett syndrome (RTT); however the electroencephalographic (EEG) biomarkers underlying sleep dysfunction are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the temporal evolution of quantitative EEG (qEEG) biomarkers in overnight EEGs recorded from girls (2–9 yrs. old) diagnosed with RTT using a non-traditional automated protocol. In this study, EEG spectral analysis identified high delta power cycles representing slow wave sleep (SWS) in 8–9h overnight sleep EEGs from the frontal, central and occipital leads (AP axis), comparing age-matched girls with and without RTT. Automated algorithms quantitated the area under the curve (AUC) within identified SWS cycles for each spectral frequency wave form. Both age-matched RTT and control EEGs showed similar increasing trends for recorded delta wave power in the EEG leads along the antero-posterior (AP). RTT EEGs had significantly fewer numbers of SWS sleep cycles; therefore, the overall time spent in SWS was also significantly lower in RTT. In contrast, the AUC for delta power within each SWS cycle was significantly heightened in RTT and remained heightened over consecutive cycles unlike control EEGs that showed an overnight decrement of delta power in consecutive cycles. Gamma wave power associated with these SWS cycles was similar to controls. However, the negative correlation of gamma power with age (r = -.59; p<0.01) detected in controls (2–5 yrs. vs. 6–9 yrs.) was lost in RTT. Poor % SWS (i.e., time spent in SWS overnight) in RTT was also driven by the younger age-group. Incidence of seizures in RTT was associated with significantly lower number of SWS cycles. Therefore, qEEG biomarkers of SWS in RTT evolved temporally and correlated significantly with clinical severity. PMID:26444000

  3. Age of diagnosis in Rett syndrome: patterns of recognition among diagnosticians and risk factors for late diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Tarquinio, Daniel C.; Hou, Wei; Neul, Jeffrey L.; Lane, Jane B.; Barnes, Katherine V.; O’Leary, Heather M.; Bruck, Natalie M.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Motil, Kathleen J.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Skinner, Steven A.; Annese, Fran; Baggett, Lauren; Barrish, Judy O.; Geerts, Suzanne P.; Percy, Alan K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diagnosis of Rett syndrome (RTT) is often delayed. We sought to determine type of physician who typically makes the diagnosis of RTT and to identify risk factors for delayed diagnosis. Methods One-thousand eighty-five participants from the multicenter longitudinal RTT natural history study with classic and atypical RTT were recruited from 2006 to 2014. Age of diagnosis, diagnostician, diagnostic criteria, clinical and developmental data were collected. Results Among 919 classic and 166 atypical RTT participants, median diagnosis age was 2.7 years (interquartile range 2.0–4.1) in classic and 3.8 years (interquartile range 2.3–6.9) in atypical RTT. Pediatricians made the diagnosis of classic RTT rarely (5.2%); however, proportion diagnosed by pediatricians increased since 2006. Since the first diagnostic criteria, the age of diagnosis decreased among subspecialists but not pediatricians. Odds of a pediatrician making the diagnosis of classic RTT were higher if a child stopped responding to parental interaction, and lower if they possessed gastro-esophageal reflux, specific stereotypies, lost babbling or the ability to follow commands. Delayed acquisition of basic gross motor skills or finger feeding were associated with younger diagnosis; delayed acquisition of higher level fine motor skills, later onset of supportive features, and normal head circumference were associated with late diagnosis. 33% with microcephaly before 2.5 years were diagnosed after the median age of 2.7 years. Conclusions Age of RTT diagnosis has improved among subspecialists, and pediatricians have made the diagnosis of classic RTT more frequently since 2006. Strategies for educating diagnosticians should incorporate specific risk factors for delayed diagnosis. PMID:25801175

  4. Oxidative brain damage in Mecp2-mutant murine models of Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Claudio; Della Ragione, Floriana; Signorini, Cinzia; Leoncini, Silvia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Ciccoli, Lucia; Scalabrì, Francesco; Marracino, Federico; Madonna, Michele; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Ricceri, Laura; De Filippis, Bianca; Laviola, Giovanni; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Durand, Thierry; Galano, Jean-Marie; Oger, Camille; Guy, Alexandre; Bultel-Poncé, Valérie; Guy, Jacky; Filosa, Stefania; Hayek, Joussef; D'Esposito, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females, caused in the overwhelming majority of the cases by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2). High circulating levels of oxidative stress (OS) markers in patients suggest the involvement of OS in the RTT pathogenesis. To investigate the occurrence of oxidative brain damage in Mecp2 mutant mouse models, several OS markers were evaluated in whole brains of Mecp2-null (pre-symptomatic, symptomatic, and rescued) and Mecp2-308 mutated (pre-symptomatic and symptomatic) mice, and compared to those of wild type littermates. Selected OS markers included non-protein-bound iron, isoprostanes (F2-isoprostanes, F4-neuroprostanes, F2-dihomo-isoprostanes) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal protein adducts. Our findings indicate that oxidative brain damage 1) occurs in both Mecp2-null (both −/y and stop/y) and Mecp2-308 (both 308/y males and 308/+ females) mouse models of RTT; 2) precedes the onset of symptoms in both Mecp2-null and Mecp2-308 models; and 3) is rescued by Mecp2 brain specific gene reactivation. Our data provide direct evidence of the link between Mecp2 deficiency, oxidative stress and RTT pathology, as demonstrated by the rescue of the brain oxidative homeostasis following brain-specifically Mecp2-reactivated mice. The present study indicates that oxidative brain damage is a previously unrecognized hallmark feature of murine RTT, and suggests that Mecp2 is involved in the protection of the brain from oxidative stress. PMID:24769161

  5. Mecp2-Null Mice Provide New Neuronal Targets for Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Urdinguio, Rocio G.; Lopez-Serra, Lidia; Lopez-Nieva, Pilar; Alaminos, Miguel; Diaz-Uriarte, Ramon; Fernandez, Agustin F.; Esteller, Manel

    2008-01-01

    Background Rett syndrome (RTT) is a complex neurological disorder that is one of the most frequent causes of mental retardation in women. A great landmark in research in this field was the discovery of a relationship between the disease and the presence of mutations in the gene that codes for the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Currently, MeCP2 is thought to act as a transcriptional repressor that couples DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing. The present study aimed to identify new target genes regulated by Mecp2 in a mouse model of RTT. Methodology/Principal Findings We have compared the gene expression profiles of wild type (WT) and Mecp2-null (KO) mice in three regions of the brain (cortex, midbrain, and cerebellum) by using cDNA microarrays. The results obtained were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Subsequent chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed seven direct target genes of Mecp2 bound in vivo (Fkbp5, Mobp, Plagl1, Ddc, Mllt2h, Eya2, and S100a9), and three overexpressed genes due to an indirect effect of a lack of Mecp2 (Irak1, Prodh and Dlk1). The regions bound by Mecp2 were always methylated, suggesting the involvement of the methyl-CpG binding domain of the protein in the mechanism of interaction. Conclusions We identified new genes that are overexpressed in Mecp2-KO mice and are excellent candidate genes for involvement in various features of the neurological disease. Our results demonstrate new targets of MeCP2 and provide us with a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of RTT. PMID:18989361

  6. Forniceal deep brain stimulation rescues hippocampal memory in Rett syndrome mice.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuang; Tang, Bin; Wu, Zhenyu; Ure, Kerstin; Sun, Yaling; Tao, Huifang; Gao, Yan; Patel, Akash J; Curry, Daniel J; Samaco, Rodney C; Zoghbi, Huda Y; Tang, Jianrong

    2015-10-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has improved the prospects for many individuals with diseases affecting motor control, and recently it has shown promise for improving cognitive function as well. Several studies in individuals with Alzheimer disease and in amnesic rats have demonstrated that DBS targeted to the fimbria-fornix, the region that appears to regulate hippocampal activity, can mitigate defects in hippocampus-dependent memory. Despite these promising results, DBS has not been tested for its ability to improve cognition in any childhood intellectual disability disorder. Such disorders are a pressing concern: they affect as much as 3% of the population and involve hundreds of different genes. We proposed that stimulating the neural circuits that underlie learning and memory might provide a more promising route to treating these otherwise intractable disorders than seeking to adjust levels of one molecule at a time. We therefore studied the effects of forniceal DBS in a well-characterized mouse model of Rett syndrome (RTT), which is a leading cause of intellectual disability in females. Caused by mutations that impair the function of MeCP2 (ref. 6), RTT appears by the second year of life in humans, causing profound impairment in cognitive, motor and social skills, along with an array of neurological features. RTT mice, which reproduce the broad phenotype of this disorder, also show clear deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here we show that forniceal DBS in RTT mice rescues contextual fear memory as well as spatial learning and memory. In parallel, forniceal DBS restores in vivo hippocampal long-term potentiation and hippocampal neurogenesis. These results indicate that forniceal DBS might mitigate cognitive dysfunction in RTT. PMID:26469053

  7. Pathophysiology of Locus Ceruleus Neurons in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Praveen; Ogier, Michael; Brooks-Harris, Gabriel; Schmid, Danielle A.; Katz, David M.; Nelson, Sacha B.

    2010-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the Methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MECP2) gene and is characterized by derangements in cognition, behavior, motor control, respiration and autonomic homeostasis, as well as seizures. Deficits in norepinephrine (NE) are thought to contribute to RTT pathogenesis, but little is known about how MeCP2 regulates function of noradrenergic neurons. We therefore characterized morphological, electrical, and neurochemical properties of neurons in the locus ceruleus (LC), the major source of noradrenergic innervation to the central neuraxis, in Mecp2 mutant mice. We found that MeCP2 null LC neurons are electrically hyperexcitable, smaller in size, and express less of the NE-synthesizing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) compared with wild-type neurons. Increased excitability of mutant neurons is associated with reductions in passive membrane conductance and the amplitude of the slow afterhyperpolarization. Studies in Mecp2 heterozygotes, which are mosaic for the null allele, demonstrated that electrical hyperexcitability and reduced neuronal size are cell-autonomous consequences of MeCP2 loss, whereas reduced TH expression appears to reflect both cell-autonomous and non-autonomous influences. Finally, we found reduced levels of TH and norepinephrine in cingulate cortex, a forebrain target of the LC. Thus, genetic loss of MeCP2 results in a somewhat paradoxical LC neuron phenotype, characterized by both electrical hyperexcitability and reduced indices of noradrenergic function. Given the importance of the LC in modulating activity in brainstem and forebrain networks, we hypothesize that dysregulation of LC function in the absence of MeCP2 plays a key role in the pathophysiology of RTT. PMID:19793977

  8. Rett Syndrome and Beyond: Recurrent Spontaneous and Familial MECP2 Mutations at CpG Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Mimi; Lee, Stephen Sung Jae; Zhang, Xianyu; Houwink-Manville, Isa; Song, Hae-Ri; Amir, Ruthie E.; Budden, Sarojini; Naidu, SakkuBai; Pereira, Jose Luiz P.; Lo, Ivan F. M.; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Schanen, N. Carolyn; Francke, Uta

    1999-01-01

    Summary Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by loss of acquired skills after a period of normal development in infant girls. The responsible gene, encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2), was recently discovered. Here we explore the spectrum of phenotypes resulting from MECP2 mutations. Both nonsense (R168X and R255X) and missense (R106W and R306C) mutations have been found, with multiple recurrences. R168X mutations were identified in six unrelated sporadic cases, as well as in two affected sisters and their normal mother. The missense mutations were de novo and affect conserved domains of MeCP2. All of the nucleotide substitutions involve C→T transitions at CpG hotspots. A single nucleotide deletion, at codon 137, that creates a L138X stop codon within the methyl-binding domain was found in an individual with features of RTT and incontinentia pigmenti. An 806delG deletion causing a V288X stop in the transcription-repression domain was identified in a woman with motor-coordination problems, mild learning disability, and skewed X inactivation; in her sister and daughter, who were affected with classic RTT; and in her hemizygous son, who died from congenital encephalopathy. Thus, some males with RTT-causing MECP2 mutations may survive to birth, and female heterozygotes with favorably skewed X-inactivation patterns may have little or no involvement. Therefore, MECP2 mutations are not limited to RTT and may be implicated in a much broader phenotypic spectrum. PMID:10577905

  9. Pharmacological Stimulation of the Brain Serotonin Receptor 7 as a Novel Therapeutic Approach for Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Bianca; Nativio, Paola; Fabbri, Alessia; Ricceri, Laura; Adriani, Walter; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Passarelli, Francesca; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause >95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. The serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R) is linked to neuro-physiological regulation of circadian rhythm, mood, cognition, and synaptic plasticity. We presently report that 5-HT7R density is consistently reduced in cortical and hippocampal brain areas of symptomatic MeCP2–308 male mice, a RTT model. Systemic repeated treatment with LP-211 (0.25 mg/kg once/day for 7 days), a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist, was able to rescue RTT-related defective performance: anxiety-related profiles in a Light/Dark test, motor abilities in a Dowel test, the exploratory behavior in the Marble Burying test, as well as memory in the Novelty Preference task. In the brain of RTT mice, LP-211 also reversed the abnormal activation of PAK and cofilin (key regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics) and of the ribosomal protein (rp) S6, whose reduced activation in MECP2 mutant neurons by mTOR is responsible for the altered protein translational control. Present findings indicate that pharmacological targeting of 5-HT7R improves specific behavioral and molecular manifestations of RTT, thus representing a first step toward the validation of an innovative systemic treatment. Beyond RTT, the latter might be extended to other disorders associated with intellectual disability. PMID:24809912

  10. Decreased Hering-Breuer input-output entrainment in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, Rishi R; Zhu, Yenan; Jacono, Frank J; Katz, David M; Galán, Roberto F; Dick, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome, a severe X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (Mecp2), is associated with a highly irregular respiratory pattern including severe upper-airway dysfunction. Recent work suggests that hyperexcitability of the Hering-Breuer reflex (HBR) pathway contributes to respiratory dysrhythmia in Mecp2 mutant mice. To assess how enhanced HBR input impacts respiratory entrainment by sensory afferents in closed-loop in vivo-like conditions, we investigated the input (vagal stimulus trains) - output (phrenic bursting) entrainment via the HBR in wild-type and MeCP2-deficient mice. Using the in situ perfused brainstem preparation, which maintains an intact pontomedullary axis capable of generating an in vivo-like respiratory rhythm in the absence of the HBR, we mimicked the HBR feedback input by stimulating the vagus nerve (at threshold current, 0.5 ms pulse duration, 75 Hz pulse frequency, 100 ms train duration) at an inter-burst frequency matching that of the intrinsic oscillation of the inspiratory motor output of each preparation. Using this approach, we observed significant input-output entrainment in wild-type mice as measured by the maximum of the cross-correlation function, the peak of the instantaneous relative phase distribution, and the mutual information of the instantaneous phases. This entrainment was associated with a reduction in inspiratory duration during feedback stimulation. In contrast, the strength of input-output entrainment was significantly weaker in Mecp2 (-/+) mice. However, Mecp2 (-/+) mice also had a reduced inspiratory duration during stimulation, indicating that reflex behavior in the HBR pathway was intact. Together, these observations suggest that the respiratory network compensates for enhanced sensitivity of HBR inputs by reducing HBR input-output entrainment. PMID:23565077